WorldWideScience

Sample records for animal bioassays published

  1. Profiling animal toxicants by automatically mining public bioassay data: a big data approach for computational toxicology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available In vitro bioassays have been developed and are currently being evaluated as potential alternatives to traditional animal toxicity models. Already, the progress of high throughput screening techniques has resulted in an enormous amount of publicly available bioassay data having been generated for a large collection of compounds. When a compound is tested using a collection of various bioassays, all the testing results can be considered as providing a unique bio-profile for this compound, which records the responses induced when the compound interacts with different cellular systems or biological targets. Profiling compounds of environmental or pharmaceutical interest using useful toxicity bioassay data is a promising method to study complex animal toxicity. In this study, we developed an automatic virtual profiling tool to evaluate potential animal toxicants. First, we automatically acquired all PubChem bioassay data for a set of 4,841 compounds with publicly available rat acute toxicity results. Next, we developed a scoring system to evaluate the relevance between these extracted bioassays and animal acute toxicity. Finally, the top ranked bioassays were selected to profile the compounds of interest. The resulting response profiles proved to be useful to prioritize untested compounds for their animal toxicity potentials and form a potential in vitro toxicity testing panel. The protocol developed in this study could be combined with structure-activity approaches and used to explore additional publicly available bioassay datasets for modeling a broader range of animal toxicities.

  2. Profiling Animal Toxicants by Automatically Mining Public Bioassay Data: A Big Data Approach for Computational Toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Zhang; Jui-Hua Hsieh; Hao Zhu

    2014-01-01

    In vitro bioassays have been developed and are currently being evaluated as potential alternatives to traditional animal toxicity models. Already, the progress of high throughput screening techniques has resulted in an enormous amount of publicly available bioassay data having been generated for a large collection of compounds. When a compound is tested using a collection of various bioassays, all the testing results can be considered as providing a unique bio-profile for this compound, which...

  3. Bioassay based screening of steroid derivatives in animal feed and supplements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijk, J.C.W.; Ashwin, H.M.; Kuijk, van S.J.A.; Groot, M.J.; Heskamp, H.H.; Bovee, T.F.H.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2011-01-01

    Receptor binding transcription activation bioassays are valuable tools for the screening of steroid hormones in animal feed and supplements. However, steroid derivatives often lack affinity for their cognate receptor and do not show any direct hormonal activity by themselves. These compounds are thu

  4. NTP Workshop: Animal Models for the NTP Rodent Cancer Bioassay: Stocks and Strains - Should We Switch?

    OpenAIRE

    King-Herbert, Angela; Thayer, Kristina

    2006-01-01

    The National Toxicology Program (NTP) hosted a workshop, “Animal Models for the NTP Rodent Cancer Bioassay: Strains & Stocks -- Should We Switch?” on June 16-17, 2005, at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in Research Triangle Park, NC. The workshop’s objectives were to determine (1) whether the currently used models, the F344/N rat and B6C3F1/N mouse, continue to be appropriate to identify substances that may pose a carcinogenic hazard for humans and (2) whether ...

  5. Using animal dosimetry models to interpret human bioassay data for actinide exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassay and dosimetry models are needed to estimate intakes of radionuclides, and to calculate radiation doses to target tissues following such intakes. Because of the diversity of exposure materials, individual biological variabilities, and the general lack of adequate bioassay information and knowledge of the metabolism of radionuclides, current models are based mostly on empiricism. This paper describes biokinetic/dosimetry models for U, Am and Cm. They are based on experimental data developed from studies in dogs that inhaled one of the above radionuclides in specific chemical forms and specific particle sizes. The models, which are based on similar biological principles, and, therefore, have similar structure, are applied to the very sparse human bioassay data available from cases of exposure to either U, Am, or Cm. The results thus far indicate that the lung retention for the different actinides are well described by the models, that urinary bioassay data can be described within limited time periods, and that the fecal excretion rate is not adequately described. Improvements in modeling are predicted on increased publication of human bioassay data, and better cooperative interaction between model developers and health protection professionals responsible for industrial bioassay programs. (author) 36 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  6. Assessment of the potential toxicity of a linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) to freshwater animal life by means of cladoceran bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Katiuscia da Silva; Rocha, Odete

    2010-04-01

    The acute and chronic toxic effects of LAS on the cladocerans Daphnia similis, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Ceriodaphnia silvestrii were tested. Both types of toxicity bioassays and the methods of culture and stock maintenance of the test organisms conformed to the recommendations of ABNT (Brazilian Society of Technical Standards), which closely follow the standard methods of USEPA. The results obtained for EC(50) (48 h) were: 14.17 mg L(-1) for D. similis, 11.84 mg L(-1) for C. dubia and 13.52 mg L(-1) for C. silvestrii. In the chronic toxicity tests performed on C. dubia and C. silvestrii, there was a significant decrease in the fecundity of the exposed animals; the value of NOEC for C. dubia and C. silvestrii were 1.00 mg L(-1) and 2.50 mg L(-1), respectively. Cladoceran bioassays provided evidence that LAS concentration as low as 1.00 mg L(-1) can damage invertebrate animal life in freshwaters, concentrations that can be found in many eutrophic rivers and reservoirs. PMID:20091119

  7. The ethical dimension in published animal research in critical care: the dark side of our moon

    OpenAIRE

    Huet, Olivier; de Haan, Judy B.

    2014-01-01

    The replacement, refinement, and reduction (3Rs) guidelines are the cornerstone of animal welfare practice for medical research. Nowadays, no animal research can be performed without being approved by an animal ethics committee. Therefore, we should expect that any published article would respect and promote the highest standard of animal welfare. However, in the previous issue of Critical Care, Bara and Joffe reported an unexpected finding: animal welfare is extremely poorly reported in crit...

  8. The ethical dimension in published animal research in critical care: the public face of science

    OpenAIRE

    Bara, Meredith; Ari R. Joffe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The ethical quality of animal research is important for many reasons, including for maintaining public support. We aimed to determine the reported attention to the ethical dimensions of the 3Rs (Refinement, Reduction, and Replacement) in critical care animal research published in 2012. Methods A data-collection form and instruction manual were created based on published recommendations, and completed for all consecutive critical care animal research (using mammals) publications f...

  9. Predictive values of traditional animal bioassay studies for human perinatal carcinogenesis risk determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The many physiological, biochemical, and structure differences between rodents and humans, especially with regard to gestation and fetal development, invite questions as to the utility of rodent models for the prediction of risk of perinatal carcinogenesis in humans and for extrapolation of mechanistic studies. Here, the relevance of basic generalities, derived from rodent perinatal studies, to human contexts is considered. The cross-species usefulness of these generalities was upheld by the example of carcinogen activation and detoxification as determining factors. These have been established in rodent studies and recently indicted in humans by investigations of genetic polymorphisms in cytochromes P450, N-acetyltransferase, myeloperoxidase, quinone reductase, and glutathione S-transferase. Also, published data have been analyzed comparatively for diethylstilbestrol and irradiation, the two known human transplacental carcinogenic agents. At similar doses to those experienced by humans, both diethylstilbestrol and X- and gamma-irradiation in rodents and dogs yielded increased tumors at rates similar to those for humans. In rodents, there was a clearly negative relationship between total diethylstilbestrol dose and tumors per dose unit, and a similar pattern was suggested for radiation. Diethylstilbestrol had transgenerational effects that did not diminish over three generations. Overall, this analysis of the published literature indicates that there are basic qualitative and quantitative similarities in the responsiveness of human and rodent fetuses to carcinogens, and that dose effects may be complex and in need of further investigation

  10. The ethical dimension in published animal research in critical care: the dark side of our moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huet, Olivier; de Haan, Judy B

    2014-01-01

    The replacement, refinement, and reduction (3Rs) guidelines are the cornerstone of animal welfare practice for medical research. Nowadays, no animal research can be performed without being approved by an animal ethics committee. Therefore, we should expect that any published article would respect and promote the highest standard of animal welfare. However, in the previous issue of Critical Care, Bara and Joffe reported an unexpected finding: animal welfare is extremely poorly reported in critical care research publications involving animal models.This may have a significant negative impact on the reliability of the results and on future funding for our research.The ability of septic shock animal models to translate into clinical studies has been a challenge. Therefore, every means to improve the quality of these models should be pursued. Animal welfare issues should be seen as an additional benefit to achieve this goal. It is therefore critical to draw conclusions from this study to improve the standard of animal welfare in critical care research. This has already been achieved in other fields of research, and we should follow their example. PMID:24886758

  11. Publishing on the WWW. Part 8 - Creating standalone animations from the DICOM format

    OpenAIRE

    Grech, V

    2003-01-01

    Cardiology images and animations are often available in DICOM format. This article will briefly describe the simplest and least expensive methods of converting DICOM images to small and manageable AVI format files.

  12. Publishing on the WWW : part 8 : creating standalone animations from the DICOM format

    OpenAIRE

    Grech, Victor E.

    2003-01-01

    Cardiology images and animations are often available in DICOM format. This article will briefly describe the simplest and least expensive methods of converting DICOM images to small and manageable AVI format files.

  13. Animal or Plant Disease, Gypsy Moth spray blocks, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade & Consumer Protection.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Animal or Plant Disease dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as...

  14. Herds, Exotic Animal, WI Livestock Consortium Livestock Premises; confidentiality protected by law; use for animal health emergencies only; some aggregated county data, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade & Consumer Protection.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Herds, Exotic Animal dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as 'WI...

  15. Bioassay-Directed Fractionation of Diesel and Biodiesel Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofuels are being developed as alternatives to petroleum-derived products, but published research is contradictory regarding the mutagenic activity of such emissions relative to those from petroleum diesel. We performed bioassay-directed fractionation and analyzed the polycyclic...

  16. Applications of the Poly-K Statistical Test to Life-Time Cancer Bioassay Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Hoel, David

    2009-01-01

    The statistical analysis of cancer bioassay data has historically depended on the pathological determination of the experimental animal's cause of death. The poly-k statistical test has provided a method of statistical analysis of animal bioassay data without the need for cause of death information. The test has been shown to have good statistical properties in the typical 2-year cancer bioassay. However, while the poly-k test has been applied to chronic lifetime animal studies, it has not be...

  17. Insulin-like growth factor I and II in 14 animal species and man as determined by three radioligand assays and two bioassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin-like growth factor I and II (IGF I and II) were determined by five different assays in human serum, in the sera of ten mammalian species and in chicken, turtle, and frog serum. Sera of all tested mammals contain two different IGFs corresponding to human immunoreactive IGF I and receptor reactive IGF II. Receptor reactive IGF II of most animal species does not show significant cross-reactivity in the RIA for human IGF II. IGF activity was also detected in sera of non-mammals, such as chicken and turtles, but not in frog serum. The IGF values obtained with the different assay system corresponded rather well: there is a good correlation between the values obtained in the protein binding and the fat cell assay, and between the results of the latter assays and the sum of immunoreactive IGF I and receptor reative IGF II. The results suggest that those regions in the IGF I and II molecules which are responsible for reactivity with the type I IGF and the insulin receptor have not essentially changed during evolution. Similarly, the C-region, which mainly determines the immunological properties of IGFs, appears to have remained relatively constant in the IGF I, but not in the IGF II molecule. (author)

  18. Instruments for Assessing Risk of Bias and Other Methodological Criteria of Published Animal Studies: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Krauth, David; Tracey J Woodruff; Bero, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Results from animal toxicology studies are critical to evaluating the potential harm from exposure to environmental chemicals or the safety of drugs prior to human testing. However, there is significant debate about how to evaluate the methodology and potential biases of the animal studies. There is no agreed-upon approach, and a systematic evaluation of current best practices is lacking. Objective: We performed a systematic review to identify and evaluate instruments for assessin...

  19. Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG)

  20. Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨光

    2000-01-01

    The largest animal ever to live on the earth is the blue whale(蓝鲸)It weighs about 80 tons--more than 24 elephants. It is more than 30 metres long. A newborn baby whale weighs as much as a big elephant.

  1. ANIMALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Mammals(哺乳动物)Mammals are the world's most dominant(最占优势的)animal.They are extremely(非常)diverse(多种多样的)creatures(生物,动物)that include(包括)the biggest ever animal (the blue whale鲸,which eats up to 6 tons every day),the smallest(leaf-nosed bat小蹄蝠) and the laziest(sloth树獭,who spends 80% of their time sleeping).There are over 4,600 kinds of mammals and they live in very different environments(环境)—oceans(海洋),rivers,the jungle(丛林),deserts,and plains(平原).

  2. Animal or Plant Disease, County and municipal humane offices and officers, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade & Consumer Protection.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Animal or Plant Disease dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as...

  3. A Colorimetric Bioassay for Perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinnickel, M. L.; Smith, S.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Recognition of perchlorate (ClO4-) as a widespread contaminant across the United States and its potential adverse affects towards human health has motivated the EPA to place ClO4- on its contaminant candidate list for drinking water supplies. While a federal MCL has not yet been set, a recommended public health goal of 1 ppb (μg.L-1) was established by the US EPA in 2002. To date, methods of detection require use of sensitive ion chromatographic equipment that are expensive, time consuming, and require highly trained personnel for use. Our studies are focused on the development of a highly sensitive, simple, and robust colorimetric bioassay based on the primary enzyme involved in microbial ClO4- reduction, the perchlorate reductase (Pcr). A previously published assay used reduced methyl viologen (MV, the dye is reduced with sodium hydrosulfite) as an electron donor to demonstrate Pcr activity. The assay directly correlates the amount of MV oxidized with the amount of ClO4- reduced by assuming a transfer of four electrons. To test this assumption, we compared actual concentrations of MV oxidized to ClO4- reduced in this assay. ClO4- concentrations were determined using a Dionex ICS-500 ion chromatography system, while MV concentrations were determined using a standard curve generated at 578 nm. Comparisons between the two revealed that twelve molecules of MV were oxidized for each molecule of ClO4- reduced. The oxidation of these additional eight MV molecules is explained by the interaction of the dye with chlorite (the product of the Pcr reaction) and other contaminants that could be present in the enzyme prep. This unsettling result indicated this assay would be problematic for the detection of ClO4- in soil, which has many chemicals that could react with MV. To improve upon this assay, we have tried to reduce ClO4- using less reactive dyes and reductants. The reductants ascorbic acid, NADH, and dithiothreitol drive Pcr catalyzed ClO4- reduction, however, they

  4. Animal or Plant Disease, WI Livestock Consortium Livestock Premises; confidentiality protected by law; use for animal health emergencies only; some aggregated county data, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade & Consumer Protection.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Animal or Plant Disease dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as 'WI...

  5. UNIFYING SCALER FOR BIOASSAY TESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    An extensive set of interlaboratory root bioassay data was unified using centroids of individual tests as scalers. It is shown that the dose response obeys a first order differential equation with the constant of the equation related to the sensitivity of the dose response relati...

  6. 77 FR 14837 - Bioassay at Uranium Mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... COMMISSION Bioassay at Uranium Mills AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory guide... for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-8051, ``Bioassay at Uranium Mills.'' This guide describes a bioassay program acceptable to the NRC staff for uranium mills and applicable portions...

  7. Stockyards, DATCP licensed animal markets, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade & Consumer Protection.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Stockyards dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as 'DATCP licensed...

  8. Assessment of acrylamide toxicity using a battery of standardised bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zovko, Mira; Vidaković-Cifrek, Željka; Cvetković, Želimira; Bošnir, Jasna; Šikić, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Acrylamide is a monomer widely used as an intermediate in the production of organic chemicals, e.g. polyacrylamides (PAMs). Since PAMs are low cost chemicals with applications in various industries and waste- and drinking water treatment, a certain amount of non-polymerised acrylamide is expected to end up in waterways. PAMs are non-toxic but acrylamide induces neurotoxic effects in humans and genotoxic, reproductive, and carcinogenic effects in laboratory animals. In order to evaluate the effect of acrylamide on freshwater organisms, bioassays were conducted on four species: algae Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, duckweed Lemna minor and water flea Daphnia magna according to ISO (International Organization for Standardisation) standardised methods. This approach ensures the evaluation of acrylamide toxicity on organisms with different levels of organisation and the comparability of results, and it examines the value of using a battery of low-cost standardised bioassays in the monitoring of pollution and contamination of aquatic ecosystems. These results showed that EC50 values were lower for Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata than for Daphnia magna and Lemna minor, which suggests an increased sensitivity of algae to acrylamide. According to the toxic unit approach, the values estimated by the Lemna minor and Daphnia magna bioassays, classify acrylamide as slightly toxic (TU=0-1; Class 1). The results obtained from algal bioassays (Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) revealed the toxic effect of acrylamide (TU=1-10; Class 2) on these organisms. PMID:26751864

  9. Why Publish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    In humanities, there does not seem to be any good reason to privilege the academic journal over other venues. If the goal of humanities publishing is to spread new ideas, then it seems that creating a popular Internet blog would be the better choice. However, the goal of humanities publishing is not just to spread new ideas, but to spread "good"…

  10. Virtual screening of bioassay data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schierz Amanda C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are three main problems associated with the virtual screening of bioassay data. The first is access to freely-available curated data, the second is the number of false positives that occur in the physical primary screening process, and finally the data is highly-imbalanced with a low ratio of Active compounds to Inactive compounds. This paper first discusses these three problems and then a selection of Weka cost-sensitive classifiers (Naive Bayes, SVM, C4.5 and Random Forest are applied to a variety of bioassay datasets. Results Pharmaceutical bioassay data is not readily available to the academic community. The data held at PubChem is not curated and there is a lack of detailed cross-referencing between Primary and Confirmatory screening assays. With regard to the number of false positives that occur in the primary screening process, the analysis carried out has been shallow due to the lack of cross-referencing mentioned above. In six cases found, the average percentage of false positives from the High-Throughput Primary screen is quite high at 64%. For the cost-sensitive classification, Weka's implementations of the Support Vector Machine and C4.5 decision tree learner have performed relatively well. It was also found, that the setting of the Weka cost matrix is dependent on the base classifier used and not solely on the ratio of class imbalance. Conclusions Understandably, pharmaceutical data is hard to obtain. However, it would be beneficial to both the pharmaceutical industry and to academics for curated primary screening and corresponding confirmatory data to be provided. Two benefits could be gained by employing virtual screening techniques to bioassay data. First, by reducing the search space of compounds to be screened and secondly, by analysing the false positives that occur in the primary screening process, the technology may be improved. The number of false positives arising from primary screening leads to

  11. Acarine attractants: Chemoreception, bioassay, chemistry and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Ann L; Roe, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The Acari are of significant economic importance in crop production and human and animal health. Acaricides are essential for the control of these pests, but at the same time, the number of available pesticides is limited, especially for applications in animal production. The Acari consist of two major groups, the mites that demonstrate a wide variety of life strategies, i.e., herbivory, predation and ectoparasitism, and ticks which have evolved obligatory hematophagy. The major sites of chemoreception in the acarines are the chelicerae, palps and tarsi on the forelegs. A unifying name, the "foretarsal sensory organ" (FSO), is proposed for the first time in this review for the sensory site on the forelegs of all acarines. The FSO has multiple sensory functions including olfaction, gustation, and heat detection. Preliminary transcriptomic data in ticks suggest that chemoreception in the FSO is achieved by a different mechanism from insects. There are a variety of laboratory and field bioassay methods that have been developed for the identification and characterization of attractants but minimal techniques for electrophysiology studies. Over the past three to four decades, significant progress has been made in the chemistry and analysis of function for acarine attractants in mites and ticks. In mites, attractants include aggregation, immature female, female sex and alarm pheromones; in ticks, the attraction-aggregation-attachment, assembly and sex pheromones; in mites and ticks host kairomones and plant allomones; and in mites, fungal allomones. There are still large gaps in our knowledge of chemical communication in the acarines compared to insects, especially relative to acarine pheromones, and more so for mites than ticks. However, the use of lure-and-kill and lure-enhanced biocontrol strategies has been investigated for tick and mite control, respectively, with significant environmental advantages which warrant further study. PMID:27265828

  12. A Shrinkage Estimator for Combination of Bioassays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Xiong; D.G. Chen; Zhen-hai Yang

    2007-01-01

    A shrinkage estimator and a maximum likelihood estimator are proposed in this paper for combination of bioassays. The shrinkage estimator is obtained in closed form which incorporates prior information just on the common log relative potency after the homogeneity test for combination of bioassays is accepted. It is a practical improvement over other estimators which require iterative procedure to obtain the estimator for the relative potency. A real data is also used to show the superiorities for the newly-proposed procedures.

  13. Publisher's Announcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriven, Neil

    2003-12-01

    We are delighted to announce that the new Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and General for 2004 will be Professor Carl M Bender of Washington University, St. Louis. Carl will, with the help of his world class editorial board, maintain standards of scientific rigour whilst ensuring that research published is of the highest importance. Carl attained his first degree in physics at Cornell University before studying for his PhD at Harvard. He later worked at The Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and at MIT before assuming his current position at Washington University, St Louis. He has been a visiting professor at Technion, Haifa, and Imperial College, London and a scientific consultant for Los Alamos National Laboratory. His main expertise is in using classical applied mathematics to solve a broad range of problems in high-energy theoretical physics and mathematical physics. Since the publication of his book Advanced Mathematical Methods for Scientists and Engineers, written with Steven Orszag, he has been regarded as an expert on the subject of asymptotic analysis and perturbative methods. `Carl publishes his own internationally-important research in the journal and has been an invaluable, energetic member of the Editorial Board for some time' said Professor Ed Corrigan, Carl's predecessor as Editor, `he will be an excellent Editor-in-Chief'. Our grateful thanks and best wishes go to Professor Corrigan who has done a magnificent job for the journal during his five-year tenure.

  14. Bioassay criteria for environmental restoration workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental restoration (ER) work at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford Site posed questions concerning when to perform bioassay monitoring of workers for potential intakes of radioactivity. Application of criteria originally developed for use inside radionuclide processing facilities to ER work resulted in overly restrictive bioassay requirements. ER work typically involves site characterization or, excavating large quantities of potentially contaminated soil, rather than working with concentrated quantities of radioactivity as in a processing facility. An improved approach, tailored to ER work, provided soil contamination concentrations above which worker bioassay would be required. Soil concentrations were derived assuming acute or chronic intakes of 2% of an Annual Limit on Intake (ALI), or a potential committed effective dose equivalent of 100 mrem, and conservative dust loading of air from the work. When planning ER work, the anticipated soil concentration and corresponding need for bioassay could be estimated from work-site historical records. Once site work commenced, soil sampling and work-place surveys could be used to determine bioassay needs. This approach substantially reduced the required number of bioassay samples with corresponding reductions in analytical costs, schedules, and more flexible work-force management. (Work supported by the US Department of Energy under contract DOE-AC06-76RLO 1830.)

  15. Animal Distribution and Habitat, Other, Ichthyoplankton Sampling Locations; The ichthyoplankton survey is jointly conducted by the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography and RIDEM, under the direction of Dr. Grace Klein-MacPhee., Published in 2003, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Animal Distribution and Habitat, Other dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of...

  16. Soil bioassays and the 129I problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine-129 is a very long-lived radionuclide associated with spent nuclear fuel. Because 129I has a 107-year half-life, is very mobile in the environment and is a biologically essential element, it is the most limiting radionuclide affecting disposal of spent fuel. Traditionally, the potential impacts of 129I have been estimated for human receptors, with the implicit assumption that all other organisms are less at risk. Risk is the operative word, the objective for protection of humans is to protect individuals, whereas the objective for other biota is usually to protect populations. Here, 129I poses an interesting problem: the half-life is so long it is barely radioactive. Thus, the chemical toxicity may be more limiting than the radiological impact. A series of soil bioassays were employed, including a life-cycle plant (Brassica rapa) bioassay, a modified earthworm survival bioassay, a microarthropod colonization/survival bioassay, and a series of more common soil and aquatic bioassays. Chemical toxicity was indicated at soil concentrations as low as 5 mg kg-1. At these levels, radiological impact on non-human biota would not be expected, and therefore the chemical toxicity effects are more critical. However, human food-chain model estimates show these levels, as pure 129I, would be unacceptable for human radiological exposure, so that for 129I, protection of the human environment should also be protective of non-human biota

  17. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  18. Comparison of solid-phase bioassays and ecoscores to evaluate the toxicity of contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five bioassays (inhibition of lettuce germination and growth, earthworm mortality, inhibition of springtail population growth, avoidance by springtails) were compared, using four coke factory soils contaminated by PAHs and trace elements, before and after biotreatment. For each bioassay, several endpoints were combined in an 'ecoscore', a measure of test sensitivity. Ecoscores pooled over all tested bioassays revealed that most organisms were highly sensitive to the concentration of 3-ring PAHs. When four soils were combined, behavioural tests using the springtail Folsomia candida showed higher ecoscores, i.e. they were most sensitive to soil contamination. However, despite overall higher sensitivity of behavioural tests, which could be used for cheap and rapid assessment of soil toxicity, especially at low levels of contamination, some test endpoints were more sensitive than others, and this may differ from a soil to another, pointing to the need for a battery of bioassays when more itemized results are expected. - The avoidance test using the soil springtail Folsomia candida is globally more sensitive to PAH contamination than acute and chronic toxicity bioassays using plants and animals but a battery of tests could reveal better in detail.

  19. Comparison of solid-phase bioassays and ecoscores to evaluate the toxicity of contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lors, Christine [Universite Lille Nord de France, 1bis rue Georges Lefevre, 59044 Lille Cedex (France); Ecole des Mines de Douai, MPE-GCE, 941 rue Charles-Bourseul, 59500 Douai (France); Centre National de Recherche sur les Sites et Sols Pollues, 930 Boulevard Lahure, BP 537, 59505 Douai Cedex (France); Ponge, Jean-Francois, E-mail: ponge@mnhn.f [Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, CNRS UMR 7179, 4 Avenue du Petit-Chateau, 91800 Brunoy (France); Martinez Aldaya, Maite [Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, CNRS UMR 7179, 4 Avenue du Petit-Chateau, 91800 Brunoy (France); Damidot, Denis [Universite Lille Nord de France, 1bis rue Georges Lefevre, 59044 Lille Cedex (France); Ecole des Mines de Douai, MPE-GCE, 941 rue Charles-Bourseul, 59500 Douai (France)

    2010-08-15

    Five bioassays (inhibition of lettuce germination and growth, earthworm mortality, inhibition of springtail population growth, avoidance by springtails) were compared, using four coke factory soils contaminated by PAHs and trace elements, before and after biotreatment. For each bioassay, several endpoints were combined in an 'ecoscore', a measure of test sensitivity. Ecoscores pooled over all tested bioassays revealed that most organisms were highly sensitive to the concentration of 3-ring PAHs. When four soils were combined, behavioural tests using the springtail Folsomia candida showed higher ecoscores, i.e. they were most sensitive to soil contamination. However, despite overall higher sensitivity of behavioural tests, which could be used for cheap and rapid assessment of soil toxicity, especially at low levels of contamination, some test endpoints were more sensitive than others, and this may differ from a soil to another, pointing to the need for a battery of bioassays when more itemized results are expected. - The avoidance test using the soil springtail Folsomia candida is globally more sensitive to PAH contamination than acute and chronic toxicity bioassays using plants and animals but a battery of tests could reveal better in detail.

  20. Efficient algal bioassay based on short-term photosynthetic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure is described for measuring the effects of toxicants on algal photosynthesis (carbon-14 bicarbonate (H14CO3)uptake) in 4-h experiments. The results for individual aromatic compounds and the water-soluble fraction (WSF) of a synthetic oil are presented as examples of applications of the bioassay. The toxicity of the WSF varied among the seven algal species tested, and the responses of some species were pH-dependent. With Selenastrum capricornutum as the test organism, the bioassay results were unaffected by variations in pH from 7.0 to 9.0, light intensity from 40 to 200 μeinsteins m-2 s-1, culture density up to 0.5 mg chlorophyll a per litre, and agitation up to 100 rpm. The photosynthesis bioassay is simpler and faster (4 h versus 4 to 14 days), uses smaller culture volumes, and requires less space than static culture-growth tests. One person can conveniently test four materials per day, and the entire procedure, including preparation, exposure, and analysis, takes less than two days. The short incubation time reduces bottle effects such as pH changes, accumulation of metabolic products, nutrient depletion, and bacterial growth. Processes that remove or alter the test materials are also minimized. The data presented here indicate that algal photosynthesis is inhibited at toxicant concentrations similar to those that cause acute effects in aquatic animals. A model of a pelagic ecosystem is used to demonstrate that even temporary (seven-day) inhibition of algal photosynthesis can have a measurable impact on other trophic levels, particularly if the other trophic levels are also experiencing toxic effects. 25 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  1. Brine Shrimp Bioassays: A Useful Technique in Biological Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Stanley A.; Maness, Ian B.

    2004-01-01

    A technique to measure the potency of leaf compounds against herbivores with the use of a bioassay is described. Bioassays are useful in classes where students have career plans like medicine in which bioassays can be used as tools for screening plants for possible medicinal potency.

  2. 9 CFR 390.2 - Published materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... to Agency programs, which implement the laws listed in the Delegation of Authority, 7 CFR 2.15(a... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Published materials. 390.2 Section 390... § 390.2 Published materials. FSIS rules and regulations relating to its regulatory responsibilities...

  3. Padronização da titulação da toxina épsilon de Clostridium perfringens tipo D em linhagem contínua de células como alternativa ao bioensaio animal Standardization of the titration of the epsilon toxin of Clostridium perfringens type D in cell line as an alternative to animal bioassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Formiga Souza Júnior

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxemia, também chamada de doença do rim pulposo, doença que acomete os ruminantes domésticos, é causada pela ação da toxina épsilon produzida pelo Clostridium perfringens tipo D, um anaeróbio comumente isolado do solo e das fezes de animais sadios. O método tradicional de diagnóstico baseia-se na detecção e classificação dessa exotoxina no conteúdo intestinal por meio da soroneutralização em camundongos. Com isso, o objetivo deste estudo foi padronizar um teste para detecção e titulação dessa toxina in vitro e compará-lo ao fenômeno in vivo. Para isso, uma partida de toxina épsilon de Clostridium perfringens tipo D foi titulada em camundongos e em várias linhagens contínuas de células. Após a determinação da linhagem celular mais sensível, realizaram-se ensaios de titulação in vitro de diluições de uma partida de toxina, comparando-os com os títulos in vivo conhecidos. Os resultados foram agrupados, e foi desenvolvida a equação matemática que melhor adaptou-se aos intervalos trabalhados. A linhagem MDCK, além de mais sensível, demonstrou que o fenômeno observado in vitro pode ser expresso por meio da equação matemática que apresenta uma correlação de 98,33%, com a dose mínima mortal determinada in vivo. Portanto, a linhagem MDCK permite titular a toxina épsilon de C. perfringens tipo D de forma específica e sensível, além de ser uma técnica prática, rápida e que dispensa o uso de animais.Enterotoxemia (also called pulpy kidney disease is an enteric disease, that affect ruminants, produced by epsilon toxin from Clostridium perfringens type D, an anaerobic commonly isolated from soil and feces of healthy animals. The diagnostic is based on detection of this exotoxin in the intestinal content by soroneutralization in mice. Therefore, this study aimed to standardize a test for detection and titration of the toxin in vitro, and compare it with the phenomenon in vivo. A volume of epsilon

  4. Use of viral promoters in mammalian cell-based bioassays: How reliable?

    OpenAIRE

    Gill-Sharma Manjit; Choudhuri Jyoti; Betrabet Shrikant S

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Cell-based bioassays have been suggested for screening of hormones and drug bioactivities. They are a plausible alternative to animal based methods. The technique used is called receptor/reporter system. Receptor/reporter system was initially developed as a research technique to understand gene function. Often reporter constructs containing viral promoters were used because they could be expressed with very 'high' magnitude in a variety of cell types in the laboratory. On the other h...

  5. A Nisin Bioassay Based on Bioluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlström, G.; Saris, P. E. J.

    1999-01-01

    A Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain that can sense the bacteriocin nisin and transduce the signal into bioluminescence was constructed. By using this strain, a bioassay based on bioluminescence was developed for quantification of nisin, for detection of nisin in milk, and for identification of nisin-producing strains. As little as 0.0125 ng of nisin per ml was detected within 3 h by this bioluminescence assay. This detection limit was lower than in previously described methods.

  6. A Multichannel Bioluminescence Determination Platform for Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Naganawa, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol introduces a multichannel bioluminescence determination platform allowing a high sample throughput determination of weak bioluminescence with reduced standard deviations. The platform is designed to carry a multichannel conveyer, an optical filter, and a mirror cap. The platform enables us to near-simultaneously determine ligands in multiple samples without the replacement of the sample tubes. Furthermore, the optical filters beneath the multichannel conveyer are designed to easily discriminate colors during assays. This optical system provides excellent time- and labor-efficiency to users during bioassays. PMID:27424912

  7. Publishing with XML structure, enter, publish

    CERN Document Server

    Prost, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    XML is now at the heart of book publishing techniques: it provides the industry with a robust, flexible format which is relatively easy to manipulate. Above all, it preserves the future: the XML text becomes a genuine tactical asset enabling publishers to respond quickly to market demands. When new publishing media appear, it will be possible to very quickly make your editorial content available at a lower cost. On the downside, XML can become a bottomless pit for publishers attracted by its possibilities. There is a strong temptation to switch to audiovisual production and to add video and a

  8. Arthropod Distribution and Habitat, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) animal distribution in Wisconsin - Rusty Crayfish, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Arthropod Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2009....

  9. Fish Distribution and Habitat, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) animal distribution in Wisconsin - Rainbow Smelt, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Fish Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2009. It...

  10. Mollusk Distribution and Habitat, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) animal distribution in Wisconsin - Zebra mussels, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Mollusk Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2009....

  11. Jellyfish Distribution and Habitat, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) animal distribution in Wisconsin - Freshwater jellyfish, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Jellyfish Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2009....

  12. Arthropod Distribution and Habitat, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) animal distribution in Wisconsin - Spiny/fishhook water flea, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Arthropod Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2009....

  13. Herds, Sheep, WI Livestock Consortium Livestock Premises; confidentiality protected by law; use for animal health emergencies only; some aggregated county data, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade & Consumer Protection.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Herds, Sheep dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as 'WI Livestock...

  14. Herds, Beef, WI Livestock Consortium Livestock Premises; confidentiality protected by law; use for animal health emergencies only; some aggregated county data, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade & Consumer Protection.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Herds, Beef dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as 'WI Livestock...

  15. SINGLE LABORATORY EVALUATION OF THE HYDROGEN OXIDATION SOIL BIOASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hydrogen Oxidation Soil Bioassay was single laboratory tested as a potential method for monitoring hazardous wastes and hazardous waste sites. The bioassay is based on the rate of hydrogen consumption by soil microorganisms. Oxidation of hydrogen to water is inhibited when va...

  16. Embracing Electronic Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Gordon

    1996-01-01

    Electronic publishing is the grandest revolution in the capture and dissemination of academic and professional knowledge since Caxton developed the printing press. This article examines electronic publishing, describes different electronic publishing scenarios (authors' cooperative, consolidator/retailer/agent oligopsony, publisher oligopoly), and…

  17. Cell-based bioassays in microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itle, Laura J.; Zguris, Jeanna C.; Pishko, Michael V.

    2004-12-01

    The development of cell-based bioassays for high throughput drug screening or the sensing of biotoxins is contingent on the development of whole cell sensors for specific changes in intracellular conditions and the integration of those systems into sample delivery devices. Here we show the feasibility of using a 5-(and-6)-carboxy SNARF-1, acetoxymethyl ester, acetate, a fluorescent dye capable of responding to changes in intracellular pH, as a detection method for the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide. We used photolithography to entrap cells with this dye within poly(ethylene) glyocol diacrylate hydrogels in microfluidic channels. After 18 hours of exposure to lipopolysaccharide, we were able to see visible changes in the fluorescent pattern. This work shows the feasibility of using whole cell based biosensors within microfluidic networks to detect cellular changes in response to exogenous agents.

  18. Performance characteristics of high performance liquid chromatography, first order derivative UV spectrophotometry and bioassay for fluconazole determination in capsules

    OpenAIRE

    Josilene Chaves Ruela Corrêa; Camila Reichman; Hérida Regina Nunes Salgado; Cristina Duarte Vianna-Soares

    2012-01-01

    The bioassay, first order derivative UV spectrophotometry and chromatographic methods for assaying fluconazole capsules were compared. They have shown great advantages over the earlier published methods. Using the first order derivative, the UV spectrophotometry method does not suffer interference of excipients. Validation parameters such as linearity, precision, accuracy, limit of detection and limit of quantitation were determined. All methods were linear and reliable within acceptable limi...

  19. Copyright of Electronic Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Elaine; Wang, Bob

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes the importance of copyright, considers the main causes of copyright infringement in electronic publishing, discusses fair use of a copyrighted work, and suggests methods to safeguard copyrighted electronic publishing, including legislation, contracts, and technology. (Author/LRW)

  20. Darwin and his publisher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClay, David

    2009-01-01

    Charles Darwin's publisher John Murray played an important, if often underrated, role in bringing his theories to the public. As their letters and publishing archives show they had a friendly, business like and successful relationship. This was despite fundamental scientific and religious differences between the men. In addition to publishing Darwin, Murray also published many of the critical and supportive works and reviews which Darwin's own works excited. PMID:19960865

  1. Digital self-publishing

    OpenAIRE

    KRANJC, ALJAŽ

    2016-01-01

    Digital publishing (also referred to as e-publishing or digital publishing) includes the digital publication of e-books, digital magazines, and the development of digital libraries and catalogs. It has become common to distribute books, magazines, and newspapers to consumers in the digital form. There are a lot of different online tools for creating and formatting our texts, depending on their type (plain text, scientific articles, web content). We have reviewed several self-publishing platfo...

