WorldWideScience

Sample records for anion sorption capability

  1. Natural minerals and synthetic materials for sorption of radioactive anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Mun Ja; Chun, Kwan Sik; Kim, Seung Soo

    1998-07-01

    Technetium-99 and iodine-129 are fission products with long half-lives, and exist as highly soluble anionic species. Studies on natural and synthetic materials sorbing TcO{sub 4} and/or I have been performed by several researchers. The application of these materials as an additive in the high-level waste disposal has been considered. The iron- or sulfide-containing minerals such as metal iron, iron powder, stibnite and pyrrhotite show a high capacity for TcO{sub 4} sorption. And the small amounts of activated carbon are reported to have high distribution coefficients recently. In the iodine sorption studies, sulfide-, copper-, lead- or mercury-containing minerals can be a candidate. Pyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, Cu{sub 2}S and CuS reveal a high capacity for I sorption. The synthetic materials were found to have high sorption capacity and compensate the defects of natural minerals, which contain hydrous oxides such as zirconium oxide, aluminium oxide and mercarbide. The mercarbide has the high distribution coefficients for the sorption of TcO{sub 4} and I. Recently it was proposed that the synthetic clay, hydrotalcite, could be useful for the fixation of anion. However, to determine the applicability of those natural and synthetic materials as an additive to a buffer or backfill material for sorption of TcO{sub 4} and/or I, the sorption behavior of the anions on those materials under the repository conditions should be identified. (author). 32 refs., 21 tabs., 10 figs

  2. Hydration and sorption characteristics of a polyfunctional weak-base anion exchanger after the sorption of vanillin and ethylvanillin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, D. O.; Voronyuk, I. V.; Eliseeva, T. V.

    2016-07-01

    Features of the sorption of substituted aromatic aldehydes by a weak-base anion exchanger under equilibrium conditions are investigated using vanillin and ethylvanillin as examples. Analysis of the sorption isotherms of carbonyl compounds at different temperatures allows us to calculate the equilibrium characteristics of their sorption and assess the entropy and enthalpy contributions to the energy of the process. Hydration characteristics of the macroporous weak-base anion exchanger before and after the sorption of aromatic aldehydes are compared.

  3. A study of sorption of pertechnetate anion on chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivarciova, L.; Rosskopfova, O.; Rajec, P.; Galambos, M.

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is one of the natural materials of biological origin. The sorption of pertechnetate anions from aqueous solutions on chitosan was studied in a batch system. This work was aimed to study influence of the contact time, effect of pH and effect of different ions on sorption of pertechnetate anions on chitosan. This sorbent was characterized by BET-surface area and potentiometric titration. The point of zero charge (pH pzc ) was at pH=7.15. The highest percentage of technetium sorption on chitosan was near pH 3. The adsorption capacity of chitosan decreased with increase in pH value above 3. In the initial pH range of 4-10, final pHs are the same. The selectivity of chitosan for these cations with concentration above 1·10 -3 mol·dm -3 was in the order Na + > Ca 2+ > Fe 3+ > Fe 2+ . The competition effect of (SO 4 ) 2- towards TcO 4 - sorption was stronger than the competition effect (ClO 4 ) - of ions. (authors)

  4. Environmental Conditions Influencing Sorption of Inorganic Anions to Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Studied by Column Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzelder, Florian; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2017-05-02

    Sorption to carbon-based nanomaterials is typically studied in batch experiments. An alternative method offering advantages to study sorption is column chromatography. Sorbent packed columns are used and sorption data are determined by relating sorbate retention to that of a nonretarded tracer. We have now for the first time applied this technique to study the influence of environmental conditions on sorption of inorganic anions (bromide, nitrite, nitrate, and iodide) to multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Deuterium oxide was used as nonretarded tracer. Sorption isotherms were best described by the Freundlich model. Sorption increased in the order bromide 4.5 the surface charge was negative, but sorption was still detectable at pH 6 and 9. Consequently, other forces than electrostatic attraction contributed to sorption. These forces may include H-bonding as indicated by sorption enthalpy determined by variation of column temperature. Overall, column chromatography represents a promising alternative in sorption studies to reveal sorbent properties.

  5. Sorption-desorption of antimony species onto calcined hydrotalcite: Surface structure and control of competitive anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Leonel Vinicius; Quirino, Juliana Nunes; Abrão, Taufik; Parreira, Paulo Sérgio; Urbano, Alexandre; Santos, Maria Josefa

    2018-02-15

    Calcined hydrotalcite can be applied to remove anionic contaminants from aqueous systems such as antimony species due to its great anion exchange capacity and high surface area. Hence, this study evaluated antimonite and antimonate sorption-desorption processes onto calcined hydrotalcite in the presence of nitrate, sulfate and phosphate. Sorption and desorption experiments of antimonite and antimonate were carried out in batch equilibrium and the post-sorption solids were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). Sorption data were better fitted by dual-mode Langmuir-Freundlich model (R 2 >0.99) and desorption data by Langmuir model. High maximum sorption capacities were found for the calcined hydrotalcite, ranging from 617 to 790meqkg -1 . The competing anions strongly affected the antimony sorption. EDXRF analysis and mathematical modelling showed that sulfate and phosphate presented higher effect on antimonite and antimonate sorption, respectively. High values for sorption efficiency (SE=99%) and sorption capacity were attributed to the sorbent small particles and the large surface area. Positive hysteresis indexes and low mobilization factors (MF>3%) suggest very low desorption capacity to antimony species from LDH. These calcined hydrotalcite characteristics are desirable for sorption of antimony species from aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Sorption of Pu(IV) from nitric acid by bifunctional anion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartsch, R.A.; Zhang, Z.Y.; Elshani, S.; Zhao, W.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Barr, M.E.; Marsh, S.F.; Chamberlin, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    Anion exchange is attractive for separating plutonium because the Pu(IV) nitrate complex is very strongly sorbed and few other metal ions form competing anionic nitrate complexes. The major disadvantage of this process has been the unusually slow rate at which the Pu(IV) nitrate complex is sorbed by the resin. The paper summarizes the concept of bifunctional anion-exchange resins, proposed mechanism for Pu(IV) sorption, synthesis of the alkylating agent, calculation of K d values from Pu(IV) sorption results, and conclusions from the study of Pu(IV) sorption from 7M nitric acid by macroporous anion-exchange resins including level of crosslinking, level of alkylation, length of spacer, and bifunctional vs. monofunctional anion-exchange resins

  7. Sericitization of illite decreases sorption capabilities for cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choung, S.; Hwang, J.; Han, W.; Shin, W.

    2017-12-01

    Release of radioactive cesium (137Cs) to environment occurs through nuclear accidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima. The concern is that 137Cs has long half-life (t1/2 = 30.2 years) with chemical toxicity and γ-radiation. Sorption techniques are mainly applied to remove 137Cs from aquatic environment. In particular, it has been known well that clay minerals (e.g, illite) are effective and economical sorbents for 137Cs. Illite that was formed by hydrothermal alteration exist with sericite through "sericitization" processes. Although sericite has analogous composition and lattice structure with illite, the sorptive characteristics of illite and sericite for radiocesium could be different. This study evaluated the effects of hydrothermal alteration and weathering process on illite cesium sorption properties. Natural illite samples were collected at Yeongdong area in Korea as the world-largest hydrothermal deposits for illite. The samples were analyzed by XRF, XRD and SEM-EDX to determine mineralogy, chemical compositions and morphological characteristics, and used for batch sorption experiments. The Yeongdong illites predominantly consist of illite, sericite, quartz, and albite. The measured cesium sorption distribution coefficients (Kd,Cs) of reference illite and sericite were approximately 6000 and 400 L kg-1 at low aqueous concentration (Cw 10-7 M), respectively. In contrast, Kd,Cs values for the Yeongdong illite samples ranged from 500 to 4000 L kg-1 at identical concentration. The observed narrow and sharp XRD peak of sericite indicated that the sericite has better crystallinity compared to illite. These experimental results suggested that sericitization processes of illite can decline the sorption capabilities of illite for cesium under various hydrothermal conditions. In particular, weathering experiments raised the cesium sorption to illite, which seems to be related to the increase of preferential sorption sites for cesium through crystallinity destruction

  8. Sorption of vanillin on highly basic anion exchanger under static conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholokhova, A. Yu.; Eliseeva, T. V.; Voronyuk, I. V.

    2017-11-01

    The kinetics of the sorption of vanillin by a granulated anion exchanger is studied under static conditions. A comparison of the kinetic curves of the uptake of hydroxybenzaldehyde by gel and macroporous anion exchanger shows that macroporous sorbent has better kinetic characteristics. The effect temperature has on the capacity of an anion exchanger and the time needed to establish sorption equilibrium is found, and the activation energy of vanillin uptake is determined. Studying the effect experimental factors have on the rate of sorption and using the formal kinetics approach, it is established that in the investigated range of concentrations, the limiting stage of the uptake of vanillin by an anion exchanger with the functional groups of a quaternary ammonium base is that of external diffusion. Vanillin sorption by a highly basic anion exchanger in hydroxyl form is characterized by polymolecular uptake best described by a BET isotherm; at the same time, the uptake of sorbate by a chloride form is of a monomolecular character and can be described by a Freindlich isotherm. Structural changes in the anion exchanger sorbed hydroxybenzaldehyde are identified via FTIR spectroscopy.

  9. Kinetics of boron ions sorption from solution by inorganic anion exchanger of MNH type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leont'eva, G.V.

    1990-01-01

    By the method of restricted volume in case of boron excess in solution kinetics of boron sorption by inorganic anion-exchanger of the composition (Mg 0.55 Ni 0.45 )(OH) 2 has been studied. The sorption was carried out from solution containing Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , Cl - , SO 4 2- , CO 3 2- , HCO 3 at 283, 293, 303 and 313 K and pH 8.1, while the density of solution was 1225 kg/m 3 . The sorption mechanism was considered. It is shown that heterogeneity of the character of kinetic curves is caused by the change in the mechanism of limiting stages of the sorption

  10. The effect of anionic sorption on the metakaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Valquiria; Morais, Leandro C.; Rosa, Andre H.; Fraceto, Leonardo F.; Buchler, Pedro M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports an investigation on the effect of thermal activation of kaolinite. It is well known that during calcination (400-650 deg C), kaolinite loses the OH lattice water and is transformed into metakaolinite or amorphous material. Arsenic is trace element that is toxic to animals including humans. The adsorption of arsenic on kaolinite was investigated at varying pH and thermal pretreatment. Calcination of sample is carried out at 650 deg C for 3 h. The decomposition of kaolinite is recorded using methods of thermal analysis. The resultant product is identified by XRD. Laboratory experiments were conducted examining the effect of arsenic by thermally modified kaolinite. The Langmuir isotherm was used to describe arsenite and arsenate sorption by the calcined kaolinite. The equilibrium parameters used were based on experimental data obtained for the dynamic adsorption process of arsenic. Removal of arsenate using natural kaolinite was satisfactory, whereas arsenic was not removed by adsorption with thermally modified kaolinite. Moreover, the adsorption of arsenic by kaolinite and metakaolinite decreases with increasing pH. (author)

  11. Anion concurrence and anion selectivity in the sorption of radionuclides by organotones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnsen, Julia G.

    2007-01-01

    Some long-lived and radiologically important nuclear fission products, such as I-129 (half-life t 1/2 = 1,6 . 10 7 a), Tc-99 (t 1/2 = 2,1 . 10 5 a), and Se-79 (t 1/2 = 6,5 . 10 4 a) are anionic in aqueous environments. This study focuses on the adsorption of such anions to organoclays and the understanding of the selectivity of the process. The organoclays used in this study were prepared from a bentonite (MX-80) and a vermiculite clay, and the cationic surfactants hexadcylpyridium, hexadecyltrimethylammonium, and benzethonium. Surfactant adsorption to the bentonite exceeds the cation exchange capacity of the clay, with the surplus positive charge being balanced by the co-adsorption of chloride. The interlayer distance of the bentonites is increased sufficiently to contain bi- and pseudotrimolecular structures of the surfactants. Adsorption experiments were carried out using the batch technique. Anion adsorption of iodide, perrhenate, selenite, nitrate, and sulphate is mainly due to ion exchange with chloride. As an additional adsorption mechanism, the incorporation of inorganic ion pairs into the interlayer space of the clay is proposed as a result of experiments showing differences in the adsorption levels of sodium and potassium iodide. Anion adsorption results show a clear selectivity of the organoclays, with the affinity sequence being: ReO - 4 > I - > NO - 3 > Cl - > SO 2- 4 > SeO 2- 3 . This sequence corresponds to the sequence of increasing hydration energies of the anions, thus selectivity could be due to the process of minimization of free energy of the system. (orig.)

  12. Sorption of uranium anionic species from aqueous solutions on HDTMA-bentonite Jelsovy potok

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajnak, A.; Viglasova, E.; Galambos, M.; Rosskopfova, O.

    2014-01-01

    Bentonite deposit Jelsovy potok in Slovakia has great potential for use as a engineering barrier in the multi-barrier system of deep geological repository. In this paper, HDTMA-modified bentonite J15m from Slovak bentonite Jelsovy potok was prepared and its sorption properties (sorption isotherms, kinetics) towards anionic uranium species was investigated. The removal of uranium anionic species from aqueous solutions (initial concentration: 10-1,000 mg/L) by J15m was studied in the absence of background electrolytes at initial pH range (pH init ) 8.5; 9.5; 10.5. The amount of the sorbed U was determined spectrophotometrically using the Arsenazo III method. The maximum uptake capacity observed was 31.35 (mg/g) at 298 K. Experimental results were analysed by the Langmuir, Freundlich Dubinin-Redushkevich and Tempkin isotherm. The kinetics of adsorption of U(VI) ions was also discussed using the pseudo-first-order and the pseudo-second-order at three different temperatures. The activation energy of the sorption for J15m was calculated as 23.534 kJ·mol -1 . (authors)

  13. Fe electron transfer and atom exchange in goethite: influence of Al-substitution and anion sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latta, Drew E; Bachman, Jonathan E; Scherer, Michelle M

    2012-10-02

    The reaction of Fe(II) with Fe(III) oxides and hydroxides is complex and includes sorption of Fe(II) to the oxide, electron transfer between sorbed Fe(II) and structural Fe(III), reductive dissolution coupled to Fe atom exchange, and, in some cases mineral phase transformation. Much of the work investigating electron transfer and atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxides has been done under relatively simple aqueous conditions in organic buffers to control pH and background electrolytes to control ionic strength. Here, we investigate whether electron transfer is influenced by cation substitution of Al(III) in goethite and the presence of anions such as phosphate, carbonate, silicate, and natural organic matter. Results from (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy indicate that both Al-substitution (up to 9%) and the presence of common anions (PO(4)(3-), CO(3)(2-), SiO(4)(4-), and humic acid) does not inhibit electron transfer between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III) in goethite under the conditions we studied. In contrast, sorption of a long-chain phospholipid completely shuts down electron transfer. Using an enriched isotope tracer method, we found that Al-substitution in goethite (10%), does, however, significantly decrease the extent of atom exchange between Fe(II) and goethite (from 43 to 12%) over a month's time. Phosphate, somewhat surprisingly, appears to have little effect on the rate and extent of atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite. Our results show that electron transfer between aqueous Fe(II) and solid Fe(III) in goethite can occur under wide range of geochemical conditions, but that the extent of redox-driven Fe atom exchange may be dependent on the presence of substituting cations such as Al.

  14. Diffusion, sorption, and retardation processes of anions in bentonite and organo-bentonites for multibarrier systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schampera, Birgit; Dultz, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    The low permeability, high cation exchange capacity (CEC) and plasticity of bentonites favor their use in multibarrier systems of waste deposits [1]. Bentonites have a high CEC but their ability to sorb anions is very low. There is, however, need for retardation of anions and organic pollutants in many applications. Bentonites, modified with certain organic cations, have the capacity to sorb anions and non-polar organic compounds in addition to cations. Investigations on organically modified clays address a wide variety of applications including immobilization of pollutants in contaminated soils, waste water treatment and in situ placement for the protection of ground water [2]. Many experiments on anion and cation sorption of organo-clays were conducted in the batch mode which does not reflect solid-liquid ratios and material densities in barrier systems. Diffusion experiments on compacted clays allow the evaluation of transport processes and sorption of pollutants at conditions relevant for repositories. For organo-clays only few diffusion studies are published e.g. [3] measured the diffusion of tritium and [4] the diffusion of H2O in bentonite and organo-bentonites. The organic cation hexadecylpyridinium (HDPy) was added to Wyoming bentonite (MX-80) in amounts corresponding to 2-400 % of the CEC. The uptake of organic cations was determined by the C-content, XRD and IR-spectroscopy. Wettability was analyzed by the contact angle. Physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of clays were characterized. Diffusion experiments were carried out in situ in a cell attached to the ATR-unit of a FTIR-spectrometer. For H2O-diffusion the compacted organo-clays are saturated first with D2O, afterwards H2O is supplied to the surface at the top of the clay platelet. Anion-diffusion was conducted with NO3--solution instead of H2O only having characteristic IR band positions at 1350 cm-1. Three different concentrations (0.25M, 0.5M and 1M) were used. Additional batch

  15. Influence of some factors on kinetics of boron ions sorption by inorganic anion exchanger of MNG type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leont'eva, G.V.

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to the influence of particle size of anion exchanger and boron ion concentration on boron sorption from the solution of the following composition (kg/m 3 ): Na + -71.3; K + - 1.9; Ca 2+ - 43.8; Mg 2+ - 5.7; B 2 O 3 -0.32-1.50; Cl - - 204.6, SO 4 2- - 0.02, CO 3 2+ - 0.40; HCO 3 - - 1.74; pH=8.1; density - 1225 kg/m 3 . Increase of dispersivity of ion-exchange material promotes the elevation of sorption rate. Increase of boron ion concentration in the solution leads to exchange capacity growth and reduction of latent period of nucleation; this results to increase of sorption rate

  16. Spectroscopic investigations on sorption of uranium onto suspended bentonite. Effects of pH, ionic strength and complexing anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Parveen Kumar; Pathak, Priyanath; Mohapatra, Manoj; Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry Div.; Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Jha, Sambhunath; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Atomic and Molecular Physics Div.

    2015-06-01

    Batch sorption experiments were carried out under aerobic conditions to understand the sorption behavior of U(VI) onto bentonite clay under varying pH (2-8) and ionic strength (I = 0.01 - 1 M (NaClO{sub 4})) conditions. The influences of different complexing anions (1 x 10{sup -4} M) such as oxalic acid (ox), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}), citric acid (cit), and humic acid (HA, 10 mg/L) on the sorption behavior were also investigated. The sorption of U(VI) increased with increasing pH up to pH 6 beyond which a decrease was attributed to the formation of anionic carbonate species. Marginal influence of the change in the ionic strength of the medium on the sorption profile of uranium suggested inner-sphere complexation onto the bentonite surface. The presence of humic acid showed interesting sorption profile with varying pH. Initially, there was an enhancement in the sorption with increased pH followed by a plateau and finally a decrease thereafter due to the formation of aqueous U(VI)-humate complexes. Spectroscopic studies such as UV spectrophotometry, luminescence and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements were also performed to understand the changes in aqueous speciation of U(VI) ion. The luminescence yields of different aqueous U(VI) species followed the order: U(VI){sub Hydroxy} > U(VI){sub HumicAcid} > U(VI){sub carbonate} > U(VI){sub citrate}. The lower luminescence yield of U(VI)carbonate complex can be attributed to the strong dynamic quenching by carbonate at room temperature. The U(VI) samples shows two distinct life-time suggesting the presence of the different luminescent U(VI) species. Similar trend was observed for U(VI)-bentonite suspension in presence/absence of the complexing ligands. There was luminescence quenching for the sorbed U(VI) due to surface complexation. These observations were further supported by spectrophotometric measurements. EXAFS spectra of U(VI) samples were recorded in luminescence mode at the U L{sub 3

  17. Influence of concentration and hydrodynamic factors in sorption of iodine by anion-exchangers of the mass-transfer rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, V.V.; Smirnov, N.N.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of the joint influence of hydrodynamic and concentration factors in sorption of iodine by AV-17-8 and anion exchange resins on the mass-transfer coefficient is the subject of this report. The method of central composite rotatable experimental design was used for quantitative assessment and derivation of the appropriate equations. The investigation yielded the necessary regression equations satisfactorily describing the influence of all the factors in the mass-transfer coefficient. the optimal mass-transfer conditions were determined. On the basis of the values obtained, recommendations are made on the optimal hydrodynamic conditions of operation of equipment with pneumatic circulation of the ion-exchanger

  18. An investigation of the sorption/desorption of organics from natural waters by solid adsorbents and anion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larin, B.M.; Sedlov, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    The results of laboratory and operational tests at thermal and nuclear power stations on anion exchangers and solid adsorbents of makeup water treatment plants with regard to the sorption/desorption of organic substances in natural water and condensate are presented. The resins Amberlite trademark IRA-67, IRA-900, IRA-958Cl, Purolite registered 2 A-500P, Dowex TM3 Marathon, and others were tested. Retention of up to 60-80% of the ''organic'' material on the anion exchangers and organic absorbers installed at different places in the technological scheme of the water processing unit was attained. The possibility of a partial ''poisoning'' of the resins and the degradation of the working characteristics over the first year of operation are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Np(V)O2+ sorption on hydroxyapatite-effect of calcium and phosphate anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, P.; Choppin, G.R.; Moore, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    The sorption of NpO 2 + from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite was studied as a function of the amount of sorbent, initial NpO 2 + concentration, ionic strength and pcH. The hydroxyapatite was characterized by SEM, EDS, XRD, FT-IR and ICP-MS measurements. At ionic strengths of 0.10 to 5.00 M NaClO 4 , the sorption increased with increased pcH to a maximum between pcH 8-8.5, then decreased as the pcH increased. The kinetics of NpO 2 + sorption on hydroxyapatite followed Lagergren first order kinetics. The temperature dependence of sorption was small in the range of 273-283 K, but increased more sharply at higher temperatures of 298-333 K. The heat of sorption of NpO 2 + was endothermic and the free energy values were exothermic indicating large, positive entropy. The activation energy for the sorption process was calculated to be 29.52 ± 1.2 kJ/mole. The effect of calcium and phosphate on NpO 2 + sorption was studied as a function of concentration and pcH. (orig.)

  20. Sorption behaviour of Cs, Sr radionuclides in the presence of various anions and surfactants in solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydov, Yu.P.; Toropov, I.G.; Vasilevskaya, T.V.

    1997-01-01

    The state of 137 Cs and 90 Sr radionuclides was studied in solutions of different compositions to develop appropriate methodology and technology for treatment of spent decontamination solutions. Complex physico-chemical methods were used for this study. Particular attention was paid to the sorption of 137 Cs and 90 Sr on different natural and synthetic inorganic sorbents, as the most specific and selective sorbents for separation of these radionuclides from different solutions. Sorption of CS and Sr on different fractions of soil was also studied in connection with development of rehabilitation methods for contaminated territories. (author). 2 refs, 20 tabs

  1. Thermodynamic characteristics of sorption extraction and chromatographic separation of anionic complexes of erbium and cerium with Trilon B on weakly basic anionite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheremisina, O. V.; Ponomareva, M. A.; Sagdiev, V. N.

    2016-03-01

    The adsorption of anionic complexes of erbium with Trilon B on D-403 anionite is studied at ionic strengths of 1 and 2 mol/kg (NaNO3) and temperatures of 298 and 343 K. The values of the stability constants of complex ions of REE with Trilon B and the Gibbs energies of complexation are calculated. The values of the Gibbs energy and the enthalpy and entropy of ion exchange are determined. Using the obtained thermo-dynamic and sorption characteristics, the possible separation of anionic complexes of erbium and cerium with Trilon B is demonstrated via frontal ion-exchange chromatography. A series of sorption capacities of anionic complexes of cerium, yttrium, and erbium is presented using the values of the Gibbs energy of ion exchange.

  2. Polyethylenimine-modified fungal biomass as a high-capacity biosorbent for Cr(VI) anions: sorption capacity and uptake mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shubo; Ting, Yen Peng

    2005-11-01

    Heavy metal pollution in the aqueous environment is a problem of global concern. Biosorption has been considered as a promising technology for the removal of low levels of toxic metals from industrial effluents and natural waters. A modified fungal biomass of Penicillium chrysogenum with positive surface charges was prepared by grafting polyethylenimine (PEI) onto the biomass surface in a two-step reaction. The presence of PEI on the biomass surface was verified by FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. Due to the high density of amine groups in the long chains of PEI molecules on the surface, the modified biomass was found to possess positive zeta potential at pH below 10.4 as well as high sorption capacity for anionic Cr(VI). Using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, the maximum sorption capacity for Cr(VI) at a pH range of 4.3-5.5 was 5.37 mmol/g of biomass dry weight, the highest sorption capacity for Cr(VI) compared to other sorbents reported in the literature. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) provided evidence of chromium aggregates formed on the biomass surface. XPS results verified the presence of Cr(III) on the biomass surface in the pH range 2.5-10.5, suggesting that some Cr(VI) anions were reduced to Cr(III) during the sorption. The sorption kinetics indicated that redox reaction occurred on the biomass surface, and whether the converted Cr(III) ions were released to solution or adsorbed on the biomass depended on the solution pH. Sorption mechanisms including electrostatic interaction, chelation, and precipitation were found to be involved in the complex sorption of chromium on the PEI-modified biomass.

  3. An Automated Anion-Exchange Method forthe Selective Sorption of five Groups ofTrace Elements in Neutron-IrradiatedBiological Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsahl, K.

    1966-02-01

    An anion-exchange method based on fast selective sorption steps from mixtures of sulfuric, hydrobromic, and hydrochloric acid solutions has been developed for the separation of five different groups of radioactive trace elements in neutron-irradiated biological material. The separations are performed automatically with a simple proportioning pump apparatus. The apparatus allows the exact adjustment of influent solutions to the series of ion-exchange columns. The practical application of the method is described in detail. The successful use of the method is practically independent on the level of Na activity present in the sample

  4. The many ways of making anionic clays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Together with hydrotalcite-like layered double hydroxides, bivalent and trivalent metal hydroxides and their hydroxy salts are actually anionic clays consisting of positively charged hydroxide layers with anions intercalated in the interlayer region. The anionic clays exhibit anion sorption, anion diffusion and exchange ...

  5. Sorption of radionuclides on geologic media - A literature survey. I: Fission Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, K.; Allard, B.

    1983-01-01

    The fission products investigated were cobalt, nickel, strontium, cesium, technetium and iodine. Parameters of importance to sorption have been identified and a tabulation of distribution coefficients for groundwater conditions (pH 7-9, low to medium ionic strength) is included in the report. For cobalt and nickel the sorption is related to hydrolysis. High sorption is observed at a pH where hydrolysis become important and the sorption is high as long as cationic hydrolysis products are formed. When pH is increased or negatively charged hydrolysis products may be formed and the sorption decreases. For strontium hydrolysis is of no importance at the normal pH of groundwater, but in groundwater above pH 9 carbonate complexation may occur. For most minerals, the sorption is low, ususally with a pronounced pH dependence. Other important parameters are ionic strength and CEC. A nonselective sorption due to electrostatic interactions between negatively charged mineral surfaces and Sr 2+ seems to occur. For cesium no hydrolysis may be expected and pH has less importance than for Sr. For most minerals, however, the sorption of Cs is higher than for Sr. Important parameters are nuclide concentration and ionic strength. A selective for Cs-sorption is found for some minerals, mostly sheet-silicates. For technetium sorption is due to a reduction of TcO 4 - TcO 2 (s) and as anions are poorly sorbed, the sorption is dependent on the redox potential. Iodine is also anionic and poorly sorbed. Minerals containing ions capable of forming iodides with low solubility (Ag, Mg, Pb etc) are, however, sorbing I - . (Author)

  6. Study of sorption of platinum metals, gold and silver by phosphonium hydroxide antonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khudaybergenov, U.; Tajibaev, D.; Yuldasheva, K.T.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study and to use a phosphonium hydroxide anionite for concentrating of trace amounts of platinum metals, gold and silver from the mixed solutions composed of copper, nickel, cobalt, iron and zinc. The experiments were done using radionuclides of determined and interfered elements. Conditions for sorption concentrating of the noble metals by phosphonium hydroxide were determined by the selectivity of the phosphonium hydroxide to the noble metals from acid solutions. A noble metal sorption degree was observed from the experiments to be rather high at the acid concentration level of 0.1-0.5 M. At higher than 0.5 M acid concentration sorption activity decreased. With increase of chlorine acid-concentration sorption of palladium was observed to considerably decrease, while iridium sorption was increased. The latter fact can be caused by lowering of hydration of iridium ions. A considerable decrease of capability of the noble metal sorption from nitric acid solutions was observed. It is possible that HNO 3 anions are strongly bound with the anionite functional group. Thus, nitric acid reduces sorption of the noble metals in the following order: Ir>Ru>Pd>Pt>Os, and it does not have effect on the sorption activity of Au and Ag. Increase of H 2 SO 4 concentration in the solution has slightly reduced noble metal sorption activity. Copper, nickel, iron and other metals accompanying the noble metals, at concentration ratio of 1:1000 have resulted in decrease of sorption activity of the noble metals, although sorption of iridium was increased in the presence of copper, silver and nickel. We suggest that copper, silver and nickel have formed the complex functional compounds, which can probably undergo an anion exchange

  7. EXAFS and FTIR studies of selenite and selenate sorption by alkoxide-free sol–gel generated Mg–Al–CO 3 layered double hydroxide with very labile interlayer anions

    KAUST Repository

    Chubar, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. Current research on Layered Double Hydroxides (LDHs, also known as hydrotalcites, HTs) is predominantly focused on their intercalations, but the industrial application of LDHs for anion exchange adsorption has not yet been achieved. It was recently recognized that, to develop LDH applications, these materials should be produced using methods other than direct co-precipitation. Mg-Al-CO3LDH produced using an alkoxide-free sol-gel synthesis showed exceptional removal properties for aqueous selenium species. Se K-edge EXAFS/XANES and FTIR studies (supporting the data by XRD patterns) were performed to explain the unusual adsorptive performance of Mg-Al LDH by revealing the molecular-level mechanism of HSeO3 -, SeO4 2-and {HSeO3 -+ SeO4 2-} uptake at pH 5, 7 and 8.5. The role of inner-sphere complexation (exhibited by inorganic adsorbents with good performance) in adsorption of both selenium aqueous species was not confirmed. However, Mg-Al LDH fully met the other expectations regarding the involvement of the interlayer anions. The interlayer carbonate (due to its favorable speciation and generous HT hydration) gave a "second breath" to selenite sorption and was the only mechanism that controlled the removal of Se(vi). Because inner sphere complexation was the leading mechanism for selenite removal, ion exchange via surface OH-and interlayer CO3 2-species was the only mechanism for selenate removal; both of these species were easily bound to Mg-Al LDH (on its surface and gently parked into the interlayer forming a multilayer without violation of the structure of Mg-Al-CO3LDH). This work provides the first theoretical explanation of why it is more difficult to sorb selenate than selenite and which material should be used for this purpose. This journal is

  8. EXAFS and FTIR studies of selenite and selenate sorption by alkoxide-free sol–gel generated Mg–Al–CO 3 layered double hydroxide with very labile interlayer anions

    KAUST Repository

    Chubar, Natalia

    2014-08-08

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. Current research on Layered Double Hydroxides (LDHs, also known as hydrotalcites, HTs) is predominantly focused on their intercalations, but the industrial application of LDHs for anion exchange adsorption has not yet been achieved. It was recently recognized that, to develop LDH applications, these materials should be produced using methods other than direct co-precipitation. Mg-Al-CO3LDH produced using an alkoxide-free sol-gel synthesis showed exceptional removal properties for aqueous selenium species. Se K-edge EXAFS/XANES and FTIR studies (supporting the data by XRD patterns) were performed to explain the unusual adsorptive performance of Mg-Al LDH by revealing the molecular-level mechanism of HSeO3 -, SeO4 2-and {HSeO3 -+ SeO4 2-} uptake at pH 5, 7 and 8.5. The role of inner-sphere complexation (exhibited by inorganic adsorbents with good performance) in adsorption of both selenium aqueous species was not confirmed. However, Mg-Al LDH fully met the other expectations regarding the involvement of the interlayer anions. The interlayer carbonate (due to its favorable speciation and generous HT hydration) gave a "second breath" to selenite sorption and was the only mechanism that controlled the removal of Se(vi). Because inner sphere complexation was the leading mechanism for selenite removal, ion exchange via surface OH-and interlayer CO3 2-species was the only mechanism for selenate removal; both of these species were easily bound to Mg-Al LDH (on its surface and gently parked into the interlayer forming a multilayer without violation of the structure of Mg-Al-CO3LDH). This work provides the first theoretical explanation of why it is more difficult to sorb selenate than selenite and which material should be used for this purpose. This journal is

  9. Superior catalytic effect of TiF{sub 3} over TiCl{sub 3} in improving the hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}: Catalytic role of fluorine anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, L.-P.; Kang, X.-D.; Dai, H.-B.; Liang, Y.; Fang, Z.-Z.; Wang, P.-J. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, P. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)], E-mail: pingwang@imr.ac.cn; Cheng, H.-M. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2009-04-15

    TiF{sub 3} shows a superior catalytic effect over TiCl{sub 3} in improving the hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}. Combined phase analysis and microstructure characterization suggest that both titanium halide additives react with host MgH{sub 2} in a similar way. However, systematic X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal that the incorporated fluorine (F) differs significantly from its analog chlorine (Cl) in terms of bonding state. The asymmetry of F 1s spectra and the sputtering-induced peak shift suggest that, in addition to the Mg-F bond, a new Ti-F-Mg bonding is formed in the TiF{sub 3}-doped MgH{sub 2}. In contrast, only one stable binding state of Cl is identified in the form of MgCl{sub 2} for the TiCl{sub 3}-doped MgH{sub 2}. In combination with the designed experiments, these findings suggest that the generation of active F-containing species may be responsible for the advantage of TiF{sub 3} over TiCl{sub 3} in improving both the absorption and desorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}. Fundamentally, it emphasizes the functionality of F anion in tuning the activity of compound catalyst.

  10. Superior catalytic effect of TiF3 over TiCl3 in improving the hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH2: Catalytic role of fluorine anion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, L.-P.; Kang, X.-D.; Dai, H.-B.; Liang, Y.; Fang, Z.-Z.; Wang, P.-J.; Wang, P.; Cheng, H.-M.

    2009-01-01

    TiF 3 shows a superior catalytic effect over TiCl 3 in improving the hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH 2 . Combined phase analysis and microstructure characterization suggest that both titanium halide additives react with host MgH 2 in a similar way. However, systematic X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal that the incorporated fluorine (F) differs significantly from its analog chlorine (Cl) in terms of bonding state. The asymmetry of F 1s spectra and the sputtering-induced peak shift suggest that, in addition to the Mg-F bond, a new Ti-F-Mg bonding is formed in the TiF 3 -doped MgH 2 . In contrast, only one stable binding state of Cl is identified in the form of MgCl 2 for the TiCl 3 -doped MgH 2 . In combination with the designed experiments, these findings suggest that the generation of active F-containing species may be responsible for the advantage of TiF 3 over TiCl 3 in improving both the absorption and desorption kinetics of MgH 2 . Fundamentally, it emphasizes the functionality of F anion in tuning the activity of compound catalyst

  11. Enhancement of sorption capacity of cocoa shell biomass modified with non-thermal plasma for removal of both cationic and anionic dyes from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takam, Brice; Acayanka, Elie; Kamgang, Georges Y; Pedekwang, Merlin T; Laminsi, Samuel

    2017-07-01

    Removal of cationic dye, Azur II, and anionic dye, Reactive Red 2 (RR-2) from aqueous solutions, has been successfully achieved by using a modified agricultural biomaterial waste: cocoa shell husk (Theobroma cacao) treated by gliding arc plasma (CPHP). The biomass in its natural form CPHN and modified form CPHP was characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and point of zero charge (pH pzc ). Experimental variables such as initial pH, contact time, and temperature were optimized for adsorptive characteristics of CPHN and CPHP. The results show that the removal of the Azur II dye was favorable in the basic pH region (pH 10) while the Reactive Red 2 dye was favorable in the acidic pH region (pH 2). The minimum equilibrium time for Azur II and RR-2 dye was obtained after 40 and 240 min, respectively. The adsorption kinetics and isotherm data obtained were best described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic rate model and a combination of Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm models. This work indicates that the plasma-treated raw materials are good alternative multi-purpose sorbents for the removal of many coexisting pollutants from aqueous solutions.

  12. Sorption mechanisms and sorption models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedoroff, M.; Lefevre, G.; Duc, M.; Neskovic, C.; Milonjic, S.

    2004-01-01

    Sorption at the solid-liquid interfaces play a major role in many phenomena and technologies: chemical separations, catalysis, biological processes, transport of toxic and radioactive species in surface and underground waters. The long term safety of radioactive waste repositories is based on artificial and natural barriers, intended to sorb radionuclides after the moment when the storage matrixes and containers will be corroded. Predictions on the efficiency of sorption for more than 10 6 years have to be done in order to demonstrate the safety of such depositories, what is a goal never encountered in the history of sciences and technology. For all these purposes, and, especially for the long term prediction, acquiring of sorption data constitutes only a first step of studies. Modeling based on a very good knowledge of sorption mechanisms is needed. In this review, we shall examine the main approaches and models used to quantify sorption processes, including results taken from the literature and from our own studies. We shall compare sorption models and examine their adequacy with sorption mechanisms. The cited references are only a few examples of the numerous articles published in that field. (orig.)

  13. Anion retention in soil: Possible application to reduce migration of buried technetium and iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, B.; Schulz, R.K.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes a literature review of our present knowledge of the anion exchange properties of a number of soils and minerals, which may potentially be used as anion exchangers to retard migration of such anions as iodide (I - ), iodate (IO 3 - ) and pertechnetate (TcO 4 - ) away from disposal site. The amorphous clays allophane and imogolite, are found to be among the most important soil components capable of developing appreciable amounts of positive charge for anion exchange even at about neutral pH. Decreases in the SiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 ratio and soil pH result in an increase in soil AEC. Allophane and imogolite rich soils have an AEC ranging from 1 to 18 meq/100g at pH about 6. Highly weathered soils dominated by Fe and Al oxides and kaolinite may develop a significant amount of AEC as soil pH falls. The retention of iodine (I) and technetium (T c ), by soils is associated with both soil organic matter, and Fe and Al oxides, whereas sorption on layer silicate minerals in negligible. Fe and Al oxides become more important in the retention of anionic I - , IO 3 - , and TcO 4 - as pH falls, since more positive charge is developed on the oxide surfaces. Although few studies, if any, have been conducted on I and T c sorption by soil allophane and imogolite, it is estimated that a surface plough soil (2 million pounds soil per acre) with 5 meq/100g AEC, as is commonly found in andisols, shall retain approximately 5900 kg I and 4500 kg T c . It is conceivable that an anion exchanger such as an andisol could be used to modify the near field environment of a radioactive waste disposal facility. This whole disposal system would then offer similar migration resistance to anions as is normally afforded to cations by usual and normal soils. 93 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs

  14. Are superhalogens without halogen ligand capable of transcending traditional halogen-based superhalogens? Ab initio case study of binuclear anions based on pseudohalogen ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jin-Feng; Sun, Yin-Yin; Li, Miao-Miao; Li, Jian-Li; Yin, Bing; Bai, Hongcun

    2015-01-01

    The superhalogen properties of polynuclear structures without halogen ligand are theoretically explored here for several [M 2 (CN) 5 ] −1 (M =  Ca, Be) clusters. At CCSD(T) level, these clusters have been confirmed to be superhalogens due to their high vertical electron detachment energies (VDE). The largest one is 9.70 eV for [Ca 2 (CN) 5 ] −1 which is even higher than those of corresponding traditional structures based on fluorine or chlorine ligands. Therefore the superhalogens stronger than the traditional halogen-based structures could be realized by ligands other than halogen atoms. Compared with CCSD(T), outer valence Green’s function (OVGF) method either overestimates or underestimates the VDEs for different structures while MP2 results are generally consistent in the aspect of relative values. The extra electrons of the highest VDE anions here aggregate on the bridging CN units with non-negligible distribution occurring on other CN units too. These two features lower both the potential and kinetic energies of the extra electron respectively and thus lead to high VDE. Besides superhalogen properties, the structures, relative stabilities and thermodynamic stabilities with respect to the detachment of cyanide ligand were also investigated. The sum of these results identifies the potential of polynuclear structures with pseudohalogen ligand as suitable candidates with enhanced superhalogens properties

  15. Are superhalogens without halogen ligand capable of transcending traditional halogen-based superhalogens? Ab initio case study of binuclear anions based on pseudohalogen ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Feng; Sun, Yin-Yin; Bai, Hongcun; Li, Miao-Miao; Li, Jian-Li; Yin, Bing

    2015-06-01

    The superhalogen properties of polynuclear structures without halogen ligand are theoretically explored here for several [M2(CN)5]-1 (M = Ca, Be) clusters. At CCSD(T) level, these clusters have been confirmed to be superhalogens due to their high vertical electron detachment energies (VDE). The largest one is 9.70 eV for [Ca2(CN)5]-1 which is even higher than those of corresponding traditional structures based on fluorine or chlorine ligands. Therefore the superhalogens stronger than the traditional halogen-based structures could be realized by ligands other than halogen atoms. Compared with CCSD(T), outer valence Green's function (OVGF) method either overestimates or underestimates the VDEs for different structures while MP2 results are generally consistent in the aspect of relative values. The extra electrons of the highest VDE anions here aggregate on the bridging CN units with non-negligible distribution occurring on other CN units too. These two features lower both the potential and kinetic energies of the extra electron respectively and thus lead to high VDE. Besides superhalogen properties, the structures, relative stabilities and thermodynamic stabilities with respect to the detachment of cyanide ligand were also investigated. The sum of these results identifies the potential of polynuclear structures with pseudohalogen ligand as suitable candidates with enhanced superhalogens properties.

  16. Are superhalogens without halogen ligand capable of transcending traditional halogen-based superhalogens? Ab initio case study of binuclear anions based on pseudohalogen ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jin-Feng; Sun, Yin-Yin; Li, Miao-Miao; Li, Jian-Li; Yin, Bing, E-mail: rayinyin@nwu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Physico-Inorganic Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Bai, Hongcun [Key Laboratory of Energy Source and Chemical Engineering, Ningxia University, Yinchuan, Ningxia 750021 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The superhalogen properties of polynuclear structures without halogen ligand are theoretically explored here for several [M{sub 2}(CN){sub 5}]{sup −1} (M =  Ca, Be) clusters. At CCSD(T) level, these clusters have been confirmed to be superhalogens due to their high vertical electron detachment energies (VDE). The largest one is 9.70 eV for [Ca{sub 2}(CN){sub 5}]{sup −1} which is even higher than those of corresponding traditional structures based on fluorine or chlorine ligands. Therefore the superhalogens stronger than the traditional halogen-based structures could be realized by ligands other than halogen atoms. Compared with CCSD(T), outer valence Green’s function (OVGF) method either overestimates or underestimates the VDEs for different structures while MP2 results are generally consistent in the aspect of relative values. The extra electrons of the highest VDE anions here aggregate on the bridging CN units with non-negligible distribution occurring on other CN units too. These two features lower both the potential and kinetic energies of the extra electron respectively and thus lead to high VDE. Besides superhalogen properties, the structures, relative stabilities and thermodynamic stabilities with respect to the detachment of cyanide ligand were also investigated. The sum of these results identifies the potential of polynuclear structures with pseudohalogen ligand as suitable candidates with enhanced superhalogens properties.

  17. EXAFS and FTIR studies of selenite and selenate sorption by alkoxide-free sol-gel generated Mg-Al-CO3 layered double hydroxide with very labile interlayer anions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chubar, N.

    Current research on Layered Double Hydroxides (LDHs, also known as hydrotalcites, HTs) is predominantly focused on their intercalations, but the industrial application of LDHs for anion exchange adsorption has not yet been achieved. It was recently recognized that, to develop LDH applications, these

  18. Modeling approaches of competitive sorption and transport of trace metals and metalloids in soils: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, H M; Zhang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Competition among various heavy metal species for available adsorption sites on soil matrix surfaces can enhance the mobility of contaminants in the soil environment. Accurate predictions of the fate and behavior of heavy metals in soils and geologic media requires the understanding of the underlying competitive-sorption and transport processes. In this review, we present equilibrium and kinetic models for competitive heavy metal sorption and transport in soils. Several examples are summarized to illustrate the impact of competing ions on the reactivities and mobility of heavy metals in the soil-water environment. We demonstrate that equilibrium Freundlich approaches can be extended to account for competitive sorption of cations and anions with the incorporation of competition coefficients associated with each reaction. Furthermore, retention models of the multiple-reaction type including the two-site nonlinear equilibrium-kinetic models and the concurrent- and consecutive-multireaction models were modified to describe commonly observed time-dependent behaviors of heavy metals in soils. We also show that equilibrium Langmuir and kinetic second-order models can be extended to simulate the competitive sorption and transport in soils, although the use of such models is limited due to their simplifying assumptions. A major drawback of the empirically based Freundlich and Langmuir approaches is that their associated parameters are specific for each soil. Alternatively, geochemical models that are based on ion-exchange and surface-complexation concepts are capable of quantifying the competitive behavior of several chemical species under a wide range of environmental conditions. Such geochemical models, however, are incapable of describing the time-dependent sorption behavior of heavy metal ions in competitive systems. Further research is needed to develop a general-purpose model based on physical and chemical mechanisms governing competitive sorption in soils. Copyright

  19. Iodine sorption by microwave irradiated hydrotalcites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, S.P. [Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, C.P. 72570, Puebla, Pue (Mexico); Instituto Politecnico Nacional, ESIQIE, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Fetter, G. [Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, C.P. 72570, Puebla, Pue (Mexico)]. E-mail: geolarfetter@yahoo.com.mx; Bosch, P. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, C.P. 04510, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bulbulian, S. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, C.P. 11801, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-12-15

    Mg-Al hydrotalcite-like compounds (HT) were prepared by the microwave method on the one hand with ethoxide-acetylacetonate and on the other with acetylacetonate as precursors. They presented a maximum sorption capacity of 2.179 and 1.517 meq of {sup 131}I{sup -}/g of hydrotalcite respectively. When the hydrotalcites were calcined and rehydrated in a {sup 131}I{sup -} solution, iodine sorption decreased in both samples to 1.515 and 1.446, respectively. The corresponding value for nitrated hydrotalcite which was prepared by the conventional method for comparison purposes, was 0.570. The radionuclide content in hydrotalcites was determined by {gamma}-spectrometry. {sup 131}I{sup -} sorption is dependent on two main parameters: one is the type of the interlayer organic material and the second the surface area. It was found that hydrotalcites prepared with ethoxide-acetylacetonate were better sorbents for {sup 131}I{sup -} than those with acetylacetonate. Still, if the specific surface area increased, {sup 131}I{sup -}sorption increased as well; nitrated HT resulted in low specific surface area and a low sorption capacity. It is, therefore, concluded that organic residues present in the samples prepared by the microwave method favor the sorption of radioactive anions, in particular {sup 131}I{sup -} if compared with nitrated and/or carbonate interlayered hydrotalcites.

  20. Contribution of attendant anions on cadmium toxicity to soil enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Haixia; Kong, Long; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; He, Wenxiang

    2017-11-01

    Sorption and desorption are critical processes to control the mobility and biotoxicity of cadmium (Cd) in soils. It is known that attendant anion species of heavy metals could affect metal adsorption on soils and might further alter their biotoxicity. However, for Cd, the influence of attendant anions on its sorption in soils and subsequent toxicity on soil enzymes are still unknown. In this work, four Cd compounds with different salt anions (SO 4 2- , NO 3 - , Cl - , and Ac - ) were selected to investigate their impact of on the sorption, soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) and alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP). Thus, a series of simulated Cd pollution batch experiments including measuring adsorption-desorption behavior of Cd on soils and soil enzyme activities were carried out. Results showed that CdSO 4 exhibited highest sorption capacity among the tested soils except in Hunan soil. The Cd sorption with NO 3 - displayed a similar behavior with Cl - on all tested soils. Compared with soil properties, all four kinds of anions on Cd sorption played a more significant role affecting Cd ecological toxicity to soil DHA and ALP. Cd in acetate or nitrate form appears more sensitive towards DHA than sulphate and chloride, while the later pair is more toxic towards ALP than the former. These results have important implications for evaluation of Cd contamination using soil enzyme as bioindicator. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pu Anion Exchange Process Intensification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M. L.

    2017-01-01

    This research is focused on improving the efficiency of the anion exchange process for purifying plutonium. While initially focused on plutonium, the technology could also be applied to other ion-exchange processes. Work in FY17 focused on the improvement and optimization of porous foam columns that were initially developed in FY16. These foam columns were surface functionalized with poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) to provide the Pu specific anion-exchange sites. Two different polymerization methods were explored for maximizing the surface functionalization with the PVP. The open-celled polymeric foams have large open pores and large surface areas available for sorption. The fluid passes through the large open pores of this material, allowing convection to be the dominant mechanism by which mass transport takes place. These materials generally have very low densities, open-celled structures with high cell interconnectivity, small cell sizes, uniform cell size distributions, and high structural integrity. These porous foam columns provide advantages over the typical porous resin beads by eliminating the slow diffusion through resin beads, making the anion-exchange sites easily accessible on the foam surfaces. The best performing samples exceeded the Pu capacity of the commercially available resin, and also offered the advantage of sharper elution profiles, resulting in a more concentrated product, with less loss of material to the dilute heads and tails cuts. An alternate approach to improving the efficiency of this process was also explored through the development of a microchannel array system for performing the anion exchange.

  2. Pu Anion Exchange Process Intensification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-10-06

    This research is focused on improving the efficiency of the anion exchange process for purifying plutonium. While initially focused on plutonium, the technology could also be applied to other ion-exchange processes. Work in FY17 focused on the improvement and optimization of porous foam columns that were initially developed in FY16. These foam columns were surface functionalized with poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) to provide the Pu specific anion-exchange sites. Two different polymerization methods were explored for maximizing the surface functionalization with the PVP. The open-celled polymeric foams have large open pores and large surface areas available for sorption. The fluid passes through the large open pores of this material, allowing convection to be the dominant mechanism by which mass transport takes place. These materials generally have very low densities, open-celled structures with high cell interconnectivity, small cell sizes, uniform cell size distributions, and high structural integrity. These porous foam columns provide advantages over the typical porous resin beads by eliminating the slow diffusion through resin beads, making the anion-exchange sites easily accessible on the foam surfaces. The best performing samples exceeded the Pu capacity of the commercially available resin, and also offered the advantage of sharper elution profiles, resulting in a more concentrated product, with less loss of material to the dilute heads and tails cuts. An alternate approach to improving the efficiency of this process was also explored through the development of a microchannel array system for performing the anion exchange.

  3. Sorption of technetium and its analogue rhenium on bentonite material under aerobic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinsova, H.; Koudelkova, M.; Konirova, R.; Vecernik, P.; Jedinakova-Krizova, V.

    2003-01-01

    The uptake of technetium on bentonite materials has been studied from the point of view of characterization of long-term radioactive elements behavior in nuclear waste repository. Bentonite R (locality Rokle, Czech Republic) and two types of model groundwater (granitic and bentonite) were selected for the sorption experiments. It is generally known that bentonite materials show an excellent cation-exchange capacity and, on the other hand, a poor uptake of anions. Technetium occurs under aerobic conditions in its most stable oxidation state (+VII) as pertechnetate, which makes a question of its sorption on bentonite more complex when compared with e.g. Cs + or Sr 2+ . To increase the K d values for technetium sorption on bentonite, it is necessary to carry out the experiments under anaerobic conditions in the presence of reducing agent, which is capable to lower the oxidation state of technetium which enables its successful immobilization. The aim of our research has been to find out the conditions suitable for the technetium sorption on selected bentonite under oxidizing conditions. The sorption experiments with Tc-99 on bentonite have been carried out by batch method. The influence of the addition of different materials (e.g. activated carbon, graphite, Fe 2+ , Fe) with bentonite, the effect of solid:aqueous phase ratio and a pH value on the percentage of technetium uptake and on the K d values were tested. Perrhenate was selected as an analogue of pertechnetate in non-active experiments of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and isotachophoresis (ITP). The percentage of rhenium sorbed on bentonite material was determined from the decrease of perrhenate peak area (CE) and from the shortening of the ITP zone corresponding to perrhenate. Both electromigration methods provided comparable results. The results obtained in this study with non-active material were compared to those of technetium acquired by radiometry and polarography. (authors)

  4. Sorption of chromium(VI) and chromium(III) on aluminium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.

    1986-01-01

    Factors that influence the sorption of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) on aluminium hydroxide were investigated. The sorption of chromates decreases as the pH of the suspension increases. The mechanism of CrOsub(4)sup(2-) sorption was interpreted in terms of reactions between chromates and -OH and/or Hsub(2)O groups at the hydroxide/liquid interface. It was shown that chromates are more tightly sorbed on aluminium hydroxide compared to other anions, e.g. chlorides. On the other hand, specifically absorbed anions, such as molybdates, compete strongly with chromates for the sorption sites. The sorption of chromium(III) increases with the pH of the suspension. Also, the sorption of chromium(III) is suppressed in the presence of citrate ions. The best conditions for the fixation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) by aluminium hydroxide are presented. (author)

  5. Comparison of neptunium sorption results using batch and column techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triay, I.R.; Furlano, A.C.; Weaver, S.C.; Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

    1996-08-01

    We used crushed-rock columns to study the sorption retardation of neptunium by zeolitic, devitrified, and vitric tuffs typical of those at the site of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We used two sodium bicarbonate waters (groundwater from Well J-13 at the site and water prepared to simulate groundwater from Well UE-25p No. 1) under oxidizing conditions. It was found that values of the sorption distribution coefficient, Kd, obtained from these column experiments under flowing conditions, regardless of the water or the water velocity used, agreed well with those obtained earlier from batch sorption experiments under static conditions. The batch sorption distribution coefficient can be used to predict the arrival time for neptunium eluted through the columns. On the other hand, the elution curves showed dispersivity, which implies that neptunium sorption in these tuffs may be nonlinear, irreversible, or noninstantaneous. As a result, use of a batch sorption distribution coefficient to calculate neptunium transport through Yucca Mountain tuffs would yield conservative values for neptunium release from the site. We also noted that neptunium (present as the anionic neptunyl carbonate complex) never eluted prior to tritiated water, which implies that charge exclusion does not appear to exclude neptunium from the tuff pores. The column experiments corroborated the trends observed in batch sorption experiments: neptunium sorption onto devitrified and vitric tuffs is minimal and sorption onto zeolitic tuffs decreases as the amount of sodium and bicarbonate/carbonate in the water increases

  6. Radionuclide sorption kinetics and column sorption studies with Columbia River basalts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.

    1983-09-01

    The kinetics of radionuclide sorption and desorption reactions in basalt-groundwater systems were evaluated at 60 degrees C using a batch equilibration method. It was found that many sorption reactions on surfaces of fresh (unaltered) basalt from the Umtanum and Cohassett flows are slow. Some reactions require more than 50 days to reach a steady state. Sorption of neptunium and uranium in oxidizing (air saturated) groundwater appears to be controlled by slow reduction of these elements by the basalt surfaces. The resulting lower oxidation states are more strongly sorbed. Technetium and selenium, which are anionic under oxidizing conditions, are not measurably sorbed on fresh basalt surfaces, but are slightly sorbed on the altered surfaces of flow top basalt. Under reducing conditions, where the groundwater contains dilute hydrazine, sorption is faster for neptunium, uranium, technetium, selenium, and lead. Plutonium sorption rates were not affected by the groundwater Eh. It was shown that radium was precipitated rather than sorbed under the conditions of these experiments. Umtanum flow top material sorbed radionuclides much faster than fresh basalt surfaces due to its greater surface area and cation exchange capacity. Desorption rates for plutonium, uranium, neptunium, technetium, and selenium were generally much less than sorption rates (especially for reducing conditions). These radionuclides are irreversibly sorbed on the basalts. 25 refs., 20 figs., 19 tabs

  7. Supramolecular Chemistry of Environmentally Relevant Anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman-James, Kristin; Moyer, B.A.; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this project is the development of highly selective extractants for anions targeting important and timely problems of critical interest to the EMSP mission. In particular, sulfate poses a special problem in cleaning up the Hanford waste tanks in that it interferes with vitrification, but available technologies for sulfate removal are limited. The basic chemical aspects of anion receptor design of functional pH independent systems as well as design of separations strategies for selective and efficient removal of targeted anions have been probed. Key findings include: (1) some of the first synthetic sulfate-selective anion-binding agents; (2) simple, structure-based methods for modifying the intrinsic anion selectivity of a given class of anion receptors; and (3) the first system capable of extracting sulfate from acidic, nitrate-containing aqueous media. Receptor design, structural influences on anion binding affinities, and findings from liquid-liquid extraction studies will be discussed

  8. Anion retention in soil: Possible application to reduce migration of buried technetium and iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, B.; Schulz, R.K. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Soil Science)

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes a literature review of our present knowledge of the anion exchange properties of a number of soils and minerals, which may potentially be used as anion exchangers to retard migration of such anions as iodide (I{sup {minus}}), iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) and pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) away from disposal site. The amorphous clays allophane and imogolite, are found to be among the most important soil components capable of developing appreciable amounts of positive charge for anion exchange even at about neutral pH. Decreases in the SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio and soil pH result in an increase in soil AEC. Allophane and imogolite rich soils have an AEC ranging from 1 to 18 meq/100g at pH about 6. Highly weathered soils dominated by Fe and Al oxides and kaolinite may develop a significant amount of AEC as soil pH falls. The retention of iodine (I) and technetium ({Tc}), by soils is associated with both soil organic matter, and Fe and Al oxides, whereas sorption on layer silicate minerals in negligible. Fe and Al oxides become more important in the retention of anionic I{sup {minus}}, IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} as pH falls, since more positive charge is developed on the oxide surfaces. Although few studies, if any, have been conducted on I and {Tc} sorption by soil allophane and imogolite, it is estimated that a surface plough soil (2 million pounds soil per acre) with 5 meq/100g AEC, as is commonly found in andisols, shall retain approximately 5900 kg I and 4500 kg {Tc}. It is conceivable that an anion exchanger such as an andisol could be used to modify the near field environment of a radioactive waste disposal facility. This whole disposal system would then offer similar migration resistance to anions as is normally afforded to cations by usual and normal soils. 93 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Sorption of citalopram, irbesartan and fexofenadine in soils: Estimation of sorption coefficients from soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, Aleš; Kodešová, Radka; Bauerová, Martina; Golovko, Oksana; Kočárek, Martin; Fér, Miroslav; Koba, Olga; Nikodem, Antonín; Grabic, Roman

    2018-03-01

    The sorption of 3 pharmaceuticals, which may exist in 4 different forms depending on the solution pH (irbesartan in cationic, neutral and anionic, fexofenadine in cationic, zwitter-ionic and anionic, and citalopram cationic and neutral), in seven different soils was studied. The measured sorption isotherms were described by Freundlich equations, and the sorption coefficients, K F (for the fixed n exponent for each compound), were related to the soil properties to derive relationships for estimating the sorption coefficients from the soil properties (i.e., pedotransfer rules). The largest sorption was obtained for citalopram (average K F value for n = 1 was 1838 cm 3  g -1 ) followed by fexofenadine (K F  = 35.1 cm 3/n μg 1-1/n g -1 , n = 1.19) and irbesartan (K F  = 3.96 cm 3/n μg 1-1/n g -1 , n = 1.10). The behavior of citalopram (CIT) in soils was different than the behaviors of irbesartan (IRB) and fexofenadine (FEX). Different trends were documented according to the correlation coefficients between the K F values for different compounds (R IRB,FEX  = 0.895, p-valuesoil properties in the pedotransfer functions. While the K F value for citalopram was positively related to base cation saturation (BCS) or sorption complex saturation (SCS) and negatively correlated to the organic carbon content (Cox), the K F values of irbesartan and fexofenadine were negatively related to BCS, SCS or the clay content and positively related to Cox. The best estimates were obtained by combining BCS and Cox for citalopram (R 2  = 93.4), SCS and Cox for irbesartan (R 2  = 96.3), and clay content and Cox for fexofenadine (R 2  = 82.9). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Co-contaminants and factors affecting the sorption behaviour of two sulfonamides in pasture soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Prakash; Sarmah, Ajit K.; Manley-Harris, Merilyn

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of soil pH, organic carbon, ionic strength and steroid hormones on the sorption of sulfamethoxazole (SMO) and sulfachloropyridazine (SCP) in three pastoral soils of New Zealand. A model linking sorbate speciation with species-specific sorption coefficients describing the pH dependence of the apparent sorption coefficients was used to derive the fraction of each species of SMO. All soils displayed a decrease in sorption when pH was increased, with SMO exhibiting the highest sorption at pH 2. The cationic form of SMO appeared to sorb more close to pH ≥ pK a1 and, when pH ≥ pK a2 (6.5, 7.5 and 8.5) the anionic species seems to dominate, however, its sorption affinity to all soils was low. SMO sorption was affected by ionic strengths and organic carbon content, while the presence of hormones showed only a subtle decrease in SCP sorption in a selected model pasture soil. -- Highlights: •The effect of OC content on sulfamethoxazole sorption is nullified by the pH effect. •Steroid hormone has a subtle influence on the sulfachloropyridazine sorption in pastoral soil. •Increased hormone concentrations decrease sulfachloropyridazine sorption in soils. -- Sorption affinity of SMO and SCP are strongly governed by multitude of factors, and variations in these factors can be significant when manure and fertilisers are added to soil

  11. Sorption of 237Pu by the diatom Asterionella formosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, H.L.; Wahlgren, M.A.; Peterson, N.; Nelson, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    Knowledge of the behavior of the man-made radionuclide plutonium within aquatic environments is of fundamental importance in assessing its potential hazards and ecological impact. The sorption of plutonium by phytoplankton and other algae is the dominant factor in the biological transport of plutonium in the aquatic environment, and it has been suggested that sorption by phytoplankton may be responsible for the seasonal loss of plutonium from the epilimnion of Lake Michigan. A unialgal diatom culture was spiked with 237 Pu tracer solution in an attempt to simulate the behavior of fallout plutonium observed in field studies. The results were encouraging in that the 237 Pu in the filtered lake water medium exhibited strongly anionic properties similar to fallout plutonium in Lake Michigan, with limited sorption on container walls. The purpose of the present study was to extend the investigations of the sorption of plutonium by phytoplankton in a controlled environment using continuous culture techniques

  12. Migration and sorption phenomena in packaged foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasekharan, V; Floros, J D

    1997-10-01

    Rapidly developing analytical capabilities and continuously evolving stringent regulations have made food/package interactions a subject of intense research. This article focuses on: (1) the migration of package components such as oligomers and monomers, processing aids, additives, and residual reactants in to packaged foods, and (2) sorption of food components such as flavors, lipids, and moisture into packages. Principles of diffusion and thermodynamics are utilized to describe the mathematics of migration and sorption. Mathematical models are developed from first principles, and their applicability is illustrated using numerical simulations and published data. Simulations indicate that available models are system (polymer-penetrant) specific. Furthermore, some models best describe the early stages of migration/sorption, whereas others should be used for the late stages of these phenomena. Migration- and/or sorption-related problems with respect to glass, metal, paper-based and polymeric packaging materials are discussed, and their importance is illustrated using published examples. The effects of migrating and absorbed components on food safety, quality, and the environment are presented for various foods and packaging materials. The impact of currently popular packaging techniques such as microwavable, ovenable, and retortable packaging on migration and sorption are discussed with examples. Analytical techniques for investigating migration and sorption phenomena in food packaging are critically reviewed, with special emphasis on the use and characteristics of food-simulating liquids (FSLs). Finally, domestic and international regulations concerning migration in packaged foods, and their impact on food packaging is briefly presented.

