WorldWideScience

Sample records for anisotropic galactic outflows

  1. Cluster Magnetic Fields from Galactic Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Donnert, J; Lesch, H; Müller, E

    2008-01-01

    We performed cosmological, magneto-hydrodynamical simulations to follow the evolution of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters, exploring the possibility that the origin of the magnetic seed fields are galactic outflows during the star-burst phase of galactic evolution. To do this we coupled a semi-analytical model for magnetized galactic winds as suggested by Bertone et.al. (2006) to our cosmological simulation. We find that the strength and structure of magnetic fields observed in galaxy clusters are well reproduced for a wide range of model parameters for the magnetized, galactic winds and do only weakly depend on the exact magnetic structure within the assumed galactic outflows. Although the evolution of a primordial magnetic seed field shows no significant differences to that of galaxy clusters fields from previous studies, we find that the magnetic field pollution in the diffuse medium within filaments is below the level predicted by scenarios with pure primordial magnetic seed field. We therefore conclude...

  2. Quantifying Supernovae-Driven Multiphase Galactic Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Miao; Ostriker, Jeremiah P

    2016-01-01

    Galactic outflows are ubiquitously observed in star-forming disk galaxies and are critical for galaxy formation. Supernovae (SNe) play the key role in driving the outflows, but there is no consensus as to how much energy, mass and metal they can launch out of the disk. We perform 3D, high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations to study SNe-driven outflows from stratified media. Assuming SN rate scales with gas surface density $\\Sigma_{\\rm{gas}}$ as in the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation, we find the mass loading factor, defined as the mass outflow flux divided by the star formation surface density, decreases with increasing $\\Sigma_{\\rm{gas}}$ as $\\propto \\Sigma^{-0.61}_{\\rm{gas}}$. Approximately $\\Sigma_{\\rm{gas}} \\lesssim$ 50 $M_\\odot/pc^2$ marks when the mass loading factor $\\gtrsim$1. About 10-50\\% of the energy and 40-80\\% of the metals produced by SNe end up in the outflows. The tenuous hot phase ($T>3\\times 10^5$ K) carries the majority of the energy and metals in outflows. We discuss how various physical...

  3. FIRE simulations: galactic outflows and their consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keres, Dusan; FIRE team

    2016-06-01

    We study gaseous outflows and their consequences in high-resolution galaxy formation simulations with explicit stellar feedback from the Feedback in Realistic Environments project. Collective, galaxy scale, effect of stellar feedback results in episodic ejections of large amount of gas and heavy elements into the circum-galactic medium. Gas ejection episodes follow strong bursts of star formation. Properties of galactic star formation and ejection episodes depend on galaxy mass and redshift and, together with gas infall and recycling, shape the evolution of the circum-galactic medium and galaxies. As a consequence, our simulated galaxies have masses, star formation histories and heavy element content in good agreement with the observed population of galaxies.

  4. Supernovae and AGN Driven Galactic Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mahavir; Nath, Biman B.

    2013-01-01

    We present analytical solutions for winds from galaxies with a Navarro-Frank-White (NFW) dark matter halo. We consider winds driven by energy and mass injection from multiple supernovae (SNe), as well as momentum injection due to radiation from a central black hole. We find that the wind dynamics depends on three velocity scales: (1) v_\\star ˜ (\\dot{E} / 2 \\dot{M})^{1/2} describes the effect of starburst activity, with \\dot{E} and \\dot{M} as energy and mass injection rate in a central region of radius R; (2) v • ~ (GM •/2R)1/2 for the effect of a central black hole of mass M • on gas at distance R; and (3) v_{s} =(GM_h / 2 {C}r_s)^{1/2}, which is closely related to the circular speed (vc ) for an NFW halo, where rs is the halo scale radius and {C} is a function of the halo concentration parameter. Our generalized formalism, in which we treat both energy and momentum injection from starbursts and radiation from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN), allows us to estimate the wind terminal speed to be (4v 2 sstarf + 6(Γ - 1)v • 2 - 4v 2 s )1/2, where Γ is the ratio of force due to radiation pressure to gravity of the central black hole. Our dynamical model also predicts the following: (1) winds from quiescent star-forming galaxies cannot escape from 1011.5 M ⊙ ~ 1000 km s-1. We also find that the ratio [2v 2 sstarf - (1 - Γ)v • 2]/v 2 c dictates the amount of gas lost through winds. Used in conjunction with an appropriate relation between M • and Mh and an appropriate opacity of dust grains in infrared (K band), this ratio has the attractive property of being minimum at a certain halo mass scale (Mh ~ 1012-1012.5 M ⊙) that signifies the crossover of AGN domination in outflow properties from starburst activity at lower masses. We find that stellar mass for massive galaxies scales as M sstarfvpropM 0.26 h , and for low-mass galaxies, M sstarfvpropM 5/3 h .

  5. Suppression of galactic outflows by cosmological infall and circumgalactic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priyanka; Rana, Sandeep; Bagla, Jasjeet S.; Nath, Biman B.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the relative importance of two galactic outflow suppression mechanisms: (a) cosmological infall of the intergalactic gas on to the galaxy, and (b) the existence of a hot circumgalactic medium (CGM). Considering only radial motion, the infall reduces the speed of outflowing gas and even halts the outflow, depending on the mass and redshift of the galaxy. For star-forming galaxies, there exists an upper mass limit beyond which outflows are suppressed by the gravitational field of the galaxy. We find that infall can reduce this upper mass limit approximately by a factor of 2 (independent of the redshift). Massive galaxies (≳1012 M⊙) host large reservoir of hot, diffuse CGM around the central part of the galaxy. The CGM acts as a barrier between the infalling and outflowing gas and provides an additional source of outflow suppression. We find that at low redshifts (z ≲ 3.5), the CGM is more effective than the infall in suppressing the outflows. Together, these two processes give a mass range in which galaxies are unable to have effective outflows. We also discuss the impact of outflow suppression on the enrichment history of the galaxy and its environment.

  6. The role of cosmic ray pressure in accelerating galactic outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, Christine M; Marinacci, Federico; Pfrommer, Christoph; Springel, Volker; Glover, Simon C O; Clark, Paul C; Smith, Rowan J

    2016-01-01

    We study the formation of galactic outflows from supernova explosions (SNe) with the moving-mesh code AREPO in a stratified column of gas with a surface density similar to the Milky Way disk at the solar circle. We compare different simulation models for SNe placement and energy feedback, including cosmic rays (CR), and find that models that place SNe in dense gas and account for CR diffusion are able to drive outflows with similar mass loading as obtained from a random placement of SNe with no CRs. Despite this similarity, CR-driven outflows differ in several other key properties including their overall clumpiness and velocity. Moreover, the forces driving these outflows originate in different sources of pressure, with the CR diffusion model relying on non-thermal pressure gradients to create an outflow driven by internal pressure and the random-placement model depending on kinetic pressure gradients to propel a ballistic outflow. CRs therefore appear to be non-negligible physics in the formation of outflows...

  7. Suppression of galactic outflows by cosmological infall and circumgalactic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Priyanka; Bagla, Jasjeet S; Nath, Biman B

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the relative importance of two galactic outflow suppression mechanisms : a) Cosmological infall of the intergalactic gas onto the galaxy, and b) the existence of a hot circumgalactic medium (CGM). Considering only radial motion, the infall reduces the speed of outflowing gas and even halts the outflow, depending on the mass and redshift of the galaxy. For star forming galaxies there exists an upper mass limit beyond which outflows are suppressed by the gravitational field of the galaxy. We find that infall can reduce this upper mass limit approximately by a factor of two (independent of the redshift). Massive galaxies ($\\gtrsim 10^{12} M_{\\odot}$) host large reservoir of hot, diffuse CGM around the central part of the galaxy. The CGM acts as a barrier between the infalling and outflowing gas and provides an additional source of outflow suppression. We find that at low redshifts ($z\\lesssim3.5$), the CGM is more effective than the infall in suppressing the outflows. Together, these two processes...

  8. The role of cosmic ray pressure in accelerating galactic outflows

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Christine M.; Pakmor, Ruediger; Marinacci, Federico; Pfrommer, Christoph; Springel, Volker; Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.; Smith, Rowan J.

    2016-01-01

    We study the formation of galactic outflows from supernova explosions (SNe) with the moving-mesh code AREPO in a stratified column of gas with a surface density similar to the Milky Way disk at the solar circle. We compare different simulation models for SNe placement and energy feedback, including cosmic rays (CR), and find that models that place SNe in dense gas and account for CR diffusion are able to drive outflows with similar mass loading as obtained from a random placement of SNe with ...

  9. Simulating galactic outflows with kinetic supernova feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Vecchia, Claudio Dalla

    2008-01-01

    Feedback from star formation is thought to play a key role in the formation and evolution of galaxies, but its implementation in cosmological simulations is currently hampered by a lack of numerical resolution. We present and test a sub-grid recipe to model feedback from massive stars in cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. The energy is distributed in kinetic form among the gas particles surrounding recently formed stars. The impact of the feedback is studied using a suite of high-resolution simulations of isolated disc galaxies embedded in dark halos with total mass 10^{10} and 10^{12} M_sol/h. We focus in particular on the effect of pressure forces within the disc, which we turn off temporarily in some of our runs to mimic a recipe that has been widely used in the literature. We find that (ram) pressure forces on expanding superbubbles determine both the structure of the disc and the development of large-scale outflows. Pressure forces exerted by expanding superbubbles puff up the disc...

  10. An Analytic Model of Galactic Winds and Mass Outflows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Gang Shu; Hou-Jun Mo; Shu-De Mao

    2005-01-01

    Galactic winds and mass outflows are observed both in nearby starburst galaxies and in high-redshift star-forming galaxies. We develop a simple analytic model to understand the observed superwind phenomenon with a discussion of the model uncertainties. Our model is built upon the model of McKee & Ostriker for the interstellar medium. It allows one to predict how properties of a superwind,such as wind velocity and mass outflow rate, are related to properties of its star forming host galaxy, such as size, gas density and star formation rate. The model predicts a threshold of star formation rate density for the generation of observable galactic winds. Galaxies with more concentrated star formation activities produce superwinds with higher velocities. The predicted mass outflow rates are compara ble to (or slightly larger than) the corresponding star formation rates. We apply our model to both local starburst galaxies and high-redshift Lyman break galaxies, and find its predictions to be in good agreement with current observations. Our model is simple and so can be easily incorporated into numerical simulations and semi-analytical models of galaxy formation.

  11. An analytic model for the galactic winds and mass outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Shu, C; Mao, S; Shu, Chenggang; Mao, Shude

    2003-01-01

    Galactic winds and mass outflows are observed both in nearby starburst galaxies and in high-redshift star-forming galaxies. In this paper we develop a simple analytic model to understand the observed superwind phenomenon. Our model is built upon the model of McKee & Ostriker (1977) for the interstellar medium. It allows one to predict how properties of a superwind, such as wind velocity and mass outflow rate, are related to properties of its star-forming host galaxy, such as size, gas density and star formation rate. The model predicts a threshold of star formation rate density for the generation of observable galactic winds. Galaxies with more concentrated star formation produce superwinds with higher velocities. The predicted mass outflow rates are comparable to (or slightly larger than) the corresponding star formation rates. We apply our model to both local starburst galaxies and high-redshift Lyman break galaxies, and find its predictions to be in good agreement with current observations. Our model i...

  12. Galactic winds driven by isotropic and anisotropic cosmic ray diffusion in disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pakmor, Ruediger; Simpson, Christine M; Springel, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The physics of cosmic rays (CR) is a promising candidate for explaining the driving of galactic winds and outflows. Recent galaxy formation simulations have demonstrated the need for active CR transport either in the form of diffusion or streaming to successfully launch winds in galaxies. However, due to computational limitations, most previous simulations have modeled CR transport isotropically. Here, we discuss high resolution simulations of isolated disk galaxies in a $10^{11}\\rm{M_\\odot}$ halo with the moving mesh code {\\sc Arepo} that include injection of CRs from supernovae, advective transport, CR cooling, and CR transport through isotropic or anisotropic diffusion. We show that either mode of diffusion leads to the formation of strong bipolar outflows. However, they develop significantly later in the simulation with anisotropic diffusion compared to the simulation with isotropic diffusion. Moreover, we find that isotropic diffusion allows most of the CRs to quickly diffuse out of the disk, while in th...

  13. Galactic Winds Driven by Isotropic and Anisotropic Cosmic-Ray Diffusion in Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakmor, R.; Pfrommer, C.; Simpson, C. M.; Springel, V.

    2016-06-01

    The physics of cosmic rays (CRs) is a promising candidate for explaining the driving of galactic winds and outflows. Recent galaxy formation simulations have demonstrated the need for active CR transport either in the form of diffusion or streaming to successfully launch winds in galaxies. However, due to computational limitations, most previous simulations have modeled CR transport isotropically. Here, we discuss high-resolution simulations of isolated disk galaxies in a 1011 M ⊙ halo with the moving-mesh code Arepo that include injection of CRs from supernovae, advective transport, CR cooling, and CR transport through isotropic or anisotropic diffusion. We show that either mode of diffusion leads to the formation of strong bipolar outflows. However, they develop significantly later in the simulation with anisotropic diffusion compared to the simulation with isotropic diffusion. Moreover, we find that isotropic diffusion allows most of the CRs to quickly diffuse out of the disk, while in the simulation with anisotropic diffusion, most CRs remain in the disk once the magnetic field becomes dominated by its azimuthal component, which occurs after ∼300 Myr. This has important consequences for the gas dynamics in the disk. In particular, we show that isotropic diffusion strongly suppresses the amplification of the magnetic field in the disk compared to anisotropic or no diffusion models. We therefore conclude that reliable simulations which include CR transport inevitably need to account for anisotropic diffusion.

  14. Powerful Outflows and Feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    King, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) represent the growth phases of the supermassive black holes in the center of almost every galaxy. Powerful, highly ionized winds, with velocities $\\sim 0.1- 0.2c$ are a common feature in X--ray spectra of luminous AGN, offering a plausible physical origin for the well known connections between the hole and properties of its host. Observability constraints suggest that the winds must be episodic, and detectable only for a few percent of their lifetimes. The most powerful wind feedback, establishing the $M -\\sigma$ relation, is probably not directly observable at all. The $M - \\sigma$ relation signals a global change in the nature of AGN feedback. At black hole masses below $M-\\sigma$ feedback is confined to the immediate vicinity of the hole. At the $M-\\sigma$ mass it becomes much more energetic and widespread, and can drive away much of the bulge gas as a fast molecular outflow.

  15. Ultrafast Outflows: Galaxy-scale Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2013-01-01

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  16. Ultra Fast Outflows: Galaxy-Scale Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, A Y; Bicknell, G V

    2012-01-01

    We show, using global 3D grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that Ultra Fast Outflows (UFOs) from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous hot hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the inter-cloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically, rather than in a disc. In the latter case the turbulent backflow...

  17. ULTRAFAST OUTFLOWS: GALAXY-SCALE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M. [Center for Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8577 (Japan); Bicknell, G. V., E-mail: ayw@ccs.tsukuba.ac.jp [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2013-01-20

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  18. ULTRAFAST OUTFLOWS: GALAXY-SCALE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  19. Ultrafast outflows in radio-loud active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F.; Tazaki, F.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Ueda, Y.; Cappi, M.; Gofford, J.; Reeves, J. N.; Guainazzi, M.

    2014-09-01

    Recent X-ray observations show absorbing winds with velocities up to mildly relativistic values of the order of ˜0.1c in a limited sample of six broad-line radio galaxies. They are observed as blueshifted Fe XXV-XXVI K-shell absorption lines, similarly to the ultrafast outflows (UFOs) reported in Seyferts and quasars. In this work we extend the search for such Fe K absorption lines to a larger sample of 26 radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) observed with XMM-Newton and Suzaku. The sample is drawn from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope 58-month catalogue and blazars are excluded. X-ray bright Fanaroff-Riley Class II radio galaxies constitute the majority of the sources. Combining the results of this analysis with those in the literature we find that UFOs are detected in >27 per cent of the sources. However, correcting for the number of spectra with insufficient signal-to-noise ratio, we can estimate that the incidence of UFOs is this sample of radio-loud AGN is likely in the range f ≃ (50 ± 20) per cent. A photoionization modelling of the absorption lines with XSTAR allows us to estimate the distribution of their main parameters. The observed outflow velocities are broadly distributed between vout ≲ 1000 km s-1 and vout ≃ 0.4c, with mean and median values of vout ≃ 0.133c and vout ≃ 0.117c, respectively. The material is highly ionized, with an average ionization parameter of logξ ≃ 4.5 erg s-1 cm, and the column densities are larger than NH > 1022 cm-2. Overall, these characteristics are consistent with the presence of complex accretion disc winds in a significant fraction of radio-loud AGN and demonstrate that the presence of relativistic jets does not preclude the existence of winds, in accordance with several theoretical models.

  20. Radiation-driven Outflows from and Radiative Support in Dusty Tori of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chi-Ho; Krolik, Julian H.

    2016-07-01

    Substantial evidence points to dusty, geometrically thick tori obscuring the central engines of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), but so far no mechanism satisfactorily explains why cool dust in the torus remains in a puffy geometry. Near-Eddington infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) luminosities coupled with high dust opacities at these frequencies suggest that radiation pressure on dust can play a significant role in shaping the torus. To explore the possible effects of radiation pressure, we perform three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics simulations of an initially smooth torus. Our code solves the hydrodynamics equations, the time-dependent multi–angle group IR radiative transfer (RT) equation, and the time-independent UV RT equation. We find a highly dynamic situation. IR radiation is anisotropic, leaving primarily through the central hole. The torus inner surface exhibits a break in axisymmetry under the influence of radiation and differential rotation; clumping follows. In addition, UV radiation pressure on dust launches a strong wind along the inner surface; when scaled to realistic AGN parameters, this outflow travels at ˜ 5000 {(M/{10}7{M}ȯ )}1/4 {[{L}{UV}/(0.1{L}{{E}})]}1/4 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and carries ˜ 0.1 {(M/{10}7{M}ȯ )}3/4 {[{L}{UV}/(0.1{L}{{E}})]}3/4 M ⊙ yr‑1, where M, {L}{UV}, and {L}{{E}} are the mass, UV luminosity, and Eddington luminosity of the central object respectively.

  1. A Robust Measurement of the Mass Outflow Rate of the Galactic Outflow from NGC 6090

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, John; Tremonti, Christy A.; Leitherer, Claus; Chen, Yanmei

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of stellar feedback, it is critical to estimate the mass outflow rates of galaxies. Past estimates have been plagued by uncertain assumptions about the outflow geometry, metallicity, and ionization fraction. Here we use Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectroscopic observations of the nearby starburst NGC 6090 to demonstrate that many of these quantities can be constrained by the data. We use the Si IV absorption lines to calculate the scaling of velocity (v), covering fraction (Cf), and density with distance from the starburst (r), assuming the Sobolev optical depth and a velocity law of the form: v~∝(1 - Ri/r)β (where Ri is the inner outflow radius). We find that the velocity (β=0.43) is consistent with an outflow driven by an r-2 force with the outflow radially accelerated, while the scaling of the covering fraction (Cf∝r-0.82) suggests that cool clouds in the outflow are in pressure equilibrium with an adiabatically expanding medium. We use the column densities of four weak metal lines and CLOUDY photoionization models to determine the outflow metallicity, the ionization correction, and the initial density of the outflow. Combining these values with the profile fitting, we find Ri = 63 pc, with most of the mass within 300 pc of the starburst. Finally, we find that the maximum mass outflow rate is 2.3 M⊙ yr-1 and the mass loading factor (outflow divided by the star formation rate) is 0.09, a factor of 10 lower than the value calculated using common assumptions for the geometry, metallicity and ionization structure of the outflow.

  2. Anisotropic Models for Globular Clusters, Galactic Bulges and Dark Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, P H

    2013-01-01

    Spherical systems with a polytropic equation of state are of great interest in astrophysics. They are widely used to describe neutron stars, red giants, white dwarfs, brown dwarfs, main sequence stars, galactic halos and globular clusters of diverse sizes. In this paper we construct analytically a family of self-gravitating spherical models in the post-Newtonian approximation of general relativity. These models present interesting cusps in their density profiles which are appropriate for the modeling of galaxies and dark matter halos. The systems described here are anisotropic in the sense that their equiprobability surfaces in velocity space are non-spherical, leading to an overabundance of radial or circular orbits, depending on the parameters of the model in consideration. Among the family, we find the post-Newtonian generalization of the Plummer and Hernquist models. A close inspection of their equation of state reveals that these solutions interpolate smoothly between a polytropic sphere in the asymptoti...

  3. A Robust Measurement of the Mass Outflow Rate of the Galactic Outflow from NGC 6090

    CERN Document Server

    Chisholm, John; Leitherer, Claus; Chen, Yanmei

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of stellar feedback, it is critical to estimate the mass outflow rates of galaxies. Past estimates have been plagued by uncertain assumptions about the outflow geometry, metallicity, and ionization fraction. Here we use Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectroscopic observations of the nearby starburst NGC 6090 to demonstrate that many of these quantities can be constrained by the data. We use the Si~{\\sc IV} absorption lines to calculate the scaling of velocity (v), covering fraction (C$_f$), and density with distance from the starburst (r), assuming the Sobolev optical depth and a velocity law of the form: $v \\propto(1 -R_i/r )^\\beta$ (were R$_i$ is the inner outflow radius). We find that the velocity ($\\beta$=0.43) is consistent with an outflow driven by an r$^{-2}$ force, while the scaling of the covering fraction ($C_f \\propto r^{-0.82}$) suggests that cool clouds in the outflow are in pressure equilibrium with an adiabatically expanding medium. We use the column densities of fou...

  4. The Role of Cosmic-Ray Pressure in Accelerating Galactic Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Christine M.; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Marinacci, Federico; Pfrommer, Christoph; Springel, Volker; Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.; Smith, Rowan J.

    2016-08-01

    We study the formation of galactic outflows from supernova (SN) explosions with the moving-mesh code AREPO in a stratified column of gas with a surface density similar to the Milky Way disk at the solar circle. We compare different simulation models for SN placement and energy feedback, including cosmic rays (CRs), and find that models that place SNe in dense gas and account for CR diffusion are able to drive outflows with similar mass loading as obtained from a random placement of SNe with no CRs. Despite this similarity, CR-driven outflows differ in several other key properties including their overall clumpiness and velocity. Moreover, the forces driving these outflows originate in different sources of pressure, with the CR diffusion model relying on non-thermal pressure gradients to create an outflow driven by internal pressure and the random-placement model depending on kinetic pressure gradients to propel a ballistic outflow. CRs therefore appear to be non-negligible physics in the formation of outflows from the interstellar medium.

  5. Galactic outflow and diffuse gas properties at z>=1 using different baryonic feedback models

    CERN Document Server

    Barai, Paramita; Murante, Giuseppe; Ragagnin, Antonio; Viel, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    We measure and quantify properties of galactic outflows and diffuse gas at $z \\geq 1$ in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Our novel sub-resolution model, MUPPI, implements supernova feedback using fully local gas properties, where the wind velocity and mass loading are not given as input. We find the following trends at $z = 2$ by analysing central galaxies having a stellar mass higher than $10^{9} M_{\\odot}$. The outflow velocity and mass outflow rate ($\\dot{M}_{\\rm out}$) exhibit positive correlations with galaxy mass and with the star formation rate (SFR). However, most of the relations present a large scatter. The outflow mass loading factor ($\\eta$) is between $0.2 - 10$. The comparison Effective model generates a constant outflow velocity, and a negative correlation of $\\eta$ with halo mass. The number fraction of galaxies where outflow is detected decreases at lower redshifts, but remains more than $80 \\%$ over $z = 1 - 5$. High SF activity at $z \\sim 2 - 4$ drives strong outflows, causing the ...

  6. Velocities of Warm Galactic Outflows from Synthetic Halpha Observations of Star-forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ceverino, Daniel; Colina, Luis; Del Pino, Bruno Rodriguez; Dekel, Avishai; Primack, Joel

    2015-01-01

    The velocity structure imprinted in the Halpha emission line profiles contains valuable information about galactic outflows. Using a set of high-resolution zoom-in cosmological simulations of galaxies at z=2, we generate Halpha emission line profiles, taking into account the temperature-dependent Halpha emissivity, as well as dust extinction. The lines can be described as a sum of two gaussians, as typically done with observations. In general, its properties are in good agreement with those observed in local isolated galaxies with similar masses and star formation rates. Blueshifted outflows are very common in the sample. They extend several kpc above the galaxy discs. They are also spread over the full extent of the discs. However, at small radii, the material with high velocities tends to remain confined within a thick disc, as part of galactic fountains or a turbulent medium, most probably due to the deeper gravitational potential at the galaxy center.

  7. Can galactic outflows explain the properties of Ly-alpha emitters?

    CERN Document Server

    Orsi, Alvaro; Baugh, Carlton M

    2011-01-01

    We study the properties of Ly-alpha emitters in a cosmological framework by computing the escape of Ly-alpha photons through galactic outflows. We combine the GALFORM semi-analytical model of galaxy formation with a Monte Carlo Ly-alpha radiative transfer code. The properties of Ly-alpha emitters at 0outflow geometries: a Shell of neutral gas and a Wind ejecting material, both expanding at constant velocity. We characterise the differences in the Ly-alpha line profiles predicted by the two outflow geometries in terms of their width, asymmetry and shift from the line centre for a set of outflows with different hydrogen column densities, expansion velocities and metallicities. In general, the Ly-alpha line profile of the Shell geometry is broader and more asymmetric, and the Ly-alpha escape fraction is lower than with the Wind geometry for the same set of parameters. In order to implement the outflow geometries in the semi-analytical model GALFORM, a number of free parameters ...

  8. Galactic Outflows and the pollution of the Galactic Environment by Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal; Ercole, A D; Brighenti, F; Raga, A

    2008-01-01

    We here explore the effects of the SN explosions into the environment of star-forming galaxies like the Milky Way. Successive randomly distributed and clustered SNe explosions cause the formation of hot superbubbles that drive either fountains or galactic winds above the galactic disk, depending on the amount and concentration of energy that is injected by the SNe. In a galactic fountain, the ejected gas is re-captured by the gravitational potential and falls back onto the disk. From 3D nonequilibrium radiative cooling hydrodynamical simulations of these fountains, we find that they may reach altitudes up to about 5 kpc in the halo and thus allow for the formation of the so called intermediate-velocity-clouds (IVCs) which are often observed in the halos of disk galaxies. The high-velocity-clouds that are also observed but at higher altitudes (of up to 12 kpc) require another mechanism to explain their production. We argue that they could be formed either by the capture of gas from the intergalactic medium and...

  9. Anisotropic Metal-enriched Outflows Driven by AGN in Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkpatrick, C C; Cavagnolo, K W

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the spatial distribution of metal-rich gas in ten galaxy clusters using deep observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The brightest cluster galaxies have experienced recent AGN activity in the forms of bright radio emission, cavities, and shock fronts embedded in the hot atmospheres. The heavy elements are distributed anisotropically and are aligned with the large-scale radio and cavity axes. They are apparently being transported from the halo of the brightest cluster galaxy into the intracluster medium along large-scale outflows driven by the radio jets. The radial ranges of the metal-enriched outflows are found to scale with jet power as R_Fe ~ P_jet^0.42, with a scatter of only 0.5 dex. The heavy elements are transported beyond the extent of the inner cavities in all clusters, suggesting this is a long lasting effect sustained over multiple generations of outbursts. Black holes in BCGs will likely have difficulty ejecting metal enriched gas beyond 1 Mpc unless their masses...

  10. Velocities of warm galactic outflows from synthetic Hα observations of star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Arribas, Santiago; Colina, Luis; Rodríguez Del Pino, Bruno; Dekel, Avishai; Primack, Joel

    2016-08-01

    The velocity structure imprinted in the Hα emission line profiles contains valuable information about galactic outflows. Using a set of high-resolution zoom-in cosmological simulations of galaxies at z ≃ 2, we generate Hα emission line profiles, taking into account the temperature-dependent Hα emissivity, as well as dust extinction. The Hα line can be described as a sum of two Gaussians, as typically done with observations. In general, its properties are in good agreement with those observed in local isolated galaxies with similar masses and star formation rates, assuming a spatially constant clumping factor of c ≃ 24. Blueshifted outflows are very common in the sample. They extend several kpc above the galaxy discs. They are also spread over the full extent of the discs. However, at small radii, the material with high velocities tends to remain confined within a thick disc, as part of galactic fountains or a turbulent medium, most probably due to the deeper gravitational potential at the galaxy centre.

  11. FEEDBACK FROM MASS OUTFLOWS IN NEARBY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. I. ULTRAVIOLET AND X-RAY ABSORBERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crenshaw, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Astronomy Offices, One Park Place South SE, Suite 700, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Kraemer, S. B., E-mail: crenshaw@chara.gsu.edu [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We present an investigation into the impact of feedback from outflowing UV and X-ray absorbers in nearby (z < 0.04) active galactic nuclei (AGNs). From studies of the kinematics, physical conditions, and variability of the absorbers in the literature, we calculate the possible ranges in the total mass outflow rate (M-dot{sub out}) and kinetic luminosity (L{sub KE}) for each AGN, summed over all of its absorbers. These calculations make use of values (or limits) for the radial locations of the absorbers determined from variability, excited-state absorption, and other considerations. From a sample of 10 Seyfert 1 galaxies with detailed photoionization models for their absorbers, we find that 7 have sufficient constraints on the absorber locations to determine M-dot{sub out} and L{sub KE}. For the low-luminosity AGN NGC 4395, these values are low, although we do not have sufficient constraints on the X-ray absorbers to make definitive conclusions. At least five of the six Seyfert 1s with moderate bolometric luminosities (L{sub bol} = 10{sup 43} - 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1}) have mass outflow rates that are 10-1000 times the mass accretion rates needed to generate their observed luminosities, indicating that most of the mass outflow originates from outside the inner accretion disk. Three of these (NGC 4051, NGC 3516, and NGC 3783) have L{sub KE} in the range 0.5%-5% L{sub bol}, which is the range typically required by feedback models for efficient self-regulation of black hole and galactic bulge growth. At least two of the other three (NGC 5548, NGC 4151, and NGC 7469) have L{sub KE} {approx}> 0.1%L{sub bol}, although these values may increase if radial locations can be determined for more of the absorbers. We conclude that the outflowing UV and X-ray absorbers in moderate-luminosity AGNs have the potential to deliver significant feedback to their environments.

  12. NIHAO VIII: Circum-galactic medium and outflows - The puzzles of HI and OVI gas distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutcke, Thales A.; Stinson, Greg S.; Macciò, Andrea V.; Wang, Liang; Dutton, Aaron A.

    2016-10-01

    We study the hot and cold circum-galactic medium (CGM) of 86 galaxies of the cosmological, hydrodynamical simulation suite NIHAO. NIHAO allows a study of how the z = 0 CGM varies across 5 orders of magnitude of stellar mass using OVI and HI as proxies for hot and cold gas. The cool HI covering fraction and column density profiles match observations well, particularly in the inner CGM. OVI shows increasing column densities with mass, a trend seemingly echoed in the observations. As in multiple previous simulations, the OVI column densities in simulations are lower than observed and optically thick HI does not extend as far out as in observations. We take a look at the collisional ionisation fraction of OVI as a function of halo mass. We make observable predictions of the bipolarity of outflows and their effect on the general shape of the CGM. Bipolar outflows can be seen out to around 40 kpc in intermediate and low mass halos (MHalo < 1011 M⊙), but outside that radius, the CGM is too well mixed to detect an elongated shape. Larger halos have extended gas discs beyond the stellar disc that dominate the shape of the inner CGM. The simulated CGM is remarkably spherical even in low mass simulations. The chemical enrichment of both halo and disc gas follow expected increasing trends as a function of halo mass that are well fit with power laws. These relations can be used in non-hydrodynamic models, such as semi-analytic models.

  13. NIHAO VIII: Circum-galactic medium and outflows - The puzzles of HI and OVI gas distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Gutcke, Thales A; Macciò, Andrea V; Wang, Liang; Dutton, Aaron A

    2016-01-01

    We study the hot and cold circum-galactic medium (CGM) of galaxies of the cosmological, hydrodynamical simulation suite NIHAO. NIHAO allows a study of how the z = 0 CGM varies across 5 orders of magnitude of stellar mass using OVI and HI as proxies for hot and cold gas. The cool Hi covering fraction and column density profiles match observations well, particularly in the inner CGM. OVI shows increasing column densities with mass, a trend seemingly echoed in the observations. As in multiple previous simulations, the OVI column densities in simulations are lower than observed and optically thick HI does not extend as far out as in observations. We make observable predictions of the bipolarity of outflows and their effect on the general shape of the CGM. Bipolar outflows can be seen out to around 40 kpc, but outside that radius, the CGM is too well mixed to detect an elongated shape. The simulated CGM is remarkably spherical even in low mass simulations. The chemical enrichment of both halo and disc gas follow e...

  14. Inflows and outflows in nearby active galactic nuclei from integral field spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa

    2010-01-01

    I report recent results on the kinematics of the inner few hundred parsecs (pc) around nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) at a sampling of a few pc to a few tens of pc, using optical and near-infrared (near-IR) integral field spectroscopy obtained with the Gemini telescopes. The stellar kinematics of the hosts - comprised mostly of spiral galaxies - are dominated by circular rotation in the plane of the galaxy. Inflows with velocities of ~ 50 km/s have been observed along nuclear spiral arms in (optical) ionized gas emission for low-luminosity AGN and in (near-IR) molecular gas emission for higher-luminosity AGN. We have also observed gas rotating in the galaxy plane, sometimes in compact (few tens of pc) disks which may be fuelling the AGN. Outflows have been observed mostly in ionized gas emission from the narrow-line region, whose flux distributions and kinematics frequently correlate with radio flux distributions. Channel maps along the emission-line profiles reveal velocities as high as ~ 600 km/s. Mass...

  15. Outflowing Galactic Winds in Post-starburst and AGN Host Galaxies at 0.2

    CERN Document Server

    Coil, Alison L; Holz, Daniel E; Cooper, Michael C; Yan, Renbin; Aird, James

    2011-01-01

    We present Keck/LRIS-B spectra for a sample of ten AEGIS X-ray AGN host galaxies and thirteen post-starburst galaxies from SDSS and DEEP2 at 0.2outflowing galactic winds at intermediate redshifts. We focus on galaxies that either host a low-luminosity AGN or have recently had their star formation quenched to test whether these galaxies have winds of sufficient velocity to potentially clear gas from the galaxy. We find, using absorption features of Fe II, Mg II, and Mg I, that six of our X-ray AGN host galaxies and four of our post-starburst galaxies have outflowing galactic winds, with typical velocities of ~200 km/s. We additionally find that most of the galaxies in our sample show line emission, presumably from the wind, in either Fe II* or Mg II. A total of 100% of our X-ray AGN host sample (including four red sequence galaxies) and 77% of our post-starburst sample has either blueshifted absorption or line emission from a wind....

  16. Effect of an isotropic outflow from the Galactic centre on the bow-shock evolution along the orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Zajacek, Michal; Karas, Vladimir; Kunneriath, Devaky; Shahzamanian, Banafsheh; Sabha, Nadeen; Muzic, Koraljka; Valencia-Schneider, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the observations of several infrared-excess bow-shock sources and proplyd-like objects near the Galactic centre, we analyse the effect of a potential outflow from the centre on bow shock properties. We show that due to the non-negligible isotropic central outflow the bow-shock evolution along the orbit becomes asymmetric between the pre-peribothron and post-peribothron phases. This is demonstrated by the calculation of the bow-shock size evolution, the velocity along the shocked layer, the surface density of the bow-shock, and by emission-measure maps close to the peribothron passage. Within the ambient velocity range of $\\lesssim 2000\\,{\\rm km\\, s^{-1}}$ the asymmetry is profound and the changes are considerable for different outflow velocities. As a case study we perform model calculations for the Dusty S-cluster Object (DSO/G2) as a potential young stellar object that is currently being monitored and has passed the pericentre at $\\sim 2000$ Schwarzschild radii from the supermassive black hole ...

  17. Magnified views of the ultrafast outflow of the z = 1.51 active galactic nucleus HS 0810+2554

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartas, G.; Marvin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Hamann, F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Eracleous, M.; Charlton, J. C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Misawa, T. [School of General Education, Shinshu University, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Cappi, M. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129, Bologna (Italy); Giustini, M., E-mail: chartasg@cofc.edu [ESAC/ESA, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-01

    We present results from an observation of the gravitationally lensed z = 1.51 narrow absorption line (NAL) active galactic nucleus (AGN) HS 0810+2554 performed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. The factor of ∼100 lensing magnification of HS 0810+2554 makes this source exceptionally bright. Absorption lines are detected at rest-frame energies of ∼7.7 keV and ∼11.0 keV at ≳97% significance. By interpreting these lines to arise from highly ionized iron the implied outflow velocities of the X-ray absorbing gas corresponding to these lines are 0.13c and 0.41c, respectively. The presence of these relativistic outflows and the absence of any significant low-energy X-ray absorption suggest that a shielding gas is not required for the generation of the relativistic X-ray absorbing winds in HS 0810+2554. UV spectroscopic observations with VLT/UVES indicate that the UV absorbing material is outflowing at v {sub UV} ∼0.065c. Our analysis indicates that the fraction of the total bolometric energy released by HS 0810+2554 into the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the form of kinetic energy is ε{sub k} = 1.0{sub −0.6}{sup +0.8}. An efficiency of greater than unity implies that magnetic driving is likely a significant contributor to the acceleration of this X-ray absorbing wind. We also estimate the mass-outflow rate of the strongest absorption component to be M-dot {sub abs} = 1.1{sub −0.7}{sup +0.9} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. Assuming that the energetic outflow detected in the NAL AGN HS 0810+2554 is a common property of most AGN it would suggest that the X-ray absorbing wind may have a larger opening angle than previously thought. This has important consequences for estimating the feedback contribution of X-ray absorbing winds to the surrounding IGM.

  18. Line-driven disk wind model for ultra-fast outflows in active galactic nuclei -- Scaling with luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Nomura, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    In order to reveal the origin of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) that are frequently observed in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we perform two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the line-driven disk winds, which are accelerated by the radiation force due to the spectral lines. The line-driven winds are successfully launched for the range of $M_{\\rm BH}=10^{6-9}M_\\odot$ and $\\varepsilon$=0.1-0.5, and the resulting mass outflow rate ($\\dot{M_{\\rm w}}$), momentum flux ($\\dot{p_{\\rm w}}$), and kinetic luminosity ($\\dot{E_{\\rm w}}$) are in the region containing 90% of the posterior probability distribution in the $\\dot M_{\\rm w}$-$L_{\\rm bol}$ plane, $\\dot p_{\\rm w}$-$L_{\\rm bol}$ plane, and $\\dot E_{\\rm w}$-$L_{\\rm bol}$ plane shown in Gofford et al., where $M_{\\rm BH}$ is the black hole mass, $\\varepsilon$ is the Eddington ratio, and $L_{\\rm bol}$ is the bolometric luminosity. The best-fitting relations in Gofford et al., $d\\log\\dot{M_{\\rm w}}/d\\log{L_{\\rm bol}}\\sim 0.9$, $d\\log\\dot{p_{\\rm w}}/d\\l...

  19. The Fossil Nuclear Outflow in the Central 30 pc of the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Hwang, Chorng-Yuan; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Matsushita, Satoki; Koch, Patrick M; Iono, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    We report a new 1-pc (30") resolution CS($J=2-1$) line map of the central 30 pc of the Galactic Center (GC), made with the Nobeyama 45m telescope. We revisit our previous study of the extraplanar feature called polar arc (PA), which is a molecular cloud located above SgrA* with a velocity gradient perpendicular to the Galactic plane. We find that the PA can be traced back to the Galactic disk. This provides clues of the launching point of the PA , roughly $6\\times10^{6}$ years ago. Implications of the dynamical time scale of the PA might be related to the Galactic Center Lobe (GCL) at parsec scale. Our results suggest that in the central 30 pc of the GC, the feedback from past explosions could alter the orbital path of the molecular gas down to the central tenth of parsec. In the follow-up work of our new CS($J=2-1$) map, we also find that near the systemic velocity, the molecular gas shows an extraplanar hourglass-shaped feature (HG-feature) with a size of $\\sim$13 pc. The latitude-velocity diagrams show tha...

  20. Outflowing Diffuse Gas in the Active Galactic Nucleus of NGC 1068

    CERN Document Server

    Geballe, T R; Oka, T

    2015-01-01

    Spectra of the archetypal Type II Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068 in a narrow wavelength interval near 3.7 microns have revealed a weak absorption feature due to two lines of the molecular ion H3+. The observed wavelength of the feature corresponds to velocity of -70 km/s relative to the systemic velocity of the galaxy, implying an outward flow from the nucleus along the line of sight. The absorption by H3+ along with the previously known broad hydrocarbon absorption at 3.4~microns probably are formed in diffuse gas that is in close proximity to the continuum source, i.e. within a few tens of parsecs of the central engine. Based on that conclusion and the measured H3+ absorption velocity and with the assumption of a spherically symmetric wind we estimate a rate of mass outflow from the AGN of ~1 Msun/yr.

  1. Galactic fountains and outflows in star forming dwarf galaxies: ISM expulsion and chemical enrichment

    CERN Document Server

    Melioli, C; D'Ercole, A

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the impact of supernova feedback in gas-rich dwarf galaxies experiencing a low-to-moderate star formation rate, typical of relatively quiescent phases between starbursts. We calculated the long term evolution of the ISM and the metal-rich SN ejecta using 3D hydrodynamic simulations, in which the feedback energy is deposited by SNeII exploding in distinct OB associations. We found that a circulation flow similar to galactic fountains is generally established, with some ISM lifted at heights of one to few kpc above the galactic plane. This gas forms an extra-planar layer, which falls back to the plane in about $10^8$ yr, once the star formation stops. Very little or no ISM is expelled outside the galaxy system for the considered SFRs, even though in the most powerful model the SN energy is comparable to the gas binding energy. The metal-rich SN ejecta is instead more vulnerable to the feedback and we found that a significant fraction (25-80\\%) is vented in the intergalactic medium, even for low ...

  2. Stochastic Noncircular Motion and Outflows Driven by Magnetic Activity in the Galactic Bulge Region

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Takeru K; Torii, Kazufumi; Machida, Mami; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2015-01-01

    By performing a global magneto-hydrodynamical simulation for the Milky Way with an axisymmetric gravitational potential, we propose that spatially dependent amplification of magnetic fields possibly explains the observed noncircular motion of the gas in the Galactic center region. The radial distribution of the rotation frequency in the bulge region is not monotonic in general. The amplification of the magnetic field is enhanced in regions with stronger differential rotation, because magnetorotational instability and field-line stretching are more effective. The strength of the amplified magnetic field reaches >~ 0.5 mG, and radial flows of the gas are excited by the inhomogeneous transport of angular momentum through turbulent magnetic field that is amplified in a spatially dependent manner. In addition, the magnetic pressure-gradient force also drives radial flows in a similar manner. As a result, the simulated position-velocity diagram exhibits a time-dependent asymmetric parallelogram-shape owing to the i...

  3. Ultra-fast outflows in radio-loud active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Tombesi, F; Mushotzky, R F; Ueda, Y; Cappi, M; Gofford, J; Reeves, J N; Guainazzi, M

    2014-01-01

    Recent X-ray observations show absorbing winds with velocities up to mildly-relativistic values of the order of ~0.1c in a limited sample of 6 broad-line radio galaxies. They are observed as blue-shifted Fe XXV-XXVI K-shell absorption lines, similarly to the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) reported in Seyferts and quasars. In this work we extend the search for such Fe K absorption lines to a larger sample of 26 radio-loud AGNs observed with XMM-Newton and Suzaku. The sample is drawn from the Swift BAT 58-month catalog and blazars are excluded. X-ray bright FR II radio galaxies constitute the majority of the sources. Combining the results of this analysis with those in the literature we find that UFOs are detected in >27% of the sources. However, correcting for the number of spectra with insufficient signal-to-noise, we can estimate that the incidence of UFOs is this sample of radio-loud AGNs is likely in the range f=(50+/-20)%. A photo-ionization modeling of the absorption lines with XSTAR allows to estimate the d...

  4. Extended warm gas in the ULIRG Mrk273: Galactic outflows and tidal debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Zaurín, J.; Tadhunter, C. N.; Rupke, D. S. N.; Veilleux, S.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Chiaberge, M.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Batcheldor, D.; Sparks, W. B.

    2014-11-01

    We present new HST/ACS medium- and narrow-band images and optical Isaac Newton Telescope long-slit spectra of the merging system Mrk273. The HST observations sample the [OIII]λλ4959,5007 emission from the galaxy and the nearby continuum. These data were taken as a part of a larger study of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) with the aim of investigating the importance of the warm, AGN induced outflows in such objects. The HST images show that the morphologies of the extended continuum and the ionised gas emission from the galaxy are decoupled, extending almost perpendicular to each other. In particular, we detect for the first time a spectacular structure of ionised gas in the form of filaments and clumps that extend ~23 kpc to the east of the nuclear region. The quiescent ionised gas kinematics at these locations suggests that these filaments are tidal debris left over from a secondary merger event that are illuminated by an AGN in the nuclear regions. The images also reveal a complex morphology in the nuclear region of the galaxy for both the continuum and the [OIII] emission. Consistent with this complexity, we find a wide diversity of emission line profiles in these regions. Kinematic disturbance in the form of broad (FWHM> 500 km s-1) and/or strongly shifted (| ΔV | > 150 km s-1 ) emission line components is found at almost all locations in the nuclear regions, but confined to a radius of ~4 kpc to the east and west of the northern nucleus. In most cases, we are able to fit the profiles of all the emission lines of different ionisation with a kinematic model using two or three Gaussian components. From these fits, we derive diagnostic line ratios that are used to investigate the ionisation mechanisms at the different locations in the galaxy. We show that these line ratios are generally consistent with photoionisation by an AGN as the main ionisation mechanism. Finally, the highest surface brightness [OIII] emission is found in a compact region that is

  5. YSO jets in the Galactic plane from UWISH2 - III. Jets and outflows in Cassiopeia and Auriga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froebrich, D.; Makin, S. V.

    2016-10-01

    We present the analysis of 35.5 deg2 of images in the 1-0 S(1) line of H2 from the UK Widefield Infrared Survey for H2 (UWISH2) towards Cassiopeia and Auriga. We have identified 98 Molecular Hydrogen emission-line Objects (MHOs) driven by Young Stellar Objects, 60 per cent of which are bipolar outflows and all are new discoveries. We estimate that the UWISH2-extended emission object catalogue contains fewer than 2 per cent false positives and is complete at the 95 per cent level for jets and outflows brighter than the UWISH2 detection limit. We identified reliable driving source candidates for three quarters of the detected outflows, 40 per cent of which are associated with groups and clusters of stars. The driving source candidates are 20 per cent protostars, the remainder are Classical T-Tauri Stars. We also identified 15 new star cluster candidates near MHOs in the survey area. We find that the typical outflow identified in the sample has the following characteristics: the position angles are randomly orientated; bipolar outflows are straight within a few degrees; the two lobes are slightly asymmetrical in length and brightness; the length and brightness of the lobes are not correlated; typical time gaps between major ejections of material are 1-3 kyr, hence FU-Ori or EX-Ori eruptions are most likely not the cause of these, but we suggest MNors as a possible source. Furthermore, we find that outflow lobe length distributions are statistically different from the widely used total length distributions. There are a larger than expected number of bright outflows indicating that the flux distribution does not follow a power law.

  6. YSO jets in the Galactic Plane from UWISH2: III - Jets and Outflows in Cassiopeia and Auriga

    CERN Document Server

    Froebrich, D

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of 35.5 square degrees of images in the 1-0S(1) line of H2 from the UK Widefield Infrared Survey for H2 (UWISH2) towards Cassiopeia and Auriga. We have identified 98 Molecular Hydrogen emission-line Objects (MHOs) driven by Young Stellar Objects, 60% of which are bipolar outflows and all are new discoveries. We estimate that the UWISH2 extended emission object catalogue contains fewer than % false positives and is complete at the 95% level for jets and outflows brighter than the UWISH2 detection limit. We identified reliable driving source candidates for three quarters of the detected outflows, 40% of which are associated with groups and clusters of stars. The driving source candidates are 20% protostars, the remainder are CTTSs. We also identified 15 new star cluster candidates near MHOs in the survey area. We find that the typical outflow identified in the sample has the following characteristics: the position angles are randomly orientated; bipolar outflows are straight within a few...

  7. Evidence for powerful AGN winds at high redshift: dynamics of galactic outflows in radio galaxies during the ``Quasar Era''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Lehnert, M. D.; De Breuck, C.; Gilbert, A. M.; van Breugel, W.

    2008-11-01

    AGN feedback now appears as an attractive mechanism to resolve some of the outstanding problems with the “standard” cosmological models, in particular those related to massive galaxies. At low redshift, evidence is growing that gas cooling and star formation may be efficiently suppressed by mechanical energy input from radio sources. To directly constrain how this may influence the formation of massive galaxies near the peak in the redshift distribution of powerful quasars, z˜ 2, we present an analysis of the emission-line kinematics of 3 powerful radio galaxies at z˜ 2-3 (HzRGs) based on rest-frame optical integral-field spectroscopy obtained with SINFONI on the VLT. The host galaxies of powerful radio-loud AGN are among the most massive galaxies, and thus AGN feedback may have a particularly clear signature in these galaxies. We find evidence for bipolar outflows in all HzRGs, with kinetic energies that are equivalent to 0.2% of the rest-mass of the supermassive black hole. Observed total velocity offsets in the outflows are ~800-1000 km s-1 between the blueshifted and redshifted line emission, and FWHMs ~ 1000 km s-1 suggest strong turbulence. Line ratios allow to measure electron temperatures, ~104 K from [OIII]λλλ4363, 4959, 5007 at z˜ 2, electron densities (~500 cm-3) and extinction (A_V˜ 1-4 mag). Ionized gas masses estimated from the Hα luminosity are of order 1010~M⊙, similar to the molecular gas content of HzRGs, underlining that these outflows may indicate a significant phase in the evolution of the host galaxy. The total energy release of ~1060 erg during a dynamical time of ~107 yrs corresponds to about the binding energy of a massive galaxy, similar to the prescriptions adopted in galaxy evolution models. Geometry, timescales and energy injection rates of order 10% of the kinetic energy flux of the jet suggest that the outflows are most likely driven by the radio source. The global energy density release of ~1057 erg s-1 Mpc-3 may also

  8. Evidence for Ultra-fast Outflows in Radio-quiet Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Detailed Photoionization Modeling of Fe K-shell Absorption Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Braito, V.; Dadina, M.

    2011-11-01

    X-ray absorption line spectroscopy has recently shown evidence for previously unknown Ultra-fast Outflows (UFOs) in radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These have been detected essentially through blueshifted Fe XXV/XXVI K-shell transitions. In the previous paper of this series we defined UFOs as those highly ionized absorbers with an outflow velocity higher than 10,000 km s-1 and assessed the statistical significance of the associated blueshifted absorption lines in a large sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. The present paper is an extension of that work. First, we report a detailed curve of growth analysis of the main Fe XXV/XXVI transitions in photoionized plasmas. Then, we estimate an average spectral energy distribution for the sample sources and directly model the Fe K absorbers in the XMM-Newton spectra with the detailed Xstar photoionization code. We confirm that the frequency of sources in the radio-quiet sample showing UFOs is >35% and that the majority of the Fe K absorbers are indeed associated with UFOs. The outflow velocity distribution spans from ~10,000 km s-1 (~0.03c) up to ~100,000 km s-1 (~0.3c), with a peak and mean value of ~42,000 km s-1 (~0.14c). The ionization parameter is very high and in the range log ξ ~ 3-6 erg s-1 cm, with a mean value of log ξ ~ 4.2 erg s-1 cm. The associated column densities are also large, in the range N H ~ 1022-1024 cm-2, with a mean value of N H ~ 1023 cm-2. We discuss and estimate how selection effects, such as those related to the limited instrumental sensitivity at energies above 7 keV, may hamper the detection of even higher velocities and higher ionization absorbers. We argue that, overall, these results point to the presence of extremely ionized and possibly almost Compton-thick outflowing material in the innermost regions of AGNs. This also suggests that UFOs may potentially play a significant role in the expected cosmological feedback from AGNs and their study can

  9. Evidence for powerful AGN winds at high redshift: Dynamics of galactic outflows in radio galaxies during the "Quasar Era"

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvadba, N P H; De Breuck, C; Gilbert, A M; Van Breugel, W

    2008-01-01

    AGN feedback now appears as an attractive mechanism to resolve some of the outstanding problems with the "standard" cosmological models, in particular those related to massive galaxies. To directly constrain how this may influence the formation of massive galaxies near the peak in the redshift distribution of powerful quasars, z~2, we present an analysis of the emission-line kinematics of 3 powerful radio galaxies at z~2-3 (HzRGs) based on rest-frame optical integral-field spectroscopy obtained with SINFONI on the VLT. HzRGs are among the most massive galaxies, so AGN feedback may have a particularly clear signature. We find evidence for bipolar outflows in all HzRGs, with kinetic energies that are equivalent to 0.2% of the rest-mass of the supermassive black hole. Velocity offsets in the outflows are ~800-1000 km s^-1 between the blueshifted and redshifted line emission, FWHMs ~1000 km s^-1 suggest strong turbulence. Ionized gas masses estimated from the Ha luminosity are of order 10^10 M_s, similar to the m...

  10. Evidence for ubiquitous collimated galactic-scale outflows along the star-forming sequence at z ∼ 0.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Kate H. R.; Prochaska, J. Xavier [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Martin, Crystal L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Winstrom, Lucas O., E-mail: krubin@cfa.harvard.edu [Newman Laboratory of Elementary Particle Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    We analyze Mg II λλ2796, 2803 and Fe II λλ2586, 2600 absorption profiles in individual spectra of 105 galaxies at 0.3 < z < 1.4. The galaxies, drawn from redshift surveys of the GOODS fields and the Extended Groth Strip, sample the range in star formation rates (SFRs) occupied by the star-forming sequence with stellar masses log M {sub *}/M {sub ☉} ≳ 9.6 down to SFR ≳ 2 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} at 0.3 < z < 0.7. Using the Doppler shifts of Mg II and Fe II absorption as tracers of cool gas kinematics, we detect large-scale winds in 66 ± 5% of the galaxies. Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging and our spectral analysis indicate that the outflow detection rate depends primarily on galaxy orientation: winds are detected in ∼89% of galaxies having inclinations (i) <30° (face-on), while the wind detection rate is ∼45% in objects having i > 50° (edge-on). Combined with the comparatively weak dependence of wind detection rate on intrinsic galaxy properties, this implies that biconical outflows are ubiquitous in normal, star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 0.5. We find that wind velocity is correlated with galaxy M {sub *} at 3.4σ significance, while outflow equivalent width is correlated with SFR at 3.5σ significance, suggesting hosts with higher SFR launch more material and/or generate a larger velocity spread for the absorbing clouds. Assuming the gas is driven into halos with isothermal density profiles, the wind velocities (∼200-400 km s{sup –1}) permit escape from the halo potentials only for the lowest-M {sub *} systems in the sample. However, the gas carries sufficient energy to reach distances ≳ 50 kpc, and may therefore be a viable source of material for the massive, cool circumgalactic medium around bright galaxies at z ∼ 0.

  11. Formation of Turbulent Cones in Accretion Disk Outflows and Application to Broad Line Regions of Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Poludnenko, A Y; Frank, A

    2002-01-01

    We consider the stability of an accretion disk wind to cloud formation when subject to a central radiation force. For a vertical launch velocity profile that is Keplerian or flatter and the presence of a significant radiation pressure, the wind flow streamlines cross in a conical layer. We argue that such regions are highly unstable, and are natural sites for supersonic turbulence and, consequently, density compressions. We suggest that combined with thermal instability these will all conspire to produce clouds. Such clouds can exist in dynamical equilibrium, constantly dissipating and reforming. As long as there is an inner truncation radius to the wind, our model emerges with a biconical structure similar to that inferred by Elvis (2000) for the broad line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our results may also apply to other disk-wind systems.

  12. NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES FROM eBOSS: SIGNATURES OF UBIQUITOUS GALACTIC-SCALE OUTFLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Guangtun Ben [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Comparat, Johan [Instituto de Física Teórica, UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Kneib, Jean-Paul; Delubac, Timothée [Laboratoire dástrophysique, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Observatoire de Sauverny, 1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Raichoor, Anand; Yèche, Christophe [CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/SPP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dawson, Kyle S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Newman, Jeffrey [PITT PACC, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Zhou, Xu [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100012 (China); Schneider, Donald P., E-mail: guangtun@jhu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    We present rest-frame near-ultraviolet (NUV) spectroscopy of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 0.6 < z < 1.2 from the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) in SDSS-IV. One of the eBOSS programs is to obtain 2″ (about 15 kpc) fiber spectra of about 200,000 emission-line galaxies (ELGs) at redshift z ≳ 0.6. We use the data from the pilot observations of this program, including 8620 spectra of SFGs at 0.6 < z < 1.2. The median composite spectra of these SFGs at 2200 Å < λ < 4000 Å feature asymmetric, preferentially blueshifted non-resonant emission, Fe ii*, and blueshifted resonant absorption, e.g., Fe ii and Mg ii, indicating ubiquitous outflows driven by star formation at these redshifts. For the absorption lines, we find a variety of velocity profiles with different degrees of blueshift. Comparing our new observations with the literature, we do not observe the non-resonant emission in the small-aperture (<40 pc) spectra of local star-forming regions with the Hubble Space Telescope, and find the observed line ratios in the SFG spectra to be different from those in the spectra of local star-forming regions, as well as those of quasar absorption-line systems in the same redshift range. We introduce an outflow model that can simultaneously explain the multiple observed properties and suggest that the variety of absorption velocity profiles and the line ratio differences are caused by scattered fluorescent emission filling in on top of the absorption in the large-aperture eBOSS spectra. We develop an observation-driven, model-independent method to correct the emission infill to reveal the true absorption profiles. Finally, we show that the strengths of both the non-resonant emission and the emission-corrected resonant absorption increase with [O ii] λλ3727, 3730 rest equivalent width and luminosity, with a slightly larger dependence on the former. Our results show that the eBOSS and future dark-energy surveys (e.g., Dark Energy Spectroscopic

  13. Near-ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Star-forming Galaxies from eBOSS: Signatures of Ubiquitous Galactic-scale Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Guangtun Ben; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Delubac, Timothée; Raichoor, Anand; Dawson, Kyle S; Newman, Jeffrey; Yèche, Christophe; Zhou, Xu; Schneider, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    We present the rest-frame near-ultraviolet (NUV) spectroscopy of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 0.60.6. We use the data from the pilot observations of this program, including 8620 spectra of SFGs at 0.6outflows driven by star formation at these redshifts. For the absorption lines, we find a variety of velocity profiles with different degrees of blueshift. Comparing our new observations with the literature, we do not observe the non-resonant emission in the small-aperture (<40 pc) spectra of local star-forming regions with the Hubble Space Telescope, and find the observed line ratios in the SFG spectra to be different from those in the spectra of local star-forming regions, as well as those of quasar absorption-line systems in the same redshift range. We ...