  2. Scholarly electronic publishing bibliography

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, Jr., Charles W.

    2005-01-01

    The Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography (SEPB) presents selected English-language articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet. Most sources have been published between 1990 and the present; however, a limited number of key sources published prior to 1990 are also included. Where possible, links are provided to sources that are freely available on the Internet. SEPB includes "Scholar...

  3. Information for establishing bioassay measurements and evaluations of tritium exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes information and references used in developing regulatory guidance on programs for the bioassay of tritium as well as information useful in planning and conducting tritium bioassay programs and evaluating bioassay data. A review of literature on tritium radiobiology is included to provide a ready source of information useful for estimating internal doses of tritium and risks for the various tritium compounds and forms, including elemental (gaseous) tritium. Simplified and conservative dose conversion factors are derived and tabulated for easy reference in program planning, safety evaluations, and compliance determinations

  4. Information for establishing bioassay measurements and evaluations of tritium exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, A.

    1983-06-01

    This report summarizes information and references used in developing regulatory guidance on programs for the bioassay of tritium as well as information useful in planning and conducting tritium bioassay programs and evaluating bioassay data. A review of literature on tritium radiobiology is included to provide a ready source of information useful for estimating internal doses of tritium and risks for the various tritium compounds and forms, including elemental (gaseous) tritium. Simplified and conservative dose conversion factors are derived and tabulated for easy reference in program planning, safety evaluations, and compliance determinations.

  5. Collection and control of tritium bioassay samples at Pantex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantex is the final assembly/disassembly point for US nuclear weapons. The Pantex internal dosimetry section monitors radiation workers once a month for tritium exposure. In order to manage collection and control of the bioassay specimens efficiently, a bar code system for collection of samples was developed and implemented to speed up the process and decrease the number of errors probable when transferring data. In the past, all the bioassay data from samples were entered manually into a computer database. Transferring the bioassay data from the liquid scintillation counter to each individual's dosimetry record required as much as two weeks of concentrated effort

  6. Bioassays for the determination of nitrification inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunditz, Camilla

    1999-07-01

    Requirements for nitrogen reduction in wastewater treatment plants were introduced in Sweden in the early 1990's. This was a governmental move to reduce the nitrogen discharges to the Baltic and Kattegat in order to prevent eutrophication. The nitrification process in wastewater treatment plants is performed by nitrifying bacteria. These are susceptible to inhibition and it is of great importance that the influent water does not contain toxic compounds. Therefore, there is a need for assays for the determination of nitrification inhibition. This thesis describes the development and applications of such bioassays. Pure cultures of Nitrosomonas sp. and Nitrobacter sp. were isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant. These cultures were used as test organisms in the development of bioassays for nitrification inhibition measurements. The assays are based on two different principles; cell suspensions of the bacteria, performed in test tubes, and mediated amperometric biosensors with the bacteria immobilised. Ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation are studied separately without interference from other organisms, which makes it easier to interpret the results. The cell suspension assays were applied to samples of industrial and municipal wastewater. The Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter assays showed to have different inhibition patterns. A large percentage of the Swedish municipal wastewater treatment plants were found to receive inhibitory influent water, but the inhibition level was generally low. Compared to an assay based on activated sludge, the screening method, the pure culture assays found more samples of influent water strongly inhibitory or stimulating. The highest correlation was found between the screening method and the Nitrosomonas assay. The Nitrobacter assay was found to be the most sensitive method. Assessment of toxicity of a number of chemical substances was studied using the biosensors, together with the cell suspension assays

  7. Bioassay Phantoms Using Medical Images and Computer Aided Manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation bioassay program relies on a set of standard human phantoms to calibrate and assess radioactivity levels inside a human body for radiation protection and nuclear medicine imaging purposes. However, the methodologies in the development and application of anthropomorphic phantoms, both physical and computational, had mostly remained the same for the past 40 years. We herein propose a 3-year research project to develop medical image-based physical and computational phantoms specifically for radiation bioassay applications involving internally deposited radionuclides. The broad, long-term objective of this research was to set the foundation for a systematic paradigm shift away from the anatomically crude phantoms in existence today to realistic and ultimately individual-specific bioassay methodologies. This long-term objective is expected to impact all areas of radiation bioassay involving nuclear power plants, U.S. DOE laboratories, and nuclear medicine clinics.

  8. Bioassay Phantoms Using Medical Images and Computer Aided Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. X. Geroge Xu

    2011-01-28

    A radiation bioassay program relies on a set of standard human phantoms to calibrate and assess radioactivity levels inside a human body for radiation protection and nuclear medicine imaging purposes. However, the methodologies in the development and application of anthropomorphic phantoms, both physical and computational, had mostly remained the same for the past 40 years. We herein propose a 3-year research project to develop medical image-based physical and computational phantoms specifically for radiation bioassay applications involving internally deposited radionuclides. The broad, long-term objective of this research was to set the foundation for a systematic paradigm shift away from the anatomically crude phantoms in existence today to realistic and ultimately individual-specific bioassay methodologies. This long-term objective is expected to impact all areas of radiation bioassay involving nuclear power plants, U.S. DOE laboratories, and nuclear medicine clinics.

  9. Bioassay for SF 86-327, a new antifungal agent.

    OpenAIRE

    Kan, V L; Henderson, D. K.; Bennett, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    A bioassay with Trichophyton mentagrophytes is described for SF 86-327, an allylamine antifungal agent. SF 86-327 serum concentrations were measured by bioassay in 117 serum sampler from five patients receiving 500 mg/day. The peak, trough, and area under the concentration-time curve were determined after the first dose and at steady state. Drug accumulation occurred with prolonged therapy.

  10. Plant bioassays to assess toxicity of textile sludge compost

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo Ademir Sérgio Ferreira de; Monteiro Regina Teresa Rosim

    2005-01-01

    Composting of industrial wastes is increasing because of recycling requirements set on organic wastes. The evaluation of toxicity of these wastes by biological testing is therefore extremely important for screening the suitability of waste for land application. The toxicity of a textile sludge compost was investigated using seed germination and plant growth bioassays using soybean and wheat. Compost samples were mixed with water (seed germination bioassay) or nutrient solution (plant growth b...

  11. Screening for estrogen residues in calf urine: Comparison of a validated yeast estrogen bioassay and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.W.F.; Bovee, T.F.H.; Heskamp, H.H.; Lasaroms, J.J.P.; Sanders, M.B.; Rhijn, van J.A.; Groot, M.J.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2006-01-01

    Within the European Union, the control for residues of illegal hormones in food-producing animals is based on urine analysis for a few target analytes using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and/or liquid chromatography¿tandem mass spectrometry. Recently, we developed a robust yeast bioassay scre

  12. Documenting Norwegian Scholarly Publishing

    OpenAIRE

    R.W. Vaagan

    2005-01-01

    From 2005-2006, scholarly publishing, including e-publishing, becomes one of several criteria used by The Ministry of Education and Science in financing research in Norwegian universities and colleges. Based on qualitative methodology and critical case sampling of recent Norwegian policy documents and reports, combined with typical case sampling of articles on e-publishing 2000-2005, especially from D-Lib magazine (Patton, 2002; Hawkins, 2001), the article discusses trends in Norwegian schola...

  13. Electronic publishing and bibliometrics

    OpenAIRE

    Moed, H.F.

    2009-01-01

    This lecture deals with the relationships between electronic publishing and bibliometrics, the quantitative study of scientific-scholarly texts. It gives an overview of the effects of recent trends in electronic publishing upon the availability of bibliographic or bibliometric databases, indexing of publications, the construction of new bibliometric indicators, and upon the research topics in bibliometrics and quantitative studies of science. In fact, electronic publishing constitutes an impo...

  14. Publishing studies: what else?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Legendre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to reposition “publishing studies” in the long process that goes from the beginning of book history to the current research on cultural industries. It raises questions about interdisciplinarity and the possibility of considering publishing independently of other sectors of the media and cultural offerings. Publishing is now included in a large range of industries and, at the same time, analyses tend to become more and more segmented according to production sectors and scientific fields. In addition to the problems created, from the professional point of view, by this double movement, this one requires a questioning of the concept of “publishing studies”.

  15. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, Layer identifies occurrences of rare, threatened and endangered plants, animals, exemplary or unique natural communities, and important animal assemblages., Published in 1995, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, NC DENR / Office of Conservation, Planning, and Community Affairs / Natural Heritage Program.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of...

  16. Data Sharing & Publishing at Nature Publishing Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDecar, J. C.; Hrynaszkiewicz, I.; Hufton, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the research community has come to recognize that upon-request data sharing has important limitations1,2. The Nature-titled journals feel that researchers have a duty to share data without undue qualifications, in a manner that allows others to replicate and build upon their published findings. Historically, the Nature journals have been strong supporters of data deposition in communities with existing data mandates, and have required data sharing upon request in all other cases. To help address some of the limitations of upon-request data sharing, the Nature titles have strengthened their existing data policies and forged a new partnership with Scientific Data, to promote wider data sharing in discoverable, citeable and reusable forms, and to ensure that scientists get appropriate credit for sharing3. Scientific Data is a new peer-reviewed journal for descriptions of research datasets, which works with a wide of range of public data repositories4. Articles at Scientific Data may either expand on research publications at other journals or may be used to publish new datasets. The Nature Publishing Group has also signed the Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles5, and Scientific Data is our first journal to include formal data citations. We are currently in the process of adding data citation support to our various journals. 1 Wicherts, J. M., Borsboom, D., Kats, J. & Molenaar, D. The poor availability of psychological research data for reanalysis. Am. Psychol. 61, 726-728, doi:10.1037/0003-066x.61.7.726 (2006). 2 Vines, T. H. et al. Mandated data archiving greatly improves access to research data. FASEB J. 27, 1304-1308, doi:10.1096/fj.12-218164 (2013). 3 Data-access practices strengthened. Nature 515, 312, doi:10.1038/515312a (2014). 4 More bang for your byte. Sci. Data 1, 140010, doi:10.1038/sdata.2014.10 (2014). 5 Data Citation Synthesis Group: Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles. (FORCE11, San Diego, CA, 2014).

  17. Elearning and digital publishing

    CERN Document Server

    Ching, Hsianghoo Steve; Mc Naught, Carmel

    2006-01-01

    ""ELearning and Digital Publishing"" will occupy a unique niche in the literature accessed by library and publishing specialists, and by university teachers and planners. It examines the interfaces between the work done by four groups of university staff who have been in the past quite separate from, or only marginally related to, each other - library staff, university teachers, university policy makers, and staff who work in university publishing presses. All four groups are directly and intimately connected with the main functions of universities - the creation, management and dissemination

  18. Soil bioassays and the {sup 129}I problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, S.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Iodine-129 is a very long-lived radionuclide associated with spent nuclear fuel. Because {sup 129}I has a 10{sup 7}-year half-life, is very mobile in the environment and is a biologically essential element, it is the most limiting radionuclide affecting disposal of spent fuel. Traditionally, the potential impacts of {sup 129}I have been estimated for human receptors, with the implicit assumption that all other organisms are less at risk. Risk is the operative word, the objective for protection of humans is to protect individuals, whereas the objective for other biota is usually to protect populations. Here, {sup 129}I poses an interesting problem: the half-life is so long it is barely radioactive. Thus, the chemical toxicity may be more limiting than the radiological impact. A series of soil bioassays were employed, including a life-cycle plant (Brassica rapa) bioassay, a modified earthworm survival bioassay, a microarthropod colonization/survival bioassay, and a series of more common soil and aquatic bioassays. Chemical toxicity was indicated at soil concentrations as low as 5 mg kg{sup {minus}1}. At these levels, radiological impact on non-human biota would not be expected, and therefore the chemical toxicity effects are more critical. However, human food-chain model estimates show these levels, as pure {sup 129}I, would be unacceptable for human radiological exposure, so that for {sup 129}I, protection of the human environment should also be protective of non-human biota.

  19. Fast and accurate semantic annotation of bioassays exploiting a hybrid of machine learning and user confirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alex M; Bunin, Barry A; Litterman, Nadia K; Schürer, Stephan C; Visser, Ubbo

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatics and computer aided drug design rely on the curation of a large number of protocols for biological assays that measure the ability of potential drugs to achieve a therapeutic effect. These assay protocols are generally published by scientists in the form of plain text, which needs to be more precisely annotated in order to be useful to software methods. We have developed a pragmatic approach to describing assays according to the semantic definitions of the BioAssay Ontology (BAO) project, using a hybrid of machine learning based on natural language processing, and a simplified user interface designed to help scientists curate their data with minimum effort. We have carried out this work based on the premise that pure machine learning is insufficiently accurate, and that expecting scientists to find the time to annotate their protocols manually is unrealistic. By combining these approaches, we have created an effective prototype for which annotation of bioassay text within the domain of the training set can be accomplished very quickly. Well-trained annotations require single-click user approval, while annotations from outside the training set domain can be identified using the search feature of a well-designed user interface, and subsequently used to improve the underlying models. By drastically reducing the time required for scientists to annotate their assays, we can realistically advocate for semantic annotation to become a standard part of the publication process. Once even a small proportion of the public body of bioassay data is marked up, bioinformatics researchers can begin to construct sophisticated and useful searching and analysis algorithms that will provide a diverse and powerful set of tools for drug discovery researchers. PMID:25165633

  20. [Investigation on pattern and methods of quality control for Chinese materia medica based on dao-di herbs and bioassay - bioassay for Coptis chinensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dan; Xiao, Xiao-he

    2011-05-01

    Establishment of bioassay methods is the technical issues to be faced with in the bioassay of Chinese materia medica. Taking the bioassay of Coptis chinensis Franch. as an example, the establishment process and application of the bioassay methods (including bio-potency and bio-activity fingerprint) were explained from the aspects of methodology, principle of selection, experimental design, method confirmation and data analysis. The common technologies were extracted and formed with the above aspects, so as to provide technical support for constructing pattern and method of the quality control for Chinese materia medica based on the dao-di herbs and bioassay. PMID:21800546

  1. About EBSCO Publishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>EBSCO Publishing,headquartered in Ipswich,Massachusetts[1],is an aggregator of premium full-text content. EBSCO Publishing’s core business is providing online databases via EBSCOhost to libraries worldwide.

  2. The Book Publishing Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Paul Simon; Giuditta De Prato

    2012-01-01

    This report offers an in-depth analysis of the major economic developments in the book publishing industry. The analysis integrates data from a statistical report published earlier as part of this project. The report is divided into 4 main parts. Chapter 1, the introduction, puts the sector into an historical perspective. Chapter 2 introduces the markets at a global and regional level; describes some of the major EU markets (France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom). Chapter 3 ana...

  3. PLAGIARISM IN SCIENTIFIC PUBLISHING

    OpenAIRE

    Masic, Izet

    2012-01-01

    Scientific publishing is the ultimate product of scientist work. Number of publications and their quoting are measures of scientist success while unpublished researches are invisible to the scientific community, and as such nonexistent. Researchers in their work rely on their predecessors, while the extent of use of one scientist work, as a source for the work of other authors is the verification of its contributions to the growth of human knowledge. If the author has published an article in ...

  4. Open Access Publishing

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Heather

    2007-01-01

    An overview of open access publishing, for college faculty. Presents a definition of open access, the two roads to open access (OA publishing and self-archiving), overview of business models for open access, and examples of open access journals, with a focus on journals developed in British Columbia, including one (Topics in Scholarly Communication) developed by graduate students as a class assignment, and another developed by high school students (The Pink Voice). Includes a handout of res...

  5. Open-Access Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedjeljko Frančula

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nature, one of the most prominent scientific journals dedicated one of its issues to recent changes in scientific publishing (Vol. 495, Issue 7442, 27 March 2013. Its editors stressed that words technology and revolution are closely related when it comes to scientific publishing. In addition, the transformation of research publishing is not as much a revolution than an attrition war in which all sides are buried. The most important change they refer to is the open-access model in which an author or an institution pays in advance for publishing a paper in a journal, and the paper is then available to users on the Internet free of charge.According to preliminary results of a survey conducted among 23 000 scientists by the publisher of Nature, 45% of them believes all papers should be published in open access, but at the same time 22% of them would not allow the use of papers for commercial purposes. Attitudes toward open access vary according to scientific disciplines, leading the editors to conclude the revolution still does not suit everyone.

  6. From the 'cinematic' to the 'anime-ic': Issues of movement in anime

    OpenAIRE

    Ruddell, C

    2008-01-01

    This is the author's accepted manuscript. The final published article is available from the link below. This article explores the way that movement is formally depicted in anime. Drawing on Thomas Lamarre's concepts of the `cinematic' and the `anime-ic', the article interrogates further the differences in movement and action in anime from traditional filmic form. While often considered in terms of `flatness', anime offers spectacle, character development and, ironically, depth through the ...

  7. " Animal, trop animal "

    OpenAIRE

    Potestà, Andréa

    2010-01-01

    Dans la tradition philosophique, on trouve plusieurs définitions de l’homme. La célèbre définition aristotélicienne, zoon logon echon (animal doué du langage ou animal rationnel) fournit le paradigme ainsi que la méthode de toutes les définitions successives. Il s’agit d’ajouter au vivant, à l’animal, quelque chose d’autre, quelque chose de plus, qui permette de le caractériser et le fasse entendre comme différent des bêtes. Cette diversité peut être conçue différemment : en tant qu’élévation...

  8. Environmental effects of dredging. A chronic sublethal sediment bioassay with the marine polychaete nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, T.M.; Moore, D.W.; Bridges, T.S.

    1995-01-01

    This note provides a general overview of a new 28-day chronic sublethal sediment bioassay designed for the regulatory evaluation of dredged material. The bioassay uses survival and growth rate endpoints with the polychaete Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata. The primary technical reference for this new bioassay is Dillon, Moore, and Reish (in press), upon which this overview is based. Sediment bioassays are used to assess the aggregate toxicity of sediment associated anthropogenic chemicals. Historically, these bioassays have measured survival of highly sensitive species following acute exposures (10 days). A new generation of sediment bioassays is being developed in which the subtle, sublethal response of test species is measured following chronic sediment exposures (Dillon 1993).

  9. The effect of pesticide residue on caged mosquito bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, J A S; Greer, Mike; Coughlin, Jamie

    2006-09-01

    Wind tunnel experiments showed that secondary pickup of insecticide residue by mosquitoes in cage bioassays had a significant effect on mortality. Cage bioassays using adult Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) investigated the effect of exposure time to a contaminated surface. Cages were dosed in a wind tunnel using the LC50 for naled (0.124 mg a.i./ml) and an LC25 (0.0772 mg a.i./ml) for naled. Half of the bioassay mosquitoes were moved directly into clean cages with the other half remaining in the sprayed, hence contaminated, cage. Treatment mortality was assessed at 8, 15, 30, 60, 120, 240, and 1,440 min postapplication. Cage contamination had a significant effect on mosquito mortality for both the LC25 and LC50 between 15 and 30 min postapplication. PMID:17067048

  10. Method comparison for 241Am emergency urine bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunsheng; Sadi, Baki; Benkhedda, Karima; St-Amant, Nadereh; Moodie, Gerry; Ko, Raymond; Dinardo, Anthony; Kramer, Gary

    2010-10-01

    241Am is one of the high-risk radionuclides that might be used in a terrorist attack. 241Am in urine bioassay can identify the contaminated individuals who need immediate medical intervention and decontamination. This paper compares three methods for the measurement of 241Am in urine, namely liquid scintillation counting (LSC), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and gamma spectrometry (GS), at two levels, 20 and 2 Bq l(-1). All three methods satisfied the ANSI N13.30 radio-bioassay criteria for accuracy and repeatability. ICP-MS offered the best sensitivity and fastest sample turnaround; however, the ICP-MS system used in this work may not be available in many bioassay laboratories. LSC and GS are more commonly available instruments. GS requires minimal or no sample preparation, which makes it a good candidate method. Moreover, the sample throughput can be significantly improved if the GS and LSC methods are automated. PMID:20573683

  11. Bioassay of circulating luteinizing hormone in the rhesus monkey: comparison with radioimmunoassay during physiological changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of biologically active LH in Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) serum was measured by a highly sensitive bioassay based upon testosterone production by dispersed rat interstitial cells. The sensitivity of the in vitro bioassay was equal to or higher than that of radioimmunoassay, with detection limits of 0.1 mIU of human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) or 10 ng of a Rhesus pituitary gonadotropin preparation (LER-1909-2). Parallel dose-response curves were obtained for hMG and Rhesus monkey pituitary gonadotropin. The method permits bioassay of LH in 20--100 μl of serum from adult male monkeys, and from female monkeys during the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Bioactive LH concentrations could be assayed in 0.25 to 5 μl of serum from mid-cycle, postmenopausal, and castrated female monkeys. Serum LH was undetectable in two hypophysectomized adult female monkeys and six intact immature animals, and was 13 +- 6 (SD) mIU/ml in adult male monkeys. In adult females, follicular phase LH levels ranged from 17 to 169 mIU/ml, with a mean of 76 +- 52 mIU/ml. The midcycle LH peak was 1738 +- 742 mIU/ml and the luteal phase values ranged from 6-47 mIU/ml, with a mean of 35 +- 5 mIU/ml. Serum LH concentrations ranged from 100 to 900 mIU/ml in two menopausal females, and from 590--1480 mIU/ml in castrated females. Treatment of castrated female monkeys with estrogen plus progesterone produced an initial two-fold rise in sepum LH within 3 days, followed by a gradual decline to one-fourth to one-tenth of the initial levels after 10 days of treatment. Serum LH was suppressed to undetectable levels during the third week, and remained so for the duration of the 60-day treatment period

  12. An examination of the analysis of radiostrontiums in bioassay applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiostrontiums are among the most radiologically significant radionuclides in the nuclear reactor environment due to their relatively high fission yield, long physical half-life, volatility and mobility in the workplace, and long retention times in tissues such as bone. Effective bioassay programs include analytical processes that consider prospective monitoring requirements provided by screening measurements, as well as the retrospective monitoring requirements provided by screening measurements following an intake. Chromatography using crown ethers as well as the use of spectrometry techniques with advanced liquid-scintillation counters or solid-state surface-barrier detectors appear to have significant benefits for Sr bioassay programs. (author). 90 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  13. Publishers and repositories

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The impact of self-archiving on journals and publishers is an important topic for all those involved in scholarly communication. There is some evidence that the physics arXiv has had no impact on physics journals, while 'economic common sense' suggests that some impact is inevitable. I shall review recent studies of librarian attitudes towards repositories and journals, and place this in the context of IOP Publishing's experiences with arXiv. I shall offer some possible reasons for the mis-match between these perspectives and then discuss how IOP has linked with arXiv and experimented with OA publishing. As well as launching OA journals we have co-operated with Cornell and the arXiv on Eprintweb.org, a platform that offers new features to repository users. View Andrew Wray's biography

  14. Ethics in Scientific Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Leslie J.

    2012-08-01

    We all learn in elementary school not turn in other people's writing as if it were our own (plagiarism), and in high school science labs not to fake our data. But there are many other practices in scientific publishing that are depressingly common and almost as unethical. At about the 20 percent level authors are deliberately hiding recent work -- by themselves as well as by others -- so as to enhance the apparent novelty of their most recent paper. Some people lie about the dates the data were obtained, to cover up conflicts of interest, or inappropriate use of privileged information. Others will publish the same conference proceeding in multiple volumes, or publish the same result in multiple journals with only trivial additions of data or analysis (self-plagiarism). These shady practices should be roundly condemned and stopped. I will discuss these and other unethical actions I have seen over the years, and steps editors are taking to stop them.

  15. The Academic Publishing Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nell, Phillip Christopher; Wenzel, Tim Ole; Schmidt, Florian

    2014-01-01

    . The case is intended to be used as a basis for class discussion rather than to illustrate effective handling of a managerial situation. It is based on published sources, interviews, and personal experience. The authors have disguised some names and other identifying information to protect...

  16. Hprints - Licence to publish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabow, Ingegerd; Sikström, Marjatta; Drachen, Thea Marie;

    2010-01-01

    realised the potential advantages for them. The universities have a role here as well as the libraries that manage the archives and support scholars in various aspects of the publishing processes. Libraries are traditionally service providers with a mission to facilitate the knowledge production...

  17. Scholars | Digital Representation | Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the current state of digital publishing means that writers can now do more and say more in more ways than ever before in human history. As modes, methods, media and mechanisms of expression mutate into newer and newer digital forms, writers find themselves at a moment when they can create, critique collaborate, and comment according…

  18. A statistical treatment of bioassay pour fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Hughes, David

    A bioassay is a method for estimating the number of bacterial spores on a spacecraft surface for the purpose of demonstrating compliance with planetary protection (PP) requirements (Ref. 1). The details of the process may be seen in the appropriate PP document (e.g., for NASA, Ref. 2). In general, the surface is mechanically sampled with a damp sterile swab or wipe. The completion of the process is colony formation in a growth medium in a plate (Petri dish); the colonies are counted. Consider a set of samples from randomly selected, known areas of one spacecraft surface, for simplicity. One may calculate the mean and standard deviation of the bioburden density, which is the ratio of counts to area sampled. The standard deviation represents an estimate of the variation from place to place of the true bioburden density commingled with the precision of the individual sample counts. The accuracy of individual sample results depends on the equipment used, the collection method, and the culturing method. One aspect that greatly influences the result is the pour fraction, which is the quantity of fluid added to the plates divided by the total fluid used in extracting spores from the sampling equipment. In an analysis of a single sample’s counts due to the pour fraction, one seeks to answer the question: What is the probability that if a certain number of spores are counted with a known pour fraction, that there are an additional number of spores in the part of the rinse not poured. This is given for specific values by the binomial distribution density, where detection (of culturable spores) is success and the probability of success is the pour fraction. A special summation over the binomial distribution, equivalent to adding for all possible values of the true total number of spores, is performed. This distribution when normalized will almost yield the desired quantity. It is the probability that the additional number of spores does not exceed a certain value. Of course

  19. Field deployable technique for 90Sr emergency bioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid bioassay is very important for immediate and near-term consequence management, which includes identifying contaminated individuals and providing necessary medical intervention during a radiological or nuclear emergency. This paper reports the application of a newly developed bioassay technique for 90Sr in urine on a field deployable instrument, the TriathlerR. Performance of this field technique for sensitivity, accuracy and repeatability is evaluated against bioassay criteria (ANSI N13.30). This field technique offers the following analytical merits: (1) minimum detectable activity of 121 Bq l-1 when 20 ml of urine is used; (2) relative bias of 11.1% and relative precision of 3.2% at the level of 45 Bq per 20 ml of urine and (3) sample turnaround time of less than 1 h. The technique meets the requirements for emergency bioassay when a committed effective dose of 0.5 Sv is used as the action dose threshold for medical intervention. Sample throughput can be significantly improved if this technique is automated. (authors)

  20. STRESS ETHYLENE: A BIOASSAY FOR RHIZOSPHERE-APPLIED PHYTOTOXICANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bioassay for rhizosphere-applied phytotoxicants was developed and evaluated with a broad range of chemicals. Test substances were applied to the rhizosphere of whole, intact bush bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Bush Blue Lake 290) grown in a solid support medium and the ...

  1. Artificial diets for life tables bioassays of TPB in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two artificial diets for mass rearing and bioassay of the tarnished plant bug, (TPB), Lygus lineolaris Palisot de Beauvois, (Hemiptera: Miridae) were modified and developed, respectively. The first diet is a modification of a semisolid artificial diet (NI diet), which permits large scale rearing of ...

  2. Microplate Bioassay for Determining Substrate Selectivity of "Candida rugosa" Lipase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-zhen; Fang, Bai-shan

    2012-01-01

    Substrate selectivity of "Candida rugosa" lipase was tested using "p"-nitrophenyl esters of increasing chain length (C[subscript 1], C[subscript 7], C[subscript 15]) using the high-throughput screening method. A fast and easy 96-well microplate bioassay was developed to help students learn and practice biotechnological specificity screen. The…

  3. Amazing Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kuwari, Najat Saad

    2007-01-01

    "Animals" is a three-part lesson plan for young learners with a zoo animal theme. The first lesson is full of activities to describe animals, with Simon Says, guessing games, and learning stations. The second lesson is about desert animals, but other types of animals could be chosen depending on student interest. This lesson teaches…

  4. Bioassay for aquatic ecosystems review and classification; Rassegna dei principali test di ecotossicologia acquatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanci, Antonella; Rosa, Silvia [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1997-09-01

    Bioassay play a crucial role in assessing the actual or potential impacts of anthropogenic agents on the natural environment. In this technical report, literature on bioassays for aquatic ecosystems has been reviewed and classified. Problems associated with the choice and application of bioassays are discussed.

  5. Effects of Jatropha curcas oil in Lactuca sativa root tip bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Vieira, Larissa F; Botelho, Carolina M; Laviola, Bruno G; Palmieri, Marcel J; Praça-Fontes, Milene M

    2014-03-01

    Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) is important for biofuel production and as a feed ingredient for animal. However, the presence of phorbol esters in the oil and cake renders the seeds toxic. The toxicity of J. curcas oil is currently assessed by testing in animals, leading to their death. The identification of toxic and nontoxic improved varieties is important for the safe use of J. curcas seeds and byproducts to avoid their environmental toxicity. Hence, the aim of this study was to propose a short-term bioassay using a plant as a model to screen the toxicity of J. curcas oil without the need to sacrifice any animals. The toxicity of J. curcas oil was evident in germination, root elongation and chromosomal aberration tests in Lactuca sativa. It was demonstrated that J. curcas seeds contain natural compounds that exert phyto-, cyto- and genotoxic effects on lettuce, and that phorbol esters act as aneugenic agents, leading to the formation of sticky chromosomes and c-metaphase cells. In conclusion, the tests applied have shown reproducibility, which is important to verify the extent of detoxification and to determine toxic doses, thus reducing the numbers of animals that would be used for toxicity tests. PMID:24676174

  6. Support open access publishing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrøm, Jeannette

    2013-01-01

    Projektet Support Open Access Publishing har til mål at få opdateret Sherpa/Romeo databasen (www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo) med fagligt relevante, danske tidsskrifter. Projektet skal endvidere undersøge mulighederne for at få udviklet en database, hvor forskere på tværs af relevante tidsskriftsinformati......Projektet Support Open Access Publishing har til mål at få opdateret Sherpa/Romeo databasen (www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo) med fagligt relevante, danske tidsskrifter. Projektet skal endvidere undersøge mulighederne for at få udviklet en database, hvor forskere på tværs af relevante...

  7. Reclaiming society publishing.

    OpenAIRE

    Steinberg, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    Learned societies have become aligned with commercial publishers, who have increasingly taken over the latter’s function as independent providers of scholarly information. Using the example of geographical societies, the advantages and disadvantages of this trend are examined. It is argued that in an era of digital publication, learned societies can offer leadership with a new model of open access that can guarantee high quality scholarly material whose publication costs are supported by soci...

  8. Reclaiming Society Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip E. Steinberg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Learned societies have become aligned with commercial publishers, who have increasingly taken over the latter’s function as independent providers of scholarly information. Using the example of geographical societies, the advantages and disadvantages of this trend are examined. It is argued that in an era of digital publication, learned societies can offer leadership with a new model of open access that can guarantee high quality scholarly material whose publication costs are supported by society membership dues.

  9. UNDEMOCRATIC ASPECTS OF PUBLISHING

    OpenAIRE

    Meadows, J

    1999-01-01

    There seems to be a general belief among Internet users that it is a particularly democratic kind of activity. How true is this, more especially in terms of electronic publishing? The problem in seeking an answer is that 'democracy' means different things to different people. Its meaning not only varies from country to country, but even within a single country it can have different flavours. For example, a summary of the definition given in the Oxford English Dictionary might be: 'that form o...

  10. Ecotoxicological assessment of metal-polluted urban soils using bioassays with three soil invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santorufo, Lucia; Van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Maisto, Giulia

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed at assessing the quality of urban soils by integrating chemical and ecotoxicological approaches. Soils from five sites in downtown Naples, Italy, were sampled and characterized for physical-chemical properties and total and water-extractable metal concentrations. Bioassays with Eisenia andrei, Enchytraeus crypticus and Folsomia candida were performed to assess toxicity of the soils, using survival, reproduction and growth as the endpoints. Metal bioaccumulation in the animals was also measured. The properties and metal concentrations of the soils strongly differed. Metal bioaccumulation was related with total metal concentrations in soil and was highest in E. crypticus, which was more sensitive than E. andrei and F. candida. Responses of the three species to the investigated soils seemed due to both metal contamination and soil properties. PMID:22445389

  11. A novel bioassay for the activity determination of therapeutic human brain natriuretic peptide (BNP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP is an important peptide-based therapeutic drug indicated for the treatment of acute heart failure. Accurate determination of the potency of therapeutic rhBNP is crucial for the safety and efficacy of the drug. The current bioassay involves use of rabbit aortic strips, with experiments being complicated and time-consuming and markedly variable in results. Animal-less methods with better precision and accuracy should be explored. We have therefore developed an alternative cell-based assay, which relies on the ability of BNP to induce cGMP production in HEK293 cells expressing BNP receptor guanylyl cyclase-A. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An alternative assay based on the measurement of BNP-induced cGMP production was developed. Specifically, the bioassay employs cells engineered to express BNP receptor guanylyl cyclase-A (GCA. Upon rhBNP stimulation, the levels of the second messager cGMP in these cells drastically increased and subsequently secreted into culture supernatants. The quantity of cGMP, which corresponds to the rhBNP activity, was determined using a competitive ELISA developed by us. Compared with the traditional assay, the novel cell-based assay demonstrated better reproducibility and precision. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The optimized cell-based assay is much simpler, more rapid and precise compared with the traditional assay using animal tissues. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a novel and viable alternative assay for rhBNP potency analysis.

  12. BioAssay Ontology (BAO: a semantic description of bioassays and high-throughput screening results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Robin P

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput screening (HTS is one of the main strategies to identify novel entry points for the development of small molecule chemical probes and drugs and is now commonly accessible to public sector research. Large amounts of data generated in HTS campaigns are submitted to public repositories such as PubChem, which is growing at an exponential rate. The diversity and quantity of available HTS assays and screening results pose enormous challenges to organizing, standardizing, integrating, and analyzing the datasets and thus to maximize the scientific and ultimately the public health impact of the huge investments made to implement public sector HTS capabilities. Novel approaches to organize, standardize and access HTS data are required to address these challenges. Results We developed the first ontology to describe HTS experiments and screening results using expressive description logic. The BioAssay Ontology (BAO serves as a foundation for the standardization of HTS assays and data and as a semantic knowledge model. In this paper we show important examples of formalizing HTS domain knowledge and we point out the advantages of this approach. The ontology is available online at the NCBO bioportal http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/44531. Conclusions After a large manual curation effort, we loaded BAO-mapped data triples into a RDF database store and used a reasoner in several case studies to demonstrate the benefits of formalized domain knowledge representation in BAO. The examples illustrate semantic querying capabilities where BAO enables the retrieval of inferred search results that are relevant to a given query, but are not explicitly defined. BAO thus opens new functionality for annotating, querying, and analyzing HTS datasets and the potential for discovering new knowledge by means of inference.

  13. Use of a chemically induced-colon carcinogenesis-prone Apc-mutant rat in a chemotherapeutic bioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemotherapeutic bioassay for colorectal cancer (CRC) with a rat model bearing chemically-induced CRCs plays an important role in the development of new anti-tumor drugs and regimens. Although several protocols to induce CRCs have been developed, the incidence and number of CRCs are not much enough for the efficient bioassay. Recently, we established the very efficient system to induce CRCs with a chemically induced-colon carcinogenesis-prone Apc-mutant rat, Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) rat. Here, we applied the KAD rat to the chemotherapeutic bioassay for CRC and showed the utility of the KAD rat. The KAD rat has been developed by the ENU mutagenesis and carries a homozygous nonsense mutation in the Apc gene (S2523X). Male KAD rats were given a single subcutaneous injection of AOM (20 mg/kg body weight) at 5 weeks of age. Starting at 1 week after the AOM injection, they were given 2% DSS in drinking water for 7 days. Tumor-bearing KAD rats were divided into experimental and control groups on the basis of the number of tumors observed by endoscopy at week 8. The 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was administrated intravenously a dose of 50 or 75 mg/kg weekly at week 9, 10, and 11. After one-week interval, the 5-FU was given again at week 13, 14, and 15. At week 16, animals were sacrificed and tumor number and volume were measured macroscopically and microscopically. In total 48 tumors were observed in 27 KAD rats with a 100% incidence at week 8. The maximum tolerated dose for the KAD rat was 50 mg/kg of 5-FU. Macroscopically, the number or volume of tumors in the 5-FU treated rats was not significantly different from the control. Microscopically, the number of adenocarcinoma in the 5-FU treated rats was not significantly different (p < 0.02) from that of the control. However, the volume of adenocarcinomas was significantly lower than in the control. Anticancer effect of the 5-FU could be obtained only after the 16 weeks of experimental period. The use of the AOM/DSS-treated tumor

  14. Plagiarism in scientific publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2012-12-01

    Scientific publishing is the ultimate product of scientist work. Number of publications and their quoting are measures of scientist success while unpublished researches are invisible to the scientific community, and as such nonexistent. Researchers in their work rely on their predecessors, while the extent of use of one scientist work, as a source for the work of other authors is the verification of its contributions to the growth of human knowledge. If the author has published an article in a scientific journal it cannot publish the article in any other journal h with a few minor adjustments or without quoting parts of the first article, which are used in another article. Copyright infringement occurs when the author of a new article with or without the mentioning the author used substantial portions of previously published articles, including tables and figures. Scientific institutions and universities should,in accordance with the principles of Good Scientific Practice (GSP) and Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) have a center for monitoring,security, promotion and development of quality research. Establish rules and compliance to rules of good scientific practice are the obligations of each research institutions,universities and every individual-researchers,regardless of which area of science is investigated. In this way, internal quality control ensures that a research institution such as a university, assume responsibility for creating an environment that promotes standards of excellence, intellectual honesty and legality. Although the truth should be the aim of scientific research, it is not guiding fact for all scientists. The best way to reach the truth in its study and to avoid the methodological and ethical mistakes is to consistently apply scientific methods and ethical standards in research. Although variously defined plagiarism is basically intended to deceive the reader's own scientific contribution. There is no general regulation of control of

  15. PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT: Refereeing standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, C.; Scriven, N.