  13. Noble metal extraction and sorption concentrating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrukhin, O.M.; Malofeeva, G.I.

    1985-01-01

    Works performed in the USSR Academy of Sciences GEOCHI laboratory of extraction methods and devoted to selectivity problems of extraction and sorption methods of platinum metal, cadmium and indium concentrating in analytical chemistry are discussed. On choosing complexino. reagent main attention is paid to the selectivity variation based on different stability of metal complexes. Platinum metals are extracted in the form of ion associates when usinq hard, mainly oxyqen-containing, extractants. Coordination-solvated metal complexes are extracted white usinq extractants containing sulfur, trivalent phosphorus and aromatic nitroqen as donor anions. Selectivity is maximum for sulfur- and nitroren-containinq extractants and sorbents. In case of the group extraction of platinum metals sorption is preferable and in case of selective extraction of individual metals, especially, in case of need of relative concentratinq extraction is preferable

  14. Sorption by cation exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B.

    1994-04-01

    A procedure for introducing exchange into geochemical/surface complexation codes is described. Beginning with selectivity coefficients, K c , defined in terms of equivalent fractional ion occupancies, a general expression for the molar based exchange code input parameters, K ex , is derived. In natural systems the uptake of nuclides onto complex sorbents often occurs by more than one mechanism. The incorporation of cation exchange and surface complexation into a geochemical code therefore enables sorption by both mechanisms to be calculated simultaneously. The code and model concepts are tested against sets of experimental data from widely different sorption studies. A proposal is made to set up a data base of selectivity coefficients. Such a data base would form part of a more general one consisting of sorption mechanism specific parameters to be used in conjunction with geochemical/sorption codes to model and predict sorption. (author) 6 figs., 6 tabs., 26 refs

  15. Sorption of U(VI) species on hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, P.; Moore, R.C.; Choppin, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    The sorption of uranyl (UO 2 2+ ) cations to hydroxyapatite was studied as a function of the amount of sorbent, ionic strength, U(VI) concentration, pH and temperature. The rate of uranyl sorption on hydroxyapatite decreased with increased uranyl concentrations. The amount sorbed decreased with increased ionic strength and increased with pH to a maximum at 7-8. The sorption data for UO 2 2+ were fitted well by the Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherms. The anions Cl - , NO 3 - , SO 4 2- and CH 3 COO - decreased the sorption of uranium on hydroxyapatite while S 2 O 3 2- slightly increased it. The sorbed uranium was desorbed by 0.10 M and 1.00 M solutions of HCl and HNO 3 . The thermodynamic parameters for the sorption of UO 2 2+ were measured at temperatures of 298, 313, 323 and 333 K. The temperature dependence confirmed an endothermic heat of sorption. The activation energy for the sorption process was calculated to be +2.75±0.02 kJ/mol. (orig.)

  16. Effect of sediment properties on the sorption of C12-2-LAS in marine and estuarine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico Rico, A.; Temara, A.; Behrends, T.; Hermens, J.L.M.

    2009-01-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) are anionic high production volume surfactants used in the manufacture of cleaning products. Here, we have studied the effect of the characteristics of marine and estuarine sediments on the sorption of LAS. Sorption experiments were performed with single sediment

  17. Sorption data bases and mechanistic sorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    In common with many other countries with a nuclear programme, the Swiss concept for the disposal of radioactive waste is focused on deep burial in specially constructed repositories in geologically stable host rocks. Under such conditions, the most likely means whereby radionuclides might return to the biosphere involves their transport in slowly moving groundwater. The sorption of radionuclides by solid phases in the engineered barriers within the repository, and in the surrounding geological media, limits their release and retards their movement. Performance assessment studies for disposal concepts are carried out by Nagra, the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste, in which various release scenarios are examined, and 'doses to man' calculated. The uptake of radionuclides by immobile phases is one of the pillars upon which the safety case rests. Hence, sorption databases are very important data sets for performance assessments. The methodology lying behind the construction of sorption databases, and some aspects of the supporting experimental work, are briefly described in this report. Flexible, long-term, focused research programmes are required to properly understand the radionuclide/rock/groundwater system, and this is an essential pre-requisite for producing robust state-of-the-art sorption databases. (author)

  18. Sorption data bases and mechanistic sorption studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M.H

    2000-07-01

    In common with many other countries with a nuclear programme, the Swiss concept for the disposal of radioactive waste is focused on deep burial in specially constructed repositories in geologically stable host rocks. Under such conditions, the most likely means whereby radionuclides might return to the biosphere involves their transport in slowly moving groundwater. The sorption of radionuclides by solid phases in the engineered barriers within the repository, and in the surrounding geological media, limits their release and retards their movement. Performance assessment studies for disposal concepts are carried out by Nagra, the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste, in which various release scenarios are examined, and 'doses to man' calculated. The uptake of radionuclides by immobile phases is one of the pillars upon which the safety case rests. Hence, sorption databases are very important data sets for performance assessments. The methodology lying behind the construction of sorption databases, and some aspects of the supporting experimental work, are briefly described in this report. Flexible, long-term, focused research programmes are required to properly understand the radionuclide/rock/groundwater system, and this is an essential pre-requisite for producing robust state-of-the-art sorption databases. (author)

  19. Sorption behaviour of well-defined oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, B.; Olofsson, U.; Torstenfelt, B.; Kipatsi, H.

    1983-05-01

    The sorption of the actinides Am(III), Th(IV), Np(V), Pa(V), U(VI) and Pu has been studied as a function of pH (2-12) for two nuclide concentrations (10 -7 -10 -9 M) (only one for Pa and U) in the systems Al 2 0 3 - 0.01 M NaCl0 4 and Si0 2 - 0.01 M NaCl0 4 . Distribution coefficients have been determined by a batch technique after various contact times (6h - 6w) at constant temperature (25degreeC) in systems equilibrated with air. The observed sorption behaviour indicates a predominantly physical adsorption mechanism, where pH of the aqueous phase is the principal chemical parameter of influence. The sorption is highly related to the degree of hydrolysis, with a maximum in the pH-region where neutral species dominate and with a reduction of the sorption under conditions when anionic species (hydroxides or carbonates) would exist in solution. This is particularly the case for U(VI) at pH above 7-8 when anionic carbonate complexes would be formed. Plutonium is predominantly tetravalent under the present conditions, as indicated by the sorption behaviour. (authors)

  20. Development of Web-based Software for Sorption Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Byoung Sub; Lee, Jae Min; Seo, Min Seok; Kim, Dong Keon

    2009-08-01

    Sorption studies of radionuclides are important parts of research on radioactive waste disposal which is commonly faced in most countries where nuclear programs (power production, a variety of peaceful applications, and research) are implemented. The Sorption Database (DB) plays a very important role in the safety assessment of the radioactive waste disposal. The Sorption DB which is opened externally can be used as reference material of establishing a national policy by improving and changing the pre-developed Sorption program to be web-based. From the industrial point of view, if the Sorption DB is opened to the outside, the safety-related confidence can be achieved for nuclear industry. As the information of Sorption DB is opened, not only credibility can be provided to the administration, local governments and nearby residents, but also input of the collected information can be achieved by online. In addition, the reference material and external awareness/reliability about the domestic level of the Sorption DB management system and the current state can be achieved internationally. In order to provide the information of Sorption DB to users in more efficient way, the analysis and complement of management and search capability for the existing Sorption DB program have been performed and web-based management system has been built to provide services to users. In addition, by applying statistical techniques, it has been designed and implemented to display the accuracy and error of the information

  1. Influence of selected factors on strontium sorption on bentonites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, M.; Kufcakova, J.; Rajec, P.

    2007-01-01

    Sorption on bentonite will play an important role in retarding the migration of radionuclides from a waste repository. Bentonite is a natural clay and one of the most promising candidates for use as a buffer material in the geological disposal systems for high-level nuclear waste. It is intended to isolate metal canisters with highly radioactive waste products from the surrounding rocks because of its ability to retard the movement of radionuclides by sorption. Bentonite is characterized by low permeability, water swelling capability and excellent sorption potential for cationic radionuclides. To correctly assess the sorption potential of radionuclides on bentonite is essential for the development of predictive migration models. The sorption of strontium on bentonite from different Slovak deposits - Jelsovy potok, Kopernica and Lieskovec has been investigated under various experimental conditions, such as contact time, sorbate concentrations, presence of complementary cation. Sorption was studied using the batch technique. The uptake of Sr was rapid and equilibrium was reached almost instantaneously. The instantaneous uptake may be due to adsorption and/or exchange of the metal with some ions on the surface of the adsorbent. The best sorption characteristics distinguish bentonite Kopernica, sorption capacity for Sr of the fraction under 45 mm is 0,48 mmol·g -1 for Sr. The highest values of distribution coefficient were reached for the bentonite Jelsovy potok. Radiation stability has been investigated, the higher sorption parameters were observed for the irradiated bentonites, which can be explained by the increase of specific surface of the bentonite samples. The presence of complementary cations depresses the sorption of Sr on bentonite. Cations Ca 2+ exhibit higher effect on cesium sorption than the Na 2+ ions. Results indicate that the sorption of Sr 2+ on bentonite will be affected by the presence of high concentrations of various salts in the waste water

  2. Sorption of niobium on boreal forest soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederlund, Mervi; Hakanen, Martti; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry

    2015-07-01

    The sorption of niobium (Nb) was investigated on humus and mineral soil samples taken from various depths of a four-metre deep forest soil pit on Olkiluoto Island, southwestern Finland. Mass distribution coefficients, K{sub d}, were determined in batch sorption tests. The steady state of Nb sorption was observed in the mineral soil samples already after one week of equilibration, and sorption decreased with depth from a very high value of 185000 mL/g at 0.7 m to 54000 mL/g at 3.4 m. The reason behind this decrease is probably the tenfold reduction in the specific surface area of the soil at the same depth range. Distribution coefficients were clearly lower in the humus layer (1000 mL/g). The K{sub d} values determined in pure water at a pH range of 4.7-6.5 were at a high level (above 55000 mL/g), but decreased dramatically above pH 6.5, corresponding to the change in the major Nb species from the neutral Nb(OH){sub 5} to the low-sorbing anionic Nb(OH){sub 6}{sup -} and Nb(OH){sub 7}{sup 2-}. However, the K{sub d} values in the model soil solution were in the slightly alkaline range an order of magnitude higher than in pure water, which is probably caused by the formation of calcium niobate surface precipitate or electrostatic interaction between surface-sorbed calcium and solute Nb. Among nine soil constituent minerals kaolinite performed best in retaining Nb in both pure water and model soil solution at pH 8, whereas potassium feldspar showed the poorest sorption. The K{sub d} value for kaolinite was above 500000 mL/g in both solutions, while the respective potassium feldspar values were in the range of 120-220 mL/g.

  3. Sorption properties of wool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radetić Maja M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Strict ecological legislation, especially in highly developed countries, imposed requirements for the purification of industrial effluents and the need for efficient oil clean up after sea and inland water spills. Although numerous processes have been developed, the application of sorbents is still one of the most efficient methods to remove heavy metal ions, dyes and crude oil from water. Recently, special attention was paid to sorbents based on natural fibres. A review of studies concerning the sorption properties of wool is presented in this paper. The presence of various functional groups on the wool fibre surface contributes to the efficient sorption of heavy metal ions and dyes. A hydrophobic, scaly surface and fibre crimp strongly influence the high sorption capacity of wool for oil. Wool has great sorption potential even as a recycled material. Accordingly, it can be used as a viable substitute to commercially available synthetic sorbents that show poor biodegradab ility.

  4. Anion exchange membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  5. Recent progress in sorption mechanisms and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedoroff, M.; Lefevre, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Sorption-desorption phenomena play an important role in the migration of radioactive species in surface and underground waters. In order to predict the transport of these species, we need a good knowledge of sorption processes and data, together with reliable models able to be included in transport calculation. Traditional approaches based on experimentally determined distribution coefficients (Kd) and sorption isotherms have a limited predictive capability, since they are very sensitive to the numerous parameters characterizing the solution and the solid. Models based on thermodynamic equilibria were developed to account for the influence these parameters: the ion exchange model and the surface complexation models (2-pK mono-site, 1-pK multi-site, with several different electrostatic models: CCM, DLM, BSM, TLM,...). Although these models are very useful, studies performed in recent years showed that they have important theoretical and experimental limitations, which result in the fact that we must be very careful when we use them for extrapolating sorption data to long term and to large natural systems. Among all problems which can be found are: the possibility to fit a set of experimental data with different models, sometimes bad adequacy with the real sorption processes, some theoretical limitations such as a rigorous definition of reference and standard states in surface equilibria, slow kinetics which prevent from equilibrium achievement, irreversibility, solubility and evolution of solid phases... Through the increase of the number of sensitive spectroscopic methods, we are now able to know more about sorption processes at the atomic scale. Models such as the 1-pK CD-MUSIC model can account for the influence of orientation of the faces of the solid. More and more examples of the influence of this orientation on the sorption properties are known. Calculations performed by 'ab initio' modeling is also useful to predict the

  6. Sorption of antibiotic sulfamethoxazole varies with biochars produced at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Hao; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Jian; Herbert, Stephen; Xing, Baoshan

    2013-01-01

    Sorption of sulfonamides on biochars is poorly understood, thus sulfamethoxazole (SMX) sorption on biochars produced at 300–600 °C was determined as a function of pH and SMX concentration, as well as the inorganic fractions in the biochars. Neutral SMX molecules (SMX 0 ) were dominant for sorption at pH 1.0–6.0. Above pH 7.0, although biochars surfaces were negatively-charged, anionic SMX species sorption increased with pH and is regulated via charge-assisted H-bonds. SMX 0 sorption at pH 5.0 was nonlinear and adsorption-dominant for all the biochars via hydrophobic interaction, π–π electron donor–acceptor interaction and pore-filling. The removal of inorganic fraction reduced SMX sorption by low-temperature biochars (e.g., 300 °C), but enhanced the sorption by high-temperature biochars (e.g., 600 °C) due to the temperature-dependent inorganic fractions in the biochars. These observations are useful for producing designer biochars as engineered sorbents to reduce the bioavailability of antibiotics and/or predict the fate of sulfonamides in biochar-amended soils. -- Highlights: •Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) sorption on biochars at pH 5.0 was adsorption-dominant. •Removal of inorganic fractions in low-temperature biochars reduced SMX sorption. •Removal of inorganic fractions in high-temperature biochars enhanced SMX sorption. •Anionic SMX was adsorbed on negatively charged biochar via charge-assisted H-bond. -- Solution pH and biochar property control the sorption amount and mechanisms of antibiotic sulfamethoxazole

  7. Anions in Cometary Comae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of negative ions (anions) in cometary comae is known from Giotto mass spectrometry of IP/Halley. The anions 0-, OH-, C-, CH- and CN- have been detected, as well as unidentified anions with masses 22-65 and 85-110 amu (Chaizy et al. 1991). Organic molecular anions are known to have a significant impact on the charge balance of interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes and have been shown to act as catalysts for the gas-phase synthesis of larger hydrocarbon molecules in the ISM, but their importance in cometary comae has not yet been explored. We present details of the first attempt to model the chemistry of anions in cometary comae. Based on the combined chemical and hydro dynamical model of Rodgers & Charnley (2002), we investigate the role of large carbon-chain anions in cometary coma chemistry. We calculate the effects of these anions on coma thermodynamics, charge balance and examine their impact on molecule formation.

  8. Ion-exchange concentration of inorganic anions from aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Bondareva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of natural waters in the present time - consuming process, the accuracy of which is influenced by many factors: the composition of water, the presence of impurities and "interfering" components. The water sample preparation process includes the step of concentration and separation of ions determined. The most versatile, efficient, and frequently used method is the concentration of inorganic anions from aqueous solutions by ion exchanger, which can optimize the composition of water to the optimal for identification and quantitative determination of anions. The characteristics of sorption chloride, nitrate and sulfate ions of basic anion exchange resin AВ-17 and Purolite A430 were compared in the article. The constants of protolysis of ion exchangers both AB 17 and Purolite A430 are the same and equal 0.037 ± 0,002. The value of total capacity (POE Purolite A430 was 4.3 mmol/g, AB 17 – 3.4 mmol/g. The studied ion exchangers have the same type of ionic groups – quaternary ammonium, but their number and denotes differ. The number of quaternary ammonium groups is higher in Purolite A430, respectively the number of absorbed anions of these ion exchanger is higher. The values of dynamic exchange capacity (DOE of ion exchanger Purolite A430 is higher than these values of AB-17 and equal to 1.48 ± 0.03 mmol / dm3 for chloride ion, 1.50 ± 0.03 mmol / dm3 for nitrate ion, 1.62 ± 0.03 mmol / dm3 for sulfate ion. The values of the POE and DOE of anion-exchange resins Purolite A430 and AV-17 and the characteristics of the individual sorption of chloride, nitrate, sulfate ions showed an advantage of the Purolite for the concentrationing of anions. It is found that times of anions sorption from triple-anion solutions by Purolite A430 are significantly different for different anions, and these times are close for anion-exchanger AV-17. It proves the possibility of quantitative separation and concentration by anion-exchanger Purolite A430.

  9. Metal sorption on kaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westrich, H.R.; Brady, P.V.; Cygan, R.T.; Nagy, K.L.; Anderson, H.L.

    1997-01-01

    A key issue in performance assessment of low-level radioactive waste sites is predicting the transport and retardation of radionuclides through local soils under a variety of hydrologic and geochemical conditions. Improved transport codes should include a mechanistic model of radionuclide retardation. The authors have been investigating metal sorption (Cs + , Sr 2+ , and Ba 2+ ) on a simple clay mineral (kaolinite) to better understand the geochemical interactions of common soil minerals with contaminated groundwaters. These studies include detailed characterizations of kaolinite surfaces, experimental adsorption measurements, surface complexation modeling, and theoretical simulations of cation sorption. The aluminol edge (010) site has been identified as the most likely site for metal sorption on kaolinite in natural solutions. Relative metal binding strengths decrease from Ba 2+ to Sr 2+ to Cs + , with some portion sorbed on both kaolinite edges and basal surfaces. Some Cs + also appears to be irreversibly sorbed on both sites. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that Cs + is sorbed at aluminol (010) edge sites as an inner-sphere complex and weakly sorbed as an outer-sphere complex on (001) basal surfaces. These results provide the basis to understand and predict metal sorption onto kaolinite, and a framework to characterize sorption processes on more complex clay minerals

  10. Chemical factors controlling actinide sorption in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beall, G.W.; Allard, B.

    1979-01-01

    The solid geologic media and the aqueous phase are of equal importance for the retention of actinides in the environment. The composition of the water is largely determined by the mineralogical composition of the rock that it is in equilibrium with. The chemical form of the actinides and their sorption, are highly dependent on the composition of the water with respect to pH, redox potential, and concentration of anions like carbonate, phosphate, fluoride, and organic acids

  11. Modeling and Prediction of Soil Water Vapor Sorption Isotherms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    Soil water vapor sorption isotherms describe the relationship between water activity (aw) and moisture content along adsorption and desorption paths. The isotherms are important for modeling numerous soil processes and are also used to estimate several soil (specific surface area, clay content.......93) for a wide range of soils; and (ii) develop and test regression models for estimating the isotherms from clay content. Preliminary results show reasonable fits of the majority of the investigated empirical and theoretical models to the measured data although some models were not capable to fit both sorption...... directions accurately. Evaluation of the developed prediction equations showed good estimation of the sorption/desorption isotherms for tested soils....

  12. Nitrate Anion Exchange in Pu-238 Aqueous Scrap Recovery Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pansoy-Hjelvik, M.E.; Silver, G.L.; Reimus, M.A.H.; Ramsey, K.B.

    1999-01-01

    Strong base, nitrate anion exchange (IX) is crucial to the purification of 238 Pu solution feedstocks with gross levels of impurities. This paper discusses the work involved in bench scale experiments to optimize the nitrate anion exchange process. In particular, results are presented of experiments conducted to (a) demonstrate that high levels of impurities can be separated from 238 Pu solutions via nitrate anion exchange and, (b) work out chemical pretreatment methodology to adjust and maintain 238 Pu in the IV oxidation state to optimize the Pu(IV)-hexanitrato anionic complex sorption to Reillex-HPQ resin. Additional experiments performed to determine the best chemical treatment methodology to enhance recovery of sorbed Pu from the resin, and VIS-NIR absorption studies to determine the steady state equilibrium of Pu(IV), Pu(III), and Pu(VI) in nitric acid are discussed

  13. Possibility of sorption purification of chromium comprising waste waters of galvanic production by inorganic ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaynakov, S.A.; Likov, E.P.; Bortun, A.I.; Belyukov, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    Present work is devoted to possibilities of sorption purification of chromium comprising waste waters of galvanic production by inorganic ion exchangers. Thus, the comparative study of sorption of chromium ions on anion exchanger A B-17 and on inorganic ion exchangers on the basis of hydrated titanium and zirconium dioxides in static and dynamic conditions is conducted. The influence of chromium ions concentration, solutions acidity (ph=1÷12) and presence of base electrolyte on sorption is studied. The state of chromium ions sorbed by inorganic ion exchangers is studied by means of infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopy. It is defined that inorganic sorbents could be used for chromium extraction from different solutions.

  14. Periodic Sorption of Tungstate Ions on Anionite AV-17-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’yachenko Aleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiple sorption of sodium tungstate resulting from the autoclave-soda digestion of a tungsten-bearing concentrate was studied using anion-exchange resin AV-17-8. The choice of ion exchange resin was carried out under static conditions using highly basic anionites. The sorption and desorption plots for tungstate and carbonate ions were demonstrated under dynamic conditions. The total dynamic capacity of the resin was estimated for each species of the ions in three sorption cycles. The applicability of the AV-17-8 resin as a sorbent in the autoclave-soda process flowsheet was determined.

  15. Evaluation of sorption affinity of cadmium(II) on Haro river sand from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasany, S.M.; Chaudhary, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    The sorption of Cd(II) on Haro river sand from deionized water is reported. The sorption system obeyed according to the Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherms. The Freundlich parameters 1/n = 0.67±0.05 and of A = 1.38±1.14 mmole x g -1 have been ascertained. D-R isotherm yields the values of β = -0.003741±0.000321 kJ 2 x mole -2 , X m = 0.23±0.21 μmole x g -1 and of E = 11.6±0.5 kJ x mole -1 . The influence of common anions and cations on the sorption was examined. Trivalent Bi enhances the sorption whereas Fe, Cr, Al and chromate ions reduce the sorption significantly. Hf(IV) and Ag(I) indicate substantial sorption (61-98%) whereas Gd(III), Re(VII) and Sc(III) show low sorption (<5%). The elements having low sorption can be separated from elements indicating higher sorption using Haro river sand column. (author)

  16. Thermodynamic sorption modelling in support of radioactive waste disposal safety cases - NEA sorption project phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    and uncertainty analysis; 4. Approaches for applying TSMs to intact and complex materials: Introduction; Real substrates (What makes them complex?); Determination and estimation of TSM parameters in real systems; TSM application for Kd estimation on chemically complex substrates; Sorption modelling in clay rocks and compacted clay systems; TSM applications to crystalline host rocks; Application of generalised TSMs to complex and intact materials: concluding remarks and key messages; 5 - General guidelines and recommendations: Framework for TSM applications in the context of radioactive waste disposal; Purposes and predictive capabilities of TSMs; Strategies for building TSMs; Recommendations; Building a scientifically defensible, calibrated TSM for radioactive waste applications; Concluding comments; 6 - References; 7 - Annexes: List of authors and external experts; List of acronyms

  17. Inorganic anion exchangers for the treatment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, A.; Jamil, M.A.

    1987-07-01

    Inorganic anion exchangers are evaluated for Tc, I and S isotope removal from aqueous nuclear waste streams. Chemical, thermal, and radiation stabilities were examined. Selected exchangers were examined in detail for their selectivities, kinetics and mechanism of the sorption process (especially in NO 3 - , OH - and BO 3 - environments). Cement encapsulation and leaching experiments were made on the exchangers showing most promise for 'radwaste' treatment. (author)

  18. Adsorption study of mercury on lignite in the presence of different anions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Robles

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the effect of different anions such as chloride, nitrate, and sulphate on the mercury adsorption onto lignite, which was a model material for the humus-containing organics in soil, and can be considered as a natural sorbent in the remediation of contaminated sites. Since the complex formation can significantly influence the mercury sorption, besides chloride, the effects of other complex-forming agents such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and thiocyanate were also tested. Various batch type and dynamic experiments were performed and four sorption models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich were used to evaluate the sorption data.

  19. Sorption of radionuclides from spent fuel in crystalline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikula, A.

    1982-10-01

    The safe disposal of spent nuclear fuel or reprocessed waste is an essential element in the expansion of the nuclear power industry. Stable rock formations e.g. granite are considered to be potential sites for disposal. A major factor in evaluating the degree of safety of the disposal is the sorption of radionuclides in rock, which affects their retardation. The report considers the chemical forms of the hazardous radionuclides of spent nuclear fuel in groundwater and the effects of the water's properties on them. In the groundwater near the Olkiluoto power plant site cesium, strontium and radium are in cationic form, iodine as I - . Technetium would occur as TcO +2 , but the pertechnetate form is also possible. Uranium most probably would be as U(VI) plutonium and neptunium as Np(IV) or Np(V). The valences for thorium, americium and curium are not changed in this groundwater and would be +4, +3 and +3, respectively. The actinides in groundwater are all in hydrated or complex form. An increase on the ionic stregth of the groundwater in most instances causes a decrease in the sorption of nuclides since the ion exchange capacity of the rock is limited. Anionic ligands also decrease sorption of cations by complex formation. In some case, on the other hand, high salt concentrations may cause formation of radiocolloids of lanthanides and neptunium and thus increase sorption. In all cases the degree of sorption described by the distribution ratio Ksub(d) was influenced by the pH of the groundwater. Sorption of cesium and strontium increased with growing pH. The sorption behaviour of actinides was in positive correlation with formation of hydroxide complexes at different pH values. The Ksub(d) values of Cs, Sr, Co, Ni and Am for Olkiluoto granites were found to agree with Swedish values, also determined at ambient atmospheric conditions

  20. Influence of light-weight organic matters on strontium sorption to bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tsing-Hai; Wu, Ding-Chiang; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Light-weight organic matters were frequently observed in groundwater. Their existence had significant influence on the transport of radionuclides. In this study, light-weight organic acid species including oxalic (MW 90), succinic (MW 118), adipic (MW 146), azelaic (MW 188), eicosanedioic (MW 306), benzoic (MW 122), salicylic (MW 138), and gallic (MW 170) were selected as the surrogate of natural organic matters. Their effects on strontium sorption to bentonite were evaluated by using a surface complexation model MINEQL+. Under this framework, three sorption mechanisms were considered: 1. structure sorption sites, 2. edge sorption sites, 3. further hydration of adsorbed Sr 2+ . The presence of organic species had no influence on Sr cation sorption to structure sorption sites. However, Sr cation sorption to edge sorption was affected by the organics to certain extent. For example, sorption capability of edge sites toward Sr was increased by the gallic species. Furthermore, hydration of adsorbed Sr was significantly affected by the presence of organic species. This might relate to that adsorbed Sr would become the bridge associating organic species on bentonite surfaces, but this argument required more solid spectral evidences to support. Some preliminary observations on Sr sorption to bentonite were obtained in this work; however, further experiments are still required by conducting experiments with more variety of organic species. By doing a comprehensive study, it would be much beneficial to make a more accurate evaluation of the influence of organic matters on Sr sorption

  1. Removal of plutonium from nitric acid-oxalic acid solutions using anion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasar, U.M.; Pawar, S.M.; Joshi, A.R.

    1999-01-01

    An anion exchange method using Amberlyst A-26 (MP) resin was developed for removal of Pu from nitric acid-oxalic acid solutions without destroying oxalate. The method consists of sorption of Pu(IV) on Amberlyst A-26, a macroporous anion exchange resin, from nitric acid-oxalic acid medium in the presence of Al(NO 3 ) 3 . Pu(IV) breakthrough capacity of Amberlyst A-26 using synthetic feed solution was determined. (author)

  2. Sorption of radioiodine in organo-clays and -soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bors, J.

    1990-01-01

    In the framework of investigations on the sorption of radioiodine to natural and artificially altered soil components, a number of clay minerals and natural soils were treated with quaternary alkylammonium ions to replace the exchangeable metal cations. With help of batch experiments the resulting organo-clays were tested with respect to their sorption capability of radioiodine quantified by the distribution ratio (R D -value). Treatment of bentonite, vermiculite and cretaceous clay as well as of samples from natural horizons of chernozem soil with hexadecylpyridinium (HDPY + ) and benzethonium (BE + ) exhibited sorptions rates and amounts, which are several orders of magnitude higher than those of the respective untreated samples. Moderate increases of the R D -values were found after cation exchange with hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA + ), while the applications of trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA + ) and tetramethylammonium (TMA + ) were ineffective. Considerable sorption of radioiodine was observed with the commercially available Bentone. (orig.)

  3. Sorption of radioiodine in organo-clays and -soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bors, J. (Niedersaechsisches Inst. fuer Radiooekologie, Hannover (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-01-01

    In the framework of investigations on the sorption of radioiodine to natural and artificially altered soil components, a number of clay minerals and natural soils were treated with quaternary alkylammonium ions to replace the exchangeable metal cations. With help of batch experiments the resulting organo-clays were tested with respect to their sorption capability of radioiodine quantified by the distribution ratio (R{sub D}-value). Treatment of bentonite, vermiculite and cretaceous clay as well as of samples from natural horizons of chernozem soil with hexadecylpyridinium (HDPY{sup +}) and benzethonium (BE{sup +}) exhibited sorptions rates and amounts, which are several orders of magnitude higher than those of the respective untreated samples. Moderate increases of the R{sub D}-values were found after cation exchange with hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA{sup +}), while the applications of trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA{sup +}) and tetramethylammonium (TMA{sup +}) were ineffective. Considerable sorption of radioiodine was observed with the commercially available Bentone. (orig.).

  4. Retention/sorption and geochemical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcos, D.; Grandia, F.; Domenech, C. [Enviros Spain, S.L., Barcelona (Spain); SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Sellin, P. [SKB - Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management, SE, Stockholm (Sweden); Hunter, F.M.I.; Bate, F.; Heath, T.G.; Hoch, A. [Serco Assurance, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Werme, L.O. [SKB - Svensk Karnbranslehantering AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Bruggeman, C.; Maes, I.A.; Breynaert, E.; Vancluysen, J. [Leuven Katholieke Univ., Lab. for Colloid Chemistry (Belgium); Montavon, G.; Guo, Z. [Ecole des Mines, 44 - Nantes (France); Riebe, B.; Bunnenberg, C.; Meleshyn, A. [Leibniz Univ. Hannover, Zentrum fur Strahlenschutz und Radiookologie, Hannover (Germany); Dultz, S. [Leibniz Univ. Hannover, Institut fur Bodenkunde, Hannover (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    This session gathers 4 articles dealing with: the long-term geochemical evolution of the near field of a KBS-3 HLNW repository: insights from reactive transport modelling (D. Arcos, F. Grandia, C. Domenech, P. Sellin); the investigation of iron transport into bentonite from anaerobically corroding steel: a geochemical modelling study (F.M.I. Hunter, F. Bate, T.G. Heath, A. Hoch, L.O. Werme); SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-} adsorption on conditioned Na-illite: XAS spectroscopy, kinetics, surface complexation model and influence of compaction (C. Bruggeman, A. Maes, G. Montavon, E. Breynaert, Z. Guo, J. Vancluysen); the influence of temperature and gamma-irradiation on the anion sorption capacity of modified bentonites (B. Riebe, C. Bunnenberg, A. Meleshyn, S. Dultz)

  5. Sorption of phosphates and thiocyanates on isomorphic substituted Mg/Zn–Al-type hydrotalcites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODICA PODE

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The sorption equilibriums of phosphate and thiocyanate anions on isomorphic substituted Mg/Zn–Al-type hydrotalcites were investigated in this study. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were used to interpret the equilibrium data for phosphate. The sorption equilibriums of phosphate on Mg3Al, Mg2ZnAl and Mg1.5Zn1.5Al hydrotalcites were well described by the Langmuir isotherm. The highest maximum sorption capacities for these adsorbents were as follows: 111, 101 and 95 mg g-1. The equilibrium constant and standard Gibbs energy changes were also calculated from the sorption data. Standard Gibbs energy changes of about –20 kJ mol-1 indicated that the process might be considered as physical adsorption. The sorption equilibriums of phosphate on isomorphic substituted samples of MgZn2Al and Zn3Al were well described by the Freundlich isotherm. Thiocyanate showed a relative low affinity for the studied materials, as indicated by both the “S”-shaped isotherms and low sorption capacities. The sorption of phosphate and thiocyanate on the investigated hydrotalcites showed a continuous decrease of the sorption capacity in the following order: Mg3Al > Mg2ZnAl > Mg1.5Zn1.5Al > MgZn2Al > Zn3Al.

  6. Enhancing the antimony sorption properties of nano titania-chitosan beads using epichlorohydrin as the crosslinker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishad, Padala Abdul; Bhaskarapillai, Anupkumar; Velmurugan, Sankaralingam

    2017-07-15

    Antimony is classified as a pollutant of priority importance by USEPA. We have earlier reported the synthesis of nano-titania impregnated epichlorohydrin crosslinked chitosan (TA-Cts-Epi) beads, in a format suitable for large scale applications with high sorption capacity for antimony. To understand the sorption mechanism, and to fine tune the bead composition, the effect of crosslinking density on the swelling and sorption properties of the beads was investigated in detail. Epichlorohydrin effected significant changes in physical and sorption properties of the beads. The antimony sorption capacity of the TA-Cts-Epi beads prepared by crosslinking 0.3g non-crosslinked titania-chitosan beads (TA-Cts-NCL) with 6.4mmol epichlorohydrin was 493μmol/g, while those crosslinked with 0.64mmol showed a capacity of 133μmol/g. Whereas, TA-Cts-NCL beads showed a capacity of 75μmol/g. The increase in uptake capacity with increase in crosslinking demonstrated the active involvement of the epichlorohydrin moieties in antimony binding leading to enhanced sorption. Apart from altering the stability, swelling behaviour and sorption kinetics of the beads, crosslinking significantly increased the uptake of the anionic species via electrostatic interactions. Epichlorohydrin crosslinked chitosan beads prepared without TiO 2 also showed similar behaviour. The results demonstrated the involvement of chitosan, TiO 2 and epichlorohydrin in sorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of inorganic materials for the uptake of anions from simulated nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, J.N.

    1991-01-01

    Investigations on some commercially available hydrous oxides (Ferrox, Zirox, Alumina, Oxti and Oxtain) have been carried out with a view to understanding their sorption properties for anions (such as 36 C1 - , 51 Cr 2 O 4 2- , 99 MoO 4 - and 106 Ru complexes) and to assess their suitability in specific applications in the nuclear fuel cycle. All the materials exhibited sorption for the anions with oxtain showing the lowest of sorption in various media solutions. Sorption was most effective at solution pH 2-9 following the amphotericism of these materials. The presence of competing anions had a marked effect on the sorption properties of the exchangers for all the anions investigated. TG and DTG results revealed a general weight loss presumably due to loss of moisture. The selectivity for NO 3 - and 36 C1 - was studied by plotting ion-exchange isotherms for each exchanger. All isotherms displayed large hysteresis. The fixed-bed column experiments revealed a high affinity for 36 C1 - on Ferrox, Zirox and Alumina than was observed in the K d measurements. In-vivo γ-radiation effects on the materials and their sorption properties were investigated. Prolonged chemical treatment had little or no effect on the sorption properties of the exchangers, and revealed that none of the materials withstood long term exposure to acid or alkaline conditions. The leachability of isotopically labelled exchangers contained in cement (OPC) composites was studied along deionised water, synthetic sea-water and synthetic ground water as leachants. The effect of cement additives (BFS) on the leachability of the composites was also studied. The diffusion coefficients for the leaching process were evaluated by using the Carman-Haul equation. Results clearly showed that BFS had little or no effect on the leachability of 36 C1 - . (author)

  8. Technetium Sorption Media Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, J.B.; Kelly, S.E.; Robbins, R.A.; Adams, R.D.; Thorson, M.A.; Haass, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents information and references to aid in the selection of 99Tc sorption media for feasibility studies regarding the removal of 99Tc from Hanford's low activity waste. The report contains literature search material for sorption media (including ion exchange media) for the most tested media to date, including SuperLig 639, Reillex HPQ, TAM (Kruion), Purolite A520E and A530E, and Dowex 1X8. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities in a safe, environmentally compliant, cost-effective and energy-effective manner.

  9. TECHNETIUM SORPTION MEDIA REVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN JB; KELLY SE; ROBBINS RA; ADAMS RD; THORSON MA; HAASS CC

    2011-08-25

    This report presents information and references to aid in the selection of 99Tc sorption media for feasibility studies regarding the removal of 99Tc from Hanford's low activity waste. The report contains literature search material for sorption media (including ion exchange media) for the most tested media to date, including SuperLig 639, Reillex HPQ, TAM (Kruion), Purolite A520E and A530E, and Dowex 1X8. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities in a safe, environmentally compliant, cost-effective and energy-effective manner.

  10. Sorption behavior of Sn(II) onto Haro river sand from aqueous acidic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasany, S.M.; Khurshid, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    The sorption behavior of Sn(II) onto Haro river sand has been examined with respect to nature of electrolyte, agitation time, dosage of sorbent and concentration of sorbate. Maximum sorption (95.5%) has been achieved from 0.034M hydrochloric acid solution after equilibrating sorbate (2 x 10 -5 M) and sorbent (50 mg) for 120 minutes at a V/W ratio of 90 cm 3 x g -1 . The kinetic data have been subjected to Morris-Weber and Lagergren equations. The kinetics of sorption proceeds a two stage process consisting of a relatively slow initial uptake followed by a much rapid increase in the sorption. The rate constant of intraparticle transport, K d , comes out to be 8.75 x 10 -8 mol x g -1 x min -1/2 and the first order rate constant for sorption is 0.0416 min -1 . The sorption data of Sn(II) onto Haro river sand followed Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) type isotherms. The Langmuir constant, Q, related to sorption capacity and, b, related to sorption energy are computed to be 10.6±1.1 μmol x g -1 and 1123±137 dm 3 x mol -1 , respectively. The D-R isotherm yields the values of C m = 348±151 μmol x g -1 and β = -0.01044±0.0008 mol 2 x kJ -2 and of E = 6.9±0.3 kJ x mol -1 . In all three isotherms correlation factor (γ) is ≥ 0.99. The influence of common anions and cations on the sorption has been investigated. Zn(II), Mg(II), oxalate, Pb(II), Mn(II) and tartrate reduce the sorption significantly whereas Fe(II) causes substantial increase in the sorption. (author)

  11. Sorption of cadmium and lead by clays from municipal incinerator ash- water suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.; Steele, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of Cl complexation in extracts of a flue gas-scrubber incinerator fly ash sample on the sorption of Cd and Pb by kaolinite and illite was investigated using batch-sorption methods. In the pH range of 5 to 9, Cl complexation may reduce sorption and thus increase the mobility of these metals. When an ash-water suspension was acidified to pH 6.85, the dissolution of Cl and Ca essentially eliminated Cd sorption because of complexation and cationic competition. Cadmium would be considered as either mobile or very mobile under these conditions. Lead was not soluble in the pH- 6.85 suspension. At pH 12, the approximate pH of water in contact with flue gas-scrubber fly ash, Cd was essentially insoluble and Pb occurred as anionic Pb hydroxide. Anionic Pb was sorbed by the two clays, and the extent of sorption was not influenced by Cl or carbonate complexation. Sorption constants, derived from isotherms, suggested that Pb would be relatively immobile in saturated soil-water systems. The recent concern that highly alkaline, flue gas-scrubber fly ash may release environmentally significant concentrations of mobile Pb when placed in an ash-disposal site with a soil liner should be reevaluated in light of this study.

  12. Sorption of actinides onto nanodiamonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchatskaya, Yulia; Romanchuk, Anna; Yakovlev, Ruslan; Kulakova, Inna [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; Shiryaev, Andrei [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry; Kalmykov, Stepan [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry

    2015-06-01

    Detonation nanodiamonds (ND) present a significant part of nanocarbons group, which could be produced on commercial scale by detonation of explosives in a closed chamber. Their unique properties of high surface area, low weight and radiation resistance make ND a prospective candidate for applications in sorption processes in radiochemistry. To study the influence of surface chemistry on sorption properties, apristine sample of ND was treated with acids and hydrogen. The surface chemistry of the samples was characterised by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Boehm titration. The sorption properties of ND were tested fordifferent radionuclides. The sorption capacity of ND was shown to be higher than those of commonly used radionuclide sorbents like activated carbon and compariable to other members of nanocarbon group like graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes. The sorption properties were shown to be influenced by the presence of oxygen-containing groups on the surface of ND. This represents an opportunity to increase the sorption capacity of ND.

  13. Sorption of actinides onto nanodiamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchatskaya, Yulia; Romanchuk, Anna; Yakovlev, Ruslan; Kulakova, Inna; Shiryaev, Andrei; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow; Kalmykov, Stepan; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow

    2015-01-01

    Detonation nanodiamonds (ND) present a significant part of nanocarbons group, which could be produced on commercial scale by detonation of explosives in a closed chamber. Their unique properties of high surface area, low weight and radiation resistance make ND a prospective candidate for applications in sorption processes in radiochemistry. To study the influence of surface chemistry on sorption properties, apristine sample of ND was treated with acids and hydrogen. The surface chemistry of the samples was characterised by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Boehm titration. The sorption properties of ND were tested fordifferent radionuclides. The sorption capacity of ND was shown to be higher than those of commonly used radionuclide sorbents like activated carbon and compariable to other members of nanocarbon group like graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes. The sorption properties were shown to be influenced by the presence of oxygen-containing groups on the surface of ND. This represents an opportunity to increase the sorption capacity of ND.

  14. Capability of parasulfonato calix[6]arene, as an anion dopant, and organic solvents in enhancing the sensitivity and loading of glucose oxidase (GOx) on polypyrrole film in a biosensor: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarnavadeh, Vahideh; Zare, Karim; Fakhari, Ali Reza

    2013-11-15

    In this study, the effects of two solvents (acetonitrile and water) and an anion dopant (para sulfonato calix[6]arene ((C[6]S)(-6))), on the manufacturing and properties of a polypyrrole (Ppy)-based, glucose oxidase amperometric biosensor were studied. Pyrrole was polymerized using galvanostatic mode in two different solvents, and the effect of (C[6]S)(-6) was studied in aqueous solution. The morphology of the obtained polypyrrole films was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Glucose oxidase (GOx) was adsorbed on the Ppy films via cross-linking method. Then the amperometric responses of the Pt/Ppy/GOx electrodes were measured using the amperometric method at the potential of 0.7 V in steps of adding a glucose solution to a potassium phosphate buffer. We found that acetonitrile and (C[6]S)(-6) increase the sensitivity of the enzyme electrode up to 79.30 µA M(-1)cm(-2) in comparison with 31.60 μA M(-1)cm(-2) for the electrode synthesized in calixarene free aqueous solvent. Also (C[6]S)(-6) has the main role in preventing leaching the enzyme from the electrode. This fact increases loading of the enzyme and stability of the biosensor. So that the steady state current density of the aforementioned electrode increases linearly with increasing glucose concentration up to 190 mM. Whereas the linearity was observed up to 61 mM and 80 mM for the electrodes made using calixarene free acetonitrile and aqueous solutions, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Iodine sorption of bentonite - radiometric and polarographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konirova, R.; Vinsova, H.; Koudelkova, M.; Ernestova, M.; Jedinakova-Krizova, V.

    2003-01-01

    The experiments focused on kinetics of iodine retardation on bentonite, influence of aqueous phase pH, buffering properties of bentonite, etc. were carried out by batch method. Distribution coefficient KD was the criterion applied for evaluation of iodine interaction with solid phase. High sorption potential of bentonite to cationic forms of various radionuclides, resulting from relatively high cation exchange capacity, is generally known. On the other hand the inorganic anions are not adsorbed strongly to mineral surface of clays thus uptake of iodine (occurring mainly at iodide (I - ) or iodate (IO 3 - ) form under oxoic conditions) is limited. The distribution coefficients of iodine anions' sorption on bentonite R reach order of magnitude 10 -1 mL/g. In order to increase the sorption capacity of the solid phase, several additives were added to bentonite. Most of them didn't provide satisfactory results except of the addition of activated carbon, which has high surface area. Electromigration and polarographic methods were used for investigation of the redox state of iodine in aqueous phase and determination of KD values as well. Acquired results were compared with data obtained by radiometric measurements. (authors)

  16. Sorption of technetium on composite chitosan-hydroxyapatite from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivarciova, L.; Rosskopfova, O.; Galambos, M.; Rajec, P.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterials such as natural polymers (chitosan) and hydroxyapatite have an important application in material for bone replacement. Most of chitosan/hydroxyapatite composites are prepared by mixing hydroxyapatite particles with chitosan matrices. Another method of preparation of chitosan/hydroxyapatite composite is in-situ generation of nano-hydroxyapatite in chitosan matrix. The most common biomaterial used in the past years in hard tissue regeneration was hydroxyapatite, owing to its properties as biocompatibility, bioactivity, non-toxicity, non-immunogenicity etc. Chitosan is a polyaminosacharide, partially deacetylated product of chitin. Chitosan can be used in combination with other materials to enhance bone growth such as bone filling paste. The aims of this work were: the influence of the contact time on sorption of pertechnate anions on chitosan/hydroxyapatite composites; the effect of pH on sorption of pertechnate anions on chitosan/hydroxyapatite composites; the effect of foreign ions on sorption of pertechnate anions on chitosan/hydroxyapatite composites. The author concluded: the percentage of technetium sorption after 1 hour of contact time was > 97 %. In the initial pH range of 2.9-10.2, the percentage of technetium sorption on chitosan/hydroxyapatite composites CH/HA(A), CH/HA(B), CH/HA 30:70, ZCH was > 98 % and on CH/HA 50:50 was > 94%. The competition effect of Fe 2+ towards TcO 4 :- sorption is stronger than competition effect of other observed cations for all examined composites with the same weight ratio. The percentage of the technetium sorption was the same for all composites with the weight ratio of 30:70. (authors)

  17. Process for removing sulfate anions from waste water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, David N.; Galvan, Gloria J.; Hundley, Gary L.; Wright, John B.

    1997-01-01

    A liquid emulsion membrane process for removing sulfate anions from waste water is disclosed. The liquid emulsion membrane process includes the steps of: (a) providing a liquid emulsion formed from an aqueous strip solution and an organic phase that contains an extractant capable of removing sulfate anions from waste water; (b) dispersing the liquid emulsion in globule form into a quantity of waste water containing sulfate anions to allow the organic phase in each globule of the emulsion to extract and absorb sulfate anions from the waste water and (c) separating the emulsion including its organic phase and absorbed sulfate anions from the waste water to provide waste water containing substantially no sulfate anions.

  18. Ruthenium complexing in sorption by granulated sorbents with ethylene diamine and diethyl amine groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanova, S.A.; Kolmakova, A.I.; Konovalov, L.V.; Kukushkin, Yu.N.; Kalalova, E.

    1986-01-01

    The sorption process of ruthenium (4) chlorocomplexes - K 2 (RuCl 6 ) macroporous granulated copolymers of glycidylmethacrylate ethylene dimethacrylate with ethylene diamine and diethyl amine has been studied. Sorption has been carried out under the static conditions (at 20 and 98 deg C) from 0.1-2.0 MxHCl and 1.0 M NaCl solutions. It is established that the sorption from acidic solutions proceeds according to anion exchange mechanism with formation of onium chlorocomplexes in the sorbent phase, subjecting to Anderson regrouping during the heating. During the sorption from neutral solutions the second-sphere coordination of polymer amino groups accirs near ruthenium atom and amino-chloride complexes are formed in the sorbent phase

  19. Review of the sorption of actinides on natural minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beall, G.W.

    1981-01-01

    Over the past few years, a large body of data concerning sorption of actinides on geologic media has been built in connection with high-level-waste disposal. The primary aim of the work has been to allow predictions of the migration behavior of these radionuclides in the case of a breach of the repository that allowed groundwater flow through the repository. As a result of this work, some new backfill materials specifically tailored for the actinides have also been designed. Several major mechanisms of sorption that appear to dominate the sorption of actinides have emerged from these studies. These mechanisms can be divided into solution reactions dominated by hydrolysis, chemisorption reactions, and oxidation-reduction reactions. Each of these mechanisms will be discussed in detail, with experimental examples. Surprisingly, one mechanism, cation exchange, does not play an important role; why it fails to operate in any significant way in the environmental pH region will be discussed. The implications of the sorption mechanisms for waste forms and backfill materials will be discussed in detail. These discussions will center primarily around the valence state of the actinide in various waste forms and the effect of various anions on leachability from waste forms and backfill materials

  20. Sorption of selenium on Mg-Al and Mg-Al-Eu layered double hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtius, H.; Paparigas, Z.; Kaiser, G.

    2008-01-01

    Salt domes represent deep geological formations which are under consideration as final repositories for irradiated research reactor fuel elements. For long-term safety aspects the mobilisation of the radionuclides due to a water ingress is intensively investigated. At the Institute of Energy Research (IEF-6), leaching experiments were performed in a hot cell facility with UAl x -Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersed research reactor fuel elements in repository-relevant MgCl 2 -rich salt brines under anaerobic conditions. The fuel plates corroded completely within one year and a Mg-Al-layered double hydroxide (LDH) with chloride as interlayer anion was identified as one crystalline phase component of the corrosion products (secondary phases). This Mg-Al-LDH was synthesized, characterized, and the ability to retard europium by an incorporation process was investigated. Europium, as a representative for lanthanides, was identified to be one of the radionuclides which were found in the corrosion products. We could show that europium was incorporated in the lattice structure. LDHs have high anion exchange capacities that enhance their potential to remove anionic contaminants from aqueous systems. In this work the sorption behaviour of selenium in the chemical form as selenite (SeO 3 2- ) on Mg-Al-LDH and on Mg-Al-Eu-LDH was investigated. Especially the influence of the larger europium-III ion was of interest. It represents in the Mg-Al-Eu-LDH about 10% of the molar aluminium amount. The sorption has been experimentally studied in a wide range of pH, ionic strength, radionuclide and sorbent concentration. Both LDHs with chloride as interlayer anion were synthesized by a coprecipitation method under controlled conditions, and their main physico-chemical properties were analyzed prior to the sorption experiments. The sorption kinetics of selenite on the LDHs in water and in MgCl 2 -rich brine were rapid using a LDH concentration of 10 g/L. Equilibrium, indicated by stable p

  1. Enhanced chlorophenol sorption of soils by rice-straw-ash amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jen-Chyi; Tzou, Yu-Min; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Wu, Jeng-Tzung; Cheng, Mei-Ping; Wang, Shan-Li

    2010-01-01

    Rice-straw burning is a common post-harvest practice on rice paddy land, which results in the accumulation of rice-straw ash (RSA) in paddy soil. Because the occurrence of RSA in soil may affect the fate and transport of contaminants, this study investigated the sorption of 3-chlorophenol (3-CP) on RSA and RSA amended soils to evaluate the sorptive properties of RSA in soils. The results showed that the sorption of 3-CP to RSA proceeds through a surface reaction rather than through partitioning and that the neutral form of 3-CP is preferentially sorbed to the surface when compared to the deprotonated anionic form of 3-CP. The addition of RSA to the soils enhanced the overall 3-CP sorption, indicating that RSA amendment may be applied to retard the movement of 3-CP in contaminated soils. As the RSA content in the soils was increased from 0% to 2%, the Langmuir sorption maximum of the soils increased from 18-80 to 256-274 mg kg -1 . Thus, RSA contributed more to the total sorption of the soils than other major components in the soils. Nonetheless, the 3-CP sorption of the soils containing RSA was less than the combination of pure RSA and the soils, thereby indicating that the 3-CP sorption of RSA was suppressed. This may be attributed to the competition of organic matter or other soil components for the surface binding sites of RSA.

  2. High sorption materials for SFL - A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krall, Lindsay [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-05-15

    This literature survey is part of a project called the SFL Concept Study, carried out at SKB during the years 2011 to 2013, which investigates possible repository concepts for long-lived, low and intermediate level waste. The addition of a high sorption material has been proposed as a means through which releases may be limited from the near-field. In the previous repository concept from 1999 (SFL 3-5), the transport of cationic nuclides was expected to be reduced by their adsorption to the cement, gravel, and bedrock, However, in the preliminary safety assessment of that previous concept, it was found that the key radionuclides are mainly anions. Thus, this literature survey has placed special emphasis on the adsorption of anions. Due to their high release and dose rates from the far field, Cl-36, Mo-93, C-14, and I-129 were of particular interest. Ion exchange and surface complexation are the main adsorption mechanisms. Ion exchange is theoretically reversible and involves the isomorphic substitution of either (a) cation(s) or anion(s) in a mineral structure. The ions exchanged do not need to have the same charge, but the exchange should be stoichiometric. Surface complexation is more dependent on pH, and the strength of the bond formed (and thus the reversibility of the reaction) is partially dependent on the type of complex formed. A material's adsorption mechanism and efficiency is a function of its structure and charge density, but it will also vary as a function of pH, the type and amount of competing ions, and the concentration of the solute in solution. A substantial body of work exists that investigates the application of materials that can remediate groundwater through the adsorptive removal of the contaminant(s). Application of such a function in the future SFL repository will differ from remediation applications in that the system will be more complex and heterogeneous than most of the contaminated waters studied, the adsorption processes must be

  3. High sorption materials for SFL - A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krall, Lindsay

    2012-05-01

    This literature survey is part of a project called the SFL Concept Study, carried out at SKB during the years 2011 to 2013, which investigates possible repository concepts for long-lived, low and intermediate level waste. The addition of a high sorption material has been proposed as a means through which releases may be limited from the near-field. In the previous repository concept from 1999 (SFL 3-5), the transport of cationic nuclides was expected to be reduced by their adsorption to the cement, gravel, and bedrock, However, in the preliminary safety assessment of that previous concept, it was found that the key radionuclides are mainly anions. Thus, this literature survey has placed special emphasis on the adsorption of anions. Due to their high release and dose rates from the far field, Cl-36, Mo-93, C-14, and I-129 were of particular interest. Ion exchange and surface complexation are the main adsorption mechanisms. Ion exchange is theoretically reversible and involves the isomorphic substitution of either (a) cation(s) or anion(s) in a mineral structure. The ions exchanged do not need to have the same charge, but the exchange should be stoichiometric. Surface complexation is more dependent on pH, and the strength of the bond formed (and thus the reversibility of the reaction) is partially dependent on the type of complex formed. A material's adsorption mechanism and efficiency is a function of its structure and charge density, but it will also vary as a function of pH, the type and amount of competing ions, and the concentration of the solute in solution. A substantial body of work exists that investigates the application of materials that can remediate groundwater through the adsorptive removal of the contaminant(s). Application of such a function in the future SFL repository will differ from remediation applications in that the system will be more complex and heterogeneous than most of the contaminated waters studied, the adsorption processes must be

  4. Sorption mechanisms of selenium species (selenite and selenate) on copper-based minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devoy, J.

    2001-09-01

    The sorption of radionuclides on the surface of minerals represents a process capable to delay the migration of the elements from a spent fuel deep repository towards the biosphere. In the framework of a deep underground repository, an engineered clay barrier has a high trapping capacity for cationic radio-elements, in particular because of the negative charge of clay surfaces. However, anionic radioelements like selenium species, would be only weakly retained by chemical processes. In order to optimize the trapping capacity of a clay barrier with respect to anionic species, prospective studies are carried out in order to find and evaluate some minerals with specific chemical trapping functions. Among radionuclides, the case of selenium has to be considered because its isotope 79 Se is present in radioactive wastes and has a half life time of 6.5 10 4 years. It is also judicious to find a mineral capable of trapping simultaneously several anionic radio-elements. Copper oxides and sulfides (Cu 2 O, CuO, Cu 2 S, CuS, CuFeS 2 and Cu 5 FeS 4 ) are good adsorbents with respect to selenium species (selenite and selenate). These minerals, with their selenium retention properties, could be used also for the decontamination of soils and waters or to process industrial effluents. The sorption mechanisms have been studied in details for copper oxides (Cu 2 O and CuO) with respect to selenite and selenate. Chalcomenite precipitates in acid pH conditions when selenite is added to a Cu 2 O and CuO suspension. Selenate, in contact with cuprite (Cu 2 O) leads also to a selenium-based precipitate in acid pH environment. For higher pH values, selenite and selenate are adsorbed on copper oxides (Cu 2 O and CuO) and lead to internal and external sphere complexes, respectively. In the case of a selenite/cuprite mixture in basic pH environment and at the equilibrium, a chemical reaction occurs between the oxidation product of cuprite, Cu(OH) 2 and HSeO 3 . A preliminary study of

  5. Diffusion of anions and cations in compacted sodium bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.

    1994-02-01

    The thesis presents the results of studies on the diffusion mechanisms of anions and cations in compacted sodium bentonite, which is planned to be used as a buffer material in nuclear waste disposal in Finland. The diffusivities and sorption factors were determined by tracer experiments. The pore volume accessible to chloride, here defined as effective porosity, was determined as a function of bentonite density and electrolyte concentration in water, and the Stern-Gouy double-layer model was used to explain the observed anion exclusion. The sorption of Cs + and Sr 2+ was studied in loose and compacted bentonite samples as a function of the electrolyte concentration in solution. In order to obtain evidence of the diffusion of exchangeable cations, defined as surface diffusion, the diffusivities of Cs + and Sr 2+ in compacted bentonite were studied as a function of the sorption factor, which was varied by electrolyte concentration in solution. The measurements were performed both by a non-steady state method and by a through-diffusion method. (89 refs., 35 fig., 4 tab.)

  6. Predicting sorption of organic acids to a wide range of carbonized sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, Gabriel; Kah, Melanie; Sun, Huichao; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Many contaminants and infochemicals are organic acids that undergo dissociation under environmental conditions. The sorption of dissociated anions to biochar and other carbonized sorbents is typically lower than that of neutral species. It is driven by complex processes that are not yet fully understood. It is known that predictive approaches developed for neutral compounds are unlikely to be suitable for organic acids, due to the effects of dissociation on sorption. Previous studies on the sorption of organic acids to soils have demonstrated that log Dow, which describes the decrease in hydrophobicity of acids upon dissociation, is a useful alternative to log Kow. The aim of the present study was to adapt a log Dow based approach to describe the sorption of organic acids to carbonized sorbents. Batch experiments were performed with a series of 9 sorbents (i.e., carbonized wood shavings, pig manure, and sewage sludge, carbon nanotubes and activated carbon), and four acids commonly used for pesticidal and biocidal purposes (i.e., 2,4-D, MCPA, 2,4-DB, and triclosan). Sorbents were comprehensively characterized, including by N2 and CO2 physisorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The wide range of sorbents considered allows (i) discussing the mechanisms driving the sorption of neutral and anionic species to biochar, and (ii) their dependency on sorbate and sorbent properties. Results showed that the sorption of the four acids was influenced by factors that are usually not considered for neutral compounds (i.e., pH, ionic strength). Dissociation affected the sorption of the four compounds, and sorption of the anions ranged over five orders of magnitude, thus substantially contributing to sorption in some cases. For prediction purposes, most of the variation in sorption to carbonized sorbents (89%) could be well described with a two-parameter regression equation including log Dow and sorbent specific surface area. The proposed model

  7. A procedure for reducing the concentration of hydrogen ions in acid anionic eluate and equipment therefore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parobek, P.; Baloun, S.; Plevac, S.

    1989-01-01

    The method is described of reducing the concentration of hydrogen ions in acid anionic eluate produced in the separation of uranium or other metals, in which anion exchanger elution, precipitation, filtration and precipitate and anion exchanger washing are used. The technological line for such elution comprises at least one ion exchange column and at least one container. They together form the first and the second stages of preparation of the acid anion elution solution, the sorption-elution separation of hydrogen ions on an cation exchanger being inserted between them. The preparation of the solution is divide into two stages. In the first stage, the acid and part of the solution for the preparation of the acid anion elution solution are supplied. The resulting enriched acid elution solution is fe onto the cation exchanger where the hydrogen ion concentration i reduced. It is then carried into the second stage where it is mixed with the remaining part of the solution. (B.S.)

