WorldWideScience

Sample records for anisotropic frequency response

  1. Spatial Frequency Responses of Anisotropic Refractive Index Gratings Formed in Holographic Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Fukuda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on an experimental investigation of spatial frequency responses of anisotropic transmission refractive index gratings formed in holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystals (HPDLCs. We studied two different types of HPDLC materials employing two different monomer systems: one with acrylate monomer capable of radical mediated chain-growth polymerizations and the other with thiol-ene monomer capable of step-growth polymerizations. It was found that the photopolymerization kinetics of the two HPDLC materials could be well explained by the autocatalytic model. We also measured grating-spacing dependences of anisotropic refractive index gratings at a recording wavelength of 532 nm. It was found that the HPDLC material with the thiol-ene monomer gave higher spatial frequency responses than that with the acrylate monomer. Statistical thermodynamic simulation suggested that such a spatial frequency dependence was attributed primarily to a difference in the size of formed liquid crystal droplets due to different photopolymerization mechanisms.

  2. Polarization-controlled anisotropic coding metamaterials at terahertz frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Shuo; Xu, Quan; Bao, Di; Du, Liangliang; Wan, Xiang; Tang, Wen Xuan; Ouyang, Chunmei; Zhou, Xiao Yang; Yuan, Hao; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili; Cheng, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials based on effective media have achieved a lot of unusual physics (e.g. negative refraction and invisibility cloaking) owing to their abilities to tailor the effective medium parameters that do not exist in nature. Recently, coding metamaterials have been suggested to control electromagnetic waves by designing the coding sequences of digital elements '0' and '1', which possess opposite phase responses. Here, we propose the concept of anisotropic coding metamaterial at terahertz frequencies, in which coding behaviors in different directions are dependent on the polarization status of terahertz waves. We experimentally demonstrate an ultrathin and flexible polarization-controlled anisotropic coding metasurface functioning in the terahertz regime using specially- designed coding elements. By encoding the elements with elaborately-designed digital sequences (in both 1 bit and 2 bits), the x- and y-polarized reflected waves can be deflected or diffused independently in three dimensions. The simulated f...

  3. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D' Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  4. Frequency Response Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Kosterev, Dmitry; Dai, T.

    2014-12-31

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

  5. Low frequency noise of anisotropic magnetoresistors in DC and AC-excited metal detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetoresistors can replace induction sensors in applications like non-destructive testing and metal detection, where high spatial resolution or low frequency response is required. Using an AC excitation field the magnetic response of eddy currents is detected. Although giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors have higher measuring range and sensitivity compared to anisotropic magnetoresistors (AMR), they show also higher hysteresis and noise especially at low frequencies. Therefore AMR sensors are chosen to be evaluated in low noise measurements with combined processing of DC and AC excitation field with respect to the arrangement of processing electronics. Circuit with a commercial AMR sensor HMC1001 and AD8429 preamplifier using flipping technique exhibited 1-Hz noise as low as 125 pT/√Hz. Without flipping, the 1-Hz noise increased to 246 pT/√Hz.

  6. Low frequency eigenmodes of thin anisotropic current sheets and Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Zelenyi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The eigenmodes of low frequency perturbations of thin anisotropic current sheets with a finite value of the normal magnetic field, are investigated in this paper. It is shown that two possible polarizations of symmetric and asymmetric modes (sausage and kink exist where the growth rate of instabilities is positive. In addition, we demonstrate that a tearing instability might have a positive growth rate in thin anisotropic current sheets. The class of relatively fast wavy flapping oscillations observed by Cluster is described. The main direction of wave motion coincides with the direction of the current and the typical velocity of this motion is comparable with the plasma drift velocity in the current sheet. The comparison of these characteristics with theoretical predictions of the model of anisotropic thin current sheets, demonstrates that, in principle, the theory adequately describes the observations.

  7. Modeling the anisotropic shock response of single-crystal RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luscher, Darby

    Explosives initiate under impacts whose energy, if distributed homogeneously throughout the material, translates to temperature increases that are insufficient to drive the rapid chemistry observed. Heterogeneous thermomechanical interactions at the meso-scale (i.e. between single-crystal and macroscale) leads to the formation of localized hot spots. Direct numerical simulations of mesoscale response can contribute to our understanding of hot spots if they include the relevant deformation mechanisms that are essential to the nonlinear thermomechanical response of explosive molecular crystals. We have developed a single-crystal model for the finite deformation thermomechanical response of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX). Because of the low symmetry of RDX, a complete description of nonlinear thermoelasticity requires a careful decomposition of free energy into components that represent the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) response and the coupling between isochoric deformation and both deviatoric and hydrostatic stresses. An equation-of-state (EOS) based on Debye theory that defines the PVT response was constructed using experimental data and density functional theory calculations. This EOS replicates the equilibrium states of phase transformation from alpha to gamma polymorphs observed in static high-pressure experiments. Lattice thermoelastic parameters defining the coupled isochoric free energy were obtained from molecular dynamics calculations and previous experimental data. Anisotropic crystal plasticity is modeled using Orowan's expression relating slip rate to dislocation density and velocity. Details of the theory will be presented followed by discussion of simulations of flyer plate impact experiments, including recent experiments diagnosed with in situ X-ray diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source. Impact conditions explored within the experimental effort have spanned shock pressures ranging from 1-10 GPa for several crystallographic orientations

  8. Low-frequency noise characterization of a magnetic field monitoring system using an anisotropic magnetoresistance

    CERN Document Server

    Mateos, I; Lobo, A

    2016-01-01

    A detailed study about magnetic sensing techniques based on anisotropic magnetoresistive sensors shows that the technology is suitable for low-frequency space applications like the eLISA mission. Low noise magnetic measurements at the sub-millihertz frequencies were taken by using different electronic noise reduction techniques in the signal conditioning circuit. We found that conventional modulation techniques reversing the sensor bridge excitation do not reduce the potential $1/f$ noise of the magnetoresistors, so alternative methods such as flipping and electro-magnetic feedback are necessary. In addition, a low-frequency noise analysis of the signal conditioning circuits has been performed in order to identify and minimize the different main contributions from the overall noise. The results for chip-scale magnetoresistances exhibit similar noise along the eLISA bandwidth ($0.1\\,{\\rm mHz}-1\\,{\\rm Hz}$) to the noise measured by means of the voluminous fluxgate magnetometers used in its precursor mission, kn...

  9. High-frequency interaction-induced rototranslational wings of anisotropic nitrogen spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anisotropic rototranslational scattering spectra of nitrogen gas at high frequency up to 700 cm-1 for several temperatures and from low densities are analyzed in terms of new site-site (M3SV) intermolecular potential and interaction-induced pair polarizability models, using quantum spectral shapes computations. Our theoretical calculations take into account multipole contributions from the mean value and anisotropy of the dipole-dipole polarizability tensor α, two independent components of the dipole-octopole polarizability tensor E and dipole-dipole-quadrupole hyperpolarizability tensor B. The high-frequency wings are discussed in terms of the collision-induced rotational Rayleigh effect and estimates for the dipole-octopole polarizability |E 4| are obtained and checked with recent ab initio theoretical value. Good comparison is found in the frequency range 0-400 cm-1 between the theoretical and experimental spectra. When an exponential contribution [exp(-ν/ν 0)] with ν 0 = 425 cm-1 is considered to model very short-range light scattering mechanisms at room temperature, good agreement is found over the whole frequency range

  10. High-frequency interaction-induced rototranslational wings of anisotropic nitrogen spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Kader, M.S.A. [Department of Engineering Mathematics and Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Giza, 12211 (Egypt)], E-mail: mohamedsayedabdelkader@yahoo.com; Moustafa, S.I. [Department of Engineering Mathematics and Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Giza, 12211 (Egypt)

    2005-11-22

    The anisotropic rototranslational scattering spectra of nitrogen gas at high frequency up to 700 cm{sup -1} for several temperatures and from low densities are analyzed in terms of new site-site (M3SV) intermolecular potential and interaction-induced pair polarizability models, using quantum spectral shapes computations. Our theoretical calculations take into account multipole contributions from the mean value and anisotropy of the dipole-dipole polarizability tensor {alpha}, two independent components of the dipole-octopole polarizability tensor E and dipole-dipole-quadrupole hyperpolarizability tensor B. The high-frequency wings are discussed in terms of the collision-induced rotational Rayleigh effect and estimates for the dipole-octopole polarizability |E {sub 4}| are obtained and checked with recent ab initio theoretical value. Good comparison is found in the frequency range 0-400 cm{sup -1} between the theoretical and experimental spectra. When an exponential contribution [exp(-{nu}/{nu} {sub 0})] with {nu} {sub 0} = 425 cm{sup -1} is considered to model very short-range light scattering mechanisms at room temperature, good agreement is found over the whole frequency range.

  11. Nonlinear wave equation in frequency domain: accurate modeling of ultrafast interaction in anisotropic nonlinear media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hairun; Zeng, Xianglong; Zhou, Binbin;

    2013-01-01

    further simulations we demonstrate few-cycle compressed solitons in extremely short crystals, where spectral phenomena, such as blue/red shifting, nonstationary radiation in accordance with the nonlocal phase-matching condition, and dispersive-wave generation are observed and marked, which helps improve......We interpret the purely spectral forward Maxwell equation with up to third-order induced polarizations for pulse propagation and interactions in quadratic nonlinear crystals. The interpreted equation, also named the nonlinear wave equation in the frequency domain, includes quadratic and cubic...... nonlinearities, delayed Raman effects, and anisotropic nonlinearities. The full potential of this wave equation is demonstrated by investigating simulations of solitons generated in the process of ultrafast cascaded second-harmonic generation. We show that a balance in the soliton delay can be achieved due to...

  12. Experimental and theoretical analysis of THz-frequency, direction-dependent, phonon polariton modes in a subwavelength, anisotropic slab waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chengliang; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Jingjun; Nelson, Keith A; Werley, Christopher A

    2010-12-01

    Femtosecond optical pulses were used to generate THz-frequency phonon polariton waves in a 50 micrometer lithium niobate slab, which acts as a subwavelength, anisotropic planar waveguide. The spatial and temporal electric field profiles of the THz waves were recorded for different propagation directions using a polarization gating imaging system, and experimental dispersion curves were determined via a two-dimensional Fourier transform. Dispersion relations for an anisotropic slab waveguide were derived via analytical analysis and found to be in excellent agreement with all observed experimental modes. From the dispersion relations, we analyze the propagation-direction-dependent behavior, effective refractive index values, and generation efficiencies for THz-frequency modes in the subwavelength, anisotropic slab waveguide. PMID:21164986

  13. Enhanced high-frequency absorption of anisotropic Fe3O4/graphene nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yichao; Zeng, Min; Liu, Jue; Tang, Wukui; Dong, Hangrong; Xia, Ruozhou; Yu, Ronghai

    2016-05-01

    Anisotropic Fe3O4 nanoparticle and a series of its graphene composites have been successfully prepared as high-frequency absorbers. The crystal structure, morphology and magnetic property of the samples were detailed characterized through X-ray diffractometer (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The high-frequency absorbing performance of the composites is evaluated within 2.0–18.0 GHz. Combining reduced graphene oxide (RGO) to Fe3O4 helps to adjust the permittivity and permeability of the composite, balance the dielectric loss and magnetic loss, consequently improve the absorbing performance in view of the impedance matching characteristic. The optimal reflection loss of the pure Fe3O4 sample reaches ‑38.1 dB with a thickness of 1.7 mm, and it increases to ‑65.1 dB for the sample grafted with 3 wt.% RGO. The addition of proper content of RGO both improves the reflection loss and expands the absorbing bandwidth. This work not only opens a new method and an idea for tuning the electromagnetic properties and enhancing the capacity of high-efficient absorbers, but also broadens the application of such kinds of lightweight absorbing materials frameworks.

  14. Enhanced high-frequency absorption of anisotropic Fe3O4/graphene nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yichao; Zeng, Min; Liu, Jue; Tang, Wukui; Dong, Hangrong; Xia, Ruozhou; Yu, Ronghai

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropic Fe3O4 nanoparticle and a series of its graphene composites have been successfully prepared as high-frequency absorbers. The crystal structure, morphology and magnetic property of the samples were detailed characterized through X-ray diffractometer (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The high-frequency absorbing performance of the composites is evaluated within 2.0–18.0 GHz. Combining reduced graphene oxide (RGO) to Fe3O4 helps to adjust the permittivity and permeability of the composite, balance the dielectric loss and magnetic loss, consequently improve the absorbing performance in view of the impedance matching characteristic. The optimal reflection loss of the pure Fe3O4 sample reaches −38.1 dB with a thickness of 1.7 mm, and it increases to −65.1 dB for the sample grafted with 3 wt.% RGO. The addition of proper content of RGO both improves the reflection loss and expands the absorbing bandwidth. This work not only opens a new method and an idea for tuning the electromagnetic properties and enhancing the capacity of high-efficient absorbers, but also broadens the application of such kinds of lightweight absorbing materials frameworks. PMID:27142260

  15. Shock Compression of Beryllium Single Crystals: Time-Dependent, Anisotropic Elastic-Plastic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winey, J.; Gupta, Y.

    2013-06-01

    To gain insight into inelastic deformation mechanisms in shocked Be single crystals, wave propagation simulations were performed for crystals shocked along the c-axis, a-axis, and other crystal directions to peak stresses reaching 7 GPa. The simulations utilized a time-dependent, anisotropic material model that incorporated dislocation dynamics and deformation twinning based descriptions of inelastic deformation. The simulation results showed good qualitative agreement with the measured wave profiles, including features arising from wave mode coupling due to the highly anisotropic inelastic response of Be. The measured wave profiles can be understood in terms of dislocation slip along basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes, together with deformation twinning. Our results provide insight into the complex nature of inelastic deformation in shocked Be, and are also expected to be valuable for understanding the anisotropic inelastic response of analogous hcp metals subjected to shock compression. Work supported by ARL and DOE/NNSA.

  16. Microwave response of anisotropic high-temperature-superconductor crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, C. E.; Exon, N. J.

    1994-07-01

    Microwave penetration and losses are derived for the anisotropic normal and superconducting states of single crystals in the shape of thin platelets oriented parallel and perpendicular to the oscillating electromagnetic field. For platelet crystals with the microwave field parallel to the major flat faces, the large anisotropy in the normal state can result in dissipation dominated by microwave field penetration through the thin edges rather than across the main faces. The influence of the extreme anisotropy is also considered for the superconducting state and can account for an anomalous peak in microwave loss below Tc sometimes observed in Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O crystals. When crystals are mounted with their flat faces perpendicular to the microwave field, the losses in both the normal and superconducting states are shown to be strongly peaked towards the outer perimeter of the crystals. This makes critical demands on the degree of perfection of such regions, if the microwave measurements are not to be complicated by nonintrinsic effects associated with local imperfections.

  17. Investigation on broadband propagation characteristic of terahertz electromagnetic wave in anisotropic magnetized plasma in frequency and time domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Yuan; Han, Yiping, E-mail: yphan@xidian.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Ai, Xia [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Test physics and Numerical Mathematical, Beijing 100076 (China); Liu, Xiuxiang [Science and Technology on Space Physics Laboratory, Beijing 100076 (China)

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we investigate the propagation of terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave in an anisotropic magnetized plasma by JE convolution-finite difference time domain method. The anisotropic characteristic of the plasma, which leads to right-hand circularly polarized (RCP) and right-hand circularly polarized (LCP) waves, has been taken into account. The interaction between electromagnetic waves and magnetized plasma is illustrated by reflection and transmission coefficients for both RCP and LCP THz waves. The effects of both the magnetized plasma thickness and the external magnetized field are analyzed and numerical results demonstrate that the two factors could influence the THz wave greatly. It is worthy to note that besides the reflection and transmission coefficients in the frequency domain, the waveform of the electric field in the time domain varying with thicknesses and external magnetic fields for different polarized direction has been studied.

  18. Viscoelastic response of anisotropic biological membranes. Part II: Constitutive models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubarda Vlado A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Part I of this series [7] we described the structure of the biopolymer interlayers found in the shell of the mollusk Haliotis rufescens (the red abalone. There we described how the layers can be viewed as a viscoelastic composite reinforced by a network of chitin fibrils arranged in an often nearly unidirectional architecture. Mechanical testing documented the response to tensile testing of layers removed via demineralization. Herein in Part II we describe a general viscoelastic constitutive model for such layers that may be both transversely isotropic or orthotropic as would follow from the network of nearly aligned chitin fibrils described by Bezares et al. in Part I [7]. Part III of this series will be concerned with applying the models to more fully describing the response of these types of biological membranes to mechanical loading.

  19. Anisotropic surface roughness enhances the bending response of ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoimenov, Boyko L.; Rossiter, Jonathan M.; Mukai, Toshiharu

    2007-01-01

    Demands from the fields of bio-medical engineering and biologically-inspired robotics motivate a growing interest in actuators with properties similar to biological muscle, including ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMC), the focus of this study. IPMC actuators consist of an ion-conductive polymer membrane, coated with thin metal electrodes on both sides and bend when voltage is applied. Some of the advantages of IPMC actuators are their softness, lack of moving parts, easy miniaturization, light weight and low actuation voltage. When used in bio-mimetic robotic applications, such as a snake-like swimming robot, locomotion speed can be improved by increasing the bending amplitude. However, it cannot be improved much by increasing the driving voltage, because of water electrolysis. To enhance the bending response of IPMCs we created a "preferred" bending direction by anisotropic surface modification. Introduction of anisotropic roughness with grooves across the length of the actuator improved the bending response by a factor of 2.1. Artificially introduced cracks on the electrodes in direction, in which natural cracks form by bending, improved bending response by a factor of 1.6. Anisotropic surface modification is an effective method to enhance the bending response of IPMC actuators and does not compromise their rigidity under loads perpendicular to the bending plane.

  20. Finite frequency traveltime sensitivity kernels for acoustic anisotropic media: Angle dependent bananas

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, Ramzi

    2013-08-19

    Anisotropy is an inherent character of the Earth subsurface. It should be considered for modeling and inversion. The acoustic VTI wave equation approximates the wave behavior in anisotropic media, and especially it\\'s kinematic characteristics. To analyze which parts of the model would affect the traveltime for anisotropic traveltime inversion methods, especially for wave equation tomography (WET), we drive the sensitivity kernels for anisotropic media using the VTI acoustic wave equation. A Born scattering approximation is first derived using the Fourier domain acoustic wave equation as a function of perturbations in three anisotropy parameters. Using the instantaneous traveltime, which unwraps the phase, we compute the kernels. These kernels resemble those for isotropic media, with the η kernel directionally dependent. They also have a maximum sensitivity along the geometrical ray, which is more realistic compared to the cross-correlation based kernels. Focusing on diving waves, which is used more often, especially recently in waveform inversion, we show sensitivity kernels in anisotropic media for this case.

  1. Gaseous bubble oscillations in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids under influence of high-frequency acoustic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golykh, R. N.

    2016-06-01

    Progress of technology and medicine dictates the ever-increasing requirements (heat resistance, corrosion resistance, strength properties, impregnating ability, etc.) for non-Newtonian fluids and materials produced on their basis (epoxy resin, coating materials, liquid crystals, etc.). Materials with improved properties obtaining is possible by modification of their physicochemical structure. One of the most promising approaches to the restructuring of non-Newtonian fluids is cavitation generated by high-frequency acoustic vibrations. The efficiency of cavitation in non-Newtonian fluid is determined by dynamics of gaseous bubble. Today, bubble dynamics in isotropic non-Newtonian fluids, in which cavitation bubble shape remains spherical, is most full investigated, because the problem reduces to ordinary differential equation for spherical bubble radius. However, gaseous bubble in anisotropic fluids which are most wide kind of non-Newtonian fluids (due to orientation of macromolecules) deviates from spherical shape due to viscosity dependence on shear rate direction. Therefore, the paper presents the mathematical model of gaseous bubble dynamics in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids. The model is based on general equations for anisotropic non-Newtonian fluid flow. The equations are solved by asymptotic decomposition of fluid flow parameters. It allowed evaluating bubble size and shape evolution depending on rheological properties of liquid and acoustic field characteristics.

  2. Neutron imaging using the anisotropic response of crystalline organic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An anisotropy in a scintillator's response to neutron elastic scattering interactions can in principle be used to gather directional information about a neutron source using interactions in a single detector. In crystalline organic scintillators, such as anthracene, both the amplitude and the time structure of the scintillation light pulse vary with the direction of the proton recoil with respect to the crystalline axes. Therefore, we have investigated the exploitation of this effect to enable compact, high-efficiency fast neutron detectors that have directional sensitivity via a precise measurement of the pulse shape. We report measurements of the pulse height and shape dependence on proton recoil angle in anthracene, stilbene, p-terphenyl, diphenyl anthracene (DPA), and tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB). Image reconstruction for simulated neutron sources is demonstrated using maximum likelihood methods for optimal directional sensitivity.

  3. Slot Machine Response Frequency Predicts Pathological Gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob; Rømer Thomsen, Kristine; Møller, Arne;

    2013-01-01

    Slot machines are among the most addictive forms of gambling, and pathological gambling slot machine players represent the largest group of treatment seekers, accounting for 35% to 93% of the population. Pathological gambling sufferers have significantly higher response frequency (games / time) on...... slot machines compared with non-problem gamblers, which may suggest increased reinforcement of the gambling behavior in pathological gambling. However, to date it is unknown whether or not the increased response frequency in pathological gambling is associated with symptom severity of the disorder....... This study tested the hypothesis that response frequency is associated with symptom severity in pathological gambling. We tested response frequency among twenty-two pathological gambling sufferers and twenty-one non-problem gamblers on a commercially available slot machine, and screened for...

  4. Frequency response of slow beam extraction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A servo control system has been incorporated into the practical slow extraction system in order to stabilize the spill structure less than a few kHz. Frequency responses of the components of the servo-spill control system and the open-loop frequency response were measured. The beam transfer function of the slow extraction process was derived from the measured data and approximated using a simple function. This is utilized to improve the performance of the servo-loop. (author)

  5. Modelling ultrasonic array signals in multilayer anisotropic materials using the angular spectrum decomposition of plane wave responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humeida, Yousif; Pinfield, Valerie J.; Challis, Richard E.

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasonic arrays have seen increasing use for the characterisation of composite materials. In this paper, ultrasonic wave propagation in multilayer anisotropic materials has been modelled using plane wave and angular spectrum decomposition techniques. Different matrix techniques, such as the stiffness matrix method and the transfer matrix method, are used to calculate the reflection and transmission coefficients of ultrasonic plane waves in the considered media. Then, an angular decomposition technique is used to derive the bounded beams from finite-width ultrasonic array elements from the plane wave responses calculated earlier. This model is considered to be an analytical exact solution for the problem; hence the diffraction of waves in such composite materials can be calculated for different incident angles for a very wide range of frequencies. This model is validated against experimental measurements using the Full-Matrix Capture (FMC) of array data in both a homogeneous isotropic material, i.e. aluminium, and an inhomogeneous multilayer anisotropic material, i.e. a carbon fibre reinforced composite.

  6. Modelling ultrasonic array signals in multilayer anisotropic materials using the angular spectrum decomposition of plane wave responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasonic arrays have seen increasing use for the characterisation of composite materials. In this paper, ultrasonic wave propagation in multilayer anisotropic materials has been modelled using plane wave and angular spectrum decomposition techniques. Different matrix techniques, such as the stiffness matrix method and the transfer matrix method, are used to calculate the reflection and transmission coefficients of ultrasonic plane waves in the considered media. Then, an angular decomposition technique is used to derive the bounded beams from finite-width ultrasonic array elements from the plane wave responses calculated earlier. This model is considered to be an analytical exact solution for the problem; hence the diffraction of waves in such composite materials can be calculated for different incident angles for a very wide range of frequencies. This model is validated against experimental measurements using the Full-Matrix Capture (FMC) of array data in both a homogeneous isotropic material, i.e. aluminium, and an inhomogeneous multilayer anisotropic material, i.e. a carbon fibre reinforced composite

  7. Analytic magnetotelluric responses to a two-segment model with axially anisotropic conductivity structures overlying a perfect conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linjiang, QIN; Changfu, YANG

    2016-03-01

    The rocks in the crust and the upper mantle of the Earth are believed to exhibit electrical anisotropy to some extent. It is beneficial to further understand and recognize the propagation of the electromagnetic waves in the Earth by investigating the magnetotelluric (which is one of the main geophysical techniques to probe the deep structures in the Earth) responses of the media with anisotropic conductivity structures. In the present study, we examine the magnetotelluric fields over an idealized 2-D model consisting of two segments with axially anisotropic conductivity structures overlying a perfect conductor basement by a quasi-static analytic approach. The resulting analytic solution could not only contribute to the electromagnetic induction theory in the anisotropic Earth but also serve as at least an initial standard solution which could be used to validate the reliability and accuracy of the numerical algorithms developed for modeling the magnetotelluric responses of the 2-D media with much more general anisotropic conductivity.

  8. Analytic magnetotelluric responses to a two-segment model with axially anisotropic conductivity structures overlying a perfect conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Linjiang; Yang, Changfu

    2016-06-01

    The rocks in the crust and the upper mantle of the Earth are believed to exhibit electrical anisotropy to some extent. It is beneficial to further understand and recognize the propagation of the electromagnetic waves in the Earth by investigating the magnetotelluric (which is one of the main geophysical techniques to probe the deep structures in the Earth) responses of the media with anisotropic conductivity structures. In this study, we examine the magnetotelluric fields over an idealized 2-D model consisting of two segments with axially anisotropic conductivity structures overlying a perfect conductor basement by a quasi-static analytic approach. The resulting analytic solution could not only contribute to the electromagnetic induction theory in the anisotropic Earth but also serve as at least an initial standard solution which could be used to validate the reliability and accuracy of the numerical algorithms developed for modelling the magnetotelluric responses of the 2-D media with much more general anisotropic conductivity.

  9. TRIGA reactor dynamics: Frequency response tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the results of frequency response tests conducted on ITU TRIGA Reactor are presented. To conduct the experiments, a special 'micro control rod' and its submersible stepping-motor drive mechanism was designed and constructed. The experiments cover a frequency range of 0.002 - 2 Hz., and 0.02, 4, 200 kW nominal power levels. Zero-power and at-power reactivity to % power transfer functions are presented as gain, and phase shift vs. frequency diagrams. Low power response is in close agreement with the point reactor zero-power transfer function. Response at 200 kW is studied with the help of a Nyquist diagram, and found to be stable. An elaboration on the main features of the feedback mechanism is also given. Power to reactivity feedback was measured to be just about 1.5 cent / % power change. (authors)

  10. Autonomous Demand Response for Primary Frequency Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Matt; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mattix, S.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2012-02-28

    The research documented within this report examines the use of autonomous demand response to provide primary frequency response in an interconnected power grid. The work builds on previous studies in several key areas: it uses a large realistic model (i.e., the interconnection of the western United States and Canada); it establishes a set of metrics that can be used to assess the effectiveness of autonomous demand response; and it independently adjusts various parameters associated with using autonomous demand response to assess effectiveness and to examine possible threats or vulnerabilities associated with the technology.

  11. The Anisotropic Dynamic Response of Ultrafast Shocked Single Crystal PETN and Beta-HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaug, Joseph; Armstrong, Michael; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Austin, Ryan; Ferranti, Louis; Fried, Laurence; Bastea, Sorin

    2015-06-01

    We report results from ultrafast shockwave experiments conducted on single crystal high explosives. Experimental results consist of 12 picosecond time-resolved dynamic response wave profile data, (ultrafast time-domain interferometry-TDI), which are used to validate calculations of anisotropic stress-strain behavior of shocked loaded energetic materials. In addition, here we present unreacted equations of state data from PETN and beta-HMX up to higher pressures than previously reported, which are used to extend the predictive confidence of hydrodynamic simulations. Our previous results derived from a 360 ps drive duration yielded anisotropic elastic wave response in single crystal beta-HMX ((110) and (010) impact planes). Here we provide results using a 3x longer drive duration to probe the plastic response regime of these materials. We compare our ultrafast time domain interferometry (TDI) results with previous gun platform results. Ultrafast time scale resolution TDI measurements further guide the development of continuum models aimed to study pore collapse and energy localization in shock-compressed crystals of beta-HMX. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy jointly by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Low cost anisotropic etching of monocrystalline Si (1 0 0): Optimization using response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Khuram; Khan, Sohail Aziz; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat

    2012-10-01

    Reduced surface reflectance and enhanced light trapping is required by any high efficiency solar cell. Anisotropic etching was done on silicon (1 0 0) by using tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide TMAH, (CH3)4NOH, solution at 85 °C. Process variables considered were solution concentration and time proposed by response surface methodology (RSM). An effective surface texture was resulted with reflectance less than 8% without antireflection coating. The antireflection mechanism was also co-related with the etch rate of Si. Optimized values predicted by RSM for time and TMAH concentration were 5 min and 3.50% respectively. The technique and optimization of parameters by using response surface methodology (RSM) could be valuable in the texturization process for high-efficiency Si solar cells.

  13. Effective Dielectric Constants of Photonic Crystal of Aligned Anisotropic Cylinders: Application to the Optical Response of Periodic Array of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes, E.; Krokhin, A. A.; Roberts, J.

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the static dielectric tensor of a periodic system of aligned anisotropic dielectric cylinders. Exact analytical formulas for the effective dielectric constants for the E- and H- eigenmodes are obtained for arbitrary 2D Bravais lattice and arbitrary cross-section of anisotropic cylinders. It is shown that depending on the symmetry of the unit cell photonic crystal of anisotropic cylinders behaves in the low-frequency limit like uniaxial or biaxial natural crystal. The developed th...

  14. Step response and frequency response of an air conditioning system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crommelin, R.D.; Jackman, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    A system of induction units of an existing air conditioning system has been analyzed with respect to its dynamic properties. Time constants were calculated and measured by analogue models. Comparison with measurements at the installation itself showed a reasonable agreement. Frequency responses were

  15. Forming Super-Massive Black Hole Seeds under the Influence of a Nearby Anisotropic Multi-Frequency Source

    CERN Document Server

    Regan, John; Wise, John

    2015-01-01

    The photo-dissociation of H$_2$ by a nearby anisotropic source of radiation is seen as a critical component in creating an environment in which a direct collapse black hole may form. Employing radiative transfer we model the effect of multi-frequency (0.76 eV - 60 eV) radiation on a collapsing halo at high redshift. We vary both the shape of the spectrum which emits the radiation and the distance to the emitting galaxy. We use blackbody spectra with temperatures of $\\rm{T = 10^4\\ K}$ and $\\rm{T = 10^5\\ K}$ and a realistic stellar spectrum. We find that an optimal zone exists between 1 kpc and 4 kpc from the emitting galaxy. If the halo resides too close to the emitting galaxy the photo-ionising radiation creates a large HII region which effectively disrupts the collapsing halo, too far from the source and the radiation flux drops below the level of the expected background and the H$_2$ fraction remains too high. When the emitting galaxy is initially placed between 1 kpc and 2 kpc from the collapsing halo, wit...

  16. Subparsec-scale dynamics of a dusty gas disk exposed to anisotropic AGN radiation with frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Namekata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    We explore the gas dynamics near the dust sublimation radius of active galactic nucleus (AGN). For the purpose, we perform axisymmetric radiation hydrodynamic simulations of a dusty gas disk of radius $\\approx 1\\,\\mathrm{pc}$ around a supermassive black hole of mass $10^{7}\\,\\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$ taking into account (1) anisotropic radiation of accretion disk, (2) X-ray heating by corona, (3) radiative transfer of infrared (IR) photons reemitted by dust, (4) frequency dependency of direct and IR radiations, and (5) separate temperatures for gas and dust. As a result, we find that for Eddington ratio $\\approx 0.77$, a nearly neutral, dense ($\\approx 10^{6\\operatorname{-}8}\\;\\mathrm{cm^{-3}}$), geometrically-thin ($h/r<0.06$) disk forms with a high velocity ($\\approx 200 \\sim 3000\\;\\mathrm{km/s}$) dusty outflow launched from the disk surface. The disk temperature is determined by the balance between X-ray heating and various cooling, and the disk is almost supported by thermal pressure. Contrary to \\citet{krol...

  17. Trajectory dependent particle response for anisotropic mono domain particles in magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeser, M.; Bente, K.; Neumann, A.; Buzug, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    In magnetic particle imaging, scanners use different spatial sampling techniques to cover the field of view (FOV). As spatial encoding is realized by a selective low field region (a field-free-point, or field-free-line), this region has to be moved through the FOV on specific sampling trajectories. To achieve these trajectories complex time dependent magnetic fields are necessary. Due to the superposition of the selection field and the homogeneous time dependent fields, particles at different spatial positions experience different field sequences. As a result, the dynamic behaviour of those particles can be strongly spatially dependent. So far, simulation studies that determined the trajectory quality have used the Langevin function to model the particle response. This however, neglects the dynamic relaxation of the particles, which is highly affected by magnetic anisotropy. More sophisticated models based on stochastic differential equations that include these effects were only used for one dimensional excitation. In this work, a model based on stochastic differential equations is applied to two-dimensional trajectory field sequences, and the effects of these field sequences on the particle response are investigated. The results show that the signal of anisotropic particles is not based on particle parameters such as size and shape alone, but is also determined by the field sequence that a particle ensemble experiences at its spatial position. It is concluded, that the particle parameters can be optimized in terms of the used trajectory.

  18. Trajectory dependent particle response for anisotropic mono domain particles in magnetic particle imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In magnetic particle imaging, scanners use different spatial sampling techniques to cover the field of view (FOV). As spatial encoding is realized by a selective low field region (a field-free-point, or field-free-line), this region has to be moved through the FOV on specific sampling trajectories. To achieve these trajectories complex time dependent magnetic fields are necessary. Due to the superposition of the selection field and the homogeneous time dependent fields, particles at different spatial positions experience different field sequences. As a result, the dynamic behaviour of those particles can be strongly spatially dependent. So far, simulation studies that determined the trajectory quality have used the Langevin function to model the particle response. This however, neglects the dynamic relaxation of the particles, which is highly affected by magnetic anisotropy. More sophisticated models based on stochastic differential equations that include these effects were only used for one dimensional excitation. In this work, a model based on stochastic differential equations is applied to two-dimensional trajectory field sequences, and the effects of these field sequences on the particle response are investigated. The results show that the signal of anisotropic particles is not based on particle parameters such as size and shape alone, but is also determined by the field sequence that a particle ensemble experiences at its spatial position. It is concluded, that the particle parameters can be optimized in terms of the used trajectory. (paper)

  19. All-optical transistor- and diode-action and logic gates based on anisotropic nonlinear responsive liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Yu; Chen, Chun-Wei; Jau, Hung-Chang; Li, Cheng-Chang; Cheng, Chiao-Yu; Wang, Chun-Ta; Leng, Shi-Ee; Khoo, Iam-Choon; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we show that anisotropic photosensitive nematic liquid crystals (PNLC) made by incorporating anisotropic absorbing dyes are promising candidates for constructing all-optical elements by virtue of the extraordinarily large optical nonlinearity of the nematic host. In particular, we have demonstrated several room-temperature ‘prototype’ PNLC-based all-optical devices such as optical diode, optical transistor and all primary logic gate operations (OR, AND, NOT) based on such optical transistor. Owing to the anisotropic absorption property and the optical activity of the twist alignment nematic cell, spatially non-reciprocal transmission response can be obtained within a sizeable optical isolation region of ~210 mW. Exploiting the same mechanisms, a tri-terminal configuration as an all-optical analogue of a bipolar junction transistor is fabricated. Its ability to be switched by an optical field enables us to realize an all-optical transistor and demonstrate cascadability, signal fan-out, logic restoration, and various logical gate operations such as OR, AND and NOT. Due to the possibility of synthesizing anisotropic dyes and wide ranging choice of liquid crystals nonlinear optical mechanisms, these all-optical operations can be optimized to have much lower thresholds and faster response speeds. The demonstrated capabilities of these devices have shown great potential in all-optical control system and photonic integrated circuits.

  20. Dynamic Frequency Response of Wind Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altin, Müfit

    method has less impact of the power system frequency compared to existing control concepts. Another advantage of the proposed inertial response control has the tuning methodology which can be utilized as a generic approach for any power system with high wind power penetration levels. Additionally, an...... maintain sustainable and reliable operation of the power system for these targets, transmission system operators (TSOs) have revised the grid code requirements. Also, the TSOs are planning the future development of the power system with various wind penetration scenarios to integrate more wind power...... according to their grid codes. In these scenarios particularly with high wind power penetration cases, conventional power plants (CPPs) such as old thermal power plants are planned to be replaced with wind power plants (WPPs). Consequently, the power system stability will be affected and the control...

  1. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  2. Frequency difference beyond behavioral limen reflected by frequency following response of human auditory Brainstem

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Qin; Gong, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study investigated whether the frequency-following response (FFR) of the auditory brainstem can represent individual frequency-discrimination ability. Method We measured behavioral frequency-difference limens (FDLs) in normal hearing young adults. Then FFRs were evoked by two pure tones, whose frequency difference was no larger than behavioral FDL. Discrimination of FFRs to individual frequencies was conducted as the neural representation of stimulus frequency differenc...

  3. Conductivities in an anisotropic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Khimphun, Sunly; Park, Chanyong

    2016-01-01

    In order to imitate anisotropic medium of a condensed matter system, we take into account an Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion model as a dual gravity theory where the anisotropy is caused by different momentum relaxations. This gravity model allows an anisotropic charged black hole solution. On this background, we investigate how the linear responses of vector modes like electric, thermoelectric, and thermal conductivities rely on the anisotropy. We find that the electric conductivity in low frequency limit shows a Drude peak and that in the intermediate frequency regime it reveals the power law behavior. Especially, when the anisotropy increases the exponent of the power law becomes smaller. In addition, we find that there exist a critical value for the anisotropy at which the DC conductivity reaches to its maximum value.

  4. Terahertz-frequency dielectric response of liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Møller, Uffe; Cooke, David

    -induced dipole moments. In the polar liquid water the fastest relaxational dynamics is found at terahertz frequencies, just below the first intermolecular vibrational and librational modes. In this presentation we will discuss optical terahertz spectroscopic techniques for measurement of the full dielectric...... function of liquids at terahertz frequencies. We will review the current understanding of the high-frequency dielectric spectrum of water, and discuss the relation between the dielectric spectrum and the thermodynamic properties of certain aqueous solutions....

  5. Frequency response function method for evaluation of thermal striping phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rational analysis method of thermal stress induced by fluid temperature fluctuation is developed, by utilizing frequency response characteristics of structures. High frequency components of temperature fluctuation are attenuated in the transfer process from fluids to structures. Low frequency components hardly induce thermal stress since temperature homogenization in structures. Based on investigations of frequency response mechanism of structures of fluid temperature, a frequency response function of structures was derived, which can predict stress amplitudes on structural surfaces from fluid temperature amplitudes and frequencies. This function is formulated by separation of variables, and is composed of an effective heat transfer function and an effective thermal stress one. The frequency response function method appears to evaluate thermal stress rationally and to give information on damageable frequency range of structures. (author)

  6. Alternative Approaches for Incentivizing the Frequency Responsive Reserve Ancillary Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Tuohy, A.; Brooks, D.

    2012-03-01

    Frequency responsive reserve is the autonomous response of generators and demand response to deviations of system frequency, usually as a result of the instantaneous outage of a large supplier. Frequency responsive reserve arrests the frequency decline resulting in the stabilization of system frequency, and avoids the triggering of under-frequency load-shedding or the reaching of unstable frequencies that could ultimately lead to system blackouts. It is a crucial service required to maintain a reliable and secure power system. Regions with restructured electricity markets have historically had a lack of incentives for frequency responsive reserve because generators inherently provided the response and on large interconnected systems, more than sufficient response has been available. This may not be the case in future systems due to new technologies and declining response. This paper discusses the issues that can occur without proper incentives and even disincentives, and proposes alternatives to introduce incentives for resources to provide frequency responsive reserve to ensure an efficient and reliable power system.

  7. Polarized Raman anisotropic response of collagen in tendon: towards 3D orientation mapping of collagen in tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Galvis

    Full Text Available In this study, polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS was used to characterize the anisotropic response of the amide I band of collagen as a basis for evaluating three-dimensional collagen fibril orientation in tissues. Firstly, the response was investigated theoretically by applying classical Raman theory to collagen-like peptide crystal structures. The theoretical methodology was then tested experimentally, by measuring amide I intensity anisotropy in rat tail as a function of the orientation of the incident laser polarization. For the theoretical study, several collagen-like triple-helical peptide crystal structures obtained from the Protein Data Bank were rotated "in plane" and "out of plane" to evaluate the role of molecular orientation on the intensity of the amide I band. Collagen-like peptides exhibit a sinusoidal anisotropic response when rotated "in plane" with respect to the polarized incident laser. Maximal intensity was obtained when the polarization of the incident light is perpendicular to the molecule and minimal when parallel. In the case of "out of plane" rotation of the molecular structure a decreased anisotropic response was observed, becoming completely isotropic when the structure was perpendicular to the plane of observation. The theoretical Raman response of collagen was compared to that of alpha helical protein fragments. In contrast to collagen, alpha helices have a maximal signal when incident light is parallel to the molecule and minimal when perpendicular. For out-of-plane molecular orientations alpha-helix structures display a decreased average intensity. Results obtained from experiments on rat tail tendon are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions, thus demonstrating the high potential of PRS for experimental evaluation of the three-dimensional orientation of collagen fibers in biological tissues.

  8. Fractures in anisotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Siyi

    Rocks may be composed of layers and contain fracture sets that cause the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of a rock to be anisotropic. Coexisting fractures and layers in rock give rise to competing mechanisms of anisotropy. For example: (1) at low fracture stiffness, apparent shear-wave anisotropy induced by matrix layering can be masked or enhanced by the presence of a fracture, depending on the fracture orientation with respect to layering, and (2) compressional-wave guided modes generated by parallel fractures can also mask the presence of matrix layerings for particular fracture orientations and fracture specific stiffness. This report focuses on two anisotropic sources that are widely encountered in rock engineering: fractures (mechanical discontinuity) and matrix layering (impedance discontinuity), by investigating: (1) matrix property characterization, i.e., to determine elastic constants in anisotropic solids, (2) interface wave behavior in single-fractured anisotropic media, (3) compressional wave guided modes in parallel-fractured anisotropic media (single fracture orientation) and (4) the elastic response of orthogonal fracture networks. Elastic constants of a medium are required to understand and quantify wave propagation in anisotropic media but are affected by fractures and matrix properties. Experimental observations and analytical analysis demonstrate that behaviors of both fracture interface waves and compressional-wave guided modes for fractures in anisotropic media, are affected by fracture specific stiffness (controlled by external stresses), signal frequency and relative orientation between layerings in the matrix and fractures. A fractured layered medium exhibits: (1) fracture-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are weakly coupled; (2) isotropic behavior when fractures delay waves that are usually fast in a layered medium; and (3) matrix-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are closed and no longer delay the signal. The

  9. Reconfigurable ring filter with controllable frequency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Wahab, Norfishah; Mohd Salleh, Mohd Khairul; Ismail Khan, Zuhani; Abd Rashid, Nur Emileen

    2014-01-01

    Reconfigurable ring filter based on single-side-access ring topology is presented. Using capacitive tuning elements, the electrical length of the ring can be manipulated to shift the nominal center frequency to a desired position. A synthesis is developed to determine the values of the capacitive elements. To show the advantage of the synthesis, it is applied to the reconfigurable filter design using RF lumped capacitors. The concept is further explored by introducing varactor-diodes to continuously tune the center frequency of the ring filter. For demonstration, two prototypes of reconfigurable ring filters are realized using microstrip technology, simulated, and measured to validate the proposed concept. The reconfigured filter using lumped elements is successfully reconfigured from 2 GHz to 984.4 MHz and miniaturized by 71% compared to the filter directly designed at the same reconfigured frequency, while, for the filter using varactor-diodes, the frequency is chosen from 1.10 GHz to 1.38 GHz spreading over 280 MHz frequency range. Both designs are found to be compact with acceptable insertion loss and high selectivity. PMID:25121132

  10. Computer program for network synthesis by frequency response fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, S.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program synthesizes a passive network by minimizing the difference in desired and actual frequency response. The program solves for the critical points of the error function /weighted least squares fit between calculated and desired frequency response/ by the multivariable Newton-Raphson method with components constrained to an admissible region.

  11. Open-loop frequency response for a chaotic masking system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Xian-Gao; Yu Pei; Huang Wei

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a new numerical simulation approach is proposed for the study of open-loop frequency response of a chaotic masking system. Using Chua's circuit and the Lorenz system as illustrative examples, we have shown that one can employ chaos synchronization to separate the feedback network from a chaotic masking system, and then use numerical simulation to obtain the open-loop synchronization response, the phase response, and the amplitude response of a chaotic masking system. Based on the analysis of the frequency response, we have also proved that changing the amplitude of the exciting (input) signal within normal working domain does not influence the frequency response of the chaotic masking system. The new numerical simulation method developed in this paper can be extended to consider the open-loop frequency response of other systems described by differential or difference equations.

  12. Frequency Response of Uncertain Systems: Strong Kharitonov-Like Results

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Long

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we study the frequency response of uncertain systems using Kharitonov stability theory on first order complex polynomial set. For an interval transfer function, we show that the minimal real part of the frequency response at any fixed frequency is attained at some prescribed vertex transfer functions. By further geometric and algebraic analysis, we identify an index for strict positive realness of interval transfer functions. Some extensions and applications in positivity verif...

  13. Frequency response of IPMC actuator with palladium electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T.; Omiya, M.

    2011-04-01

    The present study investigates the frequency response of IPMC actuator. By using the electroless plating method, IPMC actuator with palladium electrode was obtained in 60 minutes, which was shorter than the conventional fabrication time. In the observation of response to step voltages, IPMC actuator with palladium electrode showed larger deformation and slower backward motion than the conventional IPMC actuators with platinum electrode. In the experiments of frequency response, IPMC actuator showed the resonance phenomenon at a specified frequency, and the resonance frequency could be predicted by the simple cantilever beam model. Then, the phase shift increased drastically when the resonance phenomena were observed. Finally, the frequency response of IPMC actuator was modeled by using the transfer function.

  14. Transformation Algorithm of Dielectric Response in Time-Frequency Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A transformation algorithm of dielectric response from time domain to frequency domain is presented. In order to shorten measuring time of low or ultralow frequency dielectric response characteristics, the transformation algorithm is used in this paper to transform the time domain relaxation current to frequency domain current for calculating the low frequency dielectric dissipation factor. In addition, it is shown from comparing the calculation results with actual test data that there is a coincidence for both results over a wide range of low frequencies. Meanwhile, the time domain test data of depolarization currents in dry and moist pressboards are converted into frequency domain results on the basis of the transformation. The frequency domain curves of complex capacitance and dielectric dissipation factor at the low frequency range are obtained. Test results of polarization and depolarization current (PDC in pressboards are also given at the different voltage and polarization time. It is demonstrated from the experimental results that polarization and depolarization current are affected significantly by moisture contents of the test pressboards, and the transformation algorithm is effective in ultralow frequency of 10−3 Hz. Data analysis and interpretation of the test results conclude that analysis of time-frequency domain dielectric response can be used for assessing insulation system in power transformer.

  15. Modeling a response function to frequency of advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Lutoshkin, Igor

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study the impact of the frequency of advertising on the product sales We introduce response function and postulate its properties Parametric classes of functions which can serve as response functions are suggested We use real data on advertising impact to estimate response functions and discuss their properties

  16. Effective dielectric response of anisotropic grains of close-packed structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klíč, Antonín; Rychetský, Ivan

    New Jersey : IEEE - Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2012, s. 510-512. ISBN 978-1-4673-2668-1. - (IEEE Conference Publications). [ISAF-ECAPD-PFM 2012. Aveiro (PT), 09.07.2012-13.07.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0232 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : anisotropic poplycrysta * spectral representation * effective permittivity * 2-component system Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/mostRecentIssue.jsp?punumber=6279558

  17. Method of detecting system function by measuring frequency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, John L. (Inventor); Morrison, William H. (Inventor); Christophersen, Jon P. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Real-time battery impedance spectrum is acquired using a one-time record. Fast Summation Transformation (FST) is a parallel method of acquiring a real-time battery impedance spectrum using a one-time record that enables battery diagnostics. An excitation current to a battery is a sum of equal amplitude sine waves of frequencies that are octave harmonics spread over a range of interest. A sample frequency is also octave and harmonically related to all frequencies in the sum. The time profile of this signal has a duration that is a few periods of the lowest frequency. The voltage response of the battery, average deleted, is the impedance of the battery in the time domain. Since the excitation frequencies are known and octave and harmonically related, a simple algorithm, FST, processes the time record by rectifying relative to the sine and cosine of each frequency. Another algorithm yields real and imaginary components for each frequency.

  18. An Exoplanet's Response to Anisotropic Stellar Mass-Loss During Birth and Death

    CERN Document Server

    Veras, Dimitri; Tout, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    The birth and death of planets may be affected by mass outflows from their parent stars during the T-Tauri or post-main-sequence phases of stellar evolution. These outflows are often modelled to be isotropic, but this assumption is not realistic for fast rotators, bipolar jets and supernovae. Here we derive the general equations of motion for the time evolution of a single planet, brown dwarf, comet or asteroid perturbed by anisotropic mass loss in terms of a complete set of planetary orbital elements, the ejecta velocity, and the parent star's co-latitude and longitude. We restrict our application of these equations to 1) rapidly rotating giant stars, and 2) arbitrarily-directed jet outflows. We conclude that the isotropic mass-loss assumption can safely be used to model planetary motion during giant branch phases of stellar evolution within distances of hundreds of au. In fact, latitudinal mass loss variations anisotropically affect planetary motion only if the mass loss is asymmetric about the stellar equa...

  19. Structural response of a highly viscous aluminoborosilicate melt to isotropic and anisotropic compressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingshi; Deubener, Joachim; Stebbins, Jonathan F.; Grygarova, Lenka; Behrens, Harald; Wondraczek, Lothar; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2009-09-01

    Aluminoborosilicate melts of E-glass composition have been compressed at pressures up to 500 MPa and subsequently cooled (4-5 K min-1) under pressure from well above the glass transition to room temperature. It is found that increasing uniaxial pressure lead to anisotropic glasses with increasing permanent birefringence, while increasing isostatic pressure resulted in isotropic glasses with increasing density (compaction of 2.1% at 500 MPa). Static and magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of B11, N23a, A27l, and S29i were performed to explore pressure-induced changes in the short-range structure of these glasses. NMR experiments readily detected increasing BIV, AVl, and AVIl concentrations with pressure as well as a decrease in the mean distance of sodium to oxygen atoms (0.7% at 500 MPa), but no detectible evidence of short-range structural orientation around these atoms in the birefringent glasses were found. Quantifying the changes in the local boron, aluminum, silicon, and sodium environments revealed that the measured increase of recovered density with pressure in E-glass can only be partly explained by increase in B and Al coordination, and that overall compression of the network and of the network modifier cation volumes must also be important. Structural changes in the intermediate range, which were not detected by NMR, are discussed as a source of birefringence in anisotropic E-glass.

  20. Fuzzy Frequency Response for Stochastic Linear Parameter Varying Dynamic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreia, Carlos Cesar Teixeira; Serra, Ginalber Luiz De Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    The Fuzzy Frequency Response: Definition and Analysis for Stochastic Linear Parameter Varying Dynamic Systems is proposed in this chapter. It was shown that the fuzzy frequency response is a region in the frequency domain, defined by the consequent linear sub-models W i (s), starting from operating regions of the SLPV dynamic system, according to the proposed Theorem 3.1. This formula is very efficient and can be used for robust stability analysis and control design for SLPV dynamic system...

  1. High-frequency response of nanostructured magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a brief overview on recent developments regarding the high-frequency response in the GHz range of nanostructured magnetic materials. Emphasis is placed on the linear regime in the frequency domain characterized by the dynamic susceptibility spectrum. Some modeling tools and experimental probes allowing determination of the dynamic susceptibility spectrum are first rapidly reviewed and their respective advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Next, some illustrative examples of the high-frequency response of nanopatterned materials based on recent works are presented. The role played by the shape of the element on the characteristics of excitation spectrum is underlined. Lastly, some prospects are proposed and promising trends are highlighted.

  2. Regional frequency response analysis under normal and emergency conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevrani, Hassan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj, PO Box 416 (Iran); Ledwich, Gerard; Ford, Jason J. [School of Engineering Systems, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld 4001 (Australia); Dong, Zhao Yang [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (China)

    2009-05-15

    This paper presents a frequency response analysis approach suitable for a power system control area in a wide range of operating conditions. The analytic approach uses the well-known system frequency response model for the turbine-governor and load units to obtain the mathematical representation of the basic concepts. Primary and supplementary frequency controls are properly considered and the effect of emergency control/protection schemes is included. Therefore, the proposed analysis/modeling approach could be grainfully used for the power system operation during the contingency and normal conditions. Time-domain nonlinear simulations with a power system example showed that the results agree with those predicted analytically. (author)

  3. Responses of an isolation system with distinct multiple frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Base isolation systems are generally designed with a single natural frequency. A major concern for these isolation systems is that, if the dominant frequency of a future earthquake is equal or close to the system's natural frequency, the ground motion will be greatly amplified because of resonance,and the superstructure would suffer severe damages. This paper present an isolation system designed with two distinct frequencies. Its responses to different ground motions, including a harmonic motion, show that no excessive amplification will occur. Adoption of this isolation system would greatly enhance the safety of an isolated superstructure against future strong earthquakes. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Rectennas at optical frequencies: How to analyze the response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical rectennas, antenna-coupled diode rectifiers that receive optical-frequency electromagnetic radiation and convert it to DC output, have been proposed for use in harvesting electromagnetic radiation from a blackbody source. The operation of these devices is qualitatively different from that of lower-frequency rectennas, and their design requires a new approach. To that end, we present a method to determine the rectenna response to high frequency illumination. It combines classical circuit analysis with classical and quantum-based photon-assisted tunneling response of a high-speed diode. We demonstrate the method by calculating the rectenna response for low and high frequency monochromatic illumination, and for radiation from a blackbody source. Such a blackbody source can be a hot body generating waste heat, or radiation from the sun

  5. TOPOLOGY OPTIMIZATION OF TRUSS STRUCTURE WITH FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY AND FREQUENCY DOMAIN DYNAMIC RESPONSE CONSTRAINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Jin; Wang De-yu

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, adaptive genetic algorithm (AGA) is applied to topology optimization of truss structure with frequency domain excitations. The optimization constraints include fundamental frequency, displacement responses under force excitations and acceleration responses under foundation acceleration excitations. The roulette wheel selection operator, adaptive crossover and mutation operators are used as genetic operators. Some heuristic strategies are put forward to direct the deletion of the extra bars and nodes on truss structures. Three examples demonstrate that the proposed method can yield the optimum structure form and the lightest weight of the given ground structure while satisfying dynamic response constraints.

  6. Anisotropic self-biased dual-phase low frequency magneto-mechano-electric energy harvesters with giant power densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Rajaram Patil

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the physical behavior of self-biased multi-functional magneto-mechano-electric (MME laminates simultaneously excited by magnetic and/or mechanical vibrations. The MME laminates composed of Ni and single crystal fiber composite exhibited strong ME coupling under Hdc = 0 Oe at both low frequency and at resonance frequency. Depending on the magnetic field direction with respect to the crystal orientation, the energy harvester showed strong in-plane anisotropy in the output voltage and was found to generate open circuit output voltage of 20 Vpp and power density of 59.78 mW/Oe2 g2 cm3 under weak magnetic field of 1 Oe and mechanical vibration of 30 mg, at frequency of 21 Hz across 1 MΩ resistance.