  14. The Origin of Double-Peaked Narrow Lines in Active Galactic Nuclei I: Very Large Array Detections of Dual AGNs and AGN Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Müller-Sanchez, Francisco; Nevin, Rebecca; Barrows, R Scott; Cooper, Michael C; Greene, Jenny E

    2015-01-01

    We have examined a subset of 18 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) drawn from a sample of 81 galaxies that possess double-peaked narrow optical emission line spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, have two optical AGN emission components separated by >0.2", and are detected in the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-centimeters survey. Without follow-up observations, the sources of the double-peaked narrow emission lines are uncertain, and may be produced by kpc-scale separation dual active supermassive black holes, AGN outflows, or disk rotation. In this work, we propose a new methodology to characterize double-peaked narrow emission-line galaxies based on optical long-slit spectroscopy and high resolution multi-band Very Large Array observations. The nature of the radio emission in the sample galaxies is varied. Of the 18 galaxies, we detect two compact flat-spectrum radio cores with projected spatial separations on the sky between 0.6-1.6 kpc in three galaxies: J1023+3243, J1158+3231, and J1623+0808. The ...

  15. Near-ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Star-forming Galaxies from eBOSS: Signatures of Ubiquitous Galactic-scale Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangtun Ben; Comparat, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Delubac, Timothée; Raichoor, Anand; Dawson, Kyle S.; Newman, Jeffrey; Yèche, Christophe; Zhou, Xu; Schneider, Donald P.

    2015-12-01

    We present rest-frame near-ultraviolet (NUV) spectroscopy of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 0.6 line galaxies (ELGs) at redshift z ≳ 0.6. We use the data from the pilot observations of this program, including 8620 spectra of SFGs at 0.6 composite spectra of these SFGs at 2200 Å lines, we find a variety of velocity profiles with different degrees of blueshift. Comparing our new observations with the literature, we do not observe the non-resonant emission in the small-aperture (line ratios in the SFG spectra to be different from those in the spectra of local star-forming regions, as well as those of quasar absorption-line systems in the same redshift range. We introduce an outflow model that can simultaneously explain the multiple observed properties and suggest that the variety of absorption velocity profiles and the line ratio differences are caused by scattered fluorescent emission filling in on top of the absorption in the large-aperture eBOSS spectra. We develop an observation-driven, model-independent method to correct the emission infill to reveal the true absorption profiles. Finally, we show that the strengths of both the non-resonant emission and the emission-corrected resonant absorption increase with [O ii] λλ3727, 3730 rest equivalent width and luminosity, with a slightly larger dependence on the former. Our results show that the eBOSS and future dark-energy surveys (e.g., Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument survey and Prime Focus Spectrograph survey) will provide rich data sets of rest-frame NUV spectroscopy for astrophysical applications.

  16. Outflows and Shock Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafalla, M.

    2016-05-01

    Bipolar outflows result from the supersonic ejection of material by a protostar, and constitute one of the most characteristic signposts of stellar birth. They also provide ideal targets to test chemical models, and can serve as templates for more complex systems of galactic and extragalactic astronomy where supersonic interactions between gas components take place.

  17. On the disappearance of broad-line region in low-luminosity active galactic nuclei: the role of the outflows from advection dominated accretion flows

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Xinwu

    2010-01-01

    The broad-line region (BLR) disappears in many low-luminosity AGNs, the reason of which is still controversial. The BLRs in AGNs are believed to be associated with the outflows from the accretion disks. Most of the low-luminosity AGNs (LLAGNs) contain advection dominated accretion flows (ADAFs), which are very hot and have a positive Bernoulli parameter. ADAFs are therefore associated with strong outflows. We estimate the cooling of the outflows from the ADAFs, and find that the gases in such hot outflows always cannot be cooled efficiently by bremsstrahlung radiation. The ADAF may co-exist with the standard disk, i.e., the inner ADAF connects to the outer thin accretion disk at radius R_tr, in the sources accreting at slightly lower than the critical rate. For the ADAFs with >0.001 L_edd, a secondary small inner cold disk is suggested to co-exist with the ADAF due to the condensation process. We estimate the Compton cooling of the outflow, of which the soft seed photons either come from the outer cold disk o...

  18. LDN 1780: A Translucent High-Galactic Latitude Interstellar Cloud in a UV-rich, Anisotropic Radiation Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRoo, Casey T.; Witt, A. N.; Barnes, F. S., III; Vijh, U. P.; Gordon, K. D.

    2010-01-01

    We combined high-resolution optical imaging observations in 12 intermediate-band (BATC) filter and deep mid- and far-IR Spitzer maps of LDN 1780 to characterize the external radiation field illuminating this high-latitude (l = 359 deg; b = 36.5 deg; distance 100 pc) translucent cloud and the infrared emission of dust within LDN 1780 in response to this external illumination. The overall energy density of the incident radiation field is approximately equal to that of the ISRF near the Sun, resulting in a large dust grain equilibrium temperature ranging from 14.5 K -16.8 K. However, the incident radiation field is highly anisotropic, with the southern portions of LDN 1780 being most strongly illuminated, especially at shorter wavelengths. This anisotropy is a result of the cloud's proximity to the Sco OB2 association (est. center: l = 322 deg; b = 10 deg). The southwestern portion and the optically-thin eastern tail of LDN 1780 exhibit strong intensity excesses at 24 micron (Spitzer MIPS) and at 8 micron (Spitzer IRAC Ch. #4) compared to dust in the diffuse ISM of the Milky Way Galaxy. We interpret these excesses as enhanced emission from stochastically-heated very small grains (VSG) and from PAH ions, respectively. These excesses, however, are not necessarily the result a greater relative abundance of these two small-particle components but rather reflect the increased frequency of photon-grain interactions (e.g. heating, excitation, or ionization) within a UV-rich radiation field. This research has been supported by grants from NASA and the NSF to the University of Toledo as well as by contributions from corporate sponsors AstroDon, RC Optical Systems, Santa Barbara Instrument Group, Software Bisque, and New Mexico Skies, for which we are grateful. We especially acknowledge the NSF-REU program at the University of Toledo, which supported the analysis of these data.

  19. Laboratory Calibration of X-ray Velocimeters for Radiation Driven Winds and Outflows Surrounding X-ray Binaries and Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Graf, A.; Hell, N.; Liedahl, D.; Magee, E. W.; Träbert, E.; Beilmann, C.; Bernitt, S.; Crespo-Lopez-Urritiua, J.; Eberle, S.; Kubicek, K.; Mäckel, V.; Rudolph, J.; Steinbrügge, R.; Ullrich, J.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M.; Porter, F. S.; Rasmussen, A.; Simon, M.; Epp, S.

    2011-09-01

    High resolution measurements of X-ray absorption and fluorescence by radiation driven winds and outflows surrounding X-ray binaries and AGN provide a powerful means for measuring wind velocities. The accuracy of these X-ray velocimeters is limited by the accuracy of atomic data. For example, in the case of the high mass X-ray binary Vela X-1 the uncertainty in the calculated transition wavelengths of the K alpha lines produced by photoionization and photoexcitation of Si L-shell ions is comparable to the likely Doppler shifts, making it impossible to determine a reliable velocity. Similar problems also exist in the case of absorption of X-rays by M-shell Fe ions, which produces in some AGN the so-called unresolved transition array across the 15-17 angstrom band. In this case, there is a 15-45 milliangstrom variation among different wavelength calculations. The uncertainty in the calculations makes it impossible to reliably determine the true velocity structure of the outflow, and in turn, prevents a reliable determination of the mass-loss rate of the AGN. We present results of a recent series of laboratory experiments conducted using an electron beam ion trap coupled with the LCLS X-ray free electron laser and the BESSY-II synchrotron and designed to calibrate the velocimeters provided by high resolution instruments on Chandra and XMM-Newton. We also present results of resonant photoexcitation measurements of the transition wavelength of an Fe XVI satellite line 'coincident' with the 2p-3d Fe XVII line 3D at 15.26 angstroms. This line has never been resolved using emission spectroscopy and its measurement confirms the intensity of line 3D is sensitive to the relative abundance of Fe XVI and XVII and thus temperature. Work at LLNL was performed under the auspices of DOE under contract DE-AC53-07NA27344 and supported by NASA's APRA program.

  20. AGN outflow feedback: Constraints from variability

    CERN Document Server

    Detmers, R G

    2009-01-01

    We present an overview on how variability can be used to constrain the location of the ionized outflow in nearby Active Galactic Nuclei using high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy. Without these constraints on the location of the outflow, the kinetic luminosity and mass loss rate can not be determined. We focus on the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548, which is arguably the best studied AGN on a timescale of 10 years. Our results show that frequent observations combined with long term monitoring, such as with the \\textit{Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE)} satellite, are crucial to investigate the effects of these outflows on their surroundings.

  1. Metal enrichment of the CGM through outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Galactic outflows enrich the circumgalactic medium through the redistribution of metals from the disks of galaxies. We examine the history of this enrichment by analyzing the outflows of twenty high-resolution simulated galaxies spanning two and a half orders of magnitude in halo mass. These simulations match many observed trends, including the mass-metallicity relation. By tracking particles in the simulations, we follow the removal and reaccretion of metals between redshift 3.5 and 0. We also determine the enrichment of the outflowing gas compared to the local interstellar media. Finally we compare the redshift zero metal census to observed values.

  2. Absorbing Outflows in AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Smita

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this program was a comprehensive multiwavelength study of absorption phenomena in active galactic nuclei (AGN). These include a variety of associated absorption systems: X-ray warm absorbers, X-ray cold absorbers. UV absorbers with high ionization lines, MgII absorbers, red quasars and BALQSOs. The aim is to determine the physical conditions in the absorbing outflows, study their inter-relations and their role in AGN. We designed several observing programs to achieve this goal: X-ray spectroscopy, UV spectroscopy, FLAY spectroscopy and X-ray imaging. We were very successful towards achieving the goal over the five year period as shown through following observing programs and papers. Copies of a few papers are attached with this report.

  3. Fast cold gas in hot AGN outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Tiago; Haehnelt, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Observations of the emission from spatially extended cold gas around bright high-redshift QSOs reveal surprisingly large velocity widths exceeding 2000 km s^(-1), out to projected distances as large as 30 kpc. The high velocity widths have been interpreted as the signature of powerful AGN-driven outflows. Naively, these findings appear in tension with hydrodynamic models in which AGN-driven outflows are energy-driven and thus very hot with typical temperatures T = 10^6-7 K. Using the moving-mesh code Arepo, we perform 'zoom-in' cosmological simulations of a z = 6 QSO and its environment, following black hole growth and feedback via energy-driven outflows. In the simulations, the QSO host galaxy is surrounded by a clumpy circum-galactic medium pre-enriched with metals due to supernovae-driven galactic outflows. As a result, part of the AGN-driven hot outflowing gas can cool radiatively, leading to large amounts (> 10^9 M_sun) of cold gas comoving with the hot bipolar outflow. This results in velocity widths of...

  4. Synergies in extragalactic and Galactic jet research

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Gustavo E

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of relativistic jets and superluminal sources associated with accreting X-ray binaries in the Galaxy opened new ways of investigating the physics of outflows from compact objects. The short timescales and relatively large angular sizes of Galactic jets allow to probe the physics of relativistic outflows to unprecedented details. In this article I discuss results of recent modelling of Galactic jets, covering both radiative and dynamical aspects, which can shed light on different features of their extragalactic cousins.

  5. Galactic Dynamos and Galactic Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Spiral galaxies host dynamically important magnetic fields which can affect gas flows in the disks and halos. Total magnetic fields in spiral galaxies are strongest (up to 30 \\muG) in the spiral arms where they are mostly turbulent or tangled. Polarized synchrotron emission shows that the resolved regular fields are generally strongest in the interarm regions (up to 15 \\muG). Faraday rotation measures of radio polarization vectors in the disks of several spiral galaxies reveal large-scale patterns which are signatures of coherent fields generated by a mean-field dynamo. -- Magnetic fields are also observed in radio halos around edge-on galaxies at heights of a few kpc above the disk. Cosmic-ray driven galactic winds transport gas and magnetic fields from the disk into the halo. The magnetic energy density is larger than the thermal energy density, but smaller than the kinetic energy density of the outflow. The orientation of field lines allows to estimate the wind speed and direction. There is no observation ...

  6. Global simulations of galactic winds including cosmic ray streaming

    CERN Document Server

    Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Zweibel, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Galactic outflows play an important role in galactic evolution. Despite their importance, a detailed understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for the driving of these winds is lacking. In an effort to gain more insight into the nature of these flows, we perform global three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of an isolated Milky Way-size starburst galaxy. We focus on the dynamical role of cosmic rays injected by supernovae, and specifically on the impact of the streaming and anisotropic diffusion of cosmic rays along the magnetic fields. We find that these microphysical effects can have a significant effect on the wind launching and mass loading factors depending on the details of the plasma physics. Due to the cosmic ray streaming instability, cosmic rays propagating in the interstellar medium scatter on self-excited Alfven waves and couple to the gas. When the wave growth due to the streaming instability is inhibited by some damping process, such as the turbulent damping, the cosmic ...

  7. DISCOVERY OF RELATIVISTIC OUTFLOW IN THE SEYFERT GALAXY Ark 564

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A.; Mathur, S. [Astronomy Department, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Krongold, Y. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Nicastro, F., E-mail: agupta@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-07-20

    We present Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectra of the narrow-line Seyfert-1 galaxy Ark 564. The spectrum shows numerous absorption lines which are well modeled with low-velocity outflow components usually observed in Seyfert galaxies. There are, however, some residual absorption lines which are not accounted for by low-velocity outflows. Here, we present identifications of the strongest lines as K{alpha} transitions of O VII (two lines) and O VI at outflow velocities of {approx}0.1c. These lines are detected at 6.9{sigma}, 6.2{sigma}, and 4.7{sigma}, respectively, and cannot be due to chance statistical fluctuations. Photoionization models with ultra-high velocity components improve the spectral fit significantly, providing further support for the presence of relativistic outflow in this source. Without knowing the location of the absorber, its mass and energy outflow rates cannot be well constrained; we find E-dot (outflow)/L{sub bol} lower limit of {>=}0.006% assuming a bi-conical wind geometry. This is the first time that absorption lines with ultra-high velocities are unambiguously detected in the soft X-ray band. The presence of outflows with relativistic velocities in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with Seyfert-type luminosities is hard to understand and provides valuable constraints to models of AGN outflows. Radiation pressure is unlikely to be the driving mechanism for such outflows and magnetohydrodynamic may be involved.

  8. Discovery of Relativistic Outflow in the Seyfert Galaxy Ark 564

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A.; Mathur, S.; Krongold, Y.; Nicastro, F.

    2013-07-01

    We present Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectra of the narrow-line Seyfert-1 galaxy Ark 564. The spectrum shows numerous absorption lines which are well modeled with low-velocity outflow components usually observed in Seyfert galaxies. There are, however, some residual absorption lines which are not accounted for by low-velocity outflows. Here, we present identifications of the strongest lines as Kα transitions of O VII (two lines) and O VI at outflow velocities of ~0.1c. These lines are detected at 6.9σ, 6.2σ, and 4.7σ, respectively, and cannot be due to chance statistical fluctuations. Photoionization models with ultra-high velocity components improve the spectral fit significantly, providing further support for the presence of relativistic outflow in this source. Without knowing the location of the absorber, its mass and energy outflow rates cannot be well constrained; we find \\dot{E}(outflow)/L_{bol} lower limit of >=0.006% assuming a bi-conical wind geometry. This is the first time that absorption lines with ultra-high velocities are unambiguously detected in the soft X-ray band. The presence of outflows with relativistic velocities in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with Seyfert-type luminosities is hard to understand and provides valuable constraints to models of AGN outflows. Radiation pressure is unlikely to be the driving mechanism for such outflows and magnetohydrodynamic may be involved.

  9. Bursty star formation feedback and cooling outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Teresita; Pontzen, Andrew; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Slyz, Adrianne; Devriendt, Julien

    2016-10-01

    We study how outflows of gas launched from a central galaxy undergoing repeated starbursts propagate through the circum-galactic medium (CGM), using the simulation code RAMSES. We assume that the outflow from the disc can be modelled as a rapidly moving bubble of hot gas at ˜1 kpc above disc, then ask what happens as it moves out further into the halo around the galaxy on ˜100 kpc scales. To do this, we run 60 two-dimensional simulations scanning over parameters of the outflow. Each of these is repeated with and without radiative cooling, assuming a primordial gas composition to give a lower bound on the importance of cooling. In a large fraction of radiative-cooling cases we are able to form rapidly outflowing cool gas from in situ cooling of the flow. We show that the amount of cool gas formed depends strongly on the `burstiness' of energy injection; sharper, stronger bursts typically lead to a larger fraction of cool gas forming in the outflow. The abundance ratio of ions in the CGM may therefore change in response to the detailed historical pattern of star formation. For instance, outflows generated by star formation with short, intense bursts contain up to 60 per cent of their gas mass at temperatures <5 × 104 K; for near-continuous star formation, the figure is ≲5 per cent. Further study of cosmological simulations, and of idealized simulations with e.g. metal-cooling, magnetic fields and/or thermal conduction, will help to understand the precise signature of bursty outflows on observed ion abundances.

  10. On the physical origin of AGN outflow driving mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Wako

    2016-07-01

    Super-massive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN) respond to the accretion process by feeding back energy and momentum into the surrounding environment. Galaxy-scale outflows are thought to provide the physical link connecting the small scales of the central black hole to the large scales of the host galaxy. Such powerful outflows are now starting to be commonly observed, and have been considered as a proof of AGN feedback in action. However, the physical origin of the mechanism driving the observed outflows is still unclear, and whether it is due to energy-driving or radiation-driving is a source of much debate in the literature. We consider AGN feedback driven by radiation pressure on dust, and show that AGN radiative feedback is capable of driving powerful outflows on galactic scales. In particular, we can obtain outflowing shells with high velocity and large momentum flux, by properly taking into account the effects of radiation trapping. Alternatively, the observed outflow characteristics may be significantly biased by AGN variability. I will discuss the resulting implications in the global context of black hole accretion-AGN feedback coupling.

  11. The Galactic Center compared with nuclei of nearby galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F

    2016-01-01

    Understanding our Galactic Center is easier with insights from nearby galactic nuclei. Both the star formation activity in nuclear gas disks, driven by bars and nuclear bars, and the fueling of low-luminosity AGN, followed by feedback of jets, driving molecular outflows, were certainly present in our Galactic Center, which appears now quenched. Comparisons and diagnostics are reviewed, in particular of m=2 and m=1 modes, lopsidedness, different disk orientations, and fossil evidences of activity and feedback.

  12. Cosmic Rays in a Galactic Breeze

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the discovery of the non-thermal Fermi bubble features both below and above the Galactic plane, we investigate a scenario in which these bubbles are formed through Galacto-centric outflow. Cosmic rays (CR) both diffusing and advecting within a Galactic breeze outflow, interacting with the ambient gas present, give rise to gamma-ray emission, providing an approximately flat surface brightness profile of this emission, as observed. Applying the same outflow profile further out within the disk, the resultant effects on the observable CR spectral properties are determined. A hardening in the spectra due to the competition of advective and diffusive propagation within a particular energy range is noted, even in the limiting case of equal CR diffusion coefficients in the disk and halo. It is postulated that this hardening effect may relate to the observed hardening feature in the CR spectrum at a rigidity of $\\approx 200$ GV.

  13. Galactic Wind in NGC 4460: New Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Oparin, D V

    2015-01-01

    NGC4460 is an isolated lenticular galaxy, in which galactic wind has been earlier discovered as a gas outflow associated with circumnuclear regions of star formation. Using the results of observations in the Halpha line with the scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer on the SAO RAS 6-m telescope, we studied the kinematics of the ionized gas in this galaxy. The parameters of gas outflow from the plane of the galactic disk were refined within a simple geometric model. We show that it is impossible to characterize the wind by a fixed velocity value. Characteristic outflow velocities are within 30..80 km/s , and they are insufficient to make the swept-out matter ultimately leave the galaxy.

  14. Anisotropic universe with anisotropic sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aluri, Pavan K.; Panda, Sukanta; Sharma, Manabendra; Thakur, Snigdha, E-mail: aluri@iucaa.ernet.in, E-mail: sukanta@iiserb.ac.in, E-mail: manabendra@iiserb.ac.in, E-mail: snigdha@iiserb.ac.in [Department of Physics, IISER Bhopal, Bhopal - 462023 (India)

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the state space of a Bianchi-I universe with anisotropic sources. Here we consider an extended state space which includes null geodesics in this background. The evolution equations for all the state observables are derived. Dynamical systems approach is used to study the evolution of these equations. The asymptotic stable fixed points for all the evolution equations are found. We also check our analytic results with numerical analysis of these dynamical equations. The evolution of the state observables are studied both in cosmic time and using a dimensionless time variable. Then we repeat the same analysis with a more realistic scenario, adding the isotropic (dust like dark) matter and a cosmological constant (dark energy) to our anisotropic sources, to study their co-evolution. The universe now approaches a de Sitter space asymptotically dominated by the cosmological constant. The cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps due to shear are also generated in this scenario, assuming that the universe contains anisotropic matter along with the usual (dark) matter and vacuum (dark) energy since decoupling. We find that they contribute dominantly to the CMB quadrupole. We also constrain the current level of anisotropy and also search for any cosmic preferred axis present in the data. We use the Union 2 Supernovae data to this extent. An anisotropy axis close to the mirror symmetry axis seen in the cosmic microwave background data from Planck probe is found.

  15. AGN-driven outflows without quenching in simulations of high-redshift disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gabor, Jared M

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed nuclear outflows in high-redshift, star forming galaxies. We study outflows driven by Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) using high- resolution simulations of idealized z=2 isolated disk galaxies. Episodic accretion events lead to outflows with velocities >1000 km/s and mass outflow rates up to the star formation rate (several tens of Msun/yr). Outflowing winds escape perpendicular to the disk with wide opening angles, and are typically asymmetric (i.e. unipolar) because dense gas above or below the AGN in the resolved disk inhibits outflow. Owing to rapid variability in the accretion rates, outflowing gas may be detectable even when the AGN is effectively "off." The highest velocity outflows are concentrated within 2-3 kpc of the galactic center during the peak accretion. With our purely thermal AGN feedback model -- standard in previous literature -- the outflowing material is mostly hot (10^6 K) and diffuse (nH<10^(-2) cm-3), but includes a cold component entrained in the ho...

  16. Material Induced Anisotropic Damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, M.S.; Wisselink, H.H.; Meinders, V.T.; Boogaard, van den A.H.; Hora, P.

    2012-01-01

    The anisotropy in damage can be driven by two different phenomena; anisotropic defor-mation state named Load Induced Anisotropic Damage (LIAD) and anisotropic (shape and/or distribution) second phase particles named Material Induced Anisotropic Damage (MIAD). Most anisotropic damage models are based

  17. The Resolved Outflow from 3C 48

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the properties of the high-velocity outflow driven by the young radio jet of 3C 48, a compact-steep-spectrum source. We use the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telecope to obtain (1) low-resolution UV and optical spectra and (2) multi-slit medium-resolution spectra of the ionized outflow. With supporting data from ground-based spectrographs, we are able to accurately measure the ratios of diagnostic emission lines such as [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ3727, [N II] λ6548, Hα, Hβ, [Ne V] λ3425, and [Ne III] λ3869. We fit the observed emission-line ratios using a range of ionization models, powered by active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation and shocks, produced by the MAPPINGS code. We have determined that AGN radiation is likely the dominant ionization source. The outflow's density is estimated to be in the range n = 103-104 cm-3, the mass is ~6 × 106 M ⊙, and the metallicity is likely equal to or higher than solar. Compared with the typical outflows associated with more evolved radio jets, this young outflow is denser, less massive, and more metal rich. Multi-slit observations allow us to construct a two-dimensional velocity map of the outflow that shows a wide range of velocities with distinct velocity components, suggesting a wide-angle clumpy outflow. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-11574. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Some of the

  18. The Prevalence of Gas Outflows in Type 2 AGNs. II. 3D Biconical Outflow Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyun-Jin; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2016-09-01

    We present 3D models of biconical outflows combined with a thin dust plane for investigating the physical properties of the ionized gas outflows and their effect on the observed gas kinematics in type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Using a set of input parameters, we construct a number of models in 3D and calculate the spatially integrated velocity and velocity dispersion for each model. We find that three primary parameters, i.e., intrinsic velocity, bicone inclination, and the amount of dust extinction, mainly determine the simulated velocity and velocity dispersion. Velocity dispersion increases as the intrinsic velocity or the bicone inclination increases, while velocity (i.e., velocity shifts with respect to systemic velocity) increases as the amount of dust extinction increases. Simulated emission-line profiles well reproduce the observed [O iii] line profiles, e.g., narrow core and broad wing components. By comparing model grids and Monte Carlo simulations with the observed [O iii] velocity-velocity dispersion distribution of ˜39,000 type 2 AGNs, we constrain the intrinsic velocity of gas outflows ranging from ˜500 to ˜1000 km s-1 for the majority of AGNs, and up to ˜1500-2000 km s-1 for extreme cases. The Monte Carlo simulations show that the number ratio of AGNs with negative [O iii] velocity to AGNs with positive [O iii] velocity correlates with the outflow opening angle, suggesting that outflows with higher intrinsic velocity tend to have wider opening angles. These results demonstrate the potential of our 3D models for studying the physical properties of gas outflows, applicable to various observations, including spatially integrated and resolved gas kinematics.

  19. Massive molecular outflows

    OpenAIRE

    Beuther, H.; Schilke, P.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, C. M.; Sridharan, T. K.; Wyrowski, F.

    2001-01-01

    We present a mapping study of massive molecular outflows in 26 high-mass star-forming regions at 11'' spatial resolution. Bipolar morpholgy is found in 80% of the sources and the collimation is higher than previously thought. Additionally, we find that well known low-mass correlations continue up to the high-mass regime, and accretion rates are around 10^(-4) Msun/yr rising as high as 10^(-3) Msun/yr. A tight correlation between the outflow and the core mass is established, implying that the ...

  20. Metallicity and Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Huiyuan; Yuan, Weimin; Wang, Tinggui

    2012-01-01

    Correlations are investigated of the outflow strength of quasars, as measured by the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) of the CIV line (Wang et al. 2011), with intensities and ratios of broad emission lines, based on composite quasar spectra built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that most of the line ratios of other ions to CIV prominently increases with BAI. These behaviors can be well understood in the context of increasing metallicity with BAI. The strength of dominant coolant, CIV line, decreases and weak collisionally excited lines increase with gas metallicity as a result of the competition between different line coolants. Using SiIV+OIV]/CIV as an indicator of gas metallicity, we present, for the first time, a strong correlation between the metallicitiy and the outflow strength of quasars over a wide range of 1.7 to 6.9 times solar abundance. Our result implies that the metallicity plays an important role in the formation of quasar outflows, likely via affecting outflow acceleration. This ...

  1. Fast outflows and star formation quenching in quasar host galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniani, S.; Marconi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Balmaverde, B.; Brusa, M.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Cicone, C.; Comastri, A.; Cresci, G.; Fiore, F.; Feruglio, C.; La Franca, F.; Mainieri, V.; Mannucci, F.; Nagao, T.; Netzer, H.; Piconcelli, E.; Risaliti, G.; Schneider, R.; Shemmer, O.

    2016-06-01

    Negative feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is considered a key mechanism in shaping galaxy evolution. Fast, extended outflows are frequently detected in the AGN host galaxies at all redshifts and luminosities, both in ionised and molecular gas. However, these outflows are only potentially able to quench star formation, and we are still lacking decisive evidence of negative feedback in action. Here we present observations obtained with the Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observations in the Near Infrared (SINFONI) H- and K-band integral-field of two quasars at z ~ 2.4 that are characterised by fast, extended outflows detected through the [Oiii]λ5007 line. The high signal-to-noise ratio of our observations allows us to identify faint narrow (FWHManti-correlated with the fast outflows. The ionised outflows therefore appear to be able to suppress star formation in the region where the outflow is expanding. However, the detection of narrow spatially extended Hα emission indicates star formation rates of at least ~50-90 M⊙ yr-1, suggesting either that AGN feedback does not affect the whole galaxy or that many feedback episodes are required before star formation is completely quenched. On the other hand, the narrow Hα emission extending along the edges of the outflow cone may also lead also to a positive feedback interpretation. Our results highlight the possible double role of galaxy-wide outflows in host galaxy evolution. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, P.ID: 086.B-0579(A) and 091.A-0261(A).The reduced data cubes are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A28

  2. Galaxy Outflows Without Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, Sharanya; Ostriker, Eve C

    2016-01-01

    High surface density, rapidly star-forming galaxies are observed to have $\\approx 50-100\\,{\\rm km\\,s^{-1}}$ line-of-sight velocity dispersions, which are much higher than expected from supernova driving alone, but may arise from large-scale gravitational instabilities. Using three-dimensional simulations of local regions of the interstellar medium, we explore the impact of high velocity dispersions that arise from these disk instabilities. Parametrizing disks by their surface densities and epicyclic frequencies, we conduct a series of simulations that probe a broad range of conditions. Turbulence is driven purely horizontally and on large scales, neglecting any energy input from supernovae. We find that such motions lead to strong global outflows in the highly-compact disks that were common at high redshifts, but weak or negligible mass loss in the more diffuse disks that are prevalent today. Substantial outflows are generated if the one-dimensional horizontal velocity dispersion exceeds $\\approx 35\\,{\\rm km\\...

  3. AGN and stellar feedback in star-forming galaxies at redshift 2 : outflows, mass-loading and quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, O.

    2016-06-01

    Galactic-scale outflows are ubiquitous in observations of star-forming galaxies, up to high redshift. Such galactic outflows are mainly generated by internal sources of feedback: young stars, supernovae and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Still, the physical origins of such outflows are not well understood, and their main driver is still debated. Up to now, most simulations take into account AGN feedback or stellar feedback but not both, because both phenomena happen on very different spatial and time scales. Most of them also still fail to reproduce all observed parameters from first principles. In this poster, we present the POGO project: Physical Origins of Galactic Outflows. With this suite of 23 simulations, we model AGN and stellar feedback simultaneously based on physical assumptions for the first time at very high resolution (6 to 1.5 pc), and investigate their impact on the outflow parameters of the host-galaxy. Here, we show that AGN and stellar feedback couple non-linearly, and that the mass-loading of the resulting outflow highly depends on the mass of the host, all the more because the coupling can either be positive (small masses) or negative (intermediate masses). Nevertheless, the main driver of the outflow remains the AGN at all masses.

  4. Jets from black hole binaries and Galactic Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Mirabel, I.F.

    2000-01-01

    Relativistic outflows are a common phenomenon in accreting black holes. Despite the enormous differences in scale, stellar-mass black holes in binaries and supermassive black holes in Galactic Nuclei produce jets with analogous properties. In both are observed two types of relativistic outflows: 1) steady compact jets with flat-spectrum, and 2) sporadic extended jets with steep-spectrum and apparent superluminal motions. Besides, the most common class of gamma-ray bursts are afterglows from u...

  5. Galactic Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    Galactic winds have become arguably one of the hottest topics in extragalactic astronomy. This enthusiasm for galactic winds is due in part to the detection of winds in many, if not most, high-redshift galaxies. Galactic winds have also been invoked by theorists to (1) suppress the number of visible dwarf galaxies and avoid the "cooling catastrophe" at high redshift that results in the overproduction of massive luminous galaxies, (2) remove material with low specific angular momentum early on and help enlarge gas disks in CDM + baryons simulations, (3) reduce the dark mass concentrations in galaxies, (4) explain the mass-metallicity relation of galaxies from selective loss of metal-enriched gas from smaller galaxies, (5) enrich and "preheat" the ICM, (6) enrich the IGM without disturbing the Lyαforest significantly, and (7) inhibit cooling flows in galaxy clusters with active cD galaxies. The present paper highlights a few key aspects of galactic winds taken from a recent ARAA review by Veilleux, Cecil, &Bland-Hawthorn (2005; herafter VCBH). Readers interested in a more detailed discussion of this topic are encouraged to refer to the original ARAA article.

  6. PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOWS AND RADIATIVE FEEDBACK FROM MASSIVE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuiper, Rolf [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J., E-mail: kuiper@mpia.de, E-mail: Harold.W.Yorke@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: Neal.J.Turner@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2015-02-20

    We carry out radiation hydrodynamical simulations of the formation of massive stars in the super-Eddington regime including both their radiative feedback and protostellar outflows. The calculations start from a prestellar core of dusty gas and continue until the star stops growing. The accretion ends when the remnants of the core are ejected, mostly by the force of the direct stellar radiation in the polar direction and elsewhere by the reradiated thermal infrared radiation. How long the accretion persists depends on whether the protostellar outflows are present. We set the mass outflow rate to 1% of the stellar sink particle's accretion rate. The outflows open a bipolar cavity extending to the core's outer edge, through which the thermal radiation readily escapes. The radiative flux is funneled into the polar directions while the core's collapse proceeds near the equator. The outflow thus extends the ''flashlight effect'', or anisotropic radiation field, found in previous studies from the few hundred AU scale of the circumstellar disk up to the 0.1 parsec scale of the core. The core's flashlight effect allows core gas to accrete on the disk for longer, in the same way that the disk's flashlight effect allows disk gas to accrete on the star for longer. Thus although the protostellar outflows remove material near the core's poles, causing slower stellar growth over the first few free-fall times, they also enable accretion to go on longer in our calculations. The outflows ultimately lead to stars of somewhat higher mass.

  7. PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOWS AND RADIATIVE FEEDBACK FROM MASSIVE STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We carry out radiation hydrodynamical simulations of the formation of massive stars in the super-Eddington regime including both their radiative feedback and protostellar outflows. The calculations start from a prestellar core of dusty gas and continue until the star stops growing. The accretion ends when the remnants of the core are ejected, mostly by the force of the direct stellar radiation in the polar direction and elsewhere by the reradiated thermal infrared radiation. How long the accretion persists depends on whether the protostellar outflows are present. We set the mass outflow rate to 1% of the stellar sink particle's accretion rate. The outflows open a bipolar cavity extending to the core's outer edge, through which the thermal radiation readily escapes. The radiative flux is funneled into the polar directions while the core's collapse proceeds near the equator. The outflow thus extends the ''flashlight effect'', or anisotropic radiation field, found in previous studies from the few hundred AU scale of the circumstellar disk up to the 0.1 parsec scale of the core. The core's flashlight effect allows core gas to accrete on the disk for longer, in the same way that the disk's flashlight effect allows disk gas to accrete on the star for longer. Thus although the protostellar outflows remove material near the core's poles, causing slower stellar growth over the first few free-fall times, they also enable accretion to go on longer in our calculations. The outflows ultimately lead to stars of somewhat higher mass

  8. Galactic cluster winds in presence of a dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G S

    2013-01-01

    We obtain a solution for the hydrodynamic outflow of the polytropic gas from the gravitating center, in presence of the uniform Dark Energy (DE). The antigravity of DE is enlightening the outflow and make the outflow possible at smaller initial temperature, at the same density. The main property of the wind in presence of DE is its unlimited acceleration after passing the critical point. In application of this solution to the winds from galaxy clusters we suggest that collision of the strongly accelerated wind with another galaxy cluster, or with another galactic cluster wind could lead to the formation of a highest energy cosmic rays.

  9. Galactic cluster winds in presence of a dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Merafina, M.

    2013-10-01

    We obtain a solution for the hydrodynamic outflow of the polytropic gas from the gravitating centre, in the presence of the uniform dark energy (DE). The antigravity of DE is enlightening the outflow and makes the outflow possible at smaller initial temperature, at the same density. The main property of the wind in the presence of DE is its unlimited acceleration after passing the critical point. In application of this solution to the winds from galaxy clusters, we suggest that collision of the strongly accelerated wind with another galaxy cluster, or with another galactic cluster wind, could lead to the formation of a highest energy cosmic rays.

  10. Cosmic ray driven outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Hanasz, Michal; Naab, Thorsten; Gawryszczak, Artur; Kowalik, Kacper; Wóltański, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    We present simulations of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM) in models of massive star forming (40 Msun / yr) disk galaxies with high gas surface densities (~100 Msun / pc^2) similar to observed star forming high-redshift disks. We assume that type II supernovae deposit 10 per cent of their energy into the ISM as cosmic rays and neglect the additional deposition of thermal energy or momentum. With a typical Galactic diffusion coefficient for CRs (3e28 cm^2 / s) we demonstrate that this process alone can trigger the local formation of a strong low density galactic wind maintaining vertically open field lines. Driven by the additional pressure gradient of the relativistic fluid the wind speed can exceed 1000 km/s, much higher than the escape velocity of the galaxy. The global mass loading, i.e. the ratio of the gas mass leaving the galactic disk in a wind to the star formation rate becomes of order unity once the system has settled into an equilibrium. We conclude that relativistic particles accelerated i...

  11. Magnetic propeller outflows

    OpenAIRE

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Romanova, M. M.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.

    1998-01-01

    A model is developed for magnetic `propeller'-driven outflows which cause a rapidly rotating magnetized star accreting from a disk to spin-down. Energy and angular momentum lost by the star goes into expelling most of the accreting disk matter. The theory gives an expression for the effective Alfven radius $R_A$ (where the inflowing matter is effectively stopped) which depends on the mass accretion rate, the star's mass and magnetic moment, and the star's rotation rate. The model points to a ...

  12. Searching for Brown Dwarf Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Whelan, E T; Bacciotti, F; Randich, S; Natta, A

    2009-01-01

    As outflow activity in low mass protostars is strongly connected to ac- cretion it is reasonable to expect accreting brown dwarfs to also be driving out- flows. In the last three years we have searched for brown dwarf outflows using high quality optical spectra obtained with UVES on the VLT and the technique of spectro-astrometry. To date five brown dwarf outflows have been discovered. Here the method is discussed and the results to date outlined.

  13. Hydrodynamics and stability of galactic cooling flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kritsuk, A G; Müller, E

    1998-01-01

    Using numerical techniques we studied the global stability of cooling flows in giant elliptical galaxies. As an initial equilibrium state we choose the hydrostatic gas recycling model (Kritsuk 1996). Non-equilibrium radiative cooling, stellar mass loss, heating by type Ia supernovae, distributed mass deposition, and thermal conductivity are included. Although the recycling model reproduces the basic X-ray observables, it appears to be unstable with respect to the development of inflow or outflow. In spherically symmetry the inflows are subject to a central cooling catastrophe, while the outflows saturate in a form of a subsonic galactic wind. Two-dimensional axisymmetric random velocity perturbations of the equilibrium model trigger the onset of a cooling catastrophe, which develops in an essentially non-spherical way. The simulations show a patchy pattern of mass deposition and the formation of hollow gas jets, which penetrate through the outflow down to the galaxy core. The X-ray observables of such a hybri...

  14. An ultra-relativistic outflow from a neutron star accreting gas from a companion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P. Fender; K. Wu; H. Johnston; T. Tzioumis; P.G. Jonker; R. Spencer; M. van der Klis

    2004-01-01

    Collimated relativistic outflows-also known as jets-are amongst the most energetic phenomena in the Universe. They are associated with supermassive black holes in distant active galactic nuclei, accreting stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars in binary systems and are believed to be responsible

  15. A bipolar-outflow object in the field of M 36

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnier, EA; Waters, LBFM; Kuan, YJ; Chu, YH; Taylor, AR; Matthews, HE; Martin, EL

    1996-01-01

    We have discovered an object in the field of the Galactic open cluster M36 which exhibits a nebulous taillike structure and a high velocity outflow. We first observed the jet morphology in optical images taken at the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT (MDM) Observatory at Kitt Peak. This source, located at 05(h

  16. Scalar fields properties for flat galactic rotation curves

    CERN Document Server

    Fay, S

    2004-01-01

    The whole class of minimally coupled and massive scalar fields which may be responsible for flattening of galactic rotation curves is found. An interesting relation with a class of scalar-tensor theories able to isotropise anisotropic models of Universe is shown. The resulting metric is found and its stability and scalar field properties are tested with respect to the presence of a second scalar field or a small perturbation of the rotation velocity at galactic outer radii.

  17. On Einstein clusters as galactic dark matter halos

    OpenAIRE

    Böhmer, CG; Harko, T.

    2007-01-01

    We consider global and gravitational lensing properties of the recently suggested Einstein clusters of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) as galactic dark matter haloes. Being tangential pressure dominated, Einstein clusters are strongly anisotropic systems which can describe any galactic rotation curve by specifying the anisotropy. Due to this property, Einstein clusters may be considered as dark matter candidates. We analyse the stability of the Einstein clusters against both radi...

  18. Stellar feedback as the origin of an extended molecular outflow in a starburst galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Geach, J E; Diamond-Stanic, A M; Krips, M; Rudnick, G H; Tremonti, C A; Sell, P H; Coil, A L; Moustakas, J

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed that starburst galaxies can drive molecular gas outflows through stellar radiation pressure. Molecular gas is the phase of the interstellar medium from which stars form, so these outflows curtail stellar mass growth in galaxies. Previously known outflows, however, involve small fractions of the total molecular gas content and are restricted to sub-kiloparsec scales. It is also apparent that input from active galactic nuclei is in at least some cases dynamically important, so pure stellar feedback has been considered incapable of aggressively terminating star formation on galactic scales. Extraplanar molecular gas has been detected in the archetype starburst galaxy M82, but so far there has been no evidence that starbursts can propel significant quantities of cold molecular gas to the same galactocentric radius (~10 kpc) as the warmer gas traced by metal absorbers. Here we report observations of molecular gas in a compact (effective radius 100 pc) massive starburst galaxy at z...

  19. DETECTION OF HIGH VELOCITY OUTFLOWS IN THE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY Mrk 590

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. [Department of Biological and Physical Sciences, Columbus State Community College, Columbus, OH 43215 (United States); Mathur, S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Krongold, Y., E-mail: agupta1@cscc.edu [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2015-01-01

    We report on the detection of ultra-fast outflows in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 590. These outflows are identified through highly blueshifted absorption lines of O VIII and Ne IX in the medium energy grating spectrum and Si XIV and Mg XII in the high energy grating spectrum on board the Chandra X-ray observatory. Our best-fit photoionization model requires two absorber components at outflow velocities of 0.176c and 0.0738c and a third tentative component at 0.0867c. The components at 0.0738c and 0.0867c have high ionization parameters and high column densities, similar to other ultra-fast outflows detected at low resolution by Tombesi et al. We also found suggestive evidence for super-solar silicon in these components. These outflows carry sufficient mass and energy to provide effective feedback proposed by theoretical models. The component at 0.176c, on the other hand, has a low ionization parameter and low column density, similar to those detected by Gupta et al. in Ark 564. These absorbers occupy a different locus on the velocity versus ionization parameter plane and have opened up a new parameter space of active galactic nucleus (AGN) outflows. The presence of ultra-fast outflows in moderate luminosity AGNs poses a challenge to models of AGN outflows.

  20. Fast outflows and star formation quenching in quasar host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Carniani, S; Maiolino, R; Balmaverde, B; Brusa, M; Cano-Díaz, M; Cicone, C; Comastri, A; Cresci, G; Fiore, F; Feruglio, C; La Franca, F; Mainieri, V; Mannucci, F; Nagao, T; Netzer, H; Piconcelli, E; Risaliti, G; Schneider, R; Shemmer, O

    2016-01-01

    Negative feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is considered a key mechanism in shaping galaxy evolution. Fast, extended outflows are frequently detected in the AGN host galaxies at all redshifts and luminosities, both in ionised and molecular gas. However, these outflows are only "potentially" able to quench star formation and we are still missing a decisive evidence of negative feedback in action. Here we present Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observations in the Near Infrared (SINFONI) H- and K-band integral-field spectroscopic observations of two quasars at $z\\sim$2.4 characterised by fast, extended outflows detected through the [OIII]$\\lambda$5007 line (Carniani et al. 2015). The high signal-to-noise ratio of our observations allows us to identify faint narrow (FWHM $< 500$ km/s), and spatially extended components in [OIII]$\\lambda$5007 and H$\\alpha$ emission associated with star formation in the host galaxy. Such star-formation powered emission is spatially anti-correlated with the fast outflow...

  1. Evidence for a chemically differentiated outflow in Mrk 231

    CERN Document Server

    Lindberg, J E; Muller, S; Martí-Vidal, I; Falstad, N; Costagliola, F; Henkel, C; van der Werf, P; García-Burillo, S; González-Alfonso, E

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Our goal is to study the chemical composition of the outflows of active galactic nuclei and starburst galaxies. Methods: We obtained high-resolution interferometric observations of HCN and HCO$^+$ $J=1\\rightarrow0$ and $J=2\\rightarrow1$ of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Mrk~231 with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We also use previously published observations of HCN and HCO$^+$ $J=1\\rightarrow0$ and $J=3\\rightarrow2$, and HNC $J=1\\rightarrow0$ in the same source. Results: In the line wings of the HCN, HCO$^+$, and HNC emission, we find that these three molecular species exhibit features at distinct velocities which differ between the species. The features are not consistent with emission lines of other molecular species. Through radiative transfer modelling of the HCN and HCO$^+$ outflow emission we find an average abundance ratio $X(\\mathrm{HCN})/X(\\mathrm{HCO}^+)\\gtrsim1000$. Assuming a clumpy outflow, modelling of the HCN and HCO$^+$ emission produces strongly inconsistent outflow masses....

  2. Tracing Inflows and Outflows with Absorption Lines in Circumgalactic Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Amanda Brady; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D; Katz, Neal; Kollmeier, Juna A; Thompson, Robert; Weinberg, David H

    2013-01-01

    We examine how HI and metal absorption lines within low-redshift galaxy halos trace the dynamical state of circumgalactic gas, using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations that include a well-vetted heuristic model for galactic outflows. We categorize inflowing, outflowing, and ambient gas based on its history and fate as tracked in our simulation. Following our earlier work showing that the ionisation level of absorbers was a primary factor in determining the physical conditions of absorbing gas, we show here that it is also a governing factor for its dynamical state. Low-ionisation metal absorbers (e.g. MgII) tend to arise in gas that will fall onto galaxies within several Gyr, while high-ionisation metal absorbers (e.g. OVI) generally trace material that was deposited by outflows many Gyr ago. Inflowing gas is dominated by enriched material that was previously ejected in an outflow, hence accretion at low redshifts is typically substantially enriched. Recycling wind material is preferentially found closer t...

  3. Methanol Maser Associated Outflows: Detection statistics and properties

    CERN Document Server

    de Villiers, H M; Thompson, M A; Ellingsen, S P; Urquhart, J S; Breen, S L; Burton, M G; Csengeri, T; Ward-Thompson, D

    2014-01-01

    We have selected the positions of 54 6.7GHz methanol masers from the Methanol Multibeam Survey catalogue, covering a range of longitudes between $20^{\\circ}$ and $34^{\\circ}$ of the Galactic Plane. These positions were mapped in the J=3-2 transition of both the $\\rm{^{13}CO}$ and $\\rm{C^{18}O}$ lines. A total of 58 $\\rm{^{13}CO}$ emission peaks are found in the vicinity of these maser positions. We search for outflows around all $\\rm{^{13}CO}$ peaks, and find evidence for high-velocity gas in all cases, spatially resolving the red and blue outflow lobes in 55 cases. Of these sources, 44 have resolved kinematic distances, and are closely associated with the 6.7GHz masers, a sub-set referred to as Methanol Maser Associated Outflows (MMAOs). We calculate the masses of the clumps associated with each peak using 870 $\\rm{\\mu m}$ continuum emission from the ATLASGAL survey. A strong correlation is seen between the clump mass and both outflow mass and mechanical force, lending support to models in which accretion is...

  4. Scaling ultraviolet outflows in Seyferts

    OpenAIRE

    Stoll, R.; S Mathur; Krongold, Y.; Nicastro, F.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray and UV absorbing outflows are frequently seen in AGN and have been cited as a possible feedback mechanism. Whether or not they can provide adequate feedback depends on how massive they are and how much energy they carry, but it depends in a more fundamental way upon whether they escape the potential of the black hole. If the outflows have reached their asymptotic velocity when we observe them, then all of these properties critically depend on the radius of the outflow: a value which is ...

  5. The Impact of Modeling Assumptions in Galactic Chemical Evolution Models

    CERN Document Server

    Côté, Benoit; Ritter, Christian; Herwig, Falk; Venn, Kim A

    2016-01-01

    We use the OMEGA galactic chemical evolution code to investigate how the assumptions used for the treatment of galactic inflows and outflows impact numerical predictions. The goal is to determine how our capacity to reproduce the chemical evolution trends of a galaxy is affected by the choice of implementation used to include those physical processes. In pursuit of this goal, we experiment with three different prescriptions for galactic inflows and outflows and use OMEGA within a Markov Chain Monte Carlo code to recover the set of input parameters that best reproduces the chemical evolution of nine elements in the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Sculptor. Despite their different degrees of intended physical realism, we found that all three prescriptions can reproduce in an almost identical way the stellar abundance trends observed in Sculptor. While the three models have the same capacity to fit the data, the best values recovered for the parameters controlling the number of Type Ia supernovae and the strength of gal...

  6. Energy exchanges in reconnection outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Newman, Davd L; Markidis, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Reconnection outflows are highly energetic directed flows that interact with the ambient plasma or with flows from other reconnection regions. Under these conditions the flow becomes highly unstable and chaotic, as any flow jets interacting with a medium. We report here massively parallel simulations of the two cases of interaction between outflow jets and between a single outflow with an ambient plasma. We find in both case the development of a chaotic magnetic field, subject to secondary reconnection events that further complicate the topology of the field lines. The focus of the present analysis is on the energy balance. We compute each energy channel (electromagnetic, bulk, thermal, for each species) and find where the most energy is exchanged and in what form. The main finding is that the largest energy exchange is not at the reconnection site proper but in the regions where the outflowing jets are destabilized.

  7. The Prevalence of Ionized Gas Outflows in Type 2 AGNs II. 3-D Biconical Outflow Models

    CERN Document Server

    Bae, Hyun-Jin

    2016-01-01

    We present 3-D models of biconical outflows combined with a thin dust plane for investigating the physical properties of the ionized gas outflows and their effect on the observed gas kinematics in type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Using a set of input parameters, we construct a number of models in 3-D and calculate the spatially integrated velocity and velocity dispersion for each model. We find that three primary parameters, i.e., intrinsic velocity, bicone inclination, and the amount of dust extinction, mainly determine the simulated velocity and velocity dispersion. Velocity dispersion increases as the intrinsic velocity or the bicone inclination increases, while velocity (i.e., velocity shift with respect to systemic velocity) increases as the amount of dust extinction increases. Simulated emission-line profiles well reproduce the observed [O III] line profiles, e.g., a narrow core and a broad wing components. By comparing model grids and Monte Carlo simulations with the observed [O III] velocity-velo...

  8. Galactic bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Peletier, Reynier; Gadotti, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    This book consists of invited reviews on Galactic Bulges written by experts in the field. A central point of the book is that, while in the standard picture of galaxy formation a significant amount of the baryonic mass is expected to reside in classical bulges, the question what is the fraction of galaxies with no classical bulges in the local Universe has remained open. The most spectacular example of a galaxy with no significant classical bulge is the Milky Way. The reviews of this book attempt to clarify the role of the various types of bulges during the mass build-up of galaxies, based on morphology, kinematics, and stellar populations, and connecting their properties at low and high redshifts. The observed properties are compared with the predictions of the theoretical models, accounting for the many physical processes leading to the central mass concentration and their destruction in galaxies. This book serves as an entry point for PhD students and non-specialists and as a reference work for researchers...

  9. Accretion Disk Outflows from Compact Object Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian

    nuclear reaction network along characteristic Lagrangian trajectories. Results of these calculations will be used to (1) reassess NS-NS/NS-BH mergers as an astrophysical source of heavy r-process nuclei; and (2) calculate the light curves of the optical transients (`kilonovae') powered by the radioactive decay. Separate work will assess the effects that neutrino irradiation from a long-lived neutron star remnant has on the electron fraction of the disk outflows. The strong contrast between the opacities of proton- and neutron-rich matter imply that the presence and lifetime of such a remnant could be imprinted on the kilonova emission. Our investigation sheds light on the central engines of GRBs and other high-energy transients and hence is relevant to NASA's Swift, MAXI, and Fermi missions. Our results will also impact the interpretation of future observations of supernovae and their galactic environments with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Our results will also impact follow-up observations of kilonovae, maximizing the impact of HST to constrain the key open questions such as the progenitors of gamma-ray bursts and the origin of r-process nuclei.

  10. Wind from the black-hole accretion disk driving a molecular outflow in an active galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F; Meléndez, M; Veilleux, S; Reeves, J N; González-Alfonso, E; Reynolds, C S

    2015-03-26

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei are often thought to affect the evolution of both supermassive black holes and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the close relationship between black holes and galaxies. Recent observations of large-scale molecular outflows in ultraluminous infrared galaxies support this quasar-feedback idea, because they directly trace the gas from which stars form. Theoretical models suggest that these outflows originate as energy-conserving flows driven by fast accretion-disk winds. Proposed connections between large-scale molecular outflows and accretion-disk activity in ultraluminous galaxies were incomplete because no accretion-disk wind had been detected. Conversely, studies of powerful accretion-disk winds have until now focused only on X-ray observations of local Seyfert galaxies and a few higher-redshift quasars. Here we report observations of a powerful accretion-disk wind with a mildly relativistic velocity (a quarter that of light) in the X-ray spectrum of IRAS F11119+3257, a nearby (redshift 0.189) optically classified type 1 ultraluminous infrared galaxy hosting a powerful molecular outflow. The active galactic nucleus is responsible for about 80 per cent of the emission, with a quasar-like luminosity of 1.5 × 10(46) ergs per second. The energetics of these two types of wide-angle outflows is consistent with the energy-conserving mechanism that is the basis of the quasar feedback in active galactic nuclei that lack powerful radio jets (such jets are an alternative way to drive molecular outflows). PMID:25810204

  11. Mediterranean Outflow Mixing and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James F.; O'Neil Baringer, Molly; Lueck, Rolf G.; Johnson, Gregory C.; Ambar, Isabel; Parrilla, Gregorio; Cantos, Alain; Kennelly, Maureen A.; Sanford, Thomas B.

    1993-02-01

    The Mediterranean Sea produces a salty, dense outflow that is strongly modified by entrainment as it first begins to descend the continental slope in the eastern Gulf of Cadiz. The current accelerates to 1.3 meters per second, which raises the internal Froude number above 1, and is intensely turbulent through its full thickness. The outflow loses about half of its density anomaly and roughly doubles its volume transport as it entrains less saline North Atlantic Central water. Within 100 kilometers downstream, the current is turned by the Coriolis force until it flows nearly parallel to topography in a damped geostrophic balance. The mixed Mediterranean outflow continues westward, slowly descending the continental slope until it becomes neutrally buoyant in the thermocline where it becomes an important water mass.

  12. The Anisotropic Geometrodynamics For Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siparov, Sergey V.

    2009-05-01

    The classical geometrodynamics (GRT) and its modern features based on the use of the Fridman-Robertson-Walker type metrics are still unable to explain several important issues of extragalactic observations like flat rotation curves of the spiral galaxies, Tully-Fisher law, globular clusters behavior in comparisson to that of the stars belonging to the galactic plane etc. The chalenging problem of the Universe expansion acceleration stemming from the supernovae observations demands the existence of the repulsion forces which brings one to the choice between the cosmological constant and some quintessence. The popular objects of discussion are now still dark (matter and energy), nevertheless, they are supposed to correspond to more than 95% of the Universe which seems to be far from satisfactory. According to the equivalence principle we can not experimentally distinguish between the inertial forces and the gravitational ones. Since there exist the inertial forces depending on velocity (Coriolis), it seems plausible to explore the velocity dependent gravitational forces. From the mathematical point of view it means that we should use the anisotropic metric. It immediately turns out that the expression for the Einstein-Hilbert action changes in a natural way - contrary to the cases of f(R)-theories, additional scalar fields, arbitrary MOND functions etc.. We use the linear approximation for the metric and derive the generalized geodesics and the equation for the gravity force that contains not only the Newton-Einstein term. The relation between the obtained results and those of Lense-Thirring approach are discussed. The resulting anisotropic geometrodynamics includes all the results of the GRT and is used to give the explanation to the problems mentioned above. One of the impressive consequences is the possibility to explain the observed Hubble red shift not by the Doppler effect as usually but by the gravitational red shift originating from the metric anisotropy.

  13. Spin properties of supermassive black holes with powerful outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Ruth. A.

    2016-05-01

    Relationships between beam power and accretion disc luminosity are studied for a sample of 55 high excitation radio galaxies (HERG), 13 low excitation radio galaxies (LERG), and 29 radio loud quasars (RLQ) with powerful outflows. The ratio of beam power to disc luminosity tends to be high for LERG, low for RLQ, and spans the full range of values for HERG. Writing general expressions for the disc luminosity and beam power and applying the empirically determined relationships allows a function that parametrizes the spins of the holes to be estimated. Interestingly, one of the solutions that is consistent with the data has a functional form that is remarkably similar to that expected in the generalized Blandford-Znajek model with a magnetic field that is similar in form to that expected in magnetically arrested disk (MAD) and advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) models. Values of the spin function, obtained independent of specific outflow models, suggest that spin and active galactic nucleus type are not related for these types of sources. The spin function can be used to solve for black hole spin in the context of particular outflow models, and one example is provided.

  14. Anisotropic Stars II Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, K; Dev, Krsna; Gleiser, Marcelo

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the stability of self-gravitating spherically symmetric anisotropic spheres under radial perturbations. We consider both the Newtonian and the full general-relativistic perturbation treatment. In the general-relativistic case, we extend the variational formalism for spheres with isotropic pressure developed by Chandrasekhar. We find that, in general, when the tangential pressure is greater than the radial pressure, the stability of the anisotropic sphere is enhanced when compared to isotropic configurations. In particular, anisotropic spheres are found to be stable for smaller values of the adiabatic index $\\gamma$.

  15. Subparsec-scale dynamics of a dusty gas disk exposed to anisotropic AGN radiation with frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Namekata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    We explore the gas dynamics near the dust sublimation radius of active galactic nucleus (AGN). For the purpose, we perform axisymmetric radiation hydrodynamic simulations of a dusty gas disk of radius $\\approx 1\\,\\mathrm{pc}$ around a supermassive black hole of mass $10^{7}\\,\\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$ taking into account (1) anisotropic radiation of accretion disk, (2) X-ray heating by corona, (3) radiative transfer of infrared (IR) photons reemitted by dust, (4) frequency dependency of direct and IR radiations, and (5) separate temperatures for gas and dust. As a result, we find that for Eddington ratio $\\approx 0.77$, a nearly neutral, dense ($\\approx 10^{6\\operatorname{-}8}\\;\\mathrm{cm^{-3}}$), geometrically-thin ($h/r<0.06$) disk forms with a high velocity ($\\approx 200 \\sim 3000\\;\\mathrm{km/s}$) dusty outflow launched from the disk surface. The disk temperature is determined by the balance between X-ray heating and various cooling, and the disk is almost supported by thermal pressure. Contrary to \\citet{krol...

  16. PROBING THE FERMI BUBBLES IN ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION: A SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURE OF THE MILKY WAY'S BICONICAL NUCLEAR OUTFLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Andrew J.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Hernandez, Svea; Tumlinson, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Savage, Blair D.; Wakker, Bart P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Lockman, Felix J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Rt. 28/92, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Jenkins, Edward B.; Bowen, David V. [Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bland-Hawthorn, Joss [Institute of Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kim, Tae-Sun [Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Benjamin, Robert A., E-mail: afox@stsci.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, 800 West Main Street, Whitewater, WI 53190 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    Giant lobes of plasma extend ≈55° above and below the Galactic center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (ℓ, b = 10.°4, +11.°2). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v {sub LSR} = –235 and +250 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain the observed profiles with an outflow velocity of ≳900 km s{sup –1} and a full opening angle of ≈110° (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic center activity over the last ≈2.5-4.0 Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles.