  8. Capability Paternalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, R.J.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269266224

    A capability approach prescribes paternalist government actions to the extent that it requires the promotion of specific functionings, instead of the corresponding capabilities. Capability theorists have argued that their theories do not have much of these paternalist implications, since promoting

  9. A suggested approach toward measuring sorption and applying sorption data to repository performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundberg, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    The prediction of radionuclide migration for the purpose of assessing the safety of a nuclear waste repository will be based on a collective knowledge of hydrologic and geochemical properties of the surrounding rock and groundwater. This knowledge along with assumption about the interactions of radionuclides with groundwater and minerals form the scientific basis for a model capable of accurately predicting the repository's performance. Because the interaction of radionuclides in geochemical systems is known to be complicated, several fundamental and empirical approaches to measuring the interaction between radionuclides and the geologic barrier have been developed. The approaches applied to the measurement of sorption involve the use of pure minerals, intact, or crushed rock in dynamic and static experiments. Each approach has its advantages and disadvantages. There is no single best method for providing sorption data for performance assessment models which can be applied without invoking information derived from multiple experiments. 53 refs., 12 figs

  10. Effects of humic acid and heavy metals on the sorption of polar and apolar organic pollutants onto biochars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fei; Sun, Hongwen; Ren, Xinhao; Liu, Yarui; Zhu, Hongkai; Zhang, Peng; Ren, Chao

    2017-01-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) and heavy metals (Cu 2+ and Ag + ) on the sorption of polar and apolar organic pollutants onto biochars that were produced at temperatures of 200 °C (BC200) and 700 °C (BC700) were studied. Due to the plentiful polar functional groups on BC200, cationic propranolol exhibited higher levels of sorption than naphthalene on BC200 while naphthalene and propranolol showed similar sorption capacities on BC700. HA changed the characteristics of biochars and generally inhibited the sorption of target organic pollutants on biochars; however, enhancement occurred in some cases depending on the pollutants involved and their concentrations, biochars used and the addition sequences and concentrations of HA. On BC200, HA modifications mainly influenced sorption by decreasing its polarity and increasing its aromaticity, while on BC700, the surface area and pore volume greatly decreased due to the pore-blocking effects of HA. Residue dissolved HA in solution may also contribute to sorption inhibition. Complexation between polar functional groups on BC200 and heavy metals slightly enhanced the sorption of neutral naphthalene and significantly enhanced that of anionic 4-nitro-1-naphtol, while limited the sorption of cationic propranolol. Heavy metals together with their associated water molecules decreased the sorption of target chemicals on BC700 via pore-filling or pore-mouth-covering. Inhibition of heavy metals for 4-nitro-1-naphthol was found to be the weakest due to the bridge effects of heavy metals between 4-nitro-1-naphtol and BC700. The higher polarizability of Ag + led to the increase of its sorption on biochars in the presence of organic aromatic pollutants. The results of the present study shed light on the sorption mechanisms of bi-solute systems and enable us to select suitable biochar sorbents when chemicals co-exist. - Highlights: • Polar functional groups on low-temperature biochar enhanced propranolol sorption. • Humic acid

  11. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prata Fábio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with KH2PO4 at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha-1 of P2O5, which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L-1, with a 14C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL-1. Four steps of the desorption procedure with CaCl2 0.01 mol L-1 and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L-1. Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm-3. Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%, and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content.

  12. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prata, Fabio; Cardinali, Vanessa Camponez do Brasil; Tornisielo, Valdemar Luiz; Regitano, Jussara Borges; Lavorenti, Arquimedes

    2003-01-01

    The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with Kh 2 PO 4 at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha -1 of P 2 O 5 , which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L -1 ), with a 14 C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL -1 . Four steps of the desorption procedures withCaCl 2 0.01 mol L -1 and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L -1 ). Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm -3 . Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%), and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content. (author)

  13. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prata, Fabio [BIOAGRI Labs., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Div. de Quimica. Lab. de Radioquimica; Cardinali, Vanessa Camponez do Brasil; Tornisielo, Valdemar Luiz; Regitano, Jussara Borges [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Ciencias Exatas; Lavorenti, Arquimedes [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Secao de Toxicologia

    2003-03-01

    The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with Kh{sub 2}PO{sub 4} at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha{sup -1} of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L{sup -1}), with a {sup 14}C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL{sup -1}. Four steps of the desorption procedures withCaCl{sub 2} 0.01 mol L{sup -1} and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L{sup -1}). Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm{sup -3}. Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%), and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content. (author)

  14. Sorption behaviour of caesium on a bentonite sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurel, C.; Marmier, N.; Fromage, F.; Seby, F.; Bourg, A.C.M.; Giffaut, E.

    2002-01-01

    Sorption of elements like Cs on clay is one of the principal processes delaying their release from deep repositories of nuclear wastes into the environment. The sorption processes taking place between non-purified natural clay material (bentonite) and synthetic groundwater (containing Ca, Mg, Na, K and carbonates) were therefore studied experimentally and modelled for Cs to determine whether thermodynamic computer codes capable of predicting the behaviour of this element in natural systems might be developed. The model used, based on the properties of a pure montmorillonite phase, incorporates the surface reactions for natural major ions and sorbing cations but does not have any adjustable parameters. The weight of each parameters used in the model is assessed. Surface reactions are classified as either major or minor, and a simplified model of Cs sorption that considers only the major processes is proposed. This simplified model might correspond to the less sophisticated thermodynamic model included in coupled geochemistry-transport models. (orig.)

  15. Sorption properties of carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eletskii, Aleksandr V

    2004-01-01

    The current status of research in sorption properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is reviewed. The structural peculiarities of CNTs, determining their sorption characteristics, are considered. The mechanisms of sorption of gaseous and condensed substances by such structures are analyzed. Special attention is paid to the problem of using CNTs for storing hydrogen and other gaseous substances. Methods for filling CNTs with liquid materials, based on capillary phenomena and wetting the graphite surface of the CNT with liquids of various nature, are considered. Properties of 'peapods' formed as a result of filling single-walled CNTs with fullerene molecules are reviewed. Also considered are perspectives on the applied usage of the sorption properties of CNTs in electrochemical and fuel cells, and material storage devices, as well as for producing superminiature metallic conductors. (reviews of topical problems)

  16. Predicting sediment sorption coefficients for linear alkylbenzenesulfonate congeners from polyacrylate-water partition coefficients at different salinities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico Rico, A.; Droge, S.T.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304834017; Hermens, J.L.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069681384

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the molecular structure and the salinity on the sorption of the anionic surfactant linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) to marine sediment has been studied. The analysis of several individual LAS congeners in seawater and of one specific LAS congener at different dilutions of seawater

  17. Effects of humic acid and heavy metals on the sorption of polar and apolar organic pollutants onto biochars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Sun, Hongwen; Ren, Xinhao; Liu, Yarui; Zhu, Hongkai; Zhang, Peng; Ren, Chao

    2017-12-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) and heavy metals (Cu 2+ and Ag + ) on the sorption of polar and apolar organic pollutants onto biochars that were produced at temperatures of 200 °C (BC200) and 700 °C (BC700) were studied. Due to the plentiful polar functional groups on BC200, cationic propranolol exhibited higher levels of sorption than naphthalene on BC200 while naphthalene and propranolol showed similar sorption capacities on BC700. HA changed the characteristics of biochars and generally inhibited the sorption of target organic pollutants on biochars; however, enhancement occurred in some cases depending on the pollutants involved and their concentrations, biochars used and the addition sequences and concentrations of HA. On BC200, HA modifications mainly influenced sorption by decreasing its polarity and increasing its aromaticity, while on BC700, the surface area and pore volume greatly decreased due to the pore-blocking effects of HA. Residue dissolved HA in solution may also contribute to sorption inhibition. Complexation between polar functional groups on BC200 and heavy metals slightly enhanced the sorption of neutral naphthalene and significantly enhanced that of anionic 4-nitro-1-naphtol, while limited the sorption of cationic propranolol. Heavy metals together with their associated water molecules decreased the sorption of target chemicals on BC700 via pore-filling or pore-mouth-covering. Inhibition of heavy metals for 4-nitro-1-naphthol was found to be the weakest due to the bridge effects of heavy metals between 4-nitro-1-naphtol and BC700. The higher polarizability of Ag + led to the increase of its sorption on biochars in the presence of organic aromatic pollutants. The results of the present study shed light on the sorption mechanisms of bi-solute systems and enable us to select suitable biochar sorbents when chemicals co-exist. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Enriched fluoride sorption using alumina/chitosan composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Natrayasamy, E-mail: natrayasamy_viswanathan@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Anna University Tiruchirappalli - Dindigul Campus, Dindigul 624 622, Tamil Nadu (India); Meenakshi, S., E-mail: drs_meena@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624 302, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2010-06-15

    Alumina possesses an appreciable defluoridation capacity (DC) of 1566 mg F{sup -}/kg. In order to improve its DC, it is aimed to prepare alumina polymeric composites using the chitosan. Alumina/chitosan (AlCs) composite was prepared by incorporating alumina particles in the chitosan polymeric matrix, which can be made into any desired form viz., beads, candles and membranes. AlCs composite displayed a maximum DC of 3809 mg F{sup -}/kg than the alumina and chitosan (52 mg F{sup -}/kg). The fluoride removal studies were carried out in batch mode to optimize the equilibrium parameters viz., contact time, pH, co-anions and temperature. The equilibrium data was fitted with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms to find the best fit for the sorption process. The calculated values of thermodynamic parameters indicate the nature of sorption. The surface characterisation of the sorbent was performed by FTIR, AFM and SEM with EDAX analysis. A possible mechanism of fluoride sorption by AlCs composite has been proposed. Suitability of AlCs composite at field conditions was tested with a field sample taken from a nearby fluoride-endemic village. This work provides a potential platform for the development of defluoridation technology.

  19. Radionuclide sorption and migration studies of getters for backfill barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, E.J.

    1980-07-01

    Bentonite and hectorite clay minerals were chosen for study and development as potential backfill materials for testing in the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a radioactive waste repository and test facility in bedded salt. This choice of materials was based on initial screening results which are presented and on the predicted physical properties of these materials. These properties were verified experimentally in concentrated brines specific to the WIPP site. Distribution coefficients, K/sub d/, were calculated from batch sorption measurements on bentonite and hectorite in the nearly saturated brines A and B. The resulting K/sub d/ values were in the range of (1 to 5) x 10 3 ml/g for europium; (2 to 40) x 10 3 ml/g for plutonium(IV); and (4 to 16) x 10 3 ml/g for americium(III). A silica- and calcite-containing sand mixed with bentonite and hectorite acted as a sorber of americium(III) but was merely an inert diluent for plutonium(IV). Pertechnetate anions (TcO 4 - ) sorbed on activated charcoal with K/sub d/ values in the range of (0.2 to 0.4) x 10 3 ml/g. Pertechnetate, cesium, and strontium ions in brine were not sorbed appreciably by bentonite or hectorite. Although experimental evidence is given for a possible role of solubility in the sorption of europium on getters, other data presented here and evidence from the literature are inconsistent with a simple single reaction sorption mechanism. It is concluded that a backfill containing bentonite on hectorite and activated charcoal is potentially an effective barrier to the migration of Eu(III), Pu(IV), and Am(III) cations and, with further development, to the migration of TcO 4 - anions as well

  20. Investigation into sorption of uranium fron its high-concentrated nitric acid solutions on resin AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savel'eva, V.I.; Sudarikov, B.N.; Kireeva, G.N.; Ryzhkova, V.N.; Kandaryuk, V.V.

    1976-01-01

    Sorption of uranium has been studied on strongly basic anion-exchange resin from nitric acid solutions with concentration in metal 10-150 g/l in presence of sodium, calcium, and aluminium nitrates. Sorption of uranium from solutions has been performed by the static method with the aid of contacting the initial solution with airdry resin for 4 hours, resin to solution ratio being 1:12.5. It has been established that sorption of uranium increases with a rise in concentration of salting out agents in the following order: Al(NO 3 ) 3 > Ca(NO 3 ) 2 > Na(NO 3 ). It has been shown spectrophotometricatly that in solutions of nitrates and HNO 3 with a concentration 3 exceeds 6 mol/l

  1. An experimental study on the sorption of U(VI) onto granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Pil Soo

    2002-01-01

    The sorption of U(VI) on a domestic granite is studied as a function of experimental conditions such as contact time, solution-solid ratio, ionic strength, and pH using a batch procedure. The distribution coefficients, K d 's, of U(VI) are about 1-100mL/g depending on the experimental conditions. The sorption of U(VI) onto granite particles is greatly dependent upon the contact time, solution-solid ratio, and pH, but very little is dependent on the ionic strength. It is noticed that an U(VI)-carbonato ternary surface complex can be formed in the neutral range of pH. In the alkaline range of pH above 7, U(VI) sorption onto granite particles is greatly decreased due to the formation of anionic U(VI)-carbonato aqueous complexes

  2. Boron removal from aqueous solutions by ion-exchange resin: Column sorption-elution studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koese, T. Ennil; Oztuerk, Nese

    2008-01-01

    A column sorption-elution study was carried out by using a strong base anion-exchange resin (Dowex 2 x 8) for the removal of boron from aqueous solutions. The breakthrough curve was obtained as a function of feed flow rate and the total and breakthrough capacity values of the resin were calculated. The boron on the resin was quantitatively eluted with 0.5 M HCl solution at different flow rates. Three consecutive sorption-elution-washing-regeneration-washing cycles were applied to the resin in order to investigate the reusability of the ion-exchange resin. Total capacity values remained almost the same after three sorption-elution-regeneration cycles. The Thomas and the Yoon-Nelson models were applied to experimental data to predict the breakthrough curves and to determine the characteristic column parameters required for process design. The results proved that the models would describe the breakthrough curves well

  3. A new safety assessment model for shallow land burial of LLW based on multicomponent sorption theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, N.; Asano, T.; Tasaka, H.

    1984-01-01

    A new model on the radionuclide migration in underground environment is developed based on ''multicomponent sorption theory''. The model is capable of predicting the behaviors of the coexisting materials in soil-ground water system as ''multicomponent sorption phenomena'' and also predicting the radinuclide migration affected by the changes of concentrations of coexisting materials. The model is not a ''statistical model'' but a ''chemical model'' based on the ''ion exchange theory'' and ''adsorption theory''. Additionally, the model is a ''kinetic model'' capable of estimating the effect of ''rate of sorption'' on the radionuclide migration. The validity of the model was checked by the results of column experiments for sorption. Finally, sample calculations on the radionuclide migration in reference shallow land burial site were carried out for demonstration

  4. Capability ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Robeyns, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe capability approach is one of the most recent additions to the landscape of normative theories in ethics and political philosophy. Yet in its present stage of development, the capability approach is not a full-blown normative theory, in contrast to utilitarianism, deontological theories, virtue ethics, or pragmatism. As I will argue in this chapter, at present the core of the capability approach is an account of value, which together with some other (more minor) normative comm...

  5. Anionic surface binders

    OpenAIRE

    Aljaž-Rožič Mateja; Hočevar Nežka

    2004-01-01

    The MELAMIN Chemical Factory in Kočevje manufactures synthetic resins and binders for the paper industry. Binders based on AKD (alkyl ketene dimer) are produced which are used for binding paper and cardboard in the range of neutral and partially basic pH. Cationic and, lately, anionic binders are mostly used for the bulk binding of paper and board. The possibility of using AKD binders on paper or board surfaces is presented. In this case partially cationic AKD binders may be applied. When opt...

  6. Formation of interstellar anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senent, Maria Luisa

    2012-05-01

    Formation of interstellar anions: M.L. Senent. The recent detection of negative charged species in the ISM1 has instigated enthusiasm for anions in the astrophysical community2. Many of these species are new and entail characterization. How they are formed in astrophysical sources is a question of major relevance. The anion presence in ISM was first predicted theoretically on the basis of electron affinities and on the negative linear chain molecular stabilities. Although very early, they were considered in astrochemical models3-4, their discovery is so recent because their abundances seem to be relatively low. These have to be understood in terms of molecular stabilities, reaction probabilities and radiative and collisional excitations. Then, we present our theoretical work on even carbon chains type Cn and CnH (n=2,4,6) focused to the understanding of anion abundances. We use highly correlated ab initio methods. We performed spectroscopic studies of various isomers that can play important roles as intermediates5-8. In previous papers9-10, we compared C2H and C2H- collisional rates responsible for observed line intensities. Actually, we study hydrogen attachment (Cn +H → CnH and Cn- +H → CnH-) and associative detachment processes (Cn- +H → CnH +e-) for 2, 4 and 6 carbon atom chains11. [1] M.C.McCarthy, C.A.Gottlieb, H.Gupta, P.Thaddeus, Astrophys.J, 652, L141 (2006) [2] V.M.Bierbaum, J.Cernicharo, R.Bachiller, eds., 2011, pp 383-389. [3] A. Dalgarno, R.A. Mc Cray, Astrophys.J,, 181, 95 (1973) [4] E. Herbst E., Nature, 289, 656 (1981); [5] H.Massó, M.L.Senent, P.Rosmus, M.Hochlaf, J.Chem.Phys., 124, 234304 (2006) [6] M.L.Senent, M.Hochlaf, Astrophys. J. , 708, 1452(2010) [7] H.Massó, M.L.Senent, J.Phys.Chem.A, 113, 12404 (2009) [8] D. Hammoutene, M.Hochlaf, M.L.Senent, submitted. [9] A. Spielfiedel, N. Feautrier, F. Najar, D. ben Abdallah, F. Dayou, M.L. Senent, F. Lique, Mon.Not.R.Astron.Soc., 421, 1891 (2012) [10] F.Dumouchel, A, Spielfieldel , M

  7. Sorption of iodine, chlorine, technetium and cesium in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederlund, M.; Lusa, M.; Lehto, J.; Hakanen, M.; Vaaramaa, K.

    2011-01-01

    The safety assessment of final disposal of spent nuclear fuel will include an estimate for the behavior of waste nuclides in the biosphere. As a part of this estimate also the sorption of radioactive iodine, chlorine, technetium and cesium in soil is to be considered. The chemistry and the sorption of these radionuclides in soils are described in this literature survey. Behavior of I-129, Cl-36 and Tc-99 in the environment is of great interest because of their long half-lives and relatively high mobilities. The importance of Cs-135 arises from its high content in spent nuclear fuel and long physical half-life, even though it is considered relatively immobile in soil. Factors affecting the migration and sorption of radionuclides in soils can be divided into elemental and soil specific parameters. The most important elemental factor is the speciation of the element, which is influenced by the soil redox potential, pH and complex forming ligands. Soil micro-organisms can either serve as sorbents for radionuclides or affect their speciation by altering the prevailing soil redox conditions. Soil organic matter content and mineral properties have a marked influence on the retention of radionuclides. The sorption of anionic radionuclides such as I-, Cl- and TcO 4 - is pronounced in the presence of organic matter. Clay minerals are known to bound cesium effectively. The effect of speciation of radioactive iodine, chlorine, technetium and cesium in soil is considered in this study, as well as the effect of soil micro-organisms, organic matter and mineral properties. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of sorption distribution coefficient of Cs onto granite using sorption data collected in sorption database and sorption model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, S.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the sorption distribution coefficients (K d ) of Cs onto granite collected from the JAERI Sorption Database (SDB), the parameters for a two-site model without the triple-layer structure were optimized. Comparing the experimentally measured K d values of Cs onto Mizunami granite carried out by JAEA with the K d values predicted by the model, the effect of the ionic strength on the K d values of Cs onto granite was evaluated. It was found that K d values could be determined using the content of biotite in granite at a sodium concentration ([Na]) of 1 x 10 -2 to 5 x 10 -1 mol/dm 3 . It was suggested that in high ionic strength solutions, the sorption of Cs onto other minerals such as microcline should also be taken into account. (author)

  9. Evaluation of sorption distribution coefficient of Cs onto granite using sorption data collected in sorption database and sorption model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaki, S., E-mail: nagasas@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Based on the sorption distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) of Cs onto granite collected from the JAERI Sorption Database (SDB), the parameters for a two-site model without the triple-layer structure were optimized. Comparing the experimentally measured K{sub d} values of Cs onto Mizunami granite carried out by JAEA with the K{sub d} values predicted by the model, the effect of the ionic strength on the K{sub d} values of Cs onto granite was evaluated. It was found that K{sub d} values could be determined using the content of biotite in granite at a sodium concentration ([Na]) of 1 x 10{sup -2} to 5 x 10{sup -1} mol/dm{sup 3} . It was suggested that in high ionic strength solutions, the sorption of Cs onto other minerals such as microcline should also be taken into account. (author)

  10. Sorption mechanisms of selenium species (selenite and selenate) on copper-based minerals; Mecanismes de sorption des especes du selenium (selenite et seleniate) sur des mineraux a base de cuivre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devoy, J

    2001-09-01

    The sorption of radionuclides on the surface of minerals represents a process capable to delay the migration of the elements from a spent fuel deep repository towards the biosphere. In the framework of a deep underground repository, an engineered clay barrier has a high trapping capacity for cationic radio-elements, in particular because of the negative charge of clay surfaces. However, anionic radioelements like selenium species, would be only weakly retained by chemical processes. In order to optimize the trapping capacity of a clay barrier with respect to anionic species, prospective studies are carried out in order to find and evaluate some minerals with specific chemical trapping functions. Among radionuclides, the case of selenium has to be considered because its isotope {sup 79}Se is present in radioactive wastes and has a half life time of 6.5 10{sup 4} years. It is also judicious to find a mineral capable of trapping simultaneously several anionic radio-elements. Copper oxides and sulfides (Cu{sub 2}O, CuO, Cu{sub 2}S, CuS, CuFeS{sub 2} and Cu{sub 5}FeS{sub 4}) are good adsorbents with respect to selenium species (selenite and selenate). These minerals, with their selenium retention properties, could be used also for the decontamination of soils and waters or to process industrial effluents. The sorption mechanisms have been studied in details for copper oxides (Cu{sub 2}O and CuO) with respect to selenite and selenate. Chalcomenite precipitates in acid pH conditions when selenite is added to a Cu{sub 2}O and CuO suspension. Selenate, in contact with cuprite (Cu{sub 2}O) leads also to a selenium-based precipitate in acid pH environment. For higher pH values, selenite and selenate are adsorbed on copper oxides (Cu{sub 2}O and CuO) and lead to internal and external sphere complexes, respectively. In the case of a selenite/cuprite mixture in basic pH environment and at the equilibrium, a chemical reaction occurs between the oxidation product of cuprite, Cu

  11. Dynamic Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Niels Nolsøe; Stenger, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    The findings reveal a positive relationship between dynamic capabilities and innovation performance in the case enterprises, as we would expect. It was, however, not possible to establish a positive relationship between innovation performance and profitability. Nor was there any positive...... relationship between dynamic capabilities and profitability....

  12. Capability ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A.M. Robeyns (Ingrid)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe capability approach is one of the most recent additions to the landscape of normative theories in ethics and political philosophy. Yet in its present stage of development, the capability approach is not a full-blown normative theory, in contrast to utilitarianism, deontological

  13. Partitioning of hydrophobic pesticides within a soil-water-anionic surfactant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Keller, Arturo A

    2009-02-01

    Surfactants can be added to pesticide-contaminated soils to enhance the treatment efficiency of soil washing. Our results showed that pesticide (atrazine and diuron) partitioning and desorbability within a soil-water-anionic surfactant system is soil particle-size dependent and is significantly influenced by the presence of anionic surfactant. Anionic surfactant (linear alkylbenzene sulphonate, LAS) sorption was influenced by its complexation with both the soluble and exchangeable divalent cations in soils (e.g. Ca2+, Mg2+). In this study, we propose a new concept: soil system hardness which defines the total amount of soluble and exchangeable divalent cations associated with a soil. Our results showed that anionic surfactant works better with soils having lower soil system hardness. It was also found that the hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) sorbed onto the LAS-divalent cation precipitate, resulting in a significant decrease in the aqueous concentration of HOC. Our results showed that the effect of exchangeable cations and sorption of HOC onto the surfactant precipitates needs to be considered to accurately predict HOC behavior within soil-water-anionic surfactant systems.

  14. Sorption of plutonium and americium on repository, backfill and geological materials relevant to the JNFL low-level radioactive waste repository at Rokkasho-Mura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Berry, J.A.; Brownsword, M.; Heath, T.G.; Tweed, C.J.; Williams, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    An integrated program of batch sorption experiments and mathematical modeling has been carried out to study the sorption of plutonium and americium on a series of repository, backfill and geological materials relevant to the JNFL low-level radioactive waste repository at Rokkasho-Mura. The sorption of plutonium and americium on samples of concrete, mortar, sand/bentonite, tuff, sandstone and cover soil has been investigated. In addition, specimens of bitumen, cation and anion exchange resins, and polyester were chemically degraded. The resulting degradation product solutions, alongside solutions of humic and isosaccharinic acids were used to study the effects on plutonium sorption onto concrete, sand/bentonite and sandstone. The sorption behavior of plutonium and americium has been modeled using the geochemical speciation program HARPHRQ in conjunction with the HATCHES database

  15. Sorption of carbamazepine by commercial graphene oxides: a comparative study with granular activated carbon and multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Nan; Larese-Casanova, Philip

    2014-07-15

    Graphene nanosheet materials represent a potentially new high surface area sorbent for the treatment of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in water. However, sorption behavior has been reported only for laboratory graphene prepared by a laborious and hazardous graphite exfoliation process. A careful examination of commercially available, clean, high-volume produced graphene materials should reveal whether they are appropriate for sorbent technologies and which physicochemical properties most influence sorption performance. In this study, three commercially available graphene oxide powders of various particle sizes, specific surface areas, and surface chemistries were evaluated for their sorption performance using carbamazepine and nine other EDCs and were compared to that of conventional granular activated carbon (GAC) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Sorption kinetics of carbamazepine on graphene oxide powders was rapid and reversible with alcohol washing, consistent with π-π interactions. The various sorption extents as described by Freundlich isotherms were best explained by available surface area, and only the highest surface area graphene oxide (771 m(2)/g) out-performed GAC and MWCNTs. Increasing pH caused more negative surface charge, a twofold decrease in sorption of anionic ibuprofen, a onefold increase in sorption of cationic atenolol, and no change for neutral carbamazepine, highlighting the role of electrostatic interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Studies on sorption of cadmium (II) ions onto Haro river sand from aqueous media using radiotracer and voltammetric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, R.; Hasany, S.M.; Yamin, T.; Ansari, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Sorption of Cd(II) ions on Haro river sand has been studied using radiotracer technique. The effects of pH and acid concentrations on the sorption were studied. The sorption increases with pH. reaches a maximum at pH 7 and decreases at higher pH values. With acids, it was found that sorption decreases with increasing acid concentration, and for more oxidizing acids sorption was less. Kinetic studies indicate that mostly intra particle diffusion occurs with first order rate constant of 18.45 x 10 -2 min -1 . The sorption data follow the Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherms. In addition to the radiotracer method, voltammetric technique was applied and the results by the two techniques are in good agreement. The sorption free energy value indicates that adsorption process is chemisorption. The effect of temperature was studied and values of ΔH, ΔS and ΔG for Cd(II) have been calculated which are 20.15 kJ mol -1 , 74.04 J mol -1 K -1 and -1.754 kJ mol -1 . Adsorption of Cd(II) on Haro river sand is endothermic, spontaneous and entropy driven. The effect of different anions and cations at different concentrations was studied. Levels of cadmium have been monitored in water and sediments. (orig.)

  17. Sorption isotherms, GAB parameters and isosteric heat of sorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quirijns, E.J.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.; Loon, van W.K.P.; Straten, van G.

    2005-01-01

    The diffusion-sorption drying model has been developed as a physics-based way to model the decreasing drying rate at low moisture contents. This new model is founded on the existence of different classes of water: free and bound water. The transition between these classes and the corresponding

  18. Sorption of cesium on titanium and zirconium phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, V.N.; Mel'nik, N.A.; Rudenko, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium phosphates were prepared from mineral raw materials of the Kola Peninsula. Their capability to recover cesium cations from the model solutions and liquid radioactive waste (LRW) was studied. Titanium phosphate prepared from solutions formed by titanite breakdown demonstrates greater distribution coefficients of cesium as compared to zirconium phosphate. Titanium phosphate as a cheaper agent featuring greater sorption capacity was recommended for treatment of LRW to remove cesium [ru

  19. Purification of degraded TBP solvent using macroreticular anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartha, P.K.S.; Kutty, P.V.E.; Janaradanan, C.; Ramanujam, A.; Dhumwad, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) diluted with a suitable diluent is commonly used for solvent extraction in Purex process for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from irradiated nuclear fuels. This solvent gets degraded due to various factors, the main degradation product being dibutyl phosphoric acid (HDBP). A solvent cleanup step is generally incorporated in the process for removing the degradation products from the used solvent. A liquid-liquid cleanup system using sodium carbonate or sodium hydroxide solution is routinely used. Considering certain advantages, like the possibility of loading the resin almost to saturation capacity and the subsequent disposal of the spent resin by incineration and the feasibility of adopting it to the process, a liquid-solid system has been tried as an alternate method, employing various available macroreticular anion exchange resins in OH - form for the sorption of HDBP from TBP. After standardizing the various conditions for the satisfactory removal of HDBP from TBP using synthetic mixtures, resins were tested with process solvent in batch contacts. The parameters studied were (1) capacity of different resins for HDBP sorption (2) influence of acidity, uranium and HDBP on the sorption behaviour of the latter (3) removal of fission products from the solvent by the resin and (4) regeneration and recycling of the resin. (author). 2 figs., 13 tabs., 17 refs

  20. Gossiping Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Martin; Frey, Davide; Guerraoui, Rachid

    Gossip-based protocols are now acknowledged as a sound basis to implement collaborative high-bandwidth content dissemination: content location is disseminated through gossip, the actual contents being subsequently pulled. In this paper, we present HEAP, HEterogeneity Aware gossip Protocol, where...... nodes dynamically adjust their contribution to gossip dissemination according to their capabilities. Using a continuous, itself gossip-based, approximation of relative capabilities, HEAP dynamically leverages the most capable nodes by (a) increasing their fanouts (while decreasing by the same proportion...... declare a high capability in order to augment their perceived quality without contributing accordingly. We evaluate HEAP in the context of a video streaming application on a 236 PlanetLab nodes testbed. Our results shows that HEAP improves the quality of the streaming by 25% over a standard gossip...

  1. Aminosilane-Functionalized Cellulosic Polymer for Increased Carbon Dioxide Sorption

    KAUST Repository

    Pacheco, Diana M.

    2012-01-11

    Improvement in the efficiency of CO 2 separation from flue gases is a high-priority research area to reduce the total energy cost of carbon capture and sequestration technologies in coal-fired power plants. Efficient CO 2 removal from flue gases by adsorption systems requires the design of novel sorbents capable of capturing, concentrating, and recovering CO 2 on a cost-effective basis. This paper describes the preparation of an aminosilane-functionalized cellulosic polymer sorbent with enhanced CO 2 sorption capacity and promising performance for use in postcombustion carbon capture via rapid temperature-swing adsorption systems. The introduction of aminosilane functionalities onto the backbone of cellulose acetate was achieved by the anhydrous grafting of N-(2-aminoethyl)-3- aminoisobutyldimethylmethoxysilane. The dry sorption capacity of the modified cellulosic polymer reached 27 cc (STP) CO 2/cc sorbent (1.01 mmol/g sorbent) at 1 atm and 39 cc (STP) CO 2/cc sorbent (1.46 mmol/g sorbent) at 5 atm and 308 K. The amine loading achieved was 5.18 mmol amine(nitrogen)/g sorbent. Exposure to water vapor after the first dry sorption cycle increased the dry sorption capacity of the sorbent by 12% at 1 atm, suggesting its potential for rapid cyclic adsorption processes under humid feed conditions. The CO 2 sorbent was characterized in terms of chemical composition, density changes, molecular structure, thermal stability, and surface morphology. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  2. Aminosilane-Functionalized Cellulosic Polymer for Increased Carbon Dioxide Sorption

    KAUST Repository

    Pacheco, Diana M.; Johnson, J.R.; Koros, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Improvement in the efficiency of CO 2 separation from flue gases is a high-priority research area to reduce the total energy cost of carbon capture and sequestration technologies in coal-fired power plants. Efficient CO 2 removal from flue gases by adsorption systems requires the design of novel sorbents capable of capturing, concentrating, and recovering CO 2 on a cost-effective basis. This paper describes the preparation of an aminosilane-functionalized cellulosic polymer sorbent with enhanced CO 2 sorption capacity and promising performance for use in postcombustion carbon capture via rapid temperature-swing adsorption systems. The introduction of aminosilane functionalities onto the backbone of cellulose acetate was achieved by the anhydrous grafting of N-(2-aminoethyl)-3- aminoisobutyldimethylmethoxysilane. The dry sorption capacity of the modified cellulosic polymer reached 27 cc (STP) CO 2/cc sorbent (1.01 mmol/g sorbent) at 1 atm and 39 cc (STP) CO 2/cc sorbent (1.46 mmol/g sorbent) at 5 atm and 308 K. The amine loading achieved was 5.18 mmol amine(nitrogen)/g sorbent. Exposure to water vapor after the first dry sorption cycle increased the dry sorption capacity of the sorbent by 12% at 1 atm, suggesting its potential for rapid cyclic adsorption processes under humid feed conditions. The CO 2 sorbent was characterized in terms of chemical composition, density changes, molecular structure, thermal stability, and surface morphology. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. Sorption on inactive repository components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardiner, M.P.; Smith, A.J.; Williams, S.J.

    1990-11-01

    The near-field of an intermediate level/low level radioactive waste repository will contain significant quantities of iron and steel, Magnox and Zircaloy. Their corrosion products may possess significant sorption capacity for radioelements. The sorption of americium and plutonium onto magnesium hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, colloidal magnetite and colloidal haematite has been studied under conditions typical of the porewater of a cementitious near-field. R D values ≥ 10 5 m g -1 were measured for both actinides on the oxides and hydroxides. These values are at least as great as those measured on crushed 3:1 Blast Furnace Slag/Ordinary Portland cement. Competitive sorption experiments have shown that sorption onto the corrosion products does not take place in preference to that on the cement or the converse. Magnetite and haematite colloids are positively charged in cement-equilibrated water whilst zirconium hydroxide is negatively charged. Crushed cement was found to be positively charged. Simple experiments show that only a small proportion of haematite colloids is potentially mobile through a column of crushed cement. (author)

  4. Sorption on inactive repository components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardiner, M.P.; Smith, A.J.; Williams, S.J.

    1990-07-01

    The near-field of an intermediate level/low level radioactive waste repository will contain significant quantities of iron and steel, Magnox and Zircaloy. Their corrosion products may possess significant sorption capacity for radioelements. The sorption of americium and plutonium onto magnesium hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, colloidal magnetite and colloidal haematite has been studied under conditions typical of the porewater of a cementitious near-field. R D values ≥ 10 5 ml g -1 were measured for both actinides on the oxides and hydroxides. These values are at least as great at those measured on crushed 3:1 Blast Furnace Slag/Ordinary Portland Cement. Competitive sorption experiments have shown that sorption onto the corrosion products does not take place in preference to that on the cement or the converse. Magnetite and haematite colloids are positively charged in cement-equilibrated water whilst zirconium hydroxide is negatively charged. Crushed cement was found to be positively charged. Simple experiments show that only a small proportion of haematite colloids is potentially mobile through a column of crushed cement. (author)

  5. Effect of chemical retention on anionic species diffusion in compacted clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazer-Bachi, Frederic

    2005-01-01

    Anionic radioisotopes are of particular importance within the framework of the calculated health risk associated with high-level and long-lived intermediate-level underground radioactive waste disposal. Therefore, the objective of this work is the construction of a transport model coupled with chemistry in order to quantify the behaviour of anionic solutes in the Callovo-Oxfordian (CO_x) argillite, the argillaceous host rock of the ANDRA Meuse/Haute-Marne underground laboratory. An experimental methodology was defined to characterize this migration, several experimental methods being implemented: batch experiments, laboratory columns and through-diffusion cells. The study of the diffusion of the non-sorbing anionic tracer "3"6Cl"- highlighted the fact that, due to anionic exclusion, anions only had access to a part of the porosity. The retention of "3"5SO_4"2"- and "1"2"5I- on CO_x argillite was then characterized, quantified by batch experiments and confirmed by other experimental methods. Nevertheless, their migration was less retarded than expected by a model based on batch experiments and on "3"6Cl"- diffusive data. This difference was explained by anion exclusion which reduced sorption site accessibility. Thus, the intensity of this phenomenon has to be considered to model anion migration in compacted clays. (author) [fr

  6. Experimental study and modelling of selenite sorption onto illite and smectite clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missana, T; Alonso, U; García-Gutiérrez, M

    2009-06-15

    This study provides a large set of experimental selenite sorption data for pure smectite and illite. Similar sorption behavior existed in both clays: linear within a large range of the Se concentrations investigated (from 1x10(-10) to 1x10(-3) M); and independent of ionic strength. Selenite sorption was also analysed in the illite/smectite system with the clays mixed in two different proportions, as follows: (a) 30% illite-70% smectite and (b) 43% illite-57% smectite. The objective of the study was to provide the simplest model possible to fit the experimental data, a model also capable of describing selenite sorption in binary illite/smectite clay systems. Selenite sorption data, separately obtained in the single mineral systems, were modeled using both a one- and a two-site non-electrostatic model that took into account the formation of two complexes at the edge sites of the clay. Although the use of a two-site model slightly improved the fit of data at a pH below 4, the simpler one-site model reproduced satisfactorily all the sorption data from pH 3 to 8. The complexation constants obtained by fitting sorption data of the individual minerals were incorporated into a model to predict the adsorption of selenium in the illite/smectite mixtures; the model's predictions were consistent with the experimental adsorption data.

  7. Monohydrocalcite: a promising remediation material for hazardous anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Munemoto, Takashi; Sakai, Minoru; Yagi, Shintaro

    2011-01-01

    The formation conditions, solubility and stability of monohydrocalcite (MHC, CaCO 3 ·H 2 O), as well as sorption behaviors of toxic anions on MHC, are reviewed to evaluate MHC as a remediation material for hazardous oxyanions. MHC is a rare mineral in geological settings that occurs in recent sediments in saline lakes. Water temperature does not seem to be an important factor for MHC formation. The pH of lake water is usually higher than 8 and the Mg/Ca ratio exceeds 4. MHC synthesis experiments as a function of time indicate that MHC is formed from amorphous calcium carbonate and transforms to calcite and/or aragonite. Most studies show that MHC forms from solutions containing Mg, which inhibits the formation of stable calcium carbonates. The solubility of MHC is higher than those of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, but lower than those of ikaite and amorphous calcium carbonate at ambient temperature. The solubility of MHC decreases with temperature. MHC is unstable and readily transforms to calcite or aragonite. The transformation consists of the dissolution of MHC and the subsequent formation of stable phases from the solution. The rate-limiting steps of the transformation of MHC are the nucleation and growth of stable crystalline phases. Natural occurrences indicate that certain additives, particularly PO 4 and Mg, stabilize MHC. Laboratory studies confirm that a small amount of PO 4 in solution (>30 μM) can significantly inhibit the transformation of MHC. MHC has a higher sorption capacity for PO 4 than calcite and aragonite. The modes of PO 4 uptake are adsorption on the MHC surface at moderate phosphate concentrations and precipitation of secondary calcium phosphate minerals at higher concentrations. Arsenate is most likely removed from the solution during the transformation of MHC. The proposed sorption mechanism of arsenate is coprecipitation during crystallization of aragonite. The arsenic sorption capacity by MHC is significantly higher than simple

  8. Monohydrocalcite: a promising remediation material for hazardous anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Munemoto, Takashi; Sakai, Minoru; Yagi, Shintaro

    2011-12-01

    The formation conditions, solubility and stability of monohydrocalcite (MHC, CaCO3·H2O), as well as sorption behaviors of toxic anions on MHC, are reviewed to evaluate MHC as a remediation material for hazardous oxyanions. MHC is a rare mineral in geological settings that occurs in recent sediments in saline lakes. Water temperature does not seem to be an important factor for MHC formation. The pH of lake water is usually higher than 8 and the Mg/Ca ratio exceeds 4. MHC synthesis experiments as a function of time indicate that MHC is formed from amorphous calcium carbonate and transforms to calcite and/or aragonite. Most studies show that MHC forms from solutions containing Mg, which inhibits the formation of stable calcium carbonates. The solubility of MHC is higher than those of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, but lower than those of ikaite and amorphous calcium carbonate at ambient temperature. The solubility of MHC decreases with temperature. MHC is unstable and readily transforms to calcite or aragonite. The transformation consists of the dissolution of MHC and the subsequent formation of stable phases from the solution. The rate-limiting steps of the transformation of MHC are the nucleation and growth of stable crystalline phases. Natural occurrences indicate that certain additives, particularly PO4 and Mg, stabilize MHC. Laboratory studies confirm that a small amount of PO4 in solution (>30 μM) can significantly inhibit the transformation of MHC. MHC has a higher sorption capacity for PO4 than calcite and aragonite. The modes of PO4 uptake are adsorption on the MHC surface at moderate phosphate concentrations and precipitation of secondary calcium phosphate minerals at higher concentrations. Arsenate is most likely removed from the solution during the transformation of MHC. The proposed sorption mechanism of arsenate is coprecipitation during crystallization of aragonite. The arsenic sorption capacity by MHC is significantly higher than simple adsorption

  9. Monohydrocalcite: a promising remediation material for hazardous anions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Fukushi, Takashi Munemoto, Minoru Sakai and Shintaro Yagi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation conditions, solubility and stability of monohydrocalcite (MHC, CaCO3centerdotH2O, as well as sorption behaviors of toxic anions on MHC, are reviewed to evaluate MHC as a remediation material for hazardous oxyanions. MHC is a rare mineral in geological settings that occurs in recent sediments in saline lakes. Water temperature does not seem to be an important factor for MHC formation. The pH of lake water is usually higher than 8 and the Mg/Ca ratio exceeds 4. MHC synthesis experiments as a function of time indicate that MHC is formed from amorphous calcium carbonate and transforms to calcite and/or aragonite. Most studies show that MHC forms from solutions containing Mg, which inhibits the formation of stable calcium carbonates. The solubility of MHC is higher than those of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, but lower than those of ikaite and amorphous calcium carbonate at ambient temperature. The solubility of MHC decreases with temperature. MHC is unstable and readily transforms to calcite or aragonite. The transformation consists of the dissolution of MHC and the subsequent formation of stable phases from the solution. The rate-limiting steps of the transformation of MHC are the nucleation and growth of stable crystalline phases. Natural occurrences indicate that certain additives, particularly PO4 and Mg, stabilize MHC. Laboratory studies confirm that a small amount of PO4 in solution (>30 μM can significantly inhibit the transformation of MHC. MHC has a higher sorption capacity for PO4 than calcite and aragonite. The modes of PO4 uptake are adsorption on the MHC surface at moderate phosphate concentrations and precipitation of secondary calcium phosphate minerals at higher concentrations. Arsenate is most likely removed from the solution during the transformation of MHC. The proposed sorption mechanism of arsenate is coprecipitation during crystallization of aragonite. The arsenic sorption capacity by MHC is significantly

  10. New sorption-reagent materials for decontamination of liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avramenko, V.A.; Golikov, A.P.; Zheleznov, V.V.; Kaplun, E.V.; Marinin, D.V.; Sokolnitskaya, T.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Use of selective sorbents in liquid radioactive waste (LRW) management is widely spread in the field of nuclear power objects liquid waste decontamination, since the main objective there is to remove long-lived radionuclides of the nuclear cycle. The latter include, first of all, cesium-137, strontium-90, cobalt-60 and a number of α-irradiators. In this case LRW composition for most of the nuclear power objects is rather simple, except acidic deactivation solutions. At the same time, liquid radioactive wastes of different research centers have a variable chemical and radiochemical composition depending on objectives and tasks of a given center research activities. As a result, application of sorption technologies in such waste decontamination determines special requirements to these sorbents selectivity: a wide spectrum of radionuclides that can be removed and fairly high selectivity enabling to remove radionuclides from solutions of complex chemical composition (containing surfactants, complexing agents etc.). This paper is concerned with studying properties of new materials selective to different radionuclides. These materials are capable to interact with solution components whether already contained in the waste or deliberately added into resulting solution. Such sorption-reagent materials combine universal character of co-precipitation methods with simplicity of sorption methods. In this work we studied sorption-reagent inorganic ion-exchange materials interacting with sulfate-, carbonate-, oxalate-, sulfide-, and permanganate-ions. Insoluble compounds formed as a result of this interaction increase tens- and hundreds-fold the sorption selectivity of different radionuclides - strontium, cobalt, mercury, iron, and manganese as compared to conventional ion-exchange system. By means of X-ray phase analysis, IR-spectroscopy, chemical and radiochemical analysis, we have studied the mechanism of radionuclide sorption on different sorption

  11. Influence of pH on pesticide sorption by soil containing wheat residue-derived char

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Guangyao; Yang Yaning; Huang Minsheng; Yang Kai

    2005-01-01

    Field burning of crop residues incorporates resulting chars into soil and may thus influence the environmental fate of pesticides in the soil. This study evaluated the influence of pH on the sorption of diuron, bromoxynil, and ametryne by a soil in the presence and absence of a wheat residue-derived char. The sorption was measured at pHs ∼3.0 and ∼7.0. Wheat char was found to be a highly effective sorbent for the pesticides, and its presence (1% by weight) in soil contributed >70% to the pesticide sorption (with one exception). The sorption of diuron was not influenced by pH, due to its electroneutrality. Bromoxynil becomes dissociated at high pHs to form anionic species. Its sorption by soil and wheat char was lower at pH ∼7.0 than at pH ∼3.0, probably due to reduced partition of the anionic species of bromoxynil into soil organic matter and its weak interaction with the carbon surface of the char. Ametryne in its molecular form at pH ∼7.0 was sorbed by char-amended soil via partitioning into soil organic matter and interaction with the carbon surface of the char. Protonated ametryne at pH ∼3.0 was substantially sorbed by soil primarily via electrostatic forces. Sorption of protonated ametryne by wheat char was also significant, likely due not only to the interaction with the carbon surface but also to interactions with hydrated silica and surface functional groups of the char. Sorption of ametryne by char-amended soil at pH ∼3.0 was thus influenced by both the soil and the char. Environmental conditions may thus significantly influence the sorption and behavior of pesticides in agricultural soils containing crop residue-derived chars. - Wheat char was effective for adsorption of pesticides in soil, with efficacy varying with pH and particular pesticides

  12. Influence of pH on pesticide sorption by soil containing wheat residue-derived char

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng Guangyao [Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States)]. E-mail: gsheng@uark.edu; Yang Yaning [Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Huang Minsheng [Department of Environmental Science and Technology, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Yang Kai [Department of Environmental Science and Technology, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2005-04-01

    Field burning of crop residues incorporates resulting chars into soil and may thus influence the environmental fate of pesticides in the soil. This study evaluated the influence of pH on the sorption of diuron, bromoxynil, and ametryne by a soil in the presence and absence of a wheat residue-derived char. The sorption was measured at pHs {approx}3.0 and {approx}7.0. Wheat char was found to be a highly effective sorbent for the pesticides, and its presence (1% by weight) in soil contributed >70% to the pesticide sorption (with one exception). The sorption of diuron was not influenced by pH, due to its electroneutrality. Bromoxynil becomes dissociated at high pHs to form anionic species. Its sorption by soil and wheat char was lower at pH {approx}7.0 than at pH {approx}3.0, probably due to reduced partition of the anionic species of bromoxynil into soil organic matter and its weak interaction with the carbon surface of the char. Ametryne in its molecular form at pH {approx}7.0 was sorbed by char-amended soil via partitioning into soil organic matter and interaction with the carbon surface of the char. Protonated ametryne at pH {approx}3.0 was substantially sorbed by soil primarily via electrostatic forces. Sorption of protonated ametryne by wheat char was also significant, likely due not only to the interaction with the carbon surface but also to interactions with hydrated silica and surface functional groups of the char. Sorption of ametryne by char-amended soil at pH {approx}3.0 was thus influenced by both the soil and the char. Environmental conditions may thus significantly influence the sorption and behavior of pesticides in agricultural soils containing crop residue-derived chars. - Wheat char was effective for adsorption of pesticides in soil, with efficacy varying with pH and particular pesticides.

  13. Capability approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Rosendal; Kjeldsen, Christian Christrup

    Lærebogen er den første samlede danske præsentation af den af Amartya Sen og Martha Nussbaum udviklede Capability Approach. Bogen indeholder en præsentation og diskussion af Sen og Nussbaums teoretiske platform. I bogen indgår eksempler fra såvel uddannelse/uddannelsespolitik, pædagogik og omsorg....

  14. Sorption of Fluorotelomer Sulfonates, Fluorotelomer Sulfonamido Betaines, and a Fluorotelomer Sulfonamido Amine in National Foam Aqueous Film-Forming Foam to Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzen-Hanson, Krista A; Davis, Shannon E; Kleber, Markus; Field, Jennifer A

    2017-11-07

    During fire-fighter training, equipment testing, and emergency responses with aqueous film-forming foams (AFFFs), milligrams per liter concentrations of anionic, zwitterionic, and cationic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) enter the environment. Because the behavior of zwitterionic and cationic PFASs in the subsurface is unknown, batch sorption experiments were conducted using National Foam AFFF, which contains anionic fluorotelomer sulfonates (FtSs), zwitterionic fluorotelomer sulfonamido betaines (FtSaBs), and cationic 6:2 fluorotelomer sulfonamido amine (FtSaAm). Sorption of the FtSs, FtSaBs, and 6:2 FtSaAm to six soils with varying organic carbon, effective cation-exchange capacity, and anion-exchange capacity was evaluated to determine sorption mechanisms. Due to the poor recovery of the FtSaBs and 6:2 FtSaAm with published PFAS soil extraction methods, a new soil extraction method was developed to achieve good (90-100%) recoveries. The 6:2 FtSaAm was depleted from the aqueous phase in all but one soil, which is attributed to electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Sorption of the FtSs was driven by hydrophobic interactions, while the FtSaBs behave more like cations that strongly associate with the solid phase relative to groundwater. Thus, the sorption mechanisms of the FtSs, FtSaBs, and 6:2 FtSaAm are more complex than expected and cannot be predicted by bulk soil properties.

  15. Influence of mineral characteristics on the retention of low molecular weight organic compounds: a batch sorption-desorption and ATR-FTIR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeasmin, Sabina; Singh, Balwant; Kookana, Rai S; Farrell, Mark; Sparks, Donald L; Johnston, Cliff T

    2014-10-15

    Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the sorption-desorption behaviour of (14)C-labelled carboxylic acids (citric and oxalic) and amino acids (glutamic, alanine, phenylalanine and lysine) on pure minerals (kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, ferrihydrite and goethite). The sorption experiments were complemented by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to gain possible mechanistic insight into the organic acids-mineral interactions. In terms of charge, the organic solutes ranged from strongly negative (i.e., citric) to positively charged solutes (i.e., lysine); similarly the mineral phases also ranged from positively to negatively charged surfaces. In general, sorption of anionic carboxylic and glutamic acids was higher compared to the other compounds (except lysine). Cationic lysine showed a stronger affinity to permanently charged phyllosilicates than Fe oxides. The sorption of alanine and phenylalanine was consistently low for all minerals, with relatively higher sorption and lower desorption of phenylalanine than alanine. Overall, the role of carboxylic functional groups for the sorption and retention of these carboxylic and amino acids on Fe oxides (and kaolinite) and of amino group on 2:1 phyllosilicates was noticeable. Mineral properties (surface chemistry, specific surface area), chemistry of the organic compounds (pKa value, functional groups) and the equilibrium pH of the system together controlled the differences in sorption-desorption patterns. The results of this study aid to understand the effects of mineralogical and chemical factors that affect naturally occurring low molecular weight organic compounds sorption under field conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ion sorption onto hydrous ferric oxides: Effect on major element fluid chemistry at Aespoe, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruton, C.J.; Viani, B.E.

    1996-06-01

    The observed variability of fluid chemistry at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory is not fully described by conservative fluid mixing models. Ion exchange may account for some of the observed discrepancies. It is also possible that variably charged solids such as oxyhydroxides of Fe can serve as sources and sinks of anions and cations through surface complexation. Surface complexation reactions on hydrous ferric oxides involve sorption of both cations and anions. Geochemical modeling of the surface chemistry of hydrous ferric oxides (HFOs) in equilibrium with shallow HBH02 and deep KA0483A waters shows that HFOs can serve as significant, pH-sensitive sources and sinks for cations and anions. Carbonate sorption is favored especially at below-neutral pH. A greater mass of carbonate is sorbed onto HFO surfaces than is contained in the fluid when 10 g goethite, used as a proxy for HFOs, is in contact with 1 kg H 2 O. The masses of sorbent required to significantly impact fluid chemistry through sorption/desorption reactions seem to be reasonable when compared to the occurrences of HFOs at Aespoe. Thus, it is possible that small changes in fluid chemistry can cause significant releases of cations or anions from HFOs into the fluid phase or, alternately, result in uptake of aqueous species onto HFO surfaces. Simulations of the mixing of shallow HBH02 and native KA0483A waters in the presence of a fixed mass of goethite show that surface complexation does not cause the concentrations of Ca, Sr, and SO 4 to deviate from those that are predicted using conservative mixing models. Results for HCO 3 are more difficult to interpret and cannot be addressed adequately at this time

  17. Phosphazene-promoted anionic polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Junpeng

    2014-01-01

    In the recent surge of metal-free polymerization techniques, phosphazene bases have shown their remarkable potential as organic promoters/catalysts for the anionic polymerization of various types of monomers. By complexation with the counterion (e.g. proton or lithium cation), phosphazene base significantly improve the nucleophilicity of the initiator/chain-end resulting in rapid and usually controlled anionic/quasi-anionic polymerization. In this review, we will introduce the general mechanism, i.e. in situ activation (of initiating sites) and polymerization, and summarize the applications of such a mechanism on macromolecular engineering toward functionalized polymers, block copolymers and complex macromolecular architectures.

  18. ENTREPRENEURIAL CAPABILITIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Nielsen, Thorkild

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse entrepreneurship from an action research perspective. What is entrepreneurship about? Which are the fundamental capabilities and processes of entrepreneurship? To answer these questions the article includes a case study of a Danish entrepreneur and his networ....... Finally, the article discuss, how more long term action research methods could be integrated into the entrepreneurial processes and the possible impacts of such an implementation?...

  19. Sorption Energy Maps of Clay Mineral Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    1999-01-01

    A molecular-level understanding of mineral-water interactions is critical for the evaluation and prediction of the sorption properties of clay minerals that may be used in various chemical and radioactive waste disposal methods. Molecular models of metal sorption incorporate empirical energy force fields, based on molecular orbital calculations and spectroscopic data, that account for Coulombic, van der Waals attractive, and short-range repulsive energies. The summation of the non-bonded energy terms at equally-spaced grid points surrounding a mineral substrate provides a three dimensional potential energy grid. The energy map can be used to determine the optimal sorption sites of metal ions on the exposed surfaces of the mineral. By using this approach, we have evaluated the crystallographic and compositional control of metal sorption on the surfaces of kaolinite and illite. Estimates of the relative sorption energy and most stable sorption sites are derived based on a rigid ion approximation

  20. Simultaneous anionic and cationic redox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung-Kyun; Kang, Kisuk

    2017-12-01

    It is challenging to unlock anionic redox activity, accompanied by full utilization of available cationic redox process, to boost capacity of battery cathodes. Now, material design by tuning the metal-oxygen interaction is shown to be a promising solution.

  1. Schlenk Techniques for Anionic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Ratkanthwar, Kedar; Zhao, Junpeng; Zhang, Hefeng; Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos; Mays, Jimmy

    2015-01-01

    Anionic polymerization-high vacuum techniques (HVTs) are doubtlessly the most prominent and reliable experimental tools to prepare polymer samples with well-defined and, in many cases, complex macromolecular architectures. Due to the high demands

  2. Control of Surface Functional Groups on Pertechnetate Sorption on Activated Carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Wang; H. Gao; R. Yeredla; H. Xu; M. Abrecht; G.D. Stasio

    2006-01-01

    99 Tc is highly soluble and poorly adsorbed by natural materials under oxidizing conditions, thus being of particular concern for radioactive waste disposal. Activated carbon can potentially be used as an adsorbent for removing Tc from aqueous solutions. We have tested six commercial activated carbon materials for their capabilities for sorption of pertechnetate (TcO 4 - ). The tested materials can be grouped into two distinct types: Type I materials have high sorption capabilities with the distribution coefficients (K d ) varying from 9.5 x 10 5 to 3.2 x 10 3 mL/g as the pH changes from 4.5 to 9.5, whereas type II materials have relatively low sorption capabilities with K d remaining more or less constant (1.1 x 10 3 - 1.8 x 10 3 mL/g) over a similar pH range. The difference in sorption behavior between the two types of materials is attributed to the distribution of surface functional groups. The predominant surface groups are identified to be carboxylic and phenolic groups. The carboxylic group can be further divided into three subgroups A, B, and C in the order of increasing acidity. The high sorption capabilities of type I materials are found to be caused by the presence of a large fraction of carboxylic subgroups A and B, while the low sorption capabilities of type II materials are due to the exclusive presence of phenolic and carboxylic subgroup C. Therefore, the performance of activated carbon for removing TcO 4 - can be improved by enhancing the formation of carboxylic subgroups A and B during material processing

  3. Applicability of microautoradiography to sorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.L.; Wolfsberg, K.

    1979-01-01

    The technique of microautoradiography was applied to the study of the sorption of uranium and americium on five rock types which exist at the Nevada Test Site. It was found that autoradiograms could be prepared in a few days which would allow the specific minerals responsible for sorption to be identified. Furthermore, the state of aggregation of the sorbed species was clearly indicated. It was concluded that microautoradiography was a useful adjunct to currently used methods for studying sorption of certain radionuclides

  4. Kinetics and thermodynamic for sorption of arsenate by Lanthanum-exchanged zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Jelas Haron; Saiful Adli Masdan; Mohd Zobir Hussein; Zulkarnain Zainal; Anuar Kassim

    2007-01-01

    Zeolites are crystalline, hydrated aluminosilicate containing exchangeable alkaline and alkaline earth cations in their structural frameworks. Since zeolites have permanent negative charges on their surfaces, they have no affinity for anions. However recent studies have shown that modification of zeolites with certain surfactants or metal cations yield sorbents with a strong affinity for many anions. In this paper, modification of zeolites (zeolite A, X and ZSM5) were performed by exchange of naturally occurring cations with lanthanum ion that forms low solubility arsenate salt. The exchanged zeolites were used to sorb arsenate from aqueous solution. Among parameters investigated were effect of pH, arsenate initial concentrations, contact time and temperature. The maximum exchanged capacity of La (III) ion was obtained when using solution with initial pH of 4. Zeolite X gives the highest La (III) exchanged capacity compared to other zeolites. The results showed that As (V) sorption by La-zeolites occurred at about pH 6.5 and increased as pH increased and reaching maximum at equilibrium pH about 7.8. On the other hand, almost no arsenate sorption occurred on un exchanged zeolites. This indicates that La (III) ion on the exchanged zeolites is taking part on the As(V) sorption via surface precipitation. The results also showed that the sorption capacities increased with increasing initial As (V) concentrations. The sorption followed Langmuir model with maximum sorption capacities of 0.41, 0.21 and 0.19 mmol/g at 25 degree Celsius for La exchanged zeolite X (La-ZX), La exchanged zeolite ZSM5 (La-ZSM) and La exchanged zeolite A (La-ZA), respectively. The amounts of sorption of As (V) by La exchanged zeolite increased as temperature increased from 25 to 70 degree Celsius indicating that the process is endothermic. The free energy changes ( ΔG degree) for the sorption at 25 degree Celsius were -10.25, -9.65 and -8.49 kJ/ mol for La-ZX, La-ZSM and La-ZA, respectively. The

  5. Strontium sorption on Savannah River Plant soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeffner, S.L.

    1984-12-01

    A laboratory study of strontium-85 sorption was conducted using Savannah River Plant soil and groundwater from the low-level waste burial ground. Systematic variation of soil and water composition indicates that strontium sorption is most strongly a function of pH. Changes in clay content and in K + , Ca 2+ , or Mg 2+ concentrations influence strontium sorption indirectly through the slight pH changes which result. The ions Na + , Cl - , and NO 3 - have no effect. Ferrous ion, added to groundwater to simulate the conditions of water at the bottom of waste trenches, did not account for low strontium sorption observed with some trench waters

  6. Experimental Study and modelling of the Sorption of Selenite and Europium Onto Smectite and Illite Clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missana, T.; Alonso, U.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.

    2009-01-01

    This study provides a large set of experimental selenite sorption data for pure smectite and illite. Similar sorption behavior existed in both clays: linear within a large range of the Se concentrations investigated and independent of ionic strength. Selenite sorption was also analysed in the illite/smectite system with the clays mixed in two different proportions. The objective of the study was to provide the simplest model possible to fit the experimental data, a model also capable of describing selenite sorption in binary illite/smectite clay systems. Selenite sorption data were modeled using both a one-and a two-site non-electrostatic model that took into account the formation of two complexes at the edge sites of the clay. The complexation constants obtained by fitting sorption data of the individual minerals were incorporated into a model to predict the adsorption of selenium in the illite/ smectite mixtures; the models predictions were consistent with the experimental adsorption data. (Author) 42 refs

  7. Experimental Study and modelling of the Sorption of Selenite and Europium Onto Smectite and Illite Clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missana, T.; Alonso, U.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.

    2009-10-12

    This study provides a large set of experimental selenite sorption data for pure smectite and illite. Similar sorption behavior existed in both clays: linear within a large range of the Se concentrations investigated and independent of ionic strength. Selenite sorption was also analysed in the illite/smectite system with the clays mixed in two different proportions. The objective of the study was to provide the simplest model possible to fit the experimental data, a model also capable of describing selenite sorption in binary illite/smectite clay systems. Selenite sorption data were modeled using both a one-and a two-site non-electrostatic model that took into account the formation of two complexes at the edge sites of the clay. The complexation constants obtained by fitting sorption data of the individual minerals were incorporated into a model to predict the adsorption of selenium in the illite/ smectite mixtures; the models predictions were consistent with the experimental adsorption data. (Author) 42 refs.

  8. Effect of precipitation conditions on the magnetic and sorption properties of zeolite-maghemite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matik, M.; Pechousek, J.; Zboril, R.; Sepelak, V.

