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Sample records for anisotropic frequency response

  1. Polarization-controlled anisotropic coding metamaterials at terahertz frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Shuo; Xu, Quan; Bao, Di; Du, Liangliang; Wan, Xiang; Tang, Wen Xuan; Ouyang, Chunmei; Zhou, Xiao Yang; Yuan, Hao; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili; Cheng, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials based on effective media have achieved a lot of unusual physics (e.g. negative refraction and invisibility cloaking) owing to their abilities to tailor the effective medium parameters that do not exist in nature. Recently, coding metamaterials have been suggested to control electromagnetic waves by designing the coding sequences of digital elements '0' and '1', which possess opposite phase responses. Here, we propose the concept of anisotropic coding metamaterial at terahertz frequencies, in which coding behaviors in different directions are dependent on the polarization status of terahertz waves. We experimentally demonstrate an ultrathin and flexible polarization-controlled anisotropic coding metasurface functioning in the terahertz regime using specially- designed coding elements. By encoding the elements with elaborately-designed digital sequences (in both 1 bit and 2 bits), the x- and y-polarized reflected waves can be deflected or diffused independently in three dimensions. The simulated f...

  2. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D' Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  3. Frequency Response Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Kosterev, Dmitry; Dai, T.

    2014-12-31

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

  4. The research of high-directive anisotropic magnetic metamaterial antenna loaded with frequency-selective surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yong-Zhi; Ran Li-Xin; Peng Liang; Wang Wei-Guang; Li Ting; Zhao Xu; Chen Qiu-Lin

    2009-01-01

    This paper uses a Computer Simulation Technology microwave studio to simulate the performance of a new highdirectivity anisotropic magnetic metamaterial antenna loaded with a frequency-selective surface. Frequency-selective surface with cross-dipole element has a great effect on the directivity, radiation pattern, and gain of such an antenna. The experimental results show that frequency-selective surface (FSS) significantly improve the radiation performance of anisotropic magnetic metamaterial antenna. For example, as a single anisotropic magnetic metamaterial antenna, half power beam width is 4 degrees in the H planes, and the gain of this antenna is 19.5dBi at 10GHz, achieving a 2.1 degree increment in half power beam width, and a 7.3dB gain increment by loading with the FSS reflector. The simulating results are consistent with our experimental results.

  5. Low frequency eigenmodes of thin anisotropic current sheets and Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Zelenyi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The eigenmodes of low frequency perturbations of thin anisotropic current sheets with a finite value of the normal magnetic field, are investigated in this paper. It is shown that two possible polarizations of symmetric and asymmetric modes (sausage and kink exist where the growth rate of instabilities is positive. In addition, we demonstrate that a tearing instability might have a positive growth rate in thin anisotropic current sheets. The class of relatively fast wavy flapping oscillations observed by Cluster is described. The main direction of wave motion coincides with the direction of the current and the typical velocity of this motion is comparable with the plasma drift velocity in the current sheet. The comparison of these characteristics with theoretical predictions of the model of anisotropic thin current sheets, demonstrates that, in principle, the theory adequately describes the observations.

  6. Linear and nonlinear optical response of spherical anisotropic semiconductor microcrystallites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaniah, Lavanya M.; Nair, Selvakumar V.; Rustagi, Kailash C.

    1989-12-01

    We present a phenomenological theory of the linear and nonlinear optical properties associated with the Fröhlich resonances of an optically anisotropic, spherical semiconductor crystallite. Using the Maxwell-Garnett approach, we calculate the effective dielectric function of a composite medium containing such crystallites. To study the effect of anisotropy, we take CdS and CdSe quantum dots as examples for the inclusions, and use a two-resonance model for the dielectric function. Even for randomly oriented inclusions, the Fröhlich resonances split as a result of anisotropic local-field corrections. At higher laser intensities, absorption saturation leads to bistability or tristability in the optical response of individual crystallites, while the response of the composite medium with randomly oriented inclusions shows multistability, with many intermediate branches. The nonlinear response of such a composite medium also exhibits a new kind of orientation-induced broadening of resonances. We also find that tristability is possible in another kind of inhomogeneous material, viz., a composite medium containing two types of isotropic spherical crystallites.

  7. Propagation of Partially Coherent Twisted Anisotropic Gaussian-Schell Model Beams in the Spatial-Frequency Domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡阳健; 林强

    2002-01-01

    The generalized Collins formula for partially coherent beams through axially non-symmetrical optical systems in the spatial-frequency domain is derived by means of the tensor method. Based on this formula, the tensor ABCD law in the spatial-frequency domain for partially coherent twisted anisotropic Gaussian-Schell model (GSM) beams is derived, which governs the transformation of the twisted anisotropic GSM beams in the spatialfrequency domain. An example of an application is provided.

  8. Modeling the anisotropic shock response of single-crystal RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luscher, Darby

    Explosives initiate under impacts whose energy, if distributed homogeneously throughout the material, translates to temperature increases that are insufficient to drive the rapid chemistry observed. Heterogeneous thermomechanical interactions at the meso-scale (i.e. between single-crystal and macroscale) leads to the formation of localized hot spots. Direct numerical simulations of mesoscale response can contribute to our understanding of hot spots if they include the relevant deformation mechanisms that are essential to the nonlinear thermomechanical response of explosive molecular crystals. We have developed a single-crystal model for the finite deformation thermomechanical response of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX). Because of the low symmetry of RDX, a complete description of nonlinear thermoelasticity requires a careful decomposition of free energy into components that represent the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) response and the coupling between isochoric deformation and both deviatoric and hydrostatic stresses. An equation-of-state (EOS) based on Debye theory that defines the PVT response was constructed using experimental data and density functional theory calculations. This EOS replicates the equilibrium states of phase transformation from alpha to gamma polymorphs observed in static high-pressure experiments. Lattice thermoelastic parameters defining the coupled isochoric free energy were obtained from molecular dynamics calculations and previous experimental data. Anisotropic crystal plasticity is modeled using Orowan's expression relating slip rate to dislocation density and velocity. Details of the theory will be presented followed by discussion of simulations of flyer plate impact experiments, including recent experiments diagnosed with in situ X-ray diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source. Impact conditions explored within the experimental effort have spanned shock pressures ranging from 1-10 GPa for several crystallographic orientations

  9. Low-frequency noise characterization of a magnetic field monitoring system using an anisotropic magnetoresistance

    CERN Document Server

    Mateos, I; Lobo, A

    2016-01-01

    A detailed study about magnetic sensing techniques based on anisotropic magnetoresistive sensors shows that the technology is suitable for low-frequency space applications like the eLISA mission. Low noise magnetic measurements at the sub-millihertz frequencies were taken by using different electronic noise reduction techniques in the signal conditioning circuit. We found that conventional modulation techniques reversing the sensor bridge excitation do not reduce the potential $1/f$ noise of the magnetoresistors, so alternative methods such as flipping and electro-magnetic feedback are necessary. In addition, a low-frequency noise analysis of the signal conditioning circuits has been performed in order to identify and minimize the different main contributions from the overall noise. The results for chip-scale magnetoresistances exhibit similar noise along the eLISA bandwidth ($0.1\\,{\\rm mHz}-1\\,{\\rm Hz}$) to the noise measured by means of the voluminous fluxgate magnetometers used in its precursor mission, kn...

  10. Nonlinear wave equation in frequency domain: accurate modeling of ultrafast interaction in anisotropic nonlinear media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hairun; Zeng, Xianglong; Zhou, Binbin;

    2013-01-01

    We interpret the purely spectral forward Maxwell equation with up to third-order induced polarizations for pulse propagation and interactions in quadratic nonlinear crystals. The interpreted equation, also named the nonlinear wave equation in the frequency domain, includes quadratic and cubic...... nonlinearities, delayed Raman effects, and anisotropic nonlinearities. The full potential of this wave equation is demonstrated by investigating simulations of solitons generated in the process of ultrafast cascaded second-harmonic generation. We show that a balance in the soliton delay can be achieved due...... the experimental knowledge of cascading nonlinear soliton pulse compression....

  11. High-frequency interaction-induced rototranslational wings of anisotropic nitrogen spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anisotropic rototranslational scattering spectra of nitrogen gas at high frequency up to 700 cm-1 for several temperatures and from low densities are analyzed in terms of new site-site (M3SV) intermolecular potential and interaction-induced pair polarizability models, using quantum spectral shapes computations. Our theoretical calculations take into account multipole contributions from the mean value and anisotropy of the dipole-dipole polarizability tensor α, two independent components of the dipole-octopole polarizability tensor E and dipole-dipole-quadrupole hyperpolarizability tensor B. The high-frequency wings are discussed in terms of the collision-induced rotational Rayleigh effect and estimates for the dipole-octopole polarizability |E 4| are obtained and checked with recent ab initio theoretical value. Good comparison is found in the frequency range 0-400 cm-1 between the theoretical and experimental spectra. When an exponential contribution [exp(-ν/ν 0)] with ν 0 = 425 cm-1 is considered to model very short-range light scattering mechanisms at room temperature, good agreement is found over the whole frequency range

  12. Experimental and theoretical analysis of THz-frequency, direction-dependent, phonon polariton modes in a subwavelength, anisotropic slab waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chengliang; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Jingjun; Nelson, Keith A; Werley, Christopher A

    2010-12-01

    Femtosecond optical pulses were used to generate THz-frequency phonon polariton waves in a 50 micrometer lithium niobate slab, which acts as a subwavelength, anisotropic planar waveguide. The spatial and temporal electric field profiles of the THz waves were recorded for different propagation directions using a polarization gating imaging system, and experimental dispersion curves were determined via a two-dimensional Fourier transform. Dispersion relations for an anisotropic slab waveguide were derived via analytical analysis and found to be in excellent agreement with all observed experimental modes. From the dispersion relations, we analyze the propagation-direction-dependent behavior, effective refractive index values, and generation efficiencies for THz-frequency modes in the subwavelength, anisotropic slab waveguide. PMID:21164986

  13. Enhanced high-frequency absorption of anisotropic Fe3O4/graphene nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yichao; Zeng, Min; Liu, Jue; Tang, Wukui; Dong, Hangrong; Xia, Ruozhou; Yu, Ronghai

    2016-05-01

    Anisotropic Fe3O4 nanoparticle and a series of its graphene composites have been successfully prepared as high-frequency absorbers. The crystal structure, morphology and magnetic property of the samples were detailed characterized through X-ray diffractometer (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The high-frequency absorbing performance of the composites is evaluated within 2.0–18.0 GHz. Combining reduced graphene oxide (RGO) to Fe3O4 helps to adjust the permittivity and permeability of the composite, balance the dielectric loss and magnetic loss, consequently improve the absorbing performance in view of the impedance matching characteristic. The optimal reflection loss of the pure Fe3O4 sample reaches ‑38.1 dB with a thickness of 1.7 mm, and it increases to ‑65.1 dB for the sample grafted with 3 wt.% RGO. The addition of proper content of RGO both improves the reflection loss and expands the absorbing bandwidth. This work not only opens a new method and an idea for tuning the electromagnetic properties and enhancing the capacity of high-efficient absorbers, but also broadens the application of such kinds of lightweight absorbing materials frameworks.

  14. Anisotropic nanolaminated CoNiFe cores integrated into microinductors for high-frequency dc-dc power conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jooncheol; Kim, Minsoo; Kim, Jung-Kwun; Herrault, Florian; Allen, Mark G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a rectangular, anisotropic nanolaminated CoNiFe core that possesses a magnetically hard axis in the long geometric axis direction. Previously, we have developed nanolaminated cores comprising tens to hundreds of layers of 300-1000 nm thick metallic alloys (i.e. Ni80Fe20 or Co44Ni37Fe19) based on sequential electrodeposition, demonstrating suppressed eddy-current losses at MHz frequencies. In this work, magnetic anisotropy was induced to the nanolaminated CoNiFe cores by applying an external magnetic field (50-100 mT) during CoNiFe film electrodeposition. The fabricated cores comprised tens to hundreds of layers of 500-1000 nm thick CoNiFe laminations that have the hard-axis magnetic property. Packaged in a 22-turn solenoid test inductor, the anisotropic core showed 10% increased effective permeability and 25% reduced core power losses at MHz operation frequency, compared to an isotropic core of the identical geometry. Operating the anisotropic nanolaminated CoNiFe core in a step-down dc-dc converter (15 V input to 5 V output) demonstrated 81% converter efficiency at a switching frequency of 1.1 MHz and output power of 6.5 W. A solenoid microinductor with microfabricated windings integrated with the anisotropic nanolaminated CoNiFe core was fabricated, demonstrating a constant inductance of 600 nH up to 10 MHz and peak quality factor exceeding 20 at 4 MHz. The performance of the microinductor with the anisotropic nanolaminated CoNiFe core is compared with other previously reported microinductors.

  15. Shock Compression of Beryllium Single Crystals: Time-Dependent, Anisotropic Elastic-Plastic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winey, J.; Gupta, Y.

    2013-06-01

    To gain insight into inelastic deformation mechanisms in shocked Be single crystals, wave propagation simulations were performed for crystals shocked along the c-axis, a-axis, and other crystal directions to peak stresses reaching 7 GPa. The simulations utilized a time-dependent, anisotropic material model that incorporated dislocation dynamics and deformation twinning based descriptions of inelastic deformation. The simulation results showed good qualitative agreement with the measured wave profiles, including features arising from wave mode coupling due to the highly anisotropic inelastic response of Be. The measured wave profiles can be understood in terms of dislocation slip along basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes, together with deformation twinning. Our results provide insight into the complex nature of inelastic deformation in shocked Be, and are also expected to be valuable for understanding the anisotropic inelastic response of analogous hcp metals subjected to shock compression. Work supported by ARL and DOE/NNSA.

  16. Investigation on broadband propagation characteristic of terahertz electromagnetic wave in anisotropic magnetized plasma in frequency and time domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Yuan; Han, Yiping, E-mail: yphan@xidian.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Ai, Xia [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Test physics and Numerical Mathematical, Beijing 100076 (China); Liu, Xiuxiang [Science and Technology on Space Physics Laboratory, Beijing 100076 (China)

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we investigate the propagation of terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave in an anisotropic magnetized plasma by JE convolution-finite difference time domain method. The anisotropic characteristic of the plasma, which leads to right-hand circularly polarized (RCP) and right-hand circularly polarized (LCP) waves, has been taken into account. The interaction between electromagnetic waves and magnetized plasma is illustrated by reflection and transmission coefficients for both RCP and LCP THz waves. The effects of both the magnetized plasma thickness and the external magnetized field are analyzed and numerical results demonstrate that the two factors could influence the THz wave greatly. It is worthy to note that besides the reflection and transmission coefficients in the frequency domain, the waveform of the electric field in the time domain varying with thicknesses and external magnetic fields for different polarized direction has been studied.

  17. Finite frequency traveltime sensitivity kernels for acoustic anisotropic media: Angle dependent bananas

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, Ramzi

    2013-08-19

    Anisotropy is an inherent character of the Earth subsurface. It should be considered for modeling and inversion. The acoustic VTI wave equation approximates the wave behavior in anisotropic media, and especially it\\'s kinematic characteristics. To analyze which parts of the model would affect the traveltime for anisotropic traveltime inversion methods, especially for wave equation tomography (WET), we drive the sensitivity kernels for anisotropic media using the VTI acoustic wave equation. A Born scattering approximation is first derived using the Fourier domain acoustic wave equation as a function of perturbations in three anisotropy parameters. Using the instantaneous traveltime, which unwraps the phase, we compute the kernels. These kernels resemble those for isotropic media, with the η kernel directionally dependent. They also have a maximum sensitivity along the geometrical ray, which is more realistic compared to the cross-correlation based kernels. Focusing on diving waves, which is used more often, especially recently in waveform inversion, we show sensitivity kernels in anisotropic media for this case.

  18. Algebraic processing technique for extracting frequency-dependent shear-wave splitting parameters in an anisotropic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kai-Feng; Zeng, Xin-Wu

    2011-06-01

    Based on the dual source cumulative rotation technique in the time-domain proposed by Zeng and MacBeth (1993), a new algebraic processing technique for extracting shear-wave splitting parameters from multi-component VSP data in frequency-dependent medium has been developed. By using this dual source cumulative rotation technique in the frequency-domain (DCTF), anisotropic parameters, including polarization direction of the shear-waves and timedelay between the fast and slow shear-waves, can be estimated for each frequency component in the frequency domain. It avoids the possible error which comes from using a narrow-band filter in the current commonly used method. By using synthetic seismograms, the feasibility and validity of the technique was tested and a comparison with the currently used method was also given. The results demonstrate that the shear-wave splitting parameters frequency dependence can be extracted directly from four-component seismic data using the DCTF. In the presence of larger scale fractures, substantial frequency dependence would be found in the seismic frequency range, which implies that dispersion would occur at seismic frequencies. Our study shows that shear-wave anisotropy decreases as frequency increases.

  19. Anisotropic surface roughness enhances the bending response of ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoimenov, Boyko L.; Rossiter, Jonathan M.; Mukai, Toshiharu

    2007-01-01

    Demands from the fields of bio-medical engineering and biologically-inspired robotics motivate a growing interest in actuators with properties similar to biological muscle, including ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMC), the focus of this study. IPMC actuators consist of an ion-conductive polymer membrane, coated with thin metal electrodes on both sides and bend when voltage is applied. Some of the advantages of IPMC actuators are their softness, lack of moving parts, easy miniaturization, light weight and low actuation voltage. When used in bio-mimetic robotic applications, such as a snake-like swimming robot, locomotion speed can be improved by increasing the bending amplitude. However, it cannot be improved much by increasing the driving voltage, because of water electrolysis. To enhance the bending response of IPMCs we created a "preferred" bending direction by anisotropic surface modification. Introduction of anisotropic roughness with grooves across the length of the actuator improved the bending response by a factor of 2.1. Artificially introduced cracks on the electrodes in direction, in which natural cracks form by bending, improved bending response by a factor of 1.6. Anisotropic surface modification is an effective method to enhance the bending response of IPMC actuators and does not compromise their rigidity under loads perpendicular to the bending plane.

  20. Gaseous bubble oscillations in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids under influence of high-frequency acoustic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golykh, R. N.

    2016-06-01

    Progress of technology and medicine dictates the ever-increasing requirements (heat resistance, corrosion resistance, strength properties, impregnating ability, etc.) for non-Newtonian fluids and materials produced on their basis (epoxy resin, coating materials, liquid crystals, etc.). Materials with improved properties obtaining is possible by modification of their physicochemical structure. One of the most promising approaches to the restructuring of non-Newtonian fluids is cavitation generated by high-frequency acoustic vibrations. The efficiency of cavitation in non-Newtonian fluid is determined by dynamics of gaseous bubble. Today, bubble dynamics in isotropic non-Newtonian fluids, in which cavitation bubble shape remains spherical, is most full investigated, because the problem reduces to ordinary differential equation for spherical bubble radius. However, gaseous bubble in anisotropic fluids which are most wide kind of non-Newtonian fluids (due to orientation of macromolecules) deviates from spherical shape due to viscosity dependence on shear rate direction. Therefore, the paper presents the mathematical model of gaseous bubble dynamics in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids. The model is based on general equations for anisotropic non-Newtonian fluid flow. The equations are solved by asymptotic decomposition of fluid flow parameters. It allowed evaluating bubble size and shape evolution depending on rheological properties of liquid and acoustic field characteristics.

  1. Enhanced response and sensitivity of self-corrugated graphene sensors with anisotropic charge distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Seung Yol Jeong; Sooyeon Jeong; Sang Won Lee; Sung Tae Kim; Daeho Kim; Hee Jin Jeong; Joong Tark Han; Kang-Jun Baeg; Sunhye Yang; Mun Seok Jeong; Geon-Woong Lee

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a high-performance molecular sensor using self-corrugated chemically modified graphene as a three dimensional (3D) structure that indicates anisotropic charge distribution. This is capable of room-temperature operation, and, in particular, exhibiting high sensitivity and reversible fast response with equilibrium region. The morphology consists of periodic, “cratered” arrays that can be formed by condensation and evaporation of graphene oxide (GO) solution on interdigitated electr...

  2. Effective dielectric response of graded composite materials containing anisotropic particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sang Zhi-Fang; Li Zhen-Ya

    2005-01-01

    The effective dielectric response of granular composites, in which spheroidal particles with graded shells are randomly distributed in a host matrix, is investigated. General expressions for the effective dielectric constant of the composites and partial resonant condition are obtained in the dilute limit by use of a quasi-static approximation. In particular, spheroidal particles with a power-law gradation profile in the shells are studied in detail. We find that, by adjusting the dielectric gradient profile in the shells, the shape and structure of particles, it is possible to enhance the effective dielectric constant of the composite and to realize partial resonance. Under the partial resonant conditions,the coated spheroidal particles with graded shells within the host matrix can be regarded as equivalent homogeneous spheroids embedded in the same host. The equivalent spheroids have the same dielectric constant as the original cores and semiaxes equal to those of the original shells: i.e., the partial resonant system behaves as if the cores of the particles were enlarged and the shells were absent.

  3. Frequency invariant beamforming via jointly optimizing spatial and frequency responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Shefeng; MA Yuanliang

    2005-01-01

    An approach to designing broadband frequency invariant beamformer based on finite impulse response (FIR) filters via jointly optimizing the spatial and frequency responses is proposed. The beam responses are jointly optimized to satisfy both spatial and frequency domain specifications by designing a bank of FIR filters corresponding to the input channels. It minimizes the maximum error between the designed beam pattern and the desired one in the mainlobe area over the working frequency band, and guarantees the sidelobes in the passband and the beam magnitude responses in the stopband to be below some given threshold values. White noise gain constraint is used to improve the robustness of the beamformer against random errors. The beam patterns are expressed as a linear function of FIR filter impulse responses, and the design problem is formulated as the second-order cone programming (SOCP), which can be solved efficiently via the well-established interior point methods. Results of computer simulation and lake-experiment for a twelve-element semicircular array demonstrate superior performance of this approach in comparison to the existing approaches.

  4. Modelling ultrasonic array signals in multilayer anisotropic materials using the angular spectrum decomposition of plane wave responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasonic arrays have seen increasing use for the characterisation of composite materials. In this paper, ultrasonic wave propagation in multilayer anisotropic materials has been modelled using plane wave and angular spectrum decomposition techniques. Different matrix techniques, such as the stiffness matrix method and the transfer matrix method, are used to calculate the reflection and transmission coefficients of ultrasonic plane waves in the considered media. Then, an angular decomposition technique is used to derive the bounded beams from finite-width ultrasonic array elements from the plane wave responses calculated earlier. This model is considered to be an analytical exact solution for the problem; hence the diffraction of waves in such composite materials can be calculated for different incident angles for a very wide range of frequencies. This model is validated against experimental measurements using the Full-Matrix Capture (FMC) of array data in both a homogeneous isotropic material, i.e. aluminium, and an inhomogeneous multilayer anisotropic material, i.e. a carbon fibre reinforced composite

  5. Slot Machine Response Frequency Predicts Pathological Gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob; Rømer Thomsen, Kristine; Møller, Arne;

    2013-01-01

    Slot machines are among the most addictive forms of gambling, and pathological gambling slot machine players represent the largest group of treatment seekers, accounting for 35% to 93% of the population. Pathological gambling sufferers have significantly higher response frequency (games / time......) on slot machines compared with non-problem gamblers, which may suggest increased reinforcement of the gambling behavior in pathological gambling. However, to date it is unknown whether or not the increased response frequency in pathological gambling is associated with symptom severity of the disorder....... This study tested the hypothesis that response frequency is associated with symptom severity in pathological gambling. We tested response frequency among twenty-two pathological gambling sufferers and twenty-one non-problem gamblers on a commercially available slot machine, and screened for pathological...

  6. Terahertz-frequency dielectric response of liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Møller, Uffe; Cooke, David

    -induced dipole moments. In the polar liquid water the fastest relaxational dynamics is found at terahertz frequencies, just below the first intermolecular vibrational and librational modes. In this presentation we will discuss optical terahertz spectroscopic techniques for measurement of the full dielectric......The dielectric response of liquids spans many decades in frequency. The dielectric response of a polar liquid is typically determined by relaxational dynamics of the dipolar moments of the liquid. In contrast, the dielectric response of a nonpolar liquid is determined by much weaker collision...

  7. TRIGA reactor dynamics: Frequency response tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the results of frequency response tests conducted on ITU TRIGA Reactor are presented. To conduct the experiments, a special 'micro control rod' and its submersible stepping-motor drive mechanism was designed and constructed. The experiments cover a frequency range of 0.002 - 2 Hz., and 0.02, 4, 200 kW nominal power levels. Zero-power and at-power reactivity to % power transfer functions are presented as gain, and phase shift vs. frequency diagrams. Low power response is in close agreement with the point reactor zero-power transfer function. Response at 200 kW is studied with the help of a Nyquist diagram, and found to be stable. An elaboration on the main features of the feedback mechanism is also given. Power to reactivity feedback was measured to be just about 1.5 cent / % power change. (authors)

  8. Autonomous Demand Response for Primary Frequency Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Matt; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mattix, S.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2012-02-28

    The research documented within this report examines the use of autonomous demand response to provide primary frequency response in an interconnected power grid. The work builds on previous studies in several key areas: it uses a large realistic model (i.e., the interconnection of the western United States and Canada); it establishes a set of metrics that can be used to assess the effectiveness of autonomous demand response; and it independently adjusts various parameters associated with using autonomous demand response to assess effectiveness and to examine possible threats or vulnerabilities associated with the technology.

  9. Symmetry Algebra of the Planar Anisotropic Quantum Harmonic Oscillator with Rational Ratio of Frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Bonatsos, Dennis; Kolokotronis, P; Lenis, D; Bonatsos, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    The symmetry algebra of the two-dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator with rational ratio of frequencies is identified as a non-linear extension of the u(2) algebra. The finite dimensional representation modules of this algebra are studied and the energy eigenvalues are determined using algebraic methods of general applicability to quantum superintegrable systems.

  10. Analysis of the anisotropic viscoplastic-damage response of composite laminates - Continuum basis and computational algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleeb, A. F.; Wilt, T. E.

    1993-01-01

    The mathematical structure underlying the rate equations of a recently-developed constitutive model for the coupled viscoplastic-damage response of anisotropic composites is critically examined. In this regard, a number of tensor projection operators have been identified, and their properties were exploited to enable the development of a general computational framework for their numerical implementation using the Euler fully-implicit integration method. In particular, this facilitated (i) the derivation of explicit expressions of the (consistent) material tangent stiffnesses that are valid for both three-dimensional as well as subspace (e.g. plane stress) formulations, (ii) the implications of the symmetry or unsymmetry properties of these tangent operators from a thermodynamic standpoint, and (iii) the development of an effective time-step control strategy to ensure accuracy and convergence of the solution. In addition, the special limiting case of inviscid elastoplasticity is treated. The results of several numerical simulations are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the schemes developed.

  11. Enhanced response and sensitivity of self-corrugated graphene sensors with anisotropic charge distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yol Jeong, Seung; Jeong, Sooyeon; Won Lee, Sang; Tae Kim, Sung; Kim, Daeho; Jin Jeong, Hee; Tark Han, Joong; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Yang, Sunhye; Seok Jeong, Mun; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a high-performance molecular sensor using self-corrugated chemically modified graphene as a three dimensional (3D) structure that indicates anisotropic charge distribution. This is capable of room-temperature operation, and, in particular, exhibiting high sensitivity and reversible fast response with equilibrium region. The morphology consists of periodic, “cratered” arrays that can be formed by condensation and evaporation of graphene oxide (GO) solution on interdigitated electrodes. Subsequent hydrazine reduction, the corrugated edge area of the graphene layers have a high electric potential compared with flat graphene films. This local accumulation of electrons interacts with a large number of gas molecules. The sensitivity of 3D-graphene sensors significantly increases in the atmosphere of NO2 gas. The intriguing structures have several advantages for straightforward fabrication on patterned substrates, high-performance graphene sensors without post-annealing process.

  12. Forming Super-Massive Black Hole Seeds under the Influence of a Nearby Anisotropic Multi-Frequency Source

    CERN Document Server

    Regan, John; Wise, John

    2015-01-01

    The photo-dissociation of H$_2$ by a nearby anisotropic source of radiation is seen as a critical component in creating an environment in which a direct collapse black hole may form. Employing radiative transfer we model the effect of multi-frequency (0.76 eV - 60 eV) radiation on a collapsing halo at high redshift. We vary both the shape of the spectrum which emits the radiation and the distance to the emitting galaxy. We use blackbody spectra with temperatures of $\\rm{T = 10^4\\ K}$ and $\\rm{T = 10^5\\ K}$ and a realistic stellar spectrum. We find that an optimal zone exists between 1 kpc and 4 kpc from the emitting galaxy. If the halo resides too close to the emitting galaxy the photo-ionising radiation creates a large HII region which effectively disrupts the collapsing halo, too far from the source and the radiation flux drops below the level of the expected background and the H$_2$ fraction remains too high. When the emitting galaxy is initially placed between 1 kpc and 2 kpc from the collapsing halo, wit...

  13. Subparsec-scale dynamics of a dusty gas disk exposed to anisotropic AGN radiation with frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Namekata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    We explore the gas dynamics near the dust sublimation radius of active galactic nucleus (AGN). For the purpose, we perform axisymmetric radiation hydrodynamic simulations of a dusty gas disk of radius $\\approx 1\\,\\mathrm{pc}$ around a supermassive black hole of mass $10^{7}\\,\\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$ taking into account (1) anisotropic radiation of accretion disk, (2) X-ray heating by corona, (3) radiative transfer of infrared (IR) photons reemitted by dust, (4) frequency dependency of direct and IR radiations, and (5) separate temperatures for gas and dust. As a result, we find that for Eddington ratio $\\approx 0.77$, a nearly neutral, dense ($\\approx 10^{6\\operatorname{-}8}\\;\\mathrm{cm^{-3}}$), geometrically-thin ($h/r<0.06$) disk forms with a high velocity ($\\approx 200 \\sim 3000\\;\\mathrm{km/s}$) dusty outflow launched from the disk surface. The disk temperature is determined by the balance between X-ray heating and various cooling, and the disk is almost supported by thermal pressure. Contrary to \\citet{krol...

  14. Nonlinear frequency response analysis of structural vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeger, Oliver; Wever, Utz; Simeon, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present a method for nonlinear frequency response analysis of mechanical vibrations of 3-dimensional solid structures. For computing nonlinear frequency response to periodic excitations, we employ the well-established harmonic balance method. A fundamental aspect for allowing a large-scale application of the method is model order reduction of the discretized equation of motion. Therefore we propose the utilization of a modal projection method enhanced with modal derivatives, providing second-order information. For an efficient spatial discretization of continuum mechanics nonlinear partial differential equations, including large deformations and hyperelastic material laws, we employ the concept of isogeometric analysis. Isogeometric finite element methods have already been shown to possess advantages over classical finite element discretizations in terms of higher accuracy of numerical approximations in the fields of linear vibration and static large deformation analysis. With several computational examples, we demonstrate the applicability and accuracy of the modal derivative reduction method for nonlinear static computations and vibration analysis. Thus, the presented method opens a promising perspective on application of nonlinear frequency analysis to large-scale industrial problems.

  15. Step response and frequency response of an air conditioning system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crommelin, R.D.; Jackman, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    A system of induction units of an existing air conditioning system has been analyzed with respect to its dynamic properties. Time constants were calculated and measured by analogue models. Comparison with measurements at the installation itself showed a reasonable agreement. Frequency responses were

  16. Trajectory dependent particle response for anisotropic mono domain particles in magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeser, M.; Bente, K.; Neumann, A.; Buzug, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    In magnetic particle imaging, scanners use different spatial sampling techniques to cover the field of view (FOV). As spatial encoding is realized by a selective low field region (a field-free-point, or field-free-line), this region has to be moved through the FOV on specific sampling trajectories. To achieve these trajectories complex time dependent magnetic fields are necessary. Due to the superposition of the selection field and the homogeneous time dependent fields, particles at different spatial positions experience different field sequences. As a result, the dynamic behaviour of those particles can be strongly spatially dependent. So far, simulation studies that determined the trajectory quality have used the Langevin function to model the particle response. This however, neglects the dynamic relaxation of the particles, which is highly affected by magnetic anisotropy. More sophisticated models based on stochastic differential equations that include these effects were only used for one dimensional excitation. In this work, a model based on stochastic differential equations is applied to two-dimensional trajectory field sequences, and the effects of these field sequences on the particle response are investigated. The results show that the signal of anisotropic particles is not based on particle parameters such as size and shape alone, but is also determined by the field sequence that a particle ensemble experiences at its spatial position. It is concluded, that the particle parameters can be optimized in terms of the used trajectory.

  17. All-optical transistor- and diode-action and logic gates based on anisotropic nonlinear responsive liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Yu; Chen, Chun-Wei; Jau, Hung-Chang; Li, Cheng-Chang; Cheng, Chiao-Yu; Wang, Chun-Ta; Leng, Shi-Ee; Khoo, Iam-Choon; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we show that anisotropic photosensitive nematic liquid crystals (PNLC) made by incorporating anisotropic absorbing dyes are promising candidates for constructing all-optical elements by virtue of the extraordinarily large optical nonlinearity of the nematic host. In particular, we have demonstrated several room-temperature ‘prototype’ PNLC-based all-optical devices such as optical diode, optical transistor and all primary logic gate operations (OR, AND, NOT) based on such optical transistor. Owing to the anisotropic absorption property and the optical activity of the twist alignment nematic cell, spatially non-reciprocal transmission response can be obtained within a sizeable optical isolation region of ~210 mW. Exploiting the same mechanisms, a tri-terminal configuration as an all-optical analogue of a bipolar junction transistor is fabricated. Its ability to be switched by an optical field enables us to realize an all-optical transistor and demonstrate cascadability, signal fan-out, logic restoration, and various logical gate operations such as OR, AND and NOT. Due to the possibility of synthesizing anisotropic dyes and wide ranging choice of liquid crystals nonlinear optical mechanisms, these all-optical operations can be optimized to have much lower thresholds and faster response speeds. The demonstrated capabilities of these devices have shown great potential in all-optical control system and photonic integrated circuits.

  18. Dynamic Frequency Response of Wind Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altin, Müfit

    capability of WPPs would be investigated. The objective of this project is to analyze and identify the power system requirements for the synchronizing power support and inertial response control of WPPs in high wind power penetration scenarios. The dynamic frequency response of WPPs is realized...... to maintain sustainable and reliable operation of the power system for these targets, transmission system operators (TSOs) have revised the grid code requirements. Also, the TSOs are planning the future development of the power system with various wind penetration scenarios to integrate more wind power...... according to their grid codes. In these scenarios particularly with high wind power penetration cases, conventional power plants (CPPs) such as old thermal power plants are planned to be replaced with wind power plants (WPPs). Consequently, the power system stability will be affected and the control...

  19. Anisotropic compressive response of Stone-Thrower-Wales defects in graphene: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, G.; Parashar, Avinash

    2016-09-01

    The mechanical properties of graphene sheet can be tailored with the help of topological defects. In this research article, the effects of Stone-Thrower-Wales (STW) defects on the mechanical properties of graphene sheet was investigated with the help of molecular dynamics based simulations. Authors has made an attempt to analyse the stress field developed in and around the vicinity of defect due to bond reorientation and further systematic evaluation has been carried out to study the effect of these stress fields against the applied axial compressive load. The results obtained with the pristine graphene were made to compare with the available open literature and the results were reported to be in good agreement with theoretical and experimental data. It was predicted that graphene with STW defect cannot able to bear compressive strength in zigzag direction, whereas on the other hand it was predicted that graphene sheet containing STW defect can bear higher compressive load in armchair direction, which shows an anisotropic response of STW defects in graphene. From the obtained results it can be observed that orientation of STW defects and the loading direction plays an important role to alter the strength of graphene under axial compression.

  20. Conductivities in an anisotropic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Khimphun, Sunly; Park, Chanyong

    2016-01-01

    In order to imitate anisotropic medium of a condensed matter system, we take into account an Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion model as a dual gravity theory where the anisotropy is caused by different momentum relaxations. This gravity model allows an anisotropic charged black hole solution. On this background, we investigate how the linear responses of vector modes like electric, thermoelectric, and thermal conductivities rely on the anisotropy. We find that the electric conductivity in low frequency limit shows a Drude peak and that in the intermediate frequency regime it reveals the power law behavior. Especially, when the anisotropy increases the exponent of the power law becomes smaller. In addition, we find that there exist a critical value for the anisotropy at which the DC conductivity reaches to its maximum value.

  1. The incremental response of a stressed, anisotropic granular material: loading and unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragione, Luigi La

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the incremental response of a transversely isotropic granular material through numerical simulations (Distinct Element Method) and a theoretical model. A granular material is idealized by a random aggregate made of elastic, identical, frictional particles. We consider an initial isotropic compression followed by a uni-axial deformation, at constant pressure. The regime of deformation of our interest is quite narrow and it encompasses shear strains small compared to the volume strain associated with the pressure. In this regime, the contact network is almost the same as in the initial, isotropic, state, and anisotropy is induced by the applied strain through the contacts. In numerical simulations, particles deform according to local force and moment equilibrium, given an applied strain. In the theory, we do something similar and we allow a pair of contacting particles to deform while satisfying force and moment equilibrium, approximately. An average expression of the first moment of the contact forces is employed to obtain the stiffness tensor Aijkl relating the increments in stress with the increments in total average strain. We determine the non-zero components of Aijkl in stressed, anisotropic, states. The results refer to two cases: (a) when the contact friction coefficient is the same as in the uni-axial compression; (b) when a relatively high-contact friction coefficient is introduced (e.g. elastic response with a full mobilization of contact network). In the latter case, we recover, within a reasonable approximation, the typical structure of a transversely isotropic stiffness tensor Aijkl, itself a function of five independent constants; in the former, in case of forward incremental loading, we find the lack of major symmetry of the stiffness tensor, Aijkl ≠Aklij. We show that this occurs because particle deformation is not affine and because anisotropy is present in the aggregate. Theory and numerical DEM simulations agree

  2. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Vian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc. are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor, and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight after low power (i.e., nonthermal HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism.

  3. Frequency difference beyond behavioral limen reflected by frequency following response of human auditory Brainstem

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Qin; Gong, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study investigated whether the frequency-following response (FFR) of the auditory brainstem can represent individual frequency-discrimination ability. Method We measured behavioral frequency-difference limens (FDLs) in normal hearing young adults. Then FFRs were evoked by two pure tones, whose frequency difference was no larger than behavioral FDL. Discrimination of FFRs to individual frequencies was conducted as the neural representation of stimulus frequency differenc...

  4. Polarized Raman anisotropic response of collagen in tendon: towards 3D orientation mapping of collagen in tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Galvis

    Full Text Available In this study, polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS was used to characterize the anisotropic response of the amide I band of collagen as a basis for evaluating three-dimensional collagen fibril orientation in tissues. Firstly, the response was investigated theoretically by applying classical Raman theory to collagen-like peptide crystal structures. The theoretical methodology was then tested experimentally, by measuring amide I intensity anisotropy in rat tail as a function of the orientation of the incident laser polarization. For the theoretical study, several collagen-like triple-helical peptide crystal structures obtained from the Protein Data Bank were rotated "in plane" and "out of plane" to evaluate the role of molecular orientation on the intensity of the amide I band. Collagen-like peptides exhibit a sinusoidal anisotropic response when rotated "in plane" with respect to the polarized incident laser. Maximal intensity was obtained when the polarization of the incident light is perpendicular to the molecule and minimal when parallel. In the case of "out of plane" rotation of the molecular structure a decreased anisotropic response was observed, becoming completely isotropic when the structure was perpendicular to the plane of observation. The theoretical Raman response of collagen was compared to that of alpha helical protein fragments. In contrast to collagen, alpha helices have a maximal signal when incident light is parallel to the molecule and minimal when perpendicular. For out-of-plane molecular orientations alpha-helix structures display a decreased average intensity. Results obtained from experiments on rat tail tendon are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions, thus demonstrating the high potential of PRS for experimental evaluation of the three-dimensional orientation of collagen fibers in biological tissues.

  5. Frequency response function method for evaluation of thermal striping phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rational analysis method of thermal stress induced by fluid temperature fluctuation is developed, by utilizing frequency response characteristics of structures. High frequency components of temperature fluctuation are attenuated in the transfer process from fluids to structures. Low frequency components hardly induce thermal stress since temperature homogenization in structures. Based on investigations of frequency response mechanism of structures of fluid temperature, a frequency response function of structures was derived, which can predict stress amplitudes on structural surfaces from fluid temperature amplitudes and frequencies. This function is formulated by separation of variables, and is composed of an effective heat transfer function and an effective thermal stress one. The frequency response function method appears to evaluate thermal stress rationally and to give information on damageable frequency range of structures. (author)

  6. Research on Frequency Response Characteristics of Rolling Mill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CaiZhengguo; ZhangKenan

    2005-01-01

    The measurement method of frequency response characteristics for rolling mill is established by imposing different signal excitation on PID input of rolling mill under the different rolling conditions. The analysis results declare that sweep sine signal was relative efficient to evaluation for the frequency response character of hydraulic system. The practical application shows that the corresponding relationship between the parameters and the frequency response range of the rolling mill is helpful for parameters verification of process control and condition monitoring of hydraulic system.

  7. Alternative Approaches for Incentivizing the Frequency Responsive Reserve Ancillary Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Tuohy, A.; Brooks, D.

    2012-03-01

    Frequency responsive reserve is the autonomous response of generators and demand response to deviations of system frequency, usually as a result of the instantaneous outage of a large supplier. Frequency responsive reserve arrests the frequency decline resulting in the stabilization of system frequency, and avoids the triggering of under-frequency load-shedding or the reaching of unstable frequencies that could ultimately lead to system blackouts. It is a crucial service required to maintain a reliable and secure power system. Regions with restructured electricity markets have historically had a lack of incentives for frequency responsive reserve because generators inherently provided the response and on large interconnected systems, more than sufficient response has been available. This may not be the case in future systems due to new technologies and declining response. This paper discusses the issues that can occur without proper incentives and even disincentives, and proposes alternatives to introduce incentives for resources to provide frequency responsive reserve to ensure an efficient and reliable power system.

  8. Reconfigurable ring filter with controllable frequency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Wahab, Norfishah; Mohd Salleh, Mohd Khairul; Ismail Khan, Zuhani; Abd Rashid, Nur Emileen

    2014-01-01

    Reconfigurable ring filter based on single-side-access ring topology is presented. Using capacitive tuning elements, the electrical length of the ring can be manipulated to shift the nominal center frequency to a desired position. A synthesis is developed to determine the values of the capacitive elements. To show the advantage of the synthesis, it is applied to the reconfigurable filter design using RF lumped capacitors. The concept is further explored by introducing varactor-diodes to continuously tune the center frequency of the ring filter. For demonstration, two prototypes of reconfigurable ring filters are realized using microstrip technology, simulated, and measured to validate the proposed concept. The reconfigured filter using lumped elements is successfully reconfigured from 2 GHz to 984.4 MHz and miniaturized by 71% compared to the filter directly designed at the same reconfigured frequency, while, for the filter using varactor-diodes, the frequency is chosen from 1.10 GHz to 1.38 GHz spreading over 280 MHz frequency range. Both designs are found to be compact with acceptable insertion loss and high selectivity. PMID:25121132

  9. Computer program for network synthesis by frequency response fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, S.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program synthesizes a passive network by minimizing the difference in desired and actual frequency response. The program solves for the critical points of the error function /weighted least squares fit between calculated and desired frequency response/ by the multivariable Newton-Raphson method with components constrained to an admissible region.

  10. Open-loop frequency response for a chaotic masking system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Xian-Gao; Yu Pei; Huang Wei

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a new numerical simulation approach is proposed for the study of open-loop frequency response of a chaotic masking system. Using Chua's circuit and the Lorenz system as illustrative examples, we have shown that one can employ chaos synchronization to separate the feedback network from a chaotic masking system, and then use numerical simulation to obtain the open-loop synchronization response, the phase response, and the amplitude response of a chaotic masking system. Based on the analysis of the frequency response, we have also proved that changing the amplitude of the exciting (input) signal within normal working domain does not influence the frequency response of the chaotic masking system. The new numerical simulation method developed in this paper can be extended to consider the open-loop frequency response of other systems described by differential or difference equations.

  11. An Exoplanet's Response to Anisotropic Stellar Mass-Loss During Birth and Death

    CERN Document Server

    Veras, Dimitri; Tout, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    The birth and death of planets may be affected by mass outflows from their parent stars during the T-Tauri or post-main-sequence phases of stellar evolution. These outflows are often modelled to be isotropic, but this assumption is not realistic for fast rotators, bipolar jets and supernovae. Here we derive the general equations of motion for the time evolution of a single planet, brown dwarf, comet or asteroid perturbed by anisotropic mass loss in terms of a complete set of planetary orbital elements, the ejecta velocity, and the parent star's co-latitude and longitude. We restrict our application of these equations to 1) rapidly rotating giant stars, and 2) arbitrarily-directed jet outflows. We conclude that the isotropic mass-loss assumption can safely be used to model planetary motion during giant branch phases of stellar evolution within distances of hundreds of au. In fact, latitudinal mass loss variations anisotropically affect planetary motion only if the mass loss is asymmetric about the stellar equa...

  12. Transformation Algorithm of Dielectric Response in Time-Frequency Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A transformation algorithm of dielectric response from time domain to frequency domain is presented. In order to shorten measuring time of low or ultralow frequency dielectric response characteristics, the transformation algorithm is used in this paper to transform the time domain relaxation current to frequency domain current for calculating the low frequency dielectric dissipation factor. In addition, it is shown from comparing the calculation results with actual test data that there is a coincidence for both results over a wide range of low frequencies. Meanwhile, the time domain test data of depolarization currents in dry and moist pressboards are converted into frequency domain results on the basis of the transformation. The frequency domain curves of complex capacitance and dielectric dissipation factor at the low frequency range are obtained. Test results of polarization and depolarization current (PDC in pressboards are also given at the different voltage and polarization time. It is demonstrated from the experimental results that polarization and depolarization current are affected significantly by moisture contents of the test pressboards, and the transformation algorithm is effective in ultralow frequency of 10−3 Hz. Data analysis and interpretation of the test results conclude that analysis of time-frequency domain dielectric response can be used for assessing insulation system in power transformer.

  13. Modeling a response function to frequency of advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Lutoshkin, Igor

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study the impact of the frequency of advertising on the product sales We introduce response function and postulate its properties Parametric classes of functions which can serve as response functions are suggested We use real data on advertising impact to estimate response functions and discuss their properties

  14. Responses of an isolation system with distinct multiple frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Base isolation systems are generally designed with a single natural frequency. A major concern for these isolation systems is that, if the dominant frequency of a future earthquake is equal or close to the system's natural frequency, the ground motion will be greatly amplified because of resonance,and the superstructure would suffer severe damages. This paper present an isolation system designed with two distinct frequencies. Its responses to different ground motions, including a harmonic motion, show that no excessive amplification will occur. Adoption of this isolation system would greatly enhance the safety of an isolated superstructure against future strong earthquakes. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Regional frequency response analysis under normal and emergency conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevrani, Hassan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj, PO Box 416 (Iran); Ledwich, Gerard; Ford, Jason J. [School of Engineering Systems, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld 4001 (Australia); Dong, Zhao Yang [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (China)

    2009-05-15

    This paper presents a frequency response analysis approach suitable for a power system control area in a wide range of operating conditions. The analytic approach uses the well-known system frequency response model for the turbine-governor and load units to obtain the mathematical representation of the basic concepts. Primary and supplementary frequency controls are properly considered and the effect of emergency control/protection schemes is included. Therefore, the proposed analysis/modeling approach could be grainfully used for the power system operation during the contingency and normal conditions. Time-domain nonlinear simulations with a power system example showed that the results agree with those predicted analytically. (author)

  16. Anisotropic self-biased dual-phase low frequency magneto-mechano-electric energy harvesters with giant power densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Rajaram Patil

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the physical behavior of self-biased multi-functional magneto-mechano-electric (MME laminates simultaneously excited by magnetic and/or mechanical vibrations. The MME laminates composed of Ni and single crystal fiber composite exhibited strong ME coupling under Hdc = 0 Oe at both low frequency and at resonance frequency. Depending on the magnetic field direction with respect to the crystal orientation, the energy harvester showed strong in-plane anisotropy in the output voltage and was found to generate open circuit output voltage of 20 Vpp and power density of 59.78 mW/Oe2 g2 cm3 under weak magnetic field of 1 Oe and mechanical vibration of 30 mg, at frequency of 21 Hz across 1 MΩ resistance.

  17. TOPOLOGY OPTIMIZATION OF TRUSS STRUCTURE WITH FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY AND FREQUENCY DOMAIN DYNAMIC RESPONSE CONSTRAINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Jin; Wang De-yu

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, adaptive genetic algorithm (AGA) is applied to topology optimization of truss structure with frequency domain excitations. The optimization constraints include fundamental frequency, displacement responses under force excitations and acceleration responses under foundation acceleration excitations. The roulette wheel selection operator, adaptive crossover and mutation operators are used as genetic operators. Some heuristic strategies are put forward to direct the deletion of the extra bars and nodes on truss structures. Three examples demonstrate that the proposed method can yield the optimum structure form and the lightest weight of the given ground structure while satisfying dynamic response constraints.

  18. Anisotropic characteristics of electrical responses of fractured reservoir with multiple sets of fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Jinsong; Su Benyu; Guo Naichuan

    2009-01-01

    In fractured reservoirs, the fractures not only provide the storage space for hydrocarbons, but also form the main flow channels which connect the pores of the matrix, so fractures dominate the productivity of reservoirs.However, because of the heterogeneity and randomness of the distribution of fractures, exploration and evaluation of fractured reservoirs is still one of the most difficult problems in the oil industry.In recent years, seismic anisotropy has been applied to the assessment of fractured formations, whereas electrical anisotropy which is more intense in fractured formations than seismic anisotropy has not been studied or used so extensively.In this study, fractured reservoir models which considered multiple sets of fractures with smooth and partly closed, rough surfaces were established based on the fractures and pore network, and the vertical and horizontal electrical resistivities were derived as a function of the matrix and fracture porosities according to Ohm's law.By using the anisotropic resistivity equations, variations of the electrical anisotropy of three types of fractured models under the conditions of free pressure and confining pressure were analyzed through the variations of the exerted pressure, matrix porosity, fracture aperture and formation water resistivity.The differences of the vertical and horizontal resistivities and the anisotropy between the connected and non-connected fractures were also analyzed.It is known from the simulated results that an increase of the confining pressure causes a decrease of electrical anisotropy because of the elasticity of the closed fractures and the decrease of the fracture aperture.For a fixed fracture porosity, the higher the matrix porosity, the weaker the electrical anisotropy in the rock formation.

  19. Dynamic frequency tuning of electric and magnetic metamaterial response

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, John F; Averitt, Richard; Padilla, Willie; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2014-09-16

    A geometrically modifiable resonator is comprised of a resonator disposed on a substrate, and a means for geometrically modifying the resonator. The geometrically modifiable resonator can achieve active optical and/or electronic control of the frequency response in metamaterials and/or frequency selective surfaces, potentially with sub-picosecond response times. Additionally, the methods taught here can be applied to discrete geometrically modifiable circuit components such as inductors and capacitors. Principally, controlled conductivity regions, using either reversible photodoping or voltage induced depletion activation, are used to modify the geometries of circuit components, thus allowing frequency tuning of resonators without otherwise affecting the bulk substrate electrical properties. The concept is valid over any frequency range in which metamaterials are designed to operate.

  20. Frequency response in surface-potential driven electrohydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing, Louise Wellendorph; Smistrup, Kristian; Pedersen, Christian Møller;

    2006-01-01

    capacitance where the net flow rate is, in general, zero while harmonic rolls as well as time-averaged vortexlike components may exist depending on the spatial symmetry and extension of the surface potential. In general, the system displays a resonance behavior at a frequency corresponding to the inverse RC...... time of the system. Different surface potentials share the common feature that the resonance frequency is inversely proportional to the characteristic length scale of the surface potential. For the asymptotic frequency dependence above resonance we find a omega(-2) power law for surface potentials...... response the two potentials display different power-law asymptotics with alpha=1 and alpha similar to 2, respectively....

  1. The receiving of chirp signals with frequency invariant beam response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yuan-xi; WANG Ji-sheng; SANG En-fang

    2006-01-01

    A frequency invariant response algorithm is proposed for getting over the signal distortion in high frequency when the beamformer receives the broadband signals. In this method, the weight vector of the reference beam pattern is designed firstly, then the weight vectors when the beam response in the frequency sub-bands approaching the reference response mostly are computed by optimized method or adaptive method. By this method, the beam pattern in each sub-band can be almost kept invariable. As a result, the receiving chirp signal can be improved. Owing to the adoption of the adaptive method to approach the optimized vectors, it has no restricting of the array format and the element directivity, and the method can be used widely.

  2. Evaluation of random temperature fluctuation problems with frequency response approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lejeail, Yves [CEA-Cadarache DER/SERSI/LECC (France); Kasahara, Naoto [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2000-01-01

    Since thermal striping is a coupled thermohydraulic and thermomechanical phenomenon, sodium mock-up tests were usually required to confirm structural integrity. Authors have developed the frequency response function to establish design-by-analysis methodology for this phenomenon. Applicability of this method to sinusoidal fluctuation was validated through two benchmark problems with FAENA and TIFFSS facilities under EJCC contract. This report describes the extension of the frequency response method to random fluctuations. As an example of application, fatigue strength of a Tee junction of PHENIX secondary piping system was investigated. (author)

  3. Evaluation of Piloted Inputs for Onboard Frequency Response Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Martos, Borja

    2013-01-01

    Frequency response estimation results are presented using piloted inputs and a real-time estimation method recently developed for multisine inputs. A nonlinear simulation of the F-16 and a Piper Saratoga research aircraft were subjected to different piloted test inputs while the short period stabilator/elevator to pitch rate frequency response was estimated. Results show that the method can produce accurate results using wide-band piloted inputs instead of multisines. A new metric is introduced for evaluating which data points to include in the analysis and recommendations are provided for applying this method with piloted inputs.

  4. Frequency response modeling and control of flexible structures: Computational methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, William H.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of vibrations in flexible structures can be conventiently modeled in terms of frequency response models. For structural control such models capture the distributed parameter dynamics of the elastic structural response as an irrational transfer function. For most flexible structures arising in aerospace applications the irrational transfer functions which arise are of a special class of pseudo-meromorphic functions which have only a finite number of right half place poles. Computational algorithms are demonstrated for design of multiloop control laws for such models based on optimal Wiener-Hopf control of the frequency responses. The algorithms employ a sampled-data representation of irrational transfer functions which is particularly attractive for numerical computation. One key algorithm for the solution of the optimal control problem is the spectral factorization of an irrational transfer function. The basis for the spectral factorization algorithm is highlighted together with associated computational issues arising in optimal regulator design. Options for implementation of wide band vibration control for flexible structures based on the sampled-data frequency response models is also highlighted. A simple flexible structure control example is considered to demonstrate the combined frequency response modeling and control algorithms.

  5. Neuromagnetic responses to frequency modulation of a continuous tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, R; Mäkelä, J P

    1986-01-01

    Neuromagnetic responses to frequency modulation of a continuous tone were studied in nine subjects. The latencies of the transient responses increased and the amplitudes decreased with decreasing speed of modulation. The equivalent dipoles for modulation of a 1,000 Hz tone were slightly but statistically significantly anterior to the dipoles activated by modulation of a 500 Hz tone. The generation mechanisms of N100m are discussed.

  6. Estimation of Frequency Response Functions by Random Decrement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, J. C.; Brincker, Rune

    1996-01-01

    A method for estimating frequency response functions by the Random Decrement technique is investigated in this paper. The method is based on the auto and cross Random Decrement functions of the input process and the output process of a linear system. The Fourier transformation of these functions...

  7. Estimation of Frequency Response Functions by Random Decrement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Asmussen, J. C.

    A method for estimating frequency response functions by the random decrement technique is investigated in this paper. The method is based on the auto and cross Random Decrement functions of the input process and the output process of a linear system. The Fourier transformation of these functions...

  8. Microwire arrays with plasmonic response at microwave frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Maccio, C.; Martin, O. J. F.; Gay-Balmaz, P.

    2002-01-01

    We study experimentally the response of three-dimensional arrays of microscopic wires. Very good agreement is found with previous theoretical work indicating that such a system can be considered as an effective plasmonic medium with a specific plasma frequency. The sample size threshold where this effective behavior appears is shown to be relatively small. (C) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Unrecorded wideband instrumentation reference tape feasibility study: Frequency response results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hust, D. R.