  17. Gemini GMOS and WHT SAURON integral-field spectrograph observations of the AGN-driven outflow in NGC 1266

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, Timothy A.; Krajnovic, Davor; McDermid, Richard M.; Bureau, Martin; Sarzi, Marc; Nyland, Kristina; Alatalo, Katherine; Bayet, Estelle; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frederic; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison; Davies, Roger L.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    We use the Spectrographic Areal Unit for Research on Optical Nebulae and Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph integral-field spectrographs to observe the active galactic nucleus (AGN) powered outflow in NGC?1266. This unusual galaxy is relatively nearby (D = 30?Mpc), allowing us to investigate the proce

  18. PROBING THE FERMI BUBBLES IN ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION: A SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURE OF THE MILKY WAY'S BICONICAL NUCLEAR OUTFLOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giant lobes of plasma extend ≈55° above and below the Galactic center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (ℓ, b = 10.°4, +11.°2). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v LSR = –235 and +250 km s–1, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain the observed profiles with an outflow velocity of ≳900 km s–1 and a full opening angle of ≈110° (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic center activity over the last ≈2.5-4.0 Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles

  19. Probing the Fermi Bubbles in Ultraviolet Absorption: A Spectroscopic Signature of the Milky Way's Biconical Nuclear Outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Andrew J; Savage, Blair D; Lockman, Felix J; Jenkins, Edward B; Wakker, Bart P; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Hernandez, Svea; Kim, Tae-Sun; Benjamin, Robert A; Bowen, David V; Tumlinson, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Giant lobes of plasma extend 55 degrees above and below the Galactic Center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves (the WMAP haze) and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity structure of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (Galactic coordinates l,b=10.4, +11.2 degrees). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v_LSR=-235 and +250 km/s, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic Center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain these observed profiles with an outflow velocity of ~900 km/s and a full opening angl...

  20. Molecular outflows in starburst nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arpita; Nath, Biman B.; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations have detected molecular outflows in a few nearby starburst nuclei. We discuss the physical processes at work in such an environment in order to outline a scenario that can explain the observed parameters of the phenomenon, such as the molecular mass, speed and size of the outflows. We show that outflows triggered by OB associations, with NOB ≥ 105 (corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR)≥1 M⊙ yr-1 in the nuclear region), in a stratified disk with mid-plane density n0 ˜ 200-1000 cm-3 and scale height z0 ≥ 200(n0/102 cm-3)-3/5 pc, can form molecules in a cool dense and expanding shell. The associated molecular mass is ≥107 M⊙ at a distance of a few hundred pc, with a speed of several tens of km s-1. We show that a SFR surface density of 10 ≤ ΣSFR ≤ 50 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 favours the production of molecular outflows, consistent with observed values.

  1. Knowledge Outflows from Foreign Subsidiaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perri, Alessandra; Andersson, Ulf

    the value of the subsidiary’s knowledge stock is very high, the need for knowledge protection restrains reciprocity mechanisms in knowledge exchanges, thus reducing the extent of knowledge outflows to the host location. This study contributes to the literature on the firm-level antecedents of FDI...

  2. Protostellar Outflows in L1340

    CERN Document Server

    Walawender, Josh; Smutko, Michael; O'Linger-Luscusk, JoAnn; Moriarty-Schieven, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    We have searched the L1340 A, B, and C clouds for shocks from protostellar outflows using the H$_2$ 2.122 $\\mu$m near-IR line as a shock tracer. Substantial outflow activity has been found in each of the three regions of the cloud (L1340 A, L1340 B, & L1340 C). We find 42 distinct shock complexes (16 in L1340 A, 11 in L1340 B, and 15 in L1340 C). We were able to link 17 of those shock complexes in to 12 distinct outflows and identify candidate source stars for each. We examine the properties (A$_{V}$, T$_{bol}$, and L$_{bol}$) of the source protostars and compare that to the properties of the general population of Class 0/I and flat SED protostars and find that there is an indication, albeit at low statistical significance, that the outflow driving protostars are drawn from a population with lower A$_{V}$, higher L$_{bol}$, and lower T$_{bol}$ than the general population of protostars.

  3. Molecular outflows in starburst nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Arpita; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations have detected molecular outflows in a few nearby starburst nuclei. We discuss the physical processes at work in such an environment in order to outline a scenario that can explain the observed parameters of the phenomenon, such as the molecular mass, speed and size of the outflows. We show that outflows triggered by OB associations, with $N_{OB}\\ge 10^5$ (corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR)$\\ge 1$ M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ in the nuclear region), in a stratified disk with mid-plane density $n_0\\sim 200\\hbox{--}1000$ cm$^{-3}$ and scale height $z_0\\ge 200 (n_0/10^2 \\, {\\rm cm}^{-3})^{-3/5}$ pc, can form molecules in a cool dense and expanding shell. The associated molecular mass is $\\ge 10^7$ M$_\\odot$ at a distance of a few hundred pc, with a speed of several tens of km s$^{-1}$. We show that a SFR surface density of $10 \\le \\Sigma_{SFR} \\le 50$ M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$ favours the production of molecular outflows, consistent with observed values.

  4. Outflow forces in intermediate mass star formation

    CERN Document Server

    van Kempen, T A; van Dishoeck, E F; Kristensen, L E; Belloche, A; Klaassen, P D; Leurini, S; Jose-Garcia, I San; Aykutalp, A; Choi, Y; Endo, A; Frieswijk, W; Harsono, D; Karska, A; Koumpia, E; van der Marel, N; Nagy, Z; Perez-Beaupuits, J P; Risacher, C; van Weeren, R J; Wyrowski, F; Yildiz, U A; Guesten, R; Boland, W; Baryshev, A

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate mass protostarsprovide a bridge between theories of low- and high-mass star formation. Emerging molecular outflows can be used to determine the influence of fragmentation and multiplicity on protostellar evolution through the correlation of outflow forces of intermediate mass protostars with the luminosity. The aim of this paper is to derive outflow forces from outflows of six intermediate mass protostellar regions and validate the apparent correlation between total luminosity and outflow force seen in earlier work, as well as remove uncertainties caused by different methodology. By comparing CO 6--5 observations obtained with APEX with non-LTE radiative transfer model predictions, optical depths, temperatures, densities of the gas of the molecular outflows are derived. Outflow forces, dynamical timescales and kinetic luminosities are subsequently calculated. Outflow parameters, including the forces, were derived for all sources. Temperatures in excess of 50 K were found for all flows, in line wi...

  5. Anisotropic Contrast Optical Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Peev, D; Kananizadeh, N; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-01-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by mea...

  6. Giant Magnetized Outflows from the Centre of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Carretti, E; Staveley-Smith, L; Haverkorn, M; Purcell, C; Gaensler, B M; Bernardi, G; Kesteven, M J; Poppi, S; 10.1038/nature11734

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus of the Milky Way is known to harbour regions of intense star formation activity as well as a super-massive black hole. Recent Fermi space telescope observations have revealed regions of \\gamma-ray emission reaching far above and below the Galactic Centre, the so-called Fermi bubbles. It is uncertain whether these were generated by nuclear star formation or by quasar-like outbursts of the central black hole and no information on the structures' magnetic field has been reported. Here we report on the detection of two giant, linearly-polarized radio Lobes, containing three ridge-like sub-structures, emanating from the Galactic Centre. The Lobes each extend ~60 deg, bear a close correspondence to the Fermi bubbles, are located in the Galactic bulge, and are permeated by strong magnetic fields of up to 15 \\mu G. Our data signal that the radio Lobes originate in a bi-conical, star-formation (rather than black hole) driven outflow from the Galaxy's central 200 pc that transports a massive magnetic energy...

  7. Modeling galactic halos with predominantly quintessential matter

    CERN Document Server

    Rahaman, F; Chakraborty, K; Kalam, M; Hossain, D

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a new model for galactic dark matter by combining an anisotropic pressure field corresponding to normal matter and a quintessence dark energy field having a characteristic parameter $\\omega_q$ such that $-1<\\omega_q< -\\frac{1}{3}$. Stable stellar orbits together with an attractive gravity exist only if $\\omega_q$ is extremely close to $-\\frac{1}{3}$, a result consistent with the special case studied by Guzman et al. (2003). Less exceptional forms of quintessence dark energy do not yield the desired stable orbits and are therefore unsuitable for modeling dark matter.

  8. Modeling Galactic Halos with Predominantly Quintessential Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, F.; Kuhfittig, Peter K. F.; Chakraborty, K.; Kalam, M.; Hossain, D.

    2011-09-01

    This paper discusses a new model for galactic dark matter by combining an anisotropic pressure field corresponding to normal matter and a quintessence dark energy field having a characteristic parameter ω q such that -1attractive gravity exist only if ω q is extremely close to -1/3, a result consistent with the special case studied by Guzman et al. (Rev. Mex. Fis. 49:303, 2003). Less exceptional forms of quintessence dark energy do not yield the desired stable orbits and are therefore unsuitable for modeling dark matter.

  9. Galactic cosmic ray propagation models using Picard

    CERN Document Server

    Kissmann, Ralf; Strong, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    We present results obtained from our newly developed Galactic cosmic-ray transport code PICARD, that solves the cosmic-ray transport equation. This code allows for the computation of cosmic-ray spectra and the resulting gamma-ray emission. Relying on contemporary numerical solvers allows for efficient computation of models with deca-parsec resolution. PICARD can handle locally anisotropic spatial diffusion acknowledging a full diffusion tensor. We used this framework to investigate the transition from axisymmetric to spiral-arm cosmic-ray source distributions. Wherever possible we compare model predictions with constraining observables in cosmic-ray astrophysics.

  10. Production of 56Ni in black hole-neutron star merger accretion disc outflows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The likely outcome of a compact object merger event is a central black hole surrounded by a rapidly accreting torus of debris. This disc of debris is a rich source of element synthesis, the outcome of which is needed to predict electromagnetic counterparts of individual events and to understand the contribution of mergers to galactic chemical evolution. Here we study disc outflow nucleosynthesis in the context of a two-dimensional, time-dependent black hole-neutron star merger accretion disc model. We use two time snapshots from this model to examine the impact of the evolution of the neutrino fluxes from the disc on the element synthesis. While the neutrino fluxes from the early-time disc snapshot appear to favor neutron-rich outflows, by the late-time snapshot the situation is reversed. As a result we find copious production of 56Ni in the outflows. (paper)

  11. On the X-ray low- and high-velocity outflows in AGNs

    CERN Document Server

    Ramirez, J M

    2011-01-01

    An exploration of the relationship between bolometric luminosity and outflow velocity, for two classes of X-ray outflows in a large sample of active galactic nuclei has been performed. We find that line radiation pressure could be one physical mechanism that might accelerate the gas we observe in warm absorber, v~100-1000 km/s, and on comparable but less stringent grounds the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs), v~0.03-0.3c. If comparable with the escape velocity of the system; the first is naturally located at distances of the dusty torus, ~ 1 pc, and the second at sub-parsec scales, ~ 0.01 pc, in accordance with large set of observational evidence existing in the literature. The presentation of this relationship might give us key clues for our understanding of the different physical mechanisms acting in the center of galaxies, the feedback process and its impact on the evolution of the host galaxy.

  12. Scaling Relations of Starburst-Driven Galactic Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Tanner, Ryan; Heitsch, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Using synthetic absorption lines generated from 3D hydro-dynamical simulations we explore how the velocity of a starburst-driven galactic wind correlates with the star formation rate (SFR) and SFR density. We find strong correlations until the scaling relations flatten abruptly at a point set by the mass loading of the starburst. Below this point the scaling relation depends on the temperature regime being probed by the absorption line, not on the mass loading. The exact scaling relation depends on whether the maximum or mean velocity of the absorption line is used. We find that the outflow velocity of neutral gas is four to five times lower than the average velocity of the hottest gas, with the difference in velocity between the neutral and ionized gas increasing with gas ionization. Thus, absorption lines of neutral or low ionized gas will underestimate the outflow velocity of hot gas, severely underestimating outflow energetics.

  13. Absorption-line measurements of AGN outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Dale L.

    Investigations into the elemental abundances in two nearby active galaxies, the narrow-line Seyfert 1 Markarian 1044 and the Seyfert 1 Markarian 279, are reported. Spectra from three space-based observatories HST, FUSE, and CHANDRA, are used to measure absorption lines in material outflowing from the nucleus. I make multi-wavelength comparisons to better convert the ionic column densities into elemental column densities which can then be used to determine abundances (metallicities). Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies are known to have extreme values of a number of properties compared to active galactic nuclei (AGNs) as a class. In particular, emission-line studies have suggested that NLS1s are unusually metal-rich compared to broad-line AGNs of comparable luminosity. To test these suggestions I perform absorption-line studies on the NLS1 Markarian 1044, a nearby and bright AGN. I use lines of H I, C IV, N V, and O VI to properly make the photoionization correction through the software Cloudy and determine abundances of Carbon, Nitrogen and Oxygen. I find two results. The first is that Markarian 1044 has a bulk metallicity greater than five times solar. The second is that the N/C ratio in Markarian 1044 is consistent with a solar mixture. This is in direct contradiction of extrapolations from local H II regions which state N/ C should scale with bulk metallicity. This implies a different enrichment history in Markarian 1044 than in the Galactic disk. I also report discovery of three new low-redshift Lya forest lines with log N HI >= 12:77 in the spectrum of Markarian 1044. This number is consistent with the 2.6 expected Lya forest lines in the path length to Markarian 1044. I also investigate the CHANDRA X-ray spectrum of Markarian 279, a broad-line Seyfert 1. I use a new code, PHASE, to self-consistently model the entire absorption spectrum simultaneously. Using solely the X-ray spectrum I am able to determine the physical parameters of this absorber to a degree only

  14. Fast Molecular Outflows in Luminous Galaxy Mergers: Evidence for Quasar Feedback from Herschel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, S.; Melendez, M.; Sturm, E.; Garcia-Carpio, J.; Fischer, J.; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E.; Contursi, A.; Lutz, D.; Poglitsch, A.; Davies, R.; Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L.; deJong, J. A.; Sternberg, A.; Netzer, H.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Verma, A.; Rupke, D. S. N.; Maiolino, R.; Teng, S. H.; Polisensky, E.

    2013-01-01

    We report the results from a systematic search for molecular (OH 119 micron) outflows with Herschel/PACS in a sample of 43 nearby (z galaxy mergers, mostly ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and QSOs. We find that the character of the OH feature (strength of the absorption relative to the emission) correlates with that of the 9.7 micron silicate feature, a measure of obscuration in ULIRGs. Unambiguous evidence for molecular outflows, based on the detection of OH absorption profiles with median velocities more blueshifted than-50 km/s, is seen in 26 (70%) of the 37 OH-detected targets, suggesting a wide-angle (approx. 145 deg.) outflow geometry. Conversely, unambiguous evidence for molecular inflows, based on the detection of OH absorption profiles with median velocities more redshifted than +50 km/s is seen in only four objects, suggesting a planar or filamentary geometry for the inflowing gas. Terminal outflow velocities of approx. -1000 km/s are measured in several objects, but median outflow velocities are typically approx.-200 km/s-1. While the outflow velocities show no statistically significant dependence on the star formation rate, they are distinctly more blueshifted among systems with large active galactic nucleus (AGN) fractions and luminosities [log (L(sub AGN)/L(sub solar)) => 11.8 +/- 0.3]. The quasars in these systems play a dominant role in driving the molecular outflows. However, the most AGN dominated systems, where OH is seen purely in emission, show relatively modest OH line widths, despite their large AGN luminosities, perhaps indicating that molecular outflows subside once the quasar has cleared a path through the obscuring material.

  15. Hot Outflows in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkpatrick, C C

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase metallicity distribution has been analyzed for the hot atmospheres of 29 galaxy clusters using {\\it Chandra X-ray Observatory} observations. All host brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with X-ray cavity systems produced by radio AGN. We find high elemental abundances projected preferentially along the cavities of 16 clusters. The metal-rich plasma was apparently lifted out of the BCGs with the rising X-ray cavities (bubbles) to altitudes between twenty and several hundred kiloparsecs. A relationship between the maximum projected altitude of the uplifted gas (the "iron radius") and jet power is found with the form $R_{\\rm Fe} \\propto P_{\\rm jet}^{0.45}$. The estimated outflow rates are typically tens of solar masses per year but exceed $100 ~\\rm M_\\odot ~yr^{-1}$ in the most powerful AGN. The outflow rates are 10% to 20% of the cooling rates, and thus alone are unable to offset a cooling inflow. Nevertheless, hot outflows effectively redistribute the cooling gas and may play a significant role at ...

  16. Quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Alqahtani, Mubarak

    2016-01-01

    We study an azimuthally-symmetric boost-invariant quark-gluon plasma using quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics including the effects of both shear and bulk viscosities. We compare results obtained using the quasiparticle method with the standard anisotropic hydrodynamics and viscous hydrodynamics. We consider the predictions of the three methods for the differential particle spectra and mean transverse momentum. We find that the three methods agree for small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\eta/s$, but show differences at large $\\eta/s$. Additionally, we find that the standard anisotropic hydrodynamics method shows suppressed production at low transverse-momentum compared to the other two methods, and the bulk-viscous correction can drive the primordial particle spectra negative at large $p_T$ in viscous hydrodynamics.

  17. Averaging anisotropic cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine the effects of spatial inhomogeneities on irrotational anisotropic cosmologies by looking at the average properties of anisotropic pressure-free models. Adopting the Buchert scheme, we recast the averaged scalar equations in Bianchi-type form and close the standard system by introducing a propagation formula for the average shear magnitude. We then investigate the evolution of anisotropic average vacuum models and those filled with pressureless matter. In the latter case we show that the backreaction effects can modify the familiar Kasner-like singularity and potentially remove Mixmaster-type oscillations. The presence of nonzero average shear in our equations also allows us to examine the constraints that a phase of backreaction-driven accelerated expansion might put on the anisotropy of the averaged domain. We close by assessing the status of these and other attempts to define and calculate 'average' spacetime behaviour in general relativity

  18. Molecular anisotropic magnetoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Fabian; Heinze, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2015-12-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, we demonstrate that the effect of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) can be enhanced by orders of magnitude with respect to conventional bulk ferromagnets in junctions containing molecules sandwiched between ferromagnetic leads. We study ballistic transport in metal-benzene complexes contacted by 3 d transition-metal wires. We show that a gigantic AMR can arise from spin-orbit coupling effects in the leads, drastically enhanced by orbital-symmetry filtering properties of the molecules. We further discuss how this molecular anisotropic magnetoresistance (MAMR) can be tuned by the proper choice of materials and their electronic properties.

  19. Anisotropic elastic plates

    CERN Document Server

    Hwu, Chyanbin

    2010-01-01

    As structural elements, anisotropic elastic plates find wide applications in modern technology. The plates here are considered to be subjected to not only in plane load but also transverse load. In other words, both plane and plate bending problems as well as the stretching-bending coupling problems are all explained in this book. In addition to the introduction of the theory of anisotropic elasticity, several important subjects have are discussed in this book such as interfaces, cracks, holes, inclusions, contact problems, piezoelectric materials, thermoelastic problems and boundary element a

  20. Mixture of Anisotropic Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florkowski, W.; Maj, R.

    The recently introduced approach describing coupled quark and gluon anisotropic fluids is generalized to include explicitly the transitions between quarks and gluons. We study the effects of such processes on the thermalization rate of anisotropic systems. We find that the quark-gluon transitions may enhance the overall thermalization rate in the cases where the initial momentum anisotropies correspond to mixed oblate-prolate or prolate configurations. On the other hand, no effect on the thermalization rate is found in the case of oblate configurations. The observed regularities are connected with the late-time behavior of the analyzed systems which is described either by the exponential decay or the power law.

  1. Mixture of anisotropic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Florkowski, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    The recently introduced approach describing coupled quark and gluon anisotropic fluids is generalized to include explicitly the transitions between quarks and gluons. We study the effects of such processes on the thermalization rate of anisotropic systems. We find that the quark-gluon transitions may enhance the overall thermalization rate in the cases where the initial momentum anisotropies correspond to mixed oblate-prolate or prolate configurations. On the other hand, no effect on the thermalization rate is found in the case of oblate configurations. The observed regularities are connected with the late-time behavior of the analyzed systems which is described either by the exponential decay or the power law.

  2. Anisotropic Weyl invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Nadal, Guillem

    2016-01-01

    We consider a non-relativistic free scalar field theory with a type of anisotropic scale invariance in which the number of coordinates "scaling like time" is generically greater than one. We propose the Cartesian product of two curved spaces, with the metric of each space parameterized by the other space, as a notion of curved background to which the theory can be extended. We study this type of geometries, and find a family of extensions of the theory to curved backgrounds in which the anisotropic scale invariance is promoted to a local, Weyl-type symmetry.

  3. Anisotropic models for compact stars

    CERN Document Server

    Maurya, S K; Ray, Saibal; Dayanandan, Baiju

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper we obtain an anisotropic analogue of Durgapal-Fuloria (1985) perfect fluid solution. The methodology consists of contraction of anisotropic factor $\\Delta$ by the help of both metric potentials $e^{\

  4. GAS OUTFLOWS IN SEYFERT GALAXIES: EFFECTS OF STAR FORMATION VERSUS AGN FEEDBACK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melioli, C.; Pino, E. M. de Gouveia Dal, E-mail: claudio.melioli@iag.usp.br, E-mail: dalpino@iag.usp.br [Department of Astronomy (IAG-USP), University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-10-20

    Large-scale, weakly collimated outflows are very common in galaxies with large infrared luminosities. In complex systems in particular, where intense star formation (SF) coexists with an active galactic nucleus (AGN), it is not clear yet from observations whether the SF, the AGN, or both are driving these outflows. Accreting supermassive black holes are expected to influence their host galaxies through kinetic and radiative feedback processes, but in a Seyfert galaxy, where the energy emitted in the nuclear region is comparable to that of the body of the galaxy, it is possible that stellar activity is also playing a key role in these processes. In order to achieve a better understanding of the mechanisms driving the gas evolution especially at the nuclear regions of these galaxies, we have performed high-resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations with radiative cooling considering the feedback from both SF regions, including supernova (Type I and II) explosions and an AGN jet emerging from the central region of the active spiral galaxy. We computed the gas mass lost by the system, separating the role of each of these injection energy sources on the galaxy evolution, and found that at scales within 1 kpc an outflow can be generally established considering intense nuclear SF only. The jet alone is unable to drive a massive gas outflow, although it can sporadically drag and accelerate clumps of the underlying outflow to very high velocities.

  5. MAJOR CONTRIBUTOR TO AGN FEEDBACK: VLT X-SHOOTER OBSERVATIONS OF S IV BALQSO OUTFLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borguet, Benoit C. J.; Arav, Nahum; Edmonds, Doug; Chamberlain, Carter [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Benn, Chris, E-mail: b.borguet@alumni.ulg.ac.be [Isaac Newton Group, Apartado 321, E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma (Spain)

    2013-01-01

    We present the most energetic BALQSO outflow measured to date, with a kinetic luminosity of at least 10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, which is 5% of the bolometric luminosity of this high Eddington ratio quasar. The associated mass-flow rate is 400 solar masses per year. Such kinetic luminosity and mass-flow rate should provide strong active galactic nucleus feedback effects. The outflow is located at about 300 pc from the quasar and has a velocity of roughly 8000 km s{sup -1}. Our distance and energetic measurements are based in large part on the identification and measurement of S IV and S IV* broad absorption lines (BALs). The use of this high-ionization species allows us to generalize the result to the majority of high-ionization BALQSOs that are identified by their C IV absorption. We also report the energetics of two other outflows seen in another object using the same technique. The distances of all three outflows from the central source (100-2000 pc) suggest that we observe BAL troughs much farther away from the central source than the assumed acceleration region of these outflows (0.01-0.1 pc).

  6. Unravelling the complex structure of AGN-driven outflows: II. Photoionization and energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Karouzos, Marios; Bae, Hyun-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Outflows have been shown to be prevalent in galaxies hosting luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and present a physically plausible way to couple the AGN energy output with the interstellar medium of their hosts. Despite their prevalence, accurate characterization of these outflows has been challenging. In the second of a series of papers, we use Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph IFU data of 6 local (z<0.1) and moderate-luminosity Type 2 AGNs to study the ionization properties and energetics of AGN-driven outflows. We find strong evidence that connect the extreme kinematics of the ionized gas with the AGN photoionization. The kinematic component related to the AGN-driven outflow is clearly separated from other kinematic components, such as virial motions or rotation, on the velocity and velocity dispersion diagram. Our spatially resolved kinematic analysis reveals that from 30% up to 90% of the total mass and kinetic energy of the outflow is contained within the central kpc of the galaxy. The spatially i...

  7. The connection between AGN-driven dusty outflows and the surrounding environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, W.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-04-01

    Significant reservoirs of cool gas are observed in the circumgalactic medium (CGM) surrounding galaxies. The CGM is also found to contain substantial amounts of metals and dust, which require some transport mechanism. We consider AGN (active galactic nucleus) feedback-driven outflows based on radiation pressure on dust. Dusty gas is ejected when the central luminosity exceeds the effective Eddington luminosity for dust. We obtain that a higher dust-to-gas ratio leads to a lower critical luminosity, implying that the more dusty gas is more easily expelled. Dusty outflows can reach large radii with a range of velocities (depending on the outflowing shell configuration and the ambient density distribution) and may account for the observed CGM gas. In our picture, dust is required in order to drive AGN feedback, and the preferential expulsion of dusty gas in the outflows may naturally explain the presence of dust in the CGM. On the other hand, the most powerful AGN outflow events can potentially drive gas out of the local galaxy group. We further discuss the effects of radiation pressure of the central AGN on satellite galaxies. AGN radiative feedback may therefore have a significant impact on the evolution of the whole surrounding environment.

  8. The connection between AGN-driven dusty outflows and the surrounding environment

    CERN Document Server

    Ishibashi, W

    2016-01-01

    Significant reservoirs of cool gas are observed in the circumgalactic medium (CGM) surrounding galaxies. The CGM is also found to contain substantial amounts of metals and dust, which require some transport mechanism. We consider AGN (active galactic nucleus) feedback-driven outflows based on radiation pressure on dust. Dusty gas is ejected when the central luminosity exceeds the effective Eddington luminosity for dust. We obtain that a higher dust-to-gas ratio leads to a lower critical luminosity, implying that the more dusty gas is more easily expelled. Dusty outflows can reach large radii with a range of velocities (depending on the outflowing shell configuration and the ambient density distribution) and may account for the observed CGM gas. In our picture, dust is required in order to drive AGN feedback, and the preferential expulsion of dusty gas in the outflows may naturally explain the presence of dust in the CGM. On the other hand, the most powerful AGN outflow events can potentially drive gas out of ...

  9. On the Newtonian anisotropic configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shojai, F. [University of Tehran, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Foundations of Physics Group, School of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fazel, M.R.; Stepanian, A. [University of Tehran, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kohandel, M. [Alzahra University, Department of Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper we are concerned with the effects of an anisotropic pressure on the boundary conditions of the anisotropic Lane-Emden equation and the homology theorem. Some new exact solutions of this equation are derived. Then some of the theorems governing the Newtonian perfect fluid star are extended, taking the anisotropic pressure into account. (orig.)

  10. Anisotropic Lyra cosmology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B B Bhowmik; A Rajput

    2004-06-01

    Anisotropic Bianchi Type-I cosmological models have been studied on the basis of Lyra's geometry. Two types of models, one with constant deceleration parameter and the other with variable deceleration parameter have been derived by considering a time-dependent displacement field.

  11. Dynamics of Anisotropic Universes

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, J

    2006-01-01

    We present a general study of the dynamical properties of Anisotropic Bianchi Universes in the context of Einstein General Relativity. Integrability results using Kovalevskaya exponents are reported and connected to general knowledge about Bianchi dynamics. Finally, dynamics toward singularity in Bianchi type VIII and IX universes are showed to be equivalent in some precise sence.

  12. Worker Inflow, Outflow, and Churning

    OpenAIRE

    Ilmakunnas, Pekka; Maliranta, Mika

    2003-01-01

    Linked employer-employee data from the Finnish business sector is used in an analysis of worker turnover. The data is an unbalanced panel with over 219 000 observations in the years 1991-97. The churning (excess worker turnover), worker inflow (hiring), and worker outflow (separation) rates are explained by various plant and employee characteristics in type 2 Tobit models where the explanatory variables can have a different effect on the probability of the flow rates to be non-zero and on the...

  13. Thoughts on galactic magnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic fields correlated on several kiloparsec scales are seen in spiral galaxies. Their origin could be due to amplification of a small seed field by a turbulent galactic dynamo. We critically review the current status of the galactic dynamo, especially some of its problems and possible solutions. We also comment on the nature of seed magnetic fields, needed to prime the dynamo.

  14. Bipolar Outflows and the Evolution of Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Adam

    1998-01-01

    Hypersonic bipolar outflows are a ubiquitous phenomena associated with both young and highly evolved stars. Observations of Planetary Nebulae, the nebulae surrounding Luminous Blue Variables such as $\\eta$ Carinae, Wolf Rayet bubbles, the circumstellar environment of SN 1987A and Young Stellar Objects all revealed high velocity outflows with a wide range of shapes. In this paper I review the current state of our theoretical understanding of these outflows. Beginning with Planetary Nebulae con...

  15. Propeller-driven Outflows and Disk Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Romanova, M. M.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Koldoba, A. V.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of propeller-driven outflows in axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations of disk accretion to rapidly rotating magnetized stars. Matter outflows in a wide cone and is centrifugally ejected from the inner regions of the disk. Closer to the axis there is a strong, collimated, magnetically dominated outflow of energy and angular momentum carried by the open magnetic field lines from the star. The ``efficiency'' of the propeller may be very high in the respect that mos...

  16. Outflows, dusty cores, and a burst of star formation in the North America and Pelican nebulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bally, John [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, UCB 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Ginsburg, Adam [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany); Probst, Ron [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Reipurth, Bo [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 640 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Shirley, Yancy L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Stringfellow, Guy S., E-mail: John.Bally@colorado.edu, E-mail: aginsburg@eso.org, E-mail: probst@noao.edu, E-mail: reipurth@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: yshirley@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: Guy.Stringfellow@colorado.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, UCB 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We present observations of near-infrared 2.12 μm molecular hydrogen outflows emerging from 1.1 mm dust continuum clumps in the North America and Pelican Nebula (NAP) complex selected from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS). Hundreds of individual shocks powered by over 50 outflows from young stars are identified, indicating that the dusty molecular clumps surrounding the NGC 7000/IC 5070/W80 H II region are among the most active sites of ongoing star formation in the solar vicinity. A spectacular X-shaped outflow, MHO 3400, emerges from a young star system embedded in a dense clump more than a parsec from the ionization front associated with the Pelican Nebula (IC 5070). Suspected to be a binary, the source drives a pair of outflows with orientations differing by 80°. Each flow exhibits S-shaped symmetry and multiple shocks indicating a pulsed and precessing jet. The 'Gulf of Mexico', located south of the North America Nebula (NGC 7000), contains a dense cluster of molecular hydrogen objects (MHOs), Herbig-Haro (HH) objects, and over 300 young stellar objects (YSOs), indicating a recent burst of star formation. The largest outflow detected thus far in the North America and Pelican Nebula complex, the 1.6 parsec long MHO 3417 flow, emerges from a 500 M {sub ☉} BGPS clump and may be powered by a forming massive star. Several prominent outflows such as MHO 3427 appear to be powered by highly embedded YSOs only visible at λ > 70 μm. An 'activity index' formed by dividing the number of shocks by the mass of the cloud containing their source stars is used to estimate the relative evolutionary states of Bolocam clumps. Outflows can be used as indicators of the evolutionary state of clumps detected in millimeter and submillimeter dust continuum surveys.

  17. INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY OF AGN ABSORPTION OUTFLOWS: MRK 509 AND IRAS F04250–5718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guilin; Arav, Nahum [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Rupke, David S. N., E-mail: glliu@vt.edu [Department of Physics, Rhodes College, Memphis, TN 38112 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Ultraviolet (UV) absorption lines provide abundant spectroscopic information enabling the probe of the physical conditions in active galactic nucleus (AGN) outflows, but the outflow radii (and the energetics consequently) can only be determined indirectly. We present the first direct test of these determinations using integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy. We have conducted Gemini IFU mapping of the ionized gas nebulae surrounding two AGNs, whose outflow radii have been constrained by UV absorption line analyses. In Mrk 509, we find a quasi-spherical outflow with a radius of 1.2 kpc and a velocity of ∼290 km s{sup −1}, while IRAS F04250–5718 is driving a biconical outflow extending out to 2.9 kpc, with a velocity of ∼580 km s{sup −1} and an opening angle of ∼70°. The derived mass flow rate ∼5 and >1 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, respectively, and the kinetic luminosity ≳1 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup −1} for both. Adopting the outflow radii and geometric parameters measured from IFU, absorption line analyses would yield mass flow rates and kinetic luminosities in agreement with the above results within a factor of ∼2. We conclude that the spatial locations, kinematics, and energetics revealed by this IFU emission-line study are consistent with pre-existing UV absorption line analyses, providing a long-awaited direct confirmation of the latter as an effective approach for characterizing outflow properties.

  18. Outflows Driven by Quasars in High-Redshift Galaxies with Radiation Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Rebekka; Dubois, Yohan; Rosdahl, Joakim; Wagner, Alexander; Silk, Joseph; Mamon, Gary A.

    2016-09-01

    The quasar mode of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the high-redshift Universe is routinely observed in gas-rich galaxies together with large-scale AGN-driven winds. It is crucial to understand how photons emitted by the central AGN source couple to the ambient interstellar-medium to trigger large-scale outflows. By means of radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of idealised galactic discs, we study the coupling of photons with the multiphase galactic gas, and how it varies with gas cloud sizes, and the radiation bands included in the simulations, which are ultraviolet (UV), optical, and infrared (IR). We show how a quasar with a luminosity of 146 erg s-1 can drive large-scale winds with velocities of 102 - 103 km s-1 and mass outflow rates around 10^3 M_⊙ yr^{-1} for times of order a few million years. Infrared radiation is necessary to efficiently transfer momentum to the gas via multi-scattering on dust in dense clouds. However, IR multi-scattering, despite being extremely important at early times, quickly declines as the central gas cloud expands and breaks up, allowing the radiation to escape through low gas density channels. The typical number of multi-scattering events for an IR photon is only about a quarter of the mean optical depth from the center of the cloud. Our models account for the observed outflow rates of ˜ 500-1000 M_{⊙} {yr}^{-1} and high velocities of ˜ 10^3 km s^{-1}, favouring winds that are energy-driven via extremely fast nuclear outflows, interpreted here as being IR-radiatively-driven winds.

  19. HNCO enhancement by shocks in the L1157 molecular outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Nemesio; Gueth, Frederic; Bachiller, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    The isocyanic acid (HNCO) presents an extended distribution in the centers of the Milky Way and the spiral galaxy IC342. Based on the morphology of the emission and the HNCO abundance with respect to H2, several authors made the hypothesis that HNCO could be a good tracer of interstellar shocks. Here we test this hypothesis by observing a well-known Galactic source where the chemistry is dominated by shocks. We have observed several transitions of HNCO towards L1157-mm and two positions (B1 and B2) in the blue lobe of the molecular outflow. The HNCO line profiles exhibit the same characteristics of other well-known shock tracers like CH3OH, H2CO, SO or SO2. HNCO, together with SO2 and OCS, are the only three molecules detected so far whose emission is much more intense in B2 than in B1, making these species valuable probes of chemical differences along the outflow. The HNCO abundance with respect to H2 is 0.4-1.8 10^-8 in B1 and 0.3-1 10^-7 in B2. These abundances are the highest ever measured, and imply an i...

  20. Outflows and complex stellar kinematics in SDSS star forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cicone, Claudia; Marconi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of star formation-driven outflows by using a large spectroscopic sample of ~160,000 local "normal" star forming galaxies, drawn from the SDSS, spanning a wide range of star formation rates and stellar masses. The galaxy sample is divided into a fine grid of bins in the M_*-SFR parameter space, for each of which we produce a composite spectrum by stacking together the SDSS spectra of the galaxies contained in that bin. We exploit the high signal-to-noise of the stacked spectra to study the emergence of faint features of optical emission lines that may trace galactic outflows and would otherwise be too faint to detect in individual galaxy spectra. We adopt a novel approach that relies on the comparison between the line-of-sight velocity distribution (LoSVD) of the ionised gas (as traced by the [OIII]5007 and Halpha+[NII]6548,6583 emission lines) and the LoSVD of the stars, which are used as a reference tracing virial motions. Significant deviations of the gas kinematics from the st...

  1. Morphologies of protostellar outflows: An ALMA view

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Thomas; Seifried, Daniel; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S

    2014-01-01

    The formation of stars is usually accompanied by the launching of protostellar outflows. Observations with the Atacama Large Millimetre/sub-millimetre Array (ALMA) will soon revolutionalise our understanding of the morphologies and kinematics of these objects. In this paper, we present synthetic ALMA observations of protostellar outflows based on numerical magnetohydrodynamic collapse simulations. We find significant velocity gradients in our outflow models and a very prominent helical structure within the outflows. We speculate that the disk wind found in the ALMA Science Verification Data of HD 163296 presents a first instance of such an observation.

  2. Inhomogeneous Anisotropic Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Kleban, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    In homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology, the topology of the universe determines its ultimate fate. If the Weak Energy Condition is satisfied, open and flat universes must expand forever, while closed cosmologies can recollapse to a Big Crunch. A similar statement holds for homogeneous but anisotropic (Bianchi) universes. Here, we prove that ${\\it arbitrarily}$ inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies with "flat" (including toroidal) and "open" (including compact hyperbolic) spatial topology that are initially expanding must continue to expand forever at least in some region, despite the presence of arbitrarily large density fluctuations and/or the formation of black holes. Because the set of 3-manifold topologies is countable, a single integer determines the ultimate fate of the universe, and, in a specific sense, most 3-manifolds are "flat" or "open". Our result has important implications for inflation: if there is a positive cosmological constant (or suitable inflationary potenti...

  3. Molecular anisotropic magnetoresistance

    OpenAIRE

    Otte, Fabian; Heinze, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, we demonstrate that the effect of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) can be enhanced by orders of magnitude with respect to conventional bulk ferromagnets in junctions containing molecules sandwiched between ferromagnetic leads. We study ballistic transport in metal-benzene complexes contacted by $3d$ transition-metal wires. We show that the gigantic AMR can arise from spin-orbit coupling effects in the leads, drastically enhanced by orbital-symm...

  4. Stellar Populations, Outflows, and Morphologies of High-Redshift Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornei, Katherine Anne

    Understanding the regulation and environment of star formation across cosmic time is critical to tracing the build-up of mass in the Universe and the interplay between the stars and gas that are the constituents of galaxies. Three studies are presented in this thesis, each examining a different aspect of star formation at a specific epoch. The first study presents the results of a photometric and spectroscopic survey of 321 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z ˜ 3 to investigate systematically the relationship between Lyalpha emission and stellar populations. Lyalpha equivalent widths were calculated from rest-frame UV spectroscopy and optical/near-infrared/Spitzer photometry was used in population synthesis modeling to derive the key properties of age, dust extinction, star formation rate (SFR), and stellar mass. Using a variety of statistical tests, we find that Lyalpha equivalent width and age, SFR, and dust extinction, respectively, are significantly correlated in the sense that objects with strong Lyalpha emission also tend to be older, lower in star formation rate, and less dusty than objects with weak Lyalpha emission, or the line in absorption. We accordingly conclude that, within the LBG sample, objects with strong Lyalpha emission represent a later stage of galaxy evolution in which supernovae-induced outflows have reduced the dust covering fraction. The second study focuses specifically on galactic-scale outflowing winds in 72 star-forming galaxies at z ˜ 1 in the Extended Groth Strip. Galaxies were selected from the DEEP2 survey and follow-up LRIS spectroscopy was obtained covering SiII, CIV, FeII, MgII, and MgI lines in the rest-frame ultraviolet. Using GALEX, HST, and Spitzer imaging available for the Extended Groth Strip, we examine galaxies on a per-object basis in order to better understand both the prevalence of galactic outflows at z ˜ 1 and the star-forming and structural properties of objects experiencing outflows. Gas velocities, measured from

  5. Probing the circumgalactic medium of active galactic nuclei with background quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kacprzak, Glenn G; Murphy, Michael T; Cooke, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    We performed a detailed study of the extended cool gas, traced by MgII absorption [$W_r(2796)\\geq0.3$~{\\AA}], surrounding 14 narrow-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at 0.1250$ km/s, indicating outflowing gas. The 2/2 intrinsic MgII systems have outflow velocities a factor of $\\sim4$ higher than the NaID outflow velocities. Our results are consistent with AGN-driven outflows destroying the cool gas within their halos, which dramatically decreases their cool gas covering fraction, while star-burst driven winds are expelling cool gas into their circumgalactic media (CGM). This picture appears contrary to quasar--quasar pair studies which show that the quasar CGM contains significant amounts of cool gas whereas intrinsic gas found `down-the-barrel' of quasars reveals no cool gas. We discuss how these results are complementary and provide support for the AGN unified model.

  6. The Galactic fountain as an origin for the Smith Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Marasco, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of an enriched metallicity for the Smith high-velocity HI cloud (SC) lends support to a Galactic origin for this system. We use a dynamical model of the galactic fountain to reproduce the observed properties of the SC. In our model, fountain clouds are ejected from the region of the disc spiral arms and move through the halo interacting with a pre-existing hot corona. We find that a simple model where cold gas outflows vertically from the Perseus spiral arm reproduces the kinematics and the distance of the SC, but is in disagreement with the cloud's cometary morphology, if this is produced by ram-pressure stripping by the ambient gas. To explain the cloud morphology we explore two scenarios: a) the outflow is inclined with respect to the vertical direction; b) the cloud is entrained by a fast wind that escapes an underlying superbubble. Solutions in agreement with all observational constraints can be found for both cases, the former requires outflow angles >40 deg while the latter require...

  7. Cluster magnetic fields from active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Sutter, P M; Yang, H -Y

    2009-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) found at the centers of clusters of galaxies are a possible source for weak cluster-wide magnetic fields. To evaluate this scenario, we present 3D adaptive mesh refinement MHD simulations of a cool-core cluster that include injection of kinetic, thermal, and magnetic energy via an AGN-powered jet. Using the MHD solver in FLASH 2, we compare several sub-resolution approaches that link the estimated accretion rate as measured on the simulation mesh to the accretion rate onto the central black hole and the resulting feedback. We examine the effects of magnetized outflows on the accretion history of the black hole and discuss the ability of these models to magnetize the cluster medium.

  8. Virgin Galactic explores CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Virgin Galactic visited CERN with a group of future astronauts and Sir Richard Branson. During their visit the group was shown around various experiments, including the Globe, SM18, AMS and the CERN Control Centre.

  9. Outflows Driven by Quasars in High-Redshift Galaxies with Radiation Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bieri, Rebekka; Rosdahl, Joakim; Wagner, Alexander Y; Silk, Joseph; Mamon, Gary A

    2016-01-01

    The quasar mode of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the high-redshift Universe is routinely observed in gas-rich galaxies together with large-scale AGN-driven winds. It is crucial to understand how photons emitted by the central AGN source couple to the ambient interstellar-medium to trigger large-scale outflows. By means of radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of idealised galactic discs, we study the coupling of photons with the multiphase galactic gas, and how it varies with gas cloud sizes, and the radiation bands included in the simulations, which are ultraviolet (UV), optical, and infrared (IR). We show how a quasar with a luminosity of $10^{46}$ erg/s can drive large-scale winds with velocities of $10^2-10^3$ km/s and mass outflow rates around $10^3$ M$_\\odot$/yr for times of order a few million years. Infrared radiation is necessary to efficiently transfer momentum to the gas via multi-scattering on dust in dense clouds. However, IR multi-scattering, despite being extremely important at early times, qu...

  10. Model anisotropic quantum Hall states

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, R. -Z.; Haldane, F.D.M.; Wan, Xin; Yang, Kun; Yi, Su

    2012-01-01

    Model quantum Hall states including Laughlin, Moore-Read and Read-Rezayi states are generalized into appropriate anisotropic form. The generalized states are exact zero-energy eigenstates of corresponding anisotropic two- or multi-body Hamiltonians, and explicitly illustrate the existence of geometric degrees of in the fractional quantum Hall effect. These generalized model quantum Hall states can provide a good description of the quantum Hall system with anisotropic interactions. Some numeri...

  11. Outflows and complex stellar kinematics in SDSS star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicone, C.; Maiolino, R.; Marconi, A.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the properties of star-formation-driven outflows by using a large spectroscopic sample of ~160 000 local "normal" star-forming galaxies drawn from the Sloan digital sky survey (SDSS), spanning a wide range of star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses (M∗). The galaxy sample is divided into a fine grid of bins in the M∗-SFR parameter space, for each of which we produced a composite spectrum by stacking the SDSS spectra of the galaxies contained in that bin together. We exploited the high signal-to-noise of the stacked spectra to study the emergence of faint features of optical emission lines that may trace galactic outflows and are otherwise too faint to detect in individual galaxy spectra. We have adopted a novel approach that relies on the comparison between the line-of-sight velocity distribution (LoSVD) of the ionised gas (as traced by the [OIII]λ5007 and Hα+[NII]λλ6548, 6583 emission lines) and the LoSVD of the stars, which are used as a reference for tracing virial motions. Significant deviations in the gas kinematics from the stellar kinematics in the high-velocity tail of the LoSVDs are interpreted as a signature of outflows. Our results suggest that the incidence of ionised outflows increases with SFR and specific SFR. The outflow velocity (vout) is found to correlate tightly with the SFR for SFR> 1 M⊙ yr-1, whereas the dependence of vout on SFR is nearly flat at lower SFRs. The outflow velocity appears to also increase with the stellar velocity dispersion (σ∗), although this relation has a much larger scatter than the one with SFR, and we infer velocities as high as vout ~ (6-8)σ∗. Strikingly, we detect the signature of ionised outflows only in galaxies located above the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies in the M∗-SFR diagram, and the incidence of such outflows increases sharply with the offset from the MS. This result suggests that star-formation-driven outflows may be responsible for shaping the upper

  12. Material Induced Anisotropic Damage in DP600

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, M.S.; Wisselink, H.H.; Meinders, V.T.; Boogaard, van den A.H.

    2013-01-01

    Plasticity induced damage development in metals is anisotropic by nature. The anisotropy in damage is driven by two different phenomena; anisotropic deformation state i.e. Load Induced Anisotropic Damage (LIAD) and anisotropic microstructure i.e. Material Induced Anisotropic Damage (MIAD). The contr

  13. On the Relativistic anisotropic configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Shojai, F; Stepanian, A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study anisotropic spherical polytropes within the framework of general relativity. Using the anisotropic Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov (TOV) equations, we explore the relativistic anisotropic Lane-Emden equations. We find how the anisotropic pressure affects the boundary conditions of these equations. Also we argue that the behaviour of physical quantities near the center of star changes in the presence of anisotropy. For constant density, a class of exact solution is derived with the aid of a new ansatz and its physical properties are discussed.

  14. On the relativistic anisotropic configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shojai, F. [University of Tehran, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Foundations of Physics Group, School of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kohandel, M. [Alzahra University, Department of Physics and Chemistry, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Stepanian, A. [University of Tehran, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In this paper we study anisotropic spherical polytropes within the framework of general relativity. Using the anisotropic Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations, we explore the relativistic anisotropic Lane-Emden equations. We find how the anisotropic pressure affects the boundary conditions of these equations. Also we argue that the behavior of physical quantities near the center of star changes in the presence of anisotropy. For constant density, a class of exact solution is derived with the aid of a new ansatz and its physical properties are discussed. (orig.)

  15. How supernova explosions power galactic winds

    CERN Document Server

    Creasey, Peter; Bower, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Feedback from supernovae is an essential aspect of galaxy formation. In order to improve subgrid models of feedback we perform a series of numerical experiments to investigate how supernova explosions power galactic winds. We use the Flash hydrodynamic code to model a simplified ISM, including gravity, hydrodynamics, radiative cooling above 10,000 K, and star formation that reproduces the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. By simulating a small patch of the ISM in a tall box perpendicular to the disk, we obtain sub-parsec resolution allowing us to resolve individual supernova events and we investigate how the wind properties depend on those of the ISM and the galaxy. We find that outflows are more efficient in disks with lower surface densities or gas fractions. A simple model in which the warm cloudy medium is the barrier that limits the expansion of blast waves reproduces the scaling of outflow properties with disk parameters at high star formation rates. The scaling we find sets the investigation of galaxy winds ...

  16. Anisotropically Inflating Universes

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, J D; Barrow, John D.; Hervik, Sigbjorn

    2008-01-01

    We show that in theories of gravity that add quadratic curvature invariants to the Einstein-Hilbert action there exist expanding vacuum cosmologies with positive cosmological constant which do not approach the de Sitter universe. Exact solutions are found which inflate anisotropically. This behaviour is driven by the Ricci curvature invariant and has no counterpart in the general relativistic limit. These examples show that the cosmic no-hair theorem does not hold in these higher-order extensions of general relativity and raises new questions about the ubiquity of inflation in the very early universe and the thermodynamics of gravitational fields.

  17. Anisotropic Stars Exact Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, K; Dev, Krsna; Gleiser, Marcelo

    2000-01-01

    We study the effects of anisotropic pressure on the properties of spherically symmetric, gravitationally bound objects. We consider the full general relativistic treatment of this problem and obtain exact solutions for various form of equations of state connecting the radial and tangential pressures. It is shown that pressure anisotropy can have significant effects on the structure and properties of stellar objects. In particular, the maximum value of 2M/R can approach unity (2M/R < 8/9 for isotropic objects) and the surface redshift can be arbitrarily large.

  18. Revealing an Energetic Galaxy-Wide Outflow in a z~2 Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, D M; Smail, I; McDermid, R; Nesvadba, N P H

    2009-01-01

    Leading models of galaxy formation require large-scale energetic outflows to regulate the growth of distant galaxies and their central black holes. However, current observational support for this hypothesis at high redshift is mostly limited to rare z>2 radio galaxies. Here we present Gemini-North NIFS Intregral Field Unit (IFU) observations of the [O III]5007 emission from a z~2 ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG; L_IR>10^12 L_sol) with an optically identified Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). The spatial extent (~4-8 kpc) of the high velocity and broad [O III] emission are consistent with that found in z>2 radio galaxies, indicating the presence of a large-scale energetic outflow in a galaxy population potentially orders of magnitude more common than distant radio galaxies. The low radio luminosity of this system indicates that radio-bright jets are unlikely to be responsible for driving the outflow. However, the estimated energy input required to produce the large-scale outflow signatures (of order ~10^59 e...

  19. Dust in the wind II: Polarization imaging from disk-born outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, F

    2013-01-01

    In this second research note of a series of two, we aim to map the polarized flux emerging from a disk-born, dusty outflow as it was prescribed by Elvis (2000). His structure for quasars was achieved to unify the emission and absorption features observed in active galactic nuclei (AGN) and can be used as an alternative scenario to the typical dusty torus that is extensively used to account for AGN circumnuclear obscuration. Using Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations, we model an obscuring outflow arising from an emitting accretion disk and examine the resulting polarization degree, polarization angle and polarized flux. Polarization cartography reveals that a disk-born outflow has a similar torus morphology in polar viewing angles, with bright polarized fluxes reprocessed onto the wind funnel. At intermediate and edge-on inclinations, the model is rather close to a double-conical wind, with higher fluxes in the cone bases. It indicates that the optically thick outflow is not efficient enough to avoid ra...

  20. CHANG-ES. VII. Magnetic Outflows from the Virgo Cluster Galaxy NGC 4388

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damas-Segovia, A.; Beck, R.; Vollmer, B.; Wiegert, T.; Krause, M.; Irwin, J.; Weżgowiec, M.; Li, J.; Dettmar, R.-J.; English, J.; Wang, Q. D.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the effects of ram pressure on the ordered magnetic field of a galaxy hosting a radio halo and strong nuclear outflows. New radio images in total and polarized intensity of the edge-on Virgo galaxy NGC 4388 were obtained within the CHANG-ES EVLA project. The unprecedented noise level reached allows us to detect striking new features of the ordered magnetic field. The nuclear outflow extends far into the halo to about 5 kpc from the center and is spatially correlated with the {{H}}α and X-ray emission. For the first time, the southern outflow is detected. Above and below both spiral arms we find extended blobs of polarized emission with an ordered field oriented perpendicular to the disk. The synchrotron lifetime of the cosmic-ray electrons (CREs) in these regions yields a mean outflow velocity of 270+/- 70 {km} {{{s}}}-1, in agreement with a galactic wind scenario. The observed symmetry of the polarized halo features in NGC 4388 excludes a compression of the halo gas by the ram pressure of the intracluster medium (ICM). The assumption of equilibrium between the halo pressure and the ICM ram pressure yields an estimate of the ICM density that is consistent with both the ICM density derived from X-ray observations and the recent Planck Sunyaev-Zel’dovich measurements. The detection of a faint radio halo around cluster galaxies could thus be used for an estimate of ICM ram pressure.

  1. CHANG-ES VII: Magnetic outflows from the Virgo cluster galaxy NGC 4388

    CERN Document Server

    Damas-Segovia, Ancor; Vollmer, Bernd; Wiegert, Theresa; Krause, Marita; Irwin, Judith; Wezgowiec, Marek; Li, Jiang-Tao; Dettmar, Ralf-Jurgen; English, Jayanne; Wang, Q Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effects of ram pressure on the ordered magnetic field of a galaxy hosting a radio halo and strong nuclear outflows. New radio images in total and polarized intensity of the edge-on Virgo galaxy NGC\\,4388 were obtained within the CHANG-ES EVLA project. The unprecedented noise level reached allows us to detect striking new features of the ordered magnetic field. The nuclear outflow extends far into the halo to about 5\\,kpc from the center and is spatially correlated with the $\\rm{H}\\alpha$ and X-ray emission. For the first time, the southern outflow is detected. Above and below both spiral arms we find extended blobs of polarized emission with an ordered field oriented perpendicular to the disk. The synchrotron lifetime of the cosmic ray electrons (CREs) in these regions yields a mean outflow velocity of $(270\\pm70)\\kms$, in agreement with a galactic wind scenario. The observed symmetry of the polarized halo features in NGC 4388 excludes a compression of the halo gas by the ram pressure of th...

  2. Accretion and plasma outflow from dissipationless discs

    OpenAIRE

    Bogovalov, Sergei; Kelner, Stanislav

    2008-01-01

    We consider an extreme case of disc accretion onto a gravitating centre when the viscosity in the disc is negligible. The angular momentum and the rotational energy of the accreted matter is carried out by a magnetized wind outflowing from the disc. The outflow of matter from the disc occurs due to the Blandford & Payne(1982) centrifugal mechanism. The disc is assumed to be cold. Accretion and outflow are connected by the conservation of the energy, mass and the angular momentum. The basic pr...

  3. Gas outflows in Seyfert galaxies: effects of star formation versus AGN feedbacks

    CERN Document Server

    Melioli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Large scale, weakly collimated outflows are very common in galaxies with large infrared luminosities. In complex systems in particular, where intense star formation (SF) coexists with an active galactic nucleus (AGN), it is not clear yet from observations whether the SF, the AGN, or both are driving these outflows. Accreting supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are expected to influence their host galaxies through kinetic and radiative feedback processes, but in a Seyfert galaxy where the energy emitted in the nuclear region is comparable to that of the body of the galaxy, it is possible that stellar activity is also playing a key role in these processes. In order to achieve a better understanding of the mechanisms driving the gas evolution specially at the nuclear regions of these galaxies, we have performed high-resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations with radiative cooling considering the feedback from both star formation regions including supernova (type I and II) explosions and an AGN jet eme...

  4. Galactic Winds in Cosmological Simulations of the Circumgalactic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Barai, Paramita; Borgani, Stefano; Tescari, Edoardo; Tornatore, Luca; Dolag, Klaus; Killedar, Madhura; Monaco, Pierluigi; D'Odorico, Valentina; Cristiani, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    (Abridged) We explore new observationally-constrained sub-resolution models of galactic outflows and investigate their impact on the circumgalactic medium (CGM) over redshifts z = 2 - 4. We perform cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, including star formation, chemical enrichment, and four cases of SNe-driven outflows: no wind (NW), an energy-driven constant velocity wind (CW), a radially varying wind (RVWa) where the outflow velocity has a positive correlation with galactocentric distance (r), and a RVW with additional dependence on halo mass (RVWb). Overall, we find that the outflows expel metal-enriched gas away from galaxies, significantly quench star formation, and enrich the CGM. At z = 2, the radial profiles of gas properties around galaxy centers are most sensitive to the choice of the wind model for halo masses (10^9 - 10^11) M_sun. We infer that the RVWb model is similar to the NW case, except that it substantially enriches the CGM: the carbon metallicity (Z_C) is 10 times higher in RVWb than in N...

  5. Outflows in Sodium Excess Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Jongwon; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2015-01-01

    van Dokkum and Conroy revisited the unexpectedly strong Na I lines at 8200 A found in some giant elliptical galaxies and interpreted it as evidence for unusually bottom-heavy initial mass function. Jeong et al. later found a large population of galaxies showing equally-extraordinary Na D doublet absorption lines at 5900 A (Na D excess objects: NEOs) and showed that their origins can be different for different types of galaxies. While a Na D excess seems to be related with the interstellar medium (ISM) in late-type galaxies, smooth-looking early-type NEOs show little or no dust extinction and hence no compelling sign of ISM contributions. To further test this finding, we measured the doppler components in the Na D lines. We hypothesized that ISM would have a better (albeit not definite) chance of showing a blueshift doppler departure from the bulk of the stellar population due to outflow caused by either star formation or AGN activities. Many of the late-type NEOs clearly show blueshift in their Na D lines, wh...

  6. Galactic winds and the Lya forest

    CERN Document Server

    Desjacques, V; Hähnelt, M G; Stoehr, F; Desjacques, Vincent; Nusser, Adi; Haehnelt, Martin G.; Stoehr, Felix

    2004-01-01

    We study the effect of galactic outflows on the Lya forest. The winds are modelled as fully ionised spherical bubbles centered around galactic haloes. The observed flux probability distribution and flux power spectrum limit the volume filling factor of bubbles to be less than 10%. We have compared the mean flux as a function of distance from haloes with the Adelberger etal (ASSP) measurement. A model with bubbles of constant radius of 1.5Mpc/h surrounding the most massive haloes matches the high transmissivity at separations <0.5Mpc/h, but the increase of the transmissivity at small scales is more gradual than observed. At separations <0.5Mpc/h, our estimate of the cosmic variance error is $\\Delta F\\sim 0.3$, 30% higher than that of ASSP. The difficulty in matching the rise in the transmissivity at small separations is caused by residual absorption of neutral hydrogen lying physically outside the bubbles but having a redshift position similar to the haloes. The flux level is thus sensitive to the amplit...

  7. Anisotropic Thermal Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Anisotropic thermal diffusion in magnetized plasmas is an important physical phenomena for a diverse set of physical conditions ranging from astrophysical plasmas to MFE and ICF. Yet numerically simulating this phenomenon accurately poses significant challenges when the computational mesh is misaligned with respect to the magnetic field. Particularly when the temperature gradients are unresolved, one frequently finds entropy violating solutions with heat flowing from cold to hot zones for χ∥ /χ⊥ >=102 which is substantially smaller than the range of interest which can reach 1010 or higher. In this talk we present a new implicit algorithm for solving the anisotropic thermal diffusion equations and demonstrate its characteristics on what has become a fairly standard set of test problems in the literature. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2013-5687A.