  7. On the statistical properties of random causal frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    In nuclear physics it is known that under broad restrictions a random scattering matrix element H satisfies a condition known as the analyticity-ergodicity (AE) requirement, which states that E [ f (H) ] = f (E [ H ]), where f is some function of H, and E[] represents the ensemble average. A scattering matrix element is directly analogous to a vibrational frequency response function, and it is of significant interest to consider whether the AE requirement is also applicable to random engineering systems. The proof of the AE condition in nuclear physics rests on the assumptions that H is causal and ergodic: causality implies that a Lorentzian frequency average satisfies the AE equation, and ergodicity implies that Lorentzian frequency averages are equal to ensemble averages. In vibrational systems it is readily shown that a typical frequency response function is non-stationary and non-ergodic, so that the Lorentzian and ensemble averages can differ significantly, and this means that the standard proof of the AE requirement breaks down. The question then arises as to whether the AE requirement might nonetheless apply to vibrational systems. It is shown in the present paper that the requirement does apply providing that the random point process representing the system natural frequencies is at least locally stationary (which is a much weaker condition than local stationarity of the frequency response function), and a number of the implications of this result are explored.

  8. Frequency response in surface-potential driven electrohydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing, Louise Wellendorph; Smistrup, Kristian; Pedersen, Christian Møller;

    2006-01-01

    capacitance where the net flow rate is, in general, zero while harmonic rolls as well as time-averaged vortexlike components may exist depending on the spatial symmetry and extension of the surface potential. In general, the system displays a resonance behavior at a frequency corresponding to the inverse RC...... time of the system. Different surface potentials share the common feature that the resonance frequency is inversely proportional to the characteristic length scale of the surface potential. For the asymptotic frequency dependence above resonance we find a omega(-2) power law for surface potentials...... response the two potentials display different power-law asymptotics with alpha=1 and alpha similar to 2, respectively....

  9. Evaluation of Piloted Inputs for Onboard Frequency Response Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Martos, Borja

    2013-01-01

    Frequency response estimation results are presented using piloted inputs and a real-time estimation method recently developed for multisine inputs. A nonlinear simulation of the F-16 and a Piper Saratoga research aircraft were subjected to different piloted test inputs while the short period stabilator/elevator to pitch rate frequency response was estimated. Results show that the method can produce accurate results using wide-band piloted inputs instead of multisines. A new metric is introduced for evaluating which data points to include in the analysis and recommendations are provided for applying this method with piloted inputs.

  10. Frequency response modeling and control of flexible structures: Computational methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, William H.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of vibrations in flexible structures can be conventiently modeled in terms of frequency response models. For structural control such models capture the distributed parameter dynamics of the elastic structural response as an irrational transfer function. For most flexible structures arising in aerospace applications the irrational transfer functions which arise are of a special class of pseudo-meromorphic functions which have only a finite number of right half place poles. Computational algorithms are demonstrated for design of multiloop control laws for such models based on optimal Wiener-Hopf control of the frequency responses. The algorithms employ a sampled-data representation of irrational transfer functions which is particularly attractive for numerical computation. One key algorithm for the solution of the optimal control problem is the spectral factorization of an irrational transfer function. The basis for the spectral factorization algorithm is highlighted together with associated computational issues arising in optimal regulator design. Options for implementation of wide band vibration control for flexible structures based on the sampled-data frequency response models is also highlighted. A simple flexible structure control example is considered to demonstrate the combined frequency response modeling and control algorithms.

  11. Anisotropic characteristics of electrical responses of fractured reservoir with multiple sets of fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Jinsong; Su Benyu; Guo Naichuan

    2009-01-01

    In fractured reservoirs, the fractures not only provide the storage space for hydrocarbons, but also form the main flow channels which connect the pores of the matrix, so fractures dominate the productivity of reservoirs.However, because of the heterogeneity and randomness of the distribution of fractures, exploration and evaluation of fractured reservoirs is still one of the most difficult problems in the oil industry.In recent years, seismic anisotropy has been applied to the assessment of fractured formations, whereas electrical anisotropy which is more intense in fractured formations than seismic anisotropy has not been studied or used so extensively.In this study, fractured reservoir models which considered multiple sets of fractures with smooth and partly closed, rough surfaces were established based on the fractures and pore network, and the vertical and horizontal electrical resistivities were derived as a function of the matrix and fracture porosities according to Ohm's law.By using the anisotropic resistivity equations, variations of the electrical anisotropy of three types of fractured models under the conditions of free pressure and confining pressure were analyzed through the variations of the exerted pressure, matrix porosity, fracture aperture and formation water resistivity.The differences of the vertical and horizontal resistivities and the anisotropy between the connected and non-connected fractures were also analyzed.It is known from the simulated results that an increase of the confining pressure causes a decrease of electrical anisotropy because of the elasticity of the closed fractures and the decrease of the fracture aperture.For a fixed fracture porosity, the higher the matrix porosity, the weaker the electrical anisotropy in the rock formation.

  12. 78 FR 45479 - Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... electronically using word processing software should be filed in native applications or print-to-PDF format and... drafting team sees merit and promise in future research with sample filtering combined with a technique... of frequency response needed for reliable operations for each Balancing Authority within...

  13. Anisotropic Metamaterial Optical Fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Pratap, Dheeraj; Pollock, Justin G; Iyer, Ashwin K

    2014-01-01

    Internal physical structure can drastically modify the properties of waveguides: photonic crystal fibers are able to confine light inside a hollow air core by Bragg scattering from a periodic array of holes, while metamaterial loaded waveguides for microwaves can support propagation at frequencies well below cutoff. Anisotropic metamaterials assembled into cylindrically symmetric geometries constitute light-guiding structures that support new kinds of exotic modes. A microtube of anodized nanoporous alumina, with nanopores radially emanating from the inner wall to the outer surface, is a manifestation of such an anisotropic metamaterial optical fiber. The nanopores, when filled with a plasmonic metal such as silver or gold, greatly increase the electromagnetic anisotropy. The modal solutions in anisotropic circular waveguides can be uncommon Bessel functions with imaginary orders.

  14. Frequency response of a thermocouple wire: Effects of axial conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forney, L. J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical expressions are derived for the steady-state frequency response of a thermocouple wire. In particular, the effects of axial heat conduction are demonstrated for both a uniform thermocouple wire and a nonuniform wire with unequal material properties and wire diameters across the junction. For the case of a uniform wire, the amplitude ratio and phase angle compare favorably with the series solution of Scadron and Warshawsky (1952) except near the ends of the wire. For the case of a non-uniform wire, the amplitude ratio at low frequency omega yields 0 agrees with the results of Scadron and Warshawsky for a steady-state temperature distribution. Moreover, the frequency response for a non-uniform wire in the limit of infinite length l yields infinity is shown to reduce to a simple expression that is analogous to the classic first order solution for a thermocouple wire with uniform properties.

  15. Modal Identification from Ambient Responses Using Frequency Domain Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Zhang, Lingmi; Andersen, Palle

    2000-01-01

    In this paper a new frequency domain technique is introduced for the modal identification from ambient responses, i.e. in the case where the modal parameters must be estimated without knowing the input exciting the system. By its user friendliness the technique is closely related to the classical...

  16. Modal Identification from Ambient Responses using Frequency Domain Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Zhang, L.; Andersen, P.

    In this paper a new frequency domain technique is introduced for the modal identification from ambient responses, ie. in the case where the modal parameters must be estimated without knowing the input exciting the system. By its user friendliness the technique is closely related to the classical...

  17. Microwire arrays with plasmonic response at microwave frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Maccio, C.; Martin, O. J. F.; Gay-Balmaz, P.

    2002-01-01

    We study experimentally the response of three-dimensional arrays of microscopic wires. Very good agreement is found with previous theoretical work indicating that such a system can be considered as an effective plasmonic medium with a specific plasma frequency. The sample size threshold where this effective behavior appears is shown to be relatively small. (C) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Frequency response of Michelson- and Sagnac-based interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Mizuno, J.; Rüdiger, A.; Schilling, R; Winkler, W.; Danzmann, K.

    1997-01-01

    The frequency response of Michelson- and Sagnac-based interferometers are evaluated and compared, considering the application for gravitational-wave detection. It is shown that Sagnac-based interferometers have some interesting features, but in general do not offer advantages over Michelson-based ones for the detection of gravitational waves.

  19. Benefits of Demand Side Response in Providing Frequency Response Service in the Future GB Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei eTeng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The demand for ancillary service is expected to increase significantly in the future GB electricity system due to high penetration of wind. In particular, the need for frequency response, required to deal with sudden frequency drops following a loss of generator, will increase because of the limited inertia capability of wind plants. This paper quantifies the requirements for primary frequency response and analyses the benefits of frequency response provision from DSR. The results show dramatic changes in frequency response requirements driven by high penetration of wind. Case studies carried out by using an advanced stochastic generation scheduling model suggest that the provision of frequency response from DSR could greatly reduce the system operation cost, wind curtailment and carbon emissions in the future GB system characterised by high penetration of wind. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that the benefit of DSR shows significant diurnal and seasonal variation, whereas an even more rapid (instant delivery of frequency response from DSR could provide significant additional value. Our studies also indicate that the competing technologies to DSR, namely battery storage and more flexible generation could potentially reduce its value by up to 35%, still leaving significant room to deploy DSR as frequency response provider.

  20. Modeling the frequency response of microwave radiometers with QUCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization of the frequency response of coherent radiometric receivers is a key element in estimating the flux of astrophysical emissions, since the measured signal depends on the convolution of the source spectral emission with the instrument band shape. Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) measurements of the instrument bandpass often require complex test setups and are subject to a number of systematic effects driven by thermal issues and impedance matching, particularly if cryogenic operation is involved. In this paper we present an approach to modeling radiometers bandpasses by integrating simulations and RF measurements of individual components. This method is based on QUCS (Quasi Universal Circuit Simulator), an open-source circuit simulator, which gives the flexibility of choosing among the available devices, implementing new analytical software models or using measured S-parameters. Therefore an independent estimate of the instrument bandpass is achieved using standard individual component measurements and validated analytical simulations. In order to automate the process of preparing input data, running simulations and exporting results we developed the Python package python-qucs and released it under GNU Public License. We discuss, as working cases, bandpass response modeling of the COFE and Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) radiometers and compare results obtained with QUCS and with a commercial circuit simulator software. The main purpose of bandpass modeling in COFE is to optimize component matching, while in LFI they represent the best estimation of frequency response, since end-to-end measurements were strongly affected by systematic effects.

  1. Health assessment of bonded composite repairs with frequency response techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Caleb; Whittingham, Brendan; Li, Henry C. H.; Herszberg, Israel; Mouritz, Adrian P.

    2007-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) technology may be applied to composite bonded repairs to enable the continuous through-life assessment of the repair's efficacy. This paper describes an SHM technique for the detection of debonding in composite bonded patches based on frequency response. The external doubler repair, commonly used to patch aircraft structures, is examined in this paper. An experimental investigation was conducted using carbon/epoxy doubler repairs bonded to carbon/epoxy substrates, with piezoelectric devices used to measure variations in the frequency response of the repaired structure due to debonding of the external doubler. Three piezoelectric devices were adhered to the structure; the actuator to the external doubler and two sensors to the parent panel. To simulate real repair design requirements (minimum surface perturbation) piezoelectric devices were installed on 'internal' surfaces. Clearance for the actuator was created by the removal of damaged material. The frequency response signature of the repaired structure with simulated debonds is analysed with respect to the response of fully bonded repairs. Results are discussed with implications for the development of a technique to monitor the integrity of external bonded repairs.

  2. Fractional Modeling of the AC Large-Signal Frequency Response in Magnetoresistive Current Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Iván Ravelo Arias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fractional calculus is considered when derivatives and integrals of non-integer order are applied over a specific function. In the electrical and electronic domain, the transfer function dependence of a fractional filter not only by the filter order n, but additionally, of the fractional order α is an example of a great number of systems where its input-output behavior could be more exactly modeled by a fractional behavior. Following this aim, the present work shows the experimental ac large-signal frequency response of a family of electrical current sensors based in different spintronic conduction mechanisms. Using an ac characterization set-up the sensor transimpedance function  is obtained considering it as the relationship between sensor output voltage and input sensing current,[PLEASE CHECK FORMULA IN THE PDF]. The study has been extended to various magnetoresistance sensors based in different technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR, giant magnetoresistance (GMR, spin-valve (GMR-SV and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR. The resulting modeling shows two predominant behaviors, the low-pass and the inverse low-pass with fractional index different from the classical integer response. The TMR technology with internal magnetization offers the best dynamic and sensitivity properties opening the way to develop actual industrial applications.

  3. Fractional modeling of the AC large-signal frequency response in magnetoresistive current sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelo Arias, Sergio Iván; Ramírez Muñoz, Diego; Moreno, Jaime Sánchez; Cardoso, Susana; Ferreira, Ricardo; de Freitas, Paulo Jorge Peixeiro

    2013-01-01

    Fractional calculus is considered when derivatives and integrals of non-integer order are applied over a specific function. In the electrical and electronic domain, the transfer function dependence of a fractional filter not only by the filter order n, but additionally, of the fractional order α is an example of a great number of systems where its input-output behavior could be more exactly modeled by a fractional behavior. Following this aim, the present work shows the experimental ac large-signal frequency response of a family of electrical current sensors based in different spintronic conduction mechanisms. Using an ac characterization set-up the sensor transimpedance function Z(t)(JF) is obtained considering it as the relationship between sensor output voltage and input sensing current, Z(t)(jf)= V(o, sensor)(jf)/I(sensor)(jf). The study has been extended to various magnetoresistance sensors based in different technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), giant magnetoresistance (GMR), spin-valve (GMR-SV) and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR). The resulting modeling shows two predominant behaviors, the low-pass and the inverse low-pass with fractional index different from the classical integer response. The TMR technology with internal magnetization offers the best dynamic and sensitivity properties opening the way to develop actual industrial applications. PMID:24351648

  4. Detrending moving average algorithm: Frequency response and scaling performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Anna; Kiyono, Ken

    2016-06-01

    The Detrending Moving Average (DMA) algorithm has been widely used in its several variants for characterizing long-range correlations of random signals and sets (one-dimensional sequences or high-dimensional arrays) over either time or space. In this paper, mainly based on analytical arguments, the scaling performances of the centered DMA, including higher-order ones, are investigated by means of a continuous time approximation and a frequency response approach. Our results are also confirmed by numerical tests. The study is carried out for higher-order DMA operating with moving average polynomials of different degree. In particular, detrending power degree, frequency response, asymptotic scaling, upper limit of the detectable scaling exponent, and finite scale range behavior will be discussed.

  5. Detrending moving average algorithm: Frequency response and scaling performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Anna; Kiyono, Ken

    2016-06-01

    The Detrending Moving Average (DMA) algorithm has been widely used in its several variants for characterizing long-range correlations of random signals and sets (one-dimensional sequences or high-dimensional arrays) over either time or space. In this paper, mainly based on analytical arguments, the scaling performances of the centered DMA, including higher-order ones, are investigated by means of a continuous time approximation and a frequency response approach. Our results are also confirmed by numerical tests. The study is carried out for higher-order DMA operating with moving average polynomials of different degree. In particular, detrending power degree, frequency response, asymptotic scaling, upper limit of the detectable scaling exponent, and finite scale range behavior will be discussed. PMID:27415389

  6. Detrending Moving Average Algorithm: Frequency Response and Scaling Performances

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The Detrending Moving Average (DMA) algorithm has been widely used in its several variants for characterizing long-range correlations of random signals and sets (one-dimensional sequences or high-dimensional arrays) either over time or space. In this paper, mainly based on analytical arguments, the scaling performances of the centered DMA, including higher-order ones, are investigated by means of a continuous time approximation and a frequency response approach. Our results are also confirmed by numerical tests. The study is carried out for higher-order DMA operating with moving average polynomials of different degree. In particular, detrending power degree, frequency response, asymptotic scaling, upper limit of the detectable scaling exponent and finite scale range behavior will be discussed.

  7. Frequency-independent response of self-complementary checkerboard screens

    CERN Document Server

    Urade, Yoshiro; Nakanishi, Toshihiro; Kitano, Masao

    2015-01-01

    This research resolves a long-standing problem on the electromagnetic response of self-complementary metallic screens with checkerboard-like geometry. Although Babinet's principle implies that they show a frequency-independent response, this unusual characteristic has not been observed yet due to the singularities of the metallic point contacts in the checkerboard geometry. We overcome this difficulty by replacing the point contacts with resistive sheets. The proposed structure is prepared and characterized by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. It is experimentally confirmed that the resistive checkerboard structures exhibit a flat transmission spectrum over 0.1--1.1 THz. It is also demonstrated that self-complementarity can eliminate even the frequency-dependent transmission characteristics of resonant metamaterials.

  8. Tunable waveguide bends with graphene-based anisotropic metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhao-xian

    2016-01-15

    We design tunable waveguide bends filled with graphene-based anisotropic metamaterials to achieve a nearly perfect bending effect. The anisotropic properties of the metamaterials can be described by the effective medium theory. The nearly perfect bending effect is demonstrated by finite element simulations of various structures with different bending curvatures and shapes. This effect is attributed to zero effective permittivity along the direction of propagation and matched effective impedance at the interfaces between the bending part and the dielectric waveguides. We envisage that the design will be applicable in the far-infrared and terahertz frequency ranges owing to the tunable dielectric responses of graphene.

  9. Investigating the anisotropic scintillation response in anthracene through neutron, gamma-ray, and muon measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Schuster, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a series of measurements that characterize the directional dependence of the scintillation response of crystalline anthracene to incident DT neutrons, DD neutrons, Cs-137 gamma rays, and, for the first time, cosmic ray muons. The neutron measurements give the amplitude and pulse shape dependence on the proton recoil direction over one hemisphere of the crystal, confirming and extending previous results in the literature. In similar measurements using incident gamma rays, no directional effect is evident, and any anisotropy with respect to the electron recoil direction is constrained to have a magnitude of less than a tenth of that present in the proton recoil events. Cosmic muons are measured at two directions, and no anisotropy is observed. This set of observations indicates that high dE/dx is necessary for an anisotropy to be present for a given type of scintillation event, which in turn could be used to discriminate among different hypotheses for the underlying causes of the anisotropy, ...

  10. Frequency response in surface-potential driven electrohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejsing, L.; Smistrup, K.; Pedersen, C. M.; Mortensen, N. A.; Bruus, H.

    2006-03-01

    Using a Fourier approach we offer a general solution to calculations of slip velocity within the circuit description of the electrohydrodynamics in a binary electrolyte confined by a plane surface with a modulated surface potential. We consider the case with a spatially constant intrinsic surface capacitance where the net flow rate is, in general, zero while harmonic rolls as well as time-averaged vortexlike components may exist depending on the spatial symmetry and extension of the surface potential. In general, the system displays a resonance behavior at a frequency corresponding to the inverse RC time of the system. Different surface potentials share the common feature that the resonance frequency is inversely proportional to the characteristic length scale of the surface potential. For the asymptotic frequency dependence above resonance we find a ω-2 power law for surface potentials with either an even or an odd symmetry. Below resonance we also find a power law ωα with α being positive and dependent of the properties of the surface potential. Comparing a tanh potential and a sech potential we qualitatively find the same slip velocity, but for the below-resonance frequency response the two potentials display different power-law asymptotics with α=1 and α˜2 , respectively.

  11. Aircraft Fault Detection Using Real-Time Frequency Response Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.

    2016-01-01

    A real-time method for estimating time-varying aircraft frequency responses from input and output measurements was demonstrated. The Bat-4 subscale airplane was used with NASA Langley Research Center's AirSTAR unmanned aerial flight test facility to conduct flight tests and collect data for dynamic modeling. Orthogonal phase-optimized multisine inputs, summed with pilot stick and pedal inputs, were used to excite the responses. The aircraft was tested in its normal configuration and with emulated failures, which included a stuck left ruddervator and an increased command path latency. No prior knowledge of a dynamic model was used or available for the estimation. The longitudinal short period dynamics were investigated in this work. Time-varying frequency responses and stability margins were tracked well using a 20 second sliding window of data, as compared to a post-flight analysis using output error parameter estimation and a low-order equivalent system model. This method could be used in a real-time fault detection system, or for other applications of dynamic modeling such as real-time verification of stability margins during envelope expansion tests.

  12. Response of air stagnation frequency to anthropogenically enhanced radiative forcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stagnant atmospheric conditions can lead to hazardous air quality by allowing ozone and particulate matter to accumulate and persist in the near-surface environment. By changing atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, global warming could alter the meteorological factors that regulate air stagnation frequency. We analyze the response of the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) air stagnation index (ASI) to anthropogenically enhanced radiative forcing using global climate model projections of late-21st century climate change (SRESA1B scenario). Our results indicate that the atmospheric conditions over the highly populated, highly industrialized regions of the eastern United States, Mediterranean Europe, and eastern China are particularly sensitive to global warming, with the occurrence of stagnant conditions projected to increase by 12–25% relative to late-20th century stagnation frequencies (3–18 + days yr−1). Changes in the position/strength of the polar jet, in the occurrence of light surface winds, and in the number of precipitation-free days all contribute to more frequent late-21st century air mass stagnation over these high-population regions. In addition, we find substantial inter-model spread in the simulated response of stagnation conditions over some regions using either native or bias corrected global climate model simulations, suggesting that changes in the atmospheric circulation and/or the distribution of precipitation represent important sources of uncertainty in the response of air quality to global warming. (letter)

  13. Response of air stagnation frequency to anthropogenically enhanced radiative forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Daniel E; Harshvardhan; Diffenbaugh, Noah S

    2012-01-01

    Stagnant atmospheric conditions can lead to hazardous air quality by allowing ozone and particulate matter to accumulate and persist in the near-surface environment. By changing atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, global warming could alter the meteorological factors that regulate air stagnation frequency. We analyze the response of the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) Air Stagnation Index (ASI) to anthropogenically enhanced radiative forcing using global climate model projections of late-21(st) century climate change (SRES A1B scenario). Our results indicate that the atmospheric conditions over the highly populated, highly industrialized regions of the eastern United States, Mediterranean Europe, and eastern China are particularly sensitive to global warming, with the occurrence of stagnant conditions projected to increase 12-to-25% relative to late-20(th) century stagnation frequencies (3-18+ days/year). Changes in the position/strength of the polar jet, in the occurrence of light surface winds, and in the number of precipitation-free days all contribute to more frequent late-21(st) century air mass stagnation over these high-population regions. In addition, we find substantial inter-model spread in the simulated response of stagnation conditions over some regions using either native or bias corrected global climate model simulations, suggesting that changes in the atmospheric circulation and/or the distribution of precipitation represent important sources of uncertainty in the response of air quality to global warming. PMID:23284587

  14. Frequency Response Adaptive Control of a Refrigeration Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens G. Balchen

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available A technique for the adaptation of controller parameters in a single control loop based upon the estimation of frequency response parameters has been presented in an earlier paper. This paper contains an extension and a generalization of the first method and results in a more versatile solution which is applicable to a wider range of process characteristics. The application of this adaptive control technique is illustrated by a laboratory refrigeration cycle in which the evaporator pressure controls the speed of the compressor.

  15. Superlens from complementary anisotropic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G. X.; Tam, H. L.; Wang, F. Y.; Cheah, K. W.

    2007-12-01

    Metamaterials with isotropic property have been shown to possess novel optical properties such as a negative refractive index that can be used to design a superlens. Recently, it was shown that metamaterials with anisotropic property can translate the high-frequency wave vector k values from evanescence to propagating. However, electromagnetic waves traveling in single-layer anisotropic metamaterial produce diverging waves of different spatial frequency. In this work, it is shown that, using bilayer metamaterials that have complementary anisotropic property, the diverging waves are recombined to produce a subwavelength image, i.e., a superlens device can be designed. The simulation further shows that the design can be achieved using a metal/oxide multilayer, and a resolution of 30 nm can be easily obtained in the optical frequency range.

  16. Time and frequency domain characteristics of detrending-operation-based scaling analysis: Exact DFA and DMA frequency responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyono, Ken; Tsujimoto, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    We develop a general framework to study the time and frequency domain characteristics of detrending-operation-based scaling analysis methods, such as detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and detrending moving average (DMA) analysis. In this framework, using either the time or frequency domain approach, the frequency responses of detrending operations are calculated analytically. Although the frequency domain approach based on conventional linear analysis techniques is only applicable to linear detrending operations, the time domain approach presented here is applicable to both linear and nonlinear detrending operations. Furthermore, using the relationship between the time and frequency domain representations of the frequency responses, the frequency domain characteristics of nonlinear detrending operations can be obtained. Based on the calculated frequency responses, it is possible to establish a direct connection between the root-mean-square deviation of the detrending-operation-based scaling analysis and the power spectrum for linear stochastic processes. Here, by applying our methods to DFA and DMA, including higher-order cases, exact frequency responses are calculated. In addition, we analytically investigate the cutoff frequencies of DFA and DMA detrending operations and show that these frequencies are not optimally adjusted to coincide with the corresponding time scale.

  17. Coupled vibro-acoustic model updating using frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2016-03-01

    Interior noise in cavities of motorized vehicles is of increasing significance due to the lightweight design of these structures. Accurate coupled vibro-acoustic FE models of such cavities are required so as to allow a reliable design and analysis. It is, however, experienced that the vibro-acoustic predictions using these models do not often correlate acceptably well with the experimental measurements and hence require model updating. Both the structural and the acoustic parameters addressing the stiffness as well as the damping modeling inaccuracies need to be considered simultaneously in the model updating framework in order to obtain an accurate estimate of these parameters. It is also noted that the acoustic absorption properties are generally frequency dependent. This makes use of modal data based methods for updating vibro-acoustic FE models difficult. In view of this, the present paper proposes a method based on vibro-acoustic frequency response functions that allow updating of a coupled FE model by considering simultaneously the parameters associated with both the structural as well as the acoustic model of the cavity. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical studies on a 3D rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate. Updating parameters related to the material property, stiffness of joints between the plate and the rectangular cavity and the properties of absorbing surfaces of the acoustic cavity are considered. The robustness of the method under presence of noise is also studied.

  18. [HLA and keloids: antigenic frequency and therapeutic response].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, A; Bozzi, M

    1989-01-01

    Twenty keloid subjects were typed for class 1 (HLA-A, B and C) and class 2 (HLA-DR and DQ) histocompatibility antigens. Their frequencies were compared to those found in control populations. Of all the antigens belonging to class 1, B 21 was more prevalent in patients. The findings regarding class 2 antigens were noteworthy: in keloid patients there was a significant prevalence of DR 5 (RR = 3.54 and 7.93 respectively for the two control groups) and DQw 3 (RR = 16.8). The patients typed for HLA-antigens were treated with corticosteroid infiltrations. The responses to the treatments were no related to the histocompatibility antigens. PMID:2628278

  19. Nano-resonator frequency response based on strain gradient theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims to explore the dynamic behaviour of a nano-resonator under ac and dc excitation using strain gradient theory. To achieve this goal, the partial differential equation of nano-beam vibration is first converted to an ordinary differential equation by the Galerkin projection method and the lumped model is derived. Lumped parameters of the nano-resonator, such as linear and nonlinear springs and damper coefficients, are compared with those of classical theory and it is demonstrated that beams with smaller thickness display greater deviation from classical parameters. Stable and unstable equilibrium points based on classic and non-classical theories are also compared. The results show that, regarding the applied dc voltage, the dynamic behaviours expected by classical and non-classical theories are significantly different, such that one theory predicts the un-deformed shape as the stable condition, while the other theory predicts that the beam will experience bi-stability. To obtain the frequency response of the nano-resonator, a general equation including cubic and quadratic nonlinearities in addition to parametric electrostatic excitation terms is derived, and the analytical solution is determined using a second-order multiple scales method. Based on frequency response analysis, the softening and hardening effects given by two theories are investigated and compared, and it is observed that neglecting the size effect can lead to two completely different predictions in the dynamic behaviour of the resonators. The findings of this article can be helpful in the design and characterization of the size-dependent dynamic behaviour of resonators on small scales. (paper)

  20. Cropping frequency and area response to climate variability can exceed yield response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Avery S.; Vanwey, Leah K.; Spera, Stephanie A.; Mustard, John F.

    2016-06-01

    The sensitivity of agricultural output to climate change has often been estimated by modelling crop yields under climate change scenarios or with statistical analysis of the impacts of year-to-year climatic variability on crop yields. However, the area of cropland and the number of crops harvested per growing season (cropping frequency) both also affect agricultural output and both also show sensitivity to climate variability and change. We model the change in agricultural output associated with the response of crop yield, crop frequency and crop area to year-to-year climate variability in Mato Grosso (MT), Brazil, a key agricultural region. Roughly 70% of the change in agricultural output caused by climate was determined by changes in frequency and/or changes in area. Hot and wet conditions were associated with the largest losses and cool and dry conditions with the largest gains. All frequency and area effects had the same sign as total effects, but this was not always the case for yield effects. A focus on yields alone may therefore bias assessments of the vulnerability of agriculture to climate change. Efforts to reduce climate impacts to agriculture should seek to limit production losses not only from crop yield, but also from changes in cropland area and cropping frequency.

  1. Study of the Relative Permittivity Response of Metal Nanoantenna at Optical Frequency

    OpenAIRE

    Mehnaj Mahbuba; Nafiz Ahmed Chisty

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the relative permittivity response of some nanometals such as Gold (Au), Silver(Ag), Copper(Cu), Aluminum (Al) and Nickel(Ni) are investigated at optical frequencies. The permittivity response is necessary because the optical response of the metal nanoantenna highly depends on the permittivity of the metals. The surface plasma response largely depends on the permittivity response at optical frequency. This relative permittivity response also playsan ...

  2. Shock wave compression of hexagonal-close-packed metal single crystals: Time-dependent, anisotropic elastic-plastic response of beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2014-07-01

    Understanding and modeling the response of hcp metals to high stress impulsive loading is challenging because the lower crystal symmetry, compared to cubic metals, results in a significantly more complex material response. To gain insight into the inelastic deformation of hcp metals subjected to high dynamic stresses, shock wave compression of single crystals provides a useful approach because different inelastic deformation mechanisms can be examined selectively by shock compression along different crystal orientations. As a representative example, we report, here, on wave propagation simulations for beryllium (Be) single crystals shocked along the c-axis, a-axis, and several low-symmetry directions to peak stresses reaching 7 GPa. The simulations utilized a time-dependent, anisotropic material model that incorporated dislocation dynamics, deformation twinning, and shear cracking based descriptions of inelastic deformation. The simulation results showed good overall agreement with measured wave profiles for all the different crystal orientations examined [Pope and Johnson, J. Appl. Phys. 46, 720 (1975)], including features arising from wave mode coupling due to the highly anisotropic inelastic response of Be. This good agreement demonstrates that the measured profiles can be understood in terms of dislocation slip along basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes, together with deformation twinning along { 10 1 ¯ 2 } planes. Our results show that the response of shocked Be single crystals involves the simultaneous operation of multiple, distinct inelastic deformation mechanisms for all orientations except the c-axis. For shocked c-axis Be, the measured wave profiles do not provide good discrimination between pyramidal slip and other inelastic deformation mechanisms, such as shear cracking. The findings presented here provide insight into the complex inelastic deformation response of shocked Be single crystals and are expected to be useful for other hcp crystals. More

  3. Shock wave compression of hexagonal-close-packed metal single crystals: Time-dependent, anisotropic elastic-plastic response of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding and modeling the response of hcp metals to high stress impulsive loading is challenging because the lower crystal symmetry, compared to cubic metals, results in a significantly more complex material response. To gain insight into the inelastic deformation of hcp metals subjected to high dynamic stresses, shock wave compression of single crystals provides a useful approach because different inelastic deformation mechanisms can be examined selectively by shock compression along different crystal orientations. As a representative example, we report, here, on wave propagation simulations for beryllium (Be) single crystals shocked along the c-axis, a-axis, and several low-symmetry directions to peak stresses reaching 7 GPa. The simulations utilized a time-dependent, anisotropic material model that incorporated dislocation dynamics, deformation twinning, and shear cracking based descriptions of inelastic deformation. The simulation results showed good overall agreement with measured wave profiles for all the different crystal orientations examined [Pope and Johnson, J. Appl. Phys. 46, 720 (1975)], including features arising from wave mode coupling due to the highly anisotropic inelastic response of Be. This good agreement demonstrates that the measured profiles can be understood in terms of dislocation slip along basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes, together with deformation twinning along (101¯2) planes. Our results show that the response of shocked Be single crystals involves the simultaneous operation of multiple, distinct inelastic deformation mechanisms for all orientations except the c-axis. For shocked c-axis Be, the measured wave profiles do not provide good discrimination between pyramidal slip and other inelastic deformation mechanisms, such as shear cracking. The findings presented here provide insight into the complex inelastic deformation response of shocked Be single crystals and are expected to be useful for other hcp crystals. More

  4. Optics of anisotropic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokushima, Katsu; Antoš, Roman; Mistrík, Jan; Višňovský, Štefan; Yamaguchi, Tomuo

    2006-07-01

    The analytical formalism of Rokushima and Yamakita [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 73, 901-908 (1983)] treating the Fraunhofer diffraction in planar multilayered anisotropic gratings proved to be a useful introduction to new fundamental and practical situations encountered in laterally structured periodic (both isotropic and anisotropic) multilayer media. These are employed in the spectroscopic ellipsometry for modeling surface roughness and in-depth profiles, as well as in the design of various frequency-selective elements including photonic crystals. The subject forms the basis for the solution of inverse problems in scatterometry of periodic nanostructures including magnetic and magneto-optic recording media. It has no principal limitations as for the frequencies and period to radiation wavelength ratios and may include matter wave diffraction. The aim of the paper is to make this formalism easily accessible to a broader community of students and non-specialists. Many aspects of traditional electromagnetic optics are covered as special cases from a modern and more general point of view, e.g., plane wave propagation in isotropic media, reflection and refraction at interfaces, Fabry-Perot resonator, optics of thin films and multilayers, slab dielectric waveguides, crystal optics, acousto-, electro-, and magneto-optics, diffraction gratings, etc. The formalism is illustrated on a model simulating the diffraction on a ferromagnetic wire grating.

  5. Study of the Relative Permittivity Response of Metal Nanoantenna at Optical Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehnaj Mahbuba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the relative permittivity response of some nanometals such as Gold (Au, Silver(Ag, Copper(Cu, Aluminum (Al and Nickel(Ni are investigated at optical frequencies. The permittivity response is necessary because the optical response of the metal nanoantenna highly depends on the permittivity of the metals. The surface plasma response largely depends on the permittivity response at optical frequency. This relative permittivity response also playsan important role in the design process of a nanoantenna. This paper represents the permittivity response at the frequency range of 20-300 THz (the wavelength range of 3-15 µm

  6. Dynamic Response to Pedestrian Loads with Statistical Frequency Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Pedestrian loads depend on the regularity and frequency of the footfall process. Traditionally, pedestrian loads have been represented by one or more specific harmonic components with a well-defined frequency, and light footbridges have been investigated for resonance vibration generated by the h...

  7. Human bone-lineage cell responses to anisotropic Ti6Al4V surfaces are dependent on their maturation state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzado-Martín, Alicia; Crespo, Lara; Saldaña, Laura; Boré, Alba; Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2014-09-01

    This article reports on the interactions of human bone cells, mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) from bone marrow and osteoblasts (hOBs), with a submicron-grooved Ti6Al4V alloy that promotes cell orientation in the direction of the anisotropy. Adhesion sites, actin and tubulin networks and fibronectin extracellular matrix of both cell types align with the direction of the grooves. hMSCs adhere at a higher rate on the patterned substrate than on the polished alloy, while no differences are found in hOBs attachment. Compared to the flat substrate, RhoA activity is higher in hMSCs and hOB cultured on the grooved alloy and treatment with C3 transferase leads to loss of organization of actin and tubulin cytoskeletons. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) activity of hMSCs is upregulated on the anisotropic samples, but not affected in hOBs. Treatment with hydroxyfasudil disrupts the alignment of adhesion sites in hMSCs but not in hOBs. When cells are cultured in media that support osteogenic maturation, OPN secretion increases in hMSCs on the anisotropic alloy and it remains unaffected in hOBs. Cell layer calcification proceeds to a same extent in hMSCs cultured on the two metallic surfaces but decreases in hOBs cultured on the patterned samples. Taken together, these results indicate that hOBs are less sensitive than hMSCs to the patterned Ti6Al4V alloy. This effect can be attributed to their different stages of cell maturation and may be mediated, at least in part, through ROCK signaling because its activity increases on hMSCs cultured on the patterned alloy, while hOBs fail to upregulate it. PMID:24136907

  8. Frequency-temperature response of a new multiferroic

    OpenAIRE

    Nawnit Kumar; Sunanda K. Patri; Ram N.P. Choudhary

    2014-01-01

    The frequency dependence of the electrical properties of a new complex multiferroic Bi4Pb2Ti3FeNbO18 at different temperatures was investigated by impedance spectroscopy technique. The impedance spectroscopic data were collected at different frequencies (100Hz–1MHz) and temperatures (25–500 °C). This study provides important information about the effect of grain and grain boundary on microstructures of the materials. The data are presented in the Nyquist plots, from which electrical resist...

  9. Application of frequency domain analysis to transient response of nuclear containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of frequency domain and time domain analyses is proposed to obtain the dynamic responses of nuclear power plant containment structures. A soil-structure model of a boiling water reactor containment subjected to an assumed safety relief valve blowdown load is used as illustration. Linear time-invariant systems are analysed using input forcing functions with varying frequency contents. Time domain analysis is performed using a synthesized input forcing function. The system characteristic function is generated in the frequency domain through Fourier transforms of the response time history and the synthesized input time history. The frequency response due to any other forcing function is obtained in frequency domain by using the system characteristic function, and the response time history is obtained by inverse Fourier transforms of the frequency response. The results obtained by the proposed method are in close agreement with the conventional time domain dynamic finite element analysis. (Auth.)

  10. Outer hair cell piezoelectricity: Frequency response enhancement and resonance behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Erik K.; Tasker, Ron; Brownell, William E.

    2003-09-01

    Stretching or compressing an outer hair cell alters its membrane potential and, conversely, changing the electrical potential alters its length. This bi-directional energy conversion takes place in the cell's lateral wall and resembles the direct and converse piezoelectric effects both qualitatively and quantitatively. A piezoelectric model of the lateral wall has been developed that is based on the electrical and material parameters of the lateral wall. An equivalent circuit for the outer hair cell that includes piezoelectricity shows a greater admittance at high frequencies than one containing only membrane resistance and capacitance. The model also predicts resonance at ultrasonic frequencies that is inversely proportional to cell length. These features suggest all mammals use outer hair cell piezoelectricity to support the high-frequency receptor potentials that drive electromotility. It is also possible that members of some mammalian orders use outer hair cell piezoelectric resonance in detecting species-specific vocalizations.

  11. Experimental frequency response for boiling two-phase flow to power variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents experimental data on power to void, and power to pressure drop frequency response of boiling two-phase flow in a vertical heated channel with Freon-113 as the working fluid. Experimental frequency response functions are measured with statistical method over a frequency range of 0.02 to 10 Hz. The data cover inlet subcooling of 7.5 and 20 K, mass flux of 500, 1000 and 2000 kg/m2s, and various power levels. Influence of each parameter on the frequency response are described. Finally the data are compared with theoretical value obtained by means of linearization technique. (author)

  12. Anisotropic lattice response induced by a linearly-polarized femtosecond optical pulse excitation in interfacial phase change memory material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Kotaro; Saito, Yuta; Fons, Paul; Kolobov, Alexander V.; Nakano, Takashi; Tominaga, Junji; Hase, Muneaki

    2016-01-01

    Optical excitation of matter with linearly-polarized femtosecond pulses creates a transient non-equilibrium lattice displacement along a certain direction. Here, the pump and probe pulse polarization dependence of the photo-induced ultrafast lattice dynamics in (GeTe)2/(Sb2Te3)4 interfacial phase change memory material is investigated under obliquely incident conditions. Drastic pump polarization dependence of the coherent phonon amplitude is observed when the probe polarization angle is parallel to the c–axis of the sample, while the pump polarization dependence is negligible when the probe polarization angle is perpendicular to the c–axis. The enhancement of phonon oscillation amplitude due to pump polarization rotation for a specific probe polarization angle is only found in the early time stage (≤2 ps). These results indicate that the origin of the pump and probe polarization dependence is dominantly attributable to the anisotropically-formed photo-excited carriers which cause the directional lattice dynamics. PMID:26805401

  13. Anisotropic lattice response induced by a linearly-polarized femtosecond optical pulse excitation in interfacial phase change memory material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Kotaro; Saito, Yuta; Fons, Paul; Kolobov, Alexander V.; Nakano, Takashi; Tominaga, Junji; Hase, Muneaki

    2016-01-01

    Optical excitation of matter with linearly-polarized femtosecond pulses creates a transient non-equilibrium lattice displacement along a certain direction. Here, the pump and probe pulse polarization dependence of the photo-induced ultrafast lattice dynamics in (GeTe)2/(Sb2Te3)4 interfacial phase change memory material is investigated under obliquely incident conditions. Drastic pump polarization dependence of the coherent phonon amplitude is observed when the probe polarization angle is parallel to the c-axis of the sample, while the pump polarization dependence is negligible when the probe polarization angle is perpendicular to the c-axis. The enhancement of phonon oscillation amplitude due to pump polarization rotation for a specific probe polarization angle is only found in the early time stage (≤2 ps). These results indicate that the origin of the pump and probe polarization dependence is dominantly attributable to the anisotropically-formed photo-excited carriers which cause the directional lattice dynamics.

  14. Influence of magnetizing and filtering frequencies on Barkhausen noise response

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stupakov, Oleksandr; Melikhov, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 4 (2014), s. 6100104. ISSN 0018-9464 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-18993S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Barkhausen effect * filtering * frequency measurement * magnetic field measurement Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.386, year: 2014

  15. Determination of the theoretical and experimental zero-power frequency response of Ghana Research Reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency response measurements of a reactor at low power help in determining the kinetic parameters of a reactor and ultimately in investigating its stability with respect to small perturbations in reactivity. In this report, we present the results of the zero-power frequency response measurements of GHARR-1 by rod method and its analytical analogue. The comparison in calculated and measured values is reasonably good in the frequency range used (author)

  16. Test method of frequency response based on diamond surface acoustic wave devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xi-ming; YANG Bao-he; WU Xiao-guo; WU Yi-zhuo

    2011-01-01

    In order to reduce the noises affixed to the signals when testing high frequency devices, a single-port test mode (S11) is used to test frequency response of high frequency (GHz) and dual-port surface acoustic wave devices (SAWDs) in this paper.The feasibility of the test is proved by simulating the Fabry-Perot model. The frequency response of the high-frequency dual-port resonant-type diamond SAWD is measured by S11 and the dual-port test mode (S21), respectively. The results show that the quality factor of the device is 51.29 and the 3 dB bandwidth is 27.8 MHz by S11 -mode measurement, which is better than the S21 mode, and is consistent with the frequency response curve by simulation.

  17. Frequency-Response Characteristics of a Single-Link Flexible Joint Manipulator and Possible Trajectory Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    DIKEN, H.

    2000-06-01

    A single-link manipulator consisting of servomotor, elastic shaft and rigid link is chosen to represent an elastic control system. Equations of the torsional elastic system are derived including the servomotor control system parameters. The transfer function of the elastic control system is obtained including not only control system parameters but also the natural frequency and the damping ratio of the torsional vibratory system. Non-dimensional parameters such as the ratio of the structural natural frequency to the substructural natural frequency and the ratio of the substructural natural frequency to the control system frequency are defined. The effects of these parameters on the frequency response of the system are investigated. A simple and effective method using the frequency-response characteristics is proposed to track a cycloidal trajectory precisely.

  18. Efficient 3D frequency response modeling with spectral accuracy by the rapid expansion method

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-07-01

    Frequency responses of seismic wave propagation can be obtained either by directly solving the frequency domain wave equations or by transforming the time domain wavefields using the Fourier transform. The former approach requires solving systems of linear equations, which becomes progressively difficult to tackle for larger scale models and for higher frequency components. On the contrary, the latter approach can be efficiently implemented using explicit time integration methods in conjunction with running summations as the computation progresses. Commonly used explicit time integration methods correspond to the truncated Taylor series approximations that can cause significant errors for large time steps. The rapid expansion method (REM) uses the Chebyshev expansion and offers an optimal solution to the second-order-in-time wave equations. When applying the Fourier transform to the time domain wavefield solution computed by the REM, we can derive a frequency response modeling formula that has the same form as the original time domain REM equation but with different summation coefficients. In particular, the summation coefficients for the frequency response modeling formula corresponds to the Fourier transform of those for the time domain modeling equation. As a result, we can directly compute frequency responses from the Chebyshev expansion polynomials rather than the time domain wavefield snapshots as do other time domain frequency response modeling methods. When combined with the pseudospectral method in space, this new frequency response modeling method can produce spectrally accurate results with high efficiency. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  19. Electrodynamic features of anisotropic hard superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Voloshin, I F; Fisher, L M; Aksenov, A V; Yampolskij, V A

    2001-01-01

    The low-frequency electromagnetic response of the superconducting plates, which are characterized by strong anisotropy of the current-carrying capacity in the sample plane, is experimentally and theoretically studied. The measurements are carried out on the polycrystalline textured plates of the Y-123 system as well as on the monocrystal. It is shown that the form of curves describing the dependence of the q relative losses on the h sub 0 alternate field amplitudes is highly sensitive to the h sub 0 vector orientation in the sample plane. The q(h sub 0) dependence by the h sub 0 orientation along one of the main directions of the current anisotropic critical density symmetry the q(h sub 0) dependence is characterized by the single dimensional maximum. Two dimensional maxima are observed on the q(h sub 0) curve by the h sub 0 significant deviation from the main directions

  20. The effect of feeding frequency on insulin and ghrelin responses in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Chambers, Edward S; Jeukendrup, Asker E; Toogood, Andrew A; Blannin, Andrew K

    2008-01-01

    Recent work shows that increased meal frequency reduces ghrelin responses in sheep. Human research suggests there is an interaction between insulin and ghrelin. The effect of meal frequency on this interaction is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effect of feeding frequency on insulin and...... ghrelin responses in human subjects. Five healthy male volunteers were recruited from the general population: age 24 (SEM 2)years, body mass 75.7 (SEM 3.2) kg and BMI 23.8 (SEM 0.8) kg/m(2). Volunteers underwent three 8-h feeding regimens: fasting (FAST); low-frequency(two) meal ingestion (LOFREQ......(MEAL)); high-frequency (twelve) meal ingestion (HIFREQ(MEAL)). Meals were equi-energetic within trials,consisting of 64% carbohydrate, 23% fat and 13% protein. Total energy intake was equal between feeding trials. Total area under the curve for serum insulin and plasma ghrelin responses did not differ between...

  1. The optimal control frequency response problem in manual control. [of manned aircraft systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    An optimal control frequency response problem is defined within the context of the optimal pilot model. The problem is designed to specify pilot model control frequencies reflective of important aircraft system properties, such as control feel system dynamics, airframe dynamics, and gust environment, as well as man machine properties, such as task and attention allocation. This is accomplished by determining a bounded set of control frequencies which minimize the total control cost. The bounds are given by zero and the neuromuscular control frequency response for each control actuator. This approach is fully adaptive, i.e., does not depend upon user entered estimates. An algorithm is developed to solve this optimal control frequency response problem. The algorithm is then applied to an attitude hold task for a bare airframe fighter aircraft case with interesting dynamic properties.

  2. Fast Frequency Response Capability of Photovoltaic Power Plants: The Necessity of New Grid Requirements and Definitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Rahmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, only a small number of publications have been presented addressing power system stability with the increased use of large-scale photovoltaic (PV generation around the world. The focus of these publications was on classical stability problems, such as transient and small signal stability, without considering frequency stability. Nevertheless, with increased PV generation, its effects on system frequency response during contingencies can no longer be ignored, especially in the case of weakly interconnected networks or isolated power systems. This paper addresses the impacts of large scale PV generation on the frequency stability of power systems. The positive effects of deloaded PV power plants (PV-PPs able to support system frequency recovery during the initial seconds after major contingencies are also examined. Because this type of frequency support is not covered by current definitions, a new terminology is proposed that includes the frequency response of inertia-less generation units immediately after major power imbalances. We refer to this type of frequency support as fast frequency response (FFR. Finally, a discussion is also presented regarding the applicability and pertinence of frequency-related grid requirements for PV-PPs in the case of real power systems. The investigation is based on the isolated power system of northern Chile. The obtained results indicate that in the case of major power imbalances, no significant effects arise on the system frequency response until PV penetration levels exceed approximately 20%. From a system security perspective, the problems arise for PV penetration levels of approximately 50%, in which case, the frequency response capability in PV-PPs would be justified during certain hours of the year.

  3. Frequency Response of a Gas-filled Tube with Minor Losses

    OpenAIRE

    West, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    A thesis on the study of the frequency response of a pneumatic system designed to provide pulsed flow for flow control applications is presented. The system consists of a high pressure air source, a high-frequency solenoid valve, a length of tube and a minor loss. The experiment mimics the pneumatic drive for our Coanda-Assisted Spray Manipulation actuator and applies to many flow control applications involving pulsed flow. Square wave signals of various frequency are fed to the solenoid valv...

  4. Classification of frequency response areas in the inferior colliculus reveals continua not discrete classes

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Alan R; Shackleton, Trevor M.; Sumner, Christian J.; Zobay, Oliver; Rees, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    A differential response to sound frequency is a fundamental property of auditory neurons. Frequency analysis in the cochlea gives rise to V-shaped tuning functions in auditory nerve fibres, but by the level of the inferior colliculus (IC), the midbrain nucleus of the auditory pathway, neuronal receptive fields display diverse shapes that reflect the interplay of excitation and inhibition. The origin and nature of these frequency receptive field types is still open to question. One proposed hy...

  5. High-field response of gated graphene at terahertz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavipour, Hadi; Yang, Wayne; Guermoune, Abdeladim; Hilke, Michael; Cooke, David G.; Al-Naib, Ibraheem; Dignam, Marc M.; Blanchard, François; Hafez, Hassan A.; Chai, Xin; Ferachou, Denis; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Lévesque, Pierre L.; Martel, Richard

    2015-12-01

    We study the Fermi energy level dependence of the nonlinear terahertz (THz) transmission of gated multilayer and single-layer graphene transferred onto sapphire and quartz substrates. The two samples represent two limits of low-field impurity scattering: short-range neutral and long-range charged impurity scattering, respectively. We observe an increase in the transmission as the field amplitude is increased due to intraband absorption bleaching starting at THz fields above 8 kV/cm. This effect arises from a field-induced reduction in THz conductivity that depends strongly on the Fermi energy. We account for intraband absorption using a free carrier Drude model that includes neutral and charged impurity scattering as well as optical phonon scattering. We find that although the Fermi-level dependence in the monolayer and five-layer samples is quite different due to the dominance of long- and short-range momentum scattering, respectively, both exhibit a strong dependence on the field amplitude that cannot be explained on the basis of an increase in the lattice temperature alone. Our results provide a deeper understanding of transport in graphene devices operating at THz frequencies and in modest kV/cm field strengths where nonlinearities exist.

  6. Aeroelastic modal dynamics of wind turbines including anisotropic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisker Skjoldan, P.

    2011-03-15

    Several methods for aeroelastic modal analysis of a rotating wind turbine are developed and used to analyse the modal dynamics of two simplified models and a complex model in isotropic and anisotropic conditions. The Coleman transformation is used to enable extraction of the modal frequencies, damping, and periodic mode shapes of a rotating wind turbine by describing the rotor degrees of freedom in the inertial frame. This approach is valid only for an isotropic system. Anisotropic systems, e.g., with an unbalanced rotor or operating in wind shear, are treated with the general approaches of Floquet analysis or Hill's method which do not provide a unique reference frame for observing the modal frequency, to which any multiple of the rotor speed can be added. This indeterminacy is resolved by requiring that the periodic mode shape be as constant as possible in the inertial frame. The modal frequency is thus identified as the dominant frequency in the response of a pure excitation of the mode observed in the inertial frame. A modal analysis tool based directly on the complex aeroelastic wind turbine code BHawC is presented. It uses the Coleman approach in isotropic conditions and the computationally efficient implicit Floquet analysis in anisotropic conditions. The tool is validated against system identifications with the partial Floquet method on the nonlinear BHawC model of a 2.3 MW wind turbine. System identification results show that nonlinear effects on the 2.3 MW turbine in most cases are small, but indicate that the controller creates nonlinear damping. In isotropic conditions the periodic mode shape contains up to three harmonic components, but in anisotropic conditions it can contain an infinite number of harmonic components with frequencies that are multiples of the rotor speed. These harmonics appear in calculated frequency responses of the turbine. Extreme wind shear changes the modal damping when the flow is separated due to an interaction between

  7. Study on DFIG wind turbines control strategy for improving frequency response characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongmei; Wu, Di; Liu, Yanhua; Zhou, Zhiyu

    2012-01-01

    The active and reactive power decoupling control for the double-fed induction generator wind turbines(DFIG) does not play a positive role to the frequency response ability of power grid because it performs as the hidden inertia for the power grid. If we want to improve the transient frequency stability of the wind turbine when it is integrated with the system, we must ameliorate its frequency response characteristics. The inability of frequency control due to DFIG decoupling control could be overcome through releasing (or absorbing) a part of the kinetic energy stored in the rotor, so as to increase (or decrease) active power injected to the power system when the deviation of power system frequency appears. This paper discusses the mathematical model of the variable speed DFIG, including the aerodynamic model, pitch control system model, shaft model, generator model and inverter control model, and other key components, focusing on the mathematical model of the converters in rotor side and grid side. Based on the existing model of wind generator, the paper attaches the frequency control model on the platform of the simulation software DIgSILENT/PowerFactory. The simulation results show that the proposed control strategy can response quickly to transient frequency deviation and prove that wind farms can participate in the system frequency regulation to a certain extent. Finally, the result verifies the accuracy and plausibility of the inverter control model which attaches the frequency control module.

  8. Unfolded Frequency Response and Model of a Multi-Tap Direct Sampling Mixer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Yun; GE Ning; DONG Zaiwang

    2008-01-01

    A transform method was used to model a discrete time multi-tap direct sampling mixer. The method transforms the mixed filtering and down.sampling stages to separate cascade filtering and sampling stages to determine the unfolded frequency response which shows the anti-aliasing ability of the mixer. The transformation can also be applied to other mixed signal and multi-rate receiver systems to analyze their unfolded frequency responses. The transformed system architecture was used to calculate the unfolded frequency response of the multi-tap direct sampling mixer and compared with the mixer model without noise in the ad-vanced design system 2005A environment to further evaluate the frequency response. The simulations show that the -3 dB bandwidth is 3.0 MHz and the voltage gain is attenuated by 1.5 dB within a 1-MHz baseband bandwidth.

  9. Frequency response variation of two offshore wind park transformers with different tap changer positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arana Aristi, Iván; Holbøll, Joachim; Sørensen, T

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of several sweep frequency response analysis (SFRA) measurements performed on two identical offshore wind farm transformers. A comparison is made between the transformers based on different recommended measurements and procedures, different measurement systems for...

  10. Frequency response variation of two offshore wind park transformers with different tap changer positions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Ivan; Soerensen, Troels [DONG Energy (Denmark); Holboell, Joachim [Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the results of several sweep frequency response analysis (SFRA) measurements performed on two identical offshore wind farm transformers. A comparison is made between the transformers based on different recommended measurements and procedures, different measurement systems for frequency response analysis (FRA) and different tap changer positions. It was shown how the series impedance and capacitance between windings vary depending on the tap changer position. (orig.)

  11. System-wide contribution to frequency response from variable speed wind turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Ruttledge, Lisa; Flynn, Damian

    2012-01-01

    Due to the differing electromechanical characteristics of modern variable speed wind turbines to conventional generators, the provision of ancillary services from wind generation is likely to change the nature of the frequency response of power systems to contingency events. This paper explores the aggregate contribution from wind turbines to the frequency response of future power systems, considering both emulated inertial and governor controls. In particular, the potential issues that may a...

