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Sample records for animal groups theoretical

  1. Modelling group dynamic animal movement

    OpenAIRE

    Langrock, Roland; Hopcraft, Grant; Blackwell, Paul; Goodall, Victoria; King, Ruth; Niu, Mu; Patterson, Toby; Pedersen, Martin; Skarin, Anna; Schick, Robert Schilling

    2013-01-01

    1). Group dynamics are a fundamental aspect of many species' movements. The need to adequately model individuals' interactions with other group members has been recognized, particularly in order to differentiate the role of social forces in individual movement from environmental factors. However, to date, practical statistical methods, which can include group dynamics in animal movement models, have been lacking. 2). We consider a flexible modelling framework that distinguishes a group-level ...

  2. Modelling group dynamic animal movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langrock, Roland; Hopcraft, J. Grant C.; Blackwell, Paul G.;

    2014-01-01

    , to date, practical statistical methods which can include group dynamics in animal movement models have been lacking. We consider a flexible modelling framework that distinguishes a group-level model, describing the movement of the group's centre, and an individual-level model, such that each individual...... makes its movement decisions relative to the group centroid. The basic idea is framed within the flexible class of hidden Markov models, extending previous work on modelling animal movement by means of multi-state random walks. While in simulation experiments parameter estimators exhibit some bias...... in an encamped state. Though the attraction to the group centroid is relatively weak, our model successfully captures group-influenced movement dynamics. Specifically, as compared to a regular mixture of correlated random walks, the group dynamic model more accurately predicts the non-diffusive behaviour...

  3. Group and ring theoretic properties of polycyclic groups

    CERN Document Server

    Wehrfritz, BAF

    2009-01-01

    Polycyclic groups are built from cyclic groups in a specific way. They arise in many contexts within group theory itself but also more generally in algebra, for example in the theory of Noetherian rings. The first half of this book develops the standard group theoretic techniques for studying polycyclic groups and the basic properties of these groups. The second half then focuses specifically on the ring theoretic properties of polycyclic groups and their applications, often to purely group theoretic situations. The book is intended to be a study manual for graduate students and researchers co

  4. Animal Rights Groups Target High School Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Two groups leading the charge against dissection are People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) and the Student Action Corps for Animals (SACA). Protests by student and community members remain the movement's strongest weapon. (MLF)

  5. Neotenic reproduction in various animal groups

    OpenAIRE

    Nevěčný, Karel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to collect information about neoteny (i. e. reproduction of animals in the larval stage to adult without metamorphosis) that describe the reproduction and assess the representation, if found more groups of animals in which it occurs. The basic method was searching various sources, sorting and analyzing. It is a compilation of work to prepare review. The sources of information were professional articles and books of Czech and foreign, including some Internet resource...

  6. Group theoretical Quantization of Isotropic Loop Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Livine, Etera R

    2012-01-01

    We achieve a group theoretical quantization of the flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model coupled to a massless scalar field adopting the improved dynamics of loop quantum cosmology. Deparemeterizing the system using the scalar field as internal time, we first identify a complete set of phase space observables whose Poisson algebra is isomorphic to the su(1,1) Lie algebra. It is generated by the volume observable and the Hamiltonian. These observables describe faithfully the regularized phase space underlying the loop quantization: they account for the polymerization of the variable conjugate to the volume and for the existence of a kinematical non-vanishing minimum volume. Since the Hamiltonian is an element in the su(1,1) Lie algebra, the dynamics is now implemented as SU(1,1) transformations. At the quantum level, the system is quantized as a time-like irreducible representation of the group SU(1,1). These representations are labeled by a half-integer spin, which gives the minimal volume. They provide super...

  7. Family group conferencing: a theoretical underpinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metze, Rosalie N; Abma, Tineke A; Kwekkeboom, Rick H

    2015-06-01

    In the last decade, Family Group Conferences (FGCs) have increasingly been used to help people and their networks deal with their problems. The FGC fits well with the call for equal rights and self-management coming from clients and client movements, as well as the economy-driven pressure towards more informal and less professional care coming from governments. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the underlying theory to explain how the FGC works. In this article, we aim to provide such a theoretical basis by examining how the concept of empowerment can be linked with the basic assumptions underlying the FGC. Can making a plan of their own indeed help to empower people and if so, how does the process of empowerment proceed? Empowerment is often mentioned as a goal of the FGC, but authors are not unanimous when it comes to the operationalisation of empowerment, especially on the relational level of the person in his or her social context. In the article, we use the concepts of relational autonomy and resilience to conceptualize empowerment on the relational and individual level. PMID:23996065

  8. Special functions group theoretical aspects and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schempp, Walter; Askey, Richard A

    1984-01-01

    Approach your problems from It isn't that they can't see the right end and begin with the solution. the answers. Then one day, It is that they can't see the perhaps you will find the problem. final question. G.K. Chesterton. The Scandal 'The Hermit Clad in Crane of Father Brown 'The Point of Feathers' in R. van Gulik's a Pin'. The Chinese Maze Murders. Growing specialization and diversification have brought a host of monographs and textbooks on increasingly specialized topics. However, the "tree" of knowledge of mathematics and related fields does not grow only by putting forth new branches. It also happens, quite often in fact, that branches which were thought to be completely disparate are suddenly seen to be related. Further, the kind and level of sophistication of mathematics applied in various sciences has changed drastically in recent years: measure theory is used (non-trivially) in regional and theoretical economics; algebraic geometry interacts with physics; the Minkowsky lemma, coding theory and the ...

  9. Putting flexible animal prospection into context: escaping the theoretical box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osvath, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    The debate on non-human future-oriented cognition has long revolved around the question whether such cognition at all occurs. Closer inspection reveals just how much cognition in general-down to its simplest forms-is geared toward predicting the future in a bid to maintain homeostasis and fend off entropy. Over the course of life's existence on Earth, evolution and natural selection have, through a series of evolutionary arms races, gotten increasingly good at achieving this. Prospection has reached its current pinnacle based partly on a system for episodic cognition that-as research increasingly is showing-is not limited principally to human beings. Nevertheless, and despite some notable recent defections, many researchers remain convinced of the merits of the Bischof-Köhler Hypothesis with its claim that no species other than human beings is able to anticipate future needs or otherwise live in anything other than the immediate present moment. What might, at first, appear to be empirical disputes turn out to reveal largely unquestioned theoretical divides. Without due care, one risks setting out conditions for 'true' future orientation that are irrelevant for describing human cognition. In sorting out the theoretical and terminological muddle framing contemporary debate, this article makes a plea for moving beyond past dogmas while putting animal prospection research into the context of evolution and contemporary cognitive science. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26537868

  10. Piezoelectricity in quasicrystals: A group-theoretical study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Rama Rao; P Hemagiri Rao; B S K Chaitanya

    2007-03-01

    Group-theoretical methods have been accepted as exact and reliable tools in studying the physical properties of crystals and quasicrystalline materials. By group representation theory, the maximum number of non-vanishing and independent second- order piezoelectric coefficients required by the seven pentagonal and two icosahedral point groups - that describe the quasicrystal symmetry groups in two and three dimensions - is determined. The schemes of non-vanishing and independent second-order piezoelectric tensor components needed by the nine point groups with five-fold rotations are identified and tabulated employing a compact notation. The results of this group-theoretical study are briefly discussed.

  11. Towards a theoretically based Group Facilitation Technique for Project Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Witte, E.H.; Engelhardt, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical framework for developing the group facilitation technique PROMOD is presented here. The efficiency of this technique in improving group decision quality is supported by the results of three experimental studies involving different kinds of problem solving tasks. The author points towards the importance of integrating theoretical assumptions, theory testing and basic research with empirical application. Such a compelling strategy can lead to new insights in group performance dyna...

  12. The Role of Renormalization Group in Fundamental Theoretical Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Shirkov, Dmitri V.

    1997-01-01

    General aspects of fundamental physics are considered. We comment the Wigner's logical scheme and modify it to adjust to modern theoretical physics. Then, we discuss the role and indicate the place of renormalization group in the logic of fundamental physics.

  13. Group-theoretical determination of minima of Higgs potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buccella, F.; Ruegg, H. (Geneva Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. de Physique Theorique; Naples Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Naples (Italy))

    1982-01-01

    We develop a group-theoretical method to determine the extrema of invariant Higgs potentials of degree four without cubic terms. It applies successfully to the adjoint representations of the O(8+2n) and SU(3+n) groups and to the spinorial representation of O(14). We give also a method to compute invariants which is very useful for critical orbits.

  14. Group-Theoretical Revision of the Unruh Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calixto, M [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y Estadistica, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Paseo Alfonso XIII 56, 30203 Cartagena (Spain); Perez-Romero, E; Aldaya, V, E-mail: Manuel.Calixto@upct.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA-CSIC), Apartado Postal 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain)

    2011-03-01

    We revise the Unruh effect (vacuum radiation in uniformly relativistic accelerated frames) in a group-theoretical setting by constructing a conformal SO(4,2)-invariant quantum field theory and its spontaneous breakdown when selecting Poincare invariant degenerated vacua (namely, coherent states of conformal zero modes). Special conformal transformations (accelerations) destabilize the Poincare vacuum and make it to radiate.

  15. A module-theoretic approach to abelian automorphism groups

    OpenAIRE

    Caranti, A.

    2013-01-01

    There are several examples in the literature of finite non-abelian $p$-groups whose automorphism group is abelian. For some time only examples that were special $p$-groups were known, until Jain and Yadav [JY12] and Jain, Rai and Yadav [JRY13] constructed several non-special examples. In this paper we show how a simple module-theoretic approach allows the construction of non-special examples, starting from special ones constructed by several authors, while at the same time avoiding further di...

  16. Jet propulsion in animals: theoretical innovation and biological constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2010-11-01

    Jet propulsion is arguably the oldest and simplest form of animal locomotion, and simple hydrodynamic theory highlights the many possible ways in which animals might maximize speed and minimize metabolic cost while using jet propulsion to travel from one point to another. However, environmental and physiological reality constrains the potential for hydrodynamic innovation. We explore two heuristic examples: Antarctic scallops, in which ecological release from predation apparently constrains the evolution of improved locomotory capacity, and squids, in which the fundamental limitations of muscular contraction constrain the hydrodynamic efficiency of locomotion for all but a small range of sizes. Even simple forms of locomotion can be complex in a biological context.

  17. Renormalization Group in different fields of theoretical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very simple and general approach to the symmetry that is widely known as a Renormalization Group symmetry is presented. It essentially uses a functional formulation of group transformations that can be considered as a generalization of self-similarity transformations well known in mathematical physics since last century. This generalized Functional Self-Similarity symmetry and corresponding group transformations are discussed first for a number of simple physical problems taken from diverse fields of classical physics as well as for QED. Then we formulate the Renorm-Group Method as a regular procedure that essentially improves the approximate solutions near the singularity. After that we discuss relations between different formulations of Renormalization Group as they appear in various parts of a modern theoretical physics. Finally we present several topics of RGM application in modern QFT. (author)

  18. Fuzzy classification of phantom parent groups in an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikse Freddy

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic evaluation models often include genetic groups to account for unequal genetic level of animals with unknown parentage. The definition of phantom parent groups usually includes a time component (e.g. years. Combining several time periods to ensure sufficiently large groups may create problems since all phantom parents in a group are considered contemporaries. Methods To avoid the downside of such distinct classification, a fuzzy logic approach is suggested. A phantom parent can be assigned to several genetic groups, with proportions between zero and one that sum to one. Rules were presented for assigning coefficients to the inverse of the relationship matrix for fuzzy-classified genetic groups. This approach was illustrated with simulated data from ten generations of mass selection. Observations and pedigree records were randomly deleted. Phantom parent groups were defined on the basis of gender and generation number. In one scenario, uncertainty about generation of birth was simulated for some animals with unknown parents. In the distinct classification, one of the two possible generations of birth was randomly chosen to assign phantom parents to genetic groups for animals with simulated uncertainty, whereas the phantom parents were assigned to both possible genetic groups in the fuzzy classification. Results The empirical prediction error variance (PEV was somewhat lower for fuzzy-classified genetic groups. The ranking of animals with unknown parents was more correct and less variable across replicates in comparison with distinct genetic groups. In another scenario, each phantom parent was assigned to three groups, one pertaining to its gender, and two pertaining to the first and last generation, with proportion depending on the (true generation of birth. Due to the lower number of groups, the empirical PEV of breeding values was smaller when genetic groups were fuzzy-classified. Conclusion Fuzzy

  19. Theoretical perspectives and applications of group learning in PBL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Dario M; van der Vleuten, Cees; Dolmans, Diana

    2016-01-01

    An essential part of problem-based learning (PBL) is group learning. Thus, an in depth understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of group learning in PBL allows educators to bridge theory and practice more effectively thus providing ideas and tools to enhance PBL practices and research. The theory-driven applications examined in this article establish grounds for future research in PBL. The purpose of this article is to describe and examine two theoretical perspectives of group learning in PBL and their potential applications to improve educational practice. They include: (1) social interdependence theory and the meaning of positive interdependence, (2) socio cognitive theory of networked expertise and the concept of knowledge creation in innovative knowledge communities (IKC). Potential applications include the following: development of instructional material to foster positive interdependency using concept maps; formal and structured use of peer feedback throughout PBL courses to promote individual and group accountability; creation and sharing of new knowledge about different topics within and across IKC; and use of rotating students with hybrid abilities across PBL groups to foster distributed cognition. PMID:26075957

  20. Animal signals and emotion in music: coordinating affect across groups

    OpenAIRE

    GregoryA.Bryant

    2013-01-01

    Researchers studying the emotional impact of music have not traditionally been concerned with the principled relationship between form and function in evolved animal signals. The acoustic structure of musical forms is related in important ways to emotion perception, and thus research on nonhuman animal vocalizations is relevant for understanding emotion in music. Musical behavior occurs in cultural contexts that include many other coordinated activities which mark group identity, and can allo...

  1. Quantifying group specificity of animal vocalizations without specific sender information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vester, Heike; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Timme, Marc; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    Recordings of animal vocalization can lack information about sender and context. This is often the case in studies on marine mammals or in the increasing number of automated bioacoustics monitorings. Here, we develop a framework to estimate group specificity without specific sender information. We introduce and apply a bag-of-calls-and-coefficients approach (BOCCA) to study ensembles of cepstral coefficients calculated from vocalization signals recorded from a given animal group. Comparing distributions of such ensembles of coefficients by computing relative entropies reveals group specific differences. Applying the BOCCA to ensembles of calls recorded from group of long-finned pilot whales in northern Norway, we find that differences of vocalizations within social groups of pilot whales (Globicephala melas) are significantly lower than intergroup differences.

  2. Bayesian inference for identifying interaction rules in moving animal groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Richard P

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of similar collective patterns from different self-propelled particle models of animal groups points to a restricted set of "universal" classes for these patterns. While universality is interesting, it is often the fine details of animal interactions that are of biological importance. Universality thus presents a challenge to inferring such interactions from macroscopic group dynamics since these can be consistent with many underlying interaction models. We present a Bayesian framework for learning animal interaction rules from fine scale recordings of animal movements in swarms. We apply these techniques to the inverse problem of inferring interaction rules from simulation models, showing that parameters can often be inferred from a small number of observations. Our methodology allows us to quantify our confidence in parameter fitting. For example, we show that attraction and alignment terms can be reliably estimated when animals are milling in a torus shape, while interaction radius cannot be reliably measured in such a situation. We assess the importance of rate of data collection and show how to test different models, such as topological and metric neighbourhood models. Taken together our results both inform the design of experiments on animal interactions and suggest how these data should be best analysed. PMID:21829657

  3. Bayesian inference for identifying interaction rules in moving animal groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P Mann

    Full Text Available The emergence of similar collective patterns from different self-propelled particle models of animal groups points to a restricted set of "universal" classes for these patterns. While universality is interesting, it is often the fine details of animal interactions that are of biological importance. Universality thus presents a challenge to inferring such interactions from macroscopic group dynamics since these can be consistent with many underlying interaction models. We present a Bayesian framework for learning animal interaction rules from fine scale recordings of animal movements in swarms. We apply these techniques to the inverse problem of inferring interaction rules from simulation models, showing that parameters can often be inferred from a small number of observations. Our methodology allows us to quantify our confidence in parameter fitting. For example, we show that attraction and alignment terms can be reliably estimated when animals are milling in a torus shape, while interaction radius cannot be reliably measured in such a situation. We assess the importance of rate of data collection and show how to test different models, such as topological and metric neighbourhood models. Taken together our results both inform the design of experiments on animal interactions and suggest how these data should be best analysed.

  4. Modeling Collective Decision-Making in Animal Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Granovskiy, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Many animal groups benefit from making decisions collectively. For example, colonies of many ant species are able to select the best possible nest to move into without every ant needing to visit each available nest site. Similarly, honey bee colonies can focus their foraging resources on the best possible food sources in their environment by sharing information with each other. In the same way, groups of human individuals are often able to make better decisions together than each individual g...

  5. Indirect Genetic Effects for group-housed animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alemu, Setegn Worku

    This thesis investigated social interactions in group-housed animals. The main findings of this thesis: 1) Statistical methods to estimate indirect genetic effects when interactions differ between kin vs. non-kin were developed. 2) Indirect genetic effects contribute a substantial amount of...

  6. Group-theoretical method for physical property tensors of quasicrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Ping; Hu Cheng-Zheng; Zhou Xiang; Wang Ai-Jun; Miao Ling

    2006-01-01

    In addition to the phonon variable there is the phason variable in hydrodynamics for quasicrystals. These two kinds of hydrodynamic variables have different transformation properties. The phonon variable transforms under the vector representation, whereas the phason variable transforms under another related representation. Thus, a basis (or a set of basis functions) in the representation space should include such two kinds of variables. This makes it more difficult to determine the physical property tensors of quasicrystals. In this paper the group-theoretical method is given to determine the physical property tensors of quasicrystals. As an illustration of this method we calculate the third-order elasticity tensors of quasicrystals with five-fold symmetry by means of basis functions. It follows that the linear phonon elasticity is isotropic, but the nonlinear phonon elasticity is anisotropic for pentagonal quasicrystals. Meanwhile, the basis functions are constructed for all noncrystallographic point groups of quasicrystals.

  7. Animal signals and emotion in music: Coordinating affect across groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A. Bryant

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers studying the emotional impact of music have not traditionally been concerned with the principled relationship between form and function in evolved animal signals. The acoustic structure of musical forms is related in important ways to emotion perception, and thus research on nonhuman animal vocalizations is relevant for understanding emotion in music. Musical behavior occurs in cultural contexts that include many other coordinated activities which mark group identity, and can allow people to communicate within and between social alliances. The emotional impact of music might be best understood as a proximate mechanism serving an ultimately social function. Here I describe recent work that reveals intimate connections between properties of certain animal signals and evocative aspects of human music, including 1 examinations of the role of nonlinearities (e.g., broadband noise in nonhuman animal vocalizations, and the analogous production and perception of these features in human music, and 2 an analysis of group musical performances and possible relationships to nonhuman animal chorusing and emotional contagion effects. Communicative features in music are likely due primarily to evolutionary byproducts of phylogenetically older, but still intact communication systems. But in some cases, such as the coordinated rhythmic sounds produced by groups of musicians, our appreciation and emotional engagement might be due to the operation of an adaptive social signaling system. Future empirical work should examine human musical behavior through the comparative lens of behavioral ecology and an adaptationist cognitive science. By this view, particular coordinated sound combinations generated by musicians exploit evolved perceptual response biases—many shared across species—and proliferate through cultural evolutionary processes.

  8. Animal signals and emotion in music: coordinating affect across groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Researchers studying the emotional impact of music have not traditionally been concerned with the principled relationship between form and function in evolved animal signals. The acoustic structure of musical forms is related in important ways to emotion perception, and thus research on non-human animal vocalizations is relevant for understanding emotion in music. Musical behavior occurs in cultural contexts that include many other coordinated activities which mark group identity, and can allow people to communicate within and between social alliances. The emotional impact of music might be best understood as a proximate mechanism serving an ultimately social function. Recent work reveals intimate connections between properties of certain animal signals and evocative aspects of human music, including (1) examinations of the role of nonlinearities (e.g., broadband noise) in non-human animal vocalizations, and the analogous production and perception of these features in human music, and (2) an analysis of group musical performances and possible relationships to non-human animal chorusing and emotional contagion effects. Communicative features in music are likely due primarily to evolutionary by-products of phylogenetically older, but still intact communication systems. But in some cases, such as the coordinated rhythmic sounds produced by groups of musicians, our appreciation and emotional engagement might be driven by an adaptive social signaling system. Future empirical work should examine human musical behavior through the comparative lens of behavioral ecology and an adaptationist cognitive science. By this view, particular coordinated sound combinations generated by musicians exploit evolved perceptual response biases - many shared across species - and proliferate through cultural evolutionary processes. PMID:24427146

  9. Importance of blood groups and blood group antibodies in companion animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenhaus, Ann E

    2004-04-01

    Dogs, cats, birds, and ferrets are popular companion animals. Because these pets are considered by many to be family members, they are provided high-quality veterinary medical care, including blood transfusions. This article reviews the current status of blood groups in dogs, cats, birds, and ferrets and discusses the impact of blood groups on veterinary transfusion medicine. One blood group with 3 types has been described in the cat, whereas multiple blood groups have been described in the dog. Only rudimentary knowledge exists regarding pet bird blood groups, and, to date, the ferret appears to be unique because no blood groups have been described. Antibodies against blood group antigens also play a role in animal blood transfusions. Cats have naturally occurring alloantibodies; however, dogs do not appear to have clinically significant naturally occurring alloantibodies. Understanding the issues related to blood groups and blood group antibodies in companion animals will also benefit those using these species as research models for human diseases. PMID:15067591

  10. Modelling animal group fission using social network dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Cédric; Maire, Anaïs

    2014-01-01

    Group life involves both advantages and disadvantages, meaning that individuals have to compromise between their nutritional needs and their social links. When a compromise is impossible, the group splits in order to reduce conflict of interests and favour positive social interactions between its members. In this study we built a dynamic model of social networks to represent a succession of temporary fissions involving a change in social relations that could potentially lead to irreversible group fission (i.e. no more group fusion). This is the first study that assesses how a social network changes according to group fission-fusion dynamics. We built a model that was based on different parameters: the group size, the influence of nutritional needs compared to social needs, and the changes in the social network after a temporary fission. The results obtained from this theoretical data indicate how the percentage of social relation transfer, the number of individuals and the relative importance of nutritional requirements and social links influence the average number of days before irreversible fission occurs. The greater the nutritional needs and the higher the transfer of social relations during temporary fission, the fewer days will be observed before an irreversible fission. It is crucial to bridge the gap between the individual and the population level if we hope to understand how simple, local interactions may drive ecological systems. PMID:24831471

  11. Improving animal research with an institutional electronic discussion group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Norman C

    2005-09-01

    To remain at the forefront of scientific discovery, investigators continually are challenged to apply new approaches, instruments, and models to their work. Research institutions work to foster the exchange of ideas and resources, but this objective becomes more difficult to meet as the organization's size and complexity increase. To facilitate communication among researchers that use mice in their work and to provide increased opportunities for resource sharing, an electronic discussion group was formed at The Johns Hopkins University. The discussion group (jhu-mousers) is restricted to individuals within the institution's three campuses, and its 145 subscribers comprise faculty (including veterinarians), postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and technicians. During its beginning 2 1/2-year period, jhu-mousers has received 207 postings that include seminar announcements; resource information; requests for mice, equipment, biological reagents, and technical assistance; and responses to these requests. The value of the electronic mailing list is evidenced by the fact that 70% of requests for resources or technical help have received at least one response, and this figure is likely to be underestimated because off-line responses are not included. Because the mailing list provides opportunities for tissue sharing and is conducive to refining experimental procedures used in mice, its application promotes the use of alternatives in animal research. To promote and assist the development of animal-user discussion groups at other institutions, the administration, applications, and benefits of an electronic mailing list for mouse users are discussed here. PMID:16138783

  12. Swarm intelligence in animal groups: when can a collective out-perform an expert?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos V Katsikopoulos

    Full Text Available An important potential advantage of group-living that has been mostly neglected by life scientists is that individuals in animal groups may cope more effectively with unfamiliar situations. Social interaction can provide a solution to a cognitive problem that is not available to single individuals via two potential mechanisms: (i individuals can aggregate information, thus augmenting their 'collective cognition', or (ii interaction with conspecifics can allow individuals to follow specific 'leaders', those experts with information particularly relevant to the decision at hand. However, a-priori, theory-based expectations about which of these decision rules should be preferred are lacking. Using a set of simple models, we present theoretical conditions (involving group size, and diversity of individual information under which groups should aggregate information, or follow an expert, when faced with a binary choice. We found that, in single-shot decisions, experts are almost always more accurate than the collective across a range of conditions. However, for repeated decisions - where individuals are able to consider the success of previous decision outcomes - the collective's aggregated information is almost always superior. The results improve our understanding of how social animals may process information and make decisions when accuracy is a key component of individual fitness, and provide a solid theoretical framework for future experimental tests where group size, diversity of individual information, and the repeatability of decisions can be measured and manipulated.

  13. Stochastic analysis of the extra clustering model for animal grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drmota, Michael; Fuchs, Michael; Lee, Yi-Wen

    2016-07-01

    We consider the extra clustering model which was introduced by Durand et al. (J Theor Biol 249(2):262-270, 2007) in order to describe the grouping of social animals and to test whether genetic relatedness is the main driving force behind the group formation process. Durand and François (J Math Biol 60(3):451-468, 2010) provided a first stochastic analysis of this model by deriving (amongst other things) asymptotic expansions for the mean value of the number of groups. In this paper, we will give a much finer analysis of the number of groups. More precisely, we will derive asymptotic expansions for all higher moments and give a complete characterization of the possible limit laws. In the most interesting case (neutral model), we will prove a central limit theorem with a surprising normalization. In the remaining cases, the limit law will be either a mixture of a discrete and continuous law or a discrete law. Our results show that, except of in degenerate cases, strong concentration around the mean value takes place only for the neutral model, whereas in the remaining cases there is also mass concentration away from the mean. PMID:26520857

  14. Confidence sharing: an economic strategy for efficient information flows in animal groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos Korman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Social animals may share information to obtain a more complete and accurate picture of their surroundings. However, physical constraints on communication limit the flow of information between interacting individuals in a way that can cause an accumulation of errors and deteriorated collective behaviors. Here, we theoretically study a general model of information sharing within animal groups. We take an algorithmic perspective to identify efficient communication schemes that are, nevertheless, economic in terms of communication, memory and individual internal computation. We present a simple and natural algorithm in which each agent compresses all information it has gathered into a single parameter that represents its confidence in its behavior. Confidence is communicated between agents by means of active signaling. We motivate this model by novel and existing empirical evidences for confidence sharing in animal groups. We rigorously show that this algorithm competes extremely well with the best possible algorithm that operates without any computational constraints. We also show that this algorithm is minimal, in the sense that further reduction in communication may significantly reduce performances. Our proofs rely on the Cramér-Rao bound and on our definition of a Fisher Channel Capacity. We use these concepts to quantify information flows within the group which are then used to obtain lower bounds on collective performance. The abstract nature of our model makes it rigorously solvable and its conclusions highly general. Indeed, our results suggest confidence sharing as a central notion in the context of animal communication.

  15. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Morcatti Coura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P<0.001 and F (P=0.018 were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P<0.001 and E (P=0.002 were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P=0.003 and D (P=0.017 were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals.

  16. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcatti Coura, Fernanda; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  17. Theoretical analysis of the microwave radiation interaction with animals suffering from endometritis

    OpenAIRE

    Думанский, Александр Васильевич

    2014-01-01

    Numerous veterinary studies show that electromagnetic treatments of endometritis in cows seems to be quite promising. However, it should be understood that the method involves creating a model describing the distribution of electromagnetic fields in different regions of animal body radiation at different frequencies, different power flux density and exposure time. However, the solution of this problem involves the overcoming major difficulties of theoretical and methodological nature. Based o...

  18. Comparative genomics of the Staphylococcus intermedius group of animal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouri eBen Zakour

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Staphylococcus intermedius group consists of 3 closely-related coagulase-positive bacterial species including S. intermedius, Staphylococus pseudintermedius, and Staphylococcus delphini. S. pseudintermedius is a major skin pathogen of dogs, which occasionally causes severe zoonotic infections of humans. S. delphini has been isolated from an array of different animals including horses, mink and pigeons, whereas S. intermedius has been isolated only from pigeons to date. Here we provide a detailed analysis of the S. pseudintermedius whole genome sequence in comparison to high quality draft S. intermedius and S. delphini genomes, and to other sequenced staphylococcal species. The core genome of the SIG was highly conserved with average nucleotide identity (ANI between the 3 species of 93.61%, which is very close to the threshold of species delineation (95% ANI, highlighting the close-relatedness of the SIG species. However, considerable variation was identified in the content of mobile genetic elements, cell wall-associated proteins, and iron and sugar transporters, reflecting the distinct ecological niches inhabited. Of note, S. pseudintermedius ED99 contained a Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR locus of the Nmeni subtype and S. intermedius contained both Nmeni and Mtube subtypes. In contrast to S. intermedius and S. delphini and most other staphylococci examined to date, S. pseudintermedius contained at least 9 predicted reverse transcriptase (RT Group II introns. Furthermore, S. pseudintermedius ED99 encoded several transposons which were largely responsible for its multi-resistant phenotype. Overall, the study highlights extensive differences in accessory genome content between closely-related staphylococcal species inhabiting distinct host niches, providing new avenues for research into pathogenesis and bacterial host-adaptation.

  19. Group theoretical approach to path integration on spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The path integral over compact and non-compact spheres (denoted by Hα) is discussed. The short time propagator is decomposed in unitary irreducible representations of the corresponding transformation group G of Hα. Two cases are considered. For G ≅ Hα the Fourier analysis leads to an expansion in group characters. However, in the general case Hα ≅ G/H the decomposition gives an expansion in zonal spherical functions of G is contained in H. The path integral is performed using the orthogonality of the representations. The groups SO(n), SO(n - 1,1) SU(2) and SU(1,1) are considered. (author). 10 refs

  20. Group theoretical construction of planar noncommutative phase spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noncommutative phase spaces are generated and classified in the framework of centrally extended anisotropic planar kinematical Lie groups as well as in the framework of noncentrally abelian extended planar absolute time Lie groups. Through these constructions the coordinates of the phase spaces do not commute due to the presence of naturally introduced fields giving rise to minimal couplings. By symplectic realizations methods, physical interpretations of generators coming from the obtained structures are given

  1. Group theoretical construction of planar noncommutative phase spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngendakumana, Ancille, E-mail: nancille@yahoo.fr; Todjihoundé, Leonard, E-mail: leonardt@imsp.uac.org [Institut de Mathématiques et des Sciences Physiques (IMSP), Porto-Novo (Benin); Nzotungicimpaye, Joachim, E-mail: kimpaye@kie.ac.rw [Kigali Institute of Education (KIE), Kigali (Rwanda)

    2014-01-15

    Noncommutative phase spaces are generated and classified in the framework of centrally extended anisotropic planar kinematical Lie groups as well as in the framework of noncentrally abelian extended planar absolute time Lie groups. Through these constructions the coordinates of the phase spaces do not commute due to the presence of naturally introduced fields giving rise to minimal couplings. By symplectic realizations methods, physical interpretations of generators coming from the obtained structures are given.

  2. PREFACE: XXXth International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics (ICGTMP) (Group30)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackx, Fred; De Schepper, Hennie; Van der Jeugt, Joris

    2015-04-01

    The XXXth International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics (ICGTMP), also known as the Group30 conference, took place in Ghent (Belgium) from Monday 14 to Friday 18 July 2014. The conference was organised by Ghent University (Department of Applied Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics, and Department of Mathematical Analysis). The website http://www.group30.ugent.be is still available. The ICGTMP is one of the traditional conference series covering the most important topics of symmetry which are relevant to the interplay of present-day mathematics and physics. More than 40 years ago a group of enthusiasts, headed by H. Bacry of Marseille and A. Janner of Nijmegen, initiated a series of annual meetings with the aim to provide a common forum for scientists interested in group theoretical methods. At that time most of the participants belonged to two important communities: on the one hand solid state specialists, elementary particle theorists and phenomenologists, and on the other mathematicians eager to apply newly-discovered group and algebraic structures. The conference series has become a meeting point for scientists working at modelling physical phenomena through mathematical and numerical methods based on geometry and symmetry. It is considered as the oldest one among the conference series devoted to geometry and physics. It has been further broadened and diversified due to the successful applications of geometric and algebraic methods in life sciences and other areas. The first four meetings took place alternatively in Marseille and Nijmegen. Soon after, the conference acquired an international standing, especially following the 1975 colloquium in Nijmegen and the 1976 colloquium in Montreal. Since then it has been organized in many places around the world. It has become a bi-annual colloquium since 1990, the year it was organized in Moscow. This was the first time the colloquium took place in Belgium. There were 246 registered

  3. Group theoretic approaches to nuclear and hadronic collective motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedenharn, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    Three approaches to nuclear and hadronic collective motion are reviewed, compared and contrasted: the standard symmetry approach as typified by the Interacting Boson Model, the kinematic symmetry group approach of Gell-Mann and Tomonaga, and the recent direct construction by Buck. 50 references.

  4. Group theoretic approaches to nuclear and hadronic collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three approaches to nuclear and hadronic collective motion are reviewed, compared and contrasted: the standard symmetry approach as typified by the Interacting Boson Model, the kinematic symmetry group approach of Gell-Mann and Tomonaga, and the recent direct construction by Buck. 50 references

  5. Theoretical aspects of graphene-like group IV semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houssa, M., E-mail: michel.houssa@fys.kuleuven.be [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Broek, B. van den; Scalise, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Ealet, B. [Aix-Marseille University, CNRS-CINaM Laboratory, 13288 Marseille (France); Pourtois, G. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Plasmant Research Group, University of Antwerp, B-2610 Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium); Chiappe, D.; Cinquanta, E. [MDM Laboratory, IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Grazianetti, C.; Fanciulli, M. [MDM Laboratory, IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, 20126 Milano (Italy); Molle, A. [MDM Laboratory, IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Afanas’ev, V.V.; Stesmans, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-02-01

    Silicene and germanene are the silicon and germanium counterparts of graphene, respectively. Recent experimental works have reported the growth of silicene on (1 1 1)Ag surfaces with different atomic configurations, depending on the growth temperature and surface coverage. We first theoretically study the structural and electronic properties of silicene on (1 1 1)Ag surfaces, focusing on the (4 × 4)silicene/Ag structure. Due to symmetry breaking in the silicene layer (nonequivalent number of top and bottom Si atoms), the corrugated silicene layer, with the Ag substrate removed, is predicted to be semiconducting, with a computed energy bandgap of about 0.3 eV. However, the hybridization between the Si 3p orbitals and the Ag 5s orbital in the silicene/(1 1 1)Ag slab model leads to an overall metallic system, with a distribution of local electronic density of states, which is related to the slightly disordered structure of the silicene layer on the (1 1 1)Ag surface. We next study the interaction of silicene and germanene with different hexagonal non-metallic substrates, namely ZnS and ZnSe. On reconstructed (0 0 0 1)ZnS or ZnSe surfaces, which should be more energetically stable for very thin layers, silicene and germanene are found to be semiconducting. Remarkably, the nature and magnitude of their energy bandgap can be controlled by an out-of-plane electric field, an important finding for the potential use of these materials in nanoelectronic devices.

  6. Application of the group-theoretical method to physical problems

    OpenAIRE

    Abd-el-Malek, Mina B.

    1998-01-01

    The concept of the theory of continuous groups of transformations has attracted the attention of applied mathematicians and engineers to solve many physical problems in the engineering sciences. Three applications are presented in this paper. The first one is the problem of time-dependent vertical temperature distribution in a stagnant lake. Two cases have been considered for the forms of the water parameters, namely water density and thermal conductivity. The second application is the unstea...

  7. Some theoretical results on the grouped variables Lasso

    OpenAIRE

    Chesneau, Christophe; Hebiri, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    We consider the linear regression model with Gaussian error. We estimate the unknown parameters by a procedure inspired from the Group Lasso estimator introduced by Yuan and Lin (2006). We show that this estimator satisfies a sparsity oracle inequality, i.e., a bound in terms of the number of non-zero components of the oracle vector. We prove that this bound is better, in some cases, than the one achieved by the Lasso and the Dantzig selector.

  8. Theoretical studies on energetic materials bearing pentaflurosulphyl (SF5) groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Li Xiao-Hong; Cui Hong-Ling; Ju Wei-Wei; Li Tong-Wei; Zhang Rui-Zhou; Yong Yong-Liang

    2014-07-01

    Heats of formation (HOF) for a series of energetic materials containing SF5 group were studied by density functional theory. Results show that HOFs increase with the augmention of field effects of substituted groups. Addition of furazan or furoxan ring increases HOF of the energetic materials. All the SF5-containing compounds have densities which are ∼0.19 g/cm3 higher than those containing -NH2 group. S-F bond is the trigger bond for the thermolysis process in the title compounds and bond dissociation energies of the weakest bonds range from 351.1 to 388.3 kJ/mol. Detonation velocities (D) and pressures (P) are evaluated by Kamlet-Jacobs equations with the calculated densities and HOFs. Results show that increasing the amount of furazan rings results in a larger D and P. Considering the detonation performance and thermal stability, eight compounds may be considered as potential candidates for high-energy density materials.

  9. Factors influencing interactions in zoos: animal-keeper relationship, animal-public interactions and solitary animals groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Quintavalle Pastorino

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Interactions that animals experience can have a significant influence on their health and welfare. These interactions can occur between animals themselves, but also between animals and keepers, and animals and the public. Human and non-human animals come into contact with each other in a variety of settings, and wherever there is contact there is the opportunity for interaction to take place. Interaction with companion animals are well known, but human–animal interaction (HAR (Hosey, 2008 also occurs in the context of farms (Hemsworth and Gonyou, 1997; Hemsworth, 2003, laboratories (Chang and Hart, 2002, zoos (Kreger and Mench, 1995 and even the wild (e.g. Cassini, 2001. This project proposes a permanent monitoring scheme to record animal-human interactions and animal-animal interactions in zoos. This will be accompanied by a survey of animal personality for welfare, husbandry, breeding programs and reintroduction purposes. The pilot project is currently based on direct monitoring of animal behaviour, use of time lapse cameras and animal personality questionnaires completed by experienced keepers. The goal of this project is to create a network between zoos to explore the aforementioned interactions to produce husbandry protocols and explore personality and behavioural traits in multiple species. We present provisional data regarding polar bear (Fasano Zoosafari, Italy, Sumatran tigers, Amur tigers and Asiatic lion (ZSL London and Whipsnade zoo interactions with humans and conspecifics. This data is collected across a broad range of environmental conditions and outlines the monitoring protocols developed to collect this data. The first year data show the great adaptability of these species to ex situ environments, low or absent negative impact of visitors’ presence and the relevance of individual personality in these interactions.

  10. Group-theoretic compactification of Bruhat-Tits buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Guivarc'h, Yves; Rémy, Bertrand

    2006-01-01

    Let GF denote the rational points of a semisimple group G over a non-archimedean local field F, with Bruhat-Tits building X. This paper contains five main results. We prove a convergence theorem for sequences of parahoric subgroups of GF in the Chabauty topology, which enables to compactify the vertices of X. We obtain a structure theorem showing that the Bruhat-Tits buildings of the Levi factors all lie in the boundary of the compactification. Then we obtain an identification theorem with th...

  11. Group theoretical approach to the analysis of interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A geometric approach to the analysis of interferometers is presented in which beam splitters and phase shifters are described as performing rotations in an abstract three space on the state vector of the light. This formulation allows one to take full advantage of representation theory for the group SU(2) in analyzing interferometer sensitivity. With these techniques it is easy to show that in conventional interferometry, where light enters only one input port, the phase sensitivity scales as the inverse square root of the number of photons that pass through the interferometer during measurement time. By injecting suitably correlated light into both input ports of an interferometer, a phase sensitivity approaching 1/n can be achieved, where n is the number of photons. Input states that allow this sensitivity can readily be identified using SU(2) representation theory. Methods of generating such states using four-wave mixers or parametric amplifiers are described. By employing the group SU(1,1) this formalism may be extended to describe active interferometers in which the beam splitters are replaced by four-wave mixers or parametric devices. Such interferometers can also achieve a phase sensitivity approaching 1/n. The potential advantages of these interferometers over conventional interferometers will be discussed

  12. Effect of Vision Angle on the Phase Transition in a Flocking Behavior of Animal Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, P The; Ngo, V Thanh

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the phase transition in a system of self-propelling particles has been extensively studied during the last few decades. A theoretical model was proposed by T. Vicsek, et. al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 1226 (1995)] with a simple rule for updating the direction of motion of each particle. Based on the Vicsek's model (VM) [1], in this work, we consider a group of animals as particles moving freely on a two-dimensional space. Due to the fact that the viewable area of animals depends on the species, we consider the motion of each individual within an angle $\\varphi=\\Phi/2$ ($\\Phi$ is called angle of view) of a circle centered at its position, of radius $R$. We obtained a phase diagram in the space ($\\varphi$, $\\eta_c$) with $\\eta_c$ being the critical noise. We show that, the phase transition exists only in the case of a wide view's angle $\\varphi \\geq 0.5\\pi$. The flocking of animals is perhaps a behavior of the species of prey only, but not the one of the predator. Our simulation results are in good ag...

  13. Effect of vision angle on the phase transition in flocking behavior of animal groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, P. The; Lee, Sang-Hee; Ngo, V. Thanh

    2015-09-01

    The nature of the phase transition in a system of self-propelling particles has been extensively studied during the past few decades. A theoretical model was proposed by [T. Vicsek et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 1226 (1995), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.75.1226] with a simple rule for updating the direction of motion of each particle. Based on the model of Vicsek et al., in this paper, we consider a group of animals as particles moving freely in a two-dimensional space. Due to the fact that the viewable area of animals depends on the species, we consider the motion of each individual within an angle φ =ϕ /2 (ϕ is called the angle of view) of a circle centered at its position of radius R . We obtained a phase diagram in the space (φ ,ηc ) with ηc being the critical noise. We show that the phase transition exists only in the case of a wide view's angle φ ≥0.5 π . The flocking of animals is a universal behavior of the species of prey but not the one of the predator. Our simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observation [C. Beccoa et al., Physica A 367, 487 (2006), 10.1016/j.physa.2005.11.041].