    2006-01-01

    Natural zeolite (clinoptilolite) from Nizny Hrabovec (Slovakia) has been magnetically modified through maghemite (γ-Fe 2 O 3 ) nanoparticles by precipitation route at various reaction conditions. An effect of the precipitation temperature, weight ratio of Fe/zeolite and interaction time on the magnetic and surface properties of maghemite-zeolite composites was monitored by Moessbauer spectroscopy, TEM and BET surface area measurements. A decrease in reaction time and the Fe/zeolite ratio leads to smaller particles of γ-Fe 2 O 3 while lowering the precipitation temperature results in the larger crystallites. The reflection of the precipitation temperature being the key variable in the sorption properties of composites was tested with selected heavy metal ions. The sample prepared at highest temperature of 85 grad C reveals much higher maximum sorption capacity for Pb 2+ than commonly observed for magnetically modified natural zeolites. Good ability for sorption of anions was demonstrated with AsO 4 3- , which offers new applications of such modified zeolites. The sample with the best sorption properties was characterized by SEM, XRD, in-field Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic measurements. Following these data, maghemite nanoparticles form aggregates, which are sorbed on zeolite inhomogeneously with some free active surface of zeolite. The particles are about 15 nm in size and reveal the partial vacancies ordering as documented through the increased ratio of tetrahedral and octahedral positions being of 1/3. FC/ZFC curves confirm strongly interacting superparamagnetic particles with a blocking temperature of 230 K. (authors)

  9. Modelling of niobium sorption on clay minerals in sodium and calcium perchlorate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ervanne, Heini; Hakanen, Martti; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Laboratory of Radiochemistry

    2014-11-01

    The sorption behaviour of niobium on kaolinite and illite minerals in sodium and calcium perchlorate solutions was evaluated with use of the mass distribution coefficient, Rd, obtained in batch sorption experiments. Very high distribution coefficient values, about 100 m{sup 3}/kg, were obtained for both minerals in the neutral pH range between 6 and 8. Values were somewhat lower at pH 5. In NaClO{sub 4} solution, the sorption of niobium starts to decrease at pH higher than 8. This is in agreement with the increase, with pH, in the proportion of anionic niobate species, which are presumed to be low or non-sorbing. A similar decrease was not observed in Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} solution, probably owing to the influence of Ca on niobium solution speciation and surface species. The surface complexation model was applied to model the Rd values. The model fitted well for the NaClO{sub 4} solution but only at pH below 9 for the Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} solution. The discrepancy between the strong sorption of niobium in calcium-bearing solution at high pH and the calculated speciation is due in part to the non-inclusion of calcium niobate solution species and Ca-Nb compounds in the present NEA and other similar thermodynamic databases.

  10. An assessment of strontium sorption onto bentonite buffer material in waste repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Pankaj

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, changes occurring in sorption characteristics of a representative bentonite (WIn-BT) exposed to SrCl 2 (0.001-0.1 M) under the pH range of 1-13 were investigated. Such interaction revealed a significant variation in surface charge density and binding energy of ions with respect to bentonite, and alteration in their physicochemical properties viz., specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, thermal and mechanical behaviour were observed. The distribution coefficients (k d ) calculated for sorption onto virgin (UCBT) and contaminated bentonite (CBT) indicated a greater influence of mineralogical changes occurred with variance of pH and strontium concentration. Notably, the sorption mechanism clearly elucidates the effect of structural negative charge and existence of anionic metal species onto CBT, and depicted the reason behind significant k d values at highly acidic and alkaline pH. The maximum k d of UCBT and CBT (0.001M SrCl2) were 8.99 and 2.92 L/kg, respectively, at the soil pH 8.5; whereas it was 2.37 and 1.23 L/kg at pH 1 for the CBT (0.1M SrCl2) and CBT (0.01M SrCl2) , respectively. The findings of this study can be useful to identify the physicochemical parameters of candidate buffer material and sorption reversibility in waste repository.

  11. Assessment of Management Oxides for the Sorption of Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.R. Learman; M.F. Hochella, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Recent research has shown that certain manganese oxides have the ability to sorb aqueous metal cations much more efficiently than any of the naturally occurring iron oxides when normalized to surface area. This ability is, at least in part, related to the internal sites available in many manganese oxide structures, including those within tunnels and between sheets. Additionally, a new naturally-occurring manganese oxide structurally related to vernadite ((delta)-MnO 2 ), collected along the Clark Fork River in western Montana, USA, has shown the ability to sorb arsenate, an anionic complex. The potential for manganese oxides to sorb anions has made it an attractive material as a radionuclide ''getter''. According to the US Department of Energy's Total Systems Performance Assessment, technetium and iodine are two major anionic radionuclides contributing to the list of potential contaminants released from Yucca Mountain repository, Nevada, USA. These two radionuclides are extremely problematic because they are very mobile in the environment. This project involves running flow-through sorption experiments using rhenium (a surrogate for technetium) and stable iodine as sorbates and several synthetic manganese oxides, including birnessite, vernadite, cryptomelane, and possibly the new vernadite-like phase mentioned earlier, as sorbants. For all synthesis reactions, manganese (VII) salts are reduced to manganese (III,IV) oxides. The different oxides are produced from specific reductants and/or the addition of heat, followed by multiple washing steps. To verify that the proper phases have been synthesized, all oxides are analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The sorption experiments will be run in flow-through reactors bearing the aqueous complex of interest, where solutions, at various temperatures, pH's, and ionic strengths, will pass through a bed of one of the manganese oxides. The effluent solution will be analyzed

  12. The kinetic and thermodynamic sorption and stabilization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in natural organic matter surrogate solutions: The effect of surrogate molecular weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tingting; Lin, Daohui; Li, Lu; Wang, Zhengyu; Wu, Fengchang

    2014-01-01

    Styrene sulfonate (SS) and polystyrene sulfonates (PSSs) were used as surrogates of natural organic matter to study the effect of molecular weight (from 206.2 to 70,000 Da) on their sorption by a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and an activated carbon (AC) and on their stabilization of MWCNT suspension. Results indicate that surface-diffusion through the liquid-sorbent boundary was the rate-controlling step of the kinetic sorption of both MWCNTs and AC, and surface-occupying and pore-filling mechanisms respectively dominated the thermodynamic sorption of MWCNTs and AC. Sorption rates and capacities of MWCNTs and AC in molecular concentration of SS and PSS decreased with increasing molecular weight. The PSSs but not SS facilitated the stabilization of MWCNT suspension because of the increased electrosteric repulsion. The PSSs with more monomers had greater capabilities to stabilize the MWCNT suspension, but the capabilities were comparable after being normalized by the total monomer number. -- Highlights: • Surface-diffusion controlled the kinetic sorption of NOM surrogates to MWCNTs and AC. • Surface-occupying mechanism dominates the thermodynamic sorption of MWCNTs. • The sorption in molecular concentration decreased with increasing M w of the PSSs. • PSS but not SS stabilized MWCNT suspension through electrosteric repulsion. • Stabilization capabilities normalized by monomer number of the PSSs were comparable. -- Molecular weight of NOM influences its sorption on and stabilizing MWCNTs

  13. Experimental and theoretical study of Co sorption in clay montmorillonites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil Rebaza, A. V.; Montes, M. L.; Taylor, M. A.; Errico, L. A.; Alonso, R. E.

    2018-03-01

    Montmorillonite (MMT) clays are 2:1 layered structures which in natural state may allocate different hydrated cations such as M-nH2O (M = Na, Ca, Fe, etc) in its interlayer space. Depending on the capability for ion sorption, these materials are interesting for environmental remediation. In this work we experimentally study the Co sorption in a natural Na-MMT using UV-visible spectrometry and XRD on semi-oriented samples, and then analyze the sorption ability of this clay by means of ab initio calculation performed on pristine MMT. The structural properties of Na-MMT and Co-adsorbed MMT, and the hyperfine parameters at different atomic sites were analyzed and compared with the experimental ones for the first, and for the case of the hyperfine parameters, presented for the first time for the last. The theoretical predictions based on total energy considerations confirm that Co incorporation replacing Na is energetically favorable. Also, the basal spacing d001 experimentally obtained is well reproduced.

  14. Sorption of radionuclides on inorganic sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajec, P.; Matel, L.

    1995-01-01

    The sorption of cesium, strontium, plutonium and americium from water solution on natural zeolite, clay minerals, synthetic zeolites and ferrocyanides in silica gel matrix was studied. The same experiments but with synthetic zeolites irradiated by the dose 100 kGy proved no change in sorption properties. 1 tab., 4 refs

  15. Nitrate Sorption in an Agricultural Soil Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissem Hamdi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing concentrations of in surface water and groundwater can cause ecological and public health effects and has come under increased scrutiny by both environmental scientists and regulatory agencies. For many regions though, including the Sahel of Tunisia, little is known about the sorption capacity of soils. In this project we measured sorption by a profile of an iso-humic soil from Chott Meriem, Tunisia. Soil samples were collected from four soil depths (0–25, 25–60, 60–90, and 90–120 cm on 1 June 2011, and their sorption capacity was determined using batch experiments under laboratory conditions. The effects of contact time, the initial concentration, and the soil-solution ratio on sorption were investigated. In general, the results suggested that was weakly retained by the Chott Meriem soil profile. The quantity of sorption increased with depth, contact time, initial concentration, and soil-solution ratios. To evaluate the sorption capacities of the soil samples at concentrations ranging between 25 and 150 mg L−1 experimental data were fitted to both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm sorption models. The results indicated that Freundlich model was better for describing sorption in this soil profile.

  16. Sorption of mercury on chemically synthesized polyaniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remya Devi, P.S.; Verma, R.; Sudersanan, M.

    2006-01-01

    Sorption of inorganic mercury (Hg 2+ ) and methyl mercury, on chemically synthesized polyaniline, in 0.1-10N HCl solutions has been studied. Hg 2+ is strongly sorbed at low acidities and the extent of sorption decreases with increase in acidity. The sorption of methyl mercury is very low in the HCl concentration range studied. Sorption of Hg 2+ on polyaniline in 0.1-10N LiCl and H 2 SO 4 solutions has also been studied. The analysis of the data indicates that the sorption of Hg 2+ depends on the degree of protonation of polyaniline and the nature of mercury(II) chloride complexes in solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis (XPS) of polyaniline sorbed with mercury show that mercury is bound as Hg 2+ . Sorbed mercury is quantitatively eluted from polyaniline with 0.5N HNO 3 . Polyaniline can be used for separation and pre-concentration of inorganic mercury from aqueous samples. (author)

  17. Phenanthrene sorption on biochar-amended soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahawaththa Gamage, Inoka Damayanthi Kumari; Moldrup, Per; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    on their influences on the sorption of environmental contaminants. In a field-based study at two experimental sites in Denmark, we investigated the effect of birch wood-derived biochar (Skogans kol) on the sorption of phenanthrene in soils with different properties. The soil sorption coefficient, Kd (L kg-1......), of phenanthrene was measured on sandy loam and loamy sand soils which have received from zero up to 100 t ha-1 of biochar. Results show that birch wood biochar had a higher Kd compared to soils. Furthermore, the application of birch wood biochar enhanced the sorption of phenanthrene in agricultural soils...... carbon, while it negatively correlated with clay content. The results also revealed that biochar-mineral interactions play an important role in the sorption of phenanthrene in biochar-amended soil....

  18. Cobalt sorption onto Savannah River Plant soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeffner, S.L.

    1985-06-01

    A laboratory study of cobalt-60 sorption was conducted using Savannah River Plant soil and groundwater from the low-level waste burial ground. Systematic variation of soil and water composition indicates that cobalt sorption is most strongly a function of pH. Over a pH range of 2 to 9, the distribution coefficient ranged from 2 to more than 10,000 mL/g. Changes in clay content and in K + , Ca 2+ , or Mg 2+ concentrations influence cobalt sorption indirectly through the slight pH changes which result. The ions Na + , Cl - , and NO 3 - have no effect on cobalt sorption. Ferrous ion, added to groundwater to simulate the condition of water at the bottom of the waste trenches, accounts for part of the decrease in cobalt sorption observed with trench waters. 17 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  19. U(VI) sorption on granite: prediction and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebelung, C.; Brendler, V.

    2010-01-01

    One widely accepted approach - component additivity (CA) - to describe the sorption of contaminants onto complex materials such as rocks or soils is based on the assumption that the surface of a complex mineral assemblage is composed of a mixture of mineral constituents whose surface properties are known from independent studies. An internally consistent SCM (surface complexation model) database can be developed that describes the adsorption reactions of solutes to each phase. Here, the capability of such a methodology was tested, using the code MINTEQA2 including thermodynamic data of the NEA-TDB, and literature data for SCM, namely the DDL model. The sorption characteristics of U(VI) on granite (from Eibenstock, Saxony, Germany, with the main components quartz, albite, orthoclase, and muscovite) was predicted and then compared to batch experiments. Granite plays an important role in the remediation of former uranium ore mining and milling sites, but is also one of the host rocks considered for final disposal of nuclear materials. Safety assessment requires a detailed understanding of this system and its retention potential with regard to hazardous components. Namely the sorption of uranium in this complex rock is not fully understood yet. The experiments thus also provided a better understanding of the far-field behaviour in granitic geological nuclear repositories. The robustness of the prediction was tested by variation of the granite composition and the variation of the specific surface area (SSA) - first all components were predicted with a uniform granite SSA, second with a distinct SSA for each granite component (determined on pure minerals for the same grain size fractions). Changes in compositions yielded only marginal differences in the prediction. Different approaches to SSA showed somewhat larger deviations. In conclusion, the CA methodology is a valid and robust approach to U(VI) sorption onto complex substrates such as granite, provided sufficient

  20. Separation of transfer ribonucleic acids on polystyrene anion exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singhal, R.P.; Griffin, G.D.; Novelli, G.D.

    1976-11-16

    The transfer RNA separation by chromatography on strong-base-polystyrene exchange materials is examined and compared with the widely used reversed-phase chromatography. Results indicate important differences in some transfer RNA (tRNA) elution patterns by the anion-exchange chromatography, as compared with the reversed-phase chromatography. Transfer RNAs containing hydrophobic groups are adsorbed more strongly. The anion exchanger has twice the number of theoretical plates. Single peaks of tRNA/sub 2//sup Glu/ and tRNA/sub 1//sup Phe/ obtained from the reversed-phase column give multiple peaks on polystyrene anion-exchange chromatography. All six leucine tRNAs (Escherichia coli) and differences in tRNA populations synthesized during early and late stages of the dividing lymphocytes from normal human blood can be characterized by the anion-exchange chromatography. Different separation profiles are obtained by two separation systems for tyrosine tRNAs from mouse liver and mouse-plasma-cell tumor. The results indicate that, in contrast to the reversed-phase chromatography, strong-base-polystyrene anion-exchange chromatography is capable of separating tRNAs with minor structural differences.

  1. REACTIVITY OF ANIONS IN INTERSTELLAR MEDIA: DETECTABILITY AND APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senent, M. L. [Departamento de Quimica y Fisica Teoricas, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-C.S.I.C., Serrano 121, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); Hochlaf, M., E-mail: senent@iem.cfmac.csic.es, E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr [Laboratoire de Modelisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, Universite Paris-Est, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 boulevard Descartes, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallee (France)

    2013-05-01

    We propose a general rule to distinguish between detectable and undetectable astronomical anions. We believe that only few anions live long enough in the interstellar medium and thus can be detected. Our method is based on quantum mechanical calculations capable of describing accurately the evolution of electronic states during chemical processes. The still not fully understood reactivity at low temperatures is discussed considering non-adiabatic effects. The role of excited states has usually been neglected in previous works which basically focused on the ground electronic state for interpretations of experimental observations. Here, we deal with unsaturated carbon chains (e.g., C{sub n} H{sup -}), which show a high density of electronic states close to their corresponding ground electronic states, complex molecular dynamics, and non-adiabatic phenomena. Our general rule shows that it is not sufficient that anions exist in the gas phase (in the laboratory) to be present in media such as astrophysical media, since formation and decomposition reactions of these anions may allow the population of anionic electronic states to autodetach, forming neutrals. For C{sub n} H, reactivity depends strongly on n, where long and short chains behave differently. Formation of linear chains is relevant.

  2. Uranium and Cesium sorption to bentonite colloids in high salinity and carbonate-rich environments: Implications for radionuclide transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, E. L.; Teutsch, N.; Klein-BenDavid, O.; Weisbrod, N.

    2017-12-01

    When radionuclides are leaked into the subsurface due to engineered waste disposal container failure, the ultimate barrier to migration of radionuclides into local aquifers is sorption to the surrounding rock matrix and sediments, which often includes a bentonite backfill. The extent of this sorption is dependent on pH, ionic strength, surface area availability, radionuclide concentration, surface mineral composition, and solution chemistry. Colloidal-sized bentonite particles eroded from the backfill have been shown to facilitate the transport of radionuclides sorbed to them away from their source. Thus, sorption of radionuclides such as uranium and cesium to bentonite surfaces can be both a mobilization or retardation factor. Though numerous studies have been conducted to-date on sorption of radionuclides under low ionic strength and carbonate-poor conditions, there has been little research conducted on the behavior of radionuclides in high salinities and carbonate rich conditions typical of aquifers in the vicinity of some potential nuclear repositories. This study attempts to characterize the sorption properties of U(VI) and Cs to bentonite colloids under these conditions using controlled batch experiments. Results indicated that U(VI) undergoes little to no sorption to bentonite colloids in a high-salinity (TDS= 9000 mg/L) artificial groundwater. This lack of sorption was attributed to the formation of CaUO2(CO3)22- and Ca2UO2(CO3)3 aqueous ions which stabilize the UO22+ ions in solution. In contrast, Cs exhibited greater sorption, the extent to which was influenced greatly by the matrix water's ionic strength and the colloid concentration used. Surprisingly, when both U and Cs were together, the presence of U(VI) in solution decreased Cs sorption, possibly due to the formation of stabilizing CaUO2(CO3)22- anions. The implications of this research are that rather than undergoing colloid-facilitated transport, U(VI) is expected to migrate similarly to a

  3. Effects of complexing compounds on sorption of metal ions to cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevgren, Lars [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Inorganic chemistry

    2005-12-15

    This present report is a literature review addressing the effects of complexing ligands on the sorption of radionuclides to solid materials of importance for repositories of radioactive waste. Focus is put on laboratory studies of metal ion adsorption to cement in presence of chelating agents under strongly alkaline conditions. As background information, metal sorption to different mineral and cement phases in ligand free systems is described. Furthermore, surface complexation model (SCM) theories are introduced. According to surface complexation theories these interactions occur at specific binding sites at the particle/water interface. Adsorption of cationic metals is stronger at high pH, and the adsorption of anions occurs preferentially at low pH. The adsorption of ions to mineral surfaces is a result of both chemical bonding and electrostatic attraction between the ions and charged mineral surfaces. By combining uptake data with spectroscopic information the sorption can be explained on a molecular level by structurally sound surface complexation models. Most of the metal sorption studies reviewed are dealing with minerals exhibiting oxygen atoms at their surfaces, mainly oxides of Fe(II,III) and Al(III), and aluminosilicates. Investigations of radionuclides are focused on clay minerals, above all montmorillonite and illite. Which mechanism that is governing the metal ion adsorption to a given mineral is to a large extent depending on the metal adsorbed. For instance, sorption of Ni to montmorillonite can occur by formation of inner-sphere mononuclear surface complexes located at the edges of montmorillonite platelets and by formation of a Ni phyllosilicate phase parallel to montmorillonite layers. Also metal uptake to cement materials can occur by different mechanisms. Cationic metals can both be attached to cement (calcium silicate hydrate, CSH) and hardened cement paste (HCP) by formation of inner-sphere complexes at specific surface sites and by

  4. Prediction of metal sorption in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westrich, Henry R.; Anderson, Harold L. Jr.; Arthur, Sara E.; Brady, Patrick V.; Cygan, Randall T.; Liang, Jianjie; Zhang, Pengchu; Yee, N.

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclide transport in soils and groundwaters is routinely calculated in performance assessment (PA) codes using simplified conceptual models for radionuclide sorption, such as the K D approach for linear and reversible sorption. Model inaccuracies are typically addressed by adding layers of conservativeness (e.g., very low K D 's), and often result in failed transport predictions or substantial increases in site cleanup costs. Realistic assessments of radionuclide transport over a wide range of environmental conditions can proceed only from accurate, mechanistic models of the sorption process. They have focused on the sorption mechanisms and partition coefficients for Cs + , Sr 2+ and Ba 2+ (analogue for Ra 2+ ) onto iron oxides and clay minerals using an integrated approach that includes computer simulations, sorption/desorption measurements, and synchrotron analyses of metal sorbed substrates under geochemically realistic conditions. Sorption of Ba 2+ and Sr 2+ onto smectite is strong, pH-independent, and fully reversible, suggesting that cation exchange at the interlayer basal sites controls the sorption process. Sr 2+ sorbs weakly onto geothite and quartz, and is pH-dependent. Sr 2+ sorption onto a mixture of smectite and goethite, however, is pH- and concentration dependent. The adsorption capacity of montmorillonite is higher than that of goethite, which may be attributed to the high specific surface area and reaction site density of clays. The presence of goethite also appears to control the extent of metal desorption. In-situ, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopic measurements for montmorillonite and goethite show that the first shell of adsorbed Ba 2+ is coordinated by 6 oxygens. The second adsorption shell, however, varies with the mineral surface coverage of adsorbed Ba 2+ and the mineral substrate. This suggests that Ba 2+ adsorption on mineral surfaces involves more than one mechanism and that the stability of sorbed

  5. Once upon Anion: A Tale of Photodetachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineberger, W. Carl

    2013-04-01

    This contribution is very much a personal history of a journey through the wonderful world of anion chemistry, and a tale of how advances in laser technologies, theoretical methods, and computational capabilities continuously enabled advances in our understanding. It is a story of the excitement and joy that come from the opportunity to add to the fabric of science, and to do so by working as a group of excited explorers with common goals. The participants in this journey include me, my students and postdoctoral associates, my collaborators, and our many generous colleagues. It all happened, in the words of the Beatles, “with a little help from my friends.” Actually, it was so much more than a little help!

  6. Sorption behavior of cesium onto bentonite colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Kazuki; Masuda, Tsuguya; Tomura, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    It is considered that bentonite colloid might be generated from bentonite which will be used as buffer material in geological disposal system, and can facilitate the migration of radionuclides by means of sorption. In order to examine this characteristic, sorption and desorption experiments of Cs onto bentonite colloid were carried out to obtain its distribution coefficient (Kd) and information on the reversibility of its sorption. In addition, particle size distribution and shape of colloid were investigated and their effect on the sorption behavior was discussed. Kds for Cs were around 20 m 3 /kg for sorption and 30 m 3 /kg for desorption, in which sorbed Cs was desorbed by 8.4x10 -4 mol/l of NaCl solution. These values did not show any dependencies on Cs concentration and duration of sorption and desorption. The first 20% of sorbed Cs was desorbed reversibly at least. Most of colloidal particles were larger than 200 nm and TEM micrographs showed they had only several sheets of the clay crystal. Obtained Kds for colloidal bentonite were larger than those for powdered bentonite. This can be caused by difference of competing ions in the solution, characteristics of contained smectite, or sorption site density. (author)

  7. Sorption of uranyl ions on hydrous oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.R.; Venkataramani, B.

    1988-01-01

    Sorption of uranyl ions on hydrous titanium oxide (HTiO), magnetite (MAG), and hydrous thorium oxide (HThO) has been studied as a function of pH. Hydrous oxides have been characterized by their pH-titration curves, intrinsic dissociation constants (pK ai * ) and point of zero charge (pH pzc ). The fraction of protonated surface hydroxyl groups as well as the surface pH (pH surf ) as a function of solution pH have been computed. The distribution of various hydrolyzed species of uranyl ions with solution pH have been compared with uranyl sorption isotherm on these oxides. Sorption edge in all the cases occurs when free hydroxyl groups are available on the surface and pH surf is sufficiently high to favor the formation of dimer-like species on the surface. A new model for the sorption process, called surface hydrolysis model, which explains these and other features of uranyl sorption on hydrous oxides has been proposed. The model visualizes the sorption process as linking of uranyl ions with two adjacent free surface hydroxyl groups without deprotonation (provided the surface pH is high for the hydrolysis of uranyl ions) and formation of dimer-like structures on the surface. The new model has been successfully applied to the present and other available data on uranyl ion sorption on hydrous oxides. (author)

  8. Sorption equilibria of ethanol on cork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequin, Sonia; Chassagne, David; Karbowiak, Thomas; Bellat, Jean-Pierre

    2013-06-05

    We report here for the first time a thermodynamic study of gaseous ethanol sorption on raw cork powder and plate. Our study aims at a better understanding of the reactivity of this material when used as a stopper under enological conditions, thus in close contact with a hydroethanolic solution, wine. Sorption−desorption isotherms were accurately measured by thermogravimetry at 298 K in a large range of relative pressures. Sorption enthalpies were determined by calorimetry as a function of loading. Sorption−desorption isotherms exhibit a hysteresis loop probably due to the swelling of the material and the absorption of ethanol. Surprisingly, the sorption enthalpy of ethanol becomes lower than the liquefaction enthalpy as the filling increases. This result could be attributed to the swelling of the material, which would generate endothermic effects. Sorption of SO₂ on cork containing ethanol was also studied. When the ethanol content in cork is 2 wt %, the amount of SO₂ sorbed is divided by 2. Thus, ethanol does not enhance the sorption rate for SO₂ but, on the contrary, decreases the SO₂ sorption activity onto cork, probably because of competitive sorption mechanisms.

  9. Sorption of streptococcus faecium to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oerstavik, D.

    1977-01-01

    A method has been developed by which to study the sorption of Streptococcus faecium to soda-lime cover glasses. Conditions were chosen to minimize the influence on sorption of bacterial polymer production, passive sorption being studied rather than attachment mediated by metabolic activities. Sorption of S. faecium increased with increasing temperature (to 50degC), time, and cell concentration, but equilibrium apparently was not reached even after incubation for 8 hours or at a cell concentration of 3 x 10 10 per ml. Sorption increased with solute molarity up to 0.1 M concentration of NaCl and KCl, indicating an effect of the electrical double layers on the apposition of cells to the glass surface. Desorption of bacteria could be obtained after multiple washings of the glasses in buffer or by the action of Tween 80, but not if sorbed bacteria were left in distilled water, various salt solutions, urea, or in suspensions of unlabelled bacteria. It was concluded that sorption occurred as a result of chemical interactions between the glass and the cell surface. Tween 80 at a concentration of 1 per cent inhibited sorption to 26 per cent of buffer controls, 2 M urea was less effective, and 1 M NaCl was without effect. It is suggested that hydrophobic interactions may be of importance in the binding of S. faecium to glass. (author)

  10. Ionic liquids comprising heteraromatic anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, William F.; Brennecke, Joan F.; Maginn, Edward J.; Mindrup, Elaine; Gurkan, Burcu; Price, Erica; Goodrich, Brett

    2018-04-24

    Some embodiments described herein relate to ionic liquids comprising an anion of a heteraromatic compound such as optionally substituted pyrrolide, optionally substituted pyrazolide, optionally substituted indolide, optionally substituted phospholide, or optionally substituted imidazolide. Methods and devices for gas separation or gas absorption related to these ionic liquids are also described herein.

  11. IMPROVING OF ANION EXCHANGERES REGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzher M. Ibrahim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Inthis study, Different basis [NaOH and KOH] of variable concentration are usedto reactivate Anion exchangers employing different schemes .The Laboratoryresults showed large improvement in efficiency of these exchangers ( i.eoperating time was increased from 12 to 42 hours .The results of this work showed that the environmentalload (waste water can be reduced greatly when using the proposed regenerationscheme .

  12. Quantum mechanics of toroidal anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, G.N.

    1990-01-01

    We consider a toroidal solenoid with an electric charge attached to it. It turns out that statistical properties of the wave function describing interacting toroidal anions depend on both their relative position and orientation. The influence of the particular gauge choice on the exchange properties of the wave function is studied. 30 refs.; 6 figs

  13. Anion binding in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiters, Martin C [Department of Organic Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram [EMBL Hamburg Outstation at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V [Faculty of Physics, Southern Federal University, Sorge 5, Rostov-na-Donu, 344090 (Russian Federation); Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris-VI, Station Biologique de Roscoff, Place Georges Teissier, BP 74, F-29682 Roscoff cedex, Bretagne (France); Kuepper, Frithjof C [Scottish Association for Marine Science, Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory, Oban, Argyll PA37 1QA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstrasse 20, Zuerich, 8093 (Switzerland); Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R, E-mail: m.feiters@science.ru.n [Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L{sub 3} (2p{sub 3/2}) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  14. Anion binding in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feiters, Martin C; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Kuepper, Frithjof C; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P; Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2009-01-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L 3 (2p 3/2 ) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  15. Anion binding in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  16. Heavy metal sorption by microalgae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandau, E.; Sandau, P.; Pulz, O.

    1996-01-01

    Viable microalgae are known to be able to accumulate heavy metals (bioaccumulation). Against a background of the increasing environmental risks caused by heavy metals, the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Spirulina platensis and their potential for the biological removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions were taken as an example for investigation. Small-scale cultivation tests (50 l) with Cd-resistant cells of Chlorella vulgaris have shown that approx. 40% of the added 10 mg Cd/l was removed from the solution within seven days. At this heavy metal concentration sensitive cells died. Non-viable microalgae are able to eliminate heavy metal ions in a short time by biosorption in uncomplicated systems, without any toxicity problems. Compared with original biomasses, the sorption capacity of microalgal by-products changes only insignificantly. Their low price makes them economical. (orig.)

  17. Adsorption of Monobutyl Phthalate from Aqueous Phase onto Two Macroporous Anion-Exchange Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwen Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As new emerging pollutants, phthalic acid monoesters (PAMs pose potential ecological and human health risks. In the present study, adsorption performance of monobutyl phthalate (MBP onto two macroporous base anion-exchange resins (D-201 and D-301 was discussed. It was found that the adsorption isotherms were best fitted by the Langmuir equation while the adsorption kinetics were well described by pseudo-first-order model. Analyses of sorption isotherms and thermodynamics proved that the adsorption mechanisms for DBP onto D-201 were ion exchange. However, the obtained enthalpy values indicate that the sorption process of MBP onto D-301 is physical adsorption. The equilibrium adsorption capacities and adsorption rates of DBP on two different resins increased with the increasing temperature of the solution. D-301 exhibited a higher adsorption capacity of MBP than D-201. These results proved that D-301, as an effective sorbent, can be used to remove phthalic acid monoesters from aqueous solution.

  18. Composite anion-exchangers modified with nanoparticles of hydrated oxides of multivalent metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltseva, T. V.; Kolomiets, E. O.; Dzyazko, Yu. S.; Scherbakov, S.

    2018-02-01

    Organic-inorganic composite ion-exchangers based on anion exchange resins have been obtained. Particles of one-component and two-component modifier were embedded using the approach, which allows us to realize purposeful control of a size of the embedded particles. The approach is based on Ostwald-Freundlich equation, which was adapted to deposition in ion exchange matrix. The equation was obtained experimentally. Hydrated oxides of zirconium and iron were applied to modification, concentration of the reagents were varied. The embedded particles accelerate sorption, the rate of which is fitted by the model equation of chemical reactions of pseudo-second order. When sorption of arsenate ions from very diluted solution (50 µg dm-3) occurs, the composites show higher distribution coefficients comparing with the pristine resin.

  19. Metal Sorption to Dolomite Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.; Kelly, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Potential human intrusion into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) might release actinides into the Culebra Dolomite where sorption reactions will affect of radiotoxicity from the repository. Using a limited residence time reactor the authors have measured Ca, Mg, Nd adsorption/exchange as a function of ionic strength, P CO2 , and pH at 25 C. By the same approach, but using as input radioactive tracers, adsorption/exchange of Am, Pu, U, and Np on dolomite were measured as a function of ionic strength, P CO2 , and pH at 25 C. Metal adsorption is typically favored at high pH. Calcium and Mg adsorb in near-stoichiometric proportions except at high pH. Adsorption of Ca and Mg is diminished at high ionic strengths (e.g., 0.5M NaCl) pointing to association of Na + with the dolomite surface, and the possibility that Ca and Mg sorb as hydrated, outer-sphere complexes. Sulfate amplifies sorption of Ca and Mg, and possibly Nd as well. Exchange of Nd for surface Ca is favored at high pH, and when Ca levels are low. Exchange for Ca appears to control attachment of actinides to dolomite as well, and high levels of Ca 2+ in solution will decrease Kds. At the same time, to the extent that high P CO2 increase Ca 2+ levels, JK d s will decrease with CO 2 levels as well, but only if sorbing actinide-carbonate complexes are not observed to form (Am-carbonate complexes appear to sorb; Pu-complexes might sorb as well; U-carbonate complexation leads to desorption). This indirect CO 2 effect is observed primarily at, and above, neutral pH. High NaCl levels do not appear to affect to actinide K d s

  20. Sorption of methylxanthines by different sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, S. G.; Andreeva, E. Yu.; Tolmacheva, V. V.; Terent'eva, E. A.

    2013-05-01

    Sorption of caffeine, theophylline, theobromine, diprophylline, and pentoxyphylline on different sorbents (supercross-linked polystyrene, surface-modified copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene Strata-X, and carbon nanomaterials Taunit and Diasorb-100-C16T) was studied in a static mode in an effort to find new sorbents suitable for sorption isolation and concentration of methylxanthines. The peculiarities of sorption of methylxanthines were explained in relation to the solution acidity, the nature of the sorbates and their concentration, the nature of the solvent, and the structural characteristics of the sorbents.

  1. Sorption isolation of strontium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avramenko, V.A.; Zheleznov, V.V.; Kaplun, E.V.; Sokol'nitskaya, T.A.; Yukhkam, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    Sorption isolation of strontium from seawater is considered and prospects of use of selective adsorbents for purification of seawater or liquid radioactive wastes mixed with seawater from 90 Sr are discussed. Comparative analysis of sorptive properties of adsorbents of different nature is done. It is shown that sorption-reagent materials developed by authors can to afford effective separation of 90 Sr from seawater. Possible mechanism of strontium sorption by these adsorbents is considered. The prospect of their use for purification of liquid radioactive wastes from strontium is shown [ru

  2. Diffusion and sorption of neptunium(V) in compacted montmorillonite: effects of carbonate and salinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachi, Y.; Yotsuji, K.; Suyama, T.; Seida, Y.; Yui, M.; Nakazawa, T.; Yamada, N.; Ochs, M.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion and sorption of radionuclides in compacted bentonite/montmorillonite are key processes in the safe geological disposal of radioactive waste. In this study, the effects of carbonate and salinity on neptunium(V) diffusion and sorption in compacted sodium montmorillonite were investigated by experimental and modeling approaches. Effective diffusion coefficients (D e ) and distribution coefficients (K d ) of 237 Np(V) in sodium montmorillonite compacted to a dry density of 800 kg m -3 were measured under four chemical conditions with different salinities (0.05/0.5 M NaCl) and carbonate concentrations (0.0.01 M NaHCO 3 ). D e values for carbonate-free conditions were of the order of 10 -10 -10 -11 m 2 s -1 and decreased as salinity increased, and those for carbonate conditions were of the order of 10 -11 -10 -12 m 2 s -1 and showed the opposite dependence. Diffusion-derived K d values for carbonate-free conditions were higher by one order of magnitude than those for carbonate conditions. Diffusion and sorption behaviors were interpreted based on mechanistic models by coupling thermodynamic aqueous speciation, thermodynamic sorption model (TSM) based on ion exchange, and surface complexation reactions, and a diffusion model based on electrical double layer (EDL) theory in homogeneous narrow pores. The model predicted the experimentally observed tendency of D e and K d qualitatively, as a result of the following mechanisms; 1) the dominant aqueous species are NpO 2 + and NpO 2 CO 3 - for carbonate-free and carbonate conditions, respectively, 2) the effects of cation excess and anion exclusion result in opposite tendencies of D e for salinity, 3) higher carbonate in solution inhibits sorption due to the formation of carbonate complexes. (orig.)

  3. REMOVAL OF ANIONIC SURFACTANTS FROM WASTEWATER BY MAGNETIC MINERAL SORBENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Vladimirova Makarchuk

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The simplest and most effective method of removing low concentrations of anionic surfactants such as sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS is adsorption. Among adsorbents the natural clays are cheap and promising for these purposes. However, there are significant difficulties in removal of spent sorbent after the adsorption process. So, the creation of magnetic sorbents that can be effectively removed from water after sorption by magnetic separation will be a successful decision. The aim of this investigation is the creation of cheap and efficient magnetic sorbents based on natural clays and magnetite for anionic surfactant removal from wastewater. We have synthesized a series of magnetic sorbents from different natural clays with a content of magnetite from 2 to 10 wt%. The ability of magnetic sorbents to remove SDBS and SLS from aqueous solutions has been studied for different adsorbate concentrations by varying the amount of adsorbent, temperature and shaking time. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated from the slope and intercept of the linear plots of ln K against 1/T. Analysis of adsorption results obtained at different temperatures showed that the adsorption pattern on magnetic sorbents correspond to the Langmuir isotherm. It is shown that with increasing the content of magnetite in the magnetic sorbents improves not only their separation from water by magnetic separation, but adsorption capacity to SDBS and SLS. Thus, we obtained of cheap magnetic sorbents based on natural clays and magnetite by the easy way, which not only quickly separated from the solution by magnetic separation, but effectively remove anionic surfactants.

  4. Monohydrocalcite: a promising remediation material for hazardous anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushi, Keisuke [Institute of Nature and Environmental Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Munemoto, Takashi [Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Sakai, Minoru [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Yagi, Shintaro [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    The formation conditions, solubility and stability of monohydrocalcite (MHC, CaCO{sub 3}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O), as well as sorption behaviors of toxic anions on MHC, are reviewed to evaluate MHC as a remediation material for hazardous oxyanions. MHC is a rare mineral in geological settings that occurs in recent sediments in saline lakes. Water temperature does not seem to be an important factor for MHC formation. The pH of lake water is usually higher than 8 and the Mg/Ca ratio exceeds 4. MHC synthesis experiments as a function of time indicate that MHC is formed from amorphous calcium carbonate and transforms to calcite and/or aragonite. Most studies show that MHC forms from solutions containing Mg, which inhibits the formation of stable calcium carbonates. The solubility of MHC is higher than those of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, but lower than those of ikaite and amorphous calcium carbonate at ambient temperature. The solubility of MHC decreases with temperature. MHC is unstable and readily transforms to calcite or aragonite. The transformation consists of the dissolution of MHC and the subsequent formation of stable phases from the solution. The rate-limiting steps of the transformation of MHC are the nucleation and growth of stable crystalline phases. Natural occurrences indicate that certain additives, particularly PO{sub 4} and Mg, stabilize MHC. Laboratory studies confirm that a small amount of PO{sub 4} in solution (>30 {mu}M) can significantly inhibit the transformation of MHC. MHC has a higher sorption capacity for PO{sub 4} than calcite and aragonite. The modes of PO{sub 4} uptake are adsorption on the MHC surface at moderate phosphate concentrations and precipitation of secondary calcium phosphate minerals at higher concentrations. Arsenate is most likely removed from the solution during the transformation of MHC. The proposed sorption mechanism of arsenate is coprecipitation during crystallization of aragonite. The arsenic sorption capacity by MHC

  5. Tripodal receptors for cation and anion sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman, [Unknown; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selectiverecognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure andselectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometricion sensing

  6. Equilibrium studies on sorption of an anionic dye onto acid activated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ISHIOMA

    Batch studies were conducted to evaluate the adsorption capacity of the dye, Congo red on the sorbent with respect to the ... pollution, but dyes are visible even in small quantities due .... in plastic bags, and stored in desiccators for use.

  7. Study of sorption of two sulfonylurea type of herbicides and their additives on soils and soil components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Földényi, Rita; Tóth, Zoltán; Samu, Gyöngyi; Érsek, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    The sorption of two sulfonylurea type herbicides (chlorsulfuron: (1-(2-chlorophenylsulfonyl)-3-(4-methoxy-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)urea; tribenuron methyl: (methyl-2-[N-(4-methoxy-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-3-(methyl-ureido)-sulfonyl]-benzoate) was studied on sand and chernozem soil adsorbents. Experimental results for solutions prepared from the pure ingredients were compared to those prepared from the appropriate formulated commercial products. At small concentrations, the extent of adsorption of the active ingredient was higher than from the formulation containing solutions. Environmental fate and effects of the forming agents are less investigated because they rarely have concentration limits recommended by authorities. In addition to the adsorption of active ingredients, therefore, the sorption behavior of a widely used additive Supragil WP (sodium diisopropyl naphthalene sulphonate) was also studied. This dispersant is an anionic forming agent applied in a lot of pesticide formulations. Using three different soils (sand, brown forest, chernozem) as adsorbents two-step isotherms were obtained. The role of the soil organic matter (OM) was significant in the adsorption mechanism because the adsorbed amounts of the dispersant correlated with the specific surface area as well as with the total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soils. The sorption behavior indicates the operation of hydrophobic interaction mechanism between the soil OM and the dispersant. These results are supported by our further sorption experiments on clays, too. Zeta potential measurements seem to be promising for the interpretation of multi-step isotherms. The application of this technique proved that higher concentrations of the anionic forming agent assisted the peptization of soil organic matter (SOM) resulting in stable colloidal solution dominated by negative charges. Since the pesticides investigated are also anionic at the studied pH (7 and 8.3) the dissolved organics lead to the

  8. Sorption of redox-sensitive elements: critical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickert, R.G.

    1980-12-01

    The redox-sensitive elements (Tc, U, Np, Pu) discussed in this report are of interest to nuclear waste management due to their long-lived isotopes which have a potential radiotoxic effect on man. In their lower oxidation states these elements have been shown to be highly adsorbed by geologic materials occurring under reducing conditions. Experimental research conducted in recent years, especially through the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) and Waste/Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) program, has provided extensive information on the mechanisms of retardation. In general, ion-exchange probably plays a minor role in the sorption behavior of cations of the above three actinide elements. Formation of anionic complexes of the oxidized states with common ligands (OH - , CO -- 3 ) is expected to reduce adsorption by ion exchange further. Pertechnetate also exhibits little ion-exchange sorption by geologic media. In the reduced (IV) state, all of the elements are highly charged and it appears that they form a very insoluble compound (oxide, hydroxide, etc.) or undergo coprecipitation or are incorporated into minerals. The exact nature of the insoluble compounds and the effect of temperature, pH, pe, other chemical species, and other parameters are currently being investigated. Oxidation states other than Tc (IV,VII), U(IV,VI), Np(IV,V), and Pu(IV,V) are probably not important for the geologic repository environment expected, but should be considered especially when extreme conditions exist (radiation, temperature, etc.). Various experimental techniques such as oxidation-state analysis of tracer-level isotopes, redox potential measurement and control, pH measurement, and solid phase identification have been used to categorize the behavior of the various valence states

  9. Sorption of redox-sensitive elements: critical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strickert, R.G.

    1980-12-01

    The redox-sensitive elements (Tc, U, Np, Pu) discussed in this report are of interest to nuclear waste management due to their long-lived isotopes which have a potential radiotoxic effect on man. In their lower oxidation states these elements have been shown to be highly adsorbed by geologic materials occurring under reducing conditions. Experimental research conducted in recent years, especially through the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) and Waste/Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) program, has provided extensive information on the mechanisms of retardation. In general, ion-exchange probably plays a minor role in the sorption behavior of cations of the above three actinide elements. Formation of anionic complexes of the oxidized states with common ligands (OH/sup -/, CO/sup - -//sub 3/) is expected to reduce adsorption by ion exchange further. Pertechnetate also exhibits little ion-exchange sorption by geologic media. In the reduced (IV) state, all of the elements are highly charged and it appears that they form a very insoluble compound (oxide, hydroxide, etc.) or undergo coprecipitation or are incorporated into minerals. The exact nature of the insoluble compounds and the effect of temperature, pH, pe, other chemical species, and other parameters are currently being investigated. Oxidation states other than Tc (IV,VII), U(IV,VI), Np(IV,V), and Pu(IV,V) are probably not important for the geologic repository environment expected, but should be considered especially when extreme conditions exist (radiation, temperature, etc.). Various experimental techniques such as oxidation-state analysis of tracer-level isotopes, redox potential measurement and control, pH measurement, and solid phase identification have been used to categorize the behavior of the various valence states.

  10. PCB congener sorption to carbonaceous sediment components: Macroscopic comparison and characterization of sorption kinetics and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyeok; Al-Abed, Souhail R.

    2009-01-01

    Sorption of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to sediment is a key process in determining their mobility, bioavailability, and chemical decomposition in aquatic environments. In order to examine the validity of currently used interpretation approaches for PCBs sorption, comparative results on 2-chlorobiphenyl sorption to carbonaceous components in sediments (activated carbon, carbon black, coal, soot, graphite, flyash, wood) were macroscopically correlated with the structural, morphological, crystallographic, and compositional properties of the carbonaceous components. Since the Freundlich sorption constant, K F (L kg -1 ) spanned several orders of magnitude, ranging from log K F of 6.13-5.27 for activated carbon, 5.04 for carbon black, 3.83 for coal to 3.08 for wood, organic carbon partitioning approach should be more specifically categorized, considering the various forms, nature and origins of organic carbon in sediment. Sorption rate constants and fraction parameters, which were numerically defined from empirical kinetic model with fast and slow sorption fractions, were closely related to the physicochemical properties of the carbonaceous components. Sorption interpretation approaches with a specific property and viewpoint, such as organic carbon partitioning, soot carbon distribution, or surface area correlation, did not properly explain the overall results on sorption capacity, fast and slow sorption kinetics, and partitioning coefficient. It is also important to emphasize the heterogeneous nature of sediment and the difficulties of encompassing the partitioning among its carbonaceous components.

  11. PCB congener sorption to carbonaceous sediment components: Macroscopic comparison and characterization of sorption kinetics and mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyeok [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R., E-mail: al-abed.souhail@epa.gov [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Sorption of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to sediment is a key process in determining their mobility, bioavailability, and chemical decomposition in aquatic environments. In order to examine the validity of currently used interpretation approaches for PCBs sorption, comparative results on 2-chlorobiphenyl sorption to carbonaceous components in sediments (activated carbon, carbon black, coal, soot, graphite, flyash, wood) were macroscopically correlated with the structural, morphological, crystallographic, and compositional properties of the carbonaceous components. Since the Freundlich sorption constant, K{sub F} (L kg{sup -1}) spanned several orders of magnitude, ranging from log K{sub F} of 6.13-5.27 for activated carbon, 5.04 for carbon black, 3.83 for coal to 3.08 for wood, organic carbon partitioning approach should be more specifically categorized, considering the various forms, nature and origins of organic carbon in sediment. Sorption rate constants and fraction parameters, which were numerically defined from empirical kinetic model with fast and slow sorption fractions, were closely related to the physicochemical properties of the carbonaceous components. Sorption interpretation approaches with a specific property and viewpoint, such as organic carbon partitioning, soot carbon distribution, or surface area correlation, did not properly explain the overall results on sorption capacity, fast and slow sorption kinetics, and partitioning coefficient. It is also important to emphasize the heterogeneous nature of sediment and the difficulties of encompassing the partitioning among its carbonaceous components.

  12. Methods and systems for measuring anions

    KAUST Repository

    Masih, Dilshad; Mohammed, Omar F.; Aly, Shawkat M.; Alarousu, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods for detecting the presence and/or concentration of anions in a solution, systems for detecting the presence and/or concentration of anions in a solution, anion sensor systems, and the like.

  13. Methods and systems for measuring anions

    KAUST Repository

    Masih, Dilshad

    2016-08-18

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods for detecting the presence and/or concentration of anions in a solution, systems for detecting the presence and/or concentration of anions in a solution, anion sensor systems, and the like.

  14. Carbon dioxide sorption on EDTA modified halloysite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waszczuk Patrycja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the sorption study of CO2 on EDTA surface modified halloysite was conducted. In the paper chemical modification of halloysite from the Dunino deposit (Poland and its influence on sorption of CO2 are presented. A halloysite samples were washed with water-EDTA 1% solution, centrifuged to separate liquid and impurities and dried. The samples were tested for the sorption capacity using a manometric method with pressure up to 3 MPa. A Langmuir adsorption model was fitted to the data. The results showed that EDTA had a limited effect on the increase of sorption potential at low pressure and the samples exhibited similar results to that ones treated solely with the water solution.

  15. Sorption of metaldehyde using granular activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Salvestrini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the ability of granular activated carbon (GAC to sorb metaldehyde was evaluated. The kinetic data could be described by an intra-particle diffusion model, which indicated that the porosity of the sorbent strongly influenced the rate of sorption. The analysis of the equilibrium sorption data revealed that ionic strength and temperature did not play any significant role in the metaldehyde uptake. The sorption isotherms were successfully predicted by the Freundlich model. The GAC used in this paper exhibited a higher affinity and sorption capacity for metaldehyde with respect to other GACs studied in previous works, probably as a result of its higher specific surface area and high point of zero charge.

  16. Study of sorption of technetium on pyrrhotine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Dong; Fan Xianhua; Su Xiguang; Zeng Jishu

    2001-01-01

    The sorption behaviors of technetium on pyrrhotine are studied with batch experiment and dilute sulfuric acid is used to dissolve the technetium adsorbed on pyrrhotine. Sorption and desorption experiment are performed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions (inert gas box). The results show that a significant sorption of technetium on pyrrhotine is found under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the sorption on the mineral is supposed to be due to the reduction of TcO 4 - to insoluble TcO 2 ·nH 2 O. Desorption process of the sorbed technetium into dilute sulfuric acid is found to be different under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. On addition of H 2 O 2 to the leach solution a sudden increase of the technetium concentration is observed

  17. Radionuclide sorption on granitic drill core material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.; Locklund, B.

    1987-11-01

    Distribution ratios were determined for Sr-85, Cs-134 and Eu-152 on crushed granite and fissure coating/filling material from Stripa mines. Measurements were also carried out on intact fissure surfaces. The experimental data for Sr-85, Cs-134 on crushed material can be accomodated by a sorption model based on the assumption that the crushed material consists of porous spheres with outer and inner surfaces available for sorption. In the case of Eu-152 only sorption on the outer surfaces of the crushed material was observed. The absence of sorption on inner surfaces is most probably due to high depletion of the more strongly sorbed Eu-152 in the water phase and very low diffusivity of Eu-152 in the sorbed state. (orig./HP)

  18. Sorption and desorption reactions of radionuclides with a crushed basalt-bentonite packing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.; Lane, D.L.; Allen, C.C.; Jones, T.E.

    1985-04-01

    Current design of waste packages for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in underground basalt formations includes a layer of packing material that surrounds the waste container. One of the functions of this material is to limit the release of radionuclides from a breached container into groundwater by providing a low hydraulic conductivity zone and by sorbing dissolved radionuclides. The objective of this study was to assess the radionuclide sorption capability of a proposed packing material composed of 25% sodium bentonite and 75% crushed basalt (by weight). Sorption and desorption reactions of several important waste radioelements (neptunium, uranium, plutonium, technetium, selenium, and radium) were investigated in the absence of air at 90 0 C. Uranium and neptunium were sorbed by slow reactions that follow first-order kinetics. The reaction rates are probably controlled by reduction of weakly sorbed uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) by ferrous iron in the crushed basalt component. Technetium(VII) was not reduced or sorbed under these conditions. Freundlich sorption and desorption isotherms for a given radionuclide were non-singular and show a strong tendency for sorption hysteresis. Applying the isotherm data to a one-dimensional transport model indicated that hysteretic sorption on the packing material provides an important safety factor in controlling releases of some radionuclides

  19. Sorption of heteropoly acids by polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitreinko, S.G.; Goncharova, L.V.; Runov, V.K.; Zakharov, V.N.; Aslanova, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    Sorption of oxidized and reduced forms of molybdosilicic, molybdophosphoric and molybdovanadophosphoric acids by polyurethane foam based on ethers and esters is studied. On the basis of sorption dependence on solution pH, polyurethane foam type and spectral characteristics of sorbates the suggestion has been made that in the polyurethane foam phase there are two main types of sorbent-sorbate interaction: electrostatic (ion-ion) and with hydrogen bond formation: and it is impossible to determine the contribution of every interaction

  20. Sorption of organophosphate esters by carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Wei; Yan, Li [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Duan, Jinming [School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an 710055 (China); Jing, Chuanyong, E-mail: cyjing@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: The interfacial interactions between the OPE molecules and CNTs. - Highlights: • Oxygen-containing groups on CNTs change the sorption property for OPEs. • Molecular configuration of OPEs has insignificant impact on their sorption. • Hydrophobic, π–π EDA and Brønsted acid–base interaction occurred between the CNTs and OPEs. - Abstract: Insights from the molecular-level mechanism of sorption of organophosphate esters (OPEs) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can further our understanding of the fate and transport of OPEs in the environment. The motivation for our study was to explore the sorption process of OPEs on multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs), single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) and their oxidized counterparts (O-MWCNTs and O-SWCNTs), and its molecular mechanism over a wide concentration range. The sorption isotherm results revealed that the hydrophobicity of OPEs dominated their affinities on a given CNT and the π–π electron donor–acceptor (EDA) interaction also played an important role in the sorption of aromatic OPEs. This π–π EDA interaction, verified with Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy, could restrict the radial vibration of SWCNTs and affect the deformation vibration γ(CH) bands of OPE molecules. The OPE surface coverage on CNTs, estimated using the nonlinear Dubinin–Ashtakhov model, indicated that the oxygen-containing functional groups on CNTs could interact with water molecules by H-bonding, resulting in a decrease in effective sorption sites. In addition, FTIR analysis also confirmed the occurrence of Brønsted acid–base interactions between OPEs and surface OH groups of SWCNTs. Our results should provide mechanistic insights into the sorption mechanism of OPE contaminants on CNTs.

  1. Sorption of cesium and uranium to Feldspar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijland, G.C.; Pennders, R.M.J.

    1990-07-01

    Within safety assessment studies, for nuclear waste disposal in deep geologic formations, calculation for the migration of radionuclides through the geosphere are often carried out with models taking sorption into account. In the past 8 years the insight grew that other physico-chemical processes, besides sorption, could affect migration behaviour. While the currently used transport models were being improved taking either linear or non-linear sorption into account, the coupling of geochemical and transport models came into scope. In spite of these developments models which are still based on the sorption theory are frequently applied in studying migration behaviour of radionuclides. This is caused by the necessity of making preliminary pronouncements, while coupled models are still in stage of development and thermodynamic data are very limited available. Therefore one has to obtain insight in the reliability of the models based on the sorption theory. within the sorption database there is a lack of knowledge about mineralogy, composition of the fluid and the experimental conditions underlying the data. Therefore the Expert Group on geochemical Modelling supported by the Finnish proposal in order to obtain insight in the possible deviation of the sorption coefficients that can be estimated from experiments performed with standard samples, fluid composition and experimental conditions. Nine laboratories from OECD membership countries took part in this intercalibration study. In the framework of the Dutch safety assessment studies the Dutch National Institute of Public health and Environmental protection (RIVM) has decided to participate in this exercise. In this report the results are presented of sorption experiments for cesium and natural Uranium to Feldspar. (H.W.). 4 refs.; 1 fig.; 7 tabs

  2. Sorption of fomesafen in Brazilian soils

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,G.R.; D'Antonino,L.; Faustino,L.A.; Silva,A.A.; Ferreira,F.A.; Texeira,C.C.

    2013-01-01

    The study of the dynamics of a herbicide in the soil focus on the interactions with environmental components to obtain agronomic efficiency, ensuring selectivity to the culture and risk reduction of environmental impact. This study evaluated the sorption process of fomesafen in the Brazilian soils Ultisol, Cambisol, and Organosol. Besides soil, washed sand was used as an inert material for determination of the sorption ratio of fomesafen in the soil. The bioassay method was applied, using Sor...

  3. Kinetics of strontium sorption in calcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacic, S.; Komarov, V.F.; Vukovic, Z.

    1989-01-01

    Kinetics of strontium sorption by highly dispersed solids: tricalcium phosphate (Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 , TCP) and hydroxyapatite (Ca 5 (PO 4 ) 3 )H, HAP) were investigated. Analysis of sorption data was made taking into consideration composition and morphology of ultra micro particles. Conclusion is that the isomorphous strontium impurity is structurally sensitive element for calcium phosphate. It was determined that the beginning of strontium desorption corresponds to the beginning of transformation of the TCP - HAP (author)

  4. Simultaneous anion and cation mobility in polypyrrole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen; Bay, Lasse; Vidanapathirana, K.

    2003-01-01

    and the expulsion of anions; a broad anodic peak centered at ca. - 0.5 V representing the expulsion of cations; and a second broad peak at +0.2 to +0.5 V corresponding to anions being inserted. Although the motion of cations is the most important, as expected, there is a significant anion contribution, thereby...... complicating reproducibility when employing PPy(DBS) polymers as actuators. When the cation is doubly charged, it enters the film less readily, and anions dominate the mobility. Using a large and bulky cation switches the mechanism to apparently total anion motion. The changes in area of the three peaks...

  5. Sorption properties of Th(IV) on the raw diatomite-Effects of contact time, pH, ionic strength and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Guodong; Hu Jun; Wang Xiangke

    2008-01-01

    Diatomite has a number of unique physicochemical properties and has diversified industrial uses. Natural diatomite has been tested as a potential sorbent for the removal of Th(IV) from aqueous solutions. The results indicate that sorption of Th(IV) is strongly dependent on ionic strength at pH 3. Outer-sphere complexation or ion exchange may be the main sorption mechanism of Th(IV) to diatomite at low pH values, whereas the sorption of Th(IV) at pH>3 is mainly dominated by inner-sphere complexation or precipitation. The competition for Th(IV) between aqueous or surface adsorbed anions (e.g., herein ClO 4 - , NO 3 - and Cl - ) and surface functional groups of diatomite is important for Th(IV) sorption. The thermodynamic data (ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 , ΔG 0 ) are calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms. The results suggest that sorption process of Th(IV) on diatomite is spontaneous and endothermic

  6. Sorption properties of Th(IV) on the raw diatomite-Effects of contact time, pH, ionic strength and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng Guodong; Hu Jun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Wang Xiangke [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China)], E-mail: xkwang@ipp.ac.cn

    2008-10-15

    Diatomite has a number of unique physicochemical properties and has diversified industrial uses. Natural diatomite has been tested as a potential sorbent for the removal of Th(IV) from aqueous solutions. The results indicate that sorption of Th(IV) is strongly dependent on ionic strength at pH<3, and is independent of ionic strength at pH>3. Outer-sphere complexation or ion exchange may be the main sorption mechanism of Th(IV) to diatomite at low pH values, whereas the sorption of Th(IV) at pH>3 is mainly dominated by inner-sphere complexation or precipitation. The competition for Th(IV) between aqueous or surface adsorbed anions (e.g., herein ClO{sub 4}{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -} and Cl{sup -}) and surface functional groups of diatomite is important for Th(IV) sorption. The thermodynamic data ({delta}H{sup 0}, {delta}S{sup 0}, {delta}G{sup 0}) are calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms. The results suggest that sorption process of Th(IV) on diatomite is spontaneous and endothermic.

  7. Geochemical behavior of Cs, Sr, Tc, Np, and U in saline groundwaters: Sorption experiments on shales and their clay mineral components: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Ho, P.C.; Case, F.I.; O'Kelley, G.D.

    1987-11-01

    The Sedimentary Rock Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is investigating shale to determine its potential suitability as a host rock for the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW). In support of this program, preliminary studies were carried out on sorption of cesium, strontium, technetium, neptunium, and uranium onto Chattanooga (Upper Dowelltown), Pierre, Green River Formation, Nolichucky, and Pumpkin Valley Shales under oxic conditions (air present). Three simulated groundwaters were used. One of the groundwaters was a synthetic brine made up to simulate highly saline groundwaters in the Pumpkin Valley Shale. The second was a 100/1 dilution of this groundwater and the third was 0.03 M NaHCO 3 . Moderate to significant sorption was observed under most conditions for all of the tested radionuclides except technetium. Moderate technetium sorption occurred on Upper Dowelltown Shale, and although technetium sorption was low on the other shales, it was higher than expected for Tc(VII), present as the anion TcO 4 - . Little sorption of strontium onto the shales was observed from the concentrated saline groundwater. These data can be used in a generic fashion to help assess the sorption characteristics of shales in support of a national survey. 10 refs., 4 figs., 23 tabs

  8. Sorption properties of Th(IV) on the raw diatomite--effects of contact time, pH, ionic strength and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Guodong; Hu, Jun; Wang, Xiangke

    2008-10-01

    Diatomite has a number of unique physicochemical properties and has diversified industrial uses. Natural diatomite has been tested as a potential sorbent for the removal of Th(IV) from aqueous solutions. The results indicate that sorption of Th(IV) is strongly dependent on ionic strength at pH3. Outer-sphere complexation or ion exchange may be the main sorption mechanism of Th(IV) to diatomite at low pH values, whereas the sorption of Th(IV) at pH>3 is mainly dominated by inner-sphere complexation or precipitation. The competition for Th(IV) between aqueous or surface adsorbed anions (e.g., herein ClO(4)(-), NO(3)(-) and Cl(-)) and surface functional groups of diatomite is important for Th(IV) sorption. The thermodynamic data (DeltaH(0), DeltaS(0), DeltaG(0)) are calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms. The results suggest that sorption process of Th(IV) on diatomite is spontaneous and endothermic.