  12. Low-frequency dielectrophoretic response of a single particle in aqueous suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyu; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Ou-Yang, H Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We use optical tweezers-based dielectrophoresis (DEP) force spectroscopy to investigate the roles of the electrical double layer in the AC dielectric response of an individual colloidal particle in an aqueous medium. Specifically, we measure the DEP crossover frequency as a function of particles size, medium viscosity, and temperature. Experimental results were compared to low frequency relaxation mechanisms predicted by Schwarz, demonstrating the dielectrophoretic responses in the frequency range between 10 kHz and 1 MHz were dominated by counterion diffusion within the electric double layer. PMID:26858820

  13. Rapid estimation of frequency response functions by close-range photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy of a rapid method which estimates the frequency response function from stereoscopic dynamic data is computed. It is shown that reversal of the order of the operations of coordinate transformation and Fourier transformation, which provides a significant increase in computational speed, introduces error. A portion of the error, proportional to the perturbation components normal to the camera focal planes, cannot be eliminated. The remaining error may be eliminated by proper scaling of frequency data prior to coordinate transformation. Methods are developed for least squares estimation of the full 3x3 frequency response matrix for a three dimensional structure.

  14. Implementation of Time and Frequency Response Analysis for Web-Based Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teyana Sapula

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The University of Dar Es Salaam has developed the web-based laboratory for Time and Frequency Response Analysis. The purpose of this web-based laboratory is the utilization of real data from real experiments, in terms of instrumentation and experimental circuits, rather than simulations. The use of webbased laboratory came after realizing the difficulties imposed by the traditional laboratories. Web-based laboratories allow students and educators to interact with real laboratory equipment located anywhere in the world at anytime. This paper presents the implementation of web-based laboratory of single stage common emitter, resistor capacitor coupled amplifier using National Instruments Educational Laboratory Virtual Instrument Suite platform. Two components are deployed: time response analysis and frequency response analysis. The experiment allows students to carryout time and frequency analysis of the amplifier. The modular can be used to any microelectronic circuits to carry out any time response and frequency response analysis. Both the time response and frequency response analysis results of the amplifier are validated.

  15. Frequency response of slot coating flow to gap disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Semi; Nam, Jaewook

    2016-03-01

    Slot coating is a common method of manufacturing films such as optical films, adhesive tapes, etc. It is a pre-metered method: the final wet film thickness is set by the flow rate and the web speed, and independent of other operating parameters and coating liquid properties. Therefore, it is ideal for precise film thickness control. To produce uniform film, the coating flow needs to be steady-state, two-dimensional, and stable. In the slot coating process, however, there are always some small-scale disturbances generated by rotating process units, such as pumps, rolls, etc., and they usually have periodicity. These disturbances cause a non-uniformity of the moving web direction and could spoil the film quality. Therefore, the sensitivity analysis of coating flow under the periodic disturbances is important. Among all disturbances, a change of coating gap, i.e. the distance between the die lip and the moving substrate, is known to the most dangerous disturbance. This type of disturbance is usually called the gap oscillation, and caused by the substrate thickness variations, mechanical vibration of the coating die or roll, and roll run outs. Here, we analyze the effect of fluid properties, operating conditions and die configurations on response of slot coating flow to gap disturbances. In this study, we use Galerkin/finite element method to solve transient Navier-Stokes equation under periodic disturbance. We define the amplification factor as an indicator of film non-uniformity and analyze the effect of different parameters by comparing the factor. In particular, we use Carreau-Yasuda model to describe shear-thinning property of xanthan gum solution and compare with Newtonian fluid.

  16. Non-linear response of an electrode-electrolyte interface impedance with the frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, G. [Departamento de Bioingenieri' a, UNT/CONICET (Argentina)]. E-mail: gruiz@herrera.unt.edu.ar; Felice, C.J. [Departamento de Bioingenieri' a, UNT/CONICET (Argentina)

    2007-01-15

    In this paper we analyze the frequency response of a distributed parameters non-linear circuit. This circuit is a fractal model of an electrode-electrolyte interface. The results show that the series equivalent resistance R {sub eq} decreases as the number of fractal levels rises. Its frequency behavior is similar to the results described by other authors that used a constant phase angle element. At low frequency range, the series equivalent reactance X {sub eq} decreases with frequency and R {sub eq} shows a flat response in this range. The model also explains how interface geometry modifies the values of some electrochemical parameters. As roughness increases the Argand diagram shows smaller semicircles. The model behavior is like a single dispersion system with its central frequency increasing with the electrode roughness.

  17. Quantitative multi-waves migration in elastic anisotropic media; Migration quantitative multi-ondes en milieu elastique anisotrope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgne, H.

    2004-12-01

    Seismic imaging is an important tool for ail exploration. From the filtered seismic traces and a subsurface velocity model, migration allows to localize the reflectors and to estimate physical properties of these interfaces. The subsurface is split up into a reference medium, corresponding to the low spatial frequencies (a smooth medium), and a perturbation medium, corresponding to the high spatial frequencies. The propagation of elastic waves in the medium of reference is modelled by the ray theory. The association of this theory with a principle of diffraction or reflection allows to take into account the high spatial frequencies: the Kirchhoff approach represents so the medium of perturbations with continuous surfaces, characterized by reflection coefficients. The target of the quantitative migration is to reconstruct this reflection coefficient, notably its behaviour according to the incidence angle. These information will open the way to seismic characterization of the reservoir domain, with. a stratigraphic inversion for instance. In order to improve the qualitative and quantitative migration results, one of the current challenges is to take into account the anisotropy of the subsurface. Taking into account rocks anisotropy in the imaging process of seismic data requires two improvements from the isotropic case. The first one roughly concerns the modelling aspect: an anisotropic propagator should be used to avoid a mis-positioning or bad focusing of the imaged reflectors. The second correction concerns the migration aspect: as anisotropy affects the reflectivity of subsurface, a specific anisotropic imaging formula should be applied in the migration kernel, in order to recover the correct A V A behavior of the subsurface reflectors, If the first correction is DOW made in most so-called anisotropic imaging algorithms, the second one is currently ignored. The first part of my work concerns theoretical aspects. 1 study first the preservation of amplitudes in the

  18. On the quantification of SSVEP frequency responses in human EEG in realistic BCI conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Kuś

    Full Text Available This article concerns one of the most important problems of brain-computer interfaces (BCI based on Steady State Visual Evoked Potentials (SSVEP, that is the selection of the a-priori most suitable frequencies for stimulation. Previous works related to this problem were done either with measuring systems that have little in common with actual BCI systems (e.g., single flashing LED or were presented on a small number of subjects, or the tested frequency range did not cover a broad spectrum. Their results indicate a strong SSVEP response around 10 Hz, in the range 13-25 Hz, and at high frequencies in the band of 40-60 Hz. In the case of BCI interfaces, stimulation with frequencies from various ranges are used. The frequencies are often adapted for each user separately. The selection of these frequencies, however, was not yet justified in quantitative group-level study with proper statistical account for inter-subject variability. The aim of this study is to determine the SSVEP response curve, that is, the magnitude of the evoked signal as a function of frequency. The SSVEP response was induced in conditions as close as possible to the actual BCI system, using a wide range of frequencies (5-30 Hz, in step of 1 Hz. The data were obtained for 10 subjects. SSVEP curves for individual subjects and the population curve was determined. Statistical analysis were conducted both on the level of individual subjects and for the group. The main result of the study is the identification of the optimal range of frequencies, which is 12-18 Hz, for the registration of SSVEP phenomena. The applied criterion of optimality was: to find the largest contiguous range of frequencies yielding the strong and constant-level SSVEP response.

  19. Types, Frequency, and Effectiveness of Responses to Unwanted Pursuit and Stalking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Leila B.; Winstead, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the types, frequency, and effectiveness of responses to unwanted pursuit (UP) and stalking after relationship termination. Participants included female and male college students who were either pursued by a former partner or who pursued an ex-partner. Factor analyses of targets' responses to pursuit yielded four factors,…

  20. Sizing of an Energy Storage System for Grid Inertial Response and Primary Frequency Reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Vaclav; Chaudhary, Sanjay Kumar; Stroe, Daniel Loan;

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale integration of renewable energy sources in power system leads to the replacement of conventional power plants (CPPs) and consequently challenges in power system reliability and security are introduced. This study is focused on improving the grid frequency response after a contingency....... Moreover, it is demonstrated that the ESS can provide the response similar to that provided by the CPPs....

  1. Moth hearing in response to bat echolocation calls manipulated independently in time and frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G; Waters, D A

    2000-08-22

    We measured the auditory responses of the noctuid moth Noctua pronuba to bat echolocation calls which were manipulated independently in time and frequency. Such manipulations are important in understanding how insect hearing influences the evolution of echolocation call characteristics. We manipulated the calls of three bat species (Rhinolophus hipposideros, Myotis nattereri and Pipistrellus pipistrellus) that use different echolocation call features by doubling their duration or reducing their frequency, and measured the auditory thresholds from the A1 cells of the moths. Knowing the auditory responses of the moth we tested three predictions. (i) The ranking of the audibility of unmanipulated calls to the moths should be predictable from their temporal and/or frequency structure. This was supported. (ii) Doubling the duration of the calls should increase their audibility by ca. 3 dB for all species. Their audibility did indeed increase by 2.1-3.5 dB. (iii) Reducing the frequency of the calls would increase their audibility for all species. Reducing the frequency had small effects for the two bat species which used short duration (2.7-3.6 ms) calls. However, the relatively long-duration (50 ms), largely constant-frequency calls of R. hipposideros increased in audibility by 21.6 dB when their frequency was halved. Time and frequency changes influence the audibility of calls to tympanate moths in different ways according to call design. Large changes in frequency and time had relatively small changes on the audibility of calls for short, largely broadband calls. Channelling energy into the second harmonic of the call substantially decreased the audibility of calls for bats which use long-duration, constant-frequency components in echolocation calls. We discuss our findings in the contexts of the evolution of both bat echolocation call design and the potential responses of insects which hear ultrasound. PMID:11467425

  2. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lehmann

    Full Text Available Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  3. Estimation of cochlear response times using lateralization of frequency-mismatched tones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strelcyk, Olaf; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral and objective estimates of cochlear response times CRTs and traveling-wave TW velocity were compared for three normal-hearing listeners. Differences between frequency-specific CRTs were estimated via lateralization of pulsed tones that were interaurally mismatched in frequency, similar...... calculated from the obtained CRTs. The correspondence between behavioral and objective estimates of CRT and TW velocity was examined. For frequencies up to 1.5 kHz, the behavioral method yielded reproducible results, which were consistent with the objective estimates. For higher frequencies, CRT differences...... could not be estimated with the behavioral method due to limitations of the lateralization paradigm. The method might be useful for studying the spatiotemporal cochlear response pattern in human listeners....

  4. Frequency response of magnetoelectric effect in piezoelectric-magnetostrictive disk-ring composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Ru, E-mail: zhangruwl@njut.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wu Gaojian; Zhang Li [Department of Applied Physics, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Li Xin [College of Electronics and Information engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Zhang Ning [Department of Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China)

    2012-08-15

    A theoretical model is presented for frequency dependence of magnetoelectric (ME) effect in piezoelectric-magnetostrictive disk-ring composite structures. Expressions for ME voltage coefficients in piezoelectric-magnetostrictive (PE-MS) disk-ring and MS-PE disk-ring are obtained by solving elastodynamic equations. The calculated resonance frequency and frequency dependence of ME voltage coefficients are in good agreement with the experimental results. This model indicates better mechanical coupling in disk-ring structure than that in traditional layered structure, and this may be responsible for the enhancing ME effect. The analysis suggests the disk-ring composites structures are promising for magnetoelectric applications. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Frequency response of ME effect in PE-MS disk-ring composites structures is modeled. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculated results are in good agreement with the experimental results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This model indicates better mechanical coupling in disk-ring structure.

  5. Oscillating Frequency Response of a Langasite Crystal Microbalance in Liquid Phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi KANG; Huai Jin ZHANG; Xue Yong LIU; Da Zhong SHEN

    2005-01-01

    The frequency responses of a langasite crystal microbalance (LCM) in liquid phase were investigated. It was shown that the LCM possessed much stronger oscillating ability in liquid phase than that of the commonly used quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The frequency shifts of the LCM to the changes in mass loading, as well as viscosity and density of the liquid were measured. The LCM was applied to monitor the adsorption process of an ionic liquid film to ethanol vapor.

  6. Frequency response of the vestibulo-ocular reflex /VOR/ in the monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, U. W.; Henn, V.; Young, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The frequency response of the vestibulo-ocular reflex has been investigated in the alert monkey during sinusoidal rotation about a vertical axis in a frequency range of 0.001-0.5 Hz. Phase and gain of nystagmus slow phase velocity was determined. In the frequency range above 0.1 Hz, nystagmus slow phase velocity was in phase with (compensated for) head velocity. At lower frequencies, an increasing phase lead was present which could reach more than 90 deg. Gain fell off correspondingly at low frequencies. Calculated time constants were 10-40 s in different monkeys. Animals which had been exposed to numerous previous rotary stimuli in the laboratory showed much shorter time constants than did 'native' monkeys.

  7. Sheath-wave-related resonances in the frequency response of a cylindrical monopole in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A floating or negatively biased antenna immersed in a plasma is surrounded by an ion sheath. The antenna-sheath-plasma system may support slow surface waves at driving frequencies below the electron plasma frequency. Resonances associated with these so-called sheath waves are observed at certain frequencies in the antenna's response to an applied sinusoidal signal. A detailed experimental study of these resonances is presented here for a short cylindrical monopole in a low-pressure isotropic argon plasma. The effect on the resonance frequencies of a dc bias applied to the antenna and of plasma density and antenna length was investigated. Good agreement was obtained with the theoretical predictions derived from a known dispersion equation for sheath waves. From the experimental data, the relationship between sheath thickness and antenna potential, and the frequency dependence of the antenna admittance could be derived

  8. Calibration Scheme for Large Kinetic Inductance Detector Arrays Based on Readout Frequency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisigello, L.; Yates, S. J. C.; Murugesan, V.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) provides a way to build large ground-based sub-mm instruments such as NIKA and A-MKID. For such instruments, therefore, it is important to understand and characterize the response to ensure good linearity and calibration over a wide dynamic range. We propose to use the MKID readout frequency response to determine the MKID responsivity to an input optical source power. A signal can be measured in a KID as a change in the phase of the readout signal with respect to the KID resonant circle. Fundamentally, this phase change is due to a shift in the KID resonance frequency, in turn due to a radiation induced change in the quasiparticle number in the superconducting resonator. We show that the shift in resonant frequency can be determined from the phase shift by using KID phase versus frequency dependence using a previously measured resonant frequency. Working in this calculated resonant frequency, we gain near linearity and constant calibration to a constant optical signal applied in a wide range of operating points on the resonance and readout powers. This calibration method has three particular advantages: first, it is fast enough to be used to calibrate large arrays, with pixel counts in the thousands of pixels; second, it is based on data that are already necessary to determine KID positions; third, it can be done without applying any optical source in front of the array.

  9. Generation of artificial time-histories, rich in all frequencies, from given response spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to apply the time-history method of seismic analysis, it is often desirable to generate a suitable artificial time-history from a given response spectrum. The method described allows the generation of such a time-history that is also rich in all frequencies in the spectrum. This richness is achieved by choosing a large number of closely-spaced frequency points such that the adjacent frequencies have their half-power points overlap. The adjacent frequencies satisfy the condition that the frequency interval Δf near a given frequency f is such that (Δf)/f<2c/csub(c) where c is the damping of the system and csub(c) is the critical damping. In developing an artificial time-history, it is desirable to specify the envelope and duration of the record, very often in such a manner as to reproduce the envelope property of a specific earthquake record, and such an option is available in the method described. Examples are given of the development of typical artificial time-histories from earthquake design response spectra and from floor response spectra

  10. Sampling frequency, response times and embedded signal filtration in fast, high efficiency liquid chromatography: A tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, M Farooq; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Kadjo, Akinde F; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2016-02-11

    With increasingly efficient columns, eluite peaks are increasingly narrower. To take full advantage of this, choice of the detector response time and the data acquisition rate a.k.a. detector sampling frequency, have become increasingly important. In this work, we revisit the concept of data sampling from the theorem variously attributed to Whittaker, Nyquist, Kotelnikov, and Shannon. Focusing on time scales relevant to the current practice of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and optical absorbance detection (the most commonly used method), even for very narrow simulated peaks Fourier transformation shows that theoretical minimum sampling frequency is still relatively low (digital filters. We show that the common wisdom of sampling 20 points per peak can be inadequate for high efficiency columns and that the sampling frequency and response choices do affect the peak shape. If the sampling frequency is too low or response time is too large, the observed peak shapes will not remain as narrow as they really are - this is especially true for high efficiency and high speed separations. It is shown that both sampling frequency and digital filtering affect the retention time, noise amplitude, peak shape and width in a complex fashion. We show how a square-wave driven light emitting diode source can reveal the nature of the embedded filter. We discuss time uncertainties related to the choice of sampling frequency. Finally, we suggest steps to obtain optimum results from a given system. PMID:26803000

  11. Calibration scheme for large Kinetic Inductance Detector Arrays based on Readout Frequency Response

    CERN Document Server

    Bisigello, L; Murugesan, V; Baselmans, J J A; Baryshev, A M

    2016-01-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) provides a way to build large ground based sub-mm instruments such as NIKA and A-MKID. For such instruments, therefore, it is important to understand and characterize the response to ensure good linearity and calibration over wide dynamic range. We propose to use the MKID readout frequency response to determine the MKID responsivity to an input optical source power. A signal can be measured in a KID as a change in the phase of the readout signal with respect to the KID resonant circle. Fundamentally, this phase change is due to a shift in the KID resonance frequency, in turn due to a radiation induced change in the quasiparticle number in the superconducting resonator. We show that shift in resonant frequency can be determined from the phase shift by using KID phase versus frequency dependence using a previously measured resonant frequency. Working in this calculated resonant frequency, we gain near linearity and constant calibration to a constant optical signal ap...

  12. Anisotropic Stars II Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, K; Dev, Krsna; Gleiser, Marcelo

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the stability of self-gravitating spherically symmetric anisotropic spheres under radial perturbations. We consider both the Newtonian and the full general-relativistic perturbation treatment. In the general-relativistic case, we extend the variational formalism for spheres with isotropic pressure developed by Chandrasekhar. We find that, in general, when the tangential pressure is greater than the radial pressure, the stability of the anisotropic sphere is enhanced when compared to isotropic configurations. In particular, anisotropic spheres are found to be stable for smaller values of the adiabatic index $\\gamma$.

  13. Modelling of ultrasonic nondestructive testing in anisotropic materials - Rectangular crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nondestructive testing with ultrasound is a standard procedure in the nuclear power industry when searching for defects, in particular cracks. To develop and qualify testing procedures extensive experimental work on test blocks is usually required. This can take a lot of time and therefore be quite costly. A good mathematical model of the testing situation is therefore of great value as it can reduce the experimental work to a great extent. A good model can be very useful for parametric studies and as a pedagogical tool. A further use of a model is as a tool in the qualification of personnel. In anisotropic materials, e.g. austenitic welds, the propagation of ultrasound becomes much more complicated as compared to isotropic materials. Therefore, modelling is even more useful for anisotropic materials, and it in particular has a greater pedagogical value. The present project has been concerned with a further development of the anisotropic capabilities of the computer program UTDefect, which has so far only contained a strip-like crack as the single defect type for anisotropic materials. To be more specific, the scattering by a rectangular crack in an anisotropic component has been studied and the result is adapted to include transmitting and receiving ultrasonic probes. The component under study is assumed to be anisotropic with arbitrary anisotropy. On the other hand, it is assumed to be homogeneous, and this in particular excludes most welds, where it is seldom an adequate approximation to assume homogeneity. The anisotropy may be arbitrarily oriented and the same is true of the rectangular crack. The crack may also be located near a backside of the component. To solve the scattering problem for the crack an integral equation method is used. The probe model has been developed in an earlier project and to compute the signal response in the receiving probe an electromechanical reciprocity argument is employed. As a rectangle is a truly 3D scatterer the sizes of the

  14. Frequency response function of multi-dimensional structures to fluid temperature fluctuations. Research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasahara, Naoto [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Takasho, Hideki [Joyo Industry Co., Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Temperature fluctuation from incomplete fluid mixing induces fatigue damages on structures of nuclear components, which should be prevented. For rational analyses of this phenomenon, the authors have developed a frequency response function of thermal stress induced by one-dimensional temperature gradient across wall thickness. On the other hand, it is pointed out that existence of other stress modes from multi-dimensional structure with complex constraint conditions. This study has extended the frequency response method for adoption to multi-dimensional problems by introducing constraint efficiency factors. Applicability of this function was validated for multi-dimensional problems such as thermal stratification problems and hot/cold spot ones. (author)

  15. Study on the frequency response mechanisms of thermal stress induced by thermal stratification oscillation phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature oscillation produced by thermal stratification phenomenon induces thermal fatigue damages on structures of nuclear components, which should be prevented. To evaluate thermal fatigue, the frequency response function was developed. However, this theoretical method does not take particular effects of thermal stratification oscillation into account. To clarify these effects, finite element simulations were conducted with two fluid temperature models. Based on mechanisms of the effects, the frequency response function was improved. Agreement with the results of the finite element simulations confirmed the proposed function. (author)

  16. Frequency response function method with constraint efficiency factors for Hot/Cold spot problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature fluctuation from incomplete fluid mixing induces typically bending plus peak stress across wall thickness. For this stress mode, author has developed the frequency response function to establish design-by-analysis methodology for this phenomenon. On the other hand, it is pointed out that hot and cold spots appear near T-junctions in piping systems. Those induce other stress modes from three-dimensional temperature distributions. This report describes the extension of the frequency response method to hot and cold spot problems by introducing constraint efficiency factors. Its applicability was validated by application to a hot spot near the T-junction of PHENIX secondary piping system. (author)

  17. Frequency response function of multi-dimensional structures to fluid temperature fluctuations. Research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature fluctuation from incomplete fluid mixing induces fatigue damages on structures of nuclear components, which should be prevented. For rational analyses of this phenomenon, the authors have developed a frequency response function of thermal stress induced by one-dimensional temperature gradient across wall thickness. On the other hand, it is pointed out that existence of other stress modes from multi-dimensional structure with complex constraint conditions. This study has extended the frequency response method for adoption to multi-dimensional problems by introducing constraint efficiency factors. Applicability of this function was validated for multi-dimensional problems such as thermal stratification problems and hot/cold spot ones. (author)

  18. Infrasound-array-element frequency response: in-situ measurement and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielson, T.

    2011-12-01

    Most array elements at the infrasound stations of the International Monitoring System use some variant of a multiple-inlet pipe system for wind-noise suppression. These pipe systems have a significant impact on the overall frequency response of the element. The spatial distribution of acoustic inlets introduces a response dependence that is a function of frequency and of vertical and horizontal arrival angle; the system of inlets, pipes, and summing junctions further shapes that response as the signal is ducted to the transducer. In-situ measurements, using a co-located reference microphone, can determine the overall frequency response and diagnose problems with the system. As of July 2011, the in-situ frequency responses for 25 individual elements at 6 operational stations (I10, I53, I55, I56, I57, and I99) have been measured. In support of these measurements, a fully thermo-viscous model for the acoustics of these multiple-inlet pipe systems has been developed. In addition to measurements at operational stations, comparative analyses have been done on experimental systems: a multiple-inlet radial-pipe system with varying inlet hole size; a one-quarter scale model of a 70-meter rosette system; and vertical directionality of a small rosette system using aircraft flyovers. [Funded by the US Army Space and Missile Defense Command

  19. A new tool to estimate maximum wind power penetration level: In perspective of frequency response adequacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This study proposes a new tool to estimate maximum wind power penetration level. • This tool takes frequency response adequacy into account. • System frequency sensitivity is modelled as a function of inertia and headroom. • A practical power system is investigated as a case study. • Outputs from the proposed tool match with dynamic simulation results. - Abstract: Wind energy is becoming a significant source of generation in many countries because of its zero fuel cost and no air pollution. Due to integration of large-scale wind power in conventional grids, synchronous generators are being economically replaced. Modern wind farms are based on power electronics interface; and unlike synchronous generators, they do not have inherent frequency support capability. So, in a combined synchronous and non-synchronous machine based power system, it has always been a concern for a network operator to maintain system frequency within acceptable limits following a major disturbance. From power system security point of view, wind penetration can be limited by frequency response criteria. Up to now, several methodologies have been proposed to estimate maximum threshold of wind integration. However, none of them recommends how a system operator could be immediately informed about a secured wind penetration limit, as soon as generation profile is known. This paper proposes a new estimation tool of maximum wind penetration level from the frequency response adequacy point of view. Available system information viz. inertia and headroom are used as input parameters in the developed tool. Output of this tool will provide the highest margin of wind power that can be integrated at a particular load condition without violating frequency response constraints. The proposed technique is applied and analysed for a 250 bus, 65 machine Australian electricity network

  20. One-Dimensional Anisotropic Band Gap Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The band gap structure of one-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal has been studied by means of the transfer matrix formalism. From the analytic expressions and numeric calculations we see some general characteristics of the band gap structure of anisotropic photonic crystals, each band separates into two branches and the two branches react to polarization sensitively. In the practical case of oblique incidence, gaps move towards high frequency when the angle of incidence increases. Under some special conditions, the two branches become degenerate again.

  1. Spatial Frequency Dependence of the Human Visual Cortex Response on Temporal Frequency Modulation Studied by fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mirzajani

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: The brain response to temporal frequencies (TF has been already reported. However, there is no study on different TF with respect to various spatial frequencies (SF. Materials and Methods: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was done by a 1.5 T General Electric system for 14 volunteers (9 males and 5 females, aged 19–26 years during square-wave reversal checkerboard visual stimulation with different temporal frequencies of 4, 6, 8 and 10 Hz in 2 states of low SF of 0.4 and high SF of 8 cycles/degree (cpd. All subjects had normal visual acuity of 20/20 based on Snellen’s fraction in each eye with good binocular vision and normal visual field based on confrontation test. The mean luminance of the entire checkerboard was 161.4 cd/m2 and the black and white check contrast was 96%. The activation map was created using the data obtained from the block designed fMRI study. Pixels with a Z score above a threshold of 2.3, at a statistical significance level of 0.05, were considered activated. The average percentage blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD signal change for all activated pixels within the occipital lobe, multiplied by the total number of activated pixels within the occipital lobe, was used as an index for the magnitude of the fMRI signal at each state of TF&SF. Results: The magnitude of the fMRI signal in response to different TF’s was maximum at 6 Hz for a high SF value of 8 cpd; it was however, maximum at a TF of 8 Hz for a low SF of 0.4 cpd. Conclusion: The results of this study agree with those of animal invasive neurophysiologic studies showing SF and TF selectivity of neurons in visual cortex. These results can be useful for vision therapy and selecting visual tasks in fMRI studies.

  2. Multisensory stimuli elicit altered oscillatory brain responses at gamma frequencies in patients with schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    David B. Stone; Coffman, Brian A; Juan Bustillo; Cheryl Aine

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in auditory and visual unisensory responses are well documented in patients with schizophrenia; however, potential abnormalities elicited from multisensory audio-visual stimuli are less understood. Further, schizophrenia patients have shown abnormal patterns in task-related and task-independent oscillatory brain activity, particularly in the gamma frequency band. We examined oscillatory responses to basic unisensory and multisensory stimuli in schizophrenia patients (N = 46) and heal...

  3. The frequency response of dynamic friction: Enhanced rate-and-state models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabboi, A.; Putelat, T.; Woodhouse, J.

    2016-07-01

    The prediction and control of friction-induced vibration requires a sufficiently accurate constitutive law for dynamic friction at the sliding interface: for linearised stability analysis, this requirement takes the form of a frictional frequency response function. Systematic measurements of this frictional frequency response function are presented for small samples of nylon and polycarbonate sliding against a glass disc. Previous efforts to explain such measurements from a theoretical model have failed, but an enhanced rate-and-state model is presented which is shown to match the measurements remarkably well. The tested parameter space covers a range of normal forces (10-50 N), of sliding speeds (1-10 mm/s) and frequencies (100-2000 Hz). The key new ingredient in the model is the inclusion of contact stiffness to take into account elastic deformations near the interface. A systematic methodology is presented to discriminate among possible variants of the model, and then to identify the model parameter values.

  4. Frequency response of forced circulation boiling two-phase flow to inlet flow modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents theoretical analysis and experimental data on the dynamic behavior of two-phase flow in a vertical boiling channel. Continuous, energy and momentum equations are linearized on the basis of small perturbation, and flow to exit void fraction and pressure drop transfer functions are obtained. Experimental frequency response functions are measured with statistical method using Freon-113 as the working fluid over a frequency range of 0.02 to 3 Hz. The data cover mass flux of 450 to 1800 kg/m2s, inlet subcooling of 2 to 300C and various heat flux levels. Influence of flow rate, inlet subcooling and heat flux on frequency response and comparison between experimental and theoretical results are described. (author)

  5. Phase Response of Fine Frequency Grid Reconstruction of Sampling Oscilloscopes Based on the NTN Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yichi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes an algorithm for determining the fine phase response of equivalent sampling oscilloscopes of a linear time-invariant response function from its magnitude. The Nose-to-Nose (NTN calibration method can give the phase response of the equivalent sampling oscilloscopes, but the phase resolution can only achieve 250 MHz because the limit of the technology. In this study the fine phase response has been reconstructed. Although the truncation of the Kramers-Kronig transform using three basic functions may approximate gives rise to large errors in estimated phase, these errors may be approximated by using three basic functions. This result rests on data obtained by an NTN technique in combination with a swept-sine calibration procedure. The NTN technique yields magnitude and phase information over a broad bandwidth, yet has low frequency resolution. The swept-sine procedure returns only the magnitude of the oscilloscope response function, yet can be made at any frequency at which fundamental microwave power standards are available. As an example, we get the fine phase response of equivalent sampling oscilloscopes Agilent 86100 C from dc to 40 GHz; its frequency resolution achieves 1 MHz. In the process of this analysis, we observe that the true oscilloscope response function as measured by the NTN calibration is indistinguishable from the reconstructed phase response over a very large bandwidth. At last we analyze the phase uncertainty of the phase response, and the uncertainty analysis process is provided. The results show that the algorithm can be used to get the fine phase response of the equivalent sampling oscilloscopes.

  6. Determining generator parameters of Camargos hydroelectric power plant through frequency response measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Sebastiao E.M. de; Padua Guarini, Antonio de [Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletrica (CEPEL), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, Joao A. de; Valgas, Helio M.; Pinto, Roberto del Giudice R. [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This work describes the results of the set frequency response tests performed in the generator number 2, 6.9 kV, 25 MVA, of Camargos hydroelectric power plant, CEMIG, and the parameters relatives to determined structures of model. This tests are unpublished in Brazil. (author) 7 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Estimation of the auto frequency response function at unexcited points using dummy masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Naoki; Yaginuma, Shinji; Onodera, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Takuya

    2015-02-01

    If structures with complex shapes have space limitations, vibration tests using an exciter or impact hammer for the excitation are difficult. Although measuring the auto frequency response function at an unexcited point may not be practical via a vibration test, it can be obtained by assuming that the inertia acting on a dummy mass is an external force on the target structure upon exciting a different excitation point. We propose a method to estimate the auto frequency response functions at unexcited points by attaching a small mass (dummy mass), which is comparable to the accelerometer mass. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated by comparing the auto frequency response functions estimated at unexcited points in a beam structure to those obtained from numerical simulations. We also consider random measurement errors by finite element analysis and vibration tests, but not bias errors. Additionally, the applicability of the proposed method is demonstrated by applying it to estimate the auto frequency response function of the lower arm in a car suspension.

  8. Time and Frequency Domain Response of Grape Berries to Nondestructive Impact during the Harvesting Period

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnka, Jan; Pavloušek, P.; Nedomová, Š.; Buchar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 1 (2016), s. 24-33. ISSN 0022-4901 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : berry´s response * dominant frequency * elastic modulus * grape berries Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.367, year: 2014 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com

  9. Effect of ischemia and cooling on the response to high frequency stimulation in rat tail nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning; Feldbæk Nielsen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Bodil;

    2000-01-01

    In normal rat tail nerves the effect of temperature and ischemia on the response to long-term high frequency stimulation (HFS) (143 Hz) was studied. The effect of temperature was studied in two consecutive tests at 14 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Prior to the HFS the peak-to-peak amplitude (PP-amp...

  10. Building the analytical response in frequency domain of AC biased bolometers Application to Planck/HFI

    CERN Document Server

    Sauvé, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Context: Bolometers are high sensitivity detector commonly used in Infrared astronomy. The HFI instrument of the Planck satellite makes extensive use of them, but after the satellite launch two electronic related problems revealed critical. First an unexpected excess response of detectors at low optical excitation frequency for {\

  11. A noise level prediction method based on electro-mechanical frequency response function for capacitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyu Zhu

    Full Text Available The capacitors in high-voltage direct-current (HVDC converter stations radiate a lot of audible noise which can reach higher than 100 dB. The existing noise level prediction methods are not satisfying enough. In this paper, a new noise level prediction method is proposed based on a frequency response function considering both electrical and mechanical characteristics of capacitors. The electro-mechanical frequency response function (EMFRF is defined as the frequency domain quotient of the vibration response and the squared capacitor voltage, and it is obtained from impulse current experiment. Under given excitations, the vibration response of the capacitor tank is the product of EMFRF and the square of the given capacitor voltage in frequency domain, and the radiated audible noise is calculated by structure acoustic coupling formulas. The noise level under the same excitations is also measured in laboratory, and the results are compared with the prediction. The comparison proves that the noise prediction method is effective.

  12. Extension of a nonlinear systems theory to general-frequency unsteady transonic aerodynamic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1993-01-01

    A methodology for modeling nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic responses, for subsequent use in aeroservoelastic analysis and design, using the Volterra-Wiener theory of nonlinear systems is presented. The methodology is extended to predict nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic responses of arbitrary frequency. The Volterra-Wiener theory uses multidimensional convolution integrals to predict the response of nonlinear systems to arbitrary inputs. The CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code is used to generate linear and nonlinear unit impulse responses that correspond to each of the integrals for a rectangular wing with a NACA 0012 section with pitch and plunge degrees of freedom. The computed kernels then are used to predict linear and nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic responses via convolution and compared to responses obtained using the CAP-TSD code directly. The results indicate that the approach can be used to predict linear unsteady aerodynamic responses exactly for any input amplitude or frequency at a significant cost savings. Convolution of the nonlinear terms results in nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic responses that compare reasonably well with those computed using the CAP-TSD code directly but at significant computational cost savings.

  13. Multisensory stimuli elicit altered oscillatory brain responses at gamma frequencies in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Stone

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Deficits in auditory and visual unisensory responses are well documented in patients with schizophrenia; however, potential abnormalities elicited from multisensory audio-visual stimuli are less understood. Further, schizophrenia patients have shown abnormal patterns in task-related and task-independent oscillatory brain activity, particularly in the gamma frequency band. We examined oscillatory responses to basic unisensory and multisensory stimuli in schizophrenia patients (N = 46 and healthy controls (N = 57 using magnetoencephalography (MEG. Time-frequency decomposition was performed to determine regions of significant changes in gamma band power by group in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli relative to baseline levels. Results showed significant behavioral differences between groups in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. In addition, time-frequency analysis revealed significant decreases and increases in gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls, which emerged both early and late over both sensory and frontal regions in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. Unisensory gamma-band power predicted multisensory gamma-band power differently by group. Furthermore, gamma-band power in these regions predicted performance in select measures of the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS test battery differently by group. These results reveal a unique pattern of task-related gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to controls that may indicate reduced inhibition in combination with impaired oscillatory mechanisms in patients with schizophrenia.

  14. Frequency-response identification of XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Mark B.

    1987-01-01

    The timely design and development of the next generation of tilt-rotor aircraft (JVX) depend heavily on the in-depth understanding of existing XV-15 dynamics and the availability of fully validated simulation models. Previous studies have considered aircraft and simulation trim characteristics, but analyses of basic flight vehicle dynamics were limited to qualitative pilot evaluation. The present study has the following objectives: documentation and evaluation of XV-15 bare-airframe dynamics; comparison of aircraft and simulation responses; and development of a validated transfer-function description of the XV-15 needed for future studies. A nonparametric frequency-response approach is used which does not depend on assumed model order or structure. Transfer-function representations are subsequently derived which fit the frequency responses in the bandwidth of greatest concern for piloted handling-qualities and control-system applications.

  15. Selective optical transmission in anisotropic multilayers structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a Green's function method to study theoretically a single-defect photonic crystal composed of anisotropic dielectric materials. This structure can trap light of a given frequency range and filter only a certain frequency light with a very high quality. It is shown that the defect modes appear as peaks in the transmission spectrum. Their intensities and frequency positions depend on the incidence angle and the orientation of the principal axes of layers consisting of the superlattice and the layer defect. Our structure offers a great variety of possibilities for creating and controlling the number and transmitted intensities of defect modes. It can be a good candidate for realizing a selective electromagnetic filter. In addition to this filtration process, the defective anisotropic photonic crystal can be used to switch the modes when appropriate geometry is selected. (author)

  16. Analysis of the frequency-dependent response to wave forcing in the extratropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Haklander

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A quasigeostrophic model for the frequency-dependent response of the zonal-mean flow to planetary-wave forcing at Northern Hemisphere (NH midlatitudes is applied to 4-D-Var ECMWF analysis data for six extended winter seasons. The theoretical response is a non-linear function of the frequency of the forcing, the thermal damping time α−1, and a scaling parameter μ which includes the aspect ratio of the meridional to the vertical length scale of the response. Non-linear regression of the calculated response from the analyses onto the theoretical response yields height-dependent estimates for both α−1 and μ. The thermal damping time estimated from this dynamical model is about 2 days in the troposphere, 7–10 days in the stratosphere, and 2–4 days in the lower mesosphere. These estimates generally lie within the range of existing estimates, although the values we find for the troposphere are significantly smaller than those calculated in several radiative transfer modeling studies. At most levels, the estimates for μ are significantly lower than can be derived from scaling arguments that apply outside the forcing region. We illustrate with an example how the response of the meridional circulation inside the forcing area can have a higher aspect ratio than the effective response outside the forcing area.

  17. Frequency-domain correction of sensor dynamic error for step response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuang-Long; Xu, Ke-Jun

    2012-11-01

    To obtain accurate results in dynamic measurements it is required that the sensors should have good dynamic performance. In practice, sensors have non-ideal dynamic characteristics due to their small damp ratios and low natural frequencies. In this case some dynamic error correction methods can be adopted for dealing with the sensor responses to eliminate the effect of their dynamic characteristics. The frequency-domain correction of sensor dynamic error is a common method. Using the existing calculation method, however, the correct frequency-domain correction function (FCF) cannot be obtained according to the step response calibration experimental data. This is because of the leakage error and invalid FCF value caused by the cycle extension of the finite length step input-output intercepting data. In order to solve these problems the data splicing preprocessing and FCF interpolation are put forward, and the FCF calculation steps as well as sensor dynamic error correction procedure by the calculated FCF are presented in this paper. The proposed solution is applied to the dynamic error correction of the bar-shaped wind tunnel strain gauge balance so as to verify its effectiveness. The dynamic error correction results show that the adjust time of the balance step response is shortened to 10 ms (shorter than 1/30 before correction) after frequency-domain correction, and the overshoot is fallen within 5% (less than 1/10 before correction) as well. The dynamic measurement accuracy of the balance is improved significantly.

  18. High Frequency Acoustic Response Characterization and Analysis of the Deep Throttling Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiano, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Common Extensive Cryogenic Engine program demonstrated the operation of a deep throttling engine design. The program, spanning five years from August 2005 to July 2010, funded testing through four separate engine demonstration test series. Along with successful completion of multiple objectives, a discrete response of approximately 4000 Hz was discovered and explored throughout the program. The typical low-amplitude acoustic response was evident in the chamber measurement through almost every operating condition; however, at certain off-nominal operating conditions, the response became discrete with higher amplitude. This paper summarizes the data reduction, characterization, and analysis of the 4,000 Hz response for the entire program duration, using the large amount of data collected. Upon first encountering the response, new objectives and instrumentation were incorporated in future test series to specifically collect 4,000 Hz data. The 4,000 Hz response was identified as being related to the first tangential acoustic mode by means of frequency estimation and spatial decomposition. The latter approach showed that the effective node line of the mode was aligned with the manifold propellant inlets with standing waves and quasi-standing waves present at various times. Contour maps that contain instantaneous frequency and amplitude trackings of the response were generated as a significant improvement to historical manual approaches of data reduction presentation. Signal analysis and dynamic data reduction also uncovered several other features of the response including a stable limit cycle, the progressive engagement of subsequent harmonics, the U-shaped time history, an intermittent response near the test-based neutral stability region, other acoustic modes, and indications of modulation with a separate subsynchronous response. Although no engine damage related to the acoustic mode was noted, the peak-to-peak fluctuating pressure amplitude achieved 12.1% of the

  19. Broadband frequency and angular response of a sinusoidal bull’s eye antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaskoetxea, U.; Navarro-Cía, M.; Beruete, M.

    2016-07-01

    A thorough experimental study of the frequency and beaming angle response of a metallic leaky-wave bull’s eye antenna working at 77 GHz with a sinusoidally corrugated profile is presented. The beam scanning property of these antennas as frequency is varied is experimentally demonstrated and corroborated through theoretical and numerical results. From the experimental results the dispersion diagram of the n  =  ‑1 and n  =  ‑2 space harmonics is extracted, and the operation at different frequency regimes is identified and discussed. In order to show the contribution of each half of the antenna, numerical examples of the near-field behavior are also displayed. Overall, experimental results are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with theoretical and numerical calculations. Finally, an analysis of the beamwidth as a function of frequency is performed, showing that it can achieve values below 1.5° in a fractional bandwidth of 4% around the operation frequency, which is an interesting frequency-stable broadside radiation.

  20. Correspondence between phasor transforms and frequency response function in RLC circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Abdalla, Hassan Mohamed Abdelalim

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of RLC circuits is usually made by considering phasor transforms of sinusoidal signals (characterized by constant amplitude, period and phase) that allow the calculation of the AC steady state of RLC circuits by solving simple algebraic equations. In this paper I try to show that phasor representation of RLC circuits is analogue to consider the frequency response function (commonly designated by FRF) of the total impedance of the circuit. In this way I derive accurate expressions for the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies and their corresponding values of impedances of the parallel and series RLC circuits respectively, notwithstanding the presence of damping effects.

  1. Frequency and Phase Synchronization in Neuromagnetic Cortical Responses to Flickering-Color Stimuli

    CERN Document Server

    Timashev, S F; Yulmetyev, R M; Demin, S A; Panischev, O Yu; Shimojo, S; Bhattacharya, J

    2009-01-01

    In our earlier study dealing with the analysis of neuromagnetic responses (magnetoencephalograms - MEG) to flickering-color stimuli for a group of control human subjects (9 volunteers) and a patient with photosensitive epilepsy (a 12-year old girl), it was shown that Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) was able to identify specific differences in the responses of each organism. The high specificity of individual MEG responses manifested itself in the values of FNS parameters for both chaotic and resonant components of the original signal. The present study applies the FNS cross-correlation function to the analysis of correlations between the MEG responses simultaneously measured at spatially separated points of the human cortex processing the red-blue flickering color stimulus. It is shown that the cross-correlations for control (healthy) subjects are characterized by frequency and phase synchronization at different points of the cortex, with the dynamics of neuromagnetic responses being determined by the low-fr...

  2. Auditory steady-state responses in cochlear implant users: Effect of modulation frequency and stimulation artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gransier, Robin; Deprez, Hanne; Hofmann, Michael; Moonen, Marc; van Wieringen, Astrid; Wouters, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that objective measures based on stimulation with low-rate pulse trains fail to predict the threshold levels of cochlear implant (CI) users for high-rate pulse trains, as used in clinical devices. Electrically evoked auditory steady-state responses (EASSRs) can be elicited by modulated high-rate pulse trains, and can potentially be used to objectively determine threshold levels of CI users. The responsiveness of the auditory pathway of profoundly hearing-impaired CI users to modulation frequencies is, however, not known. In the present study we investigated the responsiveness of the auditory pathway of CI users to a monopolar 500 pulses per second (pps) pulse train modulated between 1 and 100 Hz. EASSRs to forty-three modulation frequencies, elicited at the subject's maximum comfort level, were recorded by means of electroencephalography. Stimulation artifacts were removed by a linear interpolation between a pre- and post-stimulus sample (i.e., blanking). The phase delay across modulation frequencies was used to differentiate between the neural response and a possible residual stimulation artifact after blanking. Stimulation artifacts were longer than the inter-pulse interval of the 500pps pulse train for recording electrodes ipsilateral to the CI. As a result the stimulation artifacts could not be removed by artifact removal on the bases of linear interpolation for recording electrodes ipsilateral to the CI. However, artifact-free responses could be obtained in all subjects from recording electrodes contralateral to the CI, when subject specific reference electrodes (Cz or Fpz) were used. EASSRs to modulation frequencies within the 30-50 Hz range resulted in significant responses in all subjects. Only a small number of significant responses could be obtained, during a measurement period of 5 min, that originate from the brain stem (i.e., modulation frequencies in the 80-100 Hz range). This reduced synchronized activity of brain stem

  3. Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique for identifying nonlinear structural elements from frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Zheng, G. T.

    2016-02-01

    A simple and general Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique is proposed for identifying the parameters or the mathematical model of a nonlinear structural element with steady-state primary harmonic frequency response functions (FRFs). The Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness is defined as the complex ratio between the internal force and the displacement response of unknown element. Obtained with the test data of responses' frequencies and amplitudes, the real and imaginary part of Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness are plotted as discrete points in a three dimensional space over the displacement amplitude and the frequency, which are called the real and the imaginary Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness map, respectively. These points will form a repeatable surface as the Equivalent Dynamic stiffness is only a function of the corresponding data as derived in the paper. The mathematical model of the unknown element can then be obtained by surface-fitting these points with special functions selected by priori knowledge of the nonlinear type or with ordinary polynomials if the type of nonlinearity is not pre-known. An important merit of this technique is its capability of dealing with strong nonlinearities owning complicated frequency response behaviors such as jumps and breaks in resonance curves. In addition, this technique could also greatly simplify the test procedure. Besides there is no need to pre-identify the underlying linear parameters, the method uses the measured data of excitation forces and responses without requiring a strict control of the excitation force during the test. The proposed technique is demonstrated and validated with four classical single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) numerical examples and one experimental example. An application of this technique for identification of nonlinearity from multiple-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) systems is also illustrated.

  4. Averaging anisotropic cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine the effects of spatial inhomogeneities on irrotational anisotropic cosmologies by looking at the average properties of anisotropic pressure-free models. Adopting the Buchert scheme, we recast the averaged scalar equations in Bianchi-type form and close the standard system by introducing a propagation formula for the average shear magnitude. We then investigate the evolution of anisotropic average vacuum models and those filled with pressureless matter. In the latter case we show that the backreaction effects can modify the familiar Kasner-like singularity and potentially remove Mixmaster-type oscillations. The presence of nonzero average shear in our equations also allows us to examine the constraints that a phase of backreaction-driven accelerated expansion might put on the anisotropy of the averaged domain. We close by assessing the status of these and other attempts to define and calculate 'average' spacetime behaviour in general relativity

  5. Prediction of power system frequency response after generator outages using neural nets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djukanovic, M.B.; Popovic, D.P. (Electrotechnicki Inst. ' Nikola Tesla' , Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Sobajic, D.J.; Pao, Y.-H. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1993-09-01

    A new methodology is presented for estimating the frequency behaviour of power systems necessary for an indication of under-frequency load shedding in steady-state security assessment. It is well known that large structural disturbances such as generator tripping or load outages can initiate cascading outages, system separation into islands, and even the complete breakup. The approach provides a fairly accurate method of estimating the system average frequency response without making simplifications or neglecting non-linearities and small time constants in the equations of generating units, voltage regulators and turbines. The efficiency of the new procedure is demonstrated using the New England power system model for a series of characteristic perturbations. The validity of the proposed approach is verified by comparison with the simulation of short-term dynamics including effects of control and automatic devices. (author)

  6. Comparison of the frequency response characteristics of catheter-mounted piezoelectric and micromanometric phonotransducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, J C; Layton, S A; Rubal, B J

    1989-05-01

    This study compares the frequency response characteristics of catheter-mounted piezoelectric sound transducers with micromanometric transducers. The tip of a 8F catheter with two piezoelectric transducers and two micromanometers was inserted into a water-filled chamber that had a speaker fixed at one end. The speaker was driven by a power amplifier and sine wave generator. The outputs of the transducers were connected to a low-level amplifier. The piezoelectric transducer behaved as a tunable high-pass filter that could be modified by altering the input impedance of the low level amplifier; the frequency response characteristics were examined at five input impedances ranging from 0.96 to 11.8 megohms. The peak-to-peak outputs of the piezoelectric and pressure transducers were recorded at frequency ranges from DC to 1 kHz with a wide-band oscilloscope. The ratio of the outputs from the piezotransducer and micromanometer (Vph/Vpr) was plotted vs. frequency for each input impedance and analyzed to determine the piezotransducer's output resistance and equivalent capacitance; roll-off frequencies were then calculated. The equivalent capacitance of the piezo-element was determined to be 500-700 picofarads. Series capacitance acted with network resistance to produce a predictable frequency-dependent change in signal amplitude and phase angle. The inherent noise of the pressure transducer was found to be approximately 0.2 mm Hg, while the noise of the piezoelectric transducer was immeasurably low. The piezoelectric phonotransducers were superior to micromanometer transducers in their higher gain and lower noise, suggesting that these transducers may prove useful to physiologic and clinical studies for measuring intravascular sound. PMID:2720766

  7. Responses of the ear to low frequency sounds, infrasound and wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt, Alec N; Hullar, Timothy E

    2010-09-01

    Infrasonic sounds are generated internally in the body (by respiration, heartbeat, coughing, etc) and by external sources, such as air conditioning systems, inside vehicles, some industrial processes and, now becoming increasingly prevalent, wind turbines. It is widely assumed that infrasound presented at an amplitude below what is audible has no influence on the ear. In this review, we consider possible ways that low frequency sounds, at levels that may or may not be heard, could influence the function of the ear. The inner ear has elaborate mechanisms to attenuate low frequency sound components before they are transmitted to the brain. The auditory portion of the ear, the cochlea, has two types of sensory cells, inner hair cells (IHC) and outer hair cells (OHC), of which the IHC are coupled to the afferent fibers that transmit "hearing" to the brain. The sensory stereocilia ("hairs") on the IHC are "fluid coupled" to mechanical stimuli, so their responses depend on stimulus velocity and their sensitivity decreases as sound frequency is lowered. In contrast, the OHC are directly coupled to mechanical stimuli, so their input remains greater than for IHC at low frequencies. At very low frequencies the OHC are stimulated by sounds at levels below those that are heard. Although the hair cells in other sensory structures such as the saccule may be tuned to infrasonic frequencies, auditory stimulus coupling to these structures is inefficient so that they are unlikely to be influenced by airborne infrasound. Structures that are involved in endolymph volume regulation are also known to be influenced by infrasound, but their sensitivity is also thought to be low. There are, however, abnormal states in which the ear becomes hypersensitive to infrasound. In most cases, the inner ear's responses to infrasound can be considered normal, but they could be associated with unfamiliar sensations or subtle changes in physiology. This raises the possibility that exposure to the

  8. Anisotropic elastic plates

    CERN Document Server

    Hwu, Chyanbin

    2010-01-01

    As structural elements, anisotropic elastic plates find wide applications in modern technology. The plates here are considered to be subjected to not only in plane load but also transverse load. In other words, both plane and plate bending problems as well as the stretching-bending coupling problems are all explained in this book. In addition to the introduction of the theory of anisotropic elasticity, several important subjects have are discussed in this book such as interfaces, cracks, holes, inclusions, contact problems, piezoelectric materials, thermoelastic problems and boundary element a

  9. Anisotropic Weyl invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Nadal, Guillem

    2016-01-01

    We consider a non-relativistic free scalar field theory with a type of anisotropic scale invariance in which the number of coordinates "scaling like time" is generically greater than one. We propose the Cartesian product of two curved spaces, with the metric of each space parameterized by the other space, as a notion of curved background to which the theory can be extended. We study this type of geometries, and find a family of extensions of the theory to curved backgrounds in which the anisotropic scale invariance is promoted to a local, Weyl-type symmetry.

  10. Cortisol response and subjective sleep disturbance after low-frequency noise exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson Waye, K.; Agge, A.; Clow, A.; Hucklebridge, F.

    2004-10-01

    A previous experimental study showed that the cortisol response upon awakening was reduced following nights with low-frequency noise exposure. This study comprised a larger number of subjects and an extended period of acclimatisation nights. In total, 26 male subjects slept during five consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. Half of the subjects were exposed to low-frequency noise (40 dBA) on the 4th night and had their reference night (24 dBA) on the 5th night, while the reverse conditions were present for the other half of the group. Subjective sleep disturbances were recorded by questionnaires and cortisol response upon awakening was measured in saliva. The results showed that subjects were more tired and felt less socially orientated in the morning after nights with low-frequency noise. Mood was negatively affected in the evening after nights with low-frequency noise. No effect of noise condition was found on the cortisol secretion. There was a significant effect of group and weekday, indicating that further methodological developments are necessary before saliva cortisol secretion can be reliably used as an indicator of noise-disturbed sleep.

  11. Frequency of and subjective response to critical incidents in the prediction of PTSD in emergency personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declercq, Frédéric; Meganck, Reitske; Deheegher, J; Van Hoorde, H

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the authors compared the respective contribution of an individual's subjective response and the frequency of exposure to critical incidents to the development of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample of 136 nurses and ambulance personnel working in military facilities. They found no relationship between the frequency of encountered critical incidents and the occurrence of PTSD symptoms. The subjective response to a stressor contributed to the development of PTSD symptoms and was most strongly associated with intrusion, partial eta squared =.23, and hyperarousal symptoms, partial eta squared =.16. Stressors that elicited the most intense affects within this population were those involving children and those where workers encountered limitations in supplies and resources. PMID:21351174

  12. Robust controller design for the nuclear reactor power by extended frequency response method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a controller for a nuclear power is designed. The reactor is modeled using the three dimensional reactor design code MASTER. From the relationship of the input and output of the reactor code, a reactor dynamic model is derived by the system identification method. This model is more realistic than the one based on mathematical theories. With this model, a robust controller is designed by the extended frequency response method. As this method has the same theoretical background as the classical method, all of the existing design techniques of the classical method can be used directly. Furthermore, by introducing the real part of a Laplacian operator into the frequency response, the control design specification can be considered at the initial stage of design. The designed controller is simple, and gives a sufficient robustness with good performance

  13. Frequency-response-based analysis of respiratory sensor measuring capacitance built across skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Makie; Kumagai, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru

    2016-04-01

    A capacitive respiratory sensor is studied by attaching the electrodes to the skin. The signal characteristics related to the electrode position and body motion are examined. The frequency response indicates the nearly pure capacitance characteristics. The sensing mechanism model based on the equivalent skin thickness change generated by the body volume change accompanying respiration is reasonably consistent with the experimental results. The sensing method is examined by measuring the frequency response under some different conditions including the grounding issue. The electrode attached to the concave site tends to show a smaller signal difference between inhalation and exhalation. The convex site stabilizes the measurement. The bellyband combined with the electrode realizes stable sensing with comfortable fit on the skin.