    1980-03-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine signal response variations when a variety of wideband instrumentation magnetic tapes is used on a cross section of recorder/reproducer systems. Data for the investigation were collected by transmitting a set of eight sample test tapes to participating data recording/reproducing facilities for the purpose of making data measurements. Data collected represent measurements made with 16 different recorder/reproducer systems at 11 different testing facilities located throughout the United States. The data-collection process involved approximately 2 years of testing. The originating/coordinating facility was the Pacific Missile Test Center, Point Mugu, California. The test results indicated the following: all of the sample test tapes exhibited bidirectional performance within the limits of measurement repeatability; overall system stability was better in the low-band regions than in the upper-band regions; and the overall relative frequency response of the sample test tapes did not change appreciably during the 2 year investigative period. The most significant result of the test measurements is that at least 90% of the frequency response values were within + or - 2.0 dB at all frequencies. Machine stability factors such as azimuth, equalizer, and gain changes had more effect on data variability than did magnetic tape or tape speed. The use of a reference tape system is recommended as a method to assure that relative frequency response variations will be less than or equal to + or - 2.0 dB.

  10. Dynamic Response to Pedestrian Loads with Statistical Frequency Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2012-01-01

    by the harmonic components. Measurements indicate that the footfall frequency of a group of pedestrians has a coefficient of variation of the order 0.05–0.1. This is considerably larger than the response bandwidth of a typical lightly damped structure, and at resonance this has a significant influence...

  11. Frequency Response of Modulated Electroluminescence of Light-Emitting Diodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Lie-Feng; LI Yang; LI Ding; WANG Cun-Da; ZHANG Guo-Yi; YAO Dong-Sheng; LIU Wei-Fang; XING Peng-Fei

    2011-01-01

    Frequency responses of modulated electroluminescence (EL) of light-emitting diodes were measured using a testing setup.With increasing frequency of the ac signal,the relative light intensity (RLI) clearly decreases.Furthermore,a peculiar asynchrony between the RLI and ac small-signal is observed.At frequencies higher than 10kHz,the RLI clearly lags behind the ac signal and the absolute value of the lagging angle is nearly proportional to the signal frequency.Using the classical recombination model of light-emitting diodes under ac small-signal modulation,these abnormal characteristics of modulated EL can be clearly explained.High-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have received great attention recently owing to their applications in energy-saving lights,display items and many other fields;therefore,the optical and electrical characteristics of LEDs at forward bias hold significant potential for research.[1-4] However,for a new kind of light emission device,the general research on its performance focuses on the light emission and dc currentvoltage (I-V) characteristics.%Frequency responses of modulated electroluminescence (EL) of light-emitting diodes were measured using a testing setup. With increasing frequency of the ac signal, the relative light intensity (RLI) clearly decreases. Furthermore, a peculiar asynchrony between the RLI and ac small-signal is observed. At frequencies higher than 10kHz, the RLI clearly lags behind the ac signal and the absolute value of the lagging angle is nearly proportional to the signal frequency. Using the classical recombination model of light-emitting diodes under ac small-signal modulation, these abnormal characteristics of modulated EL can be clearly explained.

  12. Benefits of Demand Side Response in Providing Frequency Response Service in the Future GB Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei eTeng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The demand for ancillary service is expected to increase significantly in the future GB electricity system due to high penetration of wind. In particular, the need for frequency response, required to deal with sudden frequency drops following a loss of generator, will increase because of the limited inertia capability of wind plants. This paper quantifies the requirements for primary frequency response and analyses the benefits of frequency response provision from DSR. The results show dramatic changes in frequency response requirements driven by high penetration of wind. Case studies carried out by using an advanced stochastic generation scheduling model suggest that the provision of frequency response from DSR could greatly reduce the system operation cost, wind curtailment and carbon emissions in the future GB system characterised by high penetration of wind. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that the benefit of DSR shows significant diurnal and seasonal variation, whereas an even more rapid (instant delivery of frequency response from DSR could provide significant additional value. Our studies also indicate that the competing technologies to DSR, namely battery storage and more flexible generation could potentially reduce its value by up to 35%, still leaving significant room to deploy DSR as frequency response provider.

  13. Tunable waveguide bends with graphene-based anisotropic metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhao-xian

    2016-01-15

    We design tunable waveguide bends filled with graphene-based anisotropic metamaterials to achieve a nearly perfect bending effect. The anisotropic properties of the metamaterials can be described by the effective medium theory. The nearly perfect bending effect is demonstrated by finite element simulations of various structures with different bending curvatures and shapes. This effect is attributed to zero effective permittivity along the direction of propagation and matched effective impedance at the interfaces between the bending part and the dielectric waveguides. We envisage that the design will be applicable in the far-infrared and terahertz frequency ranges owing to the tunable dielectric responses of graphene.

  14. Modeling the frequency response of microwave radiometers with QUCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization of the frequency response of coherent radiometric receivers is a key element in estimating the flux of astrophysical emissions, since the measured signal depends on the convolution of the source spectral emission with the instrument band shape. Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) measurements of the instrument bandpass often require complex test setups and are subject to a number of systematic effects driven by thermal issues and impedance matching, particularly if cryogenic operation is involved. In this paper we present an approach to modeling radiometers bandpasses by integrating simulations and RF measurements of individual components. This method is based on QUCS (Quasi Universal Circuit Simulator), an open-source circuit simulator, which gives the flexibility of choosing among the available devices, implementing new analytical software models or using measured S-parameters. Therefore an independent estimate of the instrument bandpass is achieved using standard individual component measurements and validated analytical simulations. In order to automate the process of preparing input data, running simulations and exporting results we developed the Python package python-qucs and released it under GNU Public License. We discuss, as working cases, bandpass response modeling of the COFE and Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) radiometers and compare results obtained with QUCS and with a commercial circuit simulator software. The main purpose of bandpass modeling in COFE is to optimize component matching, while in LFI they represent the best estimation of frequency response, since end-to-end measurements were strongly affected by systematic effects.

  15. Fractional Modeling of the AC Large-Signal Frequency Response in Magnetoresistive Current Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Iván Ravelo Arias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fractional calculus is considered when derivatives and integrals of non-integer order are applied over a specific function. In the electrical and electronic domain, the transfer function dependence of a fractional filter not only by the filter order n, but additionally, of the fractional order α is an example of a great number of systems where its input-output behavior could be more exactly modeled by a fractional behavior. Following this aim, the present work shows the experimental ac large-signal frequency response of a family of electrical current sensors based in different spintronic conduction mechanisms. Using an ac characterization set-up the sensor transimpedance function  is obtained considering it as the relationship between sensor output voltage and input sensing current,[PLEASE CHECK FORMULA IN THE PDF]. The study has been extended to various magnetoresistance sensors based in different technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR, giant magnetoresistance (GMR, spin-valve (GMR-SV and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR. The resulting modeling shows two predominant behaviors, the low-pass and the inverse low-pass with fractional index different from the classical integer response. The TMR technology with internal magnetization offers the best dynamic and sensitivity properties opening the way to develop actual industrial applications.

  16. Fractional modeling of the AC large-signal frequency response in magnetoresistive current sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelo Arias, Sergio Iván; Ramírez Muñoz, Diego; Moreno, Jaime Sánchez; Cardoso, Susana; Ferreira, Ricardo; de Freitas, Paulo Jorge Peixeiro

    2013-01-01

    Fractional calculus is considered when derivatives and integrals of non-integer order are applied over a specific function. In the electrical and electronic domain, the transfer function dependence of a fractional filter not only by the filter order n, but additionally, of the fractional order α is an example of a great number of systems where its input-output behavior could be more exactly modeled by a fractional behavior. Following this aim, the present work shows the experimental ac large-signal frequency response of a family of electrical current sensors based in different spintronic conduction mechanisms. Using an ac characterization set-up the sensor transimpedance function Z(t)(JF) is obtained considering it as the relationship between sensor output voltage and input sensing current, Z(t)(jf)= V(o, sensor)(jf)/I(sensor)(jf). The study has been extended to various magnetoresistance sensors based in different technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), giant magnetoresistance (GMR), spin-valve (GMR-SV) and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR). The resulting modeling shows two predominant behaviors, the low-pass and the inverse low-pass with fractional index different from the classical integer response. The TMR technology with internal magnetization offers the best dynamic and sensitivity properties opening the way to develop actual industrial applications. PMID:24351648

  17. Investigating the anisotropic scintillation response in anthracene through neutron, gamma-ray, and muon measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Schuster, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a series of measurements that characterize the directional dependence of the scintillation response of crystalline anthracene to incident DT neutrons, DD neutrons, Cs-137 gamma rays, and, for the first time, cosmic ray muons. The neutron measurements give the amplitude and pulse shape dependence on the proton recoil direction over one hemisphere of the crystal, confirming and extending previous results in the literature. In similar measurements using incident gamma rays, no directional effect is evident, and any anisotropy with respect to the electron recoil direction is constrained to have a magnitude of less than a tenth of that present in the proton recoil events. Cosmic muons are measured at two directions, and no anisotropy is observed. This set of observations indicates that high dE/dx is necessary for an anisotropy to be present for a given type of scintillation event, which in turn could be used to discriminate among different hypotheses for the underlying causes of the anisotropy, ...

  18. Health assessment of bonded composite repairs with frequency response techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Caleb; Whittingham, Brendan; Li, Henry C. H.; Herszberg, Israel; Mouritz, Adrian P.

    2007-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) technology may be applied to composite bonded repairs to enable the continuous through-life assessment of the repair's efficacy. This paper describes an SHM technique for the detection of debonding in composite bonded patches based on frequency response. The external doubler repair, commonly used to patch aircraft structures, is examined in this paper. An experimental investigation was conducted using carbon/epoxy doubler repairs bonded to carbon/epoxy substrates, with piezoelectric devices used to measure variations in the frequency response of the repaired structure due to debonding of the external doubler. Three piezoelectric devices were adhered to the structure; the actuator to the external doubler and two sensors to the parent panel. To simulate real repair design requirements (minimum surface perturbation) piezoelectric devices were installed on 'internal' surfaces. Clearance for the actuator was created by the removal of damaged material. The frequency response signature of the repaired structure with simulated debonds is analysed with respect to the response of fully bonded repairs. Results are discussed with implications for the development of a technique to monitor the integrity of external bonded repairs.

  19. Detrending moving average algorithm: Frequency response and scaling performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Anna; Kiyono, Ken

    2016-06-01

    The Detrending Moving Average (DMA) algorithm has been widely used in its several variants for characterizing long-range correlations of random signals and sets (one-dimensional sequences or high-dimensional arrays) over either time or space. In this paper, mainly based on analytical arguments, the scaling performances of the centered DMA, including higher-order ones, are investigated by means of a continuous time approximation and a frequency response approach. Our results are also confirmed by numerical tests. The study is carried out for higher-order DMA operating with moving average polynomials of different degree. In particular, detrending power degree, frequency response, asymptotic scaling, upper limit of the detectable scaling exponent, and finite scale range behavior will be discussed.

  20. Detrending Moving Average Algorithm: Frequency Response and Scaling Performances

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The Detrending Moving Average (DMA) algorithm has been widely used in its several variants for characterizing long-range correlations of random signals and sets (one-dimensional sequences or high-dimensional arrays) either over time or space. In this paper, mainly based on analytical arguments, the scaling performances of the centered DMA, including higher-order ones, are investigated by means of a continuous time approximation and a frequency response approach. Our results are also confirmed by numerical tests. The study is carried out for higher-order DMA operating with moving average polynomials of different degree. In particular, detrending power degree, frequency response, asymptotic scaling, upper limit of the detectable scaling exponent and finite scale range behavior will be discussed.

  1. Detrending moving average algorithm: Frequency response and scaling performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Anna; Kiyono, Ken

    2016-06-01

    The Detrending Moving Average (DMA) algorithm has been widely used in its several variants for characterizing long-range correlations of random signals and sets (one-dimensional sequences or high-dimensional arrays) over either time or space. In this paper, mainly based on analytical arguments, the scaling performances of the centered DMA, including higher-order ones, are investigated by means of a continuous time approximation and a frequency response approach. Our results are also confirmed by numerical tests. The study is carried out for higher-order DMA operating with moving average polynomials of different degree. In particular, detrending power degree, frequency response, asymptotic scaling, upper limit of the detectable scaling exponent, and finite scale range behavior will be discussed. PMID:27415389

  2. Anisotropic universe with anisotropic sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aluri, Pavan K.; Panda, Sukanta; Sharma, Manabendra; Thakur, Snigdha, E-mail: aluri@iucaa.ernet.in, E-mail: sukanta@iiserb.ac.in, E-mail: manabendra@iiserb.ac.in, E-mail: snigdha@iiserb.ac.in [Department of Physics, IISER Bhopal, Bhopal - 462023 (India)

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the state space of a Bianchi-I universe with anisotropic sources. Here we consider an extended state space which includes null geodesics in this background. The evolution equations for all the state observables are derived. Dynamical systems approach is used to study the evolution of these equations. The asymptotic stable fixed points for all the evolution equations are found. We also check our analytic results with numerical analysis of these dynamical equations. The evolution of the state observables are studied both in cosmic time and using a dimensionless time variable. Then we repeat the same analysis with a more realistic scenario, adding the isotropic (dust like dark) matter and a cosmological constant (dark energy) to our anisotropic sources, to study their co-evolution. The universe now approaches a de Sitter space asymptotically dominated by the cosmological constant. The cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps due to shear are also generated in this scenario, assuming that the universe contains anisotropic matter along with the usual (dark) matter and vacuum (dark) energy since decoupling. We find that they contribute dominantly to the CMB quadrupole. We also constrain the current level of anisotropy and also search for any cosmic preferred axis present in the data. We use the Union 2 Supernovae data to this extent. An anisotropy axis close to the mirror symmetry axis seen in the cosmic microwave background data from Planck probe is found.

  3. Material Induced Anisotropic Damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, M.S.; Wisselink, H.H.; Meinders, V.T.; Boogaard, van den A.H.; Hora, P.

    2012-01-01

    The anisotropy in damage can be driven by two different phenomena; anisotropic defor-mation state named Load Induced Anisotropic Damage (LIAD) and anisotropic (shape and/or distribution) second phase particles named Material Induced Anisotropic Damage (MIAD). Most anisotropic damage models are based

  4. Delphinid behavioral responses to incidental mid-frequency active sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, E Elizabeth; Smith, Michael H; Gassmann, Martin; Wiggins, Sean M; Douglas, Annie B; Hildebrand, John A

    2014-10-01

    Opportunistic observations of behavioral responses by delphinids to incidental mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar were recorded in the Southern California Bight from 2004 through 2008 using visual focal follows, static hydrophones, and autonomous recorders. Sound pressure levels were calculated between 2 and 8 kHz. Surface behavioral responses were observed in 26 groups from at least three species of 46 groups out of five species encountered during MFA sonar incidents. Responses included changes in behavioral state or direction of travel, changes in vocalization rates and call intensity, or a lack of vocalizations while MFA sonar occurred. However, 46% of focal groups not exposed to sonar also changed their behavior, and 43% of focal groups exposed to sonar did not change their behavior. Mean peak sound pressure levels when a behavioral response occurred were around 122 dB re: 1 μPa. Acoustic localizations of dolphin groups exhibiting a response gave insight into nighttime movement patterns and provided evidence that impacts of sonar may be mediated by behavioral state. The lack of response in some cases may indicate a tolerance of or habituation to MFA sonar by local populations; however, the responses that occur at lower received levels may point to some sensitization as well.

  5. Response growth using a low-frequency suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiovanni, Jeffrey J; Nair, Padmaja

    2007-12-01

    Numerous psychophysical studies on two-tone suppression have been carried out. More recently, researchers have attempted to relate the magnitude of suppression to the level of suppressee. [Wojtczak, M., Viemeister, N.F., 2005. Psychophysical response growth under suppression. In: Pressnitzer, D., de Cheveigne, A., McAdams, S., Collet, L. (Eds.), Auditory Signal Processing: Physiology, Psychoaccoustics, and Models. Springer, New York, pp. 67-74] demonstrated that the magnitude of suppression for a higher-frequency, fixed-level suppressor decreases with increasing level of the suppressee. This suggests a linearization of the basilar membrane response in presence of a high-frequency suppressor. The present study expands these results to a low-frequency suppressor of varying intensity levels. Detection of a 10-ms, 4.0-kHz probe was measured under different forward-masking conditions: one with a 200-ms, 4.0-kHz masker (suppressee) presented with no suppressor and another with the same masker paired with a 2.2-kHz, 200-ms suppressor. The 4.0-kHz masker level was varied adaptively and a range of probe levels was used to measure the growth of suppression. Results indicate that (1) the magnitude of suppression increases with increasing suppressor level and (2) generally, the probe level was not related to the magnitude of suppression.

  6. Response of air stagnation frequency to anthropogenically enhanced radiative forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Daniel E; Harshvardhan; Diffenbaugh, Noah S

    2012-01-01

    Stagnant atmospheric conditions can lead to hazardous air quality by allowing ozone and particulate matter to accumulate and persist in the near-surface environment. By changing atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, global warming could alter the meteorological factors that regulate air stagnation frequency. We analyze the response of the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) Air Stagnation Index (ASI) to anthropogenically enhanced radiative forcing using global climate model projections of late-21(st) century climate change (SRES A1B scenario). Our results indicate that the atmospheric conditions over the highly populated, highly industrialized regions of the eastern United States, Mediterranean Europe, and eastern China are particularly sensitive to global warming, with the occurrence of stagnant conditions projected to increase 12-to-25% relative to late-20(th) century stagnation frequencies (3-18+ days/year). Changes in the position/strength of the polar jet, in the occurrence of light surface winds, and in the number of precipitation-free days all contribute to more frequent late-21(st) century air mass stagnation over these high-population regions. In addition, we find substantial inter-model spread in the simulated response of stagnation conditions over some regions using either native or bias corrected global climate model simulations, suggesting that changes in the atmospheric circulation and/or the distribution of precipitation represent important sources of uncertainty in the response of air quality to global warming. PMID:23284587

  7. Aircraft Fault Detection Using Real-Time Frequency Response Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.

    2016-01-01

    A real-time method for estimating time-varying aircraft frequency responses from input and output measurements was demonstrated. The Bat-4 subscale airplane was used with NASA Langley Research Center's AirSTAR unmanned aerial flight test facility to conduct flight tests and collect data for dynamic modeling. Orthogonal phase-optimized multisine inputs, summed with pilot stick and pedal inputs, were used to excite the responses. The aircraft was tested in its normal configuration and with emulated failures, which included a stuck left ruddervator and an increased command path latency. No prior knowledge of a dynamic model was used or available for the estimation. The longitudinal short period dynamics were investigated in this work. Time-varying frequency responses and stability margins were tracked well using a 20 second sliding window of data, as compared to a post-flight analysis using output error parameter estimation and a low-order equivalent system model. This method could be used in a real-time fault detection system, or for other applications of dynamic modeling such as real-time verification of stability margins during envelope expansion tests.

  8. Frequency Response Adaptive Control of a Refrigeration Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens G. Balchen

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available A technique for the adaptation of controller parameters in a single control loop based upon the estimation of frequency response parameters has been presented in an earlier paper. This paper contains an extension and a generalization of the first method and results in a more versatile solution which is applicable to a wider range of process characteristics. The application of this adaptive control technique is illustrated by a laboratory refrigeration cycle in which the evaporator pressure controls the speed of the compressor.

  9. Effect of Geometry in Frequency Response Modeling of Nanomechanical Resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esfahania, M. Nasr; Yilmaz, M.; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard;

    2016-01-01

    The trend towards nanomechanical resonator sensors with increasing sensitivity raises the need to address challengesencountered in the modeling of their mechanical behavior. Selecting the best approach in mechanical response modelingamongst the various potential computational solid mechanics...... methods is subject to controversy. A guideline for theselection of the appropriate approach for a specific set of geometry and mechanical properties is needed. In this study, geometricallimitations in frequency response modeling of flexural nanomechanical resonators are investigated. Deviation of......Euler and Timoshenko beam theories from numerical techniques including finite element modeling and Surface Cauchy-Borntechnique are studied. The results provide a limit beyond which surface energy contribution dominates the mechanical behavior.Using the Surface Cauchy-Born technique as the reference, a maximum error...

  10. Time and frequency domain characteristics of detrending-operation-based scaling analysis: Exact DFA and DMA frequency responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyono, Ken; Tsujimoto, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    We develop a general framework to study the time and frequency domain characteristics of detrending-operation-based scaling analysis methods, such as detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and detrending moving average (DMA) analysis. In this framework, using either the time or frequency domain approach, the frequency responses of detrending operations are calculated analytically. Although the frequency domain approach based on conventional linear analysis techniques is only applicable to linear detrending operations, the time domain approach presented here is applicable to both linear and nonlinear detrending operations. Furthermore, using the relationship between the time and frequency domain representations of the frequency responses, the frequency domain characteristics of nonlinear detrending operations can be obtained. Based on the calculated frequency responses, it is possible to establish a direct connection between the root-mean-square deviation of the detrending-operation-based scaling analysis and the power spectrum for linear stochastic processes. Here, by applying our methods to DFA and DMA, including higher-order cases, exact frequency responses are calculated. In addition, we analytically investigate the cutoff frequencies of DFA and DMA detrending operations and show that these frequencies are not optimally adjusted to coincide with the corresponding time scale.

  11. Multiple scattering in the high-frequency limit with second-order shadowing function from 2D anisotropic rough dielectric surfaces: II. Comparison with numerical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourlier, C.; Berginc, G.

    2004-07-01

    This second part presents illustrative examples of the model developed in the companion paper, which is based on the first- and second-order optics approximation. The surface is assumed to be Gaussian and the correlation height is chosen as anisotropic Gaussian. The incoherent scattering coefficient is computed for a height rms range from 0.5lgr to 1lgr (where lgr is the electromagnetic wavelength), for a slope rms range from 0.5 to 1 and for an incidence angle range from 0 to 70°. In addition, simulations are presented for an anisotropic Gaussian surface and when the receiver is not located in the plane of incidence. For a metallic and dielectric isotropic Gaussian surfaces, the cross- and co-polarizations are also compared with a numerical approach obtained from the forward-backward method with a novel spectral acceleration algorithm developed by Torrungrueng and Johnson (2001, JOSA A 18).

  12. Coupled vibro-acoustic model updating using frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2016-03-01

    Interior noise in cavities of motorized vehicles is of increasing significance due to the lightweight design of these structures. Accurate coupled vibro-acoustic FE models of such cavities are required so as to allow a reliable design and analysis. It is, however, experienced that the vibro-acoustic predictions using these models do not often correlate acceptably well with the experimental measurements and hence require model updating. Both the structural and the acoustic parameters addressing the stiffness as well as the damping modeling inaccuracies need to be considered simultaneously in the model updating framework in order to obtain an accurate estimate of these parameters. It is also noted that the acoustic absorption properties are generally frequency dependent. This makes use of modal data based methods for updating vibro-acoustic FE models difficult. In view of this, the present paper proposes a method based on vibro-acoustic frequency response functions that allow updating of a coupled FE model by considering simultaneously the parameters associated with both the structural as well as the acoustic model of the cavity. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical studies on a 3D rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate. Updating parameters related to the material property, stiffness of joints between the plate and the rectangular cavity and the properties of absorbing surfaces of the acoustic cavity are considered. The robustness of the method under presence of noise is also studied.

  13. [HLA and keloids: antigenic frequency and therapeutic response].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, A; Bozzi, M

    1989-01-01

    Twenty keloid subjects were typed for class 1 (HLA-A, B and C) and class 2 (HLA-DR and DQ) histocompatibility antigens. Their frequencies were compared to those found in control populations. Of all the antigens belonging to class 1, B 21 was more prevalent in patients. The findings regarding class 2 antigens were noteworthy: in keloid patients there was a significant prevalence of DR 5 (RR = 3.54 and 7.93 respectively for the two control groups) and DQw 3 (RR = 16.8). The patients typed for HLA-antigens were treated with corticosteroid infiltrations. The responses to the treatments were no related to the histocompatibility antigens. PMID:2628278

  14. Nano-resonator frequency response based on strain gradient theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims to explore the dynamic behaviour of a nano-resonator under ac and dc excitation using strain gradient theory. To achieve this goal, the partial differential equation of nano-beam vibration is first converted to an ordinary differential equation by the Galerkin projection method and the lumped model is derived. Lumped parameters of the nano-resonator, such as linear and nonlinear springs and damper coefficients, are compared with those of classical theory and it is demonstrated that beams with smaller thickness display greater deviation from classical parameters. Stable and unstable equilibrium points based on classic and non-classical theories are also compared. The results show that, regarding the applied dc voltage, the dynamic behaviours expected by classical and non-classical theories are significantly different, such that one theory predicts the un-deformed shape as the stable condition, while the other theory predicts that the beam will experience bi-stability. To obtain the frequency response of the nano-resonator, a general equation including cubic and quadratic nonlinearities in addition to parametric electrostatic excitation terms is derived, and the analytical solution is determined using a second-order multiple scales method. Based on frequency response analysis, the softening and hardening effects given by two theories are investigated and compared, and it is observed that neglecting the size effect can lead to two completely different predictions in the dynamic behaviour of the resonators. The findings of this article can be helpful in the design and characterization of the size-dependent dynamic behaviour of resonators on small scales. (paper)

  15. Shock wave compression of hexagonal-close-packed metal single crystals: Time-dependent, anisotropic elastic-plastic response of beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2014-07-01

    Understanding and modeling the response of hcp metals to high stress impulsive loading is challenging because the lower crystal symmetry, compared to cubic metals, results in a significantly more complex material response. To gain insight into the inelastic deformation of hcp metals subjected to high dynamic stresses, shock wave compression of single crystals provides a useful approach because different inelastic deformation mechanisms can be examined selectively by shock compression along different crystal orientations. As a representative example, we report, here, on wave propagation simulations for beryllium (Be) single crystals shocked along the c-axis, a-axis, and several low-symmetry directions to peak stresses reaching 7 GPa. The simulations utilized a time-dependent, anisotropic material model that incorporated dislocation dynamics, deformation twinning, and shear cracking based descriptions of inelastic deformation. The simulation results showed good overall agreement with measured wave profiles for all the different crystal orientations examined [Pope and Johnson, J. Appl. Phys. 46, 720 (1975)], including features arising from wave mode coupling due to the highly anisotropic inelastic response of Be. This good agreement demonstrates that the measured profiles can be understood in terms of dislocation slip along basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes, together with deformation twinning along { 10 1 ¯ 2 } planes. Our results show that the response of shocked Be single crystals involves the simultaneous operation of multiple, distinct inelastic deformation mechanisms for all orientations except the c-axis. For shocked c-axis Be, the measured wave profiles do not provide good discrimination between pyramidal slip and other inelastic deformation mechanisms, such as shear cracking. The findings presented here provide insight into the complex inelastic deformation response of shocked Be single crystals and are expected to be useful for other hcp crystals. More

  16. Shock wave compression of hexagonal-close-packed metal single crystals: Time-dependent, anisotropic elastic-plastic response of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding and modeling the response of hcp metals to high stress impulsive loading is challenging because the lower crystal symmetry, compared to cubic metals, results in a significantly more complex material response. To gain insight into the inelastic deformation of hcp metals subjected to high dynamic stresses, shock wave compression of single crystals provides a useful approach because different inelastic deformation mechanisms can be examined selectively by shock compression along different crystal orientations. As a representative example, we report, here, on wave propagation simulations for beryllium (Be) single crystals shocked along the c-axis, a-axis, and several low-symmetry directions to peak stresses reaching 7 GPa. The simulations utilized a time-dependent, anisotropic material model that incorporated dislocation dynamics, deformation twinning, and shear cracking based descriptions of inelastic deformation. The simulation results showed good overall agreement with measured wave profiles for all the different crystal orientations examined [Pope and Johnson, J. Appl. Phys. 46, 720 (1975)], including features arising from wave mode coupling due to the highly anisotropic inelastic response of Be. This good agreement demonstrates that the measured profiles can be understood in terms of dislocation slip along basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes, together with deformation twinning along (101¯2) planes. Our results show that the response of shocked Be single crystals involves the simultaneous operation of multiple, distinct inelastic deformation mechanisms for all orientations except the c-axis. For shocked c-axis Be, the measured wave profiles do not provide good discrimination between pyramidal slip and other inelastic deformation mechanisms, such as shear cracking. The findings presented here provide insight into the complex inelastic deformation response of shocked Be single crystals and are expected to be useful for other hcp crystals. More

  17. Cropping frequency and area response to climate variability can exceed yield response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Avery S.; Vanwey, Leah K.; Spera, Stephanie A.; Mustard, John F.

    2016-06-01

    The sensitivity of agricultural output to climate change has often been estimated by modelling crop yields under climate change scenarios or with statistical analysis of the impacts of year-to-year climatic variability on crop yields. However, the area of cropland and the number of crops harvested per growing season (cropping frequency) both also affect agricultural output and both also show sensitivity to climate variability and change. We model the change in agricultural output associated with the response of crop yield, crop frequency and crop area to year-to-year climate variability in Mato Grosso (MT), Brazil, a key agricultural region. Roughly 70% of the change in agricultural output caused by climate was determined by changes in frequency and/or changes in area. Hot and wet conditions were associated with the largest losses and cool and dry conditions with the largest gains. All frequency and area effects had the same sign as total effects, but this was not always the case for yield effects. A focus on yields alone may therefore bias assessments of the vulnerability of agriculture to climate change. Efforts to reduce climate impacts to agriculture should seek to limit production losses not only from crop yield, but also from changes in cropland area and cropping frequency.

  18. Low frequency steady-state brain responses modulate large scale functional networks in a frequency-specific means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Feng; Long, Zhiliang; Cui, Qian; Liu, Feng; Jing, Xiu-Juan; Chen, Heng; Guo, Xiao-Nan; Yan, Jin H; Chen, Hua-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Neural oscillations are essential for brain functions. Research has suggested that the frequency of neural oscillations is lower for more integrative and remote communications. In this vein, some resting-state studies have suggested that large scale networks function in the very low frequency range (brain networks because both resting-state studies and conventional frequency tagging approaches cannot simultaneously capture multiple large scale networks in controllable cognitive activities. In this preliminary study, we aimed to examine whether large scale networks can be modulated by task-induced low frequency steady-state brain responses (lfSSBRs) in a frequency-specific pattern. In a revised attention network test, the lfSSBRs were evoked in the triple network system and sensory-motor system, indicating that large scale networks can be modulated in a frequency tagging way. Furthermore, the inter- and intranetwork synchronizations as well as coherence were increased at the fundamental frequency and the first harmonic rather than at other frequency bands, indicating a frequency-specific modulation of information communication. However, there was no difference among attention conditions, indicating that lfSSBRs modulate the general attention state much stronger than distinguishing attention conditions. This study provides insights into the advantage and mechanism of lfSSBRs. More importantly, it paves a new way to investigate frequency-specific large scale brain activities.

  19. Modal response of 4-rod type radio frequency quadrupole linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Avik; Mahapatra, Abhijit [Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute (CMERI), M.G. Avenue, Durgapur 713209 (India); Mondal, Manas; Chakrabarti, Alok [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Sector-1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2009-10-15

    This paper deals with the analysis and experimental study of natural frequencies of vibration of a 4-rod type radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator. The eigenvalue analysis of the structure has been done both analytically (multispan beam concept) as well as using blocked Lanczos eigenvalue finite element solver with an ability to extract the rigid body modes. This has been done in the mechanical design phase to find the level of agreement between the output of simplified analytical analysis results and the output of a commercial finite element method (FEM) solver, since a full scale RFQ structure is too complex to handle analytically. Experimental validation of the analysis results has been done on the physical 1.7 m RFQ at the installation site. The experimental data obtained were later analyzed and found to be in close agreement with the predicted frequencies in the lower frequency ranges. It gets more and more deviated in the higher frequency ranges. Also some frequencies were observed during experimentation, which were not found in the finite element analysis results. The source of those frequencies are to be further investigated as it may play a predominant role in the design high quality factor beam line cavities for higher operational efficiency.

  20. Anisotropic lattice response induced by a linearly-polarized femtosecond optical pulse excitation in interfacial phase change memory material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Kotaro; Saito, Yuta; Fons, Paul; Kolobov, Alexander V.; Nakano, Takashi; Tominaga, Junji; Hase, Muneaki

    2016-01-01

    Optical excitation of matter with linearly-polarized femtosecond pulses creates a transient non-equilibrium lattice displacement along a certain direction. Here, the pump and probe pulse polarization dependence of the photo-induced ultrafast lattice dynamics in (GeTe)2/(Sb2Te3)4 interfacial phase change memory material is investigated under obliquely incident conditions. Drastic pump polarization dependence of the coherent phonon amplitude is observed when the probe polarization angle is parallel to the c-axis of the sample, while the pump polarization dependence is negligible when the probe polarization angle is perpendicular to the c-axis. The enhancement of phonon oscillation amplitude due to pump polarization rotation for a specific probe polarization angle is only found in the early time stage (≤2 ps). These results indicate that the origin of the pump and probe polarization dependence is dominantly attributable to the anisotropically-formed photo-excited carriers which cause the directional lattice dynamics.

  1. Frequency-temperature response of a new multiferroic

    OpenAIRE

    Nawnit Kumar; Sunanda K. Patri; Ram N.P. Choudhary

    2014-01-01

    The frequency dependence of the electrical properties of a new complex multiferroic Bi4Pb2Ti3FeNbO18 at different temperatures was investigated by impedance spectroscopy technique. The impedance spectroscopic data were collected at different frequencies (100Hz–1MHz) and temperatures (25–500 °C). This study provides important information about the effect of grain and grain boundary on microstructures of the materials. The data are presented in the Nyquist plots, from which electrical resist...

  2. Frequency Response Function Based Damage Identification for Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Joseph Acton

    Structural health monitoring technologies continue to be pursued for aerospace structures in the interests of increased safety and, when combined with health prognosis, efficiency in life-cycle management. The current dissertation develops and validates damage identification technology as a critical component for structural health monitoring of aerospace structures and, in particular, composite unmanned aerial vehicles. The primary innovation is a statistical least-squares damage identification algorithm based in concepts of parameter estimation and model update. The algorithm uses frequency response function based residual force vectors derived from distributed vibration measurements to update a structural finite element model through statistically weighted least-squares minimization producing location and quantification of the damage, estimation uncertainty, and an updated model. Advantages compared to other approaches include robust applicability to systems which are heavily damped, large, and noisy, with a relatively low number of distributed measurement points compared to the number of analytical degrees-of-freedom of an associated analytical structural model (e.g., modal finite element model). Motivation, research objectives, and a dissertation summary are discussed in Chapter 1 followed by a literature review in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 gives background theory and the damage identification algorithm derivation followed by a study of fundamental algorithm behavior on a two degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with generalized damping. Chapter 4 investigates the impact of noise then successfully proves the algorithm against competing methods using an analytical eight degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with non-proportional structural damping. Chapter 5 extends use of the algorithm to finite element models, including solutions for numerical issues, approaches for modeling damping approximately in reduced coordinates, and analytical validation using a composite

  3. Electrodynamic features of anisotropic hard superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Voloshin, I F; Fisher, L M; Aksenov, A V; Yampolskij, V A

    2001-01-01

    The low-frequency electromagnetic response of the superconducting plates, which are characterized by strong anisotropy of the current-carrying capacity in the sample plane, is experimentally and theoretically studied. The measurements are carried out on the polycrystalline textured plates of the Y-123 system as well as on the monocrystal. It is shown that the form of curves describing the dependence of the q relative losses on the h sub 0 alternate field amplitudes is highly sensitive to the h sub 0 vector orientation in the sample plane. The q(h sub 0) dependence by the h sub 0 orientation along one of the main directions of the current anisotropic critical density symmetry the q(h sub 0) dependence is characterized by the single dimensional maximum. Two dimensional maxima are observed on the q(h sub 0) curve by the h sub 0 significant deviation from the main directions

  4. Developmental changes in ERP responses to spatial frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. van den Boomen; L.M. Jonkman; P.H.J.M. Jaspers-Vlamings; J. Cousijn; C. Kemner

    2015-01-01

    Social interaction starts with perception of other persons. One of the first steps in perception is processing of basic information such as spatial frequencies (SF), which represent details and global information. However, although behavioural perception of SF is well investigated, the developmental

  5. Design and Implementation of Frequency-responsive Thermostat Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyeng, Preben; Østergaard, Jacob; Togeby, Mikael;

    2010-01-01

    A power system’s AC frequency is a system-wide indicator of the immediate power balance in the system. This is used by selected generators to adjust the generation to level out imbalances continuously, as well as in the case of disturbances in the system. However, previous theoretical and empiric...

  6. Cylindrical PVF2 film based fiber optic phase modulator - Phase shift nonlinearity and frequency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarshanam, V. S.; Claus, Richard O.

    1993-03-01

    A new cylindrical coil configuration for polyvinylidene flouride (PVF2) film based fiber optic phase modulator is studied for the frequency response and nonlinearity of phase shift at the resonance frequency. This configuration, hitherto unapproached for PVF2 film modulators, offers resonance at well defined, controllable and higher frequencies than possible for the flat-strip configuration. Two versions of this configuration are presented that differ strongly in both the resonance frequency and the phase shift nonlinearity coefficient.

  7. Aeroelastic modal dynamics of wind turbines including anisotropic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisker Skjoldan, P.

    2011-03-15

    Several methods for aeroelastic modal analysis of a rotating wind turbine are developed and used to analyse the modal dynamics of two simplified models and a complex model in isotropic and anisotropic conditions. The Coleman transformation is used to enable extraction of the modal frequencies, damping, and periodic mode shapes of a rotating wind turbine by describing the rotor degrees of freedom in the inertial frame. This approach is valid only for an isotropic system. Anisotropic systems, e.g., with an unbalanced rotor or operating in wind shear, are treated with the general approaches of Floquet analysis or Hill's method which do not provide a unique reference frame for observing the modal frequency, to which any multiple of the rotor speed can be added. This indeterminacy is resolved by requiring that the periodic mode shape be as constant as possible in the inertial frame. The modal frequency is thus identified as the dominant frequency in the response of a pure excitation of the mode observed in the inertial frame. A modal analysis tool based directly on the complex aeroelastic wind turbine code BHawC is presented. It uses the Coleman approach in isotropic conditions and the computationally efficient implicit Floquet analysis in anisotropic conditions. The tool is validated against system identifications with the partial Floquet method on the nonlinear BHawC model of a 2.3 MW wind turbine. System identification results show that nonlinear effects on the 2.3 MW turbine in most cases are small, but indicate that the controller creates nonlinear damping. In isotropic conditions the periodic mode shape contains up to three harmonic components, but in anisotropic conditions it can contain an infinite number of harmonic components with frequencies that are multiples of the rotor speed. These harmonics appear in calculated frequency responses of the turbine. Extreme wind shear changes the modal damping when the flow is separated due to an interaction between

  8. Effects of quinine on the mechanical frequency response of the cupula in the fish lateral line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, S M; Karlsson, K K; Khanna, S M; Flock, A

    1994-03-01

    Quinine induces changes in the motion of the cupula in the lateral line canal of the African knife-fish in response to sinusoidal water movements. Two different phases in the action of quinine on the cupular frequency response can be discerned. In the first phase the best frequency, i.e., the frequency at which the cupular vibratory displacement is maximal in response to constant-amplitude sinusoidal canal fluid displacement, shifts toward higher frequencies. During this phase, lasting about 70-100 min, the best frequency increases by a factor between 1.3 and 1.5. In the second phase, during roughly the following 90 min, the best frequency decreases gradually to a value 0.3-0.5 times that observed before the application of quinine.

  9. Test method of frequency response based on diamond surface acoustic wave devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xi-ming; YANG Bao-he; WU Xiao-guo; WU Yi-zhuo

    2011-01-01

    In order to reduce the noises affixed to the signals when testing high frequency devices, a single-port test mode (S11) is used to test frequency response of high frequency (GHz) and dual-port surface acoustic wave devices (SAWDs) in this paper.The feasibility of the test is proved by simulating the Fabry-Perot model. The frequency response of the high-frequency dual-port resonant-type diamond SAWD is measured by S11 and the dual-port test mode (S21), respectively. The results show that the quality factor of the device is 51.29 and the 3 dB bandwidth is 27.8 MHz by S11 -mode measurement, which is better than the S21 mode, and is consistent with the frequency response curve by simulation.

  10. Efficient 3D frequency response modeling with spectral accuracy by the rapid expansion method

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-07-01

    Frequency responses of seismic wave propagation can be obtained either by directly solving the frequency domain wave equations or by transforming the time domain wavefields using the Fourier transform. The former approach requires solving systems of linear equations, which becomes progressively difficult to tackle for larger scale models and for higher frequency components. On the contrary, the latter approach can be efficiently implemented using explicit time integration methods in conjunction with running summations as the computation progresses. Commonly used explicit time integration methods correspond to the truncated Taylor series approximations that can cause significant errors for large time steps. The rapid expansion method (REM) uses the Chebyshev expansion and offers an optimal solution to the second-order-in-time wave equations. When applying the Fourier transform to the time domain wavefield solution computed by the REM, we can derive a frequency response modeling formula that has the same form as the original time domain REM equation but with different summation coefficients. In particular, the summation coefficients for the frequency response modeling formula corresponds to the Fourier transform of those for the time domain modeling equation. As a result, we can directly compute frequency responses from the Chebyshev expansion polynomials rather than the time domain wavefield snapshots as do other time domain frequency response modeling methods. When combined with the pseudospectral method in space, this new frequency response modeling method can produce spectrally accurate results with high efficiency. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  11. Quantitative multi-waves migration in elastic anisotropic media; Migration quantitative multi-ondes en milieu elastique anisotrope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgne, H.

    2004-12-01

    Seismic imaging is an important tool for ail exploration. From the filtered seismic traces and a subsurface velocity model, migration allows to localize the reflectors and to estimate physical properties of these interfaces. The subsurface is split up into a reference medium, corresponding to the low spatial frequencies (a smooth medium), and a perturbation medium, corresponding to the high spatial frequencies. The propagation of elastic waves in the medium of reference is modelled by the ray theory. The association of this theory with a principle of diffraction or reflection allows to take into account the high spatial frequencies: the Kirchhoff approach represents so the medium of perturbations with continuous surfaces, characterized by reflection coefficients. The target of the quantitative migration is to reconstruct this reflection coefficient, notably its behaviour according to the incidence angle. These information will open the way to seismic characterization of the reservoir domain, with. a stratigraphic inversion for instance. In order to improve the qualitative and quantitative migration results, one of the current challenges is to take into account the anisotropy of the subsurface. Taking into account rocks anisotropy in the imaging process of seismic data requires two improvements from the isotropic case. The first one roughly concerns the modelling aspect: an anisotropic propagator should be used to avoid a mis-positioning or bad focusing of the imaged reflectors. The second correction concerns the migration aspect: as anisotropy affects the reflectivity of subsurface, a specific anisotropic imaging formula should be applied in the migration kernel, in order to recover the correct A V A behavior of the subsurface reflectors, If the first correction is DOW made in most so-called anisotropic imaging algorithms, the second one is currently ignored. The first part of my work concerns theoretical aspects. 1 study first the preservation of amplitudes in the

  12. Continuum-mechanical, Anisotropic Flow model, based on an anisotropic Flow Enhancement factor (CAFFE)

    CERN Document Server

    Placidi, Luca; Seddik, Hakime; Faria, Sergio H

    2009-01-01

    A complete theoretical presentation of the CAFFE model (Continuum-mechanical, Anisotropic Flow model, based on an anisotropic Flow Enhancement factor) is given. The CAFFE model is an application of the theory of mixtures with continuous diversity for the case of large ice masses in which the induced anisotropy can not be neglected. The anisotropic response of the material is considered via a simple anisotropic generalization of Glen's flow law based on a scalar anisotropic enhancement factor. Such an enhancement factor depends upon the orientation mass density, that corresponds to the distribution of lattice orientations or simply to the orientation distribution function. The evolution of anisotropy is assumed to be modeled by the evolution of the orientation mass density, that is governed by the balance of mass of the present mixture with continuous diversity and explicitly depends upon four distinct effects interpreted, respectively, with grain rotation, local rigid body rotation, grain boundary migration (...

  13. Variable Temperature High-Frequency Response of Heterostructure Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, Joy

    1992-01-01

    The development of high performance heterostructure transistors is essential for emerging opto-electronic integrated circuits (OEICs) and monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs). Applications for OEICs and MMICs include the rapidly growing telecommunications and personal communications markets. The key to successful OEIC and MMIC chip sets is the development of high performance, cost-effective technologies. In this work, several different transistor structures are investigated to determine the potential for high speed performance and the physical mechanisms controlling the ultimate device operation. A cryogenic vacuum microwave measurement system has been developed to study the high speed operation of modulation doped field-effect transistors (MODFETs), doped channel metal insulator field-effect transistors (MISFETs), and metal semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs). This study has concluded that the high field velocity and not the low field mobility is what controls high frequency operation of GaAs based field-effect transistors. Both Al_{rm x} Ga_{rm 1-x}As/GaAs and InP/In_{rm y}Ga _{rm 1-y}As heterostructure bipolar transistors (HBTs) have also been studied at reduced lattice temperatures to understand the role of diffusive transport in the Al_{rm x} Ga_{rm 1-x}As/GaAs HBT and nonequilibrium transport in the InP/In _{rm y}Ga_ {rm 1-y}As HBT. It is shown that drift/diffusion formulation must be modified to accurately estimate the base delay time in the conventional Al _{rm x}Ga_ {rm 1-x}As/GaAs HBT. The reduced lattice temperature operation of the InP/In_ {rm y}Ga_{rm 1-y}As HBT demonstrates extreme nonequilibrium transport in the neutral base and collector space charge region with current gain cut-off frequency exceeding 300 GHz, which is the fastest reported transistor to date. Finally, the MODFET has been investigated as a three-terminal negative differential resistance (NDR) transistor. The existence of real space transfer is confirmed by

  14. Fast Frequency Response Capability of Photovoltaic Power Plants: The Necessity of New Grid Requirements and Definitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Rahmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, only a small number of publications have been presented addressing power system stability with the increased use of large-scale photovoltaic (PV generation around the world. The focus of these publications was on classical stability problems, such as transient and small signal stability, without considering frequency stability. Nevertheless, with increased PV generation, its effects on system frequency response during contingencies can no longer be ignored, especially in the case of weakly interconnected networks or isolated power systems. This paper addresses the impacts of large scale PV generation on the frequency stability of power systems. The positive effects of deloaded PV power plants (PV-PPs able to support system frequency recovery during the initial seconds after major contingencies are also examined. Because this type of frequency support is not covered by current definitions, a new terminology is proposed that includes the frequency response of inertia-less generation units immediately after major power imbalances. We refer to this type of frequency support as fast frequency response (FFR. Finally, a discussion is also presented regarding the applicability and pertinence of frequency-related grid requirements for PV-PPs in the case of real power systems. The investigation is based on the isolated power system of northern Chile. The obtained results indicate that in the case of major power imbalances, no significant effects arise on the system frequency response until PV penetration levels exceed approximately 20%. From a system security perspective, the problems arise for PV penetration levels of approximately 50%, in which case, the frequency response capability in PV-PPs would be justified during certain hours of the year.

  15. Classification of frequency response areas in the inferior colliculus reveals continua not discrete classes

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Alan R; Shackleton, Trevor M.; Sumner, Christian J.; Zobay, Oliver; Rees, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    A differential response to sound frequency is a fundamental property of auditory neurons. Frequency analysis in the cochlea gives rise to V-shaped tuning functions in auditory nerve fibres, but by the level of the inferior colliculus (IC), the midbrain nucleus of the auditory pathway, neuronal receptive fields display diverse shapes that reflect the interplay of excitation and inhibition. The origin and nature of these frequency receptive field types is still open to question. One proposed hy...

  16. Soil carbon dioxide emissions in response to precipitation frequency in the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precipitation events can induce episodic CO2 emissions, so called the “Birch Effect”, but how precipitation frequency influences the mechanisms responsible for this effect in dryland cropping systems is not well known. We evaluated the effect of three precipitation frequencies (5-, 10-, and 20-d int...

  17. Developmental changes in ERP responses to spatial frequencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlijn van den Boomen

    Full Text Available Social interaction starts with perception of other persons. One of the first steps in perception is processing of basic information such as spatial frequencies (SF, which represent details and global information. However, although behavioural perception of SF is well investigated, the developmental trajectory of the temporal characteristics of SF processing is not yet well understood. The speed of processing of this basic visual information is crucial, as it determines the speed and possibly accuracy of subsequent visual and social processes. The current study investigated developmental changes in the temporal characteristics of selective processing of high SF (HSF; details versus low SF (LSF; global. To this end, brain activity was measured using EEG in 108 children aged 3-15 years, while HSF or LSF grating stimuli were presented. Interest was in the temporal characteristics of brain activity related to LSF and HSF processing, specifically at early (N80 or later (P1 or N2 peaks in brain activity. Analyses revealed that from 7-8 years onwards HSF but not LSF stimuli evoked an N80 peak. In younger children, aged 3-8 years, the visual manipulation mainly affected the visual N2 peak. Selective processing of HSF versus LSF thus occurs at a rather late time-point (N2 peak in young children. Although behavioural research previously showed that 3-6 year-olds can perceive detailed information, the current results point out that selective processing of HSF versus LSF is still delayed in these children. The delayed processing in younger children could impede the use of LSF and HSF for emotional face processing. Thus, the current study is a starting point for understanding changes in basic visual processing which underlie social development.

  18. High frequency wide-band transformer uses coax to achieve high turn ratio and flat response

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Parry, T.

    1966-01-01

    Center-tap push-pull transformer with toroidal core helically wound with a single coaxial cable creates a high frequency wideband transformer. This transformer has a high-turn ratio, a high coupling coefficient, and a flat broadband response.

  19. Piezoelectric two-layer stacks of cellular polypropylene ferroelectrets: transducer response at audio and ultrasound frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Michael; Bergweiler, Steffen; Wirges, Werner; Pucher, Andreas; Tuncer, Enis; Gerhard-Multhaupt, Reimund

    2005-09-01

    Piezoelectric cellular polypropylene films, so-called ferroelectrets, are assembled in a stack with two active transducer layers. The stack is characterized with respect to its linear and quadratic response in a frequency range from 1 kHz to 80 kHz. A relatively smooth frequency response in the sound-pressure level is found for the individual layers as well as for both layers driven in phase. The piezoelectric response of the two-layer stack is twice the response of an individual layer over a rather broad frequency range. Furthermore, the influence of the preparation conditions on the resonance frequency and the effect of the quadratic distortion on the radiated sound are investigated both for the individual transducer films in the stack and for the stack system as a whole. PMID:16285459

  20. Unfolded Frequency Response and Model of a Multi-Tap Direct Sampling Mixer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Yun; GE Ning; DONG Zaiwang

    2008-01-01

    A transform method was used to model a discrete time multi-tap direct sampling mixer. The method transforms the mixed filtering and down.sampling stages to separate cascade filtering and sampling stages to determine the unfolded frequency response which shows the anti-aliasing ability of the mixer. The transformation can also be applied to other mixed signal and multi-rate receiver systems to analyze their unfolded frequency responses. The transformed system architecture was used to calculate the unfolded frequency response of the multi-tap direct sampling mixer and compared with the mixer model without noise in the ad-vanced design system 2005A environment to further evaluate the frequency response. The simulations show that the -3 dB bandwidth is 3.0 MHz and the voltage gain is attenuated by 1.5 dB within a 1-MHz baseband bandwidth.

  1. Frequency response variation of two offshore wind park transformers with different tap changer positions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Ivan; Soerensen, Troels [DONG Energy (Denmark); Holboell, Joachim [Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the results of several sweep frequency response analysis (SFRA) measurements performed on two identical offshore wind farm transformers. A comparison is made between the transformers based on different recommended measurements and procedures, different measurement systems for frequency response analysis (FRA) and different tap changer positions. It was shown how the series impedance and capacitance between windings vary depending on the tap changer position. (orig.)

  2. Estimation of cochlear response times using lateralization of frequency-mismatched tones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strelcyk, Olaf; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral and objective estimates of cochlear response times CRTs and traveling-wave TW velocity were compared for three normal-hearing listeners. Differences between frequency-specific CRTs were estimated via lateralization of pulsed tones that were interaurally mismatched in frequency, similar...... could not be estimated with the behavioral method due to limitations of the lateralization paradigm. The method might be useful for studying the spatiotemporal cochlear response pattern in human listeners....

  3. Frequency response variation of two offshore wind park transformers with different tap changer positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arana Aristi, Iván; Holbøll, Joachim; Sørensen, T

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of several sweep frequency response analysis (SFRA) measurements performed on two identical offshore wind farm transformers. A comparison is made between the transformers based on different recommended measurements and procedures, different measurement systems for ...... for frequency response analysis (FRA) and different tap changer positions. It was shown how the series impedance and capacitance between windings vary depending on the tap changer position....

  4. Effects of mistuning and matrix structure on the topology of frequency response curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afolabi, Dare

    1989-01-01

    The stability of a frequency response curve under mild perturbations of the system's matrix is investigated. Using recent developments in the theory of singularities of differentiable maps, it is shown that the stability of a response curve depends on the structure of the system's matrix. In particular, the frequency response curves of a cylic system are shown to be unstable. Consequently, slight parameter variations engendered by mistuning will induce a significant difference in the topology of the forced response curves, if the mistuning transformation crosses the bifurcation set.

  5. A Study of Time-dependent and Anisotropic Effects on the Deformation Response of Two Flywheel Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleeb, Atef F.; Arnold, Steven M.; Al-Zoubi, Nasser R.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of material time dependency and anisotropy in the context of two specific flywheel designs-preload and multi-directional composite (MDC)--is investigated. In particular, we focus on the following aspects: 1) geometric constraints, 2) material constraints, 3) loading type, and 4) the fundamental character of the time-dependent response, i.e., reversible or irreversible. The bulk of the results presented were obtained using a composite (PMC IM7/8552 at 135 C) material system. The material was characterized using a general multimechanism hereditary (viscoelastoplastic) model. As a general conclusion, the results have clearly shown that both the preload and the MDC rotor designs are significantly affected by time-dependent material behavior, which may impact the state of rotor balance and potentially reduce its operating life. In view of the results of the parametric studies and predictions made in the present study, the need for actual experimentation focusing on the time-dependent behavior of full-scale flywheel rotors is self-evident.

  6. Anisotropic Stars II Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, K; Dev, Krsna; Gleiser, Marcelo

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the stability of self-gravitating spherically symmetric anisotropic spheres under radial perturbations. We consider both the Newtonian and the full general-relativistic perturbation treatment. In the general-relativistic case, we extend the variational formalism for spheres with isotropic pressure developed by Chandrasekhar. We find that, in general, when the tangential pressure is greater than the radial pressure, the stability of the anisotropic sphere is enhanced when compared to isotropic configurations. In particular, anisotropic spheres are found to be stable for smaller values of the adiabatic index $\\gamma$.

  7. Frequency-dependent dielectric response model for polyimide-poly(vinilydenefluoride) multilayered dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lillo, Luigi; Bergamini, Andrea; Albino Carnelli, Dario; Ermanni, Paolo

    2012-07-01

    A physical model for the frequency-dependent dielectric response of multilayered structures is reported. Two frequency regimes defined by the relative permittivities and volume resistivities of the layers have been analytically identified and experimentally investigated on a structure consisting of polyimide and poly(vinilydenefluoride) layers. The relative permittivity follows an effective medium model at high frequency while showing a dependence on the volume resistivity at low frequency. In this regime, relative permittivities exceeding those expected from effective medium model are recorded. These findings provide insights into inhomogeneous dielectrics behavior for the development of high energy density dielectric films.

  8. Rapid estimation of frequency response functions by close-range photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy of a rapid method which estimates the frequency response function from stereoscopic dynamic data is computed. It is shown that reversal of the order of the operations of coordinate transformation and Fourier transformation, which provides a significant increase in computational speed, introduces error. A portion of the error, proportional to the perturbation components normal to the camera focal planes, cannot be eliminated. The remaining error may be eliminated by proper scaling of frequency data prior to coordinate transformation. Methods are developed for least squares estimation of the full 3x3 frequency response matrix for a three dimensional structure.

  9. Frequency response of slot coating flow to gap disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Semi; Nam, Jaewook

    2016-03-01

    Slot coating is a common method of manufacturing films such as optical films, adhesive tapes, etc. It is a pre-metered method: the final wet film thickness is set by the flow rate and the web speed, and independent of other operating parameters and coating liquid properties. Therefore, it is ideal for precise film thickness control. To produce uniform film, the coating flow needs to be steady-state, two-dimensional, and stable. In the slot coating process, however, there are always some small-scale disturbances generated by rotating process units, such as pumps, rolls, etc., and they usually have periodicity. These disturbances cause a non-uniformity of the moving web direction and could spoil the film quality. Therefore, the sensitivity analysis of coating flow under the periodic disturbances is important. Among all disturbances, a change of coating gap, i.e. the distance between the die lip and the moving substrate, is known to the most dangerous disturbance. This type of disturbance is usually called the gap oscillation, and caused by the substrate thickness variations, mechanical vibration of the coating die or roll, and roll run outs. Here, we analyze the effect of fluid properties, operating conditions and die configurations on response of slot coating flow to gap disturbances. In this study, we use Galerkin/finite element method to solve transient Navier-Stokes equation under periodic disturbance. We define the amplification factor as an indicator of film non-uniformity and analyze the effect of different parameters by comparing the factor. In particular, we use Carreau-Yasuda model to describe shear-thinning property of xanthan gum solution and compare with Newtonian fluid.