  9. Influence of sorption competition on sorption data for MX-80 bentonite used in performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B.; Marques Fernandes, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In order to obtain a (quasi) mechanistic understanding of radionuclide uptake on clay minerals and argillaceous rocks, the majority of sorption experiments have been carried out on purified clay minerals such as montmorillonite and illite at trace concentrations (sorption edges), or as a function of concentration (sorption isotherms), with a single radionuclide under well-defined conditions in simple background electrolytes. As a result of such studies the 2 site proto-lysis non electrostatic surface complexation cation exchange (2SPNE SC/CE) sorption model, was developed and has been successfully applied to quantitatively describe the uptake of numerous radionuclides of differing valences as a function of pH and concentration on montmorillonite. In a deep geological repository for high level waste, stable impurities arise from many sources: they are present in the pore waters, in the tunnel back fill materials and host rock formations, they arise from the corrosion of the carbon steel canister and finally they are dissolved from the spent fuel and vitrified high level waste simultaneously with the radionuclides. These impurities, which are an integral part of a realistic repository system, can potentially compete with radionuclides for the sorption sites on the backfill materials and host rock and thus reduce their uptake on them. The influence of competitive sorption is not intrinsically included (or only partly so) in the sorption model. It is clearly an inherently important issue to quantify the influence of sorption competition on the transport of released radionuclides through the multi-barrier system in a deep repository. In this study an extreme case of a competitive sorption scenario in the near field of a HLW repository is presented. Two factors are considered: one associated with the high concentrations and the other with competitive sorption effects. The tendency in both cases is to cause a reduction in

  10. Radionuclides sorption in clay soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siraky, G.; Lewis, C.; Hamlat, S.; Nollmann, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    The sorption behaviour of clay soils is examined through a parametric study of the distribution coefficient (Kd) for the radionuclides of interest, Cs and Sr. This work is a preliminary stage of the migration studies of these nuclides in a porous medium (ground of Ezeiza, Argentina) and the evaluation of radiologic impact of the removal of low and intermediate activity wastes in shallow trenches. The determination of Kd is performed by a static technique or batch. The phases are separated by centrifugation at 20000 g during 1 hour. The activity of supernatant solution of Cs-137 and Sr-85 is measured in a detecting system of I Na(Tl) well-type. Two types of parameters were changed: a) those related to the determination method: phase separation (centrifugation vs. centrifugation plus filtration); equilibrium period, ratio solid/liquid; b) those related to the geochemical system: pH of contact solution, carrier concentration, competitive ions, ionic strength, desorption. It was observed that the modification of parameters in the Kd-measurement does not change the order of magnitude of results. (Author)

  11. Neptunium(V) sorption on kaolinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amayri, S.; Jermolajev, A.; Reich, T. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry

    2011-07-01

    The sorption behavior of neptunium(V) onto the clay mineral kaolinite was studied in batch experiments under different experimental conditions: [Np(V)] = 7 x 10{sup -12}-8 x 10{sup -6} M, solid-to-liquid ratio 2-20 g L{sup -1}, I = 0.1 and 0.01 M NaClO{sub 4}, pH = 6-10, ambient air and Ar atmosphere. The short-lived isotope {sup 239}Np (T{sub 1/2} = 2.36 d) was used instead of {sup 237}Np (T{sub 1/2} = 2.14 x 10{sup 6} a) to study the sorption behavior of Np(V) at environmentally-relevant concentrations, i.e., 7 x 10{sup -12} M Np. In addition, {sup 239}Np(V) served as tracer to measure sorption isotherms over six orders of magnitude in Np concentration (4.8 x 10{sup -12}-1.0 x 10{sup -4} M). The results show that Np(V) sorption on kaolinite is strongly influenced by pH, CO{sub 2}, and ionic strength. The sorption of 8 x 10{sup -6} M Np(V) at pH 9.0, and ionic strength of 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} was proportional to the solid-to-liquid ratio of kaolinite in the range of 2-10 g L{sup -1}. In the absence of CO{sub 2}, the Np(V) uptake increased continuously with increasing pH value up to 97% at pH 10. Under ambient CO{sub 2}, the sorption of Np decreased above pH 8 up to zero at pH 10. An increase of Np(V) concentration from 7 x 10{sup -12} to 8 x 10{sup -6} M resulted in a shift of the sorption pH edge by up to one pH unit to higher pH values. The ionic strength influenced the Np(V) sorption onto kaolinite only in the presence of ambient CO{sub 2}. Under Ar atmosphere the sorption of Np(V) was independent from ionic strength, indicating the formation of inner-sphere complexes of Np(V) with kaolinite. Time-dependent batch experiments at pH 9.0 under ambient CO{sub 2} showed that the sorption of Np(V) on kaolinite is fast and fully reversible over six orders in Np(V) concentration. (orig.)

  12. Sorption behavior of neptunium on bentonite -- Effect of calcium ion on the sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Muraoka, Susumu

    1995-01-01

    The sorption behavior of neptunium on bentonite was studied with batch type sorption and desorption experiments over a pH range of 2 to 8. A series of parallel studies using Na-smectite, Ca-smectite and admixtures of Na-smectite and calcite quantified the capacity of Ca 2+ (which occurs in bentonite as an exchangeable cation of smectite and as a component of calcite) to inhibit the sorption of neptunium. The distribution coefficient (K d ) of neptunium for bentonite was constant from pH 2 to 7, while for pure Na-smectite K d increased below pH 5 due to specific sorption of neptunium on Na-smectite. Specific sorption was defined as occurring when neptunium could be desorbed by a strong acid (1 M HCl) but was stable in the presence of 1 M KCl. It was found that the quantity of neptunium sorbed on Na-smectite was inversely proportional to the concentration of Ca 2+ in solution, an effect most pronounced at pH 2+ limits the specific sorption capacity of Na-smectite for neptunium. Similarly, in the mixture of Na-smectite and calcite, sufficient Ca 2+ was solubilized to depress neptunium sorption. This investigation demonstrates that Ca 2+ contained in bentonite as exchangeable cation and released from calcite reduces the specific sorption of neptunium

  13. Prediction of uranium and technetium sorption during titration of contaminated acidic groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fan, E-mail: zhangfan@itpcas.ac.cn [Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Parker, Jack C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Brooks, Scott C.; Watson, David B. [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6038 (United States); Jardine, Philip M. [Biosystems Engineering and Soil Science Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Gu, Baohua [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6038 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    This study investigates uranium and technetium sorption onto aluminum and iron hydroxides during titration of acidic groundwater. The contaminated groundwater exhibits oxic conditions with high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U, Tc, and various metal cations. More than 90% of U and Tc was removed from the aqueous phase as Al and Fe precipitated above pH 5.5, but was partially resolublized at higher pH values. An equilibrium hydrolysis and precipitation reaction model adequately described variations in aqueous concentrations of metal cations. An anion exchange reaction model was incorporated to simulate sulfate, U and Tc sorption onto variably charged (pH-dependent) Al and Fe hydroxides. Modeling results indicate that competitive sorption/desorption on mixed mineral phases needs to be considered to adequately predict U and Tc mobility. The model could be useful for future studies of the speciation of U, Tc and co-existing ions during pre- and post-groundwater treatment practices.

  14. Anion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vadivel Murugan

    2003-01-01

    . Its characterization is investigated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The hybrid material presents predominantly high electronic conductivities of around 2.0 and 7.0 S cm-1 at 300 and 400K respectively.

  15. Sorption behaviour of uranium and thorium on hydrous tin oxide from aqueous and mixed-solvent HNO3 media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misak, N.Z.; Salama, H.N.; El-Naggar, I.M.

    1983-01-01

    In aqueous nitric acid, uranyl and thorium ions seem to be sorbed on hydrous tin oxide mainly by a cation exchange mechanism. In 10 - 3 M aqueous solutions, the hydrous oxide prefers thorium to uranium at the relative low pH values, while the reverse is true at the higher pH values. The exchange of uranium is particle diffusion controlled while that of thorium is chemically controlled, and the isotherms point to the presence of different-energy sites in the hydrous oxide. Except for the solutions containing 80% of methanol, ethanol, or acetone, cation exchange is probably still the main mechanism of sorption of uranium. Anionic sorption of thorium seems to occur in all the mixed-solvent solutions and is perhaps the main mechanism in 80% ethanol. The equilibrium distribution coefficient K sub (d) increases almost in all cases with organic solvent content, probably due to dehydration of sorbed ions and to increasing superposition on anionic sorption. Unlike the aqueous medium, large U/Th separation factors are achieved in many of the mixed-solvent solutions and separation schemes are suggested. (Authors)

  16. Fluoride ions sorption of the water using natural and modified hematite with aluminium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teutli S, E. A.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorine is a mineral known for its dental benefits, but fluoride ions can cause fluoro sis in excessive quantities. There are many epidemiological studies on possible adverse effects resulting from prolonged ingestion of fluoride through drinking water. These studies demonstrate that fluoride mainly affects the bone tissue (bones and teeth), may produce an adverse effect on tooth enamel and can cause mild dental fluoro sis at concentrations from 0.9 to 1.2 mg/L in drinking water. In several states of Mexico, water contaminated with fluoride ions can be found, such as Aguascalientes, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Guanajuato, Sonora, Zacatecas, San Luis Potosi and Jalisco, where the fluoride ions levels are higher than 1.5 mg/L, established by the Mexican Official Standard (NOM-127-Ssa-2000) which sets the permissible limits of water for human use and consumption. Currently, several technologies have been proposed to remove fluoride ions from water such as precipitation methods which are based on the addition of chemicals to water and sorption methods to removed fluoride ions by sorption or ion exchange reactions by some suitable substrate capable of regenerate and reuse. In this work, the sorption of fluoride ions using unmodified and modified hematite with aluminum hydroxide to remove fluoride ions from water by bath experiments was studied. The hematite was modified by treating it with aluminum hydroxide, NaOH and Al 2 (SO 4 ) 3 solutions. The characterization of hematite before and after modification with aluminum hydroxide was studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, EDS and Bet. The effect of ph, contact time, concentration of fluoride ions, and the dose of sorbent on the sorption of fluoride ions by the modified hematite were studied. Equilibrium was reached within 48 hours of contact time and the maximum sorption of fluoride ions were in the range pH eq between 2.3 and 6.2. Sorption capacities of fluoride ions as a function of dose of

  17. Effects of sorption behaviour on contaminant migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnyk, T.W.

    1985-11-01

    The effects of sorption behaviour on contaminant migration in groundwater systems are varied. Retardation of migration and dispersive effects can vary widely and contaminant concentration profiles can take a number of different shapes. This report examines the nature of some of these effects, especially those due to sorption behaviours that are dependent on the concentration of the contaminant in the groundwater. The effects are calculated using, in most cases, analytical solutions to the chemical equations imbedded in a simple reaction-cell or box-model transport algorithm. The hydrogeological parameters are held constant, and radioactive decay and hydrodynamic dispersion are excluded. A general discussion of the role of sorption equations in transport modelling is followed by presentation of migration results for a number of models of sorption behaviour varying from linear isotherms, Langmuir, Freundlich and ion-exchange isotherms, to precipitation reactions and multiple-site sorption reactions. The results are compared and general conclusions are drawn about the various migration behaviours calculated. The conclusions are that equilibrium sorption of trace contaminants can be modelled with linear isotherms (constant distribution coefficients or constant retardation factors) but the evaluation and extrapolation of the distribution coefficient are not easy. Nonlinear isotherms lead to unsymmetrical migration fronts. A comparison of Freundlich and linear isotherms is made. Sorption/desorption kinetic factors can be significant on the time scale of laboratory experiments and can cause large dispersive effects. Slow but important reactions can be missed altogether. Precipitation or mineralization behaviour cannot be modelled with constant distribution coefficients. Also, mineralization reactions can be kinetically slow even on the geological time scale. 89 refs

  18. Technetium sorption by stibnite from natural water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretroukhine, V.; Sergeant, C.; Deves, G.; Poulain, S.; Vesvres, M.H.; Thomas, B.; Simonoff, M.

    2006-01-01

    The sorption of technetium by powdered and polished mineral stibnite Sb 2 S 3 has been investigated in simulated and natural underground waters from the Meuse/Haute-Marne region (France). The sorption by powdered stibnite has been found to be complete under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions in batch experiments. The sorption rate is higher in the absence of oxygen than under aerobic condition. Increasing the temperature from 30 C to 60 C results in a rise of the sorption rate by 9.1 and 27 times under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. The observed differences in sorption kinetics in the presence and in absence of oxygen are explained by the interaction of oxygen with sulfide ion in aerobic conditions and by the reduction of technetium(VII) by iron(II) and by other impurities present in natural water and in the mineral, and by the subsequent sorption of Tc(IV) on stibnite under anaerobic conditions. The sorption on a polished mineral surface resulted in the formation of a technetium film, probably Tc 2 S 7 , with a thickness of 1-3 μg Tc/cm 2 pH 3-6 and 4-12 μg Tc/cm 2 at 9-12. The simultaneous formation of stibnite colloids with adsorbed technetium occurs at pH 9-12. The study of the technetium film on the mineral by proton induced X-ray emission analysis showed it to be at least one order of magnitude thinner on the SiO 2 impurities than on the main Sb 2 S 3 component and the iron impurities. (orig.)

  19. Computer simulation of molecular sorption in zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmiano, Mark Daniel

    2001-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis encompasses the computer simulation of molecular sorption. In Chapter 1 we outline the aims and objectives of this work. Chapter 2 follows in which an introduction to sorption in zeolites is presented, with discussion of structure and properties of the main zeolites studied. Chapter 2 concludes with a description of the principles and theories of adsorption. In Chapter 3 we describe the methodology behind the work carried out in this thesis. In Chapter 4 we present our first computational study, that of the sorption of krypton in silicalite. We describe work carried out to investigate low energy sorption sites of krypton in silicalite where we observe krypton to preferentially sorb into straight and sinusoidal channels over channel intersections. We simulate single step type I adsorption isotherms and use molecular dynamics to study the diffusion of krypton and obtain division coefficients and the activation energy. We compare our results to previous experimental and computational studies where we show our work to be in good agreement. In Chapter 5 we present a systematic study of the sorption of oxygen and nitrogen in five lithium substituted zeolites using a transferable interatomic potential that we have developed from ab initio calculations. We show increased loading of nitrogen compared to oxygen in all five zeolites studied as expected and simulate adsorption isotherms, which we compare to experimental and simulated data in the literature. In Chapter 6 we present work on the sorption of ferrocene in the zeolite NaY. We show that a simulated, low energy sorption site for ferrocene is correctly located by comparing to X-ray powder diffraction results for this same system. The thesis concludes with some overall conclusions and discussion of opportunities for future work. (author)

  20. Sorption separation of Eu and As from single-component systems by Fe-modified biochar. Kinetic and equilibrium study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fristak, Vladimir; Soja, Gerhard; Michalekova-Richveisova, Barbora; Pipiska, Martin; Viglasova, Eva; Galambos, Michal; Duriska, Libor; Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    The utilization of carbonaceous materials in separation processes of radionuclides, heavy metals and metalloids represents a burning issue in environmental and waste management. The main objective of this study was to characterize the effect of chemical modification of corncob-derived biochar by Fe-impregnations on sorption efficiency of Eu and As as a model compounds of cationic lanthanides and anionic metalloids. The biochar sample produced in slow pyrolysis process at 500 C before (BC) and after (IBC) impregnation process was characterized by elemental, FTIR, SEM-EDX analysis to confirm the effectiveness of Fe-impregnation process. The basic physico-chemical properties showed differences in surface area and pH values of BC- and IBC-derived sorbents. Sorption processes of Eu and As by BC and IBC were characterized as a time- and initial concentration of sorbate-dependent processes. The sorption equilibrium was reached for both sorbates in 24 h of contact time. Batch equilibrium experiments revealed the increased maximum sorption capacities (Q max ) of IBC for As about more than 20 times (Q max BC 0.11 and Q max IBC 2.26 mg g -1 ). Our study confirmed negligible effect of Fe-impregnation on sorption capacity of biochar for Eu (Q max BC 0.89 and Q max IBC 0.98 mg g -1 ). The iron-impregnation of biochar-derived sorbents can be utilized as a valuable treatment method to produce stable and more effective sorption materials for various xenobiotics separation from liquid wastes and aqueous solutions.

  1. Sorption separation of Eu and As from single-component systems by Fe-modified biochar. Kinetic and equilibrium study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fristak, Vladimir; Soja, Gerhard [Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Tulln (Austria). Energy Dept. Environmental Resources and Technologies; Michalekova-Richveisova, Barbora; Pipiska, Martin [Trnava Univ. (Slovakia). Dept. of Chemistry; Viglasova, Eva; Galambos, Michal [Comenius Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry; Duriska, Libor [Slovak Univ. of Technology in Bratislava, Trnava (Slovakia). Faculty of Materials Science and Technology; Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo [Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Agricola y Bromatologia

    2017-03-15

    The utilization of carbonaceous materials in separation processes of radionuclides, heavy metals and metalloids represents a burning issue in environmental and waste management. The main objective of this study was to characterize the effect of chemical modification of corncob-derived biochar by Fe-impregnations on sorption efficiency of Eu and As as a model compounds of cationic lanthanides and anionic metalloids. The biochar sample produced in slow pyrolysis process at 500 C before (BC) and after (IBC) impregnation process was characterized by elemental, FTIR, SEM-EDX analysis to confirm the effectiveness of Fe-impregnation process. The basic physico-chemical properties showed differences in surface area and pH values of BC- and IBC-derived sorbents. Sorption processes of Eu and As by BC and IBC were characterized as a time- and initial concentration of sorbate-dependent processes. The sorption equilibrium was reached for both sorbates in 24 h of contact time. Batch equilibrium experiments revealed the increased maximum sorption capacities (Q{sub max}) of IBC for As about more than 20 times (Q{sub max} BC 0.11 and Q{sub max} IBC 2.26 mg g{sup -1}). Our study confirmed negligible effect of Fe-impregnation on sorption capacity of biochar for Eu (Q{sub max} BC 0.89 and Q{sub max} IBC 0.98 mg g{sup -1}). The iron-impregnation of biochar-derived sorbents can be utilized as a valuable treatment method to produce stable and more effective sorption materials for various xenobiotics separation from liquid wastes and aqueous solutions.

  2. FLUORIDE SORPTION USING MORRINGA INDICA-BASED ACTIVATED CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Karthikeyan, S. Siva Ilango

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Batch adsorption experiments using activated carbon prepared from Morringa Indica bark were conducted to remove fluoride from aqueous solution. A minimum contact time of 25 min was required for optimum fluoride removal. The influence of adsorbent, dose, pH, co-ions (cations and anions on fluoride removal by the activated carbon has been experimentally verified. The adsorption of fluoride was studied at 30 C, 40 C and 50 C. The kinetics of adsorption and adsorption isotherms at different temperatures were studied. The fluoride adsorption obeyed both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and followed a pseudo first order kinetic model. The thermodynamic studies revealed that the fluoride adsorption by Morringa Indica is an endothermic process indicating an increase in sorption rate at higher temperatures. The negative values of G indicate the spontaneity of adsorption. SEM and XRD studies confirmed the surface morphological characteristics of the adsorbent and the deposition of fluoride on the surface of the material.

  3. Sorption models and their application in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamel, Nariman H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) were found in some environmental soils not high enough to pose problems for human health. The health may be affected by increasing of NORM at some environmental soils. Four soil samples obtained from certain coastal regions in Egypt. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) of the uranium ( 238 U) series, thorium ( 232 Th) series and the radioactive isotope of potassium ( 40 K) were measured. The soil samples were selected from the situations where the radionuclide concentrations are significantly higher than the average level of other sites. It were chemically analyzed for the uranium, silicon aluminum and iron. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) were determined, it was found lower in the presence of Fe-silicates suggested that Fe-hydroxide had precipitin at the exchangeable edge sites of the clay minerals. The pH of the solid particles at which the net total surface charge is zero was known as the point of zero charge (PZC). The PZC is very important in determining the affinity of the soil samples for different cations and anions. The aim of this work is to determine the natural radiological hazardous of radionuclide at four environmental coastal soil samples in Egypt. The point of zero surface charge was determined using titration tests. Sorption model was developed for this purpose. (author)

  4. Sorption of cesium in intact rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puukko, E.

    2014-04-01

    The mass distribution coefficient K d is used in performance assessment (PA) to describe sorption of a radionuclide on rock. The R d is determined using crushed rock which causes uncertainty in converting the R d values to K d values for intact rock. This work describes a method to determine the equilibrium of sorption on intact rock. The rock types of the planned Olkiluoto waste disposal site were T-series mica gneiss (T-MGN), T-series tonalite granodiorite granite gneiss (T-TGG), P-series tonalite granodiorite granite gneiss (P-TGG) and pegmatitic granite (PGR). These rocks contain different amount of biotite which is the main sorbing mineral. The sorption of cesium on intact rock slices was studied by applying an electrical field to speed up migration of cesium into the rock. Cesium is in the solution as a noncomplex cation Cs + and it is sorbed by ion exchange. The tracer used in the experiments was 134 Cs. The experimental sorption on the intact rock is compared with values calculated using the in house cation exchange sorption model (HYRL model) in PHREEQC program. The observed sorption on T-MGN and T-TGG rocks was close to the calculated values. Two PGR samples were from a depth of 70 m and three samples were from a depth of 150 m. Cesium sorbed more than predicted on the two 70 m PGR samples. The sorption of Cs on the three 150 m PGR samples was small which was consistent with the calculations. The pegmatitic granite PGR has the smallest content of biotite of the four rock types. In the case of P-TGG rock the observed values of sorption were only half of the calculated values. Two kind of slices were cut from P-TGG drill core. The slices were against and to the direction of the foliation of the biotite rims. The sorption of cesium on P-TGG rock was same in both cases. The results indicated that there was no effect of the directions of the electric field and the foliation of biotite in the P-TGG rock. (orig.)

  5. Contribution to the study of sorption mechanisms at solid-liquid interfaces: application to the cases of apatites and oxy-hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duc, M.

    2002-11-01

    Sorption-desorption phenomena play an important role in the transport of toxic and radioactive elements in surface and underground water in contact with solid matter. Selenium, which is one of the long-lived radionuclides present in radioactive waste, is characterized by several oxidation states and by anionic species in aqueous solutions. In order to predict its transport, we need a good knowledge of its sorption processes. We have studied the sorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) on two types of solids present in natural media or which have been proposed as additives to active barriers: hydroxy-apatites, fluoro-apatite and iron oxi-hydroxides (goethite and hematite). Sorption mechanisms have been studied through an approach including several different and complementary methods: titrimetry, zeta-metry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy, etc... Results showed that Se(VI) is much less sorbed than Se(VI) on both types of solids. For Se(IV) the sorption mechanisms are different for iron oxides and apatites. On oxides, sorption increases when pH decreases. It can be interpreted by a surface complexation model, essentially through an inner sphere complex (monodentate or bidentate). Modelling of Se sorption curves was performed after the determination of acido-basic properties of oxides. However, the determination of the intrinsic properties of oxides is disturbed by several parameters identified as impurities, evolution of the solid in solution, kinetic and solubility of the solid. For apatites, selenium sorption proceeds by exchange with superficial groups, with a maximum of fixation at approximately pH 8. Thanks to XPS measurements and the elaboration of a mathematical model, we could determine the depth of penetration of both selenium and cadmium on apatites. (author)

  6. Environmental behavior of inorganic anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garland, T.R.; Cataldo, D.A.; Fellows, R.J.; Wildung, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Recent efforts have addressed two aspects of anion behavior in the soil/plant system. The first involves evaluation of the gaseous component of the terrestrial iodine cycle in soils and plants. Field analyses of 129 I in soils and vegetation adjacent to a fuels reprocessing facility, which was idle for 10 years prior to the study, indicated that there may be a significant gaseous component to the terrestrial iodine cycle. Soil substrates, including a silt-sand, organic forest soil, quartz sand, and a sterilized soil, were amended with radioiodide, and the rates and quality of the volatile components evaluated

  7. The NEA sorption data base (SDB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruegger, B.; Ticknor, K.

    1992-01-01

    The current NEA Sorption Data Base is developed to replace the former International Sorption Information Retrieval System (ISIRS) initiated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and contains about 11,000 distribution coefficients with corresponding experimental condition parameters describing sorption of key nuclides for a large variety of solid and liquid phases. The SDB is designed to run on a micro-computer using the commercially available database software dBASE III Plus. For each recorded sorption experiment, the SDB provides a bibliographical reference, the most complete characterization of the solid and liquid phases available, a description of the experimental conditions and the distribution coefficient or retardation factor for each element studied. When available, parameters such as temperature, initial radionuclide concentration, pH, Eh, contact time, solid to solution ratio, sample origin, oxidation state and type of solution are included. The SDB provides information for a wide variety of rocks or geological materials, buffer backfill candidates, concretes/cements, elements (Am, Cs, Co, I, Np, Pu, Ra, Sr, Se, Tc, U and, to a lesser extent, Ag, Ba, C, Ce, Eu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, Pd, Pm, Ru, Sb, Sn, Y, Zn, and Zr), or radioisotopes. A compilation of sorption data like SDB provide a readily available source of data for radioactive waste repository performance assessments when site specific data are not available or essential, for example, during a site selection phase. 2 appendices

  8. Radionuclide sorption from the safety evaluation perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Research and development directed towards the assessment of the long-term performance of radioactive waste disposal systems has been recognised as a priority area with a strong need for international co-operation and co-ordination. The ultimate aims is to promote the quality and credibility of safety assessment techniques for radioactive waste disposal. Sorption in the geosphere is one of the key processes for retarding the transport of radionuclide from the underground disposal facility to the biosphere. In many cases, sorption in the near field and in the biosphere is also important. A workshop, organised to favor discussion around a small number of invited papers, was held in October 1991: - to evaluate critically the way sorption processes are incorporated in performance assessment models; - to identify open issues of high priority, and; - to propose future activities to resolve these issues. These proceedings reproduce the invited papers and the conclusions and recommendations adopted by the workshop. Eight papers are in the INIS SCOPE. The main subjects studied are: sorption database comparison, sorption database development and three case studies, experimental techniques, adsorption models

  9. Sorption of radionuclides by tertiary clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.F.; Czurda, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    The sorption capacity of different clay types for some metals (Co, Cs, Sr and Zn), occurring as common radionuclides in radioactive waste deposits, had been analysed by a static (batch technique) and a dynamic method (percolation tests, in which the driving force is a hydraulic gradient). Sorption capacity generally increased with an increasing pH of solution. A decrease of sorption capacity had been observed in the order Zn > Cs ≥ Co > Sr for the batch and Cs > Zn > Sr > Co for the percolation tests. Clay marls showed a distinctly higher sorption respectively retention capacity as pure clays. Sorption capacity depends on solution parameters like type and concentration of radionuclide, pH, salt concentration, etc., and on rock parameters like mineral content (e.g. swelling clay minerals and carbonates), organic material, rock pH, micro fabric, etc. A third parameter of great influence is the contact time between clay and solution. The adsorption isotherms reflect two different adsorption mechanisms: a very rapid adsorption (a few minutes) on the external surfaces of clay minerals and a slow adsorption process (weeks and longer), due to the diffusion of metal ions into the interlayer space of clay minerals. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  10. Moisture sorption of Thai red curry powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudathip Inchuen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Moisture sorption study was conducted on Thai red curry powder prepared by two different drying methods, viz. microwave and hot-air drying. Moisture sorption isotherms of the red curry powder at 30 C and water activity in the range of 0.113-0.970 were determined by a static gravimetric method. The isotherms exhibited Type III behaviour. The moisture sorption data were fitted to several sorption models and a non-linear regression analysis method was used to evaluate the constants of the sorption equations. The fit was evaluated using the coefficient of determination (R2, the reduced chi-square (2 and the root mean square error (RMSE. The GAB model followed by the Lewiski-3 model gave the best fit to the experimental data. The monolayer moisture content, taken as the safe minimum moisture level in the red curry powder, was determined using the BET equation and was found to range between 0.080 - 0.085 gram water per gram dry matter.

  11. Schlenk Techniques for Anionic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Ratkanthwar, Kedar

    2015-09-01

    Anionic polymerization-high vacuum techniques (HVTs) are doubtlessly the most prominent and reliable experimental tools to prepare polymer samples with well-defined and, in many cases, complex macromolecular architectures. Due to the high demands for time and skilled technical personnel, HVTs are currently used in only a few research laboratories worldwide. Instead, most researchers in this filed are attracted to more facile Schlenk techniques. The basic principle of this technique followed in all laboratories is substantially the same, i.e. the use of alternate vacuum and inert gas atmosphere in glass apparatus for the purification/charging of monomer, solvents, additives, and for the manipulation of air-sensitive compounds such as alkyl metal initiators, organometallic or organic catalysts. However, it is executed quite differently in each research group in terms of the structure of Schlenk apparatus (manifolds, connections, purification/storage flasks, reactors, etc.), the use of small supplementary devices (soft tubing, cannulas, stopcocks, etc.) and experimental procedures. The operational methods are partly purpose-oriented while also featured by a high flexibility, which makes it impossible to describe in detail each specific one. In this chapter we will briefly exemplify the application of Schlenk techniques for anionic polymerization by describing the performance of a few experiments from our own work.

  12. Sorption behaviour of radioactive technetium in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Deying

    1996-01-01

    The sorption behaviour of technetium in different soils has been studied by batch experiments under aerobic conditions. The soil samples have been taken to study the characteristics and to derive the pH-Eh values. In addition, the activated carbon and reduced iron powder have been selected as additives to the JAERI sand according to the former research work, so that the technetium sorption behaviour in the artificial soils can be studied under similar conditions. The experimental results show that all these soil samples except for the gluey soil have a very small distribution coefficient for Tc, while the artificial soils have a very large distribution coefficient for Tc. Besides, for artificial soils, the distribution coefficient (R d ) values will become larger and larger when more additive is added and more contact time is allowed. The physico-chemical fixation processes and possible sorption modes have been discussed as well

  13. Sorption of Europium in zirconium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia R, G.

    2004-01-01

    Some minerals have the property of sipping radioactive metals in solution, that it takes advantage to manufacture contention barriers that are placed in the repositories of nuclear wastes. The more recent investigations are focused in the development of new technologies guided to the sorption of alpha emissors on minerals which avoid their dispersion in the environment. In an effort to contribute to the understanding of this type of properties, some studies of sorption of Europium III are presented like homologous of the americium, on the surface of zirconium silicate (ZrSiO 4 ). In this work the results of sorption experiences are presented as well as the interpretation of the phenomena of the formation of species in the surface of the zirconium silicate. (Author)

  14. Sorption of radioactive technetium on pyrrhotine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, D.; Fan, X.H.; Su, X.G.; Zeng, J.S.; Dong, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The sorption behavior of technetium on pyrrhotine was studied with batch experiments and diluted sulfuric acid (less than 2.88 mol/l) was used to dissolve the technetium adsorbed on pyrrhotine. A significant sorption of technetium on pyrrhotine was observed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the sorption on the mineral was supposed to be due to the reduction of TcO 4 - to insoluble TcO 2 x nH 2 O. Sorbed technetium on the mineral could be desorbed by diluted sulfuric acid. The maximum desorption ratio under aerobic conditions was much higher than that of under anaerobic conditions, meanwhile, the desorption rates under anaerobic conditions were higher than that of under aerobic conditions in the initial stage of the experiments. (author)

  15. Water sorption and transport in dry crispy bread crust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinders, M.B.J.; Nieuwenhuijzen, van N.H.; Tromp, R.H.; Hamer, R.J.; Vliet, van T.

    2010-01-01

    Water sorption and dynamical properties of bread crust have been studied using gravimetric sorption experiments. Water uptake and loss were followed while relative humidity (RH) was stepwise in- or decreased (isotherm experiment) or varied between two adjusted values (oscillatory experiment).

  16. The sorption of acids in cellular side of apple pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asoev, M.G.; Mukhiddinov, Z.K.

    1994-01-01

    Equilibrium swell of sample refuse after separation of water is use for study of sorption of hydrochloric acid. Quantity adsorb acids set a price to difference her concentration before and after equilibrium sorption

  17. Molecular simulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon sorption to black carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haftka, J.J.H.; Parsons, J.R.; Govers, H.A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Strong sorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants to soot or black carbon (BC) is an important environmental process limiting the bioremediation potential of contaminated soils and sediments. Reliable methods to predict BC sorption coefficients for organic contaminants are therefore required. A

  18. Tritium sorption on protective coatings for concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.M.; Senohrabek, J.A.; Allsop, P.A.

    1992-11-01

    Because of the high sorption level of tritium on unprotected concrete, a program to examine the effectiveness of various concrete coatings and sealants in reducing tritium sorption was undertaken, and various exposure conditions were examined. Coatings of epoxy, polyurethane, bituminous sealant, bituminous sealant covered with polyvinylidene chloride wrap, alkyd paint, and sodium silicate were investigated with tritium (HTO) vapor concentration, humidity and contact time being varied. An exposure to HT was also carried out, and the effect of humidity on the tritium desorption rate was investigated. The relative effectiveness of the coatings was in the order of bituminous sealant + wrap > bituminous sealant > solvent-based epoxy > 100%-solids epoxy > alkyd paint > sodium silicate. The commercially available coatings for concrete resulted in tritium sorption being reduced to less than 7% of unprotected concrete. This was improved to ∼0.1% with the use of the Saran wrap (polyvinylidene chloride). The amount of tritium sorbed was proportional to tritium concentration. The total tritium sorbed decreased with an increase in humidity. A saturation effect was observed with increasing exposure time for both the coated and unprotected samples. Under the test conditions, complete saturation was not achieved within the maximum 8-hour contact time, except for the solvent-based epoxy. The desorption rate increased with a higher-humidity air purge stream. HT desorbed more rapidly than HTO, but the amount sorbed was smaller. The experimental program showed that HTO sorption by concrete can be significantly reduced with the proper choice of coating. However, tritium sorption on concrete and proposed coatings will continue to be a concern until the effects of the various conditions that affect the adsorption and desorption of tritium are firmly established for both chronic and acute tritium release conditions. Material sorption characteristics must also be considered in

  19. On the derivation of a sorption database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewart, F.T.; Haworth, A.; Wisbey, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The safety arguments in support of many radioactive waste repository concepts are heavily dependent on the existence of a sorption reaction. Such a reaction will, in the near field, reduce the magnitude of the release of a number of hazardous radionuclides so that their release to the geosphere is dispersed in time. In the geosphere, the sorption reactions provide a mechanism whereby the migration of the elements released from the repository is retarded and the radioisotopes then subsequently decay. The processes involved in sorption cannot in many cases be satisfactorily represented in thermodynamic terms such as are employed in the description of dissolution and precipitation. Experiments that investigate these reactions are not easy to perform. The sorption parameters that are obtained experimentally for the near field relate, in the UK case, to sorption on to a cementitious surface. These surfaces, since they consist substantially of calcium hydroxide or calcium silicate hydrates, control the aqueous chemistry, do not permit pH changes to be made and limit the range of concentrations of sorbate that may be used. In the far field, on the other hand, the surfaces are not in general so active with respect to the solution chemistry and data can be obtained across a wide spectrum of aqueous chemistries. These data, although they may be useful in testing and parameterizing models, may not have validity under field conditions since the minerals will, inevitably, react to the changes in water chemistry, over geological timescales. The uncertainties in the experimental data are, for many elements and solids, balanced by a reasonable agreement between workers in the values of the parameters used to describe sorption. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  20. Carbon Chain Anions and the Growth of Complex Organic Molecules in Titan’s Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, R. T.; Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; Vuitton, V.; Crary, F. J.; González-Caniulef, D.; Shebanits, O.; Jones, G. H.; Lewis, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Cordiner, M.; Taylor, S. A.; Kataria, D. O.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Edberg, N. J. T.; Sittler, E. C.

    2017-08-01

    Cassini discovered a plethora of neutral and ionized molecules in Titan’s ionosphere including, surprisingly, anions and negatively charged molecules extending up to 13,800 u q-1. In this Letter, we forward model the Cassini electron spectrometer response function to this unexpected ionospheric component to achieve an increased mass resolving capability for negatively charged species observed at Titan altitudes of 950-1300 km. We report on detections consistently centered between 25.8 and 26.0 u q-1 and between 49.0-50.1 u q-1 which are identified as belonging to the carbon chain anions, CN-/C3N- and/or C2H-/C4H-, in agreement with chemical model predictions. At higher ionospheric altitudes, detections at 73-74 u q-1 could be attributed to the further carbon chain anions C5N-/C6H- but at lower altitudes and during further encounters extend over a higher mass/charge range. This, as well as further intermediary anions detected at >100 u, provide the first evidence for efficient anion chemistry in space involving structures other than linear chains. Furthermore, at altitudes below environments where chain anions have been observed and shows that anion chemistry plays a role in the formation of complex organics within a planetary atmosphere as well as in the interstellar medium.

  1. Sorption Properties of Some Romanian Gingerbread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulbure Anca

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Water activity of gingerbread is very important for keeping the product freshness and shelf life. Water activity is influenced by composition, water content and temperature. The water content of gingerbread could vary according with storage condition. i.e. rH. 11 gingerbread samples were analysed. The water content and water activity lies between 7.0 and 12.6% and respectively 0.590 and 0.715. The sorption isotherms were determined at 30°C by gravimetric method. The moisture sorption is influenced by composition, especially sweeteners and humectants. Honey and invert sugar have the same impact on gingerbread higroscopicity.

  2. Sorption of radionuclides on hard rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.A.; Bourke, P.J.; Green, A.; Littleboy, A.K.

    1987-09-01

    Methods for measuring sorption on hard rocks, particularly of strontium, caesium, neptunium and americium on Darley Dale sandstone and Welsh slate have been investigated. The methods tried included batch tests with crushed rock and tests of simultaneous diffusion and convection with sorption on intact rock. High pressures (800m H 2 O) were used in the convective tests to pump water quickly through the rock samples and to measure high sorptivities in times shorter than those needed in the diffusive methods with intact samples. (author)

  3. A Sorption Hysteresis Model For Cellulosic Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Damkilde, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The equilibrium concentration of adsorbed water in cellulosic materials is dependent on the history of the variations of vapor pressure in the ambient air, i.e. sorption hysteresis. Existing models to describe this phenomenon such as the independent domain theory have numerical drawbacks and....../or imply accounting for the entire history variations of every material point. This paper presents a sorption hysteresis model based on a state formulation and expressed in closed-form solutions, which makes it suitable for implementation into a numerical method....

  4. Sorption of natural uranium by algerian bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megouda, N.; Kadi, H.; Hamla, M.S.; Brahimi, H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text.Batch sorption experiments have been used to assess the sorption behaviour of uranium onto natural and drilling bentonites. The operating parameters (pH, aolis-liquid ratio, particle size, time and initial uranium concentration) influenced the rate of adsorption. The distribution coefficient (Kd) range values at equilibrium time are 45.95-1079.26 ml/g and 32.81-463053 ml/g for the drilling and natural bentonites respectively. The equilibrium isotherms show that the data correlate with both Freundlich and Langmuir models

  5. The sorption behaviour of 99Tc on activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Deying; Zeng Jishu

    2004-01-01

    The sorption behaviour of 99 Tc on apricot-pit activated carbon with batch experiment is studied. The influence of such factors as sorbent particle size, temperature, pH value on sorption ratio, and the Freundlich sorption isotherms are reported in this paper. (author)

  6. Suitability of Moshi Pumice for Phosphorus Sorption in Constructed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study of Moshi Pumice's phosphorus sorption behaviours and properties was carried out in laboratory scale where by 1-2 mm, 2-4 mm and 4-8 mm grains were tested using batch experiments. The results show that Moshi Pumice has high phosphorus sorption capacity. The sorption capacity for the Moshi Pumice was ...

  7. Phosphorus sorption in relation to soil grain size and geochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By using stepwise regression, the combination of Al, Fe, clay and Ca predicted more than 94% of the variation in the P sorption capacity of soils samples from Simiyu and Kagera basins. These four soil properties, which are strongly related to P sorption, could therefore be used as quick tests for predicting the P sorption ...

  8. Sorption of Heterocyclic Organic Compounds to Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzelder, Florian; Funck, Matin; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2018-01-16

    Sorption is an important natural and technical process. Sorption coefficients are typically determined in batch experiments, but this may be challenging for weakly sorbing compounds. An alternative method enabling analysis of those compounds is column chromatography. A column packed with the sorbent is used and sorption data are determined by relating sorbate retention to that of a nonretarded tracer. In this study, column chromatography was applied for the first time to study sorption of previously hardly investigated heterocyclic organic compounds to multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Sorption data for these compounds are very limited in literature, and weak sorption is expected from predictions. Deuterium oxide was used as nonretarded tracer. Sorption isotherms were well described by the Freundlich model and data showed reasonable agreement with predicted values. Sorption was exothermic and physisorption was observed. H-bonding may contribute to overall sorption, which is supported by reduced sorption with increasing ionic strength due to blocking of functional groups. Lowering pH reduced sorption of ionizable compounds, due to electrostatic repulsion at pH 3 where sorbent as well as sorbates were positively charged. Overall, column chromatography was successfully used to study sorption of heterocyclic compounds to MWCNTs and could be applied for other carbon-based sorbents.

  9. Attenuation of polychlorinated biphenyl sorption to charcoal by humic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.; Meulman, B.; Meijer, T.; Jonker, M.T.O.

    2009-01-01

    Strong sorption to black carbon may limit the environmental risks of organic pollutants, but interactions with cosorbing humic acid (HA) may interfere. We studied the attenuative effect of HA additions on the sorption of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to a charcoal. "Intrinsic" sorption to

  10. Sorption mechanisms of perfluorinated compounds on carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Shubo; Zhang Qiaoying; Nie Yao; Wei Haoran; Wang Bin; Huang Jun; Yu Gang; Xing Baoshan

    2012-01-01

    Sorption of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is critical for understanding their subsequent transport and fate in aqueous environments, but the sorption mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, the sorption of six PFCs on CNTs increased with increasing C-F chain length when they had a same functional group, and the CNTs with hydroxyl and carboxyl groups had much lower adsorbed amount than the pristine CNTs, indicating that hydrophobic interaction dominated the sorption of PFCs on the CNTs. Electrostatic repulsion suppressed the sorption of PFCs on the CNTs, resulting in the lower sorption with increasing pH. Hydrogen bonding interaction was negligible. The hydrophobic C-F chains can be closely adsorbed on the CNTs surface in parallel to the axis or along the curvature, making it impossible to form micelles on the CNT surface, leading to the lower sorption than other adsorbents. Highlights: ► Sorption capacities of PFOA on different CNTs are less than that on activated carbon and resins. ► Hydrophobic interaction is principally involved in the sorption of PFCs on CNTs. ► Electrostatic repulsion suppresses the sorption of PFCs on CNTs. - Hydrophobic interaction dominated the sorption of perfluorinated compounds on carbon nanotubes, while electrostatic repulsion suppressed their sorption.

  11. Model Based Control of Moisture Sorption in a Historical Interior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Zítek

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a novel scheme for microclimate control in historical exhibition rooms, inhibiting moisture sorption phenomena that are inadmissible from the preventive conservation point of view. The impact of air humidity is the most significant harmful exposure for a great deal of the cultural heritage deposited in remote historical buildings. Leaving the interior temperature to run almost its spontaneous yearly cycle, the proposed non-linear model-based control protects exhibits from harmful variations in moisture content by compensating the temperature drifts with an adequate adjustment of the air humidity. Already implemented in a medieval interior since 1999, the proposed microclimate control has proved capable of permanently maintaining constant a desirable moisture content in organic or porous materials in the interior of a building. 

  12. Influence of organic surface coatings on the sorption of anticonvulsants on mineral surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shen; Cwiertny, David M

    2013-10-01

    Here, we explore the role that sorption to mineral surfaces plays in the fate of two commonly encountered effluent-derived pharmaceuticals, the anticonvulsants phenytoin and carbamazepine. Adsorption isotherms and pH-edge experiments are consistent with electrostatics governing anticonvulsant uptake on metal oxides typically found in soil and aquifer material (e.g., Si, Al, Fe, Mn, and Ti). Appreciable, albeit limited, adsorption was observed only for phenytoin, which is anionic above pH 8.3, on the iron oxides hematite and ferrihydrite. Adsorption increased substantially in the presence of cationic and anionic surfactants, species also commonly encountered in wastewater effluent. For carbamazepine, we propose the enhanced uptake results entirely from hydrophobic interactions with apolar tails of surfactant surface coatings. For phenytoin, adsorption also arises from the ability of surfactants to alter the net charge of the mineral surface and thereby further enhance favorable electrostatic interactions with its anionic form. Collectively, our results demonstrate that although pristine mineral surfaces are likely not major sinks for phenytoin and carbamazepine in the environment, their alteration with organic matter, particularly surfactants, can considerably increase their ability to retain these emerging pollutants in subsurface systems.

  13. A suggested approach toward measuring sorption and applying sorption data to repository performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundberg, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    The sorption of radioisotopes in relation to geologic disposal of radioactive wastes is discussed. Properties of the radioactive materials, rocks, and minerals, and the chemistry involved are described. 51 refs., 12 figs. CBS

  14. Selective sorption of technetium from groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Groundwater used for processing uranium or plutonium at DOE sites is frequently contaminated with the radionuclide {sup 99}Tc. DOE`s Paducah and Portsmouth sites are typical of the contamination problem. Solutions contaminated with radionuclides were poured into lagoons and burial pits, which created a plume that has seeped into the sandy aquifers below the vadose zone. Technetium is the principal radioactive metal-ion contaminant in Paducah site ground-water, and it is present at a concentration of about 25 ng/L. At Portsmouth, Tc is present in the groundwater at a concentration that varies greatly with distance from the source, and concentrations of >400 ng/L have been reported. Commercially available anion-exchange resins can remove the TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} ion in the presence of typical anions found in groundwater, but improving the selectivity will result in substantial cost savings in terms of the quantity of resin needed and the scale of the equipment required to treat huge flows rates. The pertechnetate anion is strongly sorbed on commercially-available strong-base anion-exchange resins, but in view of the low (typically nanomolar) concentrations of Tc involved, enhanced selectivity for the pertechnetate anion over other anions commonly found in groundwater such as chloride, sulfate, and nitrite will be needed. The authors have prepared and evaluated new anion-exchange resins that were designed to be highly selective for pertechnetate. The technology involves building those features that are known to enhance the selectivity of pertechnetate over other anions into the exchange sites of the resin (hydrophobicity), while at the same time maintaining favorable exchange kinetics.

  15. Sorption of fission nuclides on model milk components. II. Sorption of radiostrontium on hydroxyapatite in milk and whey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosskopfova, O.; Kopunec, R.; Matel, L.; Macasek, F.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the whey was chosen as a model solution of liquid phase for sorption study of strontium on hydroxyapatite. The whey was obtained using two methods - ultracentrifugation and precipitation of casein. The sorption was studied at a different pH and at a different concentration of calcium. The sorption of strontium on hydroxyapatite from milk was studied, too. (authors)

  16. Rights, goals, and capabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hees, M.V.B.P.M

    This article analyses the relationship between rights and capabilities in order to get a better grasp of the kind of consequentialism that the capability theory represents. Capability rights have been defined as rights that have a capability as their object (rights to capabilities). Such a

  17. Contribution to the study of sorption mechanisms at solid-liquid interfaces: application to the cases of apatites and oxy-hydroxides; Contribution a l'etude des mecanismes de sorption aux interfaces solide-liquide: application aux cas des apatites et des oxy-hydroxydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duc, M

    2002-11-15

    Sorption-desorption phenomena play an important role in the transport of toxic and radioactive elements in surface and underground water in contact with solid matter. Selenium, which is one of the long-lived radionuclides present in radioactive waste, is characterized by several oxidation states and by anionic species in aqueous solutions. In order to predict its transport, we need a good knowledge of its sorption processes. We have studied the sorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) on two types of solids present in natural media or which have been proposed as additives to active barriers: hydroxy-apatites, fluoro-apatite and iron oxi-hydroxides (goethite and hematite). Sorption mechanisms have been studied through an approach including several different and complementary methods: titrimetry, zeta-metry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy, etc... Results showed that Se(VI) is much less sorbed than Se(VI) on both types of solids. For Se(IV) the sorption mechanisms are different for iron oxides and apatites. On oxides, sorption increases when pH decreases. It can be interpreted by a surface complexation model, essentially through an inner sphere complex (monodentate or bidentate). Modelling of Se sorption curves was performed after the determination of acido-basic properties of oxides. However, the determination of the intrinsic properties of oxides is disturbed by several parameters identified as impurities, evolution of the solid in solution, kinetic and solubility of the solid. For apatites, selenium sorption proceeds by exchange with superficial groups, with a maximum of fixation at approximately pH 8. Thanks to XPS measurements and the elaboration of a mathematical model, we could determine the depth of penetration of both selenium and cadmium on apatites. (author)

  18. Development of mechanistic sorption model and treatment of uncertainties for Ni sorption on montmorillonite/bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochs, Michael; Ganter, Charlotte; Tachi, Yukio; Suyama, Tadahiro; Yui, Mikazu

    2011-02-01

    Sorption and diffusion of radionuclides in buffer materials (bentonite) are the key processes in the safe geological disposal of radioactive waste, because migration of radionuclides in this barrier is expected to be diffusion-controlled and retarded by sorption processes. It is therefore necessary to understand the detailed/coupled processes of sorption and diffusion in compacted bentonite and develop mechanistic /predictive models, so that reliable parameters can be set under a variety of geochemical conditions relevant to performance assessment (PA). For this purpose, JAEA has developed the integrated sorption and diffusion (ISD) model/database in montmorillonite/bentonite systems. The main goal of the mechanistic model/database development is to provide a tool for a consistent explanation, prediction, and uncertainty assessment of K d as well as diffusion parameters needed for the quantification of radionuclide transport. The present report focuses on developing the thermodynamic sorption model (TSM) and on the quantification and handling of model uncertainties in applications, based on illustrating by example of Ni sorption on montmorillonite/bentonite. This includes 1) a summary of the present state of the art of thermodynamic sorption modeling, 2) a discussion of the selection of surface species and model design appropriate for the present purpose, 3) possible sources and representations of TSM uncertainties, and 4) details of modeling, testing and uncertainty evaluation for Ni sorption. Two fundamentally different approaches are presented and compared for representing TSM uncertainties: 1) TSM parameter uncertainties calculated by FITEQL optimization routines and some statistical procedure, 2) overall error estimated by direct comparison of modeled and experimental K d values. The overall error in K d is viewed as the best representation of model uncertainty in ISD model/database development. (author)

  19. Carbon Chain Anions and the Growth of Complex Organic Molecules in Titan’s Ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, R. T.; Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; González-Caniulef, D.; Jones, G. H.; Lewis, G. R.; Taylor, S. A.; Kataria, D. O. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Vuitton, V. [Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, IPAG, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Crary, F. J. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Innovation Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Shebanits, O.; Wahlund, J.-E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Waite, J. H. [Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute (SWRI), 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Cordiner, M.; Sittler, E. C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Edberg, N. J. T., E-mail: r.t.desai@ucl.ac.uk [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Box 537, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2017-08-01

    Cassini discovered a plethora of neutral and ionized molecules in Titan’s ionosphere including, surprisingly, anions and negatively charged molecules extending up to 13,800 u q{sup −1}. In this Letter, we forward model the Cassini electron spectrometer response function to this unexpected ionospheric component to achieve an increased mass resolving capability for negatively charged species observed at Titan altitudes of 950–1300 km. We report on detections consistently centered between 25.8 and 26.0 u q{sup −1} and between 49.0–50.1 u q{sup −1} which are identified as belonging to the carbon chain anions, CN{sup −}/C{sub 3}N{sup −} and/or C{sub 2}H{sup −}/C{sub 4}H{sup −}, in agreement with chemical model predictions. At higher ionospheric altitudes, detections at 73–74 u q{sup −1} could be attributed to the further carbon chain anions C{sub 5}N{sup −}/C{sub 6}H{sup −} but at lower altitudes and during further encounters extend over a higher mass/charge range. This, as well as further intermediary anions detected at >100 u, provide the first evidence for efficient anion chemistry in space involving structures other than linear chains. Furthermore, at altitudes below <1100 km, the low-mass anions (<150 u q{sup −1}) were found to deplete at a rate proportional to the growth of the larger molecules, a correlation that indicates the anions are tightly coupled to the growth process. This study adds Titan to an increasing list of astrophysical environments where chain anions have been observed and shows that anion chemistry plays a role in the formation of complex organics within a planetary atmosphere as well as in the interstellar medium.

  20. Carbon Chain Anions and the Growth of Complex Organic Molecules in Titan’s Ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, R. T.; Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; González-Caniulef, D.; Jones, G. H.; Lewis, G. R.; Taylor, S. A.; Kataria, D. O.; Vuitton, V.; Crary, F. J.; Shebanits, O.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Waite, J. H.; Cordiner, M.; Sittler, E. C.; Edberg, N. J. T.

    2017-01-01

    Cassini discovered a plethora of neutral and ionized molecules in Titan’s ionosphere including, surprisingly, anions and negatively charged molecules extending up to 13,800 u q"−"1. In this Letter, we forward model the Cassini electron spectrometer response function to this unexpected ionospheric component to achieve an increased mass resolving capability for negatively charged species observed at Titan altitudes of 950–1300 km. We report on detections consistently centered between 25.8 and 26.0 u q"−"1 and between 49.0–50.1 u q"−"1 which are identified as belonging to the carbon chain anions, CN"−/C_3N"− and/or C_2H"−/C_4H"−, in agreement with chemical model predictions. At higher ionospheric altitudes, detections at 73–74 u q"−"1 could be attributed to the further carbon chain anions C_5N"−/C_6H"− but at lower altitudes and during further encounters extend over a higher mass/charge range. This, as well as further intermediary anions detected at >100 u, provide the first evidence for efficient anion chemistry in space involving structures other than linear chains. Furthermore, at altitudes below <1100 km, the low-mass anions (<150 u q"−"1) were found to deplete at a rate proportional to the growth of the larger molecules, a correlation that indicates the anions are tightly coupled to the growth process. This study adds Titan to an increasing list of astrophysical environments where chain anions have been observed and shows that anion chemistry plays a role in the formation of complex organics within a planetary atmosphere as well as in the interstellar medium.

  1. Gas Sorption, Diffusion, and Permeation in Nafion

    KAUST Repository

    Mukaddam, Mohsin Ahmed; Litwiller, Eric; Pinnau, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The gas permeability of dry Nafion films was determined at 2 atm and 35 °C for He, H2, N2, O2, CO2, CH4, C2H6, and C3H8. In addition, gas sorption isotherms were determined by gravimetric and barometric techniques as a function of pressure up to 20

  2. Development of a microminiature sorption cooler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, Johannes; Holland, Harry; ter Brake, Marcel; Rogalla, Horst; Wade, Larry

    1997-01-01

    The development of a microcooler for operations below 80 K, for low temperature electronic devices requiring small cooling powers of the order of 10 mW is described. A sorption compressor combined with Joule-Thomson (JT) expansion was selected for miniaturization. The advantage of the system is

  3. Sorption of radiocalcium on human hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakovic, M.; Pilecka, N.

    1987-01-01

    The sorption of 45 Ca on hair from a 45 CaCl 2 solution (2.5x10 -3 mol l -1 ) was studied. The calcium amounts sorbed in 1 min to 5 h range between 0.8 and 7.2% with respect to the originally present calcium in hair. (author) 3 refs

  4. Sorption of methanol in alkali exchange zeolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rep, M.; Rep, M.; Corma, Avelino; Palomares, A.E.; Palomares gimeno, A.E.; van Ommen, J.G.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Lercher, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    Metal cation methanol sorption complexes in MFI (ZSM5), MOR and X have been studied by in situ i.r. spectroscopy in order to understand the nature of interactions of methanol in the molecular sieve pores. The results show that (a) a freely vibrating hydroxy and methyl group of methanol exist on

  5. Radionuclide sorption database for Swiss safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, I.G.; Hadermann, J.

    1984-10-01

    Recommended sorption data for use in transport models for a Swiss High-Level Waste repository are presented. The models used in 'Project Gewaehr 1985' assume linear sorption isotherms and require elemental partition coefficient (Kd) data. On the basis of a literature search 'realistic' Kd data for 22 elements have been selected for weathered crystalline rock and sediments in contact with a reducing groundwater and also sediments with a less reducing groundwater. In an appendix sorption data for 28 elements on bentonite backfill are given. These data are supplemented with 'conservative' estimates taken to represent minimum reasonable values. Available data are discussed for each element clearly exhibiting (i) the large gaps in knowledge, (ii) their unbalanced distribution between different elements and, hence, (iii) the need for further experiments in the laboratory, the field and analogue studies. An overview of the theoretical concepts of sorption, experimental methodology and data interpretation is given in order to put the values into context. General problem areas are identified. (Auth.)

  6. Anionic sorbents for arsenic and technetium species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucero, Daniel A.; Moore, Robert Charles; Bontchev, Ranko Panayotov; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Zhao, Hongting; Salas, Fred Manuel; Holt, Kathleen Caroline

    2003-01-01

    Two sorbents, zirconium coated zeolite and magnesium hydroxide, were tested for their effectiveness in removing arsenic from Albuquerque municipal water. Results for the zirconium coated zeolite indicate that phosphate present in the water interfered with the sorption of arsenic. Additionally, there was a large quantity of iron and copper present in the water, corrosion products from the piping system, which may have interfered with the uptake of arsenic by the sorbent. Magnesium hydroxide has also been proven to be a strong sorbent for arsenic as well as other metals. Carbonate, present in water, has been shown to interfere with the sorption of arsenic by reacting with the magnesium hydroxide to form magnesium carbonate. The reaction mechanism was investigated by FT-IR and shows that hydrogen bonding between an oxygen on the arsenic species and a hydrogen on the Mg(OH)2 is most likely the mechanism of sorption. This was also confirmed by RAMAN spectroscopy and XRD. Technetium exists in multiple oxidation states (IV and VII) and is easily oxidized from the relatively insoluble Tc(IV) form to the highly water soluble and mobile Tc(VII) form. The two oxidation states exhibit different sorption characteristics. Tc(VII) does not sorb to most materials whereas Tc(IV) will strongly sorb to many materials. Therefore, it was determined that it is necessary to first reduce the Tc (using SnCl2) before sorption to stabilize Tc in the environment. Additionally, the effect of carbonate and phosphate on the sorption of technetium by hydroxyapatite was studied and indicated that both have a significant effect on reducing Tc sorption

  7. Test procedure for anion exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    Plutonium from stored nitrate solutions will be sorbed onto anion exchange resins and converted to storable plutonium dioxide. Useful information will be simultaneously gained on the thermal stability and ion exchange capacity of four commercially available anion exchange resins over several years and under severe degradative conditions. This information will prove useful in predicting the safe and efficient lifetimes of these resins

  8. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N. Reinhoudt

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selectiverecognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure andselectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometricion sensing are emphasised, along with their potential applications in optical sensors or optodes.

  9. Neutral anion receptors: design and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonisse, M.M.G.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    After the development of synthetic cation receptors in the late 1960s, only in the past decade has work started on the development of synthetic neutral anion receptors. Combination and preorganization of different anion binding groups, like amides, urea moieties, or Lewis acidic metal centers lead

  10. Americium Separations from High-Salt Solutions Using Anion Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, Mary E.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Stark, Peter C.; Chamberlin, Rebecca M.; Bartsch, Richard A.; Zhang, Z.Y.; Zhao, W.

    2001-01-01

    The aging of the US nuclear stockpile presents a number of challenges, including the increasing radioactivity of plutonium residues due to the ingrowth of 241 Am from the β-decay of 241 Pu. We investigated parameters that affect the sorption of Am onto anion-exchange resins from concentrated effluents derived from nitric acid processing of plutonium residues. These postevaporator wastes are nearly saturated solutions of acidic nitrate salts, and americium removal is complicated by physical factors, such as solution viscosity and particulates, as well as by the presence of large quantities of competing metals and acid. Single- and double-contact batch distribution coefficients for americium and neodymium from simple and complex surrogate solutions are presented. Varied parameters include the nitrate salt concentration and composition and the nitric acid concentration. We find that under these extremely concentrated conditions, Am(III) removal efficiencies can surpass 50% per contact. Distribution coefficients for both neodymium and americium are insensitive to solution acidity and appear to be driven primarily by low water activities of the solutions

  11. Anionic silicate organic frameworks constructed from hexacoordinate silicon centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeser, Jérôme; Prill, Dragica; Bojdys, Michael J.; Fayon, Pierre; Trewin, Abbie; Fitch, Andrew N.; Schmidt, Martin U.; Thomas, Arne

    2017-10-01

    Crystalline frameworks composed of hexacoordinate silicon species have thus far only been observed in a few high pressure silicate phases. By implementing reversible Si-O chemistry for the crystallization of covalent organic frameworks, we demonstrate the simple one-pot synthesis of silicate organic frameworks based on octahedral dianionic SiO6 building units. Clear evidence of the hexacoordinate environment around the silicon atoms is given by 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. Characterization by high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction, density functional theory calculation and analysis of the pair-distribution function showed that those anionic frameworks—M2[Si(C16H10O4)1.5], where M = Li, Na, K and C16H10O4 is 9,10-dimethylanthracene-2,3,6,7-tetraolate—crystallize as two-dimensional hexagonal layers stabilized in a fully eclipsed stacking arrangement with pronounced disorder in the stacking direction. Permanent microporosity with high surface area (up to 1,276 m2 g-1) was evidenced by gas-sorption measurements. The negatively charged backbone balanced with extra-framework cations and the permanent microporosity are characteristics that are shared with zeolites.

  12. Radionuclide sorption on crushed and intact granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, Tryggve E.; Locklund, Birgitta

    1989-05-01

    The specific surface areas and distribution ratios for sorption of 85 Sr, 137 Cs and 152 Eu were measured for crushed and intact granite rock. The experimental data can be accommodated by a sorption model encompassing sorption on outer and inner surface. It is clearly demonstrated that the time required to obtain reliable Kd-values for the sorption of strongly sorbing radionuclides like 152 Eu is very long due to solution depletion and slow diffusion into the rock. A combination of surface area measurements and batch sorption with small particles may therefore be preferable when studying strongly sorbing nuclides. (authors) (17 figs., 6 tabs.)

  13. Sorption and migration of neptunium in porous sedimentary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tadao; Mukai, Masayuki; Nakayama, Shinichi

    2005-01-01

    Column migration experiments of neptunium were conducted for porous sedimentary materials: coastal sand, tuffaceous sand, ando soil, reddish soil, yellowish soil and loess, and migration behavior, sorption mechanisms and chemical formation of Np were investigated. The migration behavior of Np in each material was much different each other, due to chemical formation in solution and/or sorption mechanism of Np. Mathematical models of different concepts were applied to the experimental results to interpret the sorption mechanism and the migration behavior. It can be concluded that both of instantaneous equilibrium sorption and sorption-desorption kinetics have to be considered to model the Np migration in sedimentary materials. (author)

  14. Creating molecular macrocycles for anion recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar H. Flood

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The creation and functionality of new classes of macrocycles that are shape persistent and can bind anions is described. The genesis of triazolophane macrocycles emerges out of activity surrounding 1,2,3-triazoles made using click chemistry; and the same triazoles are responsible for anion capture. Mistakes made and lessons learnt in anion recognition provide deeper understanding that, together with theory, now provides for computer-aided receptor design. The lessons are acted upon in the creation of two new macrocycles. First, cyanostars are larger and like to capture large anions. Second is tricarb, which also favors large anions but shows a propensity to self-assemble in an orderly and stable manner, laying a foundation for future designs of hierarchical nanostructures.