  14. Open Photoacoustic Cell for Blood Sugar Measurement: Numerical Calculation of Frequency Response

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Bernd; Teschner, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A new approach for continuous and non-invasive monitoring of the glucose concentration in human epidermis has been suggested recently. This method is based on photoacoustic (PA) analysis of human interstitial fluid. The measurement can be performed in vitro and in vivo and, therefore, may form the basis for a non-invasive monitoring of the blood sugar level for diabetes patients. It requires a windowless PA cell with an additional opening that is pressed onto the human skin. Since signals are weak, advantage is taken of acoustic resonances of the cell. Recently, a numerical approach based on the Finite Element (FE) Method has been successfully used for the calculation of the frequency response function of closed PA cells. This method has now been adapted to obtain the frequency response of the open cell. Despite the fact that loss due to sound radiation at the opening is not included, fairly good accordance with measurement is achieved.

  15. High frequency switched-mode stimulation can evoke postsynaptic responses in cerebellar principal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn Van Dongen

    2015-03-01

    These findings are subsequently verified using in vitro experiments in which the response of a Purkinje cell is measured due to a stimulation signal in the molecular layer of the cerebellum of a mouse. For this purpose a stimulator circuit is developed that is able to produce a monophasic high frequency switched-mode stimulation signal. The results confirm the modeling by showing that switched-mode stimulation is able to induce similar responses in the Purkinje cell as classical stimulation using a constant current source. This conclusion opens up possibilities for novel stimulation designs that can improve the performance of the stimulator circuitry. Care has to be taken to avoid losses in the system due to the higher operating frequency.

  16. Characterization of the LIGO 4 km Fabry-Perot cavities via their high-frequency dynamic responses to length and laser frequency variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent measurements at the LIGO Hanford Observatory have confirmed the predicted high-frequency dynamic response of km scale Fabry-Perot cavities to length and laser frequency variations. The dynamic response functions have been exploited to determine a number of cavity parameters including the cavity length and the resonance width. A new technique based on a variation of these measurements has been utilized to measure the interferometer arm cavity lengths with a precision of 80 μm. We present an overview of these measurements and discuss how the dynamic field responses could be used to measure the cavity g factors which are related to the mirror radii of curvature

  17. Optimization of a space spectrograph main frame and frequency response analysis of the frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-yu; Chen, Zhi-yuan; Yang, Shi-mo

    2009-07-01

    A space spectrograph main structure is optimized and examined in order to satisfy the space operational needs. The space spectrograph will be transported into its operational orbit by the launch vehicle and it will undergo dynamic environment in the spacecraft injection period. The unexpected shocks may cause declination of observation accuracy and even equipment damages. The main frame is one of the most important parts because its mechanical performance has great influence on the operational life of the spectrograph, accuracy of observation, etc. For the reason of cost reduction and stability confirming, lower weight and higher structure stiffness of the frame are simultaneously required. Structure optimization was conducted considering the initial design modal analysis results. The base modal frequency raised 10.34% while the whole weight lowered 8.63% compared to the initial design. The purpose of this study is to analyze the new design of main frame mechanical properties and verify whether it can satisfy strict optical demands under the dynamic impact during spacecraft injection. For realizing and forecasting the frequency response characteristics of the main structure in mechanical environment experiment, dynamic analysis of the structure should be performed simulating impulse loads from the bottom base. Therefore, frequency response analysis (FRA) of the frame was then performed using the FEA software MSC.PATRAN/NASTRAN. Results of shock response spectrum (SRS) responses from the base excitations were given. Stress and acceleration dynamic responses of essential positions in the spacecraft injection course were also calculated and spectrometer structure design was examined considering stiffness / strength demands. In this simulation, maximum stresses of Cesic material in two acceleration application cases are 45.1 and 74.1 MPa, respectively. They are all less than yield strengths. As is demonstrated from the simulation, strength reservation of the frame is

  18. First direct measurements of behavioural responses by Cuvier's beaked whales to mid-frequency active sonar

    OpenAIRE

    De Ruiter, Stacy Lynn; Southall, Brandon L.; Calambokidis, John; Zimmer, Walter M X; Sadykova, Dinara; Falcone, Erin A.; Friedlaender, Ari S.; John E. Joseph; Moretti, David; Schorr, Gregory S.; Thomas, Len; Tyack, Peter Lloyd

    2013-01-01

    Most marine mammal­ strandings coincident with naval sonar exercises have involved Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris). We recorded animal movement and acoustic data on two tagged Ziphius and obtained the first direct measurements of behavioural responses of this species to mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar signals. Each recording included a 30-min playback (one 1.6-s simulated MFA sonar signal repeated every 25 s); one whale was also incidentally exposed to MFA sonar from distant nav...

  19. Frequency Response Of Series And Parallel Combination Of Two Single Feedback Class D Amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    R. Sivarajan; K. R. Padmavathy; A.kasthoory; N. Santha; S. Subashri

    2015-01-01

    Amplifier is generally used to increase the amplitude of the signal. Consider the audio signal, if the amplitude of the audio signal is increased, then automatically loudness of the signal is increased. Class D Amplifier (CDA) consists of integrator, PWM modulator and output stage. This system can be defined as a open loop CDA system. The main factor to be considered for any amplifier circuit is the gain which is obtained by frequency response. To improve the gain of the amplifier, ...

  20. A Posteriori Error Analysis of Component Mode Synthesis for the Frequency Response Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsson, Håkan; Larson, Mats G.

    2012-01-01

    We consider the frequency response problem and derive a posteriori error estimates for the discrete error in a reduced finite element model obtained using the component mode synthesis (CMS) method. We provide estimates in a linear quantity of interest and the energy norm. The estimates reflect to what degree each CMS subspace influence the overall error in the reduced solution. This enables automatic error control through adaptive algorithms that determine suitable dimensions of each subspace...

  1. Real-time open-loop frequency response analysis of flight test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, J. T.; West, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    A technique has been developed to compare the open-loop frequency response of a flight test aircraft real time with linear analysis predictions. The result is direct feedback to the flight control systems engineer on the validity of predictions and adds confidence for proceeding with envelope expansion. Further, gain and phase margins can be tracked for trends in a manner similar to the techniques used by structural dynamics engineers in tracking structural modal damping.

  2. Moth hearing in response to bat echolocation calls manipulated independently in time and frequency.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, G.; Waters, D A

    2000-01-01

    We measured the auditory responses of the noctuid moth Noctua pronuba to bat echolocation calls which were manipulated independently in time and frequency. Such manipulations are important in understanding how insect hearing influences the evolution of echolocation call characteristics. We manipulated the calls of three bat species (Rhinolophus hipposideros, Myotis nattereri and Pipistrellus pipistrellus) that use different echolocation call features by doubling their duration or reducing the...

  3. A Practical Method for Measuring the Spatial Frequency Response of Light Field Cameras

    OpenAIRE

    Firmenich, Damien; Süsstrunk, Sabine; Baboulaz, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    The spatial frequency response (SFR) is one of the most important and unbiased image quality measures of a digital camera. It evaluates to which extent a lens/sensor combination can resolve scene details. In this paper, we propose a simple and practical method to measure the SFR of microlens-based light field cameras. The particularity of such cameras resides in their ability to capture both spatial and angular information of the incoming light field thanks to an array of microlenses located ...

  4. Methacholine responsiveness in infants assessed with low frequency forced oscillation and forced expiration techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, G; Hantos, Z.; Wildhaber, J; Petak, F; Sly, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The contribution of the pulmonary tissues to the mechanical behaviour of the respiratory system is well recognised. This study was undertaken to detect airway and lung tissue responses to inhaled methacholine (Mch) using the low frequency forced oscillation technique (LFOT).
METHODS—The respiratory system impedance (Zrs, 0.5-20 Hz) was determined in 17 asymptomatic infants. A model containing airway resistance (Raw) and inertance (Iaw) and a constant phase tissue ...

  5. Individual Differences in the Frequency-Following Response: Relation to Pitch Perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily B J Coffey

    Full Text Available The scalp-recorded frequency-following response (FFR is a measure of the auditory nervous system's representation of periodic sound, and may serve as a marker of training-related enhancements, behavioural deficits, and clinical conditions. However, FFRs of healthy normal subjects show considerable variability that remains unexplained. We investigated whether the FFR representation of the frequency content of a complex tone is related to the perception of the pitch of the fundamental frequency. The strength of the fundamental frequency in the FFR of 39 people with normal hearing was assessed when they listened to complex tones that either included or lacked energy at the fundamental frequency. We found that the strength of the fundamental representation of the missing fundamental tone complex correlated significantly with people's general tendency to perceive the pitch of the tone as either matching the frequency of the spectral components that were present, or that of the missing fundamental. Although at a group level the fundamental representation in the FFR did not appear to be affected by the presence or absence of energy at the same frequency in the stimulus, the two conditions were statistically distinguishable for some subjects individually, indicating that the neural representation is not linearly dependent on the stimulus content. In a second experiment using a within-subjects paradigm, we showed that subjects can learn to reversibly select between either fundamental or spectral perception, and that this is accompanied both by changes to the fundamental representation in the FFR and to cortical-based gamma activity. These results suggest that both fundamental and spectral representations coexist, and are available for later auditory processing stages, the requirements of which may also influence their relative strength and thus modulate FFR variability. The data also highlight voluntary mode perception as a new paradigm with which to

  6. Machine fault detection and failure prediction via measurement of the dynamic response in the frequency domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that some common machine structural failures can be identified on-line by monitoring in some chosen characteristic frequency response functions. The response signatures are shown to be insensitive to variations in machine loading and, by suitable location of vibration monitoring points, can be used to accurately locate and identify the cause of failure. The method is used to identify faults such as shaft misalignment and bearing failures on a high speed motor-pump assembly and to detect and predict fatigue failures in shafts subjected to torsional loads. (author)

  7. Analysis of the frequency-dependent response to wave forcing in the extratropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Haklander

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A quasigeostrophic model for the frequency-dependent response of the zonal-mean flow to planetary-wave forcing at Northern Hemisphere (NH midlatitudes is applied to 4-D-Var ECMWF analysis data for six extended winter seasons. The theoretical response is a non-linear function of the frequency of the forcing, the thermal damping time α−1, and a scaling parameter µ which includes the aspect ratio of the meridional to the vertical length scale of the response. Regression of the calculated response from the analyses onto the theoretical response yields height-dependent estimates for both α−1 and µ. The thermal damping time estimated from this dynamical model is about 2 days in the troposphere, 7–10 days in the stratosphere, and 2–4 days in the lower mesosphere. For the stratosphere and lower mesosphere, the estimates lie within the range of existing radiative damping time estimates, but for the troposphere they are significantly smaller.

  8. Responses of Waveform-Selective Absorbing Metasurfaces to Oblique Waves at the Same Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki; Gao, Fei; Yagitani, Satoshi; Sievenpiper, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional materials vary their electromagnetic properties in response to the frequency of an incoming wave, but these responses generally remain unchanged at the same frequency unless nonlinearity is involved. Waveform-selective metasurfaces, recently developed by integrating several circuit elements with planar subwavelength periodic structures, allowed us to distinguish different waves even at the same frequency depending on how long the waves continued, namely, on their pulse widths. These materials were thus expected to give us an additional degree of freedom to control electromagnetic waves. However, all the past studies were demonstrated with waves at a normal angle only, although in reality electromagnetic waves scatter from various structures or boundaries and therefore illuminate the metasurfaces at oblique angles. Here we study angular dependences of waveform-selective metasurfaces both numerically and experimentally. We demonstrate that, if designed properly, capacitor-based waveform-selective metasurfaces more effectively absorb short pulses than continuous waves (CWs) for a wide range of the incident angle, while inductor-based metasurfaces absorb CWs more strongly. Our study is expected to be usefully exploited for applying the concept of waveform selectivity to a wide range of existing microwave devices to expand their functionalities or performances in response to pulse width as a new capability. PMID:27516346

  9. Research on the iterative method for model updating based on the frequency response function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Ming Li; Jia-Zhen Hong

    2012-01-01

    Model reduction technique is usually employed in model updating process,In this paper,a new model updating method named as cross-model cross-frequency response function (CMCF) method is proposed and a new iterative method associating the model updating method with the model reduction technique is investigated.The new model updating method utilizes the frequency response function to avoid the modal analysis process and it does not need to pair or scale the measured and the analytical frequency response function,which could greatly increase the number of the equations and the updating parameters.Based on the traditional iterative method,a correction term related to the errors resulting from the replacement of the reduction matrix of the experimental model with that of the finite element model is added in the new iterative method.Comparisons between the traditional iterative method and the proposed iterative method are shown by model updating examples of solar panels,and both of these two iterative methods combine the CMCF method and the succession-level approximate reduction technique.Results show the effectiveness of the CMCF method and the proposed iterative method.

  10. Frequency response of a focused SAW device based on concentric wave surfaces: simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Tsong; Tang, He-Tai; Chen, Yung-Yu

    2005-08-01

    Focused interdigital transducers (FIDTs) based on concentric wave surfaces can excite surface acoustic wave (SAW) with high intensity, high beamwidth compression ratio and small localized area. In this paper, we developed a model to analyse the frequency response of a SAW device with FIDTs based on concentric wave surfaces. First, we constructed a focused SAW device by adopting a pair of FIDTs shaped as the concentric wave surface. To calculate its frequency response, a simulation model was established based on the 2D SAW filter model, effective permittivity approach and perturbation theory. Further, the focused SAW devices were designed and fabricated via the microelectromechanical system process technique. A good agreement between the simulated and measured results was found. Finally, the frequency responses of focused SAW devices based on concentric wave surfaces were discussed and some attractive features were found, such as less ripples of pass-band and high stop-band rejection. In addition, in comparison with the conventional SAW devices with uniform interdigital transducers, the focused SAW devices are more sensitive to variations in the focal area, instead of the whole delayline region. Accordingly, they are suitable to be applied to detect or manipulate some localized variations, such as acousto-optic or acousto-electric effects.

  11. Optimizing the frequency response of a steering mirror mount for interferometry applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penado, F. Ernesto; Clark, James H., III

    2009-08-01

    The Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI) in Flagstaff, Arizona, makes use of separate smaller telescopes spaced along a Y-array and used simultaneously to simulate an equivalent single large telescope. The performance of the NPOI can be improved by increasing the steering response of the 8-in. diameter Narrow Angle Tracker (NAT). The mirrors of the NAT correct the image position for atmospherically induced motion. The current tracker has a slow response due to the low fundamental frequency of the mount and limits the quality of the data. A higher frequency will allow a faster servo feedback to the steering mirror, which will enhance the tracking performance on stellar objects resulting in final fringe data of higher quality. Also, additional and fainter objects could be observed with a faster response system, and the interferometer as a whole would be less sensitive to fluctuations in atmospheric quality. Improvements in the NAT performance over the current cast aluminum frame and glass mirror were achieved by the use of advanced composite materials in the design of the frame and mirror. Various design possibilities were evaluated using finite element analysis. It was found that the natural frequency of the NAT can be increased from 68 to 217 Hz, and the corresponding weight decreased by a factor of 5.6, by using a composite mount with a composite mirror.

  12. Responses of Waveform-Selective Absorbing Metasurfaces to Oblique Waves at the Same Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki; Gao, Fei; Yagitani, Satoshi; Sievenpiper, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Conventional materials vary their electromagnetic properties in response to the frequency of an incoming wave, but these responses generally remain unchanged at the same frequency unless nonlinearity is involved. Waveform-selective metasurfaces, recently developed by integrating several circuit elements with planar subwavelength periodic structures, allowed us to distinguish different waves even at the same frequency depending on how long the waves continued, namely, on their pulse widths. These materials were thus expected to give us an additional degree of freedom to control electromagnetic waves. However, all the past studies were demonstrated with waves at a normal angle only, although in reality electromagnetic waves scatter from various structures or boundaries and therefore illuminate the metasurfaces at oblique angles. Here we study angular dependences of waveform-selective metasurfaces both numerically and experimentally. We demonstrate that, if designed properly, capacitor-based waveform-selective metasurfaces more effectively absorb short pulses than continuous waves (CWs) for a wide range of the incident angle, while inductor-based metasurfaces absorb CWs more strongly. Our study is expected to be usefully exploited for applying the concept of waveform selectivity to a wide range of existing microwave devices to expand their functionalities or performances in response to pulse width as a new capability. PMID:27516346

  13. Frequency dependence of CA3 spike phase response arising from h-current properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jae Jang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The phase of firing of hippocampal neurons during theta oscillations encodes spatial information. Moreover, the spike phase response to synaptic inputs in individual cells depends on the expression of the hyperpolarisation-activated mixed cation current (Ih, which differs between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons. Here, we compared the phase response of these two cell types, as well as their intrinsic membrane properties. We found that both CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons show a voltage sag in response to negative current steps but that this voltage sag is significantly smaller in CA3 cells. Moreover, CA3 pyramidal neurons have less prominent resonance properties compared to CA1 pyramidal neurons. This is consistent with differential expression of Ih by the two cell types. Despite their distinct intrinsic membrane properties, both CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons displayed bidirectional spike phase control by excitatory conductance inputs during theta oscillations. In particular, excitatory inputs delivered at the descending phase of a dynamic clamp-induced membrane potential oscillation delayed the subsequent spike by nearly 50 mrad. The effect was shown to be mediated by Ih and was counteracted by increasing inhibitory conductance driving the membrane potential oscillation. Using our experimental data to feed a computational model, we showed that differences in Ih between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons could predict frequency-dependent differences in phase response properties between these cell types. We confirmed experimentally such frequency-dependent spike phase control in CA3 neurons. Therefore, a decrease in theta frequency, which is observed in intact animals during novelty, might switch the CA3 spike phase response from unidirectional to bidirectional and thereby promote encoding of the new context.

  14. On the Newtonian anisotropic configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shojai, F. [University of Tehran, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Foundations of Physics Group, School of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fazel, M.R.; Stepanian, A. [University of Tehran, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kohandel, M. [Alzahra University, Department of Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper we are concerned with the effects of an anisotropic pressure on the boundary conditions of the anisotropic Lane-Emden equation and the homology theorem. Some new exact solutions of this equation are derived. Then some of the theorems governing the Newtonian perfect fluid star are extended, taking the anisotropic pressure into account. (orig.)

  15. Anisotropic Lyra cosmology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B B Bhowmik; A Rajput

    2004-06-01

    Anisotropic Bianchi Type-I cosmological models have been studied on the basis of Lyra's geometry. Two types of models, one with constant deceleration parameter and the other with variable deceleration parameter have been derived by considering a time-dependent displacement field.

  16. Anisotropic Ambient Volume Shading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Marco; Dachsbacher, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel method to compute anisotropic shading for direct volume rendering to improve the perception of the orientation and shape of surface-like structures. We determine the scale-aware anisotropy of a shading point by analyzing its ambient region. We sample adjacent points with similar scalar values to perform a principal component analysis by computing the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the covariance matrix. In particular, we estimate the tangent directions, which serve as the tangent frame for anisotropic bidirectional reflectance distribution functions. Moreover, we exploit the ratio of the eigenvalues to measure the magnitude of the anisotropy at each shading point. Altogether, this allows us to model a data-driven, smooth transition from isotropic to strongly anisotropic volume shading. In this way, the shape of volumetric features can be enhanced significantly by aligning specular highlights along the principal direction of anisotropy. Our algorithm is independent of the transfer function, which allows us to compute all shading parameters once and store them with the data set. We integrated our method in a GPU-based volume renderer, which offers interactive control of the transfer function, light source positions, and viewpoint. Our results demonstrate the benefit of anisotropic shading for visualization to achieve data-driven local illumination for improved perception compared to isotropic shading. PMID:26529745

  17. Dynamics of Anisotropic Universes

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, J

    2006-01-01

    We present a general study of the dynamical properties of Anisotropic Bianchi Universes in the context of Einstein General Relativity. Integrability results using Kovalevskaya exponents are reported and connected to general knowledge about Bianchi dynamics. Finally, dynamics toward singularity in Bianchi type VIII and IX universes are showed to be equivalent in some precise sence.

  18. Multi-frequency response of a cylinder subjected to vortex shedding and support motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikestad, Kyrre

    1998-12-31

    This thesis deals with an experimental investigation of vortex induced vibrations of a circular cylinder. The purpose of the experiment was to identify the influence from a controlled disturbance of the cylinder motions on the response caused by vortex shedding. The cylinder investigated is 2 m long and the diameter is 10 cm. The cylinder is elastically mounted in an apparatus using springs, where the foundation of one of the springs can have a harmonic motion. The apparatus is placed on a carriage in a 25 m long towing tank. Towing velocities are varied between 0.140 m/s and 0.655 m/s corresponding to reduced velocity range from 2.8 to 13.2. The still water natural frequency is 0.497 Hz, and the natural frequency in air is 0.634 Hz. The cylinder is only able to oscillate in the cross-flow direction. The support motion frequency was varied between 0.26 Hz and 1.01 Hz, and the force motion amplitude was varied using 2, 4 and 6 cm support amplitudes. Three sets of experiments were carried out: (1) Still water oscillations due to harmonic support motion excitation, support amplitude and frequencies varied, (2) Towing tests with no support motion, the velocity is varied, (3) Combined excitation: Towing tests with support motion. All possible combinations of experiments (1) and (2) are carried out. The two first experiments provide reference values for the combined excitation experiments and for verification purposes. The results reveal the ability of the external disturbance to influence the vortex shedding process both regarding frequency and the resulting response amplitudes. Results for added mass, in-line drag and damping are also obtained. The work may be of use in deep water floating petroleum production. 81 refs., 73 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Artificial Ionization and UHF Radar Response Associated with HF Frequencies near Electron Gyro-Harmonics (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, B. J.; Fallen, C. T.; Secan, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present new results from O-mode ionospheric heating experiments at the HAARP facility in Alaska to demonstrate that the magnitude of artificial ionization production is critically dependent on the choice of HF frequency near gyro-harmonics. For O-mode heating in the lower F-region ionosphere, typically about 200 km altitude, artificial ionization enhancements are observed in the lower ionosphere (about 150 - 220 km) and also in the topside ionosphere above about 500 km. Lower ionosphere density enhancements are inferred from HF-enhanced ion and plasma-line signals observed with UHF radar. Upper ionospheric density enhancements have been observed with TEC (total electron content) experiments by monitoring satellite radio beacons where signal paths traverse the HF-modified ionosphere. Both density enhancements and corresponding upward plasma fluxes have also been observed in the upper ionosphere via in-situ satellite observations. The data presented focus mainly on observations near the third and fourth gyro-harmonics. The specific values of the height-dependent gyro-harmonics have been computed from a magnetic model of the field line through the HF heated volume. Experiments with several closely spaced HF frequencies around the gyro-harmonic frequency region show that the magnitude of the lower-ionosphere artificial ionization production maximizes for HF frequencies about 1.0 - 1.5 MHz above the gyro-harmonic frequency. The response is progressively larger as the HF frequency is increased in the frequency region near the gyro-harmonics. For HF frequencies that are initially greater than the gyro-harmonic value the UHF radar scattering cross-section is relatively small, and non-existent or very weak signals are observed; as the signal returns drop in altitude due to density enhancements the HF interaction region passes through lower altitudes where the HF frequency is less than the gyro-harmonic value, for these conditions the radar scattering cross-section is

  20. Spectral fitting inversion of low-frequency normal modes with self-coupling and cross-coupling of toroidal and spheroidal multiplets: numerical experiments to estimate the isotropic and anisotropic velocity structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    The aspherical structure of the Earth is described in terms of lateral heterogeneity and anisotropy of the P- and S-wave velocities, density heterogeneity, ellipticity and rotation of the Earth and undulation of the discontinuity interfaces of the seismic wave velocities. Its structure significantly influences the normal mode spectra of the Earth's free oscillation in the form of cross-coupling between toroidal and spheroidal multiplets and self-coupling between the singlets forming them. Thus, the aspherical structure must be conversely estimated from the free oscillation spectra influenced by the cross-coupling and self-coupling. In the present study, we improve a spectral fitting inversion algorithm which was developed in a previous study to retrieve the global structures of the isotropic and anisotropic velocities of the P and S waves from the free oscillation spectra. The main improvement is that the geographical distribution of the intensity of the S-wave azimuthal anisotropy is represented by a nonlinear combination of structure coefficients for the anisotropic velocity structure, whereas in the previous study it was expanded into a generalized spherical harmonic series. Consequently, the improved inversion algorithm reduces the number of unknown parameters that must be determined compared to the previous inversion algorithm and employs a one-step inversion method by which the structure coefficients for the isotropic and anisotropic velocities are directly estimated from the fee oscillation spectra. The applicability of the improved inversion is examined by several numerical experiments using synthetic spectral data, which are produced by supposing a variety of isotropic and anisotropic velocity structures, earthquake source parameters and station-event pairs. Furthermore, the robustness of the inversion algorithm is investigated with respect to the back-ground noise contaminating the spectral data as well as truncating the series expansions by finite terms

  1. A high-frequency response and a nonlinear coherent generation in resonant-tunneling diodes within a broad frequency range with electron-electron interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of a sequential quantum mechanical model, the response and the power of a coherent generation have been obtained numerically in a resonant-tunneling diode in a wide range of frequencies with the electron-electron interaction. The quantum regime of generation is shown to be sustained under the electron-electron interaction. Thus, a high-power generation is probable under frequencies exceeding the width of the resonant level

  2. Gamma-beam propagation in the anisotropic medium

    OpenAIRE

    V.A. Maisheev

    1997-01-01

    Propagation of gamma-beam in the anisotropic medium is considered. The simpliest example of such a medium of the general type is a combination of the two linearly polarized monochromatic laser waves with different frequencies (dichromatic wave). The optical properties of this combination are described with the use of the permittivity tensor. The refractive indices and polarization characteristics of normal electromagnetic waves propagating in the anisotropic medium are found. The relations, d...

  3. Aeroelastic modal dynamics of wind turbines including anisotropic effects

    OpenAIRE

    Skjoldan, Peter Fisker; Hansen, Morten Hartvig; Rubak, Rune; Thomsen, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Several methods for aeroelastic modal analysis of a rotating wind turbine are developed and used to analyse the modal dynamics of two simplified models and a complex model in isotropic and anisotropic conditions. The Coleman transformation is used to enable extraction of the modal frequencies, damping, and periodic mode shapes of a rotating wind turbine by describing the rotor degrees of freedom in the inertial frame. This approach is valid only for an isotropic system. Anisotropic systems, e...

  4. Dual-band frequency selective surface with quasi-elliptic bandpass response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the substrate integrated waveguide technology, we present a dual-band frequency selective surface (FSS) with a quasi-elliptic bandpass response. The characteristics of the quasi-elliptic bandpass response are realized by shunting two substrate integrated waveguide cavities of different sizes, with the same slots on both sides of the metal surfaces. Four cavities of different sizes and two slots of different sizes are used to design the novel FSS. Every bandpass response with sharp sidebands is induced by two transmission nulls that are generated by the coupling between the slot aperture resonance and the cavity resonance. The simulation results show that such dual-band FSS has the advantages of high selectivity and stable performance at different oblique incident angles. Moreover, it is easy to fabricate. (general)

  5. Time-frequency analysis of railway bridge response in forced vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantero, Daniel; Ülker-Kaustell, Mahir; Karoumi, Raid

    2016-08-01

    This paper suggests the use of the Continuous Wavelet Transform in combination with the Modified Littlewood-Paley basis to analyse bridge responses exited by traversing trains. The analysis provides an energy distribution map in the time-frequency domain that offers a better resolution compared to previous published studies. This is demonstrated with recorded responses of the Skidträsk Bridge, a 36 m long composite bridge located in Sweden. It is shown to be particularly useful to understand the evolution of the energy content during a vehicle crossing event. With this information it is possible to distinguish the effect of several of the governing factors involved in the dynamic response including vehicle's speed and axle configuration as well as non-linear behaviour of the structure.

  6. Dual-band frequency selective surface with quasi-elliptic bandpass response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Hang; Qu Shao-Bo; Peng Wei-Dong; Wang Jia-Fu; Ma Hua; Zhang Jie-Qiu; Bai Peng; Xu Zhuo

    2012-01-01

    Based on the substrate integrated waveguide technology,we present a dual-band frequency selective surface (FSS) with a quasi-elliptic bandpass response. The characteristics of the quasi-elliptic bandpass response are realized by shunting two substrate integrated waveguide cavities of different sizes,with the same slots on both sides of the metal surfaces.Four cavities of different sizes and two slots of different sizes are used to design the novel FSS.Every bandpass response with sharp sidebands is induced by two transmission nulls that are generated by the coupling between the slot aperture resonance and the cavity resonance.The simulation results show that such dual-band FSS has the advantages of high selectivity and stable performance at different oblique incident angles.Moreover,it is easy to fabricate.

  7. Frequency dependent gamma-ray irradiation response of Sm2O3 MOS capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency dependent irradiation influences on Sm2O3 MOS capacitors have been investigated and possible use of Sm2O3 in MOS-based radiation sensor was discussed in this study. To examine their gamma irradiation response over a range of doses, the fabricated MOS capacitors were irradiated up to 30 grays. Capacitance–Voltage (C–V) measurements were recorded for various doses and the influences of irradiation were determined from the mid-gap and flat-band voltage shifts. In addition, the degradations of irradiation have been studied by impedance based leakage current–voltage (J–V) characteristics. The results demonstrate that J–V characteristics have not been significantly change by irradiation and implying that the excited traps have a minor effect on current for given dose ranges. However, the frequency of applied voltage during the C–V measurements affects the irradiation response of devices, significantly. The variations on the electrical characteristics may be attributed to the different time dependency of acceptor and donor-like interface states. In spite of the variations on the device characteristics, low frequency measurements indicate that Sm2O3 is a potential candidate to be used as a dielectric layer in MOS based irradiation sensors

  8. Huge low-frequency dielectric response of (Nb,In)-doped TiO2 ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y. Q.; Zhao, X.; Zhang, J. L.; Su, W. B.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    The (Nb,In)-doped TiO2 ceramics have drawn considerable attention as a type of promising giant-permittivity dielectric materials in recent years. However, a significant controversy concerning the giant dielectric mechanism currently exists, and clarifying it is vitally important from both scientific and technological viewpoints. This letter reports the results of a systematical comparison study, where two kinds of (Nb,In)-doped TiO2 ceramics with a substantial difference in dielectric loss are used. Dielectric properties and complex impedance are investigated over a broad frequency band of 3 mHz-110 MHz. A huge low-frequency dielectric response in addition to the giant dielectric relaxation appearing above 1 MHz is observed for both kinds of (Nb,In)-doped TiO2 ceramics in dielectric dispersion. The huge dielectric response observed in the low frequency range can be ascribed to a non-ohmic electrode-contact, and the dielectric relaxation appearing above 1 MHz can be attributed to an internal barrier layer capacitance effect. An electrical equivalent circuit model suggested can well describe the observed dielectric properties and electrical behaviors.

  9. Flicker-Driven Responses in Visual Cortex Change during Matched-Frequency Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhnau, Philipp; Keitel, Christian; Lithari, Chrysa; Weisz, Nathan; Neuling, Toralf

    2016-01-01

    We tested a novel combination of two neuro-stimulation techniques, transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) and frequency tagging, that promises powerful paradigms to study the causal role of rhythmic brain activity in perception and cognition. Participants viewed a stimulus flickering at 7 or 11 Hz that elicited periodic brain activity, termed steady-state responses (SSRs), at the same temporal frequency and its higher order harmonics. Further, they received simultaneous tACS at 7 or 11 Hz that either matched or differed from the flicker frequency. Sham tACS served as a control condition. Recent advances in reconstructing cortical sources of oscillatory activity allowed us to measure SSRs during concurrent tACS, which is known to impose strong artifacts in magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings. For the first time, we were thus able to demonstrate immediate effects of tACS on SSR-indexed early visual processing. Our data suggest that tACS effects are largely frequency-specific and reveal a characteristic pattern of differential influences on the harmonic constituents of SSRs. PMID:27199707

  10. Differential responses to high-frequency electrical stimulation in ON and OFF retinal ganglion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twyford, Perry; Cai, Changsi; Fried, Shelley

    2014-04-01

    Objective. The field of retinal prosthetics for artificial vision has advanced considerably in recent years, however clinical outcomes remain inconsistent. The performance of retinal prostheses is likely limited by the inability of electrical stimuli to preferentially activate different types of retinal ganglion cell (RGC). Approach. Here we examine the response of rabbit RGCs to high-frequency stimulation, using biphasic pulses applied at 2000 pulses per second. Responses were recorded using cell-attached patch clamp methods, and stimulation was applied epiretinally via a small cone electrode. Main results. When prolonged stimulus trains were applied to OFF-brisk transient (BT) RGCs, the cells exhibited a non-monotonic relationship between response strength and stimulus amplitude; this response pattern was different from those elicited previously by other electrical stimuli. When the amplitude of the stimulus was modulated transiently from a non-zero baseline amplitude, ON-BT and OFF-BT cells exhibited different activity patterns: ON cells showed an increase in activity while OFF cells exhibited a decrease in activity. Using a different envelope to modulate the amplitude of the stimulus, we observed the opposite effect: ON cells exhibited a decrease in activity while OFF cells show an increase in activity. Significance. As ON and OFF RGCs often exhibit opposing activity patterns in response to light stimulation, this work suggests that high-frequency electrical stimulation of RGCs may be able to elicit responses that are more physiological than traditional pulsatile stimuli. Additionally, the prospect of an electrical stimulus capable of cell-type specific selective activation has broad applications throughout the fields of neural stimulation and neuroprostheses.

  11. Intracellular responses to frequency modulated tones in the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruediger eGeis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequency modulations occur in many natural sounds, including vocalizations. The neuronal response to frequency modulated (FM stimuli has been studied extensively in different brain areas, with an emphasis on the auditory cortex and the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. Here, we measured the responses to FM sweeps in whole-cell recordings from neurons in the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus. Both up- and downward logarithmic FM sweeps were presented at two different speeds to both the ipsi- and the contralateral ear. Based on the number of action potentials that were fired, between 10-24% of cells were selective for rate or direction of the FM sweeps. A somewhat lower percentage of cells, 6-21%, showed selectivity based on EPSP size. To study the mechanisms underlying the generation of FM selectivity, we compared FM responses with responses to simple tones in the same cells. We found that if pairs of neurons responded in a similar way to simple tones, they generally also responded in a similar way to FM sweeps. Further evidence that FM selectivity can be generated within the dorsal cortex was obtained by reconstructing FM sweeps from the response to simple tones using three different models. In about half of the direction selective neurons the selectivity was generated by spectrally asymmetric synaptic inhibition. In addition, evidence for direction selectivity based on the timing of excitatory responses was also obtained in some cells. No clear evidence for the local generation of rate selectivity was obtained. We conclude that FM direction selectivity can be generated within the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus by multiple mechanisms.

  12. Multiple linear regression to estimate time-frequency electrophysiological responses in single trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L; Zhang, Z G; Mouraux, A; Iannetti, G D

    2015-05-01

    oscillations, obtaining single-trial estimate of response latency, frequency, and magnitude. This permits within-subject statistical comparisons, correlation with pre-stimulus features, and integration of simultaneously-recorded EEG and fMRI. PMID:25665966

  13. The non-equilibrium response of a superconductor to pair-breaking radiation measured over a broad frequency band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, P. J. de, E-mail: p.j.devisser@tudelft.nl [Kavli Institute of NanoScience, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Yates, S. J. C. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747AD Groningen (Netherlands); Guruswamy, T.; Goldie, D. J.; Withington, S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Neto, A.; Llombart, N. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science, Terahertz Sensing Group, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 4, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Baryshev, A. M. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747AD Groningen (Netherlands); Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Klapwijk, T. M. [Kavli Institute of NanoScience, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Physics Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Baselmans, J. J. A. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science, Terahertz Sensing Group, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 4, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-06-22

    We have measured the absorption of terahertz radiation in a BCS superconductor over a broad range of frequencies from 200 GHz to 1.1 THz, using a broadband antenna-lens system and a tantalum microwave resonator. From low frequencies, the response of the resonator rises rapidly to a maximum at the gap edge of the superconductor. From there on, the response drops to half the maximum response at twice the pair-breaking energy. At higher frequencies, the response rises again due to trapping of pair-breaking phonons in the superconductor. In practice, this is a measurement of the frequency dependence of the quasiparticle creation efficiency due to pair-breaking in a superconductor. The efficiency, calculated from the different non-equilibrium quasiparticle distribution functions at each frequency, is in agreement with the measurements.

  14. The non-equilibrium response of a superconductor to pair-breaking radiation measured over a broad frequency band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the absorption of terahertz radiation in a BCS superconductor over a broad range of frequencies from 200 GHz to 1.1 THz, using a broadband antenna-lens system and a tantalum microwave resonator. From low frequencies, the response of the resonator rises rapidly to a maximum at the gap edge of the superconductor. From there on, the response drops to half the maximum response at twice the pair-breaking energy. At higher frequencies, the response rises again due to trapping of pair-breaking phonons in the superconductor. In practice, this is a measurement of the frequency dependence of the quasiparticle creation efficiency due to pair-breaking in a superconductor. The efficiency, calculated from the different non-equilibrium quasiparticle distribution functions at each frequency, is in agreement with the measurements

  15. Extending the operating temperature, wavelength and frequency response of HgCdTe heterodyne detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Near ideal optical heterodyne performance was obtained at GHz IF frequencies in the 10 micrometer wavelength region with liquid nitrogen cooled HgCdTe photodiodes. Heterodyne NEP's as low as 2.7 x 10 to the minus 20th power W/Hz at 100MHz, 5.4 x 10 to the minus 20th power W/Hz at 1.5 GHz, and 9.4 x 19 to the minus 20th power W/Hz at 3 GHz were achieved. Various physical phenomena which occur within a photodiode and affect heterodyne operation were examined in order to assess the feasibility of extending the operating temperature, wavelength, and frequency response of these HgCdTe photomixers.

  16. Cortical contributions to the auditory frequency-following response revealed by MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Emily B J; Herholz, Sibylle C; Chepesiuk, Alexander M P; Baillet, Sylvain; Zatorre, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The auditory frequency-following response (FFR) to complex periodic sounds is used to study the subcortical auditory system, and has been proposed as a biomarker for disorders that feature abnormal sound processing. Despite its value in fundamental and clinical research, the neural origins of the FFR are unclear. Using magnetoencephalography, we observe a strong, right-asymmetric contribution to the FFR from the human auditory cortex at the fundamental frequency of the stimulus, in addition to signal from cochlear nucleus, inferior colliculus and medial geniculate. This finding is highly relevant for our understanding of plasticity and pathology in the auditory system, as well as higher-level cognition such as speech and music processing. It suggests that previous interpretations of the FFR may need re-examination using methods that allow for source separation. PMID:27009409

  17. Frequency Response Analysis of an Actively Lubricated Rotor/Tilting-Pad Bearing System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Santos, Ilmar

    In the present paper, the dynamic response of a rotor supported by an active lubricated tilting-pad bearing is investigated in the frequency domain. The theoretical part of the investigation is based on a mathematical model obtained by means of rigid body dynamics. The oil film forces are inserted...... into the model by using two different approaches: (a) linearized active oil film forces and the assumption that the hydrodynamic forces and the active hydraulic forces can be decoupled; (b) equivalent dynamic coefficients of the active oil film and the solution of the modified Reynolds' equation for...... the active lubrication. The second approach based on the equivalent dynamic coefficients leads to more accurate results since it includes the frequency dependence of the active hydraulic forces. Theoretical and experimental results reveal the feasibility of reducing resonance peaks by using the active...

  18. Low-noise extended-frequency response with cooled silicon photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiswander, R. S.; Plews, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that a substantial reduction in internal noise generated by the photodiode and the preamplifier can be produced by a modest cooling of the components and by optimization of preamplifier design. With this reduction the silicon detectors can, in the SNR range of 5 or greater, produce better performance than photon-noise-limited photomultipliers. The circuit noise and frequency response model suggested by Goranson and Skipper (1974) is expanded to include the effects of frequency dependent FET voltage noise and FET load resistance noise. The modeling of the photodiode and preamplifier is described and the noise characteristics of a 0.01 Hz to 100 kHz bandwidth detector/amplifier channel are evaluated.

  19. Transfer function method for frequency response and damping effect of multilayer PCLD on cylindrical shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Q.; Fang, Z. P.; Wan, H. C.; Zheng, L.

    2013-07-01

    Based on the Donnell assumptions and linear visco-elastic theory, the constitutive equations of the cylindrical shell with multilayer Passive Constrained Layer Damping (PCLD) treatments are described. The motion equations and boundary conditions are derived by Hamilton principle. After trigonometric series expansion and Laplace transform, the state vector is introduced and the dynamic equations in state space are established. The transfer function method is used to solve the state equation. The dynamic performance including the natural frequency, the loss factor and the frequency response of clamped-clamped multi-layer PCLD cylindrical shell is obtained. The results show that multi-layer PCLD cylindrical shell is more effective than the traditional three-layer PCLD cylindrical shell in suppressing vibration and noise if the same amount of material is applied. It demonstrates a potential application of multi-layer PCLD treatments in many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles.

  20. Transfer function method for frequency response and damping effect of multilayer PCLD on cylindrical shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the Donnell assumptions and linear visco-elastic theory, the constitutive equations of the cylindrical shell with multilayer Passive Constrained Layer Damping (PCLD) treatments are described. The motion equations and boundary conditions are derived by Hamilton principle. After trigonometric series expansion and Laplace transform, the state vector is introduced and the dynamic equations in state space are established. The transfer function method is used to solve the state equation. The dynamic performance including the natural frequency, the loss factor and the frequency response of clamped-clamped multi-layer PCLD cylindrical shell is obtained. The results show that multi-layer PCLD cylindrical shell is more effective than the traditional three-layer PCLD cylindrical shell in suppressing vibration and noise if the same amount of material is applied. It demonstrates a potential application of multi-layer PCLD treatments in many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles

  1. Dynamic Response Calculation of Spatial Elastic Multibody Systems with High-Frequency Excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to establish a computational scheme for dynamic response calculations of a three-dimensional multibody mechanical system with impulsive forces, which give rise to high-frequency excitations. The finite-element method is employed to represent the local deformations of three-dimensional beam-like elastic components by either a finite set of nodal coordinates or a truncated set of modal coordinates. A reduced-order model is obtained by invoking a modal transformation. Both planar and complex modal reduction schemes are established. The developed formulation is implemented into a multibody simulation program that assembles the equations of motion and proceeds with its solution. The computational scheme permits a change in the basis of the modal space in order to regulate the admittance of higher frequencies and to accommodate any change in the kinematic configuration. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the developed computational scheme

  2. Response of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to a high-frequency input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, L S

    2009-11-01

    We study the response of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron stimulated by a periodic sequence of conductance pulses arriving through the synapse in the high-frequency regime. In addition to the usual excitation threshold there is a smooth crossover from the firing to the silent regime for increasing pulse amplitude gsyn. The amplitude of the voltage spikes decreases approximately linearly with gsyn. In some regions of parameter space the response is irregular, probably chaotic. In the chaotic regime between the mode-locked regions 3:1 and 2:1 near the lower excitation threshold, the output interspike interval histogram (ISIH) undergoes a sharp transition. If the driving period is below the critical value, TT* even multiples of Ti also appear in the histogram, starting from the largest values. Near T* the ISIH scales logarithmically on both sides of the transition. The coefficient of variation of ISIH has a cusp singularity at T*. The average response period has a maximum slightly above T*. Near the excitation threshold in the chaotic regime the average firing rate rises sublinearly from frequencies of order 1 Hz. PMID:20365013

  3. Development and applicability evaluation of frequency response function of structures to fluctuations of thermal stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oscillation of a thermal stratification layer can induce thermal fatigue damage on structures with nuclear components. To evaluate the thermal stress induced by thermal stratification oscillation, a frequency response function was developed in our previous research. However, this function does not consider the thickness of the stratified layer. Thus, it is difficult to evaluate the stress generated by actual thermal stratified layers having finite thicknesses with sufficient accuracy. To clarify the effects of layer thickness on induced thermal stress, finite element simulations were conducted under various fluid conditions. As a result, it was clarified that the non-dimensional layer thickness Ht*, which is the ratio of layer thickness to layer oscillation length, can explain the thermal stress response mechanism with layer thickness. Based on the clarified mechanisms, the frequency response function was improved. Applicability of the proposed function to a closed branch pipe of a Light Water Reactor (LWR) and the upper plenum of a pressure vessel of a Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) was validated through comparison with finite element simulations. (author)

  4. Frequency response of laminated composite plates and shells with matrix cracks type of damage mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Aly A.

    The present study has been designed to tackle a new set of problems for structural composites, as these materials are finding new applications in civil engineering field. An attempt has been made to study the frequency response of laminated polymer composite plates and shallow shells containing matrix cracks type of damage with arbitrary support conditions and free vibratory motions. The shell governing equations are derived using a simplified shallow shell theory based on a first order shear deformation field. The continuum damage mechanics approach has been used to model the matrix cracks in a damaged region within the plates and shallow shells. In such approach, the damage is accounted for in the laminate constitutive equations by using a set of second order tensor internal state variables which are strain-like quantities. The simplified damage model was then used to study the changes in frequency response of laminated composite plates and shallow cylindrical shells. The Ritz method and a finite element method have been proposed and developed as approximate solution procedures to quantify the change in the free vibration frequencies due to matrix cracks type of damage under both material as well as geometrical variables such as size, shape and extent of damage, degree of curvature, ratio of orthotropy, thickness ratio as well as support conditions. The analysis of various plates and shells with a centrally located damaged-zone depicts a typical trend of reduction in the vibration frequencies. This reduction is more pronounced for higher frequency modes and it shows greater sensitivity toward the size of the damaged region and density of cracks. The results also show that the changes in the frequency, especially for the fundamental mode, appear to be less sensitive to the shell boundary conditions as well as small values of curvature. The investigation of various undamaged plates and shallow shells demonstrates the importance of a first-order shear deformation

  5. Power-law models of totally anisotropic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Tuntsov, Artem V; Walker, Mark A; 10.1093/mnras/sts527

    2012-01-01

    The interstellar scattering responsible for pulsar parabolic arcs, and for intra-day variability of compact radio quasars, is highly anisotropic in some cases. We numerically simulate these observed phenomena using totally anisotropic, power-law models for the electron density fluctuations which cause the scattering. By comparing our results to the scattered image of PSR B0834+06 and, independently, to dual-frequency light curves of the quasar PKS1257-326, we constrain the nature of the scattering media on these lines of sight. We find that models with spectral indices slightly below \\beta=3, including the one-dimensional Kolmogorov model, are broadly consistent with both data sets. We confirm that a single physical model suffices for both sources, with the scattering medium simply being more distant in the case of B0834+06. This reinforces the idea that intra-day variability and parabolic arcs have a common cause in a type of interstellar structure which, though obscure, is commonplace. However, the implied ...

  6. Anisotropic progressive photon mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, XiaoDan; Zheng, ChangWen

    2014-01-01

    Progressive photon mapping solves the memory limitation problem of traditional photon mapping. It gives the correct radiance with a large passes, but it converges slowly. We propose an anisotropic progressive photon mapping method to generate high quality images with a few passes. During the rendering process, different from standard progressive photon mapping, we store the photons on the surfaces. At the end of each pass, an anisotropic method is employed to compute the radiance of each eye ray based on the stored photons. Before move to a new pass, the photons in the scene are cleared. The experiments show that our method generates better results than the standard progressive photon mapping in both numerical and visual qualities.

  7. Frequency Response Analysis of an Actively Lubricated Rotor/Tilting-Pad Bearing System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper, the dynamic response of a rotor supported by an active lubricated tilting-pad bearing is investigated in the frequency domain. The theoretical part of the investigation is based on a mathematical model obtained by means of rigid body dynamics. The oil film forces are inserted...... lubricated tilting-pad bearing. By applying a simple proportional controller, it is possible to reach 30% reduction of the resonance peak associated with the first rigid body mode shape of the system. One of the most important consequences of such a vibration reduction in rotating machines is the feasibility...

  8. Frequency Response Analysis of an Actively Lubricated Rotor/Tilting-Pad Bearing System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Santos, Ilmar

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper the dynamic response of a rotor supported by an active lubricated tilting-pad bearing is investigated in the frequency domain. The theoretical part of the investigation is based on a mathematical model obtained by means of rigid body dynamics. The oil film forces are inserted...... active lubricated tilting-pad bearing. By applying a simple proportional controller it is possible to reach 30% reduction of the resonance peak associated with the first rigid body mode shape of the system. One of the most important consequences of such a vibration reduction in rotating machines is the...

  9. Activation of the SOS response increases the frequency of small colony variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Paulander, Wilhelm Erik Axel; Ingmer, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    different mechanism of action influence the formation of SCVs that are resistant to otherwise lethal concentrations of the aminoglycoside, gentamicin. We found that exposure of S. aureus to fluoroquinolones and mitomycin C increased the frequency of gentamicin resistant SCVs, while other antibiotic classes...... failed to do so. The higher proportion of SCVs in cultures exposed to fluoroquinolones and mitomycin C compared to un-exposed cultures correlate with an increased mutation rate monitored by rifampicin resistance and followed induction of the SOS DNA damage response. CONCLUSION: Our observations suggest...

  10. Effects of low-spatial-frequency response of phase plates on TEM imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgcombe, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    Images of simple objects produced by a perfect lens and a phase plate have been calculated by use of Abbe theory for Foucault, Hilbert and Zernike phase plates. The results show that with a Zernike plate, white outlines and ringing like those observed previously can be caused by the beam hole, which limits the low-spatial-frequency response of the system even when the lens behaves perfectly. When the change of phase added by the phase plate is distributed over a range of radius rather than a simple step, the unwanted effects are substantially reduced.

  11. Molecular anisotropic magnetoresistance

    OpenAIRE

    Otte, Fabian; Heinze, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, we demonstrate that the effect of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) can be enhanced by orders of magnitude with respect to conventional bulk ferromagnets in junctions containing molecules sandwiched between ferromagnetic leads. We study ballistic transport in metal-benzene complexes contacted by $3d$ transition-metal wires. We show that the gigantic AMR can arise from spin-orbit coupling effects in the leads, drastically enhanced by orbital-symm...

  12. Extremely Anisotropic Scintillations

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Mark; Bignall, Hayley

    2008-01-01

    A small number of quasars exhibit interstellar scintillation on time-scales less than an hour; their scintillation patterns are all known to be anisotropic. Here we consider a totally anisotropic model in which the scintillation pattern is effectively one-dimensional. For the persistent rapid scintillators J1819+3845 and PKS1257-326 we show that this model offers a good description of the two-station time-delay measurements and the annual cycle in the scintillation time-scale. Generalising the model to finite anisotropy yields a better match to the data but the improvement is not significant and the two additional parameters which are required to describe this model are not justified by the existing data. The extreme anisotropy we infer for the scintillation patterns must be attributed to the scattering medium rather than a highly elongated source. For J1819+3845 the totally anisotropic model predicts that the particular radio flux variations seen between mid July and late August should repeat between late Au...

  13. Improved modelling of power transformer winding using bacterial swarming algorithm and frequency response analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shintemirov, A.; Tang, W.J.; Tang, W.H.; Wu, Q.H. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics The University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15

    The paper discusses an improved modelling of transformer windings based on bacterial swarming algorithm (BSA) and frequency response analysis (FRA). With the purpose to accurately identify transformer windings parameters a model-based identification approach is introduced using a well-known lumped parameter model. It includes search space estimation using analytical calculations, which is used for the subsequent model parameters identification with a novel BSA. The newly introduced BSA, being developed upon a bacterial foraging behavior, is described in detail. Simulations and discussions are presented to explore the potential of the proposed approach using simulated and experimentally measured FRA responses taken from two transformers. The BSA identification results are compared with those using genetic algorithm. It is shown that the proposed BSA delivers satisfactory parameter identification and improved modelling can be used for FRA results interpretation. (author)

  14. Enhanced High-Frequency Magnetoresistance Responses of Melt-Extracted Co-Rich Soft Ferromagnetic Microwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, D. S.; Devkota, J.; Huong, N. T.; Srikanth, H.; Phan, M. H.

    2016-05-01

    We present the relationships between the structure, magnetic properties and high-frequency magnetoresistance (MR) effect in melt-extracted Co68.2Fe4.3B15Si12.5 microwires subject to thermal annealing. In order to release residual stresses to improve the magnetic softness while retaining the good mechanical property of an amorphous material, microwire samples were annealed at different temperatures of 100°C, 200°C, 350°C, 400°C, and 450°C for 15 min. We have shown that relative to an as-cast amorphous microwire, annealing microwires at T a = 100°C, 200°C, and 350°C improved both the magnetic softness and the MR effect, while an opposite trend was observed for the microwires annealed at T a = 400°C and 450°C. We have observed a distinct difference in the frequency dependence of MR response ( ξ) for dc applied magnetic fields below and above the effective anisotropy field of the microwires. While the microwire annealed at 200°C shows the largest MR ratio (~580%) at 100 MHz, the highest value of ξ (~34%/Oe) has been achieved at 400 MHz for the microwire annealed at 350°C. These results indicate that the optimally annealed Co68.2Fe4.3B15Si12.5 microwires are attractive candidates for high-frequency sensor applications.

  15. The Short-term Memory (D.C. Response) of the Memristor Demonstrates the Causes of the Memristor Frequency Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Gale, Ella; Costello, Ben de Lacy; Erokhin, Victor; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    A memristor is often identified by showing its distinctive pinched hysteresis curve and testing for the effect of frequency. The hysteresis size should relate to frequency and shrink to zero as the frequency approaches infinity. Although mathematically understood, the material causes for this are not well known. The d.c. response of the memristor is a decaying curve with its own timescale. We show via mathematical reasoning that this decaying curve when transformed to a.c. leads to the freque...

  16. Analytical one-dimensional frequency response and stability model for PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dynamic model for PWR nuclear power plants is presented. The plant is assumed to consist of one-dimensional single-channel core, a counterflow once-through steam generator (represented by two nodes according to the nonboiling and boiling region) and the necessary connection coolant lines. The model describes analytically the frequency response behaviour of important parameters of such a plant with respect to perturbations in reactivity, subcooling or mass flow (both at the entrances to the reactor core and/or the secondary steam generator side), the perturbations in steam load or system pressure (on the secondary side of the steam generator). From corresponding 'open' loop considerations it can then be concluded - by applying the Nyquist criterion - upon the degree of the stability behaviour of the underlying system. Based on this theoretical model, a computer code named ADYPMO has been established. From the knowledge of the frequency response behaviour of such a system, the corresponding transient behaviour with respect to a stepwise or any other perturbation signal can also be calculated by applying an appropriate retransformation method, e.g. by using digital code FRETI. To demonstrate this procedure, a transient experimental curve measured during the pre-operational test period at the PWR nuclear power plant KKS Stade was recalculated using the combination ADYPMO-FRETI. Good agreement between theoretical calculations and experimental results give an insight into the validity and efficiency of the underlying theoretical model and the applied retransformation method. (Auth.)