    2004-08-01

    On 1 January 2004 I will be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and General (J. Phys. A). I am flattered at the confidence expressed in my ability to carry out this challenging job and I will try hard to justify this confidence. The previous Editor-in-Chief, Ed Corrigan, has worked tirelessly for the last five years and has done an excellent job for the journal. Everyone at the journal is profoundly grateful for his leadership and for his achievements. Before accepting the position of Editor-in-Chief, I visited the office of J. Phys. A to examine the organization and to assess its strengths and weaknesses. This office is located at the Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP) headquarters in Bristol. J. Phys. A has been expanding rapidly and now publishes at the rate of nearly 1000 articles (or about 14,000 pages) per year. The entire operation of the journal is conducted in a very small space---about 15 square metres! Working in this space are six highly intelligent, talented, hard working, and dedicated people: Neil Scriven, Publisher; Mike Williams, Publishing Editor; Rose Gray and Sarah Nadin, Publishing Administrators; Laura Smith and Steve Richards, Production Editors. In this small space every day about eight submitted manuscripts are downloaded from the computer or received in the post. These papers are then processed and catalogued, referees are selected, and the papers are sent out for evaluation. In this small space the referees' reports are received, publication decisions are made, and accepted articles are then published quickly by IOPP. The whole operation is amazingly efficient. Indeed, one of the great strengths of J. Phys. A is the speed at which papers are processed. The average time between the receipt of a manuscript and an editorial decision is under sixty days. (Many distinguished journals take three to five times this amount of time.) This speed of publication is an extremely strong enticement for

  16. RETRACTION: Publishers' Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    post="(Executive Editor">Graeme Watt,

    2010-06-01

    Withdrawal of the paper "Was the fine-structure constant variable over cosmological time?" by L. D. Thong, N. M. Giao, N. T. Hung and T. V. Hung (EPL, 87 (2009) 69002) This paper has been formally withdrawn on ethical grounds because the article contains extensive and repeated instances of plagiarism. EPL treats all identified evidence of plagiarism in the published articles most seriously. Such unethical behaviour will not be tolerated under any circumstance. It is unfortunate that this misconduct was not detected before going to press. My thanks to Editor colleagues from other journals for bringing this fact to my attention.

  17. Learning by Doing: Publishing Course as Publishing Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Dan

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how he gives students in his English 349, Editing and Publishing, at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point real-world editing and publishing experience by letting them form their own publishing company--the Cornerstone Press. In this class, students write multiple drafts of publishable articles and help…

  18. About Animal Husbandry and Feed Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>Animal Husbandry and Feed Science is published to introduce the research achievements of animal husbandry and veterinary workers to the world,enhance their chances to participate in international academic exchange,and promote

  19. The use of cultivars of Raphanus sativus for cytokinin bioassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Kubowicz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Six cultivars of radish (Raphanus sativus were tested for their usefulness in radish cytokinin bioassay by the method of Letham (1971. The best cultivar was found to be 'Sopel Lodu' which responds well to both zeatin and 2iP over a wide range of concentrations. The fresh weight of cotyledons increased at most by 71.5% (if treated with zeatin or 101.0% (if treated with 2iP compared to untreated cotyledons. This cultivar is also sensitive to the partially purified cytokinin-like fraction isolated from the pine (Pinus silvestris cambial region. The cultivar 'Sopel Lodu' is therefore proposed to be a suitable plant for cytokinin bioassays.

  20. An emergency bioassay method for 210Po in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid method was developed to efficiently measure 210Po in urine samples in an emergency situation. Polonium-210 in small urine samples (10 mL) was spontaneously deposited on a stainless steel disc in 1 M HCl at room temperature for 4 h in a polyethylene bottle. The metallic disc was then counted for 4 h by alpha spectrometry. The developed method allowed the preparation of large sample batch in a short time. The method meets the requirements for an emergency bioassay procedure. - Highlights: • A new method was developed to rapidly measurement 210Po in urine. • The method is easy to perform and does not require highly qualified staffs. • Large sample batches can be simultaneously prepared. • The method meets the requirements for an emergency bioassay method

  1. Development of software for internal dose calculation from bioassay measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently developed biokinetic models of ICRP permit increasingly realistic descriptions of the behaviour of radionuclides in the human body. This, however, has made the interpretation of bioassay data extremely difficult. Thus computer programs for implementing these models are in need, but very few are available. The present work describes personal-computer-based software, MONDAL2 (monitoring to dose calculation ver. 2), that enables users to estimate intake activity and the resulting effective doses from bioassay measurements for both workers and members of the public. This software runs on Microsoft Windows 95, 98, Millennium edition, 2000 or XP. If the system is to be fully copied to a hard disk, hard disk space of 23 MB is required. This software is distributed by the National Inst. of Radiological Sciences free of charge. (authors)

  2. The Text-mining based PubChem Bioassay neighboring analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yanli

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the number of High Throughput Screening (HTS assays deposited in PubChem has grown quickly. As a result, the volume of both the structured information (i.e. molecular structure, bioactivities and the unstructured information (such as descriptions of bioassay experiments, has been increasing exponentially. As a result, it has become even more demanding and challenging to efficiently assemble the bioactivity data by mining the huge amount of information to identify and interpret the relationships among the diversified bioassay experiments. In this work, we propose a text-mining based approach for bioassay neighboring analysis from the unstructured text descriptions contained in the PubChem BioAssay database. Results The neighboring analysis is achieved by evaluating the cosine scores of each bioassay pair and fraction of overlaps among the human-curated neighbors. Our results from the cosine score distribution analysis and assay neighbor clustering analysis on all PubChem bioassays suggest that strong correlations among the bioassays can be identified from their conceptual relevance. A comparison with other existing assay neighboring methods suggests that the text-mining based bioassay neighboring approach provides meaningful linkages among the PubChem bioassays, and complements the existing methods by identifying additional relationships among the bioassay entries. Conclusions The text-mining based bioassay neighboring analysis is efficient for correlating bioassays and studying different aspects of a biological process, which are otherwise difficult to achieve by existing neighboring procedures due to the lack of specific annotations and structured information. It is suggested that the text-mining based bioassay neighboring analysis can be used as a standalone or as a complementary tool for the PubChem bioassay neighboring process to enable efficient integration of assay results and generate hypotheses for

  3. Bioassay-guided studies on the cytotoxic and in vitro trypanocidal activities of a sesquiterpene (Muzigadial) derived from a Ugandan medicinal plant (Warburgia ugandensis)

    OpenAIRE

    Olila, D; Opuda-Asibo, J; Olwa-Odyek,

    2001-01-01

    Trypanosomiasis is arguably the most important disease of man and his domesticated animals in the tropics. There are few compounds available for its treatment. This has exacerbated the development of drug resistance. There is therefore urgent need to search for newer compounds to treat this important disease. Medicinal plants represent a potential source of the drugs. This paper reports a bioassay-guided study to search for possible biological activity (cytotoxic and trypanocidal) in two Ugan...

  4. Soil bioassays as tools for sludge compost quality assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Domene, X.; Solà i Sau, Laura; Ramírez Hernández, Wilson Ariel; Alcañiz, Josep M.; Andrés Pastor, Pilar

    2011-01-01

    Composting is a waste management technology that is becoming more widespread as a response to the increasing production of sewage sludge and the pressure for its reuse in soil. In this study, different bioassays (plant germination, earthworm survival, biomass and reproduction, and collembolan survival and reproduction) were assessed for their usefulness in the compost quality assessment. Compost samples, from two different composting plants, were taken along the composting process, which were...

  5. New experimental tools for bioassays with whitefly in laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Luis Martins Fanela

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to develop an experimental kit for assessments of repellency, deterrence for oviposition, and insecticidal activity on adults of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci biotype B. The kit, which consisted of arenas and nebulizer, was effective for conducting bioassays, and the application of aqueous extracts by inhaler was adequate. The techniques are simple, cheap, and may contribute to research on this insect.

  6. A Bioassay System Using Bioelectric Signals from Small Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terawaki, Mitsuru; Soh, Zu; Hirano, Akira; Tsuji, Toshio

    Although the quality of tap water is generally examined using chemical assay, this method cannot be used for examination in real time. Against such a background, the technique of fish bioassay has attracted attention as an approach that enables constant monitoring of aquatic contamination. The respiratory rhythms of fish are considered an efficient indicator for the ongoing assessment of water quality, since they are sensitive to chemicals and can be indirectly measured from bioelectric signals generated by breathing. In order to judge aquatic contamination accurately, it is necessary to measure bioelectric signals from fish swimming freely as well as to stably discriminate measured signals, which vary between individuals. However, no bioassay system meeting the above requirements has yet been established. This paper proposes a bioassay system using bioelectric signals generated from small fish in free-swimming conditions. The system records signals using multiple electrodes to cover the extensive measurement range required in a free-swimming environment, and automatically discriminates changes in water quality from signal frequency components. This discrimination is achieved through an ensemble classification method using probability neural networks to solve the problem of differences between individual fish. The paper also reports on the results of related validation experiments, which showed that the proposed system was able to stably discriminate between water conditions before and after bleach exposure.

  7. PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT: Editorial developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    We are delighted to announce that from January 2009, Professor Murray T Batchelor of the Australian National University, Canberra will be the new Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical. Murray Batchelor has been Editor of the Mathematical Physics section of the journal since 2007. Prior to this, he served as a Board Member and an Advisory Panel member for the journal. His primary area of research is the statistical mechanics of exactly solved models. He holds a joint appointment in mathematics and physics and has held visiting positions at the Universities of Leiden, Amsterdam, Oxford and Tokyo. We very much look forward to working with Murray to continue to improve the journal's quality and interest to the readership. We would like to thank our outgoing Editor-in-Chief, Professor Carl M Bender. Carl has done a magnificent job as Editor-in-Chief and has worked tirelessly to improve the journal over the last five years. Carl has been instrumental in designing and implementing strategies that have enhanced the quality of papers published and service provided by Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical. Notably, under his tenure, we have introduced the Fast Track Communications (FTC) section to the journal. This section provides a venue for outstanding short papers that report new and timely developments in mathematical and theoretical physics and offers accelerated publication and high visibility for our authors. During the last five years, we have raised the quality threshold for acceptance in the journal and now reject over 60% of submissions. As a result, papers published in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical are amongst the best in the field. We have also maintained and improved on our excellent receipt-to-first-decision times, which now average less than 50 days for papers. We have recently announced another innovation; the Journal of Physics A Best Paper Prize. These prizes will honour excellent papers

  8. Establishing a Book Publishing Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofalo, Andrew

    Addressing the need to prepare college graduates for careers in book publishing, this report examines the necessity and structure of a book publishing curriculum at the undergraduate level at Loyola College in Maryland. A 1977 bulletin by the American Association of Publishers (AAP) cited a lack of awareness of publishing as a possible career, and…

  9. Why publish with AGU?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graedel, T. E.

    The most visible activity of the American Geophysical Union is its publication of scientific journals. There are eight of these: Journal of Geophysical Research—Space Physics (JGR I), Journal of Geophysical Research—Solid Earth (JGR II), Journal of Geophysical Research—Oceans and Atmospheres (JGR III), Radio Science (RS), Water Resources Research (WRR), Geophysical Research Letters (GRL), Reviews of Geophysics and Space Physics (RGSP), and the newest, Tectonics.AGU's journals have established solid reputations for scientific excellence over the years. Reputation is not sufficient to sustain a high quality journal, however, since other factors enter into an author's decision on where to publish his or her work. In this article the characteristics of AGU's journals are compared with those of its competitors, with the aim of furnishing guidance to prospective authors and a better understanding of the value of the products to purchasers.

  10. Toxicity of copper-spiked sediments to Tubifex tubifex (Oligochaeta, Tubificidae): Comparison of the 28-day reproductive bioassay with an early-life-stage bioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchi, M.; Pasteris, A.; Bonomi, G. (Univ. degli Studi di Bologna (Italy). Dipt. di Biologia Evoluzionistica Sperimentale); Reynoldson, T.B. (Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario (Canada). National Water Research Inst.)

    1999-06-01

    Two sediment bioassay methods using Tubifex tubifex (Mueller, 1774) as the test species were compared. The first was an adult reproduction test, the second an early-life-stage survival test. The duration of both bioassays is 28 d and the amount of work required was similar; they may be useful alternatives to each other in different circumstances (e.g., the early life stage bioassay could be carried out with smaller volumes of sediment). The two bioassays were performed simultaneously on copper-spiked sediments. Sediments from two freshwater and two terrestrial sites were used; five separate, nonsimultaneous experiments were performed, one for each sediment or soil and a further experiment with soil with a good supplement. In the adult bioassay, there were large differences in the production of cocoons, eggs, and young among the control treatments of the five experiments. There were also major differences in the NOEC and LOEC for copper between the tested substrates. The early life stage bioassay appears to be less sensitive to copper toxicity than the adult reproductive bioassay since NOECs and LOECs are higher for early survival than for the most sensitive endpoints of the adult bioassay in three experiments out of five.

  11. In Vitro Biologic Activities of the Antimicrobials Triclocarban, Its Analogs, and Triclosan in Bioassay Screens: Receptor-Based Bioassay Screens

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Ki Chang; Zhao, Bin; Chen, Jiangang; Cherednichenko, Gennady; Sanmarti, Enio; Denison, Michael S.; Lasley, Bill; Pessah, Isaac N; Kültz, Dietmar; Chang, Daniel P.Y.; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Concerns have been raised about the biological and toxicologic effects of the antimicrobials triclocarban (TCC) and triclosan (TCS) in personal care products. Few studies have evaluated their biological activities in mammalian cells to assess their potential for adverse effects. Objectives In this study, we assessed the activity of TCC, its analogs, and TCS in in vitro nuclear-receptor–responsive and calcium signaling bioassays. Materials and methods We determined the biological ac...

  12. In vivo genotoxicity of furan in F344 rats at cancer bioassay doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furan, a potent rodent liver carcinogen, is found in many cooked food items and thus represents a human cancer risk. Mechanisms for furan carcinogenicity were investigated in male F344 rats using the in vivo Comet and micronucleus assays, combined with analysis of histopathological and gene expression changes. In addition, formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease III (EndoIII)-sensitive DNA damage was monitored as a measure of oxidative DNA damage. Rats were treated by gavage on four consecutive days with 2, 4, and 8 mg/kg bw furan, doses that were tumorigenic in 2-year cancer bioassays, and with two higher doses, 12 and 16 mg/kg. Rats were killed 3 h after the last dose, a time established as producing maximum levels of DNA damage in livers of furan-treated rats. Liver Comet assays indicated that both DNA strand breaks and oxidized purines and pyrimidines increased in a near-linear dose-responsive fashion, with statistically significant increases detected at cancer bioassay doses. No DNA damage was detected in bone marrow, a non-target tissue for cancer, and peripheral blood micronucleus assays were negative. Histopathological evaluation of liver from furan-exposed animals produced evidence of inflammation, single-cell necrosis, apoptosis, and cell proliferation. In addition, genes related to apoptosis, cell-cycle checkpoints, and DNA-repair were expressed at a slightly lower level in the furan-treated livers. Although a mixed mode of action involving direct DNA binding cannot be ruled out, the data suggest that furan induces cancer in rat livers mainly through a secondary genotoxic mechanism involving oxidative stress, accompanied by inflammation, cell proliferation, and toxicity. -- Highlights: ► Furan is a potent rodent liver carcinogen and represents a human cancer risk. ► Furan induces DNA damage in rat liver at cancer bioassay doses. ► Furan induces oxidative stress, inflammation and cell proliferation in rat liver. ► Expression of

  13. In vivo genotoxicity of furan in F344 rats at cancer bioassay doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Wei, E-mail: Wei.Ding@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Petibone, Dayton M. [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Latendresse, John R. [Toxicologic Pathology Associates, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Pearce, Mason G. [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Muskhelishvili, Levan; White, Gene A. [Toxicologic Pathology Associates, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Chang, Ching-Wei [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Mittelstaedt, Roberta A.; Shaddock, Joseph G.; McDaniel, Lea P. [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Doerge, Daniel R. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Morris, Suzanne M.; Bishop, Michelle E.; Manjanatha, Mugimane G.; Aidoo, Anane; Heflich, Robert H. [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Furan, a potent rodent liver carcinogen, is found in many cooked food items and thus represents a human cancer risk. Mechanisms for furan carcinogenicity were investigated in male F344 rats using the in vivo Comet and micronucleus assays, combined with analysis of histopathological and gene expression changes. In addition, formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease III (EndoIII)-sensitive DNA damage was monitored as a measure of oxidative DNA damage. Rats were treated by gavage on four consecutive days with 2, 4, and 8 mg/kg bw furan, doses that were tumorigenic in 2-year cancer bioassays, and with two higher doses, 12 and 16 mg/kg. Rats were killed 3 h after the last dose, a time established as producing maximum levels of DNA damage in livers of furan-treated rats. Liver Comet assays indicated that both DNA strand breaks and oxidized purines and pyrimidines increased in a near-linear dose-responsive fashion, with statistically significant increases detected at cancer bioassay doses. No DNA damage was detected in bone marrow, a non-target tissue for cancer, and peripheral blood micronucleus assays were negative. Histopathological evaluation of liver from furan-exposed animals produced evidence of inflammation, single-cell necrosis, apoptosis, and cell proliferation. In addition, genes related to apoptosis, cell-cycle checkpoints, and DNA-repair were expressed at a slightly lower level in the furan-treated livers. Although a mixed mode of action involving direct DNA binding cannot be ruled out, the data suggest that furan induces cancer in rat livers mainly through a secondary genotoxic mechanism involving oxidative stress, accompanied by inflammation, cell proliferation, and toxicity. -- Highlights: ► Furan is a potent rodent liver carcinogen and represents a human cancer risk. ► Furan induces DNA damage in rat liver at cancer bioassay doses. ► Furan induces oxidative stress, inflammation and cell proliferation in rat liver. ► Expression of

  14. Use of viral promoters in mammalian cell-based bioassays: How reliable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill-Sharma Manjit

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cell-based bioassays have been suggested for screening of hormones and drug bioactivities. They are a plausible alternative to animal based methods. The technique used is called receptor/reporter system. Receptor/reporter system was initially developed as a research technique to understand gene function. Often reporter constructs containing viral promoters were used because they could be expressed with very 'high' magnitude in a variety of cell types in the laboratory. On the other hand mammalian genes are expressed in a cell/tissue specific manner, which makes them (i.e. cells/tissues specialized for specific function in vivo. Therefore, if the receptor/reporter system is to be used as a cell-based screen for testing of hormones and drugs for human therapy then the choice of cell line as well as the promoter in the reporter module is of prime importance so as to get a realistic measure of the bioactivities of 'test' compounds. We evaluated two conventionally used viral promoters and a natural mammalian promoter, regulated by steroid hormone progesterone, in a cell-based receptor/reporter system. The promoters were spliced into vectors expressing enzyme CAT (chloramphenicol acetyl transferase, which served as a reporter of their magnitudes and consistencies in controlling gene expressions. They were introduced into breast cell lines T47D and MCF-7, which served as a cell-based source of progesterone receptors. The yardstick of their reliability was highest magnitude as well as consistency in CAT expression on induction by sequential doses of progesterone. All the promoters responded to induction by progesterone doses ranging from 10-12 to 10-6 molar by expressing CAT enzyme, albeit with varying magnitudes and consistencies. The natural mammalian promoter showed the most coherence in magnitude as well as dose dependent expression profile in both the cell lines. Our study casts doubts on use of viral promoters in a cell-based bioassay for

  15. Animal Farm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐蓉蓉

    2015-01-01

    This essayfirst introduce the background of Animal Farm and a brief introduction of the author.Then it discuss three thesis about this novel and briefly discussed about it.At last it give highly review on Animal Farm.

  16. Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild animals usually avoid people. They might attack, however, if they feel threatened, are sick, or are protecting their ... or territory. Attacks by pets are more common. Animal bites rarely are life-threatening, but if they ...

  17. Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and complications from bites Never pet, handle, or feed unknown animals Leave snakes alone Watch your children closely around animals Vaccinate your cats, ferrets, and dogs against rabies Spay or neuter ...

  18. Animal Farm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐蓉蓉

    2015-01-01

    This essay first introduce the background of Animal Farm and a brief introduction of the author.Then it discuss three thesis about this novel and briefly discussed about it.At last it give highly review on Animal Farm.

  19. Animal ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Clare; Sandøe, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes and discusses different views concerning our duties towards animals. First, we explain why it is necessary to engage in thinking about animal ethics and why it is not enough to rely on feelings alone. Secondly, we present and discuss five different kinds of views about the nature of our duties to animals. They are: contractarianism, utilitarianism, the animal rights view, contextual views, and a respect for nature view. Finally, we briefly consider whether it is possibl...

  20. Quadruped Animation

    OpenAIRE

    Skrba, Ljiljana; Reveret, Lionel; Hétroy, Franck; Cani, Marie-Paule; O'Sullivan, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Films like Shrek, Madagascar, The Chronicles of Narnia and Charlotte's web all have something in common: realistic quadruped animations. While the animation of animals has been popular for a long time, the technical challenges associated with creating highly realistic, computer generated creatures have been receiving increasing attention recently. The entertainment, education and medical industries have increased the demand for simulation of realistic animals in the computer graphics area. In...

  1. Thin Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, D.

    1998-01-01

    Lattice animals provide a discretized model for the theta transition displayed by branched polymers in solvent. Exact graph enumeration studies have given some indications that the phase diagram of such lattice animals may contain two collapsed phases as well as an extended phase. This has not been confirmed by studies using other means. We use the exact correspondence between the q --> 1 limit of an extended Potts model and lattice animals to investigate the phase diagram of lattice animals ...

  2. Animal Deliberation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, C.P.G.

    2014-01-01

    While much has been written on environmental politics on the one hand, and animal ethics and welfare on the other, animal politics, as the interface of the two, is underexamined. There are key political implications in the increase of animal protection laws, the rights of nature, and political parti

  3. Animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Krentz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Cardiovascular Endocrinology, we are proud to present a broad and dedicated spectrum of reviews on animal models in cardiovascular disease. The reviews cover most aspects of animal models in science from basic differences and similarities between small animals and the human...

  4. In vivo genotoxicity of furan in F344 rats at cancer bioassay doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Petibone, Dayton M; Latendresse, John R; Pearce, Mason G; Muskhelishvili, Levan; White, Gene A; Chang, Ching-Wei; Mittelstaedt, Roberta A; Shaddock, Joseph G; McDaniel, Lea P; Doerge, Daniel R; Morris, Suzanne M; Bishop, Michelle E; Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Aidoo, Anane; Heflich, Robert H

    2012-06-01

    Furan, a potent rodent liver carcinogen, is found in many cooked food items and thus represents a human cancer risk. Mechanisms for furan carcinogenicity were investigated in male F344 rats using the in vivo Comet and micronucleus assays, combined with analysis of histopathological and gene expression changes. In addition, formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease III (EndoIII)-sensitive DNA damage was monitored as a measure of oxidative DNA damage. Rats were treated by gavage on four consecutive days with 2, 4, and 8mg/kg bw furan, doses that were tumorigenic in 2-year cancer bioassays, and with two higher doses, 12 and 16mg/kg. Rats were killed 3h after the last dose, a time established as producing maximum levels of DNA damage in livers of furan-treated rats. Liver Comet assays indicated that both DNA strand breaks and oxidized purines and pyrimidines increased in a near-linear dose-responsive fashion, with statistically significant increases detected at cancer bioassay doses. No DNA damage was detected in bone marrow, a non-target tissue for cancer, and peripheral blood micronucleus assays were negative. Histopathological evaluation of liver from furan-exposed animals produced evidence of inflammation, single-cell necrosis, apoptosis, and cell proliferation. In addition, genes related to apoptosis, cell-cycle checkpoints, and DNA-repair were expressed at a slightly lower level in the furan-treated livers. Although a mixed mode of action involving direct DNA binding cannot be ruled out, the data suggest that furan induces cancer in rat livers mainly through a secondary genotoxic mechanism involving oxidative stress, accompanied by inflammation, cell proliferation, and toxicity. PMID:22507866

  5. Selection of a bioassay battery to assess toxicity in the affluents and effluents of three water-treatment plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Bohórquez-Echeverry

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of water quality includes the analysis of both physical-chemical and microbiological parameters. However,none of these evaluates the biological effect that can be generated in ecosystems or humans. In order to define the most suitable organismsto evaluate the toxicity in the affluent and effluent of three drinking-water treatment plants, five acute toxicity bioassays were used,incorporating three taxonomic groups of the food chain. Materials and methods. The bioassays used were Daphnia magna and Hydraattenuata as animal models, Lactuca sativa and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata as plant models, and Photobacterium leioghnathi asbacterial model. To meet this objective, selection criteria of the organisms evaluated and cluster analysis were used to identify the mostsensitive in the affluent and effluent of each plant. Results. All organisms are potentially useful in the assessment of water quality bymeeting four essential requirements and 17 desirable requirements equivalent to 100% acceptability, except P. leioghnathi which doesnot meet two essential requirements that are the IC50 for the toxic reference and the confidence interval. The animal, plant and bacterialmodels showed different levels of sensitivity at the entrance and exit of the water treatment systems. Conclusions. H. attenuata, P.subcapitata and P. leioghnathi were the most effective organisms in detecting toxicity levels in the affluents and D. magna, P. subcapitataand P. leioghnathi in the effluents.

  6. Best practice guidelines on publishing ethics: a publisher's perspective, 2nd edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Chris; Deakin, Lisa; Docking, Martine; Jones, Jackie; Joshua, Sue; McKerahan, Tiffany; Ottmar, Martin; Stevens, Allen; Wates, Edward; Wyatt, Deborah

    2015-01-14

    Wiley has updated its publishing ethics guidelines, first published in 2006. These new guidelines provide guidance, resources, and practical advice on ethical concerns that arise in academic publishing for editors, authors, and researchers, among other audiences. New guidance is included about whistle blowers, animal research, clinical research, and clinical trial registration, addressing cultural differences, human rights, and confidentiality. The guidelines are uniquely interdisciplinary, and were reviewed by 24 editors and experts chosen from the wide range of communities that Wiley serves. These guidelines are also published in: Headache, International Journal of Clinical Practice, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Social Science Quarterly, and on the website http://exchanges.wiley.com/ethicsguidelines. PMID:25330311

  7. Entry, Descent, Landing Animation (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Entry, Descent, Landing animation This animation illustrates the path the Stardust return capsule will follow once it enters Earth's atmosphere.

  8. Animal research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I.A.S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    in science (as in any other human use that is not also in the animals’ best interest). These views are not compatible, and since all three views in more or less pure form are found in modern Western societies, use of animals for research is bound to cause controversy. However, there may be room for some kind......This article presents the ethical issues in animal research using a combined approach of ethical theory and analysis of scientific findings with bearing on the ethical analysis. The article opens with a general discussion of the moral acceptability of animal use in research. The use of animals...... in research is analyzed from the viewpoint of three distinct ethical approaches: contractarianism, utilitarianism, and animal rights view. On a contractarian view, research on animals is only an ethical issue to the extent that other humans as parties to the social contract care about how research animals...

  9. Toxicity assays in nanodrops combining bioassay and morphometric endpoints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Lemaire

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Improved chemical hazard management such as REACH policy objective as well as drug ADMETOX prediction, while limiting the extent of animal testing, requires the development of increasingly high throughput as well as highly pertinent in vitro toxicity assays. METHODOLOGY: This report describes a new in vitro method for toxicity testing, combining cell-based assays in nanodrop Cell-on-Chip format with the use of a genetically engineered stress sensitive hepatic cell line. We tested the behavior of a stress inducible fluorescent HepG2 model in which Heat Shock Protein promoters controlled Enhanced-Green Fluorescent Protein expression upon exposure to Cadmium Chloride (CdCl2, Sodium Arsenate (NaAsO2 and Paraquat. In agreement with previous studies based on a micro-well format, we could observe a chemical-specific response, identified through differences in dynamics and amplitude. We especially determined IC50 values for CdCl2 and NaAsO2, in agreement with published data. Individual cell identification via image-based screening allowed us to perform multiparametric analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Using pre/sub lethal cell stress instead of cell mortality, we highlighted the high significance and the superior sensitivity of both stress promoter activation reporting and cell morphology parameters in measuring the cell response to a toxicant. These results demonstrate the first generation of high-throughput and high-content assays, capable of assessing chemical hazards in vitro within the REACH policy framework.

  10. Concordance between Results of Medium-term Liver Carcinogenesis Bioassays and Long-term Findings for Carcinogenic 2-Nitropropane and Non-carcinogenic1-Nitropropane in F344 Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Yuko; Tamano, Seiko; Kawabe, Mayumi; Sano, Masashi; Imai, Norio; Nakashima, Hironao; Furukawa, Fumio; Hagiwara, Akihiro; Otsuka, Masanori; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2011-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the concordance of results for a pair of structural isomers, 2-nitropropane (2-NP) and 1-nitropropane (1-NP), using the rat medium-term liver carcinogenesis bioassay (Ito test) and previously published long-term carcinogenicity tests. Male F344 rats were given a single intraperitoneal injection of DEN (200 mg/kg b.w.) to initiate hepatocarcinogenesis. After 2 weeks, they received per os 0, 0.8, 4 or 20 mg/kg/day of 2-NP or 1-NP six times a week and were subjected to two-thirds partial hepatectomy at week 3. Non-initiated groups receiving 0 or 20 mg/kg/day were also included. The animals were sacrificed for quantitative analysis of GST-P-positive foci at week 8. With the highest dose of 2-NP, significantly increased numbers and areas of GST-P-positive foci were demonstrated as compared with the respective control but were not noted with 1-NP. In the non-DEN-initiated groups, many small GST-P-positive foci of less than 0.2 mm in diameter were also induced in the rats treated with 2-NP at 20 mg/kg/day but were lacking with 1-NP. These results strongly support that 2-NP is a complete hepatocarcinogen with a potent initiation activity, whereas 1-NP is not. PMID:22319232

  11. Comparison of five bioassay techniques for assessing sediment-bound contaminants

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlf, Wolfgang; Calmano, Wolfgang; Erhard, Judith; Förstner, Ulrich

    1989-01-01

    Biological response could not be predicted based on chemical concentration of the sediment contaminants. Bioassays integrate the response of test organisms to contaminants and nutrients. Comparative results of five acute bioassays indicated that Neubauer phytoassay was the most sensitive. The mircobial biomass and algal growth tests indicated a response to the availability of contaminants and nutrients. These results suggest the usefulness of a diversity of bioassays in toxicity testing of se...

  12. Bioassay procedures and health physics recommendations for a promethium-147 luminescent dial painting industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to determine the hazard to workers who were applying a radioactive luminescent paint to devices such as clock dials and hands, signs, etc. The paint used was a mixture of macrospheres containing 147Pm, ZnS, and a binder. It was applied by workers either manually or by machine. This study was designed to determine the radiological safety of these operations. The potential routes of intake of 147Pm by workers were identified as inhalation and ingestion. Air samples were taken at work stations; total and respirable-sized 147Pm particles were measured. Both were shown to be at a safe level. An animal inhalation study was conducted to determine deposition of respirable-sized 147Pm particles. Testing by a bioassay procedure developed specifically for this purpose revealed low levels of deposited activity in the respiratory systems of these animals. A health physics evaluation of the dial painting facility firm and operation revealed that extensive improvements in engineering controls and worker protection were needed. The health physics recommendations made, as a result, should be adopted as a minimum for maximization of long term benefits to both the employee and the employer

  13. Fluorescent bioassays for toxic metals in milk and yoghurt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiki Mohammad Shohel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From a human health viewpoint, contaminated milk and its products could be a source of long-term exposure to toxic metals. Simple, inexpensive, and on-site assays would enable constant monitoring of their contents. Bioassays that can measure toxic metals in milk or yoghurt might reduce the risk. For this purpose, the green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged trans factors, ArsR-GFP and CadC-GFP, together with their cis elements were used to develop such bioassays. Results ArsR-GFP or CadC-GFP, which binds either toxic metal or DNA fragment including cis element, was directly mixed with cow’s milk or yoghurt within a neutral pH range. The fluorescence of GFP, which is reflected by the association/dissociation ratio between cis element and trans factor, significantly changed with increasing externally added As (III or Cd (II whereas smaller responses to externally added Pb (II and Zn (II were found. Preparation and dilution of whey fraction at low pH were essential to intrinsic zinc quantification using CadC-GFP. Using the extraction procedure and bioassay, intrinsic Zn (II concentrations ranging from 1.4 to 4.8 mg/l for milk brands and from 1.2 to 2.9 mg/kg for yoghurt brands were determined, which correlated to those determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Conclusions GFP-tagged bacterial trans factors and cis elements can work in the neutralized whole composition and diluted whey fraction of milk and yoghurt. The feature of regulatory elements is advantageous for establishment of simple and rapid assays of toxic metals in dairy products.

  14. Bioassays for the toxicity of petroleum oils to birds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to develop bioassays to predict the potential toxicity of petroleum oils to birds. Two bioassay systems were assessed. The first was the embryonated chicken egg. Mortality and pathological changes were examined in embryos treated with 1-30 μl of petroleum oils applied to the eggshell on day 9 of incubation and examined on day 13. Lesions seen consistently were extensive edema, superficial zones of hepatic necrosis, distension of the heart, and enlargement of the spleen. These morphological changes could not be reproduced by covering the eggshell with inert sealants. Liver necrosis and edema were found in embryos exposed to the 6 petroleum oils, suggesting a common mechanism of toxic action. The 96-h LD25 and ED25 (lethal and effective doses, respectively, affecting 25% of the population) for liver necrosis were determined for 6 petroleum oils. Estimates of the ED25 for liver necrosis could discriminate among the toxicities of the 6 oils better than could estimates of the LD25, and the ED25 was more reliable and consistent when bioassays were repeated on the same oil. The second system was the red blood cell exposed to petroleum oils in vitro, designed to model the Heinz body hemolytic anemia described in birds ingesting crude oil. Formation of methemoglobin and Heinz bodies was measured in rabbit erythrocytes exposed to naphthalene or extracts of petroleum oils after incubation. The assay could detect dose-responsive Heinz body formation in red cells treated with naphthalene, but Heinz body formation was not detected in red cells treated with 6 different petroleum oils. 326 refs., 19 figs., 46 tabs

  15. Seven Tips for Publishing Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumashiro, Kevin K.

    2004-01-01

    The publishing industry in the field of education is undergoing several profound changes. New publishers are emerging while established publishers are merging. More book series (that is, books on a certain topic that are approved and mentored by one or more established scholars in the field) are being created. Alternative paths are becoming more…

  16. The Workshop on Animal Botulism in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarin, Hanna; Tevell Åberg, Annica; Woudstra, Cédric;

    2013-01-01

    A workshop on animal botulism was held in Uppsala, Sweden, in June 2012. Its purpose was to explore the current status of the disease in Europe by gathering the European experts in animal botulism and to raise awareness of the disease among veterinarians and others involved in biopreparedness....... Animal botulism is underreported and underdiagnosed, but an increasing number of reports, as well as the information gathered from this workshop, show that it is an emerging problem in Europe. The workshop was divided into 4 sessions: animal botulism in Europe, the bacteria behind the disease, detection...... main conclusions drawn from these discussions were that there is an urgent need to replace the mouse bioassay for botulinum toxin detection with an in vitro test and that there is a need for a European network to function as a reference laboratory, which could also organize a European supply of...

  17. Application of the proposed new ICRP lung model to bioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new lung model being proposed by ICRP for use in radiation protection dosimetry requires the calculation of doses to separate regions of the respiratory tract, multiplying these doses by factors proportional to the risk per unit dose to each region, and summing over all regions of the lung to give a ''weighted'' lung dose. This paper compares the doses that would be calculated form bioassay measurements using the new model with those calculated using the current model, which essentially uses total lung burden to estimate lung dose

  18. The use of cultivars of Raphanus sativus for cytokinin bioassay

    OpenAIRE

    Dorota Kubowicz; Ewa Grodzka

    2013-01-01

    Six cultivars of radish (Raphanus sativus) were tested for their usefulness in radish cytokinin bioassay by the method of Letham (1971). The best cultivar was found to be 'Sopel Lodu' which responds well to both zeatin and 2iP over a wide range of concentrations. The fresh weight of cotyledons increased at most by 71.5% (if treated with zeatin) or 101.0% (if treated with 2iP) compared to untreated cotyledons. This cultivar is also sensitive to the partially purified cytokinin-like fraction is...