  10. Implementation of Time and Frequency Response Analysis for Web-Based Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teyana Sapula

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The University of Dar Es Salaam has developed the web-based laboratory for Time and Frequency Response Analysis. The purpose of this web-based laboratory is the utilization of real data from real experiments, in terms of instrumentation and experimental circuits, rather than simulations. The use of webbased laboratory came after realizing the difficulties imposed by the traditional laboratories. Web-based laboratories allow students and educators to interact with real laboratory equipment located anywhere in the world at anytime. This paper presents the implementation of web-based laboratory of single stage common emitter, resistor capacitor coupled amplifier using National Instruments Educational Laboratory Virtual Instrument Suite platform. Two components are deployed: time response analysis and frequency response analysis. The experiment allows students to carryout time and frequency analysis of the amplifier. The modular can be used to any microelectronic circuits to carry out any time response and frequency response analysis. Both the time response and frequency response analysis results of the amplifier are validated.

  11. Non-linear response of an electrode-electrolyte interface impedance with the frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, G. [Departamento de Bioingenieri' a, UNT/CONICET (Argentina)]. E-mail: gruiz@herrera.unt.edu.ar; Felice, C.J. [Departamento de Bioingenieri' a, UNT/CONICET (Argentina)

    2007-01-15

    In this paper we analyze the frequency response of a distributed parameters non-linear circuit. This circuit is a fractal model of an electrode-electrolyte interface. The results show that the series equivalent resistance R {sub eq} decreases as the number of fractal levels rises. Its frequency behavior is similar to the results described by other authors that used a constant phase angle element. At low frequency range, the series equivalent reactance X {sub eq} decreases with frequency and R {sub eq} shows a flat response in this range. The model also explains how interface geometry modifies the values of some electrochemical parameters. As roughness increases the Argand diagram shows smaller semicircles. The model behavior is like a single dispersion system with its central frequency increasing with the electrode roughness.

  12. Modelling of ultrasonic nondestructive testing in anisotropic materials - Rectangular crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nondestructive testing with ultrasound is a standard procedure in the nuclear power industry when searching for defects, in particular cracks. To develop and qualify testing procedures extensive experimental work on test blocks is usually required. This can take a lot of time and therefore be quite costly. A good mathematical model of the testing situation is therefore of great value as it can reduce the experimental work to a great extent. A good model can be very useful for parametric studies and as a pedagogical tool. A further use of a model is as a tool in the qualification of personnel. In anisotropic materials, e.g. austenitic welds, the propagation of ultrasound becomes much more complicated as compared to isotropic materials. Therefore, modelling is even more useful for anisotropic materials, and it in particular has a greater pedagogical value. The present project has been concerned with a further development of the anisotropic capabilities of the computer program UTDefect, which has so far only contained a strip-like crack as the single defect type for anisotropic materials. To be more specific, the scattering by a rectangular crack in an anisotropic component has been studied and the result is adapted to include transmitting and receiving ultrasonic probes. The component under study is assumed to be anisotropic with arbitrary anisotropy. On the other hand, it is assumed to be homogeneous, and this in particular excludes most welds, where it is seldom an adequate approximation to assume homogeneity. The anisotropy may be arbitrarily oriented and the same is true of the rectangular crack. The crack may also be located near a backside of the component. To solve the scattering problem for the crack an integral equation method is used. The probe model has been developed in an earlier project and to compute the signal response in the receiving probe an electromechanical reciprocity argument is employed. As a rectangle is a truly 3D scatterer the sizes of the

  13. On the quantification of SSVEP frequency responses in human EEG in realistic BCI conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Kuś

    Full Text Available This article concerns one of the most important problems of brain-computer interfaces (BCI based on Steady State Visual Evoked Potentials (SSVEP, that is the selection of the a-priori most suitable frequencies for stimulation. Previous works related to this problem were done either with measuring systems that have little in common with actual BCI systems (e.g., single flashing LED or were presented on a small number of subjects, or the tested frequency range did not cover a broad spectrum. Their results indicate a strong SSVEP response around 10 Hz, in the range 13-25 Hz, and at high frequencies in the band of 40-60 Hz. In the case of BCI interfaces, stimulation with frequencies from various ranges are used. The frequencies are often adapted for each user separately. The selection of these frequencies, however, was not yet justified in quantitative group-level study with proper statistical account for inter-subject variability. The aim of this study is to determine the SSVEP response curve, that is, the magnitude of the evoked signal as a function of frequency. The SSVEP response was induced in conditions as close as possible to the actual BCI system, using a wide range of frequencies (5-30 Hz, in step of 1 Hz. The data were obtained for 10 subjects. SSVEP curves for individual subjects and the population curve was determined. Statistical analysis were conducted both on the level of individual subjects and for the group. The main result of the study is the identification of the optimal range of frequencies, which is 12-18 Hz, for the registration of SSVEP phenomena. The applied criterion of optimality was: to find the largest contiguous range of frequencies yielding the strong and constant-level SSVEP response.

  14. Anisotropic Contrast Optical Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Peev, D; Kananizadeh, N; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-01-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by mea...

  15. Types, Frequency, and Effectiveness of Responses to Unwanted Pursuit and Stalking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Leila B.; Winstead, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the types, frequency, and effectiveness of responses to unwanted pursuit (UP) and stalking after relationship termination. Participants included female and male college students who were either pursued by a former partner or who pursued an ex-partner. Factor analyses of targets' responses to pursuit yielded four factors,…

  16. One-Dimensional Anisotropic Band Gap Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The band gap structure of one-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal has been studied by means of the transfer matrix formalism. From the analytic expressions and numeric calculations we see some general characteristics of the band gap structure of anisotropic photonic crystals, each band separates into two branches and the two branches react to polarization sensitively. In the practical case of oblique incidence, gaps move towards high frequency when the angle of incidence increases. Under some special conditions, the two branches become degenerate again.

  17. Frequency sweep rate dependence on the dielectrophoretic response of polystyrene beads and red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, T. N. G.; Leonard, K. M.; Minerick, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Alternating current (AC) dielectrophoresis (DEP) experiments for biological particles in microdevices are typically done at a fixed frequency. Reconstructing the DEP response curve from static frequency experiments is laborious, but essential to ascertain differences in dielectric properties of biological particles. Our lab explored the concept of sweeping the frequency as a function of time to rapidly determine the DEP response curve from fewer experiments. For the purpose of determining an ideal sweep rate, homogeneous 6.08 μm polystyrene (PS) beads were used as a model system. Translatability of the sweep rate approach to ∼7 μm red blood cells (RBC) was then verified. An Au/Ti quadrapole electrode microfluidic device was used to separately subject particles and cells to 10Vpp AC electric fields at frequencies ranging from 0.010 to 2.0 MHz over sweep rates from 0.00080 to 0.17 MHz/s. PS beads exhibited negative DEP assembly over the frequencies explored due to Maxwell-Wagner interfacial polarizations. Results demonstrate that frequency sweep rates must be slower than particle polarization timescales to achieve reliable incremental polarizations; sweep rates near 0.00080 MHz/s yielded DEP behaviors very consistent with static frequency DEP responses for both PS beads and RBCs. PMID:24396548

  18. Moth hearing in response to bat echolocation calls manipulated independently in time and frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G; Waters, D A

    2000-08-22

    We measured the auditory responses of the noctuid moth Noctua pronuba to bat echolocation calls which were manipulated independently in time and frequency. Such manipulations are important in understanding how insect hearing influences the evolution of echolocation call characteristics. We manipulated the calls of three bat species (Rhinolophus hipposideros, Myotis nattereri and Pipistrellus pipistrellus) that use different echolocation call features by doubling their duration or reducing their frequency, and measured the auditory thresholds from the A1 cells of the moths. Knowing the auditory responses of the moth we tested three predictions. (i) The ranking of the audibility of unmanipulated calls to the moths should be predictable from their temporal and/or frequency structure. This was supported. (ii) Doubling the duration of the calls should increase their audibility by ca. 3 dB for all species. Their audibility did indeed increase by 2.1-3.5 dB. (iii) Reducing the frequency of the calls would increase their audibility for all species. Reducing the frequency had small effects for the two bat species which used short duration (2.7-3.6 ms) calls. However, the relatively long-duration (50 ms), largely constant-frequency calls of R. hipposideros increased in audibility by 21.6 dB when their frequency was halved. Time and frequency changes influence the audibility of calls to tympanate moths in different ways according to call design. Large changes in frequency and time had relatively small changes on the audibility of calls for short, largely broadband calls. Channelling energy into the second harmonic of the call substantially decreased the audibility of calls for bats which use long-duration, constant-frequency components in echolocation calls. We discuss our findings in the contexts of the evolution of both bat echolocation call design and the potential responses of insects which hear ultrasound. PMID:11467425

  19. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lehmann

    Full Text Available Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  20. General-form 3-3-3 interpolation kernel and its simplified frequency-response derivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tian-Bo

    2016-11-01

    An interpolation kernel is required in a wide variety of signal processing applications such as image interpolation and timing adjustment in digital communications. This article presents a general-form interpolation kernel called 3-3-3 interpolation kernel and derives its frequency response in a closed-form by using a simple derivation method. This closed-form formula is preliminary to designing various 3-3-3 interpolation kernels subject to a set of design constraints. The 3-3-3 interpolation kernel is formed through utilising the third-degree piecewise polynomials, and it is an even-symmetric function. Thus, it will suffice to consider only its right-hand side when deriving its frequency response. Since the right-hand side of the interpolation kernel contains three piecewise polynomials of the third degree, i.e. the degrees of the three piecewise polynomials are (3,3,3), we call it the 3-3-3 interpolation kernel. Once the general-form frequency-response formula is derived, we can systematically formulate the design of various 3-3-3 interpolation kernels subject to a set of design constraints, which are targeted for different interpolation applications. Therefore, the closed-form frequency-response expression is preliminary to the optimal design of various 3-3-3 interpolation kernels. We will use an example to show the optimal design of a 3-3-3 interpolation kernel based on the closed-form frequency-response expression.

  1. Frequency response of magnetoelectric effect in piezoelectric-magnetostrictive disk-ring composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Ru, E-mail: zhangruwl@njut.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wu Gaojian; Zhang Li [Department of Applied Physics, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Li Xin [College of Electronics and Information engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Zhang Ning [Department of Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China)

    2012-08-15

    A theoretical model is presented for frequency dependence of magnetoelectric (ME) effect in piezoelectric-magnetostrictive disk-ring composite structures. Expressions for ME voltage coefficients in piezoelectric-magnetostrictive (PE-MS) disk-ring and MS-PE disk-ring are obtained by solving elastodynamic equations. The calculated resonance frequency and frequency dependence of ME voltage coefficients are in good agreement with the experimental results. This model indicates better mechanical coupling in disk-ring structure than that in traditional layered structure, and this may be responsible for the enhancing ME effect. The analysis suggests the disk-ring composites structures are promising for magnetoelectric applications. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Frequency response of ME effect in PE-MS disk-ring composites structures is modeled. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculated results are in good agreement with the experimental results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This model indicates better mechanical coupling in disk-ring structure.

  2. The effect of feeding frequency on insulin and ghrelin responses in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Chambers, Edward S; Jeukendrup, Asker E;

    2008-01-01

    Recent work shows that increased meal frequency reduces ghrelin responses in sheep. Human research suggests there is an interaction between insulin and ghrelin. The effect of meal frequency on this interaction is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effect of feeding frequency on insulin...... trials (P>0.05), although the hormonal response patterns to the two meal feeding regimens were different. An inverse relationship was found between serum insulin and plasma ghrelin during the FAST andLOFREQ(MEAL) trials (P0.05). This study provides further evidence that the postprandial fall in ghrelin...... might be due, at least partially, to the rise in insulin and that high-frequency feeding may disrupt this relationship....

  3. Oscillating Frequency Response of a Langasite Crystal Microbalance in Liquid Phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi KANG; Huai Jin ZHANG; Xue Yong LIU; Da Zhong SHEN

    2005-01-01

    The frequency responses of a langasite crystal microbalance (LCM) in liquid phase were investigated. It was shown that the LCM possessed much stronger oscillating ability in liquid phase than that of the commonly used quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The frequency shifts of the LCM to the changes in mass loading, as well as viscosity and density of the liquid were measured. The LCM was applied to monitor the adsorption process of an ionic liquid film to ethanol vapor.

  4. Liquid-filled transient pressure measuring systems: A method for determining frequency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. C.; Englund, D. R., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    An equation is given and experimentally verified for computing the resonant frequency of liquid-filled transient pressure measuring systems. Resonant frequencies of 100 to 1000 Hz are typical of those systems tested. The effect of noncondensable gas bubbles on system response is described. A method for determining transducer volumetric compliance is presented. An example system is described and analyzed to demonstrate the use of the theory.

  5. Frequency response of the vestibulo-ocular reflex /VOR/ in the monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, U. W.; Henn, V.; Young, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The frequency response of the vestibulo-ocular reflex has been investigated in the alert monkey during sinusoidal rotation about a vertical axis in a frequency range of 0.001-0.5 Hz. Phase and gain of nystagmus slow phase velocity was determined. In the frequency range above 0.1 Hz, nystagmus slow phase velocity was in phase with (compensated for) head velocity. At lower frequencies, an increasing phase lead was present which could reach more than 90 deg. Gain fell off correspondingly at low frequencies. Calculated time constants were 10-40 s in different monkeys. Animals which had been exposed to numerous previous rotary stimuli in the laboratory showed much shorter time constants than did 'native' monkeys.

  6. Sheath-wave-related resonances in the frequency response of a cylindrical monopole in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A floating or negatively biased antenna immersed in a plasma is surrounded by an ion sheath. The antenna-sheath-plasma system may support slow surface waves at driving frequencies below the electron plasma frequency. Resonances associated with these so-called sheath waves are observed at certain frequencies in the antenna's response to an applied sinusoidal signal. A detailed experimental study of these resonances is presented here for a short cylindrical monopole in a low-pressure isotropic argon plasma. The effect on the resonance frequencies of a dc bias applied to the antenna and of plasma density and antenna length was investigated. Good agreement was obtained with the theoretical predictions derived from a known dispersion equation for sheath waves. From the experimental data, the relationship between sheath thickness and antenna potential, and the frequency dependence of the antenna admittance could be derived

  7. Calibration Scheme for Large Kinetic Inductance Detector Arrays Based on Readout Frequency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisigello, L.; Yates, S. J. C.; Murugesan, V.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) provides a way to build large ground-based sub-mm instruments such as NIKA and A-MKID. For such instruments, therefore, it is important to understand and characterize the response to ensure good linearity and calibration over a wide dynamic range. We propose to use the MKID readout frequency response to determine the MKID responsivity to an input optical source power. A signal can be measured in a KID as a change in the phase of the readout signal with respect to the KID resonant circle. Fundamentally, this phase change is due to a shift in the KID resonance frequency, in turn due to a radiation induced change in the quasiparticle number in the superconducting resonator. We show that the shift in resonant frequency can be determined from the phase shift by using KID phase versus frequency dependence using a previously measured resonant frequency. Working in this calculated resonant frequency, we gain near linearity and constant calibration to a constant optical signal applied in a wide range of operating points on the resonance and readout powers. This calibration method has three particular advantages: first, it is fast enough to be used to calibrate large arrays, with pixel counts in the thousands of pixels; second, it is based on data that are already necessary to determine KID positions; third, it can be done without applying any optical source in front of the array.

  8. Sampling frequency, response times and embedded signal filtration in fast, high efficiency liquid chromatography: A tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, M Farooq; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Kadjo, Akinde F; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2016-02-11

    With increasingly efficient columns, eluite peaks are increasingly narrower. To take full advantage of this, choice of the detector response time and the data acquisition rate a.k.a. detector sampling frequency, have become increasingly important. In this work, we revisit the concept of data sampling from the theorem variously attributed to Whittaker, Nyquist, Kotelnikov, and Shannon. Focusing on time scales relevant to the current practice of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and optical absorbance detection (the most commonly used method), even for very narrow simulated peaks Fourier transformation shows that theoretical minimum sampling frequency is still relatively low (digital filters. We show that the common wisdom of sampling 20 points per peak can be inadequate for high efficiency columns and that the sampling frequency and response choices do affect the peak shape. If the sampling frequency is too low or response time is too large, the observed peak shapes will not remain as narrow as they really are - this is especially true for high efficiency and high speed separations. It is shown that both sampling frequency and digital filtering affect the retention time, noise amplitude, peak shape and width in a complex fashion. We show how a square-wave driven light emitting diode source can reveal the nature of the embedded filter. We discuss time uncertainties related to the choice of sampling frequency. Finally, we suggest steps to obtain optimum results from a given system. PMID:26803000

  9. Calibration scheme for large Kinetic Inductance Detector Arrays based on Readout Frequency Response

    CERN Document Server

    Bisigello, L; Murugesan, V; Baselmans, J J A; Baryshev, A M

    2016-01-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) provides a way to build large ground based sub-mm instruments such as NIKA and A-MKID. For such instruments, therefore, it is important to understand and characterize the response to ensure good linearity and calibration over wide dynamic range. We propose to use the MKID readout frequency response to determine the MKID responsivity to an input optical source power. A signal can be measured in a KID as a change in the phase of the readout signal with respect to the KID resonant circle. Fundamentally, this phase change is due to a shift in the KID resonance frequency, in turn due to a radiation induced change in the quasiparticle number in the superconducting resonator. We show that shift in resonant frequency can be determined from the phase shift by using KID phase versus frequency dependence using a previously measured resonant frequency. Working in this calculated resonant frequency, we gain near linearity and constant calibration to a constant optical signal ap...

  10. Sampling frequency, response times and embedded signal filtration in fast, high efficiency liquid chromatography: A tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, M Farooq; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Kadjo, Akinde F; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2016-02-11

    With increasingly efficient columns, eluite peaks are increasingly narrower. To take full advantage of this, choice of the detector response time and the data acquisition rate a.k.a. detector sampling frequency, have become increasingly important. In this work, we revisit the concept of data sampling from the theorem variously attributed to Whittaker, Nyquist, Kotelnikov, and Shannon. Focusing on time scales relevant to the current practice of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and optical absorbance detection (the most commonly used method), even for very narrow simulated peaks Fourier transformation shows that theoretical minimum sampling frequency is still relatively low (digital filters. We show that the common wisdom of sampling 20 points per peak can be inadequate for high efficiency columns and that the sampling frequency and response choices do affect the peak shape. If the sampling frequency is too low or response time is too large, the observed peak shapes will not remain as narrow as they really are - this is especially true for high efficiency and high speed separations. It is shown that both sampling frequency and digital filtering affect the retention time, noise amplitude, peak shape and width in a complex fashion. We show how a square-wave driven light emitting diode source can reveal the nature of the embedded filter. We discuss time uncertainties related to the choice of sampling frequency. Finally, we suggest steps to obtain optimum results from a given system.

  11. Study on the frequency response mechanisms of thermal stress induced by thermal stratification oscillation phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature oscillation produced by thermal stratification phenomenon induces thermal fatigue damages on structures of nuclear components, which should be prevented. To evaluate thermal fatigue, the frequency response function was developed. However, this theoretical method does not take particular effects of thermal stratification oscillation into account. To clarify these effects, finite element simulations were conducted with two fluid temperature models. Based on mechanisms of the effects, the frequency response function was improved. Agreement with the results of the finite element simulations confirmed the proposed function. (author)

  12. Sizing of an Energy Storage System for Grid Inertial Response and Primary Frequency Reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Vaclav; Chaudhary, Sanjay Kumar; Stroe, Daniel Loan;

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale integration of renewable energy sources in power system leads to the replacement of conventional power plants (CPPs) and consequently challenges in power system reliability and security are introduced. This study is focused on improving the grid frequency response after a contingency...... event in the power system with a high penetration of wind power. An energy storage system (ESS) might be a viable solution for providing inertial response and primary frequency regulation. A methodology has been presented here for the sizing of the ESS in terms of required power and energy. It describes...

  13. Quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Alqahtani, Mubarak

    2016-01-01

    We study an azimuthally-symmetric boost-invariant quark-gluon plasma using quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics including the effects of both shear and bulk viscosities. We compare results obtained using the quasiparticle method with the standard anisotropic hydrodynamics and viscous hydrodynamics. We consider the predictions of the three methods for the differential particle spectra and mean transverse momentum. We find that the three methods agree for small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\eta/s$, but show differences at large $\\eta/s$. Additionally, we find that the standard anisotropic hydrodynamics method shows suppressed production at low transverse-momentum compared to the other two methods, and the bulk-viscous correction can drive the primordial particle spectra negative at large $p_T$ in viscous hydrodynamics.

  14. Averaging anisotropic cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine the effects of spatial inhomogeneities on irrotational anisotropic cosmologies by looking at the average properties of anisotropic pressure-free models. Adopting the Buchert scheme, we recast the averaged scalar equations in Bianchi-type form and close the standard system by introducing a propagation formula for the average shear magnitude. We then investigate the evolution of anisotropic average vacuum models and those filled with pressureless matter. In the latter case we show that the backreaction effects can modify the familiar Kasner-like singularity and potentially remove Mixmaster-type oscillations. The presence of nonzero average shear in our equations also allows us to examine the constraints that a phase of backreaction-driven accelerated expansion might put on the anisotropy of the averaged domain. We close by assessing the status of these and other attempts to define and calculate 'average' spacetime behaviour in general relativity

  15. Spatial Frequency Dependence of the Human Visual Cortex Response on Temporal Frequency Modulation Studied by fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mirzajani

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: The brain response to temporal frequencies (TF has been already reported. However, there is no study on different TF with respect to various spatial frequencies (SF. Materials and Methods: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was done by a 1.5 T General Electric system for 14 volunteers (9 males and 5 females, aged 19–26 years during square-wave reversal checkerboard visual stimulation with different temporal frequencies of 4, 6, 8 and 10 Hz in 2 states of low SF of 0.4 and high SF of 8 cycles/degree (cpd. All subjects had normal visual acuity of 20/20 based on Snellen’s fraction in each eye with good binocular vision and normal visual field based on confrontation test. The mean luminance of the entire checkerboard was 161.4 cd/m2 and the black and white check contrast was 96%. The activation map was created using the data obtained from the block designed fMRI study. Pixels with a Z score above a threshold of 2.3, at a statistical significance level of 0.05, were considered activated. The average percentage blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD signal change for all activated pixels within the occipital lobe, multiplied by the total number of activated pixels within the occipital lobe, was used as an index for the magnitude of the fMRI signal at each state of TF&SF. Results: The magnitude of the fMRI signal in response to different TF’s was maximum at 6 Hz for a high SF value of 8 cpd; it was however, maximum at a TF of 8 Hz for a low SF of 0.4 cpd. Conclusion: The results of this study agree with those of animal invasive neurophysiologic studies showing SF and TF selectivity of neurons in visual cortex. These results can be useful for vision therapy and selecting visual tasks in fMRI studies.

  16. Molecular anisotropic magnetoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Fabian; Heinze, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2015-12-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, we demonstrate that the effect of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) can be enhanced by orders of magnitude with respect to conventional bulk ferromagnets in junctions containing molecules sandwiched between ferromagnetic leads. We study ballistic transport in metal-benzene complexes contacted by 3 d transition-metal wires. We show that a gigantic AMR can arise from spin-orbit coupling effects in the leads, drastically enhanced by orbital-symmetry filtering properties of the molecules. We further discuss how this molecular anisotropic magnetoresistance (MAMR) can be tuned by the proper choice of materials and their electronic properties.

  17. Anisotropic elastic plates

    CERN Document Server

    Hwu, Chyanbin

    2010-01-01

    As structural elements, anisotropic elastic plates find wide applications in modern technology. The plates here are considered to be subjected to not only in plane load but also transverse load. In other words, both plane and plate bending problems as well as the stretching-bending coupling problems are all explained in this book. In addition to the introduction of the theory of anisotropic elasticity, several important subjects have are discussed in this book such as interfaces, cracks, holes, inclusions, contact problems, piezoelectric materials, thermoelastic problems and boundary element a

  18. Mixture of Anisotropic Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florkowski, W.; Maj, R.

    The recently introduced approach describing coupled quark and gluon anisotropic fluids is generalized to include explicitly the transitions between quarks and gluons. We study the effects of such processes on the thermalization rate of anisotropic systems. We find that the quark-gluon transitions may enhance the overall thermalization rate in the cases where the initial momentum anisotropies correspond to mixed oblate-prolate or prolate configurations. On the other hand, no effect on the thermalization rate is found in the case of oblate configurations. The observed regularities are connected with the late-time behavior of the analyzed systems which is described either by the exponential decay or the power law.

  19. Mixture of anisotropic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Florkowski, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    The recently introduced approach describing coupled quark and gluon anisotropic fluids is generalized to include explicitly the transitions between quarks and gluons. We study the effects of such processes on the thermalization rate of anisotropic systems. We find that the quark-gluon transitions may enhance the overall thermalization rate in the cases where the initial momentum anisotropies correspond to mixed oblate-prolate or prolate configurations. On the other hand, no effect on the thermalization rate is found in the case of oblate configurations. The observed regularities are connected with the late-time behavior of the analyzed systems which is described either by the exponential decay or the power law.

  20. Anisotropic Weyl invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Nadal, Guillem

    2016-01-01

    We consider a non-relativistic free scalar field theory with a type of anisotropic scale invariance in which the number of coordinates "scaling like time" is generically greater than one. We propose the Cartesian product of two curved spaces, with the metric of each space parameterized by the other space, as a notion of curved background to which the theory can be extended. We study this type of geometries, and find a family of extensions of the theory to curved backgrounds in which the anisotropic scale invariance is promoted to a local, Weyl-type symmetry.

  1. The frequency response of dynamic friction: Enhanced rate-and-state models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabboi, A.; Putelat, T.; Woodhouse, J.

    2016-07-01

    The prediction and control of friction-induced vibration requires a sufficiently accurate constitutive law for dynamic friction at the sliding interface: for linearised stability analysis, this requirement takes the form of a frictional frequency response function. Systematic measurements of this frictional frequency response function are presented for small samples of nylon and polycarbonate sliding against a glass disc. Previous efforts to explain such measurements from a theoretical model have failed, but an enhanced rate-and-state model is presented which is shown to match the measurements remarkably well. The tested parameter space covers a range of normal forces (10-50 N), of sliding speeds (1-10 mm/s) and frequencies (100-2000 Hz). The key new ingredient in the model is the inclusion of contact stiffness to take into account elastic deformations near the interface. A systematic methodology is presented to discriminate among possible variants of the model, and then to identify the model parameter values.

  2. Anisotropic models for compact stars

    CERN Document Server

    Maurya, S K; Ray, Saibal; Dayanandan, Baiju

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper we obtain an anisotropic analogue of Durgapal-Fuloria (1985) perfect fluid solution. The methodology consists of contraction of anisotropic factor $\\Delta$ by the help of both metric potentials $e^{\

  3. Online tracking of instantaneous frequency and amplitude of dynamical system response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank Pai, P.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a sliding-window tracking (SWT) method for accurate tracking of the instantaneous frequency and amplitude of arbitrary dynamic response by processing only three (or more) most recent data points. Teager-Kaiser algorithm (TKA) is a well-known four-point method for online tracking of frequency and amplitude. Because finite difference is used in TKA, its accuracy is easily destroyed by measurement and/or signal-processing noise. Moreover, because TKA assumes the processed signal to be a pure harmonic, any moving average in the signal can destroy the accuracy of TKA. On the other hand, because SWT uses a constant and a pair of windowed regular harmonics to fit the data and estimate the instantaneous frequency and amplitude, the influence of any moving average is eliminated. Moreover, noise filtering is an implicit capability of SWT when more than three data points are used, and this capability increases with the number of processed data points. To compare the accuracy of SWT and TKA, Hilbert-Huang transform is used to extract accurate time-varying frequencies and amplitudes by processing the whole data set without assuming the signal to be harmonic. Frequency and amplitude trackings of different amplitude- and frequency-modulated signals, vibrato in music, and nonlinear stationary and non-stationary dynamic signals are studied. Results show that SWT is more accurate, robust, and versatile than TKA for online tracking of frequency and amplitude.

  4. Determining generator parameters of Camargos hydroelectric power plant through frequency response measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Sebastiao E.M. de; Padua Guarini, Antonio de [Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletrica (CEPEL), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, Joao A. de; Valgas, Helio M.; Pinto, Roberto del Giudice R. [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This work describes the results of the set frequency response tests performed in the generator number 2, 6.9 kV, 25 MVA, of Camargos hydroelectric power plant, CEMIG, and the parameters relatives to determined structures of model. This tests are unpublished in Brazil. (author) 7 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. A noise level prediction method based on electro-mechanical frequency response function for capacitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyu Zhu

    Full Text Available The capacitors in high-voltage direct-current (HVDC converter stations radiate a lot of audible noise which can reach higher than 100 dB. The existing noise level prediction methods are not satisfying enough. In this paper, a new noise level prediction method is proposed based on a frequency response function considering both electrical and mechanical characteristics of capacitors. The electro-mechanical frequency response function (EMFRF is defined as the frequency domain quotient of the vibration response and the squared capacitor voltage, and it is obtained from impulse current experiment. Under given excitations, the vibration response of the capacitor tank is the product of EMFRF and the square of the given capacitor voltage in frequency domain, and the radiated audible noise is calculated by structure acoustic coupling formulas. The noise level under the same excitations is also measured in laboratory, and the results are compared with the prediction. The comparison proves that the noise prediction method is effective.

  6. Frequency response for electromotility of isolated outer hair cells of the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, HP; vanDijk, P; Segenhout, HM

    1996-01-01

    Frequency and impulse responses were determined for isolated guinea pig outer hair cells by electrically stimulating the cells between two wire electrodes with white noise. Cells were attached to the bottom of a small culture dish at one end while the other end was freely moving. Results have the ch

  7. Estimation of the auto frequency response function at unexcited points using dummy masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Naoki; Yaginuma, Shinji; Onodera, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Takuya

    2015-02-01

    If structures with complex shapes have space limitations, vibration tests using an exciter or impact hammer for the excitation are difficult. Although measuring the auto frequency response function at an unexcited point may not be practical via a vibration test, it can be obtained by assuming that the inertia acting on a dummy mass is an external force on the target structure upon exciting a different excitation point. We propose a method to estimate the auto frequency response functions at unexcited points by attaching a small mass (dummy mass), which is comparable to the accelerometer mass. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated by comparing the auto frequency response functions estimated at unexcited points in a beam structure to those obtained from numerical simulations. We also consider random measurement errors by finite element analysis and vibration tests, but not bias errors. Additionally, the applicability of the proposed method is demonstrated by applying it to estimate the auto frequency response function of the lower arm in a car suspension.

  8. Building the analytical response in frequency domain of AC biased bolometers Application to Planck/HFI

    CERN Document Server

    Sauvé, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Context: Bolometers are high sensitivity detector commonly used in Infrared astronomy. The HFI instrument of the Planck satellite makes extensive use of them, but after the satellite launch two electronic related problems revealed critical. First an unexpected excess response of detectors at low optical excitation frequency for {\

  9. Effect of ischemia and cooling on the response to high frequency stimulation in rat tail nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning; Feldbæk Nielsen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Bodil;

    2000-01-01

    In normal rat tail nerves the effect of temperature and ischemia on the response to long-term high frequency stimulation (HFS) (143 Hz) was studied. The effect of temperature was studied in two consecutive tests at 14 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Prior to the HFS the peak-to-peak amplitude (PP-amp...

  10. Brainstem frequency-following response recorded from one vertical and three horizontal electrode derivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, G C; Bagasan, B; Sulahian, J

    2001-02-01

    The human brainstem frequency-following response reflects neural activity to periodic auditory stimuli. Responses were simultaneously recorded from one vertically oriented and three horizontally oriented electrode derivations. Nine participants each received a total of 16,000 tone repetitions, 4,000 for each of four stimulus frequencies: 222, 266, 350, and 450 Hz. The responses were digitally filtered, quantified by correlation and spectral analysis, and statistically evaluated by repeated measure analysis of variance. While the various horizontal derivation responses did not differ from each other in latency (values tightly clustered around M= 2.60 msec.), the vertical derivation response occurred significantly later (M=4.38 msec.). The smaller latency for the horizontal responses suggests an origin within the acoustic nerve, while the larger latency for the vertical response suggests a central brainstem origin. The largest response amplitude resulted from gold "tiptrode" electrodes placed in each auditory meatus, suggesting that this electrode derivation provided the most accurate (noninvasive) assessment of short-latency events originating at the level of the auditory nerve. PMID:11322612

  11. On the Newtonian anisotropic configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shojai, F. [University of Tehran, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Foundations of Physics Group, School of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fazel, M.R.; Stepanian, A. [University of Tehran, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kohandel, M. [Alzahra University, Department of Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper we are concerned with the effects of an anisotropic pressure on the boundary conditions of the anisotropic Lane-Emden equation and the homology theorem. Some new exact solutions of this equation are derived. Then some of the theorems governing the Newtonian perfect fluid star are extended, taking the anisotropic pressure into account. (orig.)

  12. Anisotropic Lyra cosmology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B B Bhowmik; A Rajput

    2004-06-01

    Anisotropic Bianchi Type-I cosmological models have been studied on the basis of Lyra's geometry. Two types of models, one with constant deceleration parameter and the other with variable deceleration parameter have been derived by considering a time-dependent displacement field.

  13. Dynamics of Anisotropic Universes

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, J

    2006-01-01

    We present a general study of the dynamical properties of Anisotropic Bianchi Universes in the context of Einstein General Relativity. Integrability results using Kovalevskaya exponents are reported and connected to general knowledge about Bianchi dynamics. Finally, dynamics toward singularity in Bianchi type VIII and IX universes are showed to be equivalent in some precise sence.

  14. Multisensory stimuli elicit altered oscillatory brain responses at gamma frequencies in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Stone

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Deficits in auditory and visual unisensory responses are well documented in patients with schizophrenia; however, potential abnormalities elicited from multisensory audio-visual stimuli are less understood. Further, schizophrenia patients have shown abnormal patterns in task-related and task-independent oscillatory brain activity, particularly in the gamma frequency band. We examined oscillatory responses to basic unisensory and multisensory stimuli in schizophrenia patients (N = 46 and healthy controls (N = 57 using magnetoencephalography (MEG. Time-frequency decomposition was performed to determine regions of significant changes in gamma band power by group in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli relative to baseline levels. Results showed significant behavioral differences between groups in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. In addition, time-frequency analysis revealed significant decreases and increases in gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls, which emerged both early and late over both sensory and frontal regions in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. Unisensory gamma-band power predicted multisensory gamma-band power differently by group. Furthermore, gamma-band power in these regions predicted performance in select measures of the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS test battery differently by group. These results reveal a unique pattern of task-related gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to controls that may indicate reduced inhibition in combination with impaired oscillatory mechanisms in patients with schizophrenia.

  15. Calibration scheme for large Kinetic Inductance Detector Arrays based on Readout Frequency Response

    OpenAIRE

    Bisigello, L.; Yates, S J C; Murugesan, V.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) provides a way to build large ground based sub-mm instruments such as NIKA and A-MKID. For such instruments, therefore, it is important to understand and characterize the response to ensure good linearity and calibration over wide dynamic range. We propose to use the MKID readout frequency response to determine the MKID responsivity to an input optical source power. A signal can be measured in a KID as a change in the phase of the readout signal wi...

  16. Frequency-response identification of XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Mark B.

    1987-01-01

    The timely design and development of the next generation of tilt-rotor aircraft (JVX) depend heavily on the in-depth understanding of existing XV-15 dynamics and the availability of fully validated simulation models. Previous studies have considered aircraft and simulation trim characteristics, but analyses of basic flight vehicle dynamics were limited to qualitative pilot evaluation. The present study has the following objectives: documentation and evaluation of XV-15 bare-airframe dynamics; comparison of aircraft and simulation responses; and development of a validated transfer-function description of the XV-15 needed for future studies. A nonparametric frequency-response approach is used which does not depend on assumed model order or structure. Transfer-function representations are subsequently derived which fit the frequency responses in the bandwidth of greatest concern for piloted handling-qualities and control-system applications.

  17. Behavioral responses by grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) to high frequency sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Gordon D; Donovan, Carl; Götz, Thomas; Janik, Vincent M

    2014-02-15

    The use of high frequency sonar is now commonplace in the marine environment. Most marine mammals rely on sound to navigate, and for detecting prey, and there is the potential that the acoustic signals of sonar could cause behavioral responses. To investigate this, we carried out behavioral response tests with grey seals to two sonar systems (200 and 375 kHz systems). Results showed that both systems had significant effects on the seals behavior; when the 200 kHz sonar was active, seals spent significantly more time hauled out and, although seals remained swimming during operation of the 375 kHz sonar, they were distributed further from the sonar. The results show that although peak sonar frequencies may be above marine mammal hearing ranges, high levels of sound can be produced within their hearing ranges that elicit behavioral responses; this has clear implications for the widespread use of sonar in the marine environment.

  18. The low-frequency dielectric response of charged oblate spheroidal particles immersed in an electrolyte

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Chang-Yu; Sen, Pabitra N

    2016-01-01

    We study the low-frequency polarization response of a surface-charged oblate spheroidal particle immersed in an electrolyte solution. Because the charged spheroid attracts counter-ions which form the electric double layer around the particle, using usual boundary conditions at the interface between the particle and electrolyte can be quite complicated and challenging. Hence, we generalize Fixman's boundary conditions, originally derived for spherical particles, to the case of the charged oblate spheroid. Given two different counter-ion distributions in the thin electric double layer limit, we obtain analytic expressions for the polarization coefficients to the first non-trivial order in frequency. We find that the polarization response normal to the symmetry axis depends on the total amount of charge carried by the oblate spheroid while that parallel to the symmetry axis is suppressed when there is less charge on the edge of the spheroid. We further study the overall dielectric response for a dilute suspensio...

  19. Frequency-domain correction of sensor dynamic error for step response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuang-Long; Xu, Ke-Jun

    2012-11-01

    To obtain accurate results in dynamic measurements it is required that the sensors should have good dynamic performance. In practice, sensors have non-ideal dynamic characteristics due to their small damp ratios and low natural frequencies. In this case some dynamic error correction methods can be adopted for dealing with the sensor responses to eliminate the effect of their dynamic characteristics. The frequency-domain correction of sensor dynamic error is a common method. Using the existing calculation method, however, the correct frequency-domain correction function (FCF) cannot be obtained according to the step response calibration experimental data. This is because of the leakage error and invalid FCF value caused by the cycle extension of the finite length step input-output intercepting data. In order to solve these problems the data splicing preprocessing and FCF interpolation are put forward, and the FCF calculation steps as well as sensor dynamic error correction procedure by the calculated FCF are presented in this paper. The proposed solution is applied to the dynamic error correction of the bar-shaped wind tunnel strain gauge balance so as to verify its effectiveness. The dynamic error correction results show that the adjust time of the balance step response is shortened to 10 ms (shorter than 1/30 before correction) after frequency-domain correction, and the overshoot is fallen within 5% (less than 1/10 before correction) as well. The dynamic measurement accuracy of the balance is improved significantly.

  20. Analysis of the frequency-dependent response to wave forcing in the extratropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Haklander

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A quasigeostrophic model for the frequency-dependent response of the zonal-mean flow to planetary-wave forcing at Northern Hemisphere (NH midlatitudes is applied to 4-D-Var ECMWF analysis data for six extended winter seasons. The theoretical response is a non-linear function of the frequency of the forcing, the thermal damping time α−1, and a scaling parameter μ which includes the aspect ratio of the meridional to the vertical length scale of the response. Non-linear regression of the calculated response from the analyses onto the theoretical response yields height-dependent estimates for both α−1 and μ. The thermal damping time estimated from this dynamical model is about 2 days in the troposphere, 7–10 days in the stratosphere, and 2–4 days in the lower mesosphere. These estimates generally lie within the range of existing estimates, although the values we find for the troposphere are significantly smaller than those calculated in several radiative transfer modeling studies. At most levels, the estimates for μ are significantly lower than can be derived from scaling arguments that apply outside the forcing region. We illustrate with an example how the response of the meridional circulation inside the forcing area can have a higher aspect ratio than the effective response outside the forcing area.

  1. High Frequency Acoustic Response Characterization and Analysis of the Deep Throttling Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiano, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Common Extensive Cryogenic Engine program demonstrated the operation of a deep throttling engine design. The program, spanning five years from August 2005 to July 2010, funded testing through four separate engine demonstration test series. Along with successful completion of multiple objectives, a discrete response of approximately 4000 Hz was discovered and explored throughout the program. The typical low-amplitude acoustic response was evident in the chamber measurement through almost every operating condition; however, at certain off-nominal operating conditions, the response became discrete with higher amplitude. This paper summarizes the data reduction, characterization, and analysis of the 4,000 Hz response for the entire program duration, using the large amount of data collected. Upon first encountering the response, new objectives and instrumentation were incorporated in future test series to specifically collect 4,000 Hz data. The 4,000 Hz response was identified as being related to the first tangential acoustic mode by means of frequency estimation and spatial decomposition. The latter approach showed that the effective node line of the mode was aligned with the manifold propellant inlets with standing waves and quasi-standing waves present at various times. Contour maps that contain instantaneous frequency and amplitude trackings of the response were generated as a significant improvement to historical manual approaches of data reduction presentation. Signal analysis and dynamic data reduction also uncovered several other features of the response including a stable limit cycle, the progressive engagement of subsequent harmonics, the U-shaped time history, an intermittent response near the test-based neutral stability region, other acoustic modes, and indications of modulation with a separate subsynchronous response. Although no engine damage related to the acoustic mode was noted, the peak-to-peak fluctuating pressure amplitude achieved 12.1% of the

  2. Broadband frequency and angular response of a sinusoidal bull’s eye antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaskoetxea, U.; Navarro-Cía, M.; Beruete, M.

    2016-07-01

    A thorough experimental study of the frequency and beaming angle response of a metallic leaky-wave bull’s eye antenna working at 77 GHz with a sinusoidally corrugated profile is presented. The beam scanning property of these antennas as frequency is varied is experimentally demonstrated and corroborated through theoretical and numerical results. From the experimental results the dispersion diagram of the n  =  ‑1 and n  =  ‑2 space harmonics is extracted, and the operation at different frequency regimes is identified and discussed. In order to show the contribution of each half of the antenna, numerical examples of the near-field behavior are also displayed. Overall, experimental results are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with theoretical and numerical calculations. Finally, an analysis of the beamwidth as a function of frequency is performed, showing that it can achieve values below 1.5° in a fractional bandwidth of 4% around the operation frequency, which is an interesting frequency-stable broadside radiation.

  3. Odd-frequency Cooper pairs in two-band superconductors and their magnetic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Akihiro

    2015-12-01

    We discuss the appearance of odd-frequency Cooper pairs in two-band superconductors by solving the Gor'kov equation analytically. We introduce the equal-time s -wave pair potentials as realized in MgB2 and iron pnictides. Although the order parameter symmetry is conventional, the band degree of freedom enriches the symmetry variety of pairing correlations. The hybridization and the asymmetry between the two conduction bands induce odd-frequency pairs as a subdominant pairing correlation in the uniform ground state. To study the magnetic response of odd-frequency Cooper pairs, we analyze the Meissner kernel represented by the Gor'kov Green function. In contrast to the even-frequency pairs linked to the pair potential, the induced odd-frequency Cooper pairs indicate a paramagnetic property. We also discuss the relation between the amplitude of the odd-frequency pairing correlation and the stability of superconducting states in terms of the self-consistent equation for the pair potential.

  4. Correspondence between phasor transforms and frequency response function in RLC circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Abdalla, Hassan Mohamed Abdelalim

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of RLC circuits is usually made by considering phasor transforms of sinusoidal signals (characterized by constant amplitude, period and phase) that allow the calculation of the AC steady state of RLC circuits by solving simple algebraic equations. In this paper I try to show that phasor representation of RLC circuits is analogue to consider the frequency response function (commonly designated by FRF) of the total impedance of the circuit. In this way I derive accurate expressions for the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies and their corresponding values of impedances of the parallel and series RLC circuits respectively, notwithstanding the presence of damping effects.

  5. Implications of twinning kinetics on the frequency response in NiMnGa actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faran, Eilon; Shilo, Doron

    2012-04-01

    The explicit kinetic relation for twin wall motion in NiMnGa is used to correlate basic material properties to magneto-mechanical actuation rates in these crystals. In particular, we identify two parameters: the Peierls energy barrier and the twin wall mobility, which directly determine the dynamic response of NiMnGa actuators at frequencies above 10 Hz. Comparison between the kinetics of type I and type II twin walls reveals a correlation between the Peierls energy barrier and the commonly used twinning stress property. However, it is shown that twinning stress dictates twin wall dynamics only at very slow frequencies, typically below 1 Hz.

  6. Aeroelastic modal dynamics of wind turbines including anisotropic effects

    OpenAIRE

    Skjoldan, Peter Fisker; Hansen, Morten Hartvig; Rubak, Rune; Thomsen, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Several methods for aeroelastic modal analysis of a rotating wind turbine are developed and used to analyse the modal dynamics of two simplified models and a complex model in isotropic and anisotropic conditions. The Coleman transformation is used to enable extraction of the modal frequencies, damping, and periodic mode shapes of a rotating wind turbine by describing the rotor degrees of freedom in the inertial frame. This approach is valid only for an isotropic system. Anisotropic systems, e...

  7. Gamma-beam propagation in the anisotropic medium

    OpenAIRE

    V.A. Maisheev

    1997-01-01

    Propagation of gamma-beam in the anisotropic medium is considered. The simpliest example of such a medium of the general type is a combination of the two linearly polarized monochromatic laser waves with different frequencies (dichromatic wave). The optical properties of this combination are described with the use of the permittivity tensor. The refractive indices and polarization characteristics of normal electromagnetic waves propagating in the anisotropic medium are found. The relations, d...

  8. Spectral fitting inversion of low-frequency normal modes with self-coupling and cross-coupling of toroidal and spheroidal multiplets: numerical experiments to estimate the isotropic and anisotropic velocity structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    The aspherical structure of the Earth is described in terms of lateral heterogeneity and anisotropy of the P- and S-wave velocities, density heterogeneity, ellipticity and rotation of the Earth and undulation of the discontinuity interfaces of the seismic wave velocities. Its structure significantly influences the normal mode spectra of the Earth's free oscillation in the form of cross-coupling between toroidal and spheroidal multiplets and self-coupling between the singlets forming them. Thus, the aspherical structure must be conversely estimated from the free oscillation spectra influenced by the cross-coupling and self-coupling. In the present study, we improve a spectral fitting inversion algorithm which was developed in a previous study to retrieve the global structures of the isotropic and anisotropic velocities of the P and S waves from the free oscillation spectra. The main improvement is that the geographical distribution of the intensity of the S-wave azimuthal anisotropy is represented by a nonlinear combination of structure coefficients for the anisotropic velocity structure, whereas in the previous study it was expanded into a generalized spherical harmonic series. Consequently, the improved inversion algorithm reduces the number of unknown parameters that must be determined compared to the previous inversion algorithm and employs a one-step inversion method by which the structure coefficients for the isotropic and anisotropic velocities are directly estimated from the fee oscillation spectra. The applicability of the improved inversion is examined by several numerical experiments using synthetic spectral data, which are produced by supposing a variety of isotropic and anisotropic velocity structures, earthquake source parameters and station-event pairs. Furthermore, the robustness of the inversion algorithm is investigated with respect to the back-ground noise contaminating the spectral data as well as truncating the series expansions by finite terms

  9. Frequency and Phase Synchronization in Neuromagnetic Cortical Responses to Flickering-Color Stimuli

    CERN Document Server

    Timashev, S F; Yulmetyev, R M; Demin, S A; Panischev, O Yu; Shimojo, S; Bhattacharya, J

    2009-01-01

    In our earlier study dealing with the analysis of neuromagnetic responses (magnetoencephalograms - MEG) to flickering-color stimuli for a group of control human subjects (9 volunteers) and a patient with photosensitive epilepsy (a 12-year old girl), it was shown that Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) was able to identify specific differences in the responses of each organism. The high specificity of individual MEG responses manifested itself in the values of FNS parameters for both chaotic and resonant components of the original signal. The present study applies the FNS cross-correlation function to the analysis of correlations between the MEG responses simultaneously measured at spatially separated points of the human cortex processing the red-blue flickering color stimulus. It is shown that the cross-correlations for control (healthy) subjects are characterized by frequency and phase synchronization at different points of the cortex, with the dynamics of neuromagnetic responses being determined by the low-fr...

  10. Scattering of magnetosonic waves in a relativistic and anisotropic magnetized plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moortgat, J.B.; Kuijpers, J.M.E.

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational waves (GW) propagating through a magnetized plasma excite low-frequency magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. In this paper, we investigate whether these waves can produce observable radio emission at higher frequencies by scattering on an anisotropic intrinsically relativistic distribution

  11. Frequency Domain Analysis for Assessing Fluid Responsiveness by Using Instantaneous Pulse Rate Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chen Lin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the ICU, fluid therapy is conventional strategy for the patient in shock. However, only half of ICU patients have well-responses to fluid therapy, and fluid loading in non-responsive patient delays definitive therapy. Prediction of fluid responsiveness (FR has become intense topic in clinic. Most of conventional FR prediction method based on time domain analysis, and it is limited ability to indicate FR. This study proposed a method which predicts FR based on frequency domain analysis, named instantaneous pulse rate variability (iPRV. iPRV provides a new indication in very high frequency (VHF range (0.4-0.8Hz of spectrum for peripheral responses. Twenty six healthy subjects participated this study and photoplethysmography signal was recorded in supine baseline, during head-up tilt (HUT, and passive leg raising (PLR, which induces variation of venous return and helps for quantitative assessment of FR individually. The result showed the spectral power of VHF decreased during HUT (573.96±756.36 ms2 in baseline; 348.00±434.92 ms2 in HUT and increased during PLR (573.96±756.36 ms2 in baseline; 718.92±973.70 ms2 in PLR, which present the compensated regulation of venous return and FR. This study provides an effective indicator for assessing FR in frequency domain and has potential to be a reliable system in ICU.

  12. Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique for identifying nonlinear structural elements from frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Zheng, G. T.

    2016-02-01

    A simple and general Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique is proposed for identifying the parameters or the mathematical model of a nonlinear structural element with steady-state primary harmonic frequency response functions (FRFs). The Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness is defined as the complex ratio between the internal force and the displacement response of unknown element. Obtained with the test data of responses' frequencies and amplitudes, the real and imaginary part of Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness are plotted as discrete points in a three dimensional space over the displacement amplitude and the frequency, which are called the real and the imaginary Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness map, respectively. These points will form a repeatable surface as the Equivalent Dynamic stiffness is only a function of the corresponding data as derived in the paper. The mathematical model of the unknown element can then be obtained by surface-fitting these points with special functions selected by priori knowledge of the nonlinear type or with ordinary polynomials if the type of nonlinearity is not pre-known. An important merit of this technique is its capability of dealing with strong nonlinearities owning complicated frequency response behaviors such as jumps and breaks in resonance curves. In addition, this technique could also greatly simplify the test procedure. Besides there is no need to pre-identify the underlying linear parameters, the method uses the measured data of excitation forces and responses without requiring a strict control of the excitation force during the test. The proposed technique is demonstrated and validated with four classical single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) numerical examples and one experimental example. An application of this technique for identification of nonlinearity from multiple-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) systems is also illustrated.

  13. Prediction of power system frequency response after generator outages using neural nets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djukanovic, M.B.; Popovic, D.P. (Electrotechnicki Inst. ' Nikola Tesla' , Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Sobajic, D.J.; Pao, Y.-H. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1993-09-01

    A new methodology is presented for estimating the frequency behaviour of power systems necessary for an indication of under-frequency load shedding in steady-state security assessment. It is well known that large structural disturbances such as generator tripping or load outages can initiate cascading outages, system separation into islands, and even the complete breakup. The approach provides a fairly accurate method of estimating the system average frequency response without making simplifications or neglecting non-linearities and small time constants in the equations of generating units, voltage regulators and turbines. The efficiency of the new procedure is demonstrated using the New England power system model for a series of characteristic perturbations. The validity of the proposed approach is verified by comparison with the simulation of short-term dynamics including effects of control and automatic devices. (author)

  14. Comparison of the frequency response characteristics of catheter-mounted piezoelectric and micromanometric phonotransducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, J C; Layton, S A; Rubal, B J

    1989-05-01

    This study compares the frequency response characteristics of catheter-mounted piezoelectric sound transducers with micromanometric transducers. The tip of a 8F catheter with two piezoelectric transducers and two micromanometers was inserted into a water-filled chamber that had a speaker fixed at one end. The speaker was driven by a power amplifier and sine wave generator. The outputs of the transducers were connected to a low-level amplifier. The piezoelectric transducer behaved as a tunable high-pass filter that could be modified by altering the input impedance of the low level amplifier; the frequency response characteristics were examined at five input impedances ranging from 0.96 to 11.8 megohms. The peak-to-peak outputs of the piezoelectric and pressure transducers were recorded at frequency ranges from DC to 1 kHz with a wide-band oscilloscope. The ratio of the outputs from the piezotransducer and micromanometer (Vph/Vpr) was plotted vs. frequency for each input impedance and analyzed to determine the piezotransducer's output resistance and equivalent capacitance; roll-off frequencies were then calculated. The equivalent capacitance of the piezo-element was determined to be 500-700 picofarads. Series capacitance acted with network resistance to produce a predictable frequency-dependent change in signal amplitude and phase angle. The inherent noise of the pressure transducer was found to be approximately 0.2 mm Hg, while the noise of the piezoelectric transducer was immeasurably low. The piezoelectric phonotransducers were superior to micromanometer transducers in their higher gain and lower noise, suggesting that these transducers may prove useful to physiologic and clinical studies for measuring intravascular sound. PMID:2720766

  15. Responses of the ear to low frequency sounds, infrasound and wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt, Alec N; Hullar, Timothy E

    2010-09-01

    Infrasonic sounds are generated internally in the body (by respiration, heartbeat, coughing, etc) and by external sources, such as air conditioning systems, inside vehicles, some industrial processes and, now becoming increasingly prevalent, wind turbines. It is widely assumed that infrasound presented at an amplitude below what is audible has no influence on the ear. In this review, we consider possible ways that low frequency sounds, at levels that may or may not be heard, could influence the function of the ear. The inner ear has elaborate mechanisms to attenuate low frequency sound components before they are transmitted to the brain. The auditory portion of the ear, the cochlea, has two types of sensory cells, inner hair cells (IHC) and outer hair cells (OHC), of which the IHC are coupled to the afferent fibers that transmit "hearing" to the brain. The sensory stereocilia ("hairs") on the IHC are "fluid coupled" to mechanical stimuli, so their responses depend on stimulus velocity and their sensitivity decreases as sound frequency is lowered. In contrast, the OHC are directly coupled to mechanical stimuli, so their input remains greater than for IHC at low frequencies. At very low frequencies the OHC are stimulated by sounds at levels below those that are heard. Although the hair cells in other sensory structures such as the saccule may be tuned to infrasonic frequencies, auditory stimulus coupling to these structures is inefficient so that they are unlikely to be influenced by airborne infrasound. Structures that are involved in endolymph volume regulation are also known to be influenced by infrasound, but their sensitivity is also thought to be low. There are, however, abnormal states in which the ear becomes hypersensitive to infrasound. In most cases, the inner ear's responses to infrasound can be considered normal, but they could be associated with unfamiliar sensations or subtle changes in physiology. This raises the possibility that exposure to the

  16. Using optimized wall section to improve low frequency response in a room

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xiaotian; ZHU Zhemin; CHENG Jianchun

    2006-01-01

    Three different wall sections with step shape were applied in the finite element analysis models set up to investigate the effect on low frequency sound field by wall modification.The heights of the step in three cases are taken as equal, random and optimized. The optimized value is obtained by using an optimization process with an objective function of minimum fluctuation in sound field. The frequency responses of rooms with original and modified walls were calculated in a range from 60 Hz to 120 Hz. The results showed that the room with an optimized wall section had the flattest frequency response. Same thing was true as the ratio of the room was changed. The largest improvement on fluctuation reached 4.5 dB. In addition, wall section with semicircle and triangle were studied. The rooms that wall section had optimized radius and heights also gave a better performance than those that had fixed radius and heights.Therefore, it is possible to use optimized wall section to improve low frequency sound field.