  17. Response of a kinetic Ising system to oscillating external fields: Amplitude and frequency dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The S=1/2, nearest-neighbor, kinetic Ising model has been used to model magnetization switching in nanoscale ferromagnets. For this model, earlier work based on the droplet theory of the decay of metastable phases and Monte Carlo simulations has shown the existence of a size dependent spinodal field which separates deterministic and stochastic decay regimes. We extend the above work to study the effects of an oscillating field on the magnetization response of the kinetic Ising model. We compute the power spectral density of the time-dependent magnetization for different values of the amplitude and frequency of the external field, using Monte Carlo simulation data. We also investigate the amplitude and frequency dependence of the probability distributions for the hysteresis loop area and the period-averaged magnetization. The time-dependent response of the system is classified by analyzing the behavior of these quantities within the framework of the distinct deterministic and stochastic decay modes mentioned above. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  18. Influence of applied magnetic field strength and frequency response of pick-up coil on the magnetic barkhausen noise profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of applied magnetic field strength and frequency response of the pick-up coil on the shape of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) profile have been studied. The low frequency MBN measurements have been carried out using 5 different MBN pick-up coils at two different ranges of applied magnetic field strengths on quenched and tempered (QT) and case-carburised and tempered (CT) 18CrNiMo7 steel bar samples. The MBN pick-up coils have been designed to obtain different frequency response such that the peak frequency response varies from ∼4 kHz to ∼32 kHz and the amplitude of low frequency signals decreases gradually. At lower applied magnetic field strength of ±14,000 A/m, all the pick-up coils produced a single peak MBN profile for both QT and CT sample. However, at higher applied magnetic field strength of ±22,000 A/m, the MBN profile showed two peaks for both QT and CT samples for pick-up coils with peak frequency response up to ∼17 kHz. Also, there is systematic reduction in peak 2 for QT sample and asymmetric reduction in the heights of peak 1 and peak 2 for CT sample with increase in peak frequency response of the pick-up coils. The decreasing sensitivity of pick-up coils with increasing peak frequency response to MBN signal generation is indicated by the gradual reduction in width of MBN profile and height of peak 2 in the QT sample. The drastic reduction in peak 1 as compared to peak 2 in the CT sample shows the effect of decreasing low frequency response of the pick-up coils on lowering skin-depth of MBN signal detection. This study clearly suggests that it is essential to optimise both maximum applied magnetic field strength and frequency response of the MBN pick-up coil for maximising the shape of the MBN profile for appropriate correlation with the magnetisation process and hence the material properties. - Highlights: • Influence of magnetic field and frequency response of pick-up coil on MBN profile. • Characteristic frequency response

  19. First direct measurements of behavioural responses by Cuvier's beaked whales to mid-frequency active sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRuiter, Stacy L; Southall, Brandon L; Calambokidis, John; Zimmer, Walter M X; Sadykova, Dinara; Falcone, Erin A; Friedlaender, Ari S; Joseph, John E; Moretti, David; Schorr, Gregory S; Thomas, Len; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-08-23

    Most marine mammal- strandings coincident with naval sonar exercises have involved Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris). We recorded animal movement and acoustic data on two tagged Ziphius and obtained the first direct measurements of behavioural responses of this species to mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar signals. Each recording included a 30-min playback (one 1.6-s simulated MFA sonar signal repeated every 25 s); one whale was also incidentally exposed to MFA sonar from distant naval exercises. Whales responded strongly to playbacks at low received levels (RLs; 89-127 dB re 1 µPa): after ceasing normal fluking and echolocation, they swam rapidly, silently away, extending both dive duration and subsequent non-foraging interval. Distant sonar exercises (78-106 dB re 1 µPa) did not elicit such responses, suggesting that context may moderate reactions. The observed responses to playback occurred at RLs well below current regulatory thresholds; equivalent responses to operational sonars could elevate stranding risk and reduce foraging efficiency. PMID:23825085

  20. Development of laser ablation plasma by anisotropic self-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohnishi Naofumi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed a method for reproducing an accurate solution of low-density ablation plasma by properly treating anisotropic radiation. Monte-Carlo method is employed for estimating Eddington tensor with limited number of photon samples in each fluid time step. Radiation field from ablation plasma is significantly affected by the anisotropic Eddington tensor. Electron temperature around the ablation surface changes with the radiation field and is responsible for the observed emission. An accurate prediction of the light emission from the laser ablation plasma requires a careful estimation of the anisotropic radiation field.

  1. Model anisotropic quantum Hall states

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, R. -Z.; Haldane, F.D.M.; Wan, Xin; Yang, Kun; Yi, Su

    2012-01-01

    Model quantum Hall states including Laughlin, Moore-Read and Read-Rezayi states are generalized into appropriate anisotropic form. The generalized states are exact zero-energy eigenstates of corresponding anisotropic two- or multi-body Hamiltonians, and explicitly illustrate the existence of geometric degrees of in the fractional quantum Hall effect. These generalized model quantum Hall states can provide a good description of the quantum Hall system with anisotropic interactions. Some numeri...

  2. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Undrill, John; Mackin, Peter; Daschmans, Ron; Williams, Ben; Haney, Brian; Hunt, Randall; Ellis, Jeff; Illian, Howard; Martinez, Carlos; O' Malley, Mark; Coughlin, Katie; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi

    2010-12-20

    An interconnected electric power system is a complex system that must be operated within a safe frequency range in order to reliably maintain the instantaneous balance between generation and load. This is accomplished by ensuring that adequate resources are available to respond to expected and unexpected imbalances and restoring frequency to its scheduled value in order to ensure uninterrupted electric service to customers. Electrical systems must be flexible enough to reliably operate under a variety of"change" scenarios. System planners and operators must understand how other parts of the system change in response to the initial change, and need tools to manage such changes to ensure reliable operation within the scheduled frequency range. This report presents a systematic approach to identifying metrics that are useful for operating and planning a reliable system with increased amounts of variable renewable generation which builds on existing industry practices for frequency control after unexpected loss of a large amount of generation. The report introduces a set of metrics or tools for measuring the adequacy of frequency response within an interconnection. Based on the concept of the frequency nadir, these metrics take advantage of new information gathering and processing capabilities that system operators are developing for wide-area situational awareness. Primary frequency response is the leading metric that will be used by this report to assess the adequacy of primary frequency control reserves necessary to ensure reliable operation. It measures what is needed to arrest frequency decline (i.e., to establish frequency nadir) at a frequency higher than the highest set point for under-frequency load shedding within an interconnection. These metrics can be used to guide the reliable operation of an interconnection under changing circumstances.

  3. On the Relativistic anisotropic configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Shojai, F; Stepanian, A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study anisotropic spherical polytropes within the framework of general relativity. Using the anisotropic Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov (TOV) equations, we explore the relativistic anisotropic Lane-Emden equations. We find how the anisotropic pressure affects the boundary conditions of these equations. Also we argue that the behaviour of physical quantities near the center of star changes in the presence of anisotropy. For constant density, a class of exact solution is derived with the aid of a new ansatz and its physical properties are discussed.

  4. An Unexpected Frequency Response of A Piezoelectric Quartz Crystal Sensor to the Density and Viscosity of the Liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shun FENG; Jing Tian HU; Qi KANG; Chang Ying GUO; Da Zhong SHEN

    2005-01-01

    An unexpected frequency response for a piezoelectric quartz crystal (PQC) sensor to liquid density and viscosity was reported. For a PQC oscillating in a liquid phase, the frequency shifts (△f) show a wave-shape response to liquid density (p) and viscosity (η) in fine structure, if the longitudinal wave effect was not eliminated. This result is different from the well-known linear relationship between of △f and (pη)1/2. An oscillating frequency-temperature curve of the sensor was observed and explained.

  5. Relaxation of Anisotropic Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deubener, Joachim; Martin, Birgit; Wondraczek, Lothar; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2004-01-01

    Anisotropic glasses are obtained from uniaxial compressing and pulling of glass forming liquids above the transition temperature range. To freeze-in, at least partly the structural state of the flowing melt, cylindrical samples were subjected to a controlled cooling process under constant load...... differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dilatometry. The energy release and expansion-shrinkage behaviour of the glasses are investigated as a function of the applied deformation stress. Structural origins of the frozen-in birefringence induced by viscous flow are discussed and correlation between the...

  6. Anisotropically Inflating Universes

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, J D; Barrow, John D.; Hervik, Sigbjorn

    2008-01-01

    We show that in theories of gravity that add quadratic curvature invariants to the Einstein-Hilbert action there exist expanding vacuum cosmologies with positive cosmological constant which do not approach the de Sitter universe. Exact solutions are found which inflate anisotropically. This behaviour is driven by the Ricci curvature invariant and has no counterpart in the general relativistic limit. These examples show that the cosmic no-hair theorem does not hold in these higher-order extensions of general relativity and raises new questions about the ubiquity of inflation in the very early universe and the thermodynamics of gravitational fields.

  7. Anisotropic Stars Exact Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, K; Dev, Krsna; Gleiser, Marcelo

    2000-01-01

    We study the effects of anisotropic pressure on the properties of spherically symmetric, gravitationally bound objects. We consider the full general relativistic treatment of this problem and obtain exact solutions for various form of equations of state connecting the radial and tangential pressures. It is shown that pressure anisotropy can have significant effects on the structure and properties of stellar objects. In particular, the maximum value of 2M/R can approach unity (2M/R < 8/9 for isotropic objects) and the surface redshift can be arbitrarily large.

  8. Response of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to a high-frequency input

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, L S

    2010-01-01

    We study the response of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron stimulated by a periodic sequence of conductance pulses arriving through the synapse in the high frequency regime. In addition to the usual excitation threshold there is a smooth crossover from the firing to the silent regime for increasing pulse amplitude $g_{syn}$. The amplitude of the voltage spikes decreases approximately linearly with $g_{syn}$. In some regions of parameter space the response is irregular, probably chaotic. In the chaotic regime between the mode-locked regions 3:1 and 2:1 near the lower excitation threshold the output interspike interval histogram (ISIH) undergoes a sharp transition. If the driving period is below the critical value, $T_i T^*$ even multiples of $T_i$ also appear in the histogram, starting from the largest values. Near $T^*$ the ISIH scales logarithmically on both sides of the transition. The coefficient of variation of ISIH has a cusp singularity at $T^*$. The average response period has a maximum slightly above $T^*$. Ne...

  9. Multi-frequency response from a designed array of micromechanical cantilevers fabricated using a focused ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate arrays of cantilevers with different lengths, fabricated by focused ion beam milling. The arrays of oscillators generate a spectrum of different resonant frequencies, where each frequency correlates to the corresponding individual cantilever. The frequency response from all the cantilevers is collected from a single measurement under the same environment and conditions for the entire array. The mass response of the system generated the same Δf/f0 for the cantilevers, within 0.1% accuracy. We denote the method MFSAC: multi-frequency signal analysis from an array of cantilevers. The simultaneous detection of several frequencies in one spectrum has great benefits in mass sensor applications, offering the possibility for true label-free detection

  10. Anisotropic microstructure near the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio scattering observations provide a means of measuring a two-dimensional projection of the three-dimensional spatial spectrum of electron density, i.e., in the plane perpendicular to the line of sight. Earlier observations have shown that the microstructure at scales of the order of 10 km becomes highly field-aligned inside of 10 R· [Armstrong et al., 1990]. Earlier work has also shown that density fluctuations at scales larger than 1000 km have a Kolmogorov spectrum, whereas the smaller scale structure has a flatter spectrum and is considerably enhanced above the Kolmogorov ''background'' [Coles et al., 1991]. Here we present new observations made during 1990 and 1992. These confirm the earlier work, which was restricted to one source on a few days, but they suggest that the anisotropy changes abruptly near 6 R· which was not clear in the earlier data. The axial ratio measurements are shown on Figure 1 below. The new observations were made with a more uniform sampling of the spatial plane. They show that contours of constant correlation are elliptical. This is apparently inconsistent with the spatial correlation of the ISEE-3 magnetic field which shows a 'Maltese Cross' shape [Matthaeus et al., 1990]. However this inconsistency may be only apparent: the magnetic field and density correlations need not have the same shape; the scale of the magnetic field correlations is at least 4 orders of magnitude larger; they are much further from the sun; and they are point measurements whereas ours are path-integrated. We also made two simultaneous measurements, at 10 R·, of the anisotropy on scales of 200 to 4000 km. Significant anisotropy was seen on the smaller scales, but the larger scale structure was essentially isotropic. This suggests that the process responsible for the anisotropic microstructure is independent of the larger scale isotropic turbulence. It is then tempting to speculate that the damping of this anisotropic process inside of 6 R· contributes to

  11. Effect of the Detector Width and Gas Pressure on the Frequency Response of a Micromachined Thermal Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Courteaud

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the design and the environmental conditions of a micromachined thermal accelerometer, based on convection effect, are discussed and studied in order to understand the behavior of the frequency response evolution of the sensor. It has been theoretically and experimentally studied with different detector widths, pressure and gas nature. Although this type of sensor has already been intensively examined, little information concerning the frequency response modeling is currently available and very few experimental results about the frequency response are reported in the literature. In some particular conditions, our measurements show a cut-off frequency at −3 dB greater than 200 Hz. By using simple cylindrical and planar models of the thermal accelerometer and an equivalent electrical circuit, a good agreement with the experimental results has been demonstrated.

  12. Optimized Multichannel Filter Bank with Flat Frequency Response for Texture Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kachouie Nezamoddin N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous approaches to texture analysis and segmentation use multichannel filtering by applying a set of filters in the frequency domain or a set of masks in the spatial domain. This paper presents two new texture segmentation algorithms based on multichannel filtering in conjunction with neural networks for feature extraction and segmentation. The features extracted by Gabor filters have been applied for image segmentation and analysis. Suitable choices of filter parameters and filter bank coverage in the frequency domain to optimize the filters are discussed. Here we introduce two methods to optimize Gabor filter bank. First, a Gabor filter bank with a flat response is implemented and the optimal feature dimension is extracted by competitive networks. Second, a subset of Gabor filter bank is selected to compose the best discriminative filters, so that each filter in this small set can discriminate a pair of textures in a given image. In both approaches, multilayer perceptrons are employed to segment the extracted features. The comparisons of segmentation results generated using the proposed methods and previous research using Gabor, discrete cosine transform (DCT, and Laws filters are presented. Finally, the segmentation results generated by applying the optimized filter banks to textured images are presented and discussed.

  13. A multichannel frequency response analyser for impedance spectroscopy on power sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIEL J. L. BRETT

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost multi-channel frequency response analyser (FRA has been developed based on a DAQ (data acquisition/LabVIEW interface. The system has been tested for electric and electrochemical impedance measurements. This novel association of hardware and software demonstrated performance comparable to a commercial potentiostat / FRA for passive electric circuits. The software has multichannel capabilities with minimal phase shift for 5 channels when operated below 3 kHz. When applied in active (galvanostatic mode in conjunction with a commercial electronic load (by discharging a lead acid battery at 1.5 A the performance was fit for purpose, providing electrochemical information to characterize the performance of the power source.

  14. Activation of the SOS response increases the frequency of small colony variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Paulander, Wilhelm; Ingmer, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Staphylococcus aureus sub-populations of slow-growing cells forming small colony variants (SCVs) are associated with persistent and recurrent infections that are difficult to eradicate with antibiotic therapies. In SCVs that are resistant towards aminoglycosides, mutations have been...... different mechanism of action influence the formation of SCVs that are resistant to otherwise lethal concentrations of the aminoglycoside, gentamicin. We found that exposure of S. aureus to fluoroquinolones and mitomycin C increased the frequency of gentamicin resistant SCVs, while other antibiotic classes...... that environmental stimuli, including antimicrobials that reduce replication fidelity, increase the formation of SCVs through activation of the SOS response and thereby potentially promote persistent infections that are difficult to treat....

  15. Theory of passively mode-locked lasers with self-frequency shift and saturable absorber response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Li-Jun; Shi Xiao-Juan; Li Lu; Li Zhong-Hao; Zhou Guo-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    A general theoretical model for passively mode-locked lasers is presented, in which both the self-frequency shift and either a fast or a slow saturable absorber response are taken into account. An exact soliton-like solution and condition for its existence are obtained under a definite compatible condition. The stability of the solution is analyzed by using a variational method, and a parameter region, in which the solution is linearly stable, is acquired theoretically. To verify the theoretical predictions, a typical example is given for stable pulse propagation over a long distance. The numerical results show that the soliton-like solution is stable under some perturbations within the linearly stable region and an arbitrary Gaussian pulse converges to the exact soliton-like solution after evolution in a distance.

  16. Kinetic and frequency-domain properties of reflex and conditioned eyelid responses in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruart, A; Schreurs, B G; del Toro, E D; Delgado-García, J M

    2000-02-01

    Eyelid position and the electromyographic activity of the orbicularis oculi muscle were recorded unilaterally in rabbits during reflex and conditioned blinks. Air-puff-evoked blinks consisted of a fast downward phase followed sometimes by successive downward sags. The reopening phase had a much longer duration and slower peak velocity. Onset latency, maximum amplitude, peak velocity, and rise time of reflex blinks depended on the intensity and duration of the air puff-evoking stimulus. A flashlight focused on the eye also evoked reflex blinks, but not flashes of light, or tones. Both delayed and trace classical conditioning paradigms were used. For delayed conditioning, animals were presented with a 350-ms, 90-dB, 600-Hz tone, as conditioned stimulus (CS). For trace conditioning, animals were presented with a 10-ms, 1-k/cm(2) air puff, as CS. The unconditioned stimulus (US) consisted of a 100-ms, 3-k/cm(2) air puff. The stimulus interval between CS and US onsets was 250 ms. Conditioned responses (CRs) to tones were composed of downward sags that increased in number through the successive conditioning sessions. The onset latency of the CR decreased across conditioning at the same time as its maximum amplitude and its peak velocity increased, but the time-to-peak of the CR remained unaltered. The topography of CRs evoked by short, weak air puffs as the CS showed three different components: the alpha response to the CS, the CR, and the reflex response to the US. Through conditioning, CRs showed a decrease in onset latency, and an increase in maximum amplitude and peak velocity. The time-to-peak of the CR remained unchanged. A power spectrum analysis of reflex and conditioned blink acceleration profiles showed a significant approximately 8-Hz oscillation within a broadband of frequencies between 4 and 15 Hz. Nose and mandible movements presented power spectrum profiles different from those characterizing reflex and conditioned blinks. It is concluded that eyelid reflex

  17. Provision of secondary frequency control via demand response activation on thermostatically controlled loads: Solutions and experiences from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Marinelli, Mattia; Hu, Junjie;

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the provision of secondary frequency control in electric power systems based on demand response (DR) activation on thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs) and quantifies the computation resource constraints for the control of large TCL population. Since TCLs are fast responsive...

  18. Anisotropic spheres in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prescription originally conceived for perfect fluids is extended to the case of anisotropic pressures. The method is used to obtain exact analytical solutions of the Einstein equations for spherically symmetric selfgravitating distribution of anisotropic matter. The solutions are matched to the Schwarzschild exterior metric. (author). 15 refs

  19. Acoustic Beam Forming Array Using Feedback-Controlled Microphones for Tuning and Self-Matching of Frequency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, Eliott (Inventor); Naguib, Ahmed (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A feedback-controlled microphone includes a microphone body and a membrane operatively connected to the body. The membrane is configured to be initially deflected by acoustic pressure such that the initial deflection is characterized by a frequency response. The microphone also includes a sensor configured to detect the frequency response of the initial deflection and generate an output voltage indicative thereof. The microphone additionally includes a compensator in electric communication with the sensor and configured to establish a regulated voltage in response to the output voltage. Furthermore, the microphone includes an actuator in electric communication with the compensator, wherein the actuator is configured to secondarily deflect the membrane in opposition to the initial deflection such that the frequency response is adjusted. An acoustic beam forming microphone array including a plurality of the above feedback-controlled microphones is also disclosed.

  20. Effect of bimodularity on frequency response of cylindrical panels using Galerkin time domain approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kallol Khan; Badri Prasad Patel; Yogendra Nath

    2010-12-01

    The forced vibration analysis of bimodulus material laminated structures is a challenging problem due to non-smooth nonlinear nature of governing equations. The most commonly used direct time integration schemes show numerical instability and do not predict steady state response except for limited number of cases without considering in-plane inertia. This is due to the sudden change of restoring force from positive/negative half cycle to negative/positive half cycle exciting higher modes/harmonics at every instant of a cycle change leading to numerical instability in the time marching scheme. In the present work, Galerkin time domain approach is successfully used for the forced vibration analysis of bimodular cylindrical panels. The effect of bimodularity ratio on the frequency response of cylindrical panels for few typical geometrical and lamination parameters is studied for the first time. It is found that the positive half cycle amplitude is greater than the negative half cycle amplitude for $E_{2t}/E_{2c} < 1$ and is smaller for $E_{2t}/E_{2c} > 1$. Further, the percentage difference of positive and negative half cycle amplitudes decreases with the increase in $E_{2t}/E_{2c}$. The stresses under dynamic loading are different for positive and negative half of a vibration cycle.

  1. A dual-band flexible frequency selective surface with miniaturized elements and maximally flat (Butterworth) response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dual-band flexible frequency selective surface (FSS) with miniaturized elements and maximally flat (Butterworth) response is presented in this paper. It is composed of three metallic layers, which are fabricated on thin flexible polyimide substrates and bonded together using thin bonding films. The overall thickness of the proposed structure is only about 0.3 mm, making it an attractive choice for conformal FSS applications. All the three layers can constitute a miniaturized-element FSS (MEFSS) and produce the first pass-band with miniaturization property, while the up and bottom layers can constitute a symmetric biplanar FSS and produce the second pass-band with maximally flat (Butterworth) response. The two pass-bands are independent and there is a wide band spacing up to 30 GHz between them. The principles of operation, the simulated results by using the vector modal matching method, and the experimental values of the fabricated prototype are also presented and discussed. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  2. High-frequency response of the ocean to mountain gap winds in the northeastern tropical Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jun-Hong; McWilliams, James C.; Gruber, Nicolas

    2009-12-01

    The wind jets generated by the three mountain gaps of Central America have a substantial impact on the mean state of the northeastern tropical Pacific. Here, we study the mean oceanic impact of individual high-frequency wind events by synthesizing satellite and reanalysis products. Using daily sea level wind and sea level pressure (SLP) for the period from 1999 through 2007, we identified a total of 103 short-term wind events for the Gulf of Tehuantepec, 59 events for the Gulf of Papagayo, and 36 events for the Gulf of Panama, most of them occurring between November and May. On the day of maximum wind, the composite peak wind speed reaches about 15 cm/s across nearly the entire Gulf of Tehuantepec, while the winds in the other two gulfs are somewhat weaker. Downwind of the gaps, the composite mean sea surface temperature (SST) drops substantially within one day in response to these wind events, but the spatial extent of the changes remains limited to the region of high wind speed. The high correlation with wind speed suggests that the cooling is mainly a response to wind-driven turbulent mixing rather than wind stress curl induced upwelling. The boundary layer turbulence is strongly shear-driven and weakly convectively driven in the Gulf of Tehuantepec and purely shear driven in the other two gulfs. Mean SST recovers quickly after the event, with the recovery largely being controlled by the anomalous surface heat flux induced by the SST disturbance. Each wind event is followed by a phytoplankton bloom, as evidenced by strong increases in satellite detected chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and inferred net primary production (NPP). The initial response of chlorophyll and NPP is delayed relative to SST by only one day, likely owing to upward mixing of chlorophyll from the deep chlorophyll maximum. Chlorophyll remains elevated for several days after the SST has already recovered suggesting that the upward mixing of new nutrients has sustained the bloom. This is supported by the

  3. Averaging anisotropic cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, J D; Barrow, John D.; Tsagas, Christos G.

    2006-01-01

    We examine the effects of spatial inhomogeneities on irrotational anisotropic cosmologies by looking at the average properties of pressure-free Bianchi-type models. Adopting the Buchert averaging scheme, we identify the kinematic backreaction effects by focussing on spacetimes with zero or isotropic spatial curvature. This allows us to close the system of the standard scalar formulae with a propagation equation for the shear magnitude. We find no change in the already known conditions for accelerated expansion. The backreaction terms are expressed as algebraic relations between the mean-square fluctuations of the models' irreducible kinematical variables. Based on these we investigate the early evolution of averaged vacuum Bianchi type $I$ universes and those filled with pressureless matter. In the latter case we show that the backreaction effects can modify the familiar Kasner-like singularity and potentially remove Mixmaster-type oscillations. We also discuss the possibility of accelerated expansion due to ...

  4. Thermodynamics of anisotropic branes

    CERN Document Server

    Ávila, Daniel; Patiño, Leonardo; Trancanelli, Diego

    2016-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics of flavor D7-branes embedded in an anisotropic black brane solution of type IIB supergravity. The flavor branes undergo a phase transition between a `Minkowski embedding', in which they lie outside of the horizon, and a `black hole embedding', in which they fall into the horizon. This transition depends on two independent dimensionless ratios, which are formed out of the black hole temperature, its anisotropy parameter, and the mass of the flavor degrees of freedom. It happens either at a critical temperature or at a critical anisotropy. A general lesson we learn from this analysis is that the anisotropy, in this particular realization, induces similar effects as the temperature. In particular, increasing the anisotropy bends the branes more and more into the horizon. Moreover, we observe that the transition becomes smoother for higher anisotropies.

  5. In-Situ Ultra Low Frequency Poroelastic Response of a Natural Macro-Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmi, Y.; Cappa, F.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C.; Gaffet, S.

    2008-12-01

    The seismic visibility of macro-fractures filled with fluids is a central problem in the exploration of thermo- hydro-mechanical and chemical processes that occur in Earth' s subsurface. Most studies have been concerned (1) with cracks of a small size relative to the seismic wavelength (2) with "core-sized" samples of single macro-fractures. In comparison, in-situ studies of macro-fractures are very rare and no real estimate is made of the relevance of this convenient "core-sized" data to in-situ reservoirs in general. In this study, we present a new experimental approach to in-situ characterize mechanical and hydraulic properties of fractures using the innovative HPPP protocol. This protocol allows simultaneous high-frequency (120.2 Hz) sampling of normal displacement and fluid pressure in a borehole intersecting the fracture. We show preliminary results conducted in a single fracture vertically embedded in a carbonate reservoir that contains 3 sets of macro-fractures with an average 2m spacing. Two HPPP probes were set, spaced one meter vertically in the fracture. Two types of ULF seismic sources are applied: a fluid pressure pulse injected in the fracture and a hammer hit at a point located 5m far from the fracture plane. There is a highly non-linear variation of fracture normal displacement-versus- fluid pressure as a function of frequency, the higher the frequency, the lower the displacement spectral amplitude is. The pressure pulse and the hammer hit allow exploring the fracture poroelastic response in the [0 - 3Hz] frequency range. The fracture plays the role of a "low-pass" filter for fluid pressure waves; only a quasi-static pressure signal being registered at the receiver. The displacement wave propagation is more complex resulting in uncoupled quasi-static-pressure-2Hz-deformation signals at the receiver. For low magnitude seismic sources (low amplitude pulse and seismic wave), the fracture natural resonance is amplified resulting in separate signals

  6. Frequency-dependent reduction of voltage-gated sodium current modulates retinal ganglion cell response rate to electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, David; Morley, John W.; Suaning, Gregg J.; Lovell, Nigel H.

    2011-10-01

    The ability to elicit visual percepts through electrical stimulation of the retina has prompted numerous investigations examining the feasibility of restoring sight to the blind with retinal implants. The therapeutic efficacy of these devices will be strongly influenced by their ability to elicit neural responses that approximate those of normal vision. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) can fire spikes at frequencies greater than 200 Hz when driven by light. However, several studies using isolated retinas have found a decline in RGC spiking response rate when these cells were stimulated at greater than 50 Hz. It is possible that the mechanism responsible for this decline also contributes to the frequency-dependent 'fading' of electrically evoked percepts recently reported in human patients. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings of rabbit RGCs, we investigated the causes for the spiking response depression during direct subretinal stimulation of these cells at 50-200 Hz. The response depression was not caused by inhibition arising from the retinal network but, instead, by a stimulus-frequency-dependent decline of RGC voltage-gated sodium current. Under identical experimental conditions, however, RGCs were able to spike at high frequency when driven by light stimuli and intracellular depolarization. Based on these observations, we demonstrated a technique to prevent the spiking response depression.

  7. Excitation of the half-frequency of the input signal in the response of an antenna immersed in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nonlinear response of a cylindrical monopole antenna immersed in a steady-state collisionless magnetic-field-free plasma and driven by a single-frequency RF source is investigated. The thickness of the ion sheath surrounding the antenna is controlled by a dc bias applied to the latter. It is found that a frequencies of the driving signal close to twice the frequency of a sheath wave resonance, the 1/2-subharmonic is excited, provided that the input power level is sufficiently high. The dependence of this process on the sheath thickness and on the electron plasma density is studied in the vicinity of several sheath wave resonances

  8. Effects of surface finish and treatment on the fatigue behaviour of vibrating cylinder block using frequency response approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the effects of surface finish and treatment on the high cycle fatigue behaviour of vibrating cylinder block of a new two-stroke free piston engine at complex variable amplitude loading conditions using frequency response approach,Finite element modelling and frequency response analysis was conducted using finite element analysis software Package MSC.PATRAN/MSC.NASTRAN and fatigue life prediction was carried out using MSC.FATIGUE software. Based on the finite element results, different frequency response approach was applied to predict the cylinder block fatigue life. Results for different load histories and material combinations are also discussed. Results indicated great effects for all surface finish and treatment. It is concluded that polished and cast surface finish conditions give the highest and lowest cylinder block lives, respectively; and that Nitrided treatment leads to longest cylinder block life. The results were used to draw contour plots of fatigue life and damage in the worst or most damaging case.

  9. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of quasi-symmetric anisotropic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1987-01-01

    An efficient computational method for the nonlinear dynamic analysis of quasi-symmetric anisotropic structures is proposed. The application of mixed models simplifies the analytical development and improves the accuracy of the response predictions, and operator splitting allows the reduction of the analysis model of the quasi-symmetric structure to that of the corresponding symmetric structure. The preconditoned conjugate gradient provides a stable and effective technique for generating the unsymmetric response of the structure as the sum of a symmetrized response plus correction modes. The effectiveness of the strategy is demonstrated with the example of a laminated anisotropic shallow shell of quadrilateral planform subjected to uniform normal loading.

  10. Anisotropic Inflation with General Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Jiaming; Qiu, Taotao

    2015-01-01

    Anomalies in recent observational data indicate that there might be some "anisotropic hair" generated in an inflation period. To obtain general information about the effects of this anisotropic hair to inflation models, we studied anisotropic inflation models that involve one vector and one scalar using several types of potentials. We determined the general relationship between the degree of anisotropy and the fraction of the vector and scalar fields, and concluded that the anisotropies behave independently of the potentials. We also generalized our study to the case of multi-directional anisotropies.

  11. Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyun Bum; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2016-06-01

    Anisotropy of biological tissues is a low-frequency phenomenon that is associated with the function and structure of cell membranes. Imaging of anisotropic conductivity has potential for the analysis of interactions between electromagnetic fields and biological systems, such as the prediction of current pathways in electrical stimulation therapy. To improve application to the clinical environment, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subjected to the stimulated currents. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the anisotropic conductivity tensor distribution of canine brain tissues, using a recently developed diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography method. At low frequency, electrical conductivity of the biological tissues can be expressed as a product of the mobility and concentration of ions in the extracellular space. From diffusion tensor images of the brain, we can obtain directional information on diffusive movements of water molecules, which correspond to the mobility of ions. The position dependent scale factor, which provides information on ion concentration, was successfully calculated from the magnetic flux density, to obtain the equivalent conductivity tensor. By combining the information from both techniques, we can finally reconstruct the anisotropic conductivity tensor images of brain tissues. The reconstructed conductivity images better demonstrate the enhanced signal intensity in strongly anisotropic brain regions, compared with those resulting from previous methods using a global scale factor.

  12. Machinery Fault Diagnosis Using Two-Channel Analysis Method Based on Fictitious System Frequency Response Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kihong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most existing techniques for machinery health monitoring that utilize measured vibration signals usually require measurement points to be as close as possible to the expected fault components of interest. This is particularly important for implementing condition-based maintenance since the incipient fault signal power may be too small to be detected if a sensor is located further away from the fault source. However, a measurement sensor is often not attached to the ideal point due to geometric or environmental restrictions. In such a case, many of the conventional diagnostic techniques may not be successfully applicable. In this paper, a two-channel analysis method is proposed to overcome such difficulty. It uses two vibration signals simultaneously measured at arbitrary points in a machine. The proposed method is described theoretically by introducing a fictitious system frequency response function. It is then verified experimentally for bearing fault detection. The results show that the suggested method may be a good alternative when ideal points for measurement sensors are not readily available.

  13. Absorption effects on the longitudinal bulk plasmon-polariton modes in 1D heterostructures containing anisotropic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, A. E. B.; Oliveira, L. E.; Cavalcanti, S. B.

    2015-11-01

    The transmission properties of electromagnetic waves through a one-dimensional layered system containing alternate layers of air and a uniaxial anisotropic left-handed material are investigated. The optical axis of such heterostructure is along the stacking direction and the components of the electric permittivity and magnetic permeability tensors that characterize the metamaterial are modeled by a Drude-type response and a split-ring resonator metamaterial response, respectively. Different plasmon frequencies are considered for directions parallel and perpendicular to the optical axis. For oblique incidence, longitudinal bulk-like plasmon polariton modes are found in the neighborhood of the plasmon frequency along the optical axis and anisotropy leads to the unfolding of nearly dispersionless plasmon-polariton bands either above or below the plasmon frequency. Moreover, it is shown that, even in the presence of loss/absorption, these plasmon polariton modes do survive and, therefore, should be experimentally detected.

  14. Soft particles with anisotropic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurtenberger, Peter

    Responsive colloids such as thermo- or pH-sensitive microgels are ideal model systems to investigate the relationship between the nature of interparticle interactions and the plethora of self-assembled structures that can form in colloidal suspensions. They allow for a variation of the form, strength and range of the interaction potential almost at will. While microgels have extensively been used as model systems to investigate various condensed matter problems such as glass formation, jamming or crystallization, they can also be used to study systems with anisotropic interactions. Here we show results from a systematic investigation of the influence of softness and anisotropy on the structural and dynamic properties of strongly interacting suspensions. We focus first on ionic microgels. Due to their large number of internal counterions they possess very large polarisabilities, and we can thus use external electrical ac fields to generate large dipolar contributions to the interparticle interaction potential. This leads to a number of new crystal phases, and we can trigger crystal-crystal phase transitions through the appropriate choice of the field strength. We then show that this approach can be extended to more complex particle shapes in an attempt to copy nature's well documented success in fabricating complex nanostructures such as virus shells via self assembly. European Research Council (ERC-339678-COMPASS).

  15. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic MHD shear flows

    OpenAIRE

    Uchava, E. S.; B. M. Shergelashvili; Tevzadze, A. G.; Poedts, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic MHD flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model, that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy, but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower ...

  16. Gradient expansion for anisotropic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Spaliński, Michał

    2016-01-01

    We compute the gradient expansion for anisotropic hydrodynamics. The results are compared with the corresponding expansion of the underlying kinetic-theory model with the collision term treated in the relaxation time approximation. We find that a recent formulation of anisotropic hydrodynamics based on an anisotropic matching principle yields the first three terms of the gradient expansion in agreement with those obtained for the kinetic theory. This gives further support for this particular hydrodynamic model as a good approximation of the kinetic-theory approach. We further find that the gradient expansion of anisotropic hydrodynamics is an asymptotic series, and the singularities of the analytic continuation of its Borel transform indicate the presence of non-hydrodynamic modes.

  17. Photon states in anisotropic media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepak Kumar

    2002-08-01

    Quantum aspects of optical polarization are discussed for waves traveling in anisotropic dielectric media with a view to relate the dynamics of polarization with that of photon spin and its manipulation by classical polarizers.

  18. MHz Gravitational Waves from Short-term Anisotropic Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Asuka

    2016-01-01

    We reveal the universality of short-term anisotropic inflation. As a demonstration, we study inflation with an exponential type gauge kinetic function which is ubiquitous in models obtained by dimensional reduction from higher dimensional fundamental theory. It turns out that an anisotropic inflation universally takes place in the later stage of conventional inflation. Remarkably, we find that primordial gravitational waves with a peak amplitude around $10^{-26}$ ~ $10^{-27}$ are copiously produced in high-frequency bands 10MHz~100MHz. If we could detect such gravitational waves in future, we would be able to probe higher dimensional fundamental theory.

  19. Electric double layer of anisotropic dielectric colloids under electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, M.; Wu, H.; Luijten, E.

    2016-07-01

    Anisotropic colloidal particles constitute an important class of building blocks for self-assembly directed by electrical fields. The aggregation of these building blocks is driven by induced dipole moments, which arise from an interplay between dielectric effects and the electric double layer. For particles that are anisotropic in shape, charge distribution, and dielectric properties, calculation of the electric double layer requires coupling of the ionic dynamics to a Poisson solver. We apply recently proposed methods to solve this problem for experimentally employed colloids in static and time-dependent electric fields. This allows us to predict the effects of field strength and frequency on the colloidal properties.

  20. Provision of secondary frequency control via demand response activation on thermostatically controlled loads: Solutions and experiences from Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Marinelli, Mattia; Hu, Junjie; Bindner, Henrik W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the provision of secondary frequency control in electric power systems based on demand response (DR) activation on thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs) and quantifies the computation resource constraints for the control of large TCL population. Since TCLs are fast responsive loads, they represent a suitable alternative to conventional sources for providing such control. An experimental investigation with domestic fridges representing the TCLs was conducted in an islande...

  1. Synchronization by the hand: the sight of gestures modulates low-frequency activity in brain responses to continuous speech

    OpenAIRE

    Biau, Emmanuel, 1985-; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    During social interactions, speakers often produce spontaneous gestures to accompany their speech. These coordinated body movements convey communicative intentions, and modulate how listeners perceive the message in a subtle, but important way. In the present perspective, we put the focus on the role that congruent non-verbal information from beat gestures may play in the neural responses to speech. Whilst delta-theta oscillatory brain responses reflect the time-frequency structure of the spe...

  2. Synchronization by the hand: The sight of gestures modulates low-frequency activity in brain responses to continuous speech

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel eBiau; Salvador eSoto-Faraco

    2015-01-01

    During social interactions, speakers often produce spontaneous gestures to accompany their speech. These coordinated body movements convey communicative intentions, and modulate how listeners perceive the message in a subtle, but important way. In the present perspective, we put the focus on the role that congruent non-verbal information from beat gestures may play in the neural responses to speech. Whilst delta-theta oscillatory brain responses reflect the time-frequency structure of the spe...

  3. Effects of the amplitude and frequency of salinity fluctuations on antioxidant responses in juvenile tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis

    OpenAIRE

    Sachin O. Khairnar; Xiangli Tian; Shuanglin Dong; Ziheng Fang; Bhavesh V. Solanki; Holeyappa A. Shanthanagouda

    2016-01-01

    To understand the tolerance of tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis, to varying salinities, the effects of the amplitude (2, 4, 6 and 8 g/L) and frequency (2, 4 and 8 days) of salinity fluctuations on the activities of antioxidant responses, including acidic phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) from antioxidant system in liver, muscle, gills and kidney, were investigated in this study. The results showed that the antioxidant responses of ...

  4. Application of Anisotropic Texture Components

    OpenAIRE

    Eschner, Th.; Fundenberger, J.-J.

    1997-01-01

    The description of textures in terms of texture components is an established conception in quantitative texture analysis. Recent developments lead to the representation of orientation distribution functions as a weighted sum of model functions, each corresponding to one anisotropic texture component. As was shown previously, an adequate texture description is possible with only a very small number of anisotropic texture components. As a result, textures and texture changes can be described by...

  5. Biomechanics and Biotensegrity: Study Method and Frequency Response of the Simplex and 3-bar-SVD Tensegrity Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Arenas, C.; Ghersi, I.; Miralles, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the frequency response of 3D tensegrity structures. These are structures that have been used, since the 80’s, to model biological systems of different scales. This fact led to the origin of the field of biotensegrity, which includes biomechanics as a natural field of application. In this work: a) A simple method for the analysis of frequency response of different nodes in 3D tensegrity structures was set up and tuned. This method is based on a video-analysis algorithm, which was applied to the structures, as they were vibrated along their axis of symmetry, at frequencies from 1 Hz to 60 Hz. b) Frequency-response analyses were performed, for the simplest 3D structure, the Simplex module, as well as for two towers, formed by stacking two and three Simplex modules, respectively. Resonant frequencies were detected for the Simplex module at (19.2±0.1) Hz and (50.2±0.1) Hz (the latter being an average of frequencies between homologous nodes). For the towers with two and three modules, each selected node presented a characteristic frequency response, modulated by their spatial placement in each model. Resonances for the two-stage tower were found at: (12±0.1) Hz; (16.2±0.1) Hz; (29.4±0.1) Hz and (37.2±0.1) Hz. For the tower with three Simplex modules, the main resonant frequencies were found at (12.0±0.1) Hz and (21.0±0.1) Hz. Results show that the proposed method is adequate for the study (2D) of any 3D tensegrity structure, with the potential of being generalized to the study of oscillations in three dimensions. A growing complexity and variability in the frequency response of the nodes was observed, as modules were added to the structures. These findings were compared to those found in the available literature.

  6. Transient Stability and Frequency Response of the US Western Interconnection under conditions of High Wind and Solar Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Kara; Miller, Nicholas W.; Shao, Miaolei; Pajic, Slobodan; D' Aquila, Robert

    2015-04-15

    Adding large amounts of wind and solar generation to bulk power systems that are traditionally subject to operating constraints set by transient stability and frequency response limitations is the subject of considerable concern in the industry. The US Western Interconnection (WI) is expected to experience substantial additional growth in both wind and solar generation. These plants will, to some extent, displace large central station thermal generation, both coal and gas-fired, which have traditionally helped maintain stability. Our paper reports the results of a study that investigated the transient stability and frequency response of the WI with high penetrations of wind and solar generation. Moreover, the main goals of this work were to (1) create a realistic, baseline model of the WI, (2) test selected transient stability and frequency events, (3) investigate the impact of large amounts of wind and solar generation, and (4) examine means to improve performance.

  7. Computational Study of Subdural Cortical Stimulation: Effects of Simulating Anisotropic Conductivity on Activation of Cortical Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Seo

    Full Text Available Subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS is an appealing method in the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of SuCS have been applied to determine the optimal design for electrotherapy. To achieve a better understanding of computational modeling on the stimulation effects of SuCS, the influence of anisotropic white matter conductivity on the activation of cortical neurons was investigated in a realistic head model. In this paper, we constructed pyramidal neuronal models (layers 3 and 5 that showed primary excitation of the corticospinal tract, and an anatomically realistic head model reflecting complex brain geometry. The anisotropic information was acquired from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI and then applied to the white matter at various ratios of anisotropic conductivity. First, we compared the isotropic and anisotropic models; compared to the isotropic model, the anisotropic model showed that neurons were activated in the deeper bank during cathodal stimulation and in the wider crown during anodal stimulation. Second, several popular anisotropic principles were adapted to investigate the effects of variations in anisotropic information. We observed that excitation thresholds varied with anisotropic principles, especially with anodal stimulation. Overall, incorporating anisotropic conductivity into the anatomically realistic head model is critical for accurate estimation of neuronal responses; however, caution should be used in the selection of anisotropic information.

  8. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 3 -- Frequency Response and Transient Stability (Report and Executive Summary)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N. W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D' Aquila, R.

    2014-12-01

    The primary objectives of Phase 3 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-3) were to examine the large-scale transient stability and frequency response of the Western Interconnection with high wind and solar penetration, and to identify means to mitigate any adverse performance impacts via transmission reinforcements, storage, advanced control capabilities, or other alternatives.

  9. Frequency Response Analysis of Current Controllers for Selective Harmonic Compensation in Active Power Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lascu, C.; Asiminoaei, L.; Boldea, I.;

    2009-01-01

    different. It emerges that the fourth one has superior behavior and robustness and can stably work at higher frequencies than the others. Theoretical findings and analysis are supported by comparative experimental results on a 7-kVA laboratory setup. The highest harmonic frequency that can be stably...

  10. Variable Speed (DFIG) Wind Turbines: Rapid Frequency Response to Power System Disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chandrashekhara, Divya K; Hansen, Anca Daniela; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar;

    2009-01-01

    initially to counter act the frequency change during a power system disturbance. Simulation studies have been carried out on a generic reduced model of a transmission power grid of the Danish TSO Energinet.dk to assess the impact of loss of generation on system frequency. Further, simulation study has been...

  11. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasma with heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in an anisotropic tokamak plasma is investigated in fluid approximation. The collisionless anisotropic plasma is described within the 16-momentum magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid closure model, which takes into account not only the pressure anisotropy but also the anisotropic heat flux. It is shown that the GAM frequency agrees better with the kinetic result than the standard Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) MHD model. When zeroing the anisotropy, the 16-momentum result is identical with the kinetic one to the order of 1/q2, while the CGL result agrees with the kinetic result only on the leading order. The discrepancies between the results of the CGL fluid model and the kinetic theory are well removed by considering the heat flux effect in the fluid approximation

  12. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasma with heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Haijun, E-mail: hjren@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in an anisotropic tokamak plasma is investigated in fluid approximation. The collisionless anisotropic plasma is described within the 16-momentum magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid closure model, which takes into account not only the pressure anisotropy but also the anisotropic heat flux. It is shown that the GAM frequency agrees better with the kinetic result than the standard Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) MHD model. When zeroing the anisotropy, the 16-momentum result is identical with the kinetic one to the order of 1/q{sup 2}, while the CGL result agrees with the kinetic result only on the leading order. The discrepancies between the results of the CGL fluid model and the kinetic theory are well removed by considering the heat flux effect in the fluid approximation.

  13. Dielectric response of transformer oil based ferrofluid in low frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajnak, M.; Kurimsky, J.; Dolnik, B.; Marton, K.; Tomco, L.; Taculescu, A.; Vekas, L.; Kovac, J.; Vavra, I.; Tothova, J.; Kopcansky, P.; Timko, M.

    2013-07-01

    In this article, our experimental study of the dynamic dielectric behaviour of transformer oil-based ferrofluid with magnetite nanoparticles is presented. Frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity and dissipation factor were measured within the frequency range from 20 Hz to 2 MHz by a capacitance method. The ferrofluid samples were placed in a liquid crystal cell, and experiments were carried out in an electromagnetically anechoic chamber. Two polarization processes and corresponding relaxations were revealed within the applied frequency range. Schwarz theory of electric double layer polarization is used to explain the low frequency relaxation maximum. Moreover, the shift of the maximum position towards higher frequencies is observed as the magnetic volume fraction in the ferrofluid increases. The related decrease in relaxation time due to higher counterion mobility is analysed. Reduced electric field intensity due to depolarization field, which is dependent on the particle concentration, is proposed as the reason for the maxima shift. This assumption is wholly supported by a complementary experiment.

  14. Nonlinear force propagation, anisotropic stiffening and non-affine relaxation in a model cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Daisuke; Head, David; Ikebe, Emi; Nakamasu, Akiko; Kinoshita, Suguru; Peijuan, Zhang; Ando, Shoji

    2013-03-01

    Forces are generated heterogeneously in living cells and transmitted through cytoskeletal networks that respond highly non-linearly. Here, we carry out high-bandwidth passive microrheology on vimentin networks reconstituted in vitro, and observe the nonlinear mechanical response due to forces propagating from a local source applied by an optical tweezer. Since the applied force is constant, the gel becomes equilibrated and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem can be employed to deduce the viscoelasticity of the local environment from the thermal fluctuations of colloidal probes. Our experiments unequivocally demonstrate the anisotropic stiffening of the cytoskeletal network behind the applied force, with greater stiffening in the parallel direction. Quantitative agreement with an affine continuum model is obtained, but only for the response at certain frequency ~ 10-1000 Hz which separates the high-frequency power law and low-frequency elastic behavior of the network. We argue that the failure of the model at lower frequencies is due to the presence of non-affinity, and observe that zero-frequency changes in particle separation can be fitted when an independently-measured, empirical nonaffinity factor is applied.

  15. Propagation of surface plasmons on highly anisotropic dielectric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Nagaraj; Krokhin, Arkadii

    2011-03-01

    We calculate the propagation length of surface plasmons in dielectric-metal-dielectric structures with anisotropic substrates. We show that the proper orientation of the optical axis of the crystal with respect to the metal surface minimizes Joule losses enhancing the propagation length of surface plasmons. The propagation length in a wide range of frequencies including the telecommunications region is analyzed. A simple Kronig-Penney model for anisotropic plasmonic crystal where the substrate is a periodic sequence of dielectric delta-peaks is also proposed. In this model the dispersion relation for surface plasmon has a band structure where the band width tends to zero when the frequency approaches the resonant frequency. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy through Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER46312.

  16. Automated Flight Test and System Identification for Rotary Wing Small Aerial Platform using Frequency Responses Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Adiprawita, Widyawardana; Semibiring, Jaka

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes an autopilot system that can be used to control the small scale rotorcraft during the flight test for linear-frequency-domain system identification. The input frequency swept is generated automatically as part of the autopilot control command. Therefore the bandwidth coverage and consistency of the frequency swept is guaranteed to produce high quality data for system identification. Beside that we can set the safety parameter during the flight test (maximum roll or pitch value, minimum altitude, etc) so the safety of the whole flight test is guaranteed. This autopilot for automated flight test will be tested using hardware in the loop simulator for hover flight condition.

  17. Automated Flight Test and System Identification for Rotary Wing Small Aerial Platform Using Frequency Responses Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Widyawardana Adiprawita; Adang Suwandi Ahmad; Jaka Sembiring

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes an autopilot system that can be used to control the small scale rotorcraft during the flight test for linear-frequency-domain system identification. The input frequency-sweep is generated automatically as part of the autopilot control command. Therefore the bandwidth coverage and consistency of the frequency-sweep are guaranteed to produce high quality data for system identification. Beside that, we can set the safety parameters during the flight test (maximum roll/pitch value, minimum altitude, etc.) so the safety of the whole flight test is guaranteed. This autopilot system is validated using hardware in the loop simulator for hover flight condition.

  18. Gauge Field Optics with Anisotropic Media

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Fu

    2014-01-01

    By considering gauge transformations on the macroscopic Maxwell's equations, a two dimensional gauge field, with its pseudo magnetic field in the real space, is identified as tilted anisotropy in the constitutive parameters. We show that optical spin Hall effect and one-way edge states become possible simply by using anisotropic media with broadband response. The proposed gauge field also allows us to design an optical isolator based on the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Our approach will be useful in spoof magneto-optics with arbitrary magnetic fields mimicked by metamaterials with subwavelength unit cells. It also serves as a generic way to design polarization-dependent devices.

  19. A method for achieving monotonic frequency-temperature response for langasite surface-acoustic-wave high-temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaoming, Bao; Yabing, Ke; Yanqing, Zheng; Lina, Cheng; Honglang, Li

    2016-02-01

    To achieve the monotonic frequency-temperature response for a high-temperature langasite (LGS) surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor in a wide temperature range, a method utilizing two substrate cuts with different propagation angles on the same substrate plane was proposed. In this method, the theory of effective permittivity is adopted to calculate the temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF), electromechanical coupling coefficients (k2), and power flow angle (PFA) for different propagation angles on the same substrate plane, and then the two substrate cuts were chosen to have large k2 and small PFA, as well as the difference in their TCFs (ΔTCF) to always have the same sign of their values. The Z-cut LGS substrate plane was taken as an example, and the two suitable substrate cuts with propagation angles of 74 and 80° were chosen to derive a monotonic frequency-temperature response for LGS SAW sensors at -50 to 540 °C. Experiments on a LGS SAW sensor using the above two substrate cuts were designed, and its measured frequency-temperature response at -50 to 540 °C agreed well with the theory, demonstrating the high accuracy of the proposed method.

  20. Control-focused, nonlinear and time-varying modelling of dielectric elastomer actuators with frequency response analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, William R.; Wilson, Emma D.; Assaf, Tareq; Rossiter, Jonathan; Dodd, Tony J.; Porrill, John; Anderson, Sean R.

    2015-05-01

    Current models of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) are mostly constrained to first principal descriptions that are not well suited to the application of control design due to their computational complexity. In this work we describe an integrated framework for the identification of control focused, data driven and time-varying DEA models that allow advanced analysis of nonlinear system dynamics in the frequency-domain. Experimentally generated input-output data (voltage-displacement) was used to identify control-focused, nonlinear and time-varying dynamic models of a set of film-type DEAs. The model description used was the nonlinear autoregressive with exogenous input structure. Frequency response analysis of the DEA dynamics was performed using generalized frequency response functions, providing insight and a comparison into the time-varying dynamics across a set of DEA actuators. The results demonstrated that models identified within the presented framework provide a compact and accurate description of the system dynamics. The frequency response analysis revealed variation in the time-varying dynamic behaviour of DEAs fabricated to the same specifications. These results suggest that the modelling and analysis framework presented here is a potentially useful tool for future work in guiding DEA actuator design and fabrication for application domains such as soft robotics.

  1. Understory response to varying fire frequencies after 20 years of prescribed burning in an upland oak forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, J.A.; Hallgren, S.W.; Fuhlendorf, S.D.; Leslie, David M., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystems in the eastern United States that were shaped by fire over thousands of years of anthropogenic burning recently have been subjected to fire suppression resulting in significant changes in vegetation composition and structure and encroachment by invasive species. Renewed interest in use of fire to manage such ecosystems will require knowledge of effects of fire regime on vegetation. We studied the effects of one aspect of the fire regime, fire frequency, on biomass, cover and diversity of understory vegetation in upland oak forests prescribe-burned for 20 years at different frequencies ranging from zero to five fires per decade. Overstory canopy closure ranged from 88 to 96% and was not affected by fire frequency indicating high tolerance of large trees for even the most frequent burning. Understory species richness and cover was dominated by woody reproduction followed in descending order by forbs, C3 graminoids, C4 grasses, and legumes. Woody plant understory cover did not change with fire frequency and increased 30% from one to three years after a burn. Both forbs and C3 graminoids showed a linear increase in species richness and cover as fire frequency increased. In contrast, C4 grasses and legumes did not show a response to fire frequency. The reduction of litter by fire may have encouraged regeneration of herbaceous plants and helped explain the positive response of forbs and C3 graminoids to increasing fire frequency. Our results showed that herbaceous biomass, cover, and diversity can be managed with long-term prescribed fire under the closed canopy of upland oak forests. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  2. Model of the Radio Frequency (RF) Excitation Response from Monopole and Dipole Antennas in a Large Scale Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Good antenna-mode coupling is needed for determining the amount of propellant in a tank through the method of radio frequency mass gauging (RFMG). The antenna configuration and position in a tank are important factors in coupling the antenna to the natural electromagnetic modes. In this study, different monopole and dipole antenna mounting configurations and positions were modeled and responses simulated in a full-scale tank model with the transient solver of CST Microwave Studio (CST Computer Simulation Technology of America, Inc.). The study was undertaken to qualitatively understand the effect of antenna design and placement within a tank on the resulting radio frequency (RF) tank spectrum.

  3. Frequency response experiments for a fluid and structure interaction system due to thermal stripping in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    thermal striping phenomena induced by the alternate flows of cold and hot sodium impinging against a horizontal test piece surface were investigated. The temperatures of sodium and structure material were measured simultaneously using thermocouples located various positions. From the present experiments, the following results have been obtained. (1) The alternate flows of cold and hot sodium with the frequency from 0.01 Hz to 0.2 Hz and the temperature difference of 240degC were composed using the opening and closing operations of a cold and a hot sodium valve alternately. (2) The change and fluctuation of temperature amplitude in sodium decreases with decreasing of frequency component. (3) Amplitude component of temperature vibration decreased extremely in the structure material inside of the test piece than sodium. (4) Amplitude component of temperature vibration in the structure material increases in inverse proportion to decreasing of frequency component. (5) Amplitude component change of temperature vibration in the structure material decreases with decreasing of frequency component. (6) Fine fluctuations of temperature vibration in the structure material increases with increasing of frequency component, but it was limited near the surface of material. (7) Fine fluctuations of temperature vibration in the structure material decreases with decreasing of frequency component, but it was penetrated into the deep inner part of the material. (author)

  4. Retinal ganglion cells: mechanisms underlying depolarization block and differential responses to high frequency electrical stimulation of ON and OFF cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameneva, T.; Maturana, M. I.; Hadjinicolaou, A. E.; Cloherty, S. L.; Ibbotson, M. R.; Grayden, D. B.; Burkitt, A. N.; Meffin, H.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. ON and OFF retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are known to have non-monotonic responses to increasing amplitudes of high frequency (2 kHz) biphasic electrical stimulation. That is, an increase in stimulation amplitude causes an increase in the cell’s spike rate up to a peak value above which further increases in stimulation amplitude cause the cell to decrease its activity. The peak response for ON and OFF cells occurs at different stimulation amplitudes, which allows differential stimulation of these functional cell types. In this study, we investigate the mechanisms underlying the non-monotonic responses of ON and OFF brisk-transient RGCs and the mechanisms underlying their differential responses. Approach. Using in vitro patch-clamp recordings from rat RGCs, together with simulations of single and multiple compartment Hodgkin-Huxley models, we show that the non-monotonic response to increasing amplitudes of stimulation is due to depolarization block, a change in the membrane potential that prevents the cell from generating action potentials. Main results. We show that the onset for depolarization block depends on the amplitude and frequency of stimulation and reveal the biophysical mechanisms that lead to depolarization block during high frequency stimulation. Our results indicate that differences in transmembrane potassium conductance lead to shifts of the stimulus currents that generate peak spike rates, suggesting that the differential responses of ON and OFF cells may be due to differences in the expression of this current type. We also show that the length of the axon’s high sodium channel band (SOCB) affects non-monotonic responses and the stimulation amplitude that leads to the peak spike rate, suggesting that the length of the SOCB is shorter in ON cells. Significance. This may have important implications for stimulation strategies in visual prostheses.