  8. Inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleban, Matthew; Senatore, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    In homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology, the topology of the universe determines its ultimate fate. If the Weak Energy Condition is satisfied, open and flat universes must expand forever, while closed cosmologies can recollapse to a Big Crunch. A similar statement holds for homogeneous but anisotropic (Bianchi) universes. Here, we prove that arbitrarily inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies with ``flat'' (including toroidal) and ``open'' (including compact hyperbolic) spatial topology that are initially expanding must continue to expand forever at least in some region at a rate bounded from below by a positive number, despite the presence of arbitrarily large density fluctuations and/or the formation of black holes. Because the set of 3-manifold topologies is countable, a single integer determines the ultimate fate of the universe, and, in a specific sense, most 3-manifolds are ``flat'' or ``open''. Our result has important implications for inflation: if there is a positive cosmological constant (or suitable inflationary potential) and initial conditions for the inflaton, cosmologies with ``flat'' or ``open'' topology must expand forever in some region at least as fast as de Sitter space, and are therefore very likely to begin inflationary expansion eventually, regardless of the scale of the inflationary energy or the spectrum and amplitude of initial inhomogeneities and gravitational waves. Our result is also significant for numerical general relativity, which often makes use of periodic (toroidal) boundary conditions.

  9. Magnetized galactic halos and velocity lags

    CERN Document Server

    Henriksen, Richard N

    2016-01-01

    We present an analytic model of a magnetized galactic halo surrounding a Mestel gravitating disc. The magnetic field is taken to be in energy equipartition with the pressure dominant rotating halo gas ({\\it not} with the cosmic rays), and the whole system is in a steady state. A more flexible `anisotropic equipartition' model is also explored. A definite pressure law is required to maintain the equilibrium, but the halo density is constant. The velocity/magnetic system is scale-free. The objective is to find the rotational velocity lag in such a halo. The magnetic field is not force-free so that angular momentum may be transported from the halo to the intergalactic medium. We find that the `X'-shaped structure observed for halo magnetic fields can be obtained together with a simple analytic formula for the rate of decline of the velocity with height $z$. The formula also predicts the change in lag with radius, $r$.

  10. Disks, accretion and outflows of brown dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Joergens, V; Liu, Y; Pascucci, I; Whelan, E; Alcala, J; Biazzo, K; Costigan, G; Gully-Santiago, M; Henning, Th; Natta, A; Rigliaco, E; Rodriguez-Ledesma, V; Sicilia-Aguilar, A; Tottle, J; Wolf, S

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of the properties of young brown dwarfs are important to constraining the formation of objects at the extreme low-mass end of the IMF. While young brown dwarfs share many properties with solar-mass T Tauri stars, differences may be used as tests of how the physics of accretion/outflow and disk chemistry/dissipation depend on the mass of the central object. This article summarizes the presentations and discussions during the splinter session on 'Disks, accretion and outflows of brown dwarfs' held at the CoolStars17 conference in Barcelona in June 2012. Recent results in the field of brown dwarf disks and outflows include the determination of brown dwarf disk masses and geometries based on Herschel far-IR photometry (70-160 um), accretion properties based on X-Shooter spectra, and new outflow detections in the very low-mass regime.

  11. Disk-Driven Outflows in AGNs

    CERN Document Server

    Koenigl, A

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of spectral absorption features has led to the identification of several distinct outflow components in AGNs. The outflowing gas is evidently photoionized by the nuclear continuum source and originates in the accretion flow toward the central black hole. The most likely driving mechanisms are continuum and line radiation pressure and magnetic stresses. The theoretical modeling of these outflows involves such issues as: (1) Which of the above mechanisms actually contributes in each case? (2) How is the gas uplifted from the underlying accretion disk? (3) How can the intense central continuum radiation be shielded to allow efficient radiative driving? (4) Is the outflow continuous or clumpy, and, if clumpy, what is the nature and dynamical state of the ``clouds''? This review summarizes recent theoretical and observational results that bear on these questions and outlines prospects for further progress.

  12. Magnetosphere sawtooth oscillations induced by ionospheric outflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambles, O J; Lotko, W; Zhang, B; Wiltberger, M; Lyon, J; Strangeway, R J

    2011-06-01

    The sawtooth mode of convection of Earth's magnetosphere is a 2- to 4-hour planetary-scale oscillation powered by the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere (SW-M-I) interaction. Using global simulations of geospace, we have shown that ionospheric O(+) outflows can generate sawtooth oscillations. As the outflowing ions fill the inner magnetosphere, their pressure distends the nightside magnetic field. When the outflow fluence exceeds a threshold, magnetic field tension cannot confine the accumulating fluid; an O(+)-rich plasmoid is ejected, and the field dipolarizes. Below the threshold, the magnetosphere undergoes quasi-steady convection. Repetition and the sawtooth period are controlled by the strength of the SW-M-I interaction, which regulates the outflow fluence. PMID:21636770

  13. Another piece of the puzzle: The fast H I outflow in Mrk 231

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganti, Raffaella; Veilleux, Sylvain; Oosterloo, Tom; Teng, Stacy H.; Rupke, David

    2016-09-01

    We present the detection, performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and the Karl Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), of a fast H I 21 cm outflow in the ultra-luminous infrared galaxy Mrk 231. The outflow is observed as shallow H I absorption blueshifted ~1300 km s-1 with respect to the systemic velocity and located against the inner kpc of the radio source. The outflowing gas has an estimated column density between 5 and 15 × 1018Tspin cm-2. We derive the Tspin to lie in the range 400-2000 K and the corresponding H I densities are nHI ~ 10-100 cm-3. Our results complement previous findings and confirm the multiphase nature of the outflow in Mrk 231. Although effects of the interaction between the radio plasma and the surrounding medium cannot be ruled out, the energetics and the lack of a clear kpc-scale jet suggest that the most likely origin of the H I outflow is a wide-angle nuclear wind, as earlier proposed to explain the neutral outflow traced by Na I and molecular gas in this source. Our results suggest that an H I component is present in fast outflows regardless of the acceleration mechanism (wind vs. jet driven) and that it must be connected with common properties of the pre-interaction gas involved. Considering the observed similarity of their column densities, the H I outflow likely represents the inner part of the broad wind identified on larger scales in atomic Na I. The mass outflow rate of the H I outflow (between 8 and 18 M⊙ yr-1) does not appear to be as large as that observed in molecular gas, partly owing to the smaller sizes of the outflowing region sampled by the H I absorption. These characteristics are commonly seen in other cases of outflows driven by the active galactic nucleus (AGN) suggesting that the H I may represent a short intermediate phase in the rapid cooling of the gas. The results further confirm H I as a good tracer for AGN-driven outflows not only in powerful radio sources. We also obtained deeper continuum

  14. Molecular Outflows From the Protocluster, Serpens South

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Higuchi, Aya E; Nishiyama, Shogo; Kawabe, Ryohei; Takami, Michihiro; Karr, Jennifer L; Gutermuth, Robert A; Wilson, Grant

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of CO ($J=3-2$) and HCO$^+$ ($J=4-3$) mapping observations toward a nearby embedded cluster, Serpens South, using the ASTE 10 m telescope. Our CO ($J=3-2$) map reveals that many outflows are crowded in the dense cluster-forming clump that can be recognized as a HCO$^+$ clump with a size of $\\sim$ 0.2 pc and mass of $\\sim$ 80 M$_\\odot$. The clump contains several subfragments with sizes of $\\sim$ 0.05 pc. By comparing the CO ($J=3-2$) map with the 1.1 mm dust continuum image taken by AzTEC on ASTE, we find that the spatial extents of the outflow lobes are sometimes anti-correlated with the distribution of the dense gas and some of the outflow lobes apparently collide with the dense gas. The total outflow mass, momentum, and energy are estimated at 0.6 $M_\\odot$, 8 $M_\\odot$ km s$^{-1}$, and 64 $M_\\odot$ km$^2$ s$^{-2}$, respectively. The energy injection rate due to the outflows is comparable to the turbulence dissipation rate in the clump, implying that the protostellar outflows can mai...

  15. Theory of photospheric emission from relativistic outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, R; Vereshchagin, G V

    2013-01-01

    (shortened) In this paper we reexamine the optical depth of ultrarelativistic spherically symmetric outflows and reevaluate the photospheric radius for each model during both the acceleration and coasting phases. It is shown that for both the wind and the shell models there are two asymptotic solutions for the optical depth during the coasting phase of the outflow. In particular we show that quite counterintuitively a geometrically thin shell may appear as a thick wind for photons propagating inside it. For this reason we introduce notions of photon thick and photon thin outflows, which appear more general and better physically motivated with respect to winds and shells. Photosphere of relativistic outflow is a dynamic surface. We study its geometry and find that the photosphere of photon thin outflow has always a convex shape, while in the photon thick one it is initially convex (there is always a photon thin layer in any outflow) and then it becomes concave asymptotically approaching the photosphere of an i...

  16. Thermodynamics of anisotropic branes

    CERN Document Server

    Ávila, Daniel; Patiño, Leonardo; Trancanelli, Diego

    2016-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics of flavor D7-branes embedded in an anisotropic black brane solution of type IIB supergravity. The flavor branes undergo a phase transition between a `Minkowski embedding', in which they lie outside of the horizon, and a `black hole embedding', in which they fall into the horizon. This transition depends on two independent dimensionless ratios, which are formed out of the black hole temperature, its anisotropy parameter, and the mass of the flavor degrees of freedom. It happens either at a critical temperature or at a critical anisotropy. A general lesson we learn from this analysis is that the anisotropy, in this particular realization, induces similar effects as the temperature. In particular, increasing the anisotropy bends the branes more and more into the horizon. Moreover, we observe that the transition becomes smoother for higher anisotropies.

  17. Averaging anisotropic cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, J D; Barrow, John D.; Tsagas, Christos G.

    2006-01-01

    We examine the effects of spatial inhomogeneities on irrotational anisotropic cosmologies by looking at the average properties of pressure-free Bianchi-type models. Adopting the Buchert averaging scheme, we identify the kinematic backreaction effects by focussing on spacetimes with zero or isotropic spatial curvature. This allows us to close the system of the standard scalar formulae with a propagation equation for the shear magnitude. We find no change in the already known conditions for accelerated expansion. The backreaction terms are expressed as algebraic relations between the mean-square fluctuations of the models' irreducible kinematical variables. Based on these we investigate the early evolution of averaged vacuum Bianchi type $I$ universes and those filled with pressureless matter. In the latter case we show that the backreaction effects can modify the familiar Kasner-like singularity and potentially remove Mixmaster-type oscillations. We also discuss the possibility of accelerated expansion due to ...

  18. Anisotropic Model Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kats, C. M.

    2008-10-01

    The driving forces for fundamental research in colloid science are the ability to manage the material properties of colloids and to unravel the forces that play a role between colloids to be able to control and understand the processes where colloids play an important role. Therefore we are searching for colloidal materials with specific physical properties to better understand our surrounding world.Until recently research in colloid science was mainly focused on spherical (isotropic) particles. Monodisperse spherical colloids serve as a model system as they exhibit similar phase behaviour as molecular and atomic systems. Nevertheless, in many cases the spherical shape is not sufficient to reach the desired research goals. Recently the more complex synthesis methods of anisotropic model colloids has strongly developed. This thesis should be regarded as a contribution to this research area. Anisotropic colloids can be used as a building block for complex structures and are expected not only to lead to the construction of full photonic band gap materials. They will also serve as new, more realistic, models systems for their molecular analogues. Therefore the term ‘molecular colloids” is sometimes used to qualify these anisotropic colloidal particles. In the introduction of this thesis, we give an overview of the main synthesis techniques for anisotropic colloids. Chapter 2 describes the method of etching silicon wafers to construct monodisperse silicon rods. They subsequently were oxidized and labeled (coated) with a fluorescent silica layer. The first explorative phase behaviour of these silica rods was studied. The particles showed a nematic ordering in charge stabilized suspensions. Chapter 3 describes the synthesis of colloidal gold rods and the (mesoporous) silica coating of gold rods. Chapter 4 describes the physical and optical properties of these particles when thermal energy is added. This is compared to the case where the particles are irradiated with

  19. DIAGNOSTICS OF AGN-DRIVEN MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN ULIRGs FROM HERSCHEL-PACS OBSERVATIONS OF OH AT 119 μm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoon, H. W. W.; Lebouteiller, V. [Cornell University, CRSR, Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); González-Alfonso, E. [Departamento de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad de Alcalá, Campus Universitario, E-28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Bernard-Salas, J. [Department of Physical Sciences, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Urrutia, T. [Leibniz Institut für Astrophysik, Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Rigopoulou, D.; Verma, A. [Department of Physics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Westmoquette, M. S. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Smith, H. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Afonso, J. [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa, Observatório Astronómico de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisbon (Portugal); Pearson, C. [RAL Space, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Cormier, D. [Institut für theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Efstathiou, A. [School of Sciences, European University Cyprus, Diogenes Street, Engomi, 1516 Nicosia (Cyprus); Borys, C. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Etxaluze, M. [Departamento de Astrofísica. Centro de Astrobiología. CSIC-INTA. Torrejón de Ardoz, E-28850 Madrid (Spain); Clements, D. L., E-mail: spoon@isc.astro.cornell.edu [Physics Department, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-01

    We report on our observations of the 79 and 119 μm doublet transitions of OH for 24 local (z < 0.262) ULIRGs observed with Herschel-PACS as part of the Herschel ULIRG Survey (HERUS). Some OH 119 μm profiles display a clear P-Cygni shape and therefore imply outflowing OH gas, while other profiles are predominantly in absorption or are completely in emission. We find that the relative strength of the OH emission component decreases as the silicate absorption increases. This result locates the OH outflows inside the obscured nuclei. The maximum outflow velocities for our sources range from less than 100 to ∼2000 km s{sup –1}, with 15/24 (10/24) sources showing OH absorption at velocities exceeding 700 km s{sup –1} (1000 km s{sup –1}). Three sources show maximum OH outflow velocities exceeding that of Mrk231. Since outflow velocities above 500-700 km s{sup –1} are thought to require an active galactic nucleus (AGN) to drive them, about two-thirds of our ULIRG sample may host AGN-driven molecular outflows. This finding is supported by the correlation we find between the maximum OH outflow velocity and the IR-derived bolometric AGN luminosity. No such correlation is found with the IR-derived star formation rate. The highest outflow velocities are found among sources that are still deeply embedded. We speculate that the molecular outflows in these sources may be in an early phase of disrupting the nuclear dust veil before these sources evolve into less-obscured AGNs. Four of our sources show high-velocity wings in their [C II] fine-structure line profiles, implying neutral gas outflow masses of at least (2-4.5) × 10{sup 8} M{sub ☉}.

  20. Galactic Archaeology: Current Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Wyse, Rosemary F G

    2016-01-01

    I present an overview of the science goals and achievements of ongoing spectroscopic surveys of individual stars in the nearby Universe. I include a brief discussion of the development of the field of Galactic Archaeology - using the fossil record in old stars nearby to infer how our Galaxy evolved and place the Milky Way in cosmological context.

  1. Elusive active galactic nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maiolino, R; Comastri, A; Gilli, R; Nagar, NM; Bianchi, S; Boker, T; Colbert, E; Krabbe, A; Marconi, A; Matt, G; Salvati, M

    2003-01-01

    A fraction of active galactic nuclei do not show the classical Seyfert-type signatures in their optical spectra, i.e. they are optically 'elusive'. X-ray observations are an optimal tool to identify this class of objects. We combine new Chandra observations with archival X-ray data in order to obtai

  2. Pressurized groundwater outflow experiments and numerical modeling for outflow channels on Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marra, Wouter A.; Hauber, Ernst; McLelland, Stuart J.; Murphy, Brendan J.; Parsons, Daniel R.; Conway, Susan J.; Roda, Manuel; Govers, Rob; Kleinhans, Maarten G.

    2014-01-01

    The landscape of Mars shows incised channels that often appear abruptly in the landscape, suggesting a groundwater source. However, groundwater outflow processes are unable to explain the reconstructed peak discharges of the largest outflow channels based on their morphology. Therefore, there is a d

  3. Anisotropic Inflation with General Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Jiaming; Qiu, Taotao

    2015-01-01

    Anomalies in recent observational data indicate that there might be some "anisotropic hair" generated in an inflation period. To obtain general information about the effects of this anisotropic hair to inflation models, we studied anisotropic inflation models that involve one vector and one scalar using several types of potentials. We determined the general relationship between the degree of anisotropy and the fraction of the vector and scalar fields, and concluded that the anisotropies behave independently of the potentials. We also generalized our study to the case of multi-directional anisotropies.

  4. Ionized gas outflows and global kinematics of low-z luminous star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas, S.; Colina, L.; Bellocchi, E.; Maiolino, R.; Villar-Martín, M.

    2014-08-01

    We study the kinematic properties of the ionised gas outflows and ambient interstellar medium (ISM) in a large and representative sample of local luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs) (58 systems, 75 galaxies) at galactic and sub-galactic (i.e., star-forming clumps) scales, thanks to integral field spectroscopy (IFS)-based high signal-to-noise integrated spectra. The velocity dispersion of the ionized ISM in U/LIRGs (⟨ σ ⟩ ~ 70 km s-1) is larger than in lower luminosity local star-forming galaxies (⟨ σ ⟩ ~ 25 km s-1). While for isolated disc LIRGs star formation appears to sustain turbulence, gravitational energy release associated with interactions and mergers plays an important role in driving σ in the U/LIRG range. We find that σ has a dependency on the star formation rate density (ΣSFR), which is weaker than expected if it were driven by the energy released by the starburst. The relatively small role of star formation (SF) driving the σ in U/LIRGs is reinforced by the lack of an increase in σ associated with high luminosity SF clumps. We also find that the impact of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) in ULIRGs is strong, increasing on average σ by a factor 1.5. Low-z U/LIRGs cover a range of velocity dispersion (σ ~ 30 to 100 km s-1) and star formation rate density (ΣSFR ~ 0.1 to 20 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2) similar to those of high-z SFGs. Moreover, the observed weak dependency of σ on ΣSFR for local U/LIRGs (σ ∝ ΣSFR+0.06) is in very good agreement with that measured in some high-z samples. The presence of ionized gas outflows in U/LIRGs seems universal based on the detection of a broad, usually blueshifted, Hα line. The observed dependency of the maximum velocity of the outflow (Vmax) on the star formation rate (SFR) is of the type Vmax(non - AGN) ∝ SFR(LIR)+ 0.24. We find that AGNs in U/LIRGs are able to generate faster (~×2) and more massive (~× 1.4) ionized gas outflows than pure starbursts. The derived ionized mass

  5. Protostellar Outflows and Radiative Feedback from Massive Stars. II. Feedback, Star Formation Efficiency, and Outflow Broadening

    CERN Document Server

    Kuiper, Rolf; Yorke, Harold W

    2016-01-01

    We perform two-dimensional axially symmetric radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to assess the impact of outflows and radiative force feedback from massive protostars by varying when the protostellar outflow starts, the ratio of ejection to accretion rates, and the strength of the wide angle disk wind component. The star formation efficiency, i.e. the ratio of final stellar mass to initial core mass, is dominated by radiative forces and the ratio of outflow to accretion rates. Increasing this ratio has three effects: First, the protostar grows slower with a lower luminosity at any given time, lowering radiative feedback. Second, bipolar cavities cleared by the outflow are larger, further diminishing radiative feedback on disk and core scales. Third, the higher momentum outflow sweeps up more material from the collapsing envelope, decreasing the protostar's potential mass reservoir via entrainment. The star formation efficiency varies with the ratio of ejection to accretion rates from 50% in the case of very we...

  6. Cerebral venous outflow and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive B. Beggs

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the impact of restricted cerebral venous outflow on the biomechanics of the intracranial fluid system is investigated. The cerebral venous drainage system is often viewed simply as a series of collecting vessels channeling blood back to the heart. However there is growing evidence that it plays an important role in regulating the intracranial fluid system. In particular, there appears to be a link between increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pulsatility in the Aqueduct of Sylvius and constricted venous outflow. Constricted venous outflow also appears to inhibit absorption of CSF into the superior sagittal sinus. The compliance of the cortical bridging veins appears to be critical to the behaviour of the intracranial fluid system, with abnormalities at this location implicated in normal pressure hydrocephalus. The compliance associated with these vessels appears to be functional in nature and dependent on the free egress of blood out of the cranium via the extracranial venous drainage pathways. Because constricted venous outflow appears to be linked with increased aqueductal CSF pulsatility, it suggests that inhibited venous blood outflow may be altering the compliance of the cortical bridging veins.

  7. Evolution of Mass Outflow in Protostars

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Dan M; Fischer, William J; Forrest, W J; Manoj, P; Megeath, S Thomas; Melnick, Gary J; Najita, Joan; Neufeld, David A; Sheehan, Patrick D; Stutz, Amelia M; Tobin, John J

    2015-01-01

    We have surveyed 84 Class 0, Class I, and flat-spectrum protostars in mid-infrared [Si II], [Fe II] and [S I] line emission, and 11 of these in far-infrared [O I] emission. We use the results to derive their mass outflow rates. Thereby we observe a strong correlation of mass outflow rates with bolometric luminosity, and with the inferred mass accretion rates of the central objects, which continues through the Class 0 range the trend observed in Class II young stellar objects. Along this trend from large to small mass-flow rates, the different classes of young stellar objects lie in the sequence Class 0 -- Class I/flat-spectrum -- Class II, indicating that the trend is an evolutionary sequence in which mass outflow and accretion rates decrease together with increasing age, while maintaining rough proportionality. The survey results include two which are key tests of magnetocentrifugal outflow-acceleration mechanisms: the distribution of the outflow/accretion branching ratio b, and limits on the distribution of...

  8. Bursty star formation feedback and cooling outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Suarez, Teresita; Peiris, Hiranya V; Slyz, Adrianne; Devriendt, Julien

    2016-01-01

    We study how outflows of gas launched from a central galaxy undergoing repeated starbursts propagate through the circumgalactic medium (CGM), using the simulation code RAMSES. We assume that the outflow from the disk can be modelled as a rapidly moving bubble of hot gas at $\\mathrm{\\sim1\\;kpc}$ above disk, then ask what happens as it moves out further into the halo around the galaxy on $\\mathrm{\\sim 100\\;kpc}$ scales. To do this we run 60 two-dimensional simulations scanning over parameters of the outflow. Each of these is repeated with and without radiative cooling, assuming a primordial gas composition to give a lower bound on the importance of cooling. In a large fraction of radiative-cooling cases we are able to form rapidly outflowing cool gas from in situ cooling of the flow. We show that the amount of cool gas formed depends strongly on the 'burstiness' of energy injection; sharper, stronger bursts typically lead to a larger fraction of cool gas forming in the outflow. The abundance ratio of ions in th...

  9. Non-thermal Radiation Processes in Relativistic Outflows from AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefa, Eva

    2012-11-01

    Non-thermal, leptonic radiation processes have been extensively studied for the interpretation of the observed radiation from jets of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). This work addresses the synchrotron and Inverse Compton scattering (ICS) mechanisms, and investigates the potential of a self-consistent, time-dependent approach to currently unsolved problems. Furthermore, it examines how deviations from standard, one-zone models can modify the radiated spectrum. A detailed analysis of the shape of the ICS spectrum is also performed. In the first part a possible interpretation of the hard γ-ray blazar spectra in the framework of leptonic models is investigated. It is demonstrated that hard γ-ray spectra can be generated and maintained in the presence of energy losses, under the basic assumption of a narrow electron energy distribution (EED). Broader spectra can also be modeled if multiple zones contribute to the emission. In such a scheme, hard flaring events, like the one in Mkn 501 in 2009, can be successfully interpreted within a "leading blob" scenario, when one or few zones of emission become dominant. In the second part the shape of the Compton spectrum close to the maximum cutoff is investigated. Analytical approximations for the spectral shape in the cutoff region are derived for various soft photon fields, providing a direct link between the parent EED and the upscattered spectrum. Additionally, a generalization of the beaming pattern for various processes is derived, which accounts for non-stationary, anisotropic and non-homogeneous EEDs. It is shown that anisotropic EEDs may lead to radiated spectra substantially different from the isotropic case. Finally, a self-consistent, non-homogeneous model describing the synchrotron emission from stratified jets is developed. It is found that transverse jet stratification leads to characteristic features in the emitted spectrum different to expectations in homogeneous models.

  10. Photon states in anisotropic media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepak Kumar

    2002-08-01

    Quantum aspects of optical polarization are discussed for waves traveling in anisotropic dielectric media with a view to relate the dynamics of polarization with that of photon spin and its manipulation by classical polarizers.

  11. Gradient expansion for anisotropic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Spaliński, Michał

    2016-01-01

    We compute the gradient expansion for anisotropic hydrodynamics. The results are compared with the corresponding expansion of the underlying kinetic-theory model with the collision term treated in the relaxation time approximation. We find that a recent formulation of anisotropic hydrodynamics based on an anisotropic matching principle yields the first three terms of the gradient expansion in agreement with those obtained for the kinetic theory. This gives further support for this particular hydrodynamic model as a good approximation of the kinetic-theory approach. We further find that the gradient expansion of anisotropic hydrodynamics is an asymptotic series, and the singularities of the analytic continuation of its Borel transform indicate the presence of non-hydrodynamic modes.

  12. Zooplankton in the Arctic outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, K. A.; Dritz, A. V.; Nikishina, A. B.

    2009-04-01

    Climate changes in the Arctic cause the changes in the current system that may have cascading effect on the structure of plankton community and consequently on the interlinked and delicately balanced food web. Zooplankton species are by definition incapable to perform horizontal moving. Their transport is connected with flowing water. There are zooplankton species specific for the definite water masses and they can be used as markers for the different currents. That allows us to consider zooplankton community composition as a result of water mixing in the studied area. Little is known however about the mechanisms by which spatial and temporal variability in advection affect dynamics of local populations. Ice conditions are also very important in the function of pelagic communities. Melting time is the trigger to all "plankton blooming" processes, and the duration of ice-free conditions determines the food web development in the future. Fram Strait is one of the key regions for the Arctic: the cold water outflow comes through it with the East Greenland Current and meets warm Atlantic water, the West Spitsbergen Current, producing complicated hydrological situation. During 2007 and 2008 we investigated the structure functional characteristics of zooplankton community in the Fram Strait region onboard KV "Svalbard" (April 2007, April and May 2008) and RV "Jan Mayen" (May 2007, August 2008). This study was conducted in frame of iAOOS Norway project "Closing the loop", which, in turn, was a part of IPY. During this cruises multidisciplinary investigations were performed, including sea-ice observations, CTD and ADCP profiling, carbon flux, nutrients and primary production measurements, phytoplankton sampling. Zooplankton was collected with the Hydro-Bios WP2 net and MultiNet Zooplankton Sampler, (mouth area 0.25 m2, mesh size 180 um).Samples were taken from the depth strata of 2000-1500, 1500-1000, 1000-500,500-200, 200-100, 100-60, 60-30, 30-0 m. Gut fluorescence

  13. Observations of Protostellar Outflow Feedback in Clustered Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the role of protostellar outflow feedback in clustered star formation using the observational data of recent molecular outflow surveys toward nearby cluster-forming clumps. We found that for almost all clumps, the outflow momentum injection rate is significantly larger than the turbulence dissipation rate. Therefore, the outflow feedback is likely to maintain supersonic turbulence in the clumps. For less massive clumps such as B59, L1551, and L1641N, the outflow kinetic energy is comparable to the clump gravitational energy. In such clumps, the outflow feedback probably affects significantly the clump dynamics. On the other hand, for clumps with masses larger than about 200 M$_\\odot$, the outflow kinetic energy is significantly smaller than the clump gravitational energy. Since the majority of stars form in such clumps, we conclude that outflow feedback cannot destroy the whole parent clump. These characteristics of the outflow feedback support the scenario of slow star formation.

  14. AGN Outflow Shocks on Bonnor-Ebert Spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Dugan, Zachary; Bieri, Rebekka; Silk, Joseph; Rahman, Mubdi

    2016-01-01

    Feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and subsequent jet cocoons and outflow bubbles can have a significant impact on star formation in the host galaxy. To investigate feedback physics on small scales, we perform hydrodynamic simulations of realistically fast AGN winds striking Bonnor-Ebert (BE) spheres and examine gravitational collapse and ablation. We test AGN wind velocities ranging from 300--3,000 km s$^{-1}$ and wind densities ranging from 0.5--10 $m_\\mathrm{p}\\,\\mathrm{cm}^{-3}$. We include heating and cooling of low- and high-temperature gas, self-gravity, and spatially correlated perturbations in the shock, with a maximum resolution of 0.01 pc. We find that the ram pressure is the most important factor that determines the fate of the cloud. High ram pressure winds increase fragmentation and decrease the star formation rate, but also cause star formation to occur on a much shorter time scale and with increased velocities of the newly formed stars. We find a threshold ram pressure of $\\sim 2\\times...

  15. Magnetospheric outflows in young stellar objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanni Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Different classes of outflows are associated with the magnetospheric activity of accreting T Tauri protostars. Stellar winds are accelerated along the open field lines anchored in the stellar surface; disk winds (extended or X-type can be launched along the open magnetic surfaces threading the accretion disk; another type of ejection can arise from the region of interaction of the closed magnetosphere with the accretion disk (magnetospheric ejections, conical winds, where the magnetic surfaces undergo quasiperiodic episodes of inflation and reconnection. In this chapter I will present the main dynamical properties of these different types of outflow. Two main issues will be addressed. First, I will try to understand if these ejection phenomena can account for the origin of the jets often observed in young forming stellar systems. Second, I will evaluate the impact of these outflows on the angular momentum evolution of the central protostar.

  16. Search for Molecular Outflows in Local Volume AGN with Herschel-PACS

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, M; Melendez, M; Sturm, E; Gracia-Carpio, J; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E

    2016-01-01

    We present the results from a systematic search for galactic-scale, molecular (OH 119 $\\mu$m) outflows in a sample of 52 Local Volume ($d < 50$ Mpc) Burst Alert Telescope detected active galactic nuclei (BAT AGN) with \\emph{Herschel}-PACS. We combine the results from our analysis of the BAT AGN with the published \\emph{Herschel}/PACS data of 43 nearby ($z<0.3$) galaxy mergers, mostly ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and QSOs. The objects in our sample of BAT AGN have, on average, $\\sim 10-100$ times lower AGN luminosities, star formation rates (SFRs), and stellar masses than those of the ULIRG and QSO sample. OH 119 $\\mu$m is detected in 42 of our BAT AGN targets. Evidence for molecular outflows (i.e. OH absorption profiles with median velocities more blueshifted than $-$50 km s$^{-1}$ and/or blueshifted wings with 84-percentile velocities less than $-$300 km s$^{-1}$) is seen in only four BAT AGN (NGC~7479 is the most convincing case). Evidence for molecular inflows (i.e. OH absorption profiles...

  17. Wind influence on a coastal buoyant outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Michael M.; Garvine, Richard W.

    2005-03-01

    This paper investigates the interplay between river discharge and winds in forcing coastal buoyant outflows. During light winds a plume influenced by the Earth's rotation will flow down shelf (in the direction of Kelvin wave propagation) as a slender buoyancy-driven coastal current. Downwelling favorable winds augment this down-shelf flow, narrow the plume, and mix the water column. Upwelling favorable winds drive currents that counter the buoyancy-driven flow, spread plume waters offshore, and rapidly mix buoyant waters. Two criteria are developed to assess the wind influence on a buoyant outflow. The wind strength index (Ws) determines whether a plume's along-shelf flow is in a wind-driven or buoyancy-driven state. Ws is the ratio of the wind-driven and buoyancy-driven along-shelf velocities. Wind influence on across-shelf plume structure is rated with a timescale (ttilt) for the isopycnal tilting caused by wind-driven Ekman circulation. These criteria are used to characterize wind influence on the Delaware Coastal Current and can be applied to other coastal buoyant outflows. The Delaware buoyant outflow is simulated for springtime high-river discharge conditions. Simulation results and Ws values reveal that the coastal current is buoyancy-driven most of the time (∣Ws∣ 1) several times during the high-discharge period. Strong upwelling events reverse the buoyant outflow; they constitute an important mechanism for transporting fresh water up shelf. Across-shelf plume structure is more sensitive to wind influence than the along-shelf flow. Values of ttilt indicate that moderate or strong winds persisting throughout a day can modify plume width significantly. Plume widening during upwelling events is accompanied by mixing that can erase the buoyant outflow.

  18. Galactic-scale civilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.

    1980-01-01

    Evolutionary arguments are presented in favor of the existence of civilization on a galactic scale. Patterns of physical, chemical, biological, social and cultural evolution leading to increasing levels of complexity are pointed out and explained thermodynamically in terms of the maximization of free energy dissipation in the environment of the organized system. The possibility of the evolution of a global and then a galactic human civilization is considered, and probabilities that the galaxy is presently in its colonization state and that life could have evolved to its present state on earth are discussed. Fermi's paradox of the absence of extraterrestrials in light of the probability of their existence is noted, and a variety of possible explanations is indicated. Finally, it is argued that although mankind may be the first occurrence of intelligence in the galaxy, it is unjustified to presume that this is so.

  19. Simulations of galactic dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2014-01-01

    We review our current understanding of galactic dynamo theory, paying particular attention to numerical simulations both of the mean-field equations and the original three-dimensional equations relevant to describing the magnetic field evolution for a turbulent flow. We emphasize the theoretical difficulties in explaining non-axisymmetric magnetic fields in galaxies and discuss the observational basis for such results in terms of rotation measure analysis. Next, we discuss nonlinear theory, the role of magnetic helicity conservation and magnetic helicity fluxes. This leads to the possibility that galactic magnetic fields may be bi-helical, with opposite signs of helicity and large and small length scales. We discuss their observational signatures and close by discussing the possibilities of explaining the origin of primordial magnetic fields.

  20. Episodic High Velocity Outflows from V899 Mon: A Constraint On The Outflow Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Ninan, J P; Philip, N S

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of large variations in the outflow wind velocity from a young eruptive star, V899 Mon during its ongoing high accretion outburst phase. Such large variations in the outflow velocity (from -722 km s$^{-1}$ to -425 km s$^{-1}$) have never been reported previously in this family of objects. Our continuous monitoring of this source shows that the multi-component, clumpy, and episodic high velocity outflows are stable in the time scale of a few days, and vary over the time scale of a few weeks to months. We detect significant decoupling in the instantaneous outflow strength to accretion rate. From the comparison of various possible outflow mechanisms in magnetospheric accretion of young stellar objects, we conclude magnetically driven polar winds to be the most consistent mechanism for the outflows seen in V899 Mon. The large scale fluctuations in outflow over the short period makes V899 Mon the most ideal source to constrain various magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of magnetospheric ...

  1. Episodic High-velocity Outflows from V899 Mon: A Constraint On The Outflow Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninan, J. P.; Ojha, D. K.; Philip, N. S.

    2016-07-01

    We report the detection of large variations in the outflow wind velocity from a young eruptive star, V899 Mon, during its ongoing high accretion outburst phase. Such large variations in the outflow velocity (from ‑722 to ‑425 km s‑1) have never been reported previously in this family of objects. Our continuous monitoring of this source shows that the multi-component, clumpy, and episodic high velocity outflows are stable in the timescale of a few days, and vary over the timescale of a few weeks to months. We detect significant decoupling in the instantaneous outflow strength to accretion rate. From the comparison of various possible outflow mechanisms in magnetospheric accretion of young stellar objects, we conclude magnetically driven polar winds to be the most consistent mechanism for the outflows seen in V899 Mon. The large scale fluctuations in outflow over the short period makes V899 Mon the most ideal source to constrain various magnetohydrodynamics simulations of magnetospheric accretion. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT).

  2. Gusty, gaseous flows of FIRE: galactic winds in cosmological simulations with explicit stellar feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Muratov, Alexander L; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Hopkins, Philip F; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the galaxy-scale gaseous outflows from the FIRE (Feedback in Realistic Environments) simulations. This suite of hydrodynamic cosmological zoom simulations provides a sample of halos where star-forming giant molecular clouds are resolved to z=0, and features an explicit stellar feedback model on small scales. In this work, we focus on quantifying the gas mass ejected out of galaxies in winds and how this material travels through the halo. We correlate these quantities to star formation in galaxies throughout cosmic history. Our simulations reveal that a significant portion of every galaxy's evolution, particularly at high redshift, is dominated by bursts of star formation, which are followed by powerful gusts of galactic outflow that sweep up a large fraction of gas in the interstellar medium and send it through the circumgalactic medium. The dynamical effect of these outflows can significantly limit the amount of star formation within the affected galaxy. At low redshift, however, su...

  3. The Galactic Center

    OpenAIRE

    R. Genzel; Karas, V.

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade high resolution measurements in the infrared employing adaptive optics imaging on 10m telescopes have allowed determining the three dimensional orbits stars within ten light hours of the compact radio source at the center of the Milky Way. These observations show the presence of a three million solar mass black hole in Sagittarius A* beyond any reasonable doubt. The Galactic Center thus constitutes the best astrophysical evidence for the existence of black holes which have ...

  4. Galactic oscillator symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosensteel, George

    1995-01-01

    Riemann ellipsoids model rotating galaxies when the galactic velocity field is a linear function of the Cartesian coordinates of the galactic masses. In nuclear physics, the kinetic energy in the linear velocity field approximation is known as the collective kinetic energy. But, the linear approximation neglects intrinsic degrees of freedom associated with nonlinear velocity fields. To remove this limitation, the theory of symplectic dynamical symmetry is developed for classical systems. A classical phase space for a self-gravitating symplectic system is a co-adjoint orbit of the noncompact group SP(3,R). The degenerate co-adjoint orbit is the 12 dimensional homogeneous space Sp(3,R)/U(3), where the maximal compact subgroup U(3) is the symmetry group of the harmonic oscillator. The Hamiltonian equations of motion on each orbit form a Lax system X = (X,F), where X and F are elements of the symplectic Lie algebra. The elements of the matrix X are the generators of the symplectic Lie algebra, viz., the one-body collective quadratic functions of the positions and momenta of the galactic masses. The matrix F is composed from the self-gravitating potential energy, the angular velocity, and the hydostatic pressure. Solutions to the hamiltonian dynamical system on Sp(3,R)/U(3) are given by symplectic isospectral deformations. The Casimirs of Sp(3,R), equal to the traces of powers of X, are conserved quantities.

  5. Evidence for 1000 km/s Molecular Outflows in the Local ULIRG Population

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Aeree; Naraynan, Gopal; Heyer, Mark; Erickson, Neal R

    2011-01-01

    The feedback from galactic outflows is thought to play an important role in shaping the gas content, star formation history, and ultimately the stellar mass function of galaxies. Here we present evidence for massive molecular outflows associated with ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) in the coadded Redshift Search Receiver 12CO(1-0) spectrum. Our stacked spectrum of 27 ULIRGs at z = 0.043-0.11 (freq_rest = 110-120 GHz) shows broad wings around the CO line with delta_V(FWZI)~2000 km/s. Its integrated line flux accounts for up to 25+/-5% of the total CO line luminosity. When interpreted as a massive molecular outflow wind, the associated mechanical energy can be explained by a concentrated starburst with SFR \\geq 100 M_sun/yr, which agrees well with their SFR derived from the FIR luminosity. Using the high signal-to-noise stacked composite spectrum, we also probe 13CO and 12CN emission in the sample and discuss how the chemical abundance of molecular gas may vary depending on the physical conditions of ...

  6. Wind from black hole accretion disk as the driver of a molecular outflow in a galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Tombesi, F; Veilleux, S; Reeves, J N; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E; Reynolds, C S

    2015-01-01

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are often invoked to play a fundamental role in the evolution of both supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the tight SMBH-galaxy relations. Recent observations of large-scale molecular outflows in ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) have provided the evidence to support these studies, as they directly trace the gas out of which stars form. Theoretical models suggest an origin of these outflows as energy-conserving flows driven by fast AGN accretion disk winds. Previous claims of a connection between large-scale molecular outflows and AGN activity in ULIRGs were incomplete because they were lacking the detection of the putative inner wind. Conversely, studies of powerful AGN accretion disk winds to date have focused only on X-ray observations of local Seyferts and a few higher redshift quasars. Here we show the clear detection of a powerful AGN accretion disk wind with a mildly relativistic ...

  7. FeLoBAL Outflow Variability Constraints from Multi-Year Observations

    CERN Document Server

    McGraw, Sean M; Hamann, Frederick W; Capellupo, Daniel M; Gallagher, Sarah C; Brandt, William N

    2013-01-01

    The physical properties and dynamical behavior of Broad Absorption Line (BAL) outflows are crucial themes in understanding the connections between galactic centers and their hosts. FeLoBALs (identified with the presence of low-ionization Fe II BALs) are a peculiar class of quasar outflows that constitute approximately 1% of the BAL population. With their large column densities and apparent outflow kinetic luminosities, FeLoBALs appear to be exceptionally powerful and are strong candidates for feedback in galaxy evolution. We conducted variability studies of 12 FeLoBAL quasars with emission redshifts between 0.69 and 1.93, spanning both weekly and multi-year timescales in the quasar's rest frame. We detected absorption-line variability from low-ionization species (Fe II, Mg II) in four of our objects, with which we established a representative upper limit for the distance of the absorber from the supermassive black hole (SMBH) to be approximately 20 parsecs. Our goals are to understand the mechanisms producing...

  8. The outflows accelerated by the magnetic fields and radiation force of accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Xinwu

    2014-01-01

    The inner region of a luminous accretion disk is radiation pressure dominated. We estimate the surface temperature of a radiation pressure dominated accretion disk, \\Theta=(c_s/r\\Omega_K)^2<<(H/r)^2, which is significantly lower than that of a gas pressure dominated disk, \\Theta (H/r)^2. This means that the outflow can be launched magnetically from the photosphere of the radiation pressure dominate disk only if the effective potential barrier along the magnetic field line is extremely shallow or no potential barrier is present. For the latter case, the slow sonic point in the outflow may probably be in the disk, which leads to a slow circular dense flow above the disk. This implies that hot gas (probably in the corona) is necessary for launching a jet from the radiation pressure dominated disk, which provides a natural explanation on the observational evidence that the relativistic jets are related to hot plasma in some X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei. We investigate the outflows accelerated f...

  9. Outflowing atomic and molecular gas at $z \\sim 0.67$ towards 1504+377

    CERN Document Server

    Kanekar, Nissim

    2007-01-01

    We report the detection of OH 1667 MHz and wide HI 21cm absorption at $z \\sim 0.67$ towards the red quasar 1504+377, with the Green Bank Telescope and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. The HI 21cm absorption extends over a velocity range of $\\sim 600$ km/s blueward of the quasar redshift ($z=0.674$), with the new OH 1667 MHz absorption component at $\\sim -430$ \\kms, nearly coincident with earlier detections of mm-wave absorption at $z \\sim 0.6715$. The atomic and molecular absorption appear to arise from a fast gas outflow from the quasar, with a mass outflow rate ${\\dot M} \\sim 12 M_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ and a molecular hydrogen fraction $f_{\\rm H_2} \\equiv (N_{\\rm H_2}/N_{\\rm HI}) \\sim 0.2$. The radio structure of 1504+377 is consistent with the outflow arising due to a jet-cloud interaction, followed by rapid cooling of the cloud material. The observed ratio of HCO$^+$ to OH column densities is $\\sim 20$ times higher than typical values in Galactic and high-$z$ absorbers. This could arise due to small-scale ...

  10. The Search for Molecular Outflows in Local Volume AGNs with Herschel-PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M.; Veilleux, S.; Meléndez, M.; Sturm, E.; Graciá-Carpio, J.; González-Alfonso, E.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results from a systematic search for galactic-scale, molecular (OH 119 μm) outflows in a sample of 52 Local Volume (d\\lt 50 Mpc) Burst Alert Telescope detected active galactic nuclei (BAT AGNs) with Herschel-PACS. We combine the results from our analysis of the BAT AGNs with the published Herschel/PACS data of 43 nearby (z\\lt 0.3) galaxy mergers, mostly ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and QSOs. The objects in our sample of BAT AGNs have, on average, ˜ 10{--}100 times lower AGN luminosities, star formation rates, and stellar masses than those of the ULIRG and QSO samples. OH 119 μm is detected in 42 of our BAT AGN targets. Evidence for molecular outflows (i.e., OH absorption profiles with median velocities more blueshifted than ‑50 km s‑1 and/or blueshifted wings with 84% velocities less than ‑300 km s‑1) is seen in only four BAT AGNs (NGC 7479 is the most convincing case). Evidence for molecular inflows (i.e., OH absorption profiles with median velocities more redshifted than 50 km s‑1) is seen in seven objects, although an inverted P-Cygni profile is detected unambiguously in only one object (Circinus). Our data show that both the starburst and AGN contribute to driving OH outflows, but the fastest OH winds require AGNs with quasar-like luminosities. We also confirm that the total absorption strength of OH 119 μm is a good proxy for dust optical depth as it correlates strongly with the 9.7 μm silicate absorption feature, a measure of obscuration originating in both the nuclear torus and host galaxy disk. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  11. An origin for multiphase gas in galactic winds and haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Todd A.; Quataert, Eliot; Zhang, Dong; Weinberg, David H.

    2016-01-01

    The physical origin of high-velocity cool gas seen in galactic winds remains unknown. Following work by B. Wang, we argue that radiative cooling in initially hot thermally-driven outflows can produce fast neutral atomic and photoionized cool gas. The inevitability of adiabatic cooling from the flow's initial 107-108 K temperature and the shape of the cooling function for T ≲ 107 K imply that outflows with hot gas mass-loss rate relative to star formation rate of β =dot{M}_hot/dot{M}_star ≳ 0.5 cool radiatively on scales ranging from the size of the energy injection region to tens of kpc. We highlight the β and star formation rate surface density dependence of the column density, emission measure, radiative efficiency, and velocity. At rcool, the gas produces X-ray and then UV/optical line emission with a total power bounded by ˜10-2 L⋆ if the flow is powered by steady-state star formation with luminosity L⋆. The wind is thermally unstable at rcool, potentially leading to a multiphase medium. Cooled winds decelerate significantly in the extended gravitational potential of galaxies. The cool gas precipitated from hot outflows may explain its prevalence in galactic haloes. We forward a picture of winds whereby cool clouds are initially accelerated by the ram pressure of the hot flow, but are rapidly shredded by hydrodynamical instabilities, thereby increasing β, seeding radiative and thermal instability, and cool gas rebirth. If the cooled wind shocks as it sweeps up the circumgalactic medium, its cooling time is short, thus depositing cool gas far out into the halo. Finally, conduction can dominate energy transport in low-β hot winds, leading to flatter temperature profiles than otherwise expected, potentially consistent with X-ray observations of some starbursts.

  12. Left ventricular outflow obstruction and necrotizing enterocolitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, H.A.; Haney, P.J.

    1984-02-01

    Two neonates had unusually rapid development of necrotizing enterocolitis within 24 hours of birth. Both patients had decreased systemic perfusion secondary to aortic atresia. Onset of either clinical or radiographic manifestations of necrotizing enterocolitis in the first day of life should alert one to the possible presence of severe left ventricular outflow obstruction.

  13. Protostellar Outflow Evolution in Turbulent Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, A; Frank, A; Carroll, J; Blackman, E; Quillen, A

    2008-04-11

    The link between turbulence in star formatting environments and protostellar jets remains controversial. To explore issues of turbulence and fossil cavities driven by young stellar outflows we present a series of numerical simulations tracking the evolution of transient protostellar jets driven into a turbulent medium. Our simulations show both the effect of turbulence on outflow structures and, conversely, the effect of outflows on the ambient turbulence. We demonstrate how turbulence will lead to strong modifications in jet morphology. More importantly, we demonstrate that individual transient outflows have the capacity to re-energize decaying turbulence. Our simulations support a scenario in which the directed energy/momentum associated with cavities is randomized as the cavities are disrupted by dynamical instabilities seeded by the ambient turbulence. Consideration of the energy power spectra of the simulations reveals that the disruption of the cavities powers an energy cascade consistent with Burgers-type turbulence and produces a driving scale-length associated with the cavity propagation length. We conclude that fossil cavities interacting either with a turbulent medium or with other cavities have the capacity to sustain or create turbulent flows in star forming environments. In the last section we contrast our work and its conclusions with previous studies which claim that jets can not be the source of turbulence.

  14. Accretion, Outflows, and Winds of Magnetized Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Romanova, M M

    2016-01-01

    Many types of stars have strong magnetic fields that can dynamically influence the flow of circumstellar matter. In stars with accretion disks, the stellar magnetic field can truncate the inner disk and determine the paths that matter can take to flow onto the star. These paths are different in stars with different magnetospheres and periods of rotation. External field lines of the magnetosphere may inflate and produce favorable conditions for outflows from the disk-magnetosphere boundary. Outflows can be particularly strong in the propeller regime, wherein a star rotates more rapidly than the inner disk. Outflows may also form at the disk-magnetosphere boundary of slowly rotating stars, if the magnetosphere is compressed by the accreting matter. In isolated, strongly magnetized stars, the magnetic field can influence formation and/or propagation of stellar wind outflows. Winds from low-mass, solar-type stars may be either thermally or magnetically driven, while winds from massive, luminous O and B type stars...

  15. Propeller-driven Outflows and Disk Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Romanova, M M; Koldoba, A V; Lovelace, R V E

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of propeller-driven outflows in axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations of disk accretion to rapidly rotating magnetized stars. Matter outflows in a wide cone and is centrifugally ejected from the inner regions of the disk. Closer to the axis there is a strong, collimated, magnetically dominated outflow of energy and angular momentum carried by the open magnetic field lines from the star. The ``efficiency'' of the propeller may be very high in the respect that most of the incoming disk matter is expelled from the system in winds. The star spins-down rapidly due to the magnetic interaction with the disk through closed field lines and with corona through open field lines. Diffusive and viscous interaction between magnetosphere and the disk are important: no outflows were observed for very small values of the diffusivity and viscosity. These simulation results are applicable to the early stages of evolution of classical T Tauri stars and to different stages of evolution of cataclysmi...

  16. An Exoplanet's Response to Anisotropic Stellar Mass-Loss During Birth and Death

    CERN Document Server

    Veras, Dimitri; Tout, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    The birth and death of planets may be affected by mass outflows from their parent stars during the T-Tauri or post-main-sequence phases of stellar evolution. These outflows are often modelled to be isotropic, but this assumption is not realistic for fast rotators, bipolar jets and supernovae. Here we derive the general equations of motion for the time evolution of a single planet, brown dwarf, comet or asteroid perturbed by anisotropic mass loss in terms of a complete set of planetary orbital elements, the ejecta velocity, and the parent star's co-latitude and longitude. We restrict our application of these equations to 1) rapidly rotating giant stars, and 2) arbitrarily-directed jet outflows. We conclude that the isotropic mass-loss assumption can safely be used to model planetary motion during giant branch phases of stellar evolution within distances of hundreds of au. In fact, latitudinal mass loss variations anisotropically affect planetary motion only if the mass loss is asymmetric about the stellar equa...

  17. Dusty Mass Loss from Galactic Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Meixner, Margaret; Kastner, Joel H.

    2016-06-01

    We are probing how mass loss from Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars depends upon their metallicity. Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are evolved stars that eject large parts of their mass in outflows of dust and gas in the final stages of their lives. Our previous studies focused on mass loss from AGB stars in lower metallicity galaxies: the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). In our present study, we analyze AGB star mass loss in the Galaxy, with special attention to the Bulge, to investigate how mass loss differs in an overall higher metallicity environment. We construct radiative transfer models of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of stars in the Galaxy identified as AGB stars from infrared and optical surveys. Our Magellanic Cloud studies found that the AGB stars with the highest mass loss rates tended to have outflows with carbon-rich dust, and that overall more carbon-rich (C-rich) dust than oxygen-rich (O-rich) was produced by AGB stars in both LMC and SMC. Our radiative transfer models have enabled us to determine reliably the dust chemistry of the AGB star from the best-fit model. For our Galactic sample, we are investigating both the dust chemistries of the AGB stars and their mass-loss rates, to compare the balance of C-rich dust to O-rich dust between the Galactic bulge and the Magellanic Clouds. We are also constructing detailed dust opacity models of AGB stars in the Galaxy for which we have infrared spectra; e.g., from the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). This detailed dust modeling of spectra informs our choice of dust properties to use in radiative transfer modeling of SEDs of Galactic AGB stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX15AF15G.

  18. Continuum mechanics of anisotropic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Cowin, Stephen C

    2013-01-01

    Continuum Mechanics of Anisotropic Materials(CMAM) presents an entirely new and unique development of material anisotropy in the context of an appropriate selection and organization of continuum mechanics topics. These features will distinguish this continuum mechanics book from other books on this subject. Textbooks on continuum mechanics are widely employed in engineering education, however, none of them deal specifically with anisotropy in materials. For the audience of Biomedical, Chemical and Civil Engineering students, these materials will be dealt with more frequently and greater accuracy in their analysis will be desired. Continuum Mechanics of Anisotropic Materials' author has been a leader in the field of developing new approaches for the understanding of anisotropic materials.

  19. High-velocity extended molecular outflow in the star-formation dominated luminous infrared galaxy ESO 320-G030

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Santaella, M.; Colina, L.; García-Burillo, S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Arribas, S.; Cazzoli, S.; Emonts, B.; Piqueras López, J.; Planesas, P.; Storchi Bergmann, T.; Usero, A.; Villar-Martín, M.

    2016-10-01

    We analyze new high spatial resolution (~60 pc) ALMA CO(2-1) observations of the isolated luminous infrared galaxy ESO 320-G030 (d = 48 Mpc) in combination with ancillary Hubble Space Telescope optical and near infrared (IR) imaging, as well as VLT/SINFONI near-IR integral field spectroscopy. We detect a high-velocity (~450 km s-1) spatially resolved (size~2.5 kpc; dynamical time ~3 Myr) massive (~107 M⊙; Ṁ ~ 2-8 M⊙ yr-1) molecular outflow that has originated in the central ~250 pc. We observe a clumpy structure in the outflowing cold molecular gas with clump sizes between 60 and 150 pc and masses between 105.5 and 106.4 M⊙. The mass of the clumps decreases with increasing distance, while the velocity is approximately constant. Therefore, both the momentum and kinetic energy of the clumps decrease outwards. In the innermost (~100 pc) part of the outflow, we measure a hot-to-cold molecular gas ratio of 7 × 10-5, which is similar to that measured in other resolved molecular outflows. We do not find evidence of an ionized phase in this outflow. The nuclear IR and radio properties are compatible with strong and highly obscured star-formation (Ak ~ 4.6 mag; star formation rate ~ 15 M⊙ yr-1). We do not find any evidence for the presence of an active galactic nucleus. We estimate that supernova explosions in the nuclear starburst (νSN ~ 0.2 yr-1) can power the observed molecular outflow. The kinetic energy and radial momentum of the cold molecular phase of the outflow correspond to about 2% and 20%, respectively, of the supernovae output. The cold molecular outflow velocity is lower than the escape velocity, so the gas will likely return to the galaxy disk. The mass loading factor is ~0.1-0.5, so the negative feedback owing to this star-formation-powered molecular outflow is probably limited. The reduced images and datacubes (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  20. Magnetically Driven Accretion Disk Winds and Ultra-fast Outflows in PG 1211+143

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Tombesi, Francesco; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris; Behar, Ehud; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-05-01

    We present a study of X-ray ionization of MHD accretion-disk winds in an effort to constrain the physics underlying the highly ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) inferred by X-ray absorbers often detected in various sub classes of Seyfert active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our primary focus is to show that magnetically driven outflows are indeed physically plausible candidates for the observed outflows accounting for the AGN absorption properties of the present X-ray spectroscopic observations. Employing a stratified MHD wind launched across the entire AGN accretion disk, we calculate its X-ray ionization and the ensuing X-ray absorption-line spectra. Assuming an appropriate ionizing AGN spectrum, we apply our MHD winds to model the absorption features in an XMM-Newton/EPIC spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert, PG 1211+143. We find, through identifying the detected features with Fe Kα transitions, that the absorber has a characteristic ionization parameter of log (ξc[erg cm s-1]) ≃ 5-6 and a column density on the order of NH ≃ 1023 cm-2 outflowing at a characteristic velocity of vc/c ≃ 0.1-0.2 (where c is the speed of light). The best-fit model favors its radial location at rc ≃ 200 Ro (Ro is the black hole’s innermost stable circular orbit), with an inner wind truncation radius at Rt ≃ 30 Ro. The overall K-shell feature in the data is suggested to be dominated by Fe xxv with very little contribution from Fe xxvi and weakly ionized iron, which is in good agreement with a series of earlier analyses of the UFOs in various AGNs, including PG 1211+143.

  1. Comparison of ejection events in the jet and accretion disc outflows in 3C 111

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F.; Sambruna, R. M.; Marscher, A. P.; Jorstad, S. G.; Reynolds, C. S.; Markowitz, A.

    2012-07-01

    We present a comparison of the parameters of accretion disc outflows and the jet of the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 111 on subparsec (sub-pc) scales. We make use of published X-ray observations of ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) and new 43-GHz Very Long Baseline Array images to track the jet knot ejection. We find that the superluminal jet coexists with the mildly relativistic outflows on sub-pc scales, possibly indicating a transverse stratification of a global flow. The two are roughly in pressure equilibrium, with the UFOs potentially providing additional support for the initial jet collimation. The UFOs are much more massive than the jet, but their kinetic power is probably about an order of magnitude lower, at least for the observations considered here. However, their momentum flux is equivalent and both of them are powerful enough to exert a concurrent feedback impact on the surrounding environment. A link between these components is naturally predicted in the context of magnetohydrodynamic models for jet/outflow formation. However, given the high radiation throughput of active galactic nuclei, radiation pressure should also be taken into account. From the comparison with the long-term 2-10 keV Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer light curve, we find that the UFOs are preferentially detected during periods of increasing flux. We also find the possibility to place the UFOs within the known X-ray dips-jet ejection cycles, which has been shown to be a strong proof of the disc-jet connection, in analogue with stellar mass black holes. However, given the limited number of observations presently available, these relations are only tentative and additional spectral monitoring is needed to test them conclusively.