  17. Cortisol response and subjective sleep disturbance after low-frequency noise exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson Waye, K.; Agge, A.; Clow, A.; Hucklebridge, F.

    2004-10-01

    A previous experimental study showed that the cortisol response upon awakening was reduced following nights with low-frequency noise exposure. This study comprised a larger number of subjects and an extended period of acclimatisation nights. In total, 26 male subjects slept during five consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. Half of the subjects were exposed to low-frequency noise (40 dBA) on the 4th night and had their reference night (24 dBA) on the 5th night, while the reverse conditions were present for the other half of the group. Subjective sleep disturbances were recorded by questionnaires and cortisol response upon awakening was measured in saliva. The results showed that subjects were more tired and felt less socially orientated in the morning after nights with low-frequency noise. Mood was negatively affected in the evening after nights with low-frequency noise. No effect of noise condition was found on the cortisol secretion. There was a significant effect of group and weekday, indicating that further methodological developments are necessary before saliva cortisol secretion can be reliably used as an indicator of noise-disturbed sleep.

  18. Frequency-response-based analysis of respiratory sensor measuring capacitance built across skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Makie; Kumagai, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru

    2016-04-01

    A capacitive respiratory sensor is studied by attaching the electrodes to the skin. The signal characteristics related to the electrode position and body motion are examined. The frequency response indicates the nearly pure capacitance characteristics. The sensing mechanism model based on the equivalent skin thickness change generated by the body volume change accompanying respiration is reasonably consistent with the experimental results. The sensing method is examined by measuring the frequency response under some different conditions including the grounding issue. The electrode attached to the concave site tends to show a smaller signal difference between inhalation and exhalation. The convex site stabilizes the measurement. The bellyband combined with the electrode realizes stable sensing with comfortable fit on the skin.

  19. Parametric sensitivity for frequency response analysis of large-scale flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosas de Pando, Miguel; Schmid, Peter

    2014-11-01

    When studying the frequency response of globally stable flows, direct and adjoint information from a resolvent analysis has to be computed. These computations involve a sizeable amount of effort, which suggests their reuse to identify sensitivity measures to changes in the governing parameters, base/mean flow fields, boundary conditions or other changes to the underlying linearized operator. We introduce and demonstrate a general technique to determine first-order changes in the frequency response induced by general changes to the governing equations. Examples will include changes to the Reynolds and Mach number for a tonal-noise airfoil problem, sensitivity to heating of a mixing layer past a splitter plate and closeness to global instability for a simplified model equation.

  20. Open Photoacoustic Cell for Blood Sugar Measurement: Numerical Calculation of Frequency Response

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Bernd; Teschner, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A new approach for continuous and non-invasive monitoring of the glucose concentration in human epidermis has been suggested recently. This method is based on photoacoustic (PA) analysis of human interstitial fluid. The measurement can be performed in vitro and in vivo and, therefore, may form the basis for a non-invasive monitoring of the blood sugar level for diabetes patients. It requires a windowless PA cell with an additional opening that is pressed onto the human skin. Since signals are weak, advantage is taken of acoustic resonances of the cell. Recently, a numerical approach based on the Finite Element (FE) Method has been successfully used for the calculation of the frequency response function of closed PA cells. This method has now been adapted to obtain the frequency response of the open cell. Despite the fact that loss due to sound radiation at the opening is not included, fairly good accordance with measurement is achieved.

  1. Optimization of a space spectrograph main frame and frequency response analysis of the frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-yu; Chen, Zhi-yuan; Yang, Shi-mo

    2009-07-01

    A space spectrograph main structure is optimized and examined in order to satisfy the space operational needs. The space spectrograph will be transported into its operational orbit by the launch vehicle and it will undergo dynamic environment in the spacecraft injection period. The unexpected shocks may cause declination of observation accuracy and even equipment damages. The main frame is one of the most important parts because its mechanical performance has great influence on the operational life of the spectrograph, accuracy of observation, etc. For the reason of cost reduction and stability confirming, lower weight and higher structure stiffness of the frame are simultaneously required. Structure optimization was conducted considering the initial design modal analysis results. The base modal frequency raised 10.34% while the whole weight lowered 8.63% compared to the initial design. The purpose of this study is to analyze the new design of main frame mechanical properties and verify whether it can satisfy strict optical demands under the dynamic impact during spacecraft injection. For realizing and forecasting the frequency response characteristics of the main structure in mechanical environment experiment, dynamic analysis of the structure should be performed simulating impulse loads from the bottom base. Therefore, frequency response analysis (FRA) of the frame was then performed using the FEA software MSC.PATRAN/NASTRAN. Results of shock response spectrum (SRS) responses from the base excitations were given. Stress and acceleration dynamic responses of essential positions in the spacecraft injection course were also calculated and spectrometer structure design was examined considering stiffness / strength demands. In this simulation, maximum stresses of Cesic material in two acceleration application cases are 45.1 and 74.1 MPa, respectively. They are all less than yield strengths. As is demonstrated from the simulation, strength reservation of the frame is

  2. Building the analytical response in frequency domain of AC biased bolometers - Application to Planck/HFI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvé, Alexandre; Montier, Ludovic

    2016-10-01

    uc(Context): Bolometers are high sensitivity detector commonly used in Infrared astronomy. The HFI instrument of the Planck satellite makes extensive use of them, but after the satellite launch two electronic related problems revealed critical. First an unexpected excess response of detectors at low optical excitation frequency for ν knowledge of detector response. However bolometers have highly nonlinear characteristics, coming from their electrical and thermal coupling making them very difficult to model. uc(Goal): We present a method to build the analytical transfer function in frequency domain which describe the voltage response of an Alternative Current (AC) biased bolometer to optical excitation, based on the standard bolometer model. This model is built using the setup of the Planck/HFI instrument and offers the major improvement of being based on a physical model rather than the currently in use had-hoc model based on Direct Current (DC) bolometer theory. uc(Method): The analytical transfer function expression will be presented in matrix form. For this purpose, we build linearized versions of the bolometer electro thermal equilibrium. A custom description of signals in frequency is used to solve the problem with linear algebra. The model performances is validated using time domain simulations. uc(Results): The provided expression is suitable for calibration and data processing. It can also be used to provide constraints for fitting optical transfer function using real data from steady state electronic response and optical response. The accurate description of electronic response can also be used to improve the ADC nonlinearity correction for quickly varying optical signals.

  3. Inhomogeneous Anisotropic Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Kleban, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    In homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology, the topology of the universe determines its ultimate fate. If the Weak Energy Condition is satisfied, open and flat universes must expand forever, while closed cosmologies can recollapse to a Big Crunch. A similar statement holds for homogeneous but anisotropic (Bianchi) universes. Here, we prove that ${\\it arbitrarily}$ inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies with "flat" (including toroidal) and "open" (including compact hyperbolic) spatial topology that are initially expanding must continue to expand forever at least in some region, despite the presence of arbitrarily large density fluctuations and/or the formation of black holes. Because the set of 3-manifold topologies is countable, a single integer determines the ultimate fate of the universe, and, in a specific sense, most 3-manifolds are "flat" or "open". Our result has important implications for inflation: if there is a positive cosmological constant (or suitable inflationary potenti...

  4. Individual Differences in the Frequency-Following Response: Relation to Pitch Perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily B J Coffey

    Full Text Available The scalp-recorded frequency-following response (FFR is a measure of the auditory nervous system's representation of periodic sound, and may serve as a marker of training-related enhancements, behavioural deficits, and clinical conditions. However, FFRs of healthy normal subjects show considerable variability that remains unexplained. We investigated whether the FFR representation of the frequency content of a complex tone is related to the perception of the pitch of the fundamental frequency. The strength of the fundamental frequency in the FFR of 39 people with normal hearing was assessed when they listened to complex tones that either included or lacked energy at the fundamental frequency. We found that the strength of the fundamental representation of the missing fundamental tone complex correlated significantly with people's general tendency to perceive the pitch of the tone as either matching the frequency of the spectral components that were present, or that of the missing fundamental. Although at a group level the fundamental representation in the FFR did not appear to be affected by the presence or absence of energy at the same frequency in the stimulus, the two conditions were statistically distinguishable for some subjects individually, indicating that the neural representation is not linearly dependent on the stimulus content. In a second experiment using a within-subjects paradigm, we showed that subjects can learn to reversibly select between either fundamental or spectral perception, and that this is accompanied both by changes to the fundamental representation in the FFR and to cortical-based gamma activity. These results suggest that both fundamental and spectral representations coexist, and are available for later auditory processing stages, the requirements of which may also influence their relative strength and thus modulate FFR variability. The data also highlight voluntary mode perception as a new paradigm with which to

  5. A Practical Method for Measuring the Spatial Frequency Response of Light Field Cameras

    OpenAIRE

    Firmenich, Damien; Süsstrunk, Sabine; Baboulaz, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    The spatial frequency response (SFR) is one of the most important and unbiased image quality measures of a digital camera. It evaluates to which extent a lens/sensor combination can resolve scene details. In this paper, we propose a simple and practical method to measure the SFR of microlens-based light field cameras. The particularity of such cameras resides in their ability to capture both spatial and angular information of the incoming light field thanks to an array of microlenses located ...

  6. Real-time open-loop frequency response analysis of flight test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, J. T.; West, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    A technique has been developed to compare the open-loop frequency response of a flight test aircraft real time with linear analysis predictions. The result is direct feedback to the flight control systems engineer on the validity of predictions and adds confidence for proceeding with envelope expansion. Further, gain and phase margins can be tracked for trends in a manner similar to the techniques used by structural dynamics engineers in tracking structural modal damping.

  7. A Posteriori Error Analysis of Component Mode Synthesis for the Frequency Response Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsson, Håkan; Larson, Mats G.

    2012-01-01

    We consider the frequency response problem and derive a posteriori error estimates for the discrete error in a reduced finite element model obtained using the component mode synthesis (CMS) method. We provide estimates in a linear quantity of interest and the energy norm. The estimates reflect to what degree each CMS subspace influence the overall error in the reduced solution. This enables automatic error control through adaptive algorithms that determine suitable dimensions of each subspace...

  8. Moth hearing in response to bat echolocation calls manipulated independently in time and frequency.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, G.; Waters, D A

    2000-01-01

    We measured the auditory responses of the noctuid moth Noctua pronuba to bat echolocation calls which were manipulated independently in time and frequency. Such manipulations are important in understanding how insect hearing influences the evolution of echolocation call characteristics. We manipulated the calls of three bat species (Rhinolophus hipposideros, Myotis nattereri and Pipistrellus pipistrellus) that use different echolocation call features by doubling their duration or reducing the...

  9. Methacholine responsiveness in infants assessed with low frequency forced oscillation and forced expiration techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, G; Hantos, Z.; Wildhaber, J; Petak, F; Sly, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The contribution of the pulmonary tissues to the mechanical behaviour of the respiratory system is well recognised. This study was undertaken to detect airway and lung tissue responses to inhaled methacholine (Mch) using the low frequency forced oscillation technique (LFOT).
METHODS—The respiratory system impedance (Zrs, 0.5-20 Hz) was determined in 17 asymptomatic infants. A model containing airway resistance (Raw) and inertance (Iaw) and a constant phase tissue ...

  10. Molecular anisotropic magnetoresistance

    OpenAIRE

    Otte, Fabian; Heinze, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, we demonstrate that the effect of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) can be enhanced by orders of magnitude with respect to conventional bulk ferromagnets in junctions containing molecules sandwiched between ferromagnetic leads. We study ballistic transport in metal-benzene complexes contacted by $3d$ transition-metal wires. We show that the gigantic AMR can arise from spin-orbit coupling effects in the leads, drastically enhanced by orbital-symm...

  11. Splitting of Interlayer Shear Modes and Photon Energy Dependent Anisotropic Raman Response in N-Layer ReSe₂ and ReS₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorchat, Etienne; Froehlicher, Guillaume; Berciaud, Stéphane

    2016-02-23

    We investigate the interlayer phonon modes in N-layer rhenium diselenide (ReSe2) and rhenium disulfide (ReS2) by means of ultralow-frequency micro-Raman spectroscopy. These transition metal dichalcogenides exhibit a stable distorted octahedral (1T') phase with significant in-plane anisotropy, leading to sizable splitting of the (in-plane) layer shear modes. The fan-diagrams associated with the measured frequencies of the interlayer shear modes and the (out-of-plane) interlayer breathing modes are perfectly described by a finite linear chain model and allow the determination of the interlayer force constants. Nearly identical values are found for ReSe2 and ReS2. The latter are appreciably smaller than but on the same order of magnitude as the interlayer force constants reported in graphite and in trigonal prismatic (2Hc) transition metal dichalcogenides (such as MoS2, MoSe2, MoTe2, WS2, WSe2), demonstrating the importance of van der Waals interactions in N-layer ReSe2 and ReS2. In-plane anisotropy results in a complex angular dependence of the intensity of all Raman modes, which can be empirically utilized to determine the crystal orientation. However, we also demonstrate that the angular dependence of the Raman response drastically depends on the incoming photon energy, shedding light on the importance of resonant exciton-phonon coupling in ReSe2 and ReS2. PMID:26820232

  12. Analysis of the frequency-dependent response to wave forcing in the extratropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Haklander

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A quasigeostrophic model for the frequency-dependent response of the zonal-mean flow to planetary-wave forcing at Northern Hemisphere (NH midlatitudes is applied to 4-D-Var ECMWF analysis data for six extended winter seasons. The theoretical response is a non-linear function of the frequency of the forcing, the thermal damping time α−1, and a scaling parameter µ which includes the aspect ratio of the meridional to the vertical length scale of the response. Regression of the calculated response from the analyses onto the theoretical response yields height-dependent estimates for both α−1 and µ. The thermal damping time estimated from this dynamical model is about 2 days in the troposphere, 7–10 days in the stratosphere, and 2–4 days in the lower mesosphere. For the stratosphere and lower mesosphere, the estimates lie within the range of existing radiative damping time estimates, but for the troposphere they are significantly smaller.

  13. Responses of Waveform-Selective Absorbing Metasurfaces to Oblique Waves at the Same Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki; Gao, Fei; Yagitani, Satoshi; Sievenpiper, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Conventional materials vary their electromagnetic properties in response to the frequency of an incoming wave, but these responses generally remain unchanged at the same frequency unless nonlinearity is involved. Waveform-selective metasurfaces, recently developed by integrating several circuit elements with planar subwavelength periodic structures, allowed us to distinguish different waves even at the same frequency depending on how long the waves continued, namely, on their pulse widths. These materials were thus expected to give us an additional degree of freedom to control electromagnetic waves. However, all the past studies were demonstrated with waves at a normal angle only, although in reality electromagnetic waves scatter from various structures or boundaries and therefore illuminate the metasurfaces at oblique angles. Here we study angular dependences of waveform-selective metasurfaces both numerically and experimentally. We demonstrate that, if designed properly, capacitor-based waveform-selective metasurfaces more effectively absorb short pulses than continuous waves (CWs) for a wide range of the incident angle, while inductor-based metasurfaces absorb CWs more strongly. Our study is expected to be usefully exploited for applying the concept of waveform selectivity to a wide range of existing microwave devices to expand their functionalities or performances in response to pulse width as a new capability. PMID:27516346

  14. Research on the iterative method for model updating based on the frequency response function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Ming Li; Jia-Zhen Hong

    2012-01-01

    Model reduction technique is usually employed in model updating process,In this paper,a new model updating method named as cross-model cross-frequency response function (CMCF) method is proposed and a new iterative method associating the model updating method with the model reduction technique is investigated.The new model updating method utilizes the frequency response function to avoid the modal analysis process and it does not need to pair or scale the measured and the analytical frequency response function,which could greatly increase the number of the equations and the updating parameters.Based on the traditional iterative method,a correction term related to the errors resulting from the replacement of the reduction matrix of the experimental model with that of the finite element model is added in the new iterative method.Comparisons between the traditional iterative method and the proposed iterative method are shown by model updating examples of solar panels,and both of these two iterative methods combine the CMCF method and the succession-level approximate reduction technique.Results show the effectiveness of the CMCF method and the proposed iterative method.

  15. Responses of Waveform-Selective Absorbing Metasurfaces to Oblique Waves at the Same Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki; Gao, Fei; Yagitani, Satoshi; Sievenpiper, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional materials vary their electromagnetic properties in response to the frequency of an incoming wave, but these responses generally remain unchanged at the same frequency unless nonlinearity is involved. Waveform-selective metasurfaces, recently developed by integrating several circuit elements with planar subwavelength periodic structures, allowed us to distinguish different waves even at the same frequency depending on how long the waves continued, namely, on their pulse widths. These materials were thus expected to give us an additional degree of freedom to control electromagnetic waves. However, all the past studies were demonstrated with waves at a normal angle only, although in reality electromagnetic waves scatter from various structures or boundaries and therefore illuminate the metasurfaces at oblique angles. Here we study angular dependences of waveform-selective metasurfaces both numerically and experimentally. We demonstrate that, if designed properly, capacitor-based waveform-selective metasurfaces more effectively absorb short pulses than continuous waves (CWs) for a wide range of the incident angle, while inductor-based metasurfaces absorb CWs more strongly. Our study is expected to be usefully exploited for applying the concept of waveform selectivity to a wide range of existing microwave devices to expand their functionalities or performances in response to pulse width as a new capability. PMID:27516346

  16. EFFECTS OF QUININE ON THE MECHANICAL FREQUENCY-RESPONSE OF THE CUPULA IN THE FISH LATERAL-LINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, S.M.; KARLSSON, KK; KHANNA, SM; FLOCK, A

    1994-01-01

    Quinine induces changes in the motion of the cupula in the lateral line canal of the African knife-fish in response to sinusoidal water movements. Two different phases in the action of quinine on the cupular frequency response can be discerned. In the first phase the best frequency, i.e., the freque

  17. Multi-frequency response of a cylinder subjected to vortex shedding and support motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikestad, Kyrre

    1998-12-31

    This thesis deals with an experimental investigation of vortex induced vibrations of a circular cylinder. The purpose of the experiment was to identify the influence from a controlled disturbance of the cylinder motions on the response caused by vortex shedding. The cylinder investigated is 2 m long and the diameter is 10 cm. The cylinder is elastically mounted in an apparatus using springs, where the foundation of one of the springs can have a harmonic motion. The apparatus is placed on a carriage in a 25 m long towing tank. Towing velocities are varied between 0.140 m/s and 0.655 m/s corresponding to reduced velocity range from 2.8 to 13.2. The still water natural frequency is 0.497 Hz, and the natural frequency in air is 0.634 Hz. The cylinder is only able to oscillate in the cross-flow direction. The support motion frequency was varied between 0.26 Hz and 1.01 Hz, and the force motion amplitude was varied using 2, 4 and 6 cm support amplitudes. Three sets of experiments were carried out: (1) Still water oscillations due to harmonic support motion excitation, support amplitude and frequencies varied, (2) Towing tests with no support motion, the velocity is varied, (3) Combined excitation: Towing tests with support motion. All possible combinations of experiments (1) and (2) are carried out. The two first experiments provide reference values for the combined excitation experiments and for verification purposes. The results reveal the ability of the external disturbance to influence the vortex shedding process both regarding frequency and the resulting response amplitudes. Results for added mass, in-line drag and damping are also obtained. The work may be of use in deep water floating petroleum production. 81 refs., 73 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Theta frequency background tunes transmission but not summation of spiking responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanya Parameshwaran

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neurons are known to fire as a function of frequency and phase of spontaneous network rhythms, associated with the animal's behaviour. This dependence is believed to give rise to precise rate and temporal codes. However, it is not well understood how these periodic membrane potential fluctuations affect the integration of synaptic inputs. Here we used sinusoidal current injection to the soma of CA1 pyramidal neurons in the rat brain slice to simulate background oscillations in the physiologically relevant theta and gamma frequency range. We used a detailed compartmental model to show that somatic current injection gave comparable results to more physiological synaptically driven theta rhythms incorporating excitatory input in the dendrites, and inhibitory input near the soma. We systematically varied the phase of synaptic inputs with respect to this background, and recorded changes in response and summation properties of CA1 neurons using whole-cell patch recordings. The response of the cell was dependent on both the phase of synaptic inputs and frequency of the background input. The probability of the cell spiking for a given synaptic input was up to 40% greater during the depolarized phases between 30-135 degrees of theta frequency current injection. Summation gain on the other hand, was not affected either by the background frequency or the phasic afferent inputs. This flat summation gain, coupled with the enhanced spiking probability during depolarized phases of the theta cycle, resulted in enhanced transmission of summed inputs during the same phase window of 30-135 degrees. Overall, our study suggests that although oscillations provide windows of opportunity to selectively boost transmission and EPSP size, summation of synaptic inputs remains unaffected during membrane oscillations.

  19. Artificial Ionization and UHF Radar Response Associated with HF Frequencies near Electron Gyro-Harmonics (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, B. J.; Fallen, C. T.; Secan, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present new results from O-mode ionospheric heating experiments at the HAARP facility in Alaska to demonstrate that the magnitude of artificial ionization production is critically dependent on the choice of HF frequency near gyro-harmonics. For O-mode heating in the lower F-region ionosphere, typically about 200 km altitude, artificial ionization enhancements are observed in the lower ionosphere (about 150 - 220 km) and also in the topside ionosphere above about 500 km. Lower ionosphere density enhancements are inferred from HF-enhanced ion and plasma-line signals observed with UHF radar. Upper ionospheric density enhancements have been observed with TEC (total electron content) experiments by monitoring satellite radio beacons where signal paths traverse the HF-modified ionosphere. Both density enhancements and corresponding upward plasma fluxes have also been observed in the upper ionosphere via in-situ satellite observations. The data presented focus mainly on observations near the third and fourth gyro-harmonics. The specific values of the height-dependent gyro-harmonics have been computed from a magnetic model of the field line through the HF heated volume. Experiments with several closely spaced HF frequencies around the gyro-harmonic frequency region show that the magnitude of the lower-ionosphere artificial ionization production maximizes for HF frequencies about 1.0 - 1.5 MHz above the gyro-harmonic frequency. The response is progressively larger as the HF frequency is increased in the frequency region near the gyro-harmonics. For HF frequencies that are initially greater than the gyro-harmonic value the UHF radar scattering cross-section is relatively small, and non-existent or very weak signals are observed; as the signal returns drop in altitude due to density enhancements the HF interaction region passes through lower altitudes where the HF frequency is less than the gyro-harmonic value, for these conditions the radar scattering cross-section is

  20. A high-frequency response and a nonlinear coherent generation in resonant-tunneling diodes within a broad frequency range with electron-electron interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of a sequential quantum mechanical model, the response and the power of a coherent generation have been obtained numerically in a resonant-tunneling diode in a wide range of frequencies with the electron-electron interaction. The quantum regime of generation is shown to be sustained under the electron-electron interaction. Thus, a high-power generation is probable under frequencies exceeding the width of the resonant level

  1. Management Process of a Frequency Response Flight Test for Rotorcraft Flying Qualities Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Otávio Falcão Arantes Filho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper applies the frequency response methodology to characterize and analyze the flying qualities of longitudinal and lateral axes of a rotary-wing aircraft, AS355-F2. Using the results, it is possible to check the suitability of the aircraft in accordance with ADS-33E-PRF standard, whose flying qualities specifications criteria are based on parameters in the frequency domain. The key steps addressed in the study involve getting, by means of flight test data, the closed-loop dynamic responses including the design of the instrumentation and specification of the sensors to be used in the flight test campaign, the definition of the appropriate maneuvers characteristics for excitation of the aircraft, the planning and execution of the flight test to collect the data, and the proper data treatment, processing and analysis after the flight. After treatment of the collected data, single input-single output spectral analysis is performed. The results permit the analysis of the flying qualities characteristics, anticipation of the demands to which the pilot will be subjected during closed-loop evaluations and check of compliance with the aforementioned standard, within the range of consistent excitation frequencies for flight tests, setting the agility level of the test aircraft.

  2. Time-frequency analysis of railway bridge response in forced vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantero, Daniel; Ülker-Kaustell, Mahir; Karoumi, Raid

    2016-08-01

    This paper suggests the use of the Continuous Wavelet Transform in combination with the Modified Littlewood-Paley basis to analyse bridge responses exited by traversing trains. The analysis provides an energy distribution map in the time-frequency domain that offers a better resolution compared to previous published studies. This is demonstrated with recorded responses of the Skidträsk Bridge, a 36 m long composite bridge located in Sweden. It is shown to be particularly useful to understand the evolution of the energy content during a vehicle crossing event. With this information it is possible to distinguish the effect of several of the governing factors involved in the dynamic response including vehicle's speed and axle configuration as well as non-linear behaviour of the structure.

  3. Dual-band frequency selective surface with quasi-elliptic bandpass response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Hang; Qu Shao-Bo; Peng Wei-Dong; Wang Jia-Fu; Ma Hua; Zhang Jie-Qiu; Bai Peng; Xu Zhuo

    2012-01-01

    Based on the substrate integrated waveguide technology,we present a dual-band frequency selective surface (FSS) with a quasi-elliptic bandpass response. The characteristics of the quasi-elliptic bandpass response are realized by shunting two substrate integrated waveguide cavities of different sizes,with the same slots on both sides of the metal surfaces.Four cavities of different sizes and two slots of different sizes are used to design the novel FSS.Every bandpass response with sharp sidebands is induced by two transmission nulls that are generated by the coupling between the slot aperture resonance and the cavity resonance.The simulation results show that such dual-band FSS has the advantages of high selectivity and stable performance at different oblique incident angles.Moreover,it is easy to fabricate.

  4. Silicon as an anisotropic mechanical material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Reck, Kasper; Skands, Gustav Erik;

    2014-01-01

    While silicon is an anisotropic material it is often in literature treated as an isotropic material when it comes to plate calculations. This leads to considerable errors in the calculated deflection. To overcome this problem, we present an in-depth analysis of the bending behavior of thin...... both exact analytical expressions and approximate expressions calculated by the Galerkin method. The results are applied to plates made on silicon (0 0 1), (0 1 1) and (1 1 1) substrates, respectively, and analytical equations for the deflection, strain energy and resonance frequency of such plates...... are presented. These expressions are in excellent agreement with anisotropic finite element calculations. The calculated deflection differs less than 0.1%, for both circular and rectangular plates, compared to finite element calculations. The results are presented as ready-to-use facilitating accurate...

  5. Model anisotropic quantum Hall states

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, R. -Z.; Haldane, F.D.M.; Wan, Xin; Yang, Kun; Yi, Su

    2012-01-01

    Model quantum Hall states including Laughlin, Moore-Read and Read-Rezayi states are generalized into appropriate anisotropic form. The generalized states are exact zero-energy eigenstates of corresponding anisotropic two- or multi-body Hamiltonians, and explicitly illustrate the existence of geometric degrees of in the fractional quantum Hall effect. These generalized model quantum Hall states can provide a good description of the quantum Hall system with anisotropic interactions. Some numeri...

  6. Intracellular responses to frequency modulated tones in the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruediger eGeis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequency modulations occur in many natural sounds, including vocalizations. The neuronal response to frequency modulated (FM stimuli has been studied extensively in different brain areas, with an emphasis on the auditory cortex and the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. Here, we measured the responses to FM sweeps in whole-cell recordings from neurons in the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus. Both up- and downward logarithmic FM sweeps were presented at two different speeds to both the ipsi- and the contralateral ear. Based on the number of action potentials that were fired, between 10-24% of cells were selective for rate or direction of the FM sweeps. A somewhat lower percentage of cells, 6-21%, showed selectivity based on EPSP size. To study the mechanisms underlying the generation of FM selectivity, we compared FM responses with responses to simple tones in the same cells. We found that if pairs of neurons responded in a similar way to simple tones, they generally also responded in a similar way to FM sweeps. Further evidence that FM selectivity can be generated within the dorsal cortex was obtained by reconstructing FM sweeps from the response to simple tones using three different models. In about half of the direction selective neurons the selectivity was generated by spectrally asymmetric synaptic inhibition. In addition, evidence for direction selectivity based on the timing of excitatory responses was also obtained in some cells. No clear evidence for the local generation of rate selectivity was obtained. We conclude that FM direction selectivity can be generated within the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus by multiple mechanisms.

  7. Material Induced Anisotropic Damage in DP600

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, M.S.; Wisselink, H.H.; Meinders, V.T.; Boogaard, van den A.H.

    2013-01-01

    Plasticity induced damage development in metals is anisotropic by nature. The anisotropy in damage is driven by two different phenomena; anisotropic deformation state i.e. Load Induced Anisotropic Damage (LIAD) and anisotropic microstructure i.e. Material Induced Anisotropic Damage (MIAD). The contr

  8. Development of laser ablation plasma by anisotropic self-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohnishi Naofumi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed a method for reproducing an accurate solution of low-density ablation plasma by properly treating anisotropic radiation. Monte-Carlo method is employed for estimating Eddington tensor with limited number of photon samples in each fluid time step. Radiation field from ablation plasma is significantly affected by the anisotropic Eddington tensor. Electron temperature around the ablation surface changes with the radiation field and is responsible for the observed emission. An accurate prediction of the light emission from the laser ablation plasma requires a careful estimation of the anisotropic radiation field.

  9. Multiple linear regression to estimate time-frequency electrophysiological responses in single trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L; Zhang, Z G; Mouraux, A; Iannetti, G D

    2015-05-01

    oscillations, obtaining single-trial estimate of response latency, frequency, and magnitude. This permits within-subject statistical comparisons, correlation with pre-stimulus features, and integration of simultaneously-recorded EEG and fMRI. PMID:25665966

  10. On the Relativistic anisotropic configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Shojai, F; Stepanian, A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study anisotropic spherical polytropes within the framework of general relativity. Using the anisotropic Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov (TOV) equations, we explore the relativistic anisotropic Lane-Emden equations. We find how the anisotropic pressure affects the boundary conditions of these equations. Also we argue that the behaviour of physical quantities near the center of star changes in the presence of anisotropy. For constant density, a class of exact solution is derived with the aid of a new ansatz and its physical properties are discussed.

  11. On the relativistic anisotropic configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shojai, F. [University of Tehran, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Foundations of Physics Group, School of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kohandel, M. [Alzahra University, Department of Physics and Chemistry, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Stepanian, A. [University of Tehran, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In this paper we study anisotropic spherical polytropes within the framework of general relativity. Using the anisotropic Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations, we explore the relativistic anisotropic Lane-Emden equations. We find how the anisotropic pressure affects the boundary conditions of these equations. Also we argue that the behavior of physical quantities near the center of star changes in the presence of anisotropy. For constant density, a class of exact solution is derived with the aid of a new ansatz and its physical properties are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 3 – Frequency Response and Transient Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N. W. [GE Energy Management, Schenectady, NY (United States); Shao, M. [GE Energy Management, Schenectady, NY (United States); Pajic, S. [GE Energy Management, Schenectady, NY (United States); D' Aquila, R. [GE Energy Management, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Power system operators and utilities worldwide have concerns about the impact of high-penetration wind and solar generation on electric grid reliability (EirGrid 2011b, Hydro-Quebec 2006, ERCOT 2010). The stability of North American grids under these conditions is a particular concern and possible impediment to reaching future renewable energy goals. Phase 3 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-3) considers a 33% wind and solar annual energy penetration level that results in substantial changes to the characteristics of the bulk power system, including different power flow patterns, different commitment and dispatch of existing synchronous generation, and different dynamic behavior of wind and solar generation. WWSIS-3 evaluates two specific aspects of fundamental frequency system stability: frequency response and transient stability.

  13. Extending the operating temperature, wavelength and frequency response of HgCdTe heterodyne detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Near ideal optical heterodyne performance was obtained at GHz IF frequencies in the 10 micrometer wavelength region with liquid nitrogen cooled HgCdTe photodiodes. Heterodyne NEP's as low as 2.7 x 10 to the minus 20th power W/Hz at 100MHz, 5.4 x 10 to the minus 20th power W/Hz at 1.5 GHz, and 9.4 x 19 to the minus 20th power W/Hz at 3 GHz were achieved. Various physical phenomena which occur within a photodiode and affect heterodyne operation were examined in order to assess the feasibility of extending the operating temperature, wavelength, and frequency response of these HgCdTe photomixers.

  14. Cortical contributions to the auditory frequency-following response revealed by MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Emily B J; Herholz, Sibylle C; Chepesiuk, Alexander M P; Baillet, Sylvain; Zatorre, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The auditory frequency-following response (FFR) to complex periodic sounds is used to study the subcortical auditory system, and has been proposed as a biomarker for disorders that feature abnormal sound processing. Despite its value in fundamental and clinical research, the neural origins of the FFR are unclear. Using magnetoencephalography, we observe a strong, right-asymmetric contribution to the FFR from the human auditory cortex at the fundamental frequency of the stimulus, in addition to signal from cochlear nucleus, inferior colliculus and medial geniculate. This finding is highly relevant for our understanding of plasticity and pathology in the auditory system, as well as higher-level cognition such as speech and music processing. It suggests that previous interpretations of the FFR may need re-examination using methods that allow for source separation. PMID:27009409

  15. The role of word frequencies in detecting unfamiliar terms and their effect on response quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavec Ana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Research into cognitive aspects of survey response has indicated unfamiliar terms as one of the psycholinguistic determinants of question comprehensibility problems. In this paper the estimates of wording familiarity based on text corpora for the English and Slovenian languages were used to detect potentially incomprehensible wordings in two web survey questionnaires for international exchange students at the University of Ljubljana, one for incoming (English and the other for outgoing students (Slovenian. Two versions of the questionnaire were developed for each language, one with low-frequency (complex and the other with high-frequency (improved wordings, and compared in a split-ballot experiment. The results show a lower drop-out rate and a decreased subjective perception of difficulty for the improved language versions.

  16. The non-equilibrium response of a superconductor to pair-breaking radiation measured over a broad frequency band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the absorption of terahertz radiation in a BCS superconductor over a broad range of frequencies from 200 GHz to 1.1 THz, using a broadband antenna-lens system and a tantalum microwave resonator. From low frequencies, the response of the resonator rises rapidly to a maximum at the gap edge of the superconductor. From there on, the response drops to half the maximum response at twice the pair-breaking energy. At higher frequencies, the response rises again due to trapping of pair-breaking phonons in the superconductor. In practice, this is a measurement of the frequency dependence of the quasiparticle creation efficiency due to pair-breaking in a superconductor. The efficiency, calculated from the different non-equilibrium quasiparticle distribution functions at each frequency, is in agreement with the measurements

  17. Anisotropically Inflating Universes

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, J D; Barrow, John D.; Hervik, Sigbjorn

    2008-01-01

    We show that in theories of gravity that add quadratic curvature invariants to the Einstein-Hilbert action there exist expanding vacuum cosmologies with positive cosmological constant which do not approach the de Sitter universe. Exact solutions are found which inflate anisotropically. This behaviour is driven by the Ricci curvature invariant and has no counterpart in the general relativistic limit. These examples show that the cosmic no-hair theorem does not hold in these higher-order extensions of general relativity and raises new questions about the ubiquity of inflation in the very early universe and the thermodynamics of gravitational fields.

  18. Anisotropic Stars Exact Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, K; Dev, Krsna; Gleiser, Marcelo

    2000-01-01

    We study the effects of anisotropic pressure on the properties of spherically symmetric, gravitationally bound objects. We consider the full general relativistic treatment of this problem and obtain exact solutions for various form of equations of state connecting the radial and tangential pressures. It is shown that pressure anisotropy can have significant effects on the structure and properties of stellar objects. In particular, the maximum value of 2M/R can approach unity (2M/R < 8/9 for isotropic objects) and the surface redshift can be arbitrarily large.

  19. Development and applicability evaluation of frequency response function of structures to fluctuations of thermal stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oscillation of a thermal stratification layer can induce thermal fatigue damage on structures with nuclear components. To evaluate the thermal stress induced by thermal stratification oscillation, a frequency response function was developed in our previous research. However, this function does not consider the thickness of the stratified layer. Thus, it is difficult to evaluate the stress generated by actual thermal stratified layers having finite thicknesses with sufficient accuracy. To clarify the effects of layer thickness on induced thermal stress, finite element simulations were conducted under various fluid conditions. As a result, it was clarified that the non-dimensional layer thickness Ht*, which is the ratio of layer thickness to layer oscillation length, can explain the thermal stress response mechanism with layer thickness. Based on the clarified mechanisms, the frequency response function was improved. Applicability of the proposed function to a closed branch pipe of a Light Water Reactor (LWR) and the upper plenum of a pressure vessel of a Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) was validated through comparison with finite element simulations. (author)

  20. Anisotropic microstructure near the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio scattering observations provide a means of measuring a two-dimensional projection of the three-dimensional spatial spectrum of electron density, i.e., in the plane perpendicular to the line of sight. Earlier observations have shown that the microstructure at scales of the order of 10 km becomes highly field-aligned inside of 10 R· [Armstrong et al., 1990]. Earlier work has also shown that density fluctuations at scales larger than 1000 km have a Kolmogorov spectrum, whereas the smaller scale structure has a flatter spectrum and is considerably enhanced above the Kolmogorov ''background'' [Coles et al., 1991]. Here we present new observations made during 1990 and 1992. These confirm the earlier work, which was restricted to one source on a few days, but they suggest that the anisotropy changes abruptly near 6 R· which was not clear in the earlier data. The axial ratio measurements are shown on Figure 1 below. The new observations were made with a more uniform sampling of the spatial plane. They show that contours of constant correlation are elliptical. This is apparently inconsistent with the spatial correlation of the ISEE-3 magnetic field which shows a 'Maltese Cross' shape [Matthaeus et al., 1990]. However this inconsistency may be only apparent: the magnetic field and density correlations need not have the same shape; the scale of the magnetic field correlations is at least 4 orders of magnitude larger; they are much further from the sun; and they are point measurements whereas ours are path-integrated. We also made two simultaneous measurements, at 10 R·, of the anisotropy on scales of 200 to 4000 km. Significant anisotropy was seen on the smaller scales, but the larger scale structure was essentially isotropic. This suggests that the process responsible for the anisotropic microstructure is independent of the larger scale isotropic turbulence. It is then tempting to speculate that the damping of this anisotropic process inside of 6 R· contributes to

  1. Effects of low-spatial-frequency response of phase plates on TEM imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgcombe, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    Images of simple objects produced by a perfect lens and a phase plate have been calculated by use of Abbe theory for Foucault, Hilbert and Zernike phase plates. The results show that with a Zernike plate, white outlines and ringing like those observed previously can be caused by the beam hole, which limits the low-spatial-frequency response of the system even when the lens behaves perfectly. When the change of phase added by the phase plate is distributed over a range of radius rather than a simple step, the unwanted effects are substantially reduced.

  2. Frequency Response Analysis of an Actively Lubricated Rotor/Tilting-Pad Bearing System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Santos, Ilmar

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper the dynamic response of a rotor supported by an active lubricated tilting-pad bearing is investigated in the frequency domain. The theoretical part of the investigation is based on a mathematical model obtained by means of rigid body dynamics. The oil film forces are inserted...... lubricated tilting-pad bearing. By applying a simple proportional controller it is possible to reach 30% reduction of the resonance peak associated with the first rigid body mode shape of the system. One of the most important consequences of such a vibration reduction in rotating machines is the feasibility...

  3. Anisotropic Thermal Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Anisotropic thermal diffusion in magnetized plasmas is an important physical phenomena for a diverse set of physical conditions ranging from astrophysical plasmas to MFE and ICF. Yet numerically simulating this phenomenon accurately poses significant challenges when the computational mesh is misaligned with respect to the magnetic field. Particularly when the temperature gradients are unresolved, one frequently finds entropy violating solutions with heat flowing from cold to hot zones for χ∥ /χ⊥ >=102 which is substantially smaller than the range of interest which can reach 1010 or higher. In this talk we present a new implicit algorithm for solving the anisotropic thermal diffusion equations and demonstrate its characteristics on what has become a fairly standard set of test problems in the literature. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2013-5687A.

  4. Inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleban, Matthew; Senatore, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    In homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology, the topology of the universe determines its ultimate fate. If the Weak Energy Condition is satisfied, open and flat universes must expand forever, while closed cosmologies can recollapse to a Big Crunch. A similar statement holds for homogeneous but anisotropic (Bianchi) universes. Here, we prove that arbitrarily inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies with ``flat'' (including toroidal) and ``open'' (including compact hyperbolic) spatial topology that are initially expanding must continue to expand forever at least in some region at a rate bounded from below by a positive number, despite the presence of arbitrarily large density fluctuations and/or the formation of black holes. Because the set of 3-manifold topologies is countable, a single integer determines the ultimate fate of the universe, and, in a specific sense, most 3-manifolds are ``flat'' or ``open''. Our result has important implications for inflation: if there is a positive cosmological constant (or suitable inflationary potential) and initial conditions for the inflaton, cosmologies with ``flat'' or ``open'' topology must expand forever in some region at least as fast as de Sitter space, and are therefore very likely to begin inflationary expansion eventually, regardless of the scale of the inflationary energy or the spectrum and amplitude of initial inhomogeneities and gravitational waves. Our result is also significant for numerical general relativity, which often makes use of periodic (toroidal) boundary conditions.

  5. Cachectic skeletal muscle response to a novel bout of low-frequency stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puppa, Melissa J.; Murphy, E. Angela; Fayad, Raja; Hand, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    While exercise benefits have been well documented in patients with chronic diseases, the mechanistic understanding of cachectic muscle's response to contraction is essentially unknown. We previously demonstrated that treadmill exercise training attenuates the initiation of cancer cachexia and the development of metabolic syndrome symptoms (Puppa MJ, White JP, Velazquez KT, Baltgalvis KA, Sato S, Baynes JW, Carson JA. J Cachexia Sarcopenia Muscle 3: 117–137, 2012). However, cachectic muscle's metabolic signaling response to a novel, acute bout of low-frequency contraction has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to determine whether severe cancer cachexia disrupts the acute contraction-induced response to low-frequency muscle contraction [low-frequency stimulation (LoFS)]. Metabolic gene expression and signaling was examined 3 h after a novel 30-min bout of contraction (10 Hz) in cachectic ApcMin/+ (Min) and C57BL/6 (BL-6) mice. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a STAT/NF-κB inhibitor and free radical scavenger, was administered systemically to a subset of mice to determine whether this altered the muscle contraction response. Although glucose transporter-4 mRNA was decreased by cachexia, LoFS increased muscle glucose transporter-4 mRNA in both BL-6 and Min mice. LoFS also induced muscle peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α coactivator-1 mRNA. However, in Min mice, LoFS was not able to induce muscle proliferator-activated receptor-α coactivator-1 targets nuclear respiratory factor-1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A mRNA. LoFS induced phosphorylated-S6 in BL-6 mice, but this induction was blocked by cachexia. Administration of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate for 24 h rescued LoFS-induced phosphorylated-S6 in cachectic muscle. LoFS increased muscle phosphorylated-AMP-activated protein kinase and p38 in BL-6 and Min mice. These data demonstrate that cachexia alters the muscle metabolic response

  6. Effect of ischemia and cooling on the response to high frequency stimulation in rat tail nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning; Feldbæk Nielsen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Bodil;

    2000-01-01

    In normal rat tail nerves the effect of temperature and ischemia on the response to long-term high frequency stimulation (HFS) (143 Hz) was studied. The effect of temperature was studied in two consecutive tests at 14 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Prior to the HFS the peak-to-peak amplitude (PP......-amp) of the compound nerve action potential was 139 +/- 20 microV (mean +/- SD) and 127 +/- 37 microV at 35 degrees C and 14 degrees C, respectively (NS). After 15 min of HFS the PP-amp was reduced to 45.3 +/- 20.5% of baseline level at 14 degrees C as compared with 80.8 +/- 10.2% at 35 degrees C (p ... ischemia to the rat tail, an additional fall of the PP-amp was seen after 15-20 min of HFS at both low (20 Hz) and high (143 Hz) stimulation frequencies. In conclusion, ischemia and cooling result in an impaired ability to transmit high frequency impulses....

  7. Analytical one-dimensional frequency response and stability model for PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dynamic model for PWR nuclear power plants is presented. The plant is assumed to consist of one-dimensional single-channel core, a counterflow once-through steam generator (represented by two nodes according to the nonboiling and boiling region) and the necessary connection coolant lines. The model describes analytically the frequency response behaviour of important parameters of such a plant with respect to perturbations in reactivity, subcooling or mass flow (both at the entrances to the reactor core and/or the secondary steam generator side), the perturbations in steam load or system pressure (on the secondary side of the steam generator). From corresponding 'open' loop considerations it can then be concluded - by applying the Nyquist criterion - upon the degree of the stability behaviour of the underlying system. Based on this theoretical model, a computer code named ADYPMO has been established. From the knowledge of the frequency response behaviour of such a system, the corresponding transient behaviour with respect to a stepwise or any other perturbation signal can also be calculated by applying an appropriate retransformation method, e.g. by using digital code FRETI. To demonstrate this procedure, a transient experimental curve measured during the pre-operational test period at the PWR nuclear power plant KKS Stade was recalculated using the combination ADYPMO-FRETI. Good agreement between theoretical calculations and experimental results give an insight into the validity and efficiency of the underlying theoretical model and the applied retransformation method. (Auth.)

  8. The Short-term Memory (D.C. Response) of the Memristor Demonstrates the Causes of the Memristor Frequency Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Gale, Ella; Costello, Ben de Lacy; Erokhin, Victor; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    A memristor is often identified by showing its distinctive pinched hysteresis curve and testing for the effect of frequency. The hysteresis size should relate to frequency and shrink to zero as the frequency approaches infinity. Although mathematically understood, the material causes for this are not well known. The d.c. response of the memristor is a decaying curve with its own timescale. We show via mathematical reasoning that this decaying curve when transformed to a.c. leads to the freque...

  9. Performance Analysis of a Fiber Reinforced Plastic Oil Cooler Cover Considering the Anisotropic Behavior of the Fiber Reinforced PA66

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a simulation method based on an orthogonal anisotropic material is proposed. A numerical example using a simple plate is presented to show the difference in the static performance between the orthogonal anisotropic and the isotropic models. Comparing with the tested modal data of a diesel engine oil cooler cover made by glass fiber reinforced polyamide 66 (PA66, the proposed simulation method was confirmed to be much closer to reality than the general isotropic model. After that, a comprehensive performance comparison between the plastic oil cooler covers with the orthogonal anisotropic and the isotropic fiber orientations was carried out including a static deformation and stress analysis under a pressure-temperature coupled load, a forced response analysis, and an acoustic analysis under real operating conditions. The results show that the stress, the deformation, the peak vibration velocity, and the overall sound power level of the orthogonal anisotropic model are different from that obtained with the isotropic model. More importantly, the proposed method can provide a much more detailed frequency content compared to the isotropic model.

  10. First direct measurements of behavioural responses by Cuvier's beaked whales to mid-frequency active sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRuiter, Stacy L; Southall, Brandon L; Calambokidis, John; Zimmer, Walter M X; Sadykova, Dinara; Falcone, Erin A; Friedlaender, Ari S; Joseph, John E; Moretti, David; Schorr, Gregory S; Thomas, Len; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-08-23

    Most marine mammal- strandings coincident with naval sonar exercises have involved Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris). We recorded animal movement and acoustic data on two tagged Ziphius and obtained the first direct measurements of behavioural responses of this species to mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar signals. Each recording included a 30-min playback (one 1.6-s simulated MFA sonar signal repeated every 25 s); one whale was also incidentally exposed to MFA sonar from distant naval exercises. Whales responded strongly to playbacks at low received levels (RLs; 89-127 dB re 1 µPa): after ceasing normal fluking and echolocation, they swam rapidly, silently away, extending both dive duration and subsequent non-foraging interval. Distant sonar exercises (78-106 dB re 1 µPa) did not elicit such responses, suggesting that context may moderate reactions. The observed responses to playback occurred at RLs well below current regulatory thresholds; equivalent responses to operational sonars could elevate stranding risk and reduce foraging efficiency.

  11. Thermodynamics of anisotropic branes

    CERN Document Server

    Ávila, Daniel; Patiño, Leonardo; Trancanelli, Diego

    2016-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics of flavor D7-branes embedded in an anisotropic black brane solution of type IIB supergravity. The flavor branes undergo a phase transition between a `Minkowski embedding', in which they lie outside of the horizon, and a `black hole embedding', in which they fall into the horizon. This transition depends on two independent dimensionless ratios, which are formed out of the black hole temperature, its anisotropy parameter, and the mass of the flavor degrees of freedom. It happens either at a critical temperature or at a critical anisotropy. A general lesson we learn from this analysis is that the anisotropy, in this particular realization, induces similar effects as the temperature. In particular, increasing the anisotropy bends the branes more and more into the horizon. Moreover, we observe that the transition becomes smoother for higher anisotropies.

  12. Averaging anisotropic cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, J D; Barrow, John D.; Tsagas, Christos G.

    2006-01-01

    We examine the effects of spatial inhomogeneities on irrotational anisotropic cosmologies by looking at the average properties of pressure-free Bianchi-type models. Adopting the Buchert averaging scheme, we identify the kinematic backreaction effects by focussing on spacetimes with zero or isotropic spatial curvature. This allows us to close the system of the standard scalar formulae with a propagation equation for the shear magnitude. We find no change in the already known conditions for accelerated expansion. The backreaction terms are expressed as algebraic relations between the mean-square fluctuations of the models' irreducible kinematical variables. Based on these we investigate the early evolution of averaged vacuum Bianchi type $I$ universes and those filled with pressureless matter. In the latter case we show that the backreaction effects can modify the familiar Kasner-like singularity and potentially remove Mixmaster-type oscillations. We also discuss the possibility of accelerated expansion due to ...

  13. Anisotropic Model Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kats, C. M.

    2008-10-01

    The driving forces for fundamental research in colloid science are the ability to manage the material properties of colloids and to unravel the forces that play a role between colloids to be able to control and understand the processes where colloids play an important role. Therefore we are searching for colloidal materials with specific physical properties to better understand our surrounding world.Until recently research in colloid science was mainly focused on spherical (isotropic) particles. Monodisperse spherical colloids serve as a model system as they exhibit similar phase behaviour as molecular and atomic systems. Nevertheless, in many cases the spherical shape is not sufficient to reach the desired research goals. Recently the more complex synthesis methods of anisotropic model colloids has strongly developed. This thesis should be regarded as a contribution to this research area. Anisotropic colloids can be used as a building block for complex structures and are expected not only to lead to the construction of full photonic band gap materials. They will also serve as new, more realistic, models systems for their molecular analogues. Therefore the term ‘molecular colloids” is sometimes used to qualify these anisotropic colloidal particles. In the introduction of this thesis, we give an overview of the main synthesis techniques for anisotropic colloids. Chapter 2 describes the method of etching silicon wafers to construct monodisperse silicon rods. They subsequently were oxidized and labeled (coated) with a fluorescent silica layer. The first explorative phase behaviour of these silica rods was studied. The particles showed a nematic ordering in charge stabilized suspensions. Chapter 3 describes the synthesis of colloidal gold rods and the (mesoporous) silica coating of gold rods. Chapter 4 describes the physical and optical properties of these particles when thermal energy is added. This is compared to the case where the particles are irradiated with

  14. Utra-thin anisotropic transmitting metasurface for polarization beam splitter application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wen-Long; Wang, Guang-Ming; Ding, Shan-Shan; Li, Hai-Peng; Cai, Tong

    2016-08-01

    We report a polarization beam splitter based on phase gradient metasurface for microwave frequency region. The metasurface is constructed by anisotropic cells with independent phase response for differently-polarized waves. Through putting different gradient phases for orthogonally-polarized waves on a focusing metasurface, the anisotropic sample has the ability to enhance gain and split orthogonally-polarized waves. The simulation results indicate that the incident spherical waves are converted into plane waves and split into an x-polarized wave with a refraction angle of ‑24° and a y-polarized wave with a refraction angle of 37.6° in the y direction. For verification, a metasurface sample with a size of 102.5 mm ×102.5 mm is fabricated and measured. The consistence between numerical and experimental results validates the improved gain of 10.5-dB against the feed source and the splitting effect. Moreover, the thickness of the proposed metasurface is 3 mm which is ultra-thin against the wavelength at 15 GHz. The proposed prescription opens a new route to the applications of anisotropic metasurface in microwave band. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61372034).

  15. Ultrasonic Linear Motor with Anisotropic Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾周末; 王新辉; 赵伯雷

    2004-01-01

    An idea to make up the vibrating body of ultrasonic motor with anisotropic composite is proposed and a linear piezoelectric motor is developed in this paper. Relative problems such as actuating mechanism, resonant frequency are discussed theoretically. According to the feature that impulse exists between the elastic body of composite ultrasonic linear motor and the base, an impulse analysis is presented to calculate the motor′s friction driving force and frictional conversion efficiency. The impulse analysis essentially explains the reason why the ultrasonic motor has great driving force, and can be applied to analyze the non-linear ultrasonic motor.

  16. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Undrill, John; Mackin, Peter; Daschmans, Ron; Williams, Ben; Haney, Brian; Hunt, Randall; Ellis, Jeff; Illian, Howard; Martinez, Carlos; O' Malley, Mark; Coughlin, Katie; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi

    2010-12-20

    An interconnected electric power system is a complex system that must be operated within a safe frequency range in order to reliably maintain the instantaneous balance between generation and load. This is accomplished by ensuring that adequate resources are available to respond to expected and unexpected imbalances and restoring frequency to its scheduled value in order to ensure uninterrupted electric service to customers. Electrical systems must be flexible enough to reliably operate under a variety of"change" scenarios. System planners and operators must understand how other parts of the system change in response to the initial change, and need tools to manage such changes to ensure reliable operation within the scheduled frequency range. This report presents a systematic approach to identifying metrics that are useful for operating and planning a reliable system with increased amounts of variable renewable generation which builds on existing industry practices for frequency control after unexpected loss of a large amount of generation. The report introduces a set of metrics or tools for measuring the adequacy of frequency response within an interconnection. Based on the concept of the frequency nadir, these metrics take advantage of new information gathering and processing capabilities that system operators are developing for wide-area situational awareness. Primary frequency response is the leading metric that will be used by this report to assess the adequacy of primary frequency control reserves necessary to ensure reliable operation. It measures what is needed to arrest frequency decline (i.e., to establish frequency nadir) at a frequency higher than the highest set point for under-frequency load shedding within an interconnection. These metrics can be used to guide the reliable operation of an interconnection under changing circumstances.

  17. Wave Propagation in Fractured Anisotropic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, S.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2012-12-01

    Discontinuities such as fractures, joints and faults occur in the Earth's crusts in a variety of rock types. While much theoretical, experimental and computational research have examined seismic wave propagation in fractured isotropic rock, few experimental studies have investigated seismic wave propagation in fractured anisotropic media. The co-existence of fractures and layers can complicate the interpretation of seismic properties because of the discrete guided modes that propagate along or are confined by the fractures. In this study, we use seismic arrays and acoustic wavefront imaging techniques to examine the competing sources of seismic anisotropy from fractures and from layers. Samples with textural anisotropy (100 mm x 100 mm x 100 mm) were fabricated from garolite, an epoxy - cloth laminate, with layer thickness 0f ~ 0.5 mm. Two sets of fractured samples were fabricated: (1) two single fractured samples with one fracture either parallel or (and) perpendicular to layers, and (2) four multi-fractured samples with 5 parallel fractures oriented either parallel, 30 degrees, 60 degrees or perpendicular to the layers. An intact sample containing no fractures was used as a standard orthorhombic medium for reference. Seismic arrays were used on the first set of samples to measure bulk waves and fracture interface waves as a function of stress. The seismic array contained two compressional and five shear-wave source-receiver pairs with a central frequency of 1 MHz. Shear wave transducers were polarized both perpendicular and parallel to the layering as well as to the fracture. Measurements were made for a range of stresses (0.4 - 4MPa). From these measurements it was observed that a fractured layered medium appears more isotropic or anisotropic than the orthorhombic background, depending on the orientation of the fracture relative to layers. The matrix anisotropy was recovered by increasing the normal stress on a fracture (i.e., by closing the fracture). For the

  18. The dielectric calibration of capacitance probes for soil hydrology using an oscillation frequency response model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Robinson

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Capacitance probes are a fast, safe and relatively inexpensive means of measuring the relative permittivity of soils, which can then be used to estimate soil water content. Initial experiments with capacitance probes used empirical calibrations between the frequency response of the instrument and soil water content. This has the disadvantage that the calibrations are instrument-dependent. A twofold calibration strategy is described in this paper; the instrument frequency is turned into relative permittivity (dielectric constant which can then be calibrated against soil water content. This approach offers the advantages of making the second calibration, from soil permittivity to soil water content. instrument-independent and allows comparison with other dielectric methods, such as time domain reflectometry. A physically based model, used to calibrate capacitance probes in terms of relative permittivity (εr is presented. The model, which was developed from circuit analysis, predicts, successfully, the frequency response of the instrument in liquids with different relative permittivities, using only measurements in air and water. lt was used successfully to calibrate 10 prototype surface capacitance insertion probes (SCIPS and a depth capacitance probe. The findings demonstrate that the geometric properties of the instrument electrodes were an important parameter in the model, the value of which could be fixed through measurement. The relationship between apparent soil permittivity and volumetric water content has been the subject of much research in the last 30 years. Two lines of investigation have developed, time domain reflectometry (TDR and capacitance. Both methods claim to measure relative permittivity and should therefore be comparable. This paper demonstrates that the IH capacitance probe overestimates relative permittivity as the ionic conductivity of the medium increases. Electrically conducting ionic solutions were used to test the

  19. An Unexpected Frequency Response of A Piezoelectric Quartz Crystal Sensor to the Density and Viscosity of the Liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shun FENG; Jing Tian HU; Qi KANG; Chang Ying GUO; Da Zhong SHEN

    2005-01-01

    An unexpected frequency response for a piezoelectric quartz crystal (PQC) sensor to liquid density and viscosity was reported. For a PQC oscillating in a liquid phase, the frequency shifts (△f) show a wave-shape response to liquid density (p) and viscosity (η) in fine structure, if the longitudinal wave effect was not eliminated. This result is different from the well-known linear relationship between of △f and (pη)1/2. An oscillating frequency-temperature curve of the sensor was observed and explained.