  14. Potential Leaders Trade Off Goal-Oriented and Socially Oriented Behavior in Mobile Animal Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Christos C; Singh, Manvir; Couzin, Iain D

    2015-08-01

    Leadership is widespread across the animal kingdom. In self-organizing groups, such as fish schools, theoretical models predict that effective leaders need to balance goal-oriented motion, such as toward a known resource, with their tendency to be social. Increasing goal orientation is predicted to increase decision speed and accuracy, but it is also predicted to increase the risk of the group splitting. To test these key predictions, we trained fish (golden shiners, Notemigonus crysoleucas) to associate a spatial target with a food reward ("informed" individuals) before testing each singly with a group of eight untrained fish who were uninformed ("naive") about the target. Informed fish that exhibited faster and straighter paths (indicative of greater goal orientation) were more likely to reach their preferred target and did so more quickly. However, such behavior was associated with a tendency to leave untrained fish behind and, therefore, with failure to transmit their preference to others. Either all or none of the untrained fish stayed with the trained fish in the majority of trials. Using a simple model of self-organized coordination and leadership in groups, we recreate these features of leadership observed experimentally, including the apparent consensus behavior among naive individuals. Effective leadership thus requires informed individuals to appropriately balance goal-oriented and socially oriented behavior. PMID:26655156

  15. The shifting balance of diversity among major marine animal groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alroy, J

    2010-09-01

    The fossil record demonstrates that each major taxonomic group has a consistent net rate of diversification and a limit to its species richness. It has been thought that long-term changes in the dominance of major taxonomic groups can be predicted from these characteristics. However, new analyses show that diversity limits may rise or fall in response to adaptive radiations or extinctions. These changes are idiosyncratic and occur at different times in each taxa. For example, the end-Permian mass extinction permanently reduced the diversity of important, previously dominant groups such as brachiopods and crinoids. The current global crisis may therefore permanently alter the biosphere's taxonomic composition by changing the rules of evolution. PMID:20813951

  16. Indiana University Theoretical Particle Physics Group. Final report, December 1, 1970-October 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have carried out a broad program of research to understand aspects of the interactions of nature on both theoretical and phenomenological levels. Our research has led to the publication of about 130 papers; these paper are listed. We also have worked closely with the members of the high energy experimental group to give them theoretical support and to help in interpretation of their experiments. A brief summary of accomplishments is given

  17. The group theoretical aspects of infinitesimal Riemann-Hilbert transform and hidden symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We obtain explicit expressions for infinitesimal regular Riemann-Hilbert transforms. Using them, the group theoretical aspects of infinitesimal RH transforms are discussed with an eye at the comparison with the hidden symmetry transformations proposed by us before. We find that the RH transforms have very rich group structure; e.g. in the 2-d principal chiral models, their group contains two Kac-Moody subalgebras. But not all of them are nontrivial hidden symmetry of the theory

  18. Genomic data do not support comb jellies as the sister group to all other animals

    OpenAIRE

    Pisani, Davide; Pett, Walker; Dohrmann, Martin; Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas; Wörheide, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how complex traits, such as epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, or guts, originated depends on a well-supported hypothesis about the phylogenetic relationships among major animal lineages. Traditionally, sponges (Porifera) have been interpreted as the sister group to the remaining animals, a hypothesis consistent with the conventional view that the last common animal ancestor was relatively simple and more complex body plans arose later in evolution. However, this premise has r...

  19. Evaluating Animal-Assisted Therapy in Group Treatment for Child Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Tracy J.; Davis, Diana; Pennings, Jacquelyn

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates and compares the effectiveness of three group interventions on trauma symptoms for children who have been sexually abused. All of the groups followed the same treatment protocol, with two of them incorporating variations of animal-assisted therapy. A total of 153 children ages 7 to 17 who were in group therapy at a Child…

  20. On the adaptations to cave life of some different animal groups (first note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilian Pricop

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the major and common adaptations to the cave environment ofdifferent animal groups. The common features are: anophthalmia, depigmentation, apterism in the caseof insects, body shape and ecophysiological adaptations.

  1. Perspective on Models in Theoretical and Practical Traditions of Knowledge: The Example of Otto Engine Animations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Jesper; Stromdahl, Helge

    2012-01-01

    Nineteen informants (n = 19) were asked to study and comment two computer animations of the Otto combustion engine. One animation was non-interactive and realistic in the sense of depicting a physical engine. The other animation was more idealised, interactive and synchronised with a dynamic PV-graph. The informants represented practical and…

  2. Public perceptions of animal cloning : a hybrid of survey and focus groups as participatory exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Jelsøe, Erling; Vincentsen, Ulla; Andersen, Ida-Elisabeth; Petersen, Rikke

    2006-01-01

    What was from the outset meant to be a survey testing predefined categories of ethical positions related to new biotechnologies with animal cloning as an example was subsequently developed into a process of broader involvement of groups of citizens in the issue. The survey was conducted at meetings in four different cities in Denmark. The participants were introduced to animal cloning and after that they filled out the questionnaire. Finally, the issue was discussed in focus groups. The proce...

  3. A Note on the Group-theoretic Approach to Fast Matrix Multiplication

    CERN Document Server

    Hedtke, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    In 2003 COHN and UMANS introduced a group-theoretic approach to fast matrix multiplication. This involves finding large subsets S, T and U of a group G satisfying the Triple Product Property (TPP) as a means to bound the exponent $\\omega$ of the matrix multiplication. We show that S, T and U may be be assumed to contain the identity and be otherwise disjoint. We also give a much shorter proof of the upper bound |S|+|T|+|U| <= |G|+2.

  4. A Group-Theoretical Approach to the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements: Old and New Developments

    OpenAIRE

    Kibler, M. R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a companion article to the review paper by the present author devoted to the classification of matter constituents (chemical elements and particles) and published in the first part of the proceedings of The Second Harry Wiener International Memorial Conference (see quant-ph/0310155). It is mainly concerned with a group-theoretical approach to the Periodic Table of the neutral elements based on the noncompact group SO(4,2)xSU(2).

  5. A group theoretical approach to structural transitions of icosahedral quasicrystals and point arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Emilio; Dykeman, Eric C.; Geraets, James A.; Twarock, Reidun

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we describe a group theoretical approach to the study of structural transitions of icosahedral quasicrystals and point arrays. We apply the concept of Schur rotations, originally proposed by Kramer, to the case of aperiodic structures with icosahedral symmetry; these rotations induce a rotation of the physical and orthogonal spaces invariant under the icosahedral group, and hence, via the cut-and-project method, a continuous transformation of the corresponding model sets. We prove that this approach allows for a characterisation of such transitions in a purely group theoretical framework, and provide explicit computations and specific examples. Moreover, we prove that this approach can be used in the case of finite point sets with icosahedral symmetry, which have a wide range of applications in carbon chemistry (fullerenes) and biology (viral capsids).

  6. Toward a unifying model of identification with groups: integrating theoretical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccas, Sonia; Sagiv, Lilach; Schwartz, Shalom; Halevy, Nir; Eidelson, Roy

    2008-08-01

    Building on the contributions of diverse theoretical approaches, the authors present a multidimensional model of group identification. Integrating conceptions from the social identity perspective with those from research on individualism-collectivism, nationalism- patriotism, and identification with organizations, we propose four conceptually distinct modes of identification: importance (how much I view the group as part of who I am), commitment (how much I want to benefit the group), superiority (how much I view my group as superior to other groups), and deference (how much I honor, revere, and submit to the group's norms, symbols, and leaders). We present an instrument for assessing the four modes of identification and review initial empirical findings that validate the proposed model and show its utility in understanding antecedents and consequences of identification. PMID:18641386

  7. Group-theoretical search for rows or columns of the lepton mixing matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Jurciukonis, D

    2016-01-01

    We have used the SmallGroups library of groups, together with the computer algebra systems GAP and Mathematica, to search for groups with a three-dimensional irreducible representation in which one of the group generators has a twice-degenerate eigenvalue while another generator has non-degenerate eigenvalues. By assuming one of these group generators to commute with the charged-lepton mass matrix and the other one to commute with the neutrino (Dirac) mass matrix, one derives group-theoretical predictions for the moduli of the matrix elements of either a row or a column of the lepton mixing matrix. Our search has produced several realistic predictions for either the second row, or the third row, or for any of the columns of that matrix.

  8. Theoretical evaluation of corrosion inhibition performance of imidazoline compounds with different hydrophilic groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jun, E-mail: zhjupc@yahoo.co [College of Physics Science and Technology, China University of Petroleum, Dongying 257061, Shandong Province (China); Qiao Guimin; Hu Songqing; Yan Youguo; Ren Zhenjia; Yu Lijun [College of Physics Science and Technology, China University of Petroleum, Dongying 257061, Shandong Province (China)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: The trend in inhibition efficiency of imidazoline derivatives was assessed by combination of quantum chemistry calculation and molecular mechanics simulation. Results from the theoretical investigation were in good accordance with previously published experimental ones, indicating a new theoretical solution for prediction of inhibition efficiency of corrosion inhibitors. Effect of hydrophilic side chain on corrosion inhibition performance was revealed from quantum chemistry calculation and molecular mechanics methods, which facilitates deeper understanding of microscopic inhibition mechanism of imidazoline derivatives. This theoretical work may provide a feasible idea in molecular design of new corrosion inhibitors. - Abstract: Corrosion inhibition performance of four 1-R-2-undecyl-imidazoline compounds (R=CH{sub 2}COOH (A), CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH (B), CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2} (C) and H (D)) for carbon steel was evaluated by quantum chemistry and molecular mechanics methods. Results indicated that the hydrophilic groups (R) have remarkable influence on molecular reactivity, binding strength between self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and Fe surface, and compactness of the inhibitor SAM. The inhibition efficiency evaluated via theoretical methods was well accorded with reported experimental ones, following the same order as A > B > C > D. This research might provide a theoretical inhibition performance evaluation approach for homologous inhibitors.

  9. Motion reconstruction of animal groups: From schooling fish to swarming mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butail, Sachit

    The long-term goal of this research is to provide kinematic data for the design and validation of spatial models of collective behavior in animal groups. The specific research objective of this dissertation is to apply methods from nonlinear estimation and computer vision to construct multi-target tracking systems that process multi-view calibrated video to reconstruct the three-dimensional movement of animals in a group. We adapt the tracking systems for the study of two animal species: Danio aequipinnatus, a common species of schooling fish, and Anopheles gambiae, the most important vector of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. Together these tracking systems span variability in target size on image, density, and movement. For tracking fish, we automatically initialize, predict, and reconstruct shape trajectories of multiple fish through occlusions. For mosquitoes, which appear as faded streaks on in-field footage, we provide methods to extract velocity information from the streaks, adaptively seek missing measurements, and resolve occlusions within a multi-hypothesis framework. In each case the research has yielded an unprecedented volume of trajectory data for subsequent analysis. We present kinematic data of fast-start response in fish schools and first-ever trajectories of wild mosquito swarming and mating events. The broader impact of this work is to advance the understanding of animal groups for the design of bio-inspired robotic systems, where, similar to the animal groups we study, the collective is able to perform tasks far beyond the capabilities of a single inexpensive robot.

  10. Group theoretical analysis of the H3+ +H2 ↔ H5+ reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhou

    2016-06-01

    The H3+ +H2 →H2 + H3+ proton transfer reaction is complicated due to the proton scrambling from the large amplitude motions in the H5+ intermediate. In order to understand this reaction, high-resolution spectroscopic studies are necessary for the reactants/products and the intermediate, and the group theoretical analysis is an essential aspect in the prediction and interpretation of these spectra. With five indistinguishable protons, H5+ is characterized using the G240 complete nuclear permutation-inversion (CNPI) group. For most of the configurations sampled by the reaction path, the feasible permutations depend on the distance between the H3+ and H2 fragments. Subgroups of G240 can be used to describe these feasible permutations. Specifically, we consider two limits of the molecular configurations. The equilibrium structure of H5+ , i.e., [H2 -H -H2 ]+, can be described using the G16 molecular symmetry group, while the dissociation products, i.e., H3+ ⋯H2 , require the G24 molecular symmetry group. In the present study, a group theoretical analysis is performed for both limits, providing the symmetries for the nuclear spins and rovibrational wave functions. Also, spectroscopic properties for [H2 -H -H2 ]+, particularly rovibrational couplings and electric dipole selection rules, as well as correlations of energy levels between [H2 -H -H2 ]+ and H3+ ⋯H2 , are obtained.

  11. Genomic data do not support comb jellies as the sister group to all other animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Davide; Pett, Walker; Dohrmann, Martin; Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas; Wörheide, Gert

    2015-12-15

    Understanding how complex traits, such as epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, or guts, originated depends on a well-supported hypothesis about the phylogenetic relationships among major animal lineages. Traditionally, sponges (Porifera) have been interpreted as the sister group to the remaining animals, a hypothesis consistent with the conventional view that the last common animal ancestor was relatively simple and more complex body plans arose later in evolution. However, this premise has recently been challenged by analyses of the genomes of comb jellies (Ctenophora), which, instead, found ctenophores as the sister group to the remaining animals (the "Ctenophora-sister" hypothesis). Because ctenophores are morphologically complex predators with true epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, and guts, this scenario implies these traits were either present in the last common ancestor of all animals and were lost secondarily in sponges and placozoans (Trichoplax) or, alternatively, evolved convergently in comb jellies. Here, we analyze representative datasets from recent studies supporting Ctenophora-sister, including genome-scale alignments of concatenated protein sequences, as well as a genomic gene content dataset. We found no support for Ctenophora-sister and conclude it is an artifact resulting from inadequate methodology, especially the use of simplistic evolutionary models and inappropriate choice of species to root the metazoan tree. Our results reinforce a traditional scenario for the evolution of complexity in animals, and indicate that inferences about the evolution of Metazoa based on the Ctenophora-sister hypothesis are not supported by the currently available data. PMID:26621703

  12. A theoretical analysis of the bearing performance of vertically loaded large-diameter pipe pile groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xuanming; Zhang, Ting; Li, Ping; Cheng, Ke

    2016-02-01

    This paper aims to present a theoretical method to study the bearing performance of vertically loaded large-diameter pipe pile groups. The interactions between group piles result in different bearing performance of both a single pile and pile groups. Considering the pile group effect and the skin friction from both outer and inner soils, an analytical solution is developed to calculate the settlement and axial force in large-diameter pipe pile groups. The analytical solution was verified by centrifuge and field testing results. An extensive parametric analysis was performed to study the bearing performance of the pipe pile groups. The results reveal that the axial forces in group piles are not the same. The larger the distance from central pile, the larger the axial force. The axial force in the central pile is the smallest, while that in corner piles is the largest. The axial force on the top of the corner piles decreases while that in the central pile increases with increasing of pile spacing and decreasing of pile length. The axial force in side piles varies little with the variations of pile spacing, pile length, and shear modulus of the soil and is approximately equal to the average load shared by one pile. For a pile group, the larger the pile length is, the larger the influence radius is. As a result, the pile group effect is more apparent for a larger pile length. The settlement of pile groups decreases with increasing of the pile number in the group and the shear modulus of the underlying soil.

  13. Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG)

  14. Both information and social cohesion determine collective decisions in animal groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Noam; Garnier, Simon; Hartnett, Andrew T; Couzin, Iain D

    2013-03-26

    During consensus decision making, individuals in groups balance personal information (based on their own past experiences) with social information (based on the behavior of other individuals), allowing the group to reach a single collective choice. Previous studies of consensus decision making processes have focused on the informational aspects of behavioral choice, assuming that individuals make choices based solely on their likelihood of being beneficial (e.g., rewarded). However, decisions by both humans and nonhuman animals systematically violate such expectations. Furthermore, the typical experimental paradigm of assessing binary decisions, those between two mutually exclusive options, confounds two aspects common to most group decisions: minimizing uncertainty (through the use of personal and social information) and maintaining group cohesion (for example, to reduce predation risk). Here we experimentally disassociate cohesion-based decisions from information-based decisions using a three-choice paradigm and demonstrate that both factors are crucial to understanding the collective decision making of schooling fish. In addition, we demonstrate how multiple informational dimensions (here color and stripe orientation) are integrated within groups to achieve consensus, even though no individual is explicitly aware of, or has a unique preference for, the consensus option. Balancing of personal information and social cues by individuals in key frontal positions in the group is shown to be essential for such group-level capabilities. Our results demonstrate the importance of integrating informational with other social considerations when explaining the collective capabilities of group-living animals. PMID:23440218

  15. Some theoretical aspects of the group-IIIA-ion atomic clocks: Intercombination transition probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main focus of this paper is the theoretical study of the 3P1→1S0 intercombination transition probabilities of the group-IIIA ions that are excellent candidates for high-accuracy atomic clocks. The importance of relativistic effects on the intercombination transition probabilities is made apparent by comparing their calculated values with those of the allowed 1P1→1S0 transition probabilities. In striking contrast to the allowed transition probabilities, the intercombination transition probabilities exhibit a strong Z dependence

  16. To eat and not be eaten: modelling resources and safety in multi-species animal groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Srinivasan

    Full Text Available Using mixed-species bird flocks as an example, we model the payoffs for two types of species from participating in multi-species animal groups. Salliers feed on mobile prey, are good sentinels and do not affect prey capture rates of gleaners; gleaners feed on prey on substrates and can enhance the prey capture rate of salliers by flushing prey, but are poor sentinels. These functional types are known from various animal taxa that form multi-species associations. We model costs and benefits of joining groups for a wide range of group compositions under varying abundances of two types of prey-prey on substrates and mobile prey. Our model predicts that gleaners and salliers show a conflict of interest in multi-species groups, because gleaners benefit from increasing numbers of salliers in the group, whereas salliers benefit from increasing gleaner numbers. The model also predicts that the limits to size and variability in composition of multi-species groups are driven by the relative abundance of different types of prey, independent of predation pressure. Our model emphasises resources as a primary driver of temporal and spatial group dynamics, rather than reproductive activity or predation per se, which have hitherto been thought to explain patterns of multi-species group formation and cohesion. The qualitative predictions of the model are supported by empirical patterns from both terrestrial and marine multi-species groups, suggesting that similar mechanisms might underlie group dynamics in a range of taxa. The model also makes novel predictions about group dynamics that can be tested using variation across space and time.

  17. Viability of decision-making systems in human and animal groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Cédric

    2012-08-01

    Shared and unshared consensuses are present in both human and animal societies. To date, few studies have applied an evolutionary perspective to the viability of these systems. This study therefore aimed to assess if decision-making allows group members to satisfy all their needs and to survive, decision after decision, day after day. The novelty of this study is the inclusion of multiple decision-making events with varying conditions and the parameterization of the model based on data in macaques, bringing the model closer to ecologically reality. The activity budgets of group members in the model did not differ significantly from those observed in macaques, making the model robust and providing mechanistic insight. Three different decision-making systems were then tested: (1) One single leader, (2) Leading according to needs and (3) Voting process. Results show that when individuals have equal needs, all decision-making systems are viable. However, one single leader cannot impose its decision when the needs of other group members differ too much from its own needs. The leading according to needs system is always viable whatever the group heterogeneity. However, the individual with the highest body mass decides in the majority of cases. Finally, the voting process also appears to be viable, with a majority threshold that differs according to group size and to different individual needs. This study is the first clear prediction of the different types of consensus in animal groups used in various different conditions. PMID:22554449

  18. On the group-theoretical approach to the study of interpenetrating nets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburin, Igor A

    2016-05-01

    Using group-subgroup and group-supergroup relations, a general theoretical framework is developed to describe and derive interpenetrating 3-periodic nets. The generation of interpenetration patterns is readily accomplished by replicating a single net with a supergroup G of its space group H under the condition that site symmetries of vertices and edges are the same in both H and G. It is shown that interpenetrating nets cannot be mapped onto each other by mirror reflections because otherwise edge crossings would necessarily occur in the embedding. For the same reason any other rotation or roto-inversion axes from G \\ H are not allowed to intersect vertices or edges of the nets. This property significantly narrows the set of supergroups to be included in the derivation of interpenetrating nets. A procedure is described based on the automorphism group of a Hopf ring net [Alexandrov et al. (2012). Acta Cryst. A68, 484-493] to determine maximal symmetries compatible with interpenetration patterns. The proposed approach is illustrated by examples of twofold interpenetrated utp, dia and pcu nets, as well as multiple copies of enantiomorphic quartz (qtz) networks. Some applications to polycatenated 2-periodic layers are also discussed. PMID:27126113

  19. Topics in mode conversion theory and the group theoretical foundations of path integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Andrew Stephen

    This dissertation reports research about the phase space perspective for solving wave problems, with particular emphasis on the phenomenon of mode conversion in multicomponent wave systems, and the mathematics which underlie the phase space perspective. Part I of this dissertation gives a review of the phase space theory of resonant mode conversion. We describe how the WKB approximation is related to geometrical structures in phase space, and how in particular ray-tracing algorithms can be used to construct the WKB solution. We further review how to analyze the phenomena of mode conversion from the phase space perspective. By making an expansion of the dispersion matrix about the mode conversion point in phase space, a local coupled wave equation is obtained. The solution of this local problem then provides a way to asymptotically match the WKB solutions on either side of the mode conversion region. We describe this theory in the context of a pedagogical example; that of a pair of coupled harmonic oscillators undergoing resonant conversion. Lastly, we present new higher order corrections to the local solution for the mode conversion problem which allow better asymptotic matching to the WKB solutions. The phase space tools used in Part I rely on the Weyl symbol calculus, which gives a way to relate operators to functions on phase space. In Part II of this dissertation, we explore the mathematical foundations of the theory of symbols. We first review the theory of representations of groups, and the concept of a group Fourier transform. The Fourier transform for commutative groups gives the ordinary transform, while the Fourier transform for non-commutative groups relates operators to functions on the group. We go on to present the group theoretical formulation of symbols, as developed recently by Zobin. This defines the symbol of an operator in terms of a double Fourier transform on a non-commutative group. We give examples of this new type of symbol, using the

  20. Applications of field-theoretic renormalization group methods to reaction-diffusion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the application of field-theoretic renormalization group (RG) methods to the study of fluctuations in reaction-diffusion problems. We first investigate the physical origin of universality in these systems, before comparing RG methods to other available analytic techniques, including exact solutions and Smoluchowski-type approximations. Starting from the microscopic reaction-diffusion master equation, we then pedagogically detail the mapping to a field theory for the single-species reaction kA → lA(l c - d expansions with respect to the upper critical dimension dc. With these basics established, we then provide an overview of more sophisticated applications to multiple species reactions, disorder effects, Levy flights, persistence problems and the influence of spatial boundaries. We also analyse field-theoretic approaches to non-equilibrium phase transitions separating active from absorbing states. We focus particularly on the generic directed percolation universality class, as well as on the most prominent exception to this class: even-offspring branching and annihilating random walks. Finally, we summarize the state of the field and present our perspective on outstanding problems for the future. (topical review)

  1. Quantum Electrodynamical Density-matrix Functional Theory and Group-theoretical Consideration of its Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Ohsaku, T; Yamaki, D; Yamaguchi, K

    2002-01-01

    For studying the group theoretical classification of the solutions of the density functional theory in relativistic framework, we propose quantum electrodynamical density-matrix functional theory (QED-DMFT). QED-DMFT gives the energy as a functional of a local one-body $4\\times4$ matrix $Q(x)\\equiv -$, where $\\psi$ and $\\bar{\\psi}$ are 4-component Dirac field and its Dirac conjugate, respectively. We examine some characters of QED-DMFT. After these preparations, by using Q(x), we classify the solutions of QED-DMFT under O(3) rotation, time reversal and spatial inversion. The behavior of Q(x) under nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic limits are also presented. Finally, we give plans for several extensions and applications of QED-DMFT.

  2. Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨光

    2000-01-01

    The largest animal ever to live on the earth is the blue whale(蓝鲸)It weighs about 80 tons--more than 24 elephants. It is more than 30 metres long. A newborn baby whale weighs as much as a big elephant.

  3. ANIMALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Mammals(哺乳动物)Mammals are the world's most dominant(最占优势的)animal.They are extremely(非常)diverse(多种多样的)creatures(生物,动物)that include(包括)the biggest ever animal (the blue whale鲸,which eats up to 6 tons every day),the smallest(leaf-nosed bat小蹄蝠) and the laziest(sloth树獭,who spends 80% of their time sleeping).There are over 4,600 kinds of mammals and they live in very different environments(环境)—oceans(海洋),rivers,the jungle(丛林),deserts,and plains(平原).

  4. No Pet or Their Person Left Behind: Increasing the Disaster Resilience of Vulnerable Groups through Animal Attachment, Activities and Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirrilly Thompson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Increased vulnerability to natural disasters has been associated with particular groups in the community. This includes those who are considered de facto vulnerable (children, older people, those with disabilities etc. and those who own pets (not to mention pets themselves. The potential for reconfiguring pet ownership from a risk factor to a protective factor for natural disaster survival has been recently proposed. But how might this resilience-building proposition apply to vulnerable members of the community who own pets or other animals? This article addresses this important question by synthesizing information about what makes particular groups vulnerable, the challenges to increasing their resilience and how animals figure in their lives. Despite different vulnerabilities, animals were found to be important to the disaster resilience of seven vulnerable groups in Australia. Animal attachment and animal-related activities and networks are identified as underexplored devices for disseminating or ‘piggybacking’ disaster-related information and engaging vulnerable people in resilience building behaviors (in addition to including animals in disaster planning initiatives in general. Animals may provide the kind of innovative approach required to overcome the challenges in accessing and engaging vulnerable groups. As the survival of humans and animals are so often intertwined, the benefits of increasing the resilience of vulnerable communities through animal attachment is twofold: human and animal lives can be saved together.

  5. No Pet or Their Person Left Behind: Increasing the Disaster Resilience of Vulnerable Groups through Animal Attachment, Activities and Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kirrilly; Every, Danielle; Rainbird, Sophia; Cornell, Victoria; Smith, Bradley; Trigg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Increased vulnerability to natural disasters has been associated with particular groups in the community. This includes those who are considered de facto vulnerable (children, older people, those with disabilities etc.) and those who own pets (not to mention pets themselves). The potential for reconfiguring pet ownership from a risk factor to a protective factor for natural disaster survival has been recently proposed. But how might this resilience-building proposition apply to vulnerable members of the community who own pets or other animals? This article addresses this important question by synthesizing information about what makes particular groups vulnerable, the challenges to increasing their resilience and how animals figure in their lives. Despite different vulnerabilities, animals were found to be important to the disaster resilience of seven vulnerable groups in Australia. Animal attachment and animal-related activities and networks are identified as underexplored devices for disseminating or 'piggybacking' disaster-related information and engaging vulnerable people in resilience building behaviors (in addition to including animals in disaster planning initiatives in general). Animals may provide the kind of innovative approach required to overcome the challenges in accessing and engaging vulnerable groups. As the survival of humans and animals are so often intertwined, the benefits of increasing the resilience of vulnerable communities through animal attachment is twofold: human and animal lives can be saved together. PMID:26480038

  6. Multi-scale inference of interaction rules in animal groups using Bayesian model selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P Mann

    Full Text Available Inference of interaction rules of animals moving in groups usually relies on an analysis of large scale system behaviour. Models are tuned through repeated simulation until they match the observed behaviour. More recent work has used the fine scale motions of animals to validate and fit the rules of interaction of animals in groups. Here, we use a Bayesian methodology to compare a variety of models to the collective motion of glass prawns (Paratya australiensis. We show that these exhibit a stereotypical 'phase transition', whereby an increase in density leads to the onset of collective motion in one direction. We fit models to this data, which range from: a mean-field model where all prawns interact globally; to a spatial Markovian model where prawns are self-propelled particles influenced only by the current positions and directions of their neighbours; up to non-Markovian models where prawns have 'memory' of previous interactions, integrating their experiences over time when deciding to change behaviour. We show that the mean-field model fits the large scale behaviour of the system, but does not capture the observed locality of interactions. Traditional self-propelled particle models fail to capture the fine scale dynamics of the system. The most sophisticated model, the non-Markovian model, provides a good match to the data at both the fine scale and in terms of reproducing global dynamics, while maintaining a biologically plausible perceptual range. We conclude that prawns' movements are influenced by not just the current direction of nearby conspecifics, but also those encountered in the recent past. Given the simplicity of prawns as a study system our research suggests that self-propelled particle models of collective motion should, if they are to be realistic at multiple biological scales, include memory of previous interactions and other non-Markovian effects.

  7. Multi-scale inference of interaction rules in animal groups using Bayesian model selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P Mann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inference of interaction rules of animals moving in groups usually relies on an analysis of large scale system behaviour. Models are tuned through repeated simulation until they match the observed behaviour. More recent work has used the fine scale motions of animals to validate and fit the rules of interaction of animals in groups. Here, we use a Bayesian methodology to compare a variety of models to the collective motion of glass prawns (Paratya australiensis. We show that these exhibit a stereotypical 'phase transition', whereby an increase in density leads to the onset of collective motion in one direction. We fit models to this data, which range from: a mean-field model where all prawns interact globally; to a spatial Markovian model where prawns are self-propelled particles influenced only by the current positions and directions of their neighbours; up to non-Markovian models where prawns have 'memory' of previous interactions, integrating their experiences over time when deciding to change behaviour. We show that the mean-field model fits the large scale behaviour of the system, but does not capture fine scale rules of interaction, which are primarily mediated by physical contact. Conversely, the Markovian self-propelled particle model captures the fine scale rules of interaction but fails to reproduce global dynamics. The most sophisticated model, the non-Markovian model, provides a good match to the data at both the fine scale and in terms of reproducing global dynamics. We conclude that prawns' movements are influenced by not just the current direction of nearby conspecifics, but also those encountered in the recent past. Given the simplicity of prawns as a study system our research suggests that self-propelled particle models of collective motion should, if they are to be realistic at multiple biological scales, include memory of previous interactions and other non-Markovian effects.

  8. Theoretical nuclear physics group: Progress in research, November 1, 1985-October 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical investigations include reactions induced by light ions, reactions induced by heavy ions, and nuclear collective motions interpreted by the Boson Expansion Theory. This report consists of short synopses of specific research projects including discussions of theoretical calculations. 96 refs., 12 figs

  9. Meta-Heuristics Algorithms based on the Grouping of Animals by Social Behavior for the Traveling Salesman Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge A. Ruiz-Vanoye; Ocotlán Díaz-Parra; Felipe Cocón; Andrés Soto; Ma. De los Ángeles Buenabad Arias; Gustavo Verduzco-Reyes; Roberto Alberto-Lira

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we show a survey of meta-heuristics algorithms based on grouping of animals by social behavior for the Traveling Salesman Problem, and propose a new classification of meta-heuristics algorithms (not based on swarm intelligence theory) based on grouping of animals: swarm algorithms, schools algorithms, flocks algorithms and herds algorithms: a) The swarm algorithms (inspired by the insect swarms and zooplankton swarms): Ant Colony Optimization algorithm – ACO (inspired by the re...

  10. An analysis of institutional arrangements for providing animal health services : a theoretical framework and empirical evidence from Kenya and Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Ilukor, John

    2015-01-01

    Providing adequate animal health services to smallholder farmers in developing countries has remained a challenge, in spite of various reform efforts during the past decades, mainly because of governance challenges. Although good governance has been recognized as an important element in addressing emerging and re-emerging animal disease threats, animal health research has paid limited attention to the governance challenges inherent in the provision of animal health services. The existing fram...

  11. Theoretical Background for Predicting the Properties of Petroleum Fluids via Group Contribution Methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bogdanić, Grozdana; Pavlíček, Jan; Wichterle, Ivan

    Praha : Orgit, 2012, P1.78. ISBN 978-80-905035-1-9. [International Congress of Chemical and Process Engineering CHISA 2012 and 15th Conference PRES 2012 /20./. Prague (CZ), 25.08.2012-29.08.2012] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : petroleum fluids * physico-chemical properties * prediction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry www.chisa.cz/2012

  12. Theoretical Background for Predicting the Properties of Petroleum Fluids via Group Contribution Methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bogdanić, Grozdana; Pavlíček, Jan; Wichterle, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 42, SI (2012), s. 1873-1878. ISSN 1877-7058. [International Congress of Chemical and Process Engineering CHISA 2012 and 15th Conference PRES 2012 /20./. Prague, 25.08.2012-29.08.2012] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : petroleum fluids * prediction * physico-chemical properties Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  13. Substituent group effects on reorganization and activation energies: Theoretical study of charge transfer reaction through DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arshad

    2010-02-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) calculations (B3LYP) with aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets on various substituted neutral and radical cationic guanine-cytosine (GC ∗+) base pairs suggest that an electron-withdrawing ring deactivating substituent group like -NO 2, -COOH attached to a G ring lowers the reorganization/activation energy values whereas an electron releasing ring activating group like -OH increases these values. An electron releasing , but a ring deactivating group -F, exhibits its effect in between the above two extreme cases. A weak electron releasing, ring activating methyl group, as well as substituent groups attached to C (cytosine)-ring show almost no effect.

  14. Reference group theory with implications for information studies: a theoretical essay

    OpenAIRE

    E. Murell Dawson; Elfreda A. Chatman

    2001-01-01

    This article explores the role and implications of reference group theory in relation to the field of library and information science. Reference group theory is based upon the principle that people take the standards of significant others as a basis for making self-appraisals, comparisons, and choices regarding need and use of information. Research that applies concepts of reference group theory to various sectors of library and information studies can provide data useful in enhancing areas s...

  15. Phylogenetic groups and cephalosporin resistance genes of Escherichia coli from diseased food-producing animals in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozawa Manao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A total of 318 Escherichia coli isolates obtained from different food-producing animals affected with colibacillosis between 2001 and 2006 were subjected to phylogenetic analysis: 72 bovine isolates, 89 poultry isolates and 157 porcine isolates. Overall, the phylogenetic group A was predominant in isolates from cattle (36/72, 50% and pigs (101/157, 64.3% whereas groups A (44/89, 49.4% and D (40/89, 44.9% were predominant in isolates from poultry. In addition, group B2 was not found among diseased food-producing animals except for a poultry isolate. Thus, the phylogenetic group distribution of E. coli from diseased animals was different by animal species. Among the 318 isolates, cefazolin resistance (minimum inhibitory concentrations: ≥32 μg/ml was found in six bovine isolates, 29 poultry isolates and three porcine isolates. Of them, 11 isolates (nine from poultry and two from cattle produced extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL. The two bovine isolates produced blaCTX-M-2, while the nine poultry isolates produced blaCTX-M-25 (4, blaSHV-2 (3, blaCTX-M-15 (1 and blaCTX-M-2 (1. Thus, our results showed that several types of ESBL were identified and three types of β-lactamase (SHV-2, CTX-M-25 and CTX-M-15 were observed for the first time in E. coli from diseased animals in Japan.

  16. Theoretical discovery of stable structures of group III-V monolayers: The materials for semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Tatsuo, E-mail: dr.tatsuosuzuki@gmail.com [Tokyo Metropolitan College of Industrial Technology, 8-17-1, Minami-Senju, Arakawa-ku, Tokyo 116-8523 (Japan)

    2015-11-23

    Group III-V compounds are very important as the materials of semiconductor devices. Stable structures of the monolayers of group III-V binary compounds have been discovered by using first-principles calculations. The primitive unit cell of the discovered structures is a rectangle, which includes four group-III atoms and four group-V atoms. A group-III atom and its three nearest-neighbor group-V atoms are placed on the same plane; however, these connections are not the sp{sup 2} hybridization. The bond angles around the group-V atoms are less than the bond angle of sp{sup 3} hybridization. The discovered structure of GaP is an indirect transition semiconductor, while the discovered structures of GaAs, InP, and InAs are direct transition semiconductors. Therefore, the discovered structures of these compounds have the potential of the materials for semiconductor devices, for example, water splitting photocatalysts. The discovered structures may become the most stable structures of monolayers which consist of other materials.

  17. Theoretical discovery of stable structures of group III-V monolayers: The materials for semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Group III-V compounds are very important as the materials of semiconductor devices. Stable structures of the monolayers of group III-V binary compounds have been discovered by using first-principles calculations. The primitive unit cell of the discovered structures is a rectangle, which includes four group-III atoms and four group-V atoms. A group-III atom and its three nearest-neighbor group-V atoms are placed on the same plane; however, these connections are not the sp2 hybridization. The bond angles around the group-V atoms are less than the bond angle of sp3 hybridization. The discovered structure of GaP is an indirect transition semiconductor, while the discovered structures of GaAs, InP, and InAs are direct transition semiconductors. Therefore, the discovered structures of these compounds have the potential of the materials for semiconductor devices, for example, water splitting photocatalysts. The discovered structures may become the most stable structures of monolayers which consist of other materials

  18. Neotropical Siluriformes as a Model for Insights on Determining Biodiversity of Animal Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Renata Rúbia; Message, Hugo José; da Graça, Weferson Júnio; Pavanelli, Carla Simone

    2015-01-01

    We performed an analysis of the descriptions of new species of Neotropical Siluriformes (catfishes) to estimate the number of new species that remain to be described for a complete knowledge on biodiversity of this order, to verify the effectiveness of taxonomic support, and to identify trends and present relevant information for future policies. We conducted a literature review of species descriptions between January 1990 and August 2014. The following metadata were recorded from each article: year of publication, number of species, journal and impact factor, family(s) of the described species, number of authors, age of the authors and coauthors, country of the first author’s institution and ecoregion of the type-locality. From accumulation of descriptions, we built an estimate model for number of species remaining to be described. We found 595 described species in 402 articles. The data demonstrated that there has been an increased understanding of the diversity of Siluriformes over the last 25 years in the Neotropical region, although 35% of the species still remain to be described. The model estimated that with the current trends and incentives, the biodiversity will be known in almost seven decades. We have reinforced the idea that greater joint efforts should be made by society and the scientific community to obtain this knowledge in a shorter period of time through enhanced programs for promoting science, training and the advancement of professionals before undiscovered species become extinct. The model built in this study can be used for similar estimates of other groups of animals. PMID:26168270

  19. Group theoretical basis of some identities for the generalized hypergeometric series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that Thomae's identity between two 3F2 hypergeometric series of unit argument together with the trivial invariance under separate permutations of numerator and denominator parameters implies that the symmetric group S5 is an invariance group of this series. A similar result is proved for the terminating Saalschuetzian 4F3 series, where S6 is shown to be the invariance group of this series (or S5 if one parameter is eliminated by using the Saalschuetz condition). Here Bailey's identity is realized as a permutation of appropriately defined parameters. Finally, the set of three-term relations between 3F2 series of unit argument discovered by Thomae [J. Thomae, J. Reine Angew. Math. 87, 26 (1879)] and systematized by Whipple [F. J. Whipple, Proc. London Math. Soc. 23, 104 (1925)] is shown to be transformed into itself under the action of the group S6 x Λ, where Λ is a two-element group. The 12 left cosets of S6 x Λ with respect to the invariance group S5 are the structural elements underlying the three-term relations. The symbol manipulator macsyma was used to obtain preliminary results

  20. Dimetallaheteroborane clusters containing group 16 elements: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kiran Kumarvarma Chakrahari; Rongala Ramalakshmi; Dudekula Sharmila; Sundargopal Ghosh

    2014-09-01

    Recently we described the synthesis and structural characterization of various dimetallaherteroborane clusters, namely nido-[(Cp∗Mo)2B4EClH6−], 1-3; (1: E = S, x = 0; 2: E = Se, x = 0; 3: E = Te, x = 1). A combined theoretical and experimental study was also performed, which demonstrated that the clusters 1-3 with their open face are excellent precursors for cluster growth reaction. In this investigation process on the reactivity of dimetallaheteroboranes with metal carbonyls, in addition to [(Cp∗Mo)2B4H6EFe(CO)3] (4: E = S, 6: E = Te) reported earlier, reaction of 2 with [Fe2(CO)9] yielded mixed-metallaselenaborane [(Cp∗Mo)2B4H6SeFe(CO)3], 5 in good yield. The quantum chemical calculation using DFT method has been carried out to probe the bonding, NMR chemical shifts and electronic properties of dimolybdaheteroborane clusters 4-6.

  1. [Seroprevalence of tularemia in risk groups of humans and animals in Van, eastern Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Yasemin; Özkaçmaz, Ayşe; Parlak, Mehmet; Başbuğan, Yıldıray; Kılıç, Selçuk; Güdücüoğlu, Hüseyin

    2015-10-01

    Tularemia has become a re-emerging zoonotic disease in Turkey recently. The aims of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of tularemia in humans and their animals living in rural risky areas of our region and to investigate the risk factors. Between January and July 2012, people living in rural areas of Van province (located at eastern part of Turkey) and their domestic animals were included in the study. The sample size was determined by using cluster sampling method like in an event with known prevalence and planned as a cross-sectional epidemiological study. Proportional random sampling method was used to determine which individuals will be included in the study. Presence of tularemia antibodies in the sera of a total 495 voluntary persons (343 female, 152 male; age range: 18-79 years, mean age: 40.61) and their 171 animals (40 cattle, 124 sheep and 7 goats) were screened by microagglutination test using safranin O-stained F.tularensis antigen (Public Health Agency of Turkey). For the evaluation of cross-reactivity between Brucella spp., tularemia positive serum samples were also tested with brucella microagglutination test. Among human and animal samples, 11.9% (59/495) and 44% (76/171) yielded positive results with the titers of ≥ 1:20 in F.tularensis microagglutination test, respectively. However, 69.5% (41/59) of human sera and 78.9% (60/76) of animal sera demonstrated equal or higher titers in the brucella test, so those sera were considered as cross-reactive. After exclusion of these sera, the seroprevalence for F.tularensis were calculated as 3.6% (18/495) for humans and 9.4% (16/171) for animals. Among the 16 animals with positive results, 12 were sheep, three were cattle and one was goat. The difference between seropositivity rates among the domestic animal species was not statistically significant (p> 0.05). In addition, no statistically significant differences were found between risk factors including insect bite, tick bite, contact with

  2. Group theoretical analysis of 600-cell and 120-cell 4D polytopes with quaternions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    600-cell {3, 3, 5} and 120-cell {5, 3, 3} four-dimensional dual polytopes relevant to quasicrystallography have been studied with the quaternionic representation of the Coxeter group W(H4). The maximal subgroups W(SU(5)):Z2 and W(H3) x Z2 of W(H4) play important roles in the analysis of cell structures of the dual polytopes. In particular, the Weyl-Coxeter group W(SU(4)) is used to determine the tetrahedral cells of the polytope {3, 3, 5}, and the Coxeter group W(H3) is used for the dodecahedral cells of {5, 3, 3}. Using the Lie algebraic techniques in terms of quaternions, we explicitly construct cell structures forming the vertices of the 4D polytopes

  3. Reference group theory with implications for information studies: a theoretical essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Murell Dawson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the role and implications of reference group theory in relation to the field of library and information science. Reference group theory is based upon the principle that people take the standards of significant others as a basis for making self-appraisals, comparisons, and choices regarding need and use of information. Research that applies concepts of reference group theory to various sectors of library and information studies can provide data useful in enhancing areas such as information-seeking research, special populations, and uses of information. Implications are promising that knowledge gained from like research can be beneficial in helping information professionals better understand the role theory plays in examining ways in which people manage their information and social worlds.