  15. Anion channels: master switches of stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelfsema, M Rob G; Hedrich, Rainer; Geiger, Dietmar

    2012-04-01

    During stress, plant cells activate anion channels and trigger the release of anions across the plasma membrane. Recently, two new gene families have been identified that encode major groups of anion channels. The SLAC/SLAH channels are characterized by slow voltage-dependent activation (S-type), whereas ALMT genes encode rapid-activating channels (R-type). Both S- and R-type channels are stimulated in guard cells by the stress hormone ABA, which leads to stomatal closure. Besides their role in ABA-dependent stomatal movement, anion channels are also activated by biotic stress factors such as microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). Given that anion channels occur throughout the plant kingdom, they are likely to serve a general function as master switches of stress responses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Corrigendum to “Sorption/desorption of non-hydrophobic and ionisable pharmaceutical and personal care products from reclaimed water onto/from a natural sediment” Sci Total Environ 472 (2014) 273–281

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Hernández, Virtudes, E-mail: virtudes.martinez@imdea.org [IMDEA Agua, Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies in Water, Parque Científico Tecnológico de la Universidad de Alcalá, 28805 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Meffe, Raffaella; Herrera, Sonia [IMDEA Agua, Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies in Water, Parque Científico Tecnológico de la Universidad de Alcalá, 28805 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Arranz, Elena [University of Alcalá, Geography and Geology Department, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Bustamante, Irene de [IMDEA Agua, Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies in Water, Parque Científico Tecnológico de la Universidad de Alcalá, 28805 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); University of Alcalá, Geography and Geology Department, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, the sorption of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) (acetaminophen, atenolol, carbamazepine, caffeine, naproxen and sulphamethoxazole) onto the natural organic matter (NOM) and the inorganic surfaces of a natural sandy loam sediment was quantified separately. The quantification was based on the PPCP charge, their degree of ionisation, their octanol-water partitioning coefficient (K{sub OW}) and the sediment organic carbon fraction (ƒ{sub OC}). PPCP desorption from the sediment was examined under conditions of infiltrating water containing a high concentration of inorganic ions (mimicking infiltrating reclaimed water), and a low concentration (and smaller diversity) of inorganic ions (mimicking rainwater infiltration). Batch tests were performed using a sediment/water ratio of 1:4 and a PPCP initial concentration ranging from 1 to 100 μg L{sup −1}. The results showed the type and degree of PPCP ionisation to strongly influence the sorption of these compounds onto the sediment. The sorption of cationic species onto the sediment was higher than that of anionic species and mostly reversible; the sorption of neutral species was negligible with the exception of caffeine. The anionic species sorbed less onto the sediment, but also desorbed less easily. Most of the compounds showed a sorption that was highly influenced by interaction with mineral surfaces. The presence of inorganic ions had no impact on the desorption of the PPCPs from the sediment. According to the calculated percentages of removal, the mobility followed the order: carbamazepine > acetaminophen > naproxen > atenolol > sulphamethoxazole > caffeine.

  17. Corrigendum to “Sorption/desorption of non-hydrophobic and ionisable pharmaceutical and personal care products from reclaimed water onto/from a natural sediment” Sci Total Environ 472 (2014) 273–281

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Hernández, Virtudes; Meffe, Raffaella; Herrera, Sonia; Arranz, Elena; Bustamante, Irene de

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the sorption of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) (acetaminophen, atenolol, carbamazepine, caffeine, naproxen and sulphamethoxazole) onto the natural organic matter (NOM) and the inorganic surfaces of a natural sandy loam sediment was quantified separately. The quantification was based on the PPCP charge, their degree of ionisation, their octanol-water partitioning coefficient (K OW ) and the sediment organic carbon fraction (ƒ OC ). PPCP desorption from the sediment was examined under conditions of infiltrating water containing a high concentration of inorganic ions (mimicking infiltrating reclaimed water), and a low concentration (and smaller diversity) of inorganic ions (mimicking rainwater infiltration). Batch tests were performed using a sediment/water ratio of 1:4 and a PPCP initial concentration ranging from 1 to 100 μg L −1 . The results showed the type and degree of PPCP ionisation to strongly influence the sorption of these compounds onto the sediment. The sorption of cationic species onto the sediment was higher than that of anionic species and mostly reversible; the sorption of neutral species was negligible with the exception of caffeine. The anionic species sorbed less onto the sediment, but also desorbed less easily. Most of the compounds showed a sorption that was highly influenced by interaction with mineral surfaces. The presence of inorganic ions had no impact on the desorption of the PPCPs from the sediment. According to the calculated percentages of removal, the mobility followed the order: carbamazepine > acetaminophen > naproxen > atenolol > sulphamethoxazole > caffeine

  18. Demonstrate use of capillary electrophoresis low level transient of anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moum, Kari-Lye; Solheim, Torill; McElrath, Joel; Frattini, Paul

    2012-09-01

    Capillary Electrophoresis (CE) is a well-known analytical method capable of rapid detection of very low concentration of cations and anionic species such as chloride, sulfate and nitrate. These anions are of crucial importance in reducing the potential of stainless steel components to undergo stress corrosion cracking. Currently, Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) use Ion Chromatography (IC) as the analytical technique to achieve the required detection levels of ionic species. At the Halden Reactor Project (HRP) IC was replaced by CE in 1996, and since then HRP has gained nearly 20 years of operational experience. During the last 15 years, EPRI has done research on the CE technique and has achieved extensive experience in this area. EPRI has demonstrated detection levels at ppt and sub-ppb levels. This paper presents the ability of the CE technique to follow low level transients of anions in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) coolant. A transient caused by approx. 10 ppb chloride and sulfate was simulated in an experimental circuit simulating BWR conditions. A series of grab samples were taken and analysed using HRPs CE (Agilent G1600). (authors)

  19. Sorption behaviour of perfluoroalkyl substances in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinovic, Jelena; Lacorte, Silvia; Vidal, Miquel; Rigol, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The sorption behaviour of three perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS), was studied in six soils with contrasting characteristics, especially in the organic carbon content. Sorption isotherms were obtained by equilibrating the soil samples with 0.01 mol L(-1) CaCl2 solutions spiked with increasing concentrations of the target PFAS. The sorption reversibility of PFASs was also tested for some of the samples. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify the target PFASs in the solutions. Both the Freundlich and linear models were appropriate to describe the sorption behaviour of PFASs in soils, and enabled us to derive solid-liquid distribution coefficients (Kd) for each compound in each soil. Kd values increased from 19 to 295 mL g(-1) for PFOS, from 2.2 to 38 mL g(-1) for PFOA and from 0.4 to 6.8 mL g(-1) for PFBS, and were positively correlated with the organic carbon content of the soil. KOC values obtained from the correlations were 710, 96 and 17 mL g(-1) for PFOS, PFOA and PFBS, respectively. Whereas Kd values decreased in the sequence PFOS>PFOA>PFBS, desorption yields were lower than 13% for PFOS, from 24 to 58% for PFOA, and from 32 to 60% for PFBS. This shows that the physicochemical characteristics of PFASs, basically their hydrophobicity, controlled their sorption behaviour in soils, with PFOS being the most irreversibly sorbed PFAS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products

  1. Development of a new densimeter for the combined investigation of dew-point densities and sorption phenomena of fluid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Katharina; Kleinrahm, Reiner; McLinden, Mark O.; Richter, Markus

    2017-12-01

    For the determination of dew-point densities and pressures of fluid mixtures, a new densimeter has been developed. The new apparatus is based on the well-established two-sinker density measurement principle with the additional capability of quantifying sorption effects. In the vicinity of the dew line, such effects cause a change in composition of the gas mixture under study, which can significantly distort accurate density measurements. The new experimental technique enables the accurate measurement of dew-point densities and pressures and the quantification of sorption effects at the same time.

  2. SORPTION OF Au(III BY Saccharomyces cerevisiae BIOMASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaria Amaria

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Au(III sorption by S. cerevisiae biomass extracted from beer waste industry was investigated. Experimentally, the sorption was conducted in batch method. This research involved five steps: 1 identification the functional groups present in the S. cerevisiae biomass by infrared spectroscopic technique, 2 determination of optimum pH, 3 determination of the sorption capacity and energy, 4 determination of the sorption type by conducting desorption of sorbed Au(III using specific eluents having different desorption capacity such as H2O (van der Waals, KNO3 (ion exchange, HNO3 (hydrogen bond, and tiourea (coordination bond, 5 determination of effective eluents in Au(III desorption by partial desorption of sorbed Au(III using thiourea, NaCN and KI. The remaining Au(III concentrations in filtrate were analyzed using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The results showed that: 1 Functional groups of S. cerevisiae biomass that involved in the sorption processes were hydroxyl (-OH, carboxylate (-COO- and amine (-NH2, 2 maximum sorption was occurred at pH 4, equal to 98.19% of total sorption, 3 The sorption capacity of biomass was 133.33 mg/g (6.7682E-04 mol/g and was involved sorption energy 23.03 kJ mol-1, 4 Sorption type was dominated by coordination bond, 5 NaCN was effective eluent to strip Au(III close to 100%.   Keywords: sorption, desorption, S. cerevisiae biomass, Au(III

  3. Mobile Test Capabilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electrical Power Mobile Test capabilities are utilized to conduct electrical power quality testing on aircraft and helicopters. This capability allows that the...

  4. Anion Gap Blood Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/aniongapbloodtest.html Anion Gap Blood Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is an Anion Gap Blood Test? An anion gap blood test is a way ...

  5. Estimation of biotransformation and sorption of emerging organic compounds (EOCs) during artificial recharge through a reactive barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valhondo, C.; Martinez-Landa, L.; Carrera, J.; Hidalgo, J. J.; Ayora, C.

    2016-12-01

    The reuse of lesser quality water such as effluents from wastewater treatment plants or effluent-receiving water bodies has been promoted due to the water shortages affecting many regions of the world. Artificial recharge through infiltration basins is known to improve several water quality parameters including the attenuation of emerging organic compounds (EOCs). Many of these contaminants exhibit redox dependent biotransformation because the redox state is one of the factors controlling microbial community development. Together with biotransformation, sorption also affects the behavior of EOCs in their passage through the soil. We studied EOCs attenuation in an infiltration system is located in Sant Vicenç dells Horts on the Llobregat delta (Barcelona, Spain), where the local water agency has an artificial recharge pilot project . The Llobregat river water used for the artificial recharge is affected by treatment plant effluents which contain EOCs. A reactive barrier consisting of vegetable compost, clay, and iron oxide was installed in the bottom of the infiltration basin to enhance biotransformation and sorption of EOCs. The barrier releases dissolved organic carbon, which favors the development of a broad range of redox environments, and supplies neutral, cationic, and anionic surfaces to favor sorption of different types of contaminants. Results were excellent, but quantitative evaluation of the EOCs attenuation requires knowledge of the residence time distribution of infiltrated water. A tracer test was performed by adding tracers to the infiltration water and interpreting the breakthrough curves at diverse monitoring points with a 2D multilayer numerical model. The calibrated model quantify degradation, as a first order law, and sorption through a linear distribution coefficient for ten selected EOCs. Results indicate higher degradation rates and sorption coefficients in the reactive barrier than in the rest of the aquifer for nine and eight of the ten

  6. Effect of the modification of a natural mexican zeolite in the sorption of cadmium and 4-chloro phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes M, R.

    2007-01-01

    Clinoptilolite type zeolite is a material of relative abundance in Mexico, which possess ion exchange properties and it can be used in the removal of metal ions from polluted waters. The external surface of zeolites can be modified with cationic surfactants. This modification could have a negative effect on the removal of metal ions and provides to the material the capacity to adsorb phenolic compounds. For this reason, it is important to know the capability of the modified material on the sorption of metal ions and phenolic compounds, simultaneously. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the external surface modification with surfactant of a Mexican zeolite over its sorption capacity of cadmium and 4-chloro phenol, in batch and column systems. To accomplish that, a clinoptilolite type zeolitic rock from a deposit located in the state of Sonora, Mexico, was used. It was ground, sieved and characterized with different techniques; and its external surface area was modified with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA-Br). A grain size fraction was selected to carry out sorption kinetics and equilibrium experiments, as well as packed column tests with zeolitic material and solutions of cadmium and 4-chloro phenol. There are different models proposed in literature that are used to describe sorption kinetics and equilibrium. In this work, the sorption experimental results were adjusted to some of these models to identify controlling mechanisms on the kinetics and equilibrium of the studied systems. The results showed that the cadmium adsorption on natural and modified zeolite was similar in batch systems. For the case of 4-chloro phenol sorption, it was observed that natural zeolite does not retain this compound, while in modified zeolite the sorption is better than other comparable materials. The results also showed that for the case of cadmium sorption, the mechanism involved was ion exchange; while for sorption of 4-chloro phenol, a partition mechanism

  7. The effect of interlayer anion on the reactivity of Mg-Al layered double hydroxides: improving and extending the customization capacity of anionic clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Ricardo; Bruna, Felipe; de Pauli, Carlos P; Ulibarri, M Ángeles; Giacomelli, Carla E

    2011-07-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) reactivity and interfacial behavior are closely interconnected and control particle properties relevant to the wide range of these solids' applications. Despite their importance, their relationship has been hardly described. In this work, chloride and dodecylsulfate (DDS(-)) intercalated LDHs are studied combining experimental data (electrophoretic mobility and contact angle measurements, hydroxyl and organic compounds uptake) and a simple mathematical model that includes anion-binding and acid-base reactions. This approach evidences the anion effect on LDHs interfacial behavior, reflected in the opposite particle charge and the different surface hydrophobic/hydrophilic character. LDHs reactivity are also determined by the interlayer composition, as demonstrated by the cation uptake capability of the DDS(-) intercalated sample. Consequently, the interlayer anion modifies the LDHs interfacial properties and reactivity, which in turn extends the customization capacity of these solids. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Anion-π Catalysts with Axial Chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Matile, Stefan

    2017-09-04

    The idea of anion-π catalysis is to stabilize anionic transition states by anion-π interactions on aromatic surfaces. For asymmetric anion-π catalysis, π-acidic surfaces have been surrounded with stereogenic centers. This manuscript introduces the first anion-π catalysts that operate with axial chirality. Bifunctional catalysts with tertiary amine bases next to π-acidic naphthalenediimide planes are equipped with a bulky aromatic substituent in the imide position to produce separable atropisomers. The addition of malonic acid half thioesters to enolate acceptors is used for evaluation. In the presence of a chiral axis, the selective acceleration of the disfavored but relevant enolate addition was much better than with point chirality, and enantioselectivity could be observed for the first time for this reaction with small-molecule anion-π catalysts. Enantioselectivity increased with the π acidity of the π surface, whereas the addition of stereogenic centers around the aromatic plane did not cause further improvements. These results identify axial chirality of the active aromatic plane generated by atropisomerism as an attractive strategy for asymmetric anion-π catalysis. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Defluoridation by Bacteriogenic Iron Oxides: Sorption Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, K.; Ferris, F.

    2009-05-01

    At concentrations above 1 mg/L, fluoride in drinking water can lead to dental and skeletal fluorosis, a disease that causes mottling of the teeth, calcification of ligaments, crippling bone deformities and many other physiological disorders that can, ultimately, lead to death. Conservative estimates are that fluorosis afflicts tens of millions of people worldwide. As there is no treatment for fluorosis, prevention is the only means of controlling the disease. While numerous defluoridation techniques have been explored, no single method has been found to be both effective and inexpensive enough to implement widely. Our research began in India, with a large-scale geochemical study of the groundwater in a fluoride-contaminated region of Orissa. Having developed a better understanding of the geochemical relationships that exist between fluoride and other parameters present in an affected area, as well as the complex relationships that arise among those parameters that can impact the presence of fluoride, we began investigating certain remediation scenarios involving iron oxides. A common approach to remediation involves the partitioning of fluoride from groundwater by sorption onto a variety of materials, one of the most effective of which is iron oxide whose surface area acts as a scavenger for fluoride. In the presence of iron oxidizing bacteria, the oxidation rate of iron has been shown to be ˜6 times greater than in their absence; fluoride should, therefore, be removed from an aqueous environment by bacteriogenic iron oxides (BIOS) much more quickly than by abiotic iron oxides. Most recently, sorption studies have been conducted using both BIOS and synthetic hydrous ferric oxides in order to compare the behavior between biotic and abiotic sorbents. These studies have provided sorption isotherms that allow comparison of fluoride removed by sorption to BIOS versus synthetic iron oxides. Sorption affinity constants have also been determined, which allow for the

  10. Capabilities for Strategic Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Distel, Andreas Philipp

    This dissertation explores capabilities that enable firms to strategically adapt to environmental changes and preserve competitiveness over time – often referred to as dynamic capabilities. While dynamic capabilities being a popular research domain, too little is known about what these capabiliti...

  11. Sorption of plutonium and curium on ion exchange resins in mixed aqueous organic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidvogel, N.; Reitsamer, G.; Grass, F.

    1974-12-01

    The sorption of the sulfate and nitrate-complexes of the actinides Pu(III), Pu(IV), Pu(VI), Am(III) and Om(III) on the ion-exchange-resins Dowex 1X8 and Dowex 50 WX8 is investigated. The strong sorbability of these actinide ions in solvents with high content of alcohol is explained by the existence of anionic complexes like Pu(III) (SO 4 ) 2 - , Pu(IV) (SO 4 ) 3 2 - , Pu(VI)O 2 (SO 4 ) 2 2 - , Am(SO 4 ) 2 - respectively Am(NO 3 ) 4 - and Om(NO 3 ) 4 - . The taking of autoradiographs from the thin-layer chromatograms by the aid of a special device and the evaluation of the autoradiographs by a particular photodensitometer are described. The measurement of the radioactivity of the α-emitting nuclides Pu 239, Am 241 and Om 242 are done by liquid-scintillation spectrometry. (author)

  12. Permeability, porosity, dispersion-, diffusion-, and sorption characteristics of chalk samples from Erslev, Mors, Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsen, L.; Batsberg, W.; Skytte Jensen, B.; Bo, P.

    1981-08-01

    A series of chalk samples from the cretaceous formation overlying the Erslev salt dome have been studied in order to establish permeabilities, porosities, dispersion-, diffusion-, and sorption characteristics of the chalk, Predominantly the investigations have been carried out by application of a liquid chromatographic technique. The chalk was found to be porous (epsilon approximately 0.4), however, of rather low permeability (k approximately 10 -7 cm/sec). It was found that the material exhibits a retarding effect on the migration of cationic species as Cs + , Sr 2+ , Co 2+ , and Eu 3+ , whereas anionic species as Cl - and TcO - 4 move with the water front. The geochemical implications are discussed. (author)

  13. Isotherm, kinetic, and thermodynamic study of ciprofloxacin sorption on sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutavdžić Pavlović, Dragana; Ćurković, Lidija; Grčić, Ivana; Šimić, Iva; Župan, Josip

    2017-04-01

    In this study, equilibrium isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamics of ciprofloxacin on seven sediments in a batch sorption process were examined. The effects of contact time, initial ciprofloxacin concentration, temperature and ionic strength on the sorption process were studied. The K d parameter from linear sorption model was determined by linear regression analysis, while the Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) sorption models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms by linear and nonlinear methods. The estimated K d values varied from 171 to 37,347 mL/g. The obtained values of E (free energy estimated from D-R isotherm model) were between 3.51 and 8.64 kJ/mol, which indicated a physical nature of ciprofloxacin sorption on studied sediments. According to obtained n values as measure of intensity of sorption estimate from Freundlich isotherm model (from 0.69 to 1.442), ciprofloxacin sorption on sediments can be categorized from poor to moderately difficult sorption characteristics. Kinetics data were best fitted by the pseudo-second-order model (R 2  > 0.999). Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) were calculated to estimate the nature of ciprofloxacin sorption. Results suggested that sorption on sediments was a spontaneous exothermic process.

  14. Testosterone sorption and desorption: Effects of soil particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yong, E-mail: yqi01@unomaha.edu [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Zhang, Tian C. [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Ren, Yongzheng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Smaller soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates. • The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand. • Small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. • Colloids (clays) have high potential to facilitate the transport of hormones in soil–water environments. - Abstract: Soils contain a wide range of particles of different diameters with different mobility during rainfall events. Effects of soil particles on sorption and desorption behaviors of steroid hormones have not been investigated. In this study, wet sieve washing and repeated sedimentation methods were used to fractionate the soils into five ranges. The sorption and desorption properties and related mechanisms of testosterone in batch reactors filled with fractionated soil particles were evaluated. Results of sorption and desorption kinetics indicate that small soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates than that of big ones. Thermodynamic results show the sorption processes are spontaneous and exothermal. The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand, depending mainly on specific surface area and surface functional groups. The urea control test shows that hydrogen bonding contributes to testosterone sorption onto clay and silt but not on sand. Desorption tests indicate sorption is 36–65% irreversible from clay to sand. Clays have highest desorption hysteresis among these five soil fractions, indicating small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. The results provide indirect evidence on the colloid (clay)-facilitated transport of hormones (micro-pollutants) in soil environments.

  15. Oskarshamn site investigation. Batch experiments of I, Cs, Sr, Ni, Eu, U and Np sorption onto soil from the Laxemar area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holgersson, Stellan (Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry, Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2009-04-15

    Soil and groundwater samples from the Laxemar area have been collected and characterised, as have previously been reported. Batch experiments with sorption of radiotracers of I, Cs, Sr, Ni, Eu, U and Np have been made with eight selected soil samples and one natural groundwater. The solid/liquid ratio in the experiments was 1/48 and sampling were made at 3 hours, 1 day, 7 days, 14 days, 40 days and finally 130 days. Phase separation was made by centrifugation field > 20 kG. Experiments were made in an inert-gas glove-box (O{sub 2} < 1 ppm). The same type of batch sorption experiments was also made with a synthetic groundwater. The recipe for the synthetic groundwater was based on the analyses of the natural groundwater, except for dissolved organic matter, which were omitted. A separate series of supporting experiments, without radionuclide tracers, were made for the measurement of the evolution of pH and Eh. Another series of supporting experiments were made for a number of chemical analyses, where samples were taken at 14 and 130 days only: anion and cation chromatography, alkalinity titrations, total organic carbon (TOC), inorganic carbon, pH and Eh measurements, ICP-MS and -OES analyses of background radiotracer elements and a number of other elements. The general trend of the batch sorption results show specific surface corrected distribution coefficients, R{sub a} (m) that increase with time, but the trend is a levelling out to limiting values. Iodine sorption is generally below the lower detection limit and very few data could be collected for this tracer. Eu generally shows the strongest sorption and some measurements at the later samplings are above the upper detection limit. Results from the batch experiments with peat and natural groundwater at 130 days give R{sub a} values that ranges from 5x10-5 (Sr) to 3x10-4 m (Cs). The order of increasing sorption is: Sr, Ni, Np, Eu, U and Cs. For synthetic groundwater Eu and U sorption is stronger, at least

  16. Effect of natural organic materials on cadmium and neptunium sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, K.S.; Triay, I.R.

    1994-01-01

    In a batch sorption study of the effect of naturally occurring organic materials on the sorption of cadmium and neptunium on oxides and tuff surfaces, the model sorbents were synthetic goethite, boehmite, amorphous silicon oxides, and a crushed tuff material from Yucca Mountain, Nevada. An amino acid, 3-(3,4-dihydroxypheny)-DL-alanine (DOPA), and an aquatic-originated fulvic material, Nordic aquatic fulvic acid (NAFA), were used as model organic chemicals. Sorption isotherm results showed that DOPA sorption followed the order aluminum oxide > iron oxide > silicon oxide and that the amount of DOAP sorption for a given sorbent increased as the solution pH was raised. The sorption of cadmium and neptunium on the iron oxide was about ten times higher than that on the aluminum oxide. The sorption of cadmium and neptunium on natural tuff material was much lower than that on aluminum and iron oxides. The sorption of cadmium on iron and aluminum oxides was found to be influenced by the presence of DOPA, and increasing the amount of DOPA coating resulted in higher cadmium sorption on aluminum oxide. However, for iron oxide, cadmium sorption decreased with increasing DOPA concentration. The presence of the model organic materials DOPA and NAFA did not affect the sorption of neptunium on tuff material or on the iron and aluminum oxides. Spectroscopic results indicate that cadmium complexes strongly with DOPA. Therefore, the effect of the organic material, DOPA, on the cadmium sorption is readily observed. However, neptunium is possibly complexed weakly with organic material. Thus, DOPA and NAFA have little effect on neptunium sorption on all sorbents selected for study

  17. Dynamic capabilities, Marketing Capability and Organizational Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Roseli Wünsch Takahashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study is to investigate the influence of dynamic capabilities on organizational performance and the role of marketing capabilities as a mediator in this relationship in the context of private HEIs in Brazil. As a research method we carried out a survey with 316 IES and data analysis was operationalized with the technique of structural equation modeling. The results indicate that the dynamic capabilities have influence on organizational performance only when mediated by marketing ability. The marketing capability has an important role in the survival, growth and renewal on educational services offerings for HEIs in private sector, and consequently in organizational performance. It is also demonstrated that mediated relationship is more intense for HEI with up to 3,000 students and other organizational profile variables such as amount of courses, the constitution, the type of institution and type of education do not significantly alter the results.

  18. Sorption of actinides in granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, B

    1982-11-01

    The sorption of americium (III), neptunium(V) and plutonium on geologic media under oxic conditions has been measured by a batch technique. The aqueous phase was a synthetic groundwater or 4M NaCl solution. The solid phase was a pure mineral, representative of igneous rocks, or granite. Altogether 40 different minerals and rocks were used. The effects of pH and the ionic strength of the aqueous phase as well as of the cation exchange capacity and the surface/mass ratio of the solid sorbent are discussed. Empirical equations giving the distribution coefficient as a function of pH in the environmental pH-range 7-9 are suggested. Some observations and conclusions concerning sorption mechanisms are given. (author)

  19. Sorption analyses in materials science: selected oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Condon, J.B.; Eager, M.H.; Jones, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    Physical adsorption studies have been shown to be extremely valuable in studying the chemistry and structure of dispersed materials. Many processes rely on the access to the large amount of surface made available by the high degree of dispersion. Conversely, there are many applications where consolidation of the dispersed solids is required. Several systems (silica gel, alumina catalysts, mineralogic alumino-silicates, and yttrium oxide plasters) have been studied to show the type and amount of chemical and structural information that can be obtained. Some review of current theories is given and additional concepts are developed based on statistical and thermodynamic arguments. The results are applied to sorption data to show that detailed sorption analyses are extremely useful and can provide valuable information that is difficult to obtain by any other means. Considerable emphasis has been placed on data analyses and interpretation of a nonclassical nature to show the potential of such studies that is often not recognized nor utilized

  20. Sorption of zinc on human teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helal, A.; Amin, H.; Alian, G.

    1997-01-01

    Zinc containing dental amalgams are sometimes used as fillings by dentists. The freshly mixed mass of the amalgam alloy and liquid mercury packed or condensed into a prepared tooth cavity. Zinc has been included in amalgams alloys up to 2% as an aid in manufacturing by helping to produce clean sound castings of the ingots. Although such restorations have a relatively long service life, they are subject to corrosion and galvanic action, thus releasing metallic products into the oral environment. The aim of this paper is to investigate the uptake (sorption) of Zinc ionic species on human teeth using the radioactive tracer technique. For this purpose the isotope Zn-65 produced from pile-irradiation of zinc metal was used. The various liquids studied were drinking water (tap water), tea, coffee, red tea and chicken soup. Sorption was studied through immersion of a single human tooth (extracted) in each of these liquids

  1. Sorption of 60 Co on inorganic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados C, F.; Bulbulian G, S.; Mardel V, B.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of sorption of the 60 Co in aqueous solution under static conditions to different values of pH of the aqueous solution (1, 3, 5, 7, and 10) on MgO, MnO 2 , SnO, TiO 2 , activated carbon and calcinate hydrotalcite was investigated. It was found that the best sorbents of the 60 Co was the MnO 2 , activated carbon and TiO 2 whose sorption was incremented when increasing the pH value of the aqueous solutions, in the one case of the hydrated oxides, the 60 Co interacted with the electrically charged surface of the sorbents that depends on the pH of the solution and of the point of zero charge (zpc) of the sorbent. (Author)

  2. Uranium sorption on tezontle volcanic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez M, B. E.; Duran B, J. M.; Iturbe G, J. L.; Olguin G, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    It is described a study that demonstrates that hexavalent uranium ions were sorbed by the naturally occurring mineral using a batch technique. This mineral is found in abundant quantities in Mexico. Our study focused on the separation of U Vi from synthetic aqueous systems of both H 2 O-UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O (acid) and H 2 O-Na 4 [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ] (basic). The chemical speciation was performed by using high voltage electrophoresis, and the uranium content was determined by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The quantified U(Vi) sorption by tezontle from acidic and basic systems was 2.72 and 1.68 μmol/g, respectively, and the sorption behavior is discussed considering the surface charge of the tezontle at different ph values based on the point of zero charge characteristic of this material. (Author)

  3. Sorption of phenanthrene on agricultural soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soares, Antonio; Møldrup, Per; Minh, Luong Nhat

    2013-01-01

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) sorption to soil is a key process deciding the transport and fate of PAH, and potential toxic impacts in the soil and groundwater ecosystems, for example in connection with atmospheric PAH deposition on soils. There are numerous studies on PAH sorption in relatively......, 0.25–1-m depth) by the single-point adsorption method. The organic carbon partition coefficient, KOC (liter per kilogram) for topsoils was found generally to fall between the KOC values estimated by the two most frequently used models for PAH partitioning, the Abdul et al. (Hazardous Waste...... & Hazardous Materials 4(3):211–222, 1987) model and Karickhoff et al. (Water Research 13:241–248, 1979) model. A less-recognized model by Karickhoff (Chemosphere 10:833–846, 1981), yielding a KOC of 14,918 L kg−1, closely corresponded to the average measured KOC value for the topsoils, and this model...

  4. Sorption of radionuclides on London clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.A.; Bourke, P.J.; Green, A.; Littleboy, A.K.

    1989-02-01

    Techniques for studying the sorption of radionuclides on London clay have been investigated. This work involved the use of through-diffusion, in-diffusion, high-pressure convection and batch methods to study the sorption of iodide, strontium, caesium and americium. Through-diffusion and high-pressure convection methods were found to be most useful for investigating weakly and moderately sorbing nuclides and give realistic values for sorptivity. The batch technique remains the most practical method of obtaining large quantities of data within a relatively short timescale but gives very high sorptivity values. It is however very useful for intercomparisons of nuclides or geological media. The in-diffusion method requires further refinement for use with strongly sorbing nuclides. Good agreement between through-diffusion and high-pressure convection methods was obtained for the sorptivity of strontium, whilst trends observed for caesium by through-diffusion were confirmed by batch measurements. (author)

  5. Positron Spectroscopy of Nanodiamonds after Hydrogen Sorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila Nikitina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure and defects of nanodiamonds influence the hydrogen sorption capacity. Positronium can be used as a sensor for detecting places with the most efficient capture of hydrogen atoms. Hydrogenation of carbon materials was performed from gas atmosphere. The concentration of hydrogen absorbed by the sample depends on the temperature and pressure. The concentration 1.2 wt % is achieved at the temperature of 243 K and the pressure of 0.6 MPa. The hydrogen saturation of nanodiamonds changes the positron lifetime. Increase of sorption cycle numbers effects the positron lifetime, as well as the parameters of the Doppler broadening of annihilation line. The electron-positron annihilation being a sensitive method, it allows detecting the electron density fluctuation of the carbon material after hydrogen saturation.

  6. Sorption studies of radioelements on geological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, John A.; Yui, Mikazu; Kitamura, Akira

    2007-11-01

    Batch sorption experiments have been carried out to study the sorption of uranium, technetium, curium, neptunium, actinium, protactinium, polonium, americium and plutonium onto bentonite, granodiorite and tuff. Mathematical modelling using the HARPHRQ program and the HATCHES database was carried out to predict the speciation of uranium and technetium in the equilibrated seawater, and neptunium, americium and plutonium in the rock equilibrated water. Review of the literature for thermodynamic data for curium, actinium, protactinium and polonium was carried out. Where sufficient data were available, predictions of the speciation and solubility were made. This report is a summary report of the experimental work conducted by AEA Technology during April 1991-March 1998, and the main results have been presented at Material Research Society Symposium Proceedings and published as proceedings of them. (author)

  7. Synthesis and prospective study of the use of thiophene thiosemicarbazones as signalling scaffolding for the recognition of anions

    OpenAIRE

    Raposo, M. Manuela M.; García-Acosta, Beatriz; Ábalos, Tatiana; Calero, P.; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; Ros-Lis, José Vicente; Soto, Juan

    2010-01-01

    A family of phenyl-thiosemicarbazone dyes have been prepared and their interactions with anions monitorized via UV-Vis, fluorescence and 1H NMR titrations. Additionally quantum chemical calculations and electrochemical studies completed the studies carried out. The phenyl-thiosemicarbazone dyes show a modulation of their hydrogen-bonding and electron-donating capabilities as a function of the chemical groups attached and display two different chromo-fluorogenic responses towards anions in ace...

  8. Sorption behaviour of herbicides in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchini, L.C.; Wiendl, F.M.; Ruegg, E.F.; Instituto Biologico, Sao Paulo

    1988-01-01

    Environmental contamination by herbicides is related with the sorption phenomenon of these compounds in the soils. The behaviour of paraquat, 2,4-D and diuron was studied in soils with different physico-chemical properties, through the Freundlich adsorption and desorption isotherms, using 14 C-radiolabeled herbicides. Results of the range of the adsorption-desorption of each herbicide was related mainly with the chemical characteristics of these compounds. (author) [pt

  9. Phosphate sorption characteristics of European alpine soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaňa, Jiří; Kopáček, Jiří; Camarero, L.; Garcia-Pausas, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 3 (2011), s. 862-870 ISSN 0361-5995 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/09/0567; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB600960907 Grant - others:EU EMERGE(CZ) EVK1-CT-1999-00032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : phosphate sorption * alpine soil s * acidification Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 1.979, year: 2011

  10. Moisture sorption isotherms of dehydrated whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Rimac Brnčić

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Moisture sorption isotherms describe the relation between the moisture content of the dry material (food and relative humidity of the surrounding environment. The data obtained are important in modelling of drying process conditions, packaging and shelf-life stability of food that will provide maximum retaining of aroma, colour and texture as well as nutritive and biological value. The objective of this research was to establish the equilibrium moisture content and water activity, as well as monolayer value of two commercial powdered whey protein isolates before and after tribomechanical micronisation and enzymatic hydrolysis, respectively. At the same time it was necessary to evaluate the best moisture sorption isotherm equation to fit the experimental data. The equilibrium moisture contents in investigated samples were determined using standard gravimetric method at 20 °C. The range of water activities was 0.11 to 0.75. The monolayer moisture content was estimated from sorption data using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET and Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB models. The results have shown that tribomechanically treated whey protein isolates as well as protein hydrolizates had lower monolayer moisture content values as well as higher corresponding water activity. Therefore, in spite of the fact that they have lower moisture content, they can be storage at higher relative humidity compared to untreated samples. BET model gave better fit to experimental sorption data for a water activity range from 0.11-0.54, while GAB model gave the closest fit for a water activity to 0.75.

  11. Moisture sorption isotherms of dehydrated whey proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Suzana Rimac Brnčić; Vesna Lelas; Zoran Herceg; Marija Badanjak

    2010-01-01

    Moisture sorption isotherms describe the relation between the moisture content of the dry material (food) and relative humidity of the surrounding environment. The data obtained are important in modelling of drying process conditions, packaging and shelf-life stability of food that will provide maximum retaining of aroma, colour and texture as well as nutritive and biological value. The objective of this research was to establish the equilibrium moisture content and water activity, as well as...

  12. Sorption studies of caesium by complex hexacyanoferrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, D.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive literature review was carried out on the preparation of complex hexacyanoferrates in a granular form suitable for use in a packed column. The preparation of sodium nickel hexacyanoferrate using a freeze-thaw method was studied in detail and a method developed to produce a consistent and reproducible granular product. The equilibrium and sorption kinetics were studied using batch and column tests, and the process modelled to predict performance under various conditions. (author)

  13. Techniques to measure sorption and migration between small molecules and packaging. A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Ashish A; Karbowiak, Thomas; Voilley, Andrée; Debeaufort, Frédéric

    2015-05-01

    The mass transfer parameters diffusion and sorption in food and packaging or between them are the key parameters for assessing a food product's shelf-life in reference to consumer safety. This has become of paramount importance owing to the legislations set by the regulated markets. The technical capabilities that can be exploited for analyzing product-package interactions have been growing rapidly. Different techniques categorized according to the state of the diffusant (gas or liquid) in contact with the packaging material are emphasized in this review. Depending on the diffusant and on the analytical question under review, the different ways to study sorption and/or migration are presented and compared. Some examples have been suggested to reach the best possible choice, consisting of a single technique or a combination of different approaches. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Separation of motor oils, oily wastes and hydrocarbons from contaminated water by sorption on chrome shavings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammoun, A; Tahiri, S; Albizane, A; Azzi, M; Moros, J; Garrigues, S; de la Guardia, M

    2007-06-25

    In this paper, the ability of chrome shavings to remove motor oils, oily wastes and hydrocarbons from water has been studied. To determine amount of hydrocarbons sorbed on tanned wastes, a FT-NIR methodology was used and a multivariate calibration based on partial least squares (PLS) was employed for data treatment. The light density, porous tanned waste granules float on the surface of water and remove hydrocarbons and oil films. Wastes fibers from tannery industry have high sorption capacity. These tanned solid wastes are capable of absorbing many times their weight in oil or hydrocarbons (6.5-7.6g of oil and 6.3g of hydrocarbons per gram of chrome shavings). The removal efficiency of the pollutants from water is complete. The sorption of pollutants is a quasi-instantaneous process.

  15. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Considerations on the Specific Sorption and Molecular Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejun Tong

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a work aiming at thermodynamically and kinetically interpreting the specific sorption and recognition by a molecularly imprinted polymer. Using Boc-L-Phe-OH as a template, the imprinted material was prepared. The result indicates that the prepared polymer can well discriminate the imprint species from its analogue (Boc-D-Phe-OH, so as to adsorb more for the former but less for the latter. Kinetic analysis indicates that this specific sorption, in nature, can be a result of a preferential promotion. The imprint within the polymer causes a larger adsorption rate for the template than for the analogue. Thermodynamic study also implies that the molecular induction from the specific imprint to the template is larger than to the analogue, which thus makes the polymer capable of preferentially alluring the template to bind.

  16. Sorption of antimony on human teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nofal, M.; Amin, H.; Alian, G.

    1997-01-01

    The study of the uptake of toxic elements on human teeth represents an interesting research area, as the fate of these elements when present in the human food is of health significance. Since antimony is one of the common toxic elements and since, the chemical behaviour of antimony is similar to that of arsenic, one of the most important toxic elements commonly encountered in cases of food poisoning, it has been decided to investigate its uptake on human teeth and on other restoration materials. The radioactive tracer technique was used to evaluate the concentration of antimony sorbed on teeth. This tracer was obtained by irradiation of antimony metal in the reactor, subsequent dissolution in concentrated sulphuric acid, evaporation to dryness and making the solution 6 M in Hydrochloric acid (1). Antimony prepared in this way is in the trivalent state (Sb III). Sorption was studied in water, tea, coffee, red tea and chicken soup. The highest sorption was achieved from water and chicken soup and least sorption was noticed in case of coffee. The results are presented in the form of the depletion of the radioactivity (A) of antimony with time in presence of a tooth in water and other drinks

  17. Sorption of radon-222 to natural sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.S.; Chin, Y.P.; Gschwend, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    The sorption of radon to sediments was investigated, since this may affect the use of porewater radon profiles for estimating bed irrigation rates. Batch experiments showed that radon has an organic-carbon-normalized sediment-water partition coefficient (K oc , L kg oc -1 ) of 21.1 ± 2.9 for a Boston Harbor sediment, 25.3 ± 2.1 for a Charles River sediment, and 22.4 ± 2.6 for a Buzzards Bay sediment. These values are in close agreement with predictions using radon's octanol-water partition coefficient (K ow ), which was measured to be 32.4 ± 1.5. Temperature and ionic strength effects on K oc were estimated to be small. Given rapid sorption kinetics, the authors suggest that slurry stripping techniques used by many investigators to measure 222 Rn in sediment samples collect both sorbed and dissolved radon. Sorption effects were included in a transport model to obtain revised estimates of irrigation rates from existing literature profiles. Irrigation rates had to be increased over previously reported values in proportion to the sediment organic matter content

  18. Radionuclide sorption studies on abyssal red clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, K.L.

    1979-01-01

    The radionuclide sorption properties of a widely distributed abyssal red clay are being experimentally investigated using batch equilibration techniques. This paper summarizes sorption equilibrium data obtained when 0.68 N NaCl solutions containing either Tc, U, Pu, Am or Cm were contacted with samples of the red clay and also summarizes some initial results from experiments designed to determine the relative selectivity of the clay for various nuclides. Under mildly oxidizing conditions, the sorption equilibrium distribution coefficients for technetium were essentially zero. At solution-phase nuclide concentrations on the order of 10 -6 M and less and at solution pH values of about 6.9, the distribution coefficients for plutonium were about 3 x 10 3 m1/gm and for uranium, americium, and curium were about 10 5 ml/gm or greater. However, at solution pH values of about 2.7, the distribution coefficients for each of the nuclides were greatly diminished. Initial experiments conducted in order to determine the relative selectivity of the clay for cesium, barium, and cerium, indicated that the silicate phases in the clay were selective for cesium over barium and cerium. These experiments also indicated that the hydrous oxide phases were selective for cerium over barium and for barium over cesium

  19. Lead sorption-desorption from organic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Zaragoza, Victor M; Carrillo, Rogelio; Gutierrez Castorena, Carmen M

    2011-01-01

    Sorption and desorption are mechanisms involved in the reduction of metal mobility and bioavailability in organic materials. Metal release from substrates is controlled by desorption. The capacity of coffee husk and pulp residues, vermicompost and cow manure to adsorb Pb2+ was evaluated. The mechanisms involved in the sorption process were also studied. Organic materials retained high concentrations of lead (up to 36,000 mg L(-1)); however, the mechanisms of sorption varied according to the characteristics of each material: degree of decomposition, pH, cation exchange capacity and percentage of organic matter. Vermicompost and manure removed 98% of the Pb from solution. Lead precipitated in manure and vermicompost, forming lead oxide (PbO) and lead ferrite (PbFe4O7). Adsorption isotherms did not fit to the typical Freundlich and Langmuir equations. Not only specific and non-specific adsorption was observed, but also precipitation and coprecipitation. Lead desorption from vermicompost and cow manure was less than 2%. For remediation of Pb-polluted sites, the application of vermicompost and manure is recommended in places with alkaline soils because Pb precipitation can be induced, whereas coffee pulp residue is recommended for acidic soils where Pb is adsorbed.

  20. High Vacuum Techniques for Anionic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Ratkanthwar, Kedar; Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos; Mays, Jimmy

    2015-01-01

    Anionic polymerization high vacuum techniques (HVTs) are the most suitable for the preparation of polymer samples with well-defined complex macromolecular architectures. Though HVTs require glassblowing skill for designing and making polymerization

  1. EXTRACTION AND SORPTION BENZOIC ACID FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF POLYMERS BASED ON N-VINYLAMIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Savvina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of aromatic acids (benzoic acid, salicylic as preservatives necessitates their qualitative and quantitative determination in food. Effective and common way to separation and concentration of aromatic acids liquid extraction. Biphasic system of water-soluble polymers based on (poly-N-vinyl pyrrolidone, and poly-N-vinylcaprolactam satisfy the requirements of the extraction system. When sorption concentration improved definition of the metrological characteristics, comply with the requirements for sensitivity and selectivity definition appears possible, use of inexpensive and readily available analytical equipment. When studying the adsorption of benzoic acid used as a sorbent crosslinked polymer based on N-vinyl pyrrolidone, obtained by radical polymerisation of a functional monomer and crosslinker. In the extraction of benzoic acid to maximize the allocation of water and the organic phase of the polymer used salt solutions with concentrations close to saturation. Regardless of the nature of the anion salt is used as salting-out agent, aromatic acids sorption increases with the size of the cations. In the experiment the maximum recovery rate (80% benzoic acid obtained in the PVP (0.2 weight%. Ammonium sulphate. The dependence stepepni benzoic acid extraction from time sorption sorbent mass and the pH of the aqueous phase. To establish equilibrium in the system, for 20 minutes. The dependence of the degree of extraction of the acid pH indicates that the acid is extracted into the molecular form. The maximum adsorption is reached at pH 3,5, with its efficiency decreases symbatically reduce the amount of undissociated acid molecules in solution.

  2. Chemical and geotechnical analyses of soil samples from Olkiluoto for studies on sorption in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusa, M.; Aemmaelae, K.; Hakanen, M.; Lehto, J.; Lahdenperae, A.-M.

    2009-05-01

    The safety assessment of disposal of spent nuclear fuel will include an estimate on the behavior of nuclear waste nuclides in the biosphere. As a part of this estimate also the transfer of nuclear waste nuclides in the soil and sediments is to be considered. In this study soil samples were collected from three excavator pits in Olkiluoto and the geotechnical and chemical characteristics of the samples were determined. In later stage these results will be used in sorption tests. Aim of these tests is to determine the Kd-values for Cs, Tc and I and later for Mo, Nb and Cl. Results of these sorption tests will be reported later. The geotechnical characteristics studied included dry weight and organic matter content as well as grain size distribution and mineralogy analyses. Selective extractions were carried out to study the sorption of cations into different mineral types. The extractions included five steps in which the cations bound to exchangeable, carbonate, oxides of Fe and Mn, organic matter and residual fractions were determined. For all fractions ICPMS analyses were carried out. In these analyses Li, Na, Mg, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sr, Mo, Cd, Cs and Pb were determined. In addition six profiles were taken from the surroundings of two excavator pits for the 137 Cs determination. Besides the samples taken for the characterization of soil, supplement samples were taken from the same layers for the separation of soil water. From the soil water pH, DOC, anions (F, Cl, NO 3 , SO 4 ) and cations (Na, Mg, K, Ca, Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, S, Cd, Cs, Pb, U) were determined. (orig.)

  3. Mathematical Modeling of Moisture Sorption Isotherms and Determination of Isosteric Heats of Sorption of Ziziphus Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel Saad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Desorption and adsorption equilibrium moisture isotherms of Ziziphus spina-christi leaves were determined using the gravimetric-static method at 30, 40, and 50°C for water activity (aw ranging from 0.057 to 0.898. At a given aw, the results show that the moisture content decreases with increasing temperature. A hysteresis effect was observed. The experimental data of sorption were fitted by eight models (GAB, BET, Henderson-Thompson, modified-Chung Pfost, Halsey, Oswin, Peleg, and Adam and Shove. After evaluating the models according to several criteria, the Peleg and Oswin models were found to be the most suitable for describing the sorption curves. The net isosteric heats of desorption and adsorption of Ziziphus spina-christi leaves were calculated by applying the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to the sorption isotherms and an expression for predicting these thermodynamic properties was given.

  4. Photoelectron spectroscopy of the 6-azauracil anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Buonaugurio, Angela; Dolgounitcheva, Olga; Zakrzewski, V G; Bowen, Kit H; Ortiz, J V

    2013-02-14

    We report the photoelectron spectrum of the 6-azauracil anion. The spectrum is dominated by a broad band exhibiting a maximum at an electron binding energy (EBE) of 1.2 eV. This spectral pattern is indicative of a valence anion. Our calculations were carried out using ab initio electron propagator and other many-body methods. Comparison of the anion and corresponding neutral of 6-azauracil with those of uracil shows that substituting a nitrogen atom for C-H at the C6 position of uracil gives rise to significant changes in the electronic structure of 6-azauracil versus that of uracil. The adiabatic electron affinity (AEA) of the canonical 6-azauracil tautomer is substantially larger than that of canonical uracil. Among the five tautomeric, 6-azauracil anions studied computationally, the canonical structure was found to be the most stable. The vertical detachment energies (VDE) of the canonical, valence-bound anion of 6-azauracil and its closest "very-rare" tautomer have been calculated. Electron propagator calculations on the canonical anion yield a VDE value that is in close agreement with the experimentally determined VDE value of 1.2 eV. The AEA value of 6-azauracil, assessed at the CCSD(T) level of theory to be 0.5 eV, corresponds with the EBE value of the onset of the experimental spectrum.

  5. Geochemical modelling of the sorption of tetravalent radioelements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, K.A.; Tweed, C.J.

    1991-05-01

    The results of an experimental study of the sorption of a range of tetravalent radioelements, plutonium (IV), tin (IV), thorium(IV) and uranium(IV), onto clay at pH8 and pH11 have been successfully simulated using a triple layer sorption model. The model has been incorporated into HARPHRQ, a geochemical program based on PHREEQE. The model has been parameterised using data for sorption onto ferric oxyhydroxide and goethite. The effects of hydroxycarboxylic acids on the sorption process have also been investigated experimentally. It was generally observed that in the presence of 2x10 -3 M gluconate, sorption was reduced by up two orders of magnitude. The model has satisfactorily simulated these lower sorptivities, through assuming competing sorption and complexation reactions. This work, therefore, further confirms the need to take account of such organic materials in safety assessment modelling. (author)

  6. Investigation of metal ions sorption of brown peat moss powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelus, Nadezhda; Blokhina, Elena; Novikov, Dmitry; Novikova, Yaroslavna; Chuchalin, Vladimir

    2017-11-01

    For regularities research of sorptive extraction of heavy metal ions by cellulose and its derivates from aquatic solution of electrolytes it is necessary to find possible mechanism of sorption process and to choice a model describing this process. The present article investigates the regularities of aliovalent metals sorption on brown peat moss powder. The results show that sorption isotherm of Al3+ ions is described by Freundlich isotherm and sorption isotherms of Na+ i Ni2+ are described by Langmuir isotherm. To identify the mechanisms of brown peat moss powder sorption the IR-spectra of the initial brown peat moss powder samples and brown peat moss powder samples after Ni (II) sorption were studied. Metal ion binding mechanisms by brown peat moss powder points to ion exchange, physical adsorption, and complex formation with hydroxyl and carboxyl groups.

  7. Evaluation of calix[4]arene tethered Schiff bases for anion recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, H.M.; Munjal, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Two calix[4]arene tethered Schiff base derivatives (L1 and L2) have been synthesized and their ion recognition capability has been evaluated through NMR, UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. L1 interacts with cyanide ions very selectively to usher a significant change in color and fluorescence intensity. On the other hand L2 does not show selectivity for anion sensing despite having the same functional groups as those present in L1. The differential observations may be attributed to plausible stereo control of anion recognition and tautomerization in the synthesized Schiff base derivatives.

  8. Evaluation of calix[4]arene tethered Schiff bases for anion recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chawla, H.M., E-mail: hmchawla@chemistry.iitd.ac.in; Munjal, Priyanka

    2016-11-15

    Two calix[4]arene tethered Schiff base derivatives (L1 and L2) have been synthesized and their ion recognition capability has been evaluated through NMR, UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. L1 interacts with cyanide ions very selectively to usher a significant change in color and fluorescence intensity. On the other hand L2 does not show selectivity for anion sensing despite having the same functional groups as those present in L1. The differential observations may be attributed to plausible stereo control of anion recognition and tautomerization in the synthesized Schiff base derivatives.

  9. suitability of murram for phosphorus sorption in constructed wetlands

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mimi

    sorption isotherms, determination of Phosphorus sorption capacity of the substrates, determination of. Phosphorus sorption as the function of time and determination of effect of temperature on the ... (Na2O + K2O) % SiO2. %. P2O5. %. TiO2. %. LOI. %. 19.2. 1.3. 0.69. 5.13. 0.05. 6.7. 61.9. 0.04. 0.51. 4.4. As presented in ...

  10. Mechanism of cesium sorption on potassium titanium hexacyanoferrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yongxia; Xu Shiping; Song Chongli

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of cesium sorption on potassium titanium hexacyanoferrate is described. The dependence of the sorption speed on temperature, particle granule size, and the stirring speed is studied. The results show that the sorption process is controlled by liquid film diffusion and particle diffusion. An exchange reaction occurs mainly between K + in the exchanger and Cs + in the solution, i.e. potassium titanium hexacyanoferrate, and Cs + of simulated high-level liquid waste

  11. Sorption of curium by silica colloids: Effect of humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, Aishwarya Soumitra; Kumar, Sumit; Tomar, B.S.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2011-01-01

    Sorption of curium by silica colloids has been studied as a function of pH and ionic strength using 244 Cm as a tracer. The sorption was found to increase with increasing pH and reach a saturation value of ∼95% at pH beyond 5.3. The effect of humic acid on the sorption of 244 Cm onto silica was studied by changing the order of addition of the metal ion and humic acid. In general, in the presence of humic acid (2 mg/L), the sorption increased at lower pH (<5) while it decreased in the pH range 6.5-8 and above pH 8, the sorption was found to increase again. As curium forms strong complex with humic acid, its presence results in the enhancement of curium sorption at lower pH. At higher pH the humic acid present in the solution competes with the surface sites for curium thus decreasing the sorption. The decrease in the Cm sorption in presence of humic acid was found to be less when humic acid was added after the addition of curium. Linear additive model qualitatively reproduced the profile of the Cm(III) sorption by silica in presence of humic acid at least in the lower pH region, however it failed to yield quantitative agreement with the experimental results. The results of the present study evidenced the incorporation of Cm into the silica matrix.

  12. Determining Sorption Rate by a Continuous Gravimetric Method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, Monicia R; Procell, Lawrence R; Bartram, Philip W; Shuely, Wendel J

    2003-01-01

    ... were automatically recorded in an Excel file while CARC coupons were submerged in solvent. Initial sorption rates were determined for butyl acetate, butyl ether, cyclohexane and propylene carbonate...

  13. The sorption of polonium, actinium and protactinium onto geological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Berry, J.A.; Brownsword, M.; Heath, T.G.; Ilett, D.J.; McCrohon, R.; Tweed, C.J.; Yui, M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a combined experimental and modeling program of generic sorption studies to increase confidence in the performance assessment for a potential high-level radioactive waste repository in Japan. The sorption of polonium, actinium and protactinium onto geological materials has been investigated. Sorption of these radioelements onto bentonite, tuff and granodiorite from equilibrated de-ionized water was studied under reducing conditions at room temperature. In addition, the sorption of actinium and protactinium was investigated at 60 C. Thermodynamic chemical modeling was carried out to aid interpretation of the results

  14. The sorption of polonium, actinium and protactinium onto geological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Berry, J.A.; Brownsword, M.; Heath, T.G.; Ilett, D.J.; McCrohon, R.; Tweed, C.J.; Yui, M.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a combined experimental and modeling program of generic sorption studies to increase confidence in the performance assessment for a potential high-level radioactive waste repository in Japan. The sorption of polonium, actinium and protactinium onto geological materials has been investigated. Sorption of these radioelements onto bentonite, tuff and granodiorite from equilibrated de-ionized water was studied under reducing conditions at room temperature. In addition, the sorption of actinium and protactinium was investigated at 60 C. Thermodynamic chemical modeling was carried out to aid interpretation of the results.

  15. Experimental study of strontium sorption on fissure filling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksen, T E; Cui, Daqing [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-12-01

    We have carried out a comparative study of sorption and desorption of strontium in groundwater on separated magnetic and size fractions of fissure filling material taken from natural fissures in granitic rock. Complete reversibility of the sorption process was demonstrated by identical Freundlich isotherms, isotopic exchangeability and pH dependence of the distribution coefficients Rd. The sorption was found to be strongly pH dependent in the range 3-11. The pH effect can be accommodated in the sorption model by considering the surface areas and surface charges of the minerals in the fissure filling material. 20 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs.

  16. Experimental study of strontium sorption on fissure filling material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.; Cui, Daqing

    1994-12-01

    We have carried out a comparative study of sorption and desorption of strontium in groundwater on separated magnetic and size fractions of fissure filling material taken from natural fissures in granitic rock. Complete reversibility of the sorption process was demonstrated by identical Freundlich isotherms, isotopic exchangeability and pH dependence of the distribution coefficients Rd. The sorption was found to be strongly pH dependent in the range 3-11. The pH effect can be accommodated in the sorption model by considering the surface areas and surface charges of the minerals in the fissure filling material. 20 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs

  17. Acquisition of sorption isotherms for modified woods by the use of dynamic vapour sorption instrumentation. Principles and Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang; Klamer, Morten; Venås, Thomas Mark

    2010-01-01

    The complex wood-water relationship has been the topic of numerous studies. Sorption isotherms – in particular – have been derived for hundreds of wood species, their sap- and heartwood sections as well as for decayed, engineered and modified wood materials. However, the traditional methods...... for obtaining sorption isotherms are very time consuming. With new dynamic vapour sorption (DVS) instrumentation, the acquisition of data for constructing sorption isotherms is suddenly dramatically lowered. Where the traditional methods often required months, data can now be obtained in a matter of days...... depending on the number of data points required. The fast data acquisition makes DVS a useful tool in studying the sorption properties of wood, and especially in studying the effect of different modification treatments on these properties. This study includes an investigation of the sorption properties...

  18. Supramolecular Chemistry of Selective Anion Recognition for Anions of Environmental Relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman-James, K.; Wilson, G.; Moyer, B. A.

    2004-01-01

    This project involves the design and synthesis of receptors for oxoanions of environmental importance, including emphasis on high level and low activity waste. Target anions have included primarily oxoanions and a study of the basic concepts behind selective binding of target anions. A primary target has been sulfate because of its deleterious influence on the vitrification of tank wastes

  19. 3.3. Sorption activity of cross-linked polymers of ethynyl-piperidol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalikov, D.Kh.

    2012-01-01

    The sorption activity of cross-linked polymers of ethynyl-piperidol was studied. The bilirubin sorption was studied as well. The kinetic of bilirubin sorption and human serum albumin at their joint presence in hydrogel solutions was defined. Bilirubin sorption and change of albumin composition was considered. The sorption of middle molecular peptides was considered as well. The sorption of endogenous toxin by means of ethynyl-piperidol polymers was done.

  20. Sorption of nitrate onto amine-crosslinked wheat straw: characteristics, column sorption and desorption properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xu; Gao, Bao-Yu; Zhong, Qian-Qian; Yue, Qin-Yan; Li, Qian

    2011-02-15

    The nitrate removal process was evaluated using a fixed-bed column packed with amine-crosslinked wheat straw (AC-WS). Column sorption and desorption characteristics of nitrate were studied extensively. Solid-state (13)C NMR and zeta potential analysis validated the existence of crosslinked amine groups in AC-WS. Raman shift of the nitrate peaks suggested the electrostatic attraction between the adsorbed ions and positively charged amine sites. The column sorption capacity (q(ed)) of the AC-WS for nitrate was 87.27 mg g(-1) in comparison with the raw WS of 0.57 mg g(-1). Nitrate sorption in column was affected by bed height, influent nitrate concentration, flow rate and pH, and of all these, influent pH demonstrated an essential effect on the performance of the column. In addition, desorption and dynamic elution tests were repeated for several cycles, with high desorption rate and slight losses in its initial column sorption capacity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Humidity sorption on natural building stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, C.; Mirwald, P.

    2003-04-01

    processes, physical, chemical or biological, depend on the presence of water. Like most porous materials building stone respond on humidity by water uptake. The sorption isotherm represents the equilibrium moisture, specific for each material. The determination of the isotherm for stone of low and small porosity like marble is difficult. With the help of a newly developed water sorption analysis chamber [2], which allows the simultaneous measurement of 11 samples, good results on stone/rock samples have been obtained. Even at marble species with pore volumes lower than 0.4 % isotherms are measured. This analytical method offers new insights in the pore behaviour of low porosity materials. The advantages of this technique which supplements other techniques (e.g. BET, Hg-porosimetry) are: i) the testing agent is identical to the weathering agent, water; ii) the atmospheric parameters at the measurement reflect the natural conditions - thus no changes to the material properties have to be considered; iii) due to the small diameter of the water molecule (~0.28 nm), smaller pores are reached than e.g. with N2 (~0.31 nm). Sorption isotherms of sandstone (Baumberg, Obernkirchen, Groeden), granite (Brixen), and marble (Sterzing, Laas) are presented. Particular as to marbles the resolution is considerably higher. A previously observed negative hysteresis [3] seems an effect due to limited data resolution. [1] Snethlage, R. (1984) Steinkonservierung, Bayer. LA Denkmalpflege, Ah. 22, 203 S. [2] Griesser, U.J., Dillenz, J. (2002) Neuartiges, vollautomatisches Feuchtesorptionsprüfgerät mit hohem Probendurchsatz, Feuchtetag 2002, Weimar, 85-93. [3] Fimmel, R. (1996) Verwitterungsverhalten der alpinen Marmore von Laas und Sterzing, Diss. Univ. Ibk, 116 S.