  5. Phase Response of Fine Frequency Grid Reconstruction of Sampling Oscilloscopes Based on the NTN Calibration

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Yichi; Lin Maoliu; Xu Qinghua

    2011-01-01

    This study describes an algorithm for determining the fine phase response of equivalent sampling oscilloscopes of a linear time-invariant response function from its magnitude. The Nose-to-Nose (NTN) calibration method can give the phase response of the equivalent sampling oscilloscopes, but the phase resolution can only achieve 250 MHz because the limit of the technology. In this study the fine phase response has been reconstructed. Although the truncation of the Kramers-Kronig transform usin...

  6. Continuum mechanics of anisotropic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Cowin, Stephen C

    2013-01-01

    Continuum Mechanics of Anisotropic Materials(CMAM) presents an entirely new and unique development of material anisotropy in the context of an appropriate selection and organization of continuum mechanics topics. These features will distinguish this continuum mechanics book from other books on this subject. Textbooks on continuum mechanics are widely employed in engineering education, however, none of them deal specifically with anisotropy in materials. For the audience of Biomedical, Chemical and Civil Engineering students, these materials will be dealt with more frequently and greater accuracy in their analysis will be desired. Continuum Mechanics of Anisotropic Materials' author has been a leader in the field of developing new approaches for the understanding of anisotropic materials.

  7. Growth and Flowering Responses of Cut Chrysanthemum Grown under Restricted Root Volume to Irrigation Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viyachai Taweesak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Influences of irrigation frequency on the growth and flowering of chrysanthemum grown under restricted root volume were tested. Chrysanthemum cuttings (Chrysanthemum morifolium “Reagan White” were grown in seedling tray which contained coconut peat in volumes of 73 and 140 cm3. Plants were irrigated with drip irrigation at irrigation frequencies of 4 (266 mL, 6 (400 mL, and 8 (533 mL times/day to observe their growth and flowering performances. There was interaction between irrigation frequency and substrate volume on plant height of chrysanthemum. Plants grown in 140 cm3 substrates and irrigated 6 times/day produced the tallest plant of 109.25 cm. Plants irrigated 6 and 8 times/day had significantly higher level of phosphorus content in their leaves than those plants irrigated 4 times/day. The total leaf area, number of internodes, leaf length, and leaf width of chrysanthemums grown in 140 cm3 substrate were significantly higher than those grown in 73 cm3 substrate. The numbers of flowers were affected by both irrigation frequencies and substrate volumes. Chrysanthemums irrigated 8 times/day had an average of 19.56 flowers while those irrigated 4 times/day had an average of 16.63 flowers. Increasing irrigation frequency can improve the growth and flowering of chrysanthemums in small substrate volumes.

  8. Breast ultrasound despeckling using anisotropic diffusion guided by texture descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Flores, Wilfrido; Pereira, Wagner Coelho de Albuquerque; Infantosi, Antonio Fernando Catelli

    2014-11-01

    Breast ultrasound (BUS) is considered the most important adjunct method to mammography for diagnosing cancer. However, this image modality suffers from an intrinsic artifact called speckle noise, which degrades spatial and contrast resolution and obscures the screened anatomy. Hence, it is necessary to reduce speckle artifacts before performing image analysis by means of computer-aided diagnosis systems, for example. In addition, the trade-off between smoothing level and preservation of lesion contour details should be addressed by speckle reduction schemes. In this scenario, we propose a BUS despeckling method based on anisotropic diffusion guided by Log-Gabor filters (ADLG). Because we assume that different breast tissues have distinct textures, in our approach we perform a multichannel decomposition of the BUS image using Log-Gabor filters. Next, the conduction coefficient of anisotropic diffusion filtering is computed using texture responses instead of intensity values as stated originally. The proposed algorithm is validated using both synthetic and real breast data sets, with 900 and 50 images, respectively. The performance measures are compared with four existing speckle reduction schemes based on anisotropic diffusion: conventional anisotropic diffusion filtering (CADF), speckle-reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD), texture-oriented anisotropic diffusion (TOAD), and interference-based speckle filtering followed by anisotropic diffusion (ISFAD). The validity metrics are the Pratt's figure of merit, for synthetic images, and the mean radial distance (in pixels), for real sonographies. Figure of merit and mean radial distance indices should tend toward '1' and '0', respectively, to indicate adequate edge preservation. The results suggest that ADLG outperforms the four speckle removal filters compared with respect to simulated and real BUS images. For each method--ADLG, CADF, SRAD, TOAD and ISFAD--the figure of merit median values are 0.83, 0.40, 0.39, 0

  9. LOCO - a linearised model for analysing the onset of coolant oscillations and frequency response of boiling channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial plant such as heat exchangers and nuclear and conventional boilers are prone to coolant flow oscillations which may not be detected. In this report, a hydrodynamic model is formulated in which the one-dimensional, non-linear, partial differential equations for the conservation of mass, energy and momentum are perturbed with respect to time, linearised, and Laplace-transformed into the s-domain for frequency response analysis. A computer program has been developed to integrate numerically the resulting non-linear ordinary differential equations by finite difference methods. A sample problem demonstrates how the computer code is used to analyse the frequency response and flow stability characteristics of a heated channel

  10. Synchronization by the hand: The sight of gestures modulates low-frequency activity in brain responses to continuous speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eBiau

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available During social interactions, speakers often produce spontaneous gestures to accompany their speech. These coordinated body movements convey communicative intentions, and modulate how listeners perceive the message in a subtle, but important way. In the present perspective, we put the focus on the role that congruent non-verbal information from beat gestures may play in the neural responses to speech. Whilst delta-theta oscillatory brain responses reflect the time-frequency structure of the speech signal, we argue that beat gestures promote phase resetting at relevant word onsets. This mechanism may facilitate the anticipation of associated acoustic cues relevant for prosodic/syllabic-based segmentation in speech perception. We report recently published data supporting this hypothesis, and discuss the potential of beats (and gestures in general for further studies investigating continuous AV speech processing through low-frequency oscillations.

  11. Synchronization by the hand: the sight of gestures modulates low-frequency activity in brain responses to continuous speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biau, Emmanuel; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    During social interactions, speakers often produce spontaneous gestures to accompany their speech. These coordinated body movements convey communicative intentions, and modulate how listeners perceive the message in a subtle, but important way. In the present perspective, we put the focus on the role that congruent non-verbal information from beat gestures may play in the neural responses to speech. Whilst delta-theta oscillatory brain responses reflect the time-frequency structure of the speech signal, we argue that beat gestures promote phase resetting at relevant word onsets. This mechanism may facilitate the anticipation of associated acoustic cues relevant for prosodic/syllabic-based segmentation in speech perception. We report recently published data supporting this hypothesis, and discuss the potential of beats (and gestures in general) for further studies investigating continuous AV speech processing through low-frequency oscillations. PMID:26441618

  12. Matrix method of determining the longitudinal-stability coefficients and frequency response of an aircraft from transient flight data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donegan, James J; Pearson, Henry A

    1952-01-01

    A matrix method is presented for determining the longitudinal-stability coefficients and frequency response of an aircraft from arbitrary maneuvers. The method is devised so that it can be applied to time-history measurements of combinations of such simple quantities as angle of attack, pitching velocity, load factor, elevator angle, and hinge moment to obtain the over-all coefficients. Although the method has been devised primarily for the evaluation of stability coefficients which are of primary interest in most aircraft loads and stability studies, it can be used also, with a simple additional computation, to determine the frequency-response characteristics. The entire procedure can be applied or extended to other problems which can be expressed by linear differential equations.

  13. Multi Station Frequency Response and Polarization of ELF/VLF Signals Generated via Ionospheric Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxworth, Ashanthi; Golkowski, Mark; University of Colorado Denver Team

    2013-10-01

    ELF/VLF wave generation via HF modulated ionospheric heating has been practiced for many years as a unique way to generate waves in the ELF/VLF band (3 Hz - 30 kHz). This paper presents experimental results and associated theoretical modeling from work performed at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. An experiment was designed to investigate the modulation frequency dependence of the generated ELF/VLF signal amplitudes and polarization at multiple sites at distances of 37 km, 50 km and 99 km from the facility. While no difference is observed for X mode versus O mode modulation of the heating wave, it is found that ELF/VLF amplitude and polarization as a function of modulated ELF/VLF frequency is different for each site. An ionospheric heating code is used to determine the primary current sources leading to the observations.

  14. An Analysis of Decentralized Demand Response as Frequency Control Support under CriticalWind Power Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Villena

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In power systems with high wind energy penetration, the conjunction of wind power fluctuations and power system inertia reduction can lead to large frequency excursions, where the operating reserves of conventional power generation may be insufficient to restore the power balance. With the aim of evaluating the demand-side contribution to frequency control, a complete process to determine critical wind oscillations in power systems with high wind penetration is discussed and described in this paper. This process implies thousands of wind power series simulations, which have been carried out through a validated offshore wind farm model. A large number of different conditions have been taken into account, such as frequency dead bands, the percentages of controllable demand and seasonal factor influence on controllable loads. Relevant results and statistics are also included in the paper.

  15. Infliximab therapy increases the frequency of circulating CD16(+) monocytes and modifies macrophage cytokine response to bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazareth, N; Magro, F; Silva, J; Duro, M; Gracio, D; Coelho, R; Appelberg, R; Macedo, G; Sarmento, A

    2014-09-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) has been correlated with altered macrophage response to microorganisms. Considering the efficacy of infliximab treatment on CD remission, we investigated infliximab effects on circulating monocyte subsets and on macrophage cytokine response to bacteria. Human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages were obtained from CD patients, treated or not with infliximab. Macrophages were infected with Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) or M. avium subsp avium, and cytokine levels [tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-10] were evaluated at different time-points. To evaluate infliximab-dependent effects on monocyte subsets, we studied CD14 and CD16 expression by peripheral blood monocytes before and after different infliximab administrations. We also investigated TNF secretion by macrophages obtained from CD16(+) and CD16(-) monocytes and the frequency of TNF(+) cells among CD16(+) and CD16(-) monocyte-derived macrophages from CD patients. Infliximab treatment resulted in elevated TNF and IL-10 macrophage response to bacteria. An infliximab-dependent increase in the frequency of circulating CD16(+) monocytes (particularly the CD14(++) CD16(+) subset) was also observed (before infliximab: 4·65 ± 0·58%; after three administrations: 10·68 ± 2·23%). In response to MAP infection, macrophages obtained from CD16(+) monocytes were higher TNF producers and CD16(+) macrophages from infliximab-treated CD patients showed increased frequency of TNF(+) cells. In conclusion, infliximab treatment increased the TNF production of CD macrophages in response to bacteria, which seemed to depend upon enrichment of CD16(+) circulating monocytes, particularly of the CD14(++) CD16(+) subset. Infliximab treatment of CD patients also resulted in increased macrophage IL-10 production in response to bacteria, suggesting an infliximab-induced shift to M2 macrophages. PMID:24816497

  16. Anisotropic Paramagnetic Meissner Effect by Spin-Orbit Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espedal, Camilla; Yokoyama, Takehito; Linder, Jacob

    2016-03-01

    Conventional s -wave superconductors repel an external magnetic field. However, a recent experiment [A. Di Bernardo et al., Phys. Rev. X 5, 041021 (2015)] has tailored the electromagnetic response of superconducting correlations via adjacent magnetic materials. We consider another route of altering the Meissner effect where spin-orbit interactions induce an anisotropic Meissner response that changes sign depending on the field orientation. The tunable electromagnetic response opens new paths in the utilization of hybrid systems comprising magnets and superconductors.

  17. Dynamical analysis of anisotropic inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karčiauskas, Mindaugas

    2016-06-01

    The inflaton coupling to a vector field via the f(φ)2F μνFμν term is used in several contexts in the literature, such as to generate primordial magnetic fields, to produce statistically anisotropic curvature perturbation, to support anisotropic inflation, and to circumvent the η-problem. In this work, I perform dynamical analysis of this system allowing for the most general Bianchi I initial conditions. I also confirm the stability of attractor fixed points along phase-space directions that had not been investigated before.

  18. Latest developments in anisotropic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Tinti, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the leading order of anisotropic hydrodynamics expansion. It has already been shown that in the (0+1) and (1+1)-dimensional cases it is consistent with the second order viscous hydrodynamics, and it provides a striking agreement with the exact solutions of the Boltzmann equation. Quite recently, a new set of equations has been proposed for the leading order of anisotropic hydrodynamics, which is consistent with the second order viscous hydrodynamics in the most general (3+1)-dimensional case, and does not require a next-to-leading treatment for describing pressure anisotropies in the transverse plane.

  19. Anisotropic hydrodynamics: Motivation and methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this proceedings contribution I review recent progress in our understanding of the bulk dynamics of relativistic systems that possess potentially large local rest frame momentum-space anisotropies. In order to deal with these momentum-space anisotropies, a reorganization of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics can be made around an anisotropic background, and the resulting dynamical framework has been dubbed “anisotropic hydrodynamics”. I also discuss expectations for the degree of momentum-space anisotropy of the quark–gluon plasma generated in relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC from second-order viscous hydrodynamics, strong-coupling approaches, and weak-coupling approaches

  20. Whistler Solitons in Plasma with Anisotropic Hot Electron Admixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Gallagher, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    The longitudinal and transverse modulation instability of whistler waves in plasma, with a small admixture of hot anisotropic electrons, is discussed. If the hot particles temperature anisotropy is positive, it is found that, in such plasma, longitudinal perturbations can lead to soliton formation for frequencies forbidden in cold plasma. The soliton is enriched by hot particles. The frequency region unstable to transverse modulation in cold plasma in the presence of hot electrons is divided by stable domains. For both cases the role of hot electrons is more significant for whistlers with smaller frequencies.

  1. Diagnosing Integrity of Transformer Windings by Applying Statistical Tools to Frequency Response Analysis Data Obtained at Site

    OpenAIRE

    M. Prameela; Pradeep M. Nirgude; G. Radhakrishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the results of Sweep Frequency Response Analysis (SFRA) measurement work carried out on number of power transformers at various sites involving problems like shorting of winding turns, core faults and related issues, On-Load Tap Changer (OLTC) open contacts and winding displacement issues. The numerical parameters Viz., Min-Max ratio (MM), Mean Square Error (MSE), Maximum Absolute difference (MABS), Absolute Sum of Logarithmic Error (ASLE), Standard Deviation (S.D.) and Co...

  2. Inter-subject correlation of brain hemodynamic responses during watching a movie: localization in space and frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka-Pekka Kauppi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cinema is a promising naturalistic stimulus that enables, for instance, elicitation of robust emotions during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Inter-subject correlation (ISC has been used as a model-free analysis method to map the highly complex hemodynamic responses that are evoked during watching a movie. Here, we extended the ISC analysis to frequency domain using wavelet analysis combined with non-parametric permutation methods for making voxel-wise statistical inferences about frequency-band specific ISC. We applied these novel analysis methods to a dataset collected in our previous study where 12 subjects watched an emotionally engaging movie “Crash” during fMRI scanning. Our results suggest that several regions within the frontal and temporal lobes show ISC predominantly at low frequency bands, whereas visual cortical areas exhibit ISC also at higher frequencies. It is possible that these findings relate to recent observations of a cortical hierarchy of temporal receptive windows, or that the types of events processed in temporal and prefrontal cortical areas (e.g., social interactions occur over longer time periods than the stimulus features processed in the visual areas. Software tools to perform frequency-specific ISC analysis, together with a visualization application, are available as open source Matlab code.

  3. An approach for large-scale gyroscopic eigenvalue problems with application to high-frequency response of rolling tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmeier, Maik; Nackenhorst, Udo

    2008-03-01

    The transient dynamic response of rolling tires is of essential importance for comfort questions, e.g. noise radiation. Whereas finite element models are well established for stationary rolling simulations, it lacks computational methods for the treatment of the high frequency response. One challenge is the large mode density of tire structures that is up to the acoustic frequency domain and another lies on the physically correct description of rolling (gyroscopic) structures. Despite that the eigenvalue analysis of gyroscopic systems, described by complex-valued quadratic eigenvalue systems, seems to be well understood in general, specific problems arise for the computability of large scale three-dimensional tire models. In this presentation an overall computational strategy for the high frequency response of FE-tire models is outlined, where special emphasis is placed upon the efficient numerical treatment of the complex-valued eigenproblems for large scale gyroscopic systems. The practicability of the proposed approach will be demonstrated by the analysis of detailed finite element tire models. The physical interpretation of the computational results is also discussed in detail.

  4. Identification of the most sensitive frequency response measurement technique for diagnosis of interturn faults in power transformers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interturn winding faults are one of the most prevalent and potentially destructive electrical faults in power transformers. This contribution is an initiative to explore the potential of the sweep frequency response analysis (SFRA) method in detecting interturn winding faults and also identifying the most appropriate measurement configuration for making sensitive frequency response measurements. This application enables timely warning of the rising failure and so is of particular importance, as these kinds of defects, if left undetected, can propagate and lead to catastrophic phase–ground or phase–phase faults which can finally cause the breakdown of the whole transformer. In this paper contribution is made to a better understanding of the transformer performance and modification of the transformer winding frequency response in the presence of interturn faults. The paper includes a full description of the details of the SFRA method and measuring procedure, along with principal experiments conducted on a 100 kVA distribution transformer. A large number of measurements with different transfer functions, various terminal configurations and three categories of measurement types was conducted to identify the most appropriate configuration for making SFRA measurements. The experimental results proved that the identified measurement configuration is sensitive to detect unambiguously interturn faults even down to 0.2% shorted turns along the winding

  5. Vowel Identification by Listeners with Hearing Impairment in Response to Variation in Formant Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molis, Michelle R.; Leek, Marjorie R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the influence of presentation level and mild-to-moderate hearing loss on the identification of a set of vowel tokens systematically varying in the frequency locations of their second and third formants. Method: Five listeners with normal hearing (NH listeners) and five listeners with hearing impairment (HI listeners)…

  6. Frequency Response of Synthetic Vocal Fold Models with Linear and Nonlinear Material Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Stephanie M.; Thomson, Scott L.; Dromey, Christopher; Smith, Simeon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to create synthetic vocal fold models with nonlinear stress-strain properties and to investigate the effect of linear versus nonlinear material properties on fundamental frequency (F[subscript 0]) during anterior-posterior stretching. Method: Three materially linear and 3 materially nonlinear models were…

  7. A Frequency Response Approach to Sliding Control Design for Hydraulic Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lasse; Johansen, Per; Andersen, Torben Ole

    2014-01-01

    Sliding modes applied in control structures may generally provide for perfect control performance and robustness toward uncertain bounded parameters and disturbances, in the ideal case with infinite actuator bandwidth and switching frequency. However, in the context of physical systems, such perf...

  8. Study on the anisotropic characteristics of the electric response to fractured reservoir%裂缝性储层的电各向异性响应特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈金松; 苏本玉; 郭乃川

    2009-01-01

    Based on the model of porous medium with horizontal fractures,two fractured reservoir models have been suggested which considered smooth-surface parallel fractures and point-welded rough-surface fractures,and the vertical and horizontal electric resistivity response equations have been derived from the Ohm law. According to the response equations derived above,the variation characteristics of the horizontal and vertical resistivity and electrical anisotropic coefficient of the two fractured models under the conditions of free pressure and confining pressure have been analyzed. Furthermore,we have discussed the effect of geometrical parameters,such as fracture aperture,fracture density and fracture surface roughness and others,on electric anisotropy of the fractured reservoir. For simplifying the discussion,we have ignored the influences of surficial conducting mechanism and polarization effect of the fracture and pore surfaces on the electric anisotropy. Finally,we have examined the response characteristics of the electric resistivity and electric anisotropy under condition of confining pressure based on the smooth fracture model and welded rough fracture models,and meaningful results which can be applied to practical application have been obtained.%以水平裂缝分布的孔隙介质模型为基础,建立了水平裂缝面的平行裂缝分布和带粗糙表面的点接触裂缝模型,导出了两类裂缝模型的水平和垂直电阻率响应关系,分析了两类裂缝模型在没有围压和存在围压条件下的水平电阻率、垂直电阻率变化规律和电各向异性系数的变化特征.讨论了裂缝开度、裂缝密度和裂缝粗糙度等裂缝特征参数对裂缝性储层电各向异性的影响.为简化讨论,所有电性响应特征的分析都忽略了裂缝和孔隙表面的导电性和极化的影响.利用平行分布水平裂缝面模型和带粗糙面的裂缝模型,考察了围压条件下的裂缝性岩石的电各向异性响

  9. Debonding Analyses in Anisotropic Materials with Strain-Gradient Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2012-01-01

    A unit cell approach is adopted to numerically analyze the effect of plastic anisotropy on damage evolution in a microreinforced composite. The matrix material exhibit size effects and a visco-plastic anisotropic strain gradient plasticity model accounting for such size effects is adopted. A...... conventional cohesive law is extended such that both the average as well as the jump in plastic strain across the fiber-matrix interface are accounted for. Results are shown for both conventional isotropic and anisotropic materials as well as for higher order isotropic and anisotropic materials with and...... without debonding. Generally, the strain gradient enhanced material exhibits higher load carry capacity compared to the corresponding conventional material. A sudden stress drop occurs in the macroscopic stress-strain response curve due to fiber-matrix debonding and the results show that a change in yield...

  10. Proposing New Methods to Enhance the Low-Resolution Simulated GPR Responses in the Frequency and Wavelet Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ahmadi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To date, a number of numerical methods, including the popular Finite-Difference Time Domain (FDTD technique, have been proposed to simulate Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR responses. Despite having a number of advantages, the finite-difference method also has pitfalls such as being very time consuming in simulating the most common case of media with high dielectric permittivity, causing the forward modelling process to be very long lasting, even with modern high-speed computers. In the present study the well-known hyperbolic pattern response of horizontal cylinders, usually found in GPR B-Scan images, is used as a basic model to examine the possibility of reducing the forward modelling execution time. In general, the simulated GPR traces of common reflected objects are time shifted, as with the Normal Moveout (NMO traces encountered in seismic reflection responses. This suggests the application of Fourier transform to the GPR traces, employing the time-shifting property of the transformation to interpolate the traces between the adjusted traces in the frequency domain (FD. Therefore, in the present study two post-processing algorithms have been adopted to increase the speed of forward modelling while maintaining the required precision. The first approach is based on linear interpolation in the Fourier domain, resulting in increasing lateral trace-to-trace interval of appropriate sampling frequency of the signal, preventing any aliasing. In the second approach, a super-resolution algorithm based on 2D-wavelet transform is developed to increase both vertical and horizontal resolution of the GPR B-Scan images through preserving scale and shape of hidden hyperbola features. Through comparing outputs from both methods with the corresponding actual high-resolution forward response, it is shown that both approaches can perform satisfactorily, although the wavelet-based approach outperforms the frequency-domain approach noticeably, both in amplitude and

  11. Reference-plane-invariant and thickness- and branch-index-independent retrieval of effective parameters of bi-anisotropic metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. C. Hasar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a retrieval method for reference-plane-invariant electromagnetic parameter measurements of bi-anisotropic metamaterial slabs without resorting to accurate information of the slab thickness and the branch index. To extract reference-plane distances, the slab thickness, and the branch index, we first approximate wave impedances and refractive index away from the slab resonance frequency and then use scattering parameters to calculate the refractive index and the branch index. Once these quantities are determined, they are used as inputs for the retrieval of electromagnetic properties of slabs over the whole band. Different approximations for refractive index and wave impedances are applied to demonstrate the applicability and accuracy of our proposed method. We tested our method for electromagnetic parameter extraction of bi-anisotropic split-ring-resonator and Omega-shaped MM slabs with different number of unit cells. From our analysis, we note that inaccurate information of reference-plane distances, the slab length, and the branch index not only changes the amplitude but also shifts the response of the electromagnetic properties. We show that the presented method can be applied for accurate electromagnetic parameter extraction of bi-anisotropic MM slabs.

  12. Hypergratings: nanophotonics in planar anisotropic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongrattanasiri, Sukosin; Podolskiy, Viktor A

    2009-04-01

    We present a technique capable of producing subwavelength focal spots in planar nonresonant structures not limited to the near-field of the source. The approach combines the diffraction gratings that generate the high-wave-vector-number modes and planar slabs of homogeneous anisotropic metamaterials that propagate these waves and combine them at the subwavelength focal spots. In a sense, the technique combines the benefits of Fresnel lens, near-field zone plates, hyperlens, and superlens and at the same time resolves their fundamental limitations. Several realizations of the proposed technique for visible, near-IR, and mid-IR frequencies are proposed, and their performance is analyzed theoretically and numerically. Generalizations of the developed approach for subdiffractional imaging and on-chip photonics are suggested. PMID:19340161

  13. Anisotropic dynamic mass density for fluidsolid composites

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Ying

    2012-10-01

    By taking the low frequency limit of multiple-scattering theory, we obtain the dynamic effective mass density of fluidsolid composites with a two-dimensional rectangular lattice structure. The anisotropic mass density can be described by an angle-dependent dipole solution, to the leading-order of solid concentration. The angular dependence vanishes for the square lattice, but at high solid concentrations there is a structure-dependent factor that contributes to the leading-order solution. In all cases, Woods formula is found to be accurately valid for the effective bulk modulus, independent of the structures. Numerical evaluations from the solutions are shown to be in excellent agreement with finite-element simulations. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Resistance to Change and Frequency of Response-Dependent Stimuli Uncorrelated with Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Ward, Ryan D.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2009-01-01

    Stimuli uncorrelated with reinforcement have been shown to enhance response rates and resistance to disruption; however, the effects of different rates of stimulus presentations have not been assessed. In two experiments, we assessed the effects of adding different rates of response-dependent brief stimuli uncorrelated with primary reinforcement…

  15. Failure in imperfect anisotropic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental cause of crack growth, namely nucleation and growth of voids, is investigated numerically for a two phase imperfect anisotropic material. A unit cell approach is adopted from which the overall stress strain is evaluated. Failure is observed as a sudden stress drop and depending on...

  16. Magnetic relaxation in anisotropic magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1971-01-01

    The line shape and the kinematic and thermodynamic slowing down of the critical and paramagnetic relaxation in axially anisotropic materials are discussed. Kinematic slowing down occurs only in the longitudinal relaxation function. The thermodynamic slowing down occurs in either the transverse or...

  17. Estimating peak response frequencies in a tidal band in the seas adjacent to China with a numerical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Xinmei; FANG Guohong; TENG Fei; WU Di

    2015-01-01

    A numerical method is designed to examine the response properties of real sea areas to open ocean forcing. The application of this method to modeling the China's adjacent seas shows that the Bohai Sea has a highest peak response frequency (PRF) of 1.52 d−1; the northern Yellow Sea has a PRF of 1.69 d−1; the Gyeonggi Bay has a high amplitude gain plateau in the frequency band roughly from 1.7 to 2.7 d−1; the Yellow Sea (includ-ing the Gyeonggi Bay), the East China Sea shelf and the Taiwan Strait have a common high amplitude gain band with frequencies around 1.76 to 1.78 d−1 and are shown to be a system that responds to the open ocean forcing in favor of amplifying the waves with frequencies in this band; the Beibu Gulf, the Gulf of Thailand and the South China Sea deep basin have PRFs of 0.91, 1.01 and 0.98 d−1 respectively. In addition, the East China Sea has a Poincare mode PRF of 3.91 d−1. The PRFs of the Bohai Sea, the northern Yellow Sea, the Bei-bu Gulf and the South China Sea can be explained by a classical quarter (half for the Bohai Sea) wavelength resonance theory. The results show that further investigations are needed for the response dynamics of the Yellow Sea-East China Sea-Taiwan Strait system, the East China Sea Poincare mode, the Taiwan Strait, and the Gulf of Thailand.

  18. Emotion responses under evoked consumption contexts: A focus on the consumers’ frequency of product consumption and the stability of responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piqueras Fiszman, B.; Jaeger, S.R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that the context in which a certain food is consumed (even if imagined) can affect consumers’ associative emotional responses to that product. In three separate studies we extended this line of research by: (1) replicating these previous findings with consumers fro

  19. Anisotropic problem and one-dimensional VSP modeling in EDA medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhusheng, Z.

    1991-01-01

    One-dimensional elastic wave equation in anisotropic EDA medium is derived by using Hooke's law and the kinematic equation of non-individual body in elastic theory, followed by a series of hypotheses. Then, synthetic one-dimensional VSP record in anisotropic EDA medium is obtained by solving the elastic wave equation with the use of Fourier algorithm. The numerical synthetic record and hodograph clearly show rich wave field, S-wave splitting, attenuation or absorption of amplitude and frequency in the anisotropic medium.

  20. Design and Implementation of a Frequency Response Test System for Instrument Voltage Transformer Performance Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Sen Peng

    2013-01-01

    Power system harmonics are always an important issue in power networks as they can cause many negative impacts, such as equipment thermal stress, on installations within power networks. Recently, with the increasing connections of power electronic devices based Renewable Energy Source (RES) and High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission applications, harmonics in power networks, especially high frequency harmonics (>50th order or 2.5 kHz) are on the rise. Currently, the majority of conv...

  1. Waves of change: immunomodulation of the innate immune response by low frequency electromagnetic field exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Golbach, L.A.

    2015-01-01

      In this thesis we investigated possible modulatory roles of low frequency electromagnetic fields (LF EMFs) exposure on the innate immune system. Recent decades have seen a huge increase in the use of electronic devices that nowadays enable us to communicate with distant family, enjoy music everywhere or order food without leaving the house. However besides the benefits, this evolution has also resulted in increased public concern about the potential adverse health effects of non-ionizi...

  2. Low-frequency pulmonary impedance in rabbits and its response to inhaled methacholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, R; Sato, J; Suki, B; Martin, J G; Bates, J H

    1992-07-01

    We assessed pulmonary mechanics in six open-chest rabbits (3 young and 3 adult) by the forced oscillation technique between 0.16 and 10.64 Hz. Under control conditions, pulmonary resistance (RL) decreased markedly between 0.16 and 4 Hz, after which it became reasonably constant. Measurements of alveolar pressure from two alveolar capsules in each rabbit showed that the large decrease of RL with increasing frequency below 4 Hz was due to lung tissue rheology and that tissue resistance was close to zero above 4 Hz. Estimates of resistance and elastance, also obtained by fitting tidal ventilation data at 1 Hz to the equation of the linear single-compartment model, gave values for RL motion that were slightly higher than those obtained by forced oscillations at the same frequency, presumably because of the flow dependence of airways resistance. After treatment with increasing doses of aerosolized methacholine, RL and pulmonary elastance between 0.16 and 1.34 Hz progressively increased, as did the point at which the pulmonary reactance crossed zero (the resonant frequency). The alveolar pressure measurements showed the lung to become increasingly inhomogeneously ventilated in all six animals, whereas in the three younger rabbits lobar atelectasis developed at high methacholine concentrations and the alveolar capsules ceased to communicate with the central airways. We conclude that the low-frequency pulmonary impedance of rabbits exhibits the same qualitative features observed in other species and that it is a sensitive indicator of the changes in pulmonary mechanics occurring during bronchoconstriction. PMID:1506383

  3. Responses of the ear to low frequency sounds, infrasound and wind turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Salt, Alec N.; Hullar, Timothy E.

    2010-01-01

    Infrasonic sounds are generated internally in the body (by respiration, heartbeat, coughing, etc) and by external sources, such as air conditioning systems, inside vehicles, some industrial processes and, now becoming increasingly prevalent, wind turbines. It is widely assumed that infrasound presented at an amplitude below what is audible has no influence on the ear. In this review, we consider possible ways that low frequency sounds, at levels that may or may not be heard, could influence t...

  4. A solution to solve the dilemma of high frequencies and LCD screen for SSVEP responses

    OpenAIRE

    Cecotti, Hubert; Rivet, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    International audience Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) based on the detection of Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials have proven to be highly efficient. Compared to other BCI paradigm, they usually provide the best information transfer rate. However, this type of BCI requires visual stimuli. These stimuli can be on LEDs or on a computer screen. LEDs can allow flickering lights of high frequencies while flickering lights on an LCD screen can be an integrated as a part of the user interfac...

  5. Pipeline's natural frequency response due to internal pressure effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massa, Andre L.L.; Guevara Junior, Nestor O. [Suporte - Consultoria e Projetos Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Galgoul, Nelson S. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Fernandes, Antonio C.; Coelho, Fabio M. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    2009-12-19

    A few years ago, a discussion about how internal pressure is treated in submarine pipelines has taken place. Galgoul et al (2004) have pointed out the conservatism of the latest recommendations for pipeline free-span evaluations associated to the way the axial force is considered in the determination of the pipeline natural frequency. Fyrileiv and Collberg (2005) have also discussed this point in defense of the effective axial force concept and its use in the natural frequency determination. In order to contribute to this aspect, an experimental test has been performed with a fully embedded pipeline which was pressurized. The main object consists in showing that the pipe is under tension (and not under compression) and, as a consequence, it is the authors' intention to prove that the natural frequency increases instead of reducing when the internal pressure is incremented. In addition to the test, a finite element model has been presented where this internal pressure effect is taken into account as it actually is (and not as an axial force) in order to show the real behavior of the wall stresses. Static analyses, as well as modal and transient analysis have been performed in order to compare theoretical results with the experimental test conducted. (author)

  6. High-frequency gravitational waves having large spectral densities and their electromagnetic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various cosmology models, brane oscillation scenarios, interaction of interstellar plasma with intense electromagnetic radiation, and even high-energy physics experiments (e.g., Large Hadron Collider (LHC)) all predict high frequency gravitational waves (HFGWs, i.e., high-energy gravitons) in the microwave band and higher frequency region, and some of them have large energy densities. Electromagnetic (EM) detection to such HFGWs would be suitable due to very high frequencies and large energy densities of the HFGWs. We review several typical EM detection schemes, i.e., inverse Gertsenshtein effect (G-effect), coupling of the inverse G effect with a coherent EM wave, coupling of planar superconducting open cavity with a static magnetic field, cylindrical superconducting closed cavity, and the EM sychro-resonance system, and discuss related minimal detectable amplitudes and sensitivities. Furthermore, we give some new ideas and improvement ways enhancing the possibility of measuring the HFGWs. It is shown that there is still a large room for improvement for those schemes to approach and even reach up the requirement of detection of HFGWs expected by the cosmological models and high-energy astrophysical process. (general)

  7. Monocular and binocular steady-state flicker VEPs: frequency-response functions to sinusoidal and square-wave luminance modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David S; Hamilton, Ruth; Shahani, Uma; McCulloch, Daphne L

    2011-02-01

    Steady-state VEPs to full-field flicker (FFF) using sinusoidally modulated light were compared with those elicited by square-wave modulated light across a wide range of stimulus frequencies with monocular and binocular FFF stimulation. Binocular and monocular VEPs were elicited in 12 adult volunteers to FFF with two modes of temporal modulation: sinusoidal or square-wave (abrupt onset and offset, 50% duty cycle) at ten temporal frequencies ranging from 2.83 to 58.8 Hz. All stimuli had a mean luminance of 100 cd/m(2) with an 80% modulation depth (20-180 cd/m(2)). Response magnitudes at the stimulus frequency (F1) and at the double and triple harmonics (F2 and F3) were compared. For both sinusoidal and square-wave flicker, the FFF-VEP magnitudes at F1 were maximal for 7.52 Hz flicker. F2 was maximal for 5.29 Hz flicker, and F3 magnitudes are largest for flicker stimulation from 3.75 to 7.52 Hz. Square-wave flicker produced significantly larger F1 and F2 magnitudes for slow flicker rates (up to 5.29 Hz for F1; at 2.83 and 3.75 Hz for F2). The F3 magnitudes were larger overall for square-wave flicker. Binocular FFF-VEP magnitudes are larger than those of monocular FFF-VEPs, and the amount of this binocular enhancement is not dependant on the mode of flicker stimulation (mean binocular: monocular ratio 1.41, 95% CI: 1.2-1.6). Binocular enhancement of F1 for 21.3 Hz flicker was increased to a factor of 2.5 (95% CI: 1.8-3.5). In the healthy adult visual system, FFF-VEP magnitudes can be characterized by the frequency-response functions of F1, F2 and F3. Low-frequency roll-off in the FFF-VEP magnitudes is greater for sinusoidal flicker than for square-wave flicker for rates ≤ 5.29 Hz; magnitudes for higher-frequency flicker are similar for the two types of flicker. Binocular FFF-VEPs are larger overall than those recorded monocularly, and this binocular summation is enhanced at 21.3 Hz in the mid-frequency range. PMID:21279419

  8. Frequency-specific response facilitation of supra and infragranular barrel cortical neurons depends on NMDA receptor activation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros-Zulaica, N; Castejon, C; Nuñez, A

    2014-10-01

    Sensory experience has a profound effect on neocortical neurons. Passive stimulation of whiskers or sensory deprivation from whiskers can induce long-lasting changes in neuronal responses or modify the receptive field in adult animals. We recorded barrel cortical neurons in urethane-anesthetized rats in layers 2/3 or 5/6 to determine if repetitive stimulation would induce long-lasting response facilitation. Air-puff stimulation (20-ms duration, 40 pulses at 0.5-8Hz) was applied to a single whisker. This repetitive stimulation increased tactile responses in layers 2/3 and 5/6 for 60min. Moreover, the functional coupling (coherence) between the sensory stimulus and the neural response also increased after the repetitive stimulation in neurons showing response facilitation. The long-lasting response facilitation was due to activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors because it was reduced by APV ((2R)-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid, (2R)-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate) and MK801 application. Inactivation of layer 2/3 also blocked response facilitation in layer 5/6, suggesting that layer 2/3 may be fundamental in this synaptic plasticity processes. Moreover, i.p. injection of eserine augmented the number of layer 2/3 neurons expressing long-lasting response facilitation; this effect was blocked by atropine, suggesting that muscarinic receptor activation favors the induction of the response facilitation. Our data indicate that physiologically repetitive stimulation of a single whisker at the frequency at which rats move their whiskers during exploration of the environment induces long-lasting response facilitation improving sensory processing. PMID:25281880

  9. Surface phonon polaritons on anisotropic piezoelectric superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yuanxi; Sheng, Jiteng; Sedlacek, Jonathon A.; Shaffer, James P.

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical study of surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs) on periodically poled lithium niobate and periodically poled lithium tantalate surfaces is presented. We calculate the dielectric response for six different superlattice orientations and the associated SPhP dispersion relations. Our study of SPhPs accounts for the anisotropic nature of the dielectric response of the semi-infinite piezoelectric superlattices. We find that two different types of SPhPs can be supported. The first type consists of real surface dipole oscillations coupled to photons. The second type consists of virtual surface dipole oscillations driven by the incident photons. The dependence of the SPhPs on temperature and superlattice geometry is addressed. The use of these metamaterial excitations is discussed in the context of hybrid quantum systems.

  10. Frequency response analysis of guard-heated hot-film wall shear stress sensors for turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Wall shear stress fluctuations in turbulent flow are difficult to measure accurately. • New design of thermal sensor with guard-heating proposed to remove large errors. • Analysis: large dynamic errors of standard thermal sensors in air can be eliminated. • Accurate thermal anemometry, with its many advantages, enabled by this new design. - Abstract: Guard-heated thermal sensors were recently proposed for the measurement of wall shear stress (or “skin friction”) fluctuations in turbulent flow, to overcome the severe errors due to substrate heat conduction encountered in conventional single-element (SE) hot-film sensors. An earlier computational study of steady-state performance showed that a sensor with guard-heating in two-planes (GH2P) can eliminate errors due to spatial averaging and axial heat conduction in the fluid, both of which limit the spatial resolution of conventional SE sensors. Here we present analytical and numerical results comparing the dynamic behavior – frequency response and phase lag – of the guard-heated and conventional designs. For the water–glass fluid-substrate combination, sensor amplitude and phase errors begin only at a frequency (fc) near the onset of attenuation due to boundary layer thermal inertia. In this case, although the SE sensor suffers spatial averaging errors, it shows low amplitude attenuation and phase lag, close to that of the GH2P sensors, up to fc. For air-glass, analysis suggests and numerical results confirm, that the response of the conventional SE sensor is dominated by unwanted substrate heat transfer, with rapid signal attenuation beginning at frequencies that are five orders of magnitude smaller than fc. In this case, guard-heating enables strong improvement in the dynamic response, with a small drop in the amplitude response ratio from 0.95 to 0.85 (compared to 0.95 to 0.06 for the SE sensor) and negligible phase lag errors over an additional five decades of frequency. For the

  11. Diagnosing Integrity of Transformer Windings by Applying Statistical Tools to Frequency Response Analysis Data Obtained at Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Prameela

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of Sweep Frequency Response Analysis (SFRA measurement work carried out on number of power transformers at various sites involving problems like shorting of winding turns, core faults and related issues, On-Load Tap Changer (OLTC open contacts and winding displacement issues. The numerical parameters Viz., Min-Max ratio (MM, Mean Square Error (MSE, Maximum Absolute difference (MABS, Absolute Sum of Logarithmic Error (ASLE, Standard Deviation (S.D. and Correlation Coefficient (CC computed in three different frequency bands are presented to aid the interpretation of SFRA data. Comparison of frequency responses among different phases of the same transformer and with sister units were carried out to interpret the data. The study presents limits for various numerical parameters to diagnose the condition of the transformer and discriminate the faulty winding after accounting for manufacturing, design and asymmetry of the winding. The results presented in the study will help in interpreting the SFRA data by applying numerical techniques and assess the condition of the transformer.

  12. A frequency response analysis approach for quantitative assessment of actuator tracking for real-time hybrid simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real-time hybrid simulation is a viable and economical technique that allows researchers to observe the behavior of critical elements at full scale when an entire structure is subjected to dynamic loading. To ensure reliable experimental results, it is necessary to evaluate the actuator tracking after the test, even when sophisticated compensation methods are used to negate the detrimental effect of servo-hydraulic dynamics. Existing methods for assessment of actuator tracking are often based on time-domain analysis. This paper proposes a frequency-domain-based approach to the assessment of actuator tracking for real-time hybrid simulations. To ensure the accuracy of the proposed frequency response approach, the effects of spectrum leakage are investigated as well as the length and sampling frequency requirements of the signals. Two signal pre-processing techniques (data segmentation and window transform) are also discussed and compared to improve the accuracy of the proposed approach. Finally the effectiveness of the proposed frequency-domain-based approach is demonstrated through both computational analyses and laboratory tests, including real-time tests with predefined displacement and real-time hybrid simulation. (paper)

  13. A frequency response analysis approach for quantitative assessment of actuator tracking for real-time hybrid simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tong; Chen, Cheng; Xu, WeiJie; Sanchez, Frank

    2014-04-01

    Real-time hybrid simulation is a viable and economical technique that allows researchers to observe the behavior of critical elements at full scale when an entire structure is subjected to dynamic loading. To ensure reliable experimental results, it is necessary to evaluate the actuator tracking after the test, even when sophisticated compensation methods are used to negate the detrimental effect of servo-hydraulic dynamics. Existing methods for assessment of actuator tracking are often based on time-domain analysis. This paper proposes a frequency-domain-based approach to the assessment of actuator tracking for real-time hybrid simulations. To ensure the accuracy of the proposed frequency response approach, the effects of spectrum leakage are investigated as well as the length and sampling frequency requirements of the signals. Two signal pre-processing techniques (data segmentation and window transform) are also discussed and compared to improve the accuracy of the proposed approach. Finally the effectiveness of the proposed frequency-domain-based approach is demonstrated through both computational analyses and laboratory tests, including real-time tests with predefined displacement and real-time hybrid simulation.

  14. Seismic response evaluation for piping systems with support structures. Effect of input acceleration amplitude on resonance frequency and response reduction in the elastic vibration test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the effect of pipe slide on vibration behavior of piping systems to consider modeling of pipe support structures beyond the yield point for seismic response analysis. A piping system with frame-type support structures and a lumped mass was vibrated on a shaking table with random waves which had maximum accelerations from 30gal to 400gal. The acceleration dependencies of resonance frequency, response reduction and damping factor were measured. As a result, the acceleration dependencies of the piping vibration behavior were demonstrated. Moreover, it was clarified that the acceleration dependencies differed between resonance modes in the horizontal directions and the resonance mode in the vertical direction. First, the resonance frequencies decreased when the input acceleration increased. The resonance frequencies for the horizontal vibration modes were decreased when the input acceleration increased. On the other hand, the resonance frequency for the vertical vibration mode was decreased more at the large input acceleration than for the horizontal vibration modes. Within the acceleration of this study, however, the resonance frequencies for the vertical vibration mode were almost the same values. In a comparison with the natural frequency of modal analysis performed in a conventional manner, the analysis results for the horizontal vibration modes were estimated to be lower than the experimental result. On the other hands, the analysis result for the vertical vibration mode was estimated to be higher than the experimental result. Next, the damping factor increased when the input acceleration increased. The damping factors for the horizontal vibration modes were increased to 3% at the 200gal input acceleration. On the other hand, the damping factors for the vertical vibration mode were also increased but did not show a constant value as occurred for the horizontal vibration modes. Moreover, all of the damping factors measured in this study were

  15. Antioxidant responses in estuarine invertebrates exposed to repeated oil spills: Effects of frequency and dosage in a field manipulative experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrini-Neto, Leonardo; Pereira, Letícia; Martins, César C; Silva de Assis, Helena C; Camus, Lionel; Lana, Paulo C

    2016-08-01

    We have experimentally investigated the effects of repeated diesel spills on the bivalve Anomalocardia brasiliana, the gastropod Neritina virginea and the polychaete Laeonereis culveri, by monitoring the responses of oxidative stress biomarkers in a subtropical estuary. Three frequencies of exposure events were compared against two dosages of oil in a factorial experiment with asymmetrical controls. Hypotheses were tested to distinguish between (i) the overall effect of oil spills, (ii) the effect of diesel dosage via different exposure regimes, and (iii) the effect of time since last spill. Antioxidant defense responses and oxidative damage in the bivalve A. brasiliana and the polychaete L. culveri were overall significantly affected by frequent oil spills compared to undisturbed controls. The main effects of diesel spills on both species were the induction of SOD and GST activities, a significant increase in LPO levels and a decrease in GSH concentration. N. virginea was particularly tolerant to oil exposure, with the exception of a significant GSH depletion. Overall, enzymatic activities and oxidative damage in A. brasiliana and L. culveri were induced by frequent low-dosage spills compared to infrequent high-dosage spills, although the opposite pattern was observed for N. virginea antioxidant responses. Antioxidant responses in A. brasiliana and L. culveri were not affected by timing of exposure events. However, our results revealed that N. virginea might have a delayed response to acute high-dosage exposure. Experimental in situ simulations of oil exposure events with varying frequencies and intensities provide a useful tool for detecting and quantifying environmental impacts. In general, antioxidant biomarkers were induced by frequent low-dosage exposures compared to infrequent high-dosage ones. The bivalve A. brasiliana and the polychaete L. culveri are more suitable sentinels due to their greater responsiveness to oil and also to their wider geographical

  16. Anisotropic Plasticity and Viscoplasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Schick, David

    2004-01-01

    Plastic anisotropy effects may be described in a phenomenological model by employing in the constitutive theory a set of internal variables, which are defined suitably. These variables have to model the hardening response of the material under consideration to describe e.g. the rotation of some symmetry axes. Such axes are imagined to be related with the development of the material substructure assumed, or, correspondingly, with the state variables characterizing this development. The objecti...

  17. Linear response of mutans streptococci to increasing frequency of xylitol chewing gum use: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN43479664

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi David K

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xylitol is a naturally occurring sugar substitute that has been shown to reduce the level of mutans streptococci in plaque and saliva and to reduce tooth decay. It has been suggested that the degree of reduction is dependent on both the amount and the frequency of xylitol consumption. For xylitol to be successfully and cost-effectively used in public health prevention strategies dosing and frequency guidelines should be established. This study determined the reduction in mutans streptococci levels in plaque and unstimulated saliva to increasing frequency of xylitol gum use at a fixed total daily dose of 10.32 g over five weeks. Methods Participants (n = 132 were randomized to either active groups (10.32 g xylitol/day or a placebo control (9.828 g sorbitol and 0.7 g maltitol/day. All groups chewed 12 pieces of gum per day. The control group chewed 4 times/day and active groups chewed xylitol gum at a frequency of 2 times/day, 3 times/day, or 4 times/day. The 12 gum pieces were evenly divided into the frequency assigned to each group. Plaque and unstimulated saliva samples were taken at baseline and five-weeks and were cultured on modified Mitis Salivarius agar for mutans streptococci enumeration. Results There were no significant differences in mutans streptococci level among the groups at baseline. At five-weeks, mutans streptococci levels in plaque and unstimulated saliva showed a linear reduction with increasing frequency of xylitol chewing gum use at the constant daily dose. Although the difference observed for the group that chewed xylitol 2 times/day was consistent with the linear model, the difference was not significant. Conclusion There was a linear reduction in mutans streptococci levels in plaque and saliva with increasing frequency of xylitol gum use at a constant daily dose. Reduction at a consumption frequency of 2 times per day was small and consistent with the linear-response line but was not statistically

  18. Responses of Winter Wheat Yield and Water Use Efficiency to Irrigation Frequency and Planting Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Chengyue; Ma, Changjian; Liu, Xinhui; Gao, Chao; Liu, Quanru; Yan, Zhenxing; Ren, Yujie; Li, Quanqi

    2016-01-01

    A suitable planting pattern and irrigation strategy are essential for optimizing winter wheat yield and water use efficiency (WUE). The study aimed to evaluate the impact of planting pattern and irrigation frequency on grain yield and WUE of winter wheat. During the 2013–2014 and 2014–2015 winter wheat growing seasons in the North China Plain, the effects of planting patterns and irrigation frequencies were determined on tiller number, grain yield, and WUE. The two planting patterns tested were wide-precision and conventional-cultivation. Each planting pattern had three irrigation regimes: irrigation (120 mm) at the jointing stage; irrigation (60 mm) at both the jointing and heading stages; and irrigation (40 mm) at the jointing, heading, and milking stages. In our study, tiller number was significantly higher in the wide-precision planting pattern than in the conventional-cultivation planting pattern. Additionally, the highest grain yields and WUE were observed when irrigation was applied at the jointing stage (120 mm) or at the jointing and heading stages (60 mm each) in the wide-precision planting pattern. These results could be attributed to higher tiller numbers as well as reduced water consumption due to reduced irrigation frequency. In both growing seasons, applying 60 mm of water at jointing and heading stages resulted in the highest grain yield among the treatments. Based on our results, for winter wheat production in semi-humid regions, we recommend a wide-precision planting pattern with irrigation (60 mm) at both the jointing and heading stages. PMID:27171202

  19. Electrically Anisotropic Layered Perovskite Single Crystal

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ting-You

    2016-04-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites (OIHPs), which are promising materials for electronic and optoelectronic applications (1-10), have made into layered organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites (LOIHPs). These LOIHPs have been applied to thin-film transistors, solar cells and tunable wavelength phosphors (11-18). It is known that devices fabricated with single crystal exhibit the superior performance, which makes the growth of large-sized single crystals critical for future device applications (19-23). However, the difficulty in growing large-sized LOIHPs single crystal with superior electrical properties limits their practical applications. Here, we report a method to grow the centimeter-scaled LOIHP single crystal of [(HOC2H4NH3)2PbI4], demonstrating the potentials in mass production. After that, we reveal anisotropic electrical and optoelectronic properties which proved the carrier propagating along inorganic framework. The carrier mobility of in-inorganic-plane (in-plane) devices shows the average value of 45 cm2 V–1 s–1 which is about 100 times greater than the record of LOIHP devices (15), showing the importance of single crystal in device application. Moreover, the LOIHP single crystals show its ultra-short carrier lifetime of 42.7 ps and photoluminescence quantum efficiency (PLQE) of 25.4 %. We expect this report to be a start of LOIHPs for advanced applications in which the anisotropic properties are needed (24-25), and meets the demand of high-speed applications and fast-response applications.

  20. Chiral selection and frequency response of spiral waves in reaction-diffusion systems under a chiral electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing-Wei; Cai, Mei-Chun; Zhang, Hong; Panfilov, Alexander V.; Dierckx, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Chirality is one of the most fundamental properties of many physical, chemical, and biological systems. However, the mechanisms underlying the onset and control of chiral symmetry are largely understudied. We investigate possibility of chirality control in a chemical excitable system (the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction) by application of a chiral (rotating) electric field using the Oregonator model. We find that unlike previous findings, we can achieve the chirality control not only in the field rotation direction, but also opposite to it, depending on the field rotation frequency. To unravel the mechanism, we further develop a comprehensive theory of frequency synchronization based on the response function approach. We find that this problem can be described by the Adler equation and show phase-locking phenomena, known as the Arnold tongue. Our theoretical predictions are in good quantitative agreement with the numerical simulations and provide a solid basis for chirality control in excitable media.

  1. Frequency analysis of a task-evoked pupillary response: Luminance-independent measure of mental effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peysakhovich, Vsevolod; Causse, Mickaël; Scannella, Sébastien; Dehais, Frédéric

    2015-07-01

    Pupil diameter is a widely-studied cognitive load measure, which, despite its convenience for non-intrusive operator state monitoring in complex environments, is still not available for in situ measurements because of numerous methodological limitations. The most important of these limitations is the influence of pupillary light reflex. Hence, there is the need of providing a pupil-based cognitive load measure that is independent of light conditions. In this paper, we present a promising technique of pupillary signal analysis resulting in luminance-independent measure of mental effort that could be used in real-time without a priori on luminous conditions. Twenty-two participants performed a short-term memory task under different screen luminance conditions. Our results showed that the amplitude of pupillary dilation due to load on memory was luminance-dependent with higher amplitude corresponding to lower-luminance condition. Furthermore, our experimentation showed that load on memory and luminance factors express themselves differently according to frequency. Therefore, as our statistical analysis revealed, the ratio between low (0-1.6 Hz) and high frequency (1.6-4 Hz) bands (LF/HF ratio) of power spectral densities of pupillary signal is sensitive to the cognitive load but not to luminance. Our results are promising for the measurement of load on memory in ecological settings. PMID:25941013

  2. Spatial frequency response of a volume hologram recorded in a ZrO2 nanoparticle-dispersed acrylate photopolymer film containing chain transfer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinxin; Fujii, Ryuta; Tomita, Yasuo

    2014-05-01

    Photopolymerizable nanoparticle-polymer composites (NPCs) have thus far shown their excellent performance in various applications, such as holographic data storage, nonlinear optics and neutron optics. Specifically, for such applications, a high spatial frequency material response is necessary, as it is the response to high spatial frequencies that determines their spatial resolution and diffraction properties. However, it is known that the spatial frequency response of a recorded hologram in multi-component photopolymers including NPCs and holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystals exhibits a reduction in refractive index modulation at high spatial frequencies. In order to overcome this drawback, an addition of chain transfer agents (CTAs) may be useful as done for all-organic photopolymers to modify their nonlocal response and phase separation characteristics. In our work, we investigate the effect of CTAs on the spatial frequency response in NPCs. Here we employ various chain-transfer agents with three different thiol groups in a photopolymerizable ZrO2 NPC film. A range of CTA concentration is carried out, in order to explore the most effective material combination used in the examination of spatial frequency response. The significant improvement in spatial frequency response of NPCs through the addition of a CTA with the most appropriate concentration is presented.