  2. Active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Blandford, RD; Woltjer, L

    1990-01-01

    Starting with this volume, the Lecture Notes of the renowned Advanced Courses of the Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy will be published annually. In each course, three extensive lectures given by leading experts in their respective fields cover different and essential aspects of the subject. The 20th course, held at Les Diablerets in April 1990, dealt with current research on active galactic nuclei; it represents the most up-to-date views on the subject, presented with particular regard for clarity. The previous courses considered a wide variety of subjects, beginning with ""Theory

  3. Anisotropically structured magnetic aerogel monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiligtag, Florian J.; Airaghi Leccardi, Marta J. I.; Erdem, Derya; Süess, Martin J.; Niederberger, Markus

    2014-10-01

    Texturing of magnetic ceramics and composites by aligning and fixing of colloidal particles in a magnetic field is a powerful strategy to induce anisotropic chemical, physical and especially mechanical properties into bulk materials. If porosity could be introduced, anisotropically structured magnetic materials would be the perfect supports for magnetic separations in biotechnology or for magnetic field-assisted chemical reactions. Aerogels, combining high porosity with nanoscale structural features, offer an exceptionally large surface area, but they are difficult to magnetically texture. Here we present the preparation of anatase-magnetite aerogel monoliths via the assembly of preformed nanocrystallites. Different approaches are proposed to produce macroscopic bodies with gradient-like magnetic segmentation or with strongly anisotropic magnetic texture.Texturing of magnetic ceramics and composites by aligning and fixing of colloidal particles in a magnetic field is a powerful strategy to induce anisotropic chemical, physical and especially mechanical properties into bulk materials. If porosity could be introduced, anisotropically structured magnetic materials would be the perfect supports for magnetic separations in biotechnology or for magnetic field-assisted chemical reactions. Aerogels, combining high porosity with nanoscale structural features, offer an exceptionally large surface area, but they are difficult to magnetically texture. Here we present the preparation of anatase-magnetite aerogel monoliths via the assembly of preformed nanocrystallites. Different approaches are proposed to produce macroscopic bodies with gradient-like magnetic segmentation or with strongly anisotropic magnetic texture. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Digital photographs of dispersions and gels with different water-to-ethanol ratios; magnetic measurements of an anatase aerogel containing 0.25 mol% Fe3O4 nanoparticles; XRD patterns of the iron oxide and

  4. Latest developments in anisotropic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Tinti, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the leading order of anisotropic hydrodynamics expansion. It has already been shown that in the (0+1) and (1+1)-dimensional cases it is consistent with the second order viscous hydrodynamics, and it provides a striking agreement with the exact solutions of the Boltzmann equation. Quite recently, a new set of equations has been proposed for the leading order of anisotropic hydrodynamics, which is consistent with the second order viscous hydrodynamics in the most general (3+1)-dimensional case, and does not require a next-to-leading treatment for describing pressure anisotropies in the transverse plane.

  5. Dynamical analysis of anisotropic inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karčiauskas, Mindaugas

    2016-06-01

    The inflaton coupling to a vector field via the f(φ)2F μνFμν term is used in several contexts in the literature, such as to generate primordial magnetic fields, to produce statistically anisotropic curvature perturbation, to support anisotropic inflation, and to circumvent the η-problem. In this work, I perform dynamical analysis of this system allowing for the most general Bianchi I initial conditions. I also confirm the stability of attractor fixed points along phase-space directions that had not been investigated before.

  6. Anisotropic hydrodynamics: Motivation and methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this proceedings contribution I review recent progress in our understanding of the bulk dynamics of relativistic systems that possess potentially large local rest frame momentum-space anisotropies. In order to deal with these momentum-space anisotropies, a reorganization of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics can be made around an anisotropic background, and the resulting dynamical framework has been dubbed “anisotropic hydrodynamics”. I also discuss expectations for the degree of momentum-space anisotropy of the quark–gluon plasma generated in relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC from second-order viscous hydrodynamics, strong-coupling approaches, and weak-coupling approaches

  7. Extended Warm Gas in the ULIRG Mrk273: Galactic Outflows and Tidal Debris

    CERN Document Server

    Zaurin, Javier Rodriguez; Rupke, David S N; Veilleux, Sylvain; Spoon, Henrik W W; Chiaberge, Marco; Almeida, Cristina Ramos; Batcheldor, Dan; Sparks, William B

    2014-01-01

    We present new HST ACS medium- and narrow-band images and long-slit, optical (4000 - 7200A) spectra obtained using the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) on La Palma, of the merging system Mrk273. The HST observations sample the [OIII]4959,5007 emission from the galaxy and the nearby continuum. The images show that the morphologies of the extended continuum and the ionised gas emission from the galaxy are decoupled, extending almost perpendicular to each other. In particular, we detect for the first time a spectacular structure of ionised gas in the form of filaments extending ~23 kpc to the east of the nuclear region. The quiescent ionised gas kinematics at these locations suggests that these filaments are tidal debris left over from a secondary merger event that are illuminated by an AGN in the nuclear regions. The images also reveal a complex morphology in the nuclear region of the galaxy for both the continuum and the [OIII] emission. Kinematic disturbance, in the form of broad (FWHM > 500 km s-1) and/or strong...

  8. X-ray outflows of active galactic nuclei warm absorbers: A 900 ks Chandra simulated spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Ramirez-Velasquez, J M

    2016-01-01

    We report on the performance of the statistical, X-ray absorption lines identification procedure XLINE-ID. As illustration, it is used to estimate the time averaged gas density $n_H(r)$ of a representative AGN's warm absorber ($T\\approx 10^5$~K) X-ray simulated spectrum. The method relies on three key ingredients: (1) a well established emission continuum level; (2) a robust grid of photoionisation models spanning several orders of magnitude in gas density ($n_H$), plasma column density ($N_H$), and in ionization states; (3) theoretical curves of growth for a large set of atomic lines. By comparing theoretical and observed equivalent widths of a large set of lines, spanning highly ionized charge states from O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, and the Fe L-shell and K-shell, we are able to infer the location of the X-ray warm absorber.

  9. Recollimation shocks in the relativistic outflows of active galactic nuclei. Doctoral Thesis Award Lecture 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, C. M.

    2015-06-01

    We analysed the single-dish radio light curves of the blazar CTA 102 during its major flare around April 2006. The modelling of these data revealed a possible travelling shock-recollimation shock interaction during the flare. To verify this hypothesis, we used multi-epoch and multi-frequency very-long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations and performed a detailed kinematic and spectral analysis. The results confirmed the hypothesis of a shock-shock interaction causing the 2006 radio flare and provided indications for additional recollimation shocks farther downstream.

  10. X-ray outflows of active galactic nuclei warm absorbers: A 900 ks Chandra simulated spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez-Velasquez, J. M.; Garcia, J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the performance of the statistical, X-ray absorption lines identification procedure XLINE-ID. As illustration, it is used to estimate the time averaged gas density $n_H(r)$ of a representative AGN's warm absorber ($T\\approx 10^5$~K) X-ray simulated spectrum. The method relies on three key ingredients: (1) a well established emission continuum level; (2) a robust grid of photoionisation models spanning several orders of magnitude in gas density ($n_H$), plasma column density ($N_H...

  11. Ultra-Fast Outflows in Radio-Loud AGN: New Constraints on Jet-Disk Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambruna, Rita

    There is strong observational and theoretical evidence that outflows/jets are coupled to accretion disks in black hole accreting systems, from Galactic to extragalactic sizes. While in radio-quiet AGN there is ample evidence for the presence of Ultra-Fast Outflows (UFOs) from the presence of blue-shifted absorption features in their 4-10~keV spectra, sub-relativistic winds are expected on theoretical basis in radio-loud AGN but have not been observed until now. Our recent Suzaku observations of 5 bright Broad- Line Radio Galaxies (BLRGs, the radio-loud counterparts of Seyferts) has started to change this picture. We found strong evidence for UFOs in 3 out of 5 BLRGs, with ionization parameters, column densities, and velocities of the absorber similar to Seyferts. Moreover, the outflows in BLRGs are likely to be energetically very significant: from the Suzaku data of the three sources, outflow masses similar to the accretion masses and kinetic energies of the wind similar to the X-ray luminosity and radio power of the jet are inferred. Clearly, UFOs in radio-loud AGN represent a new key ingredient to understand their central engines and in particular, the jet-disk linkage. Our discovery of UFOs in a handful of BLRGs raises the questions of how common disk winds are in radio-loud AGN, what the absorber physical and dynamical characteristics are, and what is the outflow role in broader picture of galaxy-black hole connection for radio sources, i.e., for large-scale feedback models. To address these and other issues, we propose to use archival XMM-Newton and Suzaku spectra to search for Ultra-Fast Outflows in a large number of radio sources. Over a period of two years, we will conduct a systematic, uniform analysis of the archival X-ray data, building on our extensive experience with a similar previous project for Seyferts, and using robust analysis and statistical methodologies. As an important side product, we will also obtain accurate, self- consistent measurements

  12. Accretion, winds and outflows in young stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, H. M.

    2013-02-01

    Young stars and planetary systems form in molecular clouds. After the initial radial infall an accretion disk develops. For classical T Tauri stars (CTTS, F-K type precursors) the accretion disk does not reach down to the central star, but it is truncated near the co-rotation radius by the stellar magnetic field. The inner edge of the disk is ionized by the stellar radiation, so that the accretion stream is funneled along the magnetic field lines. On the stellar surface an accretion shock develops, which is observed over a wide wavelength range as X-ray emission, UV excess, optical veiling and optical and IR emission lines. Some of the accretion tracers, e.g. Hα, can be calibrated to measure the accretion rate. This accretion process is variable on time scales of hours to years due to changing accretion rates, stellar rotation and reconfiguration of the magnetic field. Furthermore, many (if not all) accreting systems also drive strong outflows which are ultimately powered by accretion. However, the exact driving mechanism is still unclear. Several components could contribute to the outflows: slow, wide-angle disk winds, X-winds launched close to the inner disk rim, and thermally driven stellar winds. In any case, the outflows contain material of very different temperatures and speeds. The disk wind is cool and can have a molecular component with just a few tens of km s-1, while the central component of the outflow can reach a few 100 km s-1. In some cases the inner part of the outflow is collimated to a small-angle jet. These jets have an onion-like structure, where the inner components are consecutively hotter and faster. The jets can contain working surfaces, which show up as Herbig-Haro knots. Accretion and outflows in the CTTS phase do not only determine stellar parameters like the rotation rate on the main-sequence, they also can have a profound impact on the environment of young stars. This review concentrates on CTTS in near-by star forming regions where

  13. Searching for Evidence of Energetic Feedback in Distant Galaxies: A Galaxy Wide Outflow in a z~2 Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, D M; Smail, I; McDermid, R; Nesvadba, N

    2009-01-01

    Leading models of galaxy formation require large-scale energetic outflows to regulate the growth of distant galaxies and their central black holes. However, current observational support for this hypothesis at high redshift is mostly limited to rare z>2 radio galaxies. Here we present Gemini-North NIFS Intregral Field Unit (IFU) observations of the [OIII] emission from a z~2 ultraluminous infrared galaxy (L_IR>10^12 solar luminosities) with an optically identified Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). The spatial extent (~4-8 kpc) of the high velocity and broad [OIII] emission are consistent with that found in z>2 radio galaxies, indicating the presence of a large-scale energetic outflow in a galaxy population potentially orders of magnitude more common than distant radio galaxies. The low radio luminosity of this system indicates that radio-bright jets are unlikely to be responsible for driving the outflow. However, the estimated energy input required to produce the large-scale outflow signatures (of order ~10^59 e...

  14. Gemini GMOS and WHT SAURON integral-field spectrograph observations of the AGN driven outflow in NGC 1266

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Timothy A; McDermid, Richard M; Bureau, Martin; Sarzi, Marc; Nyland, Kristina; Alatalo, Katherine; Bayet, Estelle; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frederic; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison; Davies, Roger L; de Zeeuw, P T; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M

    2012-01-01

    We use the SAURON and GMOS integral field spectrographs to observe the active galactic nucleus (AGN) powered outflow in NGC 1266. This unusual galaxy is relatively nearby (D=30 Mpc), allowing us to investigate the process of AGN feedback in action. We present maps of the kinematics and line strengths of the ionised gas emission lines Halpha, Hbeta, [OIII], [OI], [NII] and [SII], and report on the detection of Sodium D absorption. We use these tracers to explore the structure of the source, derive the ionised and atomic gas kinematics and investigate the gas excitation and physical conditions. NGC 1266 contains two ionised gas components along most lines of sight, tracing the ongoing outflow and a component closer to the galaxy systemic, the origin of which is unclear. This gas appears to be disturbed by a nascent AGN jet. We confirm that the outflow in NGC 1266 is truly multiphase, containing radio plasma, atomic, molecular and ionised gas and X-ray emitting plasma. The outflow has velocities up to \\pm900 km/...

  15. An analytical model for galaxy metallicity: What do metallicity relations tell us about star formation and outflow?

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Yu; Benson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We develop a simple analytical model that tracks galactic metallicities governed by star formation and feedback to gain insight from the observed galaxy stellar mass-metallicity relations over a large range of stellar masses and redshifts. The model reveals the following implications of star formation and feedback processes in galaxy formation. First, the observed metallicity relations provide a stringent upper limit for the averaged outflow mass-loading factors of local galaxies, which is ~20 for M_*~10^9Msun galaxies and monotonically decreases to ~1 for M_*~10^{11}Msun galaxies. Second, the inferred upper-limit for the outflow mass-loading factor sensitively depends on whether the outflow is metal-enriched with respect to the ISM metallicity. If half of the metals ejected from SNe leave the galaxy in metal-enriched winds, the outflow mass-loading factor for galaxies at any mass can barely be higher than ~10, which puts strong constraints on galaxy formation models. Third, the relatively lower stellar-phase...

  16. Launching of Active Galactic Nuclei Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    As black holes accrete gas, they often produce relativistic, collimated outflows, or jets. Jets are expected to form in the vicinity of a black hole, making them powerful probes of strong-field gravity. However, how jet properties (e.g., jet power) connect to those of the accretion flow (e.g., mass accretion rate) and the black hole (e.g., black hole spin) remains an area of active research. This is because what determines a crucial parameter that controls jet properties—the strength of large-scale magnetic flux threading the black hole—remains largely unknown. First-principles computer simulations show that due to this, even if black hole spin and mass accretion rate are held constant, the simulated jet powers span a wide range, with no clear winner. This limits our ability to use jets as a quantitative diagnostic tool of accreting black holes. Recent advances in computer simulations demonstrated that accretion disks can accumulate large-scale magnetic flux on the black hole, until the magnetic flux becomes so strong that it obstructs gas infall and leads to a magnetically-arrested disk (MAD). Recent evidence suggests that central black holes in jetted active galactic nuclei and tidal disruptions are surrounded by MADs. Since in MADs both the black hole magnetic flux and the jet power are at their maximum, well-defined values, this opens up a new vista in the measurements of black hole masses and spins and quantitative tests of accretion and jet theory.

  17. A Versatile Family of Galactic Wind Models

    CERN Document Server

    Bustard, Chad; D'Onghia, Elena

    2015-01-01

    We present a versatile family of model galactic outflows including non-uniform mass and energy source distributions, a gravitational potential from an extended mass source, and radiative losses. The model easily produces steady-state wind solutions for a range of mass-loading factors, energy-loading factors, galaxy mass and galaxy radius. We find that, with radiative losses included, highly mass-loaded winds must be driven at high central temperatures, whereas low mass-loaded winds can be driven at low temperatures just above the peak of the cooling curve, meaning radiative losses can drastically affect the wind solution even for low mass-loading factors. By including radiative losses, we are able to show that subsonic flows can be ignored as a possible mechanism for expelling mass and energy from a galaxy compared to the more efficient transonic solutions. Specifically, the transonic solutions with low mass-loading and high energy-loading are the most efficient. Our model also produces low-temperature, high-...

  18. UNLEASHING POSITIVE FEEDBACK: LINKING THE RATES OF STAR FORMATION, SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE ACCRETION, AND OUTFLOWS IN DISTANT GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressure-regulated star formation is a simple variant on the usual supernova-regulated star formation efficiency that controls the global star formation rate as a function of cold gas content in star-forming galaxies, and accounts for the Schmidt-Kennicutt law in both nearby and distant galaxies. Inclusion of active galactic nucleus (AGN) induced pressure, by jets and/or winds that flow back onto a gas-rich disk, can lead, under some circumstances, to significantly enhanced star formation rates, especially at high redshift and most likely followed by the more widely accepted phase of star formation quenching. Simple expressions are derived that relate supermassive black hole growth, star formation, and outflow rates. The ratios of black hole to spheroid mass and of both black hole accretion and outflow rates to star formation rate are predicted as a function of time. I suggest various tests of the AGN-triggered star formation hypothesis

  19. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, P.G.; Bassa, C. G.; Dieball, A.; Greiss, S.; Maccarone, T. J.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Britt, C. T.; Clem, J. L.; Gossen, L.; Grindlay, J. E.; Groot, P.J.; Kuiper, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Mendez, M.; Mikles, V. J.; Ratti, E. M.; Rea, N.; van Haaften, L.; Wijnands, R.; in't Zand, J. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (CGBS) is a shallow but wide survey of two approximately 6x1 degree strips of the Galactic Bulge about a degree above and below the plane. The survey by design targets regions where extinction and crowding are manageable and optical counterparts are accessible to de

  20. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, P. G.; Bassa, C. G.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Greiss, S.; Clem, J.; Dieball, A.; Mikles, V. J.; Britt, C. T.; Gossen, L.; Collazzi, A. C.; Wijnands, R.; In't Zand, J. J. M.; Mendez, M.; Rea, N.; Kuulkers, E.; Ratti, E. M.; van Haaften, L. M.; Heinke, C.; Ozel, F.; Groot, P. J.; Verbunt, F.

    2012-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a shallow but wide survey of two approximately 6x1 degree strips of the Galactic Bulge about a degree above and below the plane. The survey by design targets regions where extinction and crowding are manageable and optical counterparts are accessible to det

  1. Influence of Mediterranean Outflow on climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmstorf, Stefan

    A cover article in Eos last year [Johnson, 1997] called for a dam across the Strait of Gibraltar to prevent a new Ice Age. In this article, R. G. Johnson argued that reduced Nile River flow after building the Aswan Dam increases Mediterranean Sea salinity, leading to enhanced outflow of salty water into the Atlantic Ocean. This, in turn, would alter the thermohaline (that is, temperature and salinity driven) circulation of the Atlantic, heat up the Labrador Sea and enhance evaporation there, and increase snowfall in Canada until a new ice sheet builds up. Ocean circulation model experiments, however, suggest that this fear is unfounded. While Mediterranean saltwater outflow (Figure 1a) does appear to have some effect on North Atlantic circulation and surface climate, the change in Mediterranean salt budget resulting from the Aswan Dam is far too small to have any noticeable impact.

  2. Protostellar outflows with Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD)

    CERN Document Server

    Bürzle, Florian; Stasyszyn, Federico; Dolag, Klaus; Klessen, Ralf S

    2011-01-01

    The protostellar collapse of a molecular cloud core is usually accompanied by outflow phenomena. The latter are thought to be driven by magnetorotational processes from the central parts of the protostellar disc. While several 3D AMR/nested grid studies of outflow phenomena in collapsing magnetically supercritical dense cores have been reported in the literature, so far no such simulation has been performed using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. This is mainly due to intrinsic numerical difficulties in handling magnetohydrodynamics within SPH, which only recently were partly resolved. In this work, we use an approach where we evolve the magnetic field via the induction equation, augmented with stability correction and divergence cleaning schemes. We consider the collapse of a rotating core of one solar mass, threaded by a weak magnetic field initially parallel to the rotation axis so that the core is magnetically supercritical. We show, that Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) is a...

  3. Hepatic venous outflow obstruction: Three similar syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulas Darda Bayraktar; Soley Seren; Yusuf Bayraktar

    2007-01-01

    Our goal is to provide a detailed review of venoocclusive disease (VOD), Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS),and congestive hepatopathy (CH), all of which results in hepatic venous outflow obstruction. This is the first article in which all three syndromes have been reviewed,enabling the reader to compare the characteristics of these disorders. The histological findings in VOD, BCS,and CH are almost identical: sinusoidal congestion and cell necrosis mostly in perivenular areas of hepatic acini which eventually leads to bridging fibrosis between adjacent central veins. Tender hepatomegaly with jaundice and ascites is common to all three conditions.However, the clinical presentation depends mostly on the extent and rapidity of the outflow obstruction.Although the etiology and treatment are completely different in VOD, BCS, and CH; the similarities in clinical manifestations and liver histology may suggest a common mechanism of hepatic injury and adaptation in response to increased sinusoidal pressure.

  4. Extracellular Matrix Turnover and Outflow Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Kate E Keller; Mini, Aga; Bradley, John M.; Kelley, Mary J.; Acott, Ted S.

    2008-01-01

    Normal homeostatic adjustment of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) involves remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the trabecular meshwork (TM). This entails sensing elevated IOP, releasing numerous activated proteinases to degrade existing ECM and concurrent biosynthesis of replacement ECM components. To increase or decrease IOP, the quantity, physical properties and/or organization of new components should be somewhat different from those replaced in order to modify outflow resistan...

  5. Magnetic relaxation in anisotropic magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1971-01-01

    The line shape and the kinematic and thermodynamic slowing down of the critical and paramagnetic relaxation in axially anisotropic materials are discussed. Kinematic slowing down occurs only in the longitudinal relaxation function. The thermodynamic slowing down occurs in either the transverse or...

  6. Anisotropic Poisson Processes of Cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Spiess, Malte

    2010-01-01

    Main characteristics of stationary anisotropic Poisson processes of cylinders (dilated k-dimensional flats) in d-dimensional Euclidean space are studied. Explicit formulae for the capacity functional, the covariance function, the contact distribution function, the volume fraction, and the intensity of the surface area measure are given which can be used directly in applications.

  7. Failure in imperfect anisotropic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental cause of crack growth, namely nucleation and growth of voids, is investigated numerically for a two phase imperfect anisotropic material. A unit cell approach is adopted from which the overall stress strain is evaluated. Failure is observed as a sudden stress drop and depending...

  8. Magnotospheric imaging of high latitude ion outflows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Garrido

    Full Text Available High latitude ion outflows mostly consist of upward streaming O+ and He+ emanating from the ionosphere. At heights above 1000 km, these flows consist of cold and hot components which resonantly scatter solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV light, however, the ion populations respond differently to Doppler shifting resulting from the large relative velocities between the ions and the Sun. The possibility of optical detection of the Doppler effect on the scattering rate will be discussed for the O+ (83.4 nm ions. We have contrasted the EUV solar resonance images of these outflows by simulations of the 30.4 nm He+ and 83.4 nm O+ emissions for both quiet and disturbed geomagnetic conditions. Input data for the 1000 km level has been obtained from the EICS instrument aboard the Dynamics Explorer satellite. Our results show emission rates of 50 and 56 milli-Rayleighs at 30.4 nm for quiet and disturbed conditions and 65 and 75 milli-Rayleighs at 83.4 nm for quiet and disturbed conditions, respectively, obtained for a polar orbiting satellite and viewing radially outward. We also find that an imager at an equatorial distance of 9 RE or more is in a favourable position for detecting ion outflows, particularly when the plasmapause is depressed in latitude. However, an occultation disk is necessary to obscure the bright plasmaspheric emissions.

  9. DLA kinematics and outflows from starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Razoumov, Alexei O

    2008-01-01

    We present results from a numerical study of the multiphase interstellar medium in sub-Lyman-break galaxy protogalactic clumps. Such clumps are abundant at z=3 and are thought to be a major contributor to damped Ly-alpha absorption. We model the formation of winds from these clumps and show that during star formation episodes they feature outflows with neutral gas velocity widths up to several hundred km/s. Such outflows are consistent with the observed high-velocity dispersion in DLAs. In our models thermal energy feedback from winds and supernovae results in efficient outflows only when cold (~ 300 K), dense (> 100 msun/pc^3) clouds are resolved at grid resolution of 12 pc. At lower 24 pc resolution the first signs of the multiphase medium are spotted; however, at this low resolution thermal injection of feedback energy cannot yet create hot expanding bubbles around star-forming regions -- instead feedback tends to erase high-density peaks and suppress star formation. At 12 pc resolution feedback compresses...

  10. Modeling galactic extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cecchi-Pestellini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a model for interstellar extinction dust, in which we assume a bimodal distribution of extinction carriers, a dispersion of core-mantle grains, supplemented by a collection of PAHs in free molecular form. We use state-of-the-art methods to calculate the extinction due to macroscopic dust particles, and the absorption cross-sections of PAHs in four different charge states. While successfull for most of observed Galactic extinction curves, in few cases the model cannot provide reliable results. Paradoxically, these failures appear to be very promising, suggesting that the whole body of dust extinction features might be described within the cycle of carbon in the interstellar medium.

  11. Galactic Diffuse Polarized Emission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ettore Carretti

    2011-12-01

    Diffuse polarized emission by synchrotron is a key tool to investigate magnetic fields in the Milky Way, particularly the ordered component of the large scale structure. Key observables are the synchrotron emission itself and the RM is by Faraday rotation. In this paper the main properties of the radio polarized diffuse emission and its use to investigate magnetic fields will be reviewed along with our current understanding of the galactic magnetic field and the data sets available. We will then focus on the future perspective discussing RM-synthesis – the new powerful instrument devised to unlock the information encoded in such an emission – and the surveys currently in progress like S-PASS and GMIMS.

  12. Gusty, gaseous flows of FIRE: galactic winds in cosmological simulations with explicit stellar feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Kereš, Dušan; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Hopkins, Philip F.; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of the galaxy-scale gaseous outflows from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulations. This suite of hydrodynamic cosmological zoom simulations resolves formation of star-forming giant molecular clouds to z = 0, and features an explicit stellar feedback model on small scales. Our simulations reveal that high-redshift galaxies undergo bursts of star formation followed by powerful gusts of galactic outflows that eject much of the interstellar medium and temporarily suppress star formation. At low redshift, however, sufficiently massive galaxies corresponding to L* progenitors develop stable discs and switch into a continuous and quiescent mode of star formation that does not drive outflows far into the halo. Mass-loading factors for winds in L* progenitors are η ≈ 10 at high redshift, but decrease to η ≪ 1 at low redshift. Although lower values of η are expected as haloes grow in mass over time, we show that the strong suppression of outflows with decreasing redshift cannot be explained by mass evolution alone. Circumgalactic outflow velocities are variable and broadly distributed, but typically range between one and three times the circular velocity of the halo. Much of the ejected material builds a reservoir of enriched gas within the circumgalactic medium, some of which could be later recycled to fuel further star formation. However, a fraction of the gas that leaves the virial radius through galactic winds is never regained, causing most haloes with mass Mh ≤ 1012 M⊙ to be deficient in baryons compared to the cosmic mean by z = 0.

  13. Galactic plane gamma-radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Ogelman, H. B.; Tumer, T.; Ozel, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of the SAS 2 data together with the COS B results shows that the distribution of galactic gamma-radiation has several similarities to that of other large-scale tracers of galactic structure. The radiation is primarily confined to a thin disc which exhibits offsets from b = 0 degrees similar to warping at radio frequencies. The principal distinction of the gamma-radiation is a stronger contrast in intensity between the region from 310 to 45 degrees in longitude and the regions away from the center that can be attributed to a variation in cosmic-ray density as a function of position in Galaxy. The diffuse galactic gamma-ray energy spectrum shows no significant variation in direction, and the spectrum seen along the plane is the same as that for the galactic component of the gamma-radiation at high altitudes. The uniformity of the galactic gamma-ray spectrum, the smooth decrease in intensity as a function of altitude, and the absence of any galactic gamma-ray sources at high altitudes indicate a diffuse origin for bulk of the galactic gamma-radiation rather than a collection of localized sources.

  14. The end of the Galactic spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    De Donato, C

    2007-01-01

    We use a diffusion galactic model to analyze the end of the Galactic cosmic ray spectrum and its mixing with the extragalactic cosmic ray flux. We analyze the transition between Galactic and extragalactic components using two different extragalactic models. We compare the sum of the diffusive galactic spectrum and extragalactic spectrum with the available experimental data.

  15. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: Shocks and Outflows in a normal star-forming galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, I-Ting; Dopita, Michael A; Medling, Anne M; Allen, J T; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bloom, Jessica V; Bryant, Julia J; Croom, Scott M; Fogarty, L M R; Goodwin, Michael; Green, Andy W; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S; Lawrence, Jon S; Owers, Matt S; Richards, Samuel; Sharp, Rob

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility and potential of using large integral field spectroscopic surveys to investigate the prevalence of galactic-scale outflows in the local Universe. Using integral field data from SAMI and the Wide Field Spectrograph, we study the nature of an isolated disk galaxy, SDSS J090005.05+000446.7 (z = 0.05386). In the integral field datasets, the galaxy presents skewed line profiles changing with position in the galaxy. The skewed line profiles are caused by different kinematic components overlapping in the line-of-sight direction. We perform spectral decomposition to separate the line profiles in each spatial pixel as combinations of (1) a narrow kinematic component consistent with HII regions, (2) a broad kinematic component consistent with shock excitation, and (3) an intermediate component consistent with shock excitation and photoionisation mixing. The three kinematic components have distinctly different velocity fields, velocity dispersions, line ratios, and electron densities. We m...

  16. Antiproton Flux in Cosmic Ray Propagation Models with Anisotropic Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Grajek, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Recently a cosmic ray propagation model has been introduced, where anisotropic diffusion is used as a mechanism to allow for $\\mathcal{O}(100)$ km/s galactic winds. This model predicts a reduced antiproton background flux, suggesting an excess is being observed. We implement this model in GALPROP v50.1 and perform a $\\chi^2$ analysis for B/C, $^{10}$Be/$^{9}$Be, and the recent PAMELA $\\bar{p}/p$ datasets. By introducing a power-index parameter $\\alpha$ that dictates the dependence of the diffusion coefficient $D_{xx}$ on height $|z|$ away from the galactic plane, we confirm that isotropic diffusion models with $\\alpha=0$ cannot accommodate high velocity convective winds suggested by ROSAT, while models with $\\alpha=1$ ($D_{xx}\\propto |z|$) can give a very good fit. A fit to B/C and $^{10}$Be/$^{9}$Be data predicts a lower $\\bar{p}/p$ flux ratio than the PAMELA measurement at energies between approximately 2 GeV to 20 GeV. A combined fit including in addition the $\\bar{p}/p$ data is marginal, suggesting only a...

  17. Anisotropic Inflation and Cosmological Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Emami, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations opened up a new window on the inflationary model building. As it was firstly reported by the WMAP data, there may be some indications of statistical anisotropy on the CMB map, although the statistical significance of these findings are under debate. Motivated by these observations, people begun considering new inflationary models which may lead to statistical anisotropy. The simplest possible way to construct anisotropic inflation is to introduce vector fields. During the course of this thesis, we study models of anisotropic inflation and their observational implications such as power spectrum, bispectrum etc. Firstly we build a new model, which contains the gauge field which breaks the conformal invariance while preserving the gauge invariance. We show that in these kind of models, there can be an attractor phase in the evolution of the system when the back-reaction of the gauge field becomes important in the evolution of the inflaton field. We then study the cosmological perturbation the...

  18. Stealths on Anisotropic Holographic Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Ayón-Beato, Eloy; Juárez-Aubry, María Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we are interested in exploring the existence of stealth configurations on anisotropic backgrounds playing a prominent role in the non-relativistic version of the gauge/gravity correspondence. By stealth configuration, we mean a nontrivial scalar field nonminimally coupled to gravity whose energy-momentum tensor evaluated on the anisotropic background vanishes identically. In the case of a Lifshitz spacetime with a nontrivial dynamical exponent z, we spotlight the role played by the anisotropy to establish the holographic character of the stealth configurations, i.e. the scalar field is shown to only depend on the radial holographic direction. This configuration which turns out to be massless and without integration constants is possible for a unique value of the nonminimal coupling parameter. Then, using a simple conformal argument, we map this configuration into a stealth solution defined on the so-called hyperscaling violation metric which is conformally related to the Lifshitz spacetime. Thi...

  19. Conductivities in an anisotropic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Khimphun, Sunly; Park, Chanyong

    2016-01-01

    In order to imitate anisotropic medium of a condensed matter system, we take into account an Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion model as a dual gravity theory where the anisotropy is caused by different momentum relaxations. This gravity model allows an anisotropic charged black hole solution. On this background, we investigate how the linear responses of vector modes like electric, thermoelectric, and thermal conductivities rely on the anisotropy. We find that the electric conductivity in low frequency limit shows a Drude peak and that in the intermediate frequency regime it reveals the power law behavior. Especially, when the anisotropy increases the exponent of the power law becomes smaller. In addition, we find that there exist a critical value for the anisotropy at which the DC conductivity reaches to its maximum value.

  20. [CII] synthetic emission maps of simulated galactic disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franeck, A.; Walch, S.; Glover, S. C. O.; Seifried, D.; Girichidis, P.; Naab, T.; Klessen, R.; Peters, T.; Wünsch, R.; Gatto, A.; Clark, P. C.

    2016-05-01

    We carry out radiative transfer simulations for the [CII] emission of simulated galactic disks from the SILCC project.6 Here we present the integrated [CII] intensity map of a typical simulation which assumes solar neighbourhood conditions with ΣGAS = 10 M⊙/pc2 and a supernova rate of 15 SN/Myr with randomly distributed supernovae (SNe) at t = 50 Myr. We analyse the intensity profile which reveals different components. These are clearly distinguishable and trace cold, molecular as well as warm, outflowing gas. We find that [CII] is a promising tool to analyse the multi-phase structure of the ISM. SILCC: Simulating the LIfe Cycle of molecular Clouds: hera.ph1.uni-koeln.de/˜silcc/

  1. Synergistic Astrophysics in the Ultraviolet using Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kriss, Gerard; Koekemoer, Anton; Mathur, Smita; Peterson, Bradley M; Scott, Jennifer E

    2012-01-01

    Observing programs comprising multiple scientific objectives will enhance the productivity of NASA's next UV/Visible mission. Studying active galactic nuclei (AGN) is intrinsically important for understanding how black holes accrete matter, grow through cosmic time, and influence their host galaxies. At the same time, the bright UV continuum of AGN serves as an ideal background light source for studying foreground gas in the intergalactic medium (IGM), the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of individual galaxies, and the interstellar medium (ISM) and halo of the Milky Way. A well chosen sample of AGN can serve as the observational backbone for multiple spectroscopic investigations including quantitative measurements of outflows from AGN, the structure of their accretion disks, and the mass of the central black hole.

  2. Functional Anatomy of the Outflow Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzirani, Stefano; Gong, Haiyan

    2015-11-01

    In order to understand the pathophysiology, select optimal therapeutic options for patients and provide clients with honest expectations for cases of canine glaucoma, clinicians should be familiar with a rational understanding of the functional anatomy of the ocular structures involved in this group of diseases. The topographical extension and the structural and humoral complexity of the regions involved with the production and the outflow of aqueous humor undergo numerous changes with aging and disease. Therefore, the anatomy relative to the fluid dynamics of aqueous has become a pivotal yet flexible concept to interpret the different phenotypes of glaucoma.

  3. A resolved outflow of matter from a Brown Dwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Whelan, E T; Bacciotti, F; Natta, A; Testi, L; Randich, S; Whelan, Emma T.; Ray, Thomas P.; Bacciotti, Francesca; Natta, Antonella; Testi, Leonardo; Randich, Sofia

    2005-01-01

    The birth of stars involves not only accretion but also, counter-intuitively, the expulsion of matter in the form of highly supersonic outflows. Although this phenomenon has been seen in young stars, a fundamental question is whether it also occurs amongst newborn brown dwarfs: these are the so-called 'failed stars', with masses between stars and planets, that never manage to reach temperatures high enough for normal hydrogen fusion to occur. Recently, evidence for accretion in young brown dwarfs has mounted, and their spectra show lines that are suggestive of outflows. Here we report spectro-astrometric data that spatially resolve an outflow from a brown dwarf. The outflow's characteristics appear similar to, but on a smaller scale than, outflows from normal young stars. This result suggests that the outflow mechanism is universal, and perhaps relevant even to the formation of planets.

  4. A resolved outflow of matter from a brown dwarf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Emma T; Ray, Thomas P; Bacciotti, Francesca; Natta, Antonella; Testi, Leonardo; Randich, Sofia

    2005-06-01

    The birth of stars involves not only accretion but also, counter-intuitively, the expulsion of matter in the form of highly supersonic outflows. Although this phenomenon has been seen in young stars, a fundamental question is whether it also occurs among newborn brown dwarfs: these are the so-called 'failed stars', with masses between stars and planets, that never manage to reach temperatures high enough for normal hydrogen fusion to occur. Recently, evidence for accretion in young brown dwarfs has mounted, and their spectra show lines that are suggestive of outflows. Here we report spectro-astrometric data that spatially resolve an outflow from a brown dwarf. The outflow's characteristics appear similar to, but on a smaller scale than, outflows from normal young stars. This result suggests that the outflow mechanism is universal, and perhaps relevant even to the formation of planets.

  5. Stellar and quasar feedback in concert: effects on AGN accretion, obscuration, and outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Torrey, Paul; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2016-05-01

    We study the interaction of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) and a multiphase interstellar medium (ISM), in simulations including explicit stellar feedback, multiphase cooling, accretion-disc winds, and Compton heating. We examine radii ˜0.1-100 pc around a black hole (BH), where the accretion rate on to the BH is determined and where AGN-powered winds and radiation couple to the ISM. We conclude: (1) the BH accretion rate is determined by exchange of angular momentum between gas and stars in gravitational instabilities. This produces accretion rates ˜0.03-1 M⊙ yr-1, sufficient to power luminous AGN. (2) The gas disc in the galactic nucleus undergoes an initial burst of star formation followed by several million years where stellar feedback suppresses the star formation rate (SFR). (3) AGN winds injected at small radii with momentum fluxes ˜LAGN/c couple efficiently to the ISM and have dramatic effects on ISM properties within ˜100 pc. AGN winds suppress the nuclear SFR by factors ˜10-30 and BH accretion rate by factors ˜3-30. They increase the outflow rate from the nucleus by factors ˜10, consistent with observational evidence for galaxy-scale AGN-driven outflows. (4) With AGN feedback, the predicted column density distribution to the BH is consistent with observations. Absent AGN feedback, the BH is isotropically obscured and there are not enough optically thin sightlines to explain type-I AGN. A `torus-like' geometry arises self-consistently as AGN feedback evacuates gas in polar regions.

  6. Galactic turbulence and paleoclimate variability

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2010-01-01

    The wavelet regression detrended fluctuations of the reconstructed temperature for the past three ice ages: approximately 340000 years (Antarctic ice cores isotopic data), exhibit clear evidences of the galactic turbulence modulation up to 2500 years time-scales. The observed strictly Kolmogorov turbulence features indicates the Kolmogorov nature of galactic turbulence, and provide explanation to random-like fluctuations of the global temperature on the millennial time scales.

  7. Line-driven Disk Winds in Active Galactic Nuclei: The Critical Importance of Ionization and Radiative Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Higginbottom, Nick; Knigge, Christian; Long, Knox S; Matthews, James H; Sim, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Accretion disk winds are thought to produce many of the characteristic features seen in the spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and quasi-stellar objects (QSOs). These outflows also represent a natural form of feedback between the central supermassive black hole and its host galaxy. The mechanism for driving this mass loss remains unknown, although radiation pressure mediated by spectral lines is a leading candidate. Here, we calculate the ionization state of, and emergent spectra for, the hydrodynamic simulation of a line-driven disk wind previously presented by Proga & Kallman (2004). To achieve this, we carry out a comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation of the radiative transfer through, and energy exchange within, the predicted outflow. We find that the wind is much more ionized than originally estimated. This is because it is much more difficult to shield any wind regions effectively when the outflow itself is allowed to reprocess and redirect ionizing photons. As a result, the wind no longer produ...

  8. Cumulative neutrino background from quasar-driven outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiawei

    2016-01-01

    Quasar-driven outflows naturally account for the missing component of the extragalactic $\\gamma$-ray background through neutral pion production in interactions between protons accelerated by the forward outflow shock and interstellar protons. We study the simultaneous neutrino emission by the same protons. We adopt outflow parameters that best fit the extragalactic $\\gamma$-ray background data and derive a cumulative neutrino background of $\\sim10^{-7}\\,\\rm GeV\\,cm^{-2}\\,s^{-1}\\,sr^{-1}$ at neutrino energies $E_{\

  9. Discovery of Relativistic Outflow in the Seyfert Galaxy Ark 564

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, A; Mathur, S; Krongold, Y.; F. Nicastro

    2013-01-01

    We present \\chandra high energy transmission grating spectra of the narrow-line Seyfert-1 galaxy Ark 564. The spectrum shows numerous absorption lines which are well modeled with low velocity outflow components usually observed in Seyfert galaxies \\citep{Gupta2013}. There are, however, some residual absorption lines which are not accounted for by low-velocity outflows. Here we present identifications of the strongest lines as $K\\alpha$ transitions of \\oviin (two lines) and \\ovin at outflow ve...

  10. The Galactic Pevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Neronov, A; Tchernin, C

    2013-01-01

    We present a self-consistent interpretation of the excess of very-high-energy neutrino emission in the direction of the inner Galaxy reported by IceCube. We demonstrate that an estimate of the neutrino flux in the E>100 TeV energy range lies at the high-energy power-law extrapolation of the spectrum of diffuse gamma-ray emission from the Galaxy, measured by Fermi telescope. This proves that IceCube neutrino and Fermi/LAT gamma-ray fluxes are both produced in interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar medium. Cosmic rays responsible for the gamma-ray and neutrino flux are characterized by hard spectrum with the slope harder than -2.4 and cut-off energy higher than 10 PeV. Morphology of the IceCube excess is consistent with a possibility that multi-PeV cosmic ray source is located at the edge of Norma arm / tip of the Galactic Bar.

  11. Elusive Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Maiolino, R; Gilli, R; Nagar, N M; Bianchi, S; Böker, T; Colbert, E; Krabbe, A; Marconi, A; Matt, G; Salvati, M

    2003-01-01

    A fraction of active galactic nuclei do not show the classical Seyfert-type signatures in their optical spectra, i.e. they are optically "elusive". X-ray observations are an optimal tool to identify this class of objects. We combine new Chandra observations with archival X-ray data in order to obtain a first estimate of the fraction of elusive AGN in local galaxies and to constrain their nature. Our results suggest that elusive AGN have a local density comparable to or even higher than optically classified Seyfert nuclei. Most elusive AGN are heavily absorbed in the X-rays, with gas column densities exceeding 10^24 cm^-2, suggesting that their peculiar nature is associated with obscuration. It is likely that in elusive AGN, the nuclear UV source is completely embedded and the ionizing photons cannot escape, which prevents the formation of a classical Narrow Line Region. Elusive AGN may contribute significantly to the 30 keV bump of the X-ray background.

  12. Galactic Open Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Von Hippel, T

    2005-01-01

    The study of open clusters has a classic feel to it since the subject predates anyone alive today. Despite the age of this topic, I show via an ADS search that its relevance and importance in astronomy has grown faster in the last few decades than astronomy in general. This is surely due to both technical reasons and the interconnection of the field of stellar evolution to many branches of astronomy. In this review, I outline what we know today about open clusters and what they have taught us about a range of topics from stellar evolution to Galactic structure to stellar disk dissipation timescales. I argue that the most important astrophysics we have learned from open clusters is stellar evolution and that its most important product has been reasonably precise stellar ages. I discuss where open cluster research is likely to go in the next few years, as well as in the era of 20m telescopes, SIM, and GAIA. Age will continue to be of wide relevance in astronomy, from cosmology to planet formation timescales, an...

  13. Galaxy Evolution in Cosmological Simulations With Outflows I: Stellar Masses and Star Formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Davé, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    We examine the growth of the stellar content of galaxies from z=3-0 in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations incorporating parameterised galactic outflows. Without outflows, galaxies overproduce stellar masses (M*) and star formation rates (SFRs) compared to observations. Winds introduce a three-tier form for the galaxy stellar mass and star formation rate functions, where the middle tier depends on differential (i.e. mass-dependent) recycling of ejected wind material back into galaxies. A tight M*-SFR relation is a generic outcome of all these simulations, and its evolution is well-described as being powered by cold accretion, although current observations at z>2 suggest that star formation in small early galaxies must be highly suppressed. Roughly one-third of z=0 galaxies at masses below M^* are satellites, and star formation in satellites is not much burstier than in centrals. All models fail to suppress star formation and stellar mass growth in massive galaxies at z<2, indicating the need for an exter...

  14. Radiation Pressure Confinement -- III. The origin of the broad ionization distribution in AGN outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Jonathan; Laor, Ari; Baskin, Alexei; Holczer, Tomer

    2014-01-01

    The winds of ionized gas driven by Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) can be studied through absorption features in their X-ray spectra. A recurring feature of these outflows is their broad ionization distribution, including essentially all ionization levels (e.g., Fe^0+ to Fe^25+). The absorption measure distribution (AMD) is defined as the distribution of column density with ionization parameter |dN / dlog xi|. The AMD extends over a wide range of 0.1 < xi < 10^4 (cgs), and is remarkably similar in different objects. Power-law fits to the observed AMDs (|dN / dlog xi| ~ N_1 xi^a) yield N_1 = 3x10^21 cm^-2 +- 0.4 dex and a = 0 -- 0.4. What is the source of this broad ionization distribution, and what sets the small range of observed $N_1$ and $a$ values? A common interpretation is a multiphase outflow, with a wide range of gas densities in a uniform pressure medium. However, it has already been shown that the incident radiation pressure leads to a gas pressure gradient in the photoionized gas, and therefore ...

  15. Jet acceleration of the fast molecular outflows in the Seyfert galaxy IC5063

    CERN Document Server

    Tadhunter, C; Rose, M; Oonk, J B R; Oosterloo, T

    2014-01-01

    Massive outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are widely recognised to play a key role in the evolution of galaxies, heating the ambient gas, expelling it from the nuclear regions, and thereby affecting the star formation histories of the galaxy bulges. It has been proposed that the powerful jets of relativistic particles launched by some AGN can both accelerate and heat the molecular gas, which often dominates the mass budgets of the outflows. However, clear evidence for this mechanism in the form of detailed associations between the molecular gas kinematics and features in the radio-emitting jets has been lacking. Here we show that the warm molecular hydrogen gas in the western radio lobe of the Seyfert galaxy IC5063 is moving at high velocities - up to 600 km/s - relative to the galaxy disk. This suggests that the molecules have been accelerated by fast shocks driven into the interstellar medium (ISM) by the expanding radio jets. These results demonstrate the general feasibility of accelerating m...

  16. Gas Dynamics and Outflow in the Barred Starburst Galaxy NGC 1808 Revealed with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Salak, Dragan; Hatakeyama, Takuya; Miyamoto, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    NGC 1808 is a nearby barred starburst galaxy with an outflow from the nuclear region. To study the inflow and outflow processes related to star formation and dynamical evolution of the galaxy, we have carried out \\(^{12}\\)CO (\\(J=1-0\\)) mapping observations of the central \\(r\\sim4\\) kpc of NGC 1808 using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Four distinct components of molecular gas are revealed at high spatial resolution of 2\\arcsec (\\(\\sim100\\) pc): (1) a compact (\\(r<200\\) pc) circumnuclear disk (CND), (2) \\(r\\sim500\\) pc ring, (3) gas-rich galactic bar, and (4) spiral arms. Basic geometric and kinematic parameters are derived for the central 1-kpc region using tilted-ring modeling. The derived rotation curve reveals multiple mass components that include (1) a stellar bulge, (2) nuclear bar and molecular CND, and (3) unresolved massive (\\(\\sim10^7~M_\\sun\\)) core. Two systemic velocities, 998 km s\\(^{-1}\\) for the CND and 964 km s\\(^{-1}\\) for the 500-pc ring, are revealed, indicating ...

  17. Power spectra of outflow-driven turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Moraghan, Anthony; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the power spectra of outflow-driven turbulence through high-resolution three-dimensional isothermal numerical simulations where the turbulence is driven locally in real-space by a simple spherical outflow model. The resulting turbulent flow saturates at an average Mach number of ~2.5 and is analysed through density and velocity power spectra, including an investigation of the evolution of the solenoidal and compressional components. We obtain a shallow density power spectrum with a slope of ~-1.2 attributed to the presence of a network of localised dense filamentary structures formed by strong shock interactions. The total velocity power spectrum slope is found to be ~-2.0, representative of Burgers shock dominated turbulence model. The density weighted velocity power spectrum slope is measured as ~-1.6, slightly less than the expected Kolmogorov scaling value (slope of -5/3) found in previous works. The discrepancy may be caused by the nature of our real space driving model and we suggest ther...

  18. Accretion, winds and outflows in young stars

    CERN Document Server

    Günther, Hans Moritz

    2012-01-01

    Young stars and planetary systems form in molecular clouds. For classical T Tauri stars (CTTS, F-K type precursors) the accretion disk does not reach down to the central star, but it is truncated near the co-rotation radius. The inner edge of the disk is ionized by the stellar radiation, so that the accretion stream is funneled along the magnetic field lines. On the stellar surface an accretion shock develops, which is observed over a wide wavelength range as X-ray emission, UV excess, optical veiling and optical and IR emission lines. Some of the accretion tracers, e.g. H\\alpha, can be calibrated to measure the accretion rate. This accretion process is variable on time scales of hours to years due to changing accretion rates, stellar rotation and reconfiguration of the magnetic field. Furthermore, many accreting systems also drive strong outflows which are ultimately powered by accretion. Several components could contribute to the outflows: slow, wide-angle disk winds, X-winds launched close to the inner dis...

  19. Jet driven molecular outflows in Orion

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-Franco, A; Wilson, T L

    1999-01-01

    We present high sensitivity and high angular resolution images of the high velocity (vLSR>30kms^-1) CO emission in the J=1-0 and J=2-1 lines of the Orion KL region. These results reveal the morphology of the high-velocity CO emission at the most extreme velocities. High velocity emission have been only detected in two regions: BN/KL (IRc2/I) and Orion-S. The Orion-S region contains a very young (dynamical age of 10^3years), very fast (~110kms^-1) and very compact (<0.16pc) bipolar outflow. From the morphology of the high-velocity gas we estimate that the position of the powering source must be ~20'' north of FIR4. For the IRc2/I molecular outflow the morphology of the moderate velocity (<60kms^-1) gas shows a weak bipolarity around IRc2/I. The gas at the most extreme velocities does not show any bipolarity around IRc2/I, if any, it is found ~30'' north from these sources. The blue and redshifted gas at moderate velocities shows similar spatial distribution with a systematic trend for the size of the hig...

  20. Quasar feedback revealed by giant molecular outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Feruglio, Chiara; Piconcelli, Enrico; Menci, Nicola; Aussel, Herve'; Lamastra, Alessandra; Fiore, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    In the standard scenario for galaxy evolution the transformation of young star-forming galaxies into red bulge-dominated spheroids, where star formation has been quenched, is often explained by invoking a strong negative feedback generated by accretion onto a central super-massive black hole. The depletion of gas resulting from quasar-driven outflows should eventually stop star-formation across the host galaxy and lead to the black hole "suicide" for starvation. Direct observational evidence for a major quasar feedback onto the host galaxy is still missing, since outflows previously observed in quasars are associated with the ionized component of the gas, which only accounts for a minor fraction of the total gas content, and typically occur in the central regions. We used the IRAM PdBI to observe the CO(1-0) transition in Mrk 231, the closest quasar known. We detect broad wings of the CO line, with velocities up to 750 km/s and spatially resolved on the kpc scale. Such broad CO wings trace a giant molecular o...

  1. Disks and Outflows Around Young Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckwith, Steven; Staude, Jakob; Quetz, Axel; Natta, Antonella

    The subject of the book, the ubiquitous circumstellar disks around very young stars and the corresponding jets of outflowing matter, has recently become one of the hottest areas in astrophysics. The disks are thought to be precursors to planetary systems, and the outflows are thought to be a necessary phase in the formation of a young star, helping the star to get rid of angular momentum and energy as it makes its way onto the main sequence. The possible connections to planetary systems and stellar astrophysics makes these topics especially broad, appealing to generalists and specialists alike. The CD not only contains papers that could not be printed in the book but allows the authors to include a fair amount of data, often displayed as color images. The CD-ROM contains all the contributions printed in the corresponding book (Lecture Notes in Physics Vol. 465) and, in addition, those presented exclusively in digital form. Each contribution consists of a file in portable document format (PDF). The electronic version allows full-text searching within each file using Adobe's Acrobat Reader providing instructions for installation on Unix (Sun), PC and Macintosh computers, respectively. All contributions can be printed out; the color diagrams and color frames, which are printed in black and white in the book, can be viewed in color on screen.

  2. On the radio dichotomy of active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Xinwu

    2016-01-01

    It is still a mystery why only a small fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) contain relativistic jets. Strong magnetic field is a necessary ingredient for jet formation, however, the advection of the external field in a geometrically thin disk is inefficient. The gas with a small angular velocity may fall from the Bondi radius $R_{\\rm B}$ nearly freely to the circularization radius $R_{\\rm c}$, and a thin accretion disk is formed within $R_{\\rm c}$. We suggest that the external magnetic field is substantially enhanced in this region, and the magnetic field at $R_{\\rm c}$ can be sufficiently strong to drive outflows from the disk if the angular velocity of the gas is low at $R_{\\rm B}$. The magnetic field is efficiently dragged in the disk, because most angular momentum of the disk is removed by the outflows that leads to a significantly high radial velocity. The strong magnetic field formed in this way may accelerate jets in the region near the black hole either by the Blandford-Payne or/and Blandford-Zn...

  3. Active Galactic Nuclei under the scrutiny of CTA

    CERN Document Server

    Sol, H; Boisson, C; de Almeida, U Barres; Biteau, J; Contreras, J -L; Giebels, B; Hassan, T; Inoue, Y; Katarzynski, K; Krawczynski, H; Mirabal, N; Poutanen, J; Rieger, F; Totani, T; Benbow, W; Cerruti, M; Errando, M; Fallon, L; Pino, E de Gouveia Dal; Hinton, J -A; Inoue, S; Lenain, J -P; Neronov, A; Takahashi, K; Takami, H; White, R

    2013-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei (hereafter AGN) produce powerful outflows which offer excellent conditions for efficient particle acceleration in internal and external shocks, turbulence, and magnetic reconnection events. The jets as well as particle accelerating regions close to the supermassive black holes (hereafter SMBH) at the intersection of plasma inflows and outflows, can produce readily detectable very high energy gamma-ray emission. As of now, more than 45 AGN including 41 blazars and 4 radiogalaxies have been detected by the present ground-based gamma-ray telescopes, which represents more than one third of the cosmic sources detected so far in the VHE gamma-ray regime. The future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) should boost the sample of AGN detected in the VHE range by about one order of magnitude, shedding new light on AGN population studies, and AGN classification and unification schemes. CTA will be a unique tool to scrutinize the extreme high-energy tail of accelerated particles in SMBH environments, t...

  4. AN INFRARED-LUMINOUS MERGER WITH TWO BIPOLAR MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS: ALMA AND SMA OBSERVATIONS OF NGC 3256

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Kazushi [Academia Sinica, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Aalto, Susanne [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, Onsala (Sweden); Combes, Francoise [Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Evans, Aaron; Peck, Alison [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We report Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array and Submillimeter Array observations of the infrared-luminous merger NGC 3256, the most luminous galaxy within z = 0.01. Both of the two merger nuclei separated by 5'' (0.8 kpc) have a molecular gas concentration, a nuclear disk, with Σ{sub mol} > 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2}. The northern nucleus is more massive and is surrounded by molecular spiral arms. Its nuclear disk is face-on, while the southern nuclear disk is almost edge-on. The high-velocity molecular gas in the system can be resolved into two molecular outflows from the two nuclei. The one from the northern nucleus is part of a starburst-driven superwind seen nearly pole-on. Its maximum velocity is >750 km s{sup –1} and its mass outflow rate is >60 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for a conversion factor X{sub CO}=N{sub H{sub 2}}/I{sub CO(1−0)} of 1 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2} (K km s{sup –1}){sup –1}. The molecular outflow from the southern nucleus is a highly collimated bipolar jet seen nearly edge-on. Its line-of-sight velocity increases with distance, out to 300 pc from the nucleus, to the maximum de-projected velocity of ∼2000 km s{sup –1} for the estimated inclination and ≳1000 km s{sup –1} taking into account the uncertainty. Its mass outflow rate is estimated to be >50 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for the same X {sub CO}. This southern outflow has indications of being driven by a bipolar radio jet from an active galactic nucleus that recently weakened. The sum of these outflow rates, although subject to the uncertainty in the molecular mass estimate, either exceeds or compares to the total star formation rate. The feedback from nuclear activity through molecular outflows is therefore significant in the gas consumption, and hence evolution, of this system.

  5. MOSFIRE and LDSS3 spectroscopy for an [O II] Blob at z = 1.18: gas outflow and energy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harikane, Yuichi; Ouchi, Masami; Yuma, Suraphong; Ono, Yoshiaki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Rauch, Michael [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Nakajima, Kimihiko, E-mail: hari@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-10-20

    We report our Keck/MOSFIRE and Magellan/Low-Dispersion Survey Spectrograph spectroscopy for an [O II] Blob, O II B 10, that is a high-z galaxy with spatially extended [O II] λλ3726, 3729 emission over 30 kpc recently identified by a Subaru large-area narrowband survey. The systemic redshift of O II B 10 is z = 1.18 securely determined with [O III] λλ4959, 5007 and Hβ emission lines. We identify Fe II λ2587 and Mg II λλ2796, 2804 absorption lines blueshifted from the systemic redshift by 80 ± 50 and 260 ± 40 km s{sup –1}, respectively, which indicates gas outflow from O II B 10 with the velocity of ∼80-260 km s{sup –1}. This outflow velocity is comparable with the escape velocity, 250 ± 140 km s{sup –1}, estimated under the assumption of a singular isothermal halo potential profile. Some fraction of the outflowing gas could escape from the halo of O II B 10, suppressing O II B 10's star-formation (SF) activity. We estimate a mass loading factor, η, that is a ratio of mass outflow rate to SF rate, and obtain η > 0.8 ± 0.1, which is relatively high compared with low-z starbursts including U/LIRGs and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The major energy source of the outflow is unclear with the available data. Although no signature of AGNs is found in the X-ray data, O II B 10 falls in the AGN/star-forming composite region in the line diagnostic diagrams. It is possible that the outflow is powered by SF and a type-2 AGN with narrow FWHM emission line widths of 70-130 km s{sup –1}. This is the first detailed spectroscopic study of oxygen-line blobs that includes analyses of the escape velocity, the mass loading factor, and the presence of an AGN, and is a significant step to understanding the nature of oxygen-line blobs and the relation between gas outflow and SF quenching at high redshift.

  6. Measurement of Outflow Facility Using iPerfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Sherwood

    Full Text Available Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP is the predominant risk factor for glaucoma, and reducing IOP is the only successful strategy to prevent further glaucomatous vision loss. IOP is determined by the balance between the rates of aqueous humour secretion and outflow, and a pathological reduction in the hydraulic conductance of outflow, known as outflow facility, is responsible for IOP elevation in glaucoma. Mouse models are often used to investigate the mechanisms controlling outflow facility, but the diminutive size of the mouse eye makes measurement of outflow technically challenging. In this study, we present a new approach to measure and analyse outflow facility using iPerfusion™, which incorporates an actuated pressure reservoir, thermal flow sensor, differential pressure measurement and an automated computerised interface. In enucleated eyes from C57BL/6J mice, the flow-pressure relationship is highly non-linear and is well represented by an empirical power law model that describes the pressure dependence of outflow facility. At zero pressure, the measured flow is indistinguishable from zero, confirming the absence of any significant pressure independent flow in enucleated eyes. Comparison with the commonly used 2-parameter linear outflow model reveals that inappropriate application of a linear fit to a non-linear flow-pressure relationship introduces considerable errors in the estimation of outflow facility and leads to the false impression of pressure-independent outflow. Data from a population of enucleated eyes from C57BL/6J mice show that outflow facility is best described by a lognormal distribution, with 6-fold variability between individuals, but with relatively tight correlation of facility between fellow eyes. iPerfusion represents a platform technology to accurately and robustly characterise the flow-pressure relationship in enucleated mouse eyes for the purpose of glaucoma research and with minor modifications, may be applied

  7. Galactic Habitable Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, A.; Mao, S.; Kawata, D.

    2014-03-01

    The fossil record shows that the Earth has experienced several mass extinctions over the past 500 million years1, and it has been suggested that there is a periodicity in extinction events on timescales of tens1 and/or hundreds of millions of years. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the cause of the mass extinctions, including the suggestion that the Earth's ozone layer may have been destroyed by intense radiation from a nearby supernovae2- 3, exposing the Earth's surface to damaging UV radiation. Recent observations of cores taken from the ocean floor revealed atoms of a very rare isotope of iron (60Fe) believed to have arrived on Earth around 2 million years ago as fallout from a nearby supernovae4. Astronomical evidence for that past supernovae was recently found in the debris of a young cluster of massive stars5, by tracing its past orbit, putting it at the right place at the right time to explain the mild extinction event. Here we report new high-resolution (both in space and time) N-body chemodynamical simulations (carried out with our novel code GCD+6) of the evolution of a model Milky Way Galaxy, tracing the orbit of èsun-like' stars over a 500 million year period, checking the proximity to supernovae throughout the history of the orbit and comparing the times when this occurs with past mass extinctions on Earth. We additionally explain the important effects of the spiral arm pattern, radial migration of stars and Galactic chemistry on habitability.