  19. Herbicide impact on Hormosira banksii gametes measured by fluorescence and germination bioassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The innovative bioassay described here involves chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements of gametes from the macroalgae, Hormosira banksii, where gametes (eggs) were exposed to Diuron, Irgarol and Bromacil. Response was assessed as percent inhibition from control of effective quantum yield (ΔF/Fm') of photosystem II, herein referred to as % PSII Inhibition. This was measured with the dual-channelled pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometer, ToxY-PAM. The fluorescence bioassay was run simultaneously with an established H. banksii germination bioassay to compare sensitivity, precision, and time-to-result. The fluorescence bioassay gave highly sensitive results evidenced by EC5s (% PSII Inhibition) for Diuron, Irgarol and Bromacil being three, four and three orders of magnitude (respectively) lower than EC5s generated from the germination bioassays. Precision of the fluorescence bioassay was demonstrated with low coefficient of variations (<30%) for all three toxicants. With regard to time, the fluorescence bioassay gave results within 6 h, as opposed to more than 50 h for the germination bioassay. - Chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements form the basis of a macroalgal bioassay with many advantages over germination-based methods

  20. [Transgenic animals and animal welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Christoph

    1998-01-01

    Under the pressure of a public vote in Switzerland (7 June 1998) on an initiative to ban the production, use and patenting of transgenic animals, their value for biomedical research and development is intensely debated. In addition, the Swiss legislation has adopted (1992) a constitutional obligation to "take into account the dignity of creatures". The term "dignity of creatures", however, can be interpreted in anthropocentric or biocentric ways. The government has now formulated the legal implications of this term for transgenic animals and plants in various laws including the animal and environmental protection laws. This paper gives arguments for a fair evaluation of trangenic animals from an animal welfare point of view where not only the costs of animal suffering must be considered but also the probability of potential benefit for man. A self-confident research community should allow such an evaluation procedure even in view of an outcome which could ban many uses of transgenic animals PMID:11208266

  1. Animal Shelter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Beijing activist Zhang Luping gives up a lucrative business career to provide a home for stray and abandoned pets "I have never been married, but I have I hundreds of children," said Zhang Luping, founder of the Beijing Human and Animal Environment Education Center (the Animal Center). "God sent me to this planet and gave me the mission of taking care of helpless and homeless dogs and cats. I will never let Him down." The Animal Center, one of a few non-

  2. Animal ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Clare; Sandøe, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes and discusses different views concerning our duties towards animals. First, we explain why it is necessary to engage in thinking about animal ethics and why it is not enough to rely on feelings alone. Secondly, we present and discuss five different kinds of views about...... the nature of our duties to animals. They are: contractarianism, utilitarianism, the animal rights view, contextual views, and a respect for nature view. Finally, we briefly consider whether it is possible to combine elements from the presented views, and how to make up one’s mind....

  3. A Publisher view on the future of scholarly publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, Jose

    2015-08-01

    The journal publishing landscape is changing rapidly. With the massive move from print to online taking place at the end of the last century, we are now seeing a shift from traditional subscription based publishing model to ‘hybrid’ models and full Open Access publishing. Other major changes are taking place at the article interface level (from a static PDF to the “Article of the Future”), in data and code repository linking, in publishing data and code and hence make it citable and discoverable, and in many other subject area specific online innovations that are being introduced.Elsevier is actively involved - both in Open Access publishing, and in content innovation - in discussing, and taking the lead through many big and smaller scale initiatives. This presentation will outline Elsevier’s perspective on the future of scientific publishing with regards to these developments.

  4. Vicia faba bioassay for environmental toxicity monitoring: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Munawar

    2016-02-01

    Higher plants are recognized as excellent genetic models to detect cytogenetic and mutagenic agents and are frequently used in environmental monitoring studies. Vicia faba (V. faba) bioassay have been used to study DNA damages i.e., chromosomal and nuclear aberrations induced by metallic compounds, pesticides, complex mixtures, petroleum derivates, toxins, nanoparticles and industrial effluents. The main advantages of using V. faba is its availability round the year, economical to use, easy to grow and handle; its use does not require sterile conditions, rate of cell division is fast, chromosomes are easy to score, less expensive and more sensitive as compared to other short-term tests that require pre-preparations. The V. faba test offers evaluation of different endpoints and tested agents can be classified as cytotoxic/genotoxic/mutagenic. This test also provides understanding about mechanism of action, whether the tested agent is clastogenic or aneugenic in nature. In view of advantages offered by V. faba test system, it is used extensively to assess toxic agents and has been emerged as an important bioassay for ecotoxicological studies. Based on the applications of V. faba test to assess the environmental quality, this article offers an overview of this test system and its efficiency in assessing the cytogenetic and mutagenic agents in different classes of the environmental concerns. PMID:26414739

  5. What comes first? Publishing business or publishing studies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josipa Selthofer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze and compare publishing studies, their programmes at the undergraduate and graduate levels and scholars involved in the teaching of publishing courses at the top universities around the world and in Croatia. Since traditional publishing business is rapidly changing, new skills and new jobs are involved in it. The main research question is: Can modern publishing studies produce a modern publisher? Or, is it the other way around? The hypothesis of the paper is that scholars involved in the teaching of publishing courses at the top universities around the world have a background in publishing business. So, can they prepare their students for the future and can their students gain competencies they need to compete in a confusing world of digital authors and electronic books? The research methods used were content analysis and comparison. Research sample included 36 university publishing programmes at the undergraduate and graduate level worldwide (24 MA, 12 BA. The research sample was limited mainly to the English-speaking countries. In most non-English-speaking countries, it was difficult to analyse the programme curriculum in the native language because the programme and course description did not exit. In the data gathering phase, a customized web application was used for content analysis. The application has three main sections: a list of websites to evaluate, a visual representation of the uploaded website and a list of characteristics grouped by categories for quantifying data. About twenty years ago, publishing was not considered a separate scientific branch in Croatia. Publishing studies are therefore a new phenomenon to both scholars and publishers in Croatia. To create a new, ideal publishing course, can we simply copy global trends or is it better to create something of our own?

  6. Potency determination of follitropin, lutropin And thyrotropin: a comparison between the quantification by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and in vivo bioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the intention of setting up physico-chemical methods as an alternative to in vivo bioassay for determining biological activity, the hFSH, hTSH and hLH content of native and recombinant preparations was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and compared with the data obtained by the classical mouse or rat in vivo bioassays (BA). A linear relationship between the two methods was found for these hormones: hFSH BAU= 0.9925 RP-HPLCU– 1.3165, r = 0.9371, p IU = 0.8771 RP-HPLCIU + 12.41, r = 0.9786, p < 0.01, n = 5. For nine other hFSH and eleven hTSH preparations, the mean difference ( ) between the bioactivity predicted from RP-HPLC data via these equations and the mean of the bioactivities obtained with the two methods was as follows. For hLH this difference could not be estimated due to lack of different samples. In the case of hFSH, ± SD = -2.11 ± 3.49% with a precision of 1.16% and in the case of hTSH, ± SD = -2.01 ± 5.56 %, with precision of 1.68%. Partly-degraded hFSH, hTSH and hLH samples presented different activity degrees that could be predicted by RP-HPLC, with an acceptable agreement with the in vivo bioassays. These results demonstrate that the employment of a non-animal physico-chemical assay, such as RP-HPLC, is a viable alternative to the use of an in vivo bioassay for hFSH and hTSH potency determination, thus reducing the number of animals currently used for assuring quality and efficacy of a pharmaceutical product. (author)

  7. Animal cytomegaloviruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Staczek, J.

    1990-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses are agents that infect a variety of animals. Human cytomegalovirus is associated with infections that may be inapparent or may result in severe body malformation. More recently, human cytomegalovirus infections have been recognized as causing severe complications in immunosuppressed individuals. In other animals, cytomegaloviruses are often associated with infections having relatively mild sequelae. Many of these sequelae parallel symptoms associated with human cytomegalovir...

  8. ANIMAL code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes ANIMAL, a two-dimensional Eulerian magnetohydrodynamic computer code. ANIMAL's physical model also appears. Formulated are temporal and spatial finite-difference equations in a manner that facilitates implementation of the algorithm. Outlined are the functions of the algorithm's FORTRAN subroutines and variables

  9. Kindergarten Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Animation is one of the last lessons that come to mind when thinking of kindergarten art. The necessary understanding of sequencing, attention to small, often detailed drawings, and the use of technology all seem more suitable to upper elementary. With today's emphasis on condensing and integrating curriculum, consider developing animation lessons…

  10. THE TYPES OF PUBLISHING SLOGANS

    OpenAIRE

    Ryzhov Konstantin Germanovich

    2015-01-01

    The author of the article focuses his attention on publishing slogans which are posted on 100 present-day Russian publishing houses' official websites and have not yet been studied in the special literature. The author has developed his own classification of publishing slogans based on the results of analysis and considering the current scientific views on the classification of slogans. The examined items are classified into autonomous and text-dependent according to interrelationship with an...

  11. `Electronic Publishing' -- Practice and Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Brailsford, David F.; Evans, David R.; Granger, Geeti

    1990-01-01

    Electronic Publishing -- Origination, Dissemination and Design (EP-odd) is an academic journal which publishes refereed papers in the subject area of electronic publishing. The authors of the present paper are, respectively, editor-in-chief, system software consultant and senior production manager for the journal. EP-odd's policy is that editors, authors, referees and production staff will work closely together using electronic mail. Authors are also encouraged to originate their papers...

  12. Research Library Publishing Services: New Options for University Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Karla L.

    2008-01-01

    A 2007 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) survey indicates that research libraries are rapidly developing publishing services: 65 percent of 80 responding ARL member libraries currently deliver or are in processing of planning these services. Established journal titles dominate this emerging publishing sector and are the main drivers of…

  13. About Animal Husbandry and Feed Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>Animal Husbandry and Feed Science is published to introduce the research achievements of animal husbandry and veterinary workers to the world,enhance their chances to participate in international academic exchange,and promote development of animal husbandry and veterinary.In 2009,Wu Chu(USA-China)Science&Culture Media Co.

  14. LIFE CYCLE BIOASSAY FOR ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF TOXIC CHEMICALS USING RAPID CYCLING OF BRASSICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Initial evaluation of a new plant life cycle bioassay for the assessment of the effects of toxic chemicals is presented. he bioassay features a rapid cycling Brassica species that can complete its life cycle in as little as 36 days. he herbicide dalapon (2,2 dichloropropionic aci...

  15. Animal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Leyre; Wasserman, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    Pavlov and Thorndike pioneered the experimental study of animal learning and provided psychologists with powerful tools to unveil its underlying mechanisms. Today's research developments and theoretical analyses owe much to the pioneering work of these early investigators. Nevertheless, in the evolution of our knowledge about animal learning, some initial conceptions have been challenged and revised. We first review the original experimental procedures and findings of Pavlov and Thorndike. Next, we discuss critical research and consequent controversies which have greatly shaped animal learning theory. For example, although contiguity seemed to be the only condition that is necessary for learning, we now know that it is not sufficient; the conditioned stimulus (CS) also has to provide information about the occurrence of the unconditioned stimulus (US). Also, animals appear to learn different things about the same stimuli when circumstances vary. For instance, when faced with situations in which the meaning of a CS changes, as in the case of acquisition and later extinction, animals seem to preserve the original knowledge (CS-US) in addition to learning about the new conditions (CS-noUS). Finally, we discuss how parallels among Pavlovian conditioning, operant conditioning, and human causal judgment suggest that causal knowledge may lie at the root of both human and animal learning. All of these empirical findings and theoretical developments prove that animal learning is more complex and intricate than was once imagined. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26272842

  16. Comparative surfactant reactivity of canine and human stratum corneum: a plea for the use of the corneosurfametry bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, V; Fontaine, J; Piérard, G E

    1999-01-01

    Comparative dermatology has paid little attention to the physiopathology of the stratum corneum. In this study, we investigated the responses of human and canine horny layers to marketed animal wash products by using the corneosurfametry bioassay. Previous work has shown that, with increasing surfactant aggressiveness to the stratum corneum, the colorimetric index of mildness (CIM) decreases, while both the corneosurfametry index (CSMI) and the overall difference in corneosurfametry (ODC) increase. In the present study, stratum corneum reactivity to wash products and inter-individual variability were significantly higher in humans than in dogs. For the three corneosurfametry variables, linear correlations were found between data gathered in the two panel groups. In conclusion, this pilot study suggests that mean stratum corneum reactivity to surfactants is stronger in humans than in dogs. Inter-individual variation, indicative of sensitive skin, also appears to be broader in humans. As a consequence, data gathered from dogs by using the corneosurfametry bioassay cannot be extrapolated to humans. Such variation between species could be important in the assessment of product safety and in supporting claims for mildness. PMID:25423404

  17. Wild Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁静

    2005-01-01

    Many of us think that all wild animals are dangerous. In fact, very few of them will eat a man if he leaves them alone. If you meet a tiger, I'm sure you will run away, but even a tiger doesn't like meeting a man if it isn't hungry. Tigers only kill and eat man when they are too old to catch their food, such as sheep and other small animals. Some animals get frightened when they only smell a man. Some of themst and and look at a man for a short time before they run away.

  18. 76 FR 16534 - New Animal Drugs for Use in Animal Feeds; Florfenicol; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a document in the Federal Register of June 17, 2010 (75 FR... and Drug Administration (FDA) published a document in the Federal Register of June 17, 2010 (75 FR... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 558 New Animal Drugs for Use in Animal...

  19. Animal performance

    OpenAIRE

    Abaye, A. O. (Azenegashe Ozzie); Rotz, Jonathan Daniel; Scaglia Alonso, Guillermo, 1963-; Fike, John Herschel; Smith, Ray Lee, 1962-

    2009-01-01

    Any forage crop that stretches the grazing season by providing additional feed in early spring, mid-summer, and late fall will provide the livestock producer with lower feed costs and boost animal performance.

  20. Animation & Neurocinematics*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpe Pérez, Inmaculada Concepción

    2016-01-01

    , indeed, can be considered a social/ emotional learning media, which goes beyond the limitations of live action movies. This is due to the diversity of techniques, and its visual plasticity that constructs the impossible. Animators are not real actors but more like the midwife who brings the anima...... machines that think”-(Damasio, A. Descartes error). Such feelings come from the interpretation of the emotions in our bodies. Emotions are our universal language, the motivation of living, the key to what makes a movie successful and truly an art piece that you will remember because moves you. Animation...... into aliveness, which requires knowing how emotions work. Ed Hooks as an expert in training animators and actors, always remarks: “emotions tend to lead to action”. In this paper we want to argue that by producing animated films, as we watch them, cause a stronger effect, not only in our brains, but also in our...

  1. Comics, Copyright and Academic Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Deazley

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the extent to which UK-based academics can rely upon the copyright regime to reproduce extracts and excerpts from published comics and graphic novels without having to ask the copyright owner of those works for permission. In doing so, it invites readers to engage with a broader debate about the nature, demands and process of academic publishing.

  2. Toxicity assessment using different bioassays and microbial biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sedky H A; Van Ginkel, Steven W; Hussein, Mohamed A M; Abskharon, Romany; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Toxicity assessment of water streams, wastewater, and contaminated sediments, is a very important part of environmental pollution monitoring. Evaluation of biological effects using a rapid, sensitive and cost effective method can indicate specific information on ecotoxicity assessment. Recently, different biological assays for toxicity assessment based on higher and lower organisms such as fish, invertebrates, plants and algal cells, and microbial bioassays have been used. This review focuses on microbial biosensors as an analytical device for environmental, food, and biomedical applications. Different techniques which are commonly used in microbial biosensing include amperometry, potentiometry, conductometry, voltammetry, microbial fuel cells, fluorescence, bioluminescence, and colorimetry. Examples of the use of different microbial biosensors in assessing a variety of environments are summarized. PMID:27071051

  3. Neotropical electric fishes (Gymnotiformes) as model organisms for bioassays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milena Ferreira; Isac Silva de Jesus; Eliana Feldberg; JoséAntônioAlves-Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Electric fishes (Gymnotiformes) inhabit Central and South America and form a relatively large group with more than 200 species. Besides a taxonomic challenge due to their still unresolved systematic, wide distribution and the variety of habitats they occupy, these fishes have been intensively studied due to their peculiar use of bioelectricity for electrolocation and communication. Conventional analysis of cells, tissues and organs have been complemented with the studies on the electric organ discharges of these fishes. This review compiles the results of 13 bioassays developed during the last 50 years, which used the quickness, low costs and functionality of the bioelectric data collection of Gymnotiformes to evaluate the effects of environmental contaminants and neuroactive drugs.

  4. Bioassay techniques for 55Fe in urine samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solvent extraction, ion chromatography and several rapid screening methods were developed and evaluated for 55Fe bioassay applications. Isopropyl ether and TNOA column extractions had radiochemical recoveries exceeding 90%. These were very reproducible with a coefficient of variation less than 5%. Screening techniques investigated included direct counting of ashed urine solids, and Fe(OH)3. precipitated from urine. The sensitivities (2-50 Bq/d urine) of the screening methods were usually limited by the effective urine volume that could be counted in a liquid scintillation counter. The reference isopropyl ether and chromatography methods could easily achieve sensitivities well below the 1 Bq/d urine output target. (author). 49 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs

  5. Groundwater animals

    OpenAIRE

    Maurice, Louise; Bloomfield, John; Robertson, Anne; Allen, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater animals are adapted to live in environments with no light and limited nutrients, They can provide insights into fundamental questions of evolution, ecology and biodiversity. They also have an important role to play in informing the reconstruction of past changes in geomorphology and climate, and can be used for characterising aquifers. The BGS is undertaking a systematic survey of selected areas and lithologies in the UK where groundwater animals have not been inves...

  6. The handbook of journal publishing

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Sally; LaFrenier, Douglas; Reich, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The Handbook of Journal Publishing is a comprehensive reference work written by experienced professionals, covering all aspects of journal publishing, both online and in print. Journals are crucial to scholarly communication, but changes in recent years in the way journals are produced, financed, and used make this an especially turbulent and challenging time for journal publishers - and for authors, readers, and librarians. The Handbook offers a thorough guide to the journal publishing process, from editing and production through marketing, sales, and fulfilment, with chapters on management, finances, metrics, copyright, and ethical issues. It provides a wealth of practical tools, including checklists, sample documents, worked examples, alternative scenarios, and extensive lists of resources, which readers can use in their day-to-day work. Between them, the authors have been involved in every aspect of journal publishing over several decades and bring to the text their experience working for a wide range of ...

  7. Seroprevalensi Toxoplasma gondii pada Kambing dan Bioassay Patogenitasnya pada Kucing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Yunik Novita Dewi Dewi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE The study aimed to determine seroprevalence of Toxoplasmosis in goats sloughtered at Kampung Jawa, Denpasar, Bali and to evaluate their pathogenicities through bioassay in cats.One hundred serums and meats of goats were collected. Anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibody was determined using Indirect Haemaglutination (IHA test. The pathogenicity bioassay of Toxoplasma gondii was carried out through inoculating the meats of goats which had seropositive of Toxoplasma gondii to the cats. The pathogenicity was evaluated using the intensity of oocyte sheding from the cats. The result showed that the seroprevalence of Toxoplasmosis was 46%. There was not significant difference between pathogenicity of Toxoplasma gondii in cat inoculated with meat of goat which had a high and low titer of antibody against Toxoplasma gondii. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; text-align:justify; line-height:150%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

  8. Comprehensive integration of homogeneous bioassays via centrifugo-pneumatic cascading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godino, Neus; Gorkin, Robert; Linares, Ana V; Burger, Robert; Ducrée, Jens

    2013-02-21

    This work for the first time presents the full integration and automation concept for a range of bioassays leveraged by cascading a centrifugo-pneumatic valving scheme to sequentially move several liquids through shared channel segments for multi-step sample preparation into the detection zone. This novel centrifugo-pneumatic liquid handling significantly simplifies system manufacture by obviating the need for complex surface functionalization procedures or hybrid material integration, as it is common in conventional valving methods such as capillary burst valves or sacrificial valves. Based on the centrifugo-pneumatic valving scheme, this work presents a toolkit of operational elements implementing liquid loading/transfer, metering, mixing and sedimentation in a microstructured polymer disc. As a proof of concept for the broad class of homogeneous bioassays, the full integration and automation of a colorimetric nitrate/nitrite test for the detection of clinically relevant nitric oxide (NO) in whole blood is implemented. First, 40 μL of plasma is extracted from a 100 μL sample of human blood, incubated for one hour with the enzymatic mixture (60 μL), and finally reacted with 100 μL of colorimetric (Greiss) reagents. Following just a single loading phase at the beginning of the process, all of these steps are automated through the centrifugo-pneumatic cascade with a high level of flow control and synchronization. Our system shows good correlation with controls up to 50 μM of nitrate, which adequately covers the healthy human range (4 to 45.3 μM). PMID:23250328

  9. A novel high-throughput irradiator for in vitro radiation sensitivity bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Tyler L.

    Given the emphasis on more personalized radiation therapy there is an ongoing and compelling need to develop high-throughput screening tools to further examine the biological effects of ionizing radiation on cells, tissues and organ systems in either the research or clinical setting. Conventional x-ray irradiators are designed to provide maximum versatility to radiobiology researchers, typically accommodating small animals, tissue or blood samples, and cellular applications. This added versatility often impedes the overall sensitivity and specificity of an experiment resulting in a trade-off between the number of absorbed doses (or dose rates) and biological endpoints that can be investigated in vitro in a reasonable amount of time. Therefore, modern irradiator designs are incompatible with current high-throughput bioassay technologies. Furthermore, important dosimetry and calibration characteristics (i.e. dose build-up region, beam attenuation, and beam scatter) of these irradiators are typically unknown to the end user, which can lead to significant deviation between delivered dose and intended dose to cells that adversely impact experimental results. Therefore, the overarching goal of this research is to design and develop a robust and fully automated high-throughput irradiator for in vitro radiation sensitivity investigations. Additionally, in vitro biological validation of this system was performed by assessing intracellular reactive oxygen species production, physical DNA double strand breaks, and activation of cellular DNA repair mechanisms. Finally, the high-throughput irradiator was used to investigate autophagic flux, a cellular adaptive response, as a potential biomarker of radiation sensitivity.

  10. Double incision wound healing bioassay using Hamelia patens from El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Beloz, Alfredo; Rucinski, James C; Balick, Michael J; Tipton, Camille

    2003-10-01

    Hamelia patens Jacq. (Rubiaceae) has received little attention in the laboratory for its wound healing ability even though it is commonly used as a treatment for wounds throughout Central America. A double incision wound healing bioassay was carried out with a crude extract of Hamelia patens collected from El Salvador. Animals were divided into three groups. Group I (n = 14) had the left incision treated with 5% (w/w) Hamelia patens and the contralateral side with petroleum jelly (PJ). Group II (n = 14) had the left incision treated with 10% (w/w) ointment and the contralateral side with petroleum jelly. Group III (n = 10) had the left incision treated with petroleum jelly and the contralateral side left untreated. Breaking strength of the incisions was measured on day 7 and day 12. For Groups I and II, there was no significant difference between treatment and control incisions at day 7. On day 12, there was a significant difference between the treated and control incisions for Groups I and II. There was no significant difference between petroleum jelly and untreated incisions for Group III on day 7 and day 12. Hamelia patens does increase breaking strength of wounds significantly more than the control group. Further wound healing studies of this plant are warranted. PMID:12963138

  11. Publishers, Publishing and the Internet: How Journal Publishing Will Survive and Prosper in the Electronic Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, John E.

    1997-01-01

    The Internet will change how publishers function. Publishers will need to acquire new skills in developing multimedia; become custodians of intellectual property rather than producers of printed artifacts; know copyright and contract law, especially international aspects; and work more closely with universities to deliver electronic information…

  12. Comparison of solid and liquid-phase bioassays using ecoscores to assess contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lors, Christine [Universite Lille Nord de France, 1bis rue Georges Lefevre, 59044 Lille Cedex (France); Ecole des Mines de Douai, LGCgE-MPE-GCE, 941 rue Charles-Bourseul, 59500 Douai (France); Centre National de Recherche sur les Sites et Sols Pollues, 930 Boulevard Lahure, BP 537, 59505 Douai Cedex (France); Ponge, Jean-Francois, E-mail: ponge@mnhn.fr [Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, Departement Ecologie et Gestion de la Biodiversite, CNRS UMR 7179, 4 Avenue du Petit-Chateau, 91800 Brunoy (France); Martinez Aldaya, Maite [Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, Departement Ecologie et Gestion de la Biodiversite, CNRS UMR 7179, 4 Avenue du Petit-Chateau, 91800 Brunoy (France); Damidot, Denis [Universite Lille Nord de France, 1bis rue Georges Lefevre, 59044 Lille Cedex (France); Ecole des Mines de Douai, LGCgE-MPE-GCE, 941 rue Charles-Bourseul, 59500 Douai (France)

    2011-10-15

    Bioassays on aqueous and solid phases of contaminated soils were compared, belonging to a wide array of trophic and response levels and using ecoscores for evaluating ecotoxicological and genotoxicological endpoints. The method was applied to four coke factory soils contaminated mainly with PAHs, but also to a lesser extent by heavy metals and cyanides. Aquatic bioassays do not differ from terrestrial bioassays when scaling soils according to toxicity but they are complementary from the viewpoint of ecological relevance. Both aquatic and terrestrial endpoints are strongly correlated with concentrations of 3-ring PAHs. This evaluation procedure allows us to propose a cost-effective battery which embraces a wide array of test organisms and response levels: it includes two rapid bioassays (Microtox) and springtail avoidance), a micronucleus test and three bioassays of a longer duration (algal growth, lettuce germination and springtail reproduction). This battery can be recommended for a cost-effective assessment of polluted/remediated soils. - Highlights: > Comparison of liquid- and solid-phase bioassays on contaminated soils, using ecoscores. > Complementarity of liquid- and solid-phase bioassays for the evaluation of environmental hazards. > Proposal for a restricted battery of 5 most sensitive tests. > Use of this restricted battery for a cost-effective assessment of polluted/remediated soils. - Aqueous and solid phases of contaminated soils give similar results in terms of toxicity but are complementary for the evaluation of environmental hazards by ecoscores.

  13. Hydrography, Published in unknown, SWGRC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hydrography dataset, was produced all or in part from Road Centerline Files information as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Geographic...

  14. The Simple Publishing Interface (SPI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Massart, David; Totschnig, Michael; Klerkx, Joris; Duval, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Ternier, S., Massart, D., Totschnig, M., Klerkx, J., & Duval, E. (2010). The Simple Publishing Interface (SPI). D-Lib Magazine, September/October 2010, Volume 16 Number 9/10, doi:10.1045/september2010-ternier

  15. Biotecnologia animal

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Lehmann Coutinho; Millor Fernandes do Rosário; Erika Cristina Jorge

    2010-01-01

    A biotecnologia animal tem fornecido novas ferramentas para os programas de melhoramento e, dessa forma, contribuído para melhorar a eficiência da produção dos produtos de origem animal. No entanto, os avanços têm sido mais lentos do que antecipados, especialmente em razão da dificuldade na identificação dos genes responsáveis pelas características fenotípicas de interesse zootécnico. Três estratégias principais têm sido utilizadas para identificar esses genes - mapeamento de QTL, genes candi...

  16. Animated symbols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on data about animation film production by 18-year-old students in a Danish upper secondary school. The optic is the on-going potential for learning and development of reflection. The purpose is to clarify what might support young people's reflection on media. I propose...... an analytic working model called Animated Symbols concerning critical reflection in a dialogic learning process. The model shows dialogue as interactions that involve two types of transformation: inner ‘learning processes' and outer signs and symbols. The classroom-based research study is part of a Ph...

  17. THE TYPES OF PUBLISHING SLOGANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryzhov Konstantin Germanovich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The author of the article focuses his attention on publishing slogans which are posted on 100 present-day Russian publishing houses' official websites and have not yet been studied in the special literature. The author has developed his own classification of publishing slogans based on the results of analysis and considering the current scientific views on the classification of slogans. The examined items are classified into autonomous and text-dependent according to interrelationship with an advertising text; marketable, corporative and mixed according to a presentation subject; rational, emotional and complex depending on the method of influence upon a recipient; slogan-presentation, slogan-assurance, slogan-identifier, slogan-appraisal, slogan-appeal depending on the communicative strategy; slogans consisting of one sentence and of two or more sentences; Russian and foreign ones. The analysis of the slogans of all kinds presented in the actual material allowed the author to determine the dominant features of the Russian publishing slogan which is an autonomous sentence in relation to the advertising text. In spite of that, the slogan shows the publishing output, influences the recipient emotionally, actualizes the communicative strategy of publishing house presentation of its distinguishing features, gives assurance to the target audience and distinguishes the advertised subject among competitors.

  18. Review of literature on bioassay methods for estimating radionuclides in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassay methods of certain important radionuclides encountered in the nuclear fuel cycle operations, viz., thorium, uranium, sup(239)Pu, sup(241)Am, sup(90)Sr, sup(99)Tc, sup(106)Ru, sup(137)Cs are reviewed, with special emphasis on urinalysis. Since the preconcentration is an important prerequisite for bioassay, various preconcentration methods are also discussed. Brief account of various instruments both nuclear and analytical used in the bioassay programme is included. The sensitivities of the methods cited in the literature vis-a-vis the derived recording levels indicated in ICRP recommendations are compared. Literature surveyed up to 1990 is tabulated. (author). 96 refs., 1 fig ., 3 tabs

  19. Evaluation on the Joint Action Between Chlorsulfuron and Haloxyfop-R by Bioassay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The joint action between chlorsulfuron and haloxyfop-R was evaluated by bioassay with wheat and com.respectivly. The dose-response curve derived from wheat bioassay showed that the inhibition of haloxyfop-Rto wheat root growth wasn't affected by the increasing rate of chlorsulfuron. It indicated that chlorsulfuron had no antagonism to haloxyfop-R. Meanwhile ,the variation analysis of corn bioassay indicated that these two herbicides had joint action on inhibition to corn primary root growth. The joint action was evaluated as addis tive action by using Isobole Method. So chlorsulfuron and haloxyfop-R could be used as tank mixture.

  20. Animal house

    OpenAIRE

    Turka, Laurence A.

    2008-01-01

    While the JCI was originally conceived as a journal that would integrate various scientific approaches to the examination of human physiology and pathophysiology, we now find many of its pages filled with animal models of human disease. Is this a good thing?

  1. Transgenic Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenisch, Rudolf

    1988-01-01

    Describes three methods and their advantages and disadvantages for introducing genes into animals. Discusses the predictability and tissue-specificity of the injected genes. Outlines the applications of transgenic technology for studying gene expression, the early stages of mammalian development, mutations, and the molecular nature of chromosomes.…

  2. Animated Symbols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frolunde, Lisbeth

    ' processer af fem udvalgte elever er gennemgået i forhold til tre opdelinger: filmskabere, filmskabelse processen og film. Den teoretiske tilgang er pragmatisme, social semiotik og diskursanalyse. Modellen "Animating Symbols" er udviklet og diskuteret som forsøg på at forstå reflektion og design som en slags...

  3. Biotecnologia animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Lehmann Coutinho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A biotecnologia animal tem fornecido novas ferramentas para os programas de melhoramento e, dessa forma, contribuído para melhorar a eficiência da produção dos produtos de origem animal. No entanto, os avanços têm sido mais lentos do que antecipados, especialmente em razão da dificuldade na identificação dos genes responsáveis pelas características fenotípicas de interesse zootécnico. Três estratégias principais têm sido utilizadas para identificar esses genes - mapeamento de QTL, genes candidatos e sequenciamento de DNA e mRNA - e cada uma tem suas vantagens e limitações. O mapeamento de QTL permite determinar as regiões genômicas que contêm genes, mas o intervalo de confiança do QTL pode ser grande e conter muitos genes. A estratégia de genes candidatos é limitada por causa do conhecimento ainda restrito das funções de todos os genes. Os sequenciamentos de genomas e de sequências expressas podem auxiliar na identificação da posição de genes e de vias metabólicas associadas à característica de interesse. A integração dessas estratégias por meio do desenvolvimento de programas de bioinformática permitirá a identificação de novos genes de interesse zootécnico. Assim, os programas de melhoramento genético se beneficiarão pela inclusão da informação obtida diretamente do DNA na avaliação do mérito genético dos plantéis disponíveis.Animal biotechnology is providing new tools for animal breeding and genetics and thus contributing to advances in production efficiency and quality of animal products. However, the progress is slower than anticipated, mainly because of the difficulty involved in identifying genes that control phenotypic characteristics of importance to the animal industry. Three main strategies: QTL mapping, candidate genes and DNA and mRNA sequencing have been used to identify genes of economic interest to animal breeding and each has advantages and disadvantages. QTL mapping allows

  4. Luminescent Lanthanide Reporters for High-Sensitivity Novel Bioassays.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anstey, Mitchell; Fruetel, Julia A.; Foster, Michael E.; Hayden, Carl C.; Buckley, Heather L.; Arnold, John

    2013-09-01

    Biological imaging and assay technologies rely on fluorescent organic dyes as reporters for a number of interesting targets and processes. However, limitations of organic dyes such as small Stokes shifts, spectral overlap of emission signals with native biological fluorescence background, and photobleaching have all inhibited the development of highly sensitive assays. To overcome the limitations of organic dyes for bioassays, we propose to develop lanthanide-based luminescent dyes and demonstrate them for molecular reporting applications. This relatively new family of dyes was selected for their attractive spectral and chemical properties. Luminescence is imparted by the lanthanide atom and allows for relatively simple chemical structures that can be tailored to the application. The photophysical properties offer unique features such as narrow and non-overlapping emission bands, long luminescent lifetimes, and long wavelength emission, which enable significant sensitivity improvements over organic dyes through spectral and temporal gating of the luminescent signal.Growth in this field has been hindered due to the necessary advanced synthetic chemistry techniques and access to experts in biological assay development. Our strategy for the development of a new lanthanide-based fluorescent reporter system is based on chelation of the lanthanide metal center using absorbing chromophores. Our first strategy involves %22Click%22 chemistry to develop 3-fold symmetric chelators and the other involves use of a new class of tetrapyrrole ligands called corroles. This two-pronged approach is geared towards the optimization of chromophores to enhance light output.

  5. Bioassay-based risk assessment of complex mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, K.C.; Huebner, H.J. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health

    1996-12-31

    The baseline risk assessment often plays an integral role in various decision-making processes at Superfund sites. The present study reports on risk characterizations prepared for seven complex mixtures using biological and chemical analysis. Three of the samples (A, B, and C) were complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) extracted from coal tar; while four samples extracted from munitions-contaminated soil contained primarily nitroaromatic hydrocarbons. The chemical-based risk assessment ranked sample C as least toxic, while the risk associated with samples A and B was approximately equal. The microbial bioassay was in general agreement for the coal tar samples. The weighted activity of the coal tar extracts in Salmonella was 4,960 for sample C, and 162,000 and 206,000 for samples A and B, respectively. The bacterial mutagenicity of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene contaminated soils exhibited an indirect correlation with chemical-based risk assessment. The aqueous extract of sample 004 induced 1,292 net revertants in Salmonella, while the estimated risk to ingestion and dermal adsorption was 2E-9. The data indicate that the chemical-based risk assessment accurately predicted the genotoxicity of the PAHs, while the accuracy of the risk assessment for munitions contaminated soils was limited due to the presence of metabolites of TNT degradation. The biological tests used in this research provide a valuable compliment to chemical analysis for characterizing the genotoxic risk of complex mixtures.

  6. Colorimetric paper bioassay for the detection of phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkasir, Ramiz S J; Ornatska, Maryna; Andreescu, Silvana

    2012-11-20

    A new type of paper based bioassay for the colorimetric detection of phenolic compounds including phenol, bisphenol A, catechol and cresols is reported. The sensor is based on a layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly approach formed by alternatively depositing layers of chitosan and alginate polyelectrolytes onto filter paper and physically entrapping the tyrosinase enzyme in between these layers. The sensor response is quantified as a color change resulting from the specific binding of the enzymatically generated quinone to the multilayers of immobilized chitosan on the paper. The color change can be quantified with the naked eye but a digitalized picture can also be used to provide more sensitive comparison to a calibrated color scheme. The sensor was optimized with respect to the number of layers, pH, enzyme, chitosan and alginate amounts. The colorimetric response was concentration dependent, with a detection limit of 0.86 (±0.1) μg/L for each of the phenolic compounds tested. The response time required for the sensor to reach steady-state color varied between 6 and 17 min depending on the phenolic substrate. The sensor showed excellent storage stability at room temperature for several months (92% residual activity after 260 days storage) and demonstrated good functionality in real environmental samples. A procedure to mass-produce the bioactive sensors by inkjet printing the LbL layers of polyelectrolyte and enzyme on paper is demonstrated. PMID:23113670

  7. Long-wavelength-emitting nanocrystals for bioassay applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, Valerie J.; Harvey, Ashley S.; McCool, Geoff D.; Quinlan, Forest T.; Feng, Jun; Shan, Guomin; Stroeve, Pieter; Risbud, Subhash H.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2002-11-01

    New fluorophores that can be excited using visible or near-infrared radiation are of considerable interest for application in environmental and complex bioassays, where background fluorescence is exacerbated by ultra-violet or blue excitation. Useful labels for biomolecules include infrared emitting semiconductor nanoparticles that can be blue-shifted into the near-infrared and visible through quantum confinement effects, oxides of iron, and rare earth oxides. In this work, the synthesis of 6 nm average diameter lead selenide nanocrystals (well below the Bohr exciton diameter of 92 nm) through a reverse micelle technique; and the synthesis of iron and europium oxides with particles less than 5 nm in diameter by pulsed laser ablation is reported. The europium oxide nanoparticles' emission showed a large Stokes shift (144 nm or 216 nm, depending on excitation wavelength); a narrow, symmetric emission line at 610 nm (FWHM of 8 nm); and long lifetime (300 μs). The Eu2O3 nanoparticles, which were coated with silica for functionalization, displayed a greatly enhanced sensitivity over a conventional ELISA (0.025 ng ml-1 vs. 0.1 ng ml-1) when run in an atrazine immunoassay.