  4. On a group-theoretical approach to the periodic table of chemical elements

    OpenAIRE

    Kibler, Maurice

    2004-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the application of the group SO(4,2)xSU(2) to the periodic table of chemical elements. It is shown how the Madelung rule of the atomic shell model can be used for setting up a periodic table that can be further rationalized via the group SO(4,2)xSU(2) and some of its subgroups. Qualitative results are obtained from the table and the general lines of a programme for a quantitative approach to the properties of chemical elements are developed on the basis of the gro...

  5. Properties of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond: the group theoretic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maze, J R; Togan, E; Chu, Y; Trifonov, A; Lukin, M D [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gali, A [Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki ut 8, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Kaxiras, E, E-mail: jmaze@puc.cl, E-mail: agali@eik.bme.hu [Department of Physics and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    We present a procedure that makes use of group theory to analyze and predict the main properties of the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond. We focus on the relatively low temperature limit where both the spin-spin and spin-orbit effects are important to consider. We demonstrate that group theory may be used to clarify several aspects of the NV structure, such as ordering of the singlets in the (e{sup 2}) electronic configuration and the spin-spin and spin-orbit interactions in the (ae) electronic configuration. We also discuss how the optical selection rules and the response of the center to electric field can be used for spin-photon entanglement schemes. Our general formalism is applicable to a broad class of local defects in solids. The present results have important implications for applications in quantum information science and nanomagnetometry.

  6. Properties of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond: group theoretic approach

    CERN Document Server

    Maze, Jeronimo; Togan, Emre; Chu, Yiwen; Trifonov, Alexei; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Lukin, Mikhail

    2010-01-01

    We present a procedure that makes use of group theory to analyze and predict the main properties of the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond. We focus on the relatively low temperatures limit where both the spin-spin and spin-orbit effects are important to consider. We demonstrate that group theory may be used to clarify several aspects of the NV structure, such as ordering of the singlets in the ($e^2$) electronic configuration, the spin-spin and the spin-orbit interactions in the ($ae$) electronic configuration. We also discuss how the optical selection rules and the response of the center to electric field can be used for spin-photon entanglement schemes. Our general formalism is applicable to a broad class of local defects in solids. The present results have important implications for applications in quantum information science and nanomagnetometry.

  7. The Empirical Measurement of a Theoretical Concept: Tracing Social Exclusion among Racial Minority and Migrant Groups in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luann Good Gingrich

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an in-depth description and case application of a conceptual model of social exclusion: aiming to advance existing knowledge on how to conceive of and identify this complex idea, evaluate the methodologies used to measure it, and reconsider what is understood about its social realities toward a meaningful and measurable conception of social inclusion. Drawing on Pierre Bourdieu’s conceptual tools of social fields and systems of capital, our research posits and applies a theoretical framework that permits the measurement of social exclusion as dynamic, social, relational, and material. We begin with a brief review of existing social exclusion research literature, and specifically examine the difficulties and benefits inherent in quantitatively operationalizing a necessarily multifarious theoretical concept. We then introduce our conceptual model of social exclusion and inclusion, which is built on measurable constructs. Using our ongoing program of research as a case study, we briefly present our approach to the quantitative operationalization of social exclusion using secondary data analysis in the Canadian context. Through the development of an Economic Exclusion Index, we demonstrate how our statistical and theoretical analyses evidence intersecting processes of social exclusion which produce consequential gaps and uneven trajectories for migrant individuals and groups compared with Canadian-born, and racial minority groups versus white individuals. To conclude, we consider some methodological implications to advance the empirical measurement of social inclusion.

  8. Spectroscopic investigation and theoretical modeling of kaolinite-group minerals and other low-temperature phases

    OpenAIRE

    Balan, Etienne; Fritsch, Emmanuel; Allard, T.; Morin, G.; Guillaumet, M.; Delattre, S.; Blanchard, M.; Calas, G.

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes some recent results obtained on the physical properties of environmental minerals, mostly kaolinite-group minerals and Fe- and Al-(hydr)oxides occurring in lateritic soils. The defective structure of these minerals, including impurities, stacking faults and radiation-induced defects, is probed using infrared spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance. Resulting information bears on models of soil formation and transformation mechanisms of minerals in low-temperat...

  9. THEORETICAL ASPECTS OF THE DEFINITION AND COLLABORATION OF INTERESTED GROUPS OF PEOPLE IN THE PROJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    BILOKON A. I.; MALANCHIY S. A.; Alqubailat, T. A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary. The article is devoted to studying the history of the theory of stakeholders, review of available scientific expertise and its uses. The article briefly describes the main provisions of the theory, considered a model formed based on them. On the basis of this review created a table "Models of groups of persons concerned". It was found that the processes of relationship management stakeholders and mechanisms for evaluating the effectiveness of management have not yet recei...

  10. Theoretical and Numerical Evaluation of the MTC Noise Estimate in 2-D 2-group Heterogeneous Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaziere, Christophe [Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Reactor Pysics

    2002-01-01

    The effect of a heterogeneous distribution of the temperature noise on the MTC estimation by noise analysis is investigated. This investigation relies on the 2-group diffusion theory, and all the calculations are performed in a 2-D realistic heterogeneous core. It is shown, similarly to the 1-D case, that the main reason of the MTC underestimation by noise analysis compared to its design-predicted value lies with the fact that the temperature noise might not be homogeneous in the core, and therefore using the local temperature noise in the MTC noise estimation gives erroneous results. A new MTC estimator, which was previously proposed for 1-D 1-group homogeneous cases and which is able to take this heterogeneity into account, was extended to 2-D 2- group heterogeneous cases. It was proven that this new estimator is always able to give a correct MTC estimation with an accuracy of 4%. This small discrepancy comes from the fact that the reactor does not behave in a point-kinetic way, contrary to the assumptions used in the noise estimators. This discrepancy is however quite small. One quantitative result of the present work is a measure of the underestimation of the traditional method as a function of the correlation length of the temperature fluctuations. It is found that the underestimation is larger in 2-D for the same correlation length as in the 1-D case. An underestimation with a factor 5 in the present model is obtained with a radial correlation length of 150 cm. Comparisons with measurements will be possible to make in measurements to be performed in Ringhals.

  11. Topological analysis of third-row main group dicarbides with molecular oxygen: A theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topological analysis of third-row main group dicarbides with molecular oxygen is calculated using density functional theory (DFT). In addition, Bader topological analysis show large electron density at the bond critical point (BCP) between carbon of C2X cluster and oxygen (of molecular oxygen), inferring that the C–O bonding to be more shared-type as compared to that of X - O bonding. This fact is also confirmed by larger positive value of electron density (ρ) and negative ∇2ρ. Similar conclusion is also obtained from the delocalization index (δ) which, in the case of C-O is found to be comparatively large

  12. THEORETICAL ASPECTS OF THE DEFINITION AND COLLABORATION OF INTERESTED GROUPS OF PEOPLE IN THE PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BILOKON A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The article is devoted to studying the history of the theory of stakeholders, review of available scientific expertise and its uses. The article briefly describes the main provisions of the theory, considered a model formed based on them. On the basis of this review created a table "Models of groups of persons concerned". It was found that the processes of relationship management stakeholders and mechanisms for evaluating the effectiveness of management have not yet received an appropriate system development either in theory or in practice. Resolving the problem requires the development of a coherent methodology, which is the basis for the definition and classification of stakeholders.

  13. Phylogenetic groups and cephalosporin resistance genes of Escherichia coli from diseased food-producing animals in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Ozawa Manao; Baba Kotaro; Usui Masaru; Hiki Mototaka; Sato Chizuru; Masani Kaori; Asai Tetsuo; Harada Kazuki; Aoki Hiroshi; Sawada Takuo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A total of 318 Escherichia coli isolates obtained from different food-producing animals affected with colibacillosis between 2001 and 2006 were subjected to phylogenetic analysis: 72 bovine isolates, 89 poultry isolates and 157 porcine isolates. Overall, the phylogenetic group A was predominant in isolates from cattle (36/72, 50%) and pigs (101/157, 64.3%) whereas groups A (44/89, 49.4%) and D (40/89, 44.9%) were predominant in isolates from poultry. In addition, group B2 was not fou...

  14. Motivation gains in performance groups: paradigmatic and theoretical developments on the Köhler effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, G; Kerr, N L; Messé, L A

    2000-10-01

    In contrast to many demonstrations of social loafing, relatively few studies have documented group motivation gains. One such exception was O. Köhler's (1926, 1927) finding that team members working together did better at a taxing persistence task than would be expected from their individual performances, particularly when there was a moderate discrepancy in coworkers' capabilities. In Experiment 1, we developed a paradigm within which Köhler's overall motivation gain effect could be replicated, although the discrepancy in coworkers' capabilities did not moderate these motivation gains (after statistical artifacts were taken into account). Experiment 2 indicated that this motivation gain occurred under conjunctive but not under additive task demands, suggesting that the instrumentality of one's contribution to valued outcomes is a more likely explanation of the Köhler effect than social comparison processes. PMID:11045740

  15. Interaction of paracetamol and 125I-paracetamol with surface groups of activated carbon. Theoretical and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The selection of activated carbon (AC) filters for water decontamination is currently carried out empirically. The low concentrations of drugs in the environment make the radioisotope labeling a valuable tool for physical and chemical studies of the adsorption process. A theoretical study of paracetamol and 125I-paracetamol adsorption onto AC was performed to evaluate the interactions between pollutants and surface groups (SG) of AC. Paracetamol was labeled with 125I and adsorption isotherms were obtained using radioanalytical and spectrophotometric techniques. The radioanalytical method overestimates the paracetamol adsorption. The validity of the chosen approach for qualitative assessment of SG influence over the adsorption process was demonstrated. (author)

  16. Design and implementation of a calibrated hyperspectral small-animal imager: Practical and theoretical aspects of system optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, Silas Josiah

    Pre-clinical imaging has been an important development within the bioscience and pharmacology fields. A rapidly growing area within these fields is small animal fluorescence imaging, in which molecularly targeted fluorescent probes are used to non-invasively image internal events on a gross anatomical scale. Small-animal fluorescence imaging has transitioned from a research technique to pre-clinical technology very quickly, due to its molecular specificity, low cost, and relative ease of use. In addition, its potential uses in gene therapy and as a translational technology are becoming evident. This thesis outlines the development of an alternative modality for small animal/tissue imaging, using hyperspectral techniques to enable the collection of fluorescence images at different excitation and emission wavelengths. In specific, acousto-optical tunable filters (AOTFs) were used to construct emission-wavelength-scanning and excitation-wavelength-scanning small animal fluorescence imagers. Statistical, classification, and unmixing algorithms have been employed to extract specific fluorescent-dye information from hyperspectral image sets. In this work, we have designed and implemented hyperspectral imaging and analysis techniques to remove background autofluorescence from the desired fluorescence signal, resulting in highly specific and localized fluorescence. Therefore, in practice, it is possible to more accurately pin-point the location and size of diagnostic anatomical markers (e.g. tumors) labeled with fluorescent probes. Furthermore, multiple probes can be individually distinguished. In addition to imaging hardware and acquisition and analysis software, we have designed an optical tissue phantom for quality control and inter-system comparison. The phantom has been modeled using Monte Carlo techniques. The culmination of this work results in an understanding of the advantages and complexities in applying hyperspectral techniques to small animal fluorescence

  17. On the Use of Group Theoretical and Graphical Techniques toward the Solution of the General N-body Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Laing, W B; Watson, D K

    2008-01-01

    Group theoretic and graphical techniques are used to derive the N-body wave function for a system of identical bosons with general interactions through first-order in a perturbation theory. This method is based on the maximal symmetry present at lowest order in a perturbation series in inverse spatial dimensions. The symmetric structure at lowest order has a point group isomorphic with the S_N group, the symmetric group of N particles, and the resulting perturbation expansion of the Hamiltonian is order-by-order invariant under the permutations of the S_N group. This invariance under S_N imposes severe symmetry requirements on the tensor blocks needed at each order in perturbation theory. We show here that these blocks can be decomposed into a basis of binary tensors invariant under S_N. This basis is small (23 terms at first order in the wave function), independent of N, and is derived using graphical techniques. This checks the N^6 scaling of these terms at first order by effectively separating the N scalin...

  18. Group theoretical and Hamiltonian structures of integrable evolution equations in 1x1 and 2x1 dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New results in investigation of the group-theoretical and hamiltonian structure of the integrable evolution equations in 1+1 and 2+1 dimensions are briefly reviewed. Main general results, such as the form of integrable equations, Baecklund transfomations, symmetry groups, are turned out to have the same form for different spectral problems. The used generalized AKNS-method (the Ablowitz Kaup, Newell and Segur method) permits to prove that all nonlinear evolution equations considered are hamiltonians. The general condition of effective application of the ACNS mehtod to the concrete spectral problem is the possibility to calculate a recursion operator explicitly. The embedded representation is shown to be a fundamental object connected with different aspects of the inverse scattering problem

  19. A Functional Generalization of the Field-Theoretical Renormalization Group Approach for the Single-Impurity Anderson Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Hermann; Corrêa, Eberth

    2012-02-01

    We apply a functional implementation of the field-theoretical renormalization group (RG) method up to two loops to the single-impurity Anderson model. To achieve this, we follow a RG strategy similar to that proposed by Vojta et al. (in Phys. Rev. Lett. 85:4940, 2000), which consists of defining a soft ultraviolet regulator in the space of Matsubara frequencies for the renormalized Green's function. Then we proceed to derive analytically and solve numerically integro-differential flow equations for the effective couplings and the quasiparticle weight of the present model, which fully treat the interplay of particle-particle and particle-hole parquet diagrams and the effect of the two-loop self-energy feedback into them. We show that our results correctly reproduce accurate numerical renormalization group data for weak to slightly moderate interactions. These results are in excellent agreement with other functional Wilsonian RG works available in the literature. Since the field-theoretical RG method turns out to be easier to implement at higher loops than the Wilsonian approach, higher-order calculations within the present approach could improve further the results for this model at stronger couplings. We argue that the present RG scheme could thus offer a possible alternative to other functional RG methods to describe electronic correlations within this model.

  20. The Development of Animal Welfare in Finland and How People Perceive Animal Welfare : Case Study: Animals in Tourism: Zoos

    OpenAIRE

    Laatu, Suvi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to study how Finnish people perceive animal welfare in general and how they feel about animals in tourism purposes, more specifically in zoos. The thesis also contains information about Finnish animal legislation and how animal welfare has developed over time. The target group for the research was people who have visited zoos recently. The interviewed people were from different age groups. The theoretical framework consists of the following topics: people’s relations...

  1. No Pet or Their Person Left Behind: Increasing the Disaster Resilience of Vulnerable Groups through Animal Attachment, Activities and Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Kirrilly Thompson; Danielle Every; Sophia Rainbird; Victoria Cornell; Bradley Smith; Joshua Trigg

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary The potential for reconfiguring pet ownership from a risk factor to a protective factor for natural disaster survival has been recently proposed. But how might this resilience-building proposition apply to members of the community who are already considered vulnerable? This article addresses this important question by synthesizing information about what makes seven particular groups vulnerable, the challenges to increasing their resilience and how animals figure in their lives....

  2. Data on the Environmental Conditions and Diversity of the Animal Ecological Groups in Gargina Dupka Cave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanimira R. Deleva

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Air and water temperature, air humidity and water oxygen levels were studied in Gargina Dupka Cave (Rhodopes Mts., Bulgaria. These environmental factors were considered for three zones of the cave: 1 – cave entrance, 2 – typical cave in the central gallery, and 3 – an area occupied by bat guano. During two visits all animals were collected from these areas. In the laboratory, after identification they were classified according to their ecological features as: relation to light, way of moving, diet, and substrates on which they were collected.

  3. Numerical approximation of a coagulation-Fragmentation Model for Animal Group Size Statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Degond, Pierre; Engel, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    We study numerically a coagulation-fragmentation model derived by Niwa and further elaborated by Degond et al., where a unique equilibrium distribution of group sizes is shown to exist in both cases of continuous and discrete group size distributions. We provide a numerical investigation of these equilibria using three different methods to approximate the equilibrium: a recursive algorithm based on the work of Ma et. al., a Newton method and the resolution of the time-dependent problem. All t...

  4. Immunogenicity in animals of a polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine against type III group B Streptococcus.

    OpenAIRE

    Wessels, M R; Paoletti, L C; Kasper, D L; DiFabio, J L; Michon, F; Holme, K; Jennings, H J

    1990-01-01

    The native capsular polysaccharide of type III group B Streptococcus elicits a specific antibody response in only 60% of nonimmune human subjects. To enhance the immunogenicity of this polysaccharide, we coupled the type III polysaccharide to tetanus toxoid. Prior to coupling, aldehyde groups were introduced on the polysaccharide by controlled periodate oxidation, resulting in the conversion of 25% of the sialic acid residues of the polysaccharide to residues of the 8-carbon analogue of siali...

  5. Group-theoretical deduction of a dyadic Tamm-Dancoff equation by using a matrix-valued generator coordinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The traditional Tamm-Dancoff (TD) method is one of the standard procedures for solving the Schroedinger equation of fermion many-body systems. However, it meets a serious difficulty when an instability occurs in the symmetry-adapted ground state of the independent particle approximation (IPA) and when the stable IPA ground state becomes of broken symmetry. If one uses the stable but broken symmetry IPA ground state as the starting approximation, TD wave functions also become of broken symmetry. On the contrary, if we start from a symmetry-adapted but unstable wave function, the convergence of the TD expansion becomes bad. Thus, the requirements of symmetry and rapid convergence are not in general compatible in the conventional TD expansion of the systems with strong collective correlations. Along the same line as Fukutome's, we give a group-theoretical deduction of a U(n) dyadic TD equation by using a matrix-valued generator coordinate

  6. Group management of young dairy cattle in relation to animal behaviour and welfare

    OpenAIRE

    Raussi, Satu

    2005-01-01

    This work consists of two collaborative research projects between INRA (France) and MTT (Finland) that examine the influence of group management on young cattle. The first work investigated whether pair versus individual housing of calves reduces their chronic stress reactions and whether positive contacts with humans could partly compensate for a lack of contact with conspecifics. In the second work, pair-housed heifers were either repeatedly regrouped or kept with their familiar peer. The c...

  7. Molecular Identification of Species from the Penicillium roqueforti Group Associated with Spoiled Animal Feed

    OpenAIRE

    Boysen, Marianne E.; Jacobsson, Karl-Gustav; Schnürer, Johan

    2000-01-01

    The Penicillium roqueforti group has recently been split into three species, P. roqueforti, Penicillium carneum, and Penicillium paneum, on the basis of differences in ribosomal DNA sequences and secondary metabolite profiles. We reevaluated the taxonomic identity of 52 livestock feed isolates from Sweden, previously identified by morphology as P. roqueforti, by comparing the sequences of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region. Identities were confirmed with random amplified polymor...

  8. Towards the identification of methanogenic archaeal groups as targets of methane mitigation in livestock animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit eSt-Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In herbivores, enteric methane is a by-product from the digestion of plant biomass by mutualistic gastrointestinal tract (GIT microbial communities. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that is not assimilated by the host and is released into the environment where it contributes to climate change. Since enteric methane is exclusively produced by methanogenic archaea, the investigation of mutualistic methanogen communities in the GIT of herbivores has been the subject of ongoing research by a number of research groups. In an effort to uncover trends that would facilitate the development of efficient methane mitigation strategies for livestock species, we have in this review summarized and compared currently available results from published studies on this subject. We also offer our perspectives on the importance of pursuing current research efforts on the sequencing of gut methanogen genomes, as well as investigating their cellular physiology and interactions with other GIT microorganisms.

  9. Spotted fever group rickettsiae in ticks collected from wild animals in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keysary, Avi; Eremeeva, Marina E; Leitner, Moshe; Din, Adi Beth; Wikswo, Mary E; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y; Inbar, Moshe; Wallach, Arian D; Shanas, Uri; King, Roni; Waner, Trevor

    2011-11-01

    We report molecular evidence for the presence of spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) in ticks collected from roe deer, addax, red foxes, and wild boars in Israel. Rickettsia aeschlimannii was detected in Hyalomma marginatum and Hyalomma detritum while Rickettsia massiliae was present in Rhipicephalus turanicus ticks. Furthermore, a novel uncultured SFGR was detected in Haemaphysalis adleri and Haemaphysalis parva ticks from golden jackals. The pathogenicity of the novel SFGR for humans is unknown; however, the presence of multiple SFGR agents should be considered when serological surveillance data from Israel are interpreted because of significant antigenic cross-reactivity among Rickettsia. The epidemiology and ecology of SFGR in Israel appear to be more complicated than was previously believed. PMID:22049050

  10. The diversity and radiation of the largest monophyletic animal group on New Caledonia (Trichoptera: Ecnomidae: Agmina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeland, M; Johanson, K A

    2010-10-01

    In area, New Caledonia is the smallest of the world's 25 official biodiversity hotspots, but in many taxonomic groups, the island has the highest concentration of species on earth, particularly so in the freshwater insect order Trichoptera. This study aims at applying molecular data and morphology for estimating the real species diversity of the genus Agmina on New Caledonia and investigating potential effects of ultramafic rock substrate on diversification. A dated molecular phylogeny was applied to study diversity and diversification related to geological substrate using the dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis model, diva and Bayesian ancestral character reconstruction. More than 47 species (>63%) were unknown to science. Initial radiation occurred on ultramafic substrate followed by several independent dispersal events to nonultramafic substrate. The rate of shift from ultramafic to nonultramafic substrate was significantly higher than the rate of shift in the opposite direction, indicating a possible cost associated with living on ultramafic substrate. PMID:20722893

  11. Group theoretical approach to gauge invariance of massive spin-one free fields in the infinite-momentum limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauge invariance in the group theoretical approach manifests itself in the transformation property of the photon potential under a Lorentz transformation. The photon potential does not transform exactly like a four-vector, rather it picks up an additional gradient term. It is therefore of fundamental importance to investigate the possibility of gaining gauge invariance by starting the theoretical development with the (1,0) and (0,1) massive spin-one irreducible fundamental free fields and then letting the mass go to zero at the end. This thesis investigates this fundamental problem. Instead of letting the mass go to zero, the investigation is made under the broader and phenomenologically meaningful assumption that the massive particle is ultrarelativistic. Starting with the massive spin-one irreducible free fields, a massive potential is constructed which transforms like a vector under three-dimensional rotations but fails to transform in a meaningful manner under a Lorentz transformation. If the ultrarelativistic assumption is then made, this massive potential transforms exactly like a photon potential, i.e., it transforms like a four-vector up to a gradient term under a Lorentz transformation. The ultrarelativistic assumption also suppresses the helicity zero component of the massive potential. A massive potential that transforms exactly as a four-vector was also constructed. The curl of this potential is the canonical antisymmetric tensor field and as the mass goes to zero this antisymmetric massive tensor field reduces to a linear combination of antisymmetric photon fields of helicities +/- 1. The lengthy task of explicitly evaluating the Wigner rotation appropriate to helicity states has also been completed

  12. Theoretical study of chlordecone and surface groups interaction in an activated carbon model under acidic and neutral conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa-Carballo, Juan José; Melchor-Rodríguez, Kenia; Hernández-Valdés, Daniel; Enriquez-Victorero, Carlos; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Gaspard, Sarra; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises Javier

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) are widely used in the purification of drinking water without almost any knowledge about the adsorption mechanisms of the persistent organic pollutants. Chlordecone (CLD, Kepone) is an organochlorinated synthetic compound that has been used mainly as agricultural insecticide. CLD has been identified and listed as a persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. The selection of the best suited AC for this type of contaminants is mainly an empirical and costly process. A theoretical study of the influence of AC surface groups (SGs) on CLD adsorption is done in order to help understanding the process. This may provide a first selection criteria for the preparation of AC with suitable surface properties. A model of AC consisting of a seven membered ring graphene sheet (coronene) with a functional group on the edge was used to evaluate the influence of the SGs over the adsorption. Multiple Minima Hypersurface methodology (MMH) coupled with PM7 semiempirical Hamiltonian was employed in order to study the interactions of the chlordecone with SGs (hydroxyl and carboxyl) at acidic and neutral pH and different hydration conditions. Selected structures were re-optimized using CAM-B3LYP to achieve a well-defined electron density to characterize the interactions by the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules approach. The deprotonated form of surface carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of AC models show the strongest interactions, suggesting a chemical adsorption. An increase in carboxylic SGs content is proposed to enhance CLD adsorption onto AC at neutral pH conditions. PMID:26945637

  13. A Pilot Study to Assess the Feasibility of Group Exercise and Animal-Assisted Therapy in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Brandon; Artese, Ashley; Schmitt, Karla; Cormier, Eileen; Panton, Lynn

    2016-04-01

    This pilot study assessed the feasibility of incorporating animal-assisted therapy teams (ATT) into a 6-week group exercise program for older adults (77 ± 6 years). Fifteen participants were randomly assigned to an exercise with ATT (E+ATT; n = 8) or exercise only (E; n = 7) group. Groups exercised 3x/week for 45 min. Feasibility was assessed by three objectives: (1) ATT will not need extensive preparation beyond their original therapy training; (2) the study will require minimal cost; and (3) ATT must not impair the effectiveness of the exercise program. By the study conclusion, all objectives were met. Time and cost were minimal for ATT, and adherence was 93% and 90% for E+ATT and E, respectively. There were significant improvements in both groups (p ≤ .05) for arm curls, get-up and go, and 6-min walk. The results of this pilot study suggest that it is feasible to incorporate ATT into group exercise programming for older adults. PMID:26439234

  14. Meta-Heuristics Algorithms based on the Grouping of Animals by Social Behavior for the Traveling Salesman Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Ruiz-Vanoye

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we show a survey of meta-heuristics algorithms based on grouping of animals by social behavior for the Traveling Salesman Problem, and propose a new classification of meta-heuristics algorithms (not based on swarm intelligence theory based on grouping of animals: swarm algorithms, schools algorithms, flocks algorithms and herds algorithms: a The swarm algorithms (inspired by the insect swarms and zooplankton swarms: Ant Colony Optimization algorithm – ACO (inspired by the research on the behavior of ant colonies, Firefly Algorithm (based on fireflies, Marriage in Honey Bees Optimization Algorithm - MBO algorithm (inspired by the Honey Bee, Wasp Swarm Algorithm (inspired on the Parasitic wasps, Termite Algorithm (inspired by the termites, Mosquito swarms Algorithm – MSA (inspired by mosquito swarms, zooplankton swarms Algorithm - ZSA (inspired by the Zooplankton and Bumblebees Swarms Algorithm – BSA (inspired by Bumblebees. b The school algorithms (inspired by the fish schools: The Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm – PSO (inspired by social behavior and movement dynamics of fish or schooling. c The flock algorithms (inspired by the bird flocks: the flocking algorithm, and the Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm (inspired on the dynamics of the birds, d The herd and pack Algorithms (inspired by the mammal herds and packs: bat algorithm (inspired by bat, wolf pack search algorithm - WPS (inspired by wolfs, Rats herds algorithm - RATHA (inspired by Rats, Dolphins Herds Algorithm - DHA (inspired by Dolphins and the feral-dogs herd algorithm - FDHA (inspired by feral-dogs herd.

  15. Detection of Hidden Hostile/Terrorist Groups in Harsh Territories by Using Animals as Mobile Biological Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncay Ercan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Terrorism is the greatest threat to national security and cannot be defeated by conventional military force alone. In critical areas such as Iraq, Afghanistan and Turkey, regular forces cannot reach these hostile/terrorist groups, the instigators of terrorism. These groups have a clear understanding of the relative ineffectiveness of counter-guerrilla operations and rely on guerrilla warfare to avoid major combat as their primary means of continuing the conflict with the governmental structures. In Internal Security Operations, detection of terrorist and hostile groups in their hiding places such as caves, lairs, etc. can only be achieved by professionally trained people such as Special Forces or intelligence units with the necessary experience and tools suitable for collecting accurate information in these often harsh, rugged and mountainous countries. To assist these forces, commercial micro-sensors with wireless interfaces could be utilized to study and monitor a variety of phenomena and environments from a certain distance for military purposes. In order to locate hidden terrorist groups and enable more effective use of conventional military resources, this paper proposes an active remote sensing model implanted into animals capable of living in these environments. By using these mobile sensor devices, improving communications for data transfer from the source, and developing better ways to monitor and detect threats, terrorist ability to carry out attacks can be severely disrupted.

  16. Crystal Structure, DFT Theoretical Study and Herbicidal Activity of Novel 1,2,4-Triazole Compound Containing Cyclopropyl Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel 1,2,4-triazole compound was synthesized and the chemical structure was confirmed by /sub 1/H NMR, MS and elemental analyses. The crystal structure of the 1,2,4-triazole (C/sub 13/H/sub 14/ FN/sub 3/S, Mr = 263.33) has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P2(1)/c with a = 7.5179(15), b = 19.638(4), c = 8.4922(17)A, α = 90 Degree, β = 98.11(3)Degree, γ= 90 Degree, V = 1241.2(4)A3, Z = 4,. The herbicidal activity of 1,2,4-triazole was determined and the results showed the title compound displayed excellent herbicidal activity. Theoretical calculations of 1,2,4-triazole was carried out with B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) approximation. The optimized geometric parameters obtained by using DFT method show the best agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  17. Is Counseling Going to the Dogs? An Exploratory Study Related to the Inclusion of an Animal in Group Counseling with Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Amber M.; Cox, Jane A.; Bernert, Donna J.; Jenkins, Christie D.

    2007-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that the use of animals in counseling provides beneficial effects to clients. This article presents literature on Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT), and details an exploratory study that applied AAT in an adolescent anger management group. Consistent with other research, beneficial effects noted in this study included a…

  18. Theoretical Calculations of Thermal Broadenings and Transition Probabilities of R, R' and B Line-Groups for Ruby

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Dong-Ping; LIU Yan-Yun; CHEN Ju-Rong

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of the unified calculation of the thermal shifts of R1 line, R2 line and ground-state-splitting transition probabilities of direct and Raman processes have theoretically been calculated. The thermal broadenings of R,The theoretically predicted transition probabilities are in good agreement with the experimental ones.PACS numbers: 71.70.Ch, 78.20.Nv, 63.20.Mt, 63.20.Kr

  19. Understanding farmers' decisions with regard to animal welfare: The case of changing to group housing for pregnant sows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauwere, de C.C.; Asseldonk, van M.A.P.M.; Riet, van 't J.P.; Hoop, de J.G.; Pierick, ten E.

    2012-01-01

    Improving animal welfare in livestock farming requires changing the behaviour of many stakeholders. Farmers have to take proper actions on their farm to improve animal welfare, retailers have to market animal-friendly products and consumers have to purchase these products. The theory of planned beha

  20. FELASA recommendations for the education and training of laboratory animal technicians: category A: report of the Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations Working Group on Education of Animal Technicians (Category A) accepted by the FELASA Board of Management.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss Convenor, J.; Bukelskiene, V.; Chambrier, P.; Ferrari, L.; Meulen, M. van der; Moreno, M.; Mulkens, F.G.G.F.M.; Sigg, H.; Yates, N.

    2010-01-01

    The future laboratory animal technician in Europe will be provided with three different levels of education. All candidates have to start with an introductory course to reach level A0. At this level (A0) they will be able to assist in the laboratory animal facility by undertaking limited specific du

  1. THE MODERN THEORETICAL APPROACHES IN THE ANALYSIS OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS: FROM INTEREST GROUPS TO CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP

    OpenAIRE

    Votchenko, E.S.

    2016-01-01

    This scientific article touches a vital topic of contemporary relations between business and government - public-private partnerships (PPP) in the system of public discourse. The article discusses the various modern theoretical approaches to the study of the social aspects of interaction between business and government in modern political science. The author considers the concept and models of foreign public-private partnerships, social investments and corporate citizenship. In the end, the a...

  2. CAN TIGHT GROUPS AT WORK BE DETRIMENTAL? A THEORETICAL VIEW OF GOSSIP FROM THE NETWORK TIE STRENGTH AND DENSITY PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    Alfred L. Luna; Decima Christine Garcia; Shih Yung Chou; Sara Jackson

    2013-01-01

    Given the importance of effective communication in organizational settings and the potential destructive impact of gossiping, greater research is needed to isolate those factors that enable negative gossip to occur. Although previous research has examined the effect of social network characteristics on gossip, the focus has not been on assessing the effect of social network tie strength and density on forms of gossip. In this article, we present a new theoretical framework for investigating h...

  3. The Wigner Kernel of a Particle obtained from the Wigner Kernel of a Spin by Group Theoretical Contraction

    CERN Document Server

    Amiet, J P; Amiet, Jean-Pierre; Weigert, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    The Moyal formalism for a particle can be derived from the Moyal formalism for a spin. This is done by contracting the group of rotations to the oscillator group. A new derivation is given for the contraction of the spin Wigner-kernel to the Wigner kernel of a particle.

  4. An Approach to Life Skills Group Work with Youth in Transition to Independent Living: Theoretical, Practice, and Operational Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Terrence T.; Williams, Larry D.

    2012-01-01

    Group work is fundamental to working with youth learning about independent living and in making the tough and challenging transition to independence. The authors, seasoned and experienced group workers and researchers with youth leaving the child welfare system, will present a conceptual framework and set of practices for helping youth gain those…

  5. The theoretical simulation of optical properties of crystals with statistically disordered arrangement of atoms and atomic groups on the basis of point-dipole model

    OpenAIRE

    Popov, D. Yu.; Popova, O. A.

    2003-01-01

    With using of point-dipole model the theoretical calculations of main refractive indices and orientation of indicatrix of 18 minerals are performed. The feature of studied minerals is the statistically disordered arrangement of CO3, SO4, SO2, PO4 groups and also separate ions. The optical characters of uniaxial minerals and orientation of indicatrix of orthorhombic and monoclinic minerals, obtained by results of calculations, agree with experimental definitions.

  6. A theoretical study of the relaxation of a phenyl group chemisorbed to an RDX freestanding thin film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereverzev, Andrey; Sewell, Thomas D

    2016-08-01

    Energy relaxation from an excited phenyl group chemisorbed to the surface of a crystalline thin film of α-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (α-RDX) at 298 K and 1 atm is simulated using molecular dynamics. Two schemes are used to excite the phenyl group. In the first scheme, the excitation energy is added instantaneously as kinetic energy by rescaling momenta of the 11 atoms in the phenyl group. In the second scheme, the phenyl group is equilibrated at a higher temperature in the presence of static RDX geometries representative of the 298 K thin film. An analytical model based on ballistic phonon transport that requires only the harmonic part of the total Hamiltonian and includes no adjustable parameters is shown to predict, essentially quantitatively, the short-time dynamics of the kinetic energy relaxation (∼200 fs). The dynamics of the phenyl group for times longer than about 6 ps follows exponential decay and agrees qualitatively with the dynamics described by a master equation. Long-time heat propagation within the bulk of the crystal film is consistent with the heat equation. PMID:27497561

  7. THE MODERN THEORETICAL APPROACHES IN THE ANALYSIS OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS: FROM INTEREST GROUPS TO CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Votchenko, E.S.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This scientific article touches a vital topic of contemporary relations between business and government - public-private partnerships (PPP in the system of public discourse. The article discusses the various modern theoretical approaches to the study of the social aspects of interaction between business and government in modern political science. The author considers the concept and models of foreign public-private partnerships, social investments and corporate citizenship. In the end, the author makes an interesting conclusion that in the modern scientific community is formed and becomes stable a new institutional paradigm of PPP – practice of corporate citizenship. Corporate social responsibility in the narrow sense of the definition goes beyond charity and philanthropy, and today it is expressed in a broad sense - as corporate citizenship, which implies mutual responsibility of business and government to the public.

  8. Guidelines for the diagnosis and antimicrobial therapy of canine superficial bacterial folliculitis (Antimicrobial Guidelines Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillier, Andrew; Lloyd, David H.; Weese, J. Scott;

    2014-01-01

    of an internationally available resource guiding practitioners in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of SBF. DEVELOPMENT OF THE GUIDELINES: The guidelines were developed by the Antimicrobial Guidelines Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases, with consultation and advice...

  9. Social networks and cooperation in electronic communities : a theoretical-empirical analysis of academic communication and Internet discussion groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matzat, Uwe

    2001-01-01

    The study examines the use of academic e-mailing lists and newsgroups on the Internet by university researchers in the Netherlands and England. Their use is related to three clusters of problems that are analyzed. Firstly, while there are considerable time costs for using Internet Discussion Groups,

  10. Animal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Leyre; Wasserman, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    Pavlov and Thorndike pioneered the experimental study of animal learning and provided psychologists with powerful tools to unveil its underlying mechanisms. Today's research developments and theoretical analyses owe much to the pioneering work of these early investigators. Nevertheless, in the evolution of our knowledge about animal learning, some initial conceptions have been challenged and revised. We first review the original experimental procedures and findings of Pavlov and Thorndike. Next, we discuss critical research and consequent controversies which have greatly shaped animal learning theory. For example, although contiguity seemed to be the only condition that is necessary for learning, we now know that it is not sufficient; the conditioned stimulus (CS) also has to provide information about the occurrence of the unconditioned stimulus (US). Also, animals appear to learn different things about the same stimuli when circumstances vary. For instance, when faced with situations in which the meaning of a CS changes, as in the case of acquisition and later extinction, animals seem to preserve the original knowledge (CS-US) in addition to learning about the new conditions (CS-noUS). Finally, we discuss how parallels among Pavlovian conditioning, operant conditioning, and human causal judgment suggest that causal knowledge may lie at the root of both human and animal learning. All of these empirical findings and theoretical developments prove that animal learning is more complex and intricate than was once imagined. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26272842

  11. Theoretical Investigation on the Electron and Energy Transfer between Peripheral Carrier Transport Groups and Central Chromophores in Electroluminescent Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘玉钰; 刘丹丹; 许海; 刘晓冬; 孙冠楠; 杨兵; 马於光

    2012-01-01

    The molecular materials with structures of luminescent core and peripheral carrier groups (e.g. carbazoles), have exhibited high-performance in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Present work is to understand the basic process of electronic and energy exchange between the peripheral functional groups and the central core through quantum chemical analysis. As an example, 4,7-bis(9,9-bis(6-(9H-carbazol-9-yl)hexyl)-9H-fluoren-2-yl)benzo[c]- [1,2,5]thiadiazole (TCBzC) is investigated in regards to optoelectronic properties using density functional theory (DFT). The results suggest that the forbidden transition from peripheral carbazole to the central chromophore core makes for separated electrical and optical properties, and high performance electroluminescence (EL) is mainly at- tributed to the energy-transfer from carbazoles to the fluorene derivative core.

  12. Understanding the effect of side groups in ionic liquids on carbon-capture properties: a combined experimental and theoretical effort

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Fangyong; Lartey, Michael; Damodaran, Krishnan; Albenze, Erik; Thompson, Robert L.; Kim, Jihan; Haranczyk, Maciej; Nulwala, Hunaid B.; Luebke, David R.; Smit, Berend

    2013-01-01

    Ionic liquids are an emerging class of materials with applications in a variety of fields. Steady progress has been made in the creation of ionic liquids tailored to specific applications. However, the understanding of the underlying structure-property relationships has been slower to develop. As a step in the effort to alleviate this deficiency, the influence of side groups on ionic liquid properties has been studied through an integrated approach utilizing synthesis, experimental determinat...

  13. Social networks and cooperation in electronic communities: a theoretical-empirical analysis of academic communication and Internet discussion groups

    OpenAIRE

    Matzat, Uwe

    2001-01-01

    The study examines the use of academic e-mailing lists and newsgroups on the Internet by university researchers in the Netherlands and England. Their use is related to three clusters of problems that are analyzed. Firstly, while there are considerable time costs for using Internet Discussion Groups, their potential benefits for the individual researcher and their impact on the informal academic communication structure are unknown. Are they information tools or social tools for enlarging the s...

  14. Evaluation, in an animal model study, of the effect of diet composition change and diet supplementation with b-group vitamins on the liver fatty acid profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzanna Goluch-Koniuszy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Contemporary diet of men is characterised by a significant contribution of processed and puri- fied products impoverished by technological processing in, e.g., B-group vitamins taking part in the synthesis of fatty acids. One of the means to prevent their insufficient intake is supplementation of food products with those components. Hence, an animal model study was undertaken in order to determine whether modification of diet composition in which whole-grain components (whole grains of wheat and maize are isocalorically substituted with white flour and saccharose, and its complementary supplementation with B-group vitamins may trigger changes in the profile of fatty acids synthesized in liver of rats. Material and methods. The study was conducted on 30 male rats aged 5 months. Group I was receiving the basal feed mixture (Labofed B, which contained among other things whole grains of wheat and maize. Groups II-III, in free access, were administered modified feed mixture in which 83.5% of wheat present in the basal diet was substituted with wheat flour, and 50% of maize – with saccharose. Contents of vitamin B1 , B2 ,B6  and PP and basic chemical composition in the feed mixture are determined by HPLC method and the fatty acid profile with the modified Folch method using gas chromatography. Groups I and II were receiving water to drink, whereas the animals from group III were administered 25 ml of an aqueous solution of vitamins in the following doses: B1 – 0.94 mg, B2 – 0.48 mg, B6 – 0.5 mg, PP – 1.9 mg. In group III – to supplement differences in contents of those vitamins between feed mixtures resulting from the exchange of components, which to some extent simulated the mode of supplementation in humans. Concentration of glucose was determined in blood serum and the amount of fat was determined with Soxhlet method in the dissected animals liver and the fatty acid profile with the modified Folch method using gas

  15. An experimental and theoretical study on concomitant polymorphism of a dithiocarbonimidates derivate in a single space group

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnkaya, Ersin; Dinçer, Muharrem; Şahan, Emine; Korkusuz, Elif; Yıldırım, İsmail; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2013-05-01

    The title organic dithiocarbonimidates derivate crystallizes in two different polymorphic modifications. The conformational differences between the two crystalline modifications lead to differences in crystal packing and thus result in the formation of the two polymorphic forms. In this paper, we will report a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the molecular structure and spectroscopic parameters (FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR) of 5-benzoyl-2-oxo-4-phenyl-1(2H)-[diethyldithiocarbonimidate]-pyrimidine.The molecular geometry was also optimized using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with the 6-311G(d,p) basis set in ground state and compared with the experimental data. From the optimized geometry of the molecule, vibrational frequencies, Gauge-Independent Atomic Orbital (GIAO) 1H and 13C-NMR chemical shift values, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) distribution, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) and thermodynamic properties of the title compound were performed at B3LYP/6-311G(d,p). The calculated MEP map verifies the solid-state interactions. The computed vibrational frequencies are used to determine the types of molecular motions associated with each of the experimental bands observed. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. The calculated HOMO-LUMO energy gap shows that charge transfer occur within the molecule. Information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and site of chemical reactivity of the molecules has been obtained by mapping electron density isosurface with electrostatic potential (ESP).