  8. Resolving Galactic Feedback and Gas Accretion in NaI Absorption with MaNGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Kate; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    Current models of galaxy formation require that the buildup of galactic stellar mass proceeds at a rate much slower than the rate at which gas is accreted onto dark matter halos. The implementation of winds in these models, however, has been primarily via ad hoc prescriptions, as the relationship between outflow morphology and kinematics and star formation activity is not well understood. In addition, empirical evidence for the inflow of gas onto star-forming galaxies has remained elusive. To address these issues, we analyze absorption line profiles for the NaI λλ5890, 5896 transition in spatially-resolved spectroscopy of nearby galaxies observed in the MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) survey. We identify outflows of cool (T~102 K) gas via the blueshift of the absorption lines. Initial results suggest that in systems in which outflows are detected, the equivalent width of the flow varies significantly over the surface of the galaxy, revealing a changing flow covering fraction/velocity within individual objects. We also measure the incidence of redshifted NaI absorption in this sample for constraints on the frequency and cross section of cool gas accretion. This analysis offers unique insight into the morphology, surface density, and velocity of cool inflow and outflow around nearby galaxies. Accurate estimates of these quantities are fundamental to understanding the role of gas flows in regulating galaxy growth.

  9. A Disturbed Galactic Duo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    The galaxies in this cosmic pairing, captured by the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, display some curious features, demonstrating that each member of the duo is close enough to feel the distorting gravitational influence of the other. The gravitational tug of war has warped the spiral shape of one galaxy, NGC 3169, and fragmented the dust lanes in its companion NGC 3166. Meanwhile, a third, smaller galaxy to the lower right, NGC 3165, has a front-row seat to the gravitational twisting and pulling of its bigger neighbours. This galactic grouping, found about 70 million light-years away in the constellation Sextans (The Sextant), was discovered by the English astronomer William Herschel in 1783. Modern astronomers have gauged the distance between NGC 3169 (left) and NGC 3166 (right) as a mere 50 000 light-years, a separation that is only about half the diameter of the Milky Way galaxy. In such tight quarters, gravity can start to play havoc with galactic structure. Spiral galaxies like NGC 3169 and NGC 3166 tend to have orderly swirls of stars and dust pinwheeling about their glowing centres. Close encounters with other massive objects can jumble this classic configuration, often serving as a disfiguring prelude to the merging of galaxies into one larger galaxy. So far, the interactions of NGC 3169 and NGC 3166 have just lent a bit of character. NGC 3169's arms, shining bright with big, young, blue stars, have been teased apart, and lots of luminous gas has been drawn out from its disc. In NGC 3166's case, the dust lanes that also usually outline spiral arms are in disarray. Unlike its bluer counterpart, NGC 3166 is not forming many new stars. NGC 3169 has another distinction: the faint yellow dot beaming through a veil of dark dust just to the left of and close to the galaxy's centre [1]. This flash is the leftover of a supernova detected in 2003 and known accordingly as SN 2003cg. A supernova of this

  10. Interplay among Cooling, AGN Feedback and Anisotropic Conduction in the Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, H -Y K

    2015-01-01

    Feedback from the active galactic nuclei (AGN) is one of the most promising heating mechanisms to circumvent the cooling-flow problem in galaxy clusters. However, the role of thermal conduction remains unclear. Previous studies have shown that anisotropic thermal conduction in cluster cool cores (CC) could drive the heat-flux driven buoyancy instabilities (HBI) that re-orient the field lines in the azimuthal directions and isolate the cores from conductive heating from the outskirts. However, how the AGN interacts with the HBI is still unknown. To understand these interwined processes, we perform the first 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of isolated CC clusters that include anisotropic conduction, radiative cooling, and AGN feedback. We find that: (1) For realistic magnetic field strengths in clusters, magnetic tension can suppress a significant portion of HBI-unstable modes and thus the HBI is either completely inhibited or significantly impaired, depending on the unknown magnetic field coherence le...

  11. The Impact of Galactic Feedback on the Circumgalactic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Suresh, Joshua; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Torrey, Paul; Sijacki, Debora; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Galactic feedback strongly affects the way galactic environments are enriched. We examine this connection by performing a suite of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, exploring a range of parameters based on the galaxy formation model developed in Vogelsberger et al. 2013 (henceforth V13). We examine the effects of AGN feedback, wind mass loading, wind specific energy, and wind metal-loading on the properties of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of galaxies with $M_\\text{halo} > 10^{11} M_\\odot$. Note that while the V13 model was tuned to match observations including the stellar mass function, no explicit tuning was done for the CGM. The wind energy per unit outflow mass has the most significant effect on the CGM enrichment. High energy winds launch metals far beyond the virial radius. AGN feedback also has a significant effect, but only at $z < 3$. We compare to high redshift HI and CIV observations. All our simulations produce the observed number of Damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ Absorbers. At lower column densi...

  12. Type-Ia Supernova-driven Galactic Bulge Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Shikui; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Joung, M Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Stellar feedback in galactic bulges plays an essential role in shaping the evolution of galaxies. To quantify this role and facilitate comparisons with X-ray observations, we conduct 3D hydrodynamical simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement code, FLASH, to investigate the physical properties of hot gas inside a galactic bulge, similar to that of our Galaxy or M31. We assume that the dynamical and thermal properties of the hot gas are dominated by mechanical energy input from SNe, primarily Type Ia, and mass injection from evolved stars as well as iron enrichment from SNe. We study the bulge-wide outflow as well as the SN heating on scales down to ~4 pc. An embedding scheme that is devised to plant individual SNR seeds, allows to examine, for the first time, the effect of sporadic SNe on the density, temperature, and iron ejecta distribution of the hot gas as well as the resultant X-ray morphology and spectrum. We find that the SNe produce a bulge wind with highly filamentary density structures and patch...

  13. Detection of HCN, HCO+ and HNC in the Mrk231 molecular outflow - Dense molecular gas in the AGN wind

    CERN Document Server

    Aalto, S; Muller, S; Winters, J M; van der Werf, P; Henkel, C; Costagliola, F; Neri, R

    2011-01-01

    We detect luminous emission from HCN, HCO+ and HNC 1--0 in the QSO ULIRG Mrk~231 with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer at 1."55 by 1."28 resolution. All three lines show broad line wings - which are particularly prominent for HCN. Velocities are found to be similar (750 km/s) to those found for CO 1-0. This is the first time bright HCN, HCO+ and HNC emission has been detected in a large-scale galactic outflow. We find that both the blue- and red-shifted line wings are spatially extended by at least 0."75 (700 pc) in a north-south direction. The line wings are brighter (relative to the line center intensity) in HCN than in CO 1-0 and line ratios suggest that the molecular outflow consists of dense (n>10E4 cmE-3) and clumpy gas with a high HCN abundance X(HCN)>10E-8. These properties are consistent with the molecular gas being compressed and fragmented by shocks in the outflow. Alternatively, HCN is instead pumped by mid-IR continuum, but we propose that this effect is not strong for the spatially extend...

  14. Magnetically-Driven Accretion-Disk Winds and Ultra-Fast Outflows in PG1211+143

    CERN Document Server

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris; Behar, Ehud; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of X-ray ionization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accretion-disk winds in an effort to constrain the physics underlying the highly-ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) inferred by X-ray absorbers often detected in various sub-classes of Seyfert active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our primary focus is to show that magnetically-driven outflows are indeed physically plausible candidates for the observed outflows accounting for the AGN absorption properties of the present X-ray spectroscopic observations. Employing a stratified MHD wind launched across the entire AGN accretion disk, we calculate its X-ray ionization and the ensuing X-ray absorption line spectra. Assuming an appropriate ionizing AGN spectrum, we apply our MHD winds to model the absorption features in an {\\it XMM-Newton}/EPIC spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert, \\pg. We find, through identifying the detected features with Fe K$\\alpha$ transitions, that the absorber has a characteristic ionization parameter of $\\log (\\xi_c [erg~cm~s$^{-1}...

  15. The MAGNUM survey: outflows and star formation in ten local Seyfert galaxies with the integral field eye of MUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturi, G.; Marconi, A.; Cresci, G.; Risaliti, G.; Carniani, S.; Mannucci, F.

    2016-08-01

    In this talk I will present the first results from the MAGNUM survey (Measuring Active Galactic Nuclei Under MUSE Microscope), which takes advantage of the unprecedented combination of the large field of view and spectral coverage of MUSE so as to carry out a detail study of the interaction of AGN outflows with the host galaxies and of the relation between AGN activity and star formation. The data comprise ten nearby galaxies so far, such as NGC 1365, NGC 1068 and Circinus. The analysis of MUSE data in many different emission lines has allowed to disentangle the various motions of the gas in the central regions of the galaxies (rotation, outflows and inflows), furthermore resolving the structure of the AGN-ionised cone. Other information of the separate phases of the gas (having different temperature, density and ionisation state) has been obtained thanks to the comparison with high resolution X-ray Chandra images. Moreover, possible evidence for star formation triggered by AGN outflows has been observed.

  16. Outflows from AGN: Kinematics of the Narrow-Line and Coronal-Line Regions in Seyfert Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Müller-Sánchez, F; Hicks, E K S; Vives-Arias, H; Davies, R I; Malkan, M; Tacconi, L J; Genzel, R

    2011-01-01

    As part of an extensive study of the physical properties of active galactic nuclei (AGN) we report high spatial resolution near-IR integral-field spectroscopy of the narrow-line region (NLR) and coronal-line region (CLR) of seven Seyfert galaxies. These measurements elucidate for the first time the two-dimensional spatial distribution and kinematics of the recombination line Br{\\gamma} and high-ionization lines [Sivi], [Alix] and [Caviii] on scales <300 pc from the AGN. The observations reveal kinematic signatures of rotation and outflow in the NLR and CLR. The spatially resolved kinematics can be modeled as a combination of an outflow bicone and a rotating disk coincident with the molecular gas. High-excitation emission is seen in both components, suggesting it is leaking out of a clumpy torus. While NGC 1068 (Seyfert 2) is viewed nearly edge-on, intermediate-type Seyferts are viewed at intermediate angles, consistent with unified schemes. A correlation between the outflow velocity and the molecular gas m...

  17. Discovering a misaligned CO outflow related to the red MSX source G034.5964-01.0292

    CERN Document Server

    Paron, S; Petriella, A; Rubio, M

    2014-01-01

    The red MSX source G034.5964-01.0292 (MSXG34), catalogued as a massive YSO, was observed in molecular lines with the aim of discover and study molecular outflows. We mapped a region of 3'x3' centered at MSXG34 using the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment in the 12CO J=3-2 and HCO+ J=4-3 lines with an angular and spectral resolution of 22" and 0.11 km/s, respectively. Additionally, public 13CO J=1-0 and near-IR UKIDSS data obtained from the Galactic Ring Survey and the WFCAM Sciencie Archive, respectively, were analyzed. We found that the 12CO spectra towards the YSO present a self-absorption dip, as it is usual in star forming regions, and spectral wings evidencing outflow activity. The HCO+ was detected only towards the MSXG34 position at v_LSR ~ 14.2 km/s, in coincidence with the 12CO absorption dip and approximately with the velocity of previous ammonia observations. HCO+ and NH3 are known to be enhanced in molecular outflows. Analyzing the spectral wings of the 12CO line, we discovered misaligned ...

  18. Ring Nebula and Bipolar Outflows Associated with the B1.5 Supergiant Sher #25 in NGC 3603

    CERN Document Server

    Brandner, W; Chu, Y H; Weis, K; Brandner, Wolfgang; Grebel, Eva K.; Chu, You-Hua; Weis, Kerstin

    1996-01-01

    We have identified a ring-shaped emission-line nebula and a possible bipolar outflow centered on the B1.5 supergiant Sher #25 in the Galactic giant HII region NGC 3603 (distance 6 kpc). The clumpy ring around Sher #25 appears to be tilted by 64 deg against the plane of the sky. Its semi-major axis (position angle approx. 165 deg) is 6.9" long, which corresponds to a ring diameter of 0.4 pc. The bipolar outflow filaments, presumably located above and below the ring plane on either side of Sher #25, show a separation of approx. 0.5 pc from the central star. High-resolution spectra show that the ring has a systemic velocity of V_LSR = +19 km/s and a de-projected expansion velocity of 20 km/s, and that one of the bipolar filaments has an outflow speed of approx. 83 km/s. The spectra also show high [NII]/Halpha ratio, suggestive of strong N enrichment. Sher #25 must be an evolved blue supergiant (BSG) past the red supergiant (RSG) stage. We find that the ratio of equatorial to polar mass-loss rate during the red s...

  19. A 10 kpc SCALE SEYFERT GALAXY OUTFLOW: HST/COS OBSERVATIONS OF IRAS F22456-5125

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borguet, Benoit C. J.; Edmonds, Doug; Arav, Nahum [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Dunn, Jay [Augusta Perimeter College, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kriss, Gerard A., E-mail: benbo@vt.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    We present analysis of the UV spectrum of the low-z AGN IRAS F22456-5125 obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The spectrum reveals six main kinematic components, spanning a range of velocities of up to 800 km s{sup -1}, which for the first time are observed in troughs associated with C II, C IV, N V, Si II, Si III, Si IV, and S IV. We also obtain data on the O VI troughs, which we compare to those available from an earlier Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer epoch. Column densities measured from these ions allow us to derive a well-constrained photoionization solution for each outflow component. Two of these kinematic components show troughs associated with transitions from excited states of Si II and C II. The number density inferred from these troughs, in combination with the deduced ionization parameter, allows us to determine the distance to these outflow components from the central source. We find these components to be at a distance of {approx}10 kpc. The distances and the number densities derived are consistent with the outflow being part of a galactic wind.

  20. A non-LTE radiative transfer model to study ionized outflows and disks. The case of MWC349A

    CERN Document Server

    Báez-Rubio, Alejandro; Thum, Clemens; Planesas, Pere

    2013-01-01

    Context. The best example of a massive star with an ionized outflow launched from its photoevaporating disk is MWC349A. The large amount of reported radio-continuum and radio-recombination line observations toward this galactic UC-HII region offers a unique possibility to build a model of the ionized envelope of this source. Aims. To understand the physical conditions and kinematics of the ionized region of the circumstellar disk and also of the outflow of MWC349A. Methods. We compared the bulk of radio-continuum maps, radio-recombination line profiles, and the H30alpha centroid map published to date with the predictions of our non-LTE 3D radiative transfer model, MORELI (MOdel for REcombination LInes), which we describe here in detail. Results. Our non-LTE 3D radiative transfer model provides new evidence that the UC-HII region of MWC349A is composed of an ionized circumstellar disk rotating in Keplerian fashion around a star of 38 solar mass, and an ionized outflow expanding with a terminal velocity of 60 k...

  1. Spin precession in anisotropic cosmologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamenshchik, A.Yu. [Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (Italy); L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); INFN, Bologna (Italy); Teryaev, O.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Dubna (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-15

    We consider the precession of a Dirac particle spin in some anisotropic Bianchi universes. This effect is present already in the Bianchi-I universe. We discuss in some detail the geodesics and the spin precession for both the Kasner and the Heckmann-Schucking solutions. In the Bianchi-IX universe the spin precession acquires the chaotic character due to the stochasticity of the oscillatory approach to the cosmological singularity. The related helicity flip of fermions in the very early universe may produce the sterile particles contributing to dark matter. (orig.)

  2. Anisotropic and nonlinear optical waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Someda, CG

    1992-01-01

    Dielectric optical waveguides have been investigated for more than two decades. In the last ten years they have had the unique position of being simultaneously the backbone of a very practical and fully developed technology, as well as an extremely exciting area of basic, forefront research. Existing waveguides can be divided into two sets: one consisting of waveguides which are already in practical use, and the second of those which are still at the laboratory stage of their evolution. This book is divided into two separate parts: the first dealing with anisotropic waveguides, an

  3. New charged anisotropic compact models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kileba Matondo, D.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-07-01

    We find new exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell field equations which are relevant in the description of highly compact stellar objects. The relativistic star is charged and anisotropic with a quark equation of state. Exact solutions of the field equations are found in terms of elementary functions. It is interesting to note that we regain earlier quark models with uncharged and charged matter distributions. A physical analysis indicates that the matter distributions are well behaved and regular throughout the stellar structure. A range of stellar masses are generated for particular parameter values in the electric field. In particular the observed mass for a binary pulsar is regained.

  4. Remarks on inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Recently a new no-global-recollapse argument was given for some inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies that utilizes surface deformation by the mean curvature flow. In this paper we discuss important properties of the mean curvature flow of spacelike surfaces in Lorentzian manifolds. We show that singularities may form during cosmic evolution, and the theorems forbidding the global recollapse lose their validity. The time evolution of the spatial scalar curvature that may kinematically prevent the recollapse is determined in normal coordinates, which shows the impact of inhomogeneities explicitly. Our analysis indicates a caveat in numerical solutions that give rise to inflation.

  5. Scattering of energetic particles by anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with a goldreich-sridhar power spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran

    2000-11-27

    Scattering rates for a Goldreich-Sridhar (GS) spectrum of anisotropic, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are calculated in the quasilinear approximation. Because the small-scale fluctuations are constrained to have wave vectors nearly perpendicular to the background magnetic field, scattering is too weak to provide either the mean-free paths commonly used in Galactic cosmic-ray propagation models or the mean-free paths required for acceleration of cosmic rays at quasiparallel shocks. Where strong pitch-angle scattering occurs, it is due to fluctuations not described by the GS spectrum, such as fluctuations generated by streaming cosmic rays. PMID:11082620

  6. Collective outflow from a small multiple stellar system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Thomas [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Klaassen, Pamela D. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Schrön, Martin; Klessen, Ralf S. [Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Federrath, Christoph [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Vic 3800 (Australia); Smith, Michael D., E-mail: tpeters@physik.uzh.ch [Centre for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of Kent, Canterbury, CT2 7NH (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-10

    The formation of high-mass stars is usually accompanied by powerful protostellar outflows. Such high-mass outflows are not simply scaled-up versions of their lower-mass counterparts, since observations suggest that the collimation degree degrades with stellar mass. Theoretically, the origins of massive outflows remain open to question because radiative feedback and fragmentation of the accretion flow around the most massive stars, with M > 15 M {sub ☉}, may impede the driving of magnetic disk winds. We here present a three-dimensional simulation of the early stages of core fragmentation and massive star formation that includes a subgrid-scale model for protostellar outflows. We find that stars that form in a common accretion flow tend to have aligned outflow axes, so that the individual jets of multiple stars can combine to form a collective outflow. We compare our simulation to observations with synthetic H{sub 2} and CO observations and find that the morphology and kinematics of such a collective outflow resembles some observed massive outflows, such as Cepheus A and DR 21. We finally compare physical quantities derived from simulated observations of our models to the actual values in the models to examine the reliability of standard methods for deriving physical quantities, demonstrating that those methods indeed recover the actual values to within a factor of two to three.

  7. Standing Shocks around Black Holes and Estimation of Outflow Rates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santabrata Das; Sandip K. Chakrabarti

    2002-03-01

    We self-consistently obtain shock locations in an accretion flow by using an analytical method. One can obtain the spectral properties, quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies and the outflowrates when the inflow parameters are known. Since temperature of the CENBOL decides the spectral states of the black hole, and also the outflow rate, the outflow rate is directly related to the spectral states.

  8. Propeller outflows from an MRI disc

    CERN Document Server

    Lii, Patrick S; Ustyugova, Galina V; Koldoba, Alexander V; Lovelace, Richard V E

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of axisymmetric simulations of MRI-driven accretion onto a rapidly rotating, magnetized star accreting in the propeller regime. The stellar magnetosphere corotates with the star, forming a centrifugal barrier at the disc-magnetosphere boundary which inhibits matter accretion onto the star. Instead, the disc matter accumulates at the disc-magnetosphere interface and slowly diffuses into the inner magnetosphere where it picks up angular momentum and is quickly ejected from the system as an outflow. Due to the interaction of the matter with the magnetosphere, this wind is discontinuous and is launched as discrete plasmoids. If the ejection rate is lower than the disc accretion rate, the matter accumulates at the disc-magnetosphere boundary faster than it can be ejected. In this case, accretion onto the star proceeds through the episodic accretion instability in which episodes of matter accumulation are followed by simultaneous accretion and ejection. During the accretion phase of this inst...

  9. Simulation of Breach Outflow for Earthfill Dam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dams have been built for many reasons such as irrigation, hydropower, flood mitigation, and water supply to support development for the benefit of human. However, the huge amount of water stored behind the dam can seriously pose adverse impacts to the downstream community should it be released due to unwanted dam break event. To minimise the potential loss of lives and property damages, a workable Emergency Response Plan is required to be developed. As part of a responsible dam owner and operator, TNB initiated a study on dam breach modelling for Cameron Highlands Hydroelectric Scheme to simulate the potential dam breach for Jor Dam. Prediction of dam breach parameters using the empirical equations of Froehlich and Macdonal-Langridge-Monopolis formed the basis of the modelling, coupled with MIKE 11 software to obtain the breach outflow due to Probable Maximum Flood (PMF). This paper will therefore discuss the model setup, simulation procedure and comparison of the prediction with existing equations.

  10. Searching for molecular outflows in Hyper-Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Calderón, D; Veilleux, S; Graciá-Carpio, J; Sturm, E; Lira, P; Schulze, S; Kim, S

    2016-01-01

    We present constraints on the molecular outflows in a sample of five Hyper-Luminous Infrared Galaxies using Herschel observations of the OH doublet at 119 {\\mu}m. We have detected the OH doublet in three cases: one purely in emission and two purely in absorption. The observed emission profile has a significant blueshifted wing suggesting the possibility of tracing an outflow. Out of the two absorption profiles, one seems to be consistent with the systemic velocity while the other clearly indicates the presence of a molecular outflow whose maximum velocity is about ~1500 km/s. Our analysis shows that this system is in general agreement with previous results on Ultra-luminous Infrared Galaxies and QSOs, whose outflow velocities do not seem to correlate with stellar masses or starburst luminosities (star formation rates). Instead the galaxy outflow likely arises from an embedded AGN.

  11. Star Counts and Galactic Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Cui-Hua; ZHOU Xu; MA Jun; CHEN Jian-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    @@ We use a model of the Galactic stellar distribution to analyse the BATC star count data toward two high Galactic latitude fields. Since star counts at high Galactic latitudes are not strongly related to the radial distribution,they are very suitable for the study of the vertical distribution of the Galaxy. The vertical density distribution of the stars shows the contribution of the thin disc, the thick disc and the stellar halo of the Galaxy. We give quantitative descriptions of these components in terms of exponential discs and a de Vaucouleurs halo. We find that the observed counts support an axial ratio of c/a ~ 0.5, implying a more flattened halo. We consider that it is possible that the halo has two subpopulations, i.e. a flattened inner halo and a spherical outer halo in the Milky Way.

  12. The inner Galactic globular clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateo M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Galactic globular clusters located towards the inner regions of the Milky Way have been historically neglected, mainly due to the difficulties caused by the presence of an elevated extinction by foreground dust, and high field star densities along the lines of sight where most of them lie. To overcome these difficulties we have developed a new method to map the differential extinction suffered by these clusters, which was successfully applied to a sample of moderately-extincted, luminous, extended, inner Galactic globular clusters observed in the optical, for which we have been able to determine more accurate physical parameters. For the most extincted inner Galactic globular clusters, near-infrared wavelengths provide a more suitable window for their study. The VVV survey, which is currently observing the central regions of the Milky Way at these wavelengths, will provide a comprehensive view, from the inner regions out to their tidal radii and beyond, of most of these globular clusters.

  13. The Galactic centre pulsar population

    CERN Document Server

    Chennamangalam, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of a magnetar in the Galactic centre region has allowed Spitler et al. to characterize the interstellar scattering in that direction. They find that the temporal broadening of the pulse profile of the magnetar is substantially less than that predicted by models of the electron density of that region. This raises the question of what the plausible limits for the number of potentially observable pulsars - i.e., the number of pulsars beaming towards the Earth - in the Galactic centre region are. In this paper, using realistic assumptions, we show that the potentially observable population of pulsars in the inner parsec has a conservative upper limit of $\\sim$950, and that it is premature to conclude that the number of pulsars in this region is small. We also show that the observational results so far are consistent with this number and make predictions for future radio pulsar surveys of the Galactic centre.

  14. Electromagnetism on anisotropic fractal media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Basic equations of electromagnetic fields in anisotropic fractal media are obtained using a dimensional regularization approach. First, a formulation based on product measures is shown to satisfy the four basic identities of the vector calculus. This allows a generalization of the Green-Gauss and Stokes theorems as well as the charge conservation equation on anisotropic fractals. Then, pursuing the conceptual approach, we derive the Faraday and Ampère laws for such fractal media, which, along with two auxiliary null-divergence conditions, effectively give the modified Maxwell equations. Proceeding on a separate track, we employ a variational principle for electromagnetic fields, appropriately adapted to fractal media, so as to independently derive the same forms of these two laws. It is next found that the parabolic (for a conducting medium) and the hyperbolic (for a dielectric medium) equations involve modified gradient operators, while the Poynting vector has the same form as in the non-fractal case. Finally, Maxwell's electromagnetic stress tensor is reformulated for fractal systems. In all the cases, the derived equations for fractal media depend explicitly on fractal dimensions in three different directions and reduce to conventional forms for continuous media with Euclidean geometries upon setting these each of dimensions equal to unity.

  15. On the Contribution of Gamma Ray Bursts to the Galactic Inventory of Some Intermediate Mass Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruet, J; Surman, R; McLaughlin, G C

    2004-01-23

    Light curves from a growing number of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) indicate that GRBs copiously produce radioactive Ni moving outward at fractions of the speed of light. We calculate nuclear abundances of elements accompanying the outflowing Ni under the assumption that this Ni originates from a wind blown off of a viscous accretion disk. We also show that GRB's likely contribute appreciably to the galactic inventory of {sup 42}Ca, {sup 45}Sc, {sup 46}Ti, {sup 49}Ti, {sup 63}Cu, and may be an important site for the production of {sup 64}Zn.

  16. On the Contribution of Gamma Ray Bursts to the Galactic Inventory of Some Intermediate Mass Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Pruet, J; McLaughlin, G C; Pruet, Jason; Surman, Rebecca; Laughlin, Gail C. Mc

    2004-01-01

    Light curves from a growing number of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) indicate that GRBs copiously produce radioactive Ni moving outward at fractions of the speed of light. We calculate nuclear abundances of elements accompanying the outflowing Ni under the assumption that this Ni originates from a wind blown off of a viscous accretion disk. We also show that GRB's likely contribute appreciably to the galactic inventory of 42Ca, 45Sc, 46Ti, 49Ti, 63Cu, and may be a principal site for the production of 64Zn.

  17. Evolution of active region outflows throughout an active region lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangrilli, L.; Poletto, G.

    2016-10-01

    Context. We have shown previously that SOHO/UVCS data allow us to detect active region (AR) outflows at coronal altitudes higher than those reached by other instrumentation. These outflows are thought to be a component of the slow solar wind. Aims: Our purpose is to study the evolution of the outflows in the intermediate corona from AR 8100, from the time the AR first forms until it dissolves, after several transits at the solar limb. Methods: Data acquired by SOHO/UVCS at the time of the AR limb transits, at medium latitudes and at altitudes ranging from 1.5 to 2.3 R⊙, were used to infer the physical properties of the outflows through the AR evolution. To this end, we applied the Doppler dimming technique to UVCS spectra. These spectra include the H i Lyα line and the O vi doublet lines at 1031.9 and 1037.6 Å. Results: Plasma speeds and electron densities of the outflows were inferred over several rotations of the Sun. AR outflows are present in the newly born AR and persist throughout the entire AR life. Moreover, we found two types of outflows at different latitudes, both possibly originating in the same negative polarity area of the AR. We also analyzed the behavior of the Si xii 520 Å line along the UVCS slit in an attempt to reveal changes in the Si abundance when different regions are traversed. Although we found some evidence for a Si enrichment in the AR outflows, alternative interpretations are also plausible. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that outflows from ARs are detectable in the intermediate corona throughout the whole AR lifetime. This confirms that outflows contribute to the slow wind.

  18. Statistics of Galactic Supernova Remnants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wen Xu; Xi-Zhen Zhang; Jin-Lin Han

    2005-01-01

    We collected the basic parameters of 231 supernova remnants (SNRs) in our Galaxy, namely, distances (d) from the Sun, linear diameters (D), Galactic heights (Z), estimated ages (t), luminosities (L), surface brightness (∑) and flux densities (Si) at 1-GHz frequency and spectral indices (α). We tried to find possible correlations between these parameters. As expected, the linear diameters were found to increase with ages for the shell-type remnants, and also to have a tendency to increase with the Galactic heights. Both the surface brightness and luminosity of SNRs at 1-GHz tend to decrease with the linear diameter and with age. No other relations between the parameters were found.

  19. ANISOTROPIC POLARIZATION TENSORS FOR ELLIPSES AND ELLIPSOIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyeonbae Kang; Kyoungsun Kim

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a systematic way of computing the polarization tensors,anisotropic as well as isotropic, based on the boundary integral method. We then use this method to compute the anisotropic polarization tensor for ellipses and ellipsoids. The computation reveals the pair of anisotropy and ellipses which produce the same polarization tensors.

  20. Anisotropic weak Hardy spaces and interpolation theorems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the authors establish the anisotropic weak Hardy spaces associated with very general discrete groups of dilations. Moreover, the atomic decomposition theorem of the anisotropic weak Hardy spaces is also given. As some applications of the above results, the authors prove some interpolation theorems and obtain the boundedness of the singular integral operators on these Hardy spaces.

  1. ANISOTROPIC BIQUADRATIC ELEMENT WITH SUPERCLOSE RESULT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongyang SHI; Shipeng MAO; Hui LIANG

    2006-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to study the convergence of biquadratic finite element for the second order problem on anisotropic meshes. By using some novel approaches and techniques, the optimal error estimates are obtained. At the same time, the anisotropic superclose results are also achieved. Furthermore, the numerical results are given to demonstrate our theoretical analysis.

  2. The San Pedro M\\'artir Kinematic Catalogue of Galactic Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    López, J A; García-Díaz, M T; Clark, D M; Meaburn, J; Riesgo, H; Steffen, W; Lloyd, M

    2011-01-01

    The San Pedro M\\'artir kinematic catalogue of galactic planetary nebulae provides spatially resolved, long-slit Echelle spectra for about 600 planetary nebulae. The data are presented wavelength calibrated and corrected for heliocentric motion. For most objects multiple spectra have been acquired and images with accurate slit positions on the nebulae are also presented for each object. This is the most extensive and homogeneous single source of data concerning the internal kinematics of the ionized nebular material in planetary nebulae. Data can be retrieved for individual objects or selected by groups that share some common characteristics, such as by morphological classes, galactic population, binary cores, presence of fast outflows, etc. The catalogue is available through the world wide web at http://kincatpn.astrosen.unam.mx .

  3. Efficient Wavefield Extrapolation In Anisotropic Media

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2014-07-03

    Various examples are provided for wavefield extrapolation in anisotropic media. In one example, among others, a method includes determining an effective isotropic velocity model and extrapolating an equivalent propagation of an anisotropic, poroelastic or viscoelastic wavefield. The effective isotropic velocity model can be based upon a kinematic geometrical representation of an anisotropic, poroelastic or viscoelastic wavefield. Extrapolating the equivalent propagation can use isotopic, acoustic or elastic operators based upon the determined effective isotropic velocity model. In another example, non-transitory computer readable medium stores an application that, when executed by processing circuitry, causes the processing circuitry to determine the effective isotropic velocity model and extrapolate the equivalent propagation of an anisotropic, poroelastic or viscoelastic wavefield. In another example, a system includes processing circuitry and an application configured to cause the system to determine the effective isotropic velocity model and extrapolate the equivalent propagation of an anisotropic, poroelastic or viscoelastic wavefield.

  4. Multidisciplinary approach to cylindrical anisotropic metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisotropic characteristics of cylindrically corrugated microstructures are analyzed in terms of their acoustic and electromagnetic (EM) behavior paying special attention to their differences and similarities. A simple analytical model has been developed using effective medium theory to understand the anisotropic features of both types of waves in terms of radial and angular components of the wave propagation velocity. The anisotropic constituent parameters have been obtained by measuring the resonances of cylindrical cavities, as well as from numerical simulations. This permits one to characterize propagation of acoustic and EM waves and to compare the fundamental anisotropic features generated by the corrugated effective medium. Anisotropic coefficients match closely in both physics fields but other relevant parameters show significant differences in the behavior of both types of waves. (paper)

  5. Designing Anisotropic Inflation with Form Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Asuka

    2015-01-01

    We study inflation with anisotropic hair induced by form fields. In four dimensions, the relevant form fields are gauge (one-form) fields and two-form fields. Assuming the exponential form of potential and gauge kinetic functions, we find new exact power-law solutions endowed with anisotropic hair. We also explore the phase space of anisotropic inflation and find fixed points corresponding to the exact power-law solutions. Moreover, we perform the stability analysis around the fixed points to reveal the structure of the phase space. It turns out that one of the fixed points becomes an attractor and others (if any) are saddle points. In particular, the one corresponding to anisotropic inflation becomes an attractor when it exists. We also argue that various anisotropic inflation models can be designed by choosing coupling constants.

  6. Designing anisotropic inflation with form fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Asuka; Soda, Jiro

    2015-12-01

    We study inflation with anisotropic hair induced by form fields. In four dimensions, the relevant form fields are gauge (one-form) fields and two-form fields. Assuming the exponential form of potential and gauge kinetic functions, we find new exact power-law solutions endowed with anisotropic hair. We also explore the phase space of anisotropic inflation and find fixed points corresponding to the exact power-law solutions. Moreover, we perform the stability analysis around the fixed points to reveal the structure of the phase space. It turns out that one of the fixed points becomes an attractor and others (if any) are saddle points. In particular, the one corresponding to anisotropic inflation becomes an attractor when it exists. We also argue that various anisotropic inflation models can be designed by choosing coupling constants.

  7. Molecular outflows driven by low-mass protostars. I. Correcting for underestimates when measuring outflow masses and dynamical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunham, Michael M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Arce, Héctor G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Mardones, Diego [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Lee, Jeong-Eun [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Matthews, Brenda C. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 W. Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Stutz, Amelia M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Williams, Jonathan P., E-mail: mdunham@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    We present a survey of 28 molecular outflows driven by low-mass protostars, all of which are sufficiently isolated spatially and/or kinematically to fully separate into individual outflows. Using a combination of new and archival data from several single-dish telescopes, 17 outflows are mapped in {sup 12}CO (2-1) and 17 are mapped in {sup 12}CO (3-2), with 6 mapped in both transitions. For each outflow, we calculate and tabulate the mass (M {sub flow}), momentum (P {sub flow}), kinetic energy (E {sub flow}), mechanical luminosity (L {sub flow}), and force (F {sub flow}) assuming optically thin emission in LTE at an excitation temperature, T {sub ex}, of 50 K. We show that all of the calculated properties are underestimated when calculated under these assumptions. Taken together, the effects of opacity, outflow emission at low velocities confused with ambient cloud emission, and emission below the sensitivities of the observations increase outflow masses and dynamical properties by an order of magnitude, on average, and factors of 50-90 in the most extreme cases. Different (and non-uniform) excitation temperatures, inclination effects, and dissociation of molecular gas will all work to further increase outflow properties. Molecular outflows are thus almost certainly more massive and energetic than commonly reported. Additionally, outflow properties are lower, on average, by almost an order of magnitude when calculated from the {sup 12}CO (3-2) maps compared to the {sup 12}CO (2-1) maps, even after accounting for different opacities, map sensitivities, and possible excitation temperature variations. It has recently been argued in the literature that the {sup 12}CO (3-2) line is subthermally excited in outflows, and our results support this finding.

  8. A High Fraction of Double-peaked Narrow Emission Lines in Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Yang; Liu, Xin

    2016-08-01

    One percent of redshift z ˜ 0.1 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) show velocity splitting of a few hundred km s-1 in the narrow emission lines in spatially integrated spectra. Such line profiles have been found to arise from the bulk motion of ionized gas clouds associated with galactic-scale outflows, merging pairs of galaxies each harboring a supermassive black hole (SMBH), and/or galactic-scale disk rotation. It remains unclear, however, how the frequency of narrow-line velocity splitting may depend on AGN luminosity. Here we study the correlation between the fraction of Type 2 AGNs with double-peaked narrow emission lines and AGN luminosity as indicated by [O III]λ5007 emission-line luminosity L[O III]. We combine the sample of Liu et al. (2010a) at z ˜ 0.1 with a new sample of 178 Type 2 AGNs with double-peaked [O III] emission lines at z ˜ 0.5. We select the new sample from a parent sample of 2089 Type 2 AGNs from the SDSS-III/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We find a statistically significant (˜4.2σ) correlation between L[O III] and the fraction of objects that exhibit double-peaked narrow emission lines among all Type 2 AGNs, corrected for selection bias and incompleteness due to [O III] line width, equivalent width, splitting velocity, and/or equivalent width ratio between the two velocity components. Our result suggests that galactic-scale outflows and/or merging pairs of SMBHs are more prevalent in more powerful AGNs, although spatially resolved follow up observations are needed to resolve the origin(s) for the narrow-line velocity splitting for individual AGNs.

  9. The Magnetized Galactic Wind and Synchrotron Halo of the Starburst Dwarf Galaxy IC 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyży, Krzysztof T.; Drzazga, Robert T.; Beck, Rainer; Urbanik, Marek; Heesen, Volker; Bomans, Dominik J.

    2016-03-01

    We aim to explore whether strong magnetic fields can be effectively generated in low-mass dwarf galaxies and, if so, whether such fields can be affected by galactic outflows and spread out into the intergalactic medium (IGM). We performed a radio continuum polarimetry study of IC 10, the nearest starbursting dwarf galaxy, using a combination of multifrequency interferometric (VLA) and single-dish (Effelsberg) observations. VLA observations at 1.43 GHz reveal an extensive and almost spherical radio halo of IC 10 in total intensity, extending twice more than the infrared-emitting galactic disk. The halo is magnetized with a magnetic field strength of 7 μG in the outermost parts. Locally, the magnetic field reaches about 29 μ {{G}} in H ii complexes, becomes more ordered, and weakens to 22 μ {{G}} in the synchrotron superbubble and to 7-10 μG within H i holes. At the higher frequency of 4.86 GHz, we found a large-scale magnetic field structure of X-shaped morphology, similar to that observed in several edge-on spiral galaxies. The X-shaped magnetic structure can be caused by the galactic wind, advecting magnetic fields injected into the interstellar medium by stellar winds and supernova explosions. The radio continuum scale heights at 1.43 GHz indicate the bulk speed of cosmic-ray electrons outflowing from H ii complexes of about 60 km s-1, exceeding the escape velocity of 40 km s-1. Hence, the magnetized galactic wind in IC 10 inflates the extensive radio halo visible at 1.43 GHz and can seed the IGM with both random and ordered magnetic fields. These are signatures of intense material feedback onto the IGM, expected to be prevalent in the protogalaxies of the early universe.

  10. The Wide-angle Outflow of the Lensed z = 1.51 AGN HS 0810+2554

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartas, G.; Cappi, M.; Hamann, F.; Eracleous, M.; Strickland, S.; Giustini, M.; Misawa, T.

    2016-06-01

    We present results from X-ray observations of the gravitationally lensed z = 1.51 active galactic nucleus (AGN) HS 0810+2554 performed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton. Blueshifted absorption lines are detected in both observations at rest-frame energies ranging between ˜1 and 12 keV at ≳99% confidence. The inferred velocities of the outflowing components range between ˜0.1c and ˜0.4c. A strong emission line at ˜6.8 keV that is accompanied by a significant absorption line at ˜7.8 keV is also detected in the Chandra observation. The presence of these lines is a characteristic feature of a P-Cygni profile supporting the presence of an expanding, outflowing, highly ionized iron absorber in this quasar. Modeling of the P-Cygni profile constrains the covering factor of the wind to be ≳0.6, assuming disk shielding. A disk-reflection component is detected in the XMM-Newton observation accompanied by blueshifted absorption lines. The XMM-Newton observation constrains the inclination angle to be detection of an ultrafast and wide-angle wind in an AGN with intrinsic narrow absorption lines (NALs) would suggest that quasar winds may couple efficiently with the intergalactic medium and provide significant feedback if ubiquitous in all NAL and broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. We estimate the mass-outflow rate of the absorbers to lie in the range of 1.5–3.4 M ⊙ yr‑1 for the two observations. We find that the fraction of kinetic to electromagnetic luminosity released by HS 0810+2554 is large (ɛ k = 9{}-6+8), which suggests that magnetic driving is likely a significant contributor to the acceleration of this outflow.

  11. Discovery of Ultra-fast Outflows in a Sample of Broad-line Radio Galaxies Observed with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F.; Sambruna, R. M.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.; Ballo, L.; Gofford, J.; Cappi, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2010-08-01

    We present the results of a uniform and systematic search for blueshifted Fe K absorption lines in the X-ray spectra of five bright broad-line radio galaxies observed with Suzaku. We detect, for the first time in radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at X-rays, several absorption lines at energies greater than 7 keV in three out of five sources, namely, 3C 111, 3C 120, and 3C 390.3. The lines are detected with high significance according to both the F-test and extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Their likely interpretation as blueshifted Fe XXV and Fe XXVI K-shell resonance lines implies an origin from highly ionized gas outflowing with mildly relativistic velocities, in the range v ~= 0.04-0.15c. A fit with specific photoionization models gives ionization parameters in the range log ξ ~= 4-5.6 erg s-1 cm and column densities of N H ~= 1022-1023 cm-2. These characteristics are very similar to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) previously observed in radio-quiet AGNs. Their estimated location within ~0.01-0.3 pc of the central super-massive black hole suggests a likely origin related with accretion disk winds/outflows. Depending on the absorber covering fraction, the mass outflow rate of these UFOs can be comparable to the accretion rate and their kinetic power can correspond to a significant fraction of the bolometric luminosity and is comparable to their typical jet power. Therefore, these UFOs can play a significant role in the expected feedback from the AGN to the surrounding environment and can give us further clues on the relation between the accretion disk and the formation of winds/jets in both radio-quiet and radio-loud AGNs.

  12. Rapid Black Hole Growth under Anisotropic Radiation Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Sugimura, Kazuyuki; Yajima, Hidenobu; Omukai, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Rapid accretion of gases onto massive black holes (BHs) is considered to have played an important role in the growth of the observed high-redshift (z > 6) supermassive BHs. Here, we present the results of our two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of rapidly accreting BHs under anisotropic radiation. We model the radiation from the central circum-BH accretion disk considering the shadowing effect by the outer part of the disk. We find that the flow structure reaches a steady state, which consists of a polar ionized outflowing region, where the gas is pushed outward by the super-Eddington radiation pressure, and an equatorial neutral inflowing region, where the gas falls toward the central BH in a Bondi-like accretion fashion without affected by radiation feedback. The resulting accretion rate is much higher than that in the case of isotropic radiation, and far exceeds the Eddington-limited rate and even reaches around the Bondi value. We find that the solid angle of the equatorial inflowing regio...

  13. Collective outflow from a small multiple stellar system

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Thomas; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Schrön, Martin; Federrath, Christoph; Smith, Michael D; Klessen, Ralf S

    2014-01-01

    The formation of high-mass stars is usually accompanied by powerful protostellar outflows. Such high-mass outflows are not simply scaled-up versions of their lower-mass counterparts, since observations suggest that the collimation degree degrades with stellar mass. Theoretically, the origins of massive outflows remain open to question because radiative feedback and fragmentation of the accretion flow around the most massive stars, with M > 15 M_Sun, may impede the driving of magnetic disk winds. We here present a three-dimensional simulation of the early stages of core fragmentation and massive star formation that includes a subgrid-scale model for protostellar outflows. We find that stars that form in a common accretion flow tend to have aligned outflow axes, so that the individual jets of multiple stars can combine to form a collective outflow. We compare our simulation to observations with synthetic H_2 and CO observations and find that the morphology and kinematics of such a collective outflow resembles s...

  14. Simulation of California's Major Reservoirs Outflow Using Data Mining Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Gao, X.; Sorooshian, S.

    2014-12-01

    The reservoir's outflow is controlled by reservoir operators, which is different from the upstream inflow. The outflow is more important than the reservoir's inflow for the downstream water users. In order to simulate the complicated reservoir operation and extract the outflow decision making patterns for California's 12 major reservoirs, we build a data-driven, computer-based ("artificial intelligent") reservoir decision making tool, using decision regression and classification tree approach. This is a well-developed statistical and graphical modeling methodology in the field of data mining. A shuffled cross validation approach is also employed to extract the outflow decision making patterns and rules based on the selected decision variables (inflow amount, precipitation, timing, water type year etc.). To show the accuracy of the model, a verification study is carried out comparing the model-generated outflow decisions ("artificial intelligent" decisions) with that made by reservoir operators (human decisions). The simulation results show that the machine-generated outflow decisions are very similar to the real reservoir operators' decisions. This conclusion is based on statistical evaluations using the Nash-Sutcliffe test. The proposed model is able to detect the most influential variables and their weights when the reservoir operators make an outflow decision. While the proposed approach was firstly applied and tested on California's 12 major reservoirs, the method is universally adaptable to other reservoir systems.

  15. The contribution of quasar outflows to cosmological structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arav, Nahum

    2011-10-01

    A vast new discovery space is opened up by the high sensitivity of COS in the far UV. These new capabilities are ushering a revolution in the study of AGN outflows. We now have the ability to obtain high quality data on objects up to a redshift of about 1, providing access to ten times more {and better} diagnostic absorption lines than was possible with STIS {which could only observe outflows at z<0.05 with sufficient S/N}. These diagnostics will allow us to quantify how much do quasar outflow contribute to AGN feedback. On the way to this lofty goal, we'll be able to resolve important questions in the study of these outflows: Where are they situated within the host galaxy? What is their ionization equilibrium and chemical abundances? Unlike ground-based observations, COS data can yield the answers to all these questions for the most ubiquitous outflows, and therefore connect them to our developing understanding of cosmological structure formation.Our analysis of recent archived COS observations gives a concrete example for the above claims; including the first determination of the distance from the central source for a high-ionization outflow. Here we propose an archive program to look through the 520 COS G130M and G160M orbits of AGN archive observations, identify quasar outflows and publish the analyses of the best cases.

  16. High-velocity molecular outflows hear massive young stellar objects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴月芳; 李月兴; 杨传义; 雷成明; 孙金江; 吕静; 韩溥

    1999-01-01

    By mapping the 12CO J=1—0 lines in IRAS 05391-0217, 06114+1745 and 06291+0421, three new high-velocity bipolar molecular outflows are found. Parameters of these outflows are derived, which suggest that they are massive and energetic outflows with total kinetic energies of about 1038 J and mass loss rates about 10-5 M⊙/a. The driving sources are identified by analyzing the positions, intensities and color temperatures of the associated infrared sources. These outflows are most likely driven by single sources which correspond to massive young stellar objects. In these regions H2O masers have been detected located near the embedded infrared sources, which indicates that their exciting mechanism may be correlated with that of the CO outflows. The relationship between the parameters of outflows and central sources shows that high-velocity outflow and thermal radiation of a star are two basic correlated but different features in the evolution of young stars.

  17. Evolution of Protostellar Outflow around Low-mass Protostar

    CERN Document Server

    Machida, Masahiro N

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of protostellar outflow is investigated with resistive magneto-hydrodynamic nested-grid simulations that cover a wide range of spatial scales (\\sim 1AU - 1pc). We follow cloud evolution from the pre-stellar core stage until the infalling envelope dissipates long after the protostar formation. We also calculate protostellar evolution to derive protostellar luminosity with time-dependent mass accretion through a circumstellar disk. The protostellar outflow is driven by the first core prior to protostar formation and is directly driven by the circumstellar disk after protostar formation. The opening angle of the outflow is large in the Class 0 stage. A large fraction of the cloud mass is ejected in this stage, which reduces the star formation efficiency to \\sim 50%. After the outflow breaks out from the natal cloud, the outflow collimation is gradually improved in the Class I stage. The head of the outflow travels more than \\sim 10^5AU in \\sim 10^5 yr. The outflow momentum, energy and mass derived ...

  18. PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A protostellar jet and outflow are calculated for ∼270 yr following the protostar formation using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulation, in which both the protostar and its parent cloud are spatially resolved. A high-velocity (∼100 km s–1) jet with good collimation is driven near the disk's inner edge, while a low-velocity (≲ 10 km s–1) outflow with a wide opening angle appears in the outer-disk region. The high-velocity jet propagates into the low-velocity outflow, forming a nested velocity structure in which a narrow high-velocity flow is enclosed by a wide low-velocity flow. The low-velocity outflow is in a nearly steady state, while the high-velocity jet appears intermittently. The time-variability of the jet is related to the episodic accretion from the disk onto the protostar, which is caused by gravitational instability and magnetic effects such as magnetic braking and magnetorotational instability. Although the high-velocity jet has a large kinetic energy, the mass and momentum of the jet are much smaller than those of the low-velocity outflow. A large fraction of the infalling gas is ejected by the low-velocity outflow. Thus, the low-velocity outflow actually has a more significant effect than the high-velocity jet in the very early phase of the star formation

  19. MOND laws of galactic dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2012-01-01

    MOND predicts a number of laws that galactic systems should obey irrespective of their complicated, haphazard, and mostly unknowable histories -- as Kepler's laws are obeyed by planetary systems. The main purpose of this work is to show how, and to what extent, these MOND laws follow from only the paradigm's basic tenets: departure from standard dynamics at accelerations a

  20. Warm anisotropic inflationary universe model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M.; Saleem, Rabia [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2014-02-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of warm inflation using vector fields in the background of a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I model of the universe. We formulate the field equations, and slow-roll and perturbation parameters (scalar and tensor power spectra as well as their spectral indices) in the slow-roll approximation. We evaluate all these parameters in terms of the directional Hubble parameter during the intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by taking the dissipation factor as a function of the scalar field as well as a constant. In each case, we calculate the observational parameter of interest, i.e., the tensor-scalar ratio in terms of the inflaton. The graphical behavior of these parameters shows that the anisotropic model is also compatible with WMAP7 and the Planck observational data. (orig.)

  1. Warm Anisotropic Inflationary Universe Model

    CERN Document Server

    Sharif, M

    2014-01-01

    This paper is devoted to study the warm inflation using vector fields in the background of locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I universe model. We formulate the field equations, slow-roll and perturbation parameters (scalar and tensor power spectra as well as their spectral indices) under slow-roll approximation. We evaluate all these parameters in terms of directional Hubble parameter during intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by taking the dissipation factor as a function of scalar field as well as a constant. In each case, we calculate the observational parameter of interest, i.e., tensor-scalar ratio in terms of inflation. The graphical behavior of these parameters shows that the anisotropic model is also compatible with WMAP7 and Planck observational data.

  2. Anisotropic scaling of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Horbury, T S; Oughton, S

    2008-01-01

    We present a quantitative estimate of the anisotropic power and scaling of magnetic field fluctuations in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, using a novel wavelet technique applied to spacecraft measurements in the solar wind. We show for the first time that, when the local magnetic field direction is parallel to the flow, the spacecraft-frame spectrum has a spectral index near 2. This can be interpreted as the signature of a population of fluctuations in field-parallel wavenumbers with a $k_{\\parallel}^{-2}$ spectrum but is also consistent with the presence of a "critical balance" style turbulent cascade. We also find, in common with previous studies, that most of the power is contained in wavevectors at large angles to the local magnetic field and that this component of the turbulence has a spectral index of 5/3.

  3. Gravitational baryogenesis after anisotropic inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Mizuno, Shuntaro; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2016-05-01

    The gravitational baryogensis may not generate a sufficient baryon asymmetry in the standard thermal history of the Universe when we take into account the gravitino problem. Hence, it has been suggested that anisotropy of the Universe can enhance the generation of the baryon asymmetry through the increase of the time change of the Ricci scalar curvature. We study the gravitational baryogenesis in the presence of anisotropy, which is produced at the end of an anisotropic inflation. Although we confirm that the generated baryon asymmetry is enhanced compared with the original isotropic cosmological model, taking into account the constraint on the anisotropy by the recent CMB observations, we find that it is still difficult to obtain the observed baryon asymmetry only through the gravitational baryogenesis without suffering from the gravitino problem.

  4. I-Love-Q Anisotropically

    CERN Document Server

    Yagi, Kent

    2015-01-01

    Certain physical quantities that characterize neutron stars and quark stars (e.g. their mass, spin angular momentum and quadrupole moment) are interrelated in a way that is approximately insensitive to their internal structure. Such approximately universal relations are useful to break degeneracies in data analysis for future radio, X-ray and gravitational wave observations. Although the pressure inside compact stars is most likely nearly isotropic, certain scenarios have been put forth that suggest otherwise, for example due to phase transitions. We here investigate whether pressure anisotropy affects the approximate universal relations and whether it prevents their use in future observations. We achieve this by numerically constructing slowly-rotating and tidally-deformed, anisotropic, compact stars in General Relativity to third order in spin. We find that anisotropy affects the universal relations only weakly; the relations become less universal by a factor of 1.5-3 relative to the isotropic case, but rem...

  5. Gravitational Baryogenesis after Anisotropic Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational baryogensis may not generate a sufficient baryon asymmetry in the standard thermal history of the Universe when we take into account the gravitino problem. Hence it has been suggested that anisotropy of the Universe can enhance the generation of the baryon asymmetry through the increase of the time change of the Ricci scalar curvature. We study the gravitational baryogenesis in the presence of anisotropy, which is produced at the end of an anisotropic inflation. Although we confirm that the generated baryon asymmetry is enhanced compared with the original isotropic cosmological model, taking into account the constraint on the anisotropy by the recent CMB observations, we find that it is still difficult to obtain the observed baryon asymmetry only through the gravitational baryogenesis without suffering from the gravitino problem.

  6. Anisotropic microstructure near the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio scattering observations provide a means of measuring a two-dimensional projection of the three-dimensional spatial spectrum of electron density, i.e., in the plane perpendicular to the line of sight. Earlier observations have shown that the microstructure at scales of the order of 10 km becomes highly field-aligned inside of 10 R· [Armstrong et al., 1990]. Earlier work has also shown that density fluctuations at scales larger than 1000 km have a Kolmogorov spectrum, whereas the smaller scale structure has a flatter spectrum and is considerably enhanced above the Kolmogorov ''background'' [Coles et al., 1991]. Here we present new observations made during 1990 and 1992. These confirm the earlier work, which was restricted to one source on a few days, but they suggest that the anisotropy changes abruptly near 6 R· which was not clear in the earlier data. The axial ratio measurements are shown on Figure 1 below. The new observations were made with a more uniform sampling of the spatial plane. They show that contours of constant correlation are elliptical. This is apparently inconsistent with the spatial correlation of the ISEE-3 magnetic field which shows a 'Maltese Cross' shape [Matthaeus et al., 1990]. However this inconsistency may be only apparent: the magnetic field and density correlations need not have the same shape; the scale of the magnetic field correlations is at least 4 orders of magnitude larger; they are much further from the sun; and they are point measurements whereas ours are path-integrated. We also made two simultaneous measurements, at 10 R·, of the anisotropy on scales of 200 to 4000 km. Significant anisotropy was seen on the smaller scales, but the larger scale structure was essentially isotropic. This suggests that the process responsible for the anisotropic microstructure is independent of the larger scale isotropic turbulence. It is then tempting to speculate that the damping of this anisotropic process inside of 6 R· contributes to

  7. Gravitational Microlensing and the Structure of Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Chelouche, D

    2005-01-01

    We show that invaluable information on the structure of quasar outflows can be obtained by considering microlensing (ML) induced variability of absorption line troughs in lensed quasars. Depending on the structure and geometry of the outflowing gas, such extrinsic line variability can be manifested as changes to the equivalent width of the line as well as line profile distortions. Here we consider several physically distinct outflow models, having very similar spectral predictions, and show how ML induced absorption line variability can be used to distinguish between them. The merits of future systematic studies of these effects are exemplified.

  8. The galactic cycle of extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Michael; Erenler, Hilary

    2008-01-01

    Global extinction and geological events have previously been linked with galactic events such as spiral arm crossings and galactic plane oscillation. The expectation that these are repeating predictable events has led to studies of periodicity in a wide set of biological, geological and climatic phenomena. Using data on carbon isotope excursions, large igneous provinces and impact craters, we identify three time zones of high geological activity which relate to the timings of the passage of the Solar System through the spiral arms. These zones are shown to include a significantly large proportion of high extinction periods. The mass extinction events at the ends of the Ordovician, Permian and Cretaceous occur in the first zone, which contains the predicted midpoints of the spiral arms. The start of the Cambrian, end of the Devonian and end of the Triassic occur in the second zone. The pattern of extinction timing in relation to spiral arm structure is supported by the positions of the superchrons and the predicted speed of the spiral arms. The passage times through an arm are simple multiples of published results on impact and fossil record periodicity and galactic plane half-periods. The total estimated passage time through four arms is 703.8 Myr. The repetition of extinction events at the same points in different spiral arm crossings suggests a common underlying galactic cause of mass extinctions, mediated through galactic effects on geological, solar and extra-solar processes. The two largest impact craters (Sudbury and Vredefort), predicted to have occurred during the early part of the first zone, extend the possible pattern to more than 2000 million years ago.

  9. Optically thick outflows in ultraluminous supersoft sources

    CERN Document Server

    Urquhart, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Ultraluminous supersoft sources (ULSs) are defined by a thermal spectrum with colour temperatures ~0.1 keV, bolometric luminosities ~ a few 10^39 erg/s, and almost no emission above 1 keV. It has never been clear how they fit into the general scheme of accreting compact objects. To address this problem, we studied a sample of seven ULSs with extensive Chandra and XMM-Newton coverage. We find an anticorrelation between fitted temperatures and radii of the thermal emitter, and no correlation between bolometric luminosity and radius or temperature. We compare the physical parameters of ULSs with those of classical supersoft sources, thought to be surface-nuclear-burning white dwarfs, and of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), thought to be super-Eddington stellar-mass black holes. We argue that ULSs are the sub-class of ULXs seen through the densest wind, perhaps an extension of the soft-ultraluminous regime. We suggest that in ULSs, the massive disk outflow becomes effectively optically thick and forms a large ...

  10. Radiation Transport for Explosive Outflows: Opacity Regrouping

    CERN Document Server

    Wollaeger, Ryan T

    2014-01-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that, in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure "opacity regrouping". Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in \\supernu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck ...