  8. Analyzing bioassay data using Bayesian methods-A primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classical statistics approach used in health physics for the interpretation of measurements is deficient in that it does not allow for the consideration of needle in a haystack effects, where events that are rare in a population are being detected. In fact, this is often the case in health physics measurements, and the false positive fraction is often very large using the prescriptions of classical statistics. Bayesian statistics provides an objective methodology to ensure acceptably small false positive fractions. The authors present the basic methodology and a heuristic discussion. Examples are given using numerically generated and real bioassay data (Tritium). Various analytical models are used to fit the prior probability distribution, in order to test the sensitivity to choice of model. Parametric studies show that the normalized Bayesian decision level kα-Lc/σ0, where σ0 is the measurement uncertainty for zero true amount, is usually in the range from 3 to 5 depending on the true positive rate. Four times σ0 rather than approximately two times σ0, as in classical statistics, would often seem a better choice for the decision level

  9. Arthropod Distribution and Habitat, Lobster Captures (allcaught); This point data set represents most, if not all, of the lobsters captured and recaptured during the University of Rhode Island, Department of Fisheries, Animal, and Veterinary Science Department tag and release study. Rhode I, Published in 2001, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Arthropod Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2001. It is...

  10. Arthropod Distribution and Habitat, Lobster Captures (allcaught); This point data set represents most, if not all, of the lobsters captured and recaptured during the University of Rhode Island, Department of Fisheries, Animal, and Veterinary Science Department tag and release study., Published in 2001, 1:9600 (1in=800ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Arthropod Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:9600 (1in=800ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2001. It is...

  11. Phototoxicity activity of Psoralea drupacea L. using Atremia salina bioassay system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ramezani

    2011-07-01

    Conclusion: The result showed that P. drupacea methanolic extract and chloroform fraction have phototoxicity in A. salina bioassay system and their toxic effect is related to phototoxic constituents such as psoralen.

  12. Comparative susceptibility of bemisia tabaci to imidacloprid in field- and laboratory-based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemisia tabaci biotype B is a resistance-prone pest of protected and open agriculture. Systemic uptake bioassays used in resistance monitoring programs have provided important information on susceptibility to neonicotinoid insecticides, but have remained decoupled from field performance. Simultaneou...

  13. Animal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The animal facilities in the Division are described. They consist of kennels, animal rooms, service areas, and technical areas (examining rooms, operating rooms, pathology labs, x-ray rooms, and 60Co exposure facilities). The computer support facility is also described. The advent of the Conversational Monitor System at Argonne has launched a new effort to set up conversational computing and graphics software for users. The existing LS-11 data acquisition systems have been further enhanced and expanded. The divisional radiation facilities include a number of gamma, neutron, and x-ray radiation sources with accompanying areas for related equipment. There are five 60Co irradiation facilities; a research reactor, Janus, is a source for fission-spectrum neutrons; two other neutron sources in the Chicago area are also available to the staff for cell biology studies. The electron microscope facilities are also described

  14. [Dangerous animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasle, Gunnar

    2002-06-30

    As travellers seek ever more exotic destinations they are more likely to encounter dangerous animals. Compared to risks such as AIDS, traffic accidents and malaria, the risk is not so great; many travellers are, however, concerned about this and those who give pre-travel vaccines and advice should know something about it. This article is mainly based on medical and zoological textbooks. Venomous stings and bites may be prevented by adequate clothing and by keeping safe distance to the animals. Listening to those who live in the area is of course important. Travellers should not carry antisera with them, but antisera should be available at local hospitals. It should be borne in mind that plant eaters cause just as many deaths as large predators. In some cases it is necessary to carry a sufficiently powerful firearm. PMID:12555616

  15. Animal Locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Graham K; Tropea, Cameron

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a wide-ranging snapshot of the state-of-the-art in experimental research on the physics of swimming and flying animals. The resulting picture reflects not only upon the questions that are of interest in current pure and applied research, but also upon the experimental techniques that are available to answer them. Doubtless, many new questions will present themselves as the scope and performance of our experimental toolbox develops over the coming years.

  16. Animal Drug Safety FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Frequently Asked Questions Animal Drug Safety Frequently Asked Questions Share Tweet Linkedin ...

  17. A rapid bioassay for detecting saxitoxins using a Daphnia acute toxicity test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrao-Filho, Aloysio da S., E-mail: aloysio@ioc.fiocruz.b [Laboratorio de Avaliacao e Promocao da Saude Ambiental, Departamento de Biologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Av. Brasil 4365, Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21045-900 (Brazil); Soares, Maria Carolina S., E-mail: mcarolsoares@gmail.co [Departamento de Engenharia Sanitaria e Ambiental Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900 (Brazil); Freitas de Magalhaes, Valeria, E-mail: valeria@biof.ufrj.b [Laboratorio de Ecofisiologia e Toxicologia de Cianobacterias, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21949-900 (Brazil); Azevedo, Sandra M.F.O., E-mail: sazevedo@biof.ufrj.b [Laboratorio de Ecofisiologia e Toxicologia de Cianobacterias, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21949-900 (Brazil)

    2010-06-15

    Bioassays using Daphnia pulex and Moina micrura were designed to detect cyanobacterial neurotoxins in raw water samples. Phytoplankton and cyanotoxins from seston were analyzed during 15 months in a eutrophic reservoir. Effective time to immobilize 50% of the exposed individuals (ET{sub 50}) was adopted as the endpoint. Paralysis of swimming movements was observed between approx0.5-3 h of exposure to lake water containing toxic cyanobacteria, followed by an almost complete recovery of the swimming activity within 24 h after being placed in control water. The same effects were observed in bioassays with a saxitoxin-producer strain of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii isolated from the reservoir. Regression analysis showed significant relationships between ET{sub 50}vs. cell density, biomass and saxitoxins content, suggesting that the paralysis of Daphnia in lake water samples was caused by saxitoxins found in C. raciborskii. Daphnia bioassay was found to be a sensitive method for detecting fast-acting neurotoxins in natural samples, with important advantages over mouse bioassays. - A new Daphnia bioassay, as an alternative to the mouse bioassay, is able to detect effects of fast-acting, potent neurotoxins in raw water.

  18. Conceptual design for comprehensive automation in radiochemical analysis of bioassay samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassay Laboratory of Health Physics Division is entrusted with the task of carrying out the bioassay monitoring of occupational workers from various plants/divisions of BARC for various radionuclides like Pu, U, Th, 90Sr, 3H etc. On the average about 1400-1500 analyses are performed on 700-800 urine samples collected annually from radiation workers. The workload has increased by 1.5 to 2.0 times in recent past and is expected to increase further due to expanding nuclear programmes of the Department. Therefore, it was planned to carry out automation in various stages of bioassay sample handling, processing and analysis under the XI plan programme. Automation work in Bioassay Lab. is planned to be taken-up in three stages namely, automation in initial processing of i) urine samples, ii) fecal samples and iii) automation in radiochemical analysis of bioassay samples. In the initial phase, automation in radiochemical analysis of bioassay samples has been taken up

  19. Teachers' Attitudes toward Publishers' Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Charles

    This paper reports on the results of seven questions asked to secondary level department chairmen regarding the unit tests which accompany textbook materials. Nearly 1,500 responses were received from teachers of French, German, and Spanish. The results indicate that most teachers do not use publishers tests when they are available. The…

  20. A Course in Desktop Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerick, Nancy M.

    1992-01-01

    Describes "Promotional Publications," a required course for public relations majors, which teaches the basics of desktop publishing. Outlines how the course covers the preparation of publications used as communication tools in public relations, advertising, and organizations, with an emphasis upon design, layout, and technology. (MM)

  1. [Publishing models in medical journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Humberto B

    2012-02-01

    Medical journals are published by scientific societies, universities, publishing agencies and other for-profit or non-profit organizations. The traditional way to cover the expenses in printed journals has been a "subscribers pay" model. The rise of electronic versions in the internet, either together with the printed version or replacing it entirely, plus a progressive adherence to an "open access" for electronic versions, has created financial difficulties. Therefore, the "authors pay" model has been added. Both models can be subsidized by commercial or institutional advertising, but still a main source for financing relies either in subscriptions or in authors' payments. A small source of income that helps to cover publishing costs is a "charge for manuscript reception", currently applied by several journals. Those authors whose work has institutional or external support can use their grants to cover any charges, but the situation is more difficult for those who do not have such support. Since 1872, Sociedad Médica de Santiago-Chilean Society of Internal Medicine, owner and publisher of Revista Médica de Chile, has employed the "subscribers pay" model, subsidized by commercial advertising and temporary sponsors (Chilean government and others). The printed journal is reproduced in an open access electronic version, in www.scielo.cl. The increasing cost of both publications systems demands a time for reflection. PMID:22739959

  2. Book review: Publishing journal articles

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeldon, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    In this accessible and informative book, Lucinda Becker and Pam Denicolo seek to introduce the best practical strategies available to help academics maximise the chance of success in getting work published. Offering advice on topics including coping with writer’s block and handling rejection, it will certainly be a useful introduction for some and an invaluable guide for many others, finds Johannes Wheeldon.

  3. The Economics of Academic Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweser, Carl

    1983-01-01

    A survey of authorships in the Journal of Finance supports the notion that academic researchers perceive that they are faced with diminishing marginal returns to publishing, and that academic writers act in a rational manner in relation to their perceptions by turning to multiple authorship of journal articles. (Author/AM)

  4. Digital publishing: how publishers can monetize content on the web

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Crissy Marie

    2010-01-01

    This paper seeks to illustrate how publishers can take their existing knowledge, expertise and content, and use online tools that are readily available to monetize their content online. By looking at two case studies – Boxcar Marketing and its online marketing training program and Capulet Communications and its ebook, both which are projects that monetize the companies’ content – the paper explores tactics and best practices for building an online business strategy around content monetization...

  5. Animal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Johnny; Chauffert, Bruno; Bouyer, Florence

    The development of a new anticancer drug is a long, complex and multistep process which is supervised by regulatory authorities from the different countries all around the world [1]. Application of a new drug for admission to the market is supported by preclinical and clinical data, both including the determination of pharmacodynamics, toxicity, antitumour activity, therapeutic index, etc. As preclinical studies are associated with high cost, optimization of animal experiments is crucial for the overall development of a new anticancer agent. Moreover, in vivo efficacy studies remain a determinant panel for advancement of agents to human trials and thus, require cautious design and interpretation from experimental and ethical point of views.

  6. Animated war

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    in production: Gzim Rewind (Sweden, 2011) by Knutte Wester, and In-World War (USA, expected 2011) by DJ Bad Vegan. These films have themes of war and include film scenes that are ‘machinima’ (real-time animation made in 3D graphic environments) within live action film scenes. Machinima harnesses...... DIY multimedia storytellers explore new ways to tell and to ‘animate’ stories. The article contains four parts: introduction to machinima and the notions of resemiosis and authorial practice, presentation of DIY filmmaking as a practice that intertwines with new networked economics, analysis...

  7. Recent Radiochemical Procedures for Bio-Assay Studies at Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bio-assay laboratory at Trombay carries out nearly 2000 analyses of urine samples annually for different radionuclides. The most abundant isotopes of interest are Th232, Th228, Ra226, Ra224 and Ra228, U natural, fission products and Pu239. The others are Co60, I131, P32, Cs137, H3, Sr90, etc. Analyses of a large number of samples containing low levels of activity with speed calls for development of special techniques when high specificity with good yields are desired. Urine presents a very complex matrix with a large amount of complexing organic material as well as variable salt content. Wet ashing procedures are time-consuming and cumbersome where samples of about 1 to 1.5 l are required to be destroyed. The paper presents some very recent methods developed in the laboratory and details of tracer studies involved in the development of these methods. Ra228: Measurement of mesothorium in urine is made after separation of Ac228 grown in equilibrium with it. Radium present in urine is co-precipitated with BaSO4 and Ac228 allowed to grow. The precipitate is dissolved in perchloric acid after the addition of Pb, Bi and La carriers. The insoluble sulphates are precipitated with diluted H2SO4. Ac2'28 in the supernate is carried on LaF3 and counted for beta activity and checked for decay. Ra228 is calculated from observed Ac228 activity after correcting for decay and chemical recovery. Thorium: The method describes techniques developed for the co-precipitation of thorium with calcium oxalate without wet ashing urine. A study of exact experimental conditions for quantitative precipitation of thorium is reported. The paper also gives tracer experiments carried out for study of interference from phosphates and calcium in the final extraction of thorium with TTA. Thorium-232 is estimated spectrophotometrically and thorium-228 in the separated thorium fraction by separation of Ra224 after equilibration. . Among other studies reported are the determinations of Cs137, P32, Co

  8. Pain and Laboratory Animals: Publication Practices for Better Data Reproducibility and Better Animal Welfare

    OpenAIRE

    Larry Carbone; Jamie Austin

    2016-01-01

    Scientists who perform major survival surgery on laboratory animals face a dual welfare and methodological challenge: how to choose surgical anesthetics and post-operative analgesics that will best control animal suffering, knowing that both pain and the drugs that manage pain can all affect research outcomes. Scientists who publish full descriptions of animal procedures allow critical and systematic reviews of data, demonstrate their adherence to animal welfare norms, and guide other scienti...

  9. Validation of an Animal Isolation Imaging Chamber for Use in Animal Biosafety Level-3 Containment

    OpenAIRE

    Alderman, T. Scott; Frothingham, Richard; Sempowski, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Live imaging of animals infected with pathogenic microbes poses a contamination risk to equipment, personnel and other animals. A Caliper animal isolation chamber designed for the IVIS® Spectrum imaging system was tested as a containment device for mice infected with microbes assigned to animal biosafety level-3 (ABSL-3). A testing protocol was developed by adapting two published standards to test other equipment in high containment environments. The protocol included quantitative leak-testin...

  10. Application of a canine {sup 238}Pu dosimetry model to human bioassay data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickman, A.W. Jr. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1991-08-01

    Associated with the use of 2{sup 238}Pu in thermoelectric power sources for space probes and power supplies for cardiac devices is the potential for human exposure to {sup 238}Pu, primarily by inhalation. In the event of human internal exposure, a means is needed for assessing the level of intake and calculating radiation doses. Several bioassay/dosimetry models have been developed for {sup 239}Pu. However, results from studies with laboratory animals have indicated that the biokinetics, and therefore the descriptive models, of {sup 238}Pu are significantly different from those for {sup 239}Pu. A canine model accounting for these differences has been applied in this work to urinary excretion data from seven humans occupationally exposed to low levels of an insoluble {sup 238}Pu compound. The modified model provides a good description of the urinary excretion kinetics observed in the exposed humans. The modified model was also used to provide estimates of the initial intakes of {sup 238}Pu for the seven individuals; these estimates ranged from 4.5 nCi (170 Bq) to 87 nCi (3200 Bq). Autopsy data on the amount and distribution of {sup 238}Pu retained in the organs may be used in the future to validate or refute both these estimates and the assumptions used to formulate the human model. Modification of the human model to simulate an injection exposure to {sup 239}Pu gave patterns of retention in the organs and urinary excretion comparable to those seen previously in humans; further modification of the model using fecal data (unavailable for the subjects of this study) is indicated.

  11. Bioassay of thermal protection afforded by candidate flight suit fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, F S; Wachtel, T L; McCahan, G R

    1979-10-01

    The United States Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory (USAARL) porcine cutaneous bioassay technique was used to determine what mitigating effect four thermally protective flight suit fabrics would have on fire-induced skin damage. The fabrics were 4.8-ox twill weave Nomex aramide, 4.5-oz stabilized twill weave polybenzimidazole, 4.8-oz plain weave experimental high-temperature polymer (HT4), and 4.8-oz plain weave Nomex aramide (New Weave Nomex or NWN). Each fabric sample was assayed 20 times in each of four configurations: as a single layer in contact with the skin; as a single layer with a 6.35 mm (0.25 in) air gap between fabric and skin; in conjuction with a cotton T-shirt with no air gaps; and, finally, in conjuction with a T-shirt with a 6.35 mm air gap between T-shirt and fabric. Bare skin was used as a control. A JP-4 fueled furnace was used as a thermal source and was adjested to deliver a mean heat flux of 3.07 cal/cm2/s. The duration of exposure was 5 s. Four hundred burn sites were graded using clinical observation and microscopic techniques. Used as single layers, none of the fabrics demonstrated superiority in providing clinically significant protection. When used with a cotton T-shirt, protection was improved. Protection improved progressively for all fabrics and configuration when an air gap was introduced. The experimental high-temperature polymer consistently demonstrated lower heat flux transmission in all configurations, but did not significantly reduce clinical burns. PMID:518445

  12. Plasmonically amplified bioassay - Total internal reflection fluorescence vs. epifluorescence geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageneder, Simone; Bauch, Martin; Dostalek, Jakub

    2016-08-15

    This paper investigates plasmonic amplification in two commonly used optical configurations for fluorescence readout of bioassays - epifluorescence (EPF) and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). The plasmonic amplification in the EPF configuration was implemented by using crossed gold diffraction grating and Kretschmann geometry of attenuated total reflection method (ATR) was employed in the TIRF configuration. Identical assay, surface architecture for analyte capture, and optics for the excitation, collection and detection of emitted fluorescence light intensity were used in both TIRF and EPF configurations. Simulations predict that the crossed gold diffraction grating (EPF) can amplify the fluorescence signal by a factor of 10(2) by the combination of surface plasmon-enhanced excitation and directional surface plasmon-coupled emission in the red part of spectrum. This factor is about order of magnitude higher than that predicted for the Kretschmann geometry (TIRF) which only took advantage of the surface plasmon-enhanced excitation. When applied for the readout of sandwich interleukin 6 (IL-6) immunoassay, the plasmonically amplified EPF geometry designed for Alexa Fluor 647 labels offered 4-times higher fluorescence signal intensity compared to TIRF. Interestingly, both geometries allowed reaching the same detection limit of 0.4pM despite of the difference in the fluorescence signal enhancement. This is attributed to inherently lower background of fluorescence signal for TIRF geometry compared to that for EPF which compensates for the weaker fluorescence signal enhancement. The analysis of the inflammation biomarker IL-6 in serum at medically relevant concentrations and the utilization of plasmonic amplification for the fluorescence measurement of kinetics of surface affinity reactions are demonstrated for both EPF and TIRF readout. PMID:27260457

  13. Radioactivity transfer to animal products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on the behaviour of strontium, caesium, ruthenium, plutonium and americium in a range of domestic animals is reviewed to form a basis for the specification of time-dependent mathematical models describing uptake, distribution and retention in various domestic animals. Transfer factors relating concentration in animal product to daily radioactivity intake are derived after 100 d continuous intake and at equilibrium. These transfer factors are compared with the available published literature and used as a basis for the derivation of feedingstuff conversion factors relating limiting concentrations in animal feedingstuffs to limiting concentrations in human foodstuffs for application to animals receiving commercial feedingstuffs after a nuclear accident. Recommended transfer factors for animal products in conditions of continuous discharge and models for application to field conditions after a nuclear accident are also presented. Transfer of caesium to animal products is more effective than that for the other elements considered here. Transfer to meat of lamb, fattening pig, and chickens is generally more effective than that for other animals and other products

  14. About Animal Husbandry and Feed Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>Animal Husbandry and Feed Science is published to introduce the research achievements of animal husbandry and veterinary workers to the world,enhance their chances to participate in international academic exchange,and promote development of animal husbandry and veterinary.In 2009,Wu Chu(USA-China)Science&Culture Media Co.(Cranston,USA)and Anhui Wuchu Science,Technology and Culture Communication Co.,Ltd(Hefei,China)issued the journal Animal Husbandry and Feed Science(ISSN 1943-9911).The main content is basic theory and applied research about animal husbandry,veterinary,feed science and other related fields.The journal covers many research areas

  15. Transfer to animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data have been compiled to derive animal product transfer coefficients for radionuclides to update the values given in Technical Reports Series No. 364. Significant new data inputs have been incorporated from an extensive review of Russian language information and inclusion of data published since the early 1990s. The resultant database has been used to provide reference transfer coefficient values for a range of radionuclides to (i) cow, sheep and goat milk, (ii) meat (muscle) of cattle, sheep, goats, pigs and poultry and (iii) eggs. The approaches and procedures used to identify and collate data, and assumptions used are given. For most animal products, transfer coefficient values for elements additional to those in Technical Reports Series No. 364 are provided, although some elements were considered in the earlier evaluation which were not included in this review. Differences between the Technical Reports Series No. 364 'expected' values and the reference values from this document, which will be incorporated into the revised transfer parameter handbook, are discussed. An alternative approach to quantifying transfer by using concentration ratios is evaluated and CR values which could be applied across animal species have been provided for milk and meat. Information on fractional gastrointestinal absorption in adult ruminants has been compiled and reference values presented. Despite these improvements many data gaps remain. (author)

  16. Three Rs in publishing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jabłońska-Stefanowicz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary teaching should be real, rich and relevant. Changes in this direction that can be observed in higher education in Poland result from the requirements of the job market, students’ expectations, the need to adapt to the goals of the Bologna Process, as well as demands by educators. Considering the declining interest in studying (which is seen especially in the humanities, universities try to present their educational offer in the most attractive way to compete successfully with other universities. All of these changes can be seen on several levels: the decisions of the government, of the universities, faculties and institutes, and in the everyday work of the teachers. The paper describes these problems in relation to publishing education. Websites of universities offering courses on publishing are analyzed and the educational offer of the LIS Institute of the University of Wroclaw is presented in details. Examples of proven methods and useful educational resources and new allies are proposed.

  17. The Industrial Engineering publishing landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Claasen, Schalk

    2012-01-01

    Looking at the Industrial Engineering publishing landscape through the window of Google Search, an interesting panorama unfolds. The view that I took is actually just a peek and therefore my description of what I saw is not meant to be comprehensive. The African landscape is empty except for the South African Journal of Industrial Engineering (SAJIE). This is an extraordinary situation if compared to the South American continent where there are Industrial Engineering journals in at least ...

  18. Publishing productivity measures in ONS

    OpenAIRE

    Dawn Camus

    2007-01-01

    Comments on the joint publication launch of this edition of ELMR and The ONS Productivity Handbook.This July 2007 Economic & Labour Market Review (ELMR) is a special productivity edition and is published alongside The ONS Productivity Handbook: A Statistical Overview and Guide. Presenting all Officefor National Statistics (ONS) productivity estimates, sources, methods and analysis, this single volume will serve as a valuable reference on the subject. Articles printed in this edition of ELMR h...

  19. Electronic Publishing for Engineering Education

    OpenAIRE

    DUDLEY, Donald G.

    2006-01-01

    Electronic transmission of text is a revolution in progress with a profound effect on engineering education. As with all revolutions, the result is both a threat and a promise. The promise is the ease and speed of dissemination of text. The threat involves serious difficulties that arise in efforts to protect the intellectual property rights of the authors and publishers of the technical information. In this paper, we discuss both the threat and the promise. We highlight the difference...

  20. Personal publishing and media literacy

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Based on a discussion of the terms “digital competence” and “media competence” this paper presents challenges of designing virtual learning arenas based on principles known from weblogs and wikis. Both are personal publishing forms that seem promising in an educational context. The paper outlines a learning environment designed to make it possible for individual users to organize their own learning environments and enabling them to utilize web-based forms of personal communication...

  1. Privacy-preserving data publishing

    OpenAIRE

    Fung, Benjamin C. M.

    2007-01-01

    The success of data mining relies on the availability of high quality data. To ensure quality data mining, effective information sharing between organizations become a vital requirement in today’s society. Since data mining often involves person-specific and sensitive information like medical records, the public has expressed a deep concern about their privacy. Privacy-preserving data publishing is a study of eliminating privacy threats while, at the same time, preserving useful information i...

  2. Where is smoking research published?

    OpenAIRE

    A. Liguori(ISAAS, Trieste); Hughes, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify journals that have a focus on human nicotine/smoking research and to investigate the coverage of smoking in "high-impact" journals. DESIGN: The MEDLINE computer database was searched for English-language articles on human studies published in 1988-1992 using "nicotine", "smoking", "smoking cessation", "tobacco", or "tobacco use disorder" as focus descriptors. This search was supplemented with a similar search of the PSYCLIT computer database. Fifty-eight journals ...

  3. (originally published in May 2000)

    OpenAIRE

    Dolfsma, Wilfred

    2005-01-01

    This paper is included in the First Monday Special Issue: Music and the Internet, published in July 2005. Special Issue editor David Beer asked authors to submit additional comments regarding their articles. Additional author comments appear in italics and brackets in the Abstract. The music industry is [still] in a genuine maelstrom. Globalization is affecting this industry more than many other industries and it is primarily induced by developments in Information Technology. The foremost...

  4. PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT: Fast Track Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Robert; Adams, Judith

    2006-12-01

    We are very pleased to announce that Classical and Quantum Gravity will launch a new Fast Track Communications section from January 2007, after which date Letters to the Editor will no longer be published. Fast Track Communications (FTCs) are short, timely papers presenting only the most important new developments. To reflect their high significance FTCs will be published at the front of the journal and will be freely available online to ensure the widest visibility. As with all articles submitted to Classical and Quantum Gravity, there are no page charges, including online colour reproduction and multi-media attachments. Authors who wish to include colour in the print version of their article will, however, be required to cover the costs. Submissions to the new Fast Track Communications section are very welcome. For details of how to submit an FTC please visit IOP Publishing's webpages http://authors.iop.org, or contact the journal at cqg@iop.org. To facilitate refereeing, authors are asked to submit a short statement accompanying their FTC, outlining why they feel that the article merits high-priority publication. Length restrictions will also be applied such that FTCs should be a maximum of 8 journal pages (5000 words) in length. The section will aim to be a high-quality, high-profile outlet for new and important research of interest to the Classical and Quantum Gravity community. We look forward to seeing it grow and take shape over the next year.

  5. Animal Intuitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaebnick, Gregory E

    2016-07-01

    As described by Lori Gruen in the Perspective column at the back of this issue, federally supported biomedical research conducted on chimpanzees has now come to an end in the United States, although the wind-down has taken longer than expected. The process began with a 2011 Institute of Medicine report that set up several stringent criteria that sharply limited biomedical research. The National Institutes of Health accepted the recommendations and formed a committee to determine how best to implement them. The immediate question raised by this transition was whether the IOM restrictions should be extended in some form to other nonhuman primates-and beyond them to other kinds of animals. In the lead article in this issue, Anne Barnhill, Steven Joffe, and Franklin Miller consider the status of other nonhuman primates. PMID:27417859

  6. Bioethical Problems: Animal Welfare, Animal Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various bioethical issues and problems related to animal welfare and animal rights. Areas examined include: Aristotelian views; animal welfare legislation; Darwin and evolutionary theory; animal and human behavior; and vegetarianism. A 14-point universal declaration of the rights of animals is included. (JN)

  7. Curating a New World of Publishing

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Mitchell; Coker, Mark; Hellman, Eric; Miller, Rush

    2013-01-01

    E-book self-publishing is a growing model of publishing that overcomes many limitations that traditional publishing presents. This model allows authors to become publishers and readers to become curators. There is increased accessibility, availability, discovery, and diversity, all of which help to promote a culture of reading. Libraries have access to a multitude of self-published books, which they can easily bring into their systems and deliver to their readers. Self-publishing also allows ...

  8. Selecting a sensitive battery of bioassays to detect toxic effects of metals in effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paiva Magalhães, Danielly; da Costa Marques, Mônica Regina; Fernandes Baptista, Darcilio; Forsin Buss, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    The use of bioassay batteries is necessary to evaluate toxic effects at various biological levels. The selection of bioassays without prior testing and determination of the most sensitive/suitable groups for each impact may allow the discharge of effluents that pose a threat to the environment. The present study tested and selected a battery of sensitive ecotoxicological bioassays for detecting toxic effects of metals. The sensitivities of six organisms were evaluated (algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Chlorella vulgaris, Cladocera Daphnia similis and Ceriodaphnia dubia, and fish Poecilia reticulata and Danio rerio) after exposure to 10 individual metal species deemed toxic to the aquatic environment (Ag(+), Cd(2+), Cu(+), Cu(2+), Cr(3+), Cr(6+), Pb(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), and Hg(2+)) and to real (steel-mill) and laboratory simulated effluents. In the bioassays, fish were the least sensitive; D. rerio showed no sensitivity to any of the effluents tested. P. subcapitata was a good bioindicator of Cr(3+) toxicity, and D. similis was the most sensitive organism to Hg(2+); but the toxic effect of effluents with higher levels of Hg(2+) was better detected by C. dubia. The most sensitive battery of bioassays to detect low concentrations of dissolved metals in effluents was the 72-h chronic test with C. vulgaris and the 48-h acute test with C. dubia. PMID:25199585

  9. Characterization of chemical waste site contamination and its extent using bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.M.; Callahan, C.A.; Cline, J.F.; Greene, J.C.; McShane, M.C.; Miller, W.E.; Peterson, S.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Skalski, J.R.

    1984-12-01

    Bioassays were used in a three-phase research project to assess the comparative sensitivity of test organisms to known chemicals, determine if the chemical components in field soil and water samples containing unknown contaminants could be inferred from our laboratory studies using known chemicals, and to investigate kriging (a relatively new statistical mapping technique) and bioassays as methods to define the areal extent of chemical contamination. The algal assay generally was most sensitive to samples of pure chemicals, soil elutriates and water from eight sites with known chemical contamination. Bioassays of nine samples of unknown chemical composition from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) site showed that a lettuce seed soil contact phytoassay was most sensitive. In general, our bioassays can be used to broadly identify toxic components of contaminated soil. Nearly pure compounds of insecticides and herbicides were less toxic in the sensitive bioassays than were the counterpart commercial formulations. This finding indicates that chemical analysis alone may fail to correctly rate the severity of environmental toxicity. Finally, we used the lettuce seed phytoassay and kriging techniques in a field study at RMA to demonstrate the feasibility of mapping contamination to aid in cleanup decisions. 25 references, 9 figures, 9 tables.

  10. Development and validation of microbial bioassay for quantification of Levofloxacin in pharmaceutical preparations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nishant A. Dafale; Uttam P. Semwal; Piyush K. Agarwal; Pradeep Sharma; G.N. Singh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate a simple, sensitive, precise and cost-effective one-level agar diffusion (5þ1) bioassay for estimation of potency and bioactivity of Levofloxacin in pharmaceutical preparation which has not yet been reported in any pharmacopoeia. Among 16 microbial strains, Bacillus pumilus ATCC-14884 was selected as the most significant strain against Levofloxacin. Bioassay was optimized by investigating several factors such as buffer pH, inoculums concentration and reference standard concentration. Identification of Levofloxacin in commercial sample Levoflox tablet was done by FTIR spectroscopy. Mean potency recovery value for Levofloxacin in Levoflox tablet was estimated as 100.90%. A validated bioassay method showed linearity (r2 ¼ 0.988), precision (Interday RSD ¼ 1.05%, between analyst RSD ¼ 1.02%) and accuracy (101.23%, RSD ¼ 0.72%). Bioassay was correlated with HPLC using same sample and estimated potencies were 100.90%and 99.37%, respectively. Results show that bioassay is a suitable method for estimation of potency and bioactivity of Levofloxacin pharmaceutical preparations.

  11. Animated nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Animated nature is educational-training project pronounced by the Slovak Environmental Agency (SAZP) in cooperation with Field Studies Council form Great Britain and financial support of Darwin Initiative and Slovensky plynarensky priemysel, s.p. In the present time this is ultimate and the most successful children's project aimed on mapping and protection of biodiversity in Europe. Activity in project is spare-time and therefore is voluntary. The interest territory is a natural as well as cultural landscape in vicinity of a school or other organisation, habitation and so on. In the project work schoolchildren at the age from 10 till 15 years. Leaders of work-groups are student of secondary schools and universities, teachers, professional workers of state and non-governmental organisation and parents. In one group works approximately 10 children. Each group which has send to SAZP result of biodiversity mapping, cost free obtained data base CD - Detske mapy biodiverzity (Children's maps of biodiversity) and so they were informed about results of all groups frame: within the frame of Slovakia. Results of activities of this project in 2001-2004 and perspectives for 2005-2006 years are discussed

  12. [Laboratory animals and official Mexican norms (NOM-062-ZOO-1999)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aluja, Aline S

    2002-01-01

    This article concerns animal experimentation and official Mexican norm Nom 0062-Zoo-1999 entitled Technical specifications for the production, care and use of laboratory animals. The history of animal experimentation is briefly resumed. During the nineteenth century, doubts arose as to the right to expose animals to experimental procedures that frequently cause pain and suffering. The first law which protected animals against cruelty was passed in Great Britain in 1876; subsequently, other nations approved similar legislation. During the second part of the twentieth century, opposition to animal experimentation grew. Other groups, mainly scientists and pharmaceutical concerns, defended the right to use animals in research. New knowledge concerning the neurophysiology, cognitive capacity, and the animal faculty to experience pain is briefly mentioned. Guidelines on care and use of animals used in research published in several countries are listed. Finally, the recently published Mexican legislation (Norm) referring to production, care and use of laboratory animals is discussed and its benefits are stressed. PMID:12096401

  13. Open Access Publishing with Drupal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina McHale

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In January 2009, the Colorado Association of Libraries (CAL suspended publication of its print quarterly journal, Colorado Libraries, as a cost-saving measure in a time of fiscal uncertainty. Printing and mailing the journal to its 1300 members cost CAL more than $26,000 per year. Publication of the journal was placed on an indefinite hiatus until the editorial staff proposed an online, open access format a year later. The benefits to migrating to open access included: significantly lower costs; a green platform; instant availability of content; a greater level of access to users with disabilities; and a higher level of visibility of the journal and the association. The editorial staff chose Drupal, including the E-journal module, and while Drupal is notorious for its steep learning curve—which exacerbated delays to content that had been created before the publishing hiatus—the fourth electronic issue was published recently at coloradolibrariesjournal.org. This article will discuss both the benefits and challenges of transitioning to an open access model and the choice Drupal as a platform over other more established journal software options.

  14. Strategies for Transferring Mixtures of Organic Contaminants from Aquatic Environments into Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Annika; Mayer, Philipp; Schäfer, Sabine; Witt, Gesine; Haase, Nora; Escher, Beate I

    2016-06-01

    Mixtures of organic contaminants are ubiquitous in the environment. Depending on their persistence and physicochemical properties, individual chemicals that make up the mixture partition and distribute within the environment and might then jointly elicit toxicological effects. For the assessment and monitoring of such mixtures, a variety of cell-based in vitro and low-complexity in vivo bioassays based on algae, daphnids or fish embryos are available. A very important and sometimes unrecognized challenge is how to combine sampling, extraction and dosing to transfer the mixtures from the environment into bioassays, while conserving (or re-establishing) their chemical composition at adjustable levels for concentration-effect assessment. This article outlines various strategies for quantifiable transfer from environmental samples including water, sediment, and biota into bioassays using total extraction or polymer-based passive sampling combined with either solvent spiking or passive dosing. PMID:26804122

  15. Strategies for Transferring Mixtures of Organic Contaminants from Aquatic Environments into Bioassays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnke, Annika; Mayer, Philipp; Schäfer, Sabine;

    2016-01-01

    Mixtures of organic contaminants are ubiquitous in the environment. Depending on their persistence and physicochemical properties, individual chemicals that make up the mixture partition and distribute within the environment and might then jointly elicit toxicological effects. For the assessment...... and monitoring of such mixtures, a variety of cell-based in vitro and low-complexity in vivo bioassays based on algae, daphnids or fish embryos are available. A very important and sometimes unrecognized challenge is how to combine sampling, extraction and dosing to transfer the mixtures from the...... environment into bioassays, while conserving (or re-establishing) their chemical composition at adjustable levels for concentration-effect assessment. This article outlines various strategies for quantifiable transfer from environmental samples including water, sediment, and biota into bioassays using total...

  16. Characterization of chemical-waste-site contamination and determination of its extent using bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.M.; Skalski, J.R.; Cline, J.F.; McShane, M.C.; Miller, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of using bioassays to evaluate soils, soil elutriates, and surface and subsurface water from hazardous chemical waste sites is to provide a more-direct, integrated estimate of environmental toxicity. Based on bioassay data, chemical waste sites can be ranked according to their toxic potential or mapped for cleanup operations. The objectives of the study were to (a) assess the comparative sensitivity of test organisms to known chemicals, (b) determine if the chemical components in field soil and water samples of unknown composition could be inferred from laboratory studies using pure chemicals and (c) investigate kriging (a relatively new statistical mapping technique) of bioassay results as a method to define the areal extent of contamination. In support of these objectives, data are presented on the response of the organisms listed in the Hazardous Materials Assessment Team (HMAT) test protocol (3) to pure chemicals from three chemical subgroups (heavy metals, insecticides, and herbicides).