  3. Decorrelation of anisotropic flow along the longitudinal direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Long-Gang; Petersen, Hannah; Qin, Guang-You; Roy, Victor; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2016-04-01

    The initial energy density distribution and fluctuations in the transverse direction lead to anisotropic flow of final hadrons through collective expansion in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Fluctuations along the longitudinal direction, on the other hand, can result in decorrelation of anisotropic flow in different regions of pseudorapidity ( η . Decorrelation of the 2nd- and 3rd-order anisotropic flow with different η gaps for final charged hadrons in high-energy heavy-ion collisions is studied in an event-by-event (3+1)D ideal hydrodynamic model with fully fluctuating initial conditions from A Multi-Phase Transport (AMPT) model. The decorrelation of anisotropic flow of final hadrons with large η gaps is found to originate from the spatial decorrelation along the longitudinal direction in the AMPT initial conditions through hydrodynamic evolution. The decorrelation is found to consist of both a linear twist and random fluctuation of the event plane angles. The agreement between our results and recent CMS data in most centralities suggests that the string-like mechanism of initial parton production in AMPT model captures the initial longitudinal fluctuation that is responsible for the measured decorrelation of anisotropic flow in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC. Our predictions for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy show stronger longitudinal decorrelation, indicating larger longitudinal fluctuations at lower beam energies. Our study also calls into question some of the current experimental methods for measuring anisotropic flow and the quantitative extraction of transport coefficients through comparisons to hydrodynamic simulations that do not include longitudinal fluctuations.

  4. An Efficient FPGA Implementation of Optimized Anisotropic Diffusion Filtering of Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrajit Pal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital image processing is an exciting area of research with a variety of applications including medical, surveillance security systems, defence, and space applications. Noise removal as a preprocessing step helps to improve the performance of the signal processing algorithms, thereby enhancing image quality. Anisotropic diffusion filtering proposed by Perona and Malik can be used as an edge-preserving smoother, removing high-frequency components of images without blurring their edges. In this paper, we present the FPGA implementation of an edge-preserving anisotropic diffusion filter for digital images. The designed architecture completely replaced the convolution operation and implemented the same using simple arithmetic subtraction of the neighboring intensities within a kernel, preceded by multiple operations in parallel within the kernel. To improve the image reconstruction quality, the diffusion coefficient parameter, responsible for controlling the filtering process, has been properly analyzed. Its signal behavior has been studied by subsequently scaling and differentiating the signal. The hardware implementation of the proposed design shows better performance in terms of reconstruction quality and accelerated performance with respect to its software implementation. It also reduces computation, power consumption, and resource utilization with respect to other related works.

  5. Anisotropic density fluctuations, plasmons, and Friedel oscillations in nodal line semimetal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Jun-Won; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by recent experimental efforts on three-dimensional semimetals, we investigate the static and dynamic density response of the nodal line semimetal by computing the polarizability for both undoped and doped cases. The nodal line semimetal in the absence of doping is characterized by a ring-shape zero energy contour in momentum space, which may be considered as a collection of Dirac points. In the doped case, the Fermi surface has a torus shape and two independent processes of the momentum transfer contribute to the singular features of the polarizability even though we only have a single Fermi surface. In the static limit, there exist two independent singularities in the second derivative of the static polarizability. This results in the highly anisotropic Friedel oscillations which show the angle-dependent algebraic power law and the beat phenomena in the oscillatory electron density near a charged impurity. Furthermore, the dynamical polarizability has two singular lines along {\\hslash }ω =γ p and {\\hslash }ω =γ p{sin}η , where η is the angle between the external momentum {p} and the plane where the nodal ring lies. From the dynamical polarizability, we obtain the plasmon modes in the doped case, which show anisotropic dispersions and angle-dependent plasma frequencies. Qualitative differences between the low and high doping regimes are discussed in light of future experiments.

  6. The in-plane anisotropic magnetic damping of ultrathin epitaxial Co2FeAl film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Qiao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The in-plane orientation-dependent effective damping of ultrathin Co2FeAl film epitaxially grown on GaAs(001 substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE has been investigated by employing the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TR-MOKE measurements. It is found that the interface-induced uniaxial anisotropy is favorable for precession response and the anisotropy of precession frequency is mainly determined by this uniaxial anisotropy, while the magnetic relaxation time and damping factor exhibit the fourfold anisotropy at high-field regime. The field-independent anisotropic damping factor obtained at high fields indicates that the effective damping shows an intrinsic fourfold anisotropy for the epitaxial Co2FeAl thin films.

  7. The in-plane anisotropic magnetic damping of ultrathin epitaxial Co2FeAl film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Shuang; Yan, Wei; Nie, Shuaihua; Zhao, Jianhua; Zhang, Xinhui

    2015-08-01

    The in-plane orientation-dependent effective damping of ultrathin Co2FeAl film epitaxially grown on GaAs(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been investigated by employing the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TR-MOKE) measurements. It is found that the interface-induced uniaxial anisotropy is favorable for precession response and the anisotropy of precession frequency is mainly determined by this uniaxial anisotropy, while the magnetic relaxation time and damping factor exhibit the fourfold anisotropy at high-field regime. The field-independent anisotropic damping factor obtained at high fields indicates that the effective damping shows an intrinsic fourfold anisotropy for the epitaxial Co2FeAl thin films.

  8. 3D time-domain airborne EM modeling for an arbitrarily anisotropic earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Changchun; Qi, Yanfu; Liu, Yunhe

    2016-08-01

    Time-domain airborne EM data is currently interpreted based on an isotropic model. Sometimes, it can be problematic when working in the region with distinct dipping stratifications. In this paper, we simulate the 3D time-domain airborne EM responses over an arbitrarily anisotropic earth with topography by edge-based finite-element method. Tetrahedral meshes are used to describe the abnormal bodies with complicated shapes. We further adopt the Backward Euler scheme to discretize the time-domain diffusion equation for electric field, obtaining an unconditionally stable linear equations system. We verify the accuracy of our 3D algorithm by comparing with 1D solutions for an anisotropic half-space. Then, we switch attentions to effects of anisotropic media on the strengths and the diffusion patterns of time-domain airborne EM responses. For numerical experiments, we adopt three typical anisotropic models: 1) an anisotropic anomalous body embedded in an isotropic half-space; 2) an isotropic anomalous body embedded in an anisotropic half-space; 3) an anisotropic half-space with topography. The modeling results show that the electric anisotropy of the subsurface media has big effects on both the strengths and the distribution patterns of time-domain airborne EM responses; this effect needs to be taken into account when interpreting ATEM data in areas with distinct anisotropy.

  9. Electromagnetic Response of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves by Coupling Open Resonant Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fang-Yu; CHEN Ying; WANG Ping

    2007-01-01

    We present a new detecting scheme of high-frequency gravitational waves(HFGWs) in the GHz band,the scheme consists of a high-quality-factor open microwave cavity,a static magnetic field passing through the cavity and an electromagnetic (EM)normal mode stored in the cavity.It is found that under the resonant condition firstand second-order perturbation EM effects have almost the same detecting sensitivity to the HFGWs in the GHz band (h~10-26,v~5GHz),but the former contains more information from the HFGWs.We akso provide a very brief review for possible improving way of the sensitivity.This scheme would be Highly complementary to other schemes of detecting the HFGWs.

  10. Time-Frequency Analysis of Electromagnetic Pulse Response from a Spherical Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈东; 金亚秋

    2003-01-01

    Transient backscattering from a spherical target under incidence of an electromagnetic short pulse is studied. The target can be a perfectly conducting sphere, a dielectric sphere or a dielectric spherical shell. To understand the scattering mechanism from transient impulse echoes for target detection, both the short-time Fourier transform(STFT) and the wavelet transform (WT) are applied to retrieval of scattering information from the backscattering data. Analysis in both the time and frequency domains demonstrates that the WT is more feasible than the STFT to clarifying scattering process of the scatterer because of its excellent multi-resolution characteristic. This technique shall be helpful for scattering analysis and detection of more complex single or multi-targets.

  11. Fabrication and Frequency Response Characteristics of AlN-Based Solidly Mounted Resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Juan; GU Hao-Shuang; HU Kuan; HU Ming-Zhe

    2009-01-01

    @@ Film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) with solidly mounted resonator (SMR)-type is carried out by rf magnetic sputtering. To fabricate SMR-type FBAR, alternative high and low acoustic impedance layers, Mo/Ti multilayer, are adopted as Bragg reflector deposited by dc magnetron sputtering. The influences of sputtering pressure, substrate temperature and sputtering power on the surface roughness of Bragg reflector layer are discussed. From the atom force microscopy (AFM) analysis, the surface roughness of the Bragg reflector is improved remarkably by controlling deposition conditions. Under the appropriate sputtering condition, AIN thin films with highly c-axis-preferred orientation are deposited by rf magnetron sputtering. The performance of fabricated Mo/Ti SMR shows that the electromechanical coupling coefficient is 3.89%, the series and parallel resonant frequencies appear at 2.49 and 2.53 GHz, with their quality factors 134.2 and 97.6, respectively.

  12. Anisotropic Inflation and Cosmological Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Emami, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations opened up a new window on the inflationary model building. As it was firstly reported by the WMAP data, there may be some indications of statistical anisotropy on the CMB map, although the statistical significance of these findings are under debate. Motivated by these observations, people begun considering new inflationary models which may lead to statistical anisotropy. The simplest possible way to construct anisotropic inflation is to introduce vector fields. During the course of this thesis, we study models of anisotropic inflation and their observational implications such as power spectrum, bispectrum etc. Firstly we build a new model, which contains the gauge field which breaks the conformal invariance while preserving the gauge invariance. We show that in these kind of models, there can be an attractor phase in the evolution of the system when the back-reaction of the gauge field becomes important in the evolution of the inflaton field. We then study the cosmological perturbation the...

  13. Stealths on Anisotropic Holographic Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Ayón-Beato, Eloy; Juárez-Aubry, María Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we are interested in exploring the existence of stealth configurations on anisotropic backgrounds playing a prominent role in the non-relativistic version of the gauge/gravity correspondence. By stealth configuration, we mean a nontrivial scalar field nonminimally coupled to gravity whose energy-momentum tensor evaluated on the anisotropic background vanishes identically. In the case of a Lifshitz spacetime with a nontrivial dynamical exponent z, we spotlight the role played by the anisotropy to establish the holographic character of the stealth configurations, i.e. the scalar field is shown to only depend on the radial holographic direction. This configuration which turns out to be massless and without integration constants is possible for a unique value of the nonminimal coupling parameter. Then, using a simple conformal argument, we map this configuration into a stealth solution defined on the so-called hyperscaling violation metric which is conformally related to the Lifshitz spacetime. Thi...

  14. Mirage technique in anisotropic solids

    OpenAIRE

    Quelin, X.; Perrin, B; Perrin, Bernard; Louis, G.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental analysis of heat diffusion in an anisotropic medium are presented. The solution of the 3D thermal conduction equation in an orthorhombic medium is calculated by the mean of a Fourier transforms method. Experiments were performed on an orthorhombic polydiacetylene single crystal sample. The temperature field at the sample surface was determined using the photothermal probe beam deflection technique. Then the 3 coefficients of the thermal conductivity tensor have be...

  15. On the lamb wave propagation in anisotropic laminated composite plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the propagation of Lamb (or plate) waves in anisotropic laminated composite plates. The dispersion relations are explicitly derived using the classical plate theory (CLT), the first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT) and the exact solution (ES), Attention is paid to the lowest antisymmetric (flexural) and lowest symmetric(extensional) modes in the low frequency, long wavelength limit. Different values of shear correction factor were tested in FSDT and comparisons between flexural wave dispersion curves were made with exact results to asses the range of validity of approximate plate theories in the frequency domain.

  16. Frequency response of axisymmetric liquid bridges to an oscillatory microgravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, J. A.

    1991-10-01

    The dynamical response of nearly-cylindrical liquid bridges when subjected to an oscillatory microgravity field has been studied. The analysis has been performed by using a linear three-dimensional model, valid for columns of arbitrary slenderness. Theoretical results are presented and compared with previous ones of a one-dimensional slice model showing that the validity of the slice model is restricted to slender columns.

  17. Insulin gene VNTR genotype associates with frequency and phenotype of the autoimmune response to proinsulin

    OpenAIRE

    Durinovic-Belló, I; Wu, R P; Gersuk, V H; Sanda, S; Shilling, H G; Nepom, G T

    2010-01-01

    Immune responses to autoantigens are in part controlled by deletion of autoreactive cells through genetically regulated selection mechanisms. We have directly analyzed peripheral CD4+ proinsulin (PI) 76–90 (SLQPLALEGSLQKRG)-specific T cells using soluble fluorescent major histocompatibility complex class II tetramers. Subjects with type I diabetes and healthy controls with high levels of peripheral proinsulin-specific T cells were characterized by the presence of a disease-susceptible polymor...

  18. The effects of reinforcement frequency and response requirements on the maintenance of behavior.

    OpenAIRE

    Rider, D P; D'Angelo, B J

    1990-01-01

    Six rats responded under fixed-interval and tandem fixed-interval fixed-ratio schedules of food reinforcement. Basic fixed-interval schedules alternated over experimental conditions with tandem fixed-interval fixed-ratio schedules with the same fixed-interval value. Fixed-interval length was varied within subjects over pairs of experimental conditions; the ratio requirement of the tandem schedules was varied across subjects. For both subjects with a ratio requirement of 10, overall response r...

  19. Anisotropic phenomena in gauge/gravity duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis we use gauge/gravity duality to model anisotropic effects realised in nature. Firstly we analyse transport properties in holographic systems with a broken rotational invariance. Secondly we discuss geometries dual to IR fixed points with anisotropic scaling behaviour, which are related to quantum critical points in condensed matter systems. Gauge/gravity duality relates a gravity theory in Anti-de Sitter space to a lower dimensional strongly coupled quantum field theory in Minkowski space. Over the past decade this duality provided many insights into systems at strong coupling, e.g. quark-gluon plasma and condensed matter close to quantum critical points. One very important result computed in this framework is the value of the shear viscosity divided by the entropy density in strongly coupled theories. The quantitative result agrees very well with measurements of the ratio in quark-gluon plasma. However, for isotropic two derivative Einstein gravity it is temperature independent. We show that by breaking the rotational symmetry of a system we obtain a temperature dependent shear viscosity over entropy density. This is important to make contact with real world systems, since substances in nature display such dependence. In addition, we derive various transport properties in strongly coupled anisotropic systems using the gauge/gravity dictionary. The most notable results include an electrical conductivity with Drude behaviour in the low frequency region. This resembles conductors with broken translational invariance. However, we did not implement the breaking explicitly. Furthermore, our analysis shows that this setup models effects, resembling the piezoelectric and exoelectric effects, known from liquid crystals. In a second project we discuss a geometry with non-trivial scaling behaviour in order to model an IR fixed point of condensed matter theories. We construct the UV completion of this geometry and analyse its properties by computing the

  20. Signal transmission from motor axons to group Ia muscle spindle afferents: frequency responses and second-order non-linearities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhorst, U; Kokkoroyiannis, T; Laouris, Y; Meyer-Lohmann, J

    1994-03-01

    Spinal recurrent inhibition via Renshaw cells and proprioceptive feedback via skeletal muscle and muscle spindle afferents have been hypothesized to constitute a compound feedback system [Windhorst (1989) Afferent Control of Posture and Locomotion; Windhorst (1993) Robots and Biological Systems--Towards a New Bionics]. To assess their detailed functions, it is necessary to know their dynamic characteristics. Previously we have extensively described the properties of signal transmission from motor axons to Renshaw cells using random motor axon stimulation and data analysis methods based thereupon. Using the same methods, we here compare these properties, in the cat, with those between motor axons and group Ia muscle spindle afferents in terms of frequency responses and nonlinear features. The frequency responses depend on the mean rate (carrier rate) of activation of motor axons and on the strength of coupling between motor units and spindles. In general, they are those of a second-order low-pass system with a cut-off at fairly low frequencies. This contrasts with the dynamics of motor axon-Renshaw cell couplings which are those of a much broader band-pass with its peak in the range of c. 2-15 Hz [Christakos (1987) Neuroscience 23, 613-623]. The second-order non-linearities in motor unit-muscle spindle signal lines are much more diverse than those in motor axon-Renshaw cell couplings. Although the average strength of response declines with mean stimulus rate in both subsystems, there is no systematic relationship between the amount of non-linearity and the average response in the former, whilst there is in the latter. The qualitative appearance of motor unit-muscle spindle non-linearities was complicated as was the average response to motor unit twitches. Thus, whilst Renshaw cells appear to dynamically reflect motor output rather faithfully, muscle spindles seem to signal local muscle fibre length changes and their dynamics. This would be consistent with the

  1. Dynamic Simulation Studies of the Frequency Response of the Three U.S. Interconnections with Increased Wind Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackin, Peter; Daschmans, R.; Williams, B.; Haney, B.; Hung, R.; Ellis, J.

    2010-12-20

    Utility Systems Efficiencies, Inc. was tasked by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to conduct dynamic simulation studies of the three U.S. interconnections (Eastern, Western, and Texas). The simulations were prepared in support of LBNL's project for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to study frequency-response-related issues that must be addressed to operate the power system reliably with large amounts of variable renewable generation. The objective of the simulation studies of each interconnection was to assess the effects of different amounts of wind generation on frequency behavior of each interconnection following a sudden loss of generation. The scenarios created to study these effects considered an operating circumstance in which system load is at or close to its minimum. The event studied was the sudden loss of the largest amount of generation recorded within each interconnection. The simulations calculated the impact of this event on interconnection frequency for three levels of wind generation. In addition to varying the amount of wind generation, the simulations varied the amount of operating reserves between a high level representative of current operating practices and a low level representative of the minimum required by present operating rules.

  2. Fast Computation of Frequency Response of Cavity-Backed Apertures Using MBPE in Conjunction with Hybrid FEM/MoM Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, M. D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    2004-01-01

    The hybrid Finite Element Method(FEM)/Method of Moments(MoM) technique has become popular over the last few years due to its flexibility to handle arbitrarily shaped objects with complex materials. One of the disadvantages of this technique, however, is the computational cost involved in obtaining solutions over a frequency range as computations are repeated for each frequency. In this paper, the application of Model Based Parameter Estimation (MBPE) method[1] with the hybrid FEM/MoM technique is presented for fast computation of frequency response of cavity-backed apertures[2,3]. In MBPE, the electric field is expanded in a rational function of two polynomials. The coefficients of the rational function are obtained using the frequency-derivatives of the integro-differential equation formed by the hybrid FEM/MoM technique. Using the rational function approximation, the electric field is calculated at different frequencies from which the frequency response is obtained.

  3. A novel biomarker of amnestic MCI based on dynamic Cross-Frequency Coupling patterns during cognitive brain responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros I Dimitriadis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The detection of mild cognitive impairment (MCI, the transitional stage between normal cognitive changes of aging and the cognitive decline caused by AD, is of paramount clinical importance, since MCI patients are at increased risk of progressing into AD. Electroencephalographic (EEG alterations in the spectral content of brainwaves and connectivity at resting state have been associated with early-stage AD. Recently, cognitive event-related potentials (ERPs have entered into the picture as an easy to perform screening test. Motivated by the recent findings about the role of cross-frequency coupling (CFC in cognition, we introduce a relevant methodological approach for detecting MCI based on cognitive responses from a standard auditory oddball paradigm. By using the single trial signals recorded at Pz sensor and comparing the responses to target and non-target stimuli, we first demonstrate that increased CFC is associated with the cognitive task. Then, considering the dynamic character of CFC, we identify instances during which the coupling between particular pairs of brainwave frequencies carries sufficient information for discriminating between normal subjects and patients with MCI. In this way, we form a multiparametric signature of impaired cognition. The new composite biomarker was tested using data from a cohort that consists of 25 amnestic MCI patients and 15 age-matched controls. Standard machine-learning algorithms were employed so as to implement the binary classification task. Based on leave-one-out cross-validation, the measured classification rate was found reaching very high levels (95%. Our approach compares favorably with the traditional alternative of using the morphology of averaged ERP response to make the diagnosis and the usage of features from spectro-temporal analysis of single-trial response. This further indicates that task-related CFC measurements can provide invaluable analytics in AD diagnosis and prognosis.

  4. A novel biomarker of amnestic MCI based on dynamic cross-frequency coupling patterns during cognitive brain responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Stavros I; Laskaris, Nikolaos A; Bitzidou, Malamati P; Tarnanas, Ioannis; Tsolaki, Magda N

    2015-01-01

    The detection of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the transitional stage between normal cognitive changes of aging and the cognitive decline caused by AD, is of paramount clinical importance, since MCI patients are at increased risk of progressing into AD. Electroencephalographic (EEG) alterations in the spectral content of brainwaves and connectivity at resting state have been associated with early-stage AD. Recently, cognitive event-related potentials (ERPs) have entered into the picture as an easy to perform screening test. Motivated by the recent findings about the role of cross-frequency coupling (CFC) in cognition, we introduce a relevant methodological approach for detecting MCI based on cognitive responses from a standard auditory oddball paradigm. By using the single trial signals recorded at Pz sensor and comparing the responses to target and non-target stimuli, we first demonstrate that increased CFC is associated with the cognitive task. Then, considering the dynamic character of CFC, we identify instances during which the coupling between particular pairs of brainwave frequencies carries sufficient information for discriminating between normal subjects and patients with MCI. In this way, we form a multiparametric signature of impaired cognition. The new composite biomarker was tested using data from a cohort that consists of 25 amnestic MCI patients and 15 age-matched controls. Standard machine-learning algorithms were employed so as to implement the binary classification task. Based on leave-one-out cross-validation, the measured classification rate was found reaching very high levels (95%). Our approach compares favorably with the traditional alternative of using the morphology of averaged ERP response to make the diagnosis and the usage of features from spectro-temporal analysis of single-trial responses. This further indicates that task-related CFC measurements can provide invaluable analytics in AD diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:26539070

  5. Abnormal auditory mismatch response in tinnitus sufferers with high-frequency hearing loss is associated with subjective distress level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Patrick

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tinnitus is an auditory sensation frequently following hearing loss. After cochlear injury, deafferented neurons become sensitive to neighbouring intact edge-frequencies, guiding an enhanced central representation of these frequencies. As psychoacoustical data 123 indicate enhanced frequency discrimination ability for edge-frequencies that may be related to a reorganization within the auditory cortex, the aim of the present study was twofold: 1 to search for abnormal auditory mismatch responses in tinnitus sufferers and 2 relate these to subjective indicators of tinnitus. Results Using EEG-mismatch negativity, we demonstrate abnormalities (N = 15 in tinnitus sufferers that are specific to frequencies located at the audiometrically normal lesion-edge as compared to normal hearing controls (N = 15. Groups also differed with respect to the cortical locations of mismatch responsiveness. Sources in the 90–135 ms latency window were generated in more anterior brain regions in the tinnitus group. Both measures of abnormality correlated with emotional-cognitive distress related to tinnitus (r ~ .76. While these two physiological variables were uncorrelated in the control group, they were correlated in the tinnitus group (r = .72. Concerning relationships with parameters of hearing loss (depth and slope, slope turned out to be an important variable. Generally, the steeper the hearing loss is the less distress related to tinnitus was reported. The associations between slope and the relevant neurophysiological variables are in agreement with this finding. Conclusions The present study is the first to show near-to-complete separation of tinnitus sufferers from a normal hearing control group based on neurophysiological variables. The finding of lesion-edge specific effects and associations with slope of hearing loss corroborates the assumption that hearing loss is the basis for tinnitus development. It is likely that some central

  6. Effects of the air-sea coupling time frequency on the ocean response during Mediterranean intense events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeaupin Brossier, Cindy; Ducrocq, Véronique; Giordani, Hervé

    2009-08-01

    The near-sea surface meteorological conditions associated with the Mediterranean heavy precipitation events constitute, on a short time scale, a strong forcing on the ocean mixed layer. This study addresses the question of the optimal time frequency of the atmospheric forcing to drive an ocean model in order to make it able to capture the fine scale ocean mixed layer response to severe meteorological conditions. The coupling time frequency should allow the ocean model to reproduce the formation of internal low-salty boundary layers due to sudden input of intense precipitation, as well as the cooling and deepening of the ocean mixed layer through large latent heat fluxes and stress under the intense low-level jet associated with these events. In this study, the one-dimensional ocean model is driven by 2.4-km atmospheric simulated fields on a case of Mediterranean heavy precipitation, varying the time resolution of the atmospheric forcing. The results show that using a finer temporal resolution than 1 h for the atmospheric forcing is not necessary, but a coarser temporal resolution (3 or 6 h) modifies the event course and intensity perceived by the ocean. Consequently, when using a too coarse temporal resolution forcing, typically 6 h, the ocean model fails to reproduce the ocean mixed layer fine scale response under the heavy rainfall pulses and the strong wind gusts.

  7. Crack modelling and detection in Timoshenko FGM beam under transverse vibration using frequency contour and response surface model with GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amit; Panigrahi, Brajesh; Pohit, G.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, dynamic response of cracked Timoshenko beam with functionally graded material properties are obtained by a numerical technique using Ritz approximation. In order to verify the applicability and performance of the formulation, comparisons of the present numerical method with three-dimensional FEM models are made. Crack is assumed to be transverse and open throughout the vibration cycle. Two different crack detection techniques have been proposed. Results obtained by the numerical technique are used in both of the crack detection techniques. In the first technique, the frequency contours with respect to crack location and size are plotted and the intersection of contours of different modes helps in the prediction of crack location and size. In the second technique, crack is modelled using response surface methodology (RSM). The sum of the squared errors between the numerical and RSM regression model natural frequencies is used as the objective function. This objective function is minimised using genetic algorithm optimisation technique. Both the crack detection techniques and the numerical analysis have shown good agreement with each other.

  8. Effect of space flight on the frequency of micronuclei and expression of stress-responsive proteins in cultured mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikenaga, Mituo; Hirayama, Jun; Kato, Tomohisa [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Radiation Biology Center] [and others

    2002-12-01

    Results of past space experiments suggest that the biological effect of space radiation could been hanced under microgravity in some cases, especially ininsects. To examine if such a synergistic effect of radiation and microgravity also exists in human cells, frequencies of chromosome instability and cellular levels of several stress-responsive proteins were analyzed incultured human and rodent cells afterspace flight. Human (MCF7 and ataxia telangiectasia(AT)2KY), mouse (m5S) and hamster (Syrian hamster embryo (SHE)) cell lines were loaded on the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-95 mission) and grown during a 9-daymission. After landing, the micronuclei resulting from abnormal nuclear division and accumulationof stress-responsive proteins such as p53 and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are involved in radiation-induced signal transduction cascades, were analyzed. The frequencies of micronucleiin all the four mammalian cell strains tested were not significantly different between flight and ground control samples. Also, the cellular amounts of p53, p21 (WAF1/SDI1/CIP1) and activated (phosphorylated) forms of three distinct MAPKs in MCF7 and m5S cells of flight samples were similar to those of ground control samples. These results indicated that anyeffect of space radiation, microgravity, or combination of both were not detectable, at least under thepresent experimental conditions. (author)

  9. Effect of space flight on the frequency of micronuclei and expression of stress-responsive proteins in cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of past space experiments suggest that the biological effect of space radiation could been hanced under microgravity in some cases, especially ininsects. To examine if such a synergistic effect of radiation and microgravity also exists in human cells, frequencies of chromosome instability and cellular levels of several stress-responsive proteins were analyzed incultured human and rodent cells afterspace flight. Human (MCF7 and ataxia telangiectasia(AT)2KY), mouse (m5S) and hamster (Syrian hamster embryo (SHE)) cell lines were loaded on the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-95 mission) and grown during a 9-daymission. After landing, the micronuclei resulting from abnormal nuclear division and accumulationof stress-responsive proteins such as p53 and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are involved in radiation-induced signal transduction cascades, were analyzed. The frequencies of micronucleiin all the four mammalian cell strains tested were not significantly different between flight and ground control samples. Also, the cellular amounts of p53, p21 (WAF1/SDI1/CIP1) and activated (phosphorylated) forms of three distinct MAPKs in MCF7 and m5S cells of flight samples were similar to those of ground control samples. These results indicated that anyeffect of space radiation, microgravity, or combination of both were not detectable, at least under thepresent experimental conditions. (author)

  10. Non-linear response of coupled soil-pile-structure system under sinusoidal excitations with various frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussien, Mahmoud N.; Tobita, Tetsuo; Iai, Susumu

    The non-linear response of coupled soil-pile-structure systems to seismic loading is parametrically studied in the frequency domain using two-dimensional (2D) finite elements (FE). The soil-pile interaction in three dimensions (3D) is idealized in the 2D type using soil-pile interaction springs with non-linear hysteretic load displacement relationships. The system under investigation comprises of a single degree of freedom structure supported by an end-bearing single pile founded in a homogenous sand layer over rigid rock. Comparisons with established results from the literature suggest that the adopted FE model reasonably captures the essential features of the seismic response of the coupled soil-pile-structure system. Numerical results demonstrate the strong influence on the effective natural period of the foundation properties. The effect of non-linear soil behavior and soil profile as well as the frequency content of excitation on both kinematic and inertial interactions is illustrated. The relative contributions of kinematic and inertial interaction to the development of dynamic pile bending are clarified.

  11. Radio-frequency response of single pores and artificial ion channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intercellular communication relies on ion channels and pores in cell membranes. These protein-formed channels enable the exchange of ions and small molecules to electrically and/or chemically interact with the cells. Traditionally, recordings on single-ion channels and pores are performed in the dc regime, due to the extremely high impedance of these molecular junctions. This paper is intended as an introduction to radio-frequency (RF) recordings of single-molecule junctions in bilipid membranes. First, we demonstrate how early approaches to using microwave circuitry as readout devices for ion channel formation were realized. The second step will then focus on how to engineer microwave coupling into the high-impedance channel by making use of bio-compatible micro-coaxial lines. We then demonstrate integration of an ultra-broadband microwave circuit for the direct sampling of single α-hemolysin pores in a suspended bilipid membrane. Simultaneous direct current recordings reveal that we can monitor and correlate the RF transmission signal. This enables us to relate the open-close states of the direct current to the RF signal. Altogether, our experiments lay the ground for an RF-readout technique to perform real-time in vitro recordings of pores. The technique thus holds great promise for research and drug screening applications. The possible enhancement of sampling rates of single channels and pores by the large recording bandwidth will allow us to track the passage of single ions.

  12. Erianthus arundinaceus HSP70 (EaHSP70) Acts as a Key Regulator in the Formation of Anisotropic Interdigitation in Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrid) in Response to Drought Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Sruthy Maria; Cherian, Anoop V; Syamaladevi, Divya P; Subramonian, N

    2015-12-01

    Plant growth during abiotic stress is a long sought-after trait especially in crop plants in the context of global warming and climate change. Previous studies on leaf epidermal cells have revealed that during normal growth and development, adjacent cells interdigitate anisotropically to form cell morphological patterns known as interlocking marginal lobes (IMLs), involving the cell wall-cell membrane-cortical actin continuum. IMLs are growth-associated cell morphological changes in which auxin-binding protein (ABP), Rho GTPases and actin are known to play important roles. In the present study, we investigated the formation of IMLs under drought stress and found that Erianthus arundinaceus, a drought-tolerant wild relative of sugarcane, develops such growth-related cell morphological patterns under drought stress. Using confocal microscopy, we showed an increasing trend in cortical F-actin intensity in drought-tolerant plants with increasing soil moisture stress. In order to check the role of drought tolerance-related genes in IML formation under soil moisture stress, we adopted a structural data mining strategy and identified indirect connections between the ABPs and heat shock proteins (HSPs). Initial experimental evidence for this connection comes from the high transcript levels of HSP70 observed in drought-stressed Erianthus, which developed anisotropic interdigitation, i.e. IMLs. Subsequently, by overexpressing the E. arundinaceus HSP70 gene (EaHSP70) in sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrid), we confirm the role of HSP70 in the formation of anisotropic interdigitation under drought stress. Taken together, our results suggest that EaHSP70 acts as a key regulator in the formation of anisotropic interdigitation in drought-tolerant plants (Erianthus and HSP70 transgenic sugarcane) under moisture stress in an actin-mediated pathway. The possible biological significance of the formation of drought-associated interlocking marginal lobes (DaIMLs) in sugarcane plants upon

  13. Effective Elliptic Models for Efficient Wavefield Extrapolation in Anisotropic Media

    KAUST Repository

    Waheed, Umair bin

    2014-05-01

    Wavefield extrapolation operator for elliptically anisotropic media offers significant cost reduction compared to that of transversely isotropic media (TI), especially when the medium exhibits tilt in the symmetry axis (TTI). However, elliptical anisotropy does not provide accurate focusing for TI media. Therefore, we develop effective elliptically anisotropic models that correctly capture the kinematic behavior of the TTI wavefield. Specifically, we use an iterative elliptically anisotropic eikonal solver that provides the accurate traveltimes for a TI model. The resultant coefficients of the elliptical eikonal provide the effective models. These effective models allow us to use the cheaper wavefield extrapolation operator for elliptic media to obtain approximate wavefield solutions for TTI media. Despite the fact that the effective elliptic models are obtained by kinematic matching using high-frequency asymptotic, the resulting wavefield contains most of the critical wavefield components, including the frequency dependency and caustics, if present, with reasonable accuracy. The methodology developed here offers a much better cost versus accuracy tradeoff for wavefield computations in TTI media, considering the cost prohibitive nature of the problem. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach on the BP TTI model.

  14. Remote activation of a microactuator using a frequency specific photo-responsive gold nanoparticle composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have demonstrated a photo-responsive microactuator comprised of monodispersed microspheres that contain gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), which, upon irradiation, transduce optical energy to thermal energy, driving a phase change in the matrix in which they are embedded. Firstly, we characterized the thermal energy transduced by the Au NP-loaded polymer microspheres upon optical irradiation from a laser at 532 nm. The photo-responsive microspheres were then combined with polyethylene glycol (PEG, Mn = 1100 g mol−1) wax, a phase-change material that undergoes a 7.5% expansion in volume upon heating. These materials were installed in a 1 mm3 reservoir within a poly(methyl methacrylate) substrate, and capped with a thin silicone membrane. When irradiated with the low intensity light (36 mW), the PEG wax would melt, expand and deform against the silicone membrane. Multiple reversible cycles were demonstrated, and peak deformations of 110 µm were achieved. The time to reach 99% actuation displacement ranged from 42 to 91 s. (paper)

  15. Rorschach test: Italian calibration update about statistical frequencies of responses and location sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Caruson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The remarkable importance of a calibration of a test lies in the formalization of useful statistical norms. In particular, the determination of these norms is of key importance for the Rorschach Test because of it allows objectifying the estimates of the interpretations’ formal qualities, and help to characterize responses consistent with the common perception. The aim of this work is to communicate the new results provided by a study conducted  on Rorschach protocols related to a sample of “non-clinical” subjects. The expert team in Psychodiagnostic of CIFRIC (Italian Center for training, research and clinic in medicine and psychology has carried out the following work identifying the rate at which the details of each card are interpreted by normative sample. The data obtained are systematized in new Location sheets, which refers to the next edition of the "Updated Manual of Locations and Coding of Responses to Rorschach Test".             Considering the Rorschach Test one of the more effective means for the acquaintance of the personality, it appears therefore fundamental to provide the professional, who uses it, with the possibility of accessing updated statistical data that reflect the population of reference, in order to deduce from them reliable and objectively valid indications.

  16. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic MHD shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Uchava, E S; Tevzadze, A G; Poedts, S

    2014-01-01

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic MHD flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model, that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy, but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also impor...

  17. Characterization of highly anisotropic three-dimensionally nanostructured surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generalized ellipsometry, a non-destructive optical characterization technique, is employed to determine geometrical structure parameters and anisotropic dielectric properties of highly spatially coherent three-dimensionally nanostructured thin films grown by glancing angle deposition. The (piecewise) homogeneous biaxial layer model approach is discussed, which can be universally applied to model the optical response of sculptured thin films with different geometries and from diverse materials, and structural parameters as well as effective optical properties of the nanostructured thin films are obtained. Alternative model approaches for slanted columnar thin films, anisotropic effective medium approximations based on the Bruggeman formalism, are presented, which deliver results comparable to the homogeneous biaxial layer approach and in addition provide film constituent volume fraction parameters as well as depolarization or shape factors. Advantages of these ellipsometry models are discussed on the example of metal slanted columnar thin films, which have been conformally coated with a thin passivating oxide layer by atomic layer deposition. Furthermore, the application of an effective medium approximation approach to in-situ growth monitoring of this anisotropic thin film functionalization process is presented. It was found that structural parameters determined with the presented optical model equivalents for slanted columnar thin films agree very well with scanning electron microscope image estimates. - Highlights: • Summary of optical model strategies for sculptured thin films with arbitrary geometries • Application of the rigorous anisotropic Bruggeman effective medium applications • In-situ growth monitoring of atomic layer deposition on biaxial metal slanted columnar thin film

  18. Acoustic metafluid with anisotropic mass density and tunable sound speed: An approach based on suspensions of orientable anisotropic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitel, Mark; Tse, Stephen; Shan, Jerry

    2011-11-01

    We investigate liquid suspensions of micron-scale, anisotropic particles as potential acoustic metafluids having anisotropic and actively controllable acoustic properties. The effective mass density (and hence the sound propagation speed) of these metafluids can vary because the added mass of an anisotropic particle suspended in the fluid changes with the particle's orientation relative to the direction of the wave propagation. A suspension with disc-like particles oriented broadside to the direction of wave propagation is thus expected to have higher effective inertia and lower sound speed than a suspension with particles with end-on alignment. To test these predictions, sound speed is measured with a time-of-flight method in suspensions of micron-size nickel flakes suspended in oil, with and without magnetic-field-induced alignment of the particles. The sound speed, relative to the unaligned case, is found to decrease for particles oriented broadside to the sound wave, and increase for edgewise alignment. We also investigate the frequency dependence of the effective sound speed, since the added mass effect is expected to diminish as the flow becomes steady at low frequencies. The experimental results are compared to the predictions of a model proposed by Ahuja & Hardee (J. Acoust. Soc. Am 1978) for the acoustic properties of aligned oblate-spheroid suspensions.

  19. Multidisciplinary approach to cylindrical anisotropic metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Carbonell Olivares, Jorge; Torrent Martí, Daniel; Diaz Rubio, Ana; Sánchez-Dehesa Moreno-Cid, José

    2011-01-01

    Anisotropic characteristics of cylindrically corrugated microstructures are analyzed in terms of their acoustic and electromagnetic (EM) behavior paying special attention to their differences and similarities. A simple analytical model has been developed using effective medium theory to understand the anisotropic features of both types of waves in terms of radial and angular components of the wave propagation velocity. The anisotropic constituent parameters have been obtained by measuring the...

  20. Efficient Modeling and Migration in Anisotropic Media Based on Prestack Exploding Reflector Model and Effective Anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hui

    2014-05-01

    This thesis addresses the efficiency improvement of seismic wave modeling and migration in anisotropic media. This improvement becomes crucial in practice as the process of imaging complex geological structures of the Earth\\'s subsurface requires modeling and migration as building blocks. The challenge comes from two aspects. First, the underlying governing equations for seismic wave propagation in anisotropic media are far more complicated than that in isotropic media which demand higher computational costs to solve. Second, the usage of whole prestack seismic data still remains a burden considering its storage volume and the existing wave equation solvers. In this thesis, I develop two approaches to tackle the challenges. In the first part, I adopt the concept of prestack exploding reflector model to handle the whole prestack data and bridge the data space directly to image space in a single kernel. I formulate the extrapolation operator in a two-way fashion to remove he restriction on directions that waves propagate. I also develop a generic method for phase velocity evaluation within anisotropic media used in this extrapolation kernel. The proposed method provides a tool for generating prestack images without wavefield cross correlations. In the second part of this thesis, I approximate the anisotropic models using effective isotropic models. The wave phenomena in these effective models match that in anisotropic models both kinematically and dynamically. I obtain the effective models through equating eikonal equations and transport equations of anisotropic and isotropic models, thereby in the high frequency asymptotic approximation sense. The wavefields extrapolation costs are thus reduced using isotropic wave equation solvers while the anisotropic effects are maintained through this approach. I benchmark the two proposed methods using synthetic datasets. Tests on anisotropic Marmousi model and anisotropic BP2007 model demonstrate the applicability of my

  1. International policy and advisory response regarding children's exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmayne, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure regulations/guidelines generally only consider acute effects, and not chronic, low exposures. Concerns for children's exposure are warranted due to the amazingly rapid uptake of many wireless devices by increasingly younger children. This review of policy and advice regarding children's RF-EMF exposure draws material from a wide variety of sources focusing on the current situation. This is not a systematic review, but aims to provide a representative cross-section of policy and advisory responses within set boundaries. There are a wide variety of approaches which I have categorized and tabulated ranging from ICNIRP/IEEE guidelines and "no extra precautions needed" to precautionary or scientific much lower maxima and extensive advice to minimize RF-EMF exposure, ban advertising/sale to children, and add exposure information to packaging. Precautionary standards use what I term an exclusion principle. The wide range of policy approaches can be confusing for parents/carers of children. Some consensus among advisory organizations would be helpful acknowledging that, despite extensive research, the highly complex nature of both RF-EMF and the human body, and frequent technological updates, means simple assurance of long-term safety cannot be guaranteed. Therefore, minimum exposure of children to RF-EMF is recommended. This does not indicate need for alarm, but mirrors routine health-and-safety precautions. Simple steps are suggested. ICNIRP guidelines need to urgently publish how the head, torso, and limbs' exposure limits were calculated and what safety margin was applied since this exposure, especially to the abdomen, is now dominant in many children. PMID:26091083

  2. Low-Frequency Response Following the Passage of Hurricane Andrew on the Texas-Louisiana Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, S. M.; Smith, D. C.; Dimarco, S. F.

    2009-12-01

    During August 24th through 27th in 1992, Hurricane Andrew passed through the Gulf Of Mexico almost directly over several moorings on the easternmost Louisiana shelf portion of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf (LATEX) coastal ocean monitoring program. Examination of the current meter time-series showed the existence of fast moving, long shelf waves over the entire Texas-Louisiana shelf west of the storm passage for up to 12 days after direct forcing ceased. The LATEX program featured 31 moorings each with 3 current meters over the 10, 20, 50, and 200 meter isobaths in 5 cross sectional lines with additional coverage on the 200 meter isobath from the Louisiana-Mississippi River delta, to Corpus Christi, Texas. Additionally, several pressure records from LATEX and several NOAA historical coastal tide gauge data from Sabine Pass to Port Isabella, Texas were incorporated. Raw, 3-hour low pass filtered, and 40-hour low pass filtered versions of the current data were analyzed. The pressure data used were detided using a least squares fit, and the tidal records were detided using the NOAA predicted tides for that location. All data were analyzed using a wavelet analysis to determine the spectra over time. The analyzed data shows that the shelf response was largely dominated in the internal Kelvin wave mode. The wave propagated towards the west on the shelf at approximately 400 km/day. These results are contrasted and compared with wave modes predicted for coastal trapped wave solutions. The output of a coastal ocean model simulation using a forced wind field similar to the storm are also contrasted and compared with the observed data.

  3. Effects of supplementation frequency on performance, reproductive, and metabolic responses of Brahman-crossbred females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, R F; Arthington, J D; Araujo, D B; Lamb, G C; Ealy, A D

    2008-09-01

    Two experiments were conducted to compare performance and metabolic responses of beef females consuming low-quality forages and offered an energy supplement based on fibrous byproducts daily (S7) or 3 times per week (S3) at similar weekly rates. In Exp. 1, BW gain, reproductive performance, mRNA expression of hepatic and skeletal muscle genes associated with nutritional metabolism and growth, and concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), plasma glucose, insulin, and IGF-I were assessed in 56 Brahman x Angus heifers supplemented at a daily rate of 1.0% of BW. Mean BW gain was greater (P = 0.03) for S7 compared with S3 heifers. Treatment x sampling day interactions were detected (P x day interactions were detected (P Brahman x British mature cows received S3 or S7 for a 3-wk period at a daily rate of 0.5% of BW. Concentrations of BUN were greater for S7 compared with S3 cows (P x time interaction was detected (P = 0.01) for insulin concentrations because a time effect was significant (P x week interaction; P = 0.02). The combined expression of gluconeogenic enzymes mRNA tended to be greater (P = 0.09) for S3 cows when both treatment groups received supplements, but was greater (P = 0.03) for S7 cows when only these were supplemented (treatment x day interaction; P Brahman-crossbred females, resulting in improved growth and reproductive performance of developing heifers. PMID:18441070

  4. New charged anisotropic compact models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kileba Matondo, D.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-07-01

    We find new exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell field equations which are relevant in the description of highly compact stellar objects. The relativistic star is charged and anisotropic with a quark equation of state. Exact solutions of the field equations are found in terms of elementary functions. It is interesting to note that we regain earlier quark models with uncharged and charged matter distributions. A physical analysis indicates that the matter distributions are well behaved and regular throughout the stellar structure. A range of stellar masses are generated for particular parameter values in the electric field. In particular the observed mass for a binary pulsar is regained.

  5. Model for Anisotropic Directed Percolation

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, V. Lien; Canessa, Enrique

    1997-01-01

    We propose a simulation model to study the properties of directed percolation in two-dimensional (2D) anisotropic random media. The degree of anisotropy in the model is given by the ratio $\\mu$ between the axes of a semi-ellipse enclosing the bonds that promote percolation in one direction. At percolation, this simple model shows that the average number of bonds per site in 2D is an invariant equal to 2.8 independently of $\\mu$. This result suggests that Sinai's theorem proposed originally fo...

  6. Anisotropic spectra of acoustic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We found universal anizopropic spectra of acoustic turbulence with the linear dispersion law ω(k)=ck within the framework of generalized kinetic equation which takes into account the finite time of three-wave interactions. This anisotropic spectra can assume both scale-invariant and non-scale-invariant form. The implications for the evolution of the acoustic turbulence with nonisotropic pumping are discussed. The main result of the article is that the spectra of acoustic turbulence tend to become more isotropic. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  7. Anisotropic and nonlinear optical waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Someda, CG

    1992-01-01

    Dielectric optical waveguides have been investigated for more than two decades. In the last ten years they have had the unique position of being simultaneously the backbone of a very practical and fully developed technology, as well as an extremely exciting area of basic, forefront research. Existing waveguides can be divided into two sets: one consisting of waveguides which are already in practical use, and the second of those which are still at the laboratory stage of their evolution. This book is divided into two separate parts: the first dealing with anisotropic waveguides, an

  8. BRDF Interpolation using Anisotropic Stencils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vávra, Radomír; Filip, Jiří

    Springfield: Society for Imaging Science and Technology , 2016 - (Imai, F.; Ortiz Segovia, M.; Urban, P.), MMRMA-356.1-MMRMA-356.6 ISSN 2470-1173. [IS&T International Symposium on Electronic Imaging 2016, Measuring, Modeling, and Reproducing Material Appearance 2016. San Francisco (US), 14.2.2016-18.2.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02652S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : BRDF * stencil * anisotropic * interpolation Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/RO/vavra-0457068.pdf

  9. Numerical modelling of tunnel construction in anisotropic foliated soft rock

    OpenAIRE

    Markovič, Jernej

    2009-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence on tunnelling in the anisotropic foliated soft rock. The excavation initiates stress redistribution around an opening and thus causes the deformation to occur. The numerical problem of the tunnel excavation was modelled in the Plaxis 2D code using different soil constitutive models for modelling the rock mass behaviour. A parametric study was performed to obtain the model response to alteration of the rock mass parameters. The analysis was divided int...

  10. Non-linear frequency response of non-isothermal adsorption controlled by micropore diffusion with variable diffusivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MENKA PETKOVSKA

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of higher order frequency response functions (FRFs is used for the analysis of non-linear adsorption kinetics on a particle scale, for the case of non-isothermal micropore diffusion with variable diffusivity. Six series of FRFs are defined for the general non-isothermal case. A non-linerar mathematical model is postulated and the first and second order FRFs derived and simulated. A variable diffusivity influences the shapes of the second order FRFs relating the sorbate concentration in the solid phase and t he gas pressure significantly, but they still keep their characteristics which can be used for discrimination of this from other kinetic mechanisms. It is also shown that first and second order particle FRFs offter sufficient information for an easy and fast estimation of all model parameters, including those defining the system non-linearity.

  11. Hardware platforms for MEMS gyroscope tuning based on evolutionary computation using open-loop and closed -loop frequency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Ferguson, Michael I.; Fink, Wolfgang; Oks, Boris; Peay, Chris; Terrile, Richard; Cheng, Yen; Kim, Dennis; MacDonald, Eric; Foor, David

    2005-01-01

    We propose a tuning method for MEMS gyroscopes based on evolutionary computation to efficiently increase the sensitivity of MEMS gyroscopes through tuning. The tuning method was tested for the second generation JPL/Boeing Post-resonator MEMS gyroscope using the measurement of the frequency response of the MEMS device in open-loop operation. We also report on the development of a hardware platform for integrated tuning and closed loop operation of MEMS gyroscopes. The control of this device is implemented through a digital design on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The hardware platform easily transitions to an embedded solution that allows for the miniaturization of the system to a single chip.

  12. Dynamic stereotypic responses of basal ganglia neurons to subthalamic nucleus high frequency stimulation in the parkinsonian primate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anan eMoran

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN is a well-established therapy for patients with severe Parkinson‟s disease (PD; however, its mechanism of action is still unclear. In this study we explored static and dynamic activation patterns in the basal ganglia during high frequency macro-stimulation of the STN. Extracellular multi-electrode recordings were performed in primates rendered parkinsonian using 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Recordings were preformed simultaneously in the STN and the globus pallidus externus and internus. Single units were recorded preceding and during the stimulation. During the stimulation, STN mean firing rate dropped significantly, while pallidal mean firing rates did not change significantly. The vast majority of neurons across all three nuclei displayed stimulation driven modulations, which were stereotypic within each nucleus but differed across nuclei. The predominant response pattern of STN neurons was somatic inhibition. However, most pallidal neurons demonstrated synaptic activation patterns. A minority of neurons across all nuclei displayed axonal activation. Temporal dynamics were observed in the response to stimulation over the first 10 seconds in the STN and over the first 30 seconds in the pallidum. In both pallidal segments, the synaptic activation response patterns underwent delay and decay of the magnitude of the peak response due to short term synaptic depression. We suggest that during STN macro stimulation the STN goes through a functional ablation as its upper bound on information transmission drops significantly. This notion is further supported by the evident dissociation between the stimulation driven pre-synaptic STN somatic inhibition and the post-synaptic axonal activation of its downstream targets. Thus, basal ganglia output maintains its firing rate while losing the deleterious effect of the STN. This may be a part of the mechanism leading to the beneficial

  13. Deficiencies in numerical models of anisotropic nonlinearly elastic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Annaidh, A; Destrade, M; Gilchrist, M D; Murphy, J G

    2013-08-01

    Incompressible nonlinearly hyperelastic materials are rarely simulated in finite element numerical experiments as being perfectly incompressible because of the numerical difficulties associated with globally satisfying this constraint. Most commercial finite element packages therefore assume that the material is slightly compressible. It is then further assumed that the corresponding strain-energy function can be decomposed additively into volumetric and deviatoric parts. We show that this decomposition is not physically realistic, especially for anisotropic materials, which are of particular interest for simulating the mechanical response of biological soft tissue. The most striking illustration of the shortcoming is that with this decomposition, an anisotropic cube under hydrostatic tension deforms into another cube instead of a hexahedron with non-parallel faces. Furthermore, commercial numerical codes require the specification of a 'compressibility parameter' (or 'penalty factor'), which arises naturally from the flawed additive decomposition of the strain-energy function. This parameter is often linked to a 'bulk modulus', although this notion makes no sense for anisotropic solids; we show that it is essentially an arbitrary parameter and that infinitesimal changes to it result in significant changes in the predicted stress response. This is illustrated with numerical simulations for biaxial tension experiments of arteries, where the magnitude of the stress response is found to change by several orders of magnitude when infinitesimal changes in 'Poisson's ratio' close to the perfect incompressibility limit of 1/2 are made. PMID:23011411

  14. Electromagnetism on anisotropic fractal media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Basic equations of electromagnetic fields in anisotropic fractal media are obtained using a dimensional regularization approach. First, a formulation based on product measures is shown to satisfy the four basic identities of the vector calculus. This allows a generalization of the Green-Gauss and Stokes theorems as well as the charge conservation equation on anisotropic fractals. Then, pursuing the conceptual approach, we derive the Faraday and Ampère laws for such fractal media, which, along with two auxiliary null-divergence conditions, effectively give the modified Maxwell equations. Proceeding on a separate track, we employ a variational principle for electromagnetic fields, appropriately adapted to fractal media, so as to independently derive the same forms of these two laws. It is next found that the parabolic (for a conducting medium) and the hyperbolic (for a dielectric medium) equations involve modified gradient operators, while the Poynting vector has the same form as in the non-fractal case. Finally, Maxwell's electromagnetic stress tensor is reformulated for fractal systems. In all the cases, the derived equations for fractal media depend explicitly on fractal dimensions in three different directions and reduce to conventional forms for continuous media with Euclidean geometries upon setting these each of dimensions equal to unity.

  15. Elicitation of High-Frequency Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Responses against both Dominant and Subdominant Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epitopes by DNA Vaccination of Rhesus Monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Barouch, Dan H.; Craiu, Abie; Santra, Sampa; Egan, Michael A.; Schmitz, Jörn E.; Kuroda, Marcelo J.; Fu, Tong-Ming; Nam, Jae-Hwan; Wyatt, Linda S.; Lifton, Michelle A.; Krivulka, Georgia R.; Nickerson, Christine E.; Lord, Carol I.; Moss, Bernard; Lewis, Mark G.

    2001-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the generation of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses specific for a diversity of viral epitopes will be needed for an effective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine. Here, we determine the frequencies of CTL responses specific for the simian immunodeficiency virus Gag p11C and HIV-1 Env p41A epitopes in simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected and vaccinated rhesus monkeys. The p11C-specific CTL response was high frequency and do...

  16. ANISOTROPIC POLARIZATION TENSORS FOR ELLIPSES AND ELLIPSOIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyeonbae Kang; Kyoungsun Kim

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a systematic way of computing the polarization tensors,anisotropic as well as isotropic, based on the boundary integral method. We then use this method to compute the anisotropic polarization tensor for ellipses and ellipsoids. The computation reveals the pair of anisotropy and ellipses which produce the same polarization tensors.

  17. Anisotropic weak Hardy spaces and interpolation theorems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the authors establish the anisotropic weak Hardy spaces associated with very general discrete groups of dilations. Moreover, the atomic decomposition theorem of the anisotropic weak Hardy spaces is also given. As some applications of the above results, the authors prove some interpolation theorems and obtain the boundedness of the singular integral operators on these Hardy spaces.