  16. Understanding the effect of side groups in ionic liquids on carbon-capture properties: a combined experimental and theoretical effort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Fangyong [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engingeering; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Lartey, Michael [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Damodaran, Krishnan [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Albenze, Erik [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); URS Corporation, South Park, PA (United States); Thompson, Robert L. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); URS Corporation, South Park, PA (United States); Kim, Jihan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Science Div.; Harancyzk, Maciel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Div.; Nulwala, Hunaid B. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Luebke, David R. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Smit, Berend [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engingeering; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division

    2013-01-01

    Ionic liquids are an emerging class of materials with applications in a variety of fields. Steady progress has been made in the creation of ionic liquids tailored to specific applications. However, the understanding of the underlying structure–property relationships has been slower to develop. As a step in the effort to alleviate this deficiency, the influence of side groups on ionic liquid properties has been studied through an integrated approach utilizing synthesis, experimental determination of properties, and simulation techniques. To achieve this goal, a classical force field in the framework of OPLS/Amber force fields has been developed to predict ionic liquid properties accurately. Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry was employed to synthesize triazolium-based ionic liquids with diverse side groups. Values of densities were predicted within 3% of experimental values, whereas self-diffusion coefficients were underestimated by about an order of magnitude though the trends were in excellent agreement, the activation energy calculated in simulation correlates well with experimental values. The predicted Henry coefficient for CO{sub 2} solubility reproduced the experimentally observed trends. This study highlights the importance of integrating experimental and computational approaches in property prediction and materials development, which is not only useful in the development of ionic liquids for CO{sub 2} capture but has application in many technological fields.

  17. Theoretical and computational analysis of two-group integral transport equation for finite spherical and cylindrical media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical procedure has been developed to solve two-group transport problems in cylindrical and spherical one-dimensional finite geometries. Both first and second order transform procedures are utilized to reduce the two-group integral transport equation to a form which can be solved using the method of singular eigenfunction expansion. The applications to specific examples include the spherical shell-source problem, the cylindrical critical problem and the cylindrical shell-source problem. In order to explore a more universal procedure of dealing with convex geometries, a second-order transform technique is discussed diversely. With application to both sperhical and cylindrical geometries, this procedure is demonstrated to be equivalent to the more specialized first-order transform procedure applicable only to spherical problems. A numerical algorithm for the spherical shell-source problem is incorporated in a computer code, TWOSS. The total neutron densities, angular flux, net current and macroscopic neutron balance can be obtained from this computation. The accuracy of TWOSS is investigated by a comparison of the total flux with the values obtained using a discrete ordinates code ANISN. Agreement was achieved to within the numerical accuracy of the model. Also the advantage of TWOSS over a discrete ordinates calculation is demonstrated since the contribution to the density from the discrete and continuous eigenfunctions is shown separately. Since the discrete solution closely approximates the diffusion theory, the errors incurred near the sources and boundaries in using the diffusion approximation are readily quantified

  18. Research and Implementation of Group Animation Based on Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm%基于ABC算法的群体动画研究与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于君; 刘弘

    2011-01-01

    对群体行为的模拟一直是动画研究领域的重点,如何表现出个体运动的独立性以及群体运动的整体性是群体行为模拟的难点所在,同时传统的群体动画制作手段工作量大,制作出的效果不能满足人们的需求.针对此问题文中将人工蜂群算法应用于群体行为模拟路径规划中,并针对群体动画的特征进行修改,从而产生一种新的简单、高效的制作群体动画的方法.仿真实验表明改进后的人工蜂群算法能够真实模拟出群体在运动过程中的心里状态及群体运动行为.%Simulating group behavior is always a hot issue in computer animation. The difficulty is how to show the independence of individual behavior and the wholeness of group behavior and tradition means made a heavy workload and the effect can't satisfy people's needs. This paper will apply Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm(ABC) to simulate the behavior of group behavior for this problem,and modified aiming at characteristics of group behavior animation,create a new method to generate group animation quickly. The simulation experiments proof that the improved ABC algorithm can simulate the psychological condition of the group in the moving process and group behavior in an actual way.

  19. Evaluation, in an animal model study, of the effect of diet composition change and diet supplementation with b-group vitamins on the liver fatty acid profile

    OpenAIRE

    Zuzanna Goluch-Koniuszy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Contemporary diet of men is characterised by a significant contribution of processed and puri- fied products impoverished by technological processing in, e.g., B-group vitamins taking part in the synthesis of fatty acids. One of the means to prevent their insufficient intake is supplementation of food products with those components. Hence, an animal model study was undertaken in order to determine whether modification of diet composition in which whole-grain components (whole gr...

  20. Inhibition of high-mobility group box 1 as therapeutic option in autoimmune disease : lessons from animal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaper, Fleur; Heeringa, Peter; Bijl, Marc; Westra, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a molecule that has gained much attention in the last couple of years as an important player in innate immune responses and modulating factor in several (auto) immune diseases. Furthermore, advancements have been made in identifying the diverse

  1. Twelve-year proximity relationships in a captive group of western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) at the San Diego Wild Animal Park, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Masayuki; Onishi, Kenji; Silldorf, April; Sexton, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Proximity data were collected in a captive breeding group of gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) at the San Diego Wild Animal Park (currently called the San Diego Zoo Safari Park) twice a year (spring and fall periods) for over 12 years, by using a convenient method in which individuals less than 5 m from each animal in the group were recorded by scan sampling, approximately once per hour. Immature females from infancy to young adulthood maintained relatively frequent proximity to both their mothers and the silverback male and spent little time alone (no animals within 10 m), with relatively large individual differences. On the other hand, immature males decreased the time spent near their mothers and the silverback male and increased the time spent alone with increasing age. Therefore, sex differences in proximity to mothers and the silverback male became apparent after late juvenility. Some adult females maintained increased frequency of proximity to the silverback male than that by other females over the 12-year period, indicating the presence of long-term, stable proximity relationships between the silverback male and the adult females. Such long-term, stable proximity relationships were also observed among adult females. Some association patterns reported in wild gorillas, such as frequent proximity between adult females with dependent offspring and the silverback male and close relationships between related females, were not observed in the present study. The idiosyncratic or individual factors influencing some association patterns were easily reflected in captive situations. PMID:24838632

  2. The role of threats in animal cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Cant, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    In human societies, social behaviour is strongly influenced by threats of punishment, even though the threats themselves rarely need to be exercised. Recent experimental evidence suggests that similar hidden threats can promote cooperation and limit within-group selfishness in some animal systems. In other animals, however, threats appear to be ineffective. Here I review theoretical and empirical studies that help to understand the evolutionary causes of these contrasting patterns, and identi...

  3. Establishing the Uniqueness of the Connection between SdS_5 and Conformally Invariant Relativistic Systems: A Group/Field Theoretical Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ktorides, A I Karanikas ank C N

    2007-01-01

    Adopting as working assumption that the conformal group O(4,2) of Minkowski space, being the largest symmetry group which respects its light cone structure, is the appropriate global symmetry underlying the description of relativistic systems, it is shown that AdS$_5$ uniquely emerges as the space on the boundary of which a corresponding relativistic field system should be accommodated. The basic mathematical tools employed for establishing this result are (a) Cartan's theory of spinors and (b) group contraction methods. Extending our considerations to supersymmetry it is demostrated how an $N$=1 SUSY YM field system can emerge as a broken version of an $N$=4 SUSY YM field system. An especially important feature of the presentation is the `unearthing' of seminal, independent from each other, works of I. Segal and of S. Fubini which give a purely field theoretical perspective on the intimate relation between conformally invariant relativistic field theories and AdS$_5$ including, in particular, the warping phe...

  4. “A short historical investigation into cross cultural Australian ideas about the marine animal group Teredinidae and some socioecological consequences and options”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Gardner

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available How are contemporary multicultural coastal Australians, Aboriginals and settlers alike, to develop wiser ideas and practices towards marine animals as well as each other? To illustrate the importance and complexity of this question, I offer a sh ort historical investigation of some contrasting ideas and practices held by Australian Aboriginal and settler cultures about marine animals of the group Teredinidae. I present two “screenshots”: one from the period 1798 - 1826 and another from 1970 - 2012. Th e first period examines a negative but influential interpretation by Thomas Malthus of a cross cultural encounter featuring Australian Aboriginal consumption of local Teredinidae known as “cobra”. While this cultural tone remains largely unchanged in the s econd period, the biological understanding of the marine animals has developed greatly. So has awareness of the socioecology of Teredinidae: their estuarine habitats and cultural significance. Their potential role as subjects of community based monitoring is undeveloped but could serve overlapping concerns of environmental justice as well as the restoration and “future proofing” of habitats. Such a new composite of ideas and practices will rely on better integration of biology with community based social in novations. A symbolic beginning would be a change in Australian English colloquialisms for Teredinidae, from the erroneous “shipworm” or “mangrove worm” to the more accurate “burrowing clam”

  5. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of aliphatic and alicyclic ethers (chemical group 16 when used as flavourings for all animal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemical group 16 consists of aliphatic and alicyclic ethers, of which four are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The FEEDAP Panel was unable to perform an assessment of 1,5,5,9-tetramethyl-13-oxatricyclo[8.3.0.0.(4.9]tridecane and theaspirane because of issues related to the purity of the compounds. The FEEDAP Panel concludes that: i1,8-cineole is safe at the high use level proposed by the applicant (5 mg/kg complete feed for all animal species with a margin of safety of 5.6 to 28.2; ii2-(2-methylprop-1-enyl-4-methyltetrahydropyran (Class II is safe at a maximum of 0.3 mg/kg complete feed for cattle, salmonids and non food producing animals and of 0.5 mg/kg complete feed for pigs and poultry. The absence of a margin of safety would not allow the simultaneous administration in feed and water for drinking of these substances. The total dose from all sources should not exceed that recommended when given in feed alone. No safety concern would arise for the consumer from the use of compounds belonging to CG 16 up to the highest safe level in feedingstuffs for all animal species. The FEEDAP Panel considers it prudent to treat both compounds under assessment as irritants to skin, eyes and respiratory tract, and as skin sensitisers. The FEEDAP Panel considers that the concentrations of the compounds belonging to CG 16 in the environment are not expected to exceed levels of concern when used in animal feeds at the levels considered to be safe to the target species. Since these compounds are used in food as flavourings, and their function in feed is essentially the same as that in food, no further demonstration of efficacy is necessary.

  6. Theoretical Physics 1. Theoretical Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an introduction to basic concepts of mechanics more advanced topics build the major part of this book. Interspersed is a discussion of selected problems of motion. This is followed by a concise treatment of the Lagrangian and the Hamiltonian formulation of mechanics, as well as a brief excursion on chaotic motion. The last chapter deals with applications of the Lagrangian formulation to specific systems (coupled oscillators, rotating coordinate systems, rigid bodies). The level of this textbook is advanced undergraduate. The authors combine teaching experience of more than 40 years in all fields of Theoretical Physics and related mathematical disciplines and thorough knowledge in creating advanced eLearning content. The text is accompanied by an extensive collection of online material, in which the possibilities of the electronic medium are fully exploited, e.g. in the form of applets, 2D- and 3D-animations. (orig.)

  7. Shape of the self-concept clarity change during group psychotherapy predicts the outcome: An empirical validation of the theoretical model of the self-concept change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał eStyła

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-concept clarity describes the extent to which the schemas of the self are internally integrated, well defined, and temporally stable. This article presents a theoretical model that describes how different shapes of self-concept clarity change (especially stable increase and V shape observed in the course of psychotherapy are related to the therapy outcome. Linking the concept of Jean Piaget and the dynamic systems theory, the study postulates that a stable self-concept clarity increase is needed for the participants with a rather healthy personality structure, while self-concept clarity change characterized by a V shape or fluctuations is optimal for more disturbed patients. Method: Correlational study in a naturalistic setting with repeated measurements (M=5.8 was conducted on the sample of 85 patients diagnosed with neurosis and personality disorders receiving intensive eclectic group psychotherapy under routine inpatient conditions. Participants filled in the Self-Concept Clarity Scale, Symptoms’ Questionnaire KS-II, and Neurotic Personality Questionnaire KON-2006 at the beginning and at the end of the course of psychotherapy. The Self-Concept Clarity Scale was also administered every two weeks during psychotherapy. Results: As hypothesized, among the relatively healthiest group of patients the stable self-concept clarity increase was related to positive treatment outcome, while more disturbed patients benefited from the fluctuations and V shape of self-concept clarity change. Conclusions: The findings support the idea that for different personality dispositions either a monotonic increase or transient destabilization of self-concept clarity is a sign of a good treatment prognosis.

  8. Theoretical study of the technical requirements for Danish disposal of radioactive wastes. Report prepared by the working group appointed by the Ministry of Information Technology and Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the shutdown of the research reactor DR-3 at Risoe National Laboratory in September 2000 and after the decision was made to decommission the nuclear facilities at Risoe, time has come to start the decision process of what to do with the radioactive wastes at Risoe. The present study describes the waste problem and presents the theoretical framework for the discussion that must be held for reaching the decisions on how to handle the wastes. The radioactive wastes in Denmark are of different origin, type and activity level. The wastes come from the nuclear research at Risoe, from the health sector, industry, and from other research activities. Most of the waste is classified as short-lived low to intermediate radioactive waste. Only a small part is classified as long-lived low to intermediate radioactive waste. The size of a disposal site is estimated to be 3.000 - 5.000 m3 for the Danish radioactive waste and another 3.400 m3 for uranium ore and tailings. The working group recommends that the IAEA's guidelines for site selection are used and that international experts evaluate proposals for actual disposal sites. Dependent on site selection strategy and depot concept the costs of establishing a depot of 5.000 m3 are roughly estimated to 180-500 mill. DKK. It is recommended to specially consider how to handle the 233 kg of low-enriched fuel from the experimentally made reactor fuel in the hot cell plant at Risoe. It should be evaluated whether it might be realistic to reach an agreement to have it disposed outside Denmark. Finally, the working group recommends special considering of how to handle the 3.670 tons of uranium ore and 1.130 tons of uranium tailings from experiments with extracting uranium from ore from a mine in Kvanefjeld in Greenland. (ln)

  9. MLVA-16 typing of 295 marine mammal Brucella isolates from different animal and geographic origins identifies 7 major groups within Brucella ceti and Brucella pinnipedialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Isabelle

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 1994, Brucella strains have been isolated from a wide range of marine mammals. They are currently recognized as two new Brucella species, B. pinnipedialis for the pinniped isolates and B. ceti for the cetacean isolates in agreement with host preference and specific phenotypic and molecular markers. In order to investigate the genetic relationships within the marine mammal Brucella isolates and with reference to terrestrial mammal Brucella isolates, we applied in this study the Multiple Loci VNTR (Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA approach. A previously published assay comprising 16 loci (MLVA-16 that has been shown to be highly relevant and efficient for typing and clustering Brucella strains from animal and human origin was used. Results 294 marine mammal Brucella strains collected in European waters from 173 animals and a human isolate from New Zealand presumably from marine origin were investigated by MLVA-16. Marine mammal Brucella isolates were shown to be different from the recognized terrestrial mammal Brucella species and biovars and corresponded to 3 major related groups, one specific of the B. ceti strains, one of the B. pinnipedialis strains and the last composed of the human isolate. In the B. ceti group, 3 subclusters were identified, distinguishing a cluster of dolphin, minke whale and porpoise isolates and two clusters mostly composed of dolphin isolates. These results were in accordance with published analyses using other phenotypic or molecular approaches, or different panels of VNTR loci. The B. pinnipedialis group could be similarly subdivided in 3 subclusters, one composed exclusively of isolates from hooded seals (Cystophora cristata and the two others comprising other seal species isolates. Conclusion The clustering analysis of a large collection of marine mammal Brucella isolates from European waters significantly strengthens the current view of the population structure of these two

  10. Building genetic networks using relatedness information: a novel approach for the estimation of dispersal and characterization of group structure in social animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Lee Ann; Browning, Lucy E; Holleley, Clare E; Savage, James L; Russell, Andrew F; Griffith, Simon C

    2012-04-01

    Natal dispersal is an important life history trait driving variation in individual fitness, and therefore, a proper understanding of the factors underlying dispersal behaviour is critical to many fields including population dynamics, behavioural ecology and conservation biology. However, individual dispersal patterns remain difficult to quantify despite many years of research using direct and indirect methods. Here, we quantify dispersal in a single intensively studied population of the cooperatively breeding chestnut-crowned babbler (Pomatostomus ruficeps) using genetic networks created from the combination of pairwise relatedness data and social networking methods and compare this to dispersal estimates from re-sighting data. This novel approach not only identifies movements between social groups within our study sites but also provides an estimation of immigration rates of individuals originating outside the study site. Both genetic and re-sighting data indicated that dispersal was strongly female biased, but the magnitude of dispersal estimates was much greater using genetic data. This suggests that many previous studies relying on mark-recapture data may have significantly underestimated dispersal. An analysis of spatial genetic structure within the sampled population also supports the idea that females are more dispersive, with females having no structure beyond the bounds of their own social group, while male genetic structure expands for 750 m from their social group. Although the genetic network approach we have used is an excellent tool for visualizing the social and genetic microstructure of social animals and identifying dispersers, our results also indicate the importance of applying them in parallel with behavioural and life history data. PMID:22335253

  11. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of the use of amino acids (chemical group 34 when used as flavourings for all animal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical group (CG 34 comprises amino acids, of which 20 are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The FEEDAP Panel was unable to perform an assessment of D,L-valine because of the lack of data on its purity. The Panel cannot conclude on the use of these compounds in water for drinking. In the absence of any information on the microbial strains or substrates used for the production of the additives, and with little information on the manufacturing process, the Panel cannot ascertain whether the manufacturing process introduces any safety concerns. The conclusions on target animals and consumer safety apply only to the compounds per se, and can be extrapolated only to feed additives containing these compounds when obtained by chemical synthesis or protein hydrolysis and to those produced by fermentation which have already undergone a strain-specific safety assessment by EFSA. The 19 compounds under assessment in CG 34 are safe at the proposed use level of 25 mg/kg feed for all animal species. The FEEDAP Panel considers the use of glycine at 20 g/kg in food for cats and dogs as safe. The safety of the proposed use of beta-alanine in pet food at 20 g/kg was not substantiated. Use of these compounds does not give rise to concern for consumer safety. The Panel considers it prudent to treat all 19 compounds as irritant to skin and eyes, skin sensitisers and hazardous by inhalation. They do not give rise to any concern for the safety of the environment. No further demonstration of their efficacy is necessary when used at concentrations up to 25 mg/kg complete feed. There is some evidence that high concentrations (20 g/kg in cat and dog food of glycine may influence the food preference of cats and dogs. Comparable evidence for beta-alanine is not available.

  12. Delivery of the high-mobility group box 1 box A peptide using heparin in the acute lung injury animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji Hyun; Kim, Ji Yeon; Piao, Chunxian; Lee, Seonyeong; Kim, Bora; Song, Su Jeong; Choi, Joon Sig; Lee, Minhyung

    2016-07-28

    In this study, the efficacy of the high-mobility group box-1 box A (HMGB1A)/heparin complex was evaluated for the treatment of acute lung injury (ALI). HMGB1A is an antagonist against wild-type high-mobility group box-1 (wtHMGB1), a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is involved in ALIs. HMGB1A has positive charges and can be captured in the mucus layer after intratracheal administration. To enhance the delivery and therapeutic efficiency of HMGB1A, the HMGB1A/heparin complex was produced using electrostatic interactions, with the expectation that the nano-sized complex with a negative surface charge could efficiently penetrate the mucus layer. Additionally, heparin itself had an anti-inflammatory effect. Complex formation with HMGB1A and heparin was confirmed by atomic force microscopy. The particle size and surface charge of the HMGB1A/heparin complex at a 1:1 weight ratio were 113nm and -25mV, respectively. Intratracheal administration of the complex was performed into an ALI animal model. The results showed that the HMGB1A/heparin complex reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-1β, more effectively than HMGB1A or heparin alone. Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed the decreased inflammatory reaction in the lungs after delivery of the HMGB1A/heparin complex. In conclusion, the HMGB1A/heparin complex might be useful to treat ALI. PMID:27196743

  13. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of aliphatic and aromatic mono- and di-thiols and mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups (chemical group 20 when used as flavourings for all animal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical group 20 consists of aliphatic and aromatic mono- and di-thiols and mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups, of which 31 are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The FEEDAP Panel was unable to perform an assessment of six compounds (methanethiol, methyl propyl disulphide, dipropyl trisulphide, 3-mercaptobutan-2-one, 3-(methylthiobutanal and 3-methyl-1,2,4-trithiane because of issues related to the purity of the compounds. The FEEDAP Panel concludes that the following 25 compounds are safe for the target species at the proposed maximum dose level (0.05 mg/kg complete feed: 3-(methylthiopropionaldehyde, methyl 3-(methylthiopropionate, allylthiol, dimethyl sulphide, dibutyl sulphide, diallyl disulphide, diallyl trisulphide, dimethyl trisulphide, dipropyl disulphide, allyl isothiocyanate, dimethyl disulphide, 2-methylbenzene-1-thiol, S-methyl butanethioate, allyl methyl disulphide, 3-(methylthiopropan-1-ol, 3-(methylthiohexan-1-ol, 1-propane-1-thiol, diallyl sulphide, 2,4-dithiapentane, 2-methyl-2-(methyldithiopropanal, 2-methylpropane-1-thiol, methylsulfinylmethane, propane-2-thiol, 3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-trithiolane and 2-methyl-4-propyl-1,3-oxathiane. No safety concern for the consumer would arise from the use of these 25 compounds of CG 20 up to the highest safe level in feedingstuffs for all animal species, with the exception of allyl isothiocyanate. Although additional exposure to this substance through its low use level in animal feeds would not substantially increase consumer exposure, the FEEDAP Panel notes that the estimated exposure of consumers is already higher than the acceptable daily intake (ADI. All compounds should be considered irritant to skin, eyes and respiratory tract and as skin sensitisers. The proposed concentration of 0.05 mg flavour/kg feed is not expected to cause detrimental effects to the environment, except for 2-methylpropane-1-thiol, for which 0

  14. " Animal, trop animal "

    OpenAIRE

    Potestà, Andréa

    2010-01-01

    Dans la tradition philosophique, on trouve plusieurs définitions de l’homme. La célèbre définition aristotélicienne, zoon logon echon (animal doué du langage ou animal rationnel) fournit le paradigme ainsi que la méthode de toutes les définitions successives. Il s’agit d’ajouter au vivant, à l’animal, quelque chose d’autre, quelque chose de plus, qui permette de le caractériser et le fasse entendre comme différent des bêtes. Cette diversité peut être conçue différemment : en tant qu’élévation...

  15. Project EAGLE (Early Academic Gifted Learning Experience): A Program for Gifted and Talented Students (Grades K-3)--Animals 3; Magnets; Sight; Geoboards 3; Dinosaurs 3; and Groups 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkoski, Kay

    Six thematic activity booklets are presented for implementing Project EAGLE, an enrichment program for gifted and talented primary-level children. "Animals 3" introduces endangered animals and locates their home areas on maps or globes, using nine learning activities involving science and creative writing. "Magnets" discusses what magnets are and…

  16. The African Elephant as a Game Ranch Animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. de Graaff

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available The Wildlife Group of the South African Veterinary Association (SAVA was constituted in the beginning of the 1970s by a number of persons interested in theoretical and practical aspects of wildlife {sensu lato, wildlife diseases, and the handling of game and wild animals {^ensit stricto}.

  17. The Application of PSO Algorithm in the Behavior Control of Group Animation%微粒群优化算法在群体动画行为控制中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪娜

    2014-01-01

    为了提高群体动画行为规划的协调性和智能性,采用微粒群优化算法来实现群体动画的行为控制。首先对群体动画体系结构和群体控制行为策略做了简要说明,接着对微粒群算法进行详细阐述,最后进行实例仿真,实验证明,采用微粒群算法很好地实现了群体动画行为控制,且能避开障碍物,具有较强的智能性。%In order to improve the coordination and intelligence of group animation behavior planning, the particle swarm optimization algorithm is adopted to achieve the group animation behavior control. This paper firstly makes a brief introduc-tion of the system structure of group animation and group control strategy, then elaborates the particle swarm algorithm, and finally carries out the simulation experiments. Experiments show that the particle swarm algorithm achieves good behavior control of group animation, avoiding the obstacles with strong intelligence.

  18. Report from the working group on combustion of domestic animal manure fractions; Rapport fra arbejdsgruppen om afbraending af fraktioner af husdyrgoedning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-06-01

    During the past few years there has been a considerable development of new technology for treatment of domestic animal manure. The development implies that environmental problems connected with storage and use of domestic animal manure for fertilization are reduced. Through several years experiences with utilization of domestic animal manure's energy potential in biogas plants have been compiled, and the technological basis for connecting slurry separation and biogas production is present. In order to promote this development, the agricultural sector has a growing desire to be able to dispose of parts from the separated slurry through combustion, hereby using the energy content to the energy production. However, there are a number of barriers that make combustion of domestic animal manure impossible. In order to uncover existing barriers for combustion of domestic animal manure fractions the Danish Minister of food appointed an inter ministerial committee on 30 March 2005. The committee should: 1. Describe the regulations within the ministerial areas that affect combustion of domestic animal manure, and also describe the regulations that act as barriers, 2. Describe binding international agreements, directives and regulations that affect combustion of domestic animal manure and which of these that act as barriers, 3. Evaluate the potential for regulation adjustments and other actions, that might further the development of sustainable energy production in which domestic animal manure is a part, 4. Evaluate socio-economic pros and cons in the light of environmental and climatic impacts, and 5. Describe estimated governmental financial consequences of potential adjustments of regulations and other actions. (BA)

  19. Amazing Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kuwari, Najat Saad

    2007-01-01

    "Animals" is a three-part lesson plan for young learners with a zoo animal theme. The first lesson is full of activities to describe animals, with Simon Says, guessing games, and learning stations. The second lesson is about desert animals, but other types of animals could be chosen depending on student interest. This lesson teaches…

  20. Design, synthesis and evaluation of redox, second order nonlinear optical properties and theoretical DFT studies of novel bithiophene azo dyes functionalized with thiadiazole acceptor groups

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, M. Cidália R.; Schellenberg, Peter Michael; Belsley, M.; Fernandes, Sara S. M.; Raposo, M. Manuela M.

    2012-01-01

    Two series of novel thermally stable second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) heterocyclic azo dyes 4-5 have been designed and synthesized. The two series of compounds were based on different combinations of acceptor groups (thiadiazole or arylthiadiazole electron-deficient heterocycles) linked to bithiophene which acts at the same time as a donor group and as a pi-conjugated bridge. The solvatochromic behavior of azo dyes 4-5 was investigated in several solvents of different polarity, while thei...

  1. Animals as disgust elicitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasperbauer, Tyler Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This paper attempts to explain how and why nonhuman animals elicit disgust in human beings. I argue that animals elicit disgust in two ways. One is by triggering disease–protection mechanisms, and the other is by eliciting mortality salience, or thoughts of death. I discuss how these two types...... of disgust operate and defend their conceptual and theoretical coherence against common objections. I also outline an explanatory challenge for disgust researchers. Both types of disgust indicate that a wide variety of animals produce aversive and avoidant reactions in human beings. This seems somewhat odd......, given the prominence of animals in human lives. The challenge, then, is explaining how humans cope with the presence of animals. I propose, as a hypothesis for further exploration, that we cope with animals, and our disgust responses to them, by attributing mental states that mark them as inferior...

  2. Animated nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Animated nature is educational-training project pronounced by the Slovak Environmental Agency (SAZP) in cooperation with Field Studies Council form Great Britain and financial support of Darwin Initiative and Slovensky plynarensky priemysel, s.p. In the present time this is ultimate and the most successful children's project aimed on mapping and protection of biodiversity in Europe. Activity in project is spare-time and therefore is voluntary. The interest territory is a natural as well as cultural landscape in vicinity of a school or other organisation, habitation and so on. In the project work schoolchildren at the age from 10 till 15 years. Leaders of work-groups are student of secondary schools and universities, teachers, professional workers of state and non-governmental organisation and parents. In one group works approximately 10 children. Each group which has send to SAZP result of biodiversity mapping, cost free obtained data base CD - Detske mapy biodiverzity (Children's maps of biodiversity) and so they were informed about results of all groups frame: within the frame of Slovakia. Results of activities of this project in 2001-2004 and perspectives for 2005-2006 years are discussed

  3. Theoretical Design of High-spin Organic Molecules with-·N-N-as a Spin-containing Fragment and Heterocycles as an End Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU De-Qing; WANG Li-Min; ZHANG Jing-Ping; WANG Rong-Shun

    2006-01-01

    Novel stable high spin molecules possessing three different arranged fashions are designed with -·N-N< as a spin-containing (SC) fragment, various aromatic, such as benzene (1), pyridine (2), pyridazine (3), pyrimidine (4),pyrazine (5), triazine (6) as end groups (EG) and phenyl as a ferromagnetic coupling (FC) unit. The effects of a different end groups on the spin multiplicities of the ground states and their stabilities were investigated by means of AM1-CI approach. It has been found that the spin densities on the two atoms of the SC fragment are different from delocalization resulting in the specific stability of -·N-N<. In these molecules, the stabilities of the triplet states decrease when the distance between the atoms of central SC (-N-) increases. The orders of the stability of triplet states for 1an, 1bn, 1cn [They are isomers in which SC is connected with FC in different way (1an, NiNNN1; 1bn,N1N NiN; 1cn, NN1N1N) and six heterocycles are EG] show that the tability of triplet states with heterocycles as end groups is higher than that with phenyl as end groups, and in the order: triazine (EG)>pyrimidine, pyrazine>pyridine, pyridazine.

  4. Capture-recapture and multiple-record systems estimation I: History and theoretical development. International Working Group for Disease Monitoring and Forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-11-15

    This paper reviews the historical background and the theoretical development of models for the analysis of data from capture-recapture or multiple-record systems for estimating the size of closed populations. The models and methods were originally developed for use in fisheries and wildlife biology and were later adapted for use in connection with human populations. Application to epidemiology came much later. The simplest capture-recapture model involves two lists or samples and has four key assumptions: that the population is closed, that individuals can be matched from capture to recapture, that capture in the second sample is independent of capture in the first sample, and that the capture probabilities are homogeneous across all individuals in the population. Log-linear models provide a convenient representation for this basic capture-recapture model and its extensions to K lists. The paper provides an overview for these models and illustrates how they allow for dependency among the lists and heterogeneity in the population. The use of log-linear models for estimation in the presence of both dependence and heterogeneity is illustrated on a four-list example involving ascertainment of diabetes using data gathered in 1988 from residents of Casale Monferrato, Italy. The final section of the paper discusses techniques for model selection in the context of models for estimating the size of populations. PMID:7485050

  5. Theoretical Study of the Structure of 2-Methylpropionyl Chloride in the Ground Electronic State: Potential Energy Surface of Internal Rotation of Isopropyl and Tow Methyl Groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geometric structure and isomerization of the 2-methylpropionyl chloride molecule in the ground electronic state in gaseous phase was studied using Ab initio methods (RHF, DFT, MP2 and QCISD). The potential energy surface (PES) and regions corresponding to transitions between conformers by the rotation of the isopropyl and two methyl groups was examined in one-dimensional approximation. The influence of the atomic orbital basis set and the method on the accuracy of the calculation of PES characteristics was considered. The calculation of the energy differences of conformers (DE) using reasonable basis sets provides values in good agreement with experimental results. The values of the potential barriers to gauche → gauche and cis → gauche transitions, and also the barrier of isopropyl and two methyl groups were compared with the same values for similar molecules as 2-methylpropanol and 2-methylpropionyl fluoride. (author)

  6. Design, synthesis and characterization of the electrochemical, nonlinear optical properties and theoretical studies of novel thienylpyrrole azo dyes bearing benzothiazole acceptor groups

    OpenAIRE

    Raposo, M. Manuela M.; Castro, M. Cidália R.; Fonseca, A. Maurício C.; Schellenberg, Peter Michael; Belsley, M.

    2011-01-01

    Two series of related donor-acceptor conjugated heterocyclic azo dyes based on the thienylpyrrole system, functionalized with benzothiazol-2-yl (5-6) or benzothiazol-6-yl acceptor groups (7) through an N=N bridge, have been synthesized by azo coupling using 1-alkyl(aryl)thienylpyrroles (1) and benzothiazolyl diazonium salts (2-4) as coupling components. Their optical (linear and first hyperpolarizability), electrochemical and thermal properties have been examined. Optimized ground-state molec...

  7. The relationship between outgroup size and anti-outgroup attitudes: a theoretical synthesis and empirical test of group threat and intergroup contact theory

    OpenAIRE

    Schlueter, E.; Scheepers, P.

    2010-01-01

    Although anti-immigrant attitudes represent a widespread social problem in many European societies, research has only partially understood the role the demographic size of the immigrant population plays for the prevalence of such attitudes. In this study, we use group threat- and intergroup contact theory to derive competing hypotheses on the role the size of the immigrant population plays for explaining the anti-immigrant attitudes of Dutch citizens. To this end, we used structural equation ...

  8. Theoretical study of heavy-atom tuning of nonlinear optical properties in group 15 derivatives of N,N,N-trimethylglycine (betaine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Bruce F; Nogueira, Fernando; Cardoso, Cláudia

    2013-03-14

    Nitrogen is a common structural element in the acceptor moieties of organic donor-acceptor nonlinear optical (NLO) chromophores. In order to assess the effect of substitution with heavier group 15 elements, computational studies of the nonlinear optical properties of betaine derivatives, (CH(3))(3)X(+)CH(2)CO(2)(-) (X = N, P, As, Sb, Bi), have been performed. First hyperpolarisabilities, β(HRS)(-2ω; ω, ω), corresponding to hyper-Rayleigh scattering susceptibilities have been estimated for this series using TDDFT quadratic response calculations including polarisable-continuum method water solvation and show a five-fold increase on going from N to Bi. Differential frequency dispersion effects lead to a gradual increase in this ratio as the wavelength of the incident radiation is increased from 1907 nm to 800 nm. The depolarisation ratio of the NLO response indicates that the change in β is accompanied by a change in the type of chromophore from octupolar (X = N) to a linear donor-acceptor type (X = Bi). The observed increase of the NLO response correlates with the changing electronic configurations of the group 15 elements and alterations in the character of the frontier molecular orbitals. Relativistic effects are found to play an important part in enhancement of the NLO response in the Sb and Bi betaine derivatives. These results suggest that derivatisation of organic molecules that otherwise display small β values with heavy group 15 elements is a useful method for creating enhanced NLO chromophores. PMID:23299281

  9. Group Theoretical Analysis of non-Newtonian Fluid Flow, Heat and Mass Transfer over a Stretching Surface in the Presence of Thermal Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tufail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article examines the flow, heat and mass transfer of a non-Newtonian fluid known as Casson fluid over a stretching surface in the presence of thermal radiations effects. Lie Group analysis is used to reduce the governing partial differential equations into non-linear ordinary differential equations. These equations are then solved by an analytical technique known as Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM. A comprehensive study of the problem is being made for various parameters involving in the equations through tables and graphs.

  10. Animal v. plant-based bait: does the bait type affect census of fish assemblages and trophic groups by baited remote underwater video (BRUV) systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazilou, A; Shokri, M R; Gladstone, W

    2016-05-01

    Coral reef fish communities were sampled at the Nayband Marine Park, Iran, using baited remote underwater video stations (BRUVSs) which incorporated animal (i.e. frigate tuna Auxis thazard and beef liver), or plant-based baits (i.e. raw dough and raw dough-turmeric powder mix). The A. thazard was found to record significantly (P turmeric powder mix trials. There was also a significant difference in trophic composition of fish assemblages surveyed by animal- and plant-based baits which seemed to be due to variations in attraction patterns of carnivores and herbivores occurring at the earlier phases of each BRUV deployments. Meanwhile, the assemblage structure was comparable among fish assemblages sampled by different bait treatments, indicating that species-level responses to each bait type may be more complicated. In essence, the efficiency of mixed baits should also be examined in future studies. PMID:27170108

  11. Current concepts of Harm-Benefit Analysis of Animal Experiments - Report from the AALAS-FELASA Working Group on Harm-Benefit Analysis - Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brønstad, Aurora; Newcomer, Christian E; Decelle, Thierry; Everitt, Jeffrey I; Guillen, Javier; Laber, Kathy

    2016-06-01

    International regulations and guidelines strongly suggest that the use of animal models in scientific research should be initiated only after the authority responsible for the review of animal studies has concluded a well-thought-out harm-benefit analysis (HBA) and deemed the project to be appropriate. Although the process for conducting HBAs may not be new, the relevant factors and algorithms used in conducting them during the review process are deemed to be poorly defined or lacking by committees in many institutions. This paper presents the current concept of HBAs based on a literature review. References on cost or risk benefit from clinical trials and other industries are also included. Several approaches to HBA have been discovered including algorithms, graphic presentations and generic processes. The aim of this study is to better aid and harmonize understanding of the concepts of 'harm', 'benefit' and 'harm-benefit analysis'. PMID:27188275

  12. Evolutionary models of in-group favoritism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki; Fu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    In-group favoritism is the tendency for individuals to cooperate with in-group members more strongly than with out-group members. Similar concepts have been described across different domains, including in-group bias, tag-based cooperation, parochial altruism, and ethnocentrism. Both humans and other animals show this behavior. Here, we review evolutionary mechanisms for explaining this phenomenon by covering recently developed mathematical models. In fact, in-group favoritism is not easily realized on its own in theory, although it can evolve under some conditions. We also discuss the implications of these modeling results in future empirical and theoretical research. PMID:25926978

  13. Theoretical Design of High-spin Organic Molecules with-. N-S-as a Spin-containing Fragment and Heterocycle as End Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Novel stable high-spin molecules possessing three different arranging fashions were designed with -(.) N-S-as a spin-containing (SC) fragment, an aromatic group, such as benzene (1), pyridine (2), pyridazine (3), pyrimidine (4), pyrazine (5) or triazine (6) as end groups (EG), and phenyl as a ferromagnetic coupling (FC) unit.The effects of different EG on the spin multiplicities of the ground states and their stabilities were investigated by means of the AM1-CI approach. All the investigated molecules corresponded to the FC and possessed high-spin ground states. The spin on the two atoms of the SC fragment was not in agreement with the delocalization results in the specific stability of -(.) N-S-. In those molecules, the stabilities of the triplet states decreased when the distance between the atoms of central SC fragments (-N-) increased. The stabilities of the triplet states of compounds 1a-n, 1b-n and 1c-n, with heterocycles as EG were higher than those of the triplet states of those compounds with phenyl as EG. Furthermore, the stabilities of the triplet states of the compounds with pyrimidine and triazine as EG were higher than those with pyridine, pyridazine or pyrazine as EG.

  14. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of glycyrrhizic acid ammoniated (chemical group 30, miscellaneous substances when used as a flavouring for all animal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycyrrhizic acid is extracted from the dried and ground rhizome and root portions of the perennial leguminous plant Glycyrrhiza glabra L., native to southern Europe and Central Asia, or other species of the genus Glycyrrhiza. It is currently listed in the register of flavouring substances, allowing its use in food without restriction. Glycyrrhyzic acid ammoniated is safe at the concentration of 1 mg/kg complete feed for all species, except chickens for fattening and laying hens. For these two categories, a safe concentration of 0.3 mg/kg complete feed applies. The Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP cannot conclude on the safety of the additive used in water for drinking. The FEEDAP Panel considers that the use of glycyrrhizic acid ammoniated in animal nutrition would not measurably increase consumer exposure. In the absence of data on user safety, the FEEDAP Panel considers it prudent to treat glycyrrhizic acid ammoniated as an irritant to skin, eyes and respiratory tract and as a skin sensitiser. The use of glycyrrhizic acid ammoniated in animal feeds would not pose a risk to the environment. As glycyrrhizic acid ammoniated is used in food as a flavouring, no further demonstration of efficacy is necessary.

  15. Research and Implementation of Group Animation Based on Particle Swarm Optimization%基于人工蜂群算法的群体动画研究与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于君; 刘弘

    2012-01-01

    对群体行为的仿真一直是动画研究领域的重点,传统的群体动画制作手段工作量大,制作出的效果不能满足人们的需求,同时如何表现出个体运动的独立性以及群体运动的整体性是群体行为仿真的难点所在.为解决上述问题,将人工蜂群算法应用于群体行为仿真中.首先对人工蜂群算法原理分析,然后将人工蜂群算法的智能性应用于群体动画中,即使用了人工蜂群算法的思想,又针对不同群体行为进行了修改,从而产生了一种新的快速的制作群体动画的方法.仿真结果表明,人工蜂群算法能够真实模拟群体行为,为设计提供了依据.%Simulating group behavior is always a hot issue in computer animation. The traditional means of group animation costs lots and can not meet people' s needs, and the difficulty is how to show the independence of individu al and the wholeness of group. This paper applied Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm (ABC) to simulate the behavior of group behavior. It analyzed ABC firstly, and then used the group intelligence of ABC to the group animation. It not only used the idea of ABC, but also modified ABC according to the different group behavior. Then it created a new method to generate group animation quickly. The simulation experiments proof that it can simulate group behavior in an actual way.

  16. Evaluation of an Immunochromatographic Assay for Rapid Detection of Penicillin-Binding Protein 2a in Human and Animal Staphylococcus intermedius Group, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, and Staphylococcus schleiferi Clinical Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, A R; Burnham, C-A D; Ford, B A; Lawhon, S D; McAllister, S K; Lonsway, D; Albrecht, V; Jerris, R C; Rasheed, J K; Limbago, B; Burd, E M; Westblade, L F

    2016-03-01

    The performance of a rapid penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) detection assay, the Alere PBP2a culture colony test, was evaluated for identification of PBP2a-mediated beta-lactam resistance in human and animal clinical isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius group, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, and Staphylococcus schleiferi. The assay was sensitive and specific, with all PBP2a-negative and PBP2a-positive strains testing negative and positive, respectively. PMID:26677248

  17. Animal Farm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐蓉蓉

    2015-01-01

    This essayfirst introduce the background of Animal Farm and a brief introduction of the author.Then it discuss three thesis about this novel and briefly discussed about it.At last it give highly review on Animal Farm.

  18. Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild animals usually avoid people. They might attack, however, if they feel threatened, are sick, or are protecting their ... or territory. Attacks by pets are more common. Animal bites rarely are life-threatening, but if they ...

  19. Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and complications from bites Never pet, handle, or feed unknown animals Leave snakes alone Watch your children closely around animals Vaccinate your cats, ferrets, and dogs against rabies Spay or neuter ...

  20. Animal Farm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐蓉蓉

    2015-01-01

    This essay first introduce the background of Animal Farm and a brief introduction of the author.Then it discuss three thesis about this novel and briefly discussed about it.At last it give highly review on Animal Farm.