  17. Toxicity Assessment of Sediments with Natural Anomalous Concentrations in Heavy Metals by the Use of Bioassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martín

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential toxicity in riverbed sediments was assessed with a bioassay using the bioluminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The selected area was characterized by the presence of ultramafic rocks (peridotites, and the sediments had high values in Ni, Cr, and Co. For the toxicity bioassay with Vibrio fischeri, water-soluble forms were used. The results indicated that most of the samples had a very low degree of toxicity, with 10% of reduction in luminescence in relation to the control; meanwhile 25% of the samples had a moderate degree of toxicity with a reduction in luminescence between 13 and 21% in relation to the control. The toxicity index correlated significantly with the concentrations of Ni and Cr in the water extracts. This toxicity bioassay was proved to be a sensitive and useful tool to detect potential toxicity in solutions, even with anomalous concentrations in heavy metals of natural origin.

  18. Current status of bioassay procedures to detect and quantify previous exposures to radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper was prepared by a working group established by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) for the purpose of assessing the current capabilities of bioassay methods that can be used to determine the occurrence and magnitude of a previous internal deposition of one or more radionuclides. The first five sections discuss general features of the use of in-vitro bioassay samples to achieve this purpose. The remainder of the paper is focused on the possible use of urine bioassay procedures to detect and quantify internal depositions of radionuclides that may have occurred in United States occupation troops in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, Japan, prior to 1 July 1946, or to personnel who participated in atmospheric nuclear weapons tests conducted between 1945 and 1962. Theoretical calculations were made to estimate the quantities of various radionuclides produced in a 20-kiloton (kt) nuclear detonation that might still be present in measurable quantities in people today if they were exposed 25 to 40 y ago

  19. PET/CT imaging of c-Myc transgenic mice identifies the genotoxic N-nitroso-diethylamine as carcinogen in a short-term cancer bioassay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Hueper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: More than 100,000 chemicals are in use but have not been tested for their safety. To overcome limitations in the cancer bioassay several alternative testing strategies are explored. The inability to monitor non-invasively onset and progression of disease limits, however, the value of current testing strategies. Here, we report the application of in vivo imaging to a c-Myc transgenic mouse model of liver cancer for the development of a short-term cancer bioassay. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: μCT and ¹⁸F-FDG μPET were used to detect and quantify tumor lesions after treatment with the genotoxic carcinogen NDEA, the tumor promoting agent BHT or the hepatotoxin paracetamol. Tumor growth was investigated between the ages of 4 to 8.5 months and contrast-enhanced μCT imaging detected liver lesions as well as metastatic spread with high sensitivity and accuracy as confirmed by histopathology. Significant differences in the onset of tumor growth, tumor load and glucose metabolism were observed when the NDEA treatment group was compared with any of the other treatment groups. NDEA treatment of c-Myc transgenic mice significantly accelerated tumor growth and caused metastatic spread of HCC in to lung but this treatment also induced primary lung cancer growth. In contrast, BHT and paracetamol did not promote hepatocarcinogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study evidences the accuracy of in vivo imaging in defining tumor growth, tumor load, lesion number and metastatic spread. Consequently, the application of in vivo imaging techniques to transgenic animal models may possibly enable short-term cancer bioassays to significantly improve hazard identification and follow-up examinations of different organs by non-invasive methods.

  20. In vitro bioassays to evaluate complex chemical mixtures in recycled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ai; Escher, Beate I; Leusch, Frederic D L; Tang, Janet Y M; Prochazka, Erik; Dong, Bingfeng; Snyder, Erin M; Snyder, Shane A

    2015-09-01

    With burgeoning population and diminishing availability of freshwater resources, the world continues to expand the use of alternative water resources for drinking, and the quality of these sources has been a great concern for the public as well as public health professionals. In vitro bioassays are increasingly being used to enable rapid, relatively inexpensive toxicity screening that can be used in conjunction with analytical chemistry data to evaluate water quality and the effectiveness of water treatment. In this study, a comprehensive bioassay battery consisting of 36 bioassays covering 18 biological endpoints was applied to screen the bioactivity of waters of varying qualities with parallel treatments. Samples include wastewater effluent, ultraviolet light (UV) and/or ozone advanced oxidation processed (AOP) recycled water, and infiltrated recycled groundwater. Based on assay sensitivity and detection frequency in the samples, several endpoints were highlighted in the battery, including assays for genotoxicity, mutagenicity, estrogenic activity, glucocorticoid activity, arylhydrocarbon receptor activity, oxidative stress response, and cytotoxicity. Attenuation of bioactivity was found to be dependent on the treatment process and bioassay endpoint. For instance, ozone technology significantly removed oxidative stress activity, while UV based technologies were most efficient for the attenuation of glucocorticoid activity. Chlorination partially attenuated genotoxicity and greatly decreased herbicidal activity, while groundwater infiltration efficiently attenuated most of the evaluated bioactivity with the exception of genotoxicity. In some cases, bioactivity (e.g., mutagenicity, genotoxicity, and arylhydrocarbon receptor) increased following water treatment, indicating that transformation products of water treatment may be a concern. Furthermore, several types of bioassays with the same endpoint were compared in this study, which could help guide the selection

  1. Pollutants impact bioassay from waters and soils in Banat region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crina Laura Mosneang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of water and soil samples by chemical methods identified the quantities of chlorides, nitrates and phosphates by comparison with the maximum limits of law. Acute toxicity tests on zebra fish embryos is an alternative test of water samples around swine farms in Banat region, because embryos are not subject to animal protection legislation during experiments. The use of Eisenia fetida earthworms as pollution indicators allowed assessment of avoidance behavior of potentially polluting soils collected from different distances from farms.

  2. Toxicity assays in nanodrops combining bioassay and morphometric endpoints.

    OpenAIRE

    Lemaire, Frédéric; Mandon, Céline A; Reboud, Julien; Papine, Alexandre; Angulo, Jesus; Pointu, Hervé; Diaz-Latoud, Chantal; Lajaunie, Christian; Chatelain, François; Arrigo, André-Patrick; Schaack, Béatrice

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Improved chemical hazard management such as REACH policy objective as well as drug ADMETOX prediction, while limiting the extent of animal testing, requires the development of increasingly high throughput as well as highly pertinent in vitro toxicity assays. METHODOLOGY: This report describes a new in vitro method for toxicity testing, combining cell-based assays in nanodrop Cell-on-Chip format with the use of a genetically engineered stress sensitive hepatic cell line. We tested ...

  3. The Internet and Unrefereed Scholarly Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Rob

    2004-01-01

    Presents a literature review that covers the following topics related to the Internet and unrefereed scholarly publishing: conceptions of scholarly publishing and scholarly communication; research manuscripts and preprints; the growth of unrefereed e-script publishing; a hybrid publishing model; controversies about communication via unrefereed…

  4. The Once and Future Publishing Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okerson, Ann; Holzman, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The report explores the revitalization of library publishing and its possible future, and examines elements that influence the success and sustainability of library publishing initiatives. The authors trace the history of library publishing and factors that have transformed the publishing landscape, and describe several significant library-press…

  5. Self-Published Books: An Empirical "Snapshot"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Jana; Fulton, Bruce; Helm, Marlene

    2012-01-01

    The number of books published by authors using fee-based publication services, such as Lulu and AuthorHouse, is overtaking the number of books published by mainstream publishers, according to Bowker's 2009 annual data. Little empirical research exists on self-published books. This article presents the results of an investigation of a random sample…

  6. Writing and Publishing: The Librarian's Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Carol, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Have you ever considered writing or reviewing for the library community? Are you interested in publishing a book on your favorite author or hobby? Do you need to write and publish for tenure? If so, "Writing and Publishing" is for you. Practical how-to guidance covering fiction, poetry, children's books/magazines, self-publishing, literary agents,…

  7. Implementation of bioassay methods to improve assessment of incorporated radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Internal exposure to uranium and thorium can principally be assessed from external radiation measurements, exhalation measurements, or the assay of these elements excreted in urine or feces. Since both 232Th and 238U emit only photon radiations of low energy and with low emission probabilities, their detection limits by in vivo counting are of the order of kBq even when sophisticated devices are used. Consequently, usually bioassay methods are used for the incorporation monitoring of workers. Alpha spectrometry is the commonly applied technique, usually employed to measure 232Th and 238U in urine or fecel samples. For accurate analysis of body contents, 24 hours collections of urine or feces are usually used. The fecal activity, however, resembles predominantly the intake by ingestion of these nuclides during the last few days whereas the urinary excretion is more closely related to the body content of the nuclides. However, urinary excretion is also varying with the actual intake of 232Th and/or 238U. The measurement of these nuclides in urine by alpha-spectrometry requires tedious and time-consuming chemical work-up to prepare the samples for spectrometric analysis. Therefore, the number of analyses, which can be carried out is quite low and the results are available only after a time lag of several days. Additionally, under certain conditions the alpha-spectrometry is not sensitive enough. Other methods that have been developed may be confined to the availability of certain devices being difficult to access (e.g. nuclear reactors for radiochemical neutron activation analysis). Much better suitable as routine method is the application of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for measurements of 232Th and 238U concentrations in urine. For elemental analyses, ICP-MS can already be considered as commonly used method. The present work which was carried out in the framework of an EU project (IDEA: Internal Dosimetry - Enhancements in

  8. Review of Bioassays for Monitoring Fate and Transport ofEstrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CGCampbell@lbl.gov

    2004-01-30

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are recognizedcontaminants threatening water quality. Despite efforts in sourceidentification, few strategies exist for characterization or treatment ofthis environmental pollution. Given that there are numerous EDCs that cannegatively affect humans and wildlife, general screening techniques likebioassays and biosensors provide an essential rapid and intensiveanalysis capacity. Commonly applied bioassays include the ELISA and YESassays, but promising technologies include ER-CALUXa, ELRA, Endotecta,RIANA, and IR-bioamplification. Two biosensors, Endotecta and RIANA, arefield portable using non-cellular biological detection strategies.Environmental management of EDCs in water requires integration ofbiosensors and bioassays for monitoring and assessment.

  9. Development of a cystatin C-specific bioassay for integration into an implantable biochip system

    OpenAIRE

    Damm, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    The interest in diagnostic biochips is growing. However, most biochips are designed for ex vivo applications. Beyond, an elevated serum human cystatin C (hCC) concentration correlates with various diseases. Thus, hCC was suggested as biomarker. To meet the requirements of an implantable biochip system it is essential to develop an hCC-specific bioassay enabling repetitive measurements.Within this PhD thesis an hCC-specific bioassay was developed which is based on the concentration-dependant r...

  10. Development and application of bioassays for a site-specific risk assessment of contaminated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Rila, J.-P.

    2008-01-01

    Soil risk assessment based on generic approaches is accompanied by a large number of uncertainties. In site-specific risk assessment aimed at identifying the actual effects on the ecosystem by using e.g. bioassays in soil elutriates and taking into account land-use these uncertainties can be largely reduced. In this thesis the application and development of bioassays for a site-specific risk assessment of contaminated soil has been discussed. The first part of this thesis deals with the influ...

  11. A versatile electrowetting-based digital microfluidic platform for quantitative homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) lab-on-a-chip systems have already proven their potential within a broad range of bio-assays. Nevertheless, research on the analytical performance of those systems is limited, yet crucial for a further breakthrough in the diagnostic field. Therefore, this paper presents the intrinsic possibilities of an EWOD lab-on-a-chip as a versatile platform for homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays with high analytical performance. Both droplet dispensing and splitting cause variations in droplet size, thereby directly influencing the assay's performance. The extent to which they influence the performance is assessed by a theoretical sensitivity analysis, which allows the definition of a basic framework for the reduction of droplet size variability. Taking advantage of the optimized droplet manipulations, both homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays are implemented in the EWOD lab-on-a-chip to demonstrate the analytical capabilities and versatility of the device. A fully on-chip enzymatic assay is realized with high analytical performance. It demonstrates the promising capabilities of an EWOD lab-on-a-chip in food-related and medical applications, such as nutritional and blood analyses. Further, a magnetic bio-assay for IgE detection using superparamagnetic nanoparticles is presented whereby the nanoparticles are used as solid carriers during the bio-assay. Crucial elements are the precise manipulation of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles with respect to dispensing and separation. Although the principle of using nano-carriers is demonstrated for protein detection, it can be easily extended to a broader range of bio-related applications like DNA sensing. In heterogeneous bio-assays the chip surface is actively involved during the execution of the bio-assay. Through immobilization of specific biological compounds like DNA, proteins and cells a reactive chip surface is realized, which enhances the bio-assay performance. To

  12. A Brine Shrimp Bioassay for Measuring Toxicity and Remediation of Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Marya

    1999-12-01

    A bioassay using Artemia franciscana (brine shrimp) was adapted to measure the toxicity of household chemicals. One project is described in which students collect dose-response curves for seven commercial flea-killing products. Next, groups of students researched the insecticidal ingredients of the flea products. On the basis of the structures of the active ingredients, they chose remediation methods to make the flea product less toxic to brine shrimp; procedures included copper-catalyzed hydrolysis, adsorption onto activated charcoal, bleach treatment, and photodegradation. No special equipment or supplies are necessary for the bioassay other than the brine shrimp eggs, which can be obtained at any aquarium store.

  13. The wild animal as a research animal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, JAA

    2004-01-01

    Most discussions on animal experimentation refer to domesticated animals and regulations are tailored to this class of animals. However, wild animals are also used for research, e. g., in biological field research that is often directed to fundamental ecological-evolutionary questions or to conserva

  14. Distributed Parallel Multi-Channel Publishing System

    OpenAIRE

    W. Li; R. Dahlin

    2001-01-01

    With more and more electronic media appearing and popularly accepted, the publishing industry is facing a greater challenge than anytime else before. The only solution to cope with these problems is to extend the traditional publishing to cover both print publishing and electronic publishing business. This paper intends to propose an integrated system solution to assist this transition. Distributed Parallel Multi-channel Parallel Publishing, as one of the outcomes of DIP (Digital Information ...

  15. Types of Open Access Publishers in Scopus

    OpenAIRE

    David Solomon

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed characteristics of publishers who published 2010 open access (OA) journals indexed in Scopus. Publishers were categorized into six types; professional, society, university, scholar/researcher, government, and other organizations. Type of publisher was broken down by number of journals/articles published in 2010, funding model, location, discipline and whether the journal was born or converted to OA. Universities and societies accounted for 50% of the journals and 43% of th...

  16. 77 FR 14272 - New Animal Drugs for Use in Animal Feeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 558 New Animal Drugs for Use in Animal Feeds CFR Correction In Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 500 to 599, revised as of April 1, 2011,...

  17. 75 FR 15610 - New Animal Drugs for Use in Animal Feeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 558 New Animal Drugs for Use in Animal Feeds CFR Correction In Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 500 to 599, revised as of April 1, 2009,...

  18. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & ... Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  19. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health ... Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  20. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) 9: ...

  1. Learning Anime Studio

    CERN Document Server

    Troftgruben, Chad

    2014-01-01

    Anime Studio is your complete animation program to help you create 2D movies, cartoons, anime, and cut out animations. You can create your own animated shorts and use Anime Studio to produce cartoon animations for film, video, or streaming over the Web, which can be enjoyed on YouTube, Vimeo, and other popular sites. Anime Studio is great for hobbyists and professionals alike, combining tools for both illustration and animation. With Anime Studio's easy-to-use interface, you will be creating an animated masterpiece in no time. This practical, step-by-step guide will provide you with a structur

  2. Beoordeling van gereinigde grond. V. Toepassing van bioassays met planten en regenwormen op verontreinigde en gereinigde gronden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gestel CAM; Dirven-van Breemen EM; Kamerman JW

    1992-01-01

    Within the framework of the project "Evaluation of decontaminated soil", the applicability of bioassays with earthworms and plants for the quality assessment of decontaminated soil is investigated. In the final phase of this project, bioassays with earthworms and plants (radish, lettuce)

  3. animation : An R Package for Creating Animations and Demonstrating Statistical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihui Xie

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Animated graphs that demonstrate statistical ideas and methods can both attract interest and assist understanding. In this paper we first discuss how animations can be related to some statistical topics such as iterative algorithms, random simulations, (resampling methods and dynamic trends, then we describe the approaches that may be used to create animations, and give an overview to the R package animation, including its design, usage and the statistical topics in the package. With the animation package, we can export the animations produced by R into a variety of formats, such as a web page, a GIF animation, a Flash movie, a PDF document, or an MP4/AVI video, so that users can publish the animations fairly easily. The design of this package is flexible enough to be readily incorporated into web applications, e.g., we can generate animations online with Rweb, which means we do not even need R to be installed locally to create animations. We will show examples of the use of animations in teaching statistics and in the presentation of statistical reports using Sweave or knitr. In fact, this paper itself was written with the knitr and animation package, and the animations are embedded in the PDF document, so that readers can watch the animations in real time when they read the paper (the Adobe Reader is required.Animations can add insight and interest to traditional static approaches to teaching statistics and reporting, making statistics a more interesting and appealing subject.

  4. Analysis of Bioactive Components of Oilseed Cakes by High-Performance Thin-Layer Chromatography-(Bioassay Combined with Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue-Siang Teh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemp, flax and canola seed cakes are byproducts of the plant oil extraction industry that have not received much attention in terms of their potential use for human food instead of animal feed. Thus, the bioactivity profiling of these oilseed cakes is of interest. For their effect-directed analysis, planar chromatography was combined with several (bioassays, namely 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenging, acetylcholine esterase inhibition, planar yeast estrogen screen, antimicrobial Bacillus subtilis and Aliivibrio fischeri assays. The streamlined high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC-bioassay method allowed the discovery of previously unknown bioactive compounds present in these oilseed cake extracts. In contrast to target analysis, the direct link to the effective compounds allowed comprehensive information with regard to selected effects. HPTLC-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry via the elution-head based TLC-MS Interface was used for a first characterization of the unknown effective compounds. The demonstrated bioactivity profiling on the feed/food intake side may guide the isolation of active compounds for production of functional food or for justified motivation of functional feed/food supplements.

  5. Antihyperglycemic Effect of Orthosiphon Stamineus Benth Leaves Extract and Its Bioassay-Guided Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsnoussi Ali Hussin Mohamed

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary investigations were carried out to evaluate the antidiabetic effects of the leaves of O. stamineus extracted serially with solvents of increasing polarity (petroleum ether, chloroform, methanol and water; bioassay-guided purification of plant extracts using the subcutaneous glucose tolerance test (SbGTT was also carried out. Only the chloroform extract, given at 1 g/kg body weight (b.w., significantly reduced (P < 0.05 the blood glucose level of rats loaded subcutaneously with 150 mg/kg (b.w. glucose. The active chloroform extract of O. stamineus was separated into five fractions using a dry flash column chromatography method. Out of the five fractions tested, only chloroform fraction 2 (Cƒ2, at the dose of 1 g/kg (b.w. significantly inhibited (P < 0.05 blood glucose levels in SbGTT. Active Cƒ2 was split into two sub-fractions Cƒ2-A and Cƒ2-B, using a dry flash column chromatography method. The activities Cƒ2-A and Cƒ2-B were investigated using SbGTT, and the active sub-fraction was then further studied for anti-diabetic effects in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model. The results clearly indicate that Cƒ2-B fraction exhibited a blood glucose lowering effect in fasted treated normal rats after glucose-loading of 150 mg/kg (b.w.. In the acute streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model, Cƒ2-B did not exhibit a hypoglycemic effect on blood glucose levels up to 7 hours after treatment. Thus, it appears that Cƒ2-B functions similarly to metformin, which has no hypoglycemic effect but demonstrates an antihyperglycemic effect only in normogycemic models. The effect of Cƒ2-B may have no direct stimulatory effects on insulin secretion or on blood glucose levels in diabetic animal models. Verification of the active compound(s within the active fraction (Cƒ2-B indicated the presence of terpenoids and, flavonoids, including sinensitin.

  6. Comparison of cellular and whole-animal bioassays for estimation of radiation effects in the polychaete worm Neanthes arenaceodentata (Polychaeta)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polychaete worm Neanthes arenaceodentata was used in experiments to determine possible relationships between short-term genotoxicity tests and reproductive and lethal consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation. Groups of juvenile N. arenaceodentata received one of four different radiation doses (2, 4, 8, and 16 Gy) to determine dose-effect estimates for chromosomal aberration induction, and groups of both adult and juveniles received one of seven different radiation doses (1, 4, 8.4, 46, 102, 500, and 1000 Gy) to determine dose-effect estimates for reproduction, mortality, and life span. Effects on reproduction and genetic material were observed at the lowest doses and in the same range; detrimental reproductive effects were observed at 1 to 4 Gy, and the frequency of chromosomal aberrations was significantly increased at 2 Gy. Only high doses resulted in acute mortality (greater than 500 Gy) and decreased life span (greater than 100 Gy). Dose-effect estimates for chromosomal aberration induction were dependent on radiation dose and on the stage of the cell cycle at the time of irradiation. Dose-effect estimates for reproduction were dependent on dose and the potential for repopulation of gonadal tissue. It is concluded that short-term genotoxicity test can be predictive of detrimental reproductive effects in those model systems for which basic cell kinetics and reproductive parameters are well known

  7. New in vitro reporter gene bioassays for screening of hormonal active compounds in the environment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, Kateřina; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 4 (2010), s. 839-847. ISSN 0175-7598 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP503/10/0408 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : endocrine disruptors * in vitro bioassays * reporter gene assays Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.280, year: 2010

  8. A RAPID, QUANTITATIVE BIOASSAY FOR DETECTING PHYTOTOXIC GASES USING STRESS-ETHYLENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple bioassay for detecting phytotoxic air pollutants has been developed. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings growing on agar medium in test-tubes are exposed to pollutants for 2 h. Stress-ethylene produced by the seedlings during exposure to the pollutants is collected in...

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A TEST-TUBE STRESS-ETHYLENE BIOASSAY FOR DETECTING PHYTOTOXIC GASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid, quantitative bioassay for detecting phytotoxic air pollutants has been developed. The technique uses wheat Triticum aestivum L. or tomato Lycopersicon esculentum L., seedlings growing on an agar medium in test-tubes. The seedlings are exposed to a pollutant in the test-t...

  10. Statistical method for determining and comparing limits of detection of bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Carly A; Griffin, Maryclare; Hong, Jing; Sampson, Paul D

    2015-10-01

    The current bioassay development literature lacks the use of statistically robust methods for calculating the limit of detection of a given assay. Instead, researchers often employ simple methods that provide a rough estimate of the limit of detection, often without a measure of the confidence in the estimate. This scarcity of robust methods is likely due to a realistic preference for simple and accessible methods and to a lack of such methods that have reduced the concepts of limit of detection theory to practice for the specific application of bioassays. Here, we have developed a method for determining limits of detection for bioassays that is statistically robust and reduced to practice in a clear and accessible manner geared at researchers, not statisticians. This method utilizes a four-parameter logistic curve fit to translate signal intensity to analyte concentration, which is a curve that is commonly employed in quantitative bioassays. This method generates a 95% confidence interval of the limit of detection estimate to provide a measure of uncertainty and a means by which to compare the analytical sensitivities of different assays statistically. We have demonstrated this method using real data from the development of a paper-based influenza assay in our laboratory to illustrate the steps and features of the method. Using this method, assay developers can calculate statistically valid limits of detection and compare these values for different assays to determine when a change to the assay design results in a statistically significant improvement in analytical sensitivity. PMID:26376354

  11. The Intersection of CMOS Microsystems and Upconversion Nanoparticles for Luminescence Bioimaging and Bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Wei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Organic fluorophores and quantum dots are ubiquitous as contrast agents for bio-imaging and as labels in bioassays to enable the detection of biological targets and processes. Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs offer a different set of opportunities as labels in bioassays and for bioimaging. UCNPs are excited at near-infrared (NIR wavelengths where biological molecules are optically transparent, and their luminesce in the visible and ultraviolet (UV wavelength range is suitable for detection using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS technology. These nanoparticles provide multiple sharp emission bands, long lifetimes, tunable emission, high photostability, and low cytotoxicity, which render them particularly useful for bio-imaging applications and multiplexed bioassays. This paper surveys several key concepts surrounding upconversion nanoparticles and the systems that detect and process the corresponding luminescence signals. The principle of photon upconversion, tuning of emission wavelengths, UCNP bioassays, and UCNP time-resolved techniques are described. Electronic readout systems for signal detection and processing suitable for UCNP luminescence using CMOS technology are discussed. This includes recent progress in miniaturized detectors, integrated spectral sensing, and high-precision time-domain circuits. Emphasis is placed on the physical attributes of UCNPs that map strongly to the technical features that CMOS devices excel in delivering, exploring the interoperability between the two technologies.

  12. Using a Macroalgal δ15N Bioassay to Detect Cruise Ship Waste Water Effluent Inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen stable isotopes are a powerful tool for tracking sources of N to marine ecosystems. I used green macroalgae as a bioassay organism to evaluate if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in Skagway Harbor, AK. Opportunistic green...

  13. Age and sex related responsiveness of Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) in novel behavioral bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hardiness and mobile nature of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) make them easy to work with but are the same factors that make their responses to behavior modifying chemical stimuli difficult to evaluate. To overcome these difficulties we developed two bioassays: a two choice test with airflow and a...

  14. A comparative study on bioassay and radioimmunoassay of vasopressin in human urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excretion of vasopressin in urine from healthy human subjects under different stages of hydration was estimated in urine extracts by bioassay (rat antidiuresis) and radioimmunoassay. In normally hydrated subjects the excretion was 490 plus minus 164 μU/h and 430 plus minus 133μU/h for bioassay and radioimmunoassay respectively (mean plus minus SEM, n=5). After total fluid restriction for 10 to 12 h the excretion increased to 1370 plus minus 329 μU/h for bioassay and 1163 plus minus 279 μU/h for radioimmunoassay (mean plus minus SEM, n=6). An oral water load (25 ml/kg) reduced the value to 169 μU/h (bioassay) and 118 μU/h (radioimmunoassay) (mean, n=2). In general the biological estimations were 20 % higher than the immunological estimations (P<0.01). The urinary vasopressin excretion was positively correlated to urine osmolality. Synthetic arginine vasopressin (AVP) and urine extracts were both heterogeneous in ion exchange chromatography. The immunoreactive material was always eluted in 2 peaks, situated at the same places in the elution diagram. The material in the second peak was biologically active. The first peak from the AVP standard was biologically inactive, whereas the same peak from urine extract was active. This peak was shown to be an artefact formed during the extraction procedure. (author)

  15. Determining UV Inactivation of Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts by Using Cell Culture and a Mouse Bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of UV exposure on Toxoplasma gondii oocysts has not been completely defined for use in water disinfection. This study evaluated UV irradiated oocysts by three assays: a SCID mouse bioassay, an in vitro T. gondii oocyst plaque assay (TOP-assay), and a quantitative reve...

  16. A fluorescence-based bioassay for antibacterials and its application in screening natural product extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michels, Katharina; Heinke, Ramona; Schöne, Pia; Kuipers, Oscar P; Arnold, Norbert; Wessjohann, Ludger A

    2015-01-01

    The reliable assessment of the biological activity of a minor component embedded in a complex matrix of several hundred compounds is a difficult but common task in the search for natural product-based antibiotics, for example, by bioassay-guided fractionation. To quantify the antibiotic properties,

  17. Evaluation of soil bioassays for use at Washington state hazardous waste sites: A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) is developing guidelines to assess soil toxicity at hazardous waste sites being investigated under the Washington Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup Regulation. To evaluate soil toxicity, Ecology selected five bioassay protocols -- Daphnia, Earthworm, Seedling, Fathead Minnow, and Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay Xenopus (FETAX) -- for use as screening level assessment tools at six State hazardous waste sites. Sites contained a variety of contaminants including metals, creosote, pesticides, and petroleum products (leaking underground storage tanks). Three locations, representing high, medium, and low levels of contamination, were samples at each site. In general, the high contaminant samples resulted in the highest toxic response in all bioassays. The order of site toxicity, as assessed by overall toxic response, is creosote, petroleum products, metals, and pesticides. Results indicate that human health standards, especially for metals, may not adequately protect some of the species tested. The FETAX bioassay had the greatest overall number of toxic responses and lowest variance. The seedling and Daphnia bioassays had lower and similar overall toxic response results, followed by the earthworm and fathead minnow. Variability was markedly highest for the seedling. The Daphnia and fathead minnow variability were similar to the FETAX level, while the earthworm variability was slightly higher

  18. Determination of Biochemical Oxygen Demand of Area Waters: A Bioassay Procedure for Environmental Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    A graphical method for determining the 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) for a body of water is described. In this bioassay, students collect a sample of water from a designated site, transport it to the laboratory, and evaluate the amount of oxygen consumed by naturally occurring bacteria during a 5-day incubation period. An accuracy check,…

  19. A SIMPLE, RAPID BIOASSAY FOR DETECTING EFFECTS OF POLLUTANTS ON BACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since approximately 90% of hazardous wastes reach soil and water for permanent disposal, it is logical that microflora (bacteria) contained in these environments be used to establish initial toxicity levels. Bacteria can be suitable bioassay tools because they are inexpensive to ...

  20. Applicability of the CALUX bioassay for screening of dioxin levels in human milk samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laier, P.; Cederberg, Tommy Licht; Larsen, John Christian;

    2003-01-01

    The CALUX (chemically activated luciferase expression) bioassay based on rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells is a sensitive assay for the detection of Ah receptor agonists like 2,3,7,8-substituted chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and related PCBs. In this paper, the assay was optimized and...

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Cyanobium sp. NIES-981, a Marine Strain Potentially Useful for Ecotoxicological Bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Yohei; Suzuki, Shigekatsu; Yamagishi, Takahiro; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Kawachi, Masanobu

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobium sp. NIES-981 is a marine cyanobacterium isolated from tidal flat sands in Okinawa, Japan. Here, we report the complete 3.0-Mbp genome sequence of NIES-981, which is composed of a single chromosome, and its annotation. This sequence information may provide a basis for developing an ecotoxicological bioassay using this strain. PMID:27469961

  2. Kinetic microplate bioassays for relative potency of antibiotics improved by partial Least Square (PLS) regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Fabiane Lacerda; Saviano, Alessandro Morais; Almeida, Túlia de Souza Botelho; Lourenço, Felipe Rebello

    2016-05-01

    Microbiological assays are widely used to estimate the relative potencies of antibiotics in order to guarantee the efficacy, safety, and quality of drug products. Despite of the advantages of turbidimetric bioassays when compared to other methods, it has limitations concerning the linearity and range of the dose-response curve determination. Here, we proposed to use partial least squares (PLS) regression to solve these limitations and to improve the prediction of relative potencies of antibiotics. Kinetic-reading microplate turbidimetric bioassays for apramacyin and vancomycin were performed using Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739) and Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633), respectively. Microbial growths were measured as absorbance up to 180 and 300min for apramycin and vancomycin turbidimetric bioassays, respectively. Conventional dose-response curves (absorbances or area under the microbial growth curve vs. log of antibiotic concentration) showed significant regression, however there were significant deviation of linearity. Thus, they could not be used for relative potency estimations. PLS regression allowed us to construct a predictive model for estimating the relative potencies of apramycin and vancomycin without over-fitting and it improved the linear range of turbidimetric bioassay. In addition, PLS regression provided predictions of relative potencies equivalent to those obtained from agar diffusion official methods. Therefore, we conclude that PLS regression may be used to estimate the relative potencies of antibiotics with significant advantages when compared to conventional dose-response curve determination. PMID:26971814

  3. An Estuarine Fish Bioassay for Sensitive Biomonitoring of Oil-related Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    An embryonic and larval bioassay using the estuarine fish, Fundulus heteroclitus, was modified for the rapid detection of bioavailable compounds that act through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). The early development of fishes is particularly sensitive to AhR agonists, such ...

  4. Comparison of two bioassay methods for determining deltamethrin resistance in German cockroaches (Blattodea: Blattellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, L E; Tang, C S; Pang, F Y; Ho, S H

    2000-06-01

    Susceptibility to deltamethrin of 10 strains of the German cockroach, Blattella germanica (L.), trapped in hotel kitchens in Singapore was determined. Two resistance detection bioassay methods (topical application and World Health Organization glass jar method) were compared. Resistance ratios based on 50% knockdown, obtained by comparison with the S strain, ranged from 17.7 to 4,235 for topical application and from 2.2 to 22 for the glass jar method. A field strain, with consistently low resistance ratios (topical method = 17.7, glass jar method = 2.2), was identified as a potential field strain to be used as a baseline for comparison with other field strains. Resistance ratios for the other field strains obtained by comparison with the R5 strain ranged from 24.5 to 239 for topical application and from 1.2 to 9.8 for the glass jar method. The results of our study demonstrate that deltamethrin-resistant German cockroaches are numerous in Singapore. Comparison between the two bioassay methods showed that there was significant correlation between KD50 and KT50 values. The glass jar method is similar to field situations but topical application is sensitive enough to define the magnitude of resistance. Differences between the two detection bioassays and the factors governing the choice of bioassay in monitoring resistance in German cockroaches are discussed. PMID:10902348

  5. Development of bioassay techniques with extracts from semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, T.L.; White, P.; Mackay, D.; Metcalfe, C. [Trent Univ., Peterborough, Ontario (Canada). Environmental and Resource Studies Program

    1995-12-31

    Semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs), consisting of polyethylene bags filled with triolein, have been used to monitor for lipophilic organic contaminants in water. Although extracts from SPMDs have most often been analyzed for concentrations of organic contaminants, there is also the potential to monitor the toxicity of these extracts using in vitro and in vivo bioassays. SPMDs were deployed for four weeks at several sites along a corridor extending from Peche Island in the Detroit River to Pelee Island in western Lake Erie to monitor the distribution of toxic organic contaminants in the water. Analysis of the extracts from the SPMDs for concentrations of PCBs and other organochlorine compounds, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) indicated that the regions in the Detroit River within the Trenton Channel and near Zug Island were the most highly contaminated. Bioassays conducted with extracts from the SPMDs included the in vitro SOS Chromotest for genotoxic activity, an acute lethality test with Daphnia magna, and a fish embryotoxicity test with embryos of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). These bioassay data generally indicated that the toxicity and concentrations of organic contaminants in the SPMD extracts were correlated. This study indicates that there is potential to use short-term bioassays of extracts from SPMDs to monitor for in situ contamination in the aquatic environment.

  6. Paper-based chromatic toxicity bioassay by analysis of bacterial ferricyanide reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol-Vila, F; Vigués, N; Guerrero-Navarro, A; Jiménez, S; Gómez, D; Fernández, M; Bori, J; Vallès, B; Riva, M C; Muñoz-Berbel, X; Mas, J

    2016-03-01

    Water quality assessment requires a continuous and strict analysis of samples to guarantee compliance with established standards. Nowadays, the increasing number of pollutants and their synergistic effects lead to the development general toxicity bioassays capable to analyse water pollution as a whole. Current general toxicity methods, e.g. Microtox(®), rely on long operation protocols, the use of complex and expensive instrumentation and sample pre-treatment, which should be transported to the laboratory for analysis. These requirements delay sample analysis and hence, the response to avoid an environmental catastrophe. In an attempt to solve it, a fast (15 min) and low-cost toxicity bioassay based on the chromatic changes associated to bacterial ferricyanide reduction is here presented. E. coli cells (used as model bacteria) were stably trapped on low-cost paper matrices (cellulose-based paper discs, PDs) and remained viable for long times (1 month at -20 °C). Apart from bacterial carrier, paper matrices also acted as a fluidic element, allowing fluid management without the need of external pumps. Bioassay evaluation was performed using copper as model toxic agent. Chromatic changes associated to bacterial ferricyanide reduction were determined by three different transduction methods, i.e. (i) optical reflectometry (as reference method), (ii) image analysis and (iii) visual inspection. In all cases, bioassay results (in terms of half maximal effective concentrations, EC50) were in agreement with already reported data, confirming the good performance of the bioassay. The validation of the bioassay was performed by analysis of real samples from natural sources, which were analysed and compared with a reference method (i.e. Microtox). Obtained results showed agreement for about 70% of toxic samples and 80% of non-toxic samples, which may validate the use of this simple and quick protocol in the determination of general toxicity. The minimum instrumentation

  7. Types of Open Access Publishers in Scopus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Solomon

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed characteristics of publishers who published 2010 open access (OA journals indexed in Scopus. Publishers were categorized into six types; professional, society, university, scholar/researcher, government, and other organizations. Type of publisher was broken down by number of journals/articles published in 2010, funding model, location, discipline and whether the journal was born or converted to OA. Universities and societies accounted for 50% of the journals and 43% of the articles published. Professional publisher accounted for a third of the journals and 42% of the articles. With the exception of professional and scholar/researcher publishers, most journals were originally subscription journals that made at least their digital version freely available. Arts, humanities and social science journals are largely published by societies and universities outside the major publishing countries. Professional OA publishing is most common in biomedicine, mathematics, the sciences and engineering. Approximately a quarter of the journals are hosted on national/international platforms, in Latin America, Eastern Europe and Asia largely published by universities and societies without the need for publishing fees. This type of collaboration between governments, universities and/or societies may be an effective means of expanding open access publications.