  20. Response of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to a high-frequency input

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, L S

    2010-01-01

    We study the response of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron stimulated by a periodic sequence of conductance pulses arriving through the synapse in the high frequency regime. In addition to the usual excitation threshold there is a smooth crossover from the firing to the silent regime for increasing pulse amplitude $g_{syn}$. The amplitude of the voltage spikes decreases approximately linearly with $g_{syn}$. In some regions of parameter space the response is irregular, probably chaotic. In the chaotic regime between the mode-locked regions 3:1 and 2:1 near the lower excitation threshold the output interspike interval histogram (ISIH) undergoes a sharp transition. If the driving period is below the critical value, $T_i T^*$ even multiples of $T_i$ also appear in the histogram, starting from the largest values. Near $T^*$ the ISIH scales logarithmically on both sides of the transition. The coefficient of variation of ISIH has a cusp singularity at $T^*$. The average response period has a maximum slightly above $T^*$. Ne...

  1. Biological stress responses to radio frequency electromagnetic radiation: are mobile phones really so (heat) shocking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotgreave, Ian A

    2005-03-01

    Cells phenotypically adapt to alterations in their intra- and extracellular environment via organised alterations to gene and protein expression. Many chemical and physical stimuli are known to drive such responses, including the induction of oxidative stress and heat shock. Increasing use of mobile telephones in our society, has brought focus on the potential for radio frequency (microwave) electromagnetic radiation to elicit biological stress responses, in association with potentially detrimental effects of this to human health. Here we review evidence suggesting altered gene and protein expression in response to such emissions, with particular focus on heat shock proteins. Non-thermal induction of heat shock proteins has been claimed by a number of investigations in in vitro cellular systems, and appears pleiotropic for many other regulatory events. However, many of these studies are flawed by inconsistencies in exposure models, cell types used and the independent reproducibility of the findings. Further, the paucity of evidence from in vivo experimentation is largely contradictory. Therefore, the validity of these effects in human health risk assessment remain unsubstantiated. Where possible, suggestions for further experimental clarification have been provided.

  2. Anisotropic Inflation with General Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Jiaming; Qiu, Taotao

    2015-01-01

    Anomalies in recent observational data indicate that there might be some "anisotropic hair" generated in an inflation period. To obtain general information about the effects of this anisotropic hair to inflation models, we studied anisotropic inflation models that involve one vector and one scalar using several types of potentials. We determined the general relationship between the degree of anisotropy and the fraction of the vector and scalar fields, and concluded that the anisotropies behave independently of the potentials. We also generalized our study to the case of multi-directional anisotropies.

  3. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of quasi-symmetric anisotropic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1987-01-01

    An efficient computational method for the nonlinear dynamic analysis of quasi-symmetric anisotropic structures is proposed. The application of mixed models simplifies the analytical development and improves the accuracy of the response predictions, and operator splitting allows the reduction of the analysis model of the quasi-symmetric structure to that of the corresponding symmetric structure. The preconditoned conjugate gradient provides a stable and effective technique for generating the unsymmetric response of the structure as the sum of a symmetrized response plus correction modes. The effectiveness of the strategy is demonstrated with the example of a laminated anisotropic shallow shell of quadrilateral planform subjected to uniform normal loading.

  4. Uncertainty analysis of strain modal parameters by Bayesian method using frequency response function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Li; Yi Weijian; Zhihua Yi

    2007-01-01

    Structural strain modes are able to detect changes in local structural performance, but errors are inevitably intermixed in the measured data. In this paper, strain modal parameters are considered as random variables, and their uncertainty is analyzed by a Bayesian method based on the structural frequency response function (FRF). The estimates of strain modal parameters with maximal posterior probability are determined. Several independent measurements of the FRF of a four-story reinforced concrete frame structural model were performed in the laboratory. The ability to identify the stiffness change in a concrete column using the strain mode was verified. It is shown that the uncertainty of the natural frequency is very small. Compared with the displacement mode shape, the variations of strain mode shapes at each point are quite different. The damping ratios are more affected by the types of test systems. Except for the case where a high order strain mode does not identify local damage, the first order strain mode can provide an exact indication of the damage location.

  5. Frequency Response Properties of Organic Photo-Detectors as Opto-Electrical Conversion Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimune, Taichiro; Kajii, Hirotake; Ohmori, Yutaka

    2006-06-01

    Frequency performances and sensitivities for three types of organic photo-detector (OPD) were studied for an opto-electrical conversion device. A high efficiency of 19.4% of the external conversion efficiency and a high cutoff frequency response of 16 MHz were achieved using a mixed-layer between copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and N, N'-bis (2,5-di-tert- butylphenyl) 3,4,9,10-perylene dicarboximide (BPPC) at a reverse bias voltage of 8 V under red incident light. These results were achieved by increasing exciton dissociation and charge carrier generation and to reduce the number of trapped carriers at the interfaces between CuPc and BPPC. The transmission of a moving picture was successfully demonstrated using mixed-layer OPD as an opto-electrical conversion device. These results indicate that it is possible for an OPD to be used as an opto-electrical conversion device in high-speed optical transmission systems.

  6. Effect of the Detector Width and Gas Pressure on the Frequency Response of a Micromachined Thermal Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Courteaud

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the design and the environmental conditions of a micromachined thermal accelerometer, based on convection effect, are discussed and studied in order to understand the behavior of the frequency response evolution of the sensor. It has been theoretically and experimentally studied with different detector widths, pressure and gas nature. Although this type of sensor has already been intensively examined, little information concerning the frequency response modeling is currently available and very few experimental results about the frequency response are reported in the literature. In some particular conditions, our measurements show a cut-off frequency at −3 dB greater than 200 Hz. By using simple cylindrical and planar models of the thermal accelerometer and an equivalent electrical circuit, a good agreement with the experimental results has been demonstrated.

  7. Characteristic analysis of the optical delay in frequency response of resonant cavity enhanced (RCE) photodetectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Jian-Chuan; Zuo Yu-Hua; Zhang Yun; Ding Wu-Chang; Cheng Bu-Wen; Yu Jin-Zhong; Wang Qi-Ming

    2009-01-01

    With consideration of the modulation frequency of the input lightwave itself, we present a new model to calculate the quantum efficiency of RCE p-i-n photodetectors (PD) by superimposition of multiple reflected lightwaves. For the first time, the optical delay, another important factor limiting the electrical bandwidth of RCE p-i-n PD excluding the transit time of the carriers and RCd response of the photodetector, is analyzed and discussed in detail. The optical delay dominates the bandwidth of RCE p-i-n PD when its active layer is thinner than several 10 nm. These three limiting factors must be considered exactly for design of ultra-high-speed RCE p-i-n PD.

  8. A multichannel frequency response analyser for impedance spectroscopy on power sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIEL J. L. BRETT

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost multi-channel frequency response analyser (FRA has been developed based on a DAQ (data acquisition/LabVIEW interface. The system has been tested for electric and electrochemical impedance measurements. This novel association of hardware and software demonstrated performance comparable to a commercial potentiostat / FRA for passive electric circuits. The software has multichannel capabilities with minimal phase shift for 5 channels when operated below 3 kHz. When applied in active (galvanostatic mode in conjunction with a commercial electronic load (by discharging a lead acid battery at 1.5 A the performance was fit for purpose, providing electrochemical information to characterize the performance of the power source.

  9. Theory of passively mode-locked lasers with self-frequency shift and saturable absorber response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Li-Jun; Shi Xiao-Juan; Li Lu; Li Zhong-Hao; Zhou Guo-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    A general theoretical model for passively mode-locked lasers is presented, in which both the self-frequency shift and either a fast or a slow saturable absorber response are taken into account. An exact soliton-like solution and condition for its existence are obtained under a definite compatible condition. The stability of the solution is analyzed by using a variational method, and a parameter region, in which the solution is linearly stable, is acquired theoretically. To verify the theoretical predictions, a typical example is given for stable pulse propagation over a long distance. The numerical results show that the soliton-like solution is stable under some perturbations within the linearly stable region and an arbitrary Gaussian pulse converges to the exact soliton-like solution after evolution in a distance.

  10. Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyun Bum; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2016-06-01

    Anisotropy of biological tissues is a low-frequency phenomenon that is associated with the function and structure of cell membranes. Imaging of anisotropic conductivity has potential for the analysis of interactions between electromagnetic fields and biological systems, such as the prediction of current pathways in electrical stimulation therapy. To improve application to the clinical environment, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subjected to the stimulated currents. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the anisotropic conductivity tensor distribution of canine brain tissues, using a recently developed diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography method. At low frequency, electrical conductivity of the biological tissues can be expressed as a product of the mobility and concentration of ions in the extracellular space. From diffusion tensor images of the brain, we can obtain directional information on diffusive movements of water molecules, which correspond to the mobility of ions. The position dependent scale factor, which provides information on ion concentration, was successfully calculated from the magnetic flux density, to obtain the equivalent conductivity tensor. By combining the information from both techniques, we can finally reconstruct the anisotropic conductivity tensor images of brain tissues. The reconstructed conductivity images better demonstrate the enhanced signal intensity in strongly anisotropic brain regions, compared with those resulting from previous methods using a global scale factor.

  11. Anisotropic artificial substrates for microwave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahvarpour, Attieh

    The perfect electromagnetic conductor (PEMC) boundary is a novel fundamental electromagnetic concept. It is a generalized description of the electromagnetic boundary conditions including the perfect electric conductor (PEC) and the perfect magnetic conductor (PMC) and due to its fundamental properties, it has the potential of enabling several electromagnetic applications. However, the PEMC boundaries concept had remained at the theoretical level and has not been practically realized. Therefore, motivated by the importance of this electromagnetic fundamental concept and its potential applications, the first contribution of this thesis is focused on the practical implementation of the PEMC boundaries by exploiting Faraday rotation principle and ground reflection in the ferrite materials which are intrinsically anisotropic. As a result, this thesis reports the first practical approach for the realization of PEMC boundaries. A generalized scattering matrix (GSM) is used for the analysis of the grounded-ferrite PEMC boundaries structure. As an application of the PEMC boundaries, a transverse electromagnetic (TEM) waveguide is experimentally demonstrated using grounded ferrite PMC (as particular case of the PEMC boundaries) side walls. Perfect electromagnetic conductor boundaries may find applications in various types of sensors, reflectors, polarization convertors and polarization-based radio frequency identifiers. Leaky-wave antennas perform as high directivity and frequency beam scanning antennas and as a result they enable applications in radar, point-to-point communications and MIMO systems. The second contribution of this thesis is introducing and analysing a novel broadband and highly directive two-dimensional leaky-wave antenna. This antenna operates differently in the lower and higher frequency ranges. Toward its lower frequencies, it allows full-space conical-beam scanning while at higher frequencies, it provides fixed-beam radiation (at a designable angle

  12. Photon states in anisotropic media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepak Kumar

    2002-08-01

    Quantum aspects of optical polarization are discussed for waves traveling in anisotropic dielectric media with a view to relate the dynamics of polarization with that of photon spin and its manipulation by classical polarizers.

  13. Gradient expansion for anisotropic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Spaliński, Michał

    2016-01-01

    We compute the gradient expansion for anisotropic hydrodynamics. The results are compared with the corresponding expansion of the underlying kinetic-theory model with the collision term treated in the relaxation time approximation. We find that a recent formulation of anisotropic hydrodynamics based on an anisotropic matching principle yields the first three terms of the gradient expansion in agreement with those obtained for the kinetic theory. This gives further support for this particular hydrodynamic model as a good approximation of the kinetic-theory approach. We further find that the gradient expansion of anisotropic hydrodynamics is an asymptotic series, and the singularities of the analytic continuation of its Borel transform indicate the presence of non-hydrodynamic modes.

  14. Acoustic Beam Forming Array Using Feedback-Controlled Microphones for Tuning and Self-Matching of Frequency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, Eliott (Inventor); Naguib, Ahmed (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A feedback-controlled microphone includes a microphone body and a membrane operatively connected to the body. The membrane is configured to be initially deflected by acoustic pressure such that the initial deflection is characterized by a frequency response. The microphone also includes a sensor configured to detect the frequency response of the initial deflection and generate an output voltage indicative thereof. The microphone additionally includes a compensator in electric communication with the sensor and configured to establish a regulated voltage in response to the output voltage. Furthermore, the microphone includes an actuator in electric communication with the compensator, wherein the actuator is configured to secondarily deflect the membrane in opposition to the initial deflection such that the frequency response is adjusted. An acoustic beam forming microphone array including a plurality of the above feedback-controlled microphones is also disclosed.

  15. Effect of bimodularity on frequency response of cylindrical panels using Galerkin time domain approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kallol Khan; Badri Prasad Patel; Yogendra Nath

    2010-12-01

    The forced vibration analysis of bimodulus material laminated structures is a challenging problem due to non-smooth nonlinear nature of governing equations. The most commonly used direct time integration schemes show numerical instability and do not predict steady state response except for limited number of cases without considering in-plane inertia. This is due to the sudden change of restoring force from positive/negative half cycle to negative/positive half cycle exciting higher modes/harmonics at every instant of a cycle change leading to numerical instability in the time marching scheme. In the present work, Galerkin time domain approach is successfully used for the forced vibration analysis of bimodular cylindrical panels. The effect of bimodularity ratio on the frequency response of cylindrical panels for few typical geometrical and lamination parameters is studied for the first time. It is found that the positive half cycle amplitude is greater than the negative half cycle amplitude for $E_{2t}/E_{2c} < 1$ and is smaller for $E_{2t}/E_{2c} > 1$. Further, the percentage difference of positive and negative half cycle amplitudes decreases with the increase in $E_{2t}/E_{2c}$. The stresses under dynamic loading are different for positive and negative half of a vibration cycle.

  16. Electric double layer of anisotropic dielectric colloids under electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, M.; Wu, H.; Luijten, E.

    2016-07-01

    Anisotropic colloidal particles constitute an important class of building blocks for self-assembly directed by electrical fields. The aggregation of these building blocks is driven by induced dipole moments, which arise from an interplay between dielectric effects and the electric double layer. For particles that are anisotropic in shape, charge distribution, and dielectric properties, calculation of the electric double layer requires coupling of the ionic dynamics to a Poisson solver. We apply recently proposed methods to solve this problem for experimentally employed colloids in static and time-dependent electric fields. This allows us to predict the effects of field strength and frequency on the colloidal properties.

  17. MHz Gravitational Waves from Short-term Anisotropic Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Asuka

    2016-01-01

    We reveal the universality of short-term anisotropic inflation. As a demonstration, we study inflation with an exponential type gauge kinetic function which is ubiquitous in models obtained by dimensional reduction from higher dimensional fundamental theory. It turns out that an anisotropic inflation universally takes place in the later stage of conventional inflation. Remarkably, we find that primordial gravitational waves with a peak amplitude around $10^{-26}$ ~ $10^{-27}$ are copiously produced in high-frequency bands 10MHz~100MHz. If we could detect such gravitational waves in future, we would be able to probe higher dimensional fundamental theory.

  18. Computational Study of Subdural Cortical Stimulation: Effects of Simulating Anisotropic Conductivity on Activation of Cortical Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Seo

    Full Text Available Subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS is an appealing method in the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of SuCS have been applied to determine the optimal design for electrotherapy. To achieve a better understanding of computational modeling on the stimulation effects of SuCS, the influence of anisotropic white matter conductivity on the activation of cortical neurons was investigated in a realistic head model. In this paper, we constructed pyramidal neuronal models (layers 3 and 5 that showed primary excitation of the corticospinal tract, and an anatomically realistic head model reflecting complex brain geometry. The anisotropic information was acquired from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI and then applied to the white matter at various ratios of anisotropic conductivity. First, we compared the isotropic and anisotropic models; compared to the isotropic model, the anisotropic model showed that neurons were activated in the deeper bank during cathodal stimulation and in the wider crown during anodal stimulation. Second, several popular anisotropic principles were adapted to investigate the effects of variations in anisotropic information. We observed that excitation thresholds varied with anisotropic principles, especially with anodal stimulation. Overall, incorporating anisotropic conductivity into the anatomically realistic head model is critical for accurate estimation of neuronal responses; however, caution should be used in the selection of anisotropic information.

  19. Provision of secondary frequency control via demand response activation on thermostatically controlled loads: Solutions and experiences from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Marinelli, Mattia; Hu, Junjie;

    2016-01-01

    of household fridge performance in terms of response time and ramp-up rate, as well as the impact on fridge temperature and behaviour after the control period. The experimental results show that TCLs are fast responsive loads for DR activation, with the average control signal response time of 24 s......This paper studies the provision of secondary frequency control in electric power systems based on demand response (DR) activation on thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs) and quantifies the computation resource constraints for the control of large TCL population. Since TCLs are fast responsive...

  20. Time history solution program, L225 (TEV126). Volume 2: Supplemental system design and maintenance document. [for airplane dynamic response using frequency response data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornallyay, A.; Clemmons, R. E.; Kroll, R. I.

    1979-01-01

    The time history solution program L225 (TEV126) is described. The program calculates the time responses of a linear system by convoluting the impulsive response functions with the time dependent excitation. The convolution is performed as a multiplication in the frequency domain. Fast Fourier transform techniques are used to transform the product back into the time domain to obtain response time histories. The design and structure of the program is presented.

  1. Effects of electronic state modulation on the high-frequency response characteristics of GaAs quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basanta Singh, N., E-mail: basanta_n@rediffmail.co [Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Manipur Institute of Technology, Imphal 795 004 (India); Deb, Sanjoy, E-mail: deb_sanjoy@yahoo.co [Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Sarkar, Subir Kumar, E-mail: su_sircir@yahoo.co.i [Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2009-11-01

    The effect of electronic-state modulation on the high frequency response of GaAs quantum well with thin inserted barrier layer is studied. The carrier scattering by polar optic phonons, acoustic deformation potential and background ionized impurities are incorporated in the present calculations considering the carrier distribution to be heated drifted Fermi-Dirac distribution. Modified phonon spectra and modulated electron wave function give different values of form factor compared to bulk mode phonon. Mobility is found to be enhanced on insertion of thin layer inside the quantum well. The ac mobility and the phase lag increases with the increase in both the channel width and the 2D carrier concentration. Cutoff frequency, where ac mobility drops down to 0.707 of its low frequency value, is observed to be enhanced reflecting better high frequency response.

  2. Anisotropic metamaterials with simultaneous attenuation and amplification

    CERN Document Server

    Mackay, Tom G

    2015-01-01

    Anisotropic metamaterials that are neither wholly dissipative nor wholly active at a specific frequency are permitted by classical electromagnetic theory. Well-established formalisms for the homogenization of particulate composite materials indicate that such a metamaterial may be conceptualized quite simply as a random mixture of electrically small spheroidal particles of at least two different isotropic dielectric materials, one of which must be dissipative but the other active. The realization of this metametarial is influenced by the volume fraction, spatial distribution, particle shape and size, and the relative permittivities of the component materials. Metamaterials displaying both dissipation and amplification at the same frequency with more complicated linear as well as nonlinear constitutive properties are possible.

  3. Neuronal cellular responses to extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure: implications regarding oxidative stress and neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Reale

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases comprise both hereditary and sporadic conditions characterized by an identifying progressive nervous system dysfunction and distinctive neuopathophysiology. The majority are of non-familial etiology and hence environmental factors and lifestyle play key roles in their pathogenesis. The extensive use of and ever increasing worldwide demand for electricity has stimulated societal and scientific interest on the environmental exposure to low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs on human health. Epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between 50/60-Hz power transmission fields and leukemia or lymphoma development. Consequent to the association between EMFs and induction of oxidative stress, concerns relating to development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD, have been voiced as the brain consumes the greatest fraction of oxygen and is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF-EMFs are reported to alter animal behavior and modulate biological variables, including gene expression, regulation of cell survival, promotion of cellular differentiation, and changes in cerebral blood flow in aged AD transgenic mice. Alterations in inflammatory responses have also been reported, but how these actions impact human health remains unknown. We hence evaluated the effects of an electromagnetic wave (magnetic field intensity 1 mT; frequency, 50-Hz on a well-characterized immortalized neuronal cell model, human SH-SY5Y cells. ELF-EMF exposure elevated the expession of NOS and O2(-, which were countered by compensatory changes in antioxidant catylase (CAT activity and enzymatic kinetic parameters related to CYP-450 and CAT activity. Actions of ELF-EMFs on cytokine gene expression were additionally evaluated and found rapidly modified. Confronted with co-exposure to H2O2-induced oxidative stress, ELF-EMF proved not as well counteracted and resulted in a

  4. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasma with heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Haijun, E-mail: hjren@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in an anisotropic tokamak plasma is investigated in fluid approximation. The collisionless anisotropic plasma is described within the 16-momentum magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid closure model, which takes into account not only the pressure anisotropy but also the anisotropic heat flux. It is shown that the GAM frequency agrees better with the kinetic result than the standard Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) MHD model. When zeroing the anisotropy, the 16-momentum result is identical with the kinetic one to the order of 1/q{sup 2}, while the CGL result agrees with the kinetic result only on the leading order. The discrepancies between the results of the CGL fluid model and the kinetic theory are well removed by considering the heat flux effect in the fluid approximation.

  5. Frequency-dependent reduction of voltage-gated sodium current modulates retinal ganglion cell response rate to electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, David; Morley, John W.; Suaning, Gregg J.; Lovell, Nigel H.

    2011-10-01

    The ability to elicit visual percepts through electrical stimulation of the retina has prompted numerous investigations examining the feasibility of restoring sight to the blind with retinal implants. The therapeutic efficacy of these devices will be strongly influenced by their ability to elicit neural responses that approximate those of normal vision. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) can fire spikes at frequencies greater than 200 Hz when driven by light. However, several studies using isolated retinas have found a decline in RGC spiking response rate when these cells were stimulated at greater than 50 Hz. It is possible that the mechanism responsible for this decline also contributes to the frequency-dependent 'fading' of electrically evoked percepts recently reported in human patients. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings of rabbit RGCs, we investigated the causes for the spiking response depression during direct subretinal stimulation of these cells at 50-200 Hz. The response depression was not caused by inhibition arising from the retinal network but, instead, by a stimulus-frequency-dependent decline of RGC voltage-gated sodium current. Under identical experimental conditions, however, RGCs were able to spike at high frequency when driven by light stimuli and intracellular depolarization. Based on these observations, we demonstrated a technique to prevent the spiking response depression.

  6. Frequency Response of Near-Wall Coherent Structures to Localized Periodic Blowing and Suction in Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-Hua; JIANG Nan

    2008-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the frequency response of near-wall coherent structures to localized periodic blowing and suction through a spanwise slot in a turbulent boundary layer by changing the frequency of periodic disturbance at similar velocities of free stream.The effects of blowing and suction disturbance on energy redistribution,turbulent intensity u'+rms over y+ and waveforms of phase-averaged velocity during sweeping process are respectively discussed under three frequencies of periodic blowing and suction in near-wall region of turbulent boundary layer,compared with those in a standard turbulent boundary layer.The most effective disturbancefrequency is figured out in this system.

  7. Feasibility demonstration of a variable frequency driver-microwave transient regression rate measurement system. [for solid propellant combustion response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, L. D.; Mcnamara, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of a system capable of rapidly and directly measuring the low-frequency (motor characteristics length bulk mode) combustion response characteristics of solid propellants has been investigated. The system consists of a variable frequency oscillatory driver device coupled with an improved version of the JPL microwave propellant regression rate measurement system. The ratio of the normalized regression rate and pressure amplitudes and their relative phase are measured as a function of varying pressure level and frequency. Test results with a well-characterized PBAN-AP propellant formulation were found to compare favorably with the results of more conventional stability measurement techniques.

  8. Excitation of the half-frequency of the input signal in the response of an antenna immersed in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nonlinear response of a cylindrical monopole antenna immersed in a steady-state collisionless magnetic-field-free plasma and driven by a single-frequency RF source is investigated. The thickness of the ion sheath surrounding the antenna is controlled by a dc bias applied to the latter. It is found that a frequencies of the driving signal close to twice the frequency of a sheath wave resonance, the 1/2-subharmonic is excited, provided that the input power level is sufficiently high. The dependence of this process on the sheath thickness and on the electron plasma density is studied in the vicinity of several sheath wave resonances

  9. Effects of surface finish and treatment on the fatigue behaviour of vibrating cylinder block using frequency response approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the effects of surface finish and treatment on the high cycle fatigue behaviour of vibrating cylinder block of a new two-stroke free piston engine at complex variable amplitude loading conditions using frequency response approach,Finite element modelling and frequency response analysis was conducted using finite element analysis software Package MSC.PATRAN/MSC.NASTRAN and fatigue life prediction was carried out using MSC.FATIGUE software. Based on the finite element results, different frequency response approach was applied to predict the cylinder block fatigue life. Results for different load histories and material combinations are also discussed. Results indicated great effects for all surface finish and treatment. It is concluded that polished and cast surface finish conditions give the highest and lowest cylinder block lives, respectively; and that Nitrided treatment leads to longest cylinder block life. The results were used to draw contour plots of fatigue life and damage in the worst or most damaging case.

  10. Tailoring Effective Media by Mie Resonances of Radially-Anisotropic Cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Kettunen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies constructing advanced effective materials using arrays of circular radially-anisotropic (RA cylinders. Homogenization of such cylinders is considered in an electrodynamic case based on Mie scattering theory. The homogenization procedure consists of two steps. First, we present an effectively isotropic model for individual cylinders, and second, we discuss the modeling of a lattice of RA cylinders. Radial anisotropy brings us extra parameters, which makes it possible to adjust the desired effective response for a fixed frequency. The analysis still remains simple enough, enabling a derivation of analytical design equations. The considered applications include generating artificial magnetism using all-dielectric cylinders, which is currently a very sought-after phenomenon in optical frequencies. We also study how negative refraction is achieved using magnetodielectric RA cylinders.

  11. Nonlinear analysis of traffic jams in an anisotropic continuum model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arvind Kumar Gupta; Sapna Sharma

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents our study of the nonlinear stability of a new anisotropic continuum traffic flow model in which the dimensionless parameter or anisotropic factor controls the non-isotropic character and diffusive influence. In order to establish traffic flow stability criterion or to know the critical parameters that lead, on one hand, to a stable response to perturbations or disturbances or, on the other hand, to an unstable response and therefore to a possible congestion, a nonlinear stability criterion is derived by using a wavefront expansion technique. The stability criterion is illustrated by numerical results using the finite difference method for two different values of anisotropic parameter. It is also been observed that the newly derived stability results are consistent with previously reported results obtained using approximate linearisation methods. Moreover, the stability criterion derived in this paper can provide more refined information from the perspective of the capability to reproduce nonlinear traffic flow behaviors observed in real traffic than previously established methodologies.

  12. Propagation of surface plasmons on highly anisotropic dielectric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Nagaraj; Krokhin, Arkadii

    2011-03-01

    We calculate the propagation length of surface plasmons in dielectric-metal-dielectric structures with anisotropic substrates. We show that the proper orientation of the optical axis of the crystal with respect to the metal surface minimizes Joule losses enhancing the propagation length of surface plasmons. The propagation length in a wide range of frequencies including the telecommunications region is analyzed. A simple Kronig-Penney model for anisotropic plasmonic crystal where the substrate is a periodic sequence of dielectric delta-peaks is also proposed. In this model the dispersion relation for surface plasmon has a band structure where the band width tends to zero when the frequency approaches the resonant frequency. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy through Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER46312.

  13. Ultrasound Backscattering Is Anisotropic in Bovine Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkinen, Satu I; Liukkonen, Jukka; Tiitu, Virpi; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2015-07-01

    Collagen, proteoglycans and chondrocytes can contribute to ultrasound scattering in articular cartilage. However, anisotropy of ultrasound scattering in cartilage is not fully characterized. We investigate this using a clinical intravascular ultrasound device with ultrasound frequencies of 9 and 40 MHz. Osteochondral samples were obtained from intact bovine patellas, and cartilage was imaged in two perpendicular directions: through articular and lateral surfaces. At both frequencies, ultrasound backscattering was higher (p < 0.05) when measured through the lateral surface of cartilage. In addition, the composition and structure of articular cartilage were investigated with multiple reference methods involving light microscopy, digital densitometry, polarized light microscopy and Fourier infrared imaging. Reference methods indicated that acoustic anisotropy of ultrasound scattering arises mainly from non-uniform distribution of chondrocytes and anisotropic orientation of collagen fibers. To conclude, ultrasound backscattering in articular cartilage was found to be anisotropic and dependent on the frequency in use. PMID:25933711

  14. Application of spatial frequency response as a criterion for evaluating thermal imaging camera performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Andrew; Amon, Francine

    2008-04-01

    Police, firefighters, and emergency medical personnel are examples of first responders that are utilizing thermal imaging cameras in a very practical way every day. However, few performance metrics have been developed to assist first responders in evaluating the performance of thermal imaging technology. This paper describes one possible metric for evaluating spatial resolution using an application of Spatial Frequency Response (SFR) calculations for thermal imaging. According to ISO 12233, the SFR is defined as the integrated area below the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) curve derived from the discrete Fourier transform of a camera image representing a knife-edge target. This concept is modified slightly for use as a quantitative analysis of the camera's performance by integrating the area between the MTF curve and the camera's characteristic nonuniformity, or noise floor, determined at room temperature. The resulting value, which is termed the Effective SFR, can then be compared with a spatial resolution value obtained from human perception testing of task specific situations to determine the acceptability of the performance of thermal imaging cameras. The testing procedures described herein are being developed as part of a suite of tests for possible inclusion into a performance standard on thermal imaging cameras for first responders.

  15. Machinery Fault Diagnosis Using Two-Channel Analysis Method Based on Fictitious System Frequency Response Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kihong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most existing techniques for machinery health monitoring that utilize measured vibration signals usually require measurement points to be as close as possible to the expected fault components of interest. This is particularly important for implementing condition-based maintenance since the incipient fault signal power may be too small to be detected if a sensor is located further away from the fault source. However, a measurement sensor is often not attached to the ideal point due to geometric or environmental restrictions. In such a case, many of the conventional diagnostic techniques may not be successfully applicable. In this paper, a two-channel analysis method is proposed to overcome such difficulty. It uses two vibration signals simultaneously measured at arbitrary points in a machine. The proposed method is described theoretically by introducing a fictitious system frequency response function. It is then verified experimentally for bearing fault detection. The results show that the suggested method may be a good alternative when ideal points for measurement sensors are not readily available.

  16. Nonlinear force propagation, anisotropic stiffening and non-affine relaxation in a model cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Daisuke; Head, David; Ikebe, Emi; Nakamasu, Akiko; Kinoshita, Suguru; Peijuan, Zhang; Ando, Shoji

    2013-03-01

    Forces are generated heterogeneously in living cells and transmitted through cytoskeletal networks that respond highly non-linearly. Here, we carry out high-bandwidth passive microrheology on vimentin networks reconstituted in vitro, and observe the nonlinear mechanical response due to forces propagating from a local source applied by an optical tweezer. Since the applied force is constant, the gel becomes equilibrated and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem can be employed to deduce the viscoelasticity of the local environment from the thermal fluctuations of colloidal probes. Our experiments unequivocally demonstrate the anisotropic stiffening of the cytoskeletal network behind the applied force, with greater stiffening in the parallel direction. Quantitative agreement with an affine continuum model is obtained, but only for the response at certain frequency ~ 10-1000 Hz which separates the high-frequency power law and low-frequency elastic behavior of the network. We argue that the failure of the model at lower frequencies is due to the presence of non-affinity, and observe that zero-frequency changes in particle separation can be fitted when an independently-measured, empirical nonaffinity factor is applied.

  17. Biomimetic three-dimensional anisotropic geometries by uniaxial stretching of poly(ε-caprolactone) films: degradation and mesenchymal stem cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zu-Yong; Lim, Jing; Ho, Yeow Siong; Zhang, Qin-Yuan; Chong, Mark S K; Tang, Min; Hong, Ming-Hui; Chan, Jerry K Y; Teoh, Swee Hin; Thian, Eng San

    2014-07-01

    Geometric cues have been used for a variety of cell regulation and tissue regenerative applications. While the function of geometric cues is being recognized, their stability and degradation behaviors are not well known. Here, we studied the influence of degradation on uniaxial-stretch-induced poly(ε-caprolactone) (UX-PCL) ridge/groove arrays and further cellular responses. Results from accelerated hydrolysis in vitro showed that UX-PCL ridge/groove arrays followed a surface-controlled erosion, with an overall geometry remained even at ∼45% film weight loss. Compared to unstretched PCL flat surfaces and/or ridge/groove arrays, UX-PCL ridge/groove arrays achieved an enhanced morphological stability against degradation. Over the degradation period, UX-PCL ridge/groove arrays exhibited an "S-shape" behavior of film weight loss, and retained more stable surface hydrophilicity and higher film mechanical properties than those of unstretched PCL surfaces. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) aligned better toward UX-PCL ridge/groove arrays when the geometries were remained intact, and became sensitive with gradually declined nucleus alignment and elongation to the geometric degradation of ridges. We speculate that uniaxial stretching confers UX-PCL ridge/groove arrays with enhanced stability against degradation in erosive environment. This study provides insights of how degradation influences geometric cues and further cell responses, and has implications for the design of biomaterials with stability-enhanced geometric cues for long-term tissue regeneration.

  18. Provision of secondary frequency control via demand response activation on thermostatically controlled loads: Solutions and experiences from Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Marinelli, Mattia; Hu, Junjie; Bindner, Henrik W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the provision of secondary frequency control in electric power systems based on demand response (DR) activation on thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs) and quantifies the computation resource constraints for the control of large TCL population. Since TCLs are fast responsive loads, they represent a suitable alternative to conventional sources for providing such control. An experimental investigation with domestic fridges representing the TCLs was conducted in an islande...

  19. Effects of the amplitude and frequency of salinity fluctuations on antioxidant responses in juvenile tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis

    OpenAIRE

    Sachin O. Khairnar; Xiangli Tian; Shuanglin Dong; Ziheng Fang; Bhavesh V. Solanki; Holeyappa A. Shanthanagouda

    2016-01-01

    To understand the tolerance of tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis, to varying salinities, the effects of the amplitude (2, 4, 6 and 8 g/L) and frequency (2, 4 and 8 days) of salinity fluctuations on the activities of antioxidant responses, including acidic phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) from antioxidant system in liver, muscle, gills and kidney, were investigated in this study. The results showed that the antioxidant responses of ...

  20. Synchronization by the hand: the sight of gestures modulates low-frequency activity in brain responses to continuous speech

    OpenAIRE

    Biau, Emmanuel, 1985-; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    During social interactions, speakers often produce spontaneous gestures to accompany their speech. These coordinated body movements convey communicative intentions, and modulate how listeners perceive the message in a subtle, but important way. In the present perspective, we put the focus on the role that congruent non-verbal information from beat gestures may play in the neural responses to speech. Whilst delta-theta oscillatory brain responses reflect the time-frequency structure of the spe...

  1. Synchronization by the hand: The sight of gestures modulates low-frequency activity in brain responses to continuous speech

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel eBiau; Salvador eSoto-Faraco

    2015-01-01

    During social interactions, speakers often produce spontaneous gestures to accompany their speech. These coordinated body movements convey communicative intentions, and modulate how listeners perceive the message in a subtle, but important way. In the present perspective, we put the focus on the role that congruent non-verbal information from beat gestures may play in the neural responses to speech. Whilst delta-theta oscillatory brain responses reflect the time-frequency structure of the spe...

  2. Continuum mechanics of anisotropic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Cowin, Stephen C

    2013-01-01

    Continuum Mechanics of Anisotropic Materials(CMAM) presents an entirely new and unique development of material anisotropy in the context of an appropriate selection and organization of continuum mechanics topics. These features will distinguish this continuum mechanics book from other books on this subject. Textbooks on continuum mechanics are widely employed in engineering education, however, none of them deal specifically with anisotropy in materials. For the audience of Biomedical, Chemical and Civil Engineering students, these materials will be dealt with more frequently and greater accuracy in their analysis will be desired. Continuum Mechanics of Anisotropic Materials' author has been a leader in the field of developing new approaches for the understanding of anisotropic materials.

  3. Biomechanics and Biotensegrity: Study Method and Frequency Response of the Simplex and 3-bar-SVD Tensegrity Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Arenas, C.; Ghersi, I.; Miralles, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the frequency response of 3D tensegrity structures. These are structures that have been used, since the 80’s, to model biological systems of different scales. This fact led to the origin of the field of biotensegrity, which includes biomechanics as a natural field of application. In this work: a) A simple method for the analysis of frequency response of different nodes in 3D tensegrity structures was set up and tuned. This method is based on a video-analysis algorithm, which was applied to the structures, as they were vibrated along their axis of symmetry, at frequencies from 1 Hz to 60 Hz. b) Frequency-response analyses were performed, for the simplest 3D structure, the Simplex module, as well as for two towers, formed by stacking two and three Simplex modules, respectively. Resonant frequencies were detected for the Simplex module at (19.2±0.1) Hz and (50.2±0.1) Hz (the latter being an average of frequencies between homologous nodes). For the towers with two and three modules, each selected node presented a characteristic frequency response, modulated by their spatial placement in each model. Resonances for the two-stage tower were found at: (12±0.1) Hz; (16.2±0.1) Hz; (29.4±0.1) Hz and (37.2±0.1) Hz. For the tower with three Simplex modules, the main resonant frequencies were found at (12.0±0.1) Hz and (21.0±0.1) Hz. Results show that the proposed method is adequate for the study (2D) of any 3D tensegrity structure, with the potential of being generalized to the study of oscillations in three dimensions. A growing complexity and variability in the frequency response of the nodes was observed, as modules were added to the structures. These findings were compared to those found in the available literature.

  4. Anisotropically structured magnetic aerogel monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiligtag, Florian J.; Airaghi Leccardi, Marta J. I.; Erdem, Derya; Süess, Martin J.; Niederberger, Markus

    2014-10-01

    Texturing of magnetic ceramics and composites by aligning and fixing of colloidal particles in a magnetic field is a powerful strategy to induce anisotropic chemical, physical and especially mechanical properties into bulk materials. If porosity could be introduced, anisotropically structured magnetic materials would be the perfect supports for magnetic separations in biotechnology or for magnetic field-assisted chemical reactions. Aerogels, combining high porosity with nanoscale structural features, offer an exceptionally large surface area, but they are difficult to magnetically texture. Here we present the preparation of anatase-magnetite aerogel monoliths via the assembly of preformed nanocrystallites. Different approaches are proposed to produce macroscopic bodies with gradient-like magnetic segmentation or with strongly anisotropic magnetic texture.Texturing of magnetic ceramics and composites by aligning and fixing of colloidal particles in a magnetic field is a powerful strategy to induce anisotropic chemical, physical and especially mechanical properties into bulk materials. If porosity could be introduced, anisotropically structured magnetic materials would be the perfect supports for magnetic separations in biotechnology or for magnetic field-assisted chemical reactions. Aerogels, combining high porosity with nanoscale structural features, offer an exceptionally large surface area, but they are difficult to magnetically texture. Here we present the preparation of anatase-magnetite aerogel monoliths via the assembly of preformed nanocrystallites. Different approaches are proposed to produce macroscopic bodies with gradient-like magnetic segmentation or with strongly anisotropic magnetic texture. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Digital photographs of dispersions and gels with different water-to-ethanol ratios; magnetic measurements of an anatase aerogel containing 0.25 mol% Fe3O4 nanoparticles; XRD patterns of the iron oxide and

  5. Transient Stability and Frequency Response of the US Western Interconnection under conditions of High Wind and Solar Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Kara; Miller, Nicholas W.; Shao, Miaolei; Pajic, Slobodan; D' Aquila, Robert

    2015-04-15

    Adding large amounts of wind and solar generation to bulk power systems that are traditionally subject to operating constraints set by transient stability and frequency response limitations is the subject of considerable concern in the industry. The US Western Interconnection (WI) is expected to experience substantial additional growth in both wind and solar generation. These plants will, to some extent, displace large central station thermal generation, both coal and gas-fired, which have traditionally helped maintain stability. Our paper reports the results of a study that investigated the transient stability and frequency response of the WI with high penetrations of wind and solar generation. Moreover, the main goals of this work were to (1) create a realistic, baseline model of the WI, (2) test selected transient stability and frequency events, (3) investigate the impact of large amounts of wind and solar generation, and (4) examine means to improve performance.

  6. Breast ultrasound despeckling using anisotropic diffusion guided by texture descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Flores, Wilfrido; Pereira, Wagner Coelho de Albuquerque; Infantosi, Antonio Fernando Catelli

    2014-11-01

    Breast ultrasound (BUS) is considered the most important adjunct method to mammography for diagnosing cancer. However, this image modality suffers from an intrinsic artifact called speckle noise, which degrades spatial and contrast resolution and obscures the screened anatomy. Hence, it is necessary to reduce speckle artifacts before performing image analysis by means of computer-aided diagnosis systems, for example. In addition, the trade-off between smoothing level and preservation of lesion contour details should be addressed by speckle reduction schemes. In this scenario, we propose a BUS despeckling method based on anisotropic diffusion guided by Log-Gabor filters (ADLG). Because we assume that different breast tissues have distinct textures, in our approach we perform a multichannel decomposition of the BUS image using Log-Gabor filters. Next, the conduction coefficient of anisotropic diffusion filtering is computed using texture responses instead of intensity values as stated originally. The proposed algorithm is validated using both synthetic and real breast data sets, with 900 and 50 images, respectively. The performance measures are compared with four existing speckle reduction schemes based on anisotropic diffusion: conventional anisotropic diffusion filtering (CADF), speckle-reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD), texture-oriented anisotropic diffusion (TOAD), and interference-based speckle filtering followed by anisotropic diffusion (ISFAD). The validity metrics are the Pratt's figure of merit, for synthetic images, and the mean radial distance (in pixels), for real sonographies. Figure of merit and mean radial distance indices should tend toward '1' and '0', respectively, to indicate adequate edge preservation. The results suggest that ADLG outperforms the four speckle removal filters compared with respect to simulated and real BUS images. For each method--ADLG, CADF, SRAD, TOAD and ISFAD--the figure of merit median values are 0.83, 0.40, 0.39, 0

  7. Analytic approach to the small-signal frequency response of saturated semiconductor optical amplifiers using multisection model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An analytic solution derived by multisection model to the small-signal frequency response (SSFR) of wavelength conversion based on cross-gain modulation (XGM) in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is presented. The result contains details that can affect the characteristics of SSFR significantly more than previous ones.

  8. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 3 -- Frequency Response and Transient Stability (Report and Executive Summary)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N. W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D' Aquila, R.

    2014-12-01

    The primary objectives of Phase 3 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-3) were to examine the large-scale transient stability and frequency response of the Western Interconnection with high wind and solar penetration, and to identify means to mitigate any adverse performance impacts via transmission reinforcements, storage, advanced control capabilities, or other alternatives.

  9. Latest developments in anisotropic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Tinti, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the leading order of anisotropic hydrodynamics expansion. It has already been shown that in the (0+1) and (1+1)-dimensional cases it is consistent with the second order viscous hydrodynamics, and it provides a striking agreement with the exact solutions of the Boltzmann equation. Quite recently, a new set of equations has been proposed for the leading order of anisotropic hydrodynamics, which is consistent with the second order viscous hydrodynamics in the most general (3+1)-dimensional case, and does not require a next-to-leading treatment for describing pressure anisotropies in the transverse plane.

  10. Dynamical analysis of anisotropic inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karčiauskas, Mindaugas

    2016-06-01

    The inflaton coupling to a vector field via the f(φ)2F μνFμν term is used in several contexts in the literature, such as to generate primordial magnetic fields, to produce statistically anisotropic curvature perturbation, to support anisotropic inflation, and to circumvent the η-problem. In this work, I perform dynamical analysis of this system allowing for the most general Bianchi I initial conditions. I also confirm the stability of attractor fixed points along phase-space directions that had not been investigated before.

  11. Anisotropic hydrodynamics: Motivation and methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this proceedings contribution I review recent progress in our understanding of the bulk dynamics of relativistic systems that possess potentially large local rest frame momentum-space anisotropies. In order to deal with these momentum-space anisotropies, a reorganization of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics can be made around an anisotropic background, and the resulting dynamical framework has been dubbed “anisotropic hydrodynamics”. I also discuss expectations for the degree of momentum-space anisotropy of the quark–gluon plasma generated in relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC from second-order viscous hydrodynamics, strong-coupling approaches, and weak-coupling approaches

  12. Frequency Response Analysis of Current Controllers for Selective Harmonic Compensation in Active Power Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lascu, C.; Asiminoaei, L.; Boldea, I.;

    2009-01-01

    different. It emerges that the fourth one has superior behavior and robustness and can stably work at higher frequencies than the others. Theoretical findings and analysis are supported by comparative experimental results on a 7-kVA laboratory setup. The highest harmonic frequency that can be stably...

  13. Variable Speed (DFIG) Wind Turbines: Rapid Frequency Response to Power System Disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chandrashekhara, Divya K; Hansen, Anca Daniela; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar;

    2009-01-01

    initially to counter act the frequency change during a power system disturbance. Simulation studies have been carried out on a generic reduced model of a transmission power grid of the Danish TSO Energinet.dk to assess the impact of loss of generation on system frequency. Further, simulation study has been...

  14. Dielectric response of transformer oil based ferrofluid in low frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajnak, M.; Kurimsky, J.; Dolnik, B.; Marton, K.; Tomco, L.; Taculescu, A.; Vekas, L.; Kovac, J.; Vavra, I.; Tothova, J.; Kopcansky, P.; Timko, M.

    2013-07-01

    In this article, our experimental study of the dynamic dielectric behaviour of transformer oil-based ferrofluid with magnetite nanoparticles is presented. Frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity and dissipation factor were measured within the frequency range from 20 Hz to 2 MHz by a capacitance method. The ferrofluid samples were placed in a liquid crystal cell, and experiments were carried out in an electromagnetically anechoic chamber. Two polarization processes and corresponding relaxations were revealed within the applied frequency range. Schwarz theory of electric double layer polarization is used to explain the low frequency relaxation maximum. Moreover, the shift of the maximum position towards higher frequencies is observed as the magnetic volume fraction in the ferrofluid increases. The related decrease in relaxation time due to higher counterion mobility is analysed. Reduced electric field intensity due to depolarization field, which is dependent on the particle concentration, is proposed as the reason for the maxima shift. This assumption is wholly supported by a complementary experiment.

  15. Whistler Solitons in Plasma with Anisotropic Hot Electron Admixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Gallagher, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    The longitudinal and transverse modulation instability of whistler waves in plasma, with a small admixture of hot anisotropic electrons, is discussed. If the hot particles temperature anisotropy is positive, it is found that, in such plasma, longitudinal perturbations can lead to soliton formation for frequencies forbidden in cold plasma. The soliton is enriched by hot particles. The frequency region unstable to transverse modulation in cold plasma in the presence of hot electrons is divided by stable domains. For both cases the role of hot electrons is more significant for whistlers with smaller frequencies.

  16. Anisotropic Paramagnetic Meissner Effect by Spin-Orbit Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espedal, Camilla; Yokoyama, Takehito; Linder, Jacob

    2016-03-01

    Conventional s -wave superconductors repel an external magnetic field. However, a recent experiment [A. Di Bernardo et al., Phys. Rev. X 5, 041021 (2015)] has tailored the electromagnetic response of superconducting correlations via adjacent magnetic materials. We consider another route of altering the Meissner effect where spin-orbit interactions induce an anisotropic Meissner response that changes sign depending on the field orientation. The tunable electromagnetic response opens new paths in the utilization of hybrid systems comprising magnets and superconductors.

  17. Anisotropic metamaterials for microwave antennas and infrared nanostructured thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Zhihao

    Wave-matter interactions have long been investigated to discover unknown physical phenomena and exploited to achieve improved device performance throughout the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from quasi-static limit to microwave frequencies, and even at infrared and optical wavelengths. As a nascent but fast growing field, metamaterial technology, which relies on clusters of artificially engineered subwavelength structures, has been demonstrated to provide a wide variety of exotic electromagnetic properties unattainable in natural materials. This dissertation presents the research on novel anisotropic metamaterials for tailoring microwave radiation and infrared scattering of nanostructured thin films. First, a new inversion algorithm is proposed for retrieving the anisotropic effective medium parameters of a slab of metamaterial. Secondly, low-loss anisotropic metamaterial lenses and coatings are introduced for improving the gain and/or bandwidth for a variety of antennas. In particular, a quad-beam high-gain lens for a quarter-wave monopole, a low-profile grounded leaky metamaterial coating for slot antenna, and an ultra-thin anisotropic metamaterial bandwidth-enhancing coating for a quarter-wave monopole are experimentally demonstrated. In the infrared regime, novel nanostructured metamaterial free-standing thin-films, which are inherently anisotropic, are introduced for achieving exotic index properties and further for practical photonic devices. In particular, a low-loss near-infrared fishnet zero-index metamaterial, a dispersionengineered optically-thin, low-loss broadband metamaterial filter with a suppressed group delay fluctuation in the mid-infrared, and a conformal dual-band near-perfectly absorbing coating in the mid-infrared are experimentally demonstrated. These explorations show the great promise anisotropic metamaterials hold for the flexible manipulation of electromagnetic waves and their broad applicability in a wide spectrum range.

  18. Debonding Analyses in Anisotropic Materials with Strain-Gradient Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2012-01-01

    A unit cell approach is adopted to numerically analyze the effect of plastic anisotropy on damage evolution in a microreinforced composite. The matrix material exhibit size effects and a visco-plastic anisotropic strain gradient plasticity model accounting for such size effects is adopted....... A conventional cohesive law is extended such that both the average as well as the jump in plastic strain across the fiber-matrix interface are accounted for. Results are shown for both conventional isotropic and anisotropic materials as well as for higher order isotropic and anisotropic materials...... with and without debonding. Generally, the strain gradient enhanced material exhibits higher load carry capacity compared to the corresponding conventional material. A sudden stress drop occurs in the macroscopic stress-strain response curve due to fiber-matrix debonding and the results show that a change in yield...

  19. Automated Flight Test and System Identification for Rotary Wing Small Aerial Platform Using Frequency Responses Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Widyawardana Adiprawita; Adang Suwandi Ahmad; Jaka Sembiring

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes an autopilot system that can be used to control the small scale rotorcraft during the flight test for linear-frequency-domain system identification. The input frequency-sweep is generated automatically as part of the autopilot control command. Therefore the bandwidth coverage and consistency of the frequency-sweep are guaranteed to produce high quality data for system identification. Beside that, we can set the safety parameters during the flight test (maximum roll/pitch value, minimum altitude, etc.) so the safety of the whole flight test is guaranteed. This autopilot system is validated using hardware in the loop simulator for hover flight condition.

  20. Magnetic relaxation in anisotropic magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1971-01-01

    The line shape and the kinematic and thermodynamic slowing down of the critical and paramagnetic relaxation in axially anisotropic materials are discussed. Kinematic slowing down occurs only in the longitudinal relaxation function. The thermodynamic slowing down occurs in either the transverse or...

  1. Anisotropic Poisson Processes of Cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Spiess, Malte

    2010-01-01

    Main characteristics of stationary anisotropic Poisson processes of cylinders (dilated k-dimensional flats) in d-dimensional Euclidean space are studied. Explicit formulae for the capacity functional, the covariance function, the contact distribution function, the volume fraction, and the intensity of the surface area measure are given which can be used directly in applications.

  2. Failure in imperfect anisotropic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental cause of crack growth, namely nucleation and growth of voids, is investigated numerically for a two phase imperfect anisotropic material. A unit cell approach is adopted from which the overall stress strain is evaluated. Failure is observed as a sudden stress drop and depending...

  3. Anisotropic dynamic mass density for fluidsolid composites

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Ying

    2012-10-01

    By taking the low frequency limit of multiple-scattering theory, we obtain the dynamic effective mass density of fluidsolid composites with a two-dimensional rectangular lattice structure. The anisotropic mass density can be described by an angle-dependent dipole solution, to the leading-order of solid concentration. The angular dependence vanishes for the square lattice, but at high solid concentrations there is a structure-dependent factor that contributes to the leading-order solution. In all cases, Woods formula is found to be accurately valid for the effective bulk modulus, independent of the structures. Numerical evaluations from the solutions are shown to be in excellent agreement with finite-element simulations. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Control-focused, nonlinear and time-varying modelling of dielectric elastomer actuators with frequency response analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, William R.; Wilson, Emma D.; Assaf, Tareq; Rossiter, Jonathan; Dodd, Tony J.; Porrill, John; Anderson, Sean R.

    2015-05-01

    Current models of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) are mostly constrained to first principal descriptions that are not well suited to the application of control design due to their computational complexity. In this work we describe an integrated framework for the identification of control focused, data driven and time-varying DEA models that allow advanced analysis of nonlinear system dynamics in the frequency-domain. Experimentally generated input-output data (voltage-displacement) was used to identify control-focused, nonlinear and time-varying dynamic models of a set of film-type DEAs. The model description used was the nonlinear autoregressive with exogenous input structure. Frequency response analysis of the DEA dynamics was performed using generalized frequency response functions, providing insight and a comparison into the time-varying dynamics across a set of DEA actuators. The results demonstrated that models identified within the presented framework provide a compact and accurate description of the system dynamics. The frequency response analysis revealed variation in the time-varying dynamic behaviour of DEAs fabricated to the same specifications. These results suggest that the modelling and analysis framework presented here is a potentially useful tool for future work in guiding DEA actuator design and fabrication for application domains such as soft robotics.

  5. A method for achieving monotonic frequency-temperature response for langasite surface-acoustic-wave high-temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaoming, Bao; Yabing, Ke; Yanqing, Zheng; Lina, Cheng; Honglang, Li

    2016-02-01

    To achieve the monotonic frequency-temperature response for a high-temperature langasite (LGS) surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor in a wide temperature range, a method utilizing two substrate cuts with different propagation angles on the same substrate plane was proposed. In this method, the theory of effective permittivity is adopted to calculate the temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF), electromechanical coupling coefficients (k2), and power flow angle (PFA) for different propagation angles on the same substrate plane, and then the two substrate cuts were chosen to have large k2 and small PFA, as well as the difference in their TCFs (ΔTCF) to always have the same sign of their values. The Z-cut LGS substrate plane was taken as an example, and the two suitable substrate cuts with propagation angles of 74 and 80° were chosen to derive a monotonic frequency-temperature response for LGS SAW sensors at -50 to 540 °C. Experiments on a LGS SAW sensor using the above two substrate cuts were designed, and its measured frequency-temperature response at -50 to 540 °C agreed well with the theory, demonstrating the high accuracy of the proposed method.

  6. Frequency-band signatures of visual responses to naturalistic input in ferret primary visual cortex during free viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Kristin K; Bennett, Davis V; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-02-19

    Neuronal firing responses in visual cortex reflect the statistics of visual input and emerge from the interaction with endogenous network dynamics. Artificial visual stimuli presented to animals in which the network dynamics were constrained by anesthetic agents or trained behavioral tasks have provided fundamental understanding of how individual neurons in primary visual cortex respond to input. In contrast, very little is known about the mesoscale network dynamics and their relationship to microscopic spiking activity in the awake animal during free viewing of naturalistic visual input. To address this gap in knowledge, we recorded local field potential (LFP) and multiunit activity (MUA) simultaneously in all layers of primary visual cortex (V1) of awake, freely viewing ferrets presented with naturalistic visual input (nature movie clips). We found that naturalistic visual stimuli modulated the entire oscillation spectrum; low frequency oscillations were mostly suppressed whereas higher frequency oscillations were enhanced. In average across all cortical layers, stimulus-induced change in delta and alpha power negatively correlated with the MUA responses, whereas sensory-evoked increases in gamma power positively correlated with MUA responses. The time-course of the band-limited power in these frequency bands provided evidence for a model in which naturalistic visual input switched V1 between two distinct, endogenously present activity states defined by the power of low (delta, alpha) and high (gamma) frequency oscillatory activity. Therefore, the two mesoscale activity states delineated in this study may define the degree of engagement of the circuit with the processing of sensory input.