  1. Structure, bonding and energetics of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) stabilized low oxidation state group 2 (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) metal complexes: A theoretical study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashim Baishya; V Rao Mundlapati; Sharanappa Nembenna; Himansu S Biswal

    2014-11-01

    A series of N-heterocyclic carbene stabilized low oxidation state group 2 metal halide and hydrides with metal-metal bonds ([L(X) M-M(X) L]; L = NHC ((CHNH)2C:), M = Be, Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba, and X = Cl or H) has been studied by computational methods. The main objective of this study is to predict whether it is possible to stabilize neutral ligated low oxidation state alkaline-earth metal complexes with metal-metal bonds. The homolytic metal-metal Bond Dissociation Energy (BDE) calculation, Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Energy Decomposition Analyses (EDA) on density functional theory (DFT) optimized [L(X)M-M(X)L] complexes revealed that they are as stable as their -diketiminate, guanidinate and -diimine counterparts. The optimized structures of the complexes are in trans-linear geometries. The bond order analyses such as Wiberg Bond Indices (WBI) and Fuzzi Bond Order (FBO) confirm the existence of single bond between two metal atoms, and it is covalent in nature.

  2. Animal ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Clare; Sandøe, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes and discusses different views concerning our duties towards animals. First, we explain why it is necessary to engage in thinking about animal ethics and why it is not enough to rely on feelings alone. Secondly, we present and discuss five different kinds of views about the nature of our duties to animals. They are: contractarianism, utilitarianism, the animal rights view, contextual views, and a respect for nature view. Finally, we briefly consider whether it is possibl...

  3. Quadruped Animation

    OpenAIRE

    Skrba, Ljiljana; Reveret, Lionel; Hétroy, Franck; Cani, Marie-Paule; O'Sullivan, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Films like Shrek, Madagascar, The Chronicles of Narnia and Charlotte's web all have something in common: realistic quadruped animations. While the animation of animals has been popular for a long time, the technical challenges associated with creating highly realistic, computer generated creatures have been receiving increasing attention recently. The entertainment, education and medical industries have increased the demand for simulation of realistic animals in the computer graphics area. In...

  4. Thin Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, D.

    1998-01-01

    Lattice animals provide a discretized model for the theta transition displayed by branched polymers in solvent. Exact graph enumeration studies have given some indications that the phase diagram of such lattice animals may contain two collapsed phases as well as an extended phase. This has not been confirmed by studies using other means. We use the exact correspondence between the q --> 1 limit of an extended Potts model and lattice animals to investigate the phase diagram of lattice animals ...

  5. Collaborative Learning: Theoretical Foundations and Applicable Strategies to University Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Nestor D. Roselli

    2016-01-01

    Collaborative learning is a construct that identifies a current strong field, both in face-to-face and virtual education. Firstly, three converging theoretical sources are analyzed: socio-cognitive conflict theory, intersubjectivity theory and distributed cognition theory. Secondly, a model of strategies that can be implemented by teachers to develop socio-cognitive collaboration is presented. This model integrates and systematizes several academic group animation techniques developed within ...

  6. Animal Deliberation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, C.P.G.

    2014-01-01

    While much has been written on environmental politics on the one hand, and animal ethics and welfare on the other, animal politics, as the interface of the two, is underexamined. There are key political implications in the increase of animal protection laws, the rights of nature, and political parti

  7. Animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Krentz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Cardiovascular Endocrinology, we are proud to present a broad and dedicated spectrum of reviews on animal models in cardiovascular disease. The reviews cover most aspects of animal models in science from basic differences and similarities between small animals and the human...

  8. Theoretical microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    Microfluidics is a young and rapidly expanding scientific discipline, which deals with fluids and solutions in miniaturized systems, the so-called lab-on-a-chip systems. It has applications in chemical engineering, pharmaceutics, biotechnology and medicine. As the lab-on-a-chip systems grow in...... complexity, a proper theoretical understanding becomes increasingly important. The basic idea of the book is to provide a self-contained formulation of the theoretical framework of microfluidics, and at the same time give physical motivation and examples from lab-on-a-chip technology. After three chapters...... introducing microfluidics, the governing equations for mass, momentum and energy, and some basic flow solutions, the following 14 chapters treat hydraulic resistance/compliance, diffusion/dispersion, time-dependent flow, capillarity, electro- and magneto-hydrodynamics, thermal transport, two-phase flow...

  9. Theoretical Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2007-04-01

    The theoretical issues in the interpretation of the precision measurements of the nucleon-to-Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes are highlighted. The results of these measurements are confronted with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD, and QCD-inspired models. The link of the nucleon-to-Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs) is also discussed.

  10. Entry, Descent, Landing Animation (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Entry, Descent, Landing animation This animation illustrates the path the Stardust return capsule will follow once it enters Earth's atmosphere.

  11. Animal research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I.A.S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    in science (as in any other human use that is not also in the animals’ best interest). These views are not compatible, and since all three views in more or less pure form are found in modern Western societies, use of animals for research is bound to cause controversy. However, there may be room for some kind......This article presents the ethical issues in animal research using a combined approach of ethical theory and analysis of scientific findings with bearing on the ethical analysis. The article opens with a general discussion of the moral acceptability of animal use in research. The use of animals...... in research is analyzed from the viewpoint of three distinct ethical approaches: contractarianism, utilitarianism, and animal rights view. On a contractarian view, research on animals is only an ethical issue to the extent that other humans as parties to the social contract care about how research animals...

  12. Theoretical geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikeš, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Theoretical geology Present day geology is mostly empirical of nature. I claim that geology is by nature complex and that the empirical approach is bound to fail. Let's consider the input to be the set of ambient conditions and the output to be the sedimentary rock record. I claim that the output can only be deduced from the input if the relation from input to output be known. The fundamental question is therefore the following: Can one predict the output from the input or can one predict the behaviour of a sedimentary system? If one can, than the empirical/deductive method has changes, if one can't than that method is bound to fail. The fundamental problem to solve is therefore the following: How to predict the behaviour of a sedimentary system? It is interesting to observe that this question is never asked and many a study is conducted by the empirical/deductive method; it seems that the empirical method has been accepted as being appropriate without question. It is, however, easy to argument that a sedimentary system is by nature complex and that several input parameters vary at the same time and that they can create similar output in the rock record. It follows trivially from these first principles that in such a case the deductive solution cannot be unique. At the same time several geological methods depart precisely from the assumption, that one particular variable is the dictator/driver and that the others are constant, even though the data do not support such an assumption. The method of "sequence stratigraphy" is a typical example of such a dogma. It can be easily argued that all the interpretation resulting from a method that is built on uncertain or wrong assumptions is erroneous. Still, this method has survived for many years, nonwithstanding all the critics it has received. This is just one example of the present day geological world and is not unique. Even the alternative methods criticising sequence stratigraphy actually depart from the same

  13. [Transgenic animals and animal welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Christoph

    1998-01-01

    Under the pressure of a public vote in Switzerland (7 June 1998) on an initiative to ban the production, use and patenting of transgenic animals, their value for biomedical research and development is intensely debated. In addition, the Swiss legislation has adopted (1992) a constitutional obligation to "take into account the dignity of creatures". The term "dignity of creatures", however, can be interpreted in anthropocentric or biocentric ways. The government has now formulated the legal implications of this term for transgenic animals and plants in various laws including the animal and environmental protection laws. This paper gives arguments for a fair evaluation of trangenic animals from an animal welfare point of view where not only the costs of animal suffering must be considered but also the probability of potential benefit for man. A self-confident research community should allow such an evaluation procedure even in view of an outcome which could ban many uses of transgenic animals PMID:11208266

  14. Theoretical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1988 progress report of the theoretical Physics Center (Ecole Polytechnique, France), is presented. The research activities are carried out in the fields of the supersymmetry theory, the dynamic systems theory, the statistical mechanics, the plasma physics and the random media. Substantial improvements are obtained on dynamical system investigations. In the field theory, the definition of the Gross-Neveu model is achieved. However the construction of the non-abelian gauge theories and the conformal theories are the main research activities. Concerning Astrophysics, a three-dimensional gravitational code is obtained. The activities of each team, and the list of the published papers, congress communications and thesis are given

  15. Theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Joos, Georg

    1986-01-01

    Among the finest, most comprehensive treatments of theoretical physics ever written, this classic volume comprises a superb introduction to the main branches of the discipline and offers solid grounding for further research in a variety of fields. Students will find no better one-volume coverage of so many essential topics; moreover, since its first publication, the book has been substantially revised and updated with additional material on Bessel functions, spherical harmonics, superconductivity, elastomers, and other subjects.The first four chapters review mathematical topics needed by theo

  16. Animal Shelter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Beijing activist Zhang Luping gives up a lucrative business career to provide a home for stray and abandoned pets "I have never been married, but I have I hundreds of children," said Zhang Luping, founder of the Beijing Human and Animal Environment Education Center (the Animal Center). "God sent me to this planet and gave me the mission of taking care of helpless and homeless dogs and cats. I will never let Him down." The Animal Center, one of a few non-

  17. Animal ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Clare; Sandøe, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes and discusses different views concerning our duties towards animals. First, we explain why it is necessary to engage in thinking about animal ethics and why it is not enough to rely on feelings alone. Secondly, we present and discuss five different kinds of views about...... the nature of our duties to animals. They are: contractarianism, utilitarianism, the animal rights view, contextual views, and a respect for nature view. Finally, we briefly consider whether it is possible to combine elements from the presented views, and how to make up one’s mind....

  18. Theoretical Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöltzner, Michael

    Answering to the double-faced influence of string theory on mathematical practice and rigour, the mathematical physicists Arthur Jaffe and Frank Quinn have contemplated the idea that there exists a `theoretical' mathematics (alongside `theoretical' physics) whose basic structures and results still require independent corroboration by mathematical proof. In this paper, I shall take the Jaffe-Quinn debate mainly as a problem of mathematical ontology and analyse it against the backdrop of two philosophical views that are appreciative towards informal mathematical development and conjectural results: Lakatos's methodology of proofs and refutations and John von Neumann's opportunistic reading of Hilbert's axiomatic method. The comparison of both approaches shows that mitigating Lakatos's falsificationism makes his insights about mathematical quasi-ontology more relevant to 20th century mathematics in which new structures are introduced by axiomatisation and not necessarily motivated by informal ancestors. The final section discusses the consequences of string theorists' claim to finality for the theory's mathematical make-up. I argue that ontological reductionism as advocated by particle physicists and the quest for mathematically deeper axioms do not necessarily lead to identical results.

  19. Group-Theoretical Aspects of Instantons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyers, C.; Roo, M. de; Sorba, P.

    1979-01-01

    We discuss the problem of embeddings in non-Abelian gauge theories. The (ir)redueibility of a gauge field configuration is characterized. For the specific case of instanton solutions we derive a practical criterion for SUn. In the general construction of self-dual solutions the reducibility of the g

  20. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of the use of amino acids (chemical group 34) when used as flavourings for all animal species

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP)

    2014-01-01

    Chemical group (CG) 34 comprises amino acids, of which 20 are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The FEEDAP Panel was unable to perform an assessment of D,L-valine because of the lack of data on its purity. The Panel cannot conclude on the use of these compounds in water for drinking. In the absence of any information on the microbial strains or substrates used for the production of the additives, and with little information on the manufacturing process, the Panel cannot ascert...

  1. Animal cytomegaloviruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Staczek, J.

    1990-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses are agents that infect a variety of animals. Human cytomegalovirus is associated with infections that may be inapparent or may result in severe body malformation. More recently, human cytomegalovirus infections have been recognized as causing severe complications in immunosuppressed individuals. In other animals, cytomegaloviruses are often associated with infections having relatively mild sequelae. Many of these sequelae parallel symptoms associated with human cytomegalovir...

  2. ANIMAL code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes ANIMAL, a two-dimensional Eulerian magnetohydrodynamic computer code. ANIMAL's physical model also appears. Formulated are temporal and spatial finite-difference equations in a manner that facilitates implementation of the algorithm. Outlined are the functions of the algorithm's FORTRAN subroutines and variables

  3. Kindergarten Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Animation is one of the last lessons that come to mind when thinking of kindergarten art. The necessary understanding of sequencing, attention to small, often detailed drawings, and the use of technology all seem more suitable to upper elementary. With today's emphasis on condensing and integrating curriculum, consider developing animation lessons…

  4. Rare oxidation states of group V metal compounds generated by radiolysis in non aqueous solvents: experimental and theoretical study. Attempts for synthesis of heterometallic complexes containing niobium and uranium or thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mononuclear and binuclear complexes of group V trivalent metals (V, Nb, Ta), coordinated with γ-picolin molecules and chlorine atoms, have been oxidized or reduced, respectively by the radical-ions CH2Cl2+ or CH3CN- radiolytically generated in free-oxygen dichloromethane or acetonitrile. The mechanism of these reactions have been established from kinetic, spectroscopic data and in some cases, from EPR measurements and theoretical SWXα calculations. Some preliminary results about the reaction occurring between Cp2Nb-(CO)H and Cp2'M(CH3)2 (M=U or Th) (Cp = eta5 - C5H5; Cp = eta5 - (C5(CH3)5) are also reported

  5. Becoming Sheep, Becoming Animal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grum, Charlotte; Svabo, Connie

    2016-01-01

    Proposal for Performance Research, in response to the call Turning Animal: As a part of a 2015 group exhibition exploring the history and local myths of a woman living in a Danish heath landscape 150 years ago, artist Charlotte Grum connected herself to a live sheep for 4 hours a day, 5 days a week......, for 5 weeks, turning the two into a hybrid relational assemblage, intra-acting and becoming with the heath habitat, the other by-passing human and non-human animals, the changing weather and their fluctuating biological needs. She wanted to explore the discursive and material effects of a site......-specific human-nonhuman animal intra-action, to challenge the gendered and anthropocentric reading of a particular historical subject and to explore the messy constituents of the very categories of women and animals. In general she is occupied with how to animate and perform the intra-active entanglement of...

  6. Integration of animals in residential care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Bunderšek, Suzana

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical part of the thesis provides insight into the role animals play in different periods of a person’s life. The usefulness of human-animal interaction is demonstrated with a description of the ways of working with animals and the presentation of different animal species. The emphasis is put on children and minors placed in residential care facilities. While the advantages of introducing animals into residential care facilities are provided, the weaknesses and risks are also pointe...

  7. Wild Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁静

    2005-01-01

    Many of us think that all wild animals are dangerous. In fact, very few of them will eat a man if he leaves them alone. If you meet a tiger, I'm sure you will run away, but even a tiger doesn't like meeting a man if it isn't hungry. Tigers only kill and eat man when they are too old to catch their food, such as sheep and other small animals. Some animals get frightened when they only smell a man. Some of themst and and look at a man for a short time before they run away.

  8. Impact of risk aversion and disease outbreak characteristics on the incentives of producers as a group to participate in animal disease insurance-A simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Jarkko K; Heikkilä, Jaakko

    2011-06-01

    The participation of agricultural producers in financing losses caused by livestock epidemics has been debated in many countries. One of the issues raised is how reluctant producers are to participate voluntarily in the financing of disease losses before an outbreak occurs. This study contributes to the literature by examining whether disease losses should be financed through pre- or post-outbreak premiums or their combination. A Monte Carlo simulation was employed to illustrate the costs of financing two diseases of different profiles. The profiles differed in the probability in which the damage occurs and in the average damage per event. Three hypothetical financing schemes were compared based on their ability to reduce utility losses in the case of risk-neutral and risk-averse producer groups. The schemes were examined in a dynamic setting where premiums depended on the compensation history of the sector. If producers choose the preferred financing scheme based on utility losses, results suggest that the timing of the premiums, the transaction costs of the scheme, the degree of risk aversion of the producer, and the level and the volatility of premiums affect the choice of the financing scheme. PMID:21497923

  9. Theoretical geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Andrzej; Kosek, Wiesław

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents a summary of research activities concerning theoretical geodesy performed in Poland in the period of 2011-2014. It contains the results of research on new methods of the parameter estimation, a study on robustness properties of the M-estimation, control network and deformation analysis, and geodetic time series analysis. The main achievements in the geodetic parameter estimation involve a new model of the M-estimation with probabilistic models of geodetic observations, a new Shift-Msplit estimation, which allows to estimate a vector of parameter differences and the Shift-Msplit(+) that is a generalisation of Shift-Msplit estimation if the design matrix A of a functional model has not a full column rank. The new algorithms of the coordinates conversion between the Cartesian and geodetic coordinates, both on the rotational and triaxial ellipsoid can be mentioned as a highlights of the research of the last four years. New parameter estimation models developed have been adopted and successfully applied to the control network and deformation analysis. New algorithms based on the wavelet, Fourier and Hilbert transforms were applied to find time-frequency characteristics of geodetic and geophysical time series as well as time-frequency relations between them. Statistical properties of these time series are also presented using different statistical tests as well as 2nd, 3rd and 4th moments about the mean. The new forecasts methods are presented which enable prediction of the considered time series in different frequency bands.

  10. Animal performance

    OpenAIRE

    Abaye, A. O. (Azenegashe Ozzie); Rotz, Jonathan Daniel; Scaglia Alonso, Guillermo, 1963-; Fike, John Herschel; Smith, Ray Lee, 1962-

    2009-01-01

    Any forage crop that stretches the grazing season by providing additional feed in early spring, mid-summer, and late fall will provide the livestock producer with lower feed costs and boost animal performance.

  11. Animation & Neurocinematics*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpe Pérez, Inmaculada Concepción

    2016-01-01

    , indeed, can be considered a social/ emotional learning media, which goes beyond the limitations of live action movies. This is due to the diversity of techniques, and its visual plasticity that constructs the impossible. Animators are not real actors but more like the midwife who brings the anima...... machines that think”-(Damasio, A. Descartes error). Such feelings come from the interpretation of the emotions in our bodies. Emotions are our universal language, the motivation of living, the key to what makes a movie successful and truly an art piece that you will remember because moves you. Animation...... into aliveness, which requires knowing how emotions work. Ed Hooks as an expert in training animators and actors, always remarks: “emotions tend to lead to action”. In this paper we want to argue that by producing animated films, as we watch them, cause a stronger effect, not only in our brains, but also in our...

  12. Groundwater animals

    OpenAIRE

    Maurice, Louise; Bloomfield, John; Robertson, Anne; Allen, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater animals are adapted to live in environments with no light and limited nutrients, They can provide insights into fundamental questions of evolution, ecology and biodiversity. They also have an important role to play in informing the reconstruction of past changes in geomorphology and climate, and can be used for characterising aquifers. The BGS is undertaking a systematic survey of selected areas and lithologies in the UK where groundwater animals have not been inves...

  13. Mathematics for theoretical physics

    OpenAIRE

    Dutailly, Jean Claude

    2012-01-01

    770 pages This book intends to give the main definitions and theorems in mathematics which could be useful for workers in theoretical physics. It gives an extensive and precise coverage of the subjects which are addressed, in a consistent and intelligible manner.The first part addresses the Foundations (mathematical logic, set theory, categories), the second Algebra (algebraic strucutes, groups, vector spaces tensors, matrices, Clifford algebra). The third Analysis (general topology, measu...

  14. Improving Decision Speed, Accuracy and Group Cohesion through Early Information Gathering in House-Hunting Ants

    OpenAIRE

    Nathalie Stroeymeyt; Martin Giurfa; Franks, Nigel R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Successful collective decision-making depends on groups of animals being able to make accurate choices while maintaining group cohesion. However, increasing accuracy and/or cohesion usually decreases decision speed and vice-versa. Such trade-offs are widespread in animal decision-making and result in various decision-making strategies that emphasize either speed or accuracy, depending on the context. Speed-accuracy trade-offs have been the object of many theoretical investigations...

  15. The 'whole-animal approach' as a heuristic principle in neuroscience research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serani-Merlo, Alejandro; Paz, Rodrigo; Castillo, Andrés

    2005-01-01

    Neuroscience embraces a heterogeneous group of disciplines. A conceptual framework that allows a better articulation of these different theoretical and experimental perspectives is needed. A 'whole-animal approach is proposed as a theoretical and hermeneutic tool. To illustrate the potential of this point of view, an overview of the research that has been performed in the extinction of fear-conditioned responses from Pavlov to the present is discussed. This is an example of how a whole-animal-based approach may help to organize and integrate basic and clinical neuroscience research. Our proposal is in agreement with recent statements calling for more integrative approaches in biological and neuropsychiatric research. PMID:16579518

  16. “灵璧三绝”动漫宣传片中的群体动画制作技术%Group Cartoon Technology of the"Three Wonders of Lingbi"Animation Propaganda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张超

    2015-01-01

    为了制作“灵璧三绝”特色文化动漫宣传片的群体动画场景,在深入研究自治体分布式行为控制理论的基础上,基于MAYA粒子系统使用MEL语言编写群体动画分布式行为控制脚本。该方法解决了粒子间的自碰撞和群体角色的路径规划。同时使用了改进的碰撞检测避免算法规划群体运动路径,该算法基于力的计算,能够模拟自然界物体在受力情况下真实躲避障碍物的运动情况,运行速度快,效果良好。实际应用结果表明,使用编写的脚本能开发制作出“灵壁三绝”动漫宣传片的群体动画,且制作简单,成本低廉。%In order to manufacture the crowd animation scene of the "Three Wonders of Lingbi" anima⁃tion propaganda with the local characteristics ,on the basis of the theory of distributed behavior with au⁃tonomous characters ,through the use of MEL language in MAYA particle system ,the script of distribut⁃ed behavior of group cartoon is realized. This method solves two problems ,which are self-collision be⁃tween particles of MAYA and the path planning of crowd animation role. Using improved collision detec⁃tion and collision avoidance algorithm to plan path for crowd animation role. This improved algorithm , which is based on the calculation of force can simulate objects naturally avoid obstacles under the action of force and achieve good results in computation speed and effect. The simulation results show the devel⁃oped script makes the crowd animation of the"Three Wonders of Lingbi"animation propaganda ,and the work is simple and low cost.

  17. Animal models of ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, A; Robbins, T W

    2011-01-01

    Studies employing animal models of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) present clear inherent advantages over human studies. Animal models are invaluable tools for the study of underlying neurochemical, neuropathological and genetic alterations that cause ADHD, because they allow relatively fast, rigorous hypothesis testing and invasive manipulations as well as selective breeding. Moreover, especially for ADHD, animal models with good predictive validity would allow the assessment of potential new therapeutics. In this chapter, we describe and comment on the most frequently used animal models of ADHD that have been created by genetic, neurochemical and physical alterations in rodents. We then discuss that an emerging and promising direction of the field is the analysis of individual behavioural differences among a normal population of animals. Subjects presenting extreme characteristics related to ADHD can be studied, thereby avoiding some of the problems that are found in other models, such as functional recovery and unnecessary assumptions about aetiology. This approach is justified by the theoretical need to consider human ADHD as the extreme part of a spectrum of characteristics that are distributed normally in the general population, as opposed to the predominant view of ADHD as a separate pathological category. PMID:21287324

  18. Biotecnologia animal

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Lehmann Coutinho; Millor Fernandes do Rosário; Erika Cristina Jorge

    2010-01-01

    A biotecnologia animal tem fornecido novas ferramentas para os programas de melhoramento e, dessa forma, contribuído para melhorar a eficiência da produção dos produtos de origem animal. No entanto, os avanços têm sido mais lentos do que antecipados, especialmente em razão da dificuldade na identificação dos genes responsáveis pelas características fenotípicas de interesse zootécnico. Três estratégias principais têm sido utilizadas para identificar esses genes - mapeamento de QTL, genes candi...

  19. Animated symbols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on data about animation film production by 18-year-old students in a Danish upper secondary school. The optic is the on-going potential for learning and development of reflection. The purpose is to clarify what might support young people's reflection on media. I propose...... an analytic working model called Animated Symbols concerning critical reflection in a dialogic learning process. The model shows dialogue as interactions that involve two types of transformation: inner ‘learning processes' and outer signs and symbols. The classroom-based research study is part of a Ph...

  20. Guidance on the severity classification of scientific procedures involving fish: report of a Working Group appointed by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the Replacement, Reduction and Refinement of animal experiments (Norecopa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, P; Dennison, N; Goodman, G; Hetherington, S; Llywelyn-Jones, S; Ryder, K; Smith, A J

    2011-10-01

    The severity classification of procedures using animals is an important tool to help focus the implementation of refinement and to assist in reporting the application of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). The recently revised Directive that regulates animal research and testing within the European Union requires Member States to ensure that all procedures are classified as 'non-recovery', 'mild', 'moderate' or 'severe', using assignment criteria set out by the European Commission (EC). However, these are focused upon terrestrial species, so are of limited relevance to fish users. A Working Group set up by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the 3Rs (Norecopa) has produced guidance on the classification of severity in scientific procedures involving fish, including examples of 'subthreshold', 'mild', 'moderate', 'severe' and 'upper threshold' procedures. The aims are to complement the EC guidelines and help to ensure that suffering in fish is effectively predicted and minimized. Norecopa has established a website (www.norecopa.no/categories) where more information on severity classification for procedures using fish, including field research, will be made available. PMID:21558168

  1. Animal house

    OpenAIRE

    Turka, Laurence A.

    2008-01-01

    While the JCI was originally conceived as a journal that would integrate various scientific approaches to the examination of human physiology and pathophysiology, we now find many of its pages filled with animal models of human disease. Is this a good thing?

  2. Transgenic Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenisch, Rudolf

    1988-01-01

    Describes three methods and their advantages and disadvantages for introducing genes into animals. Discusses the predictability and tissue-specificity of the injected genes. Outlines the applications of transgenic technology for studying gene expression, the early stages of mammalian development, mutations, and the molecular nature of chromosomes.…

  3. Animated Symbols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frolunde, Lisbeth

    ' processer af fem udvalgte elever er gennemgået i forhold til tre opdelinger: filmskabere, filmskabelse processen og film. Den teoretiske tilgang er pragmatisme, social semiotik og diskursanalyse. Modellen "Animating Symbols" er udviklet og diskuteret som forsøg på at forstå reflektion og design som en slags...

  4. Associative learning and animal cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Associative learning plays a variety of roles in the study of animal cognition from a core theoretical component to a null hypothesis against which the contribution of cognitive processes is assessed. Two developments in contemporary associative learning have enhanced its relevance to animal cognition. The first concerns the role of associatively activated representations, whereas the second is the development of hybrid theories in which learning is determined by prediction errors, both direc...

  5. Biotecnologia animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Lehmann Coutinho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A biotecnologia animal tem fornecido novas ferramentas para os programas de melhoramento e, dessa forma, contribuído para melhorar a eficiência da produção dos produtos de origem animal. No entanto, os avanços têm sido mais lentos do que antecipados, especialmente em razão da dificuldade na identificação dos genes responsáveis pelas características fenotípicas de interesse zootécnico. Três estratégias principais têm sido utilizadas para identificar esses genes - mapeamento de QTL, genes candidatos e sequenciamento de DNA e mRNA - e cada uma tem suas vantagens e limitações. O mapeamento de QTL permite determinar as regiões genômicas que contêm genes, mas o intervalo de confiança do QTL pode ser grande e conter muitos genes. A estratégia de genes candidatos é limitada por causa do conhecimento ainda restrito das funções de todos os genes. Os sequenciamentos de genomas e de sequências expressas podem auxiliar na identificação da posição de genes e de vias metabólicas associadas à característica de interesse. A integração dessas estratégias por meio do desenvolvimento de programas de bioinformática permitirá a identificação de novos genes de interesse zootécnico. Assim, os programas de melhoramento genético se beneficiarão pela inclusão da informação obtida diretamente do DNA na avaliação do mérito genético dos plantéis disponíveis.Animal biotechnology is providing new tools for animal breeding and genetics and thus contributing to advances in production efficiency and quality of animal products. However, the progress is slower than anticipated, mainly because of the difficulty involved in identifying genes that control phenotypic characteristics of importance to the animal industry. Three main strategies: QTL mapping, candidate genes and DNA and mRNA sequencing have been used to identify genes of economic interest to animal breeding and each has advantages and disadvantages. QTL mapping allows

  6. Analysis and comparation of animation techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Joštová, Barbora

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the analysis and comparison of animation techniques. In the theoretical part of the thesis I define key terms, the historical development and the basic principles of animation techniques. In the practical part I describe the comparison between classic and digital types of animation. Based on this research I chose the most suitable animations that are further used to verify my hypothesis. The provided hypothesis is the order of based on how demanding it is in terms of...

  7. Collective animal behavior from Bayesian estimation and probability matching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Pérez-Escudero

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Animals living in groups make movement decisions that depend, among other factors, on social interactions with other group members. Our present understanding of social rules in animal collectives is mainly based on empirical fits to observations, with less emphasis in obtaining first-principles approaches that allow their derivation. Here we show that patterns of collective decisions can be derived from the basic ability of animals to make probabilistic estimations in the presence of uncertainty. We build a decision-making model with two stages: Bayesian estimation and probabilistic matching. In the first stage, each animal makes a Bayesian estimation of which behavior is best to perform taking into account personal information about the environment and social information collected by observing the behaviors of other animals. In the probability matching stage, each animal chooses a behavior with a probability equal to the Bayesian-estimated probability that this behavior is the most appropriate one. This model derives very simple rules of interaction in animal collectives that depend only on two types of reliability parameters, one that each animal assigns to the other animals and another given by the quality of the non-social information. We test our model by obtaining theoretically a rich set of observed collective patterns of decisions in three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus, a shoaling fish species. The quantitative link shown between probabilistic estimation and collective rules of behavior allows a better contact with other fields such as foraging, mate selection, neurobiology and psychology, and gives predictions for experiments directly testing the relationship between estimation and collective behavior.

  8. Animal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The animal facilities in the Division are described. They consist of kennels, animal rooms, service areas, and technical areas (examining rooms, operating rooms, pathology labs, x-ray rooms, and 60Co exposure facilities). The computer support facility is also described. The advent of the Conversational Monitor System at Argonne has launched a new effort to set up conversational computing and graphics software for users. The existing LS-11 data acquisition systems have been further enhanced and expanded. The divisional radiation facilities include a number of gamma, neutron, and x-ray radiation sources with accompanying areas for related equipment. There are five 60Co irradiation facilities; a research reactor, Janus, is a source for fission-spectrum neutrons; two other neutron sources in the Chicago area are also available to the staff for cell biology studies. The electron microscope facilities are also described

  9. [Dangerous animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasle, Gunnar

    2002-06-30

    As travellers seek ever more exotic destinations they are more likely to encounter dangerous animals. Compared to risks such as AIDS, traffic accidents and malaria, the risk is not so great; many travellers are, however, concerned about this and those who give pre-travel vaccines and advice should know something about it. This article is mainly based on medical and zoological textbooks. Venomous stings and bites may be prevented by adequate clothing and by keeping safe distance to the animals. Listening to those who live in the area is of course important. Travellers should not carry antisera with them, but antisera should be available at local hospitals. It should be borne in mind that plant eaters cause just as many deaths as large predators. In some cases it is necessary to carry a sufficiently powerful firearm. PMID:12555616

  10. Animal Locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Graham K; Tropea, Cameron

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a wide-ranging snapshot of the state-of-the-art in experimental research on the physics of swimming and flying animals. The resulting picture reflects not only upon the questions that are of interest in current pure and applied research, but also upon the experimental techniques that are available to answer them. Doubtless, many new questions will present themselves as the scope and performance of our experimental toolbox develops over the coming years.

  11. Modeling animal landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, W P; Ostrowski, S; Williams, J B

    2010-01-01

    There is an increasing need to assess the effects of climate and land-use change on habitat quality, ideally from a mechanistic basis. The symposium "Molecules to Migration: Pressures of Life" at the Fourth International Conference in Africa for Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry, Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, 2008, illustrated how the principles of biophysical ecology can capture the mechanistic links between organisms, climate, and other habitat features. These principles provide spatially explicit assessments of habitat quality from a physiological perspective (i.e., "animal landscapes") that can be validated independently of the data used to derive and parameterize them. The contents of this symposium showcased how the modeling of animal landscapes can be used to assess key issues in applied and theoretical ecology. The presentations included applications to amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. The rare Arabian oryx on the Arabian Peninsula is used as an example for energetic calculations and their implications for behavior on the landscape. PMID:20670170

  12. Animal violence demystified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Natarajan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Violence has been observed in humans and animals alike, indicating its evolutionary/ biological significance. However, violence in animals has often been confounded with functional forms of aggressive behavior. Currently, violence in animals is identified primarily as either a quantitative behavior (an escalated, pathological and abnormal form of aggression characterized primarily by short attack latencies, and prolonged and frequent harm-oriented conflict behaviors or a qualitative one (characterized by attack bites aimed at vulnerable parts of the opponent’s body and context independent attacks regardless of the environment or the sex and type of the opponent. Identification of an operational definition for violence thus not only helps in understanding its potential differences from adaptive forms of aggression but also in the selection of appropriate animal models for both. To begin with, we address this issue theoretically by drawing parallels from research on aggression and appeasement in humans and other animals. We also provide empirical evidences for violence in mice selected for high aggression by comparing our findings with other currently available potentially violent rodent models. The following violence-specific features namely 1. Display of low levels of pre-escalatory/ritualistic behaviors. 2. Immediate and escalated offense durations with low withdrawal rates despite the opponent’s submissive supine and crouching/defeat postures. 3. Context independent indiscriminate attacks aimed at familiar/unfamiliar females, anaesthetized males and opponents and in neutral environments. 4. Orientation of attack-bites toward vulnerable body parts of the opponent resulting in severe wounding 5. Low pre-frontal serotonin (5-HT levels upon repeated aggression. 6. Low basal heart rates and hyporesponsive hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis were identified uniquely in the short attack latency (SAL mice suggesting a qualitative

  13. Animal Drug Safety FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Frequently Asked Questions Animal Drug Safety Frequently Asked Questions Share Tweet Linkedin ...

  14. Escala de bienestar de Ryff: análisis comparativo de los modelos teóricos en distintos grupos de edad Ryff scale of well-being: factorial structure of theoretical models in different age groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Vera-Villarroel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available La escala de bienestar psicológico surge a partir del modelo multidimensional propuesto por Ryff (1989. Pese a su amplia utilización, su estructura teórica inicial no ha sido confirmada completamente, debido a que se han encontrado otro tipo de soluciones factoriales distintas a las 6 dimensiones propuestas por la autora. Estas divergencias podrían estar relacionadas al tipo de muestras y poblaciones utilizadas. Ante esto, la siguiente investigación compara el ajuste factorial de los modelos tradicionalmente aplicados de corrección en distintos grupos en edad adulta. Se describen las propiedades psicométricas de la adaptación al español realizada por Díaz et al. (2006, analizando los niveles de confiabilidad (consistencia interna y estabilidad temporal y estructura factorial confirmatoria, en datos de 1646 personas entre 18 y 90 años de edad. Se encuentran diferencias en los indicadores de confiabilidad para la escala total y las dimensiones, así como en los indicadores de bondad de ajuste dependiendo del grupo de edad. El modelo que presenta mejores indicadores de ajuste en la mayoría de los rangos etarios evaluados fue el de seis factores de primer orden.The scale of psychological well-being arises from the multidimensional model proposed by Ryff (1989. Despite its wide use, its initial theoretical structure has not been completely confirmed because other factorial solutions which are different from those 6 dimensions proposed by the author have been found. These differences may be related to the type of sample and population used. Given this fact, the current study compares the adjustment factor of correction models traditionally used in different groups of adults. We describe the psychometric properties of the Spanish adaptation done by Díaz et al. (2006 and analyze the levels of reliability (internal consistency and temporal stability and confirmatory factorial structure with data from 1,646 people aged from 18 to 90 years old

  15. Scientific assessment of animal welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsworth, P H; Mellor, D J; Cronin, G M; Tilbrook, A J

    2015-01-01

    Animal welfare is a state within the animal and a scientific perspective provides methodologies for evidence-based assessment of an animal's welfare. A simplistic definition of animal welfare might be how the animal feels now. Affective experiences including emotions, are subjective states so cannot be measured directly in animals, but there are informative indirect physiological and behavioural indices that can be cautiously used to interpret such experiences. This review enunciates several key science-based frameworks for understanding animal welfare. The biological functioning and affective state frameworks were initially seen as competing, but a recent more unified approach is that biological functioning is taken to include affective experiences and affective experiences are recognised as products of biological functioning, and knowledge of the dynamic interactions between the two is considered to be fundamental to managing and improving animal welfare. The value of these two frameworks in understanding the welfare of group-housed sows is reviewed. The majority of studies of the welfare of group-housed sows have employed the biological functioning framework to infer compromised sow welfare, on the basis that suboptimal biological functioning accompanies negative affective states such as sow hunger, pain, fear, helplessness, frustration and anger. Group housing facilitates social living, but group housing of gestating sows raises different welfare considerations to stall housing, such as high levels of aggression, injuries and stress, at least for several days after mixing, as well as subordinate sows being underfed due to competition at feeding. This paper highlights the challenges and potential opportunities for the continued improvement in sow management through well-focused research and multidisciplinary assessment of animal welfare. In future the management of sentient animals will require the promotion of positive affective experiences in animals and this

  16. Animal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Johnny; Chauffert, Bruno; Bouyer, Florence

    The development of a new anticancer drug is a long, complex and multistep process which is supervised by regulatory authorities from the different countries all around the world [1]. Application of a new drug for admission to the market is supported by preclinical and clinical data, both including the determination of pharmacodynamics, toxicity, antitumour activity, therapeutic index, etc. As preclinical studies are associated with high cost, optimization of animal experiments is crucial for the overall development of a new anticancer agent. Moreover, in vivo efficacy studies remain a determinant panel for advancement of agents to human trials and thus, require cautious design and interpretation from experimental and ethical point of views.

  17. Animated war

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    in production: Gzim Rewind (Sweden, 2011) by Knutte Wester, and In-World War (USA, expected 2011) by DJ Bad Vegan. These films have themes of war and include film scenes that are ‘machinima’ (real-time animation made in 3D graphic environments) within live action film scenes. Machinima harnesses...... DIY multimedia storytellers explore new ways to tell and to ‘animate’ stories. The article contains four parts: introduction to machinima and the notions of resemiosis and authorial practice, presentation of DIY filmmaking as a practice that intertwines with new networked economics, analysis...

  18. Animal Intuitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaebnick, Gregory E

    2016-07-01

    As described by Lori Gruen in the Perspective column at the back of this issue, federally supported biomedical research conducted on chimpanzees has now come to an end in the United States, although the wind-down has taken longer than expected. The process began with a 2011 Institute of Medicine report that set up several stringent criteria that sharply limited biomedical research. The National Institutes of Health accepted the recommendations and formed a committee to determine how best to implement them. The immediate question raised by this transition was whether the IOM restrictions should be extended in some form to other nonhuman primates-and beyond them to other kinds of animals. In the lead article in this issue, Anne Barnhill, Steven Joffe, and Franklin Miller consider the status of other nonhuman primates. PMID:27417859

  19. Bioethical Problems: Animal Welfare, Animal Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various bioethical issues and problems related to animal welfare and animal rights. Areas examined include: Aristotelian views; animal welfare legislation; Darwin and evolutionary theory; animal and human behavior; and vegetarianism. A 14-point universal declaration of the rights of animals is included. (JN)

  20. History of animal bioacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popper, Arthur N.; Dooling, Robert J.

    2002-11-01

    The earliest studies on animal bioacoustics dealt largely with descriptions of sounds. Only later did they address issues of detection, discrimination, and categorization of complex communication sounds. This literature grew substantially over the last century. Using the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America as an example, the number of papers that fall broadly within the realm of animal sound production, communication, and hearing rose from two in the partial first decade of the journal in the 1930's, to 20 in the 1970's, to 92 in the first 2 years of this millennium. During this time there has been a great increase in the diversity of species studied, the sophistication of the methods used, and the complexity of the questions addressed. As an example, the first papers in JASA focused on a guinea pig and a bird. In contrast, since the year 2000 studies are often highly comparative and include fish, birds, dolphins, dogs, ants, crickets, and snapping shrimp. This paper on the history of animal bioacoustics will consider trends in work over the decades and discuss the formative work of a number of investigators who have spurred the field by making critical theoretical and experimental observations.

  1. Social Information Transmission in Animals: Lessons from Studies of Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboscq, Julie; Romano, Valéria; MacIntosh, Andrew; Sueur, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to use information provided by others to guide behavior is a widespread phenomenon in animal societies. A standard paradigm to test if and/or how animals use and transfer social information is through social diffusion experiments, by which researchers observe how information spreads within a group, sometimes by seeding new behavior in the population. In this article, we review the context, methodology and products of such social diffusion experiments. Our major focus is the transmission of information from an individual (or group thereof) to another, and the factors that can enhance or, more interestingly, inhibit it. We therefore also discuss reasons why social transmission sometimes does not occur despite being expected to. We span a full range of mechanisms and processes, from the nature of social information itself and the cognitive abilities of various species, to the idea of social competency and the constraints imposed by the social networks in which animals are embedded. We ultimately aim at a broad reflection on practical and theoretical issues arising when studying how social information spreads within animal groups. PMID:27540368

  2. Social Information Transmission in Animals: Lessons from Studies of Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboscq, Julie; Romano, Valéria; MacIntosh, Andrew; Sueur, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to use information provided by others to guide behavior is a widespread phenomenon in animal societies. A standard paradigm to test if and/or how animals use and transfer social information is through social diffusion experiments, by which researchers observe how information spreads within a group, sometimes by seeding new behavior in the population. In this article, we review the context, methodology and products of such social diffusion experiments. Our major focus is the transmission of information from an individual (or group thereof) to another, and the factors that can enhance or, more interestingly, inhibit it. We therefore also discuss reasons why social transmission sometimes does not occur despite being expected to. We span a full range of mechanisms and processes, from the nature of social information itself and the cognitive abilities of various species, to the idea of social competency and the constraints imposed by the social networks in which animals are embedded. We ultimately aim at a broad reflection on practical and theoretical issues arising when studying how social information spreads within animal groups. PMID:27540368

  3. Weighing Animal Lives : A Critical Assessment of Justification and Prioritization in Animal-Rights Theories

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Fredrik

    2009-01-01

    The project underlying this dissertation aims at analyzing three pro-animal-rights theories, evaluating the theories, and outlining an alternative theoretical account of animal rights. The analytical categories are justification and function of animal rights, the definition of the right holder, and the resolution approach to rights conflict. The categories are applied to a naturalist, a theocentric, and a contractarian approach to defend animal rights. The evaluation is substantiated by the a...

  4. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  5. Longevity suppresses conflict in animal societies

    OpenAIRE

    Port, M; Cant, M A

    2013-01-01

    Models of social conflict in animal societies generally assume that within-group conflict reduces the value of a communal resource. For many animals, however, the primary cost of conflict is increased mortality. We develop a simple inclusive fitness model of social conflict that takes this cost into account. We show that longevity substantially reduces the level of within-group conflict, which can lead to the evolution of peaceful animal societies if relatedness among group members is high. B...