  8. Allometry of animal-microbe interactions and global census of animal-associated microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Thomas L; Simmons, Karen A

    2015-07-01

    Animals live in close association with microorganisms, mostly prokaryotes, living in or on them as commensals, mutualists or parasites, and profoundly affecting host fitness. Most animal-microbe studies focus on microbial community structure; for this project, allometry (scaling of animal attributes with animal size) was applied to animal-microbe relationships across a range of species spanning 12 orders of magnitude in animal mass, from nematodes to whales. Microbial abundances per individual animal were gleaned from published literature and also microscopically counted in three species. Abundance of prokaryotes/individual versus animal mass scales as a nearly linear power function (exponent = 1.07, R(2) = 0.94). Combining this power function with allometry of animal abundance indicates that macrofauna have an outsized share of animal-associated microorganisms. The total number of animal-associated prokaryotes in Earth's land animals was calculated to be 1.3-1.4 × 10(25) cells and the total of marine animal-associated microbes was calculated to be 8.6-9.0 × 10(24) cells. Animal-associated microbes thus total 2.1-2.3 × 10(25) of the approximately 10(30) prokaryotes on the Earth. Microbes associated with humans comprise 3.3-3.5% of Earth's animal-associated microbes, and domestic animals harbour 14-20% of all animal-associated microbes, adding a new dimension to the scale of human impact on the biosphere. This novel allometric power function may reflect underlying mechanisms involving the transfer of energy and materials between microorganisms and their animal hosts. Microbial diversity indices of animal gut communities and gut microbial species richness for 60 mammals did not indicate significant scaling relationships with animal body mass; however, further research in this area is warranted. PMID:26108631

  9. Animal welfare assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Vučinić Marijana; Lazić Ivana

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with animal welfare definitions and animal welfare assessment. Animal welfare is a prolonged mental state, resulting from how the animal experiences its environment over time. There are different methods for animal welfare assessment. The four basic criteria for animal welfare assessment are feeding, housing, health and appropriate behavior. Therefore, criteria used to assess animal welfare are not direct measures of the mental state but only parameters that need to be interpr...

  10. Responses of lone star tick (acari: ixodidae) nymphs to the repellent deet applied in acetone and ethanol solutions in vitro bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behavioral bioassays remain a standard tool in the discovery, development, and registration of repellents. Although tick repellent bioassays tend to be rather uncomplicated, several factors can influence their outcomes. Typically repellent bioassays use a solvent, such as acetone or ethanol, to disp...

  11. Bioassays for the detection of chemicals that can form bioactivation-dependent reactive free radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, J.T.; Commandeur, J.N.M.; Wezel, A. van; Vermeulen, N.P.E. (Free Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands). Div. of Molecular Toxicology National Inst. for Coastal and Marine Management, Den Haag (Netherlands))

    1999-06-01

    In vitro bioassays were developed for the detection of chemicals that can be bioactivated to reactive free radical species in microsomal fractions. Two methods were deployed, a down-scaled spectrophotometric method for the detection of chemicals that can cause lipid peroxidation using the measurement of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and a fluorometric method for the detection of chemicals that can undergo redox cycling to generate superoxide radicals based on the detection of hydrogen peroxide. The response of these systems to prototypical and environmentally relevant chemicals, including tetrachloromethane and paraquat, was examined. The detection limit of the lipid peroxidation bioassay, based on the formation of TBARS, was about 1 [micro]M for tetrachloromethane; that of the bioassay for redox cyclers, based on the production of hydrogen peroxide, was about 2 [micro]M for paraquat and about 100-fold lower for the potent redox cycler 2,3,5,6-tetramethylbenzoquinone (TMBQ). Several binary mixtures of chemicals were tested for potential nonadditive effects in both in vitro systems. Some antagonistic effects among halogenated methanes were observed in the lipid peroxidation assay. In the hydrogen peroxide production assay, greater than additive effects were seen between small concentrations of paraquat and TMBQ. A number of surface water concentrates from several locations in The Netherlands, with various levels of chemical contamination, exhibited a weak response in the hydrogen peroxide production assay. Acetone was found to interfere with the response of the bioassay to redox cyclers and, therefore, the water concentrates (originally in acetone) were transferred to ethanol prior to testing. A good correlation was observed between the response of the water concentrates in the hydrogen peroxide production assay and their acute toxicity in Daphnia magna. No correlation was observed between this bioassay response and toxicity in the Microtox

  12. What was hidden in the Publisher's Archive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mai, Anne-Marie

    On the Danish Author Elsa Gress and her correspondence on American Literature with the Publisher, K. E. Hermann, Arena.......On the Danish Author Elsa Gress and her correspondence on American Literature with the Publisher, K. E. Hermann, Arena....

  13. Teaching Electronic Publishing: Learning Software Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Richard E. Jones; Utting, Ian

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes an experience of teaching electronic publishing to computer scientists. It takes the novel position of using electronic publishing concepts to support computer science education, rather than the more usual reverse.

  14. Concordance between Results of Medium-term Liver Carcinogenesis Bioassays and Long-term Findings for Carcinogenic 2-Nitropropane and Non-carcinogenic 1-Nitropropane in F344 Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Doi, Yuko; Tamano, Seiko; Kawabe, Mayumi; Sano,Masashi; Imai, Norio; Nakashima, Hironao; Furukawa, Fumio; Hagiwara, Akihiro; OTSUKA,MASANORI; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the concordance of results for a pair of structural isomers, 2-nitropropane (2-NP) and 1-nitropropane (1-NP), using the rat medium-term liver carcinogenesis bioassay (Ito test) and previously published long-term carcinogenicity tests. Male F344 rats were given a single intraperitoneal injection of DEN (200 mg/kg b.w.) to initiate hepatocarcinogenesis. After 2 weeks, they received per os 0, 0.8, 4 or 20 mg/kg/day of 2-NP or 1-NP six times a week and were s...

  15. Providing research infrastructures with data publishing

    OpenAIRE

    Assante, Massimiliano; Candela, Leonardo; Manghi, Paolo; Pagano, Pasquale (ISTI-CNR); Castelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of data publishing is to release research data for others to use. However, its implementation remains an open issue. 'Science 2.0 Repositories' (SciRepos) address the publishing requirements arising in Science 2.0 by blurring the distinction between research life-cycle and research publishing. SciRepos interface with the ICT services of research infrastructures to intercept and publish research products while providing researchers with social networking tools for discovery, notifi...

  16. Animal rights, animal minds, and human mindreading

    OpenAIRE

    Mameli, M.; Bortolotti, L

    2006-01-01

    Do non‐human animals have rights? The answer to this question depends on whether animals have morally relevant mental properties. Mindreading is the human activity of ascribing mental states to other organisms. Current knowledge about the evolution and cognitive structure of mindreading indicates that human ascriptions of mental states to non‐human animals are very inaccurate. The accuracy of human mindreading can be improved with the help of scientific studies of animal minds. However, the s...

  17. Animal Protection and Animal 'Rights' in Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    Toth, Zoltan J.

    2012-01-01

    In Hungary, the first Act on Animal Protection, which aimed at handling and respecting animals as living creatures capable of feelings and suffering and thus deserving and entitled to protection, was adopted in 1998. Based on this, the Act contains several regulations which ensure that animals are protected against all possible kinds of avoidable physical or mental harm. Furthermore, it prohibits and imposes sanctions for any treatment that causes animals unnecessary suffering. The present st...

  18. Trade Publishing: A Report from the Front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fister, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Reports on the current condition of trade publishing and its future prospects based on interviews with editors, publishers, agents, and others. Discusses academic libraries and the future of trade publishing, including questions relating to electronic books, intellectual property, and social and economic benefits of sharing information…

  19. What Teens Are Reading: A Publisher's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, David

    1999-01-01

    Presents a publisher's perspective on new young adult books being published and on reaching the young adult audience. Discusses reasons for publishing simultaneous hardcover and softcover editions; the more attractive and slightly more expensive trade paperback reprints; marketing and promotion; and establishment of a young adult book award. (AEF)

  20. Encouraging scholastic publishing by urologic trainees

    OpenAIRE

    STEERS, W D

    2009-01-01

    There are many reasons why urologic trainees should publish scholarly work: Personal, professional, and institutional. Publishing by trainees creates an environment that improves the specialty of urology, maintains the quality of our literature, and promotes professionalism of our practitioners. Strategies to encourage scholastic publishing distil down to providing recognition, time, and support to the individual trainee.

  1. Encouraging scholastic publishing by urologic trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steers, W D

    2009-04-01

    THERE ARE MANY REASONS WHY UROLOGIC TRAINEES SHOULD PUBLISH SCHOLARLY WORK: Personal, professional, and institutional. Publishing by trainees creates an environment that improves the specialty of urology, maintains the quality of our literature, and promotes professionalism of our practitioners. Strategies to encourage scholastic publishing distil down to providing recognition, time, and support to the individual trainee. PMID:19672356

  2. [Animal experimentation, animal welfare and scientific research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, H

    2013-10-01

    Hundreds of thousands of laboratory animals are being used every year for scientific experiments held in Israel, mostly mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and a few sheep, cattle, pigs, cats, dogs, and even a few dozen monkeys. In addition to the animals sacrificed to promote scientific research, millions of animals slain every year for other purposes such as meat and fine leather fashion industries. While opening a front against all is an impossible and perhaps an unjustified task, the state of Israel enacted the Animal Welfare (Animal Experimentation) Law (1994). The law aims to regulate scientific animal experiments and to find the appropriate balance between the need to continue to perform animal experiments for the advancement of research and medicine, and at the same time to avoid unnecessary trials and minimize animal suffering. Among other issues the law deals with the phylogenetic scale according to which experimental animals should be selected, experiments for teaching and practicing, and experiments for the cosmetic industry. This article discusses bioethics considerations in animal experiments as well as the criticism on the scientific validity of such experiments. It further deals with the vitality of animal studies and the moral and legal obligation to prevent suffering from laboratory animals. PMID:24660572

  3. Scaling Pharmacodynamics from In Vitro and Preclinical Animal Studies to Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Mager, Donald E.; Woo, Sukyung; Jusko, William J.

    2009-01-01

    An important feature of mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models is the identification of drug- and system-specific factors that determine the intensity and time-course of pharmacological effects. This provides an opportunity to integrate information obtained from in vitro bioassays and preclinical pharmacological studies in animals to anticipate the clinical and adverse responses to drugs in humans. The fact that contemporary PK/PD modeling continues to evolve and seeks...

  4. Effects of publishing industry and reading culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Breznik

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The author presents some results form the research on publishing and librarianship, which was carried out in frame of the Peace Institute in Ljubljana from 2001 till 2003. The research focused on the reading cultures cultivated by Slovene publishers through their publishing programs and on the reading preferences in Slovene public libraries. The results of the research derive from samples of the Slovene annual publishing production in year 2000 and circulation numbers of these publications in Slovene public libraries in year 2001. The author presents the field of publishing and the basic characterisitics of the contemporary »publishing industry«, naming them »the mono-culture of publishing programs«. She also analyses certain influences of the publishing industry on reading cultures in public libraries, especially the strongest, the culture of reading anglosaxon bestsellers. State interventions in the publishing field are evaluated with comparison of the subsidised and nonsubsidised publication titles. By this comparison it was found that state subsidies do not enchroach on the »natural balance« of the publishing market, but only enable the publication of more serious works, which would otherwise probably not be published at all since the »publishing industry« is not capable of accepting the risks for such publishing. The author finds that small, nonprofit publishers, publishing subsidised book titles, are in deprivileged position, being cut off from distribution routes and even public institutions, such as public libraries, do not favour them. Acqiuisition policies of public libraries prefer to serve the simple tastes of their readers and therefore buy more commercial titles, even at the cost of subsidised ones.

  5. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 08 Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (text version) Arabic Translation - Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) Chinese Translation - Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) French ...

  6. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary ... The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how ...

  7. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how ... and distributed as long as FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation ...

  8. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how ... and distributed as long as FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation ...

  9. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & ... back Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  10. [Investigation on pattern of quality control for Chinese materia medica based on famous-region drug and bioassay--the work reference].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dan; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2011-05-01

    Selection and standardization of the work reference are the technical issues to be faced with in the bioassay of Chinese materia medica. Taking the bioassay of Coptis chinensis. as an example, the manufacture process of the famous-region drugs extraction was explained from the aspects of original identification, routine examination, component analysis and bioassay. The common technologies were extracted, and the selection and standardization procedures of the work reference for the bioassay of Chinese materia medica were drawn up, so as to provide technical support for constructing a new mode and method of the quality control of Chinese materia medica based on the famous-region drugs and bioassay. PMID:21842660

  11. Animation Trends in Education

    OpenAIRE

    Lirong Xiao

    2013-01-01

    In the paper, we give a survey of animation content in education. At present, there is an extensive literature addressing the impact of animation in education and psychology fields. However, in animation field, although some software companies have developed their individual production toolboxes or platforms for animation content in education, there is lack of relevant research from the perspective of animation techniques. This paper first gives a survey of current animation content in educat...

  12. Mitigation of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from animal operations: III. A review of animal management mitigation options

    OpenAIRE

    Hristov, A.N.; Ott, T.; Tricarico, J; Rotz, A.; Waghorn, G; Adesogan, A.T.; Dijkstra, J.; Montes, F.; Oh, J; Kebreab, E.; Oosting, S.J.; Gerber, P.J.; Henderson, B.L.; H. P. S. Makkar; Firkins, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this review was to analyze published data on animal management practices that mitigate enteric methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from animal operations. Increasing animal productivity can be a very effective strategy for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per unit of livestock product. Improving the genetic potential of animals through planned cross-breeding or selection within breeds and achieving this genetic potential through proper nutrition and improvements...

  13. Seeing the animal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harfeld, Jes Lynning; Cornou, Cecile; Kornum, Anna;

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the notion that the invisibility of the animalness of the animal constitutes a fundamental obstacle to change within current production systems. It is discussed whether housing animals in environments that resemble natural habitats could lead to a re-animalization...... of the animals, a higher appreciation of their moral significance, and thereby higher standards of animal welfare. The basic claim is that experiencing the animals in their evolutionary and environmental context would make it harder to objectify animals as mere bioreactors and production systems. It is argued...... that the historic objectification of animals within intensive animal production can only be reversed if animals are given the chance to express themselves as they are and not as we see them through the tunnel visions of economy and quantifiable welfare assessment parameters....

  14. Refining Animal Models to Enhance Animal Welfare

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patricia V.Turner

    2012-01-01

    The use of animals in research will be necessary for scientific advances in the basic and biomedical sciences for the foreseeable future.As we learn more about the ability of animals to experience pain,suffering,and distress,and particularly for mammals,it becomes the responsibility of scientists,institutions,animal caregivers,and veterinarians to seek ways to improve the lives of research animals and refine their care and use.Refinement is one of the three R's emphasized by Russell and Burch,and refers to modification of procedures to minimise the potential for pain,suffering and distress. It may also refer to procedures used to enhance animal comfort. This paper summarizes considerations for refinements in research animal.

  15. Compost maturity assessment using physicochemical, solid-state spectroscopy, and plant bioassay analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D Senthil; Kumar, P Satheesh; Rajendran, N M; Anbuganapathi, G

    2013-11-27

    The vermicompost produced from flower waste inoculated with biofertilizers was subjected to compost maturity test: (i) physicochemical method (pH, OC, TN, C:N); (ii) solid state spectroscopic analysis (FTIR and (13)C CPMAS NMR); and (iii) plant bioassay (germination index). The pH of vermicompost was decreased toward neutral, C:N ratio vermicomposts result shows reduction of complex organic materials into simple minerals which indicates the maturity of the experimental vermicompost product than the control. The increased aliphatic portion incorporated with flower residues may be due to the synthesis of alkyl, O-alkyl, and COO groups by the microbes present in the gut of earthworm. Plant bioassays are considered the most conventional assessment of compost maturity analysis, and subsequently, it shows the effect of vermicompost maturity on the germination index of Vigna mungo . PMID:24191667

  16. Regional differences in stratum corneum reactivity to surfactants. Quantitative assessment using the corneosurfametry bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, F; Goffin, V; Maibach, H I; Piérard, G E

    1997-12-01

    The skin does not react similarly to the presence of xenobiotics over all anatomic sites. Distinct regional differences have been described for irritancy and percutaneous absorption. The present study assesses the regional variation of stratum corneum reactivity to surfactants using the corneosurfametry bioassay. Stratum corneum was harvested from 6 body sites in 20 young adults. Corneosurfametry was performed using water, 1% SLS and a 5% soap solution. Data show that the best variable to assess regional variability in irritancy is the overall difference in corneosurfametry (ODC), comparing the effect of a given surfactant with water. The dorsal hand and volar forearm were the least reactive, the neck, forehead, back and dorsal foot the most reactive, sites. It is concluded that the corneosurfametry bioassay, through the ODC variable, is a practically noninvasive tool for the evaluation of regional variation in irritancy at the level of the stratum corneum. PMID:9455629

  17. Trace analysis of ecdysones by gas--liquid chromatography, radioimmunoassay, and bioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioimmunoassay was compared to a gas-liquid chromatographic assay and a bioassay as a method for quantifying ecdysone titers in arthropods. In addition a continuous-development thin layer chromatographic technique was evaluated as a means for separating various ecdysone analogues. The carboxymethoxyamine derivative of β-ecdysone was synthesized and characterized by several spectral methods. This derivative was conjugated to bovine serum albumin to afford a suitable antigen and injected into rabbits. The antisera produced shows a moderate affinity for β-ecdysone and cross-reacts with many ecdysone analogues. Ecdysones were also quantified directly as trimethylsilyl ethers using a 63Ni electron capture detector in a gas-liquid chromatographic system. Less than 50 pg of material could be detected per injection. Both of these techniques and the Musca domestica bioassay were used for the comparative analysis of a number of biological samples. The advantages and disadvantages of the various methods are discussed. (U.S.)

  18. Development and bioassay of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing potato proteinase inhibitor II gene

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Junjie; Liu, Fan; Yao, Lei; Luo, Chen; Yin, Yue; Wang, Guixiang; Huang, Yubi

    2012-01-01

    Lepidopteran larvae are the most injurious pests of Chinese cabbage production. We attempted the development of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing the potato proteinase inhibitor II gene (pinII) and bioassayed the pest-repelling ability of these transgenic plants. Cotyledons with petioles from aseptic seedlings were used as explants for Agrobacterium-mediated in vitro transformation. Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 contained the binary vector pBBBasta-pinII-bar comprising pinII and bar genes...

  19. Bioassay-Directed Isolation of Active Compounds with Antiyeast Activity from a Cassia fistula Seed Extract

    OpenAIRE

    Subramanion L. Jothy; Sreenivasan Sasidharan; Lai Ngit Shin; Lachimanan Yoga Latha; Yee Ling Lau; Yeng Chen; Zuraini Zakaria

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective: Cassia fistula L belongs to the family Leguminosae, and it is one of the most popular herbal products in tropical countries. C. fistula seeds have been used as a herbal medicine and have pharmacological activity which includes anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and antioxidant properties. The goal of this study was to identify compounds from C. fistula seeds which are responsible for anti-Candida albicans activity using bioassay-directed isolation. Results: The preliminary...

  20. Bioassay- and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-guided acetylcholinesterase inhibitors from Picriafel-terrae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Picria fel-terrae is a traditional Chinese medicine. Materials and Methods: A new approach to the search for acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibitors from Picria fel-terrae is presented. Results: Bioassay- and LC-MS-guided fractionation of the ethyl acetate extract was from traditional Chinese medicine P.fel-terrae. Following primary extraction, the ethyl acetate extracts fraction of P.fel-terrae showed strong AChE inhibitory activities. So the sample was separated using highperformance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The effluent was split towards two identical 96-well fraction collectors, and the presence of the biologically interesting portion and chromatographic fractions could be readily detected by analyzing selected ion chromatograms through an electrophoresis-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS system for accurate mass measurement. One 96-well plate was used for a bioassay (AChE-inhibitory assay and detected the bioactivity and position of the relevant peak in the chromatogram. The positive well in the second 96-well plate was used for identification by LC-(+ ESIMS. Conclusion: As abovementioned, the AChE inhibitory constituents from P.fel-terrae by LC-bioassay-ESIMS were rapid identified. Liquid chromatography/ mass spectrometry (LC-MS screening detected the presence of six active compounds, identified as picfeltarraenin IA (1, picfeltarraenin IB (2, picfeltarraenin IV (3, picfeltarraenin X (4, picfeltarraenin XI (5, and one unknown compound. The structures were further determined by 13C NMR. The six compounds expressed stronger AChE inhibition than the known AChE inhibitorTacrine. Above all, the value of this LC-bioassay-ESIMS methodology is highlighted by the finding and structure elucidation of the active constituents from many other structural families of natural products.

  1. Toxicity Assessment of Perchloroethylene and Intermediate Products after Advanced Oxidation Process by Daphnia Magna Bioassay

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdi Kargar; Kazem Naddafi; Ramin Nabizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective: Perchloroethylene is a chlorinated hydrocarbon used as a solvent in many industries and services activities such as dry cleaning and auto industry as degreasing. We carried out a bioassay using Daphnia Magna in order to determine the ecological effects of wastewater treatment through applying advanced oxidation processes (ultrasonic, ultraviolet irradiation and hydrogen peroxide processes) for removal of perchloroethylene. Materials and Methods: Due to the sensiti...

  2. Predictions for the outcome of rodent carcinogenicity bioassays: identification of trans-species carcinogens and noncarcinogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Tennant, R W; Spalding, J.

    1996-01-01

    Thirty chemicals or substances currently undergoing long-term carcinogenicity bioassays in rodents have been used in a project to further evaluate methods and information that may have the capability of predicting potential carcinogens. In our predictions the principal information used includes structural alerts and in vitro test results for Salmonella mutagenicity, relative subchronic toxicity, and the sites and types of pathology found in subchronic (90-day) studies. This group of chemicals...

  3. Mouse bioassay to assess oestrogenic and anti-oestrogenic compounds: Hydroxytamoxifen, Diethylstilbestrol and Genistein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Köhlerová, Eva; Škarda, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 5 (2004), s. 209-217. ISSN 0931-184X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/02/0406; GA AV ČR IBS5045302; GA AV ČR KSK5020115 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : bioassay * anti-oestrogens * oestrogenicity Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 0.471, year: 2004

  4. BRINE SHRIM LETHALITY BIOASSAY OF METHANOLIC CRUDE EXTRACTS OF TERMINALIA ARJUNA

    OpenAIRE

    Maruf Anayet and Mohammad Musarraf Hussain

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the cytotoxic activities of Terminalia arjuna (Family: Combretaceae) by brine shrimp lethality bioassay. The leaves of Terminalia arjuna were extracted with methanol and the methanolic extract was fractionated into three fractions by using organic solvents like n-hexane, ethyl acetate and chloroform. The n-hexane, ethyl acetate and chloroform soluble fractions of methanolic crude extract were screened for antitumor properties using brine shrimp lethality b...

  5. Bioassay for grooming effectiveness towards Varroa destructor mites in Africanized and Carniolan honey bees

    OpenAIRE

    Aumeier, Pia

    2001-01-01

    International audience Grooming behavior is considered a varroosis tolerance factor of Africanized honey bees, but this behavior is difficult to evaluate directly within the honey bee colony. A laboratory bioassay was developed to measure the intensity and effectiveness of grooming responses by worker bees artificially infested with one Varroa mite. At a study site in tropical Brazil, the sequence of seven well- defined grooming reactions towards mites of different colonial origin was comp...

  6. In Vitro Androgen Bioassays as a Detection Method for Designer Androgens

    OpenAIRE

    Heather, Alison K.; Cooper, Elliot R.; McGrath, Kristine C. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Androgens are the class of sex steroids responsible for male sexual characteristics, including increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass. Illicit use of androgen doping can be an attractive option for those looking to enhance sporting performance and/or physical appearance. The use of in vitro bioassays to detect androgens, especially designer or proandrogens, is becoming increasingly important in combating androgen doping associated with nutritional supplements. The nutritional sports sup...

  7. Acute toxicity bioassay with native plants to evaluate an oil spill

    OpenAIRE

    Vivien Pentreath; Elena González; Mercedes Barquín; Stella Maris Ríos; Susana Perales

    2015-01-01

    Plant bioassays are excellent tools for the evaluation of environmental risks. In particular the use of seeds of vascular plants is recommended due to their higher sensitivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of native plants in order for them to be used as biological indicators of environmental oil pollution in relation to a standardized bioindicator. We analyzed the germination index (GI) of Lactuca sativa L., Atriplex lampa (Moq.) D.Dietri. and Prosopis denudans in thirt...

  8. Pathogenic fungi and Bio-control agents: Competitive bio-assay research

    OpenAIRE

    Olabiyi, T.I.; Ruocco, M.; Lanzuize, S.

    2014-01-01

    Fungi of the genus Trichoderma have a track record of being antagonist to quite of a number of agricultural important pathogens. Trichoderma have some unique characteristics that make it scientifically proven and suitable bio-control agents against varieties of pathogenic organism infecting economic food crops. Trichoderma has the advantage of being environment friendly and not hazardous to the health of human beings, livestock, soil and environment. Competitive bio-assay experiment was carri...

  9. Isolation of antibacterial compounds from Quercus dilatata L. through bioassay guided fractionation

    OpenAIRE

    Jamil Maryam; ul Haq Ihsan; Mirza Bushra; Qayyum Mazhar

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Four medicinal plants (Chrozophora hierosolymitana Spreng, Chrysanthemum leucanthemum L., Ephedra gerardiana Wall. ex Stapf, and Quercus dilatata L.) used by indigenous healers to treat various infectious diseases were selected for the present study. The major objective of the present study was isolation and characterization of antimicrobial components from the crude plant extracts using bioassay guided fractionation. Methods Seven methanolic extracts of the four plants we...

  10. Sensitive bioassay for detection of PPARα potentially hazardous ligands with gold nanoparticle probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We develop a sensitive and high throughput method to screen PPARα ligands. → This method is based on the ligand-receptor interaction on microplate. → The sensitivity is increased through sliver enhancement on captured gold nanoparticle probes. → There is a significant correlation between the bioassay and LC-MS for water spiked samples. - Abstract: There are so many kinds of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) ligands with hazardous effect for human health in the environment, such as certain herbicides, plasticizers and drugs. Among these agonists, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) are mostly investigated due to their persistence and accumulation in environment and their potential toxicity via PPARα. This investigation aims at developing a bioassay method to detect PPARα ligands based on the ligand-receptor interaction on microplate. PPARα, which formed heterodimers with retinoid X receptor-α (RXRα), were activated by PPARα ligands to form ligands-PPARα-RXRα complexes. Then the complexes were transferred into a microplate and captured via monoclonal anti-PPARα antibody. The PPARα responsive elements (PPRE) modified-gold nanoparticle probes were captured by the ligand-PPARα-RXRα complexes immobilized on the microplate, and then could be quantified through measuring the optical density after silver enhancement. The results showed that PFOS was quantified with a linear range from 100 pM to 1 μM and the detection limit was 10 pM. In addition to PFOS, PFOA and MEHP were also quantified within a proper range through the proposed bioassay. This bioassay was compared with that of liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for water spiked samples with a significant correlation (r = 0.9893). This study provides a high-throughput detection method for PPARα ligands in microplate with high sensitivity and wide linear range. It may serve as

  11. Biological screening of selected Pacific Northwest forest plants using the brine shrimp (Artemia salina) toxicity bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karchesy, Yvette M; Kelsey, Rick G; Constantine, George; Karchesy, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    The brine shrimp (Artemia salina) bioassay was used to screen 211 methanol extracts from 128 species of Pacific Northwest plants in search of general cytotoxic activity. Strong toxicity (LC50  1000 µg/ml). Our subsequent studies of conifer heartwoods with strong activity confirm the assay's value for identifying new investigational leads for materials with insecticidal and fungicidal activity. PMID:27186474

  12. Promising Aedes aegypti Repellent Chemotypes Identified through Integrated QSAR, Virtual Screening, Synthesis, and Bioassay

    OpenAIRE

    Oliferenko, Polina V.; Oliferenko, Alexander A; Poda, Gennadiy I.; Osolodkin, Dmitry I; Girinath G. Pillai; Bernier, Ulrich R.; Tsikolia, Maia; Agramonte, Natasha M.; Clark, Gary G.; Linthicum, Kenneth J.; Katritzky, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular field topology analysis, scaffold hopping, and molecular docking were used as complementary computational tools for the design of repellents for Aedes aegypti , the insect vector for yellow fever, chikungunya, and dengue fever. A large number of analogues were evaluated by virtual screening with Glide molecular docking software. This produced several dozen hits that were either synthesized or procured from commercial sources. Analysis of these compounds by a repellent bioassay resul...

  13. Recombinant Streptomyces clavuligerus strain including cas2 gene production and analysis its antibiotic overproduction by bioassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Hojati

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptomyces clavuligerus is one of the most important strain that produce clavulanic acid that wildly used in combination of strong but sensitive to β-lactamase antibiotics in clinics. The cas2 is one of the important genes in the biosynthesis pathway of clavulanic acid. Materials and Methods: The recombinant construct pMTcas2 which contain cas2 gene is obtained from Isfahan University. Recombinant plasmid extracts from streptomyces lividans and confirm by enzyme digestion. The streptomyces clavuligerus protoplast was prepared and transformation was done by using polyethylene glycol. Transformation was confirmed by plasmid extraction and PCR using cas2 specific primers. Finally, bioassay method was used to survey the effect of extra copy of cas2 on clavulanic acid production. Result: Plasmid extraction was initially carried out and the structure of plasmid was confirmed by digestion. The typical white colony was seen on protoplast recovery culture containing thiostrepton antibiotic and gray spores were detected after one week. Plasmid extraction was done from transformed strain and transformation was confirmed by PCR. The results of the bioassay show that amplification of the cas2 gene in multicopy plasmids resulted in a 4.1 fold increase in clavulanic acid production. Conclusion: The bioassay was done and the diameters of zone of inhibition in control and sample were compared. The results of the bioassay show that amplification of the cas2 gene in multicopy plasmids resulted in a 4.1 fold increase in clavulanic acid production. Overproduction of clavulanic acid decreases the cost of its dependent drug production.

  14. Animal Images and Metaphors in Animal Farm

    OpenAIRE

    Ping Sun

    2015-01-01

    In literary works animal images are frequently used as the “source domain” of a metaphor to disclose the natures of the “target domain”, human beings. This is called “cross-domain mapping” or “conceptual metaphor” in cognitive linguistics, which is based on the similar qualities between animals and human beings. Thus the apparent descriptions of the animals are really the deep revelations of the human beings. Animal Farm is one exemplary product of this special expressing way. Diversified ani...

  15. QlikView Server and Publisher

    CERN Document Server

    Redmond, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This is a comprehensive guide with a step-by-step approach that enables you to host and manage servers using QlikView Server and QlikView Publisher.If you are a server administrator wanting to learn about how to deploy QlikView Server for server management,analysis and testing, and QlikView Publisher for publishing of business content then this is the perfect book for you. No prior experience with QlikView is expected.

  16. Educational Publishing and the World Wide Web

    OpenAIRE

    Marion , Ann; Hacking, Elizabeth H.

    1998-01-01

    Publishers have long had an important role in education, producing books and other learning materials. Today, the publisher's role is changing fast with the platform evolution from stand-alone to networked computers. Print and the Web are compared, demonstrating that they will remain complementary. The publishers' traditional Value Chain is linear and one-way; it is operative in a stable, predictable environment, and accommodates mass production. This traditional Value Chai...

  17. Open Access Publishing: What Authors Want

    OpenAIRE

    Nariani, R.; Fernandez, L.

    2012-01-01

    Campus-based open access author funds are being considered by many academic libraries as a way to support authors publishing in open access journals. Article processing fees for open access have been introduced recently by publishers and have not yet been widely accepted by authors. Few studies have surveyed authors on their reasons for publishing open access and their perceptions of open access journals. The present study was designed to gauge the uptake of library support for author funding...

  18. Open Access Publishing - Models and Attributes

    OpenAIRE

    Dallmeier-Tiessen, S.; Goerner, B.; Darby, R.; Hyppoelae, J.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Kahn, D; S. Lambert; Lengenfelder, A.; Leonard, C.; S. Mele; Polydoratou, P.; Ross, D; Ruiz-Perez, S.; Schimmer, R.; Swaisland, M.

    2010-01-01

    The SOAP (Study of Open Access Publishing) project has compiled data on the present offer for open access publishing in online peer-reviewed journals. Starting from the Directory of Open Access Journals, several sources of data are considered, including inspection of journal web site and direct inquiries within the publishing industry. Several results are derived and discussed, together with their correlations: the number of open access journals and articles; their subject area; the starti...

  19. Application of the CALUX bioassay for epidemiological study. Analyses of Belgian human plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouwe, N. van; Debacker, N.; Sasse, A. [Scientific Institute of Public Health, Brussels (BE)] (and others)

    2004-09-15

    The CALUX bioassay is a promising screening method for the detection of dioxin-like compounds. The observed good sensitivity, low number of false negative results as well as the good correlations with the GC-HRMS TEQ-values in case of feed and food analyses allow this method to climb in the first assessment methods' scale. The low amount of sample needed in addition to those latest advantages suggest that the CALUX bioassay could be a good screening method for epidemiological studies. The Belgian epidemiological study concerning the possible effect of the dioxin incident on the body burden of the Belgian population was an opportunity to test this method in comparison to the gold reference one: the GC-HRMS. The first part of this abstract presents epidemiological parameters (sensibility, specificity,) of the CALUX bioassay using CALUX TEQ-values as estimators of the TEQ-values of the 17 PCDD/Fs. The second part examines epidemiological determinants observed for CALUX and GCHRMS TEQ-values.

  20. Bioassays as a tool for evaluating advanced oxidation processes in water and wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Luigi

    2011-10-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have been widely used in water and wastewater treatment for the removal of organic and inorganic contaminants as well as to improve biodegradability of industrial wastewater. Unfortunately, the partial oxidation of organic contaminants may result in the formation of intermediates more toxic than parent compounds. In order to avoid this drawback, AOPs are expected to be carefully operated and monitored, and toxicity tests have been used to evaluate whether effluent detoxification takes place. In the present work, the effect of AOPs on the toxicity of aqueous solutions of different classes of contaminants as well as actual aqueous matrices are critically reviewed. The dualism toxicity-biodegradability when AOPs are used as pre-treatment step to improve industrial wastewater biodegradability is also discussed. The main conclusions/remarks include the followings: (i) bioassays are a really useful tool to evaluate the dangerousness of AOPs as well as to set up the proper operative conditions, (ii) target organisms for bioassays should be chosen according to the final use of the treated water matrix, (iii) acute toxicity tests may be not suitable to evaluate toxicity in the presence of low/realistic concentrations of target contaminants, so studies on chronic effects should be further developed, (iv) some toxicity tests may be not useful to evaluate biodegradability potential, in this case more suitable tests should be applied (e.g., activated sludge bioassays, respirometry). PMID:21722938

  1. Fluorescence-Based Bioassays for the Detection and Evaluation of Food Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Nishi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We summarize here the recent progress in fluorescence-based bioassays for the detection and evaluation of food materials by focusing on fluorescent dyes used in bioassays and applications of these assays for food safety, quality and efficacy. Fluorescent dyes have been used in various bioassays, such as biosensing, cell assay, energy transfer-based assay, probing, protein/immunological assay and microarray/biochip assay. Among the arrays used in microarray/biochip assay, fluorescence-based microarrays/biochips, such as antibody/protein microarrays, bead/suspension arrays, capillary/sensor arrays, DNA microarrays/polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based arrays, glycan/lectin arrays, immunoassay/enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA-based arrays, microfluidic chips and tissue arrays, have been developed and used for the assessment of allergy/poisoning/toxicity, contamination and efficacy/mechanism, and quality control/safety. DNA microarray assays have been used widely for food safety and quality as well as searches for active components. DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling may be useful for such purposes due to its advantages in the evaluation of pathway-based intracellular signaling in response to food materials.

  2. A bioassay for the detection of perchlorate in the ppb range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinnickel, Mark; Smith, Stephen C; Koo, Jonathan; O'Connor, Susan M; Coates, John D

    2011-04-01

    A bioassay for the determination of ppb (μg·L(-1)) concentrations of perchlorate has been developed and is described herein. The assay uses the enzyme perchlorate reductase (PR) from the perchlorate-reducing organism Dechloromonas agitata in purified and partially purified forms to detect perchlorate. The redox active dye phenazine methosulfate (PMS) is shown to efficiently shuttle electrons to PR from NADH. Perchlorate can be determined indirectly by monitoring NADH oxidization by PR. To lower the detection limit, we have shown that perchlorate can be concentrated on a solid-phase extraction (SPE) column that is pretreated with the cation decyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB). Perchlorate is eluted from these columns with a solution of 2 M NaCl and 200 mM morpholine propane sulfonic acid (MOPS, pH 12.5). By washing these columns with 15 mL of 2.5 mM DTAB and 15% acetone, contaminating ions, such as chlorate and nitrate, are removed without affecting the bioassay. Because of the effect of complex matrices on the SPE columns, the method of standard additions is used to analyze tap water and groundwater samples. The efficacy of the developed bioassay was demonstrated by analyzing samples from 2-17000 ppb in deionized lab water, tap water, and contaminated groundwater. PMID:21384912

  3. Assessing the genotoxicity of urban air pollutants using two in situ plant bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarini, M.; Fatigoni, C.; Dominici, L.; Maestri, S. [Department of Medical-Surgical Specialties and Public Health, University of Perugia, I-06126 (Italy); Ederli, L.; Pasqualini, S. [Department of Applied Biology, University of Perugia, I-06121 (Italy); Monarca, S. [Department of Medical-Surgical Specialties and Public Health, University of Perugia, I-06126 (Italy); Moretti, M., E-mail: massimo.moretti@unipg.i [Department of Medical-Surgical Specialties and Public Health, University of Perugia, I-06126 (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    Genotoxicity of urban air has been analysed almost exclusively in airborne particulates. We monitored the genotoxic effects of airborne pollutants in the urban air of Perugia (Central Italy). Two plant bioindicators with different genetic endpoints were used: micronuclei in meiotic pollen mother cells using Tradescantia-micronucleus bioassay (Trad-MCN) and DNA damage in nuclei of Nicotiana tabacum leaves using comet assay (Nicotiana-comet). Buds of Tradescantia clone no. 4430 and young N. tabacum cv. Xanthi plants were exposed for 24 h at three sites with different pollution levels. One control site (indoor control) was also used. The two bioassays showed different sensitivities toward urban pollutants: Trad-MCN assay was the most sensitive, but DNA damage in N. tabacum showed a better correlation with the pollutant concentrations. In situ biomonitoring of airborne genotoxins using higher plants combined with chemical analysis is thus recommended for characterizing genotoxicity of urban air. - Plant bioassays used to explore in situ the correlation between air pollution and genotoxicity.