  11. Dissipation in Relativistic Outflows: A Multisource Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Relativistically expanding sources of X-rays and gamma-rays cover an enormous range of (central) compactness and Lorentz factor. The underlying physics is discussed, with an emphasis on how the dominant dissipative mode and the emergent spectrum depend on these parameters. Photons advected outward from high optical depth are a potentially important source of Compton seeds. Their characteristic energy is bounded below by ~1 MeV in pair-loaded outflows of relatively low compactness, and remains near ~1 MeV at very high compactness and low matter loading. This is compared with the characteristic energy of O(1) MeV observed in the rest frame spectra of many sources, including gamma-ray bursts, OSSE jet sources, MeV Blazars, and the intense initial 0.1 s pulse of the March 5 event. Additional topics discussed include the feedback of pair creation on electron heating and the formation of non-thermal spectra, their effectiveness at shielding the dissipative zone from ambient photons, direct Compton damping of irregu...

  12. Bipolar outflows in OH/IR stars

    CERN Document Server

    Zijlstra, A A; Hekkert, P L; Likkel, L; Comeron, F; Norris, R P; Molster, F J; Cohen, R J; Zijlstra, Albert A.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the development of bipolar outflows during the early post-AGB evolution. A sample of ten OH/IR stars is observed at high angular resolution, including bipolar nebulae (OH231.8+4.2), bright post-AGB stars (HD 101584) and reflection nebulae (e.g. Roberts 22). The IRAS colour--colour diagram separates the sample into different types of objects. One group may contain the progenitors to the (few) extreme bipolar planetary nebulae. Two objects show colours and chemistry very similar to the planetary nebulae with late IR-[WC] stars. One object is a confirmed close binary. A model is presented consisting of an outer AGB wind which is swept up by a faster post-AGB wind, with either wind being non-spherically symetric. The interface of the two winds is shown to exhibit a linear relation between velocity and distance from the star. The OH data confirms the predicted linear velocity gradients, and reveals torus-like, uniformly expanding components. All sources are discussed in detail using optical/HST imag...

  13. The Physical Nature of the Circum-Galactic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre

    crucial step that has been neglected in the majority theoretical studies so far. We will complete our research program with a detailed comparison of our radiative transfer results with existing measurements of covering fractions, kinematics, and position of absorbing gas relative to galaxies, and generate a catalog of simulated statistics for all the main atomic transitions for comparison with other ongoing and future HST observations. Using these results, we will develop diagnostics for testing the predictions of cosmological simulations for cold and hot gas accretion onto galaxies, and for galactic winds, including the mass fractions in hot and cool components, their energetics, and how far they disperse metals. Our work will extend high-redshift studies to the low-redshift Universe, which has received comparatively little theoretical attention. Our systematic study will test our current best numerical models of galaxy formation, powerfully complementing observations of stars and gas inside galaxies by directly probing the gas flows that ultimately regulate the fuel for star formation. Notably, we will quantify the implications of HST results for several key physical processes in galaxy formation, including: gas accretion from the IGM, cooling of hot gas in galaxy halos, angular momentum acquisition by galactic disks, galactic winds, galactic fountains, interactions between inflows and outflows, the quenching of star formation in massive halos, the dispersal of metals in the Universe, and the impact of galaxies on the IGM. We will investigate how each of these processes probed by CGM gas correlates with the properties of associated galaxies, and its relation to the color and morphological transformations of galaxies. In addition to HST, our work will have ramifications for all NASA missions used to study galaxy evolution and the IGM, including the James Webb Space Telescope, WFIRST, Spitzer, Chandra, NuSTAR, and Herschel.

  14. A new algorithm for anisotropic solutions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Chaisi; S D Maharaj

    2006-02-01

    We establish a new algorithm that generates a new solution to the Einstein field equations, with an anisotropic matter distribution, from a seed isotropic solution. The new solution is expressed in terms of integrals of an isotropic gravitational potential; and the integration can be completed exactly for particular isotropic seed metrics. A good feature of our approach is that the anisotropic solutions necessarily have an isotropic limit. We find two examples of anisotropic solutions which generalise the isothermal sphere and the Schwarzschild interior sphere. Both examples are expressed in closed form involving elementary functions only.

  15. Indirect measurement of Delta outflow using ultrasonic velocity meters and comparison with mass-balance calculated outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltmann, Richard N.

    1998-01-01

    A measurement of the quantity of water flowing from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta into Suisun Bay (Delta outflow) has been desired by those studying and managing the San Francisco Bay/Delta estuary since the 1920s.  Historically, Delta outflow has been estimated using a mass-balance calculation that uses measured Delta inflows and exports, and imprecise estimates of consumptive use for the approximately 2,000 small agricultural diversions with the Delta.  The DWR has estimated Delta outflow for 1929 to present using the computer program DAYFLOW.

  16. Nucleosynthesis in Outflows from the Inner Regions of Collapsars

    CERN Document Server

    Pruet, J; Hoffman, R D; Pruet, Jason; Thompson, Todd

    2004-01-01

    We consider nucleosynthesis in outflows originating from the inner regions of viscous accretion disks formed after the collapse of a rotating massive star. We show that wind-like outflows driven by viscous and neutrino heating can efficiently synthesize Fe-group elements moving at near-relativistic velocities. The mass of 56Ni synthesized and the asymptotic velocities attained in our calculations are in accord with those inferred from observations of SN1998bw and SN2003dh. These steady wind-like outflows are generally proton rich, characterized by only modest entropies, and consequently synthesize essentially nothing heavier than the Fe-group elements. We also discuss bubble-like outflows resulting from rapid energy deposition in localized regions near or in the accretion disk. These intermittent ejecta emerge with low electron fraction and are a promising site for the synthesis of the A=130 r-process peak elements.

  17. Estimation of cold plasma outflow during geomagnetic storms

    CERN Document Server

    Haaland, S; André, M; Maes, L; Baddeley, L; Barakat, A; Chappell, R; Eccles, V; Johnsen, C; Lybekk, B; Li, K; Pedersen, A; Schunk, R; Welling, D

    2016-01-01

    Low-energy ions of ionospheric origin constitute a significant contributor to the magnetospheric plasma population. Measuring cold ions is difficult though. Observations have to be done at sufficiently high altitudes and typically in regions of space where spacecraft attain a positive charge due to solar illumination. Cold ions are therefore shielded from the satellite particle detectors. Furthermore, spacecraft can only cover key regions of ion outflow during segments of their orbit, so additional complications arise if continuous longtime observations, such as during a geomagnetic storm, are needed. In this paper we suggest a new approach, based on a combination of synoptic observations and a novel technique to estimate the flux and total outflow during the various phases of geomagnetic storms. Our results indicate large variations in both outflow rates and transport throughout the storm. Prior to the storm main phase, outflow rates are moderate, and the cold ions are mainly emanating from moderately sized ...

  18. About the seasonal and fortnightly variabilities of the Mediterranean outflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Millot

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CTD time series from the HYDRO-CHANGES programme and INGRES projects have been collected simultaneously (2004–2008 on the shelf of Morocco and at the sills of Camarinal and Espartel in the strait of Gibraltar. They provide information that supports results recently obtained from the analysis of the two former time series, as well as from a reanalysis of GIBEX CTD profiles (1985–1986. The outflow of Mediterranean Waters, which does not show a clear seasonal variability before entering the strait, strongly mixes within the strait, due mainly to the internal tide, with the seasonally variable inflow of Atlantic Water. The outflow thus gets marked seasonal and fortnightly variabilities within the strait. Furthermore, since the outflowing waters entering the strait display marked spatial heterogeneity and long-term temporal variabilities, accurately predicting the characteristics of the Mediterranean outflow into the North Atlantic Ocean appears almost impossible.

  19. IMPLICATIONS OF INFALLING Fe II-EMITTING CLOUDS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: ANISOTROPIC PROPERTIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate consequences of the discovery that Fe II emission in quasars, one of the spectroscopic signatures of 'Eigenvector 1', may originate in infalling clouds. Eigenvector 1 correlates with the Eddington ratio L/L Edd so that Fe II/Hβ increases as L/L Edd increases. We show that the 'force multiplier', the ratio of gas opacity to electron scattering opacity, is ∼103-104 in Fe II-emitting gas. Such gas would be accelerated away from the central object if the radiation force is able to act on the entire cloud. As had previously been deduced, infall requires that the clouds have large column densities so that a substantial amount of shielded gas is present. The critical column density required for infall to occur depends on L/L Edd, establishing a link between Eigenvector 1 and the Fe II/Hβ ratio. We see predominantly the shielded face of the infalling clouds rather than the symmetric distribution of emitters that has been assumed. The Fe II spectrum emitted by the shielded face is in good agreement with observations thus solving several long-standing mysteries in quasar emission lines.

  20. Searching for molecular outflows in Hyper-Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    D. Calderón; Bauer, F. E.; Veilleux, S; Graciá-Carpio, J; Sturm, E; P. Lira; Schulze, S.; Kim, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present constraints on the molecular outflows in a sample of five Hyper-Luminous Infrared Galaxies using Herschel observations of the OH doublet at 119 {\\mu}m. We have detected the OH doublet in three cases: one purely in emission and two purely in absorption. The observed emission profile has a significant blueshifted wing suggesting the possibility of tracing an outflow. Out of the two absorption profiles, one seems to be consistent with the systemic velocity while the other clearly indi...

  1. Ultra-fast outflows (aka UFOs) from AGNs and QSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Cappi, M; Giustini, M

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, strong observational evidence has been accumulated for the existence of massive, high velocity winds/outflows (aka Ultra Fast Outflows, UFOs) in nearby AGNs and in more distant quasars. Here we briefly review some of the most recent developments in this field and discuss the relevance of UFOs for both understanding the physics of accretion disk winds in AGNs, and for quantifying the global amount of AGN feedback on the surrounding medium.

  2. Capital Outflow Controls and Income Distribution in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Jarita Duasa

    2008-01-01

    The study seeks to analyze the impact of capital outflow controls, imposed by Malaysian government on September 1998, on income distribution. Regression analysis using OLS (Ordinary Least Square), 2SLS (Two Stages Least Square) and GMM (Generalised Method of Moment) methods of estimation reveals that the capital outflow controls reduce inequality of income distribution in the country. The controls are believed to result in improvement of export-led industries, through devaluation from control...

  3. Identifying the Main Driver of Active Region Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Mandrini, C. H.; Démoulin, P.; Murray, M. J.

    2012-08-01

    Hinode's EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) has discovered ubiquitous outflows of a few to 50 km s-1 from active regions (ARs). The characteristics of these outflows are very curious in that they are most prominent at the AR boundary and appear over monopolar magnetic areas. They are linked to strong non-thermal line broadening and are stronger in hotter EUV lines. The outflows persist for at least several days. Whereas red-shifted down flows observed in AR closed loops are well understood, to date there is no general consensus for the mechanism(s) driving blue-shifted AR-related outflows. We use Hinode EIS and X-Ray Telescope observations of AR 10942 coupled with magnetic modeling to demonstrate for the first time that the outflows originate from specific locations of the magnetic topology where field lines display strong gradients of magnetic connectivity, namely quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs), or in the limit of infinitely thin QSLs, separatrices. The strongest AR outflows were found to be in the vicinity of QSL sections located over areas of strong magnetic field. We argue that magnetic reconnection at QSLs, separating closed field lines of the AR and either large-scale externally connected or ‘open’ field lines, is a viable mechanism for driving AR outflows which are potentially sources of the slow solar wind. In fact, magnetic reconnection along QSLs (including separatricies) is the first theory to explain the most puzzling characteristics of the outflows, namely their occurrence over monopolar areas at the periphery of ARs and their longevity.

  4. Ultra-fast outflows (aka UFOs) from AGNs and QSOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappi, M.; Tombesi, F.; Giustini, M.

    During the last decade, strong observational evidence has been accumulated for the existence of massive, high velocity winds/outflows (aka Ultra Fast Outflows, UFOs) in nearby AGNs and in more distant quasars. Here we briefly review some of the most recent developments in this field and discuss the relevance of UFOs for both understanding the physics of accretion disk winds in AGNs, and for quantifying the global amount of AGN feedback on the surrounding medium.

  5. Collapse and Outflow Towards an Integrated Theory of Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Pudritz, R E; Ouyed, R

    1997-01-01

    Observational advances over the last decade reveal that star formation is associated with the simultaneous presence of gravitationally collapsing gas, bipolar outflow, and an accretion disk. Two theoretical views of star formation suppose that either stellar mass is determined from the outset by gravitational instability, or by the outflow which sweeps away the collapsing envelope of initially singular density distributions. Neither picture appears to explain all of the facts. This contribution examines some of the key issues facing star formation theory.

  6. Characterization of molecular outflows in the substellar domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phan-Bao, Ngoc; Dang-Duc, Cuong [Department of Physics, International University-Vietnam National University HCM, Block 6, Linh Trung Ward, Thu Duc District, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Lee, Chin-Fei; Ho, Paul T. P. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Li, Di, E-mail: pbngoc@hcmiu.edu.vn, E-mail: pbngoc@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, Chaoyang District Datun Rd A20, Beijing (China)

    2014-11-01

    We report here our latest search for molecular outflows from young brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars in nearby star-forming regions. We have observed three sources in Taurus with the Submillimeter Array and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy at 230 GHz frequency to search for CO J = 2 → 1 outflows. We obtain a tentative detection of a redshifted and extended gas lobe at about 10 arcsec from the source GM Tau, a young brown dwarf in Taurus with an estimated mass of 73 M {sub J}, which is right below the hydrogen-burning limit. No blueshifted emission around the brown dwarf position is detected. The redshifted gas lobe that is elongated in the northeast direction suggests a possible bipolar outflow from the source with a position angle of about 36°. Assuming that the redshifted emission is outflow emission from GM Tau, we then estimate a molecular outflow mass in the range from 1.9 × 10{sup –6} M {sub ☉} to 2.9 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} and an outflow mass-loss rate from 2.7 × 10{sup –9} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} to 4.1 × 10{sup –8} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. These values are comparable to those we have observed in the young brown dwarf ISO-Oph 102 of 60 M {sub J} in ρ Ophiuchi and the very low-mass star MHO 5 of 90 M {sub J} in Taurus. Our results suggest that the outflow process in very low-mass objects is episodic with a duration of a few thousand years and the outflow rate of active episodes does not significantly change for different stages of the formation process of very low-mass objects. This may provide us with important implications that clarify the formation process of brown dwarfs.

  7. Tracing outflows in the AGN forbidden region with SINFONI

    CERN Document Server

    Kakkad, D; Padovani, P; Cresci, G; Husemann, B; Carniani, S; Brusa, M; Lamastra, A; Lanzuisi, G; Piconcelli, E; Schramm, M

    2016-01-01

    AGN driven outflows are invoked in numerical simulations to reproduce several observed properties of local galaxies. The z > 1 epoch is of particular interest as it was during this time that the volume averaged star formation and the accretion rate of black holes were maximum. Radiatively driven outflows are therefore believed to be common during this epoch. We aim to trace and characterize outflows in AGN hosts with high mass accretion rates at z > 1 using integral field spectroscopy. We obtain spatially-resolved kinematics of the [OIII]5007 line in two targets which reveal the morphology and spatial extension of the outflows. We present J and H+K band SINFONI observations of 5 AGNs at 1.2 < z < 2.2. To maximize the chance of observing radiatively driven outflows, our sample was pre-selected based on peculiar values of the Eddington ratio and the hydrogen column density of the surrounding interstellar medium. We observe high velocity (~600-1900 km/s) and kiloparsec scale extended ionized outflows in at...

  8. Characterization of Molecular Outflows in The Substellar Domain

    CERN Document Server

    Phan-Bao, Ngoc; Ho, Paul T P; Dang-Duc, Cuong; Li, Di

    2014-01-01

    We report here our latest search for molecular outflows from young brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars in nearby star-forming regions. We have observed three sources in Taurus with the Submillimeter Array and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy at 230 GHz frequency to search for CO J=2-1 outflows. We obtain a tentative detection of a redshifted and extended gas lobe at about 10 arcsec from the source GM Tau, a young brown dwarf in Taurus with an estimated mass of 73 M_J, which is right below the hydrogen-burning limit. No blueshifted emission around the brown dwarf position is detected. The redshifted gas lobe that is elongated in the northeast direction suggests a possible bipolar outflow from the source with a position angle of about 36 degrees. Assuming that the redshifted emission is outflow emission from GM Tau, we then estimate a molecular outflow mass in the range from 1.9x10^-6 M_Sun to 2.9x10^-5 M_Sun and an outflow mass-loss rate from 2.7x10^-9 M_Sun yr^-1 to 4.1x10^-8 M_Su...

  9. Evolution of active region outflows throughout an active region lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Zangrilli, L

    2016-01-01

    We have shown previously that SOHO/UVCS data allow us to detect active region (AR) outflows at coronal altitudes higher than those reached by other instrumentation. These outflows are thought to be a component of the slow solar wind. Our purpose is to study the evolution of the outflows in the intermediate corona from AR 8100, from the time the AR first forms until it dissolves, after several transits at the solar limb. Data acquired by SOHO/UVCS at the time of the AR limb transits, at medium latitudes and at altitudes ranging from 1.5 to 2.3 R_sun, were used to infer the physical properties of the outflows through the AR evolution. To this end, we applied the Doppler dimming technique to UVCS spectra. These spectra include the H I Lyman alpha line and the O VI doublet lines at 1031.9 and 1037.6 A. Plasma speeds and electron densities of the outflows were inferred over several rotations of the Sun. AR outflows are present in the newly born AR and persist throughout the entire AR life. Moreover, we found two t...

  10. A COMPLETE Search for Molecular Outflows in Perseus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallscheer, C.; Borkin, M.; Ridge, N.; Schnee, S.; Goodman, A.

    2003-12-01

    Using 12CO data collected in the Coordinated Molecular Probe Line Extinction Thermal Emission (COMPLETE) Survey, we have carried out an unbiased search for molecular outflows. To begin the search, we analyzed maps of the Spectral Correlation Function (SCF) of the 12CO spectra, at a variety of spatial lags. The known outflows were all apparent in the SCF maps as regions of either very low or very high spectral correlation. Other regions identified by the SCF as having low or high spectral correlation in the data cube were examined by hand in order to assess the possibility that they harbored previously unknown outflows. Upon making customized "channel" maps of these 15 suspect regions, we have now confidently identified 4 new outflows, and 11 other regions with unusual spectral properties potentially associated with outflow. This work is still in progress, but we can say with certainty that COMPLETE has identified several new molecular outflows in Perseus. This work was supported in part by the SAO intern program under NSF grant AST-9731923.

  11. Discovery of Relativistic Outflow in the Seyfert Galaxy Ark 564

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, A; Krongold, Y; Nicastro, F

    2013-01-01

    We present Chandra high energy transmission grating spectra of the narrow-line Seyfert-1 galaxy Ark 564. The spectrum shows numerous absorption lines which are well modeled with low velocity outflow components usually observed in Seyfert galaxies (Gupta et al. 2013). There are, however, some residual absorption lines which are not accounted for by low-velocity outflows. Here we present identifications of the strongest lines as K{\\alpha} transitions of OVII(two lines) and OVI at outflow velocities of ~0.1c. These lines are detected at 6.9{\\sigma}, 6.2{\\sigma}, and 4.7{\\sigma} respectively and cannot be due to chance statistical fluctuations. Photoionization models with ultra-high velocity components improves the spectral fit significantly, providing further support for the presence of relativistic outflow in this source. Without knowing the location of the absorber, its mass and energy outflow rates cannot be well constrained; we find E$\\dot{E}(outflow)/L_{bo}$ ranging from < 0.001% to 60% using different a...

  12. A distance limited sample of massive molecular outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Maud, L T; Lumsden, S L; Mottram, J C; Urquhart, J S; Hoare, M G

    2015-01-01

    We have observed 99 mid-infrared-bright, massive young stellar objects and compact HII regions drawn from the Red MSX source (RMS) survey in the J=3$-$2 transition of $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO, using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. 89 targets are within 6 kpc of the Sun, covering a representative range of luminosities and core masses. These constitute a relatively unbiased sample of bipolar molecular outflows associated with massive star formation. Of these, 59, 17 and 13 sources (66, 19 and 15 percent) are found to have outflows, show some evidence of outflow, and have no evidence of outflow, respectively. The time-dependent parameters of the high-velocity molecular flows are calculated using a spatially variable dynamic timescale. The canonical correlations between the outflow parameters and source luminosity are recovered and shown to scale with those of low-mass sources. For coeval star formation we find the scaling is consistent with all the protostars in an embedded cluster providing the outflow force,...

  13. MOS Mapping of the NIR Outflow HH 223

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, R.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Estalella, R.; Gómez, G.; García-Lorenzo, B.

    2016-10-01

    The Multi-Object-Spectroscopy (MOS) mode of LIRIS was used to map the near-IR stellar outflow HH 223, in the dark cloud Lynds 723 (L723). HH 223 spatially coincides with the east-west component of the L723 quadrupolar CO outflow. The radio continuum source SMA2, towards the center of the quadrupolar CO outflow, hides the YSO that seems to power both the near-IR and the CO outflows. To map the S-shaped, near-IR emission of HH 223, extending ˜ 5', an appropriate mask was designed, with 16 rectangular slitlets. J, H and K-band spectra (R ˜eq 2500) were obtained through the mask. The kinematics of the neutral (H2) and ionized ([FeII]) gas outflow was derived from these data. The results confirm that both the near-IR and the CO outflows have a common driving source. To our knowledge, this is the first use of the MOS-LIRIS observing mode with the mask designed ad hoc to fit several extended, nonaligned targets.

  14. Spatially Resolved Galactic Wind in Lensed Galaxy RCSGA 032727-132609

    CERN Document Server

    Bordoloi, Rongmon; Tumlinson, Jason; Bayliss, Matthew B; Sharon, Keren; Gladders, Michael D; Wuyts, Eva

    2016-01-01

    We probe the spatial distribution of outflowing gas along four lines of sight separated by up to 6 kpc in a gravitationally-lensed star-forming galaxy at z=1.70. Using MgII and FeII emission and absorption as tracers, we find that the clumps of star formation are driving galactic outflows with velocities of -170 to -250 km/sec. The velocities of MgII emission are redshifted with respect to the systemic velocities of the galaxy, consistent with being back-scattered. By contrast, the FeII fluorescent emission lines are either slightly blueshifted or at the systemic velocity of the galaxy. Taken together, the velocity structure of the MgII and FeII emission is consistent with arising through scattering in galactic winds. Assuming a thin shell geometry for the out owing gas, the estimated masses carried out by these outfows are large (> 30 - 50 $\\rm{M_{\\odot} yr^{-1}}$), with mass loading factors several times the star-formation rate. Almost 20% to 50% of the blueshifted absorption probably escapes the gravitatio...

  15. RADIATION TRANSPORT FOR EXPLOSIVE OUTFLOWS: OPACITY REGROUPING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison 1500 Engineering Drive, 410 ERB, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Van Rossum, Daniel R., E-mail: wollaeger@wisc.edu, E-mail: daan@flash.uchicago.edu [Flash Center for Computational Science, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure ''opacity regrouping''. Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in SuperNu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck factor for modified IMC-DDMC. We test SuperNu using numerical experiments including a quasi-manufactured analytic solution, a simple 10 group problem, and the W7 problem for Type Ia supernovae. We find that opacity regrouping is necessary to make our IMC-DDMC implementation feasible for the W7 problem and possibly Type Ia supernova simulations in general. We compare the bolometric light curves and spectra produced by the SuperNu and PHOENIX radiation transport codes for the W7 problem. The overall shape of the bolometric light curves are in good agreement, as are the spectra and their evolution with time. However, for the numerical specifications we considered, we find that the peak luminosity of the light curve calculated using SuperNu is ∼10% less than that calculated using PHOENIX.

  16. Quasar Outflows and Black Hole Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coatman, Liam; Hewett, Paul; Banerji, Manda; Richards, Gordon; Hennawi, Joseph; Prochaska, Jason X.

    2016-08-01

    Black-hole masses are crucial to understanding the physics of the connection between quasars and their host galaxies and measuring cosmic black hole-growth. At high redshift, z > 2, black hole masses are normally derived using the velocity-width of the CIV broad emission line, based on the assumption that the observed velocity-widths arise from virial-induced motions. In many quasars, the CIV-emission line exhibits significant blue asymmetries ('blueshifts') with the line centroid displaced by up to thousands of km/s to the blue. These blueshifts almost certainly signal the presence of strong outflows, most likely originating in a disc wind. Using both archival data and new observations, we have obtained near-infrared spectra, including the Ha and/or Hb emission lines, for ~400 luminous (L_Bol = 45.5-48.5 erg/s) SDSS quasars, at redshifts 1.5 population. A strong correlation between CIV-velocity width and blueshift is found and, at large blueshifts, >2000 km/s, the velocity-widths appear to be dominated by non-virial motions. Using the Ha/Hb emission to provide black hole masses free from non-virial contributions, we are able to derive a quantitative correction to the CIV-based black-hole masses as a function of blueshift. This correction reduces the scatter between Ha/Hb and CIV velocity widths to just ~0.1 dex. Without the correction, black hole masses would be overestimated by a factor of nine at the largest blueshifts. With a suitable systemic redshift-estimation algorithm, this correction can be straightforwardly applied based only on information contained in the rest-frame UV spectra.

  17. Introduction to Galactic Chemical Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    In this lecture I will introduce the concept of galactic chemical evolution, namely the study of how and where the chemical elements formed and how they were distributed in the stars and gas in galaxies. The main ingredients to build models of galactic chemical evolution will be described. They include: initial conditions, star formation history, stellar nucleosynthesis and gas flows in and out of galaxies. Then some simple analytical models and their solutions will be discussed together with the main criticisms associated to them. The yield per stellar generation will be defined and the hypothesis of instantaneous recycling approximation will be critically discussed. Detailed numerical models of chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type, able to follow the time evolution of the abundances of single elements, will be discussed and their predictions will be compared to observational data. The comparisons will include stellar abundances as well as interstellar medium ones, measured in galax...

  18. Discovery in the Galactic Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    In our efforts to map our galaxys structure, one region has remained very difficult to probe: the galactic center. A new survey, however, uses infrared light to peer through the gas and dust in the galactic plane, searching for variable stars in the bulge of the galaxy. This study has discovered a population of very young stars in a thin disk in the galactic center, providing clues to the star formation history of the Milky Way over the last 100 million years.Obscured CenterThe center of the Milky Way is dominated by a region known as the galactic bulge. Efforts to better understand this region in particular, its star formation history have been hindered by the stars, gas, and dust of the galactic disk, which prevent us from viewing the galactic bulge at low latitudes in visible light.The positions of the 35 classical Cepheids discovered in VVV data, projected onto an image of the galactic plane. Click for a better look! The survey area is bounded by the blue lines, and the galactic bar is marked with a red curve. The bottom panel shows the position of the Cepheids overlaid on the VVV bulge extinction map. [Dkny et al. 2015]Infrared light, however, can be used to probe deeper through the dust than visible-light searches. A new survey called VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) uses the VISTA telescope in Chile to search, in infrared, for variable stars in the inner part of the galaxy. The VVV survey area spans the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the mid-plane where star formation activity is high.Led by Istvn Dkny, a researcher at the Millennium Institute of Astrophysics and the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, a team has now used VVV data to specifically identify classical Cepheid variable stars in the bulge. Why? Cepheids are pulsating stars with a very useful relation between their periods and luminosities that allows them to be used as distance indicators. Moreover, classical Cepheids are indicators of young stellar populations which can

  19. Composition of the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    McWilliam, A; William, Andrew Mc

    2003-01-01

    We present detailed abundance results for 9 Galactic bulge stars in Baade's Window, based on HIRES (R=45,000--60,000) spectra taken with the Keck I telescope. The alpha elements show non-uniform enhancements relative to the Solar neighborhood trends: Mg and Si are enhanced in all our bulge stars by $\\sim$0.5--0.3 dex, showing a slight decrease with increasing [Fe/H]. Oxygen is enhanced in most bulge stars, similar to the Galactic halo, but the [O/Fe] ratios suddenly decline beginning at [Fe/H]=$-$0.5 dex, with a slope consistent with no oxygen production in the bulge for [Fe/H]$\\geq

  20. Shielding against galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J. W.; Nealy, J. E.; Thibeault, S. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Shinn, J. L.; Kim, M.; Kiefer, R.

    1996-01-01

    Ions of galactic origin are modified but not attenuated by the presence of shielding materials. Indeed, the number of particles and the absorbed energy behind most shield materials increases as a function of shield thickness. The modification of the galactic cosmic ray composition upon interaction with shielding is the only effective means of providing astronaut protection. This modification is intimately conntected with the shield transport porperties and is a strong function of shield composition. The systematic behavior of the shield properites in terms of microscopic energy absorption events will be discussed. The shield effectiveness is examined with respect to convectional protection practice and in terms of a biological endpoint: the efficiency for reduction of the probability of transformation of shielded C3H1OT1/2 mouse cells. The relative advantage of developing new shielding technologies is discussed in terms of a shield performance as related to biological effect and the resulting uncertainty in estimating astronaut risk.

  1. A possible OB protostar associated with the molecular outflow in G34.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfman, L.; May, J.; Nuernberger, D.; Shepherd, D.

    1999-10-01

    The most conspicuous massive molecular outflow candidate identified in our CS(2-1) survey of UC HII regions (Bronfman et al 1996) is G34.4 (IRAS 18507+0121) in the I Galactic quadrant. At a distance of 3.8 kpc, it is near (about 11') the very bright HII region G34.3 (Carral & Welch 1992), embedded in the same GMC with a VLSR of 57 km/s. The CS velocity profile obtained with SEST shows very broad wings, about 25 km/s wide at the 0.1 K level, indicating strong outflow activity. Near infrared images of the field, 90'' in size (0.35'' per pixel), obtained with the du Pont 100'' Telescope at Las Campanas, show a remarkably reddenned source visible only in the K' filter, elongated in shape, about 15'' in extent. We have recently observed the G34.4 region, using the OVRO array, in the 3 mm continuum band and in the H13CO+ line, at a resolution of 5''. Most of the H13CO+ flux (33.64 Jy) comes from two strong cores; while one of these cores is closely associated with the ! NIR source, the other one is associated with a single, unresolved continuum source that has a total flux of 56.8 mJy. The mass of gas and dust in this second, possibly "star-less" core is estimated from the millimeter continuum to be approximately 355 MSun, consistent with the presence of a massive, embedded OB protostar. Bronfman, L., May, J., & Nyman, L. 1996, A&AS 115, 81 Carral & Welch 1992, ApJ 385, 244

  2. The Suzaku View of Highly Ionized Outflows in AGN. 1; Statistical Detection and Global Absorber Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofford, Jason; Reeves, James N.; Tombesi, Francesco; Braito, Valentina; Turner, T. Jane; Miller, Lance; Cappi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a new spectroscopic study of Fe K-band absorption in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Using data obtained from the Suzaku public archive we have performed a statistically driven blind search for Fe XXV Healpha and/or Fe XXVI Lyalpha absorption lines in a large sample of 51 Type 1.0-1.9 AGN. Through extensive Monte Carlo simulations we find that statistically significant absorption is detected at E greater than or approximately equal to 6.7 keV in 20/51 sources at the P(sub MC) greater than or equal tov 95 per cent level, which corresponds to approximately 40 per cent of the total sample. In all cases, individual absorption lines are detected independently and simultaneously amongst the two (or three) available X-ray imaging spectrometer detectors, which confirms the robustness of the line detections. The most frequently observed outflow phenomenology consists of two discrete absorption troughs corresponding to Fe XXV Healpha and Fe XXVI Lyalpha at a common velocity shift. From xstar fitting the mean column density and ionization parameter for the Fe K absorption components are log (N(sub H) per square centimeter)) is approximately equal to 23 and log (Xi/erg centimeter per second) is approximately equal to 4.5, respectively. Measured outflow velocities span a continuous range from less than1500 kilometers per second up to approximately100 000 kilometers per second, with mean and median values of approximately 0.1 c and approximately 0.056 c, respectively. The results of this work are consistent with those recently obtained using XMM-Newton and independently provides strong evidence for the existence of very highly ionized circumnuclear material in a significant fraction of both radio-quiet and radio-loud AGN in the local universe.

  3. Anisotropic surface tension of buckled fluid membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Solid sheets and fluid membranes exhibit buckling under lateral compression. Here, it is revealed that fluid membranes have anisotropic buckling surface tension contrary to solid sheets. Surprisingly, the surface tension perpendicular to the buckling direction shows stronger dependence than that parallel to it. Our theoretical predictions are supported by numerical simulations of a meshless membrane model. This anisotropic tension can be used to measure the membrane bending rigidity. It is al...

  4. Theory of Compton scattering by anisotropic electrons

    OpenAIRE

    Poutanen, Juri; Vurm, Indrek

    2010-01-01

    Compton scattering plays an important role in various astrophysical objects such as accreting black holes and neutron stars, pulsars, and relativistic jets, clusters of galaxies as well as the early Universe. In most of the calculations it is assumed that the electrons have isotropic angular distribution in some frame. However, there are situations where the anisotropy may be significant due to the bulk motions, or anisotropic cooling by synchrotron radiation, or anisotropic source of seed so...

  5. Anisotropic rectangular metric for polygonal surface remeshing

    KAUST Repository

    Pellenard, Bertrand

    2013-06-18

    We propose a new method for anisotropic polygonal surface remeshing. Our algorithm takes as input a surface triangle mesh. An anisotropic rectangular metric, defined at each triangle facet of the input mesh, is derived from both a user-specified normal-based tolerance error and the requirement to favor rectangle-shaped polygons. Our algorithm uses a greedy optimization procedure that adds, deletes and relocates generators so as to match two criteria related to partitioning and conformity.

  6. Rainbow metric from quantum gravity: anisotropic cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Assanioussi, Mehdi; Dapor, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a construction of effective cosmological models which describe the propagation of a massive quantum scalar field on a quantum anisotropic cosmological spacetime. Each obtained effective model is represented by a rainbow metric in which particles of distinct momenta propagate on different classical geometries. Our analysis shows that upon certain assumptions and conditions on the parameters determining such anisotropic models, we surprisingly obtain a unique deformatio...

  7. Anisotropic cosmological solutions in massive vector theories

    OpenAIRE

    Heisenberg, Lavinia; Kase, Ryotaro; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    In beyond-generalized Proca theories including the extension to theories higher than second order, we study the role of a spatial component $v$ of a massive vector field on the anisotropic cosmological background. We show that, as in the case of the isotropic cosmological background, there is no additional ghostly degrees of freedom associated with the Ostrogradski instability. In second-order generalized Proca theories we find the existence of anisotropic solutions on which the ratio between...

  8. Anisotropic Transport Properties of Complex Metallic Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Smontara, Ana; Dolinšek, Janez

    2010-01-01

    Anisotropic transport properties (electrical resistivity, ρ, and thermal conductivity, κ) of the Y-phase Al-Ni-Co, o-Al13Co4 and Al4(Cr,Fe) complex metallic alloys were investigated. They belong to the class of decagonal approximant phases with stacked-layer crystallographic structure and allowed us to study the evolution of anisotropic transport properties with increasing structural complexity and the unit cell size.

  9. Anisotropic Stars: Exact Solutions and Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Dev, Krsna; Gleiser, Marcelo

    2004-01-01

    I report on recent work concerning the existence and stability of self-gravitating spheres with anisotropic pressure. After presenting new exact solutions, Chandrasekhar's variational formalism for radial perturbations is generalized to anisotropic objects and applied to investigate their stability. It is shown that anisotropy can not only support stars of mass M and radius R with 2M/R > 8/9 and arbitrarily large surface redshifts, but that stable configurations exist for values of the adiaba...

  10. Constraints on galactic wind models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiksin, Avery

    2016-09-01

    Observational implications are derived for two standard models of supernovae-driven galactic winds: a freely expanding steady-state wind and a wind sourced by a self-similarly expanding superbubble including thermal heat conduction. It is shown that, for the steady-state wind, matching the measured correlation between the soft X-ray luminosity and star formation rate of starburst galaxies is equivalent to producing a scaled wind mass-loading factor relative to the star formation rate of 0.5-3, in agreement with the amount inferred from metal absorption line measurements. The match requires the asymptotic wind velocity v∞ to scale with the star formation rate dot{M}_{ast } (in M⊙ yr-1) approximately as v_∞ ≃ (700-1000) {{km s^{-1}}} {dot{M}_{ast }}^{1/6}. The implied mass injection rate is close to the amount naturally provided by thermal evaporation from the wall of a superbubble in a galactic disc, suggesting that thermal evaporation may be a major source of mass loading. The predicted mass-loading factors from thermal evaporation within the galactic disc alone, however, are somewhat smaller, 0.2-2, so that a further contribution from cloud ablation or evaporation within the wind may be required. Both models may account for the 1.4 GHz luminosity of unresolved radio sources within starburst galaxies for plausible parameters describing the distribution of relativistic electrons. Further observational tests to distinguish the models are suggested.

  11. The Galactic Nova Rate Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Shafter, A W

    2016-01-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, a reliable estimate of the Galactic nova rate has remained elusive. Here, the overall Galactic nova rate is estimated by extrapolating the observed rate for novae reaching $m\\leq2$ to include the entire Galaxy using a two component disk plus bulge model for the distribution of stars in the Milky Way. The present analysis improves on previous work by considering important corrections for incompleteness in the observed rate of bright novae. Several models are considered to account for differences in the assumed properties of bulge and disk nova populations. The simplest models, which assume uniform properties between bulge and disk novae, predict Galactic nova rates between $\\sim$50 to as many as $\\sim$100 per year, depending on the assumed incompleteness at bright magnitudes. Models where the disk novae are assumed to be more luminous than bulge novae are explored, and predict nova rates up to 30% lower, in the range of $\\sim$35 to $\\sim$70 per year. An average of the most p...

  12. The multiphase starburst-driven galactic wind in NGC 5394

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, Pablo; Jiménez-Vicente, Jorge; Zurita, Almudena; Mediavilla, Evencio; Castillo-Morales, África

    2016-09-01

    We present a detailed study of the neutral and ionized gas phases in the galactic wind for the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 5394 based on new integral field spectroscopy obtained with the INTEGRAL fibre system at the William Herschel Telescope. The neutral gas phase in the wind is detected via the interstellar Na I D doublet absorption. After a careful removal of the stellar contribution to these lines, a significant amount of neutral gas (˜107 M⊙) is detected in a central region of ˜1.75 kpc size. This neutral gas is blueshifted by ˜165 km s-1 with respect to the underlying galaxy. The mass outflow of neutral gas is comparable to the star formation rate of the host galaxy. Simultaneously, several emission lines (Hα, [N II], [S II]) are also analysed looking for the ionized warm phase counterpart of the wind. A careful kinematic decomposition of the line profiles reveals the presence of a secondary, broader, kinematic component. This component is found roughly in the same region where the Na I D absorption is detected. It presents higher [N II]/Hα and [S II]/Hα line ratios than the narrow component at the same locations, indicative of contamination by shock ionization. This secondary component also presents blueshifted velocities, although smaller than those measured for the neutral gas, averaging to ˜-30 km s-1. The mass and mass outflow rate of the wind is dominated by the neutral gas, of which a small fraction might be able to escape the gravitational potential of the host galaxy. The observations in this system can be readily understood within a bipolar gas flow scenario.

  13. The multiphase starburst-driven galactic wind in NGC 5394

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, Pablo; Jiménez-Vicente, Jorge; Zurita, Almudena; Mediavilla, Evencio; Castillo-Morales, África

    2016-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the neutral and ionised gas phases in the galactic wind for the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 5394 based on new integral field spectroscopy obtained with the INTEGRAL fibre system at the William Herschel Telescope. The neutral gas phase in the wind is detected via the interstellar Na I D doublet absorption. After a careful removal of the stellar contribution to these lines, a significant amount of neutral gas (˜107 M⊙) is detected in a central region of ˜1.75 kpc size. This neutral gas is blueshifted by ˜165 km s-1 with respect to the underlying galaxy. The mass outflow of neutral gas is comparable to the star formation rate of the host galaxy. Simultaneously, several emission lines (Hα, [N II], [S II]) are also analysed looking for the ionised warm phase counterpart of the wind. A careful kinematic decomposition of the line profiles reveals the presence of a secondary, broader, kinematic component. This component is found roughly in the same region where the Na I D absorption is detected. It presents higher [N II]/Hα and [S II]/Hα line ratios than the narrow component at the same locations, indicative of contamination by shock ionization. This secondary component also presents blueshifted velocities, although smaller than those measured for the neutral gas, averaging to ˜-30 km s-1. The mass and mass outflow rate of the wind is dominated by the neutral gas, of which a small fraction might be able to escape the gravitational potential of the host galaxy. The observations in this system can be readily understood within a bipolar gas flow scenario.

  14. Anisotropic diffusion-limited aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, M N; Hentschel, H G E; Family, F

    2004-06-01

    Using stochastic conformal mappings, we study the effects of anisotropic perturbations on diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) in two dimensions. The harmonic measure of the growth probability for DLA can be conformally mapped onto a constant measure on a unit circle. Here we map m preferred directions for growth to a distribution on the unit circle, which is a periodic function with m peaks in [-pi,pi) such that the angular width sigma of the peak defines the "strength" of anisotropy kappa= sigma(-1) along any of the m chosen directions. The two parameters (m,kappa) map out a parameter space of perturbations that allows a continuous transition from DLA (for small enough kappa ) to m needlelike fingers as kappa--> infinity. We show that at fixed m the effective fractal dimension of the clusters D(m,kappa) obtained from mass-radius scaling decreases with increasing kappa from D(DLA) approximately 1.71 to a value bounded from below by D(min) = 3 / 2. Scaling arguments suggest a specific form for the dependence of the fractal dimension D(m,kappa) on kappa for large kappa which compares favorably with numerical results. PMID:15244564

  15. Anisotropic pressure and hyperons in neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaksono, A

    2014-01-01

    We study the effects of anisotropic pressure on properties of the neutron stars with hyperons inside its core within the framework of extended relativistic mean field. It is found that the main effects of anisotropic pressure on neutron star matter is to increase the stiffness of the equation of state, which compensates for the softening of the EOS due to the hyperons. The maximum mass and redshift predictions of anisotropic neutron star with hyperonic core are quite compatible with the result of recent observational constraints if we use the parameter of anisotropic pressure model $h \\le 0.8$[1] and $\\Lambda \\le -1.15$ [2]. The radius of the corresponding neutron star at $M$=1.4 $M_\\odot$ is more than 13 km, while the effect of anisotropic pressure on the minimum mass of neutron star is insignificant. Furthermore, due to the anisotropic pressure in the neutron star, the maximum mass limit of higher than 2.1 $M_\\odot$ cannot rule out the presence of hyperons in the neutron star core.

  16. An anisotropic minijets model for the GRB prompt emission

    CERN Document Server

    Duran, Rodolfo Barniol; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    In order to explain rapid light curve variability in the context of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and jets from active galactic nuclei (AGNs), several authors have proposed the existence of "blobs" or "minijets" that move with relativistic speed relative to the main flow of the jet. Here we consider the possibility that these minijets, instead of being isotropically distributed in the co-moving frame of the jet, form primarily perpendicular to the direction of the flow. This anisotropic collection of minijets yields two robust features. First, the main burst of emission is significantly delayed compared with the isotropic case. This delay allows for the peak of the afterglow emission to appear during the prompt emission, in contrast to the simplest isotropic model, where the afterglow peak appears at or after the end of the main burst. Second, the flux decline following the end of the main burst of emission will be steeper than the isotropic case. We find that these two features are realized in the case of GRBs: 1....

  17. Kiloparsec-scale outflows are prevalent among luminous AGN: outflows and feedback in the context of the overall AGN population

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, C M; Mullaney, J R; Swinbank, A M

    2014-01-01

    We present integral field unit (IFU) observations covering the [O III]4959,5007 and H-Beta emission lines of sixteen z~(6-16) kpc in all targets and observe signatures of spherical outflows and bi-polar superbubbles. We show that our targets are representative of z 5x10^41 erg/s) type 2 AGN and that ionised outflows are not only common but also in >=70% (3 sigma confidence) of cases, they are extended over kiloparsec scales. Our study demonstrates that galaxy-wide energetic outflows are not confined to the most extreme star-forming galaxies or radio-luminous AGN; however, there may be a higher incidence of the most extreme outflow velocities in quasars hosted in ultra-luminous infrared galaxies. Both star formation and AGN activity appear to be energetically viable to drive the outflows and we find no definitive evidence that favours one process over the other. Although highly uncertain, we derive mass outflow rates (typically ~10x the SFRs), kinetic energies (~0.5-10% of L[AGN]) and momentum rates (typically...

  18. Molecular Outflows Driven by Low-Mass Protostars. I. Correcting for Underestimates When Measuring Outflow Masses and Dynamical Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Dunham, Michael M; Mardones, Diego; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Matthews, Brenda C; Stutz, Amelia M; Williams, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    We present a survey of 28 molecular outflows driven by low-mass protostars, all of which are sufficiently isolated spatially and/or kinematically to fully separate into individual outflows. Using a combination of new and archival data from several single-dish telescopes, 17 outflows are mapped in CO (2-1) and 17 are mapped in CO (3-2), with 6 mapped in both transitions. For each outflow, we calculate and tabulate the mass, momentum, kinetic energy, mechanical luminosity, and force assuming optically thin emission in LTE at an excitation temperature of 50 K. We show that all of the calculated properties are underestimated when calculated under these assumptions. Taken together, the effects of opacity, outflow emission at low velocities confused with ambient cloud emission, and emission below the sensitivities of the observations increase outflow masses and dynamical properties by an order of magnitude, on average, and factors of 50-90 in the most extreme cases. Different (and non-uniform) excitation temperatur...

  19. Coexistence of Gravitationally Bound and Radiation Driven CIV Emission Line Regions in Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Huiyuan; Zhou, Hongyan; Liu, Bo; Wang, Jianguo; Yuan, Weimin; Dong, Xiaobo

    2011-01-01

    There are mutually contradictory views in the literature of the kinematics and structure of high-ionization line (e.g. CIV) emitting regions in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Two kinds of broad emission line region (BELR) models have been proposed, outflow and gravitationally bound BELR, which are supported respectively by blueshift of the CIV line and reverberation mapping observations. To reconcile these two apparently different models, we present a detailed comparison study between the CIV and MgII lines using a sample of AGNs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that the kinematics of the CIV region is different from that of MgII, which is thought to be controlled by gravity. A strong correlation is found between the blueshift and asymmetry of the CIV profile and the Eddington ratio. This provides strong observational support for the postulation that the outflow is driven by radiation pressure. In particular, we find robust evidence that the CIV line region is largely dominated by outflow a...

  20. Neutral gas outflows in nearby [U]LIRGs via optical NaD feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzoli, S.; Arribas, S.; Maiolino, R.; Colina, L.

    2016-05-01

    We studied the properties of the neutral gas in a sample of 38 local luminous and ultra luminous infrared galaxies ([U]LIRGs, 51 individual galaxies at z ≤ 0.09), which mainly covers the less explored LIRG luminosity range. This study is based on the analysis of the spatially integrated and spatially resolved spectra of the NaDλλ 5890, 5896 Å feature obtained with the integral field unit (IFU) of VIMOS at the Very Large Telescope. Analyzing spatially integrated spectra, we find that the contribution of the stars to the observed NaD equivalent width is small (pure-ISM integrated spectra generally show blueshifted NaD profiles, indicating neutral gas outflow velocities, V, in the range 65-260 km s-1. Excluding the galaxies with powerful AGNs, V shows a dependency with the star formation rate (SFR) of the type V ∝ SFR0.15, which is in rather good agreement with previous results. The spatially resolved analysis could be performed for 40 galaxies, 22 of which have neutral gas velocity fields dominated by noncircular motions with signatures of cone-like winds. However, a large number of targets (11/40) show disk rotation signatures. Based on a simple model, we found that the wind masses are in the range 0.4-7.5 × 108 M⊙, reaching up to ~3% of the dynamical mass of the host. The mass rates are typically only ~0.2-0.4 times the corresponding global SFR indicating that, in general, the mass loss is too small to slow down the star formation significantly. In the majority of cases, the velocity of the outflowing gas is not sufficient to escape the host potential well and, therefore, most of the gas rains back into the galaxy disk. On average V/vesc is higher in less massive galaxies, confirming that the galaxy mass has a primary role in shaping the recycling of gas and metals. The comparison between the wind power and kinetic power of the starburst associated with SNe indicates that only the starburst could drive the outflows in nearly all the [U]LIRGs galaxies, as

  1. Modeling jet and outflow feedback during star cluster formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powerful jets and outflows are launched from the protostellar disks around newborn stars. These outflows carry enough mass and momentum to transform the structure of their parent molecular cloud and to potentially control star formation itself. Despite their importance, we have not been able to fully quantify the impact of jets and outflows during the formation of a star cluster. The main problem lies in limited computing power. We would have to resolve the magnetic jet-launching mechanism close to the protostar and at the same time follow the evolution of a parsec-size cloud for a million years. Current computer power and codes fall orders of magnitude short of achieving this. In order to overcome this problem, we implement a subgrid-scale (SGS) model for launching jets and outflows, which demonstrably converges and reproduces the mass, linear and angular momentum transfer, and the speed of real jets, with ∼1000 times lower resolution than would be required without the SGS model. We apply the new SGS model to turbulent, magnetized star cluster formation and show that jets and outflows (1) eject about one-fourth of their parent molecular clump in high-speed jets, quickly reaching distances of more than a parsec, (2) reduce the star formation rate by about a factor of two, and (3) lead to the formation of ∼1.5 times as many stars compared to the no-outflow case. Most importantly, we find that jets and outflows reduce the average star mass by a factor of ∼ three and may thus be essential for understanding the characteristic mass of the stellar initial mass function.

  2. Unification of X-ray winds in Seyfert galaxies: from ultra-fast outflows to warm absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Nemmen, R. S.; Braito, V.; Gaspari, M.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2013-04-01

    The existence of ionized X-ray absorbing layers of gas along the line of sight to the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies is a well established observational fact. This material is systematically outflowing and shows a large range in parameters. However, its actual nature and dynamics are still not clear. In order to gain insights into these important issues we performed a literature search for papers reporting the parameters of the soft X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) in 35 type 1 Seyferts and compared their properties to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) detected in the same sample. The fraction of sources with WAs is >60 per cent, consistent with previous studies. The fraction of sources with UFOs is >34 per cent, >67 per cent of which also show WAs. The large dynamic range obtained when considering all the absorbers together, spanning several orders of magnitude in ionization, column, velocity and distance allows us, for the first time, to investigate general relations among them. In particular, we find significant correlations indicating that the closer the absorber is to the central black hole, the higher the ionization, column, outflow velocity and consequently the mechanical power. In all the cases, the absorbers continuously populate the whole parameter space, with the WAs and the UFOs lying always at the two ends of the distribution. These evidence strongly suggest that these absorbers, often considered of different types, could actually represent parts of a single large-scale stratified outflow observed at different locations from the black hole. The UFOs are likely launched from the inner accretion disc and the WAs at larger distances, such as the outer disc and/or torus. We argue that the observed parameters and correlations are, to date, consistent with both radiation pressure through Compton scattering and magnetohydrodynamic processes contributing to the outflow acceleration, the latter playing a major role. Most of the absorbers, especially the UFOs, show

  3. Supernova feedback in a local vertically stratified medium: interstellar turbulence and galactic winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martizzi, Davide; Fielding, Drummond; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-07-01

    We use local Cartesian simulations with a vertical gravitational potential to study how supernova (SN) feedback in stratified galactic discs drives turbulence and launches galactic winds. Our analysis includes three disc models with gas surface densities ranging from Milky Way-like galaxies to gas-rich ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), and two different SN driving schemes (random and correlated with local gas density). In order to isolate the physics of SN feedback, we do not include additional feedback processes. We find that, in these local box calculations, SN feedback excites relatively low mass-weighted gas turbulent velocity dispersions ≈3-7 km s-1 and low wind mass loading factors η ≲ 1 in all the cases we study. The low turbulent velocities and wind mass loading factors predicted by our local box calculations are significantly below those suggested by observations of gas-rich and rapidly star-forming galaxies; they are also in tension with global simulations of disc galaxies regulated by stellar feedback. Using a combination of numerical tests and analytic arguments, we argue that local Cartesian boxes cannot predict the properties of galactic winds because they do not capture the correct global geometry and gravitational potential of galaxies. The wind mass loading factors are in fact not well defined in local simulations because they decline significantly with increasing box height. More physically realistic calculations (e.g. including a global galactic potential and disc rotation) will likely be needed to fully understand disc turbulence and galactic outflows, even for the idealized case of feedback by SNe alone.

  4. High-resolution CO observation of the carbon star CIT 6 revealing the spiral structure and a nascent bipolar outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Hyosun; Hirano, Naomi; Zhao-Geisler, Ronny; Trejo, Alfonso; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Taam, Ronald E; Kemper, Francisca; Kim, Jongsoo; Byun, Do-Young; Liu, Tie

    2015-01-01

    CIT 6 is a carbon star in the transitional phase from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to the protoplanetary nebulae (pPN). Observational evidences of two point sources in the optical, circumstellar arc segments in an HC$_3$N line emission, and a bipolar nebula in near-infrared provide strong support for the presence of a binary companion. Hence, CIT 6 is very attractive for studying the role of companions in the AGB-pPN transition. We have carried out high resolution $^{12}$CO $J=2-1$ and $^{13}$CO $J=2-1$ observations of CIT 6 with the Submillimeter Array combined with the Submillimeter Telescope (single-dish) data. The $^{12}$CO channel maps reveal a spiral-shell pattern connecting the HC$_3$N segments in a continuous form, and an asymmetric outflow corresponding to the near-infrared bipolar nebula. Rotation of the $^{12}$CO channel peak position may be related to the inner spiral winding and/or the bipolar outflow. An eccentric orbit binary is suggested for the presences of an anisotropic mass loss to th...

  5. Structure and content of the galaxy and galactic gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    The conference included papers on ..gamma..-ray pulsars, galactic diffuse flux and surveys, radio surveys of external galaxies, galactic distribution of pulsars, and galactic gamma emission. Galactic structure drawing on all branches of galactic astronomy is discussed. New and unpublished material is included. (JFP)

  6. Structure and content of the galaxy and galactic gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference included papers on γ-ray pulsars, galactic diffuse flux and surveys, radio surveys of external galaxies, galactic distribution of pulsars, and galactic gamma emission. Galactic structure drawing on all branches of galactic astronomy is discussed. New and unpublished material is included

  7. Dark galactic halos without dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Nesbet, R. K.

    2011-01-01

    Using standard Einstein theory, baryonic mass cannot account for observed galactic rotation velocities and gravitational lensing, attributed to galactic dark matter halos. In contrast, theory constrained by Weyl conformal scaling symmetry explains observed galactic rotation in the halo region without invoking dark matter. An explanation of dark halos, gravitational lensing, and structural stabilization, without dark matter and consistent with conformal theory, is proposed here. Condensation o...

  8. SUBMILLIMETER INTERFEROMETRY OF THE LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY NGC 4418: A HIDDEN HOT NUCLEUS WITH AN INFLOW AND AN OUTFLOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have observed the nucleus of the nearby luminous infrared galaxy NGC 4418 with subarcsec resolution at 860 and 450 μm for the first time to characterize its hidden power source. A ∼20 pc (0.''1) hot dusty core was found inside a 100 pc scale concentration of molecular gas at the galactic center. The 860 μm continuum core has a deconvolved (peak) brightness temperature of 120-210 K. The CO(3-2) peak brightness temperature there is as high as 90 K at 50 pc resolution. The core has a bolometric luminosity of about 1011 L ☉, which accounts for most of the galaxy luminosity. It is Compton thick (N H ∼> 1025 cm–2) and has a high luminosity-to-mass ratio (L/M) ∼ 500 L ☉ M ☉–1 as well as a high luminosity surface density 108.5±0.5 L ☉ pc–2. These parameters are consistent with an active galactic nucleus to be the main luminosity source (with an Eddington ratio about 0.3), while they can be also due to a young starburst near its maximum L/M. We also found an optical color (reddening) feature that we attribute to an outflow cone emanating from the nucleus. The hidden hot nucleus thus shows evidence of both an inflow, previously seen with absorption lines, and the new outflow reported here in a different direction. The nucleus must be rapidly evolving with these gas flows.

  9. COEXISTENCE OF GRAVITATIONALLY-BOUND AND RADIATION-DRIVEN C IV EMISSION LINE REGIONS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are mutually contradictory views in the literature of the kinematics and structure of high-ionization line (e.g., C IV) emitting regions in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Two kinds of broad emission line region (BELR) models have been proposed, outflow and gravitationally-bound BELR, which are supported, respectively, by blueshift of the C IV line and reverberation mapping observations. To reconcile these two apparently different models, we present a detailed comparison study between the C IV and Mg II lines using a sample of AGNs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that the kinematics of the C IV region is different from that of Mg II, which is thought to be controlled by gravity. A strong correlation is found between the blueshift and asymmetry of the C IV profile and the Eddington ratio. This provides strong observational support for the postulation that the outflow is driven by radiation pressure. In particular, we find robust evidence that the C IV line region is largely dominated by outflow at high Eddington ratios, while it is primarily gravitationally-bounded at low Eddington ratios. Our results indicate that these two emitting regions coexist in most AGNs. The emission strength from these two gases varies smoothly with Eddington ratio in opposite ways. This explanation naturally reconciles the apparently contradictory views proposed in previous studies. Finally, candidate models are discussed which can account for both the enhancement of outflow emission and suppression of normal BEL in AGNs with high Eddington ratios.

  10. Star Formation Histories of the Galactic Satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Gilmore, G; Valls-Gabaud, D; Gilmore, Gerard; Hernandez, Xavier; Valls-Gabaud, David

    1999-01-01

    Late accretion models for formation of the Galactic halo require that many Galactic satellite galaxies have been cannibalised into the halo field. Comparison of the metallicity and age distribution function of stars in the surviving satellites with the apparently exclusively old stars in the field halo can constrain the importance of any such process. We have developed a new objective technique to determine star formation histories in dSph galaxies. We apply this technique to the surviving Galactic satellites, deducing an approximately uniform distribution of ages for the constituents, quite unlike the halo field stars. Thus, late accretion did not play a substantial part in Galactic halo formation.

  11. Gas outflow and dust transport of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ian-Lin; Su, Cheng-Chin; Ip, Wing-Huen; Lee, Jui-Chi; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Wu, Jong-Shinn

    2016-04-01

    Because of the diurnal thermal cycle and the irregular shape of the nucleus, gas outflow of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko could be highly anisotropic as possibly indicated by the colliminated dust jet structures on the sunlit side. Based on the preliminary study of the outgassing effect from the early phase of the Rosetta mission, a simple model of surface sublimation can be constructed by taking into account the dependence on the solar insolation. By implementing the time variability of the global gas production rate, a sequence of gas coma models can be generated at different epochs before and after perihelion by using an advanced DSMC code [1, 2] to calculate the gas flow near the cometary nucleus. At selected time intervals, we will also investigate the size change of the cometary ionosphere as the nucleus rotates as well as the ejection of dust particles dragged by the gas flow into bounded and unbounded trajectories. Reference: 1. Wu, J.-S., Tseng, K.-C. and Wu, F.-Y., "Parallel three-dimensional DSMC method using mesh refinement and variable time-step scheme", Comput. Phys. Comm., 162, pp. 166-187, 2004. 2. Su, C.-C., Tseng, K.-C., Cave, H.M., Wu, J.-S., Lian, Y.-Y., Kuo, T.-C. and Jermy, M.C., "Implementation of a Transient Adaptive Sub-Cell Module for the Parallel DSMC Code Using Unstructured Grids," Computers & Fluids, Vol. 39, pp. 1136-1145, 2010.