  6. Animal models of tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozoski, Thomas J; Bauer, Carol A

    2016-08-01

    Presented is a thematic review of animal tinnitus models from a functional perspective. Chronic tinnitus is a persistent subjective sound sensation, emergent typically after hearing loss. Although the sensation is experientially simple, it appears to have central a nervous system substrate of unexpected complexity that includes areas outside of those classically defined as auditory. Over the past 27 years animal models have significantly contributed to understanding tinnitus' complex neurophysiology. In that time, a diversity of models have been developed, each with its own strengths and limitations. None has clearly become a standard. Animal models trace their origin to the 1988 experiments of Jastreboff and colleagues. All subsequent models derive some of their features from those experiments. Common features include behavior-dependent psychophysical determination, acoustic conditions that contrast objective sound and silence, and inclusion of at least one normal-hearing control group. In the present review, animal models have been categorized as either interrogative or reflexive. Interrogative models use emitted behavior under voluntary control to indicate hearing. An example would be pressing a lever to obtain food in the presence of a particular sound. In this type of model animals are interrogated about their auditory sensations, analogous to asking a patient, "What do you hear?" These models require at least some training and motivation management, and reflect the perception of tinnitus. Reflexive models, in contrast, employ acoustic modulation of an auditory reflex, such as the acoustic startle response. An unexpected loud sound will elicit a reflexive motor response from many species, including humans. Although involuntary, acoustic startle can be modified by a lower-level preceding event, including a silent sound gap. Sound-gap modulation of acoustic startle appears to discriminate tinnitus in animals as well as humans, and requires no training or

  7. The wild animal as a research animal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, JAA

    2004-01-01

    Most discussions on animal experimentation refer to domesticated animals and regulations are tailored to this class of animals. However, wild animals are also used for research, e. g., in biological field research that is often directed to fundamental ecological-evolutionary questions or to conserva

  8. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & ... Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  9. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health ... Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  10. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) 9: ...

  11. Learning Anime Studio

    CERN Document Server

    Troftgruben, Chad

    2014-01-01

    Anime Studio is your complete animation program to help you create 2D movies, cartoons, anime, and cut out animations. You can create your own animated shorts and use Anime Studio to produce cartoon animations for film, video, or streaming over the Web, which can be enjoyed on YouTube, Vimeo, and other popular sites. Anime Studio is great for hobbyists and professionals alike, combining tools for both illustration and animation. With Anime Studio's easy-to-use interface, you will be creating an animated masterpiece in no time. This practical, step-by-step guide will provide you with a structur

  12. Guidance on the severity classification of scientific procedures involving fish: report of a Working Group appointed by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the Replacement, Reduction and Refinement of animal experiments (Norecopa)

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkins, P.; Dennison, N; Goodman, G; Hetherington, S; Llywelyn-Jones, S; Ryder, K; Smith, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The severity classification of procedures using animals is an important tool to help focus the implementation of refinement and to assist in reporting the application of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). The recently revised Directive that regulates animal research and testing within the European Union requires Member States to ensure that all procedures are classified as ‘non-recovery’, ‘mild’, ‘moderate’ or ‘severe’, using assignment criteria set out by the European Commissio...

  13. Mechanistic models of animal migration behaviour - their diversity, structure and use

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, S; Klaassen, M.R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Migration is a widespread phenomenon in the animal kingdom, including many taxonomic groups and modes of locomotion. Developing an understanding of the proximate and ultimate causes for this behaviour not only addresses fundamental ecological questions but has relevance to many other fields, for example in relation to the spread of emerging zoonotic diseases, the proliferation of invasive species, aeronautical safety as well as the conservation of migrants. Theoretical methods can mak...

  14. Animal-assisted intervention and social skills strengthening

    OpenAIRE

    Božič, Tjaša

    2014-01-01

    The diploma thesis describe animal-assisted interventions, more precisely, the significance of animal-assisted interventions for strengthening of social skills. Theoretical part includes a detailed presentation of the benefits of therapeutic dog in work with vulnerable populations. I focused on delimitation of the term animal-assisted interventions which includes animal-assisted therapy and animal-assisted activity and the differences and similarities between them. I continued with therapeuti...

  15. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic saturated and unsaturated tertiary alcohols and esters with esters containing tertiary alcohols ethers (chemical group 6 when used as flavourings for all animal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemical group 6 consists of aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic saturated and unsaturated tertiary alcohols and esters with esters containing tertiary alcohols ethers, of which 13 are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The high use level proposed by the applicant for linalool (25 mg/kg complete feed is safe for salmonids, veal calves, cattle for fattening and pets (excluding cats without a margin of safety with the exception of dogs (SF = 1.4. The safe use level for pigs and dairy cows is 20, for piglets 12 and for poultry 10 mg/kg complete feed. The high use level of 5 mg/kg complete feed for linalyl acetate, linalyl butyrate, linalyl formate, linalyl propionate, linalyl isobutyrate, terpineol, α-terpineol and terpineol acetate and 4-terpinenol is safe for all species with a margin of safety of 1.2 to 12. For nerolidol, 2-methyl-1-phenylpropan-2-ol and 2-(4-methylphenylpropan-2-ol, the maximum safe concentration is 1 mg/kg complete feed for pigs and poultry and 1.5 mg/kg complete feed for all other species. The absence of a margin of safety would not allow the simultaneous administration in feed and water for drinking of the following compounds: linalool, nerolidol, 2-methyl-1-phenylpropan-2-ol and 2-(4methylphenylpropan-2-ol. No safety concern would arise for the consumer from the use of compounds belonging to CG 6 up to the highest safe level in feedingstuffs for all animal species. All compounds should be considered as irritants to skin, eyes and respiratory tract, and as skin sensitisers. All compounds of CG 6 are predicted to be safe to the soil compartment when used at levels safe to the target species. Using predictions based on chemical structure, 2-methyl-1-phenylpropan-2-ol and 2-(4-methylphenylpropan-2-ol were estimated to be safe to aquatic compartments. In the absence of experimental data, safety to aquatic compartments could not be established for linalyl butyrate, linalyl isobutyrate, terpineol acetate, 4

  16. Society’s attitude towards animals

    OpenAIRE

    Brčinović, Brigita

    2014-01-01

    In my diploma thesis I decided to write about relationship between society and animals, mostly because I love animals very much. Although slow, I think that relationship between society and animals is changing to better in last few years. In lots of cases a child is growing up with an animal since his young ages, animals are included in preschool programs in different ways, and not rarely children have animals on visit or even in their own group in kindergarden. Also, in specialized literatur...

  17. Theoretical basis of the community effect in development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuttler Celine

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically identical cells often show significant variation in gene expression profile and behaviour even in the same physiological condition. Notably, embryonic cells destined to the same tissue maintain a uniform transcriptional regulatory state and form a homogeneous cell group. One mechanism to keep the homogeneity within embryonic tissues is the so-called community effect in animal development. The community effect is an interaction among a group of many nearby precursor cells, and is necessary for them to maintain tissue-specific gene expression and differentiate in a coordinated manner. Although it has been shown that the cell-cell communication by a diffusible factor plays a crucial role, it is not immediately obvious why a community effect needs many cells. Results In this work, we propose a model of the community effect in development, which consists in a linear gene cascade and cell-cell communication. We examined the properties of the model theoretically using a combination of stochastic and deterministic modelling methods. We have derived the analytical formula for the threshold size of a cell population that is necessary for a community effect, which is in good agreement with stochastic simulation results. Conclusions Our theoretical analysis indicates that a simple model with a linear gene cascade and cell-cell communication is sufficient to reproduce the community effect in development. The model explains why a community needs many cells. It suggests that the community's long-term behaviour is independent of the initial induction level, although the initiation of a community effect requires a sufficient amount of inducing signal. The mechanism of the community effect revealed by our theoretical analysis is analogous to that of quorum sensing in bacteria. The community effect may underlie the size control in animal development and also the genesis of autosomal dominant diseases including tumorigenesis.

  18. Animal welfare: a social networks perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhappel, Tanja K; John, Elizabeth A; Pike, Thomas W; Wilkinson, Anna; Burman, Oliver H P

    2016-01-01

    Social network theory provides a useful tool to study complex social relationships in animals. The possibility to look beyond dyadic interactions by considering whole networks of social relationships allows researchers the opportunity to study social groups in more natural ways. As such, network-based analyses provide an informative way to investigate the factors influencing the social environment of group-living animals, and so has direct application to animal welfare. For example, animal groups in captivity are frequently disrupted by separations, reintroductions and/or mixing with unfamiliar individuals and this can lead to social stress and associated aggression. Social network analysis ofanimal groups can help identify the underlying causes of these socially-derived animal welfare concerns. In this review we discuss how this approach can be applied, and how it could be used to identify potential interventions and solutions in the area of animal welfare. PMID:27120815

  19. Public perceptions of animal cloning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsøe, Erling; Vincentsen, Ulla; Andersen, Ida-Elisabeth;

    in four different cities in Denmark. The participants were introduced to animal cloning and after that they filled out the questionnaire. Finally, the issue was discussed in focus groups. The process as a whole was run in a dialogue oriented way. Through the information they received in combination......What was from the outset meant to be a survey testing predefined categories of ethical positions related to new biotechnologies with animal cloning as an example was subsequently developed into a process of broader involvement of groups of citizens in the issue. The survey was conducted at meetings...... with reflecting on the survey questions the participants were well prepared for discussions in the focus groups. This approach made it possible, on the one hand to get a measure of the citizen's perceptions of the ethical aspects of animal cloning, but also to go deeper into their own thoughts of the...

  20. Public perceptions of animal cloning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsøe, Erling; Vincentsen, Ulla; Andersen, Ida-Elisabeth;

    What was from the outset meant to be a survey testing predefined categories of ethical positions related to new biotechnologies with animal cloning as an example was subsequently developed into a process of broader involvement of groups of citizens in the issue. The survey was conducted at meetings...... in four different cities in Denmark. The participants were introduced to animal cloning and after that they filled out the questionnaire. Finally, the issue was discussed in focus groups. The process as a whole was run in a dialogue oriented way. Through the information they received in combination...... with reflecting on the survey questions the participants were well prepared for discussions in the focus groups. This approach made it possible, on the one hand to get a measure of the citizen's perceptions of the ethical aspects of animal cloning, but also to go deeper into their own thoughts of the...

  1. Animal welfare assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Vučinić Marijana; Lazić Ivana

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with animal welfare definitions and animal welfare assessment. Animal welfare is a prolonged mental state, resulting from how the animal experiences its environment over time. There are different methods for animal welfare assessment. The four basic criteria for animal welfare assessment are feeding, housing, health and appropriate behavior. Therefore, criteria used to assess animal welfare are not direct measures of the mental state but only parameters that need to be interpr...

  2. Collegial decision making based on social amplification leads to optimal group formation

    OpenAIRE

    Amé, Jean-Marc; Halloy, José; Rivault, Colette; Detrain, Claire; Deneubourg, Jean Louis

    2006-01-01

    Group-living animals are often faced with choosing between one or more alternative resource sites. A central question in such collective decision making includes determining which individuals induce the decision and when. This experimental and theoretical study of shelter selection by cockroach groups demonstrates that choices can emerge through nonlinear interaction dynamics between equal individuals without perfect knowledge or leadership. We identify a simple mechanism whereby a decision i...

  3. Animal rights, animal minds, and human mindreading

    OpenAIRE

    Mameli, M.; Bortolotti, L

    2006-01-01

    Do non‐human animals have rights? The answer to this question depends on whether animals have morally relevant mental properties. Mindreading is the human activity of ascribing mental states to other organisms. Current knowledge about the evolution and cognitive structure of mindreading indicates that human ascriptions of mental states to non‐human animals are very inaccurate. The accuracy of human mindreading can be improved with the help of scientific studies of animal minds. However, the s...

  4. Animal Protection and Animal 'Rights' in Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    Toth, Zoltan J.

    2012-01-01

    In Hungary, the first Act on Animal Protection, which aimed at handling and respecting animals as living creatures capable of feelings and suffering and thus deserving and entitled to protection, was adopted in 1998. Based on this, the Act contains several regulations which ensure that animals are protected against all possible kinds of avoidable physical or mental harm. Furthermore, it prohibits and imposes sanctions for any treatment that causes animals unnecessary suffering. The present st...

  5. [Animal experimentation, animal welfare and scientific research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, H

    2013-10-01

    Hundreds of thousands of laboratory animals are being used every year for scientific experiments held in Israel, mostly mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and a few sheep, cattle, pigs, cats, dogs, and even a few dozen monkeys. In addition to the animals sacrificed to promote scientific research, millions of animals slain every year for other purposes such as meat and fine leather fashion industries. While opening a front against all is an impossible and perhaps an unjustified task, the state of Israel enacted the Animal Welfare (Animal Experimentation) Law (1994). The law aims to regulate scientific animal experiments and to find the appropriate balance between the need to continue to perform animal experiments for the advancement of research and medicine, and at the same time to avoid unnecessary trials and minimize animal suffering. Among other issues the law deals with the phylogenetic scale according to which experimental animals should be selected, experiments for teaching and practicing, and experiments for the cosmetic industry. This article discusses bioethics considerations in animal experiments as well as the criticism on the scientific validity of such experiments. It further deals with the vitality of animal studies and the moral and legal obligation to prevent suffering from laboratory animals. PMID:24660572

  6. Storytelling through animation: Oxford Sparks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, D. M.; Cook, A.

    2013-12-01

    Oxford Sparks is a portal that launched in 2012, with the aim of bringing together resources that have been created across the University of Oxford and elsewhere for the purpose of wider engagement with science. To bring attention to this site, Oxford Sparks developed a set of high-quality short animations, each designed to tell a story relating to a current area of science. These animations have been launched on YouTube, and will shortly be available on iTunesU, and have covered broad areas of science from subduction zones (';Underwater Volcano Disaster'), through the early history of the solar system (';Rogue Planet') to the workings of the Large Hadron Collider (';A quick look around the LHC'). The animations have each been developed in close collaboration with researchers, created by a team with experience of education, engagement and outreach. The two minute scripts are intended to be both widely accessible and viewable as ';stand alone' stories. To this end, the scripts are humorous; while the animations are delightfully quirky, and created by professional animator with a degree-level science background. The animations are also intended to be used as ';lesson starters' in school, and educational activities graded for different age groups are being developed in parallel with the animations. They have been used, successfully, on pre-university summer schools, and in university classes. We are gathering both quantitative (analytics) and qualitative (school teacher and student focus group) feedback to monitor the success of the project, and to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the approach. In the first year since launch, Oxford Sparks animations were viewed over 80,000 times on YouTube, in part due to the surge of interest in the Large Hadron Collider animation after the discovery of the Higgs Boson.

  7. Group evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  8. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 08 Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (text version) Arabic Translation - Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) Chinese Translation - Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) French ...

  9. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary ... The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how ...

  10. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how ... and distributed as long as FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation ...

  11. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how ... and distributed as long as FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation ...

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & ... back Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  13. Animation Trends in Education

    OpenAIRE

    Lirong Xiao

    2013-01-01

    In the paper, we give a survey of animation content in education. At present, there is an extensive literature addressing the impact of animation in education and psychology fields. However, in animation field, although some software companies have developed their individual production toolboxes or platforms for animation content in education, there is lack of relevant research from the perspective of animation techniques. This paper first gives a survey of current animation content in educat...

  14. Theoretical solid state physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities at ORNL in theoretical solid state physics are described. Topics covered include: surface studies; particle-solid interactions; electronic and magnetic properties; and lattice dynamics

  15. Patients' attitudes towards animal testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masterton, Malin; Renberg, Tobias; Kälvemark Sporrong, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    (Pmore critical than men regarding which species are used for what purposes (Pmore positive attitude towards animal testing is not shared to an equal degree with patients, who are the intended end-users and beneficiaries of medical......A strong argument for the practice of animal testing in medical research is the potential benefit to patients in getting improved pain relief, minimising morbidity and mortality. However, patients’ opinions on the ethics of animal testing are seldom sought, despite their role as principal...... stakeholders. This study compared the attitudes of patients and researchers on animal testing. Focus-group interviews were held with patients suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases, resulting in a questionnaire that was distributed January–May 2011. The questionnaire was posted to patient members...

  16. C-Cl activation by group IV metal oxides in solid argon matrixes: matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy and theoretical investigations of the reactions of MOx (M = Ti, Zr; x = 1, 2) with CH3Cl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanying

    2013-07-11

    Reactions of the ground-state titanium and zirconium monoxide and dioxide molecules with monochloromethane in excess argon matrixes have been investigated in solid argon by infrared absorption spectroscopy and density functional theoretical calculations. The results show that the ground-state MOx (M = Ti, Zr; x = 1, 2) molecules react with CH3Cl to first form the weakly bound MO(CH3Cl) and MO2(CH3Cl) complexes. The MO(CH3Cl) complexes can rearrange to the CH3M(O)Cl isomers with the Cl atom of CH3Cl coordination to the metal center of MO upon UV light irradiation (λ MO + CH3Cl reaction to the more stable CH3M(O)Cl molecules via the MO(CH3Cl) complexes traversing their corresponding transition states. The MO2(CH3Cl) complexes can isomerize to the more stable CH3OM(O)Cl molecules with the addition of the C-Cl bond of CH3Cl to one of the O═M bonds of MO2 upon annealing after broad-band light irradiation. The C-Cl activation by the MOx mechanism was interpreted by the calculated potential energy profiles. PMID:23763350

  17. Seeing the animal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harfeld, Jes Lynning; Cornou, Cecile; Kornum, Anna;

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the notion that the invisibility of the animalness of the animal constitutes a fundamental obstacle to change within current production systems. It is discussed whether housing animals in environments that resemble natural habitats could lead to a re-animalization...... of the animals, a higher appreciation of their moral significance, and thereby higher standards of animal welfare. The basic claim is that experiencing the animals in their evolutionary and environmental context would make it harder to objectify animals as mere bioreactors and production systems. It is argued...... that the historic objectification of animals within intensive animal production can only be reversed if animals are given the chance to express themselves as they are and not as we see them through the tunnel visions of economy and quantifiable welfare assessment parameters....

  18. Categorization: The View from Animal Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    J. David Smith; Alexandria C. Zakrzewski; Johnson, Jennifer M.; Valleau, Jeanette C.; Church, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    Exemplar, prototype, and rule theory have organized much of the enormous literature on categorization. From this theoretical foundation have arisen the two primary debates in the literature—the prototype-exemplar debate and the single system-multiple systems debate. We review these theories and debates. Then, we examine the contribution that animal-cognition studies have made to them. Animals have been crucial behavioral ambassadors to the literature on categorization. They reveal the roots o...

  19. Animal Encounters in Environmental Education Research: Responding to the "Question of the Animal"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Jan; Watson, Gavan P. L.; Russell, Constance L.; Cutter-Mackenzie, Amy; Fawcett, Leesa; Kuhl, Gail; Russell, Joshua; van der Waal, Marlon; Warkentin, Traci

    2010-01-01

    The "question of the animal" represents an area of emergent interest in the environmental education field, as researchers critically consider human-animal relations and animal advocacy in their work. Following a group discussion at the 10th Seminar in Health and Environmental Education Research, the authors of this paper share experiences,…

  20. Refining Animal Models to Enhance Animal Welfare

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patricia V.Turner

    2012-01-01

    The use of animals in research will be necessary for scientific advances in the basic and biomedical sciences for the foreseeable future.As we learn more about the ability of animals to experience pain,suffering,and distress,and particularly for mammals,it becomes the responsibility of scientists,institutions,animal caregivers,and veterinarians to seek ways to improve the lives of research animals and refine their care and use.Refinement is one of the three R's emphasized by Russell and Burch,and refers to modification of procedures to minimise the potential for pain,suffering and distress. It may also refer to procedures used to enhance animal comfort. This paper summarizes considerations for refinements in research animal.

  1. Dicarbollylamine ligand as a tunable template for sigma,sigma- and pi,sigma-bonding modes: syntheses, structures, and theoretical studies of eta5:eta1-coordinated constrained-geometry group 13 metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Dae; Kim, Sung-Kwan; Kim, Tae-Jin; Han, Won-Sik; Lee, Young-Joo; Yoo, Dae-Hwan; Cheong, Minserk; Ko, Jaejung; Kang, Sang Ook

    2008-07-30

    A series of group 13 main group complexes with pi,sigma-type bonding interaction of the formula [{(eta (5)-RC 2B 9H 9)(CH 2)(eta (1)-NMe 2)}MMe] (M = Al, R = H 5, Me 6; Ga, R = H 7, Me 8; In, R = H 9, Me 10) was produced by the reaction of group 13 metal alkyls (MMe 3; M = Al, Ga, In) with the dicarbollylamine ligands, nido-8-R-7,8-C 2B 9H 10-7-(CH 2)NHMe 2 (R = H 1, Me 2). The reactions of 1 and 2 with AlMe 3 in toluene initially afforded tetra-coordinated aluminum complexes with sigma,sigma-type bonding interaction, [{(eta (1)-RC 2B 9H 10)(CH 2)(eta (1)-NMe 2)}AlMe 2] (R = H 3, Me 4), which readily underwent further methane elimination to yield the corresponding constrained geometry complexes (CGCs, 5 and 6) of aluminum with pi,sigma-bonding interaction. However, the reactions between 1 and 2 and MMe 3 (M = Ga, In) in toluene produced gallium and indium pi,sigma-CGCs of 7 and 10 directly, not proceeding through sigma,sigma-intermediates. The structures of group 13 metal CGCs were established by X-ray diffraction studies of 5, 6, and 8, which authenticated a characteristic eta (5):eta (1)-coordination mode of the dicarbollylamino ligand to the group 13 metals. A similar pi,sigma-bonding interaction was also established in ethylene-bridged dicarbollylethylamine series. Thus, aluminum pi,sigma-CGCs of dicarbollylethylamine, [{(eta (5)-RC 2B 9H 9)(CH 2) 2(eta (1)-NBz 2)}AlMe] (R = H 17, Me 18), were prepared by the trans-metalation of the [{(eta (5)-RC 2B 9H 9)(CH 2) 2(eta (1)-NBz 2)}Ti(NMe 2) 2] (R = H 15, Me 16) with AlMe 3. However, only sigma,sigma-bonded complexes of the formula [{(eta (1)-RC 2B 9H 9)(CH 2) 2(eta (1)-NBz 2)}AlMe 2] (R = H 13, Me 14) were isolated by the reaction between [ nido-7-8-R-7,8-C 2B 9H 10-(CH 2) 2HNBz 2] (R = H 11, Me 12) and AlMe 3. When methane-elimination reactions between metal alkyls and dicarbollylamines were carried out with either the gallium atom or monobenzyl aminoethyl tethered ligands, [ nido-7-H 2NBz(CH 2) 2-8-R-7,8-C 2B 9H

  2. Animal Images and Metaphors in Animal Farm

    OpenAIRE

    Ping Sun

    2015-01-01

    In literary works animal images are frequently used as the “source domain” of a metaphor to disclose the natures of the “target domain”, human beings. This is called “cross-domain mapping” or “conceptual metaphor” in cognitive linguistics, which is based on the similar qualities between animals and human beings. Thus the apparent descriptions of the animals are really the deep revelations of the human beings. Animal Farm is one exemplary product of this special expressing way. Diversified ani...

  3. Writing 'that animal darkness': Galway Kinnell, Gary Snyder, James Merrill

    OpenAIRE

    Hoorenman, Johanna

    2010-01-01

    As humanity’s most evident other, at once deeply similar to and fundamentally different from the human, the animal is a valuable poetical trope. This thesis examines the representation and function of animals and animality in the writings of three key late twentieth-­‐century American poets: Galway Kinneell, Gary Snyder and James Merrill. The first chapter outlines an historical and theoretical context of the notion of the representation of animals in human culture in general and in American ...

  4. Entrepreneurial and managerial aspects of animation in tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Jakovlev, Zlatko; Serafimova, Mimoza; Koteski, Cane

    2016-01-01

    This book is organized in four parts. In the first part theoretical aspects of animation in tourism and principles of animation in tourism are explained. In the second part emphasis has been given to animation as an integral part of tourist offer. Here natural and anthropocentric values are explained.In the third part main feature is entrepreneurship of animation in tourism. In the last four part conclusions had been drawn.

  5. Theoretical Division progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents highlights of activities in the Theoretical (T) Division from October 1976-January 1979. The report is divided into three parts. Part I presents an overview of the Division: its unique function at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) and within the scientific community as a whole; the organization of personnel; the main areas of research; and a survey of recent T-Division initiatives. This overview is followed by a survey of the 13 groups within the Division, their main responsibilities, interests, and expertise, consulting activities, and recent scientific accomplisments. The remainder of the report, Parts II and III, is devoted to articles on selected research activities. Recent efforts on topics of immediate interest to energy and weapons programs at LASL and elsewhere are described in Part II, Major National Programs. Separate articles present T-Divison contributions to weapons research, reactor safety and reactor physics research, fusion research, laser isotope separation, and other energy research. Each article is a compilation of independent projects within T Division, all related to but addressing different aspects of the major program. Part III is organized by subject discipline, and describes recent scientific advances of fundamental interest. An introduction, defining the scope and general nature of T-Division efforts within a given discipline, is followed by articles on the research topics selected. The reporting is done by the scientists involved in the research, and an attempt is made to communicate to a general audience. Some data are given incidentally; more technical presentations of the research accomplished may be found among the 47 pages of references. 110 figures, 5 tables

  6. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... En Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, ... Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of ...

  7. Physics for Animation Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, David; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2011-01-01

    Animation has become enormously popular in feature films, television, and video games. Art departments and film schools at universities as well as animation programs at high schools have expanded in recent years to meet the growing demands for animation artists. Professional animators identify the technological facet as the most rapidly advancing…

  8. Ian Ingram: Next Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Ian Ingram: Next Animals is an exhibition catalogue presenting research on the work by Ian Ingram in relation to his exhibition Next Animals at Nikolaj Kunsthal in 2015.......Ian Ingram: Next Animals is an exhibition catalogue presenting research on the work by Ian Ingram in relation to his exhibition Next Animals at Nikolaj Kunsthal in 2015....

  9. Carotenoids in Marine Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Maoka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine animals contain various carotenoids that show structural diversity. These marine animals accumulate carotenoids from foods such as algae and other animals and modify them through metabolic reactions. Many of the carotenoids present in marine animals are metabolites of β-carotene, fucoxanthin, peridinin, diatoxanthin, alloxanthin, and astaxanthin, etc. Carotenoids found in these animals provide the food chain as well as metabolic pathways. In the present review, I will describe marine animal carotenoids from natural product chemistry, metabolism, food chain, and chemosystematic viewpoints, and also describe new structural carotenoids isolated from marine animals over the last decade.

  10. Becoming Sheep, Becoming Animal..

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grum, Charlotte; Svabo, Connie

    As a part of a 2015 group exhibition exploring the history and local myths of a woman living in a Danish heath landscape 150 years ago, artist Charlotte Grum connected herself to a live sheep for 4 hours a day, 5 days a week, for 5 weeks, turning the two into a hybrid relational assemblage, intra...... performative practice. Continuing explorations of how to undo authorship, activate multiple subject positions and animate the very resources through which we practice and continuously become, for this conference artist Charlotte Grum has invited Connie Svabo, Associate Professor in Performance-Design at...... Roskilde University, to participate in a performative conversation. Svabo’s interest in environmental aesthetics and in new modes of disseminating artistic knowledge (Schwab & Borgdorf, 2013) will intra-act with visual and textual notes from “Becoming Sheep” in a live exploration of the methodological...

  11. Ethics in Animal Experimentation

    OpenAIRE

    Yusuf Ergun

    2010-01-01

    Experimental animals are frequently used to obtain information for primarily scientific reasons. In the present review, ethics in animal experimentation is examined. At first, the history of animal experimentation and animal rights is outlined. Thereafter, the terms in relation with the topic are defined. Finally, prominent aspects of 3Rs constituting scientific and ethical basis in animal experimentation are underlined. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(4.000): 220-235

  12. Ethics in Animal Experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Ergun

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Experimental animals are frequently used to obtain information for primarily scientific reasons. In the present review, ethics in animal experimentation is examined. At first, the history of animal experimentation and animal rights is outlined. Thereafter, the terms in relation with the topic are defined. Finally, prominent aspects of 3Rs constituting scientific and ethical basis in animal experimentation are underlined. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(4.000: 220-235

  13. Carotenoids in Marine Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi Maoka

    2011-01-01

    Marine animals contain various carotenoids that show structural diversity. These marine animals accumulate carotenoids from foods such as algae and other animals and modify them through metabolic reactions. Many of the carotenoids present in marine animals are metabolites of β-carotene, fucoxanthin, peridinin, diatoxanthin, alloxanthin, and astaxanthin, etc. Carotenoids found in these animals provide the food chain as well as metabolic pathways. In the present review, I will describe marine a...

  14. Animal Images and Metaphors in Animal Farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Sun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In literary works animal images are frequently used as the “source domain” of a metaphor to disclose the natures of the “target domain”, human beings. This is called “cross-domain mapping” or “conceptual metaphor” in cognitive linguistics, which is based on the similar qualities between animals and human beings. Thus the apparent descriptions of the animals are really the deep revelations of the human beings. Animal Farm is one exemplary product of this special expressing way. Diversified animal images are intelligently used by George Orwell to represent the people, so all the characters are animals in appearance, but humans in nature. Starting from the animal images and then the conceptual metaphors, readers can perceive a fresh understanding of this classical book. In this novel, three conceptual metaphors are identified and the special findings can be illustrated as the following: Firstly, the whole story of the animals represents the history and politics of the Soviet Union. Secondly, the pigs symbolize the authorities of the society. Thirdly, the names of the characters in the novel reveal their identities.

  15. Theoretical nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Blatt, John M

    2010-01-01

    A classic work by two leading physicists and scientific educators endures as an uncommonly clear and cogent investigation and correlation of key aspects of theoretical nuclear physics. It is probably the most widely adopted book on the subject. The authors approach the subject as ""the theoretical concepts, methods, and considerations which have been devised in order to interpret the experimental material and to advance our ability to predict and control nuclear phenomena.""The present volume does not pretend to cover all aspects of theoretical nuclear physics. Its coverage is restricted to

  16. Theoretical physics division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities of the theoretical physics division for 1979 are described. Short summaries are given of specific research work in the following fields: nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, intermediate energy physics, elementary particles

  17. Theoretical physics division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies in 1977 are reviewed. In theoretical nuclear physics: nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, intermediate energy physics; in elementary particle physics: field theory, strong interactions dynamics, nucleon-nucleon interactions, new particles, current algebra, symmetries and quarks are studied

  18. Theoretical Computer Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    The proceedings contains 8 papers from the Conference on Theoretical Computer Science. Topics discussed include: query by committee, linear separation and random walks; hardness results for neural network approximation problems; a geometric approach to leveraging weak learners; mind change...

  19. Group Psychotherapy in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Lars Bo; Thygesen, Bente; Aagaard, Søren

    2015-10-01

    This is a short article on the history and training standards in the Institute of Group Analysis in Copenhagen (IGA-CPH). We describe theoretical orientations and influences in the long-term training program and new initiatives, like courses in mentalization-based group treatment and a dynamic short-term group therapy course, as well as research in group psychotherapy in Denmark. Some group analytic initiatives in relation to social issues and social welfare are presented, as well as initiatives concerning the school system and unemployment. PMID:26401798

  20. A Theoretical Study of the Relationships between Electronic Structure and CB1 and CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor Binding Affinity in a Group of 1-Aryl-5-(1-H-pyrrol-1-yl-1-H-pyrazole-3-carboxamides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Salgado-Valdés

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of a search for model-based relationships between hCB1 and hCB2 receptor binding affinity and molecular structure for a group of 1-aryl-5-(1-H-pyrrol-1-yl-1-H-pyrazole-3-carboxamides. The wave functions and local atomic reactivity indices were obtained at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p levels of theory with full geometry optimization. Interaction pharmacophores were generated for both receptors. The main conclusions of this work are as follows. (1 We obtained statistically significant equations relating the variation of hCB1 and hCB2 receptor binding affinities with the variation of definite sets of local atomic reactivity indices. (2 The interaction of the molecules with the hCB1 and hCB2 receptors seems to be highly complex and mainly orbital controlled. (3 The interaction mechanisms seem to be different for each type of receptor. This study, contrarily to the statistically backed ones, is able to provide a microscopic insight of the mechanisms involved in the binding process.

  1. Inductive effect of methyl group in a series of methylated indoles: A graph theoretical analysis in the light of density functional theory and correlation with experimental charge transfer transition energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amit S Tiwary; Asok K Mukherjee

    2013-07-01

    The inductive effect of methyl group has been quantified by expressing highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and HOMO-1 energies of indole and a series of methylated indoles using a combination of graph theory (GT) and the Coulson-Longuett-Higgins perturbation method. By correlating these expressions with the corresponding Kohn-Sham orbital energies of the indoles obtained by density functional theory (DFT) calculation at the B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) and M06-2X/6-31++G(d,p) levels of theory, the inductive effect parameter ℎ has been estimated; the Coulomb integral of -conjugated carbon atom also comes out from the analysis. A correlation of the GT results with the HOMO and HOMO-1 energies obtained by the HF/STO-3G method yield almost the same values of ℎ and . Finally, when these estimated ℎ and are used to calculate the vertical ionization potentials of the methylated indoles in the series, an excellent correlation with experimental charge transfer transition energies of their molecular complexes with tetracyanoethylene is obtained which complies with Mulliken’s theory of charge transfer.

  2. Theoretical physics and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, VL

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present, on the one hand various topics in theoretical physics in depth - especially topics related to electrodynamics - and on the other hand to show how these topics find applications in various aspects of astrophysics. The first text on theoretical physics and astrophysical applications, it covers many recent advances including those in X-ray, &ggr;-ray and radio-astronomy, with comprehensive coverage of the literature

  3. The Research of Japanese Animation Industry Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐海光

    2013-01-01

    China owns the largest animation audience group in the world, while our native animation market had been long occupied by Japanese and American animation products. After researching some assuming solutions of that embarrassing situation on Chinese animation industry, this one continues to state the proved successful mode of Japanese animation industry. After many decades of improvement, a mature and healthy industry chain had been built up. Nowadays, there is no doubt that Japanese animation industry is the most successful mode in the world. So we are looking forward to find some valuable successful experiences and make better change accordingly. And dur-ing the following research, writer of this thesis would show some visiting on Japanese local animation companies, and more details on their business mode.

  4. II International Congress on small animals and JDC-VEPA I National Meeting of Research in Animal Science

    OpenAIRE

    Autores Varios

    2013-01-01

    SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE - INICIENFACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES II International Congress on small animals and JDC-VEPA I National Meeting of Animal science research RESEARCH GROUPS INPANTA-CEAS-GREBIAL-IRABI II International Congress on small animals and JDC-VEPA I National Meeting of Research in Animal Science

  5. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  6. Beta-agonists and animal welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of beta-agonists in animal feed is a high profile topic within the U.S. as consumers and activist groups continue to question its safety. The only beta-agonist currently available for use in swine is ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC). This is available as Paylean™ (Elanco Animal Health – FDA a...

  7. Protesters Fail to Slow Animal Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monastersky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    In the past few months, animal-rights groups have stepped up their demonstrations against academic researchers who use animals, spawning a new wave of concern among scientists. In February, extremists caused a fire at the home of a researcher from the University of California at Los Angeles, and protesters struck the husband of a scientist from…

  8. Giulio Racah and Theoretical Physics in Jerusalem

    OpenAIRE

    Zeldes, Nissan

    2007-01-01

    Giulio Racah's name is known world wide in physics due to the mathematical methods he developed that are based on tensor operators and continuous groups. These methods revolutionized spectroscopy, and they are currently essential research tools in atomic, nuclear and elementary particle physics. He himself applied them to modernizing theoretical atomic spectroscopy. Racah laid the foundations of theoretical physics in Israel. He educated several generations of Israeli physicists, and put Isra...

  9. Data base on animal mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A data base on animal mortality has been compiled. The literature on LD50 and the dose-response function for radiation-induced lethality, reflect several inconsistencies - primarily due to dose assignments and to analytical methods and/or mathematical models used. Thus, in order to make the individual experiments which were included in the data base as consistent as possible, an estimate of the uniform dose received by the bone marrow in each treatment group was made so that the interspecies differences are minimized. The LD50 was recalculated using a single estimation procedure for all studies for which sufficient experimental data are available. For small animals such as mice, the dose to the hematopoietic system is approximately equal to the treatment dose, but for large animals the marrow dose may be about half of the treatment dose

  10. RETHINKING THE ANIMATE, RE-ANIMATING THOUGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Ingold

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Animism is often described as the imputation of life to inert objects. Such imputation is more typical of people in western societies who dream of finding life on other planets than of indigenous peoples to whom the label of animism has classically been applied. These peoples are united not in their beliefs but in a way of being that is alive and open to a world in continuous birth. In this animic ontology, beings do not propel themselves across a ready-made world but rather issue forth through a world-in-formation, along the lines of their relationships. To its inhabitants this weather-world, embracing both sky and earth, is a source of astonishment but not surprise. Re-animating the ‘western’ tradition of thought means recovering the sense of astonishment banished from offi cial science.

  11. Morris Animal Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the transmission of serious illnesses. Read more » Morris Animal Foundation Receives $750,000 Grant for Cancer Studies. ... Give Partners Become a Partner Meet Our Partners Animal Lovers Our Work Ways to Give Pet Health ...

  12. "Name" that Animal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Shirley

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a texture and pattern project. Students started by doing an outline contour drawing of an animal. With the outline drawn, the students then write one of their names to fit "inside" the animal.

  13. Animals in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Andrew N.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes viewpoints on the use of animals in science experiments in the biology classroom, including those of teachers, education researchers, biomedical scientists, science education administrators, and animal welfare advocates. (Author/CS)

  14. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ... by Product Area Product Areas back Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ...

  15. Interaction between animal personality and animal cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio CARERE, Charles LOCURTO

    2011-01-01

    The study of animal personality has attracted considerable attention, as it has revealed a number of similarities in personality between humans and several nonhuman species. At the same time the adaptive value and evolutionary maintenance of different personalities are the subject of debate. Since Pavlov’s work on dogs, students of comparative cognition have been aware that animals display vast individual differences on cognitive tasks, and that these differences may not be entirely accounted...

  16. ANIMAL APPELLATION IN ENGLISH VERBAL LEXICON

    OpenAIRE

    Bragarnik-stankevich, Olga

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to offer semantic verbs-zoonyms classification based on the morphemic structure of a word. That namely means to describe the group of verbs with roots, affiliated with names of animals in English.

  17. The Evolution of Multicellular Plants and Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, James W.

    1978-01-01

    Traces the evolution of unicellular organisms to the multi-cellular plants and animals in existence today. Major events are depicted in a geologic timetable. Organisms, extinct and recent, are classified by taxonomic group. (MA)

  18. Generic Face Animation

    OpenAIRE

    Cerda, Mauricio; Valenzuela, Renato; Hitschfeld-Kahler, Nancy; Terissi, Lucas; Gomez, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    International audience In computer vision, the animation of objects has attracted a lot attention, specially the animations of 3D face models. The animation of face models requires in general to manually adapt each generic movement (open/close mouth) to each specific head geometry. In this work we propose a technique for the animation of any face model avoiding most of the manual intervention. In order to achieve this we assume that: (1) faces, despite obvious differences are quite similar...

  19. Imaging of Awake Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The 3Rs of reduction, refinement and replacement are the guiding principles of animal research and embedded in national and international legislation regulating the use of animals in scientific procedures. Awake imaging by MRI of rodents can offer a reduction by increasing the quality of scientific data through longitudinal imaging using less animals by avoiding a serial sacrifice design and refinement through reducing the stressful effects animals are exposed to, in comparison to existing mo...

  20. Biopolitics: Animals, meat, food

    OpenAIRE

    Janović Nikola

    2009-01-01

    The general idea of this text is to reflect biopolitical constitution of the society and its implications related to the issues of animal welfare. Since animal in biopolitical formation is technically reduced to an object - commodity for contentment of the industry and of the people needs - critical public advisories are calling from moral, ethical and legal standpoint for attention to the fact that is necessary to protect animals from the unnecessary exploitation. It is obvious that animal p...

  1. Bioethics in animal experimentation

    OpenAIRE

    Popa V.I.; Lascar I.; Valcu M.; Sebe Ioana Teona; Caraban B.; Margina Arina Cristiana

    2015-01-01

    Animal experiments are used on a large scale worldwide in order to develop or to refine new medicines, medicinal products or surgical procedures. It is morally wrong to cause animals to suffer, this is why animal experimentation causes serious moral problems.

  2. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Translation - Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) Chinese Translation - Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) ... by Product Area Product Areas back Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ...

  3. Animal Models for imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Croft, Barbara Y.

    2002-01-01

    Animal models can be used in the study of disease. This chapter discusses imaging animal models to elucidate the process of human disease. The mouse is used as the primary model. Though this choice simplifies many research choices, it necessitates compromises for in vivo imaging. In the future, we can expect improvements in both animal models and imaging techniques.

  4. I like animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    官健

    2008-01-01

    @@ Animals are our friends.We should protect them and we mustn't hurtthem. Do you like animals?My answer is"yes".Maybe you may ask me why.I will tell you they are very lovely.I like many animals,such as pandas,monkeys and elephants.

  5. Industralization of Animal Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Oya S. Erdogdu; David Hennessy

    2003-01-01

    The economic concerns and the technological developments increased control over nature and nurture in the animal agriculture. That changed the seasonality pattern of the supply side and lead to structural change in the animal agriculture together with the demand side factors. In this study we focused on the supply side factors and document the ‘industralization’ of the animal agricultural production.

  6. Bioethics in animal experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popa V.I.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Animal experiments are used on a large scale worldwide in order to develop or to refine new medicines, medicinal products or surgical procedures. It is morally wrong to cause animals to suffer, this is why animal experimentation causes serious moral problems.

  7. Reforming the politics of animal research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Lisa Hara; Reppy, William A

    2015-07-01

    An unfortunate tension exists between the biomedical research and animal welfare/rights communities. We believe that despite the mistrust between these groups, there are individuals on both sides of the controversy who seek to better understand the other. We recommend an update of institutional policies that will better inform the public about the use of non-human animals in biomedical research and improve a dialogue on such use between concerned individuals who either support or oppose non-human animal-based biomedical research. Such interactions may well determine the longevity of using non-human animals as experimental subjects. PMID:25717143

  8. Theoretical Division annual report, FY 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an overview of the activities in the Theoretical Division and a summary of research highlights during FY 1975. It is intended to inform a wide audience about the theoretical work of the LASL and, therefore, contains introductory material which places recent advances in a broader context. The report is organized into two special interest reports: reactor safety research and the Advanced Research Committee, and 11 reports from the T-Division group leaders on the work of their respective groups. Main interests and responsibilities are outlined including the relationship of the group's work to the work of other T-Division groups and other divisions at the Laboratory. The description of research highlights for FY 1975 explains in a fairly simple, straightforward manner the major recent advances and their significance. Each group report is followed by a publication list for FY 1975 (330 references) and a list of talks given outside the Laboratory (140 references). 29 figures

  9. Lie groups for pedestrians

    CERN Document Server

    Lipkin, Harry J

    2002-01-01

    According to the author of this concise, high-level study, physicists often shy away from group theory, perhaps because they are unsure which parts of the subject belong to the physicist and which belong to the mathematician. However, it is possible for physicists to understand and use many techniques which have a group theoretical basis without necessarily understanding all of group theory. This book is designed to familiarize physicists with those techniques. Specifically, the author aims to show how the well-known methods of angular momentum algebra can be extended to treat other Lie group

  10. Animal models of dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I. Anna S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2011-01-01

    are here distinguished. These serve as points of orientation in the following discussion of four more specific ethical questions: Does animal species matter? How effective is disease modelling in delivering the benefits claimed for it? What can be done to minimize potential harm to animals in research? Who......This chapter aims to encourage scientists and others interested in the use of animal models of disease – specifically, in the study of dementia – to engage in ethical reflection. It opens with a general discussion of the moral acceptability of animal use in research. Three ethical approaches...... bears responsibility for the use of animals in disease models?...