  18. Characterization of anisotropic acoustic metamaterial slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Hyeong; Lee, Hyung Jin; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-01-01

    In an anisotropic acoustic metamaterial, the off-diagonal components of its effective mass density tensor should be considered in order to describe the anisotropic behavior produced by arbitrarily shaped inclusions. However, few studies have been carried out to characterize anisotropic acoustic metamaterials. In this paper, we propose a method that uses the non-diagonal effective mass density tensor to determine the behavior of anisotropic acoustic metamaterials. Our method accurately evaluates the effective properties of anisotropic acoustic metamaterials by separately dealing with slabs made of single and multiple unit cells along the thickness direction. To determine the effective properties, the reflection and transmission coefficients of an acoustic metamaterial slab are calculated, and then the wave vectors inside of the slab are determined using these coefficients. The effective material properties are finally determined by utilizing the spatial dispersion relation of the anisotropic acoustic metamaterial. Since the dispersion relation of an anisotropic acoustic metamaterial is explicitly used, its effective properties can be easily determined by only using a limited number of normal and oblique plane wave incidences into a metamaterial slab, unlike existing approaches requiring a large number of wave incidences. The validity of the proposed method is verified by conducting wave simulations for anisotropic acoustic metamaterial slabs with Z-shaped elastic inclusions of tilted principal material axes.

  19. Tapering the sky response for angular power spectrum estimation from low-frequency radio-interferometric data

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhuri, Samir; Roy, Nirupam; Ghosh, Abhik; Ali, Sk Saiyad

    2016-01-01

    It is important to correctly subtract point sources from radio-interferometric data in order to measure the power spectrum of diffuse radiation like the Galactic synchrotron or the Epoch of Reionization 21-cm signal. It is computationally very expensive and challenging to image a very large area and accurately subtract all the point sources from the image. The problem is particularly severe at the sidelobes and the outer parts of the main lobe where the antenna response is highly frequency dependent and the calibration also differs from that of the phase center. Here we show that it is possible to overcome this problem by tapering the sky response. Using simulated 150 MHz observations, we demonstrate that it is possible to suppress the contribution due to point sources from the outer parts by using the Tapered Gridded Estimator to measure the angular power spectrum C_l of the sky signal. We also show from the simulation that this method can self-consistently compute the noise bias and accurately subtract it t...

  20. Tapering the sky response for angular power spectrum estimation from low-frequency radio-interferometric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Samir; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Roy, Nirupam; Ghosh, Abhik; Ali, Sk. Saiyad

    2016-06-01

    It is important to correctly subtract point sources from radio-interferometric data in order to measure the power spectrum of diffuse radiation like the Galactic synchrotron or the Epoch of Reionization 21-cm signal. It is computationally very expensive and challenging to image a very large area and accurately subtract all the point sources from the image. The problem is particularly severe at the sidelobes and the outer parts of the main lobe where the antenna response is highly frequency dependent and the calibration also differs from that of the phase centre. Here, we show that it is possible to overcome this problem by tapering the sky response. Using simulated 150 MHz observations, we demonstrate that it is possible to suppress the contribution due to point sources from the outer parts by using the Tapered Gridded Estimator to measure the angular power spectrum Cℓ of the sky signal. We also show from the simulation that this method can self-consistently compute the noise bias and accurately subtract it to provide an unbiased estimation of Cℓ.

  1. Dependence of chromatic responses in V1 on visual field eccentricity and spatial frequency: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Dany V; Auer, Tibor; Frahm, Jens; Strasburger, Hans; Lee, Barry B

    2016-03-01

    Psychophysical sensitivity to red-green chromatic modulation decreases with visual eccentricity, compared to sensitivity to luminance modulation, even after appropriate stimulus scaling. This is likely to occur at a central, rather than a retinal, site. Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses to stimuli designed to separately stimulate different afferent channels' [red-green, luminance, and short-wavelength (S)-cone] circular gratings were recorded as a function of visual eccentricity (±10  deg) and spatial frequency (SF) in human primary visual cortex (V1) and further visual areas (V2v, V3v). In V1, the SF tuning of BOLD fMRI responses became coarser with eccentricity. For red-green and luminance gratings, similar SF tuning curves were found at all eccentricities. The pattern for S-cone modulation differed, with SF tuning changing more slowly with eccentricity than for the other two modalities. This may be due to the different retinal distribution with eccentricity of this receptor type. A similar pattern held in V2v and V3v. This would suggest that transformation or spatial filtering of the chromatic (red-green) signal occurs beyond these areas. PMID:26974942

  2. Multidisciplinary approach to cylindrical anisotropic metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisotropic characteristics of cylindrically corrugated microstructures are analyzed in terms of their acoustic and electromagnetic (EM) behavior paying special attention to their differences and similarities. A simple analytical model has been developed using effective medium theory to understand the anisotropic features of both types of waves in terms of radial and angular components of the wave propagation velocity. The anisotropic constituent parameters have been obtained by measuring the resonances of cylindrical cavities, as well as from numerical simulations. This permits one to characterize propagation of acoustic and EM waves and to compare the fundamental anisotropic features generated by the corrugated effective medium. Anisotropic coefficients match closely in both physics fields but other relevant parameters show significant differences in the behavior of both types of waves. (paper)

  3. Efficient Wavefield Extrapolation In Anisotropic Media

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2014-07-03

    Various examples are provided for wavefield extrapolation in anisotropic media. In one example, among others, a method includes determining an effective isotropic velocity model and extrapolating an equivalent propagation of an anisotropic, poroelastic or viscoelastic wavefield. The effective isotropic velocity model can be based upon a kinematic geometrical representation of an anisotropic, poroelastic or viscoelastic wavefield. Extrapolating the equivalent propagation can use isotopic, acoustic or elastic operators based upon the determined effective isotropic velocity model. In another example, non-transitory computer readable medium stores an application that, when executed by processing circuitry, causes the processing circuitry to determine the effective isotropic velocity model and extrapolate the equivalent propagation of an anisotropic, poroelastic or viscoelastic wavefield. In another example, a system includes processing circuitry and an application configured to cause the system to determine the effective isotropic velocity model and extrapolate the equivalent propagation of an anisotropic, poroelastic or viscoelastic wavefield.

  4. Designing Anisotropic Inflation with Form Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Asuka

    2015-01-01

    We study inflation with anisotropic hair induced by form fields. In four dimensions, the relevant form fields are gauge (one-form) fields and two-form fields. Assuming the exponential form of potential and gauge kinetic functions, we find new exact power-law solutions endowed with anisotropic hair. We also explore the phase space of anisotropic inflation and find fixed points corresponding to the exact power-law solutions. Moreover, we perform the stability analysis around the fixed points to reveal the structure of the phase space. It turns out that one of the fixed points becomes an attractor and others (if any) are saddle points. In particular, the one corresponding to anisotropic inflation becomes an attractor when it exists. We also argue that various anisotropic inflation models can be designed by choosing coupling constants.

  5. Designing anisotropic inflation with form fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Asuka; Soda, Jiro

    2015-12-01

    We study inflation with anisotropic hair induced by form fields. In four dimensions, the relevant form fields are gauge (one-form) fields and two-form fields. Assuming the exponential form of potential and gauge kinetic functions, we find new exact power-law solutions endowed with anisotropic hair. We also explore the phase space of anisotropic inflation and find fixed points corresponding to the exact power-law solutions. Moreover, we perform the stability analysis around the fixed points to reveal the structure of the phase space. It turns out that one of the fixed points becomes an attractor and others (if any) are saddle points. In particular, the one corresponding to anisotropic inflation becomes an attractor when it exists. We also argue that various anisotropic inflation models can be designed by choosing coupling constants.

  6. Efficient anisotropic wavefield extrapolation using effective isotropic models

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-06-10

    Isotropic wavefield extrapolation is more efficient than anisotropic extrapolation, and this is especially true when the anisotropy of the medium is tilted (from the vertical). We use the kinematics of the wavefield, appropriately represented in the high-frequency asymptotic approximation by the eikonal equation, to develop effective isotropic models, which are used to efficiently and approximately extrapolate anisotropic wavefields using the isotropic, relatively cheaper, operators. These effective velocity models are source dependent and tend to embed the anisotropy in the inhomogeneity. Though this isotropically generated wavefield theoretically shares the same kinematic behavior as that of the first arrival anisotropic wavefield, it also has the ability to include all the arrivals resulting from a complex wavefield propagation. In fact, the effective models reduce to the original isotropic model in the limit of isotropy, and thus, the difference between the effective model and, for example, the vertical velocity depends on the strength of anisotropy. For reverse time migration (RTM), effective models are developed for the source and receiver fields by computing the traveltime for a plane wave source stretching along our source and receiver lines in a delayed shot migration implementation. Applications to the BP TTI model demonstrates the effectiveness of the approach.

  7. Multiscale nonlinear frequency response analysis of single-layered graphene sheet under impulse and harmonic excitation using the atomistic finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomistic finite element method (AFEM) is a multiscale technique where a sequential mode is used to transfer information between two length scales to model and simulate nanostructures at the continuum level. This method is used in this paper to investigate the nonlinear frequency response of a single-layered graphene sheet (SLGS) for impulse and harmonic excitation. The multi-body interatomic Tersoff–Brenner (TB) potential is used to represent the energy between two adjacent carbon atoms. Based on the TB potential, the equivalent geometric and elastic properties of carbon–carbon bonds are derived which are consistent with the material constitutive relations. These properties are used further to derive the nonlinear material model (stress–strain curve) of carbon–carbon bonds based on the force–deflection curve using the multi-body interatomic Tersoff–Brenner potential. A square SLGS is considered and its nonlinear vibration characteristics under an impulse and harmonic excitation for bridged, cantilever and clamped boundary conditions are investigated using the derived nonlinear material model (NMM). Before using the proposed nonlinear material model, the derived equivalent geometric and elastic properties of carbon–carbon bond are validated using molecular dynamics simulation results. The geometric (large deformation) and material nonlinearities are included in the nonlinear frequency response analysis. The investigated results of the nonlinear frequency response analysis are compared with those of the linear frequency response analysis, and the effect of the nonlinear behavior of carbon–carbon bonds on the frequency response of SLGS is studied. (paper)

  8. Frequency-dependent excitability of "membrane" slow responses of Rabbit left atrial trabeculae in the presence of Ba2+ and high K+

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Small trabeculae of rabbit left atrium immersed in TKBa solution (Tyrode with 10 mM K+ and 1 mM Ba2+) were used to study frequency dependence of "membrane" slow response excitability at long cycle lengths (greater than 1 s). In TKBa, stimuli generate graded, low- amplitude (2-15 mV) subliminal responses of variable long duration (up to 450 ms). A full all-or-none slow response is generated when a subliminal response depolarizes the membrane to about--35 mV. Subliminal response amplitude and r...

  9. An efficient wave extrapolation method for anisotropic media with tilt

    KAUST Repository

    Waheed, Umair bin

    2015-03-23

    Wavefield extrapolation operators for elliptically anisotropic media offer significant cost reduction compared with that for the transversely isotropic case, particularly when the axis of symmetry exhibits tilt (from the vertical). However, elliptical anisotropy does not provide accurate wavefield representation or imaging for transversely isotropic media. Therefore, we propose effective elliptically anisotropic models that correctly capture the kinematic behaviour of wavefields for transversely isotropic media. Specifically, we compute source-dependent effective velocities for the elliptic medium using kinematic high-frequency representation of the transversely isotropic wavefield. The effective model allows us to use cheaper elliptic wave extrapolation operators. Despite the fact that the effective models are obtained by matching kinematics using high-frequency asymptotic, the resulting wavefield contains most of the critical wavefield components, including frequency dependency and caustics, if present, with reasonable accuracy. The methodology developed here offers a much better cost versus accuracy trade-off for wavefield computations in transversely isotropic media, particularly for media of low to moderate complexity. In addition, the wavefield solution is free from shear-wave artefacts as opposed to the conventional finite-difference-based transversely isotropic wave extrapolation scheme. We demonstrate these assertions through numerical tests on synthetic tilted transversely isotropic models.

  10. Effect of current frequency during electrical stunning in a water bath on somatosensory evoked responses in turkey's brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchonière, M; Le Pottier, G; Fernandez, X

    2000-08-01

    Somatosensory evoked responses (SEP) in a turkey's brain were determined after water-bath stunning with a 150-mA (constant current) delivered with 50, 300 or 600 Hz, or with 75 mA, delivered with 50-Hz alternating current (AC) in order to evaluate the effectiveness of stunning. Ninety-four BUT 9 turkey hens 12 weeks of age were surgically implanted with EEG recording and left wing nerve stimulating electrodes 4 hours before stunning. They were individually stunned by immersion of the head and upper part of the neck in a water bath for 4 s. Using a 150-mA current, all birds stunned at 50 Hz showed cardiac arrest and a flat EEG immediately after the stun with no SEP recovery. The incidence of cardiac arrest at stunning decreased with increasing current frequency but SEP were lost in all birds. In birds that survived the stun, the duration of SEP abolition was on average 69 and 34 seconds at 300 and 600 Hz, respectively. Stunning with a 75-mA AC, delivered with 50 Hz, induced cardiac arrest in 32 per cent of turkeys. SEP were abolished in only 71 per cent of the birds that survived the stun, with an average duration of SEP of 66 seconds. The results indicate that increasing the frequency of a 150-mA AC current leads to a decreased stunning efficiency. A current of 75 mA per bird is unacceptable since 29 per cent of the birds do not show SEP abolition. PMID:10924394

  11. Anisotropic microstructured poly(vinyl alcohol) tissue-mimicking phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Andrew; Harris, Paul; Gouws, Gideon

    2010-07-01

    Novel microstructured PVA phantoms mimicking fibrous tissues have been developed using a simple freeze-casting process. Scanning electron micrographs reveal highly anisotropic microstructure with dimensions of the order of 5 to 100 microm. Characterization of an example phantom revealed acoustic properties consistent with those found in fibrous tissues. At 20 MHz, the velocity measured parallel to the microstructure orientation of 1555 ms(-1) was significantly greater than that perpendicular to the microstructure of 1537 ms(-1). The attenuation coefficient was measured to be 5 dBxmm(-1) and proportional to the 1.6 power of frequency, which is in good agreement with that for normal human myocardium. PMID:20639144

  12. Anisotropic metasurface with near-unity circular polarization conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoxiao; Meng, Yan; Wang, Li; Tian, Jingxuan; Dai, Shiwei; Wen, Weijia

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a bi-layer ultrathin anisotropic metasurface which could near-completely convert the circular-polarized electromagnetic wave to its cross polarization. The bi-layer metasurface is composed of periodic 180°-twisted double-cut split ring resonators on both sides of an F4B substrate. At resonance, cross-polarized transmission larger than 94% is observed both in simulations and experiments. The resonant frequency of the metasurface could be effectively tuned by adjusting the geometric parameters of the metasurface, while relatively high conversion efficiency is preserved. The high efficiency and ease of fabrication suggest that the ultrathin metasurface could have potential applications in telecommunications.

  13. Optical Conductivity of Anisotropic Quantum Dots in Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Kang-Xian; CHEN Chuan-Yu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Optical conductivity of anisotropic double-parabolic quantum dots is investigated with the memory-function approach, and the analytic expression for the optical conductivity is derived. With characteristic parameterspertaining to GaAs, the numerical results are presented. It is shown that: (1) the larger the optical phonon frequency ωLO, the stronger the peak intensity of the optical conductivity, and the more asymmetric the shape of the optical conductivity; (2) the magnetic field enhances the optical conductivity for levels l = 0 and l = 1, with or without electron-LO-phonon interactions; (3) the larger the quantum dot thickness lz, the smaller the optical conductivity σ(ω).

  14. SNe Ia Tests of Quintessence Tracker Cosmology in an Anisotropic Background

    CERN Document Server

    Miranda, W; Pigozzo, C

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the observational effects of a quintessence model in an anisotropic spacetime. The anisotropic metric is a non-rotating particular case of a generalized Godel's metric and is classified as Bianchi III. This metric is an exact solution of the Einstein-Klein-Gordon field equations with an anisotropic scalar field, which is responsible for the anisotropy of the spacetime geometry. We test the model against observations of type Ia supernovae, analyzing the SDSS dataset calibrated with the MLCS2k2 fitter, and the results are compared to standard quintessence models with Ratra-Peebles potentials. We obtain a good agreement with observations, with best values for the matter and curvature density parameters $\\Omega_M = 0.29$ and $\\Omega_k= 0.01$ respectively. We conclude that present SNe Ia observations cannot, alone, distinguish a possible anisotropic axis in the cosmos.

  15. SNe Ia tests of quintessence tracker cosmology in an anisotropic background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the observational effects of a quintessence model in an anisotropic spacetime. The anisotropic metric is a non-rotating particular case of a generalized Gödel's metric and is classified as Bianchi III. This metric is an exact solution of the Einstein-Klein-Gordon field equations with an anisotropic scalar field ψ, which is responsible for the anisotropy of the spacetime geometry. We test the model against observations of type Ia supernovae, analyzing the SDSS dataset calibrated with the MLCS2k2 fitter, and the results are compared to standard quintessence models with Ratra-Peebles potentials. We obtain a good agreement with observations, with best values for the matter and curvature density parameters ΩM = 0.29 and Ωk= 0.01 respectively. We conclude that present SNe Ia observations cannot, alone, distinguish a possible anisotropic axis in the cosmos

  16. Warm anisotropic inflationary universe model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M.; Saleem, Rabia [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2014-02-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of warm inflation using vector fields in the background of a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I model of the universe. We formulate the field equations, and slow-roll and perturbation parameters (scalar and tensor power spectra as well as their spectral indices) in the slow-roll approximation. We evaluate all these parameters in terms of the directional Hubble parameter during the intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by taking the dissipation factor as a function of the scalar field as well as a constant. In each case, we calculate the observational parameter of interest, i.e., the tensor-scalar ratio in terms of the inflaton. The graphical behavior of these parameters shows that the anisotropic model is also compatible with WMAP7 and the Planck observational data. (orig.)

  17. Warm Anisotropic Inflationary Universe Model

    CERN Document Server

    Sharif, M

    2014-01-01

    This paper is devoted to study the warm inflation using vector fields in the background of locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I universe model. We formulate the field equations, slow-roll and perturbation parameters (scalar and tensor power spectra as well as their spectral indices) under slow-roll approximation. We evaluate all these parameters in terms of directional Hubble parameter during intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by taking the dissipation factor as a function of scalar field as well as a constant. In each case, we calculate the observational parameter of interest, i.e., tensor-scalar ratio in terms of inflation. The graphical behavior of these parameters shows that the anisotropic model is also compatible with WMAP7 and Planck observational data.

  18. I-Love-Q Anisotropically

    CERN Document Server

    Yagi, Kent

    2015-01-01

    Certain physical quantities that characterize neutron stars and quark stars (e.g. their mass, spin angular momentum and quadrupole moment) are interrelated in a way that is approximately insensitive to their internal structure. Such approximately universal relations are useful to break degeneracies in data analysis for future radio, X-ray and gravitational wave observations. Although the pressure inside compact stars is most likely nearly isotropic, certain scenarios have been put forth that suggest otherwise, for example due to phase transitions. We here investigate whether pressure anisotropy affects the approximate universal relations and whether it prevents their use in future observations. We achieve this by numerically constructing slowly-rotating and tidally-deformed, anisotropic, compact stars in General Relativity to third order in spin. We find that anisotropy affects the universal relations only weakly; the relations become less universal by a factor of 1.5-3 relative to the isotropic case, but rem...

  19. Gravitational Baryogenesis after Anisotropic Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational baryogensis may not generate a sufficient baryon asymmetry in the standard thermal history of the Universe when we take into account the gravitino problem. Hence it has been suggested that anisotropy of the Universe can enhance the generation of the baryon asymmetry through the increase of the time change of the Ricci scalar curvature. We study the gravitational baryogenesis in the presence of anisotropy, which is produced at the end of an anisotropic inflation. Although we confirm that the generated baryon asymmetry is enhanced compared with the original isotropic cosmological model, taking into account the constraint on the anisotropy by the recent CMB observations, we find that it is still difficult to obtain the observed baryon asymmetry only through the gravitational baryogenesis without suffering from the gravitino problem.

  20. Anisotropic invariance in minisuperspace models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagoya, Javier; Sabido, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we introduce invariance under anisotropic transformations to cosmology. This invariance is one of the key ingredients of the theory of quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point put forward by Hořava. We find that this new symmetry in the minisuperspace introduces characteristics to the model that can be relevant in the ultraviolet regime. For example, by canonical quantization we find a Schrödinger-type equation which avoids the problem of frozen time in quantum cosmology. For simple cases we obtain solutions to this quantum equation in a Kantowski–Sachs (KS) minisuperspace. At the classical level, we study KS and Friedmann–Robertson–Walker cosmologies, obtaining modifications to the solutions of general relativity that can be relevant in the early Universe.

  1. Anisotropic mechanical properties of graphene sheets from molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisotropic mechanical properties are observed for a sheet of graphene along different load directions. The anisotropic mechanical properties are attributed to the hexagonal structure of the unit cells of the graphene. Under the same tensile loads, the edge bonds bear larger load in the longitudinal mode (LM) than in the transverse mode (TM), which causes fracture sooner in LM than in TM. The Young's modulus and the third order elastic modulus for the LM are slightly larger than that for the TM. Simulation also demonstrates that, for both LM and TM, the loading and unloading stress-strain response curves overlap as long as the graphene is unloaded before the fracture point. This confirms that graphene sustains complete elastic and reversible deformation in the elongation process.

  2. Cloaking by shells with radially inhomogeneous anisotropic permittivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, V Yu; Pinkevych, I P; Sluckin, T J; Evans, D R

    2016-01-25

    We model electromagnetic cloaking of a spherical or cylindrical nanoparticle enclosed by an optically anisotropic and optically inhomogeneous symmetric shell, by examining its electric response in a quasi-static uniform electric field. When the components of the shell permittivity are radially anisotropic and power-law dependent (ε~rm) whereris distance to the shell center, and m a positive or negative exponent which can be varied), the problem is analytically tractable. Formulas are calculated for the degree of cloaking in the general case, allowing the determination of a dielectric condition for the shells to be used as an invisibility cloak. Ideal cloaking is known to require that homogeneous shells exhibit an infinite ratio of tangential and radial components of the shell permittivity, but for radially inhomogeneous shells ideal cloaking can occur even for finite values of this ratio. PMID:26832575

  3. Characterization of highly anisotropic three-dimensionally nanostructured surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Generalized ellipsometry, a non-destructive optical characterization technique, is employed to determine geometrical structure parameters and anisotropic dielectric properties of highly spatially coherent three-dimensionally nanostructured thin films grown by glancing angle deposition. The (piecewise) homogeneous biaxial layer model approach is discussed, which can be universally applied to model the optical response of sculptured thin films with different geometries and from diverse materials, and structural parameters as well as effective optical properties of the nanostructured thin films are obtained. Alternative model approaches for slanted columnar thin films, anisotropic effective medium approximations based on the Bruggeman formalism, are presented, which deliver results comparable to the homogeneous biaxial layer approach and in addition provide film constituent volume fraction parameters as well as depolarization or shape factors. Advantages of these ellipsometry models are discussed on the example ...

  4. Lower-frequency event-related desynchronization: a signature of late mismatch responses to sounds, which is reduced or absent in children with specific language impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, D.V.M.; Hardiman, Mervyn J.; Barry, Johanna G.

    2010-01-01

    Poor discrimination of non-linguistic sounds has been implicated in language-learning problems in children, but research evidence has been inconsistent. This study included 32 participants with specific language impairment (SLI) and 32 typically-developing controls aged 7 to 16 years. Frequency discrimination thresholds were estimated in a task where participants had to distinguish a higher-frequency tone from a 1000 Hz tone. Neurophysiological responses were assessed in an oddball paradigm. ...

  5. The Anisotropic Geometrodynamics For Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siparov, Sergey V.

    2009-05-01

    The classical geometrodynamics (GRT) and its modern features based on the use of the Fridman-Robertson-Walker type metrics are still unable to explain several important issues of extragalactic observations like flat rotation curves of the spiral galaxies, Tully-Fisher law, globular clusters behavior in comparisson to that of the stars belonging to the galactic plane etc. The chalenging problem of the Universe expansion acceleration stemming from the supernovae observations demands the existence of the repulsion forces which brings one to the choice between the cosmological constant and some quintessence. The popular objects of discussion are now still dark (matter and energy), nevertheless, they are supposed to correspond to more than 95% of the Universe which seems to be far from satisfactory. According to the equivalence principle we can not experimentally distinguish between the inertial forces and the gravitational ones. Since there exist the inertial forces depending on velocity (Coriolis), it seems plausible to explore the velocity dependent gravitational forces. From the mathematical point of view it means that we should use the anisotropic metric. It immediately turns out that the expression for the Einstein-Hilbert action changes in a natural way - contrary to the cases of f(R)-theories, additional scalar fields, arbitrary MOND functions etc.. We use the linear approximation for the metric and derive the generalized geodesics and the equation for the gravity force that contains not only the Newton-Einstein term. The relation between the obtained results and those of Lense-Thirring approach are discussed. The resulting anisotropic geometrodynamics includes all the results of the GRT and is used to give the explanation to the problems mentioned above. One of the impressive consequences is the possibility to explain the observed Hubble red shift not by the Doppler effect as usually but by the gravitational red shift originating from the metric anisotropy.

  6. Frontal hemodynamic responses to high frequency yoga breathing in schizophrenia: A functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant eBhargav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Frontal hemodynamic responses to high frequency yoga breathing technique - Kapalabhati (KB was compared between patients of schizophrenia (n =18; 14 males, 4 females and age-gender and education matched healthy subjects (n=18; 14 males, 4 females using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS.The diagnosis was confirmed by a psychiatrist using DSM IV. All patients except one received atypical anti-psychotics (one was on typical. They had obtained a stabilized state as evidenced by a steady unchanged medication from their psychiatrist for past 3 months or longer. They learned KB, among other yoga procedures, in the yoga retreat. KB was practiced at the rate of 120 times per minute for 1minute (min. Healthy subjects who were freshly learning yoga too were taught KB. Both the groups had no previous exposure to KB practice and the training was achieved over 2 weeks. A chest pressure transducer was used to monitor the frequency and intensity of the practice objectively. The frontal hemodynamic response in terms of the oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb, deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxyHb and total hemoglobin or blood volume (totalHb concentration was tapped for 5 min before, 1min during and for 5 min after KB.This was obtained in quiet room using a 16 channel functional near-infrared system (FNIR100-ACK-W, BIOPAC Systems, Inc, USA. Average of the eight channels for each side (right and left frontals was obtained for the three sessions. The changes in the levels of oxyHb, deoxyHb and blood volume for the three sessions were compared between the two groups using Independent samples t test.Within group comparison showed that increase in bilateral oxyHb and totalHb from the baseline was highly significant in healthy controls during KB (right oxyHb, p = 0.00; left oxyHb, p= 0.00 and right totalHb, p = 0.01; left totalHb, p = 0.00, whereas schizophrenia patients did not show any significant changes in the same on both the sides. On the other hand

  7. Power management and frequency regulation for microgrid and smart grid: A real-time demand response approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmousavi Kani, Seyyed Ali

    Future power systems (known as smart grid) will experience a high penetration level of variable distributed energy resources to bring abundant, affordable, clean, efficient, and reliable electric power to all consumers. However, it might suffer from the uncertain and variable nature of these generations in terms of reliability and especially providing required balancing reserves. In the current power system structure, balancing reserves (provided by spinning and non-spinning power generation units) usually are provided by conventional fossil-fueled power plants. However, such power plants are not the favorite option for the smart grid because of their low efficiency, high amount of emissions, and expensive capital investments on transmission and distribution facilities, to name a few. Providing regulation services in the presence of variable distributed energy resources would be even more difficult for islanded microgrids. The impact and effectiveness of demand response are still not clear at the distribution and transmission levels. In other words, there is no solid research reported in the literature on the evaluation of the impact of DR on power system dynamic performance. In order to address these issues, a real-time demand response approach along with real-time power management (specifically for microgrids) is proposed in this research. The real-time demand response solution is utilized at the transmission (through load-frequency control model) and distribution level (both in the islanded and grid-tied modes) to provide effective and fast regulation services for the stable operation of the power system. Then, multiple real-time power management algorithms for grid-tied and islanded microgrids are proposed to economically and effectively operate microgrids. Extensive dynamic modeling of generation, storage, and load as well as different controller design are considered and developed throughout this research to provide appropriate models and simulation

  8. Effects of the amplitude and frequency of salinity fluctuations on antioxidant responses in juvenile tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin O. Khairnar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To understand the tolerance of tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis, to varying salinities, the effects of the amplitude (2, 4, 6 and 8 g/L and frequency (2, 4 and 8 days of salinity fluctuations on the activities of antioxidant responses, including acidic phosphatase (ACP, alkaline phosphatase (AKP, catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD from antioxidant system in liver, muscle, gills and kidney, were investigated in this study. The results showed that the antioxidant responses of tongue sole were highly tissue-specific during the varying salinity fluctuations. In all tissues, ACP and AKP activity was found to be highest at moderate salinity fluctuations compared to the control, low and high salinity treatments (p<0.05. SOD and CAT activities had significant effect due to salinity fluctuations in all tissues (p<0.05, except in hepatic and renal tissues. Variations in branchial SOD activity proved that salinity fluctuations had greater impact on tongue sole at moderate and high fluctuating salinities compared to the control and low fluctuating salinities, whereas the branchial CAT activities showed contrasting trend. Further, cortisol levels were significantly affected in lower and higher salinity fluctuations. However, plasma cortisol levels remained low in moderate salinity fluctuations and control (p<0.05. Taken together, the results indicated that salinity fluctuations could effectively stimulate and enhance the antioxidant enzyme activity in the liver, kidney, gills and muscle of the juvenile tongue sole, thus effectively eliminating the excessive reactive oxygen species and minimizing the body damage in tongue sole or could be for any other euryhaline teleosts.

  9. Assessment of Surface Treatment on Fatigue Life of Cylinder Block for Linear Engine using Frequency Response Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Rahman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was focused on the finite element techniques to investigate the effect of surface treatment on the fatigue life of the vibrating cylinder block for new two-stroke free piston engine using random loading conditions. Motivation: An understanding of the effects related to the random loading is necessary to improve the ability of designers to accurately predict the fatigue behavior of the components in service. An internal combustion engine cylinder block is a high volume production component subjected to random loading. Problem statement: Proper optimization of this component that is critical to the engine fuel efficiency and more robustly pursued by the automotive industry in recent years. A detailed understanding of the applied loads and resulting stresses under in-service conditions is demanded. Approach: The finite element modeling and analysis were performed utilizing the computer aided design and finite element analysis codes respectively. In addition, the fatigue life prediction was carried out using finite element based fatigue analysis code. Aluminum alloys were considered as typical materials in this study. Results: The frequency response approach was applied to predict the fatigue life of cylinder block using different load histories. Based on the finite element results, it was observed that the fatigue life was significantly influenced for the nitriding treatment. The obtained results were indicated that the nitrided treatment produces longest life for all loading conditions. Conclusion: The nitriding process is one of the promising surface treatments to increase the fatigue life for aluminum alloys linear engine cylinder block.

  10. Non-contact atomic force microscopy: Stability criterion and dynamical responses of the shift of frequency and damping signal

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, G; Nony, L; Aimé, J P; Boisgard, Rodolphe; Nony, Laurent; Aim\\'{e}, Jean-Pierre

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a complete analysis of the behavior of a noncontact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM). We start with a review of the equations of motion of a tip interacting with a surface in which the stability conditions are first revisited for tapping mode. Adding the equations of automatic gain control (AGC), which insures constant amplitude of the oscillations in the NC-AFM, to the equations of motion of the tip, a new analytical stability criterion that involves proportional and integral gains of AGC is deduced. Stationary solutions for the shift of frequency and for the damping signal are obtained. Special attention is paid to the damping signal in order to clarify its physical origin. The theoretical results are then compared to those given by a virtual machine. The virtual machine is a set of equations solved numerically without any approximation. The virtual machine is of great help in understanding the dynamical behavior of the NC-AFM as images are recorded. Transient responses...

  11. Low-frequency ionospheric sounding with Narrow Bipolar Event lightning radio emissions: regular variabilities and solar-X-ray responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Jacobson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We present refinements of a method of ionospheric D-region sounding that makes opportunistic use of powerful (109–1011 W broadband lightning radio emissions in the low-frequency (LF; 30–300 kHz band. Such emissions are from "Narrow Bipolar Event" (NBE lightning, and they are characterized by a narrow (10-μs, simple emission waveform. These pulses can be used to perform time-delay reflectometry (or "sounding" of the D-region underside, at an effective LF radiated power exceeding by orders-of-magnitude that from man-made sounders. We use this opportunistic sounder to retrieve instantaneous LF ionospheric-reflection height whenever a suitable lightning radio pulse from a located NBE is recorded. We show how to correct for three sources of "regular" variability, namely solar zenith angle, radio-propagation range, and radio-propagation azimuth. The residual median magnitude of the noise in reflection height, after applying the regression corrections for the three regular variabilities, is on the order of 1 km. This noise level allows us to retrieve the D-region-reflector-height variation with solar X-ray flux density for intensity levels at and above an M-1 flare. The instantaneous time response is limited by the occurrence rate of NBEs, and the noise level in the height determination is typically in the range ±1 km.

  12. A new algorithm for anisotropic solutions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Chaisi; S D Maharaj

    2006-02-01

    We establish a new algorithm that generates a new solution to the Einstein field equations, with an anisotropic matter distribution, from a seed isotropic solution. The new solution is expressed in terms of integrals of an isotropic gravitational potential; and the integration can be completed exactly for particular isotropic seed metrics. A good feature of our approach is that the anisotropic solutions necessarily have an isotropic limit. We find two examples of anisotropic solutions which generalise the isothermal sphere and the Schwarzschild interior sphere. Both examples are expressed in closed form involving elementary functions only.

  13. Anisotropic inflation in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Lahiri, Sayantani

    2016-01-01

    We study anisotropic inflation with Gauss-Bonnet correction in presence of a massless vector field. In this scenario, exact anisotropic power-law inflation is realized when the inflaton potential, gauge coupling function and the Gauss-Bonnet coupling are exponential functions. We show that anisotropy becomes proportional to two slow-roll parameters of the theory and hence gets enhanced in presence of quadratic curvature corrections. The stability analysis reveals that anisotropic power-law solutions remain stable over a substantially large parameter region.

  14. Using COMSOL Multiphysics Software to Model Anisotropic Dielectric and Metamaterial Effects in Folded-Waveguide Traveling-Wave Tube Slow-Wave Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starinshak, David P.; Smith, Nathan D.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2008-01-01

    The electromagnetic effects of conventional dielectrics, anisotropic dielectrics, and metamaterials were modeled in a terahertz-frequency folded-waveguide slow-wave circuit. Results of attempts to utilize these materials to increase efficiency are presented.

  15. Liraglutide Treatment Is Associated with a Low Frequency and Magnitude of Antibody Formation with No Apparent Impact on Glycemic Response or Increased Frequency of Adverse Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buse, John B; Garber, Alan; Rosenstock, Julio;

    2011-01-01

    Context: Therapeutic proteins/peptides can produce immunogenic responses that may increase the risk of adverse events or reduce efficacy. Objective: The objectives were to measure and characterize antibody formation to liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, to investigate the...

  16. Variably saturated flow described with the anisotropic Lattice Boltzmann methods

    OpenAIRE

    Ginzburg, I.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the numerical solution of highly nonlinear parabolic equations with Lattice Boltzmann techniques. They are first developed for generic advection and anisotropic dispersion equations (AADE). Collision configurations handle the anisotropic diffusion forms by using either anisotropic eigenvalue sets or anisotropic equilibrium functions. The coordinate transformation from the orthorhombic (rectangular) discretization grid to the cuboid computational grid is equivalen...

  17. The in-plane anisotropic magnetic damping of ultrathin epitaxial Co{sub 2}FeAl film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Shuang [State Key Laboratory of Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Heibei Key Laboratory of Optic-Electronic Information and Materials, College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Yan, Wei; Nie, Shuaihua; Zhao, Jianhua; Zhang, Xinhui, E-mail: xinhuiz@semi.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-08-15

    The in-plane orientation-dependent effective damping of ultrathin Co{sub 2}FeAl film epitaxially grown on GaAs(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been investigated by employing the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TR-MOKE) measurements. It is found that the interface-induced uniaxial anisotropy is favorable for precession response and the anisotropy of precession frequency is mainly determined by this uniaxial anisotropy, while the magnetic relaxation time and damping factor exhibit the fourfold anisotropy at high-field regime. The field-independent anisotropic damping factor obtained at high fields indicates that the effective damping shows an intrinsic fourfold anisotropy for the epitaxial Co{sub 2}FeAl thin films.

  18. Controlling the high frequency response of H2 by ultra-short tailored laser pulses: A time-dependent configuration interaction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We combine the stochastic pulse optimization (SPO) scheme with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles method in order to control the high frequency response of a simple molecular model system to a tailored femtosecond laser pulse. For this purpose, we use H2 treated in the fixed nuclei approximation. The SPO scheme, as similar genetic algorithms, is especially suited to control highly non-linear processes, which we consider here in the context of high harmonic generation. Here, we will demonstrate that SPO can be used to realize a “non-harmonic” response of H2 to a laser pulse. Specifically, we will show how adding low intensity side frequencies to the dominant carrier frequency of the laser pulse and stochastically optimizing their contribution can create a high-frequency spectral signal of significant intensity, not harmonic to the carrier frequency. At the same time, it is possible to suppress the harmonic signals in the same spectral region, although the carrier frequency is kept dominant during the optimization

  19. Controlling the high frequency response of H{sub 2} by ultra-short tailored laser pulses: A time-dependent configuration interaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schönborn, Jan Boyke; Saalfrank, Peter; Klamroth, Tillmann, E-mail: klamroth@uni-potsdam.de [Institut für Chemie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2016-01-28

    We combine the stochastic pulse optimization (SPO) scheme with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles method in order to control the high frequency response of a simple molecular model system to a tailored femtosecond laser pulse. For this purpose, we use H{sub 2} treated in the fixed nuclei approximation. The SPO scheme, as similar genetic algorithms, is especially suited to control highly non-linear processes, which we consider here in the context of high harmonic generation. Here, we will demonstrate that SPO can be used to realize a “non-harmonic” response of H{sub 2} to a laser pulse. Specifically, we will show how adding low intensity side frequencies to the dominant carrier frequency of the laser pulse and stochastically optimizing their contribution can create a high-frequency spectral signal of significant intensity, not harmonic to the carrier frequency. At the same time, it is possible to suppress the harmonic signals in the same spectral region, although the carrier frequency is kept dominant during the optimization.

  20. Anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations at the large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, You

    One of the fundamental questions in the phenomenology of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is what the properties of matter are at the extreme densities and temperatures where quarks and gluons are in a new state of matter, the so-called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Collisions of high-energy heavy-ions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), allow us to create and study the properties of such a system in the laboratory. Anisotropic flow (vn) is strong evidence for the existence of QGP, and has been described as one of the most important observations measured in the ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. In this thesis, the anisotropic flow of not only charged particles but also identified particles are presented. In addition, the investigations of correlations and fluctuations of both flow angle (symmetry plane) and magnitude were discussed. The main goal of this thesis is to understand the nature of anisotropic flow and its response to the initial geometry of the created system as well as its fluctuations.

  1. Spatial interpolation approach based on IDW with anisotropic spatial structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Duan, Ping; Sheng, Yehua; Lv, Haiyang

    2015-12-01

    In many interpolation methods, with its simple interpolation principle, Inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation is one of the most common interpolation method. There are anisotropic spatial structures with actual geographical spatial phenomenon. When the IDW interpolation is used, anisotropic spatial structures should be considered. Geostatistical theory has a characteristics of exploring anisotropic spatial structures. In this paper, spatial interpolation approach based on IDW with anisotropic spatial structures is proposed. The DEM data is tested in this paper to prove reliability of the IDW interpolation considering anisotropic spatial structures. Experimental results show that IDW interpolation considering anisotropic spatial structures can improve interpolation precision when sampling data has anisotropic spatial structures feature.

  2. Fabrication of anisotropic multifunctional colloidal carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerri, Huda A.

    The field of colloidal assembly has grown tremendously in recent years, although the direct or template-assisted methods used to fabricate complex colloidal constructions from monodisperse micro- and nanoparticles have been generally demonstrated on model materials. In this work, novel core particle syntheses, particle functionalizations and bottom-up assembly techniques are presented to create functional colloidal devices. Using particle lithography, high-information colloidal vectors have been developed and modified with imaging and targeting agents. Localized nanoscale patches have been reliably positioned on microparticles to serve as foundations for further chemical or physical modifications. Site-specific placement of RGD targeting ligands has been achieved in these lithographed patches. Preferential uptake of these targeted vectors by RGD-specific 3T3 fibroblasts was verified using confocal laser scanning microscopy. A transition was made from the functionalization of model imaging core particles to the lithography of colloidal cartridges, in an effort to construct colloidal syringes with specialized, programmable release profiles. A variety of functional, pH-sensitive fluorescent cores were engineered to respond to solution conditions. When triggered, the diverse composite core microparticles and reservoir microcapsules released embedded fluorescent moieties such as dye molecules, and fluorophore-conjugated nanoparticles. The microcapsules, created using layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte deposition on sacrificial templates, were selectively modified with a robust coating. The pH-responsive anisotropic reservoir microcapsules were extremely stable in solution, and exhibited a "Lazarus" functionality of rehydrating to their original state following desiccation. A snapshot of focused-release of core constituents through the lone opening in colloidal monotremes has been obtained by anisotropically-functionalizing degradable cores with barrier shells. Additionally

  3. Acoustic propagation through anisotropic internal wave fields: Transmission loss, cross-range coherence, and horizontal refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Roger; Finette, Steven

    2002-02-01

    Results of a computer simulation study are presented for acoustic propagation in a shallow water, anisotropic ocean environment. The water column is characterized by random volume fluctuations in the sound speed field that are induced by internal gravity waves, and this variability is superimposed on a dominant summer thermocline. Both the internal wave field and resulting sound speed perturbations are represented in three-dimensional (3D) space and evolve in time. The isopycnal displacements consist of two components: a spatially diffuse, horizontally isotropic component and a spatially localized contribution from an undular bore (i.e., a solitary wave packet or solibore) that exhibits horizontal (azimuthal) anisotropy. An acoustic field is propagated through this waveguide using a 3D parabolic equation code based on differential operators representing wide-angle coverage in elevation and narrow-angle coverage in azimuth. Transmission loss is evaluated both for fixed time snapshots of the environment and as a function of time over an ordered set of snapshots which represent the time-evolving sound speed distribution. Horizontal acoustic coherence, also known as transverse or cross-range coherence, is estimated for horizontally separated points in the direction normal to the source-receiver orientation. Both transmission loss and spatial coherence are computed at acoustic frequencies 200 and 400 Hz for ranges extending to 10 km, a cross-range of 1 km, and a water depth of 68 m. Azimuthal filtering of the propagated field occurs for this environment, with the strongest variations appearing when propagation is parallel to the solitary wave depressions of the thermocline. A large anisotropic degradation in horizontal coherence occurs under the same conditions. Horizontal refraction of the acoustic wave front is responsible for the degradation, as demonstrated by an energy gradient analysis of in-plane and out-of-plane energy transfer. The solitary wave packet is

  4. Theoretical equation for frequency responses of thyristor-controlled reactor; Thyristor seigyo reactor no shuhasu tokusei ni taisuru rironshiki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakimoto, N.; Nakamura, M.; Nagai, T. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    In power systems, power electronics apparatuses such as static var compensators (SVC) and thyristor-controlled series capacitors (TCSC) have been introduced. SVC and TCSC both consist of a thyristor-controlled reactor (TCR) in parallel with capacitor banks. By adjusting the current through the reactor with the thyristors, we can change their reactances at a fundamental frequency. However, their admittances at other frequencies are important in studies of harmonic resonance and subsynchronous resonance. The admittance of a capacitor is clear, so we study that of TCR. First, we calculate its admittance by superimposing a small voltage of a frequency on the fundamental voltage, and then extracting the current change of the frequency. The conventional theoretical equations prove to be applicable only to the fundamental and the harmonic frequencies. TCR has conductance, and it can take negative. values at other frequencies. We derive a theoretical equation applicable to general frequencies. The admittance is a function of the frequency and the firing angle. For the harmonic frequencies, it also depends on the phase difference between the fundamental and superimposed voltages. Lastly, we compare it with the simulation result to show the validity of the theoretical equation. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Theory of Compton scattering by anisotropic electrons

    OpenAIRE

    Poutanen, Juri; Vurm, Indrek

    2010-01-01

    Compton scattering plays an important role in various astrophysical objects such as accreting black holes and neutron stars, pulsars, and relativistic jets, clusters of galaxies as well as the early Universe. In most of the calculations it is assumed that the electrons have isotropic angular distribution in some frame. However, there are situations where the anisotropy may be significant due to the bulk motions, or anisotropic cooling by synchrotron radiation, or anisotropic source of seed so...

  6. Phase space analysis in anisotropic optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Ana Leonor; Chumakov, Sergey M.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    1995-01-01

    From the minimal action principle follows the Hamilton equations of evolution for geometric optical rays in anisotropic media. As in classical mechanics of velocity-dependent potentials, the velocity and the canonical momentum are not parallel, but differ by an anisotropy vector potential, similar to that of linear electromagnetism. Descartes' well known diagram for refraction is generalized and a factorization theorem holds for interfaces between two anisotropic media.

  7. Anisotropic rectangular metric for polygonal surface remeshing

    KAUST Repository

    Pellenard, Bertrand

    2013-06-18

    We propose a new method for anisotropic polygonal surface remeshing. Our algorithm takes as input a surface triangle mesh. An anisotropic rectangular metric, defined at each triangle facet of the input mesh, is derived from both a user-specified normal-based tolerance error and the requirement to favor rectangle-shaped polygons. Our algorithm uses a greedy optimization procedure that adds, deletes and relocates generators so as to match two criteria related to partitioning and conformity.

  8. Rainbow metric from quantum gravity: anisotropic cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Assanioussi, Mehdi; Dapor, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a construction of effective cosmological models which describe the propagation of a massive quantum scalar field on a quantum anisotropic cosmological spacetime. Each obtained effective model is represented by a rainbow metric in which particles of distinct momenta propagate on different classical geometries. Our analysis shows that upon certain assumptions and conditions on the parameters determining such anisotropic models, we surprisingly obtain a unique deformatio...

  9. Anisotropic cosmological solutions in massive vector theories

    OpenAIRE

    Heisenberg, Lavinia; Kase, Ryotaro; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    In beyond-generalized Proca theories including the extension to theories higher than second order, we study the role of a spatial component $v$ of a massive vector field on the anisotropic cosmological background. We show that, as in the case of the isotropic cosmological background, there is no additional ghostly degrees of freedom associated with the Ostrogradski instability. In second-order generalized Proca theories we find the existence of anisotropic solutions on which the ratio between...

  10. Anisotropic Stars: Exact Solutions and Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Dev, Krsna; Gleiser, Marcelo

    2004-01-01

    I report on recent work concerning the existence and stability of self-gravitating spheres with anisotropic pressure. After presenting new exact solutions, Chandrasekhar's variational formalism for radial perturbations is generalized to anisotropic objects and applied to investigate their stability. It is shown that anisotropy can not only support stars of mass M and radius R with 2M/R > 8/9 and arbitrarily large surface redshifts, but that stable configurations exist for values of the adiaba...

  11. Anisotropic surface tension of buckled fluid membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Solid sheets and fluid membranes exhibit buckling under lateral compression. Here, it is revealed that fluid membranes have anisotropic buckling surface tension contrary to solid sheets. Surprisingly, the surface tension perpendicular to the buckling direction shows stronger dependence than that parallel to it. Our theoretical predictions are supported by numerical simulations of a meshless membrane model. This anisotropic tension can be used to measure the membrane bending rigidity. It is al...

  12. Highly anisotropic elements for acoustic pentamode applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layman, Christopher N; Naify, Christina J; Martin, Theodore P; Calvo, David C; Orris, Gregory J

    2013-07-12

    Pentamode metamaterials are a class of acoustic metafluids that are characterized by a divergence free modified stress tensor. Such materials have an unconventional anisotropic stiffness and isotropic mass density, which allow themselves to mimic other fluid domains. Here we present a pentamode design formed by an oblique honeycomb lattice and producing customizable anisotropic properties. It is shown that anisotropy in the stiffness can exceed 3 orders of magnitude, and that it can be realistically tailored for transformation acoustic applications. PMID:23889408

  13. Anisotropic fluid spheres in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure is developed to find static solutions for anisotropic fluid spheres from known static solutions for perfect fluid spheres. The method is used to obtain four exact analytical solutions of Einstein's equations for spherically symmetric self-gravitating distribution of anisotropic matter. The solutions are matched to the Schwarzschild exterior metric. The physical features of one of the solutions are briefly discussed. Many previously known perfect fluid solutions are derived as particular cases. (author)

  14. On the anisotropic elastic properties of hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, J. L.; Ukraincik, K.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the isotropic elastic moduli on polycrystalline specimens of hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite are compared with elastic constants measured directly from single crystals of fluorapatite in order to derive a set of pseudo single crystal elastic constants for hydroxyapatite. The stiffness coefficients thus derived are given. The anisotropic and isotropic elastic properties are then computed and compared with similar properties derived from experimental observations of the anisotropic behavior of bone.

  15. Simulating the Radio-Frequency Dielectric Response of Relaxor Ferroelectrics: Combination of Coarse-Grained Hamiltonians and Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geneste, Grégory; Bellaiche, L.; Kiat, Jean-Michel

    2016-06-01

    The radio-frequency dielectric response of the lead-free Ba (Zr0.5Ti0.5)O3 relaxor ferroelectric is simulated using a coarse-grained Hamiltonian. This concept, taken from real-space renormalization group theories, allows us to depict the collective behavior of correlated local modes gathered in blocks. Free-energy barriers for their thermally activated collective hopping are deduced from this ab initio-based approach, and used as input data for kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The resulting numerical scheme allows us to simulate the dielectric response for external field frequencies ranging from kHz up to a few tens of MHz for the first time and to demonstrate, e.g., that local (electric or elastic) random fields lead to the dielectric relaxation in the radio-frequency range that has been observed in relaxors.

  16. Transport theory in anisotropic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theory of particle scattering in anisotropic media is developed. That is, a medium in which the microstructure causes the mean free paths of the particles to become dependent on their direction of motion with respect to some fixed axis. The equation which results is similar to the normal, one-speed Boltzmann transport equation but has cross-sections which are functions of direction. This equation is solved for arbitrary cross-sectional dependence on direction in plane geometry. Four distinct problems are considered: (1) the particle distribution arising from a plane source in an infinite medium, (2) the albedo problem and Milne problem for a half-space and the corresponding 'thick slab' transmission problem, (3) solution of the integral form of the Boltzmann equation for a special case of cross-sectional dependence which leads to results similar to the well-known rod model and (4) the energy spectrum of particles slowing down from a high energy source by elastic collisions. In each of these four problems the influence of the cross-section is seen to be significant in comparison with the conventional constant cross-section results, to which they revert in this limit. Some suggestions about physical applications of the results are made. (author)

  17. Anisotropic diffusion-limited aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, M N; Hentschel, H G E; Family, F

    2004-06-01

    Using stochastic conformal mappings, we study the effects of anisotropic perturbations on diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) in two dimensions. The harmonic measure of the growth probability for DLA can be conformally mapped onto a constant measure on a unit circle. Here we map m preferred directions for growth to a distribution on the unit circle, which is a periodic function with m peaks in [-pi,pi) such that the angular width sigma of the peak defines the "strength" of anisotropy kappa= sigma(-1) along any of the m chosen directions. The two parameters (m,kappa) map out a parameter space of perturbations that allows a continuous transition from DLA (for small enough kappa ) to m needlelike fingers as kappa--> infinity. We show that at fixed m the effective fractal dimension of the clusters D(m,kappa) obtained from mass-radius scaling decreases with increasing kappa from D(DLA) approximately 1.71 to a value bounded from below by D(min) = 3 / 2. Scaling arguments suggest a specific form for the dependence of the fractal dimension D(m,kappa) on kappa for large kappa which compares favorably with numerical results. PMID:15244564

  18. Anisotropic pressure and hyperons in neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaksono, A

    2014-01-01

    We study the effects of anisotropic pressure on properties of the neutron stars with hyperons inside its core within the framework of extended relativistic mean field. It is found that the main effects of anisotropic pressure on neutron star matter is to increase the stiffness of the equation of state, which compensates for the softening of the EOS due to the hyperons. The maximum mass and redshift predictions of anisotropic neutron star with hyperonic core are quite compatible with the result of recent observational constraints if we use the parameter of anisotropic pressure model $h \\le 0.8$[1] and $\\Lambda \\le -1.15$ [2]. The radius of the corresponding neutron star at $M$=1.4 $M_\\odot$ is more than 13 km, while the effect of anisotropic pressure on the minimum mass of neutron star is insignificant. Furthermore, due to the anisotropic pressure in the neutron star, the maximum mass limit of higher than 2.1 $M_\\odot$ cannot rule out the presence of hyperons in the neutron star core.

  19. Smart microgrid hierarchical frequency control ancillary service provision based on virtual inertia concept: An integrated demand response and droop controlled distributed generation framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Detailed formulation of the microgrid static and dynamic securities based on droop control and virtual inertia concepts. • Constructing a novel objective function using frequency excursion and rate of change of frequency profiles. • Ensuring the microgrid security subject to the microgrid economic and environmental policies. • Coordinated management of demand response and droop controlled distributed generation resources. • Precise scheduling of day-ahead hierarchical frequency control ancillary services using a scenario based stochastic programming. - Abstract: Low inertia stack, high penetration levels of renewable energy source and great ratio of power deviations in a small power delivery system put microgrid frequency at risk of instability. On the basis of the close coupling between the microgrid frequency and system security requirements, procurement of adequate ancillary services from cost-effective and environmental friendly resources is a great challenge requests an efficient energy management system. Motivated by this need, this paper presents a novel energy management system that is aimed to coordinately manage the demand response and distributed generation resources. The proposed approach is carried out by constructing a hierarchical frequency control structure in which the frequency dependent control functions of the microgrid components are modeled comprehensively. On the basis of the derived modeling, both the static and dynamic frequency securities of an islanded microgrid are provided in primary and secondary control levels. Besides, to cope with the low inertia stack of islanded microgrids, novel virtual inertia concept is devised based on the precise modeling of droop controlled distributed generation resources. The proposed approach is applied to typical test microgrid. Energy and hierarchical reserve resource are scheduled precisely using a scenario-based stochastic programming methodology. Moreover, analyzing the

  20. Scalar particle creation in an anisotropic universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of quantized scalar field creation in an anisotropic spatially homogeneous background universe is reexamined from a Schroedinger-picture point of view. For each mode a complete set of orthonormal wave functions, psi/subN/, is obtained using the method of Salusti and Zirilli. These wave functions are valid at all times even if there is an initial cosmological singularity and depend only on the solution of the classical equation of motion. The wave functions are fixed completely by requiring the classical solution to have positive-frequency WKB form when the universe reaches the stage of adiabatic expansion. These wave functions are eigenfunctions of a conserved number operator which has the usual particle interpretation in the adiabatic regime. An intitial state near the singularity is chosen as a superposition of the wave functions, psi/subN/, and the particle number in the adiabatic regime is calculated. For plane-wave initial states, which follow the classical behavior near the singularity, the final particle number depends only on the parameters of the initial wave packet. For an initial state which instantaneously diagonalizes the Hamiltonian, an (arbitrary) initial time must be chosen. If the mode in question is in the adiabatic regime at that time almost no particle creation occurs. If it is not adiabatic, creation occurs and becomes infinite if the initial time is taken to be that of the singularity. This creation is a consequence of the failure of particle number to be well defined in this regime. Comparisons with other particle-creation studies are made