  12. Continuum-mechanical, Anisotropic Flow model, based on an anisotropic Flow Enhancement factor (CAFFE)

    CERN Document Server

    Placidi, Luca; Seddik, Hakime; Faria, Sergio H

    2009-01-01

    A complete theoretical presentation of the CAFFE model (Continuum-mechanical, Anisotropic Flow model, based on an anisotropic Flow Enhancement factor) is given. The CAFFE model is an application of the theory of mixtures with continuous diversity for the case of large ice masses in which the induced anisotropy can not be neglected. The anisotropic response of the material is considered via a simple anisotropic generalization of Glen's flow law based on a scalar anisotropic enhancement factor. Such an enhancement factor depends upon the orientation mass density, that corresponds to the distribution of lattice orientations or simply to the orientation distribution function. The evolution of anisotropy is assumed to be modeled by the evolution of the orientation mass density, that is governed by the balance of mass of the present mixture with continuous diversity and explicitly depends upon four distinct effects interpreted, respectively, with grain rotation, local rigid body rotation, grain boundary migration (...

  13. Evidence for outflows in z ~ 6 galaxies with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Gallerani, S; Feruglio, C; Ferrara, A; Maiolino, R; Vallini, L; Riechers, D A

    2016-01-01

    We present the first attempt to detect outflows from galaxies approaching the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) using a sample of 9 star-forming (5 < SFR < 70 Msun/yr) z ~ 6 galaxies for which high-quality spectra of the [CII]158 micron line has been previously obtained with ALMA. We first fit each line with a Gaussian function and compute the residuals by subtracting the best fitting model from the data. We combine the residuals of all sample galaxies and find that the total signal is characterized by a flux excess that can be ascribed to broad wings of the [CII] line, which we interpret as a signature of starburst-driven outflows. The tentatively inferred outflow rate is dM/dt ~ 65 Msun/yr. Our interpretation is consistent with results from zoomed hydro- simulations of Dahlia, a z ~ 7 galaxy (SFR ~ 100 Msun/yr) whose feedback-regulated star formation results in an outflow rate dM/dt ~ 30 Msun/yr. These results suggest that starburst-driven outflows are in place in the EoR. Deeper observations of the [CII] l...

  14. Estimation of cold plasma outflow during geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaland, S.; Eriksson, A.; André, M.; Maes, L.; Baddeley, L.; Barakat, A.; Chappell, R.; Eccles, V.; Johnsen, C.; Lybekk, B.; Li, K.; Pedersen, A.; Schunk, R.; Welling, D.

    2015-12-01

    Low-energy ions of ionospheric origin constitute a significant contributor to the magnetospheric plasma population. Measuring cold ions is difficult though. Observations have to be done at sufficiently high altitudes and typically in regions of space where spacecraft attain a positive charge due to solar illumination. Cold ions are therefore shielded from the satellite particle detectors. Furthermore, spacecraft can only cover key regions of ion outflow during segments of their orbit, so additional complications arise if continuous longtime observations, such as during a geomagnetic storm, are needed. In this paper we suggest a new approach, based on a combination of synoptic observations and a novel technique to estimate the flux and total outflow during the various phases of geomagnetic storms. Our results indicate large variations in both outflow rates and transport throughout the storm. Prior to the storm main phase, outflow rates are moderate, and the cold ions are mainly emanating from moderately sized polar cap regions. Throughout the main phase of the storm, outflow rates increase and the polar cap source regions expand. Furthermore, faster transport, resulting from enhanced convection, leads to a much larger supply of cold ions to the near-Earth region during geomagnetic storms.

  15. Star Formation Ecology: YSO Outflow Feedback in Young Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Adam; Bally, John; Blackman, Eric; Gutermuth, Robert; Pipher, Judy; Quillen, Alice

    2007-05-01

    Energetic outflows associated with young stellar objects exert a strong effect on their parent molecular clouds. The dynamics of this interaction is yet to be well understood. In particular the role of jets and outflows in powering cloud turbulence, modifying the star formation efficiency (SFE) and/or disrupting the parent clouds remains unclear. Spitzer images of young clusters have provided new views of jet-cloud interactions that can help resolve these critical issues. In this proposal we seek to continue a highly successful (cycle 2) theory program to explore theoretical issues of jet-cloud interactions, turbulence and cloud disruption. Our research relies on 3-D Adaptive Mesh Refinement hydrodynamic and MHD simulations developed in house, in concert with Spitzer databases and other complementary observations. The team we have assembled includes computational and analytic theorists (Frank, Blackman) as well as observers who have worked closely with existing Spitzer Datasets (Bally, Quillen, Pipher, Gutermuth) The work funded through the previous TR program revealed fundamentally new aspects of YSO outflow feedback on parent cloud cores including the importance of the temporal evolution of outflow power. In this proposal we seek to extend the understanding gained in those studies to address specific questions on the nature and efficacy of outflow feedback in real systems.

  16. The Galactic Habitable Zone I. Galactic Chemical Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    González, G; Ward, P; Gonzalez, Guillermo; Brownlee, Donald; Ward, Peter

    2001-01-01

    We propose the concept of a "Galactic Habitable Zone" (GHZ). Analogous to the Circumstellar Habitable Zone (CHZ), the GHZ is that region in the Milky Way where an Earth-like planet can retain liquid water on its surface and provide a long-term habitat for animal-like aerobic life. In this paper we examine the dependence of the GHZ on Galactic chemical evolution. The single most important factor is likely the dependence of terrestrial planet mass on the metallicity of its birth cloud. We estimate, very approximately, that a metallicity at least half that of the Sun is required to build a habitable terrestrial planet. The mass of a terrestrial planet has important consequences for interior heat loss, volatile inventory, and loss of atmosphere. A key issue is the production of planets that sustain plate tectonics, a critical recycling process that provides feedback to stabilize atmospheric temperatures on planets with oceans and atmospheres. Due to the more recent decline from the early intense star formation ac...

  17. Special Features of Galactic Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Efthymiopoulos, Christos; Voglis, Nikos; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos

    2006-01-01

    The present lecture notes are an introduction to selected topics of {\\it Galactic Dynamics}. The focus is on topics that we consider more relevant to the main theme of this workshop, {\\it Celestial Mechanics}. This is not intended to be a review article. In fact, any of the topics below could be the subject of a separate review. Only the main ideas and notions are introduced, as well as some important currently open problems in each topic. Some relevant results from our own research are also ...

  18. Galactic Sodium from AGB Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Izzard, Robert G.; Gibson, Brad K.; Stancliffe, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Galactic chemical evolution models which include sodium from type II supernovae alone underestimate the abundance of sodium in the interstellar medium by a factor of two to three over about 3 dex in metallicity and predict a flat behaviour in the evolution of [Na/Fe] at super-solar metallicities. Conversely, recent observations of stars with [Fe/H]~+0.4 suggest that [Na/Fe] increases at high metallicity. We have combined stellar evolution models of asymptotic giant branch and Wolf-Rayet stars...

  19. Galactic Sodium from AGB Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Izzard, R G; Stancliffe, R J; Izzard, Robert G.; Gibson, Brad K.; Stancliffe, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Galactic chemical evolution models which include sodium from type II supernovae alone underestimate the abundance of sodium in the interstellar medium by a factor of two to three over about 3 dex in metallicity and predict a flat behaviour in the evolution of [Na/Fe] at super-solar metallicities. Conversely, recent observations of stars with [Fe/H]~+0.4 suggest that [Na/Fe] increases at high metallicity. We have combined stellar evolution models of asymptotic giant branch and Wolf-Rayet stars with the latest supernova yields in an attempt to resolve these problems ... and have created many more.

  20. Anisotropic thermal conductivity of magnetic fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaopeng Fang; Yimin Xuan; Qiang Li

    2009-01-01

    Considering the forces acting on the particles and the motion of the particles, this study uses a numerical simulation to investigate the three-dimensional microstructure of the magnetic fluids in the presence of an external magnetic field. A method is proposed for predicting the anisotropic thermal conductivity of magnetic fluids. By introducing an anisotropic structure parameter which characterizes the non-uniform distribution of particles suspended in the magnetic fluids, the traditional Maxwell formula is modified and extended to calculate anisotropic thermal conductivity of the magnetic fluids. The results show that in the presence of an external magnetic field the magnetic nanoparticles form chainlike clusters along the direction of the external magnetic field, which leads to the fact that the thermal conduc-tivity of the magnetic fluid along the chain direction is bigger than that along other directions. The thermal conductivity of the magnetic fluids presents an anisotropic feature. With the increase of the magnetic field strength the chainlike clusters in the magnetic fluid appear to be more obvious, so that the anisotropic feature of heat conduction in the fluids becomes more evident.

  1. Effective medium theory for anisotropic metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiujuan

    2015-01-20

    Materials with anisotropic material parameters can be utilized to fabricate many fascinating devices, such as hyperlenses, metasolids, and one-way waveguides. In this study, we analyze the effects of geometric anisotropy on a two-dimensional metamaterial composed of a rectangular array of elliptic cylinders and derive an effective medium theory for such a metamaterial. We find that it is possible to obtain a closed-form analytical solution for the anisotropic effective medium parameters, provided the aspect ratio of the lattice and the eccentricity of the elliptic cylinder satisfy certain conditions. The derived effective medium theory not only recovers the well-known Maxwell-Garnett results in the quasi-static regime, but is also valid beyond the long-wavelength limit, where the wavelength in the host medium is comparable to the size of the lattice so that previous anisotropic effective medium theories fail. Such an advance greatly broadens the applicable realm of the effective medium theory and introduces many possibilities in the design of structures with desired anisotropic material characteristics. A real sample of a recently theoretically proposed anisotropic medium, with a near-zero index to control the flux, is achieved using the derived effective medium theory, and control of the electromagnetic waves in the sample is clearly demonstrated.

  2. Anisotropic matching principle for the hydrodynamic expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinti, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    Following the recent success of anisotropic hydrodynamics, I propose here a new, general prescription for the hydrodynamic expansion around an anisotropic background. The anisotropic distribution fixes exactly the complete energy-momentum tensor, just like the effective temperature fixes the proper energy density in the ordinary expansion around local equilibrium. This means that momentum anisotropies are already included at the leading order, allowing for large pressure anisotropies without the need of a next-to-leading-order treatment. The first moment of the Boltzmann equation (local four-momentum conservation) provides the time evolution of the proper energy density and the four-velocity. Differently from previous prescriptions, the dynamic equations for the pressure corrections are not derived from the zeroth or second moment of the Boltzmann equation, but they are taken directly from the exact evolution given by the Boltzmann equation. As known in the literature, the exact evolution of the pressure corrections involves higher moments of the Boltzmann distribution, which cannot be fixed by the anisotropic distribution alone. Neglecting the next-to-leading-order contributions corresponds to an approximation, which depends on the chosen form of the anisotropic distribution. I check the the effectiveness of the leading-order expansion around the generalized Romatschke-Stricklad distribution, comparing with the exact solution of the Boltzmann equation in the Bjorken limit with the collisional kernel treated in the relaxation-time approximation, finding an unprecedented agreement.

  3. The VLT SINFONI Mg II Program for Line Emitters (SIMPLE). II. Background Quasars Probing Z ~ 1 Galactic Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroetter, Ilane; Bouché, Nicolas; Péroux, Céline; Murphy, Michael T.; Contini, Thierry; Finley, Hayley

    2015-05-01

    The physical properties of galactic winds are of paramount importance for our understanding of galaxy formation. Fortunately, they can be constrained using background quasars passing near star-forming galaxies (SFGs). From the 14 quasar-galaxy pairs in our Very Large Telescope (VLT)/SINFONI Mg ii Program for Line Emitters sample, we reobserved the 10 brightest galaxies in Hα with the VLT/SINFONI with 0.″ 7 seeing and the corresponding quasar with the VLT/UVES spectrograph. Applying geometrical arguments to these 10 pairs, we find that four are likely probing galactic outflows, three are likely probing extended gaseous disks, and the remaining three are not classifiable because they are viewed face-on. In this paper we present a detailed comparison between the line-of-sight kinematics and the host galaxy emission kinematics for the pairs suitable for wind studies. We find that the kinematic profile shapes (asymmetries) can be well reproduced by a purely geometrical wind model with a constant wind speed, except for one pair (toward J2357-2736) that has the smallest impact parameter b = 6 kpc and requires an accelerated wind flow. Globally, the outflow speeds are ˜100 km s-1 and the mass ejection rates (or {{\\dot{M}}out}) in the gas traced by the low-ionization species are similar to the star formation rate (SFR), meaning that the mass loading factor, η ={{\\dot{M}}out}/SFR, is ≈1.0. The outflow speeds are also smaller than the local escape velocity, which implies that the outflows do not escape the galaxy halo and are likely to fall back into the interstellar medium. Based on observations made at the ESO telescopes under program 080.A-0364(A) 080.A-0364(B) and 079.A-0600(B).

  4. General Expression of Elastic Tensor for Anisotropic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Bo

    2005-01-01

    In order to formulate a general expression of elastic tensor for anisotropic materials, a method of tensor derivative is used for determining relationship between fourth-order elastic tensor and second-order structure tensor that has satisfied material symmetrical conditions. From this general expression of elastic tensor, specific expressions of elastic tensor for different anisotropic materials, such as isotropic materials, transverse isotropic materials and orthogonal-anisotropic materials, can be deduced. This expression underlies the scalar description of anisotropic factors, which are used for classifying and analyzing anisotropic materials. Cubic crystals are analyzed macroscopically by means of the general expression and anisotropic factor.

  5. Radiation Hydrodynamic Simulations of Line-Driven Disk Winds for Ultra Fast Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Nomura, Mariko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki R; Wada, Keiichi; Yoshida, Tessei

    2015-01-01

    Using two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate origin of the ultra fast outflows (UFOs) that are often observed in luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We found that the radiation force due to the spectral lines generates strong winds (line-driven disk winds) that are launched from the inner region of accretion disks (~30 Schwarzschild radii). A wide range of black hole masses ($M_{\\rm BH}$) and Eddington ratios ($\\varepsilon$) was investigated to study conditions for causing the line-driven winds. For $M_{\\rm BH} = 10^6-10^9 M_\\odot$ and $\\varepsilon = 0.1-0.7$, funnel-shaped disk winds appear, in which dense matter is accelerated outward with an opening angle of 70-80 deg and with 10% of the light speed. If we observe the wind along its direction, the velocity, the column density, and the ionization state are consistent with those of the observed UFOs. As long as the obscuration by the torus does not affect the observations of X-ray bands, the UFOs could be statistically observe...

  6. On the presence of ultra-fast outflows in the WAX sample of Seyfert galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tombesi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The study of winds in active galactic nuclei (AGN) is of utmost importance as they may provide the long sought-after link between the central black hole and the host galaxy, establishing the AGN feedback. Recently, Laha et al. (2014) reported the X-ray analysis of a sample of 26 Seyferts observed with XMM-Newton, which are part of the so-called warm absorbers in X-rays (WAX) sample. They claim the non-detection of Fe K absorbers indicative of ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in four observations previously analyzed by Tombesi et al. (2010). They mainly impute the Tombesi et al. detections to an improper modeling of the underlying continuum in the E=4-10 keV band. We therefore re-address here the robustness of these detections and we find that the main reason for the claimed non-detections is likely due to their use of single events only spectra, which reduces the total counts by 40%. Performing a re-analysis of the data in the whole E=0.3-10 keV energy band using their models and spectra including also double event...

  7. Multi-dimensional modelling of X-ray spectra for AGN accretion-disk outflows II

    CERN Document Server

    Sim, S A; Long, K S; Turner, T J; Reeves, J N

    2010-01-01

    Highly-ionized fast accretion-disk winds have been suggested as an explanation for a variety of observed absorption and emission features in the X-ray spectra of Active Galactic Nuclei. Simple estimates have suggested that these flows may be massive enough to carry away a significant fraction of the accretion energy and could be involved in creating the link between supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. However, testing these hypotheses, and quantifying the outflow signatures, requires high-quality theoretical spectra for comparison with observations. Here we describe extensions of our Monte Carlo radiative transfer code that allow us to generate realistic theoretical spectra for a much wider variety of disk wind models than possible in our previous work. In particular, we have expanded the range of atomic physics simulated by the code so that L- and M-shell ions can now be included. We have also substantially improved our treatment of both ionization and radiative heating such that we are now abl...

  8. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations of line-driven disk winds for ultra-fast outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Mariko; Ohsuga, Ken; Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Wada, Keiichi; Yoshida, Tessei

    2016-02-01

    Using two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the origin of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) that are often observed in luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We found that the radiation force due to the spectral lines generates strong winds (line-driven disk winds) that are launched from the inner region of accretion disks (˜30 Schwarzschild radii). A wide range of black hole masses (MBH) and Eddington ratios (ε) was investigated to study the conditions causing the line-driven winds. For MBH = 106-109 M⊙ and ε = 0.1-0.7, funnel-shaped disk winds appear, in which dense matter is accelerated outward with an opening angle of 70°-80° and with 10% of the speed of light. If we observe the wind along its direction, the velocity, the column density, and the ionization state are consistent with those of the observed UFOs. As long as obscuration by the torus does not affect the observation of X-ray bands, the UFOs could be statistically observed in about 13%-28% of the luminous AGNs, which is not inconsistent with the observed ratio (˜40%). We also found that the results are insensitive to the X-ray luminosity and the density of the disk surface. Thus, we can conclude that UFOs could exist in any luminous AGNs, such as narrow-line Seyfert 1s and quasars with ε > 0.1, with which fast line-driven winds are associated.

  9. The G2+G2t complex as a fast and massive outflow?

    CERN Document Server

    Ballone, A; Burkert, A; Gillessen, S; Plewa, P M; Genzel, R; Pfuhl, O; Eisenhauer, F; Ott, T; George, E M; Habibi, M

    2016-01-01

    Observations of the gas component of the cloud G2 in the Galactic Center have revealed its connection to a tail (G2t) lying on the same orbit. More recent studies indicate a connection between G2 and G1, another cloud detected on the blueshifted side of G2's orbit, suggesting a scenario in which G2 is a denser clump in a stream of gas. In this Letter we show that a simulation of an outflow by a central source (possibly a T Tauri star) moving on G2's orbit and interacting with a hot atmosphere surrounding SgrA* can have G2 and G2t as a byproduct. G2 would be the bow-shock formed in the head of the source, while G2t might be the result of the stripping of the rest of the shocked material by the ram pressure of the surrounding hot gas and of its successive accumulation in the trailing region. Mock position-velocity diagrams for the Br$\\gamma$ emission for this simulation can indeed reproduce the correct position and velocity of G2t, as well as the more tenuous material in between. Though some tension between the...

  10. Galaxy Interactions in Compact Groups I : The Galactic Winds of HCG16

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, Frédéric P A; Kewley, Lisa J

    2013-01-01

    Using the WiFeS integral field spectrograph, we have undertaken a series of observations of star-forming galaxies in Compact Groups. In this first paper dedicated to the project, we present the analysis of the spiral galaxy NGC838, a member of the Hickson Compact Group 16, and of its galactic wind. Our observations reveal that the wind forms an asymmetric, bipolar, rotating structure, powered by a nuclear starburst. Emission line ratio diagnostics indicate that photoionization is the dominant excitation mechanism at the base of the wind. Mixing from slow shocks (up to 20%) increases further out along the outflow axis. The asymmetry of the wind is most likely caused by one of the two lobes of the wind bubble bursting out of its HI envelope, as indicated by line ratios and radial velocity maps. The characteristics of this galactic wind suggest that it is caught early (a few Myr) in the wind evolution sequence. The wind is also quite different to the galactic wind in the partner galaxy NGC839 which contains a sy...

  11. A High Fraction of Double-peaked Narrow Emission Lines in Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Lyu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    One percent of redshift z~0.1 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) show velocity splitting of a few hundred km/s in the narrow emission lines in spatially integrated spectra. Such line profiles have been found to arise from the bulk motion of ionized gas clouds associated with galactic-scale outflows, merging pairs of galaxies each harboring a supermassive black hole (SMBH), and/or galactic-scale disk rotation. It remains unclear, however, how the frequency of narrow-line velocity splitting may depend on AGN luminosity. Here we study the correlation between the fraction of Type 2 AGNs with double-peaked narrow emission lines and AGN luminosity as indicated by [O III]5007 emission-line luminosity L_[O III]. We combine the sample of Liu et al. (2010) at z~0.1 with a new sample of 178 Type 2 AGNs with double-peaked [O III] emission lines at z~0.5. We select the new sample from a parent sample of 2089 Type 2 AGNs from the SDSS-III/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We find a statistically significant (~4.2\\sigma) ...

  12. A 3D view of galactic winds in luminous infrared galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, P.; Jiménez-Vicente, J.; Zurita, A.; Mediavilla, E.; Castillo-Morales, A.

    2015-02-01

    Galactic winds and outflows are an ubiquitous phenomenon in galaxies with active star formation and/or active nuclei. They constitute the main mechanism for redistributing dust and metals on large scales and are therefore a key ingredient to understand the life cycle of galaxies. Among galaxies, ULIRGs are of particular interest in this context, as they host intense starbursts and are likely to be the dominant star formers at z > 1. These objects have been shown to host important winds, but it is not yet known what is the frequency of galactic winds and their properties in galaxies with lower star formation rates (SFR). We are studying galactic winds in a sample of 21 galaxies with different SFRs (including ULIRGs) from observations with the INTEGRAL fiber spectrograph on the 4.2m WHT. In order to be able to address the complex multi-phase nature of the wind phenomenon, we have used the Na I D doublet absorption lines to trace cold gas, and a few emission lines (Hα, [N ii] and [S ii]) to trace the warmer ionized gas of the wind. The distribution and kinematics of both components in these objects is then analysed. Preliminary results show strong spatial correlation between regions with high non-circular velocities, areas with high star formation activity and regions with two different components in the emission lines. This set of data will help us to characterise the distribution and kinematics of the winds and their relation with the host galaxy type.

  13. Starburst-driven galactic winds; 1, Energetics and intrinsic X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Strickland, D K

    2000-01-01

    We have performed an extensive hydrodynamical parameter study of starburst-driven galactic winds, motivated by the latest observation data on the best-studied starburst galaxy M82. We study how the wind dynamics, morphology and X-ray emission depend on the host galaxy's ISM distribution, starburst star formation history and strength, and presence and distribution of mass-loading by dense clouds. We find that the soft X-ray emission from galactic winds comes from low filling factor (ff < 2 per cent) gas, which contains only a small fraction (f < 10 per cent) of the mass and energy of the wind, irrespective of whether the wind models are strongly mass-loaded or not. X-ray observations of galactic winds therefore do not directly probe the gas that contains the majority of the energy, mass or metal-enriched gas in the outflow. The soft X-ray emission comes from gas at a wide range different temperatures and densities. Estimates of the physical properties of the hot gas in starburst galaxies, based on fittin...

  14. Discs, outflows, and feedback in collapsing magnetized cores

    CERN Document Server

    Duffin, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    The pre-stellar cores in which low mass stars form are generally well magnetized. Our simulations show that early protostellar discs are massive and experience strong magnetic torques in the form of magnetic braking and protostellar outflows. Simulations of protostellar disk formation suggest that these torques are strong enough to suppress a rotationally supported structure from forming for near critical values of mass-to-flux. We demonstrate through the use of a 3D adaptive mesh refinement code -- including cooling, sink particles and magnetic fields -- that one produces transient 1000 AU discs while simultaneously generating large outflows which leave the core region, carrying away mass and angular momentum. Early inflow/outflow rates suggest that only a small fraction of the mass is lost in the initial magnetic tower/jet event.

  15. The outflow speed of the coma of Halley's comet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data concerning the outflow speed of the coma of Comet Halley are studied in relation to a generalization of the coupled pure-gas-dynamic/Monte Carlo model of Combi and Smyth (1988) to include the dusty-gas dynamics of the inner coma. Measurements made by the Giotto neutral-gas spectrometer, IR water observations from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, and Doppler radio line profiles of HCN and OH are used to examine the radial dependence of the outflow speed, the asymmetry in the outflow speed, and the overall heliocentric distance dependence of the Doppler profiles, respectively. The results suggest that the model makes it possible to understand the gross long-term behavior and radial structure of the dynamics of the cometary coma. 23 refs

  16. The early history of protostellar disks, outflows, and binary stars

    CERN Document Server

    Duffin, Dennis F

    2009-01-01

    In star formation, magnetic fields act as a cosmic angular momentum extractor which increases mass accretion rates onto protostars and in the process, creates spectacular outflows. However, recently it has been argued that this magnetic brake is so strong that early protostellar disks -- the cradles of planet formation -- cannot form. Our 3D numerical simulations of the early stages of collapse (\\lesssim 10^5 yrs) of overdense star--forming clouds form early outflows and have magnetically regulated and rotationally dominated disks (inside 10 AU) with high accretion rates, despite the slip of the field through the mostly neutral gas. We find that in 3D, magnetic fields suppress gravitationally driven instabilities which would otherwise prevent young, well ordered disks from forming. Our simulations have surprising consequences for the early formation of disks, their density and temperature structure, the mechanism and structure of early outflows, the flash heating of dust grains through ambipolar diffusion, an...

  17. 3D AMR simulations of G2 as an outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Ballone, A; Burkert, A; Gillessen, S; Plewa, P M; Pfuhl, O; Genzel, R; Eisenhauer, F; Ott, T; George, E M; Habibi, M

    2016-01-01

    We study the evolution of G2 in a \\textit{Compact Source Scenario}, where G2 is the outflow from a low-mass central star moving on the observed orbit. This is done through 3D AMR simulations of the hydrodynamic interaction of G2 with the surrounding hot accretion flow. A comparison with observations is done by means of mock position-velocity (PV) diagrams. We found that a massive ($\\dot{M}_\\mathrm{w}=5\\times 10^{-7} \\;M_{\\odot} \\; \\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$) and slow ($v_\\mathrm{w}=50 \\;\\mathrm{km\\; s^{-1}}$) outflow can reproduce G2's properties. A faster outflow ($v_\\mathrm{w}=400 \\;\\mathrm{km\\; s^{-1}}$) might also be able to explain the material that seems to follow G2 on the same orbit.

  18. The Massive Bipolar Outflow in IRAS 20110+3321

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-Jing; XU Ye; MIYAZAKI Atsushi; SHEN Zhi-Qiang; CHEN Xi

    2006-01-01

    @@ Mapping observations were made towards IRAS 20110+3321 using the Nobeyama 45 m and the Delingha 13.7m radio telescopes. The high angular resolution (~ 21″) image with the 45m telescope shows that there is a highvelocity bipolar molecular outflow in this region, which is in the NW-SE direction with a collimation factor of ~ 2.2. The outflow has significantly higher mass loss rate and mechanical luminosity than those from low mass YSOs, indicating that the outflow is driven by the IRAS source. A dense massive core was detected by mapping C18O (J= 1 - 0) line in the area with the 13.7m telescope. The IRAS source lies within the core but slightly offsets from its emission peak.

  19. Outflow distribution at the distal anastomosis of infrainguinal bypass grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, R K; How, T V; Bakran, A; Brennan, J A; Harris, P L

    2004-03-01

    Outflow distribution at the distal anastomosis of infrainguinal bypass grafts remains unquantified in vivo, but is likely to influence flow patterns and haemodynamics, thereby impacting upon graft patency. This study measured the ratio of distal to proximal outflow in 30 patients undergoing infrainguinal bypass for lower limb ischaemia, using a flow probe and a transit-time ultrasonic flow meter. The mean outflow distribution was approximately 75% distal to 25% proximal, with above knee anastomoses having a greater proportion of distal flow (84%) compared to below knee grafts (73%). These in vivo flow characteristics differ significantly from those used in theoretical models studying flow phenomena (50:50 and/or 100:0), and should be incorporated into future research. PMID:14757463

  20. Studying the Outflow-Core Interaction with ALMA Cycle 1 Observations of the HH 46/47 Molecular Outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yichen; Mardones, Diego; Cabrit, Sylvie; Dunham, Michael M; Garay, Guido; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Offner, Stella S R; Raga, Alejandro C; Corder, Stuartt A

    2016-01-01

    We present ALMA Cycle 1 observations of the HH 46/47 molecular outflow using combined 12m array and 7m array observations. We use 13CO and C18O emission to correct for the 12CO optical depth, to accurately estimate the outflow mass, momentum and kinetic energy. Applying the optical depth correction increases the mass estimate by a factor of 14, the momentum by a factor of 6, and the kinetic energy by a factor of about 2. The new 13CO(1-0) and C18O(1-0) data also allow us to trace denser and slower outflow material than that traced by 12CO. These species are only detected within about 1~2 km/s from the cloud velocity. The cavity wall of the red lobe appears at very low velocities (~0.2 km/s). Combing the material traced only by 13CO and C18O, the measured total mass of the CO outflow is 1.4 Msun, the total momentum is 1.7 Msun km/s and the total energy is 4.7e43 erg, assuming Tex=15 K. The improved angular resolution and sensitivity in 12CO reveal more details of the outflow structure. Specifically, we find th...

  1. The suppression of star formation by powerful active galactic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, M J; Symeonidis, M; Vieira, J D; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dunlop, J S; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Sánchez Portal, M; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-05-10

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time. PMID:22575961

  2. Hydrostatic equilibrium in a magnetized, warped Galactic disc

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, A; Fletcher, Andrew; Shukurov, Anvar

    2001-01-01

    Hydrostatic equilibrium of the multiphase interstellar medium in the solar vicinity is reconsidered, with the regular and turbulent magnetic fields treated separately. The regular magnetic field strength required to support the gas is consistent with independent estimates provided energy equipartition is maintained between turbulence and random magnetic fields. Our results indicate that a midplane value of $B_{0}=4\\mkG$ for the regular magnetic field near the Sun leads to more attractive models than $B_{0}=2\\mkG$. The vertical profiles of both the regular and random magnetic fields contain disc and halo components whose parameters we have determined. The layer at $1\\la|z|\\la4\\kpc$ can be overpressured and an outflow at a speed of about $50\\kms$ may occur there, presumably associated with a Galactic fountain flow, if $B_{0}\\simeq 2\\mkG$. We show that hydrostatic equilibrium in a warped disc must produce asymmetric density distributions in $z$, in rough agreement with \\HI observations in the outer Galaxy. This ...

  3. The multiphase starburst-driven galactic wind in NGC 5394

    CERN Document Server

    Martín-Fernández, P; Zurita, A; Mediavilla, E; Castillo-Morales, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the neutral and ionised gas phases in the galactic wind for the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 5394 based on new integral field spectroscopy obtained with the INTEGRAL fibre system at the William Herschel Telescope. The neutral gas phase in the wind is detected via the interstellar NaI D doublet absorption. After a careful removal of the stellar contribution to these lines, a significant amount of neutral gas (~10^7 Msun) is detected in a central region of ~1.75 kpc size. This neutral gas is blueshifted by ~165 km/s with respect to the underlying galaxy. The mass outflow of neutral gas is comparable to the star formation rate of the host galaxy. Simultaneously, several emission lines (Ha, [NII], [SII]) are also analysed looking for the ionised warm phase counterpart of the wind. A careful kinematic decomposition of the line profiles reveals the presence of a secondary, broader, kinematic component. This component is found roughly in the same region where the NaI D absorption is det...

  4. Hydrodynamical Coupling of Mass and Momentum in Multiphase Galactic Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Evan E

    2016-01-01

    Using a set of high resolution hydrodynamical simulations run with the Cholla code, we investigate how mass and momentum couple to the multiphase components of galactic winds. The simulations model the interaction between a hot wind driven by supernova explosions and a cooler, denser cloud of interstellar or circumgalactic media. By resolving scales of $\\Delta x 100$ pc distances our calculations capture how the cloud disruption leads to a distribution of densities and temperatures in the resulting multiphase outflow, and quantify the mass and momentum associated with each phase. We find the multiphase wind contains comparable mass and momenta in phases over a wide range of densities extending from the hot wind $(n \\approx 10^{-3}$ $\\mathrm{cm}^{-3})$ to the coldest components $(n \\approx 10^2$ $\\mathrm{cm}^{-3})$. We further find that the momentum distributes roughly in proportion to the mass in each phase, and the mass-loading of the hot phase by the destruction of cold, dense material is an efficient proc...

  5. Study on the Contribution of the Galactic Cosmic Rays to the Galactic Halo Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, Xiao-bo; Xue, Liang; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Hong-bo

    2011-01-01

    Based on the measured cosmic ray anisotropy, a model was built to calculate the Galactic cosmic ray's contribution to the large scale Galactic magnetic field. The general agreement in the large scale structure of the Galactic magnetic field between the calculation and the observations is obtained. This result shows that the model is in the right approach in understanding the cosmic ray's contribution to the Galactic magnetic field, and in the mean while, it indicates that the observed anisotropy of cosmic rays on the earth is not just a local behavior in solar vicinity but represents a microcosm of the global anisotropy of the Galactic cosmic rays.

  6. Theory of Compton scattering by anisotropic electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Poutanen, Juri

    2010-01-01

    Compton scattering plays an important role in various astrophysical objects such as accreting black holes and neutron stars, pulsars, and relativistic jets, clusters of galaxies as well as the early Universe. In most of the calculations it is assumed that the electrons have isotropic angular distribution in some frame. However, there are situations where the anisotropy may be significant due to the bulk motions, or anisotropic cooling by synchrotron radiation, or anisotropic source of seed soft photons. We develop here an analytical theory of Compton scattering by anisotropic distribution of electrons that can simplify significantly the calculations. Assuming that the electron angular distribution can be represented by a second order polynomial over cosine of some angle (dipole and quadrupole anisotropy), we integrate the exact Klein-Nishina cross-section over the angles. Exact analytical and approximate formulae valid for any photon and electron energies are derived for the redistribution functions describin...

  7. Micromechanics and dislocation theory in anisotropic elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Lazar, Markus

    2016-01-01

    In this work, dislocation master-equations valid for anisotropic materials are derived in terms of kernel functions using the framework of micromechanics. The second derivative of the anisotropic Green tensor is calculated in the sense of generalized functions and decomposed into a sum of a $1/R^3$-term plus a Dirac $\\delta$-term. The first term is the so-called "Barnett-term" and the latter is important for the definition of the Green tensor as fundamental solution of the Navier equation. In addition, all dislocation master-equations are specified for Somigliana dislocations with application to 3D crack modeling. Also the interior Eshelby tensor for a spherical inclusion in an anisotropic material is derived as line integral over the unit circle.

  8. Anisotropic matching principle for the hydrodynamics expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Tinti, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Following the recent success of anisotropic hydrodynamics we propose a new, general prescription for the hydrodynamics expansion around an anisotropic background. The anisotropic distribution is fixing exactly the complete energy-momentum tensor, just like the effective temperature is fixing the proper energy density in the ordinary expansion around local equilibrium. This means that momen- tum anisotropies are already included at the leading order, allowing for large pressure anisotropies without the need of a next to leading order treatment. The first moment of the Boltzmann equation (local four-momentum conservation) provides the time evolution of the proper energy density and the four velocity. Differently from previous prescriptions, the dynamic equations for the pressure corrections are not derived from the zeroth or second moment of the Boltzmann equation, but they are taken directly from the exact evolution given by the Boltzmann equation. We check the effec- tiveness of this new approach by matching ...

  9. Anisotropic pseudopotential for polarized dilute quantum gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An anisotropic pseudopotential arising in the context of collisions of two particles polarized by an external field is rigorously derived and its properties are investigated. Such a low-energy pseudopotential may be useful in describing collective properties of dilute quantum gases, such as molecules polarized by an electric field or metastable 3P2 atoms polarized by a magnetic field. The pseudopotential is expressed in terms of the reactance (K) matrix and derivatives of the Dirac δ function. In most applications, it may be represented as a sum of a traditional spherically symmetric contact term and an anisotropic part. The former contribution may be parametrized by a generalized scattering length. The anisotropic part of the pseudopotential may be characterized by the off-diagonal scattering length for dipolar interactions and off-diagonal scattering volume for quadrupolar interactions. The two-body matrix element of the pseudopotential in a basis of plane waves is also derived

  10. Obtuse triangle suppression in anisotropic meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Feng

    2011-12-01

    Anisotropic triangle meshes are used for efficient approximation of surfaces and flow data in finite element analysis, and in these applications it is desirable to have as few obtuse triangles as possible to reduce the discretization error. We present a variational approach to suppressing obtuse triangles in anisotropic meshes. Specifically, we introduce a hexagonal Minkowski metric, which is sensitive to triangle orientation, to give a new formulation of the centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT) method. Furthermore, we prove several relevant properties of the CVT method with the newly introduced metric. Experiments show that our algorithm produces anisotropic meshes with much fewer obtuse triangles than using existing methods while maintaining mesh anisotropy. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics for central collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Alqahtani, Mubarak; Strickland, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We use quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics to study an azimuthally-symmetric boost-invariant quark-gluon plasma including the effects of both shear and bulk viscosities. In quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics, a single finite-temperature quasiparticle mass is introduced and fit to the lattice data in order to implement a realistic equation of state. We compare results obtained using the quasiparticle method with the standard method of imposing the equation of state in anisotropic hydrodynamics and viscous hydrodynamics. Using these three methods, we extract the primordial particle spectra, total number of charged particles, and average transverse momentum for various values of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s. We find that the three methods agree well for small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, eta/s, but differ at large eta/s. We find, in particular, that when using standard viscous hydrodynamics, the bulk-viscous correction can drive the primordial particle spectra negative...

  12. Gravitational stresses in anisotropic rock masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadei, B.; Savage, W.Z.; Swolfs, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents closed-form solutions for the stress field induced by gravity in anisotropic rock masses. These rocks are assumed to be laterally restrained and are modelled as a homogeneous, orthotropic or transversely isotropic, linearly elastic material. The analysis, constrained by the thermodynamic requirement that strain energy be positive definite, gives the following important result: inclusion of anisotropy broadens the range of permissible values of gravity-induced horizontal stresses. In fact, for some ranges of anisotropic rock properties, it is thermodynamically admissible for gravity-induced horizontal stresses to exceed the vertical stress component; this is not possible for the classical isotropic solution. Specific examples are presented to explore the nature of the gravity-induced stress field in anisotropic rocks and its dependence on the type, degree and orientation of anisotropy with respect to the horizontal ground surface. ?? 1987.

  13. Introduction to Galactic Chemical Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    In this lecture I will introduce the concept of galactic chemical evolution, namely the study of how and where the chemical elements formed and how they were distributed in the stars and gas in galaxies. The main ingredients to build models of galactic chemical evolution will be described. They include: initial conditions, star formation history, stellar nucleosynthesis and gas flows in and out of galaxies. Then some simple analytical models and their solutions will be discussed together with the main criticisms associated to them. The yield per stellar generation will be defined and the hypothesis of instantaneous recycling approximation will be critically discussed. Detailed numerical models of chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type, able to follow the time evolution of the abundances of single elements, will be discussed and their predictions will be compared to observational data. The comparisons will include stellar abundances as well as interstellar medium ones, measured in galaxies. I will show how, from these comparisons, one can derive important constraints on stellar nucleosynthesis and galaxy formation mechanisms. Most of the concepts described in this lecture can be found in the monograph by Matteucci (2012).

  14. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jason; Aguirre, James; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Bradley, Eric Todd; Cyganowski, Claudia; Dowell, Darren; Drosback, Meredith; Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J., II; Ginsburg, Adam; Harvey, Paul; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schlingman, Wayne; Shirley, Yancy L.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) is a 1.1 millimeter continuum survey of the northern Galactic Plane made with Bolocam and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The coverage totals 170 square degrees, comprised of a contiguous range from -10.5 deg is less than or equal to 90.5 deg, 0.5 deg is less than or equal to b is less than or equal to 0.5 deg, with extended coverage in b in selected regions, and four targeted regions in the outer Galaxy, including: IC1396, toward the Perseus arm at l is approximately 111 deg, W3/4/5, and Gem OB1. Depths of the maps range from 30 to 60 mJy beam (sup 1). Approximately 8,400 sources were detected and the maps and source catalog have been made publicly available. Millimeter-wave thermal dust emission reveals dense regions within molecular clouds, thus the BGPS serves as a database for studies of the dense interstellar medium and star formation within the Milky Way.

  15. Star formation in Galactic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the triggering of star formation in clouds that form in Galactic scale flows as the interstellar medium passes through spiral shocks. We use the Lagrangian nature of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to trace how the star-forming gas is gathered into self-gravitating cores that collapse to form stars. Large-scale flows that arise due to Galactic dynamics create shocks of the order of 30 km s-1 that compress the gas and form dense clouds (n > several × 102 cm-3) in which self-gravity becomes relevant. These large-scale flows are necessary for creating the dense physical conditions for gravitational collapse and star formation. Local gravitational collapse requires densities in excess of n > 103 cm-3 which occur on size scales of ≈1 pc for low-mass star-forming regions (M 103 M⊙). Star formation in the 250 pc region lasts throughout the 5 Myr time-scale of the simulation with a star formation rate of ≈10-1 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. In the absence of feedback, the efficiency of the star formation per free-fall time varies from our assumed 100 per cent at our sink accretion radius to values of <10-3 at low densities.

  16. A Heavy Baryonic Galactic Disc

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the possibility that the observed rotation of galaxies can be accounted for by invoking a massive baryonic disc with no need for non-baryonic dark matter or a massive halo. There are 5 primary reasons for suggesting this: 1. there are well known disc surface mass density distributions that naturally produce the observed rotation curves of galaxies. 2. there are a number of rotation curve `puzzles' that cannot be explained by a massive dark matter halo i.e. the success of maximum disc fitting, HI gas scaling to the observed rotation, the disc/halo conspiracy and the interpretation of the Tully-Fisher relation. 3. recent 21cm observations show an almost constant HI surface density and a distinct `cut-off' or edge to galactic discs. We explain this constant surface density in terms of either an optical depth effect or the onset of molecular gas formation and hence the possibility of considerably more gas existing in galaxies. We suggest that the HI cut-off does indeed mark the edge of the galactic...

  17. Constraints on galactic wind models

    CERN Document Server

    Meiksin, Avery

    2016-01-01

    Observational implications are derived for two standard models of supernovae-driven galactic winds: a freely expanding steady-state wind and a wind sourced by a self-similarly expanding superbubble including thermal heat conduction. It is shown that, for the steady-state wind, matching the measured correlation between the soft x-ray luminosity and star formation rate of starburst galaxies is equivalent to producing a scaled wind mass-loading factor relative to the star-formation rate of 0.5 - 3, in agreement with the amount inferred from metal absorption line measurements. The match requires the asymptotic wind velocity v_inf to scale with the star formation rate SFR (in solar masses per year) approximately as v_inf ~ (700 - 1000) km/s SFR^{1/6}. The corresponding mass injection rate is close to the amount naturally provided by thermal evaporation from the wall of a superbubble in a galactic disc, suggesting thermal evaporation may be a major source of mass-loading. The predicted mass-loading factors from the...

  18. Star formation in Galactic flows

    CERN Document Server

    Smilgys, R

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the triggering of star formation in clouds that form in Galactic scale flows as the ISM passes through spiral shocks. We use the Lagrangian nature of SPH simulations to trace how the star forming gas is gathered into self-gravitating cores that collapse to form stars. Large scale flows that arise due to Galactic dynamics create shocks of order 30 km/s that compress the gas and form dense clouds $(n> $several $\\times 10^2$ cm$^{-3}$) in which self-gravity becomes relevant. These large-scale flows are necessary for creating the dense physical conditions for gravitational collapse and star formation. Local gravitational collapse requires densities in excess of $n>10^3$ cm$^{-3}$ which occur on size scales of $\\approx 1$ pc for low-mass star forming regions ($M10^3 M_{\\odot}$). Star formation in the 250 pc region lasts throughout the 5 Myr timescale of the simulation with a star formation rate of $\\approx 10^{-1} M_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$. In the absence of feedback, the efficiency of the sta...

  19. Heating of the Intracluster Medium by Quasar Outflows

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suparna Roychowdhury; Biman B. Nath

    2002-03-01

    We study the possibility of quasar outflows in clusters and groups of galaxies heating the intracluster gas in order to explain the recent observation of excess entropy in this gas. We show that radio galaxies alone cannot provide the energy required to explain the observations but the inclusion of Broad Absorption Line (BAL) outflows can do so, and that in this scenario most of the heating takes place at ∼ 1–4, the ``preheating” epoch being at a lower redshift for lower mass clusters.

  20. Can dark energy explain the observed outflow in galaxy clusters?

    CERN Document Server

    Donnari, M; Merafina, M

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations of the Virgo cluster and the Local Group suggested that some galaxies are flowing out from their parent cluster. This may be the signature that dark energy (DE) acts significantly also on small cosmological scales. By means of direct N-body simulations we performed several simulations, in which the effect of DE and gravity are taken into account, aiming to determine whether DE can produce an outflow of galaxies compatible with observations. Comparing the different simulations, our results suggest that the observed outflow of galaxies is likely due to the local effect of DE.

  1. Magnetized Astrophysical Outflows Cradle to Grave, Source to Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, A I; Lery, T; Frank, Adam; Gardiner, Thomas A.; Lery, Thibaut

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the propagation of radiative MHD jets and outflows focusing on outflows driven by magneto-centrifugal rotators. Our goal is to link the properties of the jets with the physics of the sources which produce them. We find that density and magnetic field stratification (with radius) in jets from magnetized rotators leads to new behavior including the development of a dense inner jet core and a low density collar. We also report on more general studies of ambipolar diffusion and field geometry in pulsed jets. Finally we describe a new work designed to study the effects of magnetized winds on circumstellar environments appropriate to YSOs and PNe.

  2. The effects of vertical outflows on disk dynamos

    OpenAIRE

    Bardou, A.; Rekowski, B. v.; Dobler, W.; Brandenburg, A.; Shukurov, A.

    2000-01-01

    We consider the effect of vertical outflows on the mean-field dynamo in a thin disk. These outflows could be due to winds or magnetic buoyancy. We analyse both two-dimensional finite-difference numerical solutions of the axisymmetric dynamo equations and a free-decay mode expansion using the thin-disk approximation. Contrary to expectations, a vertical velocity can enhance dynamo action, provided it is not too strong. In the nonlinear regime this can lead to super-exponential growth of the ma...

  3. Outflow channel sources, reactivation, and chaos formation, Xanthe Terra, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, J.A.P.; Sasaki, S.; Kuzmin, R.O.; Dohm, J.M.; Tanaka, K.L.; Miyamoto, H.; Kurita, K.; Komatsu, G.; Fairen, A.G.; Ferris, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    The undulating, warped, and densely fractured surfaces of highland regions east of Valles Marineris (located north of the eastern Aureum Chaos, east of the Hydraotes Chaos, and south of the Hydaspis Chaos) resulted from extensional surface warping related to ground subsidence, caused when pressurized water confined in subterranean caverns was released to the surface. Water emanations formed crater lakes and resulted in channeling episodes involved in the excavation of Ares, Tiu, and Simud Valles of the eastern part of the circum-Chryse outflow channel system. Progressive surface subsidence and associated reduction of the subsurface cavernous volume, and/or episodes of magmatic-driven activity, led to increases of the hydrostatic pressure, resulting in reactivation of both catastrophic and non-catastrophic outflow activity. Ancient cratered highland and basin materials that underwent large-scale subsidence grade into densely fractured terrains. Collapse of rock materials in these regions resulted in the formation of chaotic terrains, which occur in and near the headwaters of the eastern circum-Chryse outflow channels. The deepest chaotic terrain in the Hydaspis Chaos region resulted from the collapse of pre-existing outflow channel floors. The release of volatiles and related collapse may have included water emanations not necessarily linked to catastrophic outflow. Basal warming related to dike intrusions, thermokarst activity involving wet sediments and/or dissected ice-enriched country rock, permafrost exposed to the atmosphere by extensional tectonism and channel incision, and/or the injection of water into porous floor material, may have enhanced outflow channel floor instability and subsequent collapse. In addition to the possible genetic linkage to outflow channel development dating back to at least the Late Noachian, clear disruption of impact craters with pristine ejecta blankets and rims, as well as preservation of fine tectonic fabrics, suggest that

  4. River Outflow of the Conterminous United States, 1939-1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guetter, Alexandre K.; Georgakakos, Konstantine P.

    1993-10-01

    A record of 50 years of daily outflows through the boundaries of the continental United States has been assembled based on observations recorded by U.S. Geological Survey streamflow stations. Only stations with continuous records from 1939 through 1988 were included. These stations (197 total) are near the outlets of rivers located at the vicinity of the Canadian, Mexican, Atlantic (including the Gulf of Mexico), and Pacific borders of the continental United States. The drainage area of the selected stations covers 77% of the conterminous United States, whereas the existing network of gauging stations covers 83% of the conterminous U.S. area. Station daily data were aggregated over the entire boundary of the United States and were integrated in monthly and annual totals. The 50-year average annual streamflow divergence normalized by the aggregated drainage area is 210.2 mm yr1, reaching a peak in April with 27.3 mm month1 and a minimum in September with 8.7 mm month1. The Mississippi-Missouri Basin comprises 50% of the gauged area and dominates the absolute value of the outflow discharge. Spectral analysis of the monthly outflow anomalies shows an 11-year dominant cycle. The 1939-1988 period contains four notable droughts. Two droughts are partially registered in the limits of the records characterized by the negative anomalies extending from 1939 to 1941 and by the 1987-1988 anomalies for the late 1980s drought. The middle 1950s and early 1960s droughts are fully included in the dataset. Periods of high outflows were registered in the middle 1940s, early 1970s, and early 1980s. Analysis of the spatial coherence of the annual anomalies shows large-scale features, whereas analysis of the monthly anomalies yields the frequency and persistence patterns of floods and droughts. An estimate of the climatological land-surface water budget for the continental United States was done based on recorded precipitation, panevaporation, and outflow. Eigenvector analysis of the

  5. XMM observations of BAL Quasars with polar outflows

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, JunXian; Jiang, Peng; Zhou, Hongyan; Wang, Tinggui; Dong, Xiaobo; Wang, Huiyuan

    2008-01-01

    We have selected a sample of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars which show significant radio variations, indicating the presence of polar BAL outflows. We obtained snapshot XMM observations of four polar BAL QSOs, to check whether strong X-ray absorption, one of the most prominent characteristics of most BAL QSOs, also exist in polar outflows. Two of the sources are detected in X-ray. Spectral fittings show that they are X-ray normal with no intrinsic X-ray absorption, suggesting the X-ray s...

  6. On the thermal line emission from the outflows in ultraluminous X-ray sources

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ya-Di; Cao, Xinwu

    2016-01-01

    The atomic features in the X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) may be associated with the outflow (Middleton et al. 2015), which may provide a way to explore the physics of the ULXs. We construct a conical outflow model, and calculate the thermal X-ray Fe emission lines from the outflows. Our results show that thermal line luminosity decreases with increasing outflow velocity or/and opening angle of the outflow for a fixed kinetic power of the outflows. Assuming the kinetic ...

  7. Planck 2013 results. XIII. Galactic CO emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.;

    2014-01-01

    Rotational transition lines of CO play a major role in molecular radio astronomy as a mass tracer and in particular in the study of star formation and Galactic structure. Although a wealth of data exists for the Galactic plane and some well-known molecular clouds, there is no available high sensi...

  8. 3-Dimensional dynamics of the galactic bulge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soto Vicencio, Mario Humberto

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is part of a project which attempts to unveil the structure of the galactic bulge of our galaxy through the study of the kinematics of stars in low foreground extinction windows.Thus, in order to effectively constraint the phase-space distribution function of the galactic bulge, we have

  9. Energy Radiation of the Active Galactic Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Zhi-Ming; WANG Yong-Jiu

    2004-01-01

    In the Hellings-Nordtvedt theory, we obtain some expressions of energy radiation and mass defect effect for a kind of the active galactic nuclei, which is meaningful to calculating the energy radiation in the procession of forming this kind of celestial bodies. This calculation can give some interpretation for energy source of the jet from the active galactic nuclei.

  10. PGMS: TO STUDY THE GALACTIC MAGNETISM OUT OF THE GALACTIC PLANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carretti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Parkes Galactic Meridian Survey (PGMS is a 5 X 90 strip to map the polarized synchrotron emission along a Galactic meridian from the Galactic plane down to the south Galactic pole. The survey is carried out at the Parkes radio telescope at a frequency of 2.3 GHz with 30 adjacent 8 MHz bands which enable Faraday Rotation studies. The scienti c goal is twofold: (1 To probe the Galactic magnetism o the Galactic plane of which little is known so far. PGMS gives an insight into the Galactic magnetic eld in the thick disc, halo, and disc-halo transition; (2 To study the synchrotron emission as foreground noise of the CMB Polarization, especially for the weak B-Mode which carries the signature of the primordial gravitational wave background left by the In ation. PGMS observations have been recently concluded. In this contribution we present the survey along with rst results.

  11. Relativistic Solutions of Anisotropic Compact Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Bikash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    We present a class of new relativistic solutions with anisotropic fluid for compact stars in hydrostatic equilibrium. The interior space-time geometry considered here for compact objects are described by parameters namely, $\\lambda$, $k$, $A$, $R$ and $n$. The values of the geometrical parameters are determined here for obtaining a class of physically viable stellar models. The energy-density, radial pressure and tangential pressure are finite and positive inside the anisotropic stars. Considering some stars of known mass we present stellar models which describe compact astrophysical objects with nuclear density.

  12. Bouncing Anisotropic Universes with Varying Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D

    2013-01-01

    We examine the evolution of a closed, homogeneous and anisotropic cosmology subject to a variation of the fine structure 'constant', \\alpha, within the context of the theory introduced by Bekenstein, Sandvik, Barrow and Magueijo, which generalises Maxwell's equations and general relativity. The variation of \\alpha permits an effective ghost scalar field, whose negative energy density becomes dominant at small length scales, leading to a bouncing cosmology. A thermodynamically motivated coupling which describes energy exchange between the effective ghost field and the radiation field leads to an expanding, isotropizing sequence of bounces. In the absence of entropy production we also find solutions with stable anisotropic oscillations around a static universe.

  13. One-Dimensional Anisotropic Band Gap Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The band gap structure of one-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal has been studied by means of the transfer matrix formalism. From the analytic expressions and numeric calculations we see some general characteristics of the band gap structure of anisotropic photonic crystals, each band separates into two branches and the two branches react to polarization sensitively. In the practical case of oblique incidence, gaps move towards high frequency when the angle of incidence increases. Under some special conditions, the two branches become degenerate again.

  14. Anisotropic Gold Nanocrystals:. Synthesis and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiufiuc, R.; Toderas, F.; Iosin, M.; Stiufiuc, G.

    In this letter we report on successful preparation and characterization of anisotropic gold nanocrystals bio-synthesized by reduction of aqueous chloroaurate ions in pelargonium plant extract. The nanocrystals have been characterized by means of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy and tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). Using these investigation techniques, the successful formation of anisotropic single nanocrystals with the preferential growth direction along the gold (111) plane has been confirmed. The high detail phase images could give us an explanation concerning the growth mechanism of the nanocrystals.

  15. CAVITATION BIFURCATION FOR COMPRESSIBLE ANISOTROPIC HYPERELASTIC MATERIALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChengChangjun; RenJiusheng

    2004-01-01

    The effect of material anisotropy on the bifurcation for void tormation in anisotropic compressible hyperelastic materials is examined. Numerical solutions are obtained in an anisotropic sphere, whose material is transversely isotropic in the radial direction. It is shown that the bifurcation may occur either to the right or to the left, depending on the degree of material anisotropy. The deformation and stress contribution in the sphere before cavitation are different from those after cavitation. The stability of solutions is discussed through a comparison of energy.

  16. Anisotropic Stars: Exact Solutions and Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, K; Dev, Krsna; Gleiser, Marcelo

    2004-01-01

    I report on recent work concerning the existence and stability of self-gravitating spheres with anisotropic pressure. After presenting new exact solutions, Chandrasekhar's variational formalism for radial perturbations is generalized to anisotropic objects and applied to investigate their stability. It is shown that anisotropy can not only support stars of mass M and radius R with 2M/R > 8/9 and arbitrarily large surface redshifts, but that stable configurations exist for values of the adiabatic index smaller than the corresponding isotropic value.

  17. Controllable underwater anisotropic oil-wetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yong, Jiale; Chen, Feng, E-mail: chenfeng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Yang, Qing; Farooq, Umar; Bian, Hao; Du, Guangqing; Hou, Xun [State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing System Engineering and Key Laboratory of Photonics Technology for Information of Shaanxi Province, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2014-08-18

    This Letter demonstrates a simple method to achieve underwater anisotropic oil-wetting using silicon surfaces with a microgroove array produced by femtosecond laser ablation. The oil contact angles along the direction perpendicular to the grooves are consistently larger than those parallel to the microgroove arrays in water because the oil droplet is restricted by the energy barrier that exists between the non-irradiated domain and the trapped water in the laser-ablated microgrooves. This underwater anisotropic oil-wetting is able to be controlled, and the anisotropy can be tuned from 0° to ∼20° by adjusting the period of the microgroove arrays.

  18. Anisotropic nanomaterials preparation, properties, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Quan

    2015-01-01

    In this book anisotropic one-dimensional and two-dimensional nanoscale building blocks and their assembly into fascinating and qualitatively new functional structures embracing both hard and soft components are explained. Contributions from leading experts regarding important aspects like synthesis, assembly, properties and applications of the above materials are compiled into a reference book. The anisotropy, i.e. the direction-dependent physical properties, of materials is fascinating and elegant and has sparked the quest for anisotropic materials with useful properties. With such a curiosi

  19. (abstract) A Test of the Theoretical Models of Bipolar Outflows: The Bipolar Outflow in Mon R2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Taoling; Goldsmith, Paul; Patel, Nimesh

    1993-01-01

    We report some results of a study of the massive bipolar outflow in the central region of the relatively nearby giant molecular cloud Monoceros R2. We make a quantative comparison of our results with the Shu et al. outflow model which incorporates a radially directed wind sweeping up the ambient material into a shell. We find that this simple model naturally explains the shape of this thin shell. Although Shu's model in its simplest form predicts with reasonable parameters too much mass at very small polar angles, as previously pointed out by Masson and Chernin, it provides a reasonable good fit to the mass distribution at larger polar angles. It is possible that this discrepancy is due to inhomogeneities of the ambient molecular gas which is not considered by the model. We also discuss the constraints imposed by these results on recent jet-driven outflow models.

  20. New knowledge of the Galactic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J L

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic fields of our Milky Way galaxy are the main agent for cosmic rays to transport. In the last decade, much new knowledge has been gained from measurements of the Galactic magnetic fields. In the Galactic disk, from the RMs of a large number of newly discovered pulsars, the large-scale magnetic fields along the spiral arms have been delineated in a much larger region than ever before, with alternating directions in the arm and interarm regions. The toroidal fields in the Galactic halo were revealed to have opposite directions below and above the Galactic plane, which is an indication of an A0 mode dynamo operating in the halo. The strength of large-scale fields obtained from pulsar RM data has been found to increase exponentially towards the Galactic center. Compared to the steep Kolmogorov spectrum of magnetic energy at small scales, the large-scale magnetic fields show a shallow broken spatial magnetic energy spectrum.