  11. Hermaphroditism in some marine animals

    OpenAIRE

    Kagwade, P.V.

    1988-01-01

    Hermaphroditism, a phenomenon in which one and the same individual produces sperms, the male gamate the ovum, the female gamate, is generally common in plants and lower animals and hence is considered as a primitive character. However, it is rare in higher invertebrates such as insects, spiders, prawns and also in the lower vertebrates to which fishes belong. Prawns and fishes have highly evolved reproductive systems and occur as separate individuals of males and females. Both these groups do...

  12. A study in animal ethics in New Brunswick.

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, B J

    2001-01-01

    Society uses animals in ever-increasing numbers and ways, providing ethical challenges. Decisions about animal use are guided by the social consensus ethic towards animals. Because there is no clear social consensus ethic, these decisions are difficult. Society's ethic is changing and a "new ethic" towards animals is emerging. This study addressed the need to better understand society's ethics towards animals. Qualitative research methodology (focus groups) was used to study 7 different anima...

  13. Reflections on theoretical pragmatics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄衍

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides a critical survey of theoretical pragmatics in contemporary linguistics. Among the topics that are addressed in the essay include the Anglo-American, and European Continental schools of thought;neo-Gricean pragmatic, and Relevance theories, the pragmatics-semantics interface; and the pragmatics-syntax interface.

  14. A Theoretical Trombone

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    What follows is a description of a theoretical model designed to calculate the playing frequencies of the musical pitches produced by a trombone. The model is based on quantitative treatments that demonstrate the effects of the flaring bell and cup-shaped mouthpiece sections on these frequencies and can be used to calculate frequencies that…

  15. Theoretical Summary, Electroweak Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Langacker, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Aspects of theoretical electroweak physics are summarized, including the status of electroweak radiative corrections, the hadronic contribution to the running of alpha, global fits to precision data and their implication for testing the standard model and constraining new physics, and electroweak baryogenesis.

  16. Children's Understanding of Animal Minds

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the development of children’s understanding of animals’ minds and mental capabilities over two experiments. Experiment 1 modified standard false-belief and discrepant-desire tasks in two age-groups (3-4 and 7-8 years) to test developmental and species differences in children’ basic cognitive reasoning about animal and human minds. Experiment 2 incorporated a modified mental-capacity rating task in three age-groups (3-4-, 7-8 years, and adults) to investigate developmental ...

  17. Group theory in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cornwell, J F

    1989-01-01

    Recent devopments, particularly in high-energy physics, have projected group theory and symmetry consideration into a central position in theoretical physics. These developments have taken physicists increasingly deeper into the fascinating world of pure mathematics. This work presents important mathematical developments of the last fifteen years in a form that is easy to comprehend and appreciate.

  18. Group-theoretical derivation of Aharonov-Bohm phase shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, C. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627-0171 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    The phase shifts of the Aharonov-Bohm effect are generally determined by means of the partial wave decomposition of the underlying Schroedinger equation. It is shown here that they readily emerge from an o(2,1) calculation of the energy levels employing an added harmonic oscillator potential which discretizes the spectrum.

  19. Theoretical Concepts of Social Networks and Group Formation: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karuna C. Gull

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A social network is defined as a social structure of individuals, who are related (directly or indirectly to each other based on a common relation of interest, e.g. friendship, trust, etc. Social network analysis is the study of social networks to understand their structure and behavior. The online social network field is broad, and any literature review can only focus on a selection of articles. The present article highlights recent research in the field and focuses on centrality, linkage strength, identity, trust, activity and benefits. By no means is this review comprehensive, but it should give practitioners some useful concepts to consider as they design social network based web applications. Thus the overall objective of the proposed survey is to come up with an aim to have the latest research and simultaneously discuss contributions of renowned researchers whose work created a revolution in the social networking area. The goal of the survey process is to produce new knowledge or deepen understanding of a same topic or an issue.

  20. Research in theoretical nuclear physics, Nuclear Theory Group. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary emphasis is placed on understanding the nature of nucleon-nucleon and meson-nucleon interactions and on determining the consequences of such microscopic interactions in nuclear systems. We have constructed models of baryons which smoothly interpolate between currently popular bag and Skyrme models of hadrons and provide a vehicle for introducing the notions of quantum chromodynamics to low energy nuclear physics without violating the constraints of chiral invariance. Such models have been used to study the nucleon-nucleon interaction, the spectrum of baryons, and the important question of the radius of the quark bag. We have used many-body techniques to consider a variety of problems in finite nuclei and infinite many-body systems. New light has been shed on the nuclear coexistence of spherical and deformed states in the A = 18 region as well as the role of genuine three-body forces in this region. Phenomenological studies of infinite systems have led to a number of predictions particularly regarding the spin-polarized quantum liquids of current experimental interest. Microscopic many-body theories, based on the parquet diagrams, have been improved to a fully quantitative level for the ground state properties of infinite many-body systems. Finite temperature theories of nuclear matter, important in the study of heavy ion reactions, have been constructed. An expanded program in heavy ion theory has led to major advances in the multi-dimensional barrier penetration problem. Activities in nuclear astrophysics have provided a far more reliable description of the role of electron capture processes in stellar collapse. As a consequence, we have been able to perform legitimate calculations of the unshocked mass in Type II supernovae

  1. Animal reproduction and physiology: from basis to application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUI JianFang

    2010-01-01

    @@ Animal reproduction and physiology is one of the traditional subjects in biology, and also one of the most rapidly developing fields because it is related to human food requirements.Along with advances in the life sciences and biotechnology, animal reproduction and physiology has achieved new theoretical developments and potential applications.

  2. Internal communication in corporate groups

    OpenAIRE

    Grzesik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    This chapter is dedicated to internal communication in corporate groups. It discusses internal communication systems operating in the explored corporate groups and their significance for effective human resources management in those organisations. The chapter presents both the theoretical analysis based on the results of literature studies, and empirical research carried out in the explored groups. Narodowe Centrum Nauki Katarzyna Grzesik

  3. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  4. Compendium of theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wachter, Armin

    2006-01-01

    Mechanics, Electrodynamics, Quantum Mechanics, and Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics comprise the canonical undergraduate curriculum of theoretical physics. In Compendium of Theoretical Physics, Armin Wachter and Henning Hoeber offer a concise, rigorous and structured overview that will be invaluable for students preparing for their qualifying examinations, readers needing a supplement to standard textbooks, and research or industrial physicists seeking a bridge between extensive textbooks and formula books. The authors take an axiomatic-deductive approach to each topic, starting the discussion of each theory with its fundamental equations. By subsequently deriving the various physical relationships and laws in logical rather than chronological order, and by using a consistent presentation and notation throughout, they emphasize the connections between the individual theories. The reader’s understanding is then reinforced with exercises, solutions and topic summaries. Unique Features: Every topic is ...

  5. Animal models of asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Bates, Jason H.T.; Rincon, Mercedes; Irvin, Charles G.

    2009-01-01

    Studies in animal models form the basis for much of our current understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma, and are central to the preclinical development of drug therapies. No animal model completely recapitulates all features of the human disease, however. Research has focused primarily on ways to generate allergic inflammation by sensitizing and challenging animals with a variety of foreign proteins, leading to an increased understanding of the immunological factors that mediate the in...

  6. Animal Violence Demystified

    OpenAIRE

    Natarajan, Deepa; Caramaschi, Doretta

    2010-01-01

    Violence has been observed in humans and animals alike, indicating its evolutionary/biological significance. However, violence in animals has often been confounded with functional forms of aggressive behavior. Currently, violence in animals is identified primarily as either a quantitative behavior (an escalated, pathological and abnormal form of aggression characterized primarily by short attack latencies, and prolonged and frequent harm-oriented conflict behaviors) or a qualitative one (char...

  7. Animal Model of Dermatophytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuyoshi Shimamura; Nobuo Kubota; Kazutoshi Shibuya

    2012-01-01

    Dermatophytosis is superficial fungal infection caused by dermatophytes that invade the keratinized tissue of humans and animals. Lesions from dermatophytosis exhibit an inflammatory reaction induced to eliminate the invading fungi by using the host’s normal immune function. Many scientists have attempted to establish an experimental animal model to elucidate the pathogenesis of human dermatophytosis and evaluate drug efficacy. However, current animal models have several issues. In the presen...

  8. PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL BREEDING

    OpenAIRE

    Sonja Jovanovac

    2014-01-01

    University textbook Principles of Animal Breeding is intended for students of agriculture and veterinary medicine. The material is the adapted curricula of undergraduate and graduate level studies in the framework of which the modules Principles of animal breeding as well as Basics of genetics and selection of animals attended are listened. The textbook contains 14 chapters and a glossary of terms. Its concept enables combining fundamental and modern knowledge in the ...

  9. Are ticks venomous animals?

    OpenAIRE

    Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; James J Valdés

    2014-01-01

    Introduction As an ecological adaptation venoms have evolved independently in several species of Metazoa. As haematophagous arthropods ticks are mainly considered as ectoparasites due to directly feeding on the skin of animal hosts. Ticks are of major importance since they serve as vectors for several diseases affecting humans and livestock animals. Ticks are rarely considered as venomous animals despite that tick saliva contains several protein families present in venomous taxa and that many...

  10. The representative animal

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The anthropocentric approach to the study of animal behavior uses representative nonhuman animals to understand human behavior. This approach raises problems concerning the comparison of the behavior of two different species. The datum of behavior analysis is the behavior of humans and representative animal phenotypes. The behavioral phenotype is the product of the ontogeny and phylogeny of each species, and this requires that contributions of genotype as well as behavioral history to experim...

  11. Animal Production in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    SARICA, Şenay; Ulutaş, Zafer; ŞAHİN, Aziz

    2004-01-01

    Animal sector in Turkey has changed considerably in the last few years. Although the most significant advancements have occurred in the poultry sector, the cattle and small ruminants sector could not achieve similar improvements. Reasons of the depression in the cattle and small ruminants sector are the lack of breeding animal materials and high quality feed sources, insufficient disease control, disorganized and small size of the animal farms, lack of infrastructure, poor education levels of...

  12. Thinking with animals

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    they also enlist them to symbolize, dramatize, and illuminate aspects of humans' experience and fantasy. Humans merge with animals in stories, films, philosophical speculations, and scientific treatises. In their performance on many stages and in different ways, animals move us to think." "Essays in the book investigate the changing patterns of anthropomorphism across different time periods and settings, as well as their transformative effects, both figuratively and literally, upon animals, h...

  13. The Group Treatment of Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Harvey M.; Richman, Ann

    1984-01-01

    Bulimia has become an increasing problem in the college population. This article describes a group psychotherapeutic treatment approach to the problem. A theoretical formulation of the psychodynamics that may underlie the development of bulimia is offered. (Author/DF)

  14. Group cubization

    OpenAIRE

    Osajda, Damian

    2016-01-01

    We present a procedure of group cubization: It results in a group whose some features resemble the ones of a given group, and which acts without fixed points on a CAT(0) cubical complex. As a main application we establish lack of Kazhdan's property (T) for Burnside groups. Other applications include new constructions of non-exact groups.

  15. Theoretical assessment of the electro-optical features of the group III nitrides (B12N12, Al12N12 and Ga12N12) and group IV carbides (C24, Si12C12 and Ge12C12) nanoclusters encapsulated with alkali metals (Li, Na and K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Elham; Shakerzadeh, Ehsan; Biglari, Zeinab

    2016-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out to study the influence of alkali metals (Li, Na and K) encapsulation within the group III nitrides (B12N12, Al12N12 and Ga12N12) and the group IV carbides (C24, Si12C12and Ge12C12) nanoclusters. The encapsulation of Li, Na and K atoms is found to narrow the HOMO-LUMO gaps of the considered clusters. The electronic properties of these clusters, especially the group III nitrides nanoclusters, are strongly sensitive to interaction with the alkali metals. Moreover it is observed that the encapsulation of alkali metals enhances the first hyperpolarizabilities of B12N12 nanocluster. Surprisingly, due to the alkali metals encapsulation within B12N12 nanocluster, the first hyperpolarizability values are remarkably increased to 8505.49 and 122,503.76 a.u. for Na@B12N12 and K@B12N12, respectively. Also the TD-DFT calculations at both CAM-B3LYP/6-311+G(d) and PBE0/6-311+G(d) levels of theory are also performed to investigate the origin of first hyperpolarizabilities.

  16. Electrochemical kinetics theoretical aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Vetter, Klaus J

    1967-01-01

    Electrochemical Kinetics: Theoretical Aspects focuses on the processes, methodologies, reactions, and transformations in electrochemical kinetics. The book first offers information on electrochemical thermodynamics and the theory of overvoltage. Topics include equilibrium potentials, concepts and definitions, electrical double layer and electrocapillarity, and charge-transfer, diffusion, and reaction overvoltage. Crystallization overvoltage, total overvoltage, and resistance polarization are also discussed. The text then examines the methods of determining electrochemical reaction mechanisms

  17. ALICE Physics Theoretical Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Alessandro, B; Baier, R; Becattini, F; Botje, M; Carminati, F; Csörgö, T; De Cataldo, G; Foka, P Y; Giovannini, Alberto; Giubellino, P; Guillet, J P; Heinz, Ulrich W; Hencken, K; Iancu, E; Kaidalov, A B; Kajantie, Keijo; Karsch, Frithjof; Koch, V; Kopeliovich, B Z; Kurepin, A B; Laine, Mikko; Lednicky, R; Mangano, Michelangelo L; Monteno, M; Paic, G; Pilon, E; Pshenichnov, I A; Rapp, R; Redlich, Krzysztof; Revol, Jean Pierre Charles; Riggi, F; Safarík, K; Salgado, C A; Schükraft, Jürgen; Sinyukov, Yu M; Tomasik, Boris; Treleani, D; Ugoccioni, R; Venugopalan, R; Vogt, R; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2002-01-01

    ALICE is the dedicated heavy-ion experiment at the LHC. This note summarises theoretical developments in the field of hot and dense matter and their relevance for observables accessible to ALICE in nucleus-nucleus, proton-nucleus and proton-proton collisions. In addition, aspects of specific interest for proton-proton, proton-nucleus, ultra-peripheral collisions and cosmic-ray physics, which can be addressed by ALICE, are also discussed.

  18. Silicene: Recent theoretical advances

    KAUST Repository

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.

    2016-04-14

    Silicene is a two-dimensional allotrope of silicon with a puckered hexagonal structure closely related to the structure of graphene and that has been predicted to be stable. To date, it has been successfully grown in solution (functionalized) and on substrates. The goal of this review is to provide a summary of recent theoretical advances in the properties of both free-standing silicene as well as in interaction with molecules and substrates, and of proposed device applications.

  19. Theoretical Results on Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Shun

    2015-01-01

    In this talk, I first summarize our current knowledge about the fundamental properties of neutrinos and emphasize the remaining unsolved problems in neutrino physics. Then, recent theoretical results on neutrino mass models are introduced. Different approaches to understanding tiny neutrino masses, lepton flavor mixing and CP violation are presented. Finally, I report briefly some new progress in the studies of astrophysical neutrinos, including keV sterile neutrinos, supernova neutrinos and ultrahigh-energy cosmic neutrinos.

  20. MOND--theoretical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2002-01-01

    I discuss open theoretical questions pertaining to the modified dynamics (MOND)--a proposed alternative to dark matter, which posits a breakdown of Newtonian dynamics in the limit of small accelerations. In particular, I point the reasons for thinking that MOND is an effective theory--perhaps, despite appearance, not even in conflict with GR. I then contrast the two interpretations of MOND as modified gravity and as modified inertia. I describe two mechanical models that are described by pote...

  1. Theoretical high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses progress on theoretical high energy physics at Columbia University in New York City. Some of the topics covered are: Chern-Simons gauge field theories; dynamical fermion QCD calculations; lattice gauge theory; the standard model of weak and electromagnetic interactions; Boson-fermion model of cuprate superconductors; S-channel theory of superconductivity and axial anomaly and its relation to spin in the parton model

  2. A theoretical trombone

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2014-09-01

    What follows is a description of a theoretical model designed to calculate the playing frequencies of the musical pitches produced by a trombone. The model is based on quantitative treatments that demonstrate the effects of the flaring bell and cup-shaped mouthpiece sections on these frequencies and can be used to calculate frequencies that compare well to both the desired frequencies of the musical pitches and those actually played on a real trombone.

  3. 3. Theoretical Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the period September 1980 - Aug 1981, the studies in theoretical physics divisions have been compiled under the following headings: in nuclear physics, nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and intermediate energies; in particle physics, NN and NantiN interactions, dual topological unitarization, quark model and quantum chromodynamics, classical and quantum field theories, non linear integrable equations and topological preons and Grand unified theories. A list of publications, lectures and meetings is included

  4. MARKETING MIX THEORETICAL ASPECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Margarita Išoraitė

    2016-01-01

    Aim of article is to analyze marketing mix theoretical aspects. The article discusses that marketing mix is one of the main objectives of the marketing mix elements for setting objectives and marketing budget measures. The importance of each element depends not only on the company and its activities, but also on the competition and time. All marketing elements are interrelated and should be seen in the whole of their actions. Some items may have greater importance than others; it depends main...

  5. 3D Animation Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The essential fundamentals of 3D animation for aspiring 3D artists 3D is everywhere--video games, movie and television special effects, mobile devices, etc. Many aspiring artists and animators have grown up with 3D and computers, and naturally gravitate to this field as their area of interest. Bringing a blend of studio and classroom experience to offer you thorough coverage of the 3D animation industry, this must-have book shows you what it takes to create compelling and realistic 3D imagery. Serves as the first step to understanding the language of 3D and computer graphics (CG)Covers 3D anim

  6. The dying animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Jessica

    2013-12-01

    The study of animal death is poised to blossom into an exciting new interdisciplinary field-and one with profound relevance for bioethics. Areas of interest include the biology and evolution of death-related behavior in nonhuman animals, as well as human social, psychological, cultural, and moral attitudes toward and practices related to animal death. In this paper, I offer a brief overview of what we know about death-related behavior in animals. I will then sketch some of the bioethical implications of this emerging field of research. PMID:24092402

  7. Animal-free toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2013-01-01

    assessment, in accordance with the legislation on chemical, medicine and food safety. Toxicology studies based on human mechanistic and exposure information can replace animal studies. These animal-free approaches can be further supplemented by new in silico methods and chemical structure......-activity relationships. The inclusion of replacement expertise in the international Three Rs centres, the ongoing exploration of alternatives to animal research, and the improvement of conditions for research animals, all imply the beginning of a paradigm shift in toxicology research toward the use of human data....

  8. Diagnosis of animal allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, R

    1987-01-01

    The aims of the diagnostic evaluation are to establish the presence and severity of disease and the importance of animal exposure as the etiology of the disease. The evaluation of the importance of animals may be part of a general allergy evaluation or specifically directed toward an animal in certain cases, such as occupational exposure. The diagnostic techniques are medical history, physical examination, allergy skin tests or in vitro tests for IgE antibody and correlation of improvement in symptoms with animal avoidance. PMID:3477684

  9. Political Communication with Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Meijer, E

    2013-01-01

    In this article I sketch the outlines of a theory of political human-animal conversations, based on ideas about language that I borrow from Ludwig Wittgenstein’s later work, in particular his notion of language-games. I present this theory as a supplement to the political theory of animal rights Sue Donaldson and Will Kymlicka present in Zoopolis (2011). I will argue their political theory is an important step forward in the debate about animal rights, because it proposes to see animals as po...

  10. Occupational allergy to laboratory animals: an epidemiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, S M; Levine, M S; Wilson, P D; Fox, N L; Rivera, J C

    1986-11-01

    A cross-sectional study has been carried out at The National Institutes of Health to examine the prevalence of laboratory animal allergy (LAA) in a population exposed to animals, and to compare the prevalence of general allergy in the exposed v a control group. A group of 289 workers with light-to-moderate exposure to animals, 260 with heavy exposure, and 242 control subjects were interviewed. A slightly greater prevalence of general allergy was found among those working with laboratory animals (39%), than in the control group (33.9%), but the difference was not statistically significant. The prevalence of LAA in the total exposed group was 23.9%. A history of atopic problems and history of allergy to domestic animals correlated significantly with LAA, as did the number of species of animals handled and the average number of hours per week exposed to laboratory animals, with evidence of dose-response relationships. PMID:3491199

  11. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of branched-chain primary aliphatic alcohols/aldehydes/acids, acetals and esters with esters containing branched-chain alcohols and acetals containing branched-chain aldehydes (chemical group 2 when used as flavourings for all animal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Chemical group 2 consists of branched-chain primary aliphatic alcohols/aldehydes/acids, acetals and esters with esters containing branched-chain alcohols and acetals containing branched-chain aldehydes, of which 34 are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The use of 2-methylpropionic acid, isopentyl acetate, 3-methylbutyl butyrate and 2-methylbutyl acetate is safe at the proposed use level of 25 mg/kg complete feed for cattle, salmonids and non food producing animals and at 5 mg/kg complete feed for pigs and poultry. 2-Methylpropan-1-ol, isopentanol, 2-ethylhexan-1-ol, 2-methylpropanal, 3-methylbutanal, 2-methylbutyraldehyde, 3-methylbutyric acid, 2-methylvaleric acid, 2-ethylbutyric acid, 2-methylbutyric acid, 2-methylheptanoic acid, 4-methyloctanoic acid, isobutyl acetate, isobutyl butyrate, 3-methylbutyl propionate, 3-methylbutyl formate, glyceryl tributyrate, isobutyl isobutyrate, isopentyl isobutyrate, isobutyl isovalerate, isopentyl 2-methylbutyrate, 2-methylbutyl isovalerate and 2-methylbutyl butyrate are safe at the proposed use level of 5 mg/kg complete feed for all animal species. 3,7-Dimethyloctan-1-ol, 2-methylundecanal, 4-methylnonanoic acid, 3-methylbutyl hexanoate, 3-methylbutyl dodecanoate, 3-methylbutyl octanoate and 3-methylbutyl 3-methylbutyrate are safe at a maximum of 1.5 mg/kg complete feed for cattle, salmonids and non food-producing animals and of 1.0 mg/kg complete feed for pigs and poultry. No safety concern was identified for the consumer from the use of these compounds up to the highest safe level in feedingstuffs for all animal species. All compounds should be considered as irritants to skin, eyes and respiratory tract, and as skin sensitisers. The compounds do not pose a risk to the environment when used at concentrations considered safe for the target species. Since all compounds are used in food as flavourings, no further demonstration of efficacy is necessary.

  12. Fauna Europaea: Helminths (Animal Parasitic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gibson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region, and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. Helminths parasitic in animals represent a large assemblage of worms, representing three phyla, with more than 200 families and almost 4,000 species of parasites from all major vertebrate and many invertebrate groups. A general introduction is given for each of the major groups of parasitic worms, i.e. the Acanthocephala, Monogenea, Trematoda (Aspidogastrea and Digenea, Cestoda and Nematoda. Basic information for each group includes its size, host-range, distribution, morphological features, life-cycle, classification, identification and recent key-works. Tabulations include a complete list of families dealt with, the number of species in each and the name of the specialist responsible for data acquisition, a list of additional specialists who helped with particular groups, and a list of higher taxa dealt with down to the family level. A compilation of useful references is appended.

  13. A common control group - optimising the experiment design to maximise sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Bate

    Full Text Available Methods for choosing an appropriate sample size in animal experiments have received much attention in the statistical and biological literature. Due to ethical constraints the number of animals used is always reduced where possible. However, as the number of animals decreases so the risk of obtaining inconclusive results increases. By using a more efficient experimental design we can, for a given number of animals, reduce this risk. In this paper two popular cases are considered, where planned comparisons are made to compare treatments back to control and when researchers plan to make all pairwise comparisons. By using theoretical and empirical techniques we show that for studies where all pairwise comparisons are made the traditional balanced design, as suggested in the literature, maximises sensitivity. For studies that involve planned comparisons of the treatment groups back to the control group, which are inherently more sensitive due to the reduced multiple testing burden, the sensitivity is maximised by increasing the number of animals in the control group while decreasing the number in the treated groups.

  14. [Animal experiments concerning the autoimplantation of splenic tissue (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhles, H; Willital, G H; Krebs, C; Kaduk, B; Herzog, K H

    1981-09-01

    15 male rabbits were divided into three groups. The animals in group 1 were splenectomized. In group 2 pulpa tissue from the cut surface of the spleen was left in the abdominal cavity. Group 3 was sham operated. After 15 months all animals from group 2 showed particles of histologically intact splenic tissue mainly on the parietal peritoneum of the abdominal wall. The implications of the autoimplantation of splenic tissue during splenectomy are discussed. PMID:7314957

  15. Animals in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Use of animals in middle school science classrooms is a curriculum component worthy of consideration, providing proper investigation and planning are addressed. A responsible approach to this action, including safety, must be adopted for success. In this month's column, the author provides some suggestions on incorporating animals into the…

  16. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary ... by Product Area Product Areas back Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary ...

  17. Companion Animals. [Information Packet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Anti-Vivisection Society, Chicago, IL.

    This collection of articles reprinted from other National Anti-Vivisection Society (NAVS) publications was compiled to educate the public on issues of importance to NAVS concerning companion animals. Topics covered include spaying and neutering, animal safety, pet theft, and the use of cats and dogs in research. The article on spaying and…

  18. Political Communication with Animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Meijer

    2013-01-01

    In this article I sketch the outlines of a theory of political human-animal conversations, based on ideas about language that I borrow from Ludwig Wittgenstein’s later work, in particular his notion of language-games. I present this theory as a supplement to the political theory of animal rights Sue

  19. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Translation - Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) Chinese Translation - Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) ... FEAR Act Site Map Transparency Website Policies U.S. Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver ...

  20. Endangered Animals. Second Grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Marcia

    This second grade teaching unit centers on endangered animal species around the world. Questions addressed are: What is an endangered species? Why do animals become extinct? How do I feel about the problem? and What can I do? Students study the definition of endangered species and investigate whether it is a natural process. They explore topics…

  1. First Aid: Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Animal Bites KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Animal Bites Print A A A Text Size ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC First Aid & Safety Center Infections That Pets Carry Dealing With ...

  2. Ode to an Animal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelken, Miranda

    2008-01-01

    People know little about the non-domesticated animals that live around them. Somehow, they seem remote. In stories they hear about them, animals are often acting, speaking, and dressing like people. This article presents a lesson where students learn about the native species of their area while exploring the concept of interdependence through…

  3. [Laboratory animals and official Mexican norms (NOM-062-ZOO-1999)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aluja, Aline S

    2002-01-01

    This article concerns animal experimentation and official Mexican norm Nom 0062-Zoo-1999 entitled Technical specifications for the production, care and use of laboratory animals. The history of animal experimentation is briefly resumed. During the nineteenth century, doubts arose as to the right to expose animals to experimental procedures that frequently cause pain and suffering. The first law which protected animals against cruelty was passed in Great Britain in 1876; subsequently, other nations approved similar legislation. During the second part of the twentieth century, opposition to animal experimentation grew. Other groups, mainly scientists and pharmaceutical concerns, defended the right to use animals in research. New knowledge concerning the neurophysiology, cognitive capacity, and the animal faculty to experience pain is briefly mentioned. Guidelines on care and use of animals used in research published in several countries are listed. Finally, the recently published Mexican legislation (Norm) referring to production, care and use of laboratory animals is discussed and its benefits are stressed. PMID:12096401

  4. Interaction between animal personality and animal cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio CARERE, Charles LOCURTO

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of animal personality has attracted considerable attention, as it has revealed a number of similarities in personality between humans and several nonhuman species. At the same time the adaptive value and evolutionary maintenance of different personalities are the subject of debate. Since Pavlov’s work on dogs, students of comparative cognition have been aware that animals display vast individual differences on cognitive tasks, and that these differences may not be entirely accounted for differences in cognitive abilities. Here, we argue that personality is an important source of variation that may affect cognitive performance and we hypothesise mutual influences between personality and cognition across an individual’s lifespan. In particular, we suggest that: 1 personality profiles may be markers of different cognitive styles; 2 success or failure in cognitive tasks could affect different personalities differently; 3 ontogenetic changes of personality profiles could be reflected in changes in cognitive performance. The study of such interplay has implications in animal welfare as well as in neuroscience and in translational medicine [Current Zoology 57 (4: 491–498, 2011].

  5. Animal Health in Albania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The animal health service policy in Albania represents an integral component of overall governmental, social and economic policy in the field of agricultural and rural development, public health, food processing and import/export of animal products. In order to obtain the necessary political, economic and public support, the animal health service attempts to contribute effectively to the overall development of the country which aims at improving the standards of living of its inhabitants. Practical means of contributing to national development include reducing food loses due to animal morbidity and mortality, increasing the productivity of the livestock population, protecting human health against zoonotic diseases and ensuring humane treatment of animals. An animal health strategy contributes to the creation of conditions necessary for uninterrupted animal disease surveillance and control in the country. The main animal health problem in Albania is brucellosis in ruminants, caused by B. melitensis. This infection currently affects the entire country, reaching a prevalence of 10% in several districts. The latest and most severe outbreaks of classical swine fever were identified on 1996 when 5 515 animals were infected and 3 683 animals died. The circulation of bluetongue virus (BTV) was detected for the first time in Albania in 2002 with a seroprevalence of 15%. The evidence of BTV circulation in Albania and the absence of the main vector C. imicola suggest that other Culicoides species could be implicated in virus transmission. H5N1 avian influenza in Albania was confirmed in March 2006 in backyard flocks in the villages of Cuke and Peze-Helmes. In both villages there were no human cases. Rabies was of concern in Albania from 1928 until 1976. The disease re-emerged in March 2001 in the village of Morine in Kukes district affecting a domestic dog and three persons were bitten. Other cases have been reported in northern Albania. (author)

  6. Theoretical Optics An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Römer, Hartmann

    2004-01-01

    Starting from basic electrodynamics, this volume provides a solid, yet concise introduction to theoretical optics, containing topics such as nonlinear optics, light-matter interaction, and modern topics in quantum optics, including entanglement, cryptography, and quantum computation. The author, with many years of experience in teaching and research, goes way beyond the scope of traditional lectures, enabling readers to keep up with the current state of knowledge. Both content and presentation make it essential reading for graduate and phD students as well as a valuable reference for researche

  7. Theoretical astrophysics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Bartelmann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    A concise yet comprehensive introduction to the central theoretical concepts of modern astrophysics, presenting hydrodynamics, radiation, and stellar dynamics all in one textbook. Adopting a modular structure, the author illustrates a small number of fundamental physical methods and principles, which are sufficient to describe and understand a wide range of seemingly very diverse astrophysical phenomena and processes. For example, the formulae that define the macroscopic behavior of stellar systems are all derived in the same way from the microscopic distribution function. This function it

  8. Theoretical solid state physics

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical Solid State Physics, Volume 1 focuses on the study of solid state physics. The volume first takes a look at the basic concepts and structures of solid state physics, including potential energies of solids, concept and classification of solids, and crystal structure. The book then explains single-electron approximation wherein the methods for calculating energy bands; electron in the field of crystal atoms; laws of motion of the electrons in solids; and electron statistics are discussed. The text describes general forms of solutions and relationships, including collective electron i

  9. Reasoning about theoretical entities

    CERN Document Server

    Forster, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Reductionism is one of those philosophical myths that are either enthusiastically embraced or wholeheartedly rejected. And, like all other philosophical myths, it rarely gets serious consideration. Reasoning About Theoretical Entities strives to give reductionism its day in court, as it were, by explicitly developing several versions of the reductionist project and assessing their merits within the framework of modern symbolic logic. Not since the days of Carnap's Aufbau has reductionism received such close attention (albeit in a necessarily restricted and regimented setting such as that of mo

  10. Information-theoretic incompleteness

    CERN Document Server

    Chaitin, Gregory J

    1992-01-01

    In this mathematical autobiography, Gregory Chaitin presents a technical survey of his work and a nontechnical discussion of its significance. The volume is an essential companion to the earlier collection of Chaitin's papers Information, Randomness and Incompleteness, also published by World Scientific.The technical survey contains many new results, including a detailed discussion of LISP program size and new versions of Chaitin's most fundamental information-theoretic incompleteness theorems. The nontechnical part includes the lecture given by Chaitin in Gšdel's classroom at the University o

  11. Theoretical Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen K

    1998-01-01

    "Although there are many texts and monographs on fluid dynamics, I do not know of any which is as comprehensive as the present book. It surveys nearly the entire field of classical fluid dynamics in an advanced, compact, and clear manner, and discusses the various conceptual and analytical models of fluid flow." - Foundations of Physics on the first edition. Theoretical Fluid Dynamics functions equally well as a graduate-level text and a professional reference. Steering a middle course between the empiricism of engineering and the abstractions of pure mathematics, the author focuses

  12. Theoretical high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses theoretical research in high energy physics at Columbia University. Some of the research topics discussed are: quantum chromodynamics with dynamical fermions; lattice gauge theory; scattering of neutrinos by photons; atomic physics constraints on the properties of ultralight-ultraweak gauge bosons; black holes; Chern- Simons physics; S-channel theory of superconductivity; charged boson system; gluon-gluon interactions; high energy scattering in the presence of instantons; anyon physics; causality constraints on primordial magnetic manopoles; charged black holes with scalar hair; properties of Chern-Aimona-Higgs solitons; and extended inflationary universe

  13. Information theoretic neural computation

    CERN Document Server

    Kamimura, Ryotaro

    2002-01-01

    In order to develop new types of information media and technology, it is essential to model complex and flexible information processing in living systems. This book presents a new approach to modeling complex information processing in living systems. Traditional information-theoretic methods in neural networks are unified in one framework, i.e. a-entropy. This new approach will enable information systems such as computers to imitate and simulate human complex behavior and to uncover the deepest secrets of the human mind.

  14. Theoretical studies of vircator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Wenkai; Zhu Xiongwei; Liu Shenggang [Univ. of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan (China). Inst. of High Energy Electronics

    1995-11-01

    The results of theoretical studies of virtual cathode microwave devices are reported. The analytical calculation for the space-charge limited current of intense relativistic electron beam in arbitrary cross-sectional waveguide and resonator is derived by the Green` s function method. The space-charge field of a single charged sheath in cylindrical cavity,and the behavior of virtual cathode phenomenon relevant to time in cylindrical drifting space are calculated and analyzed by means of Green function method and virtual displacement method. And finally, the phase and frequency locking on power combining of vircator are also presented and analyzed.

  15. Institute for Theoretical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giddings, S.B.; Ooguri, H.; Peet, A.W.; Schwarz, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    String theory is the only serious candidate for a unified description of all known fundamental particles and interactions, including gravity, in a single theoretical framework. Over the past two years, activity in this subject has grown rapidly, thanks to dramatic advances in understanding the dynamics of supersymmetric field theories and string theories. The cornerstone of these new developments is the discovery of duality which relates apparently different string theories and transforms difficult strongly coupled problems of one theory into weakly coupled problems of another theory.

  16. Review of theoretical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays the 'experimental' charge densities are produced with convincing error estimates due to new methods and techniques. In addition the accuracy of those experiments means that r.m.s. radii are known within a few hundredths of a fermi. Because of that accuracy the theorists are left far behind. In order to show which theoretical possiblities exist at the moment we will discuss the single particle shell model and the Hartree-Fock or mean field approximation. Corrections to the mean field approximation are described. Finally, some examples and conclusions are presented. (KBE)

  17. Social Networks and Welfare in Future Animal Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, P.; Ipema, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    It may become advantageous to keep human-managed animals in the social network groups to which they have adapted. Data concerning the social networks of farm animal species and their ancestors are scarce but essential to establishing the importance of a natural social network for farmed animal speci

  18. ANIMAL MODELS: A REVIEW FROM THREE TESTS USED IN ANXIETY

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Eduardo Góngora; Cristina Vargas-Irwin; Lady Andrea Polanco

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a review of commonly used animal models tostudy anxiety, looking to make a presentation of three instruments used in thelaboratory. It describes the importance of using animal models for understandinghuman behavior; there are two groups of animal models and the most representativetests for each of these.

  19. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for new physics.'' The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10[sup [minus]6] eV--10[sup [minus]4] eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  20. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for ``new physics.`` The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10{sup {minus}6} eV--10{sup {minus}4} eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  1. The Theoretical Virtual Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Simon

    A functioning virtual observatory will require easy and transparent access not only to diverse observational databases but also to the tools needed to analyse visualise and interpret them. For the large statistical datasets produced by modern multiwavelength surveys this almost always requires the use of equally large artificially generated ""mock"" surveys. These are used to calibrate observational biases introduced for example by flux or resolution limits and to study how differing physical effects are manifest in the observational plane (for example how the observable clustering of galaxies is affected by merging by collision-induced starbursts by harassment etc). Such mock catalogues are almost always produced from large-scale supercomputer simulations so the ""virtual observer"" of the future will need access to such theoretical datasets or to the computer codes and resources needed to create them. At the MPA and within the Virgo Supercomputing Consortium we have for several years publically released both supercomputer code and large simulated datasets. I will review how this eperience can help in the design of the theoretical component of a virtual observatory.

  2. Theoretical ecology without species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Mikhail

    The sequencing-driven revolution in microbial ecology demonstrated that discrete ``species'' are an inadequate description of the vast majority of life on our planet. Developing a novel theoretical language that, unlike classical ecology, would not require postulating the existence of species, is a challenge of tremendous medical and environmental significance, and an exciting direction for theoretical physics. Here, it is proposed that community dynamics can be described in a naturally hierarchical way in terms of population fluctuation eigenmodes. The approach is applied to a simple model of division of labor in a multi-species community. In one regime, effective species with a core and accessory genome are shown to naturally appear as emergent concepts. However, the same model allows a transition into a regime where the species formalism becomes inadequate, but the eigenmode description remains well-defined. Treating a community as a black box that expresses enzymes in response to resources reveals mathematically exact parallels between a community and a single coherent organism with its own fitness function. This coherence is a generic consequence of division of labor, requires no cooperative interactions, and can be expected to be widespread in microbial ecosystems. Harvard Center of Mathematical Sciences and Applications;John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  3. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for ''new physics.'' The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10-6 eV--10-4 eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos

  4. Transparency and public involvement in animal research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Pandora; Blaug, Ricardo

    2016-05-01

    To be legitimate, research needs to be ethical, methodologically sound, of sufficient value to justify public expenditure and be transparent. Animal research has always been contested on ethical grounds, but there is now mounting evidence of poor scientific method, and growing doubts about its clinical value. So what of transparency? Here we examine the increasing focus on openness within animal research in the UK, analysing recent developments within the Home Office and within the main group representing the interests of the sector, Understanding Animal Research. We argue that, while important steps are being taken toward greater transparency, the legitimacy of animal research continues to be undermined by selective openness. We propose that openness could be increased through public involvement, and that this would bring about much needed improvements in animal research, as it has done in clinical research. PMID:27256456

  5. Valuation theoretic and model theoretic aspects of local uniformization

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhlmann, Franz-Viktor

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a survey on a valuation theoretical approach to local uniformization in positive characteristic, the model theory of valued fields in positive characteristic, and their connection with the valuation theoretical phenomenon of defect.

  6. The application of the Internet of Things to animal ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Songtao; Qiang, Min; Luan, Xiaorui; Xu, Pengfei; He, Gang; Yin, Xiaoyan; Xi, Luo; Jin, Xuelin; Shao, Jianbin; Chen, Xiaojiang; Fang, Dingyi; Li, Baoguo

    2015-11-01

    For ecologists, understanding the reaction of animals to environmental changes is critical. Using networked sensor technology to measure wildlife and environmental parameters can provide accurate, real-time and comprehensive data for monitoring, research and conservation of wildlife. This paper reviews: (i) conventional detection technology; (ii) concepts and applications of the Internet of Things (IoT) in animal ecology; and (iii) the advantages and disadvantages of IoT. The current theoretical limits of IoT in animal ecology are also discussed. Although IoT offers a new direction in animal ecological research, it still needs to be further explored and developed as a theoretical system and applied to the appropriate scientific frameworks for understanding animal ecology. PMID:26338071

  7. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  8. Environmentally friendly animal litter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chett, Boxley; McKelvie, Jessica

    2013-08-20

    A method of making an animal litter that includes geopolymerized ash, wherein, the animal litter is made from a quantity of a pozzolanic ash mixed with a sufficient quantity of water and an alkaline activator to initiate a geopolymerization reaction that forms geopolymerized ash. After the geopolymerized ash is formed, it is dried, broken into particulates, and sieved to a desired size. These geopolymerized ash particulates are used to make a non-clumping or clumping animal litter. Odor control may be accomplished with the addition of a urease inhibitor, pH buffer, an odor eliminating agent, and/or fragrance.

  9. Precision animal breeding

    OpenAIRE

    Flint, A.P.F.; WOOLLIAMS, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    We accept that we are responsible for the quality of life of animals in our care. We accept that the activities of man affect all the living things with which we share this planet. But we are slow to realize that as a result we have a duty of care for all living things. That duty extends to the breeding of animals for which we are responsible. When animals are bred by man for a purpose, the aim should be to meet certain goals: to improve the precision with which breeding outcomes can be predi...

  10. Kinect driven facial animation

    OpenAIRE

    Ojeda Noda, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Kinect es un dispositivo que se presenta en el ámbito de la industria de la animación como una alternativa económica. Haciendo uso de él, este proyecto desarrolla una aplicación de animación facial que aplique las expresiones faciales del usuario a un modelo 3D. Nowadays, facial animation is a core part of the character animation industry. From movies to video games, facial animation is done by most companies with the help of expensive equipment that capture real people's facial expression...

  11. Animal welfare and eggs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Laura Mørch

    This paper identifies revealed willingness to pay for animal welfare using a panel mixed logit model allowing for correlation between willingness to pay for different types of production. We utilize a unique household level panel, combining real purchases with survey data on perceived public and...... private good attributes of different types of eggs. We find that the estimated correlations are consistent with the levels of animal welfare, and that consumers perceiving a stronger connection between animal welfare and the organic label have higher willingness to pay for organic eggs, even when we...