  4. A rapid bioassay to monitor murine leukemia virus infection in mice using cellular gp71 binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid and sensitive bioassay based on the availability of cell surface receptors for the binding of purified envelope glycoprotein, gp71, of Rauscher murine leukemia virus (R-MuLV) was developed to serially monitor viral-induced leukemogenesis in individual BALB/cAnN mice. The specificity of the bioassay was demonstrated by the competition of [125I]gp71 cellular binding with murine ecotropic viruses, purified unlabelled R-MuLV envelope glycoprotein and by antiserum to R-MuLV gp71. In contrast, there was no effect on the [125I]gp71 binding level with the addition of murine xenotropic viruses, R-MuLV p30, or several other proteins. The [125I]gp71 binding level of circulating leukocytes was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in mice after R-MuLV infection. The reduction of cellular gp71 binding developed in two stages and the latter stage was highly dependent (P < 0.05) on circulating infections virus titer. Using this technique, the gp71 cellular binding levels of 48-60 individual mice can be assayed in a 4 h period. The advantages of this bioassay compared to standard immunological and tissue culture techniques used in studying retrovirus expression and viral-cell interactions are discussed. (Auth.)

  5. In Vitro Androgen Bioassays as a Detection Method for Designer Androgens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison K. Heather

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Androgens are the class of sex steroids responsible for male sexual characteristics, including increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass. Illicit use of androgen doping can be an attractive option for those looking to enhance sporting performance and/or physical appearance. The use of in vitro bioassays to detect androgens, especially designer or proandrogens, is becoming increasingly important in combating androgen doping associated with nutritional supplements. The nutritional sports supplement market has grown rapidly throughout the past decade. Many of these supplements contain androgens, designer androgens or proandrogens. Many designer or proandrogens cannot be detected by the standard highly-sensitive screening methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry because their chemical structure is unknown. However, in vitro androgen bioassays can detect designer and proandrogens as these assays are not reliant on knowing the chemical structure but instead are based on androgen receptor activation. For these reasons, it may be advantageous to use routine androgen bioassay screening of nutraceutical samples to help curb the increasing problem of androgen doping.

  6. Open Access Publishing: An Initial Discussion of Income Sources, Scholarly Journals and Publishers

    OpenAIRE

    Polydoratou, P.; Palzenberger, M.; Schimmer, R.; S. Mele

    2010-01-01

    The Study for Open Access Publishing (SOAP) project is one of the initiatives undertaken to explore the risks and opportunities of the transition to open access publishing. Some of the early analyses of open access journals listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) show that more than half of the open access publishing initiatives were undertaken by smaller publishers, learned societies and few publishing houses that own a large number of journal titles. Regarding income sources ...

  7. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... En Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, ... Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of ...

  8. Physics for Animation Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, David; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2011-01-01

    Animation has become enormously popular in feature films, television, and video games. Art departments and film schools at universities as well as animation programs at high schools have expanded in recent years to meet the growing demands for animation artists. Professional animators identify the technological facet as the most rapidly advancing…

  9. Ian Ingram: Next Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Ian Ingram: Next Animals is an exhibition catalogue presenting research on the work by Ian Ingram in relation to his exhibition Next Animals at Nikolaj Kunsthal in 2015.......Ian Ingram: Next Animals is an exhibition catalogue presenting research on the work by Ian Ingram in relation to his exhibition Next Animals at Nikolaj Kunsthal in 2015....

  10. Selection of a bioassay battery to assess toxicity in the affluents and effluents of three water-treatment plants

    OpenAIRE

    Paola Bohórquez-Echeverry; Marcela Duarte-Castañeda; Nubia León-López; Claudia Campos-Pinilla; Fabián Caicedo-Carrascal; Myriam Vásquez-Vásquez

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of water quality includes the analysis of both physical-chemical and microbiological parameters. However,none of these evaluates the biological effect that can be generated in ecosystems or humans. In order to define the most suitable organismsto evaluate the toxicity in the affluent and effluent of three drinking-water treatment plants, five acute toxicity bioassays were used,incorporating three taxonomic groups of the food chain. Materials and methods. The bioassays used were...

  11. Sensitivity bioassays of the Cnesterodon decemmaculatus and Pimephales promelasin a series of samples of effluent and reference toxicant

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Saona; Agustín Carnikian; Martín Spósito; Patricia Baklayan; Julio Espínola

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the toxicological sensitivity quantified by the 50% lethal dose of acute toxicity bioassays of Cnesterodon decemmaculatusand Pimephales promelasin benchmark exposure to toxic industrial effluents, wastewater effluents and reference toxicants. At the same time, the toxicological sensitivity of C. decemmaculatusrelated to the size was assayed. Both species were analyzed with 16 bioassays mated by the same substance or compound and a good agreement rL= 0.75 was observed. No s...

  12. Beoordeling van gereinigde grond. V. Toepassing van bioassays met planten en regenwormen op verontreinigde en gereinigde gronden

    OpenAIRE

    Gestel CAM van; Dirven-van Breemen EM; Kamerman JW

    1992-01-01

    Within the framework of the project "Evaluation of decontaminated soil", the applicability of bioassays with earthworms and plants for the quality assessment of decontaminated soil is investigated. In the final phase of this project, bioassays with earthworms and plants (radish, lettuce) developed earlier, were applied to a number of polluted and decontaminated soils. As earlier studies demonstrated that bioavailability of metals increased due to clean-up operations, the decontamina...

  13. Performance characteristics of bioassay UV-spectrophotometry and high perfomance liquid chromatographic determination of gatifloxacin in tablets

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiani Capistrano Gonçalves de Oliveira Lopes; Hérida Regina Nunes Salgado

    2008-01-01

    The microbiological bioassay, UV-spectrophotometry and HPLC methods for assaying gatifloxacin in tablets were compared. Validation parameters such as linearity, precision, accuracy, limit of detection and limit of quantitation were determined. Beer's law was obeyed in the ranges 4.0-14.0 μg/mL for HPLC and UV-spectrophotometric method, and 4.0-16.0 μg/mL for bioassay. All methods were reliable within acceptable limits for antibiotic pharmaceutical preparations being accurate, precis...

  14. Quality assurance exercise for estimating low-levels of alpha emitters in urine samples: performance of Trombay's bioassay laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of quality assurance, Trombay's bioassay laboratory took part in the international intercomparison exercise organized by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for estimating low-levels of alpha emitters (234U, 238U, 239+240Pu and 241Am) in urine samples. In this paper, performance of the Trombay's bioassay laboratory in the intercomparison exercise is presented. The results submitted by the laboratory were found to be in good agreement with the organizers (spiked) values. (author)

  15. Carotenoids in Marine Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Maoka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine animals contain various carotenoids that show structural diversity. These marine animals accumulate carotenoids from foods such as algae and other animals and modify them through metabolic reactions. Many of the carotenoids present in marine animals are metabolites of β-carotene, fucoxanthin, peridinin, diatoxanthin, alloxanthin, and astaxanthin, etc. Carotenoids found in these animals provide the food chain as well as metabolic pathways. In the present review, I will describe marine animal carotenoids from natural product chemistry, metabolism, food chain, and chemosystematic viewpoints, and also describe new structural carotenoids isolated from marine animals over the last decade.

  16. Ethics in Animal Experimentation

    OpenAIRE

    Yusuf Ergun

    2010-01-01

    Experimental animals are frequently used to obtain information for primarily scientific reasons. In the present review, ethics in animal experimentation is examined. At first, the history of animal experimentation and animal rights is outlined. Thereafter, the terms in relation with the topic are defined. Finally, prominent aspects of 3Rs constituting scientific and ethical basis in animal experimentation are underlined. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(4.000): 220-235

  17. Ethics in Animal Experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Ergun

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Experimental animals are frequently used to obtain information for primarily scientific reasons. In the present review, ethics in animal experimentation is examined. At first, the history of animal experimentation and animal rights is outlined. Thereafter, the terms in relation with the topic are defined. Finally, prominent aspects of 3Rs constituting scientific and ethical basis in animal experimentation are underlined. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(4.000: 220-235

  18. Carotenoids in Marine Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi Maoka

    2011-01-01

    Marine animals contain various carotenoids that show structural diversity. These marine animals accumulate carotenoids from foods such as algae and other animals and modify them through metabolic reactions. Many of the carotenoids present in marine animals are metabolites of β-carotene, fucoxanthin, peridinin, diatoxanthin, alloxanthin, and astaxanthin, etc. Carotenoids found in these animals provide the food chain as well as metabolic pathways. In the present review, I will describe marine a...

  19. Academic Publishing: Making the Implicit Explicit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile Badenhorst

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available For doctoral students, publishing in peer-reviewed journals is a task many face with anxiety and trepidation. The world of publishing, from choosing a journal, negotiating with editors and navigating reviewers’ responses is a bewildering place. Looking in from the outside, it seems that successful and productive academic writers have knowledge that is inaccessible to novice scholars. While there is a growing literature on writing for scholarly publication, many of these publications promote writing and publishing as a straightforward activity that anyone can achieve if they follow the rules. We argue that the specific and situated contexts in which academic writers negotiate publishing practices is more complicated and messy. In this paper, we attempt to make explicit our publishing processes to highlight the complex nature of publishing. We use autoethnographic narratives to provide discussion points and insights into the challenges of publishing peer reviewed articles. One narrative is by a doctoral student at the beginning of her publishing career, who expresses her desires, concerns and anxieties about writing for publication. The other narrative focuses on the publishing practices of a more experienced academic writer. Both are international scholars working in the Canadian context. The purpose of this paper is to explore academic publishing through the juxtaposition of these two narratives to make explicit some of the more implicit processes. Four themes emerge from these narratives. To publish successfully, academic writers need: (1 to be discourse analysts; (2 to have a critical competence; (3 to have writing fluency; and (4 to be emotionally intelligent.

  20. A rapid and high-throughput quantum dots bioassay for monitoring of perfluorooctane sulfonate in environmental water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jiong; Wan Yanjian; Li Yuanyuan; Zhang Qiongfang; Xu Shunqing [Minister of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430030 (China); Zhu Huijun [Cranfield Health, Cranfield University, Kempston, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Shu Baihua, E-mail: shubaihua@hotmail.com [Minister of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430030 (China)

    2011-05-15

    Currently HPLC/MS is the state of the art tool for environmental/drinking water perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) monitoring. PFOS can bind to peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}), which forms heterodimers with retinoid X receptors (RXRs) and binds to PPAR response elements. In this bioassay free PFOS in water samples competes with immobilized PFOS in ELISA plates for a given amount of PPAR{alpha}-RXR{alpha}. It can be determined indirectly by immobilizing PPAR{alpha}-RXR{alpha}-PFOS complex to another plate coated with PPAR{alpha} antibody and subsequent measuring the level of PPAR{alpha}-RXR{alpha} by using biotin-modified PPAR{alpha}-RXR{alpha} probes-quantum dots-streptavidin detection system. The rapid and high-throughput bioassay demonstrated a detection limit of 2.5 ng L{sup -1} with linear range between 2.5 ng L{sup -1} and 75 ng L{sup -1}. Detection results of environmental water samples were highly consistent between the bioassay and HPLC/MS. - We developed a rapid and high-throughput bioassay for monitoring of PFOS in environmental water samples. - Highlights: > We developed a rapid and high-throughput bioassay for monitoring of PFOS in water. > We detected the PFOS concentration of water samples by two methods. > The bioassay is effective for evaluating PFOS contamination level.

  1. A rapid and high-throughput quantum dots bioassay for monitoring of perfluorooctane sulfonate in environmental water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently HPLC/MS is the state of the art tool for environmental/drinking water perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) monitoring. PFOS can bind to peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα), which forms heterodimers with retinoid X receptors (RXRs) and binds to PPAR response elements. In this bioassay free PFOS in water samples competes with immobilized PFOS in ELISA plates for a given amount of PPARα-RXRα. It can be determined indirectly by immobilizing PPARα-RXRα-PFOS complex to another plate coated with PPARα antibody and subsequent measuring the level of PPARα-RXRα by using biotin-modified PPARα-RXRα probes-quantum dots-streptavidin detection system. The rapid and high-throughput bioassay demonstrated a detection limit of 2.5 ng L-1 with linear range between 2.5 ng L-1 and 75 ng L-1. Detection results of environmental water samples were highly consistent between the bioassay and HPLC/MS. - We developed a rapid and high-throughput bioassay for monitoring of PFOS in environmental water samples. - Highlights: → We developed a rapid and high-throughput bioassay for monitoring of PFOS in water. → We detected the PFOS concentration of water samples by two methods. → The bioassay is effective for evaluating PFOS contamination level.

  2. Animal Images and Metaphors in Animal Farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Sun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In literary works animal images are frequently used as the “source domain” of a metaphor to disclose the natures of the “target domain”, human beings. This is called “cross-domain mapping” or “conceptual metaphor” in cognitive linguistics, which is based on the similar qualities between animals and human beings. Thus the apparent descriptions of the animals are really the deep revelations of the human beings. Animal Farm is one exemplary product of this special expressing way. Diversified animal images are intelligently used by George Orwell to represent the people, so all the characters are animals in appearance, but humans in nature. Starting from the animal images and then the conceptual metaphors, readers can perceive a fresh understanding of this classical book. In this novel, three conceptual metaphors are identified and the special findings can be illustrated as the following: Firstly, the whole story of the animals represents the history and politics of the Soviet Union. Secondly, the pigs symbolize the authorities of the society. Thirdly, the names of the characters in the novel reveal their identities.

  3. Publish, Don't Perish: Ten Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Katherine; Aulette, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Going public with research is an important part of the research process. Besides the intrinsic value of sharing experience and insights with a community of peers, in higher education, publishing is vital for job security and promotion. Despite these forces encouraging publishing, few academics actually do. The purpose of this article is to provide…

  4. Publish or perish, but at what cost?

    OpenAIRE

    Neill, Ushma S.

    2008-01-01

    The academic scientific enterprise rewards those with the longest CVs and the most publications. Under pressure to generate voluminous output, scientists often fall prey to double publishing, self plagiarism, and submitting the “minimal publishable unit.” Are these ethical gray areas, or true transgressions?

  5. The cost of publishing in Danish astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, Bertil F.

    I investigate the cost of publishing in Danish astronomy on a fine scale, including all direct publication costs: The figures show how the annual number of publications with authors from Denmark in astronomy journals increased by a factor approximately four during 15 years (Elsevier’s Scopus...... database), and the increase of the corresponding potential (maximum) cost of publishing....

  6. Children's Book Publishing in Neoliberal Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hade, Daniel; Edmondson, Jacqueline

    2003-01-01

    Considers how commercialization has brought popular culture texts and products into children's book publishing, possibly compromising the potential for books that reflectively engage children. Hopes to inform readers of current influences on children's book publishing and to raise questions for discussion and debate among those who are interested…

  7. A History of Children's Book Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Jean E.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a history of children's book publishing that focuses on past, current, and future trends and reviews how these trends affect library budgets and services. Highlights include an examination of elements that have affected children's book publishing and sales and a discussion of the creation of Children's Book Week, an effort to publish…

  8. Open Access Publishing: What Authors Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariani, Rajiv; Fernandez, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Campus-based open access author funds are being considered by many academic libraries as a way to support authors publishing in open access journals. Article processing fees for open access have been introduced recently by publishers and have not yet been widely accepted by authors. Few studies have surveyed authors on their reasons for publishing…

  9. Publish or perish, but at what cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Ushma S

    2008-07-01

    The academic scientific enterprise rewards those with the longest CVs and the most publications. Under pressure to generate voluminous output, scientists often fall prey to double publishing, self plagiarism, and submitting the "minimal publishable unit." Are these ethical gray areas, or true transgressions? PMID:18596904

  10. What Does the Academic Publisher Actually Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, David

    1991-01-01

    A frustrated author recounts his own experiences and those of others in dealing with publishers. He concludes that academic publishers prefer exchanging ideas and academic gossip with authors to the basics of business, letting the books sell themselves to a captive audience of academic libraries. (MSE)

  11. 20 CFR 902.3 - Published information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Published information. 902.3 Section 902.3 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES RULES REGARDING AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 902.3 Published information. (a) Federal Register. Pursuant to sections 552 and 553 of title 5 of...

  12. Scientific publishing: some food for thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Bo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Scientific publishing, here to be considered in a broader sense, as publishing of both specialised scientific journals and science popularisation works addressed to a wider audience, has been sailing for some years on troubled waters. To gather some possible food for thought is the purpose of this brief article.

  13. Publish or perish: authorship and peer review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Publish or perish is defined in Wikipedia as the pressure to publish work constantly to further or sustain one’s career in academia. This is an apt description given that refereed scientific publications are the currency of science and the primary means for broad dissemination of knowledge. Professi...

  14. Standard of reporting animal-based experimental research in Indian Journal of Pharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    Umme Aiman; Syed Ziaur Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of present study was to survey and determine the reporting standards of animal studies published during three years from 2012 to 2014 in the Indian Journal of Pharmacology (IJP). Material and Methods: All issues of IJP published in the year 2012, 2013 and 2014 were reviewed to identify animal studies. Each animal study was searched for 15 parameters specifically designed to review standards of animal experimentation and research methodology. Observation: All pub...

  15. Exploring Digital News Publishing Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindskow, Kasper

    News publishers in the industrialized world are experiencing a fundamental challenge to their business models because of the changing modes of consumption, competition, and production of their offerings that are associated with the emergence of the networked information society. The erosion of the...... traditional business models poses an existential threat to news publishing and has given rise to a continuing struggle among news publishers to design digital business models that will be sustainable in the future. This dissertation argues that a central and underresearched aspect of digital news publishing...... business models concerns the production networks that support the co-production of digital news offerings. To fill this knowledge gap, this dissertation explores the strategic design of the digital news publishing production networks that are associated with HTML-based news offerings on the open Web. In...

  16. Publishing Outside the Box: Popular Press Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyse, Stuart

    2014-10-01

    Writing and publishing popular press books requires a set of skills, not natural to basic and applied researchers trained to publish in peer-referred behavior analytic journals or to practice behavior analysis in applied settings. This article provides suggestions and examples. These include finding a distinctive idea, securing a contract, hiring an agent (or not), deciding on a publisher, and writing engagingly for a broad audience. The last is the greatest challenge. Among my recommendations are to read good prose, good models, and good books about publishing; talk to experienced colleagues; read aloud to judge the appropriateness of your vocabulary and style; and interject humor, imagery, and drama. Book publishing is a long and difficult process, but it is possible. It has a great potential for bringing behavior analytic research, practice and theory to the attention of the general public. PMID:27274959

  17. What publishers do, and what it costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Jamie

    2015-08-01

    In the 350th year of the academic journal, it is perhaps surprising that Publishers have done such a poor job of explaining exactly what it is we do, how we add value to scientific discourse, and how we justify our charges.IOP Publishing occupies a somewhat unique position as publishing house wholly owned by a major society, and with approximately half of its portfolio managed on behalf of other societies and institutions, including several significant examples in the fields of Astronomy and Astrophysics.Studies of the costs of publishing, several different business models, and some major investment initiatives aimed at improving the author and reader experience, will be drawn upon as context to consider the true costs of publishing.

  18. New journals for publishing medical case reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Katherine G.

    2016-01-01

    Because they do not rank highly in the hierarchy of evidence and are not frequently cited, case reports describing the clinical circumstances of single patients are seldom published by medical journals. However, many clinicians argue that case reports have significant educational value, advance medical knowledge, and complement evidence-based medicine. Over the last several years, a vast number (∼160) of new peer-reviewed journals have emerged that focus on publishing case reports. These journals are typically open access and have relatively high acceptance rates. However, approximately half of the publishers of case reports journals engage in questionable or “predatory” publishing practices. Authors of case reports may benefit from greater awareness of these new publication venues as well as an ability to discriminate between reputable and non-reputable journal publishers. PMID:27076803

  19. Identification of a Peripheral Nerve Neurite Growth-Promoting Activity by Development and Use of an in vitro Bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, Alfred W.; Matthew, William D.

    1987-10-01

    The effective regeneration of severed neuronal axons in the peripheral nerves of adult mammals may be explained by the presence of molecules in situ that promote the effective elongation of neurites. The absence of such molecules in the central nervous system of these animals may underlie the relative inability of axons to regenerate in this tissue after injury. In an effort to identify neurite growth-promoting molecules in tissues that support effective axonal regeneration, we have developed an in vitro bioassay that is sensitive to substrate-bound factors of peripheral nerve that influence the growth of neurites. In this assay, neonatal rat superior cervical ganglion explants are placed on longitudinal cryostat sections of fresh-frozen sciatic nerve, and the regrowing axons are visualized by catecholamine histofluorescence. Axons are found to regenerate effectively over sciatic nerve tissue sections. When ganglia are similarly explanted onto cryostat sections of adult rat central nervous system tissue, however, axonal regeneration is virtually absent. We have begun to identify the molecules in peripheral nerve that promote effective axonal regeneration by examining the effect of antibodies that interfere with the activity of previously described neurite growth-promoting factors. Axonal elongation over sciatic nerve tissue was found to be sensitive to the inhibitory effects of INO (for inhibitor of neurite outgrowth), a monoclonal antibody that recognizes and inhibits a neurite growth-promoting activity from PC-12 cell-conditioned medium. The INO antigen appears to be a molecular complex of laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In contrast, a rabbit antiserum that recognizes laminin purified from mouse Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) sarcoma, stains the Schwann cell basal lamina of peripheral nerve, and inhibits neurite growth over purified laminin substrata has no detectable effect on the rate of axonal regeneration in our assay.

  20. Low cost quantitative digital imaging as an alternative to qualitative in vivo bioassays for analysis of active aflatoxin B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasooly, Reuven; Do, Paula M; Hernlem, Bradley J

    2016-06-15

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) producing fungi contaminate food and feed and are a major health concern. To minimize the sources and incidence of AFB1 illness there is a need to develop affordable, sensitive mobile devices for detection of active AFB1. In the present study we used a low cost fluorescence detector and describe two quantitative assays for detection of detoxified and active AFB1 demonstrating that AFB1 concentration can be measured as intensity of fluorescence. When the assay plate containing increasing concentrations of AFB1 is illuminated with a 366nm ultraviolet lamp, AFB1 molecules absorb photons and emit blue light with peak wavelength of 432nm. The fluorescence intensity increased in dose dependent manner. However, this method cannot distinguish between active AFB1 which poses a threat to health, and the detoxified AFB1 which exhibits no toxicity. To measure the toxin activity, we used a cell based assay that makes quantification more robust and is capable of detecting multiple samples simultaneously. It is an alternative to the qualitative duckling bioassay which is the "gold-standard" assay currently being used for quantitative analysis of active AFB1. AFB1 was incubated with transduced Vero cells expressing the green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene. After excitation with blue light at 475nm, cells emitted green light with emission peak at 509nm. The result shows that AFB1 inhibits protein expression in a concentration dependent manner resulting in proportionately less GFP fluorescence in cells exposed to AFB1. The result also indicates strong positive linear relationship with R(2)=0.90 between the low cost CCD camera and a fluorometer, which costs 100 times more than a CCD camera. This new analytical method for measuring active AFB1 is low in cost and combined with in vitro assay, is quantitative. It also does not require the use of animals and may be useful especially for laboratories in regions with limited resources. PMID:26874107

  1. Bioassay of Estrogenic Activity of Effluent and Influent in a Farm Wastewater Treatment Plant Using an in vitro Recombinant Assay with Yeast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG-MING LI; FANG-NI LUO; GuI-XIA LIU; PING-TING ZHU

    2008-01-01

    Objective Environmental estrogens at an elevated concentration are known to produce adverse effects on human and animal life. However, the majority of researches have been focused on ndustrial discharges, while the impact of livestock wastes as a source of endocrine disrupters in aquatic environments has been rarely elucidated. In order to investigate the contribution of environmental estrogens from livestock, the estrogenic activity in water samples from a farm wastewater treatment plant was analyzed by a recombinant yeast screening method. Methods The extracts prepared from 15 selected water samples from the farm wastewater treatment plant, among which 6 samples were from pre-treatment section (influents) and 9 from post-treatment section (effluents), were analyzed for estrogenic activity by cellar bioassay. Yeast cells transfected with the expression plasmid of human estrogen receptor and the Lac Z reporter plasmid encoding β-galactossidase, were used to measure the estrogen-like compounds in the farm wastewater treatment plant. Results The wastewater samples from influents showed a higher estrogenic potency than the effluent samples showing a low induction of β-galactossidase relative to solvent control condition. By comparison with a standard curve for 1713-estradiol (E2), estrogenic potency in water samples from the influents was calculated as E2-equivalent and ranged from 0.1 to 150 pM E2-equivalent. The estrogenic potency in water samples from the effluents was significantly lower than that in the influents, and 7 water samples had less detectable limit in the total of 9 samples. Conclusion Yeast bioassay of estrogenic activity in most of the samples from the farm wastewater after disposal by traditional sewage treatment showed negative results.

  2. Modified hydra bioassay to evaluate the toxicity of multiple mycotoxins and predict the detoxification efficacy of a clay-based sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K A; Mays, T; Romoser, A; Marroquin-Cardona, A; Mitchell, N J; Elmore, S E; Phillips, T D

    2014-01-01

    Food shortages and a lack of food supply regulation in developing countries often leads to chronic exposure of vulnerable populations to hazardous mixtures of mycotoxins, including aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) and fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)). A refined calcium montmorillonite clay [i.e. uniform particle size NovaSil (UPSN)] has been reported to tightly bind these toxins, thereby decreasing bioavailability in humans and animals. Hence, our objectives in the present study were to examine the ability of UPSN to bind mixtures of AFB(1) and FB(1) at gastrointestinally relevant pH in vitro, and to utilize a rapid in vivo bioassay to evaluate AFB(1) and FB(1) toxicity and UPSN efficacy. Isothermal sorption data indicated tight AFB(1) binding to UPSN surfaces at both pH 2.0 and 6.5, but substantially more FB(1) bound at pH 2.0 than 6.5. Site-specific competition occurred between the toxins when exposed to UPSN in combination. Importantly, treatment with UPSN resulted in significant protection to mycotoxin-exposed hydra maintained at pH 6.9-7.0. Hydra were exposed to FB(1), AFB(1) and FB(1) /AFB(1) combinations with and without UPSN. A toxic response over 92 h was rated based on morphology and mortality. Hydra assay results indicated a minimum effective concentration (MEC) of 20 µg ml(-1) for AFB(1), whereas the MEC for FB(1) was not reached. The MEC for co-exposure was 400 µg ml(-1) FB(1) + 10 µg ml(-1) AFB(1). This study demonstrates that UPSN sorbs both mycotoxins tightly at physiologically relevant pH levels, resulting in decreased bioavailability, and that a modified hydra bioassay can be used as an initial screen in vivo to predict efficacy of toxin-binding agents. PMID:23047854

  3. Body weight considerations in the B6C3F1 mouse and the use of dietary control to standardize background tumor incidence in chronic bioassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In B6C3F1 mice, the rate of body growth influences susceptibility to liver neoplasia and large variations in body weight can complicate the interpretation of bioassay data. The relationship between body weight and liver tumor incidence was calculated for historical control populations of male and female ad libitum-fed mice (approx. 2750 and 2300 animals, respectively) and in populations of male and female mice which had been subjected to forced body weight reduction due to either dietary restriction or exposure to noncarcinogenic chemicals (approx. 1600 and 1700, respectively). Resulting tumor risk data were then used to construct idealized weight curves for male and female B6C3F1 mice; these curves predict a terminal background liver tumor incidence of 15-20%. Use of dietary control to manipulate body growth of male B6C3F1 mice to fit the idealized weight curve was evaluated in a 2-year bioassay of chloral hydrate. Cohorts of mice were successfully maintained at weights approximating their idealized target weights throughout the study. These mice exhibited less body weight variation than their ad libitum-fed counterparts (e.g., standard deviations of body weight were 1.4 and 3.4 g for respective control groups at 36 weeks). Historical control body weight and tumor risk data from the two male mouse populations were utilized to predict background liver tumor rates for each experimental group of the chloral hydrate study. The predicted background tumor rates closely matched the observed rates for both the dietary controlled and ad libitum-fed chloral hydrate control groups when each mouse was evaluated according to either its weekly food consumption or its weekly change in body weight

  4. Re-thinking the ethics of intensification for animal agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandøe, Peter

    2008-01-01

    In a recent essay published in the prestigious series of readings in ethics issued by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations David Fraser discusses the relationship between animal welfare and modern, intensive animal production. His main view is that it is possible to uphold a...

  5. Developing educational software for publisher vendors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, L S; Joseph, A F

    1985-09-01

    This article has provided the principles of CAI development, marketing strategies, information on getting started with CAI, and how to approach publisher vendors. Guidelines for software development proposals have been synthesized from major software publishers in nursing. There is a great demand for courseware that teaches critical thinking skills, problem solving, application, and analysis. Tutorials and simulations are much needed. Computer-assisted testing courseware will also be highly used by teachers at all levels in the future. Opportunity awaits the CAI author in the publishing arena! PMID:3903670

  6. Truth in Science Publishing: A Personal Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Südhof, Thomas C

    2016-08-01

    Scientists, public servants, and patient advocates alike increasingly question the validity of published scientific results, endangering the public's acceptance of science. Here, I argue that emerging flaws in the integrity of the peer review system are largely responsible. Distortions in peer review are driven by economic forces and enabled by a lack of accountability of journals, editors, and authors. One approach to restoring trust in the validity of published results may be to establish basic rules that render peer review more transparent, such as publishing the reviews (a practice already embraced by some journals) and monitoring not only the track records of authors but also of editors and journals. PMID:27564858

  7. RETHINKING THE ANIMATE, RE-ANIMATING THOUGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Ingold

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Animism is often described as the imputation of life to inert objects. Such imputation is more typical of people in western societies who dream of finding life on other planets than of indigenous peoples to whom the label of animism has classically been applied. These peoples are united not in their beliefs but in a way of being that is alive and open to a world in continuous birth. In this animic ontology, beings do not propel themselves across a ready-made world but rather issue forth through a world-in-formation, along the lines of their relationships. To its inhabitants this weather-world, embracing both sky and earth, is a source of astonishment but not surprise. Re-animating the ‘western’ tradition of thought means recovering the sense of astonishment banished from offi cial science.

  8. Genomes and evolutionary genomics of animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luting SONG; Wen WANG

    2013-01-01

    Alongside recent advances and booming applications of DNA sequencing technologies,a great number of complete genome sequences for animal species are available to researchers.Hundreds of animals have been involved in whole genome sequencing,and at least 87 non-human animal species' complete or draft genome sequences have been published since 1998.Based on these technological advances and the subsequent accumulation of large quantity of genomic data,evolutionary genomics has become one of the most rapidly advancing disciplines in biology.Scientists now can perform a number of comparative and evolutionary genomic studies for animals,to identify conserved genes or other functional elements among species,genomic elements that confer animals their own specific characteristics and new phenotypes for adaptation.This review deals with the current genomic and evolutionary research on non-human animals,and displays a comprehensive landscape of genomes and the evolutionary genomics of non-human animals.It is very helpful to a better understanding of the biology and evolution of the myriad forms within the animal kingdom [Current Zoology 59 (1):87-98,2013].

  9. Morris Animal Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the transmission of serious illnesses. Read more » Morris Animal Foundation Receives $750,000 Grant for Cancer Studies. ... Give Partners Become a Partner Meet Our Partners Animal Lovers Our Work Ways to Give Pet Health ...

  10. "Name" that Animal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Shirley

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a texture and pattern project. Students started by doing an outline contour drawing of an animal. With the outline drawn, the students then write one of their names to fit "inside" the animal.

  11. Animals in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Andrew N.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes viewpoints on the use of animals in science experiments in the biology classroom, including those of teachers, education researchers, biomedical scientists, science education administrators, and animal welfare advocates. (Author/CS)

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ... by Product Area Product Areas back Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ...

  13. Interaction between animal personality and animal cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio CARERE, Charles LOCURTO

    2011-01-01

    The study of animal personality has attracted considerable attention, as it has revealed a number of similarities in personality between humans and several nonhuman species. At the same time the adaptive value and evolutionary maintenance of different personalities are the subject of debate. Since Pavlov’s work on dogs, students of comparative cognition have been aware that animals display vast individual differences on cognitive tasks, and that these differences may not be entirely accounted...

  14. Agricultural Census 2012: Publishing Mashable GIS Big Data Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R.

    2014-12-01

    The 2012 Agricultural Census was released by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) on May 2nd 2014; published on a quinquennial basis covering all facets of American production agriculture. The Agricultural Census is a comprehensive source of uniform published agricultural data for every state and county in the US. This is the first Agricultural Census that is disseminated with web mapping services using REST APIs. USDA developed an open GIS mashable web portal that depicts over 250 maps on Crops and Plants, Economics, Farms, Livestock and Animals, and Operators. These mapping services written in JavaScript replace the traditional static maps published as the Ag Atlas. Web users can now visualize, interact, query, and download the Agricultural Census data in a means not previously discoverable. Stakeholders will now be able to leverage this data for activities such as community planning, agribusiness location suitability analytics, availability of loans/funds, service center locations and staffing, and farm programs and policies. Additional sites serving compatible mashable USDA Big Data web services are as follows: The Food Environment Atlas, The Atlas of Rural and Small-Town America, The Farm Program Atlas, SNAP Data System, CropScape, and VegScape. All portals use a similar data organization scheme of "Categories" and "Maps" providing interactive mashable web services for agricultural stakeholders to exploit.

  15. Publishing Support for Small Print-Based Publishers: Options for ARL Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivins, October; Luther, Judy

    2011-01-01

    This project was originally defined to explore the potential for ARL libraries to provide support to small, print-only publishers in order to ensure long-term digital access to their content. Research library publishing programs vary widely, from posting PDFs in an institutional repository to full-fledged publishing operations. During the life of…

  16. Generic Face Animation

    OpenAIRE

    Cerda, Mauricio; Valenzuela, Renato; Hitschfeld-Kahler, Nancy; Terissi, Lucas; Gomez, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    International audience In computer vision, the animation of objects has attracted a lot attention, specially the animations of 3D face models. The animation of face models requires in general to manually adapt each generic movement (open/close mouth) to each specific head geometry. In this work we propose a technique for the animation of any face model avoiding most of the manual intervention. In order to achieve this we assume that: (1) faces, despite obvious differences are quite similar...

  17. Imaging of Awake Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The 3Rs of reduction, refinement and replacement are the guiding principles of animal research and embedded in national and international legislation regulating the use of animals in scientific procedures. Awake imaging by MRI of rodents can offer a reduction by increasing the quality of scientific data through longitudinal imaging using less animals by avoiding a serial sacrifice design and refinement through reducing the stressful effects animals are exposed to, in comparison to existing mo...

  18. Biopolitics: Animals, meat, food

    OpenAIRE

    Janović Nikola

    2009-01-01

    The general idea of this text is to reflect biopolitical constitution of the society and its implications related to the issues of animal welfare. Since animal in biopolitical formation is technically reduced to an object - commodity for contentment of the industry and of the people needs - critical public advisories are calling from moral, ethical and legal standpoint for attention to the fact that is necessary to protect animals from the unnecessary exploitation. It is obvious that animal p...

  19. Bioethics in animal experimentation

    OpenAIRE

    Popa V.I.; Lascar I.; Valcu M.; Sebe Ioana Teona; Caraban B.; Margina Arina Cristiana

    2015-01-01

    Animal experiments are used on a large scale worldwide in order to develop or to refine new medicines, medicinal products or surgical procedures. It is morally wrong to cause animals to suffer, this is why animal experimentation causes serious moral problems.

  20. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Translation - Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) Chinese Translation - Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) ... by Product Area Product Areas back Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ...

  1. Animal Models for imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Croft, Barbara Y.

    2002-01-01

    Animal models can be used in the study of disease. This chapter discusses imaging animal models to elucidate the process of human disease. The mouse is used as the primary model. Though this choice simplifies many research choices, it necessitates compromises for in vivo imaging. In the future, we can expect improvements in both animal models and imaging techniques.

  2. I like animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    官健

    2008-01-01

    @@ Animals are our friends.We should protect them and we mustn't hurtthem. Do you like animals?My answer is"yes".Maybe you may ask