  7. Understory response to varying fire frequencies after 20 years of prescribed burning in an upland oak forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, J.A.; Hallgren, S.W.; Fuhlendorf, S.D.; Leslie, David M., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystems in the eastern United States that were shaped by fire over thousands of years of anthropogenic burning recently have been subjected to fire suppression resulting in significant changes in vegetation composition and structure and encroachment by invasive species. Renewed interest in use of fire to manage such ecosystems will require knowledge of effects of fire regime on vegetation. We studied the effects of one aspect of the fire regime, fire frequency, on biomass, cover and diversity of understory vegetation in upland oak forests prescribe-burned for 20 years at different frequencies ranging from zero to five fires per decade. Overstory canopy closure ranged from 88 to 96% and was not affected by fire frequency indicating high tolerance of large trees for even the most frequent burning. Understory species richness and cover was dominated by woody reproduction followed in descending order by forbs, C3 graminoids, C4 grasses, and legumes. Woody plant understory cover did not change with fire frequency and increased 30% from one to three years after a burn. Both forbs and C3 graminoids showed a linear increase in species richness and cover as fire frequency increased. In contrast, C4 grasses and legumes did not show a response to fire frequency. The reduction of litter by fire may have encouraged regeneration of herbaceous plants and helped explain the positive response of forbs and C3 graminoids to increasing fire frequency. Our results showed that herbaceous biomass, cover, and diversity can be managed with long-term prescribed fire under the closed canopy of upland oak forests. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  8. Model of the Radio Frequency (RF) Excitation Response from Monopole and Dipole Antennas in a Large Scale Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Good antenna-mode coupling is needed for determining the amount of propellant in a tank through the method of radio frequency mass gauging (RFMG). The antenna configuration and position in a tank are important factors in coupling the antenna to the natural electromagnetic modes. In this study, different monopole and dipole antenna mounting configurations and positions were modeled and responses simulated in a full-scale tank model with the transient solver of CST Microwave Studio (CST Computer Simulation Technology of America, Inc.). The study was undertaken to qualitatively understand the effect of antenna design and placement within a tank on the resulting radio frequency (RF) tank spectrum.

  9. Reference-plane-invariant and thickness- and branch-index-independent retrieval of effective parameters of bi-anisotropic metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. C. Hasar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a retrieval method for reference-plane-invariant electromagnetic parameter measurements of bi-anisotropic metamaterial slabs without resorting to accurate information of the slab thickness and the branch index. To extract reference-plane distances, the slab thickness, and the branch index, we first approximate wave impedances and refractive index away from the slab resonance frequency and then use scattering parameters to calculate the refractive index and the branch index. Once these quantities are determined, they are used as inputs for the retrieval of electromagnetic properties of slabs over the whole band. Different approximations for refractive index and wave impedances are applied to demonstrate the applicability and accuracy of our proposed method. We tested our method for electromagnetic parameter extraction of bi-anisotropic split-ring-resonator and Omega-shaped MM slabs with different number of unit cells. From our analysis, we note that inaccurate information of reference-plane distances, the slab length, and the branch index not only changes the amplitude but also shifts the response of the electromagnetic properties. We show that the presented method can be applied for accurate electromagnetic parameter extraction of bi-anisotropic MM slabs.

  10. Anisotropic and dispersive wave propagation within strain-gradient framework

    CERN Document Server

    Rosi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    In this paper anisotropic and dispersive wave propagation within linear strain-gradient elasticity is investigated. This analysis reveals significant features of this extended theory of continuum elasticity. First, and contrarily to classical elasticity, wave propagation in hexagonal (chiral or achiral) lattices becomes anisotropic as the frequency increases. Second, since strain-gradient elasticity is dispersive, group and energy velocities have to be treated as different quantities. These points are first theoretically derived, and then numerically experienced on hexagonal chiral and achiral lattices. The use of a continuum model for the description of the high frequency behavior of these microstructured materials can be of great interest in engineering applications, allowing problems with complex geometries to be more easily treated.

  11. Anisotropic problem and one-dimensional VSP modeling in EDA medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhusheng, Z.

    1991-01-01

    One-dimensional elastic wave equation in anisotropic EDA medium is derived by using Hooke's law and the kinematic equation of non-individual body in elastic theory, followed by a series of hypotheses. Then, synthetic one-dimensional VSP record in anisotropic EDA medium is obtained by solving the elastic wave equation with the use of Fourier algorithm. The numerical synthetic record and hodograph clearly show rich wave field, S-wave splitting, attenuation or absorption of amplitude and frequency in the anisotropic medium.

  12. Study on the anisotropic characteristics of the electric response to fractured reservoir%裂缝性储层的电各向异性响应特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈金松; 苏本玉; 郭乃川

    2009-01-01

    Based on the model of porous medium with horizontal fractures,two fractured reservoir models have been suggested which considered smooth-surface parallel fractures and point-welded rough-surface fractures,and the vertical and horizontal electric resistivity response equations have been derived from the Ohm law. According to the response equations derived above,the variation characteristics of the horizontal and vertical resistivity and electrical anisotropic coefficient of the two fractured models under the conditions of free pressure and confining pressure have been analyzed. Furthermore,we have discussed the effect of geometrical parameters,such as fracture aperture,fracture density and fracture surface roughness and others,on electric anisotropy of the fractured reservoir. For simplifying the discussion,we have ignored the influences of surficial conducting mechanism and polarization effect of the fracture and pore surfaces on the electric anisotropy. Finally,we have examined the response characteristics of the electric resistivity and electric anisotropy under condition of confining pressure based on the smooth fracture model and welded rough fracture models,and meaningful results which can be applied to practical application have been obtained.%以水平裂缝分布的孔隙介质模型为基础,建立了水平裂缝面的平行裂缝分布和带粗糙表面的点接触裂缝模型,导出了两类裂缝模型的水平和垂直电阻率响应关系,分析了两类裂缝模型在没有围压和存在围压条件下的水平电阻率、垂直电阻率变化规律和电各向异性系数的变化特征.讨论了裂缝开度、裂缝密度和裂缝粗糙度等裂缝特征参数对裂缝性储层电各向异性的影响.为简化讨论,所有电性响应特征的分析都忽略了裂缝和孔隙表面的导电性和极化的影响.利用平行分布水平裂缝面模型和带粗糙面的裂缝模型,考察了围压条件下的裂缝性岩石的电各向异性响

  13. Identification of the photoluminescence response in the frequency domain modulated infrared radiometry signal of ZnTe:Cr bulk crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, M.; Strzałkowski, K.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we investigated the photoluminescence response in the frequency domain modulated infrared radiometry signal observed of ZnTe:Cr bulk crystal. In mid-infrared range, three characteristic phenomena are observed in ZnTe:Cr crystal: absorption and emission of IR photons (2-3 μm) and the free carrier absorption. This implies that the modulated infrared radiometry signal yields information about the effective infrared absorption coefficient (photothermal response) as well about the recombination lifetime of carriers related with the infrared photoluminescence emission. In this paper, the frequency equivalence of the two-term independent exponential photoluminescence decay model in order to explain the measured frequency characteristics is proposed. The measured recombination lifetimes (2.3 μs for two exponential decay model and 1.5 μs for one exponential decay model) are in good agreement with the values given by other authors (about 2.5-3.0 μs). Moreover, we found that the photothermal response is uncorrelated with the photoluminescence one, in contrast, to the photocarrier response.

  14. Surface phonon polaritons on anisotropic piezoelectric superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yuanxi; Sheng, Jiteng; Sedlacek, Jonathon A.; Shaffer, James P.

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical study of surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs) on periodically poled lithium niobate and periodically poled lithium tantalate surfaces is presented. We calculate the dielectric response for six different superlattice orientations and the associated SPhP dispersion relations. Our study of SPhPs accounts for the anisotropic nature of the dielectric response of the semi-infinite piezoelectric superlattices. We find that two different types of SPhPs can be supported. The first type consists of real surface dipole oscillations coupled to photons. The second type consists of virtual surface dipole oscillations driven by the incident photons. The dependence of the SPhPs on temperature and superlattice geometry is addressed. The use of these metamaterial excitations is discussed in the context of hybrid quantum systems.

  15. Two-dimensional optical coherence vibration tomography for low-frequency vibration measurement and response-only modal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianfeng; Zhong, Shuncong; Zhang, Qiukun

    2016-10-01

    A high-speed camera-based two-dimensional optical coherence vibration tomography (2DOCVT) system with a subnanometre displacement resolution was developed and employed for low-frequency vibration measurement and modal analysis. Experimental results demonstrated the ability of low-frequency absolute displacement measurement of structural line vibrations without scanning. Three-dimensional (3D) surface displacement of a vibrating structure could also be obtained using the developed 2DOCVT by scanning the structure. The scanning 2DOCVT system acted like a 3D optical coherence vibration tomography system. The developed 2DOCVT system could capture structural modal parameters without vibration excitation input information, and therefore, it is a response-only method. The 2DOCVT could be recommended in the application of low-frequency vibration measurement and modal analysis of beam and plate structures, especially when the vibration amplitude is at nanometre or micrometre scale.

  16. Growth and Flowering Responses of Cut Chrysanthemum Grown under Restricted Root Volume to Irrigation Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viyachai Taweesak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Influences of irrigation frequency on the growth and flowering of chrysanthemum grown under restricted root volume were tested. Chrysanthemum cuttings (Chrysanthemum morifolium “Reagan White” were grown in seedling tray which contained coconut peat in volumes of 73 and 140 cm3. Plants were irrigated with drip irrigation at irrigation frequencies of 4 (266 mL, 6 (400 mL, and 8 (533 mL times/day to observe their growth and flowering performances. There was interaction between irrigation frequency and substrate volume on plant height of chrysanthemum. Plants grown in 140 cm3 substrates and irrigated 6 times/day produced the tallest plant of 109.25 cm. Plants irrigated 6 and 8 times/day had significantly higher level of phosphorus content in their leaves than those plants irrigated 4 times/day. The total leaf area, number of internodes, leaf length, and leaf width of chrysanthemums grown in 140 cm3 substrate were significantly higher than those grown in 73 cm3 substrate. The numbers of flowers were affected by both irrigation frequencies and substrate volumes. Chrysanthemums irrigated 8 times/day had an average of 19.56 flowers while those irrigated 4 times/day had an average of 16.63 flowers. Increasing irrigation frequency can improve the growth and flowering of chrysanthemums in small substrate volumes.

  17. Electrically Anisotropic Layered Perovskite Single Crystal

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ting-You

    2016-04-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites (OIHPs), which are promising materials for electronic and optoelectronic applications (1-10), have made into layered organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites (LOIHPs). These LOIHPs have been applied to thin-film transistors, solar cells and tunable wavelength phosphors (11-18). It is known that devices fabricated with single crystal exhibit the superior performance, which makes the growth of large-sized single crystals critical for future device applications (19-23). However, the difficulty in growing large-sized LOIHPs single crystal with superior electrical properties limits their practical applications. Here, we report a method to grow the centimeter-scaled LOIHP single crystal of [(HOC2H4NH3)2PbI4], demonstrating the potentials in mass production. After that, we reveal anisotropic electrical and optoelectronic properties which proved the carrier propagating along inorganic framework. The carrier mobility of in-inorganic-plane (in-plane) devices shows the average value of 45 cm2 V–1 s–1 which is about 100 times greater than the record of LOIHP devices (15), showing the importance of single crystal in device application. Moreover, the LOIHP single crystals show its ultra-short carrier lifetime of 42.7 ps and photoluminescence quantum efficiency (PLQE) of 25.4 %. We expect this report to be a start of LOIHPs for advanced applications in which the anisotropic properties are needed (24-25), and meets the demand of high-speed applications and fast-response applications.

  18. Multi Station Frequency Response and Polarization of ELF/VLF Signals Generated via Ionospheric Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxworth, Ashanthi; Golkowski, Mark; University of Colorado Denver Team

    2013-10-01

    ELF/VLF wave generation via HF modulated ionospheric heating has been practiced for many years as a unique way to generate waves in the ELF/VLF band (3 Hz - 30 kHz). This paper presents experimental results and associated theoretical modeling from work performed at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. An experiment was designed to investigate the modulation frequency dependence of the generated ELF/VLF signal amplitudes and polarization at multiple sites at distances of 37 km, 50 km and 99 km from the facility. While no difference is observed for X mode versus O mode modulation of the heating wave, it is found that ELF/VLF amplitude and polarization as a function of modulated ELF/VLF frequency is different for each site. An ionospheric heating code is used to determine the primary current sources leading to the observations.

  19. An Analysis of Decentralized Demand Response as Frequency Control Support under CriticalWind Power Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Villena

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In power systems with high wind energy penetration, the conjunction of wind power fluctuations and power system inertia reduction can lead to large frequency excursions, where the operating reserves of conventional power generation may be insufficient to restore the power balance. With the aim of evaluating the demand-side contribution to frequency control, a complete process to determine critical wind oscillations in power systems with high wind penetration is discussed and described in this paper. This process implies thousands of wind power series simulations, which have been carried out through a validated offshore wind farm model. A large number of different conditions have been taken into account, such as frequency dead bands, the percentages of controllable demand and seasonal factor influence on controllable loads. Relevant results and statistics are also included in the paper.

  20. Analysis of frequency response of high power MUTC photodiodes based on photocurrent-dependent equivalent circuit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Xiong, Bing; Sun, Changzheng; Miao, Di; Luo, Yi

    2015-08-24

    A back-illuminated mesa-structure InGaAs/InP modified uni-traveling-carrier photodiode (MUTC-PD) is fabricated and its frequency response is investigated. A bandwidth of 40 GHz and a saturation photocurrent up to 33 mA are demonstrated. A photocurrent-dependent equivalent circuit model is proposed to analyze the frequency response of the high power MUTC-PDs. The influences of the space-charge screening, self-induced electric field and over-shoot effects are discussed in detail based on the model. Fitted curves obtained from the simple equivalent circuit model are found to be in good agreement with the data measured under different bias voltages and photocurrents.

  1. Matrix method of determining the longitudinal-stability coefficients and frequency response of an aircraft from transient flight data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donegan, James J; Pearson, Henry A

    1952-01-01

    A matrix method is presented for determining the longitudinal-stability coefficients and frequency response of an aircraft from arbitrary maneuvers. The method is devised so that it can be applied to time-history measurements of combinations of such simple quantities as angle of attack, pitching velocity, load factor, elevator angle, and hinge moment to obtain the over-all coefficients. Although the method has been devised primarily for the evaluation of stability coefficients which are of primary interest in most aircraft loads and stability studies, it can be used also, with a simple additional computation, to determine the frequency-response characteristics. The entire procedure can be applied or extended to other problems which can be expressed by linear differential equations.

  2. Synchronization by the hand: The sight of gestures modulates low-frequency activity in brain responses to continuous speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eBiau

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available During social interactions, speakers often produce spontaneous gestures to accompany their speech. These coordinated body movements convey communicative intentions, and modulate how listeners perceive the message in a subtle, but important way. In the present perspective, we put the focus on the role that congruent non-verbal information from beat gestures may play in the neural responses to speech. Whilst delta-theta oscillatory brain responses reflect the time-frequency structure of the speech signal, we argue that beat gestures promote phase resetting at relevant word onsets. This mechanism may facilitate the anticipation of associated acoustic cues relevant for prosodic/syllabic-based segmentation in speech perception. We report recently published data supporting this hypothesis, and discuss the potential of beats (and gestures in general for further studies investigating continuous AV speech processing through low-frequency oscillations.

  3. Synchronization by the hand: the sight of gestures modulates low-frequency activity in brain responses to continuous speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biau, Emmanuel; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    During social interactions, speakers often produce spontaneous gestures to accompany their speech. These coordinated body movements convey communicative intentions, and modulate how listeners perceive the message in a subtle, but important way. In the present perspective, we put the focus on the role that congruent non-verbal information from beat gestures may play in the neural responses to speech. Whilst delta-theta oscillatory brain responses reflect the time-frequency structure of the speech signal, we argue that beat gestures promote phase resetting at relevant word onsets. This mechanism may facilitate the anticipation of associated acoustic cues relevant for prosodic/syllabic-based segmentation in speech perception. We report recently published data supporting this hypothesis, and discuss the potential of beats (and gestures in general) for further studies investigating continuous AV speech processing through low-frequency oscillations. PMID:26441618

  4. Inter-subject correlation of brain hemodynamic responses during watching a movie: localization in space and frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka-Pekka Kauppi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cinema is a promising naturalistic stimulus that enables, for instance, elicitation of robust emotions during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Inter-subject correlation (ISC has been used as a model-free analysis method to map the highly complex hemodynamic responses that are evoked during watching a movie. Here, we extended the ISC analysis to frequency domain using wavelet analysis combined with non-parametric permutation methods for making voxel-wise statistical inferences about frequency-band specific ISC. We applied these novel analysis methods to a dataset collected in our previous study where 12 subjects watched an emotionally engaging movie “Crash” during fMRI scanning. Our results suggest that several regions within the frontal and temporal lobes show ISC predominantly at low frequency bands, whereas visual cortical areas exhibit ISC also at higher frequencies. It is possible that these findings relate to recent observations of a cortical hierarchy of temporal receptive windows, or that the types of events processed in temporal and prefrontal cortical areas (e.g., social interactions occur over longer time periods than the stimulus features processed in the visual areas. Software tools to perform frequency-specific ISC analysis, together with a visualization application, are available as open source Matlab code.

  5. Decorrelation of anisotropic flow along the longitudinal direction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Long-Gang [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Petersen, Hannah [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Goethe University, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Qin, Guang-You [Central China Normal University, Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Wuhan (China); Roy, Victor [Goethe University, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Wang, Xin-Nian [Central China Normal University, Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Wuhan (China); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division MS70R0319, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-04-15

    The initial energy density distribution and fluctuations in the transverse direction lead to anisotropic flow of final hadrons through collective expansion in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Fluctuations along the longitudinal direction, on the other hand, can result in decorrelation of anisotropic flow in different regions of pseudorapidity (η). Decorrelation of the 2nd- and 3rd-order anisotropic flow with different η gaps for final charged hadrons in high-energy heavy-ion collisions is studied in an event-by-event (3+1)D ideal hydrodynamic model with fully fluctuating initial conditions from A Multi-Phase Transport (AMPT) model. The decorrelation of anisotropic flow of final hadrons with large η gaps is found to originate from the spatial decorrelation along the longitudinal direction in the AMPT initial conditions through hydrodynamic evolution. The decorrelation is found to consist of both a linear twist and random fluctuation of the event plane angles. The agreement between our results and recent CMS data in most centralities suggests that the string-like mechanism of initial parton production in AMPT model captures the initial longitudinal fluctuation that is responsible for the measured decorrelation of anisotropic flow in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC. Our predictions for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy show stronger longitudinal decorrelation, indicating larger longitudinal fluctuations at lower beam energies. Our study also calls into question some of the current experimental methods for measuring anisotropic flow and the quantitative extraction of transport coefficients through comparisons to hydrodynamic simulations that do not include longitudinal fluctuations. (orig.)

  6. Decorrelation of anisotropic flow along the longitudinal direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Long-Gang; Petersen, Hannah; Qin, Guang-You; Roy, Victor; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2016-04-01

    The initial energy density distribution and fluctuations in the transverse direction lead to anisotropic flow of final hadrons through collective expansion in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Fluctuations along the longitudinal direction, on the other hand, can result in decorrelation of anisotropic flow in different regions of pseudorapidity ( η . Decorrelation of the 2nd- and 3rd-order anisotropic flow with different η gaps for final charged hadrons in high-energy heavy-ion collisions is studied in an event-by-event (3+1)D ideal hydrodynamic model with fully fluctuating initial conditions from A Multi-Phase Transport (AMPT) model. The decorrelation of anisotropic flow of final hadrons with large η gaps is found to originate from the spatial decorrelation along the longitudinal direction in the AMPT initial conditions through hydrodynamic evolution. The decorrelation is found to consist of both a linear twist and random fluctuation of the event plane angles. The agreement between our results and recent CMS data in most centralities suggests that the string-like mechanism of initial parton production in AMPT model captures the initial longitudinal fluctuation that is responsible for the measured decorrelation of anisotropic flow in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC. Our predictions for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy show stronger longitudinal decorrelation, indicating larger longitudinal fluctuations at lower beam energies. Our study also calls into question some of the current experimental methods for measuring anisotropic flow and the quantitative extraction of transport coefficients through comparisons to hydrodynamic simulations that do not include longitudinal fluctuations.

  7. Identification of the most sensitive frequency response measurement technique for diagnosis of interturn faults in power transformers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interturn winding faults are one of the most prevalent and potentially destructive electrical faults in power transformers. This contribution is an initiative to explore the potential of the sweep frequency response analysis (SFRA) method in detecting interturn winding faults and also identifying the most appropriate measurement configuration for making sensitive frequency response measurements. This application enables timely warning of the rising failure and so is of particular importance, as these kinds of defects, if left undetected, can propagate and lead to catastrophic phase–ground or phase–phase faults which can finally cause the breakdown of the whole transformer. In this paper contribution is made to a better understanding of the transformer performance and modification of the transformer winding frequency response in the presence of interturn faults. The paper includes a full description of the details of the SFRA method and measuring procedure, along with principal experiments conducted on a 100 kVA distribution transformer. A large number of measurements with different transfer functions, various terminal configurations and three categories of measurement types was conducted to identify the most appropriate configuration for making SFRA measurements. The experimental results proved that the identified measurement configuration is sensitive to detect unambiguously interturn faults even down to 0.2% shorted turns along the winding

  8. Frequency Response of Synthetic Vocal Fold Models with Linear and Nonlinear Material Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Stephanie M.; Thomson, Scott L.; Dromey, Christopher; Smith, Simeon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to create synthetic vocal fold models with nonlinear stress-strain properties and to investigate the effect of linear versus nonlinear material properties on fundamental frequency (F[subscript 0]) during anterior-posterior stretching. Method: Three materially linear and 3 materially nonlinear models were…

  9. Waves of change: immunomodulation of the innate immune response by low frequency electromagnetic field exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golbach, L.A.

    2015-01-01

      In this thesis we investigated possible modulatory roles of low frequency electromagnetic fields (LF EMFs) exposure on the innate immune system. Recent decades have seen a huge increase in the use of electronic devices that nowadays enable us to communicate with distant family, enjoy music ev

  10. Anisotropic Inflation and Cosmological Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Emami, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations opened up a new window on the inflationary model building. As it was firstly reported by the WMAP data, there may be some indications of statistical anisotropy on the CMB map, although the statistical significance of these findings are under debate. Motivated by these observations, people begun considering new inflationary models which may lead to statistical anisotropy. The simplest possible way to construct anisotropic inflation is to introduce vector fields. During the course of this thesis, we study models of anisotropic inflation and their observational implications such as power spectrum, bispectrum etc. Firstly we build a new model, which contains the gauge field which breaks the conformal invariance while preserving the gauge invariance. We show that in these kind of models, there can be an attractor phase in the evolution of the system when the back-reaction of the gauge field becomes important in the evolution of the inflaton field. We then study the cosmological perturbation the...

  11. Stealths on Anisotropic Holographic Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Ayón-Beato, Eloy; Juárez-Aubry, María Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we are interested in exploring the existence of stealth configurations on anisotropic backgrounds playing a prominent role in the non-relativistic version of the gauge/gravity correspondence. By stealth configuration, we mean a nontrivial scalar field nonminimally coupled to gravity whose energy-momentum tensor evaluated on the anisotropic background vanishes identically. In the case of a Lifshitz spacetime with a nontrivial dynamical exponent z, we spotlight the role played by the anisotropy to establish the holographic character of the stealth configurations, i.e. the scalar field is shown to only depend on the radial holographic direction. This configuration which turns out to be massless and without integration constants is possible for a unique value of the nonminimal coupling parameter. Then, using a simple conformal argument, we map this configuration into a stealth solution defined on the so-called hyperscaling violation metric which is conformally related to the Lifshitz spacetime. Thi...

  12. Time course analysis of the effects of distractor frequency and categorical relatedness in picture naming: An evaluation of the response exclusion account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Starreveld; W. La Heij; R. Verdonschot

    2013-01-01

    The response exclusion account (REA), advanced by Mahon and colleagues, localises the distractor frequency effect and the semantic interference effect in picture naming at the level of the response output buffer. We derive four predictions from the REA: (1) the size of the distractor frequency effec

  13. 3D time-domain airborne EM modeling for an arbitrarily anisotropic earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Changchun; Qi, Yanfu; Liu, Yunhe

    2016-08-01

    Time-domain airborne EM data is currently interpreted based on an isotropic model. Sometimes, it can be problematic when working in the region with distinct dipping stratifications. In this paper, we simulate the 3D time-domain airborne EM responses over an arbitrarily anisotropic earth with topography by edge-based finite-element method. Tetrahedral meshes are used to describe the abnormal bodies with complicated shapes. We further adopt the Backward Euler scheme to discretize the time-domain diffusion equation for electric field, obtaining an unconditionally stable linear equations system. We verify the accuracy of our 3D algorithm by comparing with 1D solutions for an anisotropic half-space. Then, we switch attentions to effects of anisotropic media on the strengths and the diffusion patterns of time-domain airborne EM responses. For numerical experiments, we adopt three typical anisotropic models: 1) an anisotropic anomalous body embedded in an isotropic half-space; 2) an isotropic anomalous body embedded in an anisotropic half-space; 3) an anisotropic half-space with topography. The modeling results show that the electric anisotropy of the subsurface media has big effects on both the strengths and the distribution patterns of time-domain airborne EM responses; this effect needs to be taken into account when interpreting ATEM data in areas with distinct anisotropy.

  14. An Efficient FPGA Implementation of Optimized Anisotropic Diffusion Filtering of Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrajit Pal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital image processing is an exciting area of research with a variety of applications including medical, surveillance security systems, defence, and space applications. Noise removal as a preprocessing step helps to improve the performance of the signal processing algorithms, thereby enhancing image quality. Anisotropic diffusion filtering proposed by Perona and Malik can be used as an edge-preserving smoother, removing high-frequency components of images without blurring their edges. In this paper, we present the FPGA implementation of an edge-preserving anisotropic diffusion filter for digital images. The designed architecture completely replaced the convolution operation and implemented the same using simple arithmetic subtraction of the neighboring intensities within a kernel, preceded by multiple operations in parallel within the kernel. To improve the image reconstruction quality, the diffusion coefficient parameter, responsible for controlling the filtering process, has been properly analyzed. Its signal behavior has been studied by subsequently scaling and differentiating the signal. The hardware implementation of the proposed design shows better performance in terms of reconstruction quality and accelerated performance with respect to its software implementation. It also reduces computation, power consumption, and resource utilization with respect to other related works.

  15. Anisotropic density fluctuations, plasmons, and Friedel oscillations in nodal line semimetal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Jun-Won; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by recent experimental efforts on three-dimensional semimetals, we investigate the static and dynamic density response of the nodal line semimetal by computing the polarizability for both undoped and doped cases. The nodal line semimetal in the absence of doping is characterized by a ring-shape zero energy contour in momentum space, which may be considered as a collection of Dirac points. In the doped case, the Fermi surface has a torus shape and two independent processes of the momentum transfer contribute to the singular features of the polarizability even though we only have a single Fermi surface. In the static limit, there exist two independent singularities in the second derivative of the static polarizability. This results in the highly anisotropic Friedel oscillations which show the angle-dependent algebraic power law and the beat phenomena in the oscillatory electron density near a charged impurity. Furthermore, the dynamical polarizability has two singular lines along {\\hslash }ω =γ p and {\\hslash }ω =γ p{sin}η , where η is the angle between the external momentum {p} and the plane where the nodal ring lies. From the dynamical polarizability, we obtain the plasmon modes in the doped case, which show anisotropic dispersions and angle-dependent plasma frequencies. Qualitative differences between the low and high doping regimes are discussed in light of future experiments.

  16. Proposing New Methods to Enhance the Low-Resolution Simulated GPR Responses in the Frequency and Wavelet Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ahmadi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To date, a number of numerical methods, including the popular Finite-Difference Time Domain (FDTD technique, have been proposed to simulate Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR responses. Despite having a number of advantages, the finite-difference method also has pitfalls such as being very time consuming in simulating the most common case of media with high dielectric permittivity, causing the forward modelling process to be very long lasting, even with modern high-speed computers. In the present study the well-known hyperbolic pattern response of horizontal cylinders, usually found in GPR B-Scan images, is used as a basic model to examine the possibility of reducing the forward modelling execution time. In general, the simulated GPR traces of common reflected objects are time shifted, as with the Normal Moveout (NMO traces encountered in seismic reflection responses. This suggests the application of Fourier transform to the GPR traces, employing the time-shifting property of the transformation to interpolate the traces between the adjusted traces in the frequency domain (FD. Therefore, in the present study two post-processing algorithms have been adopted to increase the speed of forward modelling while maintaining the required precision. The first approach is based on linear interpolation in the Fourier domain, resulting in increasing lateral trace-to-trace interval of appropriate sampling frequency of the signal, preventing any aliasing. In the second approach, a super-resolution algorithm based on 2D-wavelet transform is developed to increase both vertical and horizontal resolution of the GPR B-Scan images through preserving scale and shape of hidden hyperbola features. Through comparing outputs from both methods with the corresponding actual high-resolution forward response, it is shown that both approaches can perform satisfactorily, although the wavelet-based approach outperforms the frequency-domain approach noticeably, both in amplitude and

  17. The in-plane anisotropic magnetic damping of ultrathin epitaxial Co2FeAl film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Qiao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The in-plane orientation-dependent effective damping of ultrathin Co2FeAl film epitaxially grown on GaAs(001 substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE has been investigated by employing the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TR-MOKE measurements. It is found that the interface-induced uniaxial anisotropy is favorable for precession response and the anisotropy of precession frequency is mainly determined by this uniaxial anisotropy, while the magnetic relaxation time and damping factor exhibit the fourfold anisotropy at high-field regime. The field-independent anisotropic damping factor obtained at high fields indicates that the effective damping shows an intrinsic fourfold anisotropy for the epitaxial Co2FeAl thin films.

  18. The in-plane anisotropic magnetic damping of ultrathin epitaxial Co2FeAl film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Shuang; Yan, Wei; Nie, Shuaihua; Zhao, Jianhua; Zhang, Xinhui

    2015-08-01

    The in-plane orientation-dependent effective damping of ultrathin Co2FeAl film epitaxially grown on GaAs(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been investigated by employing the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TR-MOKE) measurements. It is found that the interface-induced uniaxial anisotropy is favorable for precession response and the anisotropy of precession frequency is mainly determined by this uniaxial anisotropy, while the magnetic relaxation time and damping factor exhibit the fourfold anisotropy at high-field regime. The field-independent anisotropic damping factor obtained at high fields indicates that the effective damping shows an intrinsic fourfold anisotropy for the epitaxial Co2FeAl thin films.

  19. Anisotropic phenomena in gauge/gravity duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis we use gauge/gravity duality to model anisotropic effects realised in nature. Firstly we analyse transport properties in holographic systems with a broken rotational invariance. Secondly we discuss geometries dual to IR fixed points with anisotropic scaling behaviour, which are related to quantum critical points in condensed matter systems. Gauge/gravity duality relates a gravity theory in Anti-de Sitter space to a lower dimensional strongly coupled quantum field theory in Minkowski space. Over the past decade this duality provided many insights into systems at strong coupling, e.g. quark-gluon plasma and condensed matter close to quantum critical points. One very important result computed in this framework is the value of the shear viscosity divided by the entropy density in strongly coupled theories. The quantitative result agrees very well with measurements of the ratio in quark-gluon plasma. However, for isotropic two derivative Einstein gravity it is temperature independent. We show that by breaking the rotational symmetry of a system we obtain a temperature dependent shear viscosity over entropy density. This is important to make contact with real world systems, since substances in nature display such dependence. In addition, we derive various transport properties in strongly coupled anisotropic systems using the gauge/gravity dictionary. The most notable results include an electrical conductivity with Drude behaviour in the low frequency region. This resembles conductors with broken translational invariance. However, we did not implement the breaking explicitly. Furthermore, our analysis shows that this setup models effects, resembling the piezoelectric and exoelectric effects, known from liquid crystals. In a second project we discuss a geometry with non-trivial scaling behaviour in order to model an IR fixed point of condensed matter theories. We construct the UV completion of this geometry and analyse its properties by computing the

  20. Resistance to Change and Frequency of Response-Dependent Stimuli Uncorrelated with Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Ward, Ryan D.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2009-01-01

    Stimuli uncorrelated with reinforcement have been shown to enhance response rates and resistance to disruption; however, the effects of different rates of stimulus presentations have not been assessed. In two experiments, we assessed the effects of adding different rates of response-dependent brief stimuli uncorrelated with primary reinforcement…

  1. On the lamb wave propagation in anisotropic laminated composite plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the propagation of Lamb (or plate) waves in anisotropic laminated composite plates. The dispersion relations are explicitly derived using the classical plate theory (CLT), the first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT) and the exact solution (ES), Attention is paid to the lowest antisymmetric (flexural) and lowest symmetric(extensional) modes in the low frequency, long wavelength limit. Different values of shear correction factor were tested in FSDT and comparisons between flexural wave dispersion curves were made with exact results to asses the range of validity of approximate plate theories in the frequency domain.

  2. Estimating peak response frequencies in a tidal band in the seas adjacent to China with a numerical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Xinmei; FANG Guohong; TENG Fei; WU Di

    2015-01-01

    A numerical method is designed to examine the response properties of real sea areas to open ocean forcing. The application of this method to modeling the China's adjacent seas shows that the Bohai Sea has a highest peak response frequency (PRF) of 1.52 d−1; the northern Yellow Sea has a PRF of 1.69 d−1; the Gyeonggi Bay has a high amplitude gain plateau in the frequency band roughly from 1.7 to 2.7 d−1; the Yellow Sea (includ-ing the Gyeonggi Bay), the East China Sea shelf and the Taiwan Strait have a common high amplitude gain band with frequencies around 1.76 to 1.78 d−1 and are shown to be a system that responds to the open ocean forcing in favor of amplifying the waves with frequencies in this band; the Beibu Gulf, the Gulf of Thailand and the South China Sea deep basin have PRFs of 0.91, 1.01 and 0.98 d−1 respectively. In addition, the East China Sea has a Poincare mode PRF of 3.91 d−1. The PRFs of the Bohai Sea, the northern Yellow Sea, the Bei-bu Gulf and the South China Sea can be explained by a classical quarter (half for the Bohai Sea) wavelength resonance theory. The results show that further investigations are needed for the response dynamics of the Yellow Sea-East China Sea-Taiwan Strait system, the East China Sea Poincare mode, the Taiwan Strait, and the Gulf of Thailand.

  3. Emotion responses under evoked consumption contexts: A focus on the consumers’ frequency of product consumption and the stability of responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piqueras Fiszman, B.; Jaeger, S.R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that the context in which a certain food is consumed (even if imagined) can affect consumers’ associative emotional responses to that product. In three separate studies we extended this line of research by: (1) replicating these previous findings with consumers fro

  4. A solution to solve the dilemma of high frequencies and LCD screen for SSVEP responses

    OpenAIRE

    Cecotti, Hubert; Rivet, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    International audience Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) based on the detection of Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials have proven to be highly efficient. Compared to other BCI paradigm, they usually provide the best information transfer rate. However, this type of BCI requires visual stimuli. These stimuli can be on LEDs or on a computer screen. LEDs can allow flickering lights of high frequencies while flickering lights on an LCD screen can be an integrated as a part of the user interfac...

  5. Waves of change: immunomodulation of the innate immune response by low frequency electromagnetic field exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Golbach, L.A.

    2015-01-01

      In this thesis we investigated possible modulatory roles of low frequency electromagnetic fields (LF EMFs) exposure on the innate immune system. Recent decades have seen a huge increase in the use of electronic devices that nowadays enable us to communicate with distant family, enjoy music everywhere or order food without leaving the house. However besides the benefits, this evolution has also resulted in increased public concern about the potential adverse health effects of non-ionizi...

  6. Pipeline's natural frequency response due to internal pressure effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massa, Andre L.L.; Guevara Junior, Nestor O. [Suporte - Consultoria e Projetos Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Galgoul, Nelson S. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Fernandes, Antonio C.; Coelho, Fabio M. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    2009-12-19

    A few years ago, a discussion about how internal pressure is treated in submarine pipelines has taken place. Galgoul et al (2004) have pointed out the conservatism of the latest recommendations for pipeline free-span evaluations associated to the way the axial force is considered in the determination of the pipeline natural frequency. Fyrileiv and Collberg (2005) have also discussed this point in defense of the effective axial force concept and its use in the natural frequency determination. In order to contribute to this aspect, an experimental test has been performed with a fully embedded pipeline which was pressurized. The main object consists in showing that the pipe is under tension (and not under compression) and, as a consequence, it is the authors' intention to prove that the natural frequency increases instead of reducing when the internal pressure is incremented. In addition to the test, a finite element model has been presented where this internal pressure effect is taken into account as it actually is (and not as an axial force) in order to show the real behavior of the wall stresses. Static analyses, as well as modal and transient analysis have been performed in order to compare theoretical results with the experimental test conducted. (author)

  7. Streaming driven by sessile microbubbles: Explaining flow patterns and frequency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallabandi, Bhargav; Wang, Cheng; Guo, Lin; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound excitation of bubbles drives powerful steady streaming flows which have found widespread applications in microfluidics, where bubbles are typically of semicircular cross section and attached to walls of the device (sessile). While bubble-driven streaming in bulk fluid is well understood, this practically relevant case presents additional complexity introduced by the wall and contact lines. We develop an asymptotic theory that takes into account the presence of the wall as well as the oscillation dynamics of the bubble, providing a complete description of the streaming flow as a function only of the driving frequency, the bubble size, and the physical properties of the fluid. We show that the coupling between different bubble oscillation modes sustains the experimentally observed streaming flow vortex pattern over a broad range of frequencies, greatly exceeding the widths of individual mode resonances. Above a threshold frequency, we predict, and observe in experiment, reversal of the flow direction. Our analytical theory can be used to guide the design of microfluidic devices, both in situations where robust flow patterns insensitive to parameter changes are desired (e.g. lab-on-a-chip sorters), and in cases where intentional modulation of the flow field appearance is key (e.g. efficient mixers). Current address: Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology.

  8. Monocular and binocular steady-state flicker VEPs: frequency-response functions to sinusoidal and square-wave luminance modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David S; Hamilton, Ruth; Shahani, Uma; McCulloch, Daphne L

    2011-02-01

    Steady-state VEPs to full-field flicker (FFF) using sinusoidally modulated light were compared with those elicited by square-wave modulated light across a wide range of stimulus frequencies with monocular and binocular FFF stimulation. Binocular and monocular VEPs were elicited in 12 adult volunteers to FFF with two modes of temporal modulation: sinusoidal or square-wave (abrupt onset and offset, 50% duty cycle) at ten temporal frequencies ranging from 2.83 to 58.8 Hz. All stimuli had a mean luminance of 100 cd/m(2) with an 80% modulation depth (20-180 cd/m(2)). Response magnitudes at the stimulus frequency (F1) and at the double and triple harmonics (F2 and F3) were compared. For both sinusoidal and square-wave flicker, the FFF-VEP magnitudes at F1 were maximal for 7.52 Hz flicker. F2 was maximal for 5.29 Hz flicker, and F3 magnitudes are largest for flicker stimulation from 3.75 to 7.52 Hz. Square-wave flicker produced significantly larger F1 and F2 magnitudes for slow flicker rates (up to 5.29 Hz for F1; at 2.83 and 3.75 Hz for F2). The F3 magnitudes were larger overall for square-wave flicker. Binocular FFF-VEP magnitudes are larger than those of monocular FFF-VEPs, and the amount of this binocular enhancement is not dependant on the mode of flicker stimulation (mean binocular: monocular ratio 1.41, 95% CI: 1.2-1.6). Binocular enhancement of F1 for 21.3 Hz flicker was increased to a factor of 2.5 (95% CI: 1.8-3.5). In the healthy adult visual system, FFF-VEP magnitudes can be characterized by the frequency-response functions of F1, F2 and F3. Low-frequency roll-off in the FFF-VEP magnitudes is greater for sinusoidal flicker than for square-wave flicker for rates ≤ 5.29 Hz; magnitudes for higher-frequency flicker are similar for the two types of flicker. Binocular FFF-VEPs are larger overall than those recorded monocularly, and this binocular summation is enhanced at 21.3 Hz in the mid-frequency range. PMID:21279419

  9. A frequency response analysis approach for quantitative assessment of actuator tracking for real-time hybrid simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real-time hybrid simulation is a viable and economical technique that allows researchers to observe the behavior of critical elements at full scale when an entire structure is subjected to dynamic loading. To ensure reliable experimental results, it is necessary to evaluate the actuator tracking after the test, even when sophisticated compensation methods are used to negate the detrimental effect of servo-hydraulic dynamics. Existing methods for assessment of actuator tracking are often based on time-domain analysis. This paper proposes a frequency-domain-based approach to the assessment of actuator tracking for real-time hybrid simulations. To ensure the accuracy of the proposed frequency response approach, the effects of spectrum leakage are investigated as well as the length and sampling frequency requirements of the signals. Two signal pre-processing techniques (data segmentation and window transform) are also discussed and compared to improve the accuracy of the proposed approach. Finally the effectiveness of the proposed frequency-domain-based approach is demonstrated through both computational analyses and laboratory tests, including real-time tests with predefined displacement and real-time hybrid simulation. (paper)

  10. Effective Elliptic Models for Efficient Wavefield Extrapolation in Anisotropic Media

    KAUST Repository

    Waheed, Umair bin

    2014-05-01

    Wavefield extrapolation operator for elliptically anisotropic media offers significant cost reduction compared to that of transversely isotropic media (TI), especially when the medium exhibits tilt in the symmetry axis (TTI). However, elliptical anisotropy does not provide accurate focusing for TI media. Therefore, we develop effective elliptically anisotropic models that correctly capture the kinematic behavior of the TTI wavefield. Specifically, we use an iterative elliptically anisotropic eikonal solver that provides the accurate traveltimes for a TI model. The resultant coefficients of the elliptical eikonal provide the effective models. These effective models allow us to use the cheaper wavefield extrapolation operator for elliptic media to obtain approximate wavefield solutions for TTI media. Despite the fact that the effective elliptic models are obtained by kinematic matching using high-frequency asymptotic, the resulting wavefield contains most of the critical wavefield components, including the frequency dependency and caustics, if present, with reasonable accuracy. The methodology developed here offers a much better cost versus accuracy tradeoff for wavefield computations in TTI media, considering the cost prohibitive nature of the problem. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach on the BP TTI model.

  11. Activation of the SOS response increases the frequency of small colony variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Paulander, Wilhelm Erik Axel; Ingmer, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    failed to do so. The higher proportion of SCVs in cultures exposed to fluoroquinolones and mitomycin C compared to un-exposed cultures correlate with an increased mutation rate monitored by rifampicin resistance and followed induction of the SOS DNA damage response. CONCLUSION: Our observations suggest...... that environmental stimuli, including antimicrobials that reduce replication fidelity, increase the formation of SCVs through activation of the SOS response and thereby potentially promote persistent infections that are difficult to treat....

  12. Using high frequency consumption data to identify demand response potential for solar energy integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, L.; Borgeson, S.; Fredman, D.; Hans, L.; Spurlock, A.; Todd, A.

    2015-12-01

    California's renewable portfolio standard (2012) requires the state to get 33% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2020. Increased share of variable renewable sources such as solar and wind in the California electricity system may require more grid flexibility to insure reliable power services. Such grid flexibility can be potentially provided by changes in end use electricity consumptions in response to grid conditions (demand-response). In the solar case, residential consumption in the late afternoon can be used as reserve capacity to balance the drop in solar generation. This study presents our initial attempt to identify, from a behavior perspective, residential demand response potentials in relation to solar ramp events using a data-driven approach. Based on hourly residential energy consumption data, we derive representative daily load shapes focusing on discretionary consumption with an innovative clustering analysis technique. We aggregate the representative load shapes into behavior groups in terms of the timing and rhythm of energy use in the context of solar ramp events. Households of different behavior groups that are active during hours with high solar ramp rates are identified for capturing demand response potential. Insights into the nature and predictability of response to demand-response programs are provided.

  13. Antioxidant responses in estuarine invertebrates exposed to repeated oil spills: Effects of frequency and dosage in a field manipulative experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrini-Neto, Leonardo; Pereira, Letícia; Martins, César C; Silva de Assis, Helena C; Camus, Lionel; Lana, Paulo C

    2016-08-01

    We have experimentally investigated the effects of repeated diesel spills on the bivalve Anomalocardia brasiliana, the gastropod Neritina virginea and the polychaete Laeonereis culveri, by monitoring the responses of oxidative stress biomarkers in a subtropical estuary. Three frequencies of exposure events were compared against two dosages of oil in a factorial experiment with asymmetrical controls. Hypotheses were tested to distinguish between (i) the overall effect of oil spills, (ii) the effect of diesel dosage via different exposure regimes, and (iii) the effect of time since last spill. Antioxidant defense responses and oxidative damage in the bivalve A. brasiliana and the polychaete L. culveri were overall significantly affected by frequent oil spills compared to undisturbed controls. The main effects of diesel spills on both species were the induction of SOD and GST activities, a significant increase in LPO levels and a decrease in GSH concentration. N. virginea was particularly tolerant to oil exposure, with the exception of a significant GSH depletion. Overall, enzymatic activities and oxidative damage in A. brasiliana and L. culveri were induced by frequent low-dosage spills compared to infrequent high-dosage spills, although the opposite pattern was observed for N. virginea antioxidant responses. Antioxidant responses in A. brasiliana and L. culveri were not affected by timing of exposure events. However, our results revealed that N. virginea might have a delayed response to acute high-dosage exposure. Experimental in situ simulations of oil exposure events with varying frequencies and intensities provide a useful tool for detecting and quantifying environmental impacts. In general, antioxidant biomarkers were induced by frequent low-dosage exposures compared to infrequent high-dosage ones. The bivalve A. brasiliana and the polychaete L. culveri are more suitable sentinels due to their greater responsiveness to oil and also to their wider geographical

  14. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic MHD shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Uchava, E S; Tevzadze, A G; Poedts, S

    2014-01-01

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic MHD flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model, that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy, but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also impor...

  15. Linear response of mutans streptococci to increasing frequency of xylitol chewing gum use: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN43479664

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi David K

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xylitol is a naturally occurring sugar substitute that has been shown to reduce the level of mutans streptococci in plaque and saliva and to reduce tooth decay. It has been suggested that the degree of reduction is dependent on both the amount and the frequency of xylitol consumption. For xylitol to be successfully and cost-effectively used in public health prevention strategies dosing and frequency guidelines should be established. This study determined the reduction in mutans streptococci levels in plaque and unstimulated saliva to increasing frequency of xylitol gum use at a fixed total daily dose of 10.32 g over five weeks. Methods Participants (n = 132 were randomized to either active groups (10.32 g xylitol/day or a placebo control (9.828 g sorbitol and 0.7 g maltitol/day. All groups chewed 12 pieces of gum per day. The control group chewed 4 times/day and active groups chewed xylitol gum at a frequency of 2 times/day, 3 times/day, or 4 times/day. The 12 gum pieces were evenly divided into the frequency assigned to each group. Plaque and unstimulated saliva samples were taken at baseline and five-weeks and were cultured on modified Mitis Salivarius agar for mutans streptococci enumeration. Results There were no significant differences in mutans streptococci level among the groups at baseline. At five-weeks, mutans streptococci levels in plaque and unstimulated saliva showed a linear reduction with increasing frequency of xylitol chewing gum use at the constant daily dose. Although the difference observed for the group that chewed xylitol 2 times/day was consistent with the linear model, the difference was not significant. Conclusion There was a linear reduction in mutans streptococci levels in plaque and saliva with increasing frequency of xylitol gum use at a constant daily dose. Reduction at a consumption frequency of 2 times per day was small and consistent with the linear-response line but was not statistically

  16. Chiral selection and frequency response of spiral waves in reaction-diffusion systems under a chiral electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing-Wei; Cai, Mei-Chun; Zhang, Hong; Panfilov, Alexander V.; Dierckx, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Chirality is one of the most fundamental properties of many physical, chemical, and biological systems. However, the mechanisms underlying the onset and control of chiral symmetry are largely understudied. We investigate possibility of chirality control in a chemical excitable system (the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction) by application of a chiral (rotating) electric field using the Oregonator model. We find that unlike previous findings, we can achieve the chirality control not only in the field rotation direction, but also opposite to it, depending on the field rotation frequency. To unravel the mechanism, we further develop a comprehensive theory of frequency synchronization based on the response function approach. We find that this problem can be described by the Adler equation and show phase-locking phenomena, known as the Arnold tongue. Our theoretical predictions are in good quantitative agreement with the numerical simulations and provide a solid basis for chirality control in excitable media.

  17. Modeling of CMUTs with Multiple Anisotropic Layers and Residual Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Mathias; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2014-01-01

    Usually the analytical approach for modeling CMUTs uses the single layer plate equation to obtain the deflection and does not take anisotropy and residual stress into account. A highly accurate model is developed for analytical characterization of CMUTs taking an arbitrary number of layers...... and residual stress into account. Based on the stress-strain relation of each layer and balancing stress resultants and bending moments, a general multilayered anisotropic plate equation is developed for plates with an arbitrary number of layers. The exact deflection profile is calculated for a circular...... clamped plate of anisotropic materials with residual bi-axial stress. From the deflection shape the critical stress for buckling is calculated and by using the Rayleigh-Ritz method the natural frequency is estimated....

  18. Characteristics of surface waves in anisotropic left-handed materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Yong-Yuan; Shi Hong-Yan; Zhang Yong-Qiang; Hou Chun-Feng; Sun Xiu-Dong

    2007-01-01

    We report the coexistence of TE and TM surface modes in certain same frequency domain at the interface between one isotropic regular medium and another biaxially anistotropic left-handed medium. The conditions for the existence of TE and TM polarized surface waves in biaxially anisotropic left-handed materials are identified, respectively.The Poynting vector and the energy density associated with surface modes are calculated. Depending on the system parameters, either TE or TM surface modes can have the time averaged Poynting vector directed to or opposite to the mode phase velocity. It is seen that the characteristics of surface waves in biaxially anisotropic left-handed media are significantly different from that in isotropic left-handed media.

  19. Erianthus arundinaceus HSP70 (EaHSP70) Acts as a Key Regulator in the Formation of Anisotropic Interdigitation in Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrid) in Response to Drought Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Sruthy Maria; Cherian, Anoop V; Syamaladevi, Divya P; Subramonian, N

    2015-12-01

    Plant growth during abiotic stress is a long sought-after trait especially in crop plants in the context of global warming and climate change. Previous studies on leaf epidermal cells have revealed that during normal growth and development, adjacent cells interdigitate anisotropically to form cell morphological patterns known as interlocking marginal lobes (IMLs), involving the cell wall-cell membrane-cortical actin continuum. IMLs are growth-associated cell morphological changes in which auxin-binding protein (ABP), Rho GTPases and actin are known to play important roles. In the present study, we investigated the formation of IMLs under drought stress and found that Erianthus arundinaceus, a drought-tolerant wild relative of sugarcane, develops such growth-related cell morphological patterns under drought stress. Using confocal microscopy, we showed an increasing trend in cortical F-actin intensity in drought-tolerant plants with increasing soil moisture stress. In order to check the role of drought tolerance-related genes in IML formation under soil moisture stress, we adopted a structural data mining strategy and identified indirect connections between the ABPs and heat shock proteins (HSPs). Initial experimental evidence for this connection comes from the high transcript levels of HSP70 observed in drought-stressed Erianthus, which developed anisotropic interdigitation, i.e. IMLs. Subsequently, by overexpressing the E. arundinaceus HSP70 gene (EaHSP70) in sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrid), we confirm the role of HSP70 in the formation of anisotropic interdigitation under drought stress. Taken together, our results suggest that EaHSP70 acts as a key regulator in the formation of anisotropic interdigitation in drought-tolerant plants (Erianthus and HSP70 transgenic sugarcane) under moisture stress in an actin-mediated pathway. The possible biological significance of the formation of drought-associated interlocking marginal lobes (DaIMLs) in sugarcane plants upon

  20. Frequency analysis of a task-evoked pupillary response: Luminance-independent measure of mental effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peysakhovich, Vsevolod; Causse, Mickaël; Scannella, Sébastien; Dehais, Frédéric

    2015-07-01

    Pupil diameter is a widely-studied cognitive load measure, which, despite its convenience for non-intrusive operator state monitoring in complex environments, is still not available for in situ measurements because of numerous methodological limitations. The most important of these limitations is the influence of pupillary light reflex. Hence, there is the need of providing a pupil-based cognitive load measure that is independent of light conditions. In this paper, we present a promising technique of pupillary signal analysis resulting in luminance-independent measure of mental effort that could be used in real-time without a priori on luminous conditions. Twenty-two participants performed a short-term memory task under different screen luminance conditions. Our results showed that the amplitude of pupillary dilation due to load on memory was luminance-dependent with higher amplitude corresponding to lower-luminance condition. Furthermore, our experimentation showed that load on memory and luminance factors express themselves differently according to frequency. Therefore, as our statistical analysis revealed, the ratio between low (0-1.6 Hz) and high frequency (1.6-4 Hz) bands (LF/HF ratio) of power spectral densities of pupillary signal is sensitive to the cognitive load but not to luminance. Our results are promising for the measurement of load on memory in ecological settings. PMID:25941013

  1. Words in Context: The Effects of Length, Frequency, and Predictability on Brain Responses During Natural Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Sarah; Hawelka, Stefan; Hutzler, Florian; Kronbichler, Martin; Richlan, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Word length, frequency, and predictability count among the most influential variables during reading. Their effects are well-documented in eye movement studies, but pertinent evidence from neuroimaging primarily stem from single-word presentations. We investigated the effects of these variables during reading of whole sentences with simultaneous eye-tracking and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fixation-related fMRI). Increasing word length was associated with increasing activation in occipital areas linked to visual analysis. Additionally, length elicited a U-shaped modulation (i.e., least activation for medium-length words) within a brain stem region presumably linked to eye movement control. These effects, however, were diminished when accounting for multiple fixation cases. Increasing frequency was associated with decreasing activation within left inferior frontal, superior parietal, and occipito-temporal regions. The function of the latter region—hosting the putative visual word form area—was originally considered as limited to sublexical processing. An exploratory analysis revealed that increasing predictability was associated with decreasing activation within middle temporal and inferior frontal regions previously implicated in memory access and unification. The findings are discussed with regard to their correspondence with findings from single-word presentations and with regard to neurocognitive models of visual word recognition, semantic processing, and eye movement control during reading. PMID:27365297

  2. Acoustic metafluid with anisotropic mass density and tunable sound speed: An approach based on suspensions of orientable anisotropic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitel, Mark; Tse, Stephen; Shan, Jerry

    2011-11-01

    We investigate liquid suspensions of micron-scale, anisotropic particles as potential acoustic metafluids having anisotropic and actively controllable acoustic properties. The effective mass density (and hence the sound propagation speed) of these metafluids can vary because the added mass of an anisotropic particle suspended in the fluid changes with the particle's orientation relative to the direction of the wave propagation. A suspension with disc-like particles oriented broadside to the direction of wave propagation is thus expected to have higher effective inertia and lower sound speed than a suspension with particles with end-on alignment. To test these predictions, sound speed is measured with a time-of-flight method in suspensions of micron-size nickel flakes suspended in oil, with and without magnetic-field-induced alignment of the particles. The sound speed, relative to the unaligned case, is found to decrease for particles oriented broadside to the sound wave, and increase for edgewise alignment. We also investigate the frequency dependence of the effective sound speed, since the added mass effect is expected to diminish as the flow becomes steady at low frequencies. The experimental results are compared to the predictions of a model proposed by Ahuja & Hardee (J. Acoust. Soc. Am 1978) for the acoustic properties of aligned oblate-spheroid suspensions.