  12. Standing for Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Sunstein, Cass Robert

    1999-01-01

    From the legal point of view, there is nothing at all new or unfamiliar in the idea of "animal rights;" on the contrary, it is entirely clear that animals have legal rights. Indeed, the rise of legal rights for animals has been one of the most distinctive features of the last thirty years of federal statutory law. An investigation of the question of standing helps show that the real issues involve problems of enforcement and scope. Human beings often do and should have standing to protect ani...

  13. Theoretical studies of chemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatz, G.C. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This collaborative program with the Theoretical Chemistry Group at Argonne involves theoretical studies of gas phase chemical reactions and related energy transfer and photodissociation processes. Many of the reactions studied are of direct relevance to combustion; others are selected they provide important examples of special dynamical processes, or are of relevance to experimental measurements. Both classical trajectory and quantum reactive scattering methods are used for these studies, and the types of information determined range from thermal rate constants to state to state differential cross sections.

  14. Group Flow and Group Genius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  15. Research in Theoretical Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, Hume A; Marfatia, Danny

    2014-09-24

    This document is the final report on activity supported under DOE Grant Number DE-FG02-13ER42024. The report covers the period July 15, 2013 – March 31, 2014. Faculty supported by the grant during the period were Danny Marfatia (1.0 FTE) and Hume Feldman (1% FTE). The grant partly supported University of Hawaii students, David Yaylali and Keita Fukushima, who are supervised by Jason Kumar. Both students are expected to graduate with Ph.D. degrees in 2014. Yaylali will be joining the University of Arizona theory group in Fall 2014 with a 3-year postdoctoral appointment under Keith Dienes. The group’s research covered topics subsumed under the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. Many theoretical results related to the Standard Model and models of new physics were published during the reporting period. The report contains brief project descriptions in Section 1. Sections 2 and 3 lists published and submitted work, respectively. Sections 4 and 5 summarize group activity including conferences, workshops and professional presentations.

  16. Group Psychotherapy in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannone, Francesca; Giordano, Cecilia; Di Blasi, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the history and the prevailing orientations of group psychotherapy in Italy (psychoanalytically oriented, psychodrama, CBT groups) and particularly group analysis. Provided free of charge by the Italian health system, group psychotherapy is growing, but its expansion is patchy. The main pathways of Italian training in the different group psychotherapy orientations are also presented. Clinical-theoretical elaboration on self development, psychopathology related to group experiences, and the methodological attention paid to objectives and methods in different clinical groups are issues related to group therapy in Italy. Difficulties in the relationship between research and clinical practice are discussed, as well as the empirical research network that tries to bridge the gap between research and clinical work in group psychotherapy. The economic crisis in Italy has led to massive cuts in health care and to an increasing demand for some forms of psychological treatment. For these reasons, and because of its positive cost-benefit ratio, group psychotherapy is now considered an important tool in the national health care system to expand the clinical response to different forms of psychological distress. PMID:26401793

  17. The “animalized humans” – the reformulated body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2016-01-01

    The paper will discuss the phenomenon of Japanese Catgirls who practice cat behavior as a counterpart to Disney's cartoon in which animals have a human character. Furthermore, the role of this Japanese phenomenon in a Danish pedagogical context is addressed. The discussion's theoretical approaches...... draw on performativity, social aesthetics and visual culture. In the final discussion the humanized animal is related to symmetrical anthropology, brought about by the contradictory position between the humanized animal character and a non-humanized social practice in which humans’ attribute themselves...... with animal behaviors....

  18. Categorization: The View from Animal Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. David; Zakrzewski, Alexandria C.; Johnson, Jennifer M.; Valleau, Jeanette C.; Church, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    Exemplar, prototype, and rule theory have organized much of the enormous literature on categorization. From this theoretical foundation have arisen the two primary debates in the literature—the prototype-exemplar debate and the single system-multiple systems debate. We review these theories and debates. Then, we examine the contribution that animal-cognition studies have made to them. Animals have been crucial behavioral ambassadors to the literature on categorization. They reveal the roots of human categorization, the basic assumptions of vertebrates entering category tasks, the surprising weakness of exemplar memory as a category-learning strategy. They show that a unitary exemplar theory of categorization is insufficient to explain human and animal categorization. They show that a multiple-systems theoretical account—encompassing exemplars, prototypes, and rules—will be required for a complete explanation. They show the value of a fitness perspective in understanding categorization, and the value of giving categorization an evolutionary depth and phylogenetic breadth. They raise important questions about the internal similarity structure of natural kinds and categories. They demonstrate strong continuities with humans in categorization, but discontinuities, too. Categorization’s great debates are resolving themselves, and to these resolutions animals have made crucial contributions. PMID:27314392

  19. Categorization: The View from Animal Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. David Smith

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Exemplar, prototype, and rule theory have organized much of the enormous literature on categorization. From this theoretical foundation have arisen the two primary debates in the literature—the prototype-exemplar debate and the single system-multiple systems debate. We review these theories and debates. Then, we examine the contribution that animal-cognition studies have made to them. Animals have been crucial behavioral ambassadors to the literature on categorization. They reveal the roots of human categorization, the basic assumptions of vertebrates entering category tasks, the surprising weakness of exemplar memory as a category-learning strategy. They show that a unitary exemplar theory of categorization is insufficient to explain human and animal categorization. They show that a multiple-systems theoretical account—encompassing exemplars, prototypes, and rules—will be required for a complete explanation. They show the value of a fitness perspective in understanding categorization, and the value of giving categorization an evolutionary depth and phylogenetic breadth. They raise important questions about the internal similarity structure of natural kinds and categories. They demonstrate strong continuities with humans in categorization, but discontinuities, too. Categorization’s great debates are resolving themselves, and to these resolutions animals have made crucial contributions.

  20. Categorization: The View from Animal Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J David; Zakrzewski, Alexandria C; Johnson, Jennifer M; Valleau, Jeanette C; Church, Barbara A

    2016-01-01

    Exemplar, prototype, and rule theory have organized much of the enormous literature on categorization. From this theoretical foundation have arisen the two primary debates in the literature-the prototype-exemplar debate and the single system-multiple systems debate. We review these theories and debates. Then, we examine the contribution that animal-cognition studies have made to them. Animals have been crucial behavioral ambassadors to the literature on categorization. They reveal the roots of human categorization, the basic assumptions of vertebrates entering category tasks, the surprising weakness of exemplar memory as a category-learning strategy. They show that a unitary exemplar theory of categorization is insufficient to explain human and animal categorization. They show that a multiple-systems theoretical account-encompassing exemplars, prototypes, and rules-will be required for a complete explanation. They show the value of a fitness perspective in understanding categorization, and the value of giving categorization an evolutionary depth and phylogenetic breadth. They raise important questions about the internal similarity structure of natural kinds and categories. They demonstrate strong continuities with humans in categorization, but discontinuities, too. Categorization's great debates are resolving themselves, and to these resolutions animals have made crucial contributions. PMID:27314392

  1. Machine vision application in animal trajectory tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koniar, Dušan; Hargaš, Libor; Loncová, Zuzana; Duchoň, František; Beňo, Peter

    2016-04-01

    This article was motivated by the doctors' demand to make a technical support in pathologies of gastrointestinal tract research [10], which would be based on machine vision tools. Proposed solution should be less expensive alternative to already existing RF (radio frequency) methods. The objective of whole experiment was to evaluate the amount of animal motion dependent on degree of pathology (gastric ulcer). In the theoretical part of the article, several methods of animal trajectory tracking are presented: two differential methods based on background subtraction, the thresholding methods based on global and local threshold and the last method used for animal tracking was the color matching with a chosen template containing a searched spectrum of colors. The methods were tested offline on five video samples. Each sample contained situation with moving guinea pig locked in a cage under various lighting conditions. PMID:26776540

  2. Theoretical Molecular Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    "Theoretical Molecular Biophysics" is an advanced study book for students, shortly before or after completing undergraduate studies, in physics, chemistry or biology. It provides the tools for an understanding of elementary processes in biology, such as photosynthesis on a molecular level. A basic knowledge in mechanics, electrostatics, quantum theory and statistical physics is desirable. The reader will be exposed to basic concepts in modern biophysics such as entropic forces, phase separation, potentials of mean force, proton and electron transfer, heterogeneous reactions coherent and incoherent energy transfer as well as molecular motors. Basic concepts such as phase transitions of biopolymers, electrostatics, protonation equilibria, ion transport, radiationless transitions as well as energy- and electron transfer are discussed within the frame of simple models.

  3. Theoretical physics 3 electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Nolting, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    This textbook offers a clear and comprehensive introduction to electrodynamics, one of the core components of undergraduate physics courses. It follows on naturally from the previous volumes in this series. The first part of the book describes the interaction of electric charges and magnetic moments by introducing electro- and magnetostatics. The second part of the book establishes deeper understanding of electrodynamics with the Maxwell equations, quasistationary fields and electromagnetic fields. All sections are accompanied by a detailed introduction to the math needed. Ideally suited to undergraduate students with some grounding in classical and analytical mechanics, the book is enhanced throughout with learning features such as boxed inserts and chapter summaries, with key mathematical derivations highlighted to aid understanding. The text is supported by numerous worked examples and end of chapter problem sets. About the Theoretical Physics series Translated from the renowned and highly successful Germa...

  4. Theoretical Particle Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamionkowski, Marc

    2013-08-07

    Abstract: Theoretical Particle Astrophysics The research carried out under this grant encompassed work on the early Universe, dark matter, and dark energy. We developed CMB probes for primordial baryon inhomogeneities, primordial non-Gaussianity, cosmic birefringence, gravitational lensing by density perturbations and gravitational waves, and departures from statistical isotropy. We studied the detectability of wiggles in the inflation potential in string-inspired inflation models. We studied novel dark-matter candidates and their phenomenology. This work helped advance the DoE's Cosmic Frontier (and also Energy and Intensity Frontiers) by finding synergies between a variety of different experimental efforts, by developing new searches, science targets, and analyses for existing/forthcoming experiments, and by generating ideas for new next-generation experiments.

  5. Potential of producing renewable hydrogen from livestock animal waste. Paper no. IGEC-1-143

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen economy and fuel cell technology have become increasingly recognized as means for maintaining a sustainable energy supply as well as a sustainable environment. Simultaneously, solutions are being sought to effectively manage the animal wastes from livestock farming of cattle, cow, hog, and poultry to ensure an environmentally sustainable method of food production. This discussion examines the potential of producing hydrogen from livestock waste on a scale that can effectively solve a waste management problem for the livestock industry and provide significant quantities of renewable hydrogen to the clean energy industry. The green energy derived from animal waste is considered to be carbon-neutral because animal feed is largely grown from photosynthesis of carbon dioxide. Electricity and heat thus generated will offset those generated from fossil fuels and can be rewarded with greenhouse gas emission reduction credits. Two groups of well proven technologies: biochemical processes such as anaerobic digestion (AD), and thermochemical processes such as gasification are considered in this paper. A theoretical analysis of the potential of reforming the biogas and syngas from these reactions has been conducted using mathematical models of AD, gasification, steam reforming and water-gas shift reactions, and the results indicate that significant quantities of renewable hydrogen can be generated to fuel clean energy technologies such as the fuel cell. Practical considerations are presented to complement the theoretical analysis and future research directions are also discussed. (author)

  6. Bottom dwelling animals: Benthos

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.

    . At the bottom/sediment dwelling animal communities are collectively termed as 'BENTHOS'. This extremely valuable component of the marine environment consumes the sediment organic matter from the overlying water column and effectively converts into benthic...

  7. A northern animal kingdom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RainerThomm

    2005-01-01

    I began photographing wild animals at Baiquan in 2002,what is really propelling me to go back time and time again,though,is the unforgettable experience of tracking down and getting shots of red foxes and shika.

  8. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how ... efforts are underway in both veterinary and human medicine to preserve the effectiveness of these drugs. One ...

  9. Retrospectives: Animal Spirits

    OpenAIRE

    Roger Koppl

    1991-01-01

    John Maynard Keynes argued that when the conditions for rational action are not present, people are driven by "animal spirits." This article briefly considers Keynes' argument, and the history of the term.

  10. [Alternatives to animal testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Isabelle

    2009-11-01

    The use of alternative methods to animal testing are an integral part of the 3Rs concept (refine, reduce, replace) defined by Russel & Burch in 1959. These approaches include in silico methods (databases and computer models), in vitro physicochemical analysis, biological methods using bacteria or isolated cells, reconstructed enzyme systems, and reconstructed tissues. Emerging "omic" methods used in integrated approaches further help to reduce animal use, while stem cells offer promising approaches to toxicologic and pathophysiologic studies, along with organotypic cultures and bio-artificial organs. Only a few alternative methods can so far be used in stand-alone tests as substitutes for animal testing. The best way to use these methods is to integrate them in tiered testing strategies (ITS), in which animals are only used as a last resort. PMID:20669543

  11. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About FDA Contact FDA Browse by Product Area Product Areas back Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  12. Group Formation in Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Gabrielle; Wooders, Myrna

    2005-01-01

    Broad and diverse ranges of activities are conducted within and by organized groups of individuals, including political, economic and social activities. These activities have recently become a subject of intense interest in economics and game theory. Some of the topics investigated in this collection are models of networks of power and privilege, trade networks, co-authorship networks, buyer-seller networks with differentiated products, and networks of medical innovation and the adaptation of new information. Other topics are social norms on punctuality, clubs and the provision of club goods and public goods, research and development and collusive alliances among corporations, and international alliances and trading agreements. While relatively recent, the literature on game theoretic studies of group formation in economics is already vast. This volume provides an introduction to this important literature on game-theoretic treatments of situations with networks, clubs, and coalitions, including some applications.

  13. Religious slaughter and animal welfare: data from an online consultation

    OpenAIRE

    C. Baldinelli; P. Sechi; V. Cambiotti; S. Parmegiani; B.T. Cenci Goga

    2012-01-01

    Two are the main results of the online survey, which was conducted with the purpose to examine the purchase behavior of a group of consumers and their views on animal welfare and religious slaughter. First result is the respondents’ great interest about the question on animal welfare, which is in accordance with the growing interest of European citizens about this issue. Second is the demand for a more transparent labeling of animal products, which would be also concerning animal welfar...

  14. EFFECTS OF SEGMENTATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL ANIMATION IN FACILITATING LEARNING

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Zamzuri Mohamad Ali; Ahmad Rizal Madar

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of segmented-animation, playpause- animation and continuous-animation in facilitating learning of low prior knowledge learners. A courseware prototype entitled Transmission Media was developed for the research purpose. The courseware contains nine animations on various topics in Transmission Media. Pre-test and post-test experimental design was employed on three different groups respectively. The data collected were analyzed statistically b...

  15. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of straight-chain primary aliphatic alcohols/aldehydes/acids, acetals and esters with esters containing saturated alcohols and acetals containing saturated aldehydes (chemical group 1 when used as flavourings for all animal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical group 1 (CG 1 consists of straight-chain primary aliphatic alcohols/aldehydes/acids, acetals and esters with esters containing saturated alcohols and acetals containing saturated aldehydes of which 86 are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The FEEDAP Panel was unable to perform an assessment of ethyl oleate because of its insufficient purity. The following compounds are considered to be safe for all animal species at the use level proposed for feed flavourings: formic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, octanoic acid, decanoic acid, dodecanoic acid, tetradecanoic acid, hexadecanoic acid, oleic acid, decanol, dodecanol, decyl acetate and dodecyl acetate. The remaining substances are considered safe for all animal species at 5 mg/kg complete feed (with a margin of safety between 1 and 120 and at 25 mg/kg complete feed (ethyl acetate and hexyl acetate, with a margin of safety between 2 and 6; and at 1 mg/kg complete feed for pigs and poultry and 1.5 mg/kg complete feed for all other species (ethylacrylate, ethyl hex-3-enoate, ethyl trans-2-butenoate, ethyl isobutyrate, ethyl isovalerate, butyl isovalerate, methyl isovalerate, hexyl isobutyrate, methyl 2-methyl butyrate, pentyl isovalerate, butyl 2-methyl butyrate, hexyl isovalerate, ethyl 2-methyl butyrate, hexyl 2-methyl butyrate and methyl 2-methylvalerate. No safety concern would arise for the consumer from the use of compounds belonging to CG 1 up to the highest safe level in feedingstuffs for all animal species. The FEEDAP Panel considers it prudent to treat all compounds under assessment as irritants to skin, eyes and respiratory tract and as skin sensitizers. No risk for the safety for the environment is foreseen. Since all 85 compounds are used in food as flavourings, no further demonstration of efficacy is necessary.

  16. Animal Models of Fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Nagakura, Yukinori; Ito, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Yasuaki

    2012-01-01

    Animal models of disease states are valuable tools for developing new treatments and investigating underlying mechanisms. They should mimic the symptoms and pathology of the disease and importantly be predictive of effective treatments. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread pain with associated co-morbid symptoms that include fatigue, depression, anxiety and sleep dysfunction. In this review, we present different animal models that mimic the signs and symptoms of fibromyalgia. T...

  17. Animal models of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, CA; Watson, DJG; Fone, KCF

    2011-01-01

    Developing reliable, predictive animal models for complex psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, is essential to increase our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for the development of novel drugs with improved therapeutic efficacy. All available animal models of schizophrenia fit into four different induction categories: developmental, drug-induced, lesion or genetic manipulation, and the best characterized examples of each type are reviewed herein. Most rod...

  18. Laboratory animal allergy.

    OpenAIRE

    Hollander, A

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of the study presented in this thesis was to estimate the prevalence rate of laboratory animal allergy and to determine its association with risk factors, like allergen exposure level, atopy, gender and other host factors. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken among 540 workers at 8 laboratory animal facilities. All participants completed a questionnaire and underwent skin prick testing with common and occupational allergens. Total and specific IgE measures were obtained....

  19. Whole animal imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Sandhu, Gurpreet Singh; Solorio, Luis; Broome, Ann-Marie; Salem, Nicolas; Kolthammer, Jeff; Shah, Tejas; Flask, Chris; Duerk, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Translational research plays a vital role in understanding the underlying pathophysiology of human diseases, and hence development of new diagnostic and therapeutic options for their management. After creating an animal disease model, pathophysiologic changes and effects of a therapeutic intervention on them are often evaluated on the animals using immunohistologic or imaging techniques. In contrast to the immunohistologic techniques, the imaging techniques are noninvasive and hence can be us...

  20. Cultural - Amusement Animation

    OpenAIRE

    Jakovlev, Zlatko; Koteski, Cane; Angelkova, Tanja; Dzambazoski, Kristijan

    2011-01-01

    In the contemporary tourism, the cultural – amusing animation is at the same level as the food and the accommodation. This animation contributes to avoid the monotony and boredom of the guests/visitors.The visitors need diversion and dynamics during their tourist stay.There is nothing more destructive for themas the feeling of boredom, itself. The whole phenomenom of amusement and diversion is very relevant and characteristic for the human and it has its roots in the need for change, because ...

  1. On Animal Metaphor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李凡凡

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays it is common to talk about metaphor. In fact, metaphor is a kind of comparison. Because of comparison and association,familiar objects become strange and glamorous. Animal metaphors can involve either nominal form or verb forms. A person's crying may be called barking. A woman may be called a cat, or a goose, etc. Animal metaphor is connected tightly with our life and helps language development. We can utilize them to make our life and languages more colorful.

  2. Snow White Trench (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This animation shows the evolution of the trench called 'Snow White' that NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander began digging on the 22nd Martian day of the mission after the May 25, 2008, landing. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Trade, Environment & Animal Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Peter; Nielsen, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of animal welfare and the environment under the WTO GATT and GATS Agreements - including introduction of the innovative idea of limiting consumption abroad (mode 2) for e.g. bull fights.......Regulation of animal welfare and the environment under the WTO GATT and GATS Agreements - including introduction of the innovative idea of limiting consumption abroad (mode 2) for e.g. bull fights....

  4. Experimental Animal Welfare

    OpenAIRE

    Yusuf Ergun

    2011-01-01

    It is an obvious obligation for investigators to consume millions of experimental animals every year to obtain scientific data. Because most of these experiments involve painful and distressing procedures, to obey the so-called 3Rs, reduction, refinement and replacement, is a prerequisite for those who would apply to ethics committees for a given research proposal. Of the 3Rs, refinement could be defined as “decrease in the incidence of severity of inhumane procedures applied to those animals...

  5. Small Animal Bone Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Vashishth, Deepak

    2008-01-01

    Animal models, in particular mice, offer the possibility of naturally achieving or genetically engineering a skeletal phenotype associated with disease and conducting destructive fracture tests on bone to determine the resulting change in bone’s mechanical properties. Several recent developments, including nano- and micro- indentation testing, microtensile and microcompressive testing, and bending tests on notched whole bone specimens, offer the possibility to mechanically probe small animal ...

  6. Group morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2000-01-01

    In its original form, mathematical morphology is a theory of binary image transformations which are invariant under the group of Euclidean translations. This paper surveys and extends constructions of morphological operators which are invariant under a more general group TT, such as the motion group

  7. Abelian Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishina, A.P.

    1995-10-15

    This fifth survey of reviews on abelian groups comprises papers reviewed in 1985-1992. Just as in the preceding surveys, the issues concerning finite abelian groups, topological groups, ordered groups, group algebras, modules (with rare exceptions), and topics on logic are not considered. The issues on the lattice of subgroups of an abelian group are included in Section 11. In contrast to the fourth survey, this one does not contain Sections 6 (N-high subgroups), 9 (rings with a given additive group), and 10 (valuated groups); since only a few papers treated these topics, the material discussed earlier in Sections 9, and 10 is now included in Section 11 and the material of the former Section 6 will be found in Sections 1, 7, 8, and 11 of this survey. On the other hand, the fifth survey has three new sections devoted to separable groups (a new Sect. 5), Butler groups (a new Sect. 6), and the endormorphism rings and automorphism groups of abelian groups (a new Sect. 9).

  8. Equity valuation : Eurocash Group

    OpenAIRE

    Branco, Ana Isabel Antunes de Azevedo

    2015-01-01

    Equity valuation is an extremely complex and subjective process, it depends not only on the theoretical models but also on the analysis and assumptions used by the analyst. This thesis focuses on the valuation of Eurocash Group, a leading wholesale distributor of fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) in Poland. In order to present stronger conclusions we decided to use two different models: the discounted cash-flow (DCF) model and the multiples method as a complement. The combination of both l...

  9. Hadron hadron collider group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this group was to make a rough assessment of the characteristics of a hadron-hadron collider which could make it possible to study the 1 TeV mass scale. Since there is very little theoretical guidance for the type of experimental measurements which could illuminate this mass scale, we chose to extend the types of experiments which have been done at the ISR, and which are in progress at the SPS collider to these higher energies

  10. Coagulation-fragmentation model for animal group-size statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Degond, Pierre; Liu, Jian-guo; Pego, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    We study coagulation-fragmentation equations inspired by a simple model proposed in fisheries science to explain data for the size distribution of schools of pelagic fish. Although the equations lack detailed balance and admit no $H$-theorem, we are able to develop a rather complete description of equilibrium profiles and large-time behavior, based on recent developments in complex function theory for Bernstein and Pick functions. In the large-population continuum limit, a scaling-invariant r...

  11. Permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    Passman, Donald S

    2012-01-01

    This volume by a prominent authority on permutation groups consists of lecture notes that provide a self-contained account of distinct classification theorems. A ready source of frequently quoted but usually inaccessible theorems, it is ideally suited for professional group theorists as well as students with a solid background in modern algebra.The three-part treatment begins with an introductory chapter and advances to an economical development of the tools of basic group theory, including group extensions, transfer theorems, and group representations and characters. The final chapter feature

  12. MICE, a program to track and monitor animals in animal facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pognonec Philippe

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing number of laboratories are using the mouse as a model system in developmental biology as well as in molecular biology. Surprisingly, most of these laboratories do not have reliable computerized systems to track these animals, and the few commercial solutions available are expensive. We thus developed MICE (Mouse Information and Classification Entity, a program aimed at facilitating the monitoring of animals in animal facilities. Results This program consists of a virtual facility in which scientists can perform all the tasks done in the real world (i.e., receiving animals, breeding them, preparing cage labels, etc.. Recording of each animal (birth date, cage number, ID number, tail analysis number, parents, genetic status, genetic background, etc. enables reliable tracking. According to any parameter of interest, animals can then be identified, grouped, sorted, moved, and so forth. Crossings are automatically processed by the program. For example, new genetic backgrounds, generation number, and anticipated due dates are determined. The program also reminds the user when new births are expected and entering newborn animals only requires a few clicks. The genealogy of each animal can be determined in two different ways, one being the visualization of a genealogical tree from which information of ancestors can be retrieved. Conclusion This standalone program, that will be distributed free of charge to academic laboratories requesting a license, represents a new and valuable tool for all animal facility users, and permits simple and reliable tracking and retrieving of animals.

  13. Animal experimentation and scientific knowledge: a thought style?

    OpenAIRE

    Thales de Astrogildo e Tréz

    2010-01-01

    Animal experimentation, besides a research method extensively applied in the production of scientific knowledge, is also considered essential to science and with undeniable historical relevance in advances in human health. In this survey, a questionnaire was applied to a group of researchers involved with research based on non-animal models (n =18), and to another group involved with research based on animal models (n =18). The data analysis was grounded in Ludwik Fleck (1896 -1961) epistemol...

  14. Comparative mortality levels among selected species of captive animals

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel H. Preston; Laurie Bingaman Lackey; Iliana Kohler

    2006-01-01

    We present life tables by single year of age and sex for groups of animals and for 42 individual mostly mammalian species. Data are derived from the International Species Information System. The survivorship of most of these species has never been mapped systematically. We demonstrate that, in most of the groups, female survivorship significantly exceeds that of males above age five. Wild-born animals do not have mortality that differs significantly from captive-born animals. While most speci...

  15. Collective Animal Behavior from Bayesian Estimation and Probability Matching

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonso Pérez-Escudero; de Polavieja, Gonzalo G.

    2011-01-01

    Animals living in groups make movement decisions that depend, among other factors, on social interactions with other group members. Our present understanding of social rules in animal collectives is mainly based on empirical fits to observations, with less emphasis in obtaining first-principles approaches that allow their derivation. Here we show that patterns of collective decisions can be derived from the basic ability of animals to make probabilistic estimations in the presence of uncertai...

  16. Galaxy Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, R. Brent

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times {{10}12}{{M}⊙ } are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of {{Ω}matter}˜ 0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  17. Galaxy groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent Tully, R. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  18. Group theory and chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, David M

    1993-01-01

    Group theoretical principles are an integral part of modern chemistry. Not only do they help account for a wide variety of chemical phenomena, they simplify quantum chemical calculations. Indeed, knowledge of their application to chemical problems is essential for students of chemistry. This complete, self-contained study, written for advanced undergraduate-level and graduate-level chemistry students, clearly and concisely introduces the subject of group theory and demonstrates its application to chemical problems.To assist chemistry students with the mathematics involved, Professor Bishop ha

  19. Animal, animalité, devenir-animal

    OpenAIRE

    Viennet, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Question de regard Nous regardons les animaux et les animaux nous regardent. Nous faisons signe à un chat, par la voix, par le geste, le chat nous regarde et cligne des yeux. Il n’a pas la capacité d’exprimer des paroles selon le modèle humain, mais à sa manière il nous répond, par un clin d’œil. Que se passe-t-il dans ce clin d’œil ? Une communication s’établit, un échange a lieu. Nous regardons l’animal qui nous regarde. Que voyons-nous alors ? Le clin d’œil énigmatique nous pousse à regard...

  20. 9 CFR 79.4 - Designation of scrapie-positive animals, high-risk animals, exposed animals, suspect animals...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... complete a post exposure monitoring and management plan. Testing may include live-animal testing using a... testing of genetically susceptible animals in the flock that cannot be evaluated by a live animal test... investigation which may include additional testing of the suspect animal and or animals that have...

  1. Group decision making in meerkats (Suricata suricatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Bousquet, C A H

    2011-01-01

    Groups of social animals are common in nature and often remain cohesive despite variation in each member’s needs and optimal activity. How and why individuals coordinate themselves within groups has long been a puzzle for behavioural ecologists. Recently, theories on group decision-making have greatly advanced but there is still a lack of empirical evidence about the applicability and the generality of such theories in animals. Within my PhD project, I addressed questions on group decision ma...

  2. Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Tully, R Brent

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10^12 Msun are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosi...

  3. Overview. Department of Theoretical Physics. Section 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activity of the Department of the Theoretical Physics spans a wide variety of problems in theoretical high-energy and elementary particle physics, theoretical nuclear physics, theory of the nuclear matter, quark gluon plasma and relativistic heavy-ion collisions, theoretical astrophysics, as well as general physics. Theoretical research in high energy and elementary particle physics is concentrated on the theory of deep inelastic lepton scattering in the region of low x and its phenomenological implication for the ep collider HERA at DESY, on the theory of nonleptonic decays of hadrons, and on low energy ππ and K-anti-K interactions and scalar meson spectroscopy. The activity in the theory of relativistic heavy-ion collisions is focused on the study of quark condensate fluctuations, on the analysis of critical scattering near the chiral phase transition, and on Bose-Einstein correlation in heavy-ion collisions. Theoretical studies in nuclear physics and in theory of nuclear matter concern analysis of models, with dynamical symmetry based on group Sp(6,R) for the description of collective modes of atomic nuclei, analysis of the Goldstone bosons in nuclear matter and analysis of saturation properties of nuclear matter. Research in theoretical astrophysics is mainly devoted to the analysis of magnetic properties of hadronic matter in neutron stars with proton admixture. Studies in general physics concern problem related to the Galilean covariance of classical and quantum mechanics. The detailed results obtained in various fields are summarised in presented abstracts as well as information about employed personnel, publications, contribution to conferences, reports, workshops and seminars

  4. Overview. Department of Theoretical Physics. Section 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiecinski, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Research activity of the Department of the Theoretical Physics spans a wide variety of problems in theoretical high-energy and elementary particle physics, theoretical nuclear physics, theory of the nuclear matter, quark gluon plasma and relativistic heavy-ion collisions, theoretical astrophysics, as well as general physics. Theoretical research in high energy and elementary particle physics is concentrated on the theory of deep inelastic lepton scattering in the region of low x and its phenomenological implication for the ep collider HERA at DESY, on the theory of nonleptonic decays of hadrons, and on low energy {pi}{pi} and K-anti-K interactions and scalar meson spectroscopy. The activity in the theory of relativistic heavy-ion collisions is focused on the study of quark condensate fluctuations, on the analysis of critical scattering near the chiral phase transition, and on Bose-Einstein correlation in heavy-ion collisions. Theoretical studies in nuclear physics and in theory of nuclear matter concern analysis of models, with dynamical symmetry based on group S{sub p}(6,R) for the description of collective modes of atomic nuclei, analysis of the Goldstone bosons in nuclear matter and analysis of saturation properties of nuclear matter. Research in theoretical astrophysics is mainly devoted to the analysis of magnetic properties of hadronic matter in neutron stars with proton admixture. Studies in general physics concern problem related to the Galilean covariance of classical and quantum mechanics. The detailed results obtained in various fields are summarised in presented abstracts as well as information about employed personnel, publications, contribution to conferences, reports, workshops and seminars.

  5. Theoretical plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This textbook which introduces plasma physics as a field of theoretical physics should be studied following the fundamental lectures of mechanics, electrodynamics, quantum theory, statistics and thermodynamics as a special field of students' education. It discusses the following topics: Motion of single particles (in a magnetic field, as drift in Hamilton theory); Equilibrium statistics of a plasma (cluster integrals, Debye-Hueckel theory of electron gas, Debye shielding and microfields); Kinetic plasma description (BBGKY hierarchy, Vlasov equation and Landau damping, Z-function, Landau-Fokker-Planck equation, Lenard-Balescu equation, Boltzmann equation and Lorentz collision term, driftkinetic equation); Macroscopic plasma description (moments, two-liquid-model, magnetohydrodynamics, magnetohydrostatics and hydromagnetic waves, the hydrodynamical regime, transport coefficients); Waves and instabilities in Vlasov systems (fundamentals, dispersion and instabilities in homogeneous systems, stationary inhomogeneous Vlasov systems, dispersion relations); Stability of magnetohydrodynamical systems (criteria of stability, applications of the energy principle, exchange instability, resistive instabilities); Nonlinear waves (wave breaking, ion-acoustic solitons, nonlinear Langmuir oscillations, the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation, drift vortices, BGK-modes); Integrability, chaos, and turbulence (integrability of the KdV-equation and the Schroedinger equation, collaps in NLS-systems and KdV systems, chaos in Schroedinger systems, weak turbulence); Appendix (system of units, Fourier and Laplace transformations, vectoranalytical relations). (orig.) With 58 figs

  6. Theoretical atomic collision physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, N.F. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA) Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Quantum Inst.)

    1990-01-01

    The theoretical atomic physics at Rice University focuses on obtaining a better understanding of the mechanisms that control inelastic collisions between excited atoms and atoms, molecules and ions. Particular attention is given to systems and processes that are of potential importance to advanced energy technologies. In the current year, significant progress has been made in quantitative studies of: quenching of low-Rydberg Na atoms in thermal energy collisions with He, Ne and Ar atoms; selective excitation resulting from charge transfer in collisions of highly stripped ions of He, Li, C, and with Li, Na and He atoms and H{sub 2} molecules at keV energies; differential elastic and single, and double electron transfer in He{sup ++} collisions with He at keV energies; inelastic electron-transfer in ultra-low-energy-energy (T=8 to 80K) collisions between {sup 3}He{sup +} and {sup 4}He and {sup 4}He{sup +} and {sup 3}He; a formalism for ionization by electron impact of ions in dense, high temperature plasmas.

  7. Theoretical Approaches to Coping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dealing with stress requires conscious effort, it cannot be perceived as equal to individual's spontaneous reactions. The intentional management of stress must not be confused withdefense mechanisms. Coping differs from adjustment in that the latter is more general, has a broader meaning and includes diverse ways of facing a difficulty.Aim: An exploration of the definition of the term "coping", the function of the coping process as well as its differentiation from other similar meanings through a literature review.Methodology: Three theoretical approaches of coping are introduced; the psychoanalytic approach; approaching by characteristics; and the Lazarus and Folkman interactive model.Results: The strategic methods of the coping approaches are described and the article ends with a review of the approaches including the functioning of the stress-coping process , the classificationtypes of coping strategies in stress-inducing situations and with a criticism of coping approaches.Conclusions: The comparison of coping in different situations is difficult, if not impossible. The coping process is a slow process, so an individual may select one method of coping under one set ofcircumstances and a different strategy at some other time. Such selection of strategies takes place as the situation changes.

  8. Statistical and theoretical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant accomplishments include the creation of field designs to detect population impacts, new census procedures for small mammals, and methods for designing studies to determine where and how much of a contaminant is extent over certain landscapes. A book describing these statistical methods is currently being written and will apply to a variety of environmental contaminants, including radionuclides. PNL scientists also have devised an analytical method for predicting the success of field eexperiments on wild populations. Two highlights of current research are the discoveries that population of free-roaming horse herds can double in four years and that grizzly bear populations may be substantially smaller than once thought. As stray horses become a public nuisance at DOE and other large Federal sites, it is important to determine their number. Similar statistical theory can be readily applied to other situations where wild animals are a problem of concern to other government agencies. Another book, on statistical aspects of radionuclide studies, is written specifically for researchers in radioecology

  9. Consumo e desempenho de animais alimentados individualmente ou em grupo e características de carcaça de animais Nelore de três classes sexuais Performance of animals fed individually or in groups and carcass traits of Nellore cattle from three sexual classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Inácio Marcondes

    2008-12-01

    , concentrated and forage for animals feed in group. Evaluate also, dry matter intake, average daily gain and feed conversion ratio by animals from one of three genders (bulls, steers or heifers fed individually or in groups, with two levels of concentrate offer (1.00 or 1.25% of BW, and carcass traits of confined Nellore cattle. Forty five Nellore cattle - 15 bulls, 15 steers and 15 heifers were used. Nine animals (three from each gender were slaughtered at beginning of the trial performing reference group. The remaining 36 animals were fed either 1.0 or 1.25% of concentrate under two feeding schemes (individually or in groups, in a 2 × 2 × 3 factorial arrangement. In order to estimate the individual DMI of animals fed in group, LIPE® was used to estimate the fecal dry matter production, Cr2O3 and TiO2 were used to estimate the individual concentrate intake and NDFi and ADFi were used to estimate the individual forage intake. At the end of the experiment all animals individually fed were slaughtered to evaluate carcass traits and yield of commercial cuts. The feed scheme had no influence upon DMI and DWG of Nellore cattle from different gender. There were no effect of 1.00 or 1.25% of concentrate on carcass traits and carcass yield. Bulls grow 24% more than steers and steers grow 22% more than females and bulls tend to be more efficient in meat deposition and had higher yield in some commercial cuts.

  10. Terrestrial animal ecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Animal Ecology project is an integral part of the terrestrial ecology program. For convenience, it is reported separately because of the specialized nature of its techniques. It includes studies to characterize faunal populations taxonomically and ecologically and to estimate density and biomass of important mammal, bird, herpetofauna, and invertebrate populations. Extensive studies of small mammal populations conducted in past years are being summarized for open literature publication. Methodology and techniques developed in the animal ecology program are expected to be vital to studies to be initiated under a newly funded 189 entitled Radioecology of Waste Management Zones. These kinds of supportive studies will be needed to determine dietary habits of important animals inhabiting waste management zones, construction of realistic food chain models, and estimating radioactivity doses to biota

  11. Statistics of lattice animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Nadler, Walder; Grassberger, Peter

    2005-07-01

    The scaling behavior of randomly branched polymers in a good solvent is studied in two to nine dimensions, modeled by lattice animals on simple hypercubic lattices. For the simulations, we use a biased sequential sampling algorithm with re-sampling, similar to the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method (PERM) used extensively for linear polymers. We obtain high statistics of animals with up to several thousand sites in all dimension 2⩽d⩽9. The partition sum (number of different animals) and gyration radii are estimated. In all dimensions we verify the Parisi-Sourlas prediction, and we verify all exactly known critical exponents in dimensions 2, 3, 4, and ⩾8. In addition, we present the hitherto most precise estimates for growth constants in d⩾3. For clusters with one site attached to an attractive surface, we verify the superuniversality of the cross-over exponent at the adsorption transition predicted by Janssen and Lyssy.

  12. Phoenix Lidar Operation Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This is an animation of the Canadian-built meteorological station's lidar, which was successfully activated on Sol 2. The animation shows how the lidar is activated by first opening its dust cover, then emitting rapid pulses of light (resembling a brilliant green laser) into the Martian atmosphere. Some of the light then bounces off particles in the atmosphere, and is reflected back down to the lidar's telescope. This allows the lidar to detect dust, clouds and fog. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Animal Watching: Outdoors and In.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, John W.

    2001-01-01

    Describes using domesticated, wild, or feral animals to teach students about nature and animal behavior. Connections can be made with psychology, economics, genetics, history, art, and other disciplines. The study of animal behavior provides opportunities for harmless student experimentation. (SAH)

  14. The experiments on healthy animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter author describes the experiments on leukotitin influence on hematosis which was held on :1. healthy animals received the preparation; 2. irradiated animals received the preparation; 3. irradiated animals didn't receive the preparation

  15. Companion animal adoption study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidhart, Laura; Boyd, Renee

    2002-01-01

    To better understand the outcomes of companion animal adoptions, Bardsley & Neidhart Inc. conducted a series of 3 surveys over a 1-year period with dog and cat owners who had adopted their pet through either a (a) Luv-A-Pet location, (b) Adopt-a-thon, or (c) traditional shelter. This article suggests opportunities to improve owners' perceptions of their pets and the adoption process through (a) providing more information before adoption about pet health and behaviors, (b) providing counseling to potential adopters to place pets appropriately, and (c) educating adopters to promote companion animal health and retention. Results demonstrate that the pet's relationship to the family unit, such as where the pet sleeps and how much time is spent with the pet, is related to the amount of veterinary care the companion animal receives, and to long-term retention. Satisfaction and retention are attributed to the pet's personality, compatibility, and behavior, rather than demographic differences among adopters or between adoption settings. The age of the companion animal at adoption, the intended recipient, and presence of children in the home also play a role. Health problems were an issue initially for half of all adopted pets, but most were resolved within 12 months. Roughly one fourth of adopters who no longer have their companion animal said their pet died. Characteristics of pets that died support the contention that spaying and neutering profoundly affects a companion animal's life span. Although retention is similar for dogs and cats, mortality is higher among cats in the first year after adoption. PMID:12578739

  16. Reactivity of Alkyldibenzothiophenes Using Theoretical Descriptors

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Luis Rivera; Pedro Navarro-Santos; Luis Hernandez-Gonzalez; Roberto Guerra-Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of the reactivity of dibenzothiophene and its methyl, dimethyl, and trimethyl derivatives show that local reactivity descriptors reproduce their experimental desulfurization reactivity trend if the first desulfurization step involves directly the sulfur atom, which only occurs if the sulfur atom is blocked at most by one methyl group. In the series of molecules {4,7-dimethyldibenzothiophene, x,4,7-trimethyldibenzothiophene (x=1,2,3)}, the most reactive molecule is 2,4...

  17. COMPAIXÃO ANIMAL

    OpenAIRE

    Márcio Seligmann Silva

    2011-01-01

    O trabalho estuda a questão da compaixão, que na história do pensamento foi ora tratada como uma marca da humanidade, ora pensada como uma marca de nossa origem natural e animal. Para Lactâncio, por exemplo, sem piedade o homem é um animal. O texto parte de uma discussão de Buffon, que falava de uma compaixão como uma de nossas “affections naturelles”. Para ele, “a alma tem menos a ver do que o corpo nesse sentimento de piedade natural e os animais, assim como o homem, sã...

  18. L’animal

    OpenAIRE

    Rongier, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    On sait que l’amitié entre Maurice Blanchot et Emmanuel Lévinas est dense, complète et exigeante. À partir de quelques textes (et des lignes de fuite), je voudrais souligner ce lien amical et intellectuel, la constance avec laquelle les deux hommes ont mutuellement nourri leur réflexion, leur écriture. Et, au fil des lectures, s’est progressivement dégagée l’idée de l’animal comme espace d’interrogation, l’animal et l’animalité comme enjeu pour lire le lien, mais aussi la distance. Trois text...

  19. God, animals and zombies

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    Argumentos neo-cartesianos recientes intentan reducir los animales a zombis filosóficos, seres sin estados de conciencia fenoménica. Si tales argumentos fuesen correctos, los animales verdaderamente no sufrirían, y, por tanto, no existiría el problema de Dios y el sufrimiento animal. En mi opinión, la afirmación de que los animales son zombis no es suficientemente plausible para proporcionar una teodicea adecuada acerca del problema de Dios y el dolor animal.

  20. Animation of MARDI Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image to view the animation This animation shows a zoom into the Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) instrument onboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. The Phoenix team will soon attempt to use a microphone on the MARDI instrument to capture sounds of Mars. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.