  2. EXAFS study of plutonium sorption onto kaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, T.Y.; Banik, L.; Buda, R.A.; Amayri, S.; Drebert, J.; Kratz, J.V.; Trautmann, N.; Reich, T.; Ageev, A.L.; Korshunov, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    The uptake mechanism of plutonium by kaolinite was investigated by applying X-ray absorption spectroscopy to batch sorption samples (total Pu concentrations 1 and 10 μM; 4 g kaolinite/L in 0.1 M NaClO 4 ; 1 ≤ pH ≤ 9; presence and absence of ambient CO 2 ). For XAFS measurements, one sample was prepared from a Pu(III) solution at pH 6 under argon atmosphere. Three samples were obtained by sorption of Pu(IV) at pH I, 4, and 9 in an air-equilibrated system. The Pu L III -edge XANES spectra indicated that in all samples, including the Pu(III) sample, plutonium is sorbed at the kaolinite surface as Pu(IV). The Pu L III -edge k 3 -weighted EXAFS spectra showed eight oxygen atoms at an average Pu-O distance of 2.3 angstrom. Two Pu atoms were detected at ∼ 3.7 angstrom in all spectra, indicating the formation of polynuclear Pu(IV) species at the kaolinite surface. For the sample prepared from Pu(III) solution, an additional Pu-O shell at 3.2 angstrom was observed. The spectra of samples prepared from Pu(IV) included a Pu-Al/Si co-ordination shell at approximately 3.6 angstrom, indicating formation of inner-sphere sorption complexes. The structural models used in the least-squares fits were confirmed by an alternative EXAFS data analysis approach based on a modified Tikhonov regularization method. (authors)

  3. Infrared spectroscopy of anionic hydrated fluorobenzenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Holger; Vogelhuber, Kristen M.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the structural motifs of anionic hydrated fluorobenzenes by infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and density functional theory. Our calculations show that all fluorobenzene anions under investigation are strongly distorted from the neutral planar molecular geometries. In the anions, different F atoms are no longer equivalent, providing structurally different binding sites for water molecules and giving rise to a multitude of low-lying isomers. The absorption bands for hexa- and pentafluorobenzene show that only one isomer for the respective monohydrate complexes is populated in our experiment. For C 6 F 6 - ·H 2 O, we can assign these bands to an isomer where water forms a weak double ionic hydrogen bond with two F atoms in the ion, in accord with the results of Bowen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 014312 (2007), following paper.] The spectroscopic motif of the binary complexes changes slightly with decreasing fluorination of the aromatic anion. For dihydrated hexafluorobenzene anions, several isomers are populated in our experiments, some of which may be due to hydrogen bonding between water molecules

  4. Sorption behaviour of uranium and thorium on hydrons tin oxide from aqueous and mixed-solvent H2SO4 media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misak, N.Z.; Salema, H.N.; El-Naggar, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    At pH values > about 2 in 10 -3 -10 -2 M aqueous sulphate solutions, uranium seems to be sorbed by hydrous tin oxide mainly as cations, while thorium is sorced as cations and as the neutral complex. At pH values of about 1.1-1.4, both uranium and thorium seem to be mainly sorbed as the neutral complexes. while at lower pH values, sorption of anionic commplexes comes into play. The sorption of uranium generally increased progressively on addition of increasing amounts of methanol, ethanol or acetone. The sorption of thorium decreases a little at 0.01 N H 2 SO 4 and increases a little at 0.5 N H 2 SO 4 on adding the organic solvents. At 0.1 N H 2 SO 4 , the addition of 20percent of the organic solvents brings the sorption of thorium to almost negligible values, which seems to offer an attractive means for U/Th separation. (author)

  5. Sorption of pesticides to aquifer minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Liselotte; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes results from a work were the sorption of five pesticides on seven minerals were studied in order to quantify the adsorption to different mineral surfaces. Investigated mineral phases are: quartz, calcite, kaolinite, a-alumina, and three iron oxides (2-line ferrihydrite......, goethite, lepidocrocite). Selected pesticides are: atrazine, isoproturon, mecoprop, 2,4-D, and bentazone. The results demonstrate that pesticides adsorb to pure mineral surfaces. However, the size of the adsorption depends on the type of pesticide and the type of mineral....

  6. Tritium sorption by cement and subsequent release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, F.; Tanaka, S.; Yamawaki, M.

    1994-01-01

    In a fusion reactor or tritium handling facilities, contamination of concrete by tritium and subsequent release from it to the reactor or experimental rooms is a matter of problem for safety control of tritium and management of operational environment. In order to evaluate these tritium behavior, interaction of tritiated water with concrete or cement should be clarified. In the present study, HTO sorption and subsequent release from cement were studied by combining various experimental methods. From the basic studies on tritium-cement interactions, it has become possible to evaluate tritium uptake by cement or concrete and subsequent tritium release behavior as well as tritium removing methods from them

  7. Thermodynamics of imidacloprid sorption in Croatian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milin, Čedomila; Broznic, Dalibor

    2015-04-01

    Neonicotinoids are increasingly replacing the organophosphate and methylcarbamate acetylcholinesterase inhibitors which are losing their effectiveness because of selection for resistant pest populations. Imidacloprid is the most important neonicotinoid with low soil persistence, high insecticidal potency and relatively low mammalian toxicity. In Croatia, imidacloprid is most commonly used in olive growing areas, including Istria and Kvarner islands, as an effective means of olive fruit fly infestation control. Sorption-desorption behavior of imidacloprid in six soils collected from five coastal regions in Croatia at 20, 30 and 40°C was investigated using batch equilibrium technique. Isothermal data were applied to Freundlich, Langmuir and Temkin equation, and the thermodynamic parameters ΔH°, ΔG°, ΔS° were calculated. The sorption isotherm curves were of non-linear and may be classified as L-type suggesting a relatively high sorption capacity for imidacloprid. Our results showed that the KFsor values decreased for all the tested soils as the temperature increases, indicating that the temperature strongly influence the sorption. Values of ΔG° were negative (-4.65 to -2.00 kJ/mol) indicating that at all experimental temperatures the interactions of imidacloprid with soils were spontaneous process. The negative and small ΔH° values (-19.79 to -8.89 kJ/mol) were in the range of weak forces, such as H-bonds, consistent with interactions and par¬titioning of the imidacloprid molecules into soil organic matter. The ΔS° values followed the range of -57.12 to -14.51 J/molK, suggesting that imidacloprid molecules lose entropy during transition from the solution phase to soil surface. It was found that imidacloprid desorption from soil was concentration and temperature dependent, i.e. at lower imidacloprid concentrations and temperature, lower desorption percentage occurred. Desorption studies revealed that hysteretic behavior under different temperature

  8. Sorption of radiostrontium from liquid metallic rubidium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhujkov, B.L.; Kokhnyuk, V.M.; Vincent, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    One studied the radiostrontium (in particular, 82 Sr) sorption from the liquid metallic Rb in various inorganic sorbents (both metals and oxides). One studied the temperature dependence and the dynamics of the adsorption and put forward an interpretation of the observed mechanisms. The elaborated approach enables to extract 82 Sr efficiently from the Rb targets upon their irradiation by the accelerated protons. One studies various procedures and the applicability of the process to ensure elaboration of a new highly efficient process to produce 82 Sr, in particular, with the targets of the circulating Rb [ru

  9. Pu sorption to activated conglomerate anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Kudo, Akira

    2001-01-01

    The sorption of Pu to the anaerobic bacteria activated under specific conditions of temperature, pH and depleted nutrients after long dormant period was investigated. After 4 h at neutral pH, the distribution coefficient (K d ) between bacteria and aqueous phase at 308 and 278 K had around 10 3 to 10 4 . After over 5 days, however, the K d at only 308 K had increased to over 10 5 . Sterilized (dead) and dormant anaerobic bacteria adsorbed Pu to the same extent. (author)

  10. Cytotoxic mechanisms of hydrosulfide anion and cyanide anion in primary rat hepatocyte cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Rodney W.; Valentine, Holly L.; Valentine, William M.

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen cyanide are known to compromise mitochondrial respiration through inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase and this is generally considered to be their primary mechanism of toxicity. Experimental studies and the efficiency of current treatment protocols suggest that H 2 S may exert adverse physiological effects through additional mechanisms. To evaluate the role of alternative mechanisms in H 2 S toxicity, the relative contributions of electron transport inhibition, uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration, and opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) to hydrosulfide and cyanide anion cytotoxicity in primary hepatocyte cultures were examined. Supplementation of hepatocytes with the glycolytic substrate, fructose, rescued hepatocytes from cyanide anion induced toxicity, whereas fructose supplementation increased hydrosulfide anion toxicity suggesting that hydrosulfide anion may compromise glycolysis in hepatocytes. Although inhibitors of the MPTP opening were protective for hydrosulfide anion, they had no effect on cyanide anion toxicity, consistent with an involvement of the permeability transition pore in hydrosulfide anion toxicity but not cyanide anion toxicity. Exposure of isolated rat liver mitochondria to hydrosulfide did not result in large amplitude swelling suggesting that if H 2 S induces the permeability transition it does so indirectly through a mechanism requiring other cellular components. Hydrosulfide anion did not appear to be an uncoupler of mitochondrial respiration in hepatocytes based upon the inability of oligomycin and fructose to protect hepatocytes from hydrosulfide anion toxicity. These findings support mechanisms additional to inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase in hydrogen sulfide toxicity. Further investigations are required to assess the role of the permeability transition in H 2 S toxicity, determine whether similar affects occur in other cell types or in vivo and evaluate whether this may

  11. Ultraselective Carbon Molecular Sieve Membranes with Tailored Synergistic Sorption Selective Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Koros, William J

    2017-09-01

    Membrane-based separations can reduce the energy consumption and the CO 2 footprint of large-scale fluid separations, which are traditionally practiced by energy-intensive thermally driven processes. Here, a new type of membrane structure based on nanoporous carbon is reported, which, according to this study, is best referred to as carbon/carbon mixed-matrix (CCMM) membranes. The CCMM membranes are formed by high-temperature (up to 900 °C) pyrolysis of polyimide precursor hollow-fiber membranes. Unprecedentedly high permselectivities are seen in CCMM membranes for CO 2 /CH 4 , N 2 /CH 4 , He/CH 4 , and H 2 /CH 4 separations. Analysis of permeation data suggests that the ultrahigh selectivities result from substantially increased sorption selectivities, which is hypothetically owing to the formation of ultraselective micropores that selectively exclude the bulkier CH 4 molecules. With tunable sorption selectivities, the CCMM membranes outperform flexible polymer membranes and traditional rigid molecular-sieve membranes. The capability to increase sorption selectivities is a powerful tool to leverage diffusion selectivities, and has opened the door to many challenging and economically important fluid separations that require ultrafine differentiation of closely sized molecules. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A polyaniline-magnetite nanocomposite as an anion exchange sorbent for solid-phase extraction of chromium(VI) ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezvani, Mehdi; Asgharinezhad, Ali Akbar; Ebrahimzadeh, Homeira; Shekari, Nafiseh

    2014-01-01

    This work describes a novel polyaniline-magnetite nanocomposite and its application to the preconcentration of Cr(VI) anions. The material was obtained by oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of magnetite nanoparticles. The parameters affecting preconcentration were optimized by a Box-Behnken design through response surface methodology. Extraction time, amount of magnetic sorbent and pH value were selected as the main factors affecting sorption. The sorption capacity of the sorbent for Cr(VI) is 54 mg g −1 . The type, volume and concentration of the eluents, and the elution time were selected as main factors in the optimization study of the elution step. Following sorption and elution, the Cr(VI) ions were reacted with diphenylcarbazide, and the resulting dye was quantified by HPLC with optical detection at 546 nm. The limit of detection is 0.1 μg L −1 , and all the relative standard deviations are <6.3 %. The nanocomposite was successfully applied to the rapid extraction and determination of trace quantities of Cr(VI) ions in spiked water samples. (author)

  13. Building Service Provider Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Kristin; Jaura, Manya; Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study whether and how the interaction between clients and the service providers contributes to the development of capabilities in service provider firms. In situations where such a contribution occurs, we analyze how different types of activities in the production process...... process. We find that clients influence the development of human capital capabilities and management capabilities in reciprocally produced services. While in sequential produced services clients influence the development of organizational capital capabilities and management capital capabilities....... of the services, such as sequential or reciprocal task activities, influence the development of different types of capabilities. We study five cases of offshore-outsourced knowledge-intensive business services that are distinguished according to their reciprocal or sequential task activities in their production...

  14. Surface charges and Np(V) sorption on amorphous Al- and Fe- silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Nero, M.; Assada, A.; Barillon, R.; Duplatre, G.; Made, B.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Sorption onto Si-rich alteration layers of crystalline minerals and nuclear glasses, and onto amorphous secondary silicates of rocks and soils, are expected to retard the migration of actinides in the near- and far-field of HLW repositories. We present experimental and modeling studies on the effects of silicate structure and bulk chemistry, and of solution chemistry, on charges and adsorption of neptunyl ions at surfaces of synthetic, amorphous or poorly ordered silica, Al-silicates and Fe-silicates. The Al-silicates display similar pH-dependent surface charges characterized by predominant Si-O - Si sites, and similar surface affinities for neptunyl ions, irrespective to their Si/Al molar ratio (varying from 10 to 4.3). Such experimental features are explained by incorporation of Al atoms in tetrahedral position in the silicate lattice, leading to only trace amounts of high-affinity Al-OH surface groups due to octahedral Al. By contrast, the structure of the Fe-silicates ensures the occurrence of high-affinity Fe-OH surface groups, whose concentration is shown by proton adsorption measurements to increase with decreasing of the silicate Si/Fe molar ratio (from 10 to 2.3). Nevertheless, experimental data of the adsorption of neptunyl and electrolyte ions show unexpectedly weak effect of the Si/Fe ratio, and suggest predominant Si-OH surface groups. A possible explanation is that aqueous silicate anions, released by dissolution, adsorb at OH Fe - surface groups and / or precipitate as silica gel coatings, because experimental solutions were found at near-equilibrium with respect to amorphous silica. Therefore, the environmental sorption of Np(V) onto Si-rich, amorphous or poorly ordered Al-silicates may primarily depend on pH and silicate specific surface areas, given the low overall chemical affinity of such phases for dissolved metals. By contrast, the sorption of Np(V) on natural, amorphous or poorly ordered Fe-silicates may be a

  15. Computational Studies of CO 2 Sorption and Separation in an Ultramicroporous Metal–Organic Material

    KAUST Repository

    Forrest, Katherine A.

    2013-08-29

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations of CO2 sorption and separation were performed in [Zn(pyz)2SiF6], a metal-organic material (MOM) consisting of a square grid of Zn2+ ions coordinated to pyrazine (pyz) linkers and pillars of SiF6 2- ions. This MOM was recently shown to have an unprecedented selectivity for CO2 over N2, CH4, and H 2 under industrially relevant conditions. The simulated CO 2 sorption isotherms and calculated isosteric heat of adsorption, Qst, values were in excellent agreement with the experimental data for all the state points considered. CO2 saturation in [Zn(pyz) 2SiF6] was achieved at near-ambient temperatures and pressures lower than 1.0 atm. Moreover, the sorbed CO2 molecules were representative of a liquid/fluid under such conditions as confirmed through calculating the isothermal compressibility, βT, values. The simulated CO2 uptakes within CO2/N2 (10:90), CO2/CH4 (50:50), and CO2/H2 (30:70) mixture compositions, characteristic of flue gas, biogas, and syngas, respectively, were comparable to those that were produced in the single-component CO2 sorption simulations. The modeled structure at saturation revealed a loading of 1 CO2 molecule per unit cell. The favored CO2 sorption site was identified as the attraction of the carbon atoms of CO2 molecules to four equatorial fluorine atoms of SiF6 2- anions simultaneously, resulting in CO2 molecules localized at the center of the channel. Furthermore, experimental studies have shown that [Zn(pyz)2SiF6] sorbed minimal amounts of CO2 and N2 at their respective liquid temperatures. Analysis of the crystal structure at 100 K revealed that the unit cell undergoes a slight contraction in all dimensions and contains pyrazine rings that are mildly slanted with an angle of 13.9. Additionally, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations revealed that the sorbate molecules are anchored to the framework at low temperatures, which inhibits diffusion. Thus, it is hypothesized that the sorbed molecules

  16. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Microsolvated Anions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ditte Linde

    the gas-phase α-effect. The experimental studies are performed by means of the flowing after glow selected ion flow tube technique, and these are supplemented by electronic structure calculations. The α-nucleophile employed is the microsolvated hydrogen peroxide anion whose reactivity is compared......Gas-phase studies of ion-molecule reactions shed light on the intrinsic factors that govern reactivity; and even solvent effects can be examined in the gasphase environment by employing microsolvated ions. An area that has received considerable attention with regard to the interplay between...... to that of a series of microsolvated oxygen centered anions. The association of the nucleophiles with a single water or methanol molecule allows the α-effect to be observed in the SN2 reaction with methyl chloride; this effect was not apparent in the reactions of the unsolvated anions. The results suggest...

  17. Patchy proteins, anions and the Hofmeister series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, Mikael; Jungwirth, Pavel [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo namesti 2, 16610 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Center for Complex Molecular Systems and Biomolecules, Flemingovo namesti 2, 16610 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: mikael.lund@uochb.cas.cz

    2008-12-10

    We investigate specific anion binding to a range of patchy protein models and use our results to probe protein-protein interactions for aqueous lysozyme solutions. Our molecular simulation studies show that the ion-protein interaction mechanism and strength largely depend on the nature of the interfacial amino acid residues. Via direct ion pairing, small anions interact with charged side-chains while larger anions are attracted to non-polar residues due to several solvent assisted mechanisms. Incorporating ion and surface specificity into a mesoscopic model for protein-protein interactions we calculate the free energy of interaction between lysozyme molecules in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride and sodium iodide. In agreement with experiment, our finding is that 'salting out' follows the reverse Hofmeister series for pH below the iso-electric point and the direct series for pH above pI.

  18. New borohydride anion B6H7-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, I.Yu.; Vinitskij, D.M.; Solntsev, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    The [Ni(Bipy) 3 ] (B 6 H 7 ) 2 , (Ph 4 P)B 6 H 7 , [Ni(Phen) 3 ](B 6 H 7 ) 2 crystals (where Bipy = bipyridine, Phen = phenathroline, Ph = phenyl) are obtained via the exchange reaction with a subsequent recrystallization from aqua-acetonic and acetonic solutions. The structure is studied of a new borohydride anion B 6 H 7 - possessing a four-valence bond unique for polyhedral borohydride anions. A triangular face of boride skeleton coordinating a hydrogen atom is considerably larger than other faces, and the electron density on this hydrogen atom is evidently much higher than at the end hydride hydrogen atoms. The trend of B 6 H 7 - anion to form statistically disordered structurs testifies to a rather slight effect of the seventh hydrogen atom position on the structure pattern of the ionic crystal lattice

  19. Column Chromatography To Obtain Organic Cation Sorption Isotherms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolin, William C; Sullivan, James; Vasudevan, Dharni; MacKay, Allison A

    2016-08-02

    Column chromatography was evaluated as a method to obtain organic cation sorption isotherms for environmental solids while using the peak skewness to identify the linear range of the sorption isotherm. Custom packed HPLC columns and standard batch sorption techniques were used to intercompare sorption isotherms and solid-water sorption coefficients (Kd) for four organic cations (benzylamine, 2,4-dichlorobenzylamine, phenyltrimethylammonium, oxytetracycline) with two aluminosilicate clay minerals and one soil. A comparison of Freundlich isotherm parameters revealed isotherm linearity or nonlinearity was not significantly different between column chromatography and traditional batch experiments. Importantly, skewness (a metric of eluting peak symmetry) analysis of eluting peaks can establish isotherm linearity, thereby enabling a less labor intensive means to generate the extensive data sets of linear Kd values required for the development of predictive sorption models. Our findings clearly show that column chromatography can reproduce sorption measures from conventional batch experiments with the benefit of lower labor-intensity, faster analysis times, and allow for consistent sorption measures across laboratories with distinct chromatography instrumentation.

  20. Sorption of Triangular Silver Nanoplates on Polyurethane Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furletov, A. A.; Apyari, V. V.; Garshev, A. V.; Volkov, P. A.; Tolmacheva, V. V.; Dmitrienko, S. G.

    2018-02-01

    The sorption of triangular silver nanoplates on polyurethane foam is investigated as a procedure for creating a nanocomposite sensing material for subsequent use in optical means of chemical analysis. Triangular silver nanoplates are synthesized and characterized, and a simple sorption technique for the formation of a composite material based on these nanoplates is proposed.

  1. Sorption and desorption of diuron in Oxisol under biochar application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano André Petter

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to verify the kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron in an Oxisol under application of biochar. The samples were collected in a field experiment conducted in randomized design blocks consisted of 2 base fertilization levels (0 and 400 kg∙ha−1 NPK 00-20-20 fertilizer formula and 3 doses of biochar (0, 8 and 16 Mg∙ha−1. In the evaluation of sorption and desorption, Batch Equilibrium method was used. The kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron, total organic carbon, fulvic acid, humic acid and humin, pH and partition coefficient to organic carbon were evaluated. The Freundlich isotherm was adjusted appropriately to describe diuron sorption kinetics in all the studied treatments. The application of biochar provided increment in the sorption (Kf and reduction in the desorption of diuron in 64 and 44%, respectively. This effect is attributed to the biochar contribution to the total organic carbon and C-humin and of these to diuron through hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds. The positive correlation between the partition coefficient to organic carbon and Kf confirms the importance of soil organic compartment in the sorption of diuron. There was no competition of NPK fertilizer for the same sorption site of diuron. The increase and reduction in sorption and desorption, respectively, show that the application of biochar is an important alternative for the remediation of soil leaching of diuron, especially in sandy soils.

  2. Kinetics and reversibility of micropollutant sorption in sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maialen; Carrère, Hélène; Patau, Mathieu; Patureau, Dominique

    2011-10-01

    The fate of micropollutants throughout wastewater treatment systems is highly dependent on their sorption interactions with sludge matter. In this study, both the sorption and desorption kinetics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in activated sludge were shown to be very rapid in comparison to biodegradation kinetics. It was concluded that PAH transfer does not limit their biodegradation and that their fate is governed by the sorption/desorption equilibrium state. The effect of contact time between sludge and PAHs was also investigated. It was shown that aging did not influence the sorption/desorption equilibrium although PAH losses during aging suggest that sequestration phenomena had occurred. This implies that for PAH sorption assessment within treatment processes there is no need to include a contact time dimension. As a consequence, thanks to an innovative approach taking into account sorption equilibria and sequestration, this work has demonstrated that studies in the literature which, in main, deal with micropollutant sorption in sewage sludge with only a short contact time can be extrapolated to real systems in which sorption, desorption and aging occur.

  3. CO2 sorption of a ceramic separation membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wormeester, Herbert; Benes, Nieck Edwin; Spijksma, G.I.; Verweij, H.; Poelsema, Bene

    2004-01-01

    The ellipsometric characterization of the CO2 sorption of a silica membrane provides a fast and accurate technique for the characterization of maximum sorption and the heat of adsorption. Both parameters are evaluated for the 73 nm thick silica layer as well as the 1650 nm thick supporting γ-layer.

  4. Status report on SIRS: sorption information retrieval system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hostetler, D.D.; Serne, R.J.; Baldwin, A.J.; Petrie, G.M.

    1980-11-01

    Two major uses were identified for the Sorption Information Retrieval System: (1) to aid geochemists in the elucidation of sorption mechanisms; and (2) to aid safety assessment modelers in selection of Kds for any given scenerio. Other benefits such as providing an auditable vehicle for the Kd selection were also discussed

  5. Effect of humic acid (HA) on sulfonamide sorption by biochars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, Fei; Sun, Binbin; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Lingyan; Liu, Zhongqi; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-01-01

    Effect of quantity and fractionation of loaded humic acid (HA) on biochar sorption for sulfonamides was investigated. The HA was applied in two different modes, i.e. pre-coating and co-introduction with sorbate. In pre-coating mode, the polar fractions of HA tended to interact with low-temperature biochars via H-bonding, while the hydrophobic fractions were likely to be adsorbed by high-temperature biochars through hydrophobic and π-π interactions, leading to different composition and structure of the HA adlayers. The influences of HA fractionation on biochar sorption for sulfonamides varied significantly, depending on the nature of interaction between HA fraction and sorbate. Meanwhile, co-introduction of HA with sulfonamides revealed that the effect of HA on sulfonamide sorption was also dependent on HA concentration. These findings suggest that the amount and fractionation of adsorbed HA are tailored by the surface properties of underlying biochars, which differently affect the sorption for organic contaminants. - Highlights: • Effect of quantity and fractionation of coated HA on sorption of sulfonamides by BC was studied. • Fractionation of coated HA is tailored by surface properties of BC. • Roles of HA in BC sorption depend on interaction between HA adlayer and sorbate. • Roles of HA in sulfonamide sorption by BC also depend on HA aqueous concentration. - The quantity and fractionation of adsorbed HA play a major role in sulfonamide sorption by biochars

  6. Sorption of malachite green (MG) by cassava stem biochar (CSB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassava stem biochar (CSB) was produced by pyrolyzing CS at 500°C for 2 hours at nitrogen environment. Proximate and ultimate analyses were conducted on CS and CSB. Batch sorption experiment on synthetic MG wastewater was optimized for the sorbent dosage, MG solution pH and contact time. Sorption data was ...

  7. Competitive sorption of heavy metals by water hyacinth roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia-Chuan; Liu, Hou-Qi; Feng, Hui-Min; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Lam, Paul Kwan-Sing; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a global issue severely constraining aquaculture practices, not only deteriorating the aquatic environment but also threatening the aquaculture production. One promising solution is adopting aquaponics systems where a synergy can be established between aquaculture and aquatic plants for metal sorption, but the interactions of multiple metals in such aquatic plants are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the absorption behaviors of Cu(II) and Cd(II) in water by water hyacinth roots in both single- and binary-metal systems. Cu(II) and Cd(II) were individually removed by water hyacinth roots at high efficiency, accompanied with release of protons and cations such as Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ . However, in a binary-metal arrangement, the Cd(II) sorption was significantly inhibited by Cu(II), and the higher sorption affinity of Cu(II) accounted for its competitive sorption advantage. Ionic exchange was identified as a predominant mechanism of the metal sorption by water hyacinth roots, and the amine and oxygen-containing groups are the main binding sites accounting for metal sorption via chelation or coordination. This study highlights the interactive impacts of different metals during their sorption by water hyacinth roots and elucidates the underlying mechanism of metal competitive sorption, which may provide useful implications for optimization of phytoremediation system and development of more sustainable aquaculture industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of ideal sorption compressor cycles operating with gas mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzabar, N.; ter Brake, H.J.M.

    2018-01-01

    Sorption-based compressors are thermally driven and because of the absence of moving parts they are vibration free, and have the potential for long life. Sorption-based compressors have been reported to operate Joule–Thomson (JT) cryogenic coolers with pure working fluids. However, using mixed

  9. Picloram and Aminopyralid Sorption to Soil and Clay Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminopyralid sorption data are lacking, and these data are needed to predict off-target transport and plant available herbicide in soil solution. The objective of this research was to determine the sorption of picloram and aminopyralid to five soils and three clay minerals and determine if the pote...

  10. Hysteresis and Temperature Dependency of Moisture Sorption – New Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2011-01-01

    measurements of hysteresis and temperature dependency of the moisture sorption characteristics of three different porous building materials: aerated concrete, cement paste and spruce. Scanning curves are measured for all three materials where periods with adsorption and desorption interrupt each other...... intermittently. For one of the materials, aerated concrete, the sorption curves are determined at three different temperatures....

  11. Sorption of fluoroquinolones and sulfonamides in 13 Brazilian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Rafael Marques Pereira; Alleoni, Luis Reynaldo Ferracciú; Tornisielo, Valdemar Luiz; Regitano, Jussara Borges

    2013-08-01

    Animal production is a leading economic activity in Brazil and antibiotics are widely used. However, the occurrence, behavior, and impacts of antibiotics in Brazilian soils are still poorly known. We evaluated the sorption behavior of four fluoroquinolones (norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, and enrofloxacin) and five sulfonamides (sulfadiazine, sulfachloropyridazine, sulfamethoxazole, sulfadimidine, and sulfathiazole) in 13 Brazilian soils with contrasting physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties. Fluoroquinolone sorption was very high (Kd≥544 L kg(-1)) whereas sulfonamide sorption ranged from low to high (Kd=0.7-70.1 L kg(-1)), consistent with previous reports in the literature. Soil texture and cation exchange capacity were the soil attributes that most affected sorption. Cation exchange was the most important sorption mechanism for the fluoroquinolones in highly weathered tropical soils, although cation bridging and ion pairing could not be ruled out. Hydrophobic partition played an important role in the sorption of the sulfonamides, but sorption was also affected by non-hydrophobic interactions with organic and/or mineral surfaces. Sorption for both compound classes tended to be higher in soils with high Al and Fe oxihydroxide contents, but they were not correlated with Kd values. No direct effect of soil pH was seen. The fluoroquinolones are not expected to leach even in worst-case scenarios (soils rich in sand and poor in organic carbon), whereas soil attributes dictate leaching potential for the sulfonamides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The absorption of plutonium by anion resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, R. W.; Mills, R.

    1961-10-15

    Equilibrium experiments have shown Pu{sup +4} to be absorbed from nitric acid onto an anion resin as a complex anion Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup -2}. The amount of absorption is dependent on the plutonium and nitric acid concentrations in the equilibrium solution with a maximum at 7N to 8N HNO{sub 3}. A low cross-linked resin has a higher capacity and reaches equilibrium more rapidly than the normally supplied resin. Saturation capacity of one per cent cross-linked Nalcite SBR (Dowex 1), 50 -- 100 mesh, is 385 mg Pu/gram dry resin. (author)

  13. High Vacuum Techniques for Anionic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Ratkanthwar, Kedar

    2015-09-01

    Anionic polymerization high vacuum techniques (HVTs) are the most suitable for the preparation of polymer samples with well-defined complex macromolecular architectures. Though HVTs require glassblowing skill for designing and making polymerization reactor, it is the best way to avoid any termination of living polymers during the number of steps for the synthesis of polymers with complex structure. In this chapter, we describe the different polymerization reactors and HVTs for the purification of monomers, solvents, and other reagents for anionic polymerization as well as few model reactions for the synthesis of polymers with simple to complex structure.

  14. Dibromine radical anion reactions with heme enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebicka, L.; Gebicki, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Reactions of Br 2 radical anion with heme enzymes, catalase horseradish peroxidase, have been studied by pulse radiolysis. It has been found that Br 2 - does not react with the heme centre of investigated enzymes. Dibromine radical anion reacts with tryptophan residues of catalase without any influence on the activity of catalase. It is suggested that in pulse radiolysis studies, where horseradish peroxidase is at about tenfold excess toward Br 2 - , the enzyme is modified rather by Br 2 , than by Br 2 - . (author). 26 refs., 3 figs

  15. Sorption of Np (Ⅴ) on Beishan granite fracture filling materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Tao; Wang Bo; Bao Liangjin; Zhou Duo; Long Haoqi; Song Zhixin; Chen Xi

    2012-01-01

    The sorption behaviors of Np (Ⅴ) on the granite fracture filling materials were studied by batch experiments under anaerobic in Beishan groundwater. The impact of pH of groundwater, CO 3 2- , humic acid and different components of granite fracture filling materials on sorption of Np (Ⅴ) was investigated. The results show that the granite fracture filling materials have strong capacity of Np (Ⅴ) adsorption. The value of K d , for Np (Ⅴ) sorption on the granite fracture filling materials is 843 mL/g. With the increase of pH, the value of K d increases at first and then decreases. K d of Np sorption on granite fracture filling materials in the presence of CO 3 2- and humic acid decreases. The chlorite and feldspar are major contributors to the sorption of Np (Ⅴ) on Beishan granite fracture filling materials. (authors)

  16. Sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on particulate organic matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xueyan; Luo Lei; Ma Yibing; Zhang Shuzhen

    2010-01-01

    Particulate organic matter (POM) is a key organic matter fraction which can influence soil fertility. Its interactions with hydrophobic organic pollutants (HOCs) have not been characterized and the mechanisms of retention of HOCs by POM remain unclear. In the present study, sorption behaviors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) naphthalene (NAP), phenanthrene (PHE), and pyrene (PYR) by POMs separated from different soils were examined and the POMs were characterized by elemental analysis, solid state 13 C NMR, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The results indicated that POMs were mainly composed of aliphatic components with high polarity. The different original POMs showed similar chemical composition and configuration. Sorption behaviors of PAHs indicated that there was no significant difference in sorption capacity among the POMs. Sorption of NAP and PHE by POMs displayed a nonlinear isotherm, while sorption of PYR yielded a linear isotherm. No significant hysteresis and ionic strength effect were observed for PAH desorption from the POMs.

  17. Sorption of perfluoroalkyl substances to two types of minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellsing, Maja S; Josefsson, Sarah; Hughes, Arwel V; Ahrens, Lutz

    2016-09-01

    The sorption of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) was investigated for two model soil mineral surfaces, alumina (Al2O3) and silica (SiO2), on molecular level using neutron scattering. The PFASs were selected (i.e. perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS)) to examine the role of hydrophobic chain length and hydrophilic functional group on their sorption behaviour. All four PFASs were found to sorb to alumina surface (positively charged) forming a hydrated layer consisting of 50% PFASs. The PFAS solubility limit, which decrease with chain length, was found to strongly influence the sorption behaviour. The sorbed PFAS layer could easily be removed by gentle rinsing with water, indicating release upon rainfall in the environment. No sorption was observed for PFOA and PFOS at silica surface (negatively charged), showing electrostatic interaction being the driving force in the sorption process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sorption behaviour of cobalt-60 on Suez Canal bottom sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Gawad, S.A.; El-Shinawy, R.M.K.; Abdel Malik, W.E.Y.

    1981-01-01

    Mineralogical, elemental analysis and sorption behaviour of the Suez Canal bottom sediments in the Port Said area were investigated. It was found that the bottom sediment consist mainly of quartz, feldspars and traces of calcite mineral. The cation-exchange capacity was found to increase as the particle size of the sediment decreased. Sorption of 60 Co by the bottom sediment increased with contact time up to 6 h. Variation of the solution pH from 4 to 9 showed limited increase in the sorption of 60 Co. As carrier concentrations increase from 10 -7 N to 10 -3 N, sorption of Co was found to increase linearly following Freundlich isotherm. The presence of Mg 2+ and Fe 3+ in solution depressed the sorption of 60 Co by the sediments. The desorption of 60 Co from bottom sediment with distilled and Suez Canal water was found to increase with contact time. (author)

  19. Sorption mechanisms of metals to graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showalter, Allison R; Bunker, Bruce A; Duster, Thomas A; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Na, Chongzheng; Fein, Jeremy B

    2016-01-01

    Environmental toxic metal contamination remediation and prevention is an ongoing issue. Graphene oxide is highly sorptive for many heavy metals over a wide pH range under different ionic strength conditions. We present x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy results investigating the binding environment of Pb(II), Cd(II) and U(VI) ions onto multi-layered graphene oxide (MLGO). Analysis indicates that the dominant sorption mechanism of Pb to MLGO changes as a function of pH, with increasing inner sphere contribution as pH increases. In contrast, the sorption mechanism of Cd to MLGO remains constant under the studied pH range. This adsorption mechanism is an electrostatic attraction between the hydrated Cd +2 ion and the MLGO surface. The U(VI), present as the uranyl ion, changes only subtly as a function of pH and is bound to the surface via an inner sphere bond. Knowledge of the binding mechanism for each metal is necessary to help in optimizing environmental remediation or prevention in filtration systems. (paper)

  20. Mercury Sorption onto Malt Spent Rootlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manariotis, I. D.; Anagnostopoulos, V.; Karapanagioti, H. K.; Chrysikopoulos, C.

    2011-12-01

    Mercury is a metal of particular concern due to its toxicity even at relatively low concentrations. The maximum permissible level for mercury in drinking water set by the European Union is 0.001 mg/L. Mercury is released into the environment via four principal pathways: (1) natural processes; i.e. a volcanic eruption, (2) incidental to some other activity; i.e. coal burning power plants, (3) accidentally during the manufacture, breakage or disposal of products that have mercury put into them deliberately, and (4) direct use in industrial settings. The present study focuses on the removal of mercury (II) from aqueous solutions via sorption onto Malt Spent Rootlets (MSR). Batch experiments were conducted employing MSR with size ranging from 0.18 to 1 mm. The effects of pH, mercury concentration, contact time, and solid to liquid ratio on mercury sorption onto MSR were investigated. The highest mercury removal from the aqueous phase, of 41%, was observed at pH of 5.

  1. Tritium sorption by cement and subsequent release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, F.; Yamawaki, M.

    1995-01-01

    In a fusion reactor or tritium-handling facilities, contamination of concrete by tritium and subsequent release from it to the reator or experimental room is a matter of problem for safe control of tritium and management of operational environment. In order to evaluate this tritium behavior, interaction of tritiated water with concrete or cement should be clarified. In the present study, HTO sorption and subsequent release from cement were experimentally studied.(1)Sorption experiments were conducted using columns packed with cement particles of different sizes. From the analysis of the breakthrough curve, tritium diffusivity in macropores and microparticles were evaluated.(2)From the short-term tritium release experiments, effective desorption rate constants were evaluated and the effects of temperature and moisture were studied.(3)In the long-term tritium release experiments to 6000h, the tritium release mechanism was found to be composed of three kinds of water: initially from capillary water, and in the second stage from gel water and from the water in the cement crystal.(4)Tritium release behavior by heat treatment to 800 C was studied. A high temperature above 600 C was required for the tritium trapped in the crystal water to be released. (orig.)

  2. Sorption of uranium by cellulose derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroi, M.; Imai, S.; Hamaguchi, A.

    1985-01-01

    The sorption behaviour of uranium was investigated by batch and column methods using four cellulose derivatives, two having an amino group and two having an amino group plus a dithiocarboxylate group. All four derivatives showed maximum uranium sorption from pure water in the neutral region or from artificial sea water in the acidic region. In the batch method, quantitative removal of 100 μg of uranium from 50 ml of water at pH 5.0 was achieved by equilibration with 50 mg of any of the four sorbents. The percentage removal under these conditions decreased gradually with increasing concentration of uranium above 100 μg per 50 ml. A similar high percentage removal of uranium was achieved using artificial sea water. In the column method, quantitative removal of 5 μg of uranium from 1l of water at pH 6.7 was achieved with 200 mg of either of the two sorbents. Similar quantitative removal of uranium was achieved from 1l of artificial sea water at pH 5.4 with 500 mg of either of the two sorbents. (author)

  3. Uranium sorption on tezontle volcanic rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez M, B. E.; Duran B, J. M.; Iturbe G, J. L.; Olguin G, M. T., E-mail: beatriz.lopez@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    It is described a study that demonstrates that hexavalent uranium ions were sorbed by the naturally occurring mineral using a batch technique. This mineral is found in abundant quantities in Mexico. Our study focused on the separation of U Vi from synthetic aqueous systems of both H{sub 2}O-UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O (acid) and H{sub 2}O-Na{sub 4}[UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}] (basic). The chemical speciation was performed by using high voltage electrophoresis, and the uranium content was determined by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The quantified U(Vi) sorption by tezontle from acidic and basic systems was 2.72 and 1.68 mumol/g, respectively, and the sorption behavior is discussed considering the surface charge of the tezontle at different ph values based on the point of zero charge characteristic of this material. (Author)

  4. Gas Sorption, Diffusion, and Permeation in Nafion

    KAUST Repository

    Mukaddam, Mohsin Ahmed

    2015-12-22

    The gas permeability of dry Nafion films was determined at 2 atm and 35 °C for He, H2, N2, O2, CO2, CH4, C2H6, and C3H8. In addition, gas sorption isotherms were determined by gravimetric and barometric techniques as a function of pressure up to 20 atm. Nafion exhibited linear sorption uptake for low-solubility gases, following Henry’s law, and convex behavior for highly sorbing condensable gases, indicating rubber-like behavior at 35 °C. XRD results demonstrated that Nafion contains bimodal amorphous chain domains with average d-spacing values of 2.3 and 5.3 Å. Only helium and hydrogen showed relatively high gas permeability of 37 and 7 barrers, respectively; all other gases exhibited low permeability that decreased significantly as penetrant size increased. Dry Nafion was characterized by extraordinarily high selectivities: He/H2 = 5.2, He/CH4 = 445, He/C2H6 = 1275, He/C3H8 = 7400, CO2/CH4 = 28, CO2/C2H6 = 79, CO2/C3H8 = 460, H2/CH4 = 84, H2/C2H6 = 241, and H2/C3H8 = 1400. These high selectivities could make Nafion a potential candidate membrane material for dry feeds for helium recovery and carbon dioxide separation from natural gas and removal of higher hydrocarbons from hydrogen-containing refinery gases.

  5. Status of sorption information retrieval system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hostetler, D.D.; Serne, R.J.; Brandstetter, A.

    1979-09-01

    A Sorption Information Retrieval System (SIRS) is being designed to provide an efficient, computerized, data base for information on radionuclide sorption in geologic media. The data bank will include Kd values for a large number of radionuclides occurring in radioactive wastes originating from the commercial nuclear power industry. Kd values determined to date span several groundwater compositions and a wide variety of rock types and minerals. The data system will not only include Kd values, but also background information on the experiments themselves. This will allow the potential user to retrieve not only the Kd values of interest but also sufficient information to evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of the data. During FY-1979, the logic structure of the system was designed, the software programmed, the data categories selected, and the data format specified. About 40% of the approximately 5000 Kd experiments performed by the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) and its subcontractors during FY-1977 and FY-1978 have been evaluated, coded and keypunched. Additional software improvements and system testing are needed before the system will be fully operational. A workshop requested by the NEA was held to discuss potential internatioal participation in the data system

  6. Sorption and diffusion of Cs and I in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, K.; Torstenfelt, B.; Allard, B.

    1983-01-01

    Concrete has been suggested as a possible encapsulation material for long-term storage of low and medium level radioactive waste. At an underground storage of concrete encapsulated waste, a slow release of radioactive elements into the groundwater by diffusion through the concrete must be considered in the safety analysis. The diffusion may be delayed by sorption reactions on the solid. A wide range of long-lived radionuclides may be present in the low and medium level radioactive waste. Here, the sorption and diffusion of iodide and cesium on slag cement paste and concrete has been studied. The influence of four different water phases (pore water, groundwater, Baltic Sea water and sea water) as well as the influence of some added species (carbonate, sulphate and magnesium) has been investigated. A significant sorption of iodide on cement paste in contact with pore water was observed, indicating that the diffusion may be expected to be retarded in this medium. For cesium the highest sorption was found for concrete and groundwater. This means that the sorption increases as the concrete is weathered. Low or insignificant sorption was found for the cement paste, indicating that the ballast is responsible for the Cs-sorption. Carbonatization enhances the Cs-sorption by about a factor of 3. The diffusivity of Cs in concrete and cement paste was determined to between 2x10 - 14 and 8x10 - 14 m 2 /s in pore water (where an insignificant sorption was observed). The choice of ballast as well as addition of suitable getters with high sorption of the long-lived radionuclides might decrease the mass transfer rate through the cement. (Authors)

  7. Effect of humic acid on sorption of technetium by alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.; Rawat, N.; Kar, A.S.; Tomar, B.S.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Tc sorption on alumina has been studied under aerobic as well anaerobic condition over pH 3-10. → Effect of humic acid on sorption of Tc by alumina has been investigated. → Linear additive modeling and surface complexation modeling were carried out to delineate the role of humic acid in Tc(IV) sorption in ternary system of Tc(IV)-humic acid-alumina. → Sorption of humic acid onto alumina and strong complexation of Tc(IV) with humic acid were found to govern the sorption of Tc(IV) in the ternary system. - Abstract: Sorption of technetium by alumina has been studied in absence as well as in presence of humic acid using 95 Tc m as a tracer. Measurements were carried out at fixed ionic strength (0.1 M NaClO 4 ) under varying pH (3-10) as well as redox (aerobic and reducing anaerobic) conditions. Under aerobic conditions, negligible sorption of technetium was observed onto alumina both in absence and in presence of humic acid. However, under reducing conditions (simulated with [Sn(II)] = 10 -6 M), presence of humic acid enhanced the sorption of technetium in the low pH region significantly and decreased at higher pH with respect to that in absence of humic acid. Linear additive as well as surface complexation modeling of Tc(IV) sorption in presence of humic acid indicated the predominant role of sorbed humic acid in deciding technetium sorption onto alumina.

  8. Capability Handbook- offline metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Marhöfer, David Maximilian; Tosello, Guido

    This offline metrological capability handbook has been made in relation to HiMicro Task 3.3. The purpose of this document is to assess the metrological capability of the HiMicro partners and to gather the information of all available metrological instruments in the one single document. It provides...

  9. Dynamic Capabilities and Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilden, Ralf; Gudergan, Siegfried P.; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    are contingent on the competitive intensity faced by firms. Our findings demonstrate the performance effects of internal alignment between organizational structure and dynamic capabilities, as well as the external fit of dynamic capabilities with competitive intensity. We outline the advantages of PLS...

  10. Developing Alliance Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimeriks, Koen H.; Duysters, Geert; Vanhaverbeke, Wim

    This paper assesses the differential performance effects of learning mechanisms on the development of alliance capabilities. Prior research has suggested that different capability levels could be identified in which specific intra-firm learning mechanisms are used to enhance a firm's alliance...

  11. Telematics Options and Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, Cabell [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-05

    This presentation describes the data tracking and analytical capabilities of telematics devices. Federal fleet managers can use the systems to keep their drivers safe, maintain a fuel efficient fleet, ease their reporting burden, and save money. The presentation includes an example of how much these capabilities can save fleets.

  12. Anion exchange behavior of Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb and Ta as homologues of Rf and Db in mixed HF-acetone solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, N.V.; Bozhikov, G.A.; Starodub, G.Ya.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Filosofov, D.V.; Jon Sun Jin; Radchenko, V.I.; Lebedev, N.A.; Novgorodov, A.F.

    2009-01-01

    We studied in detail the sorption behavior of Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb and Ta on AG 1 anion exchange resin in HF-acetone mixed solutions as a function of organic cosolvent and acid concentrations. Anion exchange behavior was found to be strongly acetone concentration dependent. The distribution coefficients of Ti, Zr, Hf and Nb increased and those of Ta decreased with increasing content of acetone in HF solutions. With increasing HF concentration, anion exchange equilibrium analysis indicated the formation of fluoride complexes of group-4 elements with charge -3 and Ta with charge -2. For Nb the slope of -2 increased up to -5. Optimal conditions for separation of the elements using AIX chromatography were found. Group-4 elements formed MF 7 3- (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) complexes whose sorption decreased Ti > Hf > Zr in reverse order of complex stability. This fact is of particular interest for studying ion exchange behavior of Rf compared to Ti. The advantages of studying chemical properties of Rf and Db in aqueous HF solutions mixed with organic solvents are briefly discussed

  13. Formation of Aqueous MgUO2(CO3)32- Complex and Uranium Anion Exchange Mechanism onto an Exchange Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Wenming; Brooks, Scott C

    2008-01-01

    The formation of and stability constants for aqueous Mg-UO2-CO3 complexes were determined using an anion exchange method. Magnesium concentration was varied (up to 20 mmol/L) at constant ionic strength (I = 0.101, 0.202, 0.304, 0.406, and 0.509 mol/kg NaNO3), pH = 8.1, total [U(VI)] = 10.4 mol/L under equilibrium with atmospheric CO2. The results indicate that only the MgUO2(CO3)32- complex is formed. The cumulative formation constant extrapolated to zero ionic strength is similar regardless of the activity correction convention used: log = 25.8 b 0.5 using Davies equation and = 25.02 b 0.08 using specific ion interaction theory (SIT). Uranium sorption onto the exchange resin decreased in the presence of Mg putatively due to the formation of MgUO2(CO3)32- that had a lower affinity for the resin than UO2(CO3)34-. Uranium sorption results are consistent with an equivalent anion exchange reaction between NO3- and UO2(CO3)34- species to retain charge neutrality regardless of Mg concentration. No Mg was associated with the anion exchange resin indicating that the MgUO2(CO3)32- complex did not sorb

  14. The assessment of pellicular anion-exchange resins for the determination of anions by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlandt, C.

    1981-01-01

    Because pellicular anion-exchange resins suitable for the determination, by ion chromatography, of anions with alkaline eluents were unavailable in South Africa at the inception of this work, an attempt was made to prepare such resins. In this study it is shown that the pellicular resins produced are more efficient than the surface-aminated resins used previously. The simultaneous separation and determination of five common anions is demonstrated. The method was applied to the analysis of uranium leach liquors, effluent samples, and a solid sample of ferric oxide (goethite)

  15. Removal of tartrazine from aqueous solutions by strongly basic polystyrene anion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzkiewicz, Monika; Hubicki, Zbigniew

    2009-05-30

    The removal of tartrazine from aqueous solutions onto the strongly basic polystyrene anion exchangers of type 1 (Amberlite IRA-900) and type 2 (Amberlite IRA-910) was investigated. The experimental data obtained at 100, 200, 300 and 500 mg/dm(3) initial concentrations at 20 degrees C were applied to the pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and Weber-Morris kinetic models. The calculated sorption capacities (q(e,cal)) and the rate constant of the first order adsorption (k(1)) were determined. The pseudo-second order kinetic constants (k(2)) and capacities were calculated from the plots of t/q(t) vs. t, 1/q(t) vs. 1/t, 1/t vs. 1/q(t) and q(t)/t vs. q(t) for type 1, type 2, type 3 and type 4 of the pseudo-second order expression, respectively. The influence of phase contact time, solution pH and temperature on tartrazine removal was also discussed. The FTIR spectra of pure anion exchangers and those loaded with tartrazine were recorded, too.

  16. Limitations of sorption isotherms on modeling groundwater contaminant transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Eduardo Figueira da

    2007-01-01

    Design and safety assessment of radioactive waste repositories, as well as remediation of radionuclide contaminated groundwater require the development of models capable of accurately predicting trace element fate and transport. Adsorption of trace radionuclides onto soils and groundwater is an important mechanism controlling near- and far- field transport. Although surface complexation models (SCMs) can better describe the adsorption mechanisms of most radionuclides onto mineral surfaces by directly accounting for variability of system properties and mineral surface properties, isotherms are still used to model contaminant transport in groundwater, despite the much higher system dependence. The present work investigates differences between transport model results based on these two approaches for adsorption modeling. A finite element transport model is used for the isotherm model, whereas the computer program PHREEQC is used for the SCM approach. Both models are calibrated for a batch experiment, and one-dimensional transport is simulated using the calibrated parameters. At the lower injected concentrations there are large discrepancies between SCM and isotherm transport predictions, with the SCM presenting much longer tails on the breakthrough curves. Isotherms may also provide non-conservative results for time to breakthrough and for maximum concentration in a contamination plume. Isotherm models are shown not to be robust enough to predict transport behavior of some trace elements, thus discouraging their use. The results also illustrate the promise of the SCM modeling approach in safety assessment and environmental remediation applications, also suggesting that independent batch sorption measurements can be used, within the framework of the SCM, to produce a more versatile and realistic groundwater transport model for radionuclides which is capable of accounting more accurately for temporal and spatial variations in geochemical conditions. (author)

  17. Interstellar dehydrogenated PAH anions: vibrational spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buragohain, Mridusmita; Pathak, Amit; Sarre, Peter; Gour, Nand Kishor

    2018-03-01

    Interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules exist in diverse forms depending on the local physical environment. Formation of ionized PAHs (anions and cations) is favourable in the extreme conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM). Besides in their pure form, PAHs are also likely to exist in substituted forms; for example, PAHs with functional groups, dehydrogenated PAHs etc. A dehydrogenated PAH molecule might subsequently form fullerenes in the ISM as a result of ongoing chemical processes. This work presents a density functional theory (DFT) calculation on dehydrogenated PAH anions to explore the infrared emission spectra of these molecules and discuss any possible contribution towards observed IR features in the ISM. The results suggest that dehydrogenated PAH anions might be significantly contributing to the 3.3 μm region. Spectroscopic features unique to dehydrogenated PAH anions are highlighted that may be used for their possible identification in the ISM. A comparison has also been made to see the size effect on spectra of these PAHs.

  18. Anion-conducting polymer, composition, and membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovar, Bryan S [Los Alamos, NM; Thorn, David L [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-09-01

    Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

  19. Synthesis of azaphenanthridines via anionic ring closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henriette Møller; Lysén, M.; Begtrup, M.

    2005-01-01

    A new and convergent synthesis of azaphenanthridines via an anionic ring closure is reported. Ortho-lithiation/in situ borylation of cyanopyridines produces the corresponding cyanopyridylboronic esters, which undergo a Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling to give the key intermediates. Addition of lithium...

  20. Sorption of cesium in young till soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusa, Merja; Lempinen, Janne; Ahola, Hanna; Soederlund, Mervi; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Laboratory of Radiochemistry; Lahdenperae, Anne-Maj [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Consulting Engineers, Helsinki (Finland); Ikonen, Ari T.K. [Posiva Oy, Eurajoki (Finland)

    2014-10-01

    Soil samples from three forest soil pits were examined down to a depth of approximately three metres using 1 M ammonium acetate extraction and microwave-assisted extraction with concentrated nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), to study the binding of cesium (Cs) at Olkiluoto Island, southern Finland. Ammonium acetate was used to extract the readily exchangeable Cs fractions roughly representing the Cs fraction in soil which is available for plants. Microwave-assisted HNO{sub 3} extraction dissolves various minerals, e.g. carbonates, most sulphides, arsenides, selenides, phosphates, molybdates, sulphates, iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) oxides and some silicates (olivine, biotite, zeolite), and reflects the total Cs concentrations. Cs was mostly found in the strongly bound fraction obtained through HNO{sub 3} extraction. The average Cs concentrations found in this fraction were 3.53 ± 0.30 mg/kg (d.w.), 3.06 ± 1.86 mg/kg (d.w.) and 1.83 ± 0.42 mg/kg (d.w.) in the three soil pits, respectively. The average exchangeable Cs found in the ammonium acetate extraction in all three sampling pits was 0.015 ± 0.008 mg/kg (d.w.). In addition, Cs concentrations in the soil solution were determined and in situ distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) for Cs were calculated. Furthermore, the in situ K{sub d} data was compared with the Cs K{sub d} data obtained using the model batch experiments. The in situ K{sub d} values were observed to fairly well follow the trend of batch sorption data with respect to soil depth, but on average the batch distribution coefficients were almost an order of magnitude higher than the in situ K{sub d} data. In situ Cs sorption data could be satisfactory fitted with the Langmuir sorption isotherm, but the Freundlich isotherm failed to fit the data. Finally, distribution coefficients were calculated by an ion exchange approach using soil solution data, the cation exchange capacity (CEC) as well as Cs to sodium (Na) and Cs to potassium (K) ion exchange selectivity

  1. FMEF/experimental capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, C.A.; Dronen, V.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), under construction at the Hanford site north of Richland, Washington, will be one of the most modern facilities offering irradiated fuels and materials examination capabilities and fuel fabrication development technologies. Scheduled for completion in 1984, the FMEF will provide examination capability for fuel assemblies, fuel pins and test pins irradiated in the FFTF. Various functions of the FMEF are described, with emphasis on experimental data-gathering capabilities in the facility's Nondestructive and Destructive examination cell complex

  2. KSC Technical Capabilities Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nufer, Brian; Bursian, Henry; Brown, Laurette L.

    2010-01-01

    This document is the website pages that review the technical capabilities that the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has for partnership opportunities. The purpose of this information is to make prospective customers aware of the capabilities and provide an opportunity to form relationships with the experts at KSC. The technical capabilities fall into these areas: (1) Ground Operations and Processing Services, (2) Design and Analysis Solutions, (3) Command and Control Systems / Services, (4) Materials and Processes, (5) Research and Technology Development and (6) Laboratories, Shops and Test Facilities.

  3. Modelling the transport of carbonic acid anions through anion-exchange membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonenko, V.; Lebedev, K.; Manzanares, J.A.; Pourcelly, G.

    2003-01-01

    Electrodiffusion of carbonate and bicarbonate anions through anion-exchange membranes (AEM) is described on the basis of the Nernst-Planck equations taking into account coupled hydrolysis reactions in the external diffusion boundary layers (DBLs) and internal pore solution. The model supposes local electroneutrality as well as chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium. The transport is considered in three layers being an anion exchange membrane and two adjoining diffusion layers. A mechanism of competitive transport of HCO 3 - and CO 3 2- anions through the membrane which takes into account Donnan exclusion of H + ions is proposed. It is predicted that the pH of the depleting solution decreases and that of the concentrating solution increases during electrodialysis (ED). Eventual deviations from local electroneutrality and local chemical equilibrium are discussed

  4. Study of sorption processes of copper on synthetic hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosskopfova, O.; Galambos, M.; Ometakova, J.; Rajec, P.; Caplovicova, M.

    2012-01-01

    The sorption of copper on synthetic hydroxyapatite was investigated using a batch method and radiotracer technique. The hydroxyapatite sample prepared by a wet precipitation process was of high crystallinity with Ca/P ratio of 1.688. The sorption of copper on hydroxyapatite was pH independent ranging from 4 to 6 as a result of buffering properties of hydroxyapatite. The adsorption of copper was rapid and the percentage of Cu sorption was >98% during the first 15-30 min of the contact time. The experimental data for sorption of copper have been interpreted in the term of Langmuir isotherm. The sorption of Cu 2+ ions was performed by ion-exchange with Ca 2+ cations on the crystal surface of hydroxyapatite under experimental conditions. The competition effect of Zn 2+ , Fe 2+ and Pb 2+ towards Cu 2+ sorption was stronger than that of Co 2+ , Ni 2+ and Ca 2+ ions. The ability of the bivalent cations to depress the sorption of copper on hydroxyapatite was in the following order Pb 2+ > Fe 2+ > Zn 2+ > Co 2+ ∼ Ni 2+ . (author)

  5. Artificial Weathering of Biotite and Uranium Sorption Characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Baik, Min Hoon; Lee, Jae Kwang

    2009-01-01

    An experiment for uranium sorption onto fresh and weathered biotites was performed. After centrifugation, concentrations of uranium in the supernatants were analyzed using ICP-MS, and biotite samples were investigated using XRD and SEM. With powdered biotites (<3 mm in size), we have conducted uranium sorption experiments about fresh and weathered biotites to obtain uranium sorption amounts in various pH conditions. The uranium sorption was not high at a low pH (e.g., pH 3), but increased with increasing pH. There were lower uranium sorption by the weathered biotites than by the fresh ones, and the difference was much larger at higher pH (e.g., pH 11). The lower sorption values of uranium by the weathered biotites may be caused by a change of mineral surfaces and a chemical behavior of surrounding dissolved elements. It seems that the uranium-mineral interaction has been diminished, especially, in the weathered biotite by a destruction and dissolution of preferential sorption sites on the mineral surfaces and by the colloidal formation from dissolved elements.

  6. Mechanisms of metal sorption by biochars: Biochar characteristics and modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongbo; Dong, Xiaoling; da Silva, Evandro B; de Oliveira, Letuzia M; Chen, Yanshan; Ma, Lena Q

    2017-07-01

    Biochar produced by thermal decomposition of biomass under oxygen-limited conditions has received increasing attention as a cost-effective sorbent to treat metal-contaminated waters. However, there is a lack of information on the roles of different sorption mechanisms for different metals and recent development of biochar modification to enhance metal sorption capacity, which is critical for biochar field application. This review summarizes the characteristics of biochar (e.g., surface area, porosity, pH, surface charge, functional groups, and mineral components) and main mechanisms governing sorption of As, Cr, Cd, Pb, and Hg by biochar. Biochar properties vary considerably with feedstock material and pyrolysis temperature, with high temperature producing biochars with higher surface area, porosity, pH, and mineral contents, but less functional groups. Different mechanisms dominate sorption of As (complexation and electrostatic interactions), Cr (electrostatic interactions, reduction, and complexation), Cd and Pb (complexation, cation exchange, and precipitation), and Hg (complexation and reduction). Besides sorption mechanisms, recent advance in modifying biochar by loading with minerals, reductants, organic functional groups, and nanoparticles, and activation with alkali solution to enhance metal sorption capacity is discussed. Future research needs for field application of biochar include competitive sorption mechanisms of co-existing metals, biochar reuse, and cost reduction of biochar production. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Role of interlayer hydration in lincomycin sorption by smectite clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuiping; Ding, Yunjie; Teppen, Brian J; Boyd, Stephen A; Song, Cunyi; Li, Hui

    2009-08-15

    Lincomycin, an antibiotic widely administered as a veterinary medicine, is frequently detected in water. Little is known about the soil-water distribution of lincomycin despite the fact that this is a major determinant of its environmental fate and potential for exposure. Cation exchange was found to be the primary mechanism responsible for lincomycin sorption by soil clay minerals. This was evidenced by pH-dependent sorption, and competition with inorganic cations for sorptive sites. As solution pH increased, lincomycin sorption decreased. The extent of reduction was consistent with the decrease in cationic lincomycin species in solution. The presence of Ca2+ in solution diminished lincomycin sorption. Clay interlayer hydration status strongly influenced lincomycin adsorption. Smectites with the charge deficit from isomorphic substitution in tetrahedral layers (i.e., saponite) manifest a less hydrated interlayer environment resulting in greater sorption than that by octahedrally substituted clays (i.e., montmorillonite). Strongly hydrated exchangeable cations resulted in a more hydrated clay interlayer environment reducing sorption in the order of Ca- smectite. X-ray diffraction revealed that lincomycin was intercalated in smectite clay interlayers. Sorption capacity was limited by clay surface area rather than by cation exchange capacity. Smectite interlayer hydration was shown to be a major, yet previously unrecognized, factor influencing the cation exchange process of lincomycin on aluminosilicate mineral surfaces.

  8. Web-based sorption database (KAERI-SDB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Kwang; Baik, Min Hoon

    2010-10-01

    Radionuclide sorption data is necessary for the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal. However the accessibility to the nuclide sorption database is limited. The web-based sorption database (KAERI-SDB) was developed to provide sorption data in a convenient way. The development of the KAERI-SDB was achieved by improving the performance of pre-existing sorption DB programme (SDB-21C) and incorporating the user requirement. The KAERI-SDB was designed that users can access it by using a web browser. Main functions of the KAERI-SDB include (1) log-in/join, (2) search and store of sorption data and (3) scatter plot chart and index chart. It is expected that the KAERI-SDB is widely applied to the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal by enhancing the accessibility to experts and practitioner related the nuclear industry and governmental administration. It is also expected that reliabilities for the radioactive waste disposal increased by opening the web-based sorption DB to public

  9. A mechanistic approach to the generation of sorption databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B.

    1992-01-01

    Sorption of radionuclides in the near and far fields of an underground nuclear waste repository is one of the most important processes retarding their release to the environment. In the vast majority of cases sorption data have been presented in terms of empirical parameters such as distribution coefficients and isotherm equations. A consequence of this empirical methodology is that the sorption data are only strictly valid under the experimental conditions at which they were measured. Implicit in this approach is the need to generate large amounts of data and fitting parameters necessary for an empirical description of sorption under all realistically conceivable conditions which may arise in space and time along the migration pathway to Man. An alternative approach to the problem is to try to understand, and develop model descriptions of, underlying retention mechanisms and to identify those systems parameters which essentially determine the extent of sorption. The aim of this work is to see to what extent currently existing mechanistic models, together with their associated data, can be applied to predict sorption data from laboratory experiments on natural systems. This paper describes the current status of this work which is very much in an early stage of development. An example is given whereby model predictions are compared with laboratory results for the sorption of Np at trace concentrations under oxidizing conditions on a series of minerals relevant to granite formations. 31 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Water vapor sorption thermodynamics of the Nafion ionomer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsö, Lars; Jannasch, Patric

    2013-07-18

    The water interactions of polymer electrolyte membranes are of significant interest when these materials are used in, for example, fuel cells. We have therefore studied the sorption thermodynamics of Nafion with a sorption calorimeter that simultaneously measures the sorption isotherm and the mixing (sorption) enthalpy. This unique method is suitable for investigating the sorption thermodynamics of ionic polymers. The measurements were made at 25 °C on a series of samples dried at different temperatures from 25 to 120 °C. The sorption isotherms indicate that the samples dried at 120 °C lost about 0.8 more water molecules per sulfonic group during the drying than did the samples dried at 25 °C, and this result was verified gravimetrically. The mixing enthalpies showed several peaks or plateaus for the samples dried at 60-120 °C. This behavior was seen up to about 2 water molecules per sulfonic group. As these peaks were not directly related to any feature in the sorption isotherm, they probably have their origin in a secondary process, such as a reorganization of the polymer.