  3. Time- and frequency-domain parameters of heart rate variability and sympathetic skin response in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maetzler, Walter; Karam, Marie; Berger, Monika Fruhmann; Heger, Tanja; Maetzler, Corina; Ruediger, Heinz; Bronzova, Juliana; Lobo, Patricia Pita; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Berg, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) is regularly affected in Parkinson's disease (PD). Information on autonomic dysfunction can be derived from e.g. altered heart rate variability (HRV) and sympathetic skin response (SSR). Such parameters can be quantified easily and measured repeatedly which might be helpful for evaluating disease progression and therapeutic outcome. In this 2-center study, HRV and SSR of 45 PD patients and 26 controls were recorded. HRV was measured during supine metronomic breathing and analyzed in time- and frequency-domains. SSR was evoked by repetitive auditory stimulation. Various ANS parameters were compared (1) between patients and healthy controls, (2) to clinical scales (Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale, Mini-Mental State Examination, Becks Depression Inventory), and (3) to disease duration. Root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) and low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio differed significantly between PD and controls. Both, HRV and SSR parameters showed low or no association with clinical scores. Time-domain parameters tended to be affected already at early PD stages but did not consistently change with longer disease duration. In contrast, frequency-domain parameters were not altered in early PD phases but tended to be lower (LF, LF/HF ratio), respectively higher (HF) with increasing disease duration. This report confirms previous results of altered ANS parameters in PD. In addition, it suggests that (1) these ANS parameters are not relevantly associated with motor, behavioral, and cognitive changes in PD, (2) time-domain parameters are useful for the assessment of early PD, and (3) frequency-domain parameters are more closely associated with disease duration.

  4. Mechanisms of frequency-specific responses of omega neuron 1 in crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus): a polysynaptic pathway for song?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkes, Z; Pollack, G S

    2001-04-01

    In crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus), the auditory interneuron omega neuron 1 (ON1) responds to sounds over a wide range of frequencies but is most sensitive to the frequency of conspecific songs (4.5 kHz). Response latency is longest for this same frequency. We investigate the mechanisms that might account for the longer latency of ON1 to cricket-like sounds. Intracellular recordings revealed no evidence for appropriately timed postsynaptic inhibition of ON1 that might increase its latency, nor was latency affected by picrotoxin. The onset of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) was delayed for 4.5 kHz stimuli compared with ultrasound stimuli, pointing to a presynaptic locus for the latency difference. When ON1 is stimulated with high frequencies, discrete, apparently unitary EPSPs can be recorded in its dendrite, and these are latency-locked to spikes recorded simultaneously in the auditory nerve. This suggests that input to ON1 from high-frequency-tuned auditory receptor neurons is monosynaptic. In agreement with this, brief ultrasound stimuli evoke a single, short-latency EPSP in ON1. In contrast, the EPSP evoked by a brief 4.5 kHz stimulus consists of an early component, similar in latency to that evoked by ultrasound and possibly evoked by ultrasound-tuned receptors, and a later, dominant component. We interpret the early peak as arising from a monosynaptic afferent pathway and the late peak from a polysynaptic afferent pathway. Multiple-peak EPSPs, with timing similar to those evoked by sound stimuli, were also evoked by electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve.

  5. Efficient Modeling and Migration in Anisotropic Media Based on Prestack Exploding Reflector Model and Effective Anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hui

    2014-05-01

    This thesis addresses the efficiency improvement of seismic wave modeling and migration in anisotropic media. This improvement becomes crucial in practice as the process of imaging complex geological structures of the Earth\\'s subsurface requires modeling and migration as building blocks. The challenge comes from two aspects. First, the underlying governing equations for seismic wave propagation in anisotropic media are far more complicated than that in isotropic media which demand higher computational costs to solve. Second, the usage of whole prestack seismic data still remains a burden considering its storage volume and the existing wave equation solvers. In this thesis, I develop two approaches to tackle the challenges. In the first part, I adopt the concept of prestack exploding reflector model to handle the whole prestack data and bridge the data space directly to image space in a single kernel. I formulate the extrapolation operator in a two-way fashion to remove he restriction on directions that waves propagate. I also develop a generic method for phase velocity evaluation within anisotropic media used in this extrapolation kernel. The proposed method provides a tool for generating prestack images without wavefield cross correlations. In the second part of this thesis, I approximate the anisotropic models using effective isotropic models. The wave phenomena in these effective models match that in anisotropic models both kinematically and dynamically. I obtain the effective models through equating eikonal equations and transport equations of anisotropic and isotropic models, thereby in the high frequency asymptotic approximation sense. The wavefields extrapolation costs are thus reduced using isotropic wave equation solvers while the anisotropic effects are maintained through this approach. I benchmark the two proposed methods using synthetic datasets. Tests on anisotropic Marmousi model and anisotropic BP2007 model demonstrate the applicability of my

  6. Behavioral responses of California sea lions to mid-frequency (3250-3450 Hz) sonar signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Dorian S; Martin, Stephen W; Finneran, James J

    2013-12-01

    Military sonar has the potential to negatively impact marine mammals. To investigate factors affecting behavioral disruption in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), fifteen sea lions participated in a controlled exposure study using a simulated tactical sonar signal (1 s duration, 3250-3450 Hz) as a stimulus. Subjects were placed into groups of three and each group received a stimulus exposure of 125, 140, 155, 170, or 185 dB re: 1 μPa (rms). Each subject was trained to swim across an enclosure, touch a paddle, and return to the start location. Sound exposures occurred at the mid-point of the enclosure. Control and exposure sessions were run consecutively and each consisted of ten, 30-s trials. The occurrence and severity of behavioral responses were used to create acoustic dose-response and dose-severity functions. Age of the subject significantly affected the dose-response relationship, but not the dose-severity relationship. Repetitive exposures did not affect the dose-response relationship.

  7. Spin precession in anisotropic cosmologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamenshchik, A.Yu. [Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (Italy); L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); INFN, Bologna (Italy); Teryaev, O.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Dubna (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-15

    We consider the precession of a Dirac particle spin in some anisotropic Bianchi universes. This effect is present already in the Bianchi-I universe. We discuss in some detail the geodesics and the spin precession for both the Kasner and the Heckmann-Schucking solutions. In the Bianchi-IX universe the spin precession acquires the chaotic character due to the stochasticity of the oscillatory approach to the cosmological singularity. The related helicity flip of fermions in the very early universe may produce the sterile particles contributing to dark matter. (orig.)

  8. Anisotropic and nonlinear optical waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Someda, CG

    1992-01-01

    Dielectric optical waveguides have been investigated for more than two decades. In the last ten years they have had the unique position of being simultaneously the backbone of a very practical and fully developed technology, as well as an extremely exciting area of basic, forefront research. Existing waveguides can be divided into two sets: one consisting of waveguides which are already in practical use, and the second of those which are still at the laboratory stage of their evolution. This book is divided into two separate parts: the first dealing with anisotropic waveguides, an

  9. New charged anisotropic compact models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kileba Matondo, D.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-07-01

    We find new exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell field equations which are relevant in the description of highly compact stellar objects. The relativistic star is charged and anisotropic with a quark equation of state. Exact solutions of the field equations are found in terms of elementary functions. It is interesting to note that we regain earlier quark models with uncharged and charged matter distributions. A physical analysis indicates that the matter distributions are well behaved and regular throughout the stellar structure. A range of stellar masses are generated for particular parameter values in the electric field. In particular the observed mass for a binary pulsar is regained.

  10. Remarks on inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Recently a new no-global-recollapse argument was given for some inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies that utilizes surface deformation by the mean curvature flow. In this paper we discuss important properties of the mean curvature flow of spacelike surfaces in Lorentzian manifolds. We show that singularities may form during cosmic evolution, and the theorems forbidding the global recollapse lose their validity. The time evolution of the spatial scalar curvature that may kinematically prevent the recollapse is determined in normal coordinates, which shows the impact of inhomogeneities explicitly. Our analysis indicates a caveat in numerical solutions that give rise to inflation.

  11. An Adaptive Controller Based upon Continuous Estimation of the Closed Loop Frequency Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens G. Balchen

    1987-10-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive control algorithm based upon on-line estimation of the -180 degree shift frequency and the gain margin is investigated. The estimates are found by perturbing the system with a small signal and then correlating the system deviation with the excitation. As only two parameters are estimated, the algorithm is robust. Moreover, the estimator can be applied to non-minimum phase systems, including systems with a varying time-delay. The control algorithm can be of any form as long as there is a functional relationship between the estimated parameters and the control algorithm parameters. To avoid an excessive perturbation signal, the square of the amplitude of this signal is automatically adjusted to a certain ratio of the variance of the error signal. A mathematical analysis of convergence is presented and the theory is confirmed by experimental results.

  12. Electromagnetic Response of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves by Coupling Open Resonant Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fang-Yu; CHEN Ying; WANG Ping

    2007-01-01

    We present a new detecting scheme of high-frequency gravitational waves(HFGWs) in the GHz band,the scheme consists of a high-quality-factor open microwave cavity,a static magnetic field passing through the cavity and an electromagnetic (EM)normal mode stored in the cavity.It is found that under the resonant condition firstand second-order perturbation EM effects have almost the same detecting sensitivity to the HFGWs in the GHz band (h~10-26,v~5GHz),but the former contains more information from the HFGWs.We akso provide a very brief review for possible improving way of the sensitivity.This scheme would be Highly complementary to other schemes of detecting the HFGWs.

  13. Time-Frequency Analysis of Electromagnetic Pulse Response from a Spherical Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈东; 金亚秋

    2003-01-01

    Transient backscattering from a spherical target under incidence of an electromagnetic short pulse is studied. The target can be a perfectly conducting sphere, a dielectric sphere or a dielectric spherical shell. To understand the scattering mechanism from transient impulse echoes for target detection, both the short-time Fourier transform(STFT) and the wavelet transform (WT) are applied to retrieval of scattering information from the backscattering data. Analysis in both the time and frequency domains demonstrates that the WT is more feasible than the STFT to clarifying scattering process of the scatterer because of its excellent multi-resolution characteristic. This technique shall be helpful for scattering analysis and detection of more complex single or multi-targets.

  14. Multivariable frequency response methods for optimal Kalman-Bucy filters with applications to radar tracking systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcasoy, C. C.

    1992-11-01

    The problem of multi-output, infinite-time, linear time-invariant optimal Kalman-Bucy filter both in continuous and discrete-time cases in frequency domain is addressed. A simple new algorithm is given for the analytical solution to the steady-state gain of the optimum filter based on a transfer function approach. The algorithm is based on spectral factorization of observed spectral density matrix of the filter which generates directly the return-difference matrix of the optimal filter. The method is more direct than by algebraic Riccati equation solution and can easily be implemented on digital computer. The design procedure is illustrated by examples and closed-form solution of ECV and ECA radar tracking filters are considered as an application of the method.

  15. Fabrication and Frequency Response Characteristics of AlN-Based Solidly Mounted Resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Juan; GU Hao-Shuang; HU Kuan; HU Ming-Zhe

    2009-01-01

    @@ Film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) with solidly mounted resonator (SMR)-type is carried out by rf magnetic sputtering. To fabricate SMR-type FBAR, alternative high and low acoustic impedance layers, Mo/Ti multilayer, are adopted as Bragg reflector deposited by dc magnetron sputtering. The influences of sputtering pressure, substrate temperature and sputtering power on the surface roughness of Bragg reflector layer are discussed. From the atom force microscopy (AFM) analysis, the surface roughness of the Bragg reflector is improved remarkably by controlling deposition conditions. Under the appropriate sputtering condition, AIN thin films with highly c-axis-preferred orientation are deposited by rf magnetron sputtering. The performance of fabricated Mo/Ti SMR shows that the electromechanical coupling coefficient is 3.89%, the series and parallel resonant frequencies appear at 2.49 and 2.53 GHz, with their quality factors 134.2 and 97.6, respectively.

  16. Insulin gene VNTR genotype associates with frequency and phenotype of the autoimmune response to proinsulin

    OpenAIRE

    Durinovic-Belló, I; Wu, R P; Gersuk, V H; Sanda, S; Shilling, H G; Nepom, G T

    2010-01-01

    Immune responses to autoantigens are in part controlled by deletion of autoreactive cells through genetically regulated selection mechanisms. We have directly analyzed peripheral CD4+ proinsulin (PI) 76–90 (SLQPLALEGSLQKRG)-specific T cells using soluble fluorescent major histocompatibility complex class II tetramers. Subjects with type I diabetes and healthy controls with high levels of peripheral proinsulin-specific T cells were characterized by the presence of a disease-susceptible polymor...

  17. Frequency response of axisymmetric liquid bridges to an oscillatory microgravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, J. A.

    1991-10-01

    The dynamical response of nearly-cylindrical liquid bridges when subjected to an oscillatory microgravity field has been studied. The analysis has been performed by using a linear three-dimensional model, valid for columns of arbitrary slenderness. Theoretical results are presented and compared with previous ones of a one-dimensional slice model showing that the validity of the slice model is restricted to slender columns.

  18. Numerical modelling of tunnel construction in anisotropic foliated soft rock

    OpenAIRE

    Markovič, Jernej

    2009-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence on tunnelling in the anisotropic foliated soft rock. The excavation initiates stress redistribution around an opening and thus causes the deformation to occur. The numerical problem of the tunnel excavation was modelled in the Plaxis 2D code using different soil constitutive models for modelling the rock mass behaviour. A parametric study was performed to obtain the model response to alteration of the rock mass parameters. The analysis was divided int...

  19. Signal transmission from motor axons to group Ia muscle spindle afferents: frequency responses and second-order non-linearities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhorst, U; Kokkoroyiannis, T; Laouris, Y; Meyer-Lohmann, J

    1994-03-01

    Spinal recurrent inhibition via Renshaw cells and proprioceptive feedback via skeletal muscle and muscle spindle afferents have been hypothesized to constitute a compound feedback system [Windhorst (1989) Afferent Control of Posture and Locomotion; Windhorst (1993) Robots and Biological Systems--Towards a New Bionics]. To assess their detailed functions, it is necessary to know their dynamic characteristics. Previously we have extensively described the properties of signal transmission from motor axons to Renshaw cells using random motor axon stimulation and data analysis methods based thereupon. Using the same methods, we here compare these properties, in the cat, with those between motor axons and group Ia muscle spindle afferents in terms of frequency responses and nonlinear features. The frequency responses depend on the mean rate (carrier rate) of activation of motor axons and on the strength of coupling between motor units and spindles. In general, they are those of a second-order low-pass system with a cut-off at fairly low frequencies. This contrasts with the dynamics of motor axon-Renshaw cell couplings which are those of a much broader band-pass with its peak in the range of c. 2-15 Hz [Christakos (1987) Neuroscience 23, 613-623]. The second-order non-linearities in motor unit-muscle spindle signal lines are much more diverse than those in motor axon-Renshaw cell couplings. Although the average strength of response declines with mean stimulus rate in both subsystems, there is no systematic relationship between the amount of non-linearity and the average response in the former, whilst there is in the latter. The qualitative appearance of motor unit-muscle spindle non-linearities was complicated as was the average response to motor unit twitches. Thus, whilst Renshaw cells appear to dynamically reflect motor output rather faithfully, muscle spindles seem to signal local muscle fibre length changes and their dynamics. This would be consistent with the

  20. Signal transmission from motor axons to group Ia muscle spindle afferents: frequency responses and second-order non-linearities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhorst, U; Kokkoroyiannis, T; Laouris, Y; Meyer-Lohmann, J

    1994-03-01

    Spinal recurrent inhibition via Renshaw cells and proprioceptive feedback via skeletal muscle and muscle spindle afferents have been hypothesized to constitute a compound feedback system [Windhorst (1989) Afferent Control of Posture and Locomotion; Windhorst (1993) Robots and Biological Systems--Towards a New Bionics]. To assess their detailed functions, it is necessary to know their dynamic characteristics. Previously we have extensively described the properties of signal transmission from motor axons to Renshaw cells using random motor axon stimulation and data analysis methods based thereupon. Using the same methods, we here compare these properties, in the cat, with those between motor axons and group Ia muscle spindle afferents in terms of frequency responses and nonlinear features. The frequency responses depend on the mean rate (carrier rate) of activation of motor axons and on the strength of coupling between motor units and spindles. In general, they are those of a second-order low-pass system with a cut-off at fairly low frequencies. This contrasts with the dynamics of motor axon-Renshaw cell couplings which are those of a much broader band-pass with its peak in the range of c. 2-15 Hz [Christakos (1987) Neuroscience 23, 613-623]. The second-order non-linearities in motor unit-muscle spindle signal lines are much more diverse than those in motor axon-Renshaw cell couplings. Although the average strength of response declines with mean stimulus rate in both subsystems, there is no systematic relationship between the amount of non-linearity and the average response in the former, whilst there is in the latter. The qualitative appearance of motor unit-muscle spindle non-linearities was complicated as was the average response to motor unit twitches. Thus, whilst Renshaw cells appear to dynamically reflect motor output rather faithfully, muscle spindles seem to signal local muscle fibre length changes and their dynamics. This would be consistent with the

  1. Dynamic Simulation Studies of the Frequency Response of the Three U.S. Interconnections with Increased Wind Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackin, Peter; Daschmans, R.; Williams, B.; Haney, B.; Hung, R.; Ellis, J.

    2010-12-20

    Utility Systems Efficiencies, Inc. was tasked by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to conduct dynamic simulation studies of the three U.S. interconnections (Eastern, Western, and Texas). The simulations were prepared in support of LBNL's project for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to study frequency-response-related issues that must be addressed to operate the power system reliably with large amounts of variable renewable generation. The objective of the simulation studies of each interconnection was to assess the effects of different amounts of wind generation on frequency behavior of each interconnection following a sudden loss of generation. The scenarios created to study these effects considered an operating circumstance in which system load is at or close to its minimum. The event studied was the sudden loss of the largest amount of generation recorded within each interconnection. The simulations calculated the impact of this event on interconnection frequency for three levels of wind generation. In addition to varying the amount of wind generation, the simulations varied the amount of operating reserves between a high level representative of current operating practices and a low level representative of the minimum required by present operating rules.

  2. Fast Computation of Frequency Response of Cavity-Backed Apertures Using MBPE in Conjunction with Hybrid FEM/MoM Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, M. D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    2004-01-01

    The hybrid Finite Element Method(FEM)/Method of Moments(MoM) technique has become popular over the last few years due to its flexibility to handle arbitrarily shaped objects with complex materials. One of the disadvantages of this technique, however, is the computational cost involved in obtaining solutions over a frequency range as computations are repeated for each frequency. In this paper, the application of Model Based Parameter Estimation (MBPE) method[1] with the hybrid FEM/MoM technique is presented for fast computation of frequency response of cavity-backed apertures[2,3]. In MBPE, the electric field is expanded in a rational function of two polynomials. The coefficients of the rational function are obtained using the frequency-derivatives of the integro-differential equation formed by the hybrid FEM/MoM technique. Using the rational function approximation, the electric field is calculated at different frequencies from which the frequency response is obtained.

  3. A novel biomarker of amnestic MCI based on dynamic cross-frequency coupling patterns during cognitive brain responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Stavros I; Laskaris, Nikolaos A; Bitzidou, Malamati P; Tarnanas, Ioannis; Tsolaki, Magda N

    2015-01-01

    The detection of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the transitional stage between normal cognitive changes of aging and the cognitive decline caused by AD, is of paramount clinical importance, since MCI patients are at increased risk of progressing into AD. Electroencephalographic (EEG) alterations in the spectral content of brainwaves and connectivity at resting state have been associated with early-stage AD. Recently, cognitive event-related potentials (ERPs) have entered into the picture as an easy to perform screening test. Motivated by the recent findings about the role of cross-frequency coupling (CFC) in cognition, we introduce a relevant methodological approach for detecting MCI based on cognitive responses from a standard auditory oddball paradigm. By using the single trial signals recorded at Pz sensor and comparing the responses to target and non-target stimuli, we first demonstrate that increased CFC is associated with the cognitive task. Then, considering the dynamic character of CFC, we identify instances during which the coupling between particular pairs of brainwave frequencies carries sufficient information for discriminating between normal subjects and patients with MCI. In this way, we form a multiparametric signature of impaired cognition. The new composite biomarker was tested using data from a cohort that consists of 25 amnestic MCI patients and 15 age-matched controls. Standard machine-learning algorithms were employed so as to implement the binary classification task. Based on leave-one-out cross-validation, the measured classification rate was found reaching very high levels (95%). Our approach compares favorably with the traditional alternative of using the morphology of averaged ERP response to make the diagnosis and the usage of features from spectro-temporal analysis of single-trial responses. This further indicates that task-related CFC measurements can provide invaluable analytics in AD diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:26539070

  4. A novel biomarker of amnestic MCI based on dynamic Cross-Frequency Coupling patterns during cognitive brain responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros I Dimitriadis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The detection of mild cognitive impairment (MCI, the transitional stage between normal cognitive changes of aging and the cognitive decline caused by AD, is of paramount clinical importance, since MCI patients are at increased risk of progressing into AD. Electroencephalographic (EEG alterations in the spectral content of brainwaves and connectivity at resting state have been associated with early-stage AD. Recently, cognitive event-related potentials (ERPs have entered into the picture as an easy to perform screening test. Motivated by the recent findings about the role of cross-frequency coupling (CFC in cognition, we introduce a relevant methodological approach for detecting MCI based on cognitive responses from a standard auditory oddball paradigm. By using the single trial signals recorded at Pz sensor and comparing the responses to target and non-target stimuli, we first demonstrate that increased CFC is associated with the cognitive task. Then, considering the dynamic character of CFC, we identify instances during which the coupling between particular pairs of brainwave frequencies carries sufficient information for discriminating between normal subjects and patients with MCI. In this way, we form a multiparametric signature of impaired cognition. The new composite biomarker was tested using data from a cohort that consists of 25 amnestic MCI patients and 15 age-matched controls. Standard machine-learning algorithms were employed so as to implement the binary classification task. Based on leave-one-out cross-validation, the measured classification rate was found reaching very high levels (95%. Our approach compares favorably with the traditional alternative of using the morphology of averaged ERP response to make the diagnosis and the usage of features from spectro-temporal analysis of single-trial response. This further indicates that task-related CFC measurements can provide invaluable analytics in AD diagnosis and prognosis.

  5. Abnormal auditory mismatch response in tinnitus sufferers with high-frequency hearing loss is associated with subjective distress level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Patrick

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tinnitus is an auditory sensation frequently following hearing loss. After cochlear injury, deafferented neurons become sensitive to neighbouring intact edge-frequencies, guiding an enhanced central representation of these frequencies. As psychoacoustical data 123 indicate enhanced frequency discrimination ability for edge-frequencies that may be related to a reorganization within the auditory cortex, the aim of the present study was twofold: 1 to search for abnormal auditory mismatch responses in tinnitus sufferers and 2 relate these to subjective indicators of tinnitus. Results Using EEG-mismatch negativity, we demonstrate abnormalities (N = 15 in tinnitus sufferers that are specific to frequencies located at the audiometrically normal lesion-edge as compared to normal hearing controls (N = 15. Groups also differed with respect to the cortical locations of mismatch responsiveness. Sources in the 90–135 ms latency window were generated in more anterior brain regions in the tinnitus group. Both measures of abnormality correlated with emotional-cognitive distress related to tinnitus (r ~ .76. While these two physiological variables were uncorrelated in the control group, they were correlated in the tinnitus group (r = .72. Concerning relationships with parameters of hearing loss (depth and slope, slope turned out to be an important variable. Generally, the steeper the hearing loss is the less distress related to tinnitus was reported. The associations between slope and the relevant neurophysiological variables are in agreement with this finding. Conclusions The present study is the first to show near-to-complete separation of tinnitus sufferers from a normal hearing control group based on neurophysiological variables. The finding of lesion-edge specific effects and associations with slope of hearing loss corroborates the assumption that hearing loss is the basis for tinnitus development. It is likely that some central

  6. Electromagnetism on anisotropic fractal media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Basic equations of electromagnetic fields in anisotropic fractal media are obtained using a dimensional regularization approach. First, a formulation based on product measures is shown to satisfy the four basic identities of the vector calculus. This allows a generalization of the Green-Gauss and Stokes theorems as well as the charge conservation equation on anisotropic fractals. Then, pursuing the conceptual approach, we derive the Faraday and Ampère laws for such fractal media, which, along with two auxiliary null-divergence conditions, effectively give the modified Maxwell equations. Proceeding on a separate track, we employ a variational principle for electromagnetic fields, appropriately adapted to fractal media, so as to independently derive the same forms of these two laws. It is next found that the parabolic (for a conducting medium) and the hyperbolic (for a dielectric medium) equations involve modified gradient operators, while the Poynting vector has the same form as in the non-fractal case. Finally, Maxwell's electromagnetic stress tensor is reformulated for fractal systems. In all the cases, the derived equations for fractal media depend explicitly on fractal dimensions in three different directions and reduce to conventional forms for continuous media with Euclidean geometries upon setting these each of dimensions equal to unity.

  7. Deficiencies in numerical models of anisotropic nonlinearly elastic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Annaidh, A; Destrade, M; Gilchrist, M D; Murphy, J G

    2013-08-01

    Incompressible nonlinearly hyperelastic materials are rarely simulated in finite element numerical experiments as being perfectly incompressible because of the numerical difficulties associated with globally satisfying this constraint. Most commercial finite element packages therefore assume that the material is slightly compressible. It is then further assumed that the corresponding strain-energy function can be decomposed additively into volumetric and deviatoric parts. We show that this decomposition is not physically realistic, especially for anisotropic materials, which are of particular interest for simulating the mechanical response of biological soft tissue. The most striking illustration of the shortcoming is that with this decomposition, an anisotropic cube under hydrostatic tension deforms into another cube instead of a hexahedron with non-parallel faces. Furthermore, commercial numerical codes require the specification of a 'compressibility parameter' (or 'penalty factor'), which arises naturally from the flawed additive decomposition of the strain-energy function. This parameter is often linked to a 'bulk modulus', although this notion makes no sense for anisotropic solids; we show that it is essentially an arbitrary parameter and that infinitesimal changes to it result in significant changes in the predicted stress response. This is illustrated with numerical simulations for biaxial tension experiments of arteries, where the magnitude of the stress response is found to change by several orders of magnitude when infinitesimal changes in 'Poisson's ratio' close to the perfect incompressibility limit of 1/2 are made. PMID:23011411

  8. Analysis of frequency response and scale-factor of tuning fork micro-gyroscope operating at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xukai; Li, Hongsheng; Ni, Yunfang; Sang, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the frequency response and the scale-factor of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope operating at atmospheric pressure in the presence of an interference sense mode by utilizing the approximate transfer function. The optimal demodulation phase (ODP), which is always ignored in vacuum packaged micro-gyroscopes but quite important in gyroscopes operating at atmospheric pressure, is obtained through the transfer function of the sense mode, including the primary mode and the interference mode. The approximate transfer function of the micro-gyroscope is deduced in consideration of the interference mode and the ODP. Then, the equation describing the scale-factor of the gyroscope is also obtained. The impacts of the interference mode and Q-factor on the frequency response and the scale-factor of the gyroscope are analyzed through numerical simulations. The relationship between the scale-factor and the demodulation phase is also illustrated and gives an effective way to find out the ODP in practice. The simulation results predicted by the transfer functions are in close agreement with the results of the experiments. The analyses and simulations can provide constructive guidance on bandwidth and sensitivity designs of the micro-gyroscopes operating at atmospheric pressure.

  9. Crack modelling and detection in Timoshenko FGM beam under transverse vibration using frequency contour and response surface model with GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amit; Panigrahi, Brajesh; Pohit, G.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, dynamic response of cracked Timoshenko beam with functionally graded material properties are obtained by a numerical technique using Ritz approximation. In order to verify the applicability and performance of the formulation, comparisons of the present numerical method with three-dimensional FEM models are made. Crack is assumed to be transverse and open throughout the vibration cycle. Two different crack detection techniques have been proposed. Results obtained by the numerical technique are used in both of the crack detection techniques. In the first technique, the frequency contours with respect to crack location and size are plotted and the intersection of contours of different modes helps in the prediction of crack location and size. In the second technique, crack is modelled using response surface methodology (RSM). The sum of the squared errors between the numerical and RSM regression model natural frequencies is used as the objective function. This objective function is minimised using genetic algorithm optimisation technique. Both the crack detection techniques and the numerical analysis have shown good agreement with each other.

  10. Effect of space flight on the frequency of micronuclei and expression of stress-responsive proteins in cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of past space experiments suggest that the biological effect of space radiation could been hanced under microgravity in some cases, especially ininsects. To examine if such a synergistic effect of radiation and microgravity also exists in human cells, frequencies of chromosome instability and cellular levels of several stress-responsive proteins were analyzed incultured human and rodent cells afterspace flight. Human (MCF7 and ataxia telangiectasia(AT)2KY), mouse (m5S) and hamster (Syrian hamster embryo (SHE)) cell lines were loaded on the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-95 mission) and grown during a 9-daymission. After landing, the micronuclei resulting from abnormal nuclear division and accumulationof stress-responsive proteins such as p53 and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are involved in radiation-induced signal transduction cascades, were analyzed. The frequencies of micronucleiin all the four mammalian cell strains tested were not significantly different between flight and ground control samples. Also, the cellular amounts of p53, p21 (WAF1/SDI1/CIP1) and activated (phosphorylated) forms of three distinct MAPKs in MCF7 and m5S cells of flight samples were similar to those of ground control samples. These results indicated that anyeffect of space radiation, microgravity, or combination of both were not detectable, at least under thepresent experimental conditions. (author)

  11. Non-linear response of coupled soil-pile-structure system under sinusoidal excitations with various frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussien, Mahmoud N.; Tobita, Tetsuo; Iai, Susumu

    The non-linear response of coupled soil-pile-structure systems to seismic loading is parametrically studied in the frequency domain using two-dimensional (2D) finite elements (FE). The soil-pile interaction in three dimensions (3D) is idealized in the 2D type using soil-pile interaction springs with non-linear hysteretic load displacement relationships. The system under investigation comprises of a single degree of freedom structure supported by an end-bearing single pile founded in a homogenous sand layer over rigid rock. Comparisons with established results from the literature suggest that the adopted FE model reasonably captures the essential features of the seismic response of the coupled soil-pile-structure system. Numerical results demonstrate the strong influence on the effective natural period of the foundation properties. The effect of non-linear soil behavior and soil profile as well as the frequency content of excitation on both kinematic and inertial interactions is illustrated. The relative contributions of kinematic and inertial interaction to the development of dynamic pile bending are clarified.

  12. Dose-response effect of exercise frequency on bone mineral density in post-menopausal, osteopenic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmler, W; von Stengel, S

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term dose-response relationship of exercise frequency on areal bone mineral density (aBMD) in early post-menopausal women with osteopenia. Based on the 12-year results of the consequently supervised exercise group (EG) of the Erlangen Fitness and Osteoporosis Prevention Study, we retrospectively structured two exercise groups according to the overall exercise frequency. Changes in aBMD at lumbar spine and proximal femur as assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry technique were compared between a low-frequency exercise group (LEF-EG, n = 16) with 1.5-exercise group (HEF-EG, n = 25) with ≥ 2-3.5 sessions/week. Changes in aBMD at the lumbar spine and proximal femur were significantly more favorable in the HEF-EG compared with the LEF-EG; lumbar spine: (mean value ± standard deviation) 1.1 ± 4.7% vs -4.1 ± 3.0%; P = 0.001, ES: d' = 1.26; total hip: -4.4 ± 3.9% vs -6.7 ± 3.5%, P = 0.045, ES: d' = 0.70). BMD results of the LEF-EG did not significantly differ from the data of the non-training control group (lumbar spine: -4.4 ± 5.2%, total hip: -6.9 ± 5.0%). Although this result might not be generalizable across all exercise types and cohorts, it indicates that to impact bone, an overall exercise frequency of at least 2 sessions/week may be crucial, even if exercise is applied with high intensity/impact.

  13. The influence of antagonist muscle control strategies on the isometric frequency response of the cat's ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, A; Zhou, B H; Baratta, R V; Solomonow, M; Keegan, A P

    1997-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of various strategies to control the interaction between agonist and antagonist muscles on the frequency response of the isometric cat ankle joint actuated by the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) muscles. Some strategies were based on the physiologic need for increasing joint stability during forceful contractions; with these strategies, the proportional rate of physiologic antagonist activity was termed antagonist gain. Other strategies were based on the electrical stimulation literature, which advocates co-contraction at low force levels. The range of crossover of antagonist activity to the agonist's domain was termed overlap. Strategies consisting of 0%, 10%, and 20% antagonist gain were combined with 0%, 50%, and 100% overlap for a total of nine strategies. These were applied to the TA and SOL using sinusoidal input signals varying in frequency from 0.4 to 6 Hz. Gain and phase Bode plots were constructed through the use of the fast Fourier transforms (FFT's); and analysis of variance determined the significance of differences in gain and phase across frequencies. Best-fit models consisting of four poles and two zeroes were used to fit the experimental data and compared against an analytical model of muscles acting independently across the joint. Harmonic distortion was calculated to evaluate signal quality. It was found that changing the overlap and the antagonist gain produces significant changes in the dynamic response of the two-muscle joint system. The analytical approach to modeling such a system tends to consistently overestimate gain. It is suggested that signal quality is optimal when a moderate amount of antagonist gain (10%) is engaged, with overlap of 50% to smooth transitions between opposing movements. It is expected that this type of strategy will achieve optimum signal quality while preserving the long-term integrity of the joint. PMID:9210823

  14. ANISOTROPIC POLARIZATION TENSORS FOR ELLIPSES AND ELLIPSOIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyeonbae Kang; Kyoungsun Kim

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a systematic way of computing the polarization tensors,anisotropic as well as isotropic, based on the boundary integral method. We then use this method to compute the anisotropic polarization tensor for ellipses and ellipsoids. The computation reveals the pair of anisotropy and ellipses which produce the same polarization tensors.

  15. Anisotropic weak Hardy spaces and interpolation theorems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the authors establish the anisotropic weak Hardy spaces associated with very general discrete groups of dilations. Moreover, the atomic decomposition theorem of the anisotropic weak Hardy spaces is also given. As some applications of the above results, the authors prove some interpolation theorems and obtain the boundedness of the singular integral operators on these Hardy spaces.

  16. ANISOTROPIC BIQUADRATIC ELEMENT WITH SUPERCLOSE RESULT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongyang SHI; Shipeng MAO; Hui LIANG

    2006-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to study the convergence of biquadratic finite element for the second order problem on anisotropic meshes. By using some novel approaches and techniques, the optimal error estimates are obtained. At the same time, the anisotropic superclose results are also achieved. Furthermore, the numerical results are given to demonstrate our theoretical analysis.

  17. Remote activation of a microactuator using a frequency specific photo-responsive gold nanoparticle composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have demonstrated a photo-responsive microactuator comprised of monodispersed microspheres that contain gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), which, upon irradiation, transduce optical energy to thermal energy, driving a phase change in the matrix in which they are embedded. Firstly, we characterized the thermal energy transduced by the Au NP-loaded polymer microspheres upon optical irradiation from a laser at 532 nm. The photo-responsive microspheres were then combined with polyethylene glycol (PEG, Mn = 1100 g mol−1) wax, a phase-change material that undergoes a 7.5% expansion in volume upon heating. These materials were installed in a 1 mm3 reservoir within a poly(methyl methacrylate) substrate, and capped with a thin silicone membrane. When irradiated with the low intensity light (36 mW), the PEG wax would melt, expand and deform against the silicone membrane. Multiple reversible cycles were demonstrated, and peak deformations of 110 µm were achieved. The time to reach 99% actuation displacement ranged from 42 to 91 s. (paper)

  18. Rorschach test: Italian calibration update about statistical frequencies of responses and location sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Caruson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The remarkable importance of a calibration of a test lies in the formalization of useful statistical norms. In particular, the determination of these norms is of key importance for the Rorschach Test because of it allows objectifying the estimates of the interpretations’ formal qualities, and help to characterize responses consistent with the common perception. The aim of this work is to communicate the new results provided by a study conducted  on Rorschach protocols related to a sample of “non-clinical” subjects. The expert team in Psychodiagnostic of CIFRIC (Italian Center for training, research and clinic in medicine and psychology has carried out the following work identifying the rate at which the details of each card are interpreted by normative sample. The data obtained are systematized in new Location sheets, which refers to the next edition of the "Updated Manual of Locations and Coding of Responses to Rorschach Test".             Considering the Rorschach Test one of the more effective means for the acquaintance of the personality, it appears therefore fundamental to provide the professional, who uses it, with the possibility of accessing updated statistical data that reflect the population of reference, in order to deduce from them reliable and objectively valid indications.

  19. Efficient Wavefield Extrapolation In Anisotropic Media

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2014-07-03

    Various examples are provided for wavefield extrapolation in anisotropic media. In one example, among others, a method includes determining an effective isotropic velocity model and extrapolating an equivalent propagation of an anisotropic, poroelastic or viscoelastic wavefield. The effective isotropic velocity model can be based upon a kinematic geometrical representation of an anisotropic, poroelastic or viscoelastic wavefield. Extrapolating the equivalent propagation can use isotopic, acoustic or elastic operators based upon the determined effective isotropic velocity model. In another example, non-transitory computer readable medium stores an application that, when executed by processing circuitry, causes the processing circuitry to determine the effective isotropic velocity model and extrapolate the equivalent propagation of an anisotropic, poroelastic or viscoelastic wavefield. In another example, a system includes processing circuitry and an application configured to cause the system to determine the effective isotropic velocity model and extrapolate the equivalent propagation of an anisotropic, poroelastic or viscoelastic wavefield.

  20. Multidisciplinary approach to cylindrical anisotropic metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisotropic characteristics of cylindrically corrugated microstructures are analyzed in terms of their acoustic and electromagnetic (EM) behavior paying special attention to their differences and similarities. A simple analytical model has been developed using effective medium theory to understand the anisotropic features of both types of waves in terms of radial and angular components of the wave propagation velocity. The anisotropic constituent parameters have been obtained by measuring the resonances of cylindrical cavities, as well as from numerical simulations. This permits one to characterize propagation of acoustic and EM waves and to compare the fundamental anisotropic features generated by the corrugated effective medium. Anisotropic coefficients match closely in both physics fields but other relevant parameters show significant differences in the behavior of both types of waves. (paper)

  1. Designing Anisotropic Inflation with Form Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Asuka

    2015-01-01

    We study inflation with anisotropic hair induced by form fields. In four dimensions, the relevant form fields are gauge (one-form) fields and two-form fields. Assuming the exponential form of potential and gauge kinetic functions, we find new exact power-law solutions endowed with anisotropic hair. We also explore the phase space of anisotropic inflation and find fixed points corresponding to the exact power-law solutions. Moreover, we perform the stability analysis around the fixed points to reveal the structure of the phase space. It turns out that one of the fixed points becomes an attractor and others (if any) are saddle points. In particular, the one corresponding to anisotropic inflation becomes an attractor when it exists. We also argue that various anisotropic inflation models can be designed by choosing coupling constants.

  2. Designing anisotropic inflation with form fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Asuka; Soda, Jiro

    2015-12-01

    We study inflation with anisotropic hair induced by form fields. In four dimensions, the relevant form fields are gauge (one-form) fields and two-form fields. Assuming the exponential form of potential and gauge kinetic functions, we find new exact power-law solutions endowed with anisotropic hair. We also explore the phase space of anisotropic inflation and find fixed points corresponding to the exact power-law solutions. Moreover, we perform the stability analysis around the fixed points to reveal the structure of the phase space. It turns out that one of the fixed points becomes an attractor and others (if any) are saddle points. In particular, the one corresponding to anisotropic inflation becomes an attractor when it exists. We also argue that various anisotropic inflation models can be designed by choosing coupling constants.

  3. An inverse relation between event-related and time-frequency violation responses in sentence processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, D J; Indefrey, P

    2007-07-16

    The relationship between semantic and grammatical processing in sentence comprehension was investigated by examining event-related potential (ERP) and event-related power changes in response to semantic and grammatical violations. Sentences with semantic, phrase structure, or number violations and matched controls were presented serially (1.25 words/s) to 20 participants while EEG was recorded. Semantic violations were associated with an N400 effect and a theta band increase in power, while grammatical violations were associated with a P600 effect and an alpha/beta band decrease in power. A quartile analysis showed that for both types of violations, larger average violation effects were associated with lower relative amplitudes of oscillatory activity, implying an inverse relation between ERP amplitude and event-related power magnitude change in sentence processing.

  4. Interactions of Low-Frequency, Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields with Living Tissue: Biochemical Responses and Clinical Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek, Ulrik L.; Tritsaris, Katerina; Dissing, Steen

    2005-01-01

    In recent years many studies have demonstrated stimulatory effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) on biological tissue. However, controversies have also surrounded the research often due to the lack of knowledge of the different physical consequences of static versus pulsed electromagnetic......, are still lacking. Despite the apparent success of the PEMF technology very little is known regarding the coupling between pulsed electrical fields and biochemical events leading to cellular responses. Insight into this research area is therefore of great importance. In this review we describe the physical...... properties of PEMF-induced electrical fields and explain the typical set up for coils and pulse patterns. Furthermore, we discuss possible models that can account for mechanisms by which induced electric fields are able to enhance cellular signaling. We have emphasized the currently well-documented effects...

  5. Efficient anisotropic wavefield extrapolation using effective isotropic models

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-06-10

    Isotropic wavefield extrapolation is more efficient than anisotropic extrapolation, and this is especially true when the anisotropy of the medium is tilted (from the vertical). We use the kinematics of the wavefield, appropriately represented in the high-frequency asymptotic approximation by the eikonal equation, to develop effective isotropic models, which are used to efficiently and approximately extrapolate anisotropic wavefields using the isotropic, relatively cheaper, operators. These effective velocity models are source dependent and tend to embed the anisotropy in the inhomogeneity. Though this isotropically generated wavefield theoretically shares the same kinematic behavior as that of the first arrival anisotropic wavefield, it also has the ability to include all the arrivals resulting from a complex wavefield propagation. In fact, the effective models reduce to the original isotropic model in the limit of isotropy, and thus, the difference between the effective model and, for example, the vertical velocity depends on the strength of anisotropy. For reverse time migration (RTM), effective models are developed for the source and receiver fields by computing the traveltime for a plane wave source stretching along our source and receiver lines in a delayed shot migration implementation. Applications to the BP TTI model demonstrates the effectiveness of the approach.

  6. Kramers-Kronig-consistent optical functions of anisotropic crystals: generalized spectroscopic ellipsometry on pentacene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressel, M; Gompf, B; Faltermeier, D; Tripathi, A K; Pflaum, J; Schubert, M

    2008-11-24

    The Kramers-Kronig relations between the real and imaginary parts of a response function are widely used in solid-state physics to evaluate the corresponding quantity if only one component is measured. They are among the most fundamental statements since only based on the analytical behavior and causal nature of the material response [Phys. Rev. 104, 1760-1770 (1956)]. Optical losses, for instance, can be obtained from the dispersion of the dielectric constant at all wavelengths, and vice versa [Handbook of optical constants of solids, Vol. 1, p. 35]. Although the general validity was never casted into doubt, it is a longstanding problem that Kramers-Kronig relations cannot simply be applied to anisotropic crystalline materials because contributions from different directions mix in a frequency-dependent way. Here we present a general method to identify frequency-independent principal polarizability directions for which the Kramers-Kronig relations are obeyed even in materials with lowest symmetry. Using generalized spectroscopic ellipsometry on a single crystal surface of triclinic pentacene, as an example, enables us to evaluate the complex dielectric constant and to compare it with band-structure calculations along the crystallographic directions. A general recipe is provided how to proceed from a macroscopic measurement on a low symmetry crystal plane to the microscopic dielectric properties of the unit cell, along whose axes the Kramers-Kronig relations hold.

  7. Warm anisotropic inflationary universe model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M.; Saleem, Rabia [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2014-02-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of warm inflation using vector fields in the background of a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I model of the universe. We formulate the field equations, and slow-roll and perturbation parameters (scalar and tensor power spectra as well as their spectral indices) in the slow-roll approximation. We evaluate all these parameters in terms of the directional Hubble parameter during the intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by taking the dissipation factor as a function of the scalar field as well as a constant. In each case, we calculate the observational parameter of interest, i.e., the tensor-scalar ratio in terms of the inflaton. The graphical behavior of these parameters shows that the anisotropic model is also compatible with WMAP7 and the Planck observational data. (orig.)

  8. Warm Anisotropic Inflationary Universe Model

    CERN Document Server

    Sharif, M

    2014-01-01

    This paper is devoted to study the warm inflation using vector fields in the background of locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I universe model. We formulate the field equations, slow-roll and perturbation parameters (scalar and tensor power spectra as well as their spectral indices) under slow-roll approximation. We evaluate all these parameters in terms of directional Hubble parameter during intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by taking the dissipation factor as a function of scalar field as well as a constant. In each case, we calculate the observational parameter of interest, i.e., tensor-scalar ratio in terms of inflation. The graphical behavior of these parameters shows that the anisotropic model is also compatible with WMAP7 and Planck observational data.

  9. Anisotropic scaling of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Horbury, T S; Oughton, S

    2008-01-01

    We present a quantitative estimate of the anisotropic power and scaling of magnetic field fluctuations in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, using a novel wavelet technique applied to spacecraft measurements in the solar wind. We show for the first time that, when the local magnetic field direction is parallel to the flow, the spacecraft-frame spectrum has a spectral index near 2. This can be interpreted as the signature of a population of fluctuations in field-parallel wavenumbers with a $k_{\\parallel}^{-2}$ spectrum but is also consistent with the presence of a "critical balance" style turbulent cascade. We also find, in common with previous studies, that most of the power is contained in wavevectors at large angles to the local magnetic field and that this component of the turbulence has a spectral index of 5/3.

  10. Gravitational baryogenesis after anisotropic inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Mizuno, Shuntaro; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2016-05-01

    The gravitational baryogensis may not generate a sufficient baryon asymmetry in the standard thermal history of the Universe when we take into account the gravitino problem. Hence, it has been suggested that anisotropy of the Universe can enhance the generation of the baryon asymmetry through the increase of the time change of the Ricci scalar curvature. We study the gravitational baryogenesis in the presence of anisotropy, which is produced at the end of an anisotropic inflation. Although we confirm that the generated baryon asymmetry is enhanced compared with the original isotropic cosmological model, taking into account the constraint on the anisotropy by the recent CMB observations, we find that it is still difficult to obtain the observed baryon asymmetry only through the gravitational baryogenesis without suffering from the gravitino problem.

  11. I-Love-Q Anisotropically

    CERN Document Server

    Yagi, Kent

    2015-01-01

    Certain physical quantities that characterize neutron stars and quark stars (e.g. their mass, spin angular momentum and quadrupole moment) are interrelated in a way that is approximately insensitive to their internal structure. Such approximately universal relations are useful to break degeneracies in data analysis for future radio, X-ray and gravitational wave observations. Although the pressure inside compact stars is most likely nearly isotropic, certain scenarios have been put forth that suggest otherwise, for example due to phase transitions. We here investigate whether pressure anisotropy affects the approximate universal relations and whether it prevents their use in future observations. We achieve this by numerically constructing slowly-rotating and tidally-deformed, anisotropic, compact stars in General Relativity to third order in spin. We find that anisotropy affects the universal relations only weakly; the relations become less universal by a factor of 1.5-3 relative to the isotropic case, but rem...

  12. Gravitational Baryogenesis after Anisotropic Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational baryogensis may not generate a sufficient baryon asymmetry in the standard thermal history of the Universe when we take into account the gravitino problem. Hence it has been suggested that anisotropy of the Universe can enhance the generation of the baryon asymmetry through the increase of the time change of the Ricci scalar curvature. We study the gravitational baryogenesis in the presence of anisotropy, which is produced at the end of an anisotropic inflation. Although we confirm that the generated baryon asymmetry is enhanced compared with the original isotropic cosmological model, taking into account the constraint on the anisotropy by the recent CMB observations, we find that it is still difficult to obtain the observed baryon asymmetry only through the gravitational baryogenesis without suffering from the gravitino problem.

  13. The Anisotropic Geometrodynamics For Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siparov, Sergey V.

    2009-05-01

    The classical geometrodynamics (GRT) and its modern features based on the use of the Fridman-Robertson-Walker type metrics are still unable to explain several important issues of extragalactic observations like flat rotation curves of the spiral galaxies, Tully-Fisher law, globular clusters behavior in comparisson to that of the stars belonging to the galactic plane etc. The chalenging problem of the Universe expansion acceleration stemming from the supernovae observations demands the existence of the repulsion forces which brings one to the choice between the cosmological constant and some quintessence. The popular objects of discussion are now still dark (matter and energy), nevertheless, they are supposed to correspond to more than 95% of the Universe which seems to be far from satisfactory. According to the equivalence principle we can not experimentally distinguish between the inertial forces and the gravitational ones. Since there exist the inertial forces depending on velocity (Coriolis), it seems plausible to explore the velocity dependent gravitational forces. From the mathematical point of view it means that we should use the anisotropic metric. It immediately turns out that the expression for the Einstein-Hilbert action changes in a natural way - contrary to the cases of f(R)-theories, additional scalar fields, arbitrary MOND functions etc.. We use the linear approximation for the metric and derive the generalized geodesics and the equation for the gravity force that contains not only the Newton-Einstein term. The relation between the obtained results and those of Lense-Thirring approach are discussed. The resulting anisotropic geometrodynamics includes all the results of the GRT and is used to give the explanation to the problems mentioned above. One of the impressive consequences is the possibility to explain the observed Hubble red shift not by the Doppler effect as usually but by the gravitational red shift originating from the metric anisotropy.

  14. An efficient wave extrapolation method for anisotropic media with tilt

    KAUST Repository

    Waheed, Umair bin

    2015-03-23

    Wavefield extrapolation operators for elliptically anisotropic media offer significant cost reduction compared with that for the transversely isotropic case, particularly when the axis of symmetry exhibits tilt (from the vertical). However, elliptical anisotropy does not provide accurate wavefield representation or imaging for transversely isotropic media. Therefore, we propose effective elliptically anisotropic models that correctly capture the kinematic behaviour of wavefields for transversely isotropic media. Specifically, we compute source-dependent effective velocities for the elliptic medium using kinematic high-frequency representation of the transversely isotropic wavefield. The effective model allows us to use cheaper elliptic wave extrapolation operators. Despite the fact that the effective models are obtained by matching kinematics using high-frequency asymptotic, the resulting wavefield contains most of the critical wavefield components, including frequency dependency and caustics, if present, with reasonable accuracy. The methodology developed here offers a much better cost versus accuracy trade-off for wavefield computations in transversely isotropic media, particularly for media of low to moderate complexity. In addition, the wavefield solution is free from shear-wave artefacts as opposed to the conventional finite-difference-based transversely isotropic wave extrapolation scheme. We demonstrate these assertions through numerical tests on synthetic tilted transversely isotropic models.

  15. SNe Ia tests of quintessence tracker cosmology in an anisotropic background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, W.; Carneiro, S.; Pigozzo, C.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the observational effects of a quintessence model in an anisotropic spacetime. The anisotropic metric is a non-rotating particular case of a generalized Gödel's metric and is classified as Bianchi III. This metric is an exact solution of the Einstein-Klein-Gordon field equations with an anisotropic scalar field ψ, which is responsible for the anisotropy of the spacetime geometry. We test the model against observations of type Ia supernovae, analyzing the SDSS dataset calibrated with the MLCS2k2 fitter, and the results are compared to standard quintessence models with Ratra-Peebles potentials. We obtain a good agreement with observations, with best values for the matter and curvature density parameters ΩM = 0.29 and Ωk= 0.01 respectively. We conclude that present SNe Ia observations cannot, alone, distinguish a possible anisotropic axis in the cosmos.

  16. SNe Ia Tests of Quintessence Tracker Cosmology in an Anisotropic Background

    CERN Document Server

    Miranda, W; Pigozzo, C

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the observational effects of a quintessence model in an anisotropic spacetime. The anisotropic metric is a non-rotating particular case of a generalized Godel's metric and is classified as Bianchi III. This metric is an exact solution of the Einstein-Klein-Gordon field equations with an anisotropic scalar field, which is responsible for the anisotropy of the spacetime geometry. We test the model against observations of type Ia supernovae, analyzing the SDSS dataset calibrated with the MLCS2k2 fitter, and the results are compared to standard quintessence models with Ratra-Peebles potentials. We obtain a good agreement with observations, with best values for the matter and curvature density parameters $\\Omega_M = 0.29$ and $\\Omega_k= 0.01$ respectively. We conclude that present SNe Ia observations cannot, alone, distinguish a possible anisotropic axis in the cosmos.

  17. SNe Ia tests of quintessence tracker cosmology in an anisotropic background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the observational effects of a quintessence model in an anisotropic spacetime. The anisotropic metric is a non-rotating particular case of a generalized Gödel's metric and is classified as Bianchi III. This metric is an exact solution of the Einstein-Klein-Gordon field equations with an anisotropic scalar field ψ, which is responsible for the anisotropy of the spacetime geometry. We test the model against observations of type Ia supernovae, analyzing the SDSS dataset calibrated with the MLCS2k2 fitter, and the results are compared to standard quintessence models with Ratra-Peebles potentials. We obtain a good agreement with observations, with best values for the matter and curvature density parameters ΩM = 0.29 and Ωk= 0.01 respectively. We conclude that present SNe Ia observations cannot, alone, distinguish a possible anisotropic axis in the cosmos

  18. International policy and advisory response regarding children's exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmayne, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure regulations/guidelines generally only consider acute effects, and not chronic, low exposures. Concerns for children's exposure are warranted due to the amazingly rapid uptake of many wireless devices by increasingly younger children. This review of policy and advice regarding children's RF-EMF exposure draws material from a wide variety of sources focusing on the current situation. This is not a systematic review, but aims to provide a representative cross-section of policy and advisory responses within set boundaries. There are a wide variety of approaches which I have categorized and tabulated ranging from ICNIRP/IEEE guidelines and "no extra precautions needed" to precautionary or scientific much lower maxima and extensive advice to minimize RF-EMF exposure, ban advertising/sale to children, and add exposure information to packaging. Precautionary standards use what I term an exclusion principle. The wide range of policy approaches can be confusing for parents/carers of children. Some consensus among advisory organizations would be helpful acknowledging that, despite extensive research, the highly complex nature of both RF-EMF and the human body, and frequent technological updates, means simple assurance of long-term safety cannot be guaranteed. Therefore, minimum exposure of children to RF-EMF is recommended. This does not indicate need for alarm, but mirrors routine health-and-safety precautions. Simple steps are suggested. ICNIRP guidelines need to urgently publish how the head, torso, and limbs' exposure limits were calculated and what safety margin was applied since this exposure, especially to the abdomen, is now dominant in many children. PMID:26091083

  19. International policy and advisory response regarding children's exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmayne, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure regulations/guidelines generally only consider acute effects, and not chronic, low exposures. Concerns for children's exposure are warranted due to the amazingly rapid uptake of many wireless devices by increasingly younger children. This review of policy and advice regarding children's RF-EMF exposure draws material from a wide variety of sources focusing on the current situation. This is not a systematic review, but aims to provide a representative cross-section of policy and advisory responses within set boundaries. There are a wide variety of approaches which I have categorized and tabulated ranging from ICNIRP/IEEE guidelines and "no extra precautions needed" to precautionary or scientific much lower maxima and extensive advice to minimize RF-EMF exposure, ban advertising/sale to children, and add exposure information to packaging. Precautionary standards use what I term an exclusion principle. The wide range of policy approaches can be confusing for parents/carers of children. Some consensus among advisory organizations would be helpful acknowledging that, despite extensive research, the highly complex nature of both RF-EMF and the human body, and frequent technological updates, means simple assurance of long-term safety cannot be guaranteed. Therefore, minimum exposure of children to RF-EMF is recommended. This does not indicate need for alarm, but mirrors routine health-and-safety precautions. Simple steps are suggested. ICNIRP guidelines need to urgently publish how the head, torso, and limbs' exposure limits were calculated and what safety margin was applied since this exposure, especially to the abdomen, is now dominant in many children.

  20. Low-Frequency Response Following the Passage of Hurricane Andrew on the Texas-Louisiana Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, S. M.; Smith, D. C.; Dimarco, S. F.

    2009-12-01

    During August 24th through 27th in 1992, Hurricane Andrew passed through the Gulf Of Mexico almost directly over several moorings on the easternmost Louisiana shelf portion of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf (LATEX) coastal ocean monitoring program. Examination of the current meter time-series showed the existence of fast moving, long shelf waves over the entire Texas-Louisiana shelf west of the storm passage for up to 12 days after direct forcing ceased. The LATEX program featured 31 moorings each with 3 current meters over the 10, 20, 50, and 200 meter isobaths in 5 cross sectional lines with additional coverage on the 200 meter isobath from the Louisiana-Mississippi River delta, to Corpus Christi, Texas. Additionally, several pressure records from LATEX and several NOAA historical coastal tide gauge data from Sabine Pass to Port Isabella, Texas were incorporated. Raw, 3-hour low pass filtered, and 40-hour low pass filtered versions of the current data were analyzed. The pressure data used were detided using a least squares fit, and the tidal records were detided using the NOAA predicted tides for that location. All data were analyzed using a wavelet analysis to determine the spectra over time. The analyzed data shows that the shelf response was largely dominated in the internal Kelvin wave mode. The wave propagated towards the west on the shelf at approximately 400 km/day. These results are contrasted and compared with wave modes predicted for coastal trapped wave solutions. The output of a coastal ocean model simulation using a forced wind field similar to the storm are also contrasted and compared with the observed data.

  1. Effects of supplementation frequency on performance, reproductive, and metabolic responses of Brahman-crossbred females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, R F; Arthington, J D; Araujo, D B; Lamb, G C; Ealy, A D

    2008-09-01

    Two experiments were conducted to compare performance and metabolic responses of beef females consuming low-quality forages and offered an energy supplement based on fibrous byproducts daily (S7) or 3 times per week (S3) at similar weekly rates. In Exp. 1, BW gain, reproductive performance, mRNA expression of hepatic and skeletal muscle genes associated with nutritional metabolism and growth, and concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), plasma glucose, insulin, and IGF-I were assessed in 56 Brahman x Angus heifers supplemented at a daily rate of 1.0% of BW. Mean BW gain was greater (P = 0.03) for S7 compared with S3 heifers. Treatment x sampling day interactions were detected (P x day interactions were detected (P Brahman x British mature cows received S3 or S7 for a 3-wk period at a daily rate of 0.5% of BW. Concentrations of BUN were greater for S7 compared with S3 cows (P x time interaction was detected (P = 0.01) for insulin concentrations because a time effect was significant (P x week interaction; P = 0.02). The combined expression of gluconeogenic enzymes mRNA tended to be greater (P = 0.09) for S3 cows when both treatment groups received supplements, but was greater (P = 0.03) for S7 cows when only these were supplemented (treatment x day interaction; P Brahman-crossbred females, resulting in improved growth and reproductive performance of developing heifers. PMID:18441070

  2. Anisotropic metasurface with near-unity circular polarization conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoxiao; Meng, Yan; Wang, Li; Tian, Jingxuan; Dai, Shiwei; Wen, Weijia

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a bi-layer ultrathin anisotropic metasurface which could near-completely convert the circular-polarized electromagnetic wave to its cross polarization. The bi-layer metasurface is composed of periodic 180°-twisted double-cut split ring resonators on both sides of an F4B substrate. At resonance, cross-polarized transmission larger than 94% is observed both in simulations and experiments. The resonant frequency of the metasurface could be effectively tuned by adjusting the geometric parameters of the metasurface, while relatively high conversion efficiency is preserved. The high efficiency and ease of fabrication suggest that the ultrathin metasurface could have potential applications in telecommunications.

  3. Optical Conductivity of Anisotropic Quantum Dots in Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Kang-Xian; CHEN Chuan-Yu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Optical conductivity of anisotropic double-parabolic quantum dots is investigated with the memory-function approach, and the analytic expression for the optical conductivity is derived. With characteristic parameterspertaining to GaAs, the numerical results are presented. It is shown that: (1) the larger the optical phonon frequency ωLO, the stronger the peak intensity of the optical conductivity, and the more asymmetric the shape of the optical conductivity; (2) the magnetic field enhances the optical conductivity for levels l = 0 and l = 1, with or without electron-LO-phonon interactions; (3) the larger the quantum dot thickness lz, the smaller the optical conductivity σ(ω).

  4. Surface polaritons in a dielectric – anisotropic nanocomposite system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sannikov, D G; Sementsov, D I; Filatov, L D [Ulyanovsk State University, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-30

    We have studied the peculiarities of propagation of surface polaritons at a planar interface between an isotropic dielectric and anisotropic nanocomposite with metal inclusions of ellipsoidal shape. For the case when the axes of all nanoellipsoids of revolution are perpendicular to the propagation direction and parallel to the medium interface, we have obtained frequency dependences of the propagation constant and transverse wave vector components, penetration depth and path length, longitudinal and transverse energy fluxes for surface polaritons. The shape of nanoellipsoids is shown to have an effect on the wave characteristics of surface polaritons. (nanostructures)

  5. Anisotropic mechanical properties of graphene sheets from molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisotropic mechanical properties are observed for a sheet of graphene along different load directions. The anisotropic mechanical properties are attributed to the hexagonal structure of the unit cells of the graphene. Under the same tensile loads, the edge bonds bear larger load in the longitudinal mode (LM) than in the transverse mode (TM), which causes fracture sooner in LM than in TM. The Young's modulus and the third order elastic modulus for the LM are slightly larger than that for the TM. Simulation also demonstrates that, for both LM and TM, the loading and unloading stress-strain response curves overlap as long as the graphene is unloaded before the fracture point. This confirms that graphene sustains complete elastic and reversible deformation in the elongation process.

  6. Characterization of highly anisotropic three-dimensionally nanostructured surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Generalized ellipsometry, a non-destructive optical characterization technique, is employed to determine geometrical structure parameters and anisotropic dielectric properties of highly spatially coherent three-dimensionally nanostructured thin films grown by glancing angle deposition. The (piecewise) homogeneous biaxial layer model approach is discussed, which can be universally applied to model the optical response of sculptured thin films with different geometries and from diverse materials, and structural parameters as well as effective optical properties of the nanostructured thin films are obtained. Alternative model approaches for slanted columnar thin films, anisotropic effective medium approximations based on the Bruggeman formalism, are presented, which deliver results comparable to the homogeneous biaxial layer approach and in addition provide film constituent volume fraction parameters as well as depolarization or shape factors. Advantages of these ellipsometry models are discussed on the example ...

  7. Hardware platforms for MEMS gyroscope tuning based on evolutionary computation using open-loop and closed -loop frequency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Ferguson, Michael I.; Fink, Wolfgang; Oks, Boris; Peay, Chris; Terrile, Richard; Cheng, Yen; Kim, Dennis; MacDonald, Eric; Foor, David

    2005-01-01

    We propose a tuning method for MEMS gyroscopes based on evolutionary computation to efficiently increase the sensitivity of MEMS gyroscopes through tuning. The tuning method was tested for the second generation JPL/Boeing Post-resonator MEMS gyroscope using the measurement of the frequency response of the MEMS device in open-loop operation. We also report on the development of a hardware platform for integrated tuning and closed loop operation of MEMS gyroscopes. The control of this device is implemented through a digital design on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The hardware platform easily transitions to an embedded solution that allows for the miniaturization of the system to a single chip.

  8. A cortical locus for anisotropic overlay suppression of stimuli presented at fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Bruce C; Richard, Bruno; Andres, Kristin; Johnson, Aaron P; Thompson, Benjamin; Essock, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    Human contrast sensitivity for narrowband Gabor targets is suppressed when superimposed on narrowband masks of the same spatial frequency and orientation (referred to as overlay suppression), with suppression being broadly tuned to orientation and spatial frequency. Numerous behavioral and neurophysiological experiments have suggested that overlay suppression originates from the initial lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) inputs to V1, which is consistent with the broad tuning typically reported for overlay suppression. However, recent reports have shown narrowly tuned anisotropic overlay suppression when narrowband targets are masked by broadband noise. Consequently, researchers have argued for an additional form of overlay suppression that involves cortical contrast gain control processes. The current study sought to further explore this notion behaviorally using narrowband and broadband masks, along with a computational neural simulation of the hypothesized underlying gain control processes in cortex. Additionally, we employed transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in order to test whether cortical processes are involved in driving narrowly tuned anisotropic suppression. The behavioral results yielded anisotropic overlay suppression for both broadband and narrowband masks and could be replicated with our computational neural simulation of anisotropic gain control. Further, the anisotropic form of overlay suppression could be directly modulated by tDCS, which would not be expected if the suppression was primarily subcortical in origin. Altogether, the results of the current study provide further evidence in support of an additional overlay suppression process that originates in cortex and show that this form of suppression is also observable with narrowband masks.

  9. Dynamic stereotypic responses of basal ganglia neurons to subthalamic nucleus high frequency stimulation in the parkinsonian primate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anan eMoran

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN is a well-established therapy for patients with severe Parkinson‟s disease (PD; however, its mechanism of action is still unclear. In this study we explored static and dynamic activation patterns in the basal ganglia during high frequency macro-stimulation of the STN. Extracellular multi-electrode recordings were performed in primates rendered parkinsonian using 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Recordings were preformed simultaneously in the STN and the globus pallidus externus and internus. Single units were recorded preceding and during the stimulation. During the stimulation, STN mean firing rate dropped significantly, while pallidal mean firing rates did not change significantly. The vast majority of neurons across all three nuclei displayed stimulation driven modulations, which were stereotypic within each nucleus but differed across nuclei. The predominant response pattern of STN neurons was somatic inhibition. However, most pallidal neurons demonstrated synaptic activation patterns. A minority of neurons across all nuclei displayed axonal activation. Temporal dynamics were observed in the response to stimulation over the first 10 seconds in the STN and over the first 30 seconds in the pallidum. In both pallidal segments, the synaptic activation response patterns underwent delay and decay of the magnitude of the peak response due to short term synaptic depression. We suggest that during STN macro stimulation the STN goes through a functional ablation as its upper bound on information transmission drops significantly. This notion is further supported by the evident dissociation between the stimulation driven pre-synaptic STN somatic inhibition and the post-synaptic axonal activation of its downstream targets. Thus, basal ganglia output maintains its firing rate while losing the deleterious effect of the STN. This may be a part of the mechanism leading to the beneficial

  10. A new algorithm for anisotropic solutions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Chaisi; S D Maharaj

    2006-02-01

    We establish a new algorithm that generates a new solution to the Einstein field equations, with an anisotropic matter distribution, from a seed isotropic solution. The new solution is expressed in terms of integrals of an isotropic gravitational potential; and the integration can be completed exactly for particular isotropic seed metrics. A good feature of our approach is that the anisotropic solutions necessarily have an isotropic limit. We find two examples of anisotropic solutions which generalise the isothermal sphere and the Schwarzschild interior sphere. Both examples are expressed in closed form involving elementary functions only.

  11. Using COMSOL Multiphysics Software to Model Anisotropic Dielectric and Metamaterial Effects in Folded-Waveguide Traveling-Wave Tube Slow-Wave Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starinshak, David P.; Smith, Nathan D.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2008-01-01

    The electromagnetic effects of conventional dielectrics, anisotropic dielectrics, and metamaterials were modeled in a terahertz-frequency folded-waveguide slow-wave circuit. Results of attempts to utilize these materials to increase efficiency are presented.

  12. Sex difference in response to stress by lunar month: A pilot study of four years' crisis-call frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffert Beverly

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study is in response to the question of whether the moon can influence daily levels of stress. Method Four years of telephone-call frequency data were obtained from a single crisis-call centre. We used the method of lunar-day numbers 1 to 29 for analysis. We also tested the concept of 'strong moons' as occurring when the Sun was near to the lunar-node axis. Results An increase in calls was recorded from females and a decrease in calls by males during the new moon period, suggesting a sex difference in response, and there were proportionally more calls by males a fortnight later. A comparable swing in the male/female call-ratio on a weekly basis over Fridays and Saturdays was noted. Limitations of staffing at the call-centre prohibited comment on seasonal correlations. Conclusion Lunar-related studies of stress should endeavour to separate the data by sex or the effect can be lost. Distress-calls by women were more strongly linked to the lunar month than were those by men.

  13. Tapering the sky response for angular power spectrum estimation from low-frequency radio-interferometric data

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhuri, Samir; Roy, Nirupam; Ghosh, Abhik; Ali, Sk Saiyad

    2016-01-01

    It is important to correctly subtract point sources from radio-interferometric data in order to measure the power spectrum of diffuse radiation like the Galactic synchrotron or the Epoch of Reionization 21-cm signal. It is computationally very expensive and challenging to image a very large area and accurately subtract all the point sources from the image. The problem is particularly severe at the sidelobes and the outer parts of the main lobe where the antenna response is highly frequency dependent and the calibration also differs from that of the phase center. Here we show that it is possible to overcome this problem by tapering the sky response. Using simulated 150 MHz observations, we demonstrate that it is possible to suppress the contribution due to point sources from the outer parts by using the Tapered Gridded Estimator to measure the angular power spectrum C_l of the sky signal. We also show from the simulation that this method can self-consistently compute the noise bias and accurately subtract it t...

  14. Prolonged response to calling songs by the L3 auditory interneuron in female crickets (Acheta domesticus): possible roles in regulating phonotactic threshold and selectiveness for call carrier frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronsert, Michael; Bingol, Hilary; Atkins, Gordon; Stout, John

    2003-03-01

    L3, an auditory interneuron in the prothoracic ganglion of female crickets (Acheta domesticus) exhibited two kinds of responses to models of the male's calling song (CS): a previously described, phasically encoded immediate response; a more tonically encoded prolonged response. The onset of the prolonged response required 3-8 sec of stimulation to reach its maximum spiking rate and 6-20 sec to decay once the calling song ceased. It did not encode the syllables of the chirp. The prolonged response was sharply selective for the 4-5 kHz carrier frequency of the male's calling songs and its threshold tuning matched the threshold tuning of phonotaxis, while the immediate response of the same neuron was broadly tuned to a wide range of carrier frequencies. The thresholds for the prolonged response covaried with the changing phonotactic thresholds of 2- and 5-day-old females. Treatment of females with juvenile hormone reduced the thresholds for both phonotaxis and the prolonged response by equivalent amounts. Of the 3 types of responses to CSs provided by the ascending L1 and L3 auditory interneurons, the threshold for L3's prolonged response, on average, best matched the same females phonotactic threshold. The prolonged response was stimulated by inputs from both ears while L3's immediate response was driven only from its axon-ipsilateral ear. The prolonged response was not selective for either the CS's syllable period or chirp rate.

  15. Anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations at the large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, You

    One of the fundamental questions in the phenomenology of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is what the properties of matter are at the extreme densities and temperatures where quarks and gluons are in a new state of matter, the so-called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Collisions of high-energy heavy-ions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), allow us to create and study the properties of such a system in the laboratory. Anisotropic flow (vn) is strong evidence for the existence of QGP, and has been described as one of the most important observations measured in the ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. In this thesis, the anisotropic flow of not only charged particles but also identified particles are presented. In addition, the investigations of correlations and fluctuations of both flow angle (symmetry plane) and magnitude were discussed. The main goal of this thesis is to understand the nature of anisotropic flow and its response to the initial geometry of the created system as well as its fluctuations.

  16. Tungsten based Anisotropic Metamaterial as an Ultra-broadband Absorber

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Yinyue; Ding, Fei; Fung, Kin Hung; Ji, Ting; Li, Dongdong; Hao, Yuying

    2016-01-01

    The trapped rainbow effect has been mostly found on tapered anisotropic metamaterials (MMs) made of low loss noble metals, such as gold, silver, etc. In this work, we demonstrate that an anisotropic MM waveguide made of high loss metal tungsten can also support the trapped rainbow effect similar to the noble metal based structure. We show theoretically that an array of tungsten/germanium anisotropic nano-cones placed on top of a reflective substrate can absorb light at the wavelength range from 0.3 micrometer to 9 micrometer with an average absorption efficiency approaching 98%. It is found that the excitation of multiple orders of slow-light resonant modes is responsible for the efficient absorption at wavelengths longer than 2 micrometer, and the anti-reflection effect of tapered lossy material gives rise to the near perfect absorption at shorter wavelengths. The absorption spectrum suffers a small dip at around 4.2 micrometer where the first order and second order slow-light modes get overlapped, but we ca...

  17. Multiscale nonlinear frequency response analysis of single-layered graphene sheet under impulse and harmonic excitation using the atomistic finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomistic finite element method (AFEM) is a multiscale technique where a sequential mode is used to transfer information between two length scales to model and simulate nanostructures at the continuum level. This method is used in this paper to investigate the nonlinear frequency response of a single-layered graphene sheet (SLGS) for impulse and harmonic excitation. The multi-body interatomic Tersoff–Brenner (TB) potential is used to represent the energy between two adjacent carbon atoms. Based on the TB potential, the equivalent geometric and elastic properties of carbon–carbon bonds are derived which are consistent with the material constitutive relations. These properties are used further to derive the nonlinear material model (stress–strain curve) of carbon–carbon bonds based on the force–deflection curve using the multi-body interatomic Tersoff–Brenner potential. A square SLGS is considered and its nonlinear vibration characteristics under an impulse and harmonic excitation for bridged, cantilever and clamped boundary conditions are investigated using the derived nonlinear material model (NMM). Before using the proposed nonlinear material model, the derived equivalent geometric and elastic properties of carbon–carbon bond are validated using molecular dynamics simulation results. The geometric (large deformation) and material nonlinearities are included in the nonlinear frequency response analysis. The investigated results of the nonlinear frequency response analysis are compared with those of the linear frequency response analysis, and the effect of the nonlinear behavior of carbon–carbon bonds on the frequency response of SLGS is studied. (paper)

  18. Theoretical study of the anisotropic diffraction of light waves by acoustic waves in lithium niobate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvaen, J M; Waxin, G; Gazalet, M G; Bridoux, E

    1990-03-20

    The anisotropic diffraction of light by high frequency longitudinal ultrasonic waves in the tangential phase matching configuration may present some definite advantages over the same interaction using transverse acoustic waves. A systematic search for favorable crystal cuts in lithium niobate was worked out. The main results of this study are reported here; they enable the choice of the best configuration for a given operating center frequency.

  19. Anisotropic surface tension of buckled fluid membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Solid sheets and fluid membranes exhibit buckling under lateral compression. Here, it is revealed that fluid membranes have anisotropic buckling surface tension contrary to solid sheets. Surprisingly, the surface tension perpendicular to the buckling direction shows stronger dependence than that parallel to it. Our theoretical predictions are supported by numerical simulations of a meshless membrane model. This anisotropic tension can be used to measure the membrane bending rigidity. It is al...

  20. Theory of Compton scattering by anisotropic electrons

    OpenAIRE

    Poutanen, Juri; Vurm, Indrek

    2010-01-01

    Compton scattering plays an important role in various astrophysical objects such as accreting black holes and neutron stars, pulsars, and relativistic jets, clusters of galaxies as well as the early Universe. In most of the calculations it is assumed that the electrons have isotropic angular distribution in some frame. However, there are situations where the anisotropy may be significant due to the bulk motions, or anisotropic cooling by synchrotron radiation, or anisotropic source of seed so...

  1. Anisotropic rectangular metric for polygonal surface remeshing

    KAUST Repository

    Pellenard, Bertrand

    2013-06-18

    We propose a new method for anisotropic polygonal surface remeshing. Our algorithm takes as input a surface triangle mesh. An anisotropic rectangular metric, defined at each triangle facet of the input mesh, is derived from both a user-specified normal-based tolerance error and the requirement to favor rectangle-shaped polygons. Our algorithm uses a greedy optimization procedure that adds, deletes and relocates generators so as to match two criteria related to partitioning and conformity.

  2. Rainbow metric from quantum gravity: anisotropic cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Assanioussi, Mehdi; Dapor, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a construction of effective cosmological models which describe the propagation of a massive quantum scalar field on a quantum anisotropic cosmological spacetime. Each obtained effective model is represented by a rainbow metric in which particles of distinct momenta propagate on different classical geometries. Our analysis shows that upon certain assumptions and conditions on the parameters determining such anisotropic models, we surprisingly obtain a unique deformatio...

  3. Anisotropic cosmological solutions in massive vector theories

    OpenAIRE

    Heisenberg, Lavinia; Kase, Ryotaro; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    In beyond-generalized Proca theories including the extension to theories higher than second order, we study the role of a spatial component $v$ of a massive vector field on the anisotropic cosmological background. We show that, as in the case of the isotropic cosmological background, there is no additional ghostly degrees of freedom associated with the Ostrogradski instability. In second-order generalized Proca theories we find the existence of anisotropic solutions on which the ratio between...

  4. Anisotropic Transport Properties of Complex Metallic Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Smontara, Ana; Dolinšek, Janez

    2010-01-01

    Anisotropic transport properties (electrical resistivity, ρ, and thermal conductivity, κ) of the Y-phase Al-Ni-Co, o-Al13Co4 and Al4(Cr,Fe) complex metallic alloys were investigated. They belong to the class of decagonal approximant phases with stacked-layer crystallographic structure and allowed us to study the evolution of anisotropic transport properties with increasing structural complexity and the unit cell size.

  5. Anisotropic Stars: Exact Solutions and Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Dev, Krsna; Gleiser, Marcelo

    2004-01-01

    I report on recent work concerning the existence and stability of self-gravitating spheres with anisotropic pressure. After presenting new exact solutions, Chandrasekhar's variational formalism for radial perturbations is generalized to anisotropic objects and applied to investigate their stability. It is shown that anisotropy can not only support stars of mass M and radius R with 2M/R > 8/9 and arbitrarily large surface redshifts, but that stable configurations exist for values of the adiaba...

  6. Effective material parameter retrieval of anisotropic elastic metamaterials with inherent nonlocality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung Jin; Lee, Heung Son; Ma, Pyung Sik; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the scattering (S-) parameter retrieval method is presented specifically for anisotropic elastic metamaterials; so far, no retrieval has been accomplished when elastic metamaterials exhibit fully anisotropic behavior. Complex constitutive property and intrinsic scattering behavior of elastic metamaterials make their characterization far more complicated than that for acoustic and electromagnetic metamaterials. In particular, elastic metamaterials generally exhibit anisotropic scattering behavior due to higher scattering modes associated with shear deformation. They also exhibit nonlocal responses to some degrees, which originate from strong multiple scattering interactions even in the long wavelength limit. Accordingly, the conventional S-parameter retrieval methods cannot be directly used for elastic metamaterials, because they determine only the diagonal components in effective tensor property. Also, the conventional methods simply use the analytic inversion formulae for the material characterization so that inherent nonlocality cannot be taken into account. To establish a retrieval method applicable to anisotropic elastic metamaterials, we propose an alternative S-parameter method to deal with full anisotropy of elastic metamaterials. To retrieve the whole effective anisotropic parameter, we utilize not only normal but also oblique wave incidences. For the retrieval, we first retrieve the ratio of the effective stiffness tensor to effective density and then determine the effective density. The proposed retrieval method is validated by characterizing the effective material parameters of various types of non-resonant anisotropic metamaterials. It is found that the whole effective parameters are retrieved consistently regardless of used retrieval conditions in spite of inherent nonlocality.

  7. Frequency-dependent excitability of "membrane" slow responses of Rabbit left atrial trabeculae in the presence of Ba2+ and high K+

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Small trabeculae of rabbit left atrium immersed in TKBa solution (Tyrode with 10 mM K+ and 1 mM Ba2+) were used to study frequency dependence of "membrane" slow response excitability at long cycle lengths (greater than 1 s). In TKBa, stimuli generate graded, low- amplitude (2-15 mV) subliminal responses of variable long duration (up to 450 ms). A full all-or-none slow response is generated when a subliminal response depolarizes the membrane to about--35 mV. Subliminal response amplitude and r...

  8. Anisotropic diffusion-limited aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, M N; Hentschel, H G E; Family, F

    2004-06-01

    Using stochastic conformal mappings, we study the effects of anisotropic perturbations on diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) in two dimensions. The harmonic measure of the growth probability for DLA can be conformally mapped onto a constant measure on a unit circle. Here we map m preferred directions for growth to a distribution on the unit circle, which is a periodic function with m peaks in [-pi,pi) such that the angular width sigma of the peak defines the "strength" of anisotropy kappa= sigma(-1) along any of the m chosen directions. The two parameters (m,kappa) map out a parameter space of perturbations that allows a continuous transition from DLA (for small enough kappa ) to m needlelike fingers as kappa--> infinity. We show that at fixed m the effective fractal dimension of the clusters D(m,kappa) obtained from mass-radius scaling decreases with increasing kappa from D(DLA) approximately 1.71 to a value bounded from below by D(min) = 3 / 2. Scaling arguments suggest a specific form for the dependence of the fractal dimension D(m,kappa) on kappa for large kappa which compares favorably with numerical results. PMID:15244564

  9. The in-plane anisotropic magnetic damping of ultrathin epitaxial Co{sub 2}FeAl film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Shuang [State Key Laboratory of Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Heibei Key Laboratory of Optic-Electronic Information and Materials, College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Yan, Wei; Nie, Shuaihua; Zhao, Jianhua; Zhang, Xinhui, E-mail: xinhuiz@semi.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-08-15

    The in-plane orientation-dependent effective damping of ultrathin Co{sub 2}FeAl film epitaxially grown on GaAs(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been investigated by employing the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TR-MOKE) measurements. It is found that the interface-induced uniaxial anisotropy is favorable for precession response and the anisotropy of precession frequency is mainly determined by this uniaxial anisotropy, while the magnetic relaxation time and damping factor exhibit the fourfold anisotropy at high-field regime. The field-independent anisotropic damping factor obtained at high fields indicates that the effective damping shows an intrinsic fourfold anisotropy for the epitaxial Co{sub 2}FeAl thin films.

  10. Imaging the anisotropic nonlinear meissner effect in nodal YBa2 Cu3 O7-δ thin-film superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravel, Alexander P; Ghamsari, B G; Kurter, C; Jung, P; Remillard, S; Abrahams, J; Lukashenko, A V; Ustinov, Alexey V; Anlage, Steven M

    2013-02-22

    We have directly imaged the anisotropic nonlinear Meissner effect in an unconventional superconductor through the nonlinear electrodynamic response of both (bulk) gap nodes and (surface) Andreev bound states. A superconducting thin film is patterned into a compact self-resonant spiral structure, excited near resonance in the radio-frequency range, and scanned with a focused laser beam perturbation. At low temperatures, direction-dependent nonlinearities in the reactive and resistive properties of the resonator create photoresponse that maps out the directions of nodes, or of bound states associated with these nodes, on the Fermi surface of the superconductor. The method is demonstrated on the nodal superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ and the results are consistent with theoretical predictions for the bulk and surface contributions.

  11. Anisotropic pressure and hyperons in neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaksono, A

    2014-01-01

    We study the effects of anisotropic pressure on properties of the neutron stars with hyperons inside its core within the framework of extended relativistic mean field. It is found that the main effects of anisotropic pressure on neutron star matter is to increase the stiffness of the equation of state, which compensates for the softening of the EOS due to the hyperons. The maximum mass and redshift predictions of anisotropic neutron star with hyperonic core are quite compatible with the result of recent observational constraints if we use the parameter of anisotropic pressure model $h \\le 0.8$[1] and $\\Lambda \\le -1.15$ [2]. The radius of the corresponding neutron star at $M$=1.4 $M_\\odot$ is more than 13 km, while the effect of anisotropic pressure on the minimum mass of neutron star is insignificant. Furthermore, due to the anisotropic pressure in the neutron star, the maximum mass limit of higher than 2.1 $M_\\odot$ cannot rule out the presence of hyperons in the neutron star core.

  12. Computational architecture for full-color holographic displays based on anisotropic leaky-mode modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Sundeep; Smalley, Daniel; Barabas, James; Bove, V. Michael

    2014-02-01

    The MIT Mark IV holographic display system employs a novel anisotropic leaky-mode spatial light modulator that allows for the simultaneous and superimposed modulation of red, green, and blue light via wavelength-division multiplexing. This WDM-based scheme for full-color display requires that incoming video signals containing holographic fringe information are comprised of non-overlapping spectral bands that fall within the available 200 MHz output bandwidth of commercial GPUs. These bands correspond to independent color channels in the display output and are appropriately band-limited and centered to match the multiplexed passbands and center frequencies in the frequency response of the mode-coupling device. The computational architecture presented in this paper involves the computation of holographic fringe patterns for each color channel and their summation in generating a single video signal for input to the display. In composite, 18 such input signals, each containing holographic fringe information for 26 horizontal-parallax only holographic lines, are generated via three dual-head GPUs for a total of 468 holographic lines in the display output. We present a general scheme for full-color CGH computation for input to Mark IV and furthermore depict the adaptation of the diffraction specific coherent panoramagram approach to fringe computation for the Mark IV architecture.

  13. Frontal hemodynamic responses to high frequency yoga breathing in schizophrenia: A functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant eBhargav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Frontal hemodynamic responses to high frequency yoga breathing technique - Kapalabhati (KB was compared between patients of schizophrenia (n =18; 14 males, 4 females and age-gender and education matched healthy subjects (n=18; 14 males, 4 females using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS.The diagnosis was confirmed by a psychiatrist using DSM IV. All patients except one received atypical anti-psychotics (one was on typical. They had obtained a stabilized state as evidenced by a steady unchanged medication from their psychiatrist for past 3 months or longer. They learned KB, among other yoga procedures, in the yoga retreat. KB was practiced at the rate of 120 times per minute for 1minute (min. Healthy subjects who were freshly learning yoga too were taught KB. Both the groups had no previous exposure to KB practice and the training was achieved over 2 weeks. A chest pressure transducer was used to monitor the frequency and intensity of the practice objectively. The frontal hemodynamic response in terms of the oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb, deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxyHb and total hemoglobin or blood volume (totalHb concentration was tapped for 5 min before, 1min during and for 5 min after KB.This was obtained in quiet room using a 16 channel functional near-infrared system (FNIR100-ACK-W, BIOPAC Systems, Inc, USA. Average of the eight channels for each side (right and left frontals was obtained for the three sessions. The changes in the levels of oxyHb, deoxyHb and blood volume for the three sessions were compared between the two groups using Independent samples t test.Within group comparison showed that increase in bilateral oxyHb and totalHb from the baseline was highly significant in healthy controls during KB (right oxyHb, p = 0.00; left oxyHb, p= 0.00 and right totalHb, p = 0.01; left totalHb, p = 0.00, whereas schizophrenia patients did not show any significant changes in the same on both the sides. On the other hand

  14. Anisotropic thermal expansion of a 3D metal–organic framework with hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3D flexible metal–organic framework (MOF) with 1D hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores shows anisotropic thermal expansion with relatively large thermal expansion coefficient (αa=−21×10−6 K−1 and αc=79×10−6 K−1) between 133 K and 383 K. Temperature change gives deformation of both pores, which expand in diameter and elongate in length on cooling and vice versa. The thermally induced structural change should be derived from a unique framework topology like “lattice fence”. Silica accommodation changes not only the nature of the MOF but also thermal responsiveness of the MOF. Since the hydrophobic pores in the material are selectively blocked by the silica, the MOF with the silica is considered as a hydrophilic microporous material. Furthermore, inclusion of silica resulted in a drastic pore contraction in diameter and anisotropically changed the thermal responsiveness of the MOF. - Graphical abstract: A 3D metal–organic framework with hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores shows anisotropic thermal expansion behavior. The influence of silica filler in the hydrophobic pore was investigated. - Highlights: • Thermally induced structural change of a 3D MOF with a lattice fence topology was investigated. • The structural change was analyzed by synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns. • Temperature change induces anisotropic thermal expansion/contraction of the MOF. • Silica inclusion anisotropically changes the thermal responsiveness of the MOF

  15. Anisotropic thermal expansion of a 3D metal–organic framework with hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Atsushi, E-mail: kondoa@cc.tuat.ac.jp; Maeda, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-15

    A 3D flexible metal–organic framework (MOF) with 1D hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores shows anisotropic thermal expansion with relatively large thermal expansion coefficient (α{sub a}=−21×10{sup −6} K{sup −1} and α{sub c}=79×10{sup −6} K{sup −1}) between 133 K and 383 K. Temperature change gives deformation of both pores, which expand in diameter and elongate in length on cooling and vice versa. The thermally induced structural change should be derived from a unique framework topology like “lattice fence”. Silica accommodation changes not only the nature of the MOF but also thermal responsiveness of the MOF. Since the hydrophobic pores in the material are selectively blocked by the silica, the MOF with the silica is considered as a hydrophilic microporous material. Furthermore, inclusion of silica resulted in a drastic pore contraction in diameter and anisotropically changed the thermal responsiveness of the MOF. - Graphical abstract: A 3D metal–organic framework with hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores shows anisotropic thermal expansion behavior. The influence of silica filler in the hydrophobic pore was investigated. - Highlights: • Thermally induced structural change of a 3D MOF with a lattice fence topology was investigated. • The structural change was analyzed by synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns. • Temperature change induces anisotropic thermal expansion/contraction of the MOF. • Silica inclusion anisotropically changes the thermal responsiveness of the MOF.

  16. Enhancement of the low-frequency response of a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier slow light-based microwave phase shifter by forced coherent population oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Aidan; Connelly, Michael J.

    2014-05-01

    The enhancement of the low frequency gain response of a microwave phase shifter based on slow light in a bulk reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA), by using forced coherent population oscillations (FCPO), is experimentally demonstrated. FCPO is achieved by simultaneously modulating the input optical power and bias current. The beat signal gain improvement ranges from 45 to 0 dB over a frequency range of 0.5 to 2.5 GHz, thereby improving the noise performance of the phase shifter. Tunable phase shifts of up to 40º are possible over this frequency range.

  17. Power management and frequency regulation for microgrid and smart grid: A real-time demand response approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmousavi Kani, Seyyed Ali

    Future power systems (known as smart grid) will experience a high penetration level of variable distributed energy resources to bring abundant, affordable, clean, efficient, and reliable electric power to all consumers. However, it might suffer from the uncertain and variable nature of these generations in terms of reliability and especially providing required balancing reserves. In the current power system structure, balancing reserves (provided by spinning and non-spinning power generation units) usually are provided by conventional fossil-fueled power plants. However, such power plants are not the favorite option for the smart grid because of their low efficiency, high amount of emissions, and expensive capital investments on transmission and distribution facilities, to name a few. Providing regulation services in the presence of variable distributed energy resources would be even more difficult for islanded microgrids. The impact and effectiveness of demand response are still not clear at the distribution and transmission levels. In other words, there is no solid research reported in the literature on the evaluation of the impact of DR on power system dynamic performance. In order to address these issues, a real-time demand response approach along with real-time power management (specifically for microgrids) is proposed in this research. The real-time demand response solution is utilized at the transmission (through load-frequency control model) and distribution level (both in the islanded and grid-tied modes) to provide effective and fast regulation services for the stable operation of the power system. Then, multiple real-time power management algorithms for grid-tied and islanded microgrids are proposed to economically and effectively operate microgrids. Extensive dynamic modeling of generation, storage, and load as well as different controller design are considered and developed throughout this research to provide appropriate models and simulation

  18. Approximate study of the free vibrations of a cantilever anisotropic plate carrying a concentrated mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancio, P. M.; Rossit, C. A.; Laura, P. A. A.

    2007-05-01

    This study is concerned with the vibration analysis of a cantilevered rectangular anisotropic plate when a concentrated mass is rigidly attached to its center point. Based on the classical theory of anisotropic plates, the Ritz method is employed to perform the analysis. The deflection of the plate is approximated by a set of beam functions in each principal coordinate direction. The influence of the mass magnitude on the natural frequencies and modal shapes of vibration is studied for a boron-epoxy plate and also in the case of a generic anisotropic material. The classical Ritz method with beam functions as the spatial approximation proved to be a suitable procedure to solve a problem of this analytical complexity.

  19. Effects of the Biot and the squirt-flow coupling interaction on anisotropic elastic waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Considering the velocity anisotropy of the solid/fluid relative motion and employment of the BISQ theory[1] based on the one-dimensional porous isotropic case, we establish a two-phase anisotropic elastic wave equation to simultaneously include the Biot and the squirt mechanisms in terms of both the basic principles of the fluid's mass conservation and the elastic-wave dynamical equations in the two-phase anisotropic rock. Numerical results, while the Biot-flow and the squirt-flow effects are simultaneously considered in the transversely isotropic (TI) poroelastic medium, show that the attenuation of the quasi P-wave and the quasi SV-wave strongly depend on the permeability anisotropy, and the attenuation behavior at low and high frequencies is contrary. Meanwhile, the attenuation and dispersion of the quasi P-wave are also affected seriously by the anisotropic solid/fluid coupling additional density.

  20. Effects of the amplitude and frequency of salinity fluctuations on antioxidant responses in juvenile tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin O. Khairnar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To understand the tolerance of tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis, to varying salinities, the effects of the amplitude (2, 4, 6 and 8 g/L and frequency (2, 4 and 8 days of salinity fluctuations on the activities of antioxidant responses, including acidic phosphatase (ACP, alkaline phosphatase (AKP, catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD from antioxidant system in liver, muscle, gills and kidney, were investigated in this study. The results showed that the antioxidant responses of tongue sole were highly tissue-specific during the varying salinity fluctuations. In all tissues, ACP and AKP activity was found to be highest at moderate salinity fluctuations compared to the control, low and high salinity treatments (p<0.05. SOD and CAT activities had significant effect due to salinity fluctuations in all tissues (p<0.05, except in hepatic and renal tissues. Variations in branchial SOD activity proved that salinity fluctuations had greater impact on tongue sole at moderate and high fluctuating salinities compared to the control and low fluctuating salinities, whereas the branchial CAT activities showed contrasting trend. Further, cortisol levels were significantly affected in lower and higher salinity fluctuations. However, plasma cortisol levels remained low in moderate salinity fluctuations and control (p<0.05. Taken together, the results indicated that salinity fluctuations could effectively stimulate and enhance the antioxidant enzyme activity in the liver, kidney, gills and muscle of the juvenile tongue sole, thus effectively eliminating the excessive reactive oxygen species and minimizing the body damage in tongue sole or could be for any other euryhaline teleosts.

  1. Low-frequency ionospheric sounding with Narrow Bipolar Event lightning radio emissions: regular variabilities and solar-X-ray responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Jacobson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We present refinements of a method of ionospheric D-region sounding that makes opportunistic use of powerful (109–1011 W broadband lightning radio emissions in the low-frequency (LF; 30–300 kHz band. Such emissions are from "Narrow Bipolar Event" (NBE lightning, and they are characterized by a narrow (10-μs, simple emission waveform. These pulses can be used to perform time-delay reflectometry (or "sounding" of the D-region underside, at an effective LF radiated power exceeding by orders-of-magnitude that from man-made sounders. We use this opportunistic sounder to retrieve instantaneous LF ionospheric-reflection height whenever a suitable lightning radio pulse from a located NBE is recorded. We show how to correct for three sources of "regular" variability, namely solar zenith angle, radio-propagation range, and radio-propagation azimuth. The residual median magnitude of the noise in reflection height, after applying the regression corrections for the three regular variabilities, is on the order of 1 km. This noise level allows us to retrieve the D-region-reflector-height variation with solar X-ray flux density for intensity levels at and above an M-1 flare. The instantaneous time response is limited by the occurrence rate of NBEs, and the noise level in the height determination is typically in the range ±1 km.

  2. Assessment of Surface Treatment on Fatigue Life of Cylinder Block for Linear Engine using Frequency Response Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Rahman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was focused on the finite element techniques to investigate the effect of surface treatment on the fatigue life of the vibrating cylinder block for new two-stroke free piston engine using random loading conditions. Motivation: An understanding of the effects related to the random loading is necessary to improve the ability of designers to accurately predict the fatigue behavior of the components in service. An internal combustion engine cylinder block is a high volume production component subjected to random loading. Problem statement: Proper optimization of this component that is critical to the engine fuel efficiency and more robustly pursued by the automotive industry in recent years. A detailed understanding of the applied loads and resulting stresses under in-service conditions is demanded. Approach: The finite element modeling and analysis were performed utilizing the computer aided design and finite element analysis codes respectively. In addition, the fatigue life prediction was carried out using finite element based fatigue analysis code. Aluminum alloys were considered as typical materials in this study. Results: The frequency response approach was applied to predict the fatigue life of cylinder block using different load histories. Based on the finite element results, it was observed that the fatigue life was significantly influenced for the nitriding treatment. The obtained results were indicated that the nitrided treatment produces longest life for all loading conditions. Conclusion: The nitriding process is one of the promising surface treatments to increase the fatigue life for aluminum alloys linear engine cylinder block.

  3. An oversampling technique for the multiscale finite volume method to simulate electromagnetic responses in the frequency domain

    CERN Document Server

    Mata, Luz Angelica Caudillo; Schwarzbach, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce the computational cost of the simulation of electromagnetic responses in geophysical settings that involve highly heterogeneous media, we develop a multiscale finite volume method with oversampling for the quasi-static Maxwell's equations in the frequency domain. We assume a coarse mesh nested within a fine mesh that accurately discretizes the problem. For each coarse cell, we independently solve a local version of the original Maxwell's system subject to linear boundary conditions on an extended domain, which includes the coarse cell and a neighborhood of fine cells around it. The local Maxwell's system is solved using the fine mesh contained in the extended domain and the mimetic finite volume method. Next, these local solutions (basis functions) together with a weak-continuity condition are used to construct a coarse-mesh version of the global problem. The basis functions can be used to obtain the fine-mesh details from the solution of the coarse-mesh problem. Our approach leads to a sig...

  4. Liraglutide Treatment Is Associated with a Low Frequency and Magnitude of Antibody Formation with No Apparent Impact on Glycemic Response or Increased Frequency of Adverse Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buse, John B; Garber, Alan; Rosenstock, Julio;

    2011-01-01

    Context: Therapeutic proteins/peptides can produce immunogenic responses that may increase the risk of adverse events or reduce efficacy. Objective: The objectives were to measure and characterize antibody formation to liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, to investigate the im...

  5. Frequency selectivity in pulse responses of Pt/poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl/polyethylene oxide +Li+/Pt hetero-junction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zeng

    Full Text Available Pt/poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl/polyethylene oxide + Li+/Pt hetero junctions were fabricated, and their pulse responses were studied. The direct current characteristics were not symmetric in the sweeping range of ±2 V. Negative differential resistance appeared in the input range of 0 to 2 V because of de-doping (or reduction in the side with the semiconductor layer. The device responded stably to a train of pulses with a fixed frequency. The inverse current after a pulse was related to the back-migrated ions. Importantly, the weight calculated based on the inverse current strength, was depressed during low-frequency stimulations but was potentiated during high-frequency stimulations when pulses were positive. Therefore, frequency selectivity was first observed in a semiconducting polymer/electrolyte hetero junction. Detailed analysis of the pulse response showed that the input frequency could modulate the timing of ion doping, de-doping, and re-doping at the semiconducting polymer/electrolyte interface, which then resulted in the frequency selectivity. Our study suggests that the simple redox process in semiconducting polymers can be modulated and used in signal handling or the simulation of bio-learning.

  6. Anisotropic thermal conductivity of magnetic fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaopeng Fang; Yimin Xuan; Qiang Li

    2009-01-01

    Considering the forces acting on the particles and the motion of the particles, this study uses a numerical simulation to investigate the three-dimensional microstructure of the magnetic fluids in the presence of an external magnetic field. A method is proposed for predicting the anisotropic thermal conductivity of magnetic fluids. By introducing an anisotropic structure parameter which characterizes the non-uniform distribution of particles suspended in the magnetic fluids, the traditional Maxwell formula is modified and extended to calculate anisotropic thermal conductivity of the magnetic fluids. The results show that in the presence of an external magnetic field the magnetic nanoparticles form chainlike clusters along the direction of the external magnetic field, which leads to the fact that the thermal conduc-tivity of the magnetic fluid along the chain direction is bigger than that along other directions. The thermal conductivity of the magnetic fluids presents an anisotropic feature. With the increase of the magnetic field strength the chainlike clusters in the magnetic fluid appear to be more obvious, so that the anisotropic feature of heat conduction in the fluids becomes more evident.

  7. Effective medium theory for anisotropic metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiujuan

    2015-01-20

    Materials with anisotropic material parameters can be utilized to fabricate many fascinating devices, such as hyperlenses, metasolids, and one-way waveguides. In this study, we analyze the effects of geometric anisotropy on a two-dimensional metamaterial composed of a rectangular array of elliptic cylinders and derive an effective medium theory for such a metamaterial. We find that it is possible to obtain a closed-form analytical solution for the anisotropic effective medium parameters, provided the aspect ratio of the lattice and the eccentricity of the elliptic cylinder satisfy certain conditions. The derived effective medium theory not only recovers the well-known Maxwell-Garnett results in the quasi-static regime, but is also valid beyond the long-wavelength limit, where the wavelength in the host medium is comparable to the size of the lattice so that previous anisotropic effective medium theories fail. Such an advance greatly broadens the applicable realm of the effective medium theory and introduces many possibilities in the design of structures with desired anisotropic material characteristics. A real sample of a recently theoretically proposed anisotropic medium, with a near-zero index to control the flux, is achieved using the derived effective medium theory, and control of the electromagnetic waves in the sample is clearly demonstrated.

  8. Anisotropic matching principle for the hydrodynamic expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinti, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    Following the recent success of anisotropic hydrodynamics, I propose here a new, general prescription for the hydrodynamic expansion around an anisotropic background. The anisotropic distribution fixes exactly the complete energy-momentum tensor, just like the effective temperature fixes the proper energy density in the ordinary expansion around local equilibrium. This means that momentum anisotropies are already included at the leading order, allowing for large pressure anisotropies without the need of a next-to-leading-order treatment. The first moment of the Boltzmann equation (local four-momentum conservation) provides the time evolution of the proper energy density and the four-velocity. Differently from previous prescriptions, the dynamic equations for the pressure corrections are not derived from the zeroth or second moment of the Boltzmann equation, but they are taken directly from the exact evolution given by the Boltzmann equation. As known in the literature, the exact evolution of the pressure corrections involves higher moments of the Boltzmann distribution, which cannot be fixed by the anisotropic distribution alone. Neglecting the next-to-leading-order contributions corresponds to an approximation, which depends on the chosen form of the anisotropic distribution. I check the the effectiveness of the leading-order expansion around the generalized Romatschke-Stricklad distribution, comparing with the exact solution of the Boltzmann equation in the Bjorken limit with the collisional kernel treated in the relaxation-time approximation, finding an unprecedented agreement.

  9. 一种新的测量系统频率响应的方法%A New Way for Measuring System Frequency Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张三宝; 刘文江; 和旬涛; 聂泽昆

    2001-01-01

    The system output is real-time sampled by taking the exponentialdescent sine combined signal as the system input.Based on the known system input and output,the system frequency response is obtained through using the discrete Fourier transform and processed by the frequency domain compensation,so resolving the problem of inaccuracy of the frequency response of the system at the high frequency end and thus getting a measuring method of high applicable value for the single input and single output system frequency response.%以指数衰减的组合正弦信号作为系统输入信号,同时实时采集系统输出,在已知系统输入及输出的基础上,运用离散傅立叶变换求得系统频率响应,并采用频域补偿法对所求得的系统频率响应进行处理,解决了系统的频率响应在高频端不准确这一特殊问题,从而得到了一套对单输入单输出系统频率响应的测量方法,具有较大的实用价值。

  10. Theoretical equation for frequency responses of thyristor-controlled reactor; Thyristor seigyo reactor no shuhasu tokusei ni taisuru rironshiki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakimoto, N.; Nakamura, M.; Nagai, T. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    In power systems, power electronics apparatuses such as static var compensators (SVC) and thyristor-controlled series capacitors (TCSC) have been introduced. SVC and TCSC both consist of a thyristor-controlled reactor (TCR) in parallel with capacitor banks. By adjusting the current through the reactor with the thyristors, we can change their reactances at a fundamental frequency. However, their admittances at other frequencies are important in studies of harmonic resonance and subsynchronous resonance. The admittance of a capacitor is clear, so we study that of TCR. First, we calculate its admittance by superimposing a small voltage of a frequency on the fundamental voltage, and then extracting the current change of the frequency. The conventional theoretical equations prove to be applicable only to the fundamental and the harmonic frequencies. TCR has conductance, and it can take negative. values at other frequencies. We derive a theoretical equation applicable to general frequencies. The admittance is a function of the frequency and the firing angle. For the harmonic frequencies, it also depends on the phase difference between the fundamental and superimposed voltages. Lastly, we compare it with the simulation result to show the validity of the theoretical equation. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Experimental Verification and Research for the Distortion in the Integrated Frequency Responses of the High-Pressure Sealed Cabin and Magnetic Field Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Ming; Wei Wenbo; Jin Sheng; Ye Gaofeng; Zhang Qisheng; Jing Jian'en

    2007-01-01

    Although magnetotelluric sounding method applied to the land is advanced, there are many difficulties when it is applied to marine environment, one of which is how to lay magnetic field sensors down to the seafloor to complete measurements. To protect the magnetic field sensors from intense erosion and high pressure, suitable high-pressure sealed cabins must be designed to load them. For the consideration of magnetic measurement and marine operation, the sealed pressure cabin should be nonmagnetic and transportable. Among all optional materials, LC4 super-hard aluminum alloy has the highest performance of price/quality ratio to make the sealed pressure cabin. However, it does not mean that the high-pressure sealed cabin made using LC4 will be perfect in performance. In fact, because of its weak magnetism, the pressure cabin made using LC4 has distorting effect on frequency responses of the magnetic field sensors sealed in it. This distorting effect does not affect the use of the magnetic field sensor,but if we want to eliminate its effect, we should study it by experimental measurements. In our experiment tests, frequency sweep magnetic field as excitation signal was used, and then responses of the magnetic field sensor before and after being loaded into the high-pressure sealed cabin were measured. Finally,normalized abnormal curves for the frequency responses were obtained, through which we could show how the high-pressure sealed cabin produces effects on the responses of the magnetic field sensor. Experimental results suggest that the response distortion induced by the sealed pressure cabin appears on mid- and high-frequency areas. Using experimental results as standardization data, the frequency responses collected from seafloor magnetotelluric measurements can be corrected to restore real information about the seafloor field source.

  12. Effective stress law for anisotropic double porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ying; CHEN Mian; ZHANG Guangqing

    2004-01-01

    An effective stress law is derived analytically to describe the effect of pore (fracture pore and matrix-block pore) fluid pressure on the linearly elastic response of anisotropic saturated dual-porous rocks, which exhibit anisotropy. For general anisotropy the difference between the effective stress and the applied stress is not hydrostatic simply multiplied by Biot coefficient. The effective stress law involves four constants for transversely isotropic response; these constants can be expressed in terms of the moduli of the single porous material, double porous material and of the solid material. These expressions are simplified considerably when the anisotropy is structural rather than intrinsic, i.e. in the case of an isotropic solid material with an anisotropic pore structure. In this case the effective stress law involves grain bulk modulus, four moduli and two compliances of the porous material for transverse isotropy. The law reduces, in the case of isotropic response, to that suggested by Li Shuiquan (2001). And reduction to the single-porosity (derived analytically by Carroll (1979)) is presented to demonstrate the conceptual consistency of the proposed law.

  13. General Expression of Elastic Tensor for Anisotropic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Bo

    2005-01-01

    In order to formulate a general expression of elastic tensor for anisotropic materials, a method of tensor derivative is used for determining relationship between fourth-order elastic tensor and second-order structure tensor that has satisfied material symmetrical conditions. From this general expression of elastic tensor, specific expressions of elastic tensor for different anisotropic materials, such as isotropic materials, transverse isotropic materials and orthogonal-anisotropic materials, can be deduced. This expression underlies the scalar description of anisotropic factors, which are used for classifying and analyzing anisotropic materials. Cubic crystals are analyzed macroscopically by means of the general expression and anisotropic factor.

  14. Effect of varying the intensity and train frequency of forelimb and cerebellar mossy fiber conditioned stimuli on the latency of conditioned eye-blink responses in decerebrate ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, P; Ivarsson, M; Hesslow, G

    1997-01-01

    To study the role of the mossy fiber afferents to the cerebellum in classical eye-blink conditioning, in particular the timing of the conditioned responses, we compared the effects of varying a peripheral conditioned stimulus with the effects of corresponding variations of direct stimulation of the mossy fibers. In one set of experiments, decerebrate ferrets were trained in a Pavlovian eye-blink conditioning paradigm with electrical forelimb train stimulation as conditioned stimulus and electrical periorbital stimulation as the unconditioned stimulus. When stable conditioning had been achieved, the effect of increasing the intensity or frequency of the forelimb stimulation was tested. By increasing the intensity from 1 to 2 mA, or the train frequency from 50 to 100 Hz, an immediate decrease was induced in both the onset latency and the latency to peak of the conditioned response. If the conditioned stimulus intensity/frequency was maintained at the higher level, the response latencies gradually returned to preshift values. In a second set of experiments, the forelimb stimulation was replaced by direct train stimulation of the middle cerebellar peduncle as conditioned stimulus. Varying the frequency of the stimulus train between 50 and 100 Hz had effects that were almost identical to those obtained when using a forelimb conditioned stimulus. The functional meaning of the latency effect is discussed. It is also suggested that the results support the view that the conditioned stimulus is transmitted through the mossy fibers and that the mechanism for timing the conditioned response is situated in the cerebellum.

  15. Theory of Compton scattering by anisotropic electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Poutanen, Juri

    2010-01-01

    Compton scattering plays an important role in various astrophysical objects such as accreting black holes and neutron stars, pulsars, and relativistic jets, clusters of galaxies as well as the early Universe. In most of the calculations it is assumed that the electrons have isotropic angular distribution in some frame. However, there are situations where the anisotropy may be significant due to the bulk motions, or anisotropic cooling by synchrotron radiation, or anisotropic source of seed soft photons. We develop here an analytical theory of Compton scattering by anisotropic distribution of electrons that can simplify significantly the calculations. Assuming that the electron angular distribution can be represented by a second order polynomial over cosine of some angle (dipole and quadrupole anisotropy), we integrate the exact Klein-Nishina cross-section over the angles. Exact analytical and approximate formulae valid for any photon and electron energies are derived for the redistribution functions describin...

  16. Micromechanics and dislocation theory in anisotropic elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Lazar, Markus

    2016-01-01

    In this work, dislocation master-equations valid for anisotropic materials are derived in terms of kernel functions using the framework of micromechanics. The second derivative of the anisotropic Green tensor is calculated in the sense of generalized functions and decomposed into a sum of a $1/R^3$-term plus a Dirac $\\delta$-term. The first term is the so-called "Barnett-term" and the latter is important for the definition of the Green tensor as fundamental solution of the Navier equation. In addition, all dislocation master-equations are specified for Somigliana dislocations with application to 3D crack modeling. Also the interior Eshelby tensor for a spherical inclusion in an anisotropic material is derived as line integral over the unit circle.

  17. Anisotropic matching principle for the hydrodynamics expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Tinti, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Following the recent success of anisotropic hydrodynamics we propose a new, general prescription for the hydrodynamics expansion around an anisotropic background. The anisotropic distribution is fixing exactly the complete energy-momentum tensor, just like the effective temperature is fixing the proper energy density in the ordinary expansion around local equilibrium. This means that momen- tum anisotropies are already included at the leading order, allowing for large pressure anisotropies without the need of a next to leading order treatment. The first moment of the Boltzmann equation (local four-momentum conservation) provides the time evolution of the proper energy density and the four velocity. Differently from previous prescriptions, the dynamic equations for the pressure corrections are not derived from the zeroth or second moment of the Boltzmann equation, but they are taken directly from the exact evolution given by the Boltzmann equation. We check the effec- tiveness of this new approach by matching ...

  18. Anisotropic pseudopotential for polarized dilute quantum gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An anisotropic pseudopotential arising in the context of collisions of two particles polarized by an external field is rigorously derived and its properties are investigated. Such a low-energy pseudopotential may be useful in describing collective properties of dilute quantum gases, such as molecules polarized by an electric field or metastable 3P2 atoms polarized by a magnetic field. The pseudopotential is expressed in terms of the reactance (K) matrix and derivatives of the Dirac δ function. In most applications, it may be represented as a sum of a traditional spherically symmetric contact term and an anisotropic part. The former contribution may be parametrized by a generalized scattering length. The anisotropic part of the pseudopotential may be characterized by the off-diagonal scattering length for dipolar interactions and off-diagonal scattering volume for quadrupolar interactions. The two-body matrix element of the pseudopotential in a basis of plane waves is also derived

  19. Obtuse triangle suppression in anisotropic meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Feng

    2011-12-01

    Anisotropic triangle meshes are used for efficient approximation of surfaces and flow data in finite element analysis, and in these applications it is desirable to have as few obtuse triangles as possible to reduce the discretization error. We present a variational approach to suppressing obtuse triangles in anisotropic meshes. Specifically, we introduce a hexagonal Minkowski metric, which is sensitive to triangle orientation, to give a new formulation of the centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT) method. Furthermore, we prove several relevant properties of the CVT method with the newly introduced metric. Experiments show that our algorithm produces anisotropic meshes with much fewer obtuse triangles than using existing methods while maintaining mesh anisotropy. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics for central collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Alqahtani, Mubarak; Strickland, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We use quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics to study an azimuthally-symmetric boost-invariant quark-gluon plasma including the effects of both shear and bulk viscosities. In quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics, a single finite-temperature quasiparticle mass is introduced and fit to the lattice data in order to implement a realistic equation of state. We compare results obtained using the quasiparticle method with the standard method of imposing the equation of state in anisotropic hydrodynamics and viscous hydrodynamics. Using these three methods, we extract the primordial particle spectra, total number of charged particles, and average transverse momentum for various values of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s. We find that the three methods agree well for small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, eta/s, but differ at large eta/s. We find, in particular, that when using standard viscous hydrodynamics, the bulk-viscous correction can drive the primordial particle spectra negative...