  11. Sorption of strontium by magnetically modified yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yantao; Ji Yanqin; Tian Qing; Shao Xianzhang; Shi Jianhe; Ivo Safarik; Zhang Shengdong; Li Jinying

    2008-01-01

    Magnetically modified fodder's yeast (Kluyveromyces fragilis) cells using water based magnetic fluid, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). The sorption-desorption properties of Sr 2+ by these yeast cells from nitrate salt of Sr 2+ were studied. The results demonstrated that the Sr 2+ sorption volume by these cells enhanced with increasing pH and reached a plateau between pH 4.0 and 7.0. A minor effect by temperature was observed. The sorption volumes are 19.5 mg/g and 53.5 mg/g from 10 ppm and 40 ppm Sr 2+ solution respectively within 20 min. The sorption of Sr 2+ in these cells can be desorbed under 0.1 mol/L HNO 3 solution. The maximum Sr 2+ sorption volume is 96.7 mg/g at 20℃. The sorption characteristic fits Langmuir model well with 140.8 mg/g calculated maximum sorption volume by these yeast cells. (authors)

  12. New Anion-Exchange Resins for Improved Separations of Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartsch, Richard A.; Barr, Mary E.

    2001-01-01

    Improved separations of nuclear materials will have a significant impact upon a broad range of DOE activities. DOE-EM Focus Areas and Crosscutting Programs have identified improved methods for the extraction and recovery of radioactive metal ions from process, waste, and environmental waters as critical needs for the coming years. We propose to develop multifunctional anion-exchange resins that facilitate anion uptake by carefully controlling the structure of the anion receptor site. Our new ion-exchange resins interface the field of ion-specific chelating ligands with robust, commercial ion-exchange technology to provide materials which exhibit superior selectivity and kinetics of sorption and desorption. The following Focus Areas and Crosscutting Programs have described needs that would be favorably impacted by the new material: Efficient Separations and Processing - radionuclide removal from aqueous phases; Plutonium - Pu, Am or total alpha removal to meet regulatory requirement s before discharge to the environment; Plumes - U and Tc in groundwater, U, Pu, Am, and Tc in soils; Mixed Waste - radionuclide partitioning; High-Level Tank Waste - actinide and Tc removal from supernatants and/or sludges. The basic scientific issues which need to be addressed are actinide complex speciation along with modeling of metal complex/functional site interactions in order to determine optimal binding-site characteristics. Synthesis of multifunctionalized extractants and ion-exchange materials that implement key features of the optimized binding site, and testing of these materials, will provide feedback to the modeling and design activities. Resin materials which actively facilitate the uptake of actinide complexes from solution should display both improved selectivity and kinetic properties. The long-range implications of this research, however, go far beyond the nuclear complex. This new methodology of ''facilitated uptake'' could revolutionize ion-exchange technology

  13. Retention of metal and sulphate ions from acidic mining water by anionic nanofibrillated cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venäläinen, Salla H; Hartikainen, Helinä

    2017-12-01

    We carried out an adsorption experiment to investigate the ability of anionic nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) to retain metal and SO 4 2- ions from authentic highly acidic (pH3.2) mining water. Anionic NFC gels of different consistencies (1.1-%, 1.4-% and 1.8-% w/w) were allowed to react for 10min with mining water, after which NFC-induced changes in the metal and SO 4 2- concentrations of the mining water were determined. The sorption capacities of the NFC gels were calculated as the difference between the element concentrations in the untreated and NFC-treated mining water samples. All the NFCs efficiently co-adsorbed both metals and SO 4 2- . The retention of metals was concluded to take place through formation of metal-ligand complexes. The reaction between the NFC ligand and the polyvalent cations renders the cellulose nanofibrils positively charged and, thus, able to retain SO 4 2- electrostatically. Adsorption capacity of the NFC gels substantially increased upon decreasing DM content as a result of the dilution-induced weakening of the mutual interactions between individual cellulose nanofibrils. This outcome reveals that the dilution of the NFC gel not only increases its purification capacity but also reduces the demand for cellulosic raw material. These results suggest that anionic NFC made of renewable materials serves as an environmentally sound and multifunctional purification agent for acidic multimetal mining waters or AMDs of high ionic strength. Unlike industrial minerals traditionally used to precipitate valuable metals from acidic mining effluents before their permanent disposal from the material cycle, NFC neither requires mining of unrenewable raw materials nor produces inorganic sludges. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Selected anionic and cationic surface active agents: case study on the Kłodnica sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olkowska Ewa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface active agents (surfactants are a group of chemical compounds, which are used as ingredients of detergents, cleaning products, cosmetics and functional products. After use, wastes containing surfactants or their degradation products are discharged to wastewater treatment plants or directly into surface waters. Due to their specific properties of SAAs, compounds are able to migrate between different environmental compartments such as soil, sediment, water or even living organisms and accumulate there. Surfactants can have a harmful effect on living organisms. They can connect with bioactive molecules and modify their function. Additionally, they have the ability to migrate into cells and cause their damage or death. For these reasons investigation of individual surfactants should be conducted. The presented research has been undertaken to obtain information about SAA contamination of sediment from the River Kłodnica catchment caused by selected anionic (linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS C10-C13 and cationic (alkylbenzyldimethylammonium (BDMA-C12-16, alkyl trimethyl ammonium (DTMA, hexadecyl piridinium chloride (HP chlorides surfactants. This river flows through an area of the Upper Silesia Industrial Region where various companies and other institutions (e.g. coal mining, power plants, metallurgy, hospitals are located. To determine their concentration the following analytical tools have been applied: accelerated solvent extraction– solid phase extraction – high performance liquid chromatography – UV-Vis (anionic SAAs and conductivity (cationic SAAs detectors. In all sediments anionic SAAs have been detected. The concentrations of HTMA and BDMA-C16 in tested samples were higher than other cationic analytes. Generally, levels of surfactants with longer alkyl chains were higher and this observation can confirm their higher susceptibility to sorption on solid surfaces.

  15. Resources, constraints and capabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhondt, S.; Oeij, P.R.A.; Schröder, A.

    2018-01-01

    Human and financial resources as well as organisational capabilities are needed to overcome the manifold constraints social innovators are facing. To unlock the potential of social innovation for the whole society new (social) innovation friendly environments and new governance structures

  16. a Capability approach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    efforts towards gender equality in education as a means of achieving social justice. ... should mean that a lot of capability approach-oriented commentators are ... processes, their forms of exercising power, and their rules, unwritten cultures, ...

  17. Engineering Capabilities and Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the engineering capabilities at Johnson Space Center, The presentation also reviews the partnerships that have resulted in successfully designed and developed projects that involved commercial and educational institutions.

  18. Regulation of organic anion transport in the liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofsen, H; Jansen, PLM

    1997-01-01

    In several liver diseases the biliary transport is disturbed, resulting in, for example, jaundice and cholestasis. Many of these symptoms can be attributed to altered regulation of hepatic transporters. Organic anion transport, mediated by the canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter

  19. Changes in plasma osmolality and anion gap: potential predictors of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in plasma osmolality and anion gap: potential predictors of ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Objective: To determine the relationship of mortality to plasma osmolality and anion gap inpatients on haemodialysis.

  20. Plutonium sorption to nanocast mesoporous carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons-Moss, Tashi; Wang, Deborah; Jones, Stephen; Olive, Daniel; Nitsche, Heino [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.; Tueysuez, Harun [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    2014-09-01

    Nanocast ordered mesoporous carbons are attractive as sorbents because of their extremely high surface areas and large pore volumes. This paper compares Pu uptake, added as Pu(VI), to both untreated and chemically oxidized CMK-(carbon molecular sieves from KAIST) type mesoporous carbon with that to a commercial amorphous activated carbon. The CMK was synthesized via nanocasting by using cubic ordered mesoporous silica KIT-6 as a hard template, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and nitrogen adsorption. A portion of the CMK was oxidized by treatment with nitric acid, and will be called OX CMK. The three carbon powders have similar particle morphology, and high BET surface areas. The activated carbon is disordered, while the CMK materials show large domains of ordered cubic mesostructure. The CMK material seems to have more oxygen-containing functional groups than the activated carbon, and the oxidation of the CMK increased the density of these groups, especially - COOH, thus lowering the point of zero charge (PZC) of the material. Batch studies of all 3 materials with plutonium solutions, in a 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} matrix were performed to investigate pH dependence, sorption kinetics, Pu uptake capacities, competition with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in solution, and Pu desorption. Both CMK materials demonstrated high Pu sorption from solutions of pH 3 or greater, and the oxidized CMK also showed high sorption from pH 2 solutions. The activated carbon bound less Pu, and at a much slower rate than CMK. All other batch experiments were carried out in pH 4 solutions. The Pu uptake from low-concentration solutions was faster for the oxidized CMK than for untreated CMK, but in more concentrated samples (∝ 250 μM Pu), the Pu uptake kinetics and apparent capacity were the same for oxidized and untreated CMK. The 23-h Pu uptake capacity of the CMK

  1. Sorption compressor/mechanical expander hybrid refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. A.; Britcliffe, M.

    1987-01-01

    Experience with Deep Space Network (DSN) ground-based cryogenic refrigerators has proved the reliability of the basic two-stage Gifford-McMahon helium refrigerator. A very long life cryogenic refrigeration system appears possible by combining this expansion system or a turbo expansion system with a hydride sorption compressor in place of the usual motor driven piston compressor. To test the feasibility of this system, a commercial Gifford-McMahon refrigerator was tested using hydrogen gas as the working fluid. Although no attempt was made to optimize the system for hydrogen operation, the refrigerator developed 1.3 W at 30 K and 6.6 W at 60 K. The results of the test and of theoretical performances of the hybrid compressor coupled to these expansion systems are presented.

  2. Sorption of radionuclides on a soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Masami

    1979-01-01

    Disposal of radioactive wastes into the ground has been discussed, and this paper emphasized significance of the investigation for underground water flow and for the prediction of radionuclides through a stratified aquifer using column experiments to evaluate the internal radiation dose. Distributions and redistributions of radionuclides in a sandy layer were observed to identify the sorption model which predicts the behavior, and the underground water flow in the Plio-Pleistocene Osaka Group was investigated as an example, by mean of the measurement of 222 Rn concentration, the pumping technique and the tracer technique using the activation analysis. Then, the estimation of radioactive concentration in the underground water was worked out for the boundary condition of steady state inflow of liquid wastes and of which the 90 Sr are leached from the solidified body, moreover, the equation which easily evaluates the suitability of the disposal site was proposed. These approach may be useful for the actual site selection of radioactive wastes disposal. (author)

  3. Study of the radium sorption/desorption on goethite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassot, S.; Stammose, D.; Mallet, C.; Lefebvre, C.; Ferreux, J.-M.

    2000-01-01

    The oxi-hydroxides, present at trace level in uranium mill tailings, are responsible of about 70% of the 226 radium sorption, half being fixed on crystallized forms. This radionuclide (half time=1622y), present at high level (50 to 100kBq.kg -1 ), can be released in groundwater, involving a possible contamination of the food chain (actual concentration limit=0.37Bq.1 -1 ). So, it is very important to point out the mechanisms of the radium sorption/desorption on crystallized oxi-hydroxides as a function of chemical conditions of the system. The radium sorption on synthetic goethite α-FeOOH has been studied as a function of contact time, initial radium activity, pH, sodium and calcium concentrations. The results show that, after one hour of contact time (necessary to reach equilibrium), the radium sorption increases widely in a pH range 6-7. The increase of Na + concentration is without influence on the radium sorption, indicating the low interactions between sodium and surface sites. At the opposite, the presence of calcium in solution decreases widely the radium sorption, that indicates a competition between calcium and radium for the same kind of sorption sites of the oxi-hydroxide surface. The percentage of radium desorbed increases widely with time, from 1 to 120h and becomes constant at a time higher than 120h. This long equilibrium time for desorption in comparison with sorption one can be explain by a local evolution of the sorption sites of the solid, which become less accessible for the solution in contact. (author)

  4. Brandishing Cyberattack Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Advertising cyberwar capabilities may be helpful. It may back up a deterrence strategy. It might dissuade other states from conventional mischief or...to enable the attack.5 Many of the instruments of the attack remain with the target system, nestled in its log files, or even in the malware itself...debat- able. Even if demonstrated, what worked yesterday may not work today. But difficult does not mean impossible. Advertising cyberwar capabilities

  5. CASL Dakota Capabilities Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Brian M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Simmons, Chris [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Williams, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-10

    The Dakota software project serves the mission of Sandia National Laboratories and supports a worldwide user community by delivering state-of-the-art research and robust, usable software for optimization and uncertainty quantification. These capabilities enable advanced exploration and riskinformed prediction with a wide range of computational science and engineering models. Dakota is the verification and validation (V&V) / uncertainty quantification (UQ) software delivery vehicle for CASL, allowing analysts across focus areas to apply these capabilities to myriad nuclear engineering analyses.

  6. Sorption of Metal Ions on Clay Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel; Manceau; Chateigner; Charlet

    1999-07-01

    The local structural environment of Co sorbed on hectorite (a magnesian smectite) has been investigated by polarized EXAFS (P-EXAFS) spectroscopy on a self-supporting film of Co-sorbed hectorite. This sorption sample was prepared by contacting Co and hectorite at pH 6.5 and at high ionic strength (0.3 M NaNO3) to favor pH-dependent sorption reaction over cation exchange. A self-supporting film was elaborated after 120 h of reacting time, when apparent quasi-equilibrium conditions were attained. The half-width at half maximum of the orientation distribution of c* axis of individual clay platelets off the film normal was determined by quantitative texture analysis, and found to be equal to 18.9 degrees. Co K-edge P-EXAFS spectra were recorded at angles between the incident beam and the film normal equal to 0 degrees, 35 degrees, 50 degrees, and 60 degrees; the 90 degrees spectrum was obtained by extrapolation. Spectral analysis led to the identification of the two nearest cationic subshells containing 1.6 +/- 0.4 Mg at 3.03 Å and 2.2 +/- 0.5 Si at 3.27 Å. These distances are respectively characteristic of edge-sharing linkages between Mg and Co octahedra and of corner-sharing linkages between Co octahedra and Si tetrahedra, as in clay structures. The angular dependence of the Co-Mg and Co-Si contributions indicates that Co-Mg pairs are oriented parallel to the film plane, whereas Co-Si pairs are not. These results are interpreted by the formation of Co inner-sphere mononuclear surface complexes located at the edges of hectorite platelets, in the continuity of the (Mg, Li) octahedral sheet. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  7. Selective separation of uranium using alizarin red S (ARS)-modified anion-exchange resin or by flotation of U-ARS chelate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalifa, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    An alizarin red S (ARS)-modified anion exchange resin was prepared by a simple reaction of ARS with the anion exchange Doulite A101 and used for the efficient sorption of uranium from aqueous media. The effect of various parameters on the sorption of U(VI) (pH effect, sorption kinetics, resin capacity and breakthrough curves) was investigated. The modified resin sorbs U(VI) over a wide range of pH (2.8--5) with a maximum sorption capacity of 0.68 mmol/g at pH 3.2 to 4.0. Iron(III), Zr(IV), Ti(IV), Cu(II), and Th(IV) ions are also sorbed to different extents, but Be(II), Bi(III), Ca(II), Mg(II), Pb(II), Hg(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Al(III), Mn(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) are not sorbed; thus, conditions for separating U(VI) from these metal ions have been identified. For eluting U(VI) from the resin, 0.2 mol/L HCl was used and the recovery recorded was as high as 99.9%. The use of ARS is extended to float uranium quantitatively and selectively from aqueous media at pH ∼ 4 by using oleic acid as a surfactant. The different parameters affecting the flotation process have also been investigated. Uranium(VI) has been effectively separated from natural water samples and certified uranium ores using both procedures

  8. Supramolecular Chemistry of Selective Anion Recognition for Anions of Environmental Relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2007-01-01

    The major thrust of this project, led by the University of Kansas (Prof. Kristin Bowman-James), entails an exploration of the basic determinants of anion recognition and their application to the design, synthesis, and testing of novel sulfate extractants. A key scientific inspiration for the work comes from the need, codified in simple-to-appreciate terms by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory component of the team (viz. Dr. Bruce Moyer), for chemical entities that can help in the extractive removal of species that have low solubilities in borosilicate glass. Among such species, sulfate anion, has been identified as particularly insidious. Its presence interferes with the vitrification process, thus rendering the remediation of tank waste from, e.g., the Hanford site far more difficult and expensive. The availability of effective extractants, that would allow for the separation of separating sulfate from the major competing anions in the waste, especially nitrate, could allow for pre-vitrification removal of sulfate via liquid-liquid extraction. The efforts at The University of Texas, the subject of this report, have thus concentrated on the development of new sulfate receptors. These systems are designed to increase our basic understanding of anion recognition events and set the stage for the development of viable sulfate anion extractants. In conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) members of the research team, several of these new receptors were studied as putative extractants, with two of the systems being shown to act as promising synergists for anion exchange.

  9. SORPTION OF Cu2+ IONS ONTO DIATOMITE CONSTITUENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Rusu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the sorption capacity towards Cu2+ ions of diatomite from the Ghidirim location of RM, as well as of the extracted clay phase are presented. Separated clay fraction from diatomic material is clean enough, and especially is rich in montmorillonite. Maximum sorption capacity for studied clay fraction is achieved by rising the temperature of calcination treatment up to 200oC. At higher temperatures the lattice of montmorillonite is contracted and its sorption capacity towards Cu2+ ions decreases strongly.

  10. Sorption and desorption of diuron in Oxisol under biochar application

    OpenAIRE

    Petter, Fabiano André; Ferreira, Tamara Santos; Sinhorin, Adilson Paulo; Lima, Larissa Borges de; Morais, Leidimar Alves de; Pacheco, Leandro Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to verify the kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron in an Oxisol under application of biochar. The samples were collected in a field experiment conducted in randomized design blocks consisted of 2 base fertilization levels (0 and 400 kg∙ha−1 NPK 00-20-20 fertilizer formula) and 3 doses of biochar (0, 8 and 16 Mg∙ha−1). In the evaluation of sorption and desorption, Batch Equilibrium method was used. The kinetics of sorption and desorption of diu...

  11. Interim report on modeling sorption with EQ3/6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viani, B.

    1988-01-01

    Reversible, equilibrium models of sorption to be incorporated into the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling package are summarized. Empirical sorption models as formulated in linear, Langmuir, and Freundlich isotherms will be developed as options to EQ3/6. This work will be done at LLNL. Options for modeling sorption using surface- complexation constructs (diffuse, constant capacitance, and triple-layer models) will also be developed. Development of the surface-complexation options will require part of the work be done under contract. 27 refs., 1 fig

  12. Implementation of sorption hysteresis in multi-Fickian moisture transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2007-01-01

    In the cellular structure of wood, bound-water diffusion and water-vapor diffusion interact via sorption in a complex moisture-transportation system. At low relative humidities, moisture transport may be modeled by a Fickian diffusion equation with a good approximation. At higher relative......-35% in moisture content. Hence, for a precise moisture content computation, sorption hysteresis must be taken into account. The present paper explains the relation between sorption hysteresis and multi-Fickian moisture transport, and clarifies how models for the two phenomena are coupled. To illustrate...

  13. Sorption of molybdenum by cellulose polyphosphate from acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luneva, N.K.; Oputina, A.G.; Ermolenko, I.N.

    1985-01-01

    The sorption of molybdenum on cellulose polyphosphate from acid solutions of ammonium molybdate depending on the phosphorus content in samples, concentration and pH of the solution, sorption time is studied. It is shown that a maximum molybdenum content on the cellulose samples with different phosphorus content is pointed out at an ammonium molybdate concentration 0.02 M. Saturation of the sorption curve is attained at molar ratio of adsrbed molybdenum to phosphorus 1:4. In case of small fillings the compound with molybdenum to phosphorus ratio 1:10 is formed

  14. Sorption of Co2+ on modified inorganic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanzel, R.; Rajec, P.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was preparation and characterization of sorbents on the base a silica-gel matrix with immobilized functional group (imidazole or crown-ether). Sorption of cobalt from aqueous solutions on prepared sorbents in static conditions (by 'batch' method) in the dependence of concentration, pH value,, as well as kinetics of sorption were studied. The influence of heavy or toxic metals [Hg(II), Cd(II), Mn(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Fe(III), Cr(III), Al(III), Na and K] on sorption of cobalt was studied, too

  15. Arsenic Sorption on Mechanically Activated Magnetite and Olivine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenka Bujňáková

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic sorption on mechanically activated minerals such as magnetite Fe3O4 (Kiruna, Sweden and olivine (Mg,Fe2SiO4 (Ǻheim,Norway has been studied and compared in this work. Experiments were carried out with non-activated and mechanically activatedsamples. The activation of both minerals was performed in a planetary mill at different milling conditions. The specific surface areaand consequent sorption activity were enhanced by mechanical activation. The using of olivine seems to be better than magnetite fromthe point of view of milling time, which is necessary for achievement of the same sorption effect.

  16. Sorption of trace cesium on 21 Hanford Site sediment types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routson, R.C.; Barney, G.S.; Smith, R.M.; Delegard, C.A.

    1980-03-01

    Sorption of trace cesium (Cs) was measured on 21 Hanford Site sediment types. A Box-Behnken statistical design was used to develop empirical-statistical equations predicting 137 Cs sorption as a function of the equilibrium concentrations of macroions Na + , K + , and Ca +2 in solution over the concentration ranges of 3.0 to 0.001M, 0.2 to 0.002M, and 0.2 to 0.002M, respectively. These equations are required to estimate trace Cs transport from Hanford ground disposal sites. Average Cs sorption equations for the 21 sediments will be presented and discussed

  17. Integrated sorption and diffusion model for bentonite. Part 1. Clay-water interaction and sorption modeling in dispersed systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachi, Yukio; Suyama, Tadahiro; Ochs, Michael

    2014-01-01

    To predict the long-term migration of radionuclides (RNs) under variable conditions within the framework of safety analyses for geological disposal, thermodynamic sorption models are very powerful tools. The integrated sorption and diffusion (ISD) model for compacted bentonite was developed to achieve a consistent combination of clay–water interaction, sorption, and diffusion models. The basic premise considered in the ISD model was to consistently use the same simple surface model design and parameters for describing RNs sorption/diffusion as well as clay surface and porewater chemistry. A simple 1-site non-electrostatic surface complexation model in combination with a 1-site ion exchange model was selected to keep sorption model characteristics relatively robust for compacted systems. Fundamental parameters for the proposed model were evaluated from surface titration data for purified montmorillonite. The resulting basic model was then parameterized on the basis of selected published sorption data-sets for Np(V), Am(III), and U(VI) in dispersed systems, which cover a range of key geochemical conditions such as pH, ionic strength, and carbonate concentration. The sorption trends for these RNs can be quantitatively described by the model considering a full suite of surface species including hydrolytic and carbonate species. The application of these models to the description of diffusive-sorptive transport in compacted bentonites is presented in Part 2. (author)

  18. Development of a Self-Consistent Model of Plutonium Sorption: Quantification of Sorption Enthalpy and Ligand-Promoted Dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, Brian [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Kaplan, Daniel I [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Arai, Yuji [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Becker, Udo [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ewing, Rod [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-12-29

    This university lead SBR project is a collaboration lead by Dr. Brian Powell (Clemson University) with co-principal investigators Dan Kaplan (Savannah River National Laboratory), Yuji Arai (presently at the University of Illinois), Udo Becker (U of Michigan) and Rod Ewing (presently at Stanford University). Hypothesis: The underlying hypothesis of this work is that strong interactions of plutonium with mineral surfaces are due to formation of inner sphere complexes with a limited number of high-energy surface sites, which results in sorption hysteresis where Pu(IV) is the predominant sorbed oxidation state. The energetic favorability of the Pu(IV) surface complex is strongly influenced by positive sorption entropies, which are mechanistically driven by displacement of solvating water molecules from the actinide and mineral surface during sorption. Objectives: The overarching objective of this work is to examine Pu(IV) and Pu(V) sorption to pure metal (oxyhydr)oxide minerals and sediments using variable temperature batch sorption, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and quantum-mechanical and empirical-potential calculations. The data will be compiled into a self-consistent surface complexation model. The novelty of this effort lies largely in the manner the information from these measurements and calculations will be combined into a model that will be used to evaluate the thermodynamics of plutonium sorption reactions as well as predict sorption of plutonium to sediments from DOE sites using a component additivity approach.

  19. Carbonate component reduces o,oEDDHA/Fe sorption on two-line ferrihydrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunta, F.; Lucena, J. J.; Smolders, E.

    2012-04-01

    The o,oEDDHA/Fe is the most common and effective iron chelate used as fertilizer in calcareous soils. Several authors have reported that the anionic o,oEDDHA/Fe complex is adsorbed to soil components such as ferrihydrite. The bicarbonate anion may be a competing ion for this sorption, however no studies have yet identified the extent and mechanism of this interaction. The aim of this work was to study the carbonate (bicarbonate + carbonate) effect on EDDHA/Fe adsorption on two-line ferrihydrite. Two-line ferrihydrite was synthetized adding NaOH on a nitrate iron (III) solution up to a final pH to be 8.0 and allowing to age for 22 hours at 20°C. Dialyzed ferrihydrite was characterized by determining specific parameters such as Fe/OH ratio, BET surface, point zero of charge and x-ray diffraction. The sorption was performed at three pH levels (5, 7.5 and 9.5) and three initial carbonate concentrations (from 0 to 2 mM). Initial EDDHA/Fe, ferrihydrite and ionic strength concentrations were adjusted to 0.18 mM, 10 g L-1 and 5 mM respectively. Total dissolved FeEDDHA concentrations were quantified at 480 nm. The o,oEDDHA/Fe isomers (rac-o,oEDDHA/Fe and meso-o,oEDDHA/Fe) were separated and quantified by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) fitting a photodiode array detector (PDA). Distribution factor (KD) and sorbed o,oEDDHA/Fe concentration were determined. Actual carbonate concentration was determined using a multi N/C analyzer. Ferrihydrite samples showed a typical XRD pattern of two-line ferrihydrite, two broad peaks at about 35 and 62° respectively. The BET surfaces (two replicates) were 259.2 ± 3.1 m2/g and 256.0 ± 2.5 m2/g. The Point Zero of Salt Effect (PZSE) was 7.9 ± 0.2 as bibliographically supported for all fresh and thus not rigorously de-carbonated ferrihydrite samples. The KD of the o,oEDDHA/Fe increased from 27.4 ± 0.6 to 304 ± 6 l/kg by decreasing pH from 9.5 and 5.0 when no carbonate was added. Increasing equilibrium carbonate

  20. Space Logistics: Launch Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnas, Randall B.

    1989-01-01

    The current maximum launch capability for the United States are shown. The predicted Earth-to-orbit requirements for the United States are presented. Contrasting the two indicates the strong National need for a major increase in Earth-to-orbit lift capability. Approximate weights for planned payloads are shown. NASA is studying the following options to meet the need for a new heavy-lift capability by mid to late 1990's: (1) Shuttle-C for near term (include growth versions); and (2) the Advanced Lauching System (ALS) for the long term. The current baseline two-engine Shuttle-C has a 15 x 82 ft payload bay and an expected lift capability of 82,000 lb to Low Earth Orbit. Several options are being considered which have expanded diameter payload bays. A three-engine Shuttle-C with an expected lift of 145,000 lb to LEO is being evaluated as well. The Advanced Launch System (ALS) is a potential joint development between the Air Force and NASA. This program is focused toward long-term launch requirements, specifically beyond the year 2000. The basic approach is to develop a family of vehicles with the same high reliability as the Shuttle system, yet offering a much greater lift capability at a greatly reduced cost (per pound of payload). The ALS unmanned family of vehicles will provide a low end lift capability equivalent to Titan IV, and a high end lift capability greater than the Soviet Energia if requirements for such a high-end vehicle are defined.In conclusion, the planning of the next generation space telescope should not be constrained to the current launch vehicles. New vehicle designs will be driven by the needs of anticipated heavy users.

  1. Bio-sorption of uranium and plutonium with Eichhornia crassipes (Water Hyacinth)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulhani, Vandana; Dafauti, Sunita; Hegde, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    The continuous expansion in nuclear energy program and an aim of zero discharge makes waste management a challenging task. Waste effluents containing long-lived radionuclides such as 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 238+239+240 Pu and uranium along with other toxic elements have to he suitably treated to bring down the radioactivity levels before it is discharged in to the environment. Biological materials have emerged as an economic and eco-friendly option for removal of toxic heavy metals to an environmentally safe level. Bio-sorption is a phenomenon of rapid passive metal uptake, an ideal alternative for decontamination of metal containing effluents. Bio-sorption of uranium and plutonium from aqueous solutions by dried biomass of Eichhornia crassipes or water hyacinth, a hyper-accumulator, which can tolerate highly toxic condition, was studied. The adsorption of Pu by roots biomass was seen to be more in the pH range from 3-8 and a similar trend was shown by leaves. The adsorption of U by both roots and leaves was more in the pH range of 4-8. Distribution coefficient for Pu in roots and leaf was an average of 1349 ml/g and 3152 ml/g for uranium studied using a wide activity range from 10 Bq to 200 Bq. The presence of anions inhibited the uptake and showed the trend sulphate> nitrate> chloride>> carbonates. The effect of other cations on the absorption capacity was also checked. Effluent solutions from an effluent treatment plant were also subjected to remediation with this biomass. Biomass related metal removal processes may not necessarily replace existing treatment processes but may complement them. (author)

  2. The adsorption-desorption transition of double-stranded DNA interacting with an oppositely charged dendrimer induced by multivalent anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yangwei; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Yaoyang; Deng, Zhenyu; Zhang, Linxi

    2014-05-28

    The adsorption-desorption transition of DNA in DNA-dendrimer solutions is observed when high-valence anions, such as hexavalent anions, are added to the DNA-dendrimer solutions. In the DNA-dendrimer solutions with low-valence anions, dendrimers bind tightly with the V-shaped double-stranded DNA. When high-valence anions, such as pentavalent or hexavalent anions, are added to the DNA-dendrimer solutions, the double-stranded DNA chains can be stretched straightly and the dendrimers are released from the double-stranded DNA chains. In fact, adding high-valence anions to the solutions can change the charge spatial distribution in the DNA-dendrimer solutions, and weaken the electrostatic interactions between the positively charged dendrimers and the oppositely charged DNA chains. Adsorption-desorption transition of DNA is induced by the overcharging of dendrimers. This investigation is capable of helping us understand how to control effectively the release of DNA in gene/drug delivery because an effective gene delivery for dendrimers includes non-covalent DNA-dendrimer binding and the effective release of DNA in gene therapy.

  3. Bio sorption of strontium from aqueous solution by the new strain of bacillus sp. strain GT-83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajer Mohammad Ghazvini, P.; Ghorbanzadeh Mashkani, S.; Mazaheri, M.

    2009-01-01

    An attempt was made to isolate bacterial strains capable of removing strontium biologically. In this study ten different water samples collected from Neydasht spring in the north of Iran and then the bacterial species were isolated from the water samples. The initial screening of a total of 50 bacterial isolates resulted in selection of one strain.The isolated strain showed a maximum adsorption capacity with 55 milligrams strontium/g dry wt. It was tentatively identified as Bacillus sp. According to the morphological and biochemical properties, and called strain GT-83. Our studies indicated that Bacillus sp. GT-83 is able to grow aerobically in the presence of 50 mM SrCl 2 , but its growth was inhibited at high levels of strontium concentrations. The bio sorption capacity of Bacillus sp. GT-83 depends strongly on the p H solution. Hence the maximum strontium sorption capacity of Bacillus sp. GT-83 was obtained at pah 10, independent of absence or presence of MgCl 2 of different concentrations. Strontium-salt bio sorption studies were also performed at this p H values. The equilibrium bio sorption of strontium was elevated by increasing the strontium concentration, up to 250 milligrams/l for Bacillus sp. GT-83. The maximum bio sorption of strontium was obtained at temperatures in the range of 30-35 d eg C . The Bacillus sp. GT-83 bio sorbed 97 milligrams strontium/g dry wt at 100 milligrams/l initial strontium concentration without MgCl 2 . When MgCl 2 concentration increased to 15%(w/v), these values dropped to 23.6 milligrams strontium/g dry wt at the same conditions. Uptake of strontium within 5 min of incubation was relatively rapid and the absorption continued slowly thereafter

  4. Campus Capability Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Arsenlis, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bailey, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bergman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brase, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brenner, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Camara, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carlton, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cheng, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chrzanowski, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Colson, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); East, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Farrell, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ferranti, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gursahani, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Helms, L. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hernandez, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jeffries, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Larson, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lu, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNabb, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mercer, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Skeate, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sueksdorf, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zucca, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Le, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ancria, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Scott, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leininger, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gagliardi, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gash, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bronson, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chung, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hobson, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meeker, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sanchez, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zagar, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Quivey, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sommer, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Atherton, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Campus Capability Plan for 2018-2028. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is one of three national laboratories that are part of the National Nuclear Security Administration. LLNL provides critical expertise to strengthen U.S. security through development and application of world-class science and technology that: Ensures the safety, reliability, and performance of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile; Promotes international nuclear safety and nonproliferation; Reduces global danger from weapons of mass destruction; Supports U.S. leadership in science and technology. Essential to the execution and continued advancement of these mission areas are responsive infrastructure capabilities. This report showcases each LLNL capability area and describes the mission, science, and technology efforts enabled by LLNL infrastructure, as well as future infrastructure plans.

  5. Technological Capability's Predictor Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Maciel Reichert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the factors that influence in configuration of the technological capability of companies in sectors with medium-low technological intensity. To achieve the goal proposed in this article a survey was carried out. Based on the framework developed by Lall (1992 which classifies firms in basic, intermediate and advanced level of technological capability; it was found that the predominant technological capability is intermediate, with 83.7% of respondent companies (plastics companies in Brazil. It is believed that the main contribution of this study is the finding that the dependent variable named “Technological Capability” can be explained at a rate of 65% by six variables: development of new processes; selection of the best equipment supplier; sales of internally developed new technology to third parties; design and manufacture of equipment; study of the work methods and perform inventory control; and improvement of product quality.

  6. Transformation and sorption of illicit drug biomarkers in sewer biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Pedram; Brock, Andreas Libonati; Causanilles Llanes, Ana

    2017-01-01

    , 16 drug biomarkers were selected, including the major human metabolites of mephedrone, methadone, cocaine, heroin, codeine and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Transformation and sorption of these substances were assessed in targeted batch experiments using laboratory-scale biofilm reactors operated under...

  7. Isothermal, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on basic dye sorption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isothermal, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on basic dye sorption onto tartaric acid esterified wheat straw. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... esterified wheat straw (EWS), was originally prepared by solid phase thermochemistry method.

  8. Isothermal, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on basic dye sorption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... The isothermal data correlated with the Langmuir model better than the. Freundlich model. ... there were two intra-particle diffusion steps in the dye sorption processes. .... rated monolayer of sorbate molecule on the sorbent.

  9. Sorption and desorption of insecticides in Brazilian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchini, L.C.; Lord, K.A.; Ruegg, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    The sorption from aqueous solution of ten Brazilian soil types of four organochlorine, two organophosphorus and one carbamate insecticide was determined in the laboratory using gas chromatographic and radiometric techniques. Measurements showed that soils richest in organic matter, sorbed all substances except aldrin more strongly than the other soils. DDT was the most and aldrin the least sorbed organochlorine pesticide, being dieldrin sorbed two to four times more strongly than aldrin. Sorption of lindane varied in different soils. The organophosphate insecticides malathion and parathion were strongly sorbed in the soils richest in organic matter and weakly sorbed in the poorest soils heing moderately sorbed by the other soils. Sorption of carbaryl by all soils is small. Lindane was desorbed from the soil richest in organic matter and the extent of desorption was dependent on the sorption time. (Author) [pt

  10. Copper foliar sorption: study of cuticular uptake and penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamel, Andre; Bougie, Bernadette

    1977-01-01

    Results show that copper is easily retained by enzymatically isolated cuticles from pear leaves discs. The sorption is very rapid during the first hour, then progressively slower with increasing time. Upper and lower cuticles exhibit the same sorption when immersed, but the sorption by the upper internal surface is greater than that by the external surface. Sorption depends on the dates of sampling of the leaves and vegetal species. The variation of the process with concentrations is hyperbolic. The retained copper may be partially exchanged: from 16 to 95% after 24 hours of exchange in a cupric solution, as the Cu concentration increases from 10 -6 to 10 -2 M. The penetration of copper through astomatous cuticular discs is extremely reduced if there is pure water in the receiver unit [fr

  11. Effects of sorption hysteresis on radionuclide releases from waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.; Reed, D.T.

    1985-01-01

    A one-dimensional, numerical transport model was used to calculate radionuclide releases from waste packages emplaced in a nuclear waste repository in basalt. The model incorporates both sorption and desorption isotherm parameters measured previously for sorption of key radionuclides on the packing material component of the waste package. Sorption hysteresis as described by these isotherms lowered releases of some radionuclides by as much as two orders of magnitude. Radionuclides that have low molar inventories (relative to uranium), high solubility, and strongly sorbed, are most affected by sorption hysteresis. In these cases, almost the entire radionuclide inventory is sorbed on the packing material. The model can be used to help optimize the thickness of the packing material layer by comparing release rate versus packing material thickness curves with Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) release limits

  12. Capabilities for innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter; Nielsen, Rene Nesgaard; Bamberger, Simon Grandjean

    2012-01-01

    is a survey that collected information from 601 firms belonging to the private urban sector in Denmark. The survey was carried out in late 2010. Keywords: dynamic capabilities/innovation/globalization/employee/employer cooperation/Nordic model Acknowledgment: The GOPA study was financed by grant 20080053113......Technological developments combined with increasing levels of competition related to the ongoing globalization imply that firms find themselves in dynamic, changing environments that call for dynamic capabilities. This challenges the internal human and organizational resources of firms in general...

  13. Human push capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Ralph L; Liber, Theodore

    2006-02-22

    Use of unassisted human push capability arises from time to time in the areas of crowd and animal control, the security of locked doors, the integrity of railings, the removal of tree stumps and entrenched vehicles, the manoeuvering of furniture, and athletic pursuits such as US football or wrestling. Depending on the scenario, human push capability involves strength, weight, weight distribution, push angle, footwear/floor friction, and the friction between the upper body and the pushed object. Simple models are used to establish the relationships among these factors.

  14. The Capability Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Robeyns, Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    textabstract In its most general description, the capability approach is a flexible and multi-purpose normative framework, rather than a precise theory of well-being, freedom or justice. At its core are two normative claims: first, the claim that the freedom to achieve well-being is of primary moral importance, and second, that freedom to achieve well-being is to be understood in terms of people’s capabilities, that is, their real opportunities to do and be what they have reason to value. Thi...

  15. Sandia QIS Capabilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Richard P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a broad set of capabilities in quantum information science (QIS), including elements of quantum computing, quantum communications, and quantum sensing. The Sandia QIS program is built atop unique DOE investments at the laboratories, including the MESA microelectronics fabrication facility, the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) facilities (joint with LANL), the Ion Beam Laboratory, and ASC High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities. Sandia has invested $75 M of LDRD funding over 12 years to develop unique, differentiating capabilities that leverage these DOE infrastructure investments.

  16. Understanding mechanisms to predict and optimize biochar for agrochemical sorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kathleen; Gámiz, Beatriz; Cox, Lucia; Spokas, Kurt; Koskinen, William

    2017-04-01

    The ability of biochars to bind various organic compounds has been widely studied due to the potential effects on pesticide fate in soil and interest in the adoption of biochar as a "low-cost" filter material. However, the sorptive behaviors of biochars are extremely variable and much of the reported data is limited to specific biochar-chemical interactions. The lack of knowledge regarding biochar sorption mechanisms limits our current ability to predict and optimize biochar's use. This work unveils mechanistic drivers of organic pesticide sorption on biochars through targeted alteration of biochar surface chemistry. Changes in the quantity and type of functional groups on biochars and other black carbon materials were achieved through treatments with H2O2, and CO2, and characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM/EDX). The sorption capacities of these treated biochars were subsequently measured to evaluate the effects of different surface moieties on the binding of target herbicides cyhalofop acid ((R)-2-[4-(4-cyano-2-fluorophenoxy)phenoxy]propionic acid) and clomazone (2-[(2-chlorophenyl)methyl]-4,4-dimethyl-1,2-oxazolidin-3-one). Sorption of both herbicides on the studied biochars increased following H2O2 activation; however, the influence of the H2O2 activation on sorption was more pronounced for cyhalofop acid (pKa = 3.9) than clomazone, which is non-ionizable. Increased cyhalofop acid sorption on H2O2 treated biochars can be attributed to the increase in oxygen containing functional groups as well as the decrease in biochar pH. In contrast, CO2 activation reduced the sorption of cyhalofop acid compared to untreated biochar. FTIR data suggest the reduced sorption on CO2 -treated biochar was due to the removal of surface carboxyl groups, further supporting the role of specific functionality in the sorption of ionizable herbicides. Results from this work offer insight into the mechanisms of sorption and

  17. Water permeation through anion exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoyan; Wright, Andrew; Weissbach, Thomas; Holdcroft, Steven

    2018-01-01

    An understanding of water permeation through solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) membranes is crucial to offset the unbalanced water activity within SPE fuel cells. We examine water permeation through an emerging class of anion exchange membranes, hexamethyl-p-terphenyl poly (dimethylbenzimidazolium) (HMT-PMBI), and compare it against series of membrane thickness for a commercial anion exchange membrane (AEM), Fumapem® FAA-3, and a series of proton exchange membranes, Nafion®. The HMT-PMBI membrane is found to possess higher water permeabilities than Fumapem® FAA-3 and comparable permeability than Nafion (H+). By measuring water permeation through membranes of different thicknesses, we are able to decouple, for the first time, internal and interfacial water permeation resistances through anion exchange membranes. Permeation resistances on liquid/membrane interface is found to be negligible compared to that for vapor/membrane for both series of AEMs. Correspondingly, the resistance of liquid water permeation is found to be one order of magnitude smaller compared to that of vapor water permeation. HMT-PMBI possesses larger effective internal water permeation coefficient than both Fumapem® FAA-3 and Nafion® membranes (60 and 18% larger, respectively). In contrast, the effective interfacial permeation coefficient of HMT-PMBI is found to be similar to Fumapem® (±5%) but smaller than Nafion®(H+) (by 14%).

  18. Kinetics of the sorption of triterpene saponin by hypercrosslinked polystyrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironenko, N. V.; Brezhneva, T. A.; Selemenev, V. F.

    2013-03-01

    The kinetics of sorption of triterpene saponin by the polymer sorbent NM-200 is considered. The influence of the surface activity of glycoside on the rate of formation and structure of the adsorption layer on the sorbent's surface is established. The rate-determining step of sorption is found to be diffusion into the sorbent grain. The value of the activation energy demonstrates the determining role of dispersion forces in the interaction between triterpene saponin and the polymer sorbent MN-200.

  19. Further developments of the RES3T sorption database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendler, V.

    2002-01-01

    RES 3 T - the Rossendorf expert system for surface and sorption thermodynamics currently under development has been expanded towards the provision of comprehensive sorption data sets suitable for complex natural systems of rocks and soils. Also a statistical evaluation of the available SCM (surface complexation model) data is now implemented. Finally, a normalization of SCM parameters to a standard site density has been incorporated. (orig.)

  20. Sorption heat engines: simple inanimate negative entropy generators

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Anthonie W. J.; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    The name 'sorption heat engines' is proposed for simple negative entropy generators that are driven by thermal cycling and work on alternating adsorption and desorption. These generators are in general not explicitly recognized as heat engines. Their mechanism is applicable to the fields of engineering, physics, chemistry, geology, and biology, in particular the origin of life. Four kinds of sorption heat engines are distinguished depending on the occurrence of changes in the adsorbent or ads...

  1. Sorption Properties of Steam Treated Wood and Plant Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Preben; Jensen, Signe Kamp; Jones, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    temperatures the behaviour was different for low/medium RH and high RH. For low/medium range RH (.... This behaviour corresponds to the reduction of the number of primary sorption sites on e.g. hemicellulose. For high range RH (> ca. 85 %) two additional mechanisms may have been active. One is the capillary sorption in micropores created as a result of the thermal degradation of cell wall matter. A second...

  2. Sorption and pertechnetate by salts of molybdophosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suess, M.; Pfrepper, G.

    1983-01-01

    The sorption of pertechnetate on salts of molybdophosphoric acid from nitric acid and in the presence of electrolytes was investigated. Distribution coefficients from 10 to 100 ml/g were found. The sorption of pertechnetate can be increased by the addition of K + , NH 4 + , Rb + and Cs + salts. A saturation capacity of proportional 0,19 mmol/g ammonium phosphomolybdate was found from the adsorption isotherms. The formation of alkali metal pertechnetate associates in the sorbent phase is supposed. (orig.)

  3. Sorption of strontium on bentonites from Slovak deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kufcakova, J.; Galambos, M.; Rajc, P.

    2005-01-01

    Sorption on bentonite from different Slovak deposits / Jelsovy potok, Kopernica and Lieskove has been investigated under various experimental conditions, such as contact time, pH, sorbate concentrations, presence of complementary cation. The sorption of strontium from aqueous solutions was investigated using a radiometric determination of distribution coefficient, Kd. The individual solutions were labelled with radiotracer. Radiation stability has been investigated, the higher sorption parameters were observed for the irradiated bentonites /tab.l/ , which can be explained by the increase of specific surface and change of solubility of the irradiated samples of bentonite. The presence of complementary cations, Na + , K + , NH 4 + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ and Ba 2+ depresses the sorption of Sr on bentonite. In the case of bentonite Kopernica the effectiveness in reducing the sorption of strontium by cations followed the order K + 4 + + 2+ 2+ 2+ . Results indicate that the sorption of Sr + on bentonite will be affected by the presence of high concentrations of various salts in the waste water effluents. (author)

  4. Moisture sorption isotherms and thermodynamic properties of bovine leather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhfakh, Rihab; Mihoubi, Daoued; Kechaou, Nabil

    2018-04-01

    This study was aimed at the determination of bovine leather moisture sorption characteristics using a static gravimetric method at 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 °C. The curves exhibit type II behaviour according to the BET classification. The sorption isotherms fitting by seven equations shows that GAB model is able to reproduce the equilibrium moisture content evolution with water activity for moisture range varying from 0.02 to 0.83 kg/kg d.b (0.9898 thermodynamic properties such as isosteric heat of sorption, sorption entropy, spreading pressure, net integral enthalpy and entropy. Net isosteric heat of sorption and differential entropy were evaluated through direct use of moisture isotherms by applying the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and used to investigate the enthalpy-entropy compensation theory. Both sorption enthalpy and entropy for desorption increase to a maximum with increasing moisture content, and then decrease sharply with rising moisture content. Adsorption enthalpy decreases with increasing moisture content. Whereas, adsorption entropy increases smoothly with increasing moisture content to a maximum of 6.29 J/K.mol. Spreading pressure increases with rising water activity. The net integral enthalpy seemed to decrease and then increase to become asymptotic. The net integral entropy decreased with moisture content increase.

  5. Investigation of rare earths sorption from sulfuric- and hydrochloric media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, V.N.; Mikhlin, E.B.; Norina, T.M.; Afonina, T.A.

    1978-01-01

    A rate of equilibrium attainment has been studied during REE sorption from sulfuric and hydrochloric acid solutions and pulps. It has been shown that equilibrium upon sorption from hydrochloric acid solutions is attained faster than from sulfuric acid solutions. Equilibrium upon sorption from pulps is attained considerably slower than upon sorption from solutions. In all cases REM of cerium subgroup are sorbed better. An effect has been studied of the medium acidity on sorbability of REM and elements of iron and calcium impurities. It has been established that sorbability of these elements decreases with increasing acid concentration. Selectivity of REM sorption from sulfuric acid solutions decreases with a rise in H 2 SO 4 concentration in the solution. For hydrochloric acid solutions it remains constant in a wide range of HCl concentrations. Sorption leaching of REM from concentrates and cakes of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in the presence of KU-2 leads to high technical and economic indexes: extraction with respect to the total amount of REM and yttrium into a commercial product is 76-86% for sulfuric acid solutions and 81-90% for hydrochloric solutions

  6. Modelling of a diffusion-sorption experiment on sandstone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.A.

    1989-11-01

    The results of a diffusion-sorption experiment on a sample of Darley Dale sandstone, using simulated groundwater spiked with a mixture of 125 I, 85 Sr and 137 Cs, are modelled by a one-dimensional porous medium approach in which sorption is described by Freundlich isotherms. The governing equations are solved analytically for the special case of a linear isotherm, and numerically using the computer code RANCHDIFF for non-linear isotherms. A set of time-dependent, ordinary differential equations is obtained using the Lagrange interpolation technique and integrated by Gear's variable order predictor-corrector method. It is shown that the sorption behaviour of 85 Sr can be modelled successfully by a linear isotherm, using a sorption parameter consistent with batch-sorption tests. The behaviour of 137 Cs may be modelled by a non-linear isotherm, but the amount of 137 Cs sorbed is less than that anticipated from batch-sorption tests. 125 I is assumed to be non-sorbing and is used to determine the porosity of the sandstone. (author) 10 figs., 4 tabs., 6 refs

  7. The sorption of silver by poorly crystallized manganese oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B.J.; Jenne, E.A.; Chao, T.T.

    1973-01-01

    The sorption of silver by poorly crystallized manganese oxides was studied using synthesized samples of three members of the manganous manganite (birnessite) group, of different chemical composition and crystallinity, and a poorly organized ??-MnO2. All four oxides sorbed significant quantities of silver. The manganous manganites showed the greatest sorption (up to 0.5 moles silver/mole MnOx at pH 7) while the ??-MnO2 showed the least (0.3 moles silver/ mole MnOx at pH 7). Sorption of silver was adequately described by the Langmuir equation over a considerable concentration range. The relationship failed at low pH values and high equilibrium silver concentrations. The sorption capacity showed a direct relationship with pH. However, the rate of increase of sorption capacity decreased at the higher pH values. Silver sorption maxima. were not directly related to surface area but appeared to vary with the amount of occluded sodium and potassium present in the manganese oxide. The important processes involved in the uptake of silver by the four poorly crystallized manganese oxides ara considered to be surface exchange for manganese, potassium and sodium as well as exchange for structural manganese, potassium and sodium. ?? 1973.

  8. Thermodynamic parameters and sorption of U(VI) on ACSD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donat, R.; Cilgi, G.K.; Cetisli, H.; Aytas, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the sorption properties for U(VI) by alginate coated CaSO 4 x 2H 2 O sepiolite and calcined diatomite earth (Kieselguhr) (ACSD). The removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution by sorption onto ACSF in a single component system with various contact times, pH, temperatures, and initial concentrations of U(VI) was investigated. The sorption patterns of uranium on the composite adsorbent followed the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkhevic (D-R) isotherms. The Freundlich, Langmuir, and D-R models have been applied and the data correlated well with Freundlich model and that the sorption was physical in nature (sorption energy, E a = 17.05 kJ/mol). The thermodynamic parameters such as variation of enthalpy ΔH, variation of entropy ΔS and variation of Gibbs free energy ΔG were calculated from the slope and intercept of lnK 0 vs. 1/T plots. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH ads = 31.83 kJ/mol, ΔS ads = 167 J/mol x K, ΔGdeg ads (293.15 K) = -17.94 kJ/mol) showed the endothermic heat of sorption and the feasibility of the process. The thermodynamics of U(VI) ion/ACSD system indicates the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the process. It was noted that an increase in temperature resulted in a higher uranium loading per unit weight of the adsorbent. (author)

  9. Compilation of radionuclide sorption coefficients for performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbol, P.; Engkvist, I. [PI Chemical Consulting HB, Landvetter (Sweden)

    1997-09-01

    The report presents four possible site-specific conditions in Sweden. The different sorption mechanisms applicable to the studied elements together with the K{sub d} concept are shortly summarised. The influence of organic substances present in the groundwater on the element`s sorption and mobility is also discussed. Criteria for selection of K{sub d} values are presented together with sensitivity of the values to pH, E{sub h} and salinity. Sorption coefficients are recommended for elements in the repository with half-life above 5.3 years. The elements reviewed are: Cs, Sr, Ra, Ln, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Co, Ni, Cd, Zr, Nb, Tc, Pd, Ag, Sn, C, I, Cl, Se and Kr. For every element there is a recommendation of a realistic K{sub d} value with an uncertainty limit. The selection is based on experimental investigations or chemical analogues. In some cases few or no K{sub d} data were found, and it is recommended that sorption studies be performed on elements such as Cd, Pa, Cm, Zr, Nb, Pd, Ag and Sn. The recommended K{sub d} values for the different element`s sorption on granitic rock, serve as a guidance of the sorption performance 87 refs, 18 tabs

  10. Compilation of radionuclide sorption coefficients for performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbol, P.; Engkvist, I.

    1997-09-01

    The report presents four possible site-specific conditions in Sweden. The different sorption mechanisms applicable to the studied elements together with the K d concept are shortly summarised. The influence of organic substances present in the groundwater on the element's sorption and mobility is also discussed. Criteria for selection of K d values are presented together with sensitivity of the values to pH, E h and salinity. Sorption coefficients are recommended for elements in the repository with half-life above 5.3 years. The elements reviewed are: Cs, Sr, Ra, Ln, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Co, Ni, Cd, Zr, Nb, Tc, Pd, Ag, Sn, C, I, Cl, Se and Kr. For every element there is a recommendation of a realistic K d value with an uncertainty limit. The selection is based on experimental investigations or chemical analogues. In some cases few or no K d data were found, and it is recommended that sorption studies be performed on elements such as Cd, Pa, Cm, Zr, Nb, Pd, Ag and Sn. The recommended K d values for the different element's sorption on granitic rock, serve as a guidance of the sorption performance

  11. Experimental determination of sorption in fractured flow systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mitchell D.; Bennett, Philip C.; Sharp, John M.; Choi, Wan-Joo

    2002-09-01

    Fracture "skins" are alteration zones on fracture surfaces created by a variety of biological, chemical, and physical processes. Skins increase surface area, where sorption occurs, compared to the unaltered rock matrix. This study examines the sorption of organic solutes on altered fracture surfaces in an experimental fracture-flow apparatus. Fracture skins containing abundant metal oxides, clays, and organic material from the Breathitt Formation (Kentucky, USA) were collected in a manner such that skin surface integrity was maintained. The samples were reassembled in the lab in a flow-through apparatus that simulated ˜2.7 m of a linear fracture "conduit." A dual-tracer injection scheme was utilized with the sorbing or reactive tracer compared to a non-reactive tracer (chloride) injected simultaneously. Sorption was assessed from the ratio of the first temporal moments of the breakthrough curves and from the loss of reactive tracer mass and evaluated as a function of flow velocity and solute type. The breakthrough curves suggest dual-flow regimes in the fracture with both sorbing and non-sorbing flow fields. Significant sorption occurs for the reactive components, and sorption increased with decreasing flow rate and decreasing compound solubility. Based on moment analysis, however, there was little retardation of the center of solute mass. These data suggest that non-equilibrium sorption processes dominate and that slow desorption and boundary layer diffusion cause extensive tailing in the breakthrough curves.

  12. Sorption Coefficients for Iodine, Silver, and Cesium on Dust Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stempniewicz, M.M.; Goede, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the work performed to find relevant experimental data and find the sorption coefficients that represent well the available data for cesium, iodine, and silver on dust particles. The purpose of this work is to generate a set of coefficients that may be recommended for the computer code users. The work was performed using the computer code SPECTRA. Calculations were performed for the following data: • I-131 on AVR dust; • Ag-110m on AVR dust; • Cs-13 and Cs-137 on AVR dust. Available data was matched using the SPECTRA Sorption Model. S = A(T) · C_V-B(T) · C_d. The results are summarized as follows: • The available data can be correlated. The data scatter is about 4 orders of magnitude. Therefore the coefficients of the Langmuir isotherms vary by 4 orders of magnitude. • Sorption rates are higher at low temperatures and lower at high temperatures. This tendency has been observed in the data compiled at Oak Ridge. It is therefore surmised that the highest value of the sorption coefficients are appropriate for the low temperatures and the lowest value of the sorption coefficients are appropriate for the high temperatures. The recommended sorption coefficients are presented in this paper. • The present set of coefficients is very rough and should be a subject for future verification against experimental data. (author)

  13. Correlational study between sorption and goo apparent organoclays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, D.L.; Silva, M.R.O.; Ferreira, H.S.; Brasileiro, C.T.

    2016-01-01

    The sorption of surfactants in bentonite clay can occur through the mechanism of adsorption and absorption, this being a very supple phenomenon according clay and surfactant utilized. Thus the more surfactant sorbed at the organoclay it becomes, and can be used in various applications, including in oil drilling fluid. This study aimed to correlate the sorption of surfactants with the rheological properties of non-aqueous fluids (oil base). In organophilization process was used Bentongel clay which had its concentration varied from 3.16 to 7.16% by weight of clay. It was used to organophilization an ionic surfactant Praepagem WB with 75% of active matter, where its concentration ranged from 127-181 mEq. After organophilizated the clays were filtered, dried in an oven for 48 hours and passed in ABNT sieve No. 200, to be so characterized. Sorption was calculated from mathematical equations. Non-aqueous fluids were prepared according to standard Petrobras (EP-1EP-00023A) for rheological testing. Correlating the sorption of surfactant, and the rheological properties of non-aqueous fluid, obtained satisfactory results where observed through the scatter plots there is a strong correlation between the variables sorption and apparent viscosity, it should also be noted that the viscosity is a variable which increases with an increase in sorption, confirming that the surfactant concentration influences the viscosity. (author)

  14. ISOPHOT - Capabilities and performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, D.; Klaas, U.; Abolins, J.

    1996-01-01

    ISOPHOT covers the largest wavelength range on ISO from 2.5 to 240 mu m. Its scientific capabilities include multi filter and multi-aperture photometry, polarimetry, imaging and spectrophotometry. All modes can optionally include a focal plane chopper. The backbone of the photometric calibration...

  15. Capabilities for Intercultural Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    The capabilities approach offers a valuable analytical lens for exploring the challenge and complexity of intercultural dialogue in contemporary settings. The central tenets of the approach, developed by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum, involve a set of humanistic goals including the recognition that development is a process whereby people's…

  16. Capabilities and Special Needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Christian Christrup

    into international consideration in relation to the implementation of the UN convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. As for the theoretical basis, the research makes use of the sociological open-ended and relational concepts of Pierre Bourdieu and the normative yardstick of the Capability Approach...

  17. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Glen E. Gronniger

    2007-10-02

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 13.2, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2005, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1. FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/Standards/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized. The Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major fields of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; (3) Electrical (DC, AC, RF/Microwave); and (4) Optical and Radiation. Metrology Engineering provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement in the fields listed above. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. Evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys.

  18. The Capability Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A.M. Robeyns (Ingrid)

    2011-01-01

    textabstract In its most general description, the capability approach is a flexible and multi-purpose normative framework, rather than a precise theory of well-being, freedom or justice. At its core are two normative claims: first, the claim that the freedom to achieve well-being is of primary

  19. Sensor Alerting Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Jakob; Bermudez, Luis; Satapathy, Goutam

    2013-04-01

    There is a large amount of sensor data generated today by various sensors, from in-situ buoys to mobile underwater gliders. Providing sensor data to the users through standardized services, language and data model is the promise of OGC's Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) initiative. As the amount of data grows it is becoming difficult for data providers, planners and managers to ensure reliability of data and services and to monitor critical data changes. Intelligent Automation Inc. (IAI) is developing a net-centric alerting capability to address these issues. The capability is built on Sensor Observation Services (SOSs), which is used to collect and monitor sensor data. The alerts can be configured at the service level and at the sensor data level. For example it can alert for irregular data delivery events or a geo-temporal statistic of sensor data crossing a preset threshold. The capability provides multiple delivery mechanisms and protocols, including traditional techniques such as email and RSS. With this capability decision makers can monitor their assets and data streams, correct failures or be alerted about a coming phenomena.

  20. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to discriminate among different sorption sites of micas: With implications for heterogeneous reduction of chromate at the mica-water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilton, E.S.; Moses, C.O.; Veblen, D.R.

    2000-04-01

    This contribution uses Cr2p and 3p binding energies (BEs) determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to distinguish Cr{sup III} sorbed to different mica sorption sites. The results were used to better understand mechanisms for coupled sorption-reduction of Cr{sub (aq)}{sup VI} by ferrous micas. The research is important because: (1) Cr contamination is a serious and wide spread problem associated with a variety of industries; (2) Micas are important sorbents for Cr because they are ubiquitous, sorb cations and anions over a wide range of pH, and participate in heterogeneous redox reactions via structural Fe{sup II} and FE{sup III}; and (3) The mobility of cations sorbed by micas will depend, in part, on the dominant sorption site. Micas (two biotites, end member phologopite and muscovite) were reacted with Cr{sup III} solutions that contained variable concentrations of NaCl and KCl. Samples were extracted at times intervals and mica edge orientations were analyzed by ZPS. Cr{sub (aq)}{sup III} sorption was greater in Cr{sup III}-NaCl solutions relative to Cr{sup III}-KCl solutions. Cr2p and 3p BEs were bracketed by those for Cr{sup III} in the structure of silicates and in Cr{sup III}-oxyhydroxides. The BE of Cr{sup III} sorbed to micas was higher by about 0.3 eV after reaction with Cr{sup III}-NaCl solutions compared to Cr{sup III}-KCl aqueous solutions. At the experimental conditions, Na{sup +} and K{sup +} differentially block permanent charge sites but not variably charged edge sites of micas. Using the constraints inherent in the experimental design, the authors interpret the difference in CR{sup III} BE between the Cr{sup III}-NaCl and Cr{sup III}-KCl experiments to reflect a change in the dominant sorption site, where high and low Cr BEs indicate Cr sorbed by the interlamellar region and variably charged functional groups at mica edges, respectively. They conclude that small BE shifts for cations sorbed to silicates can be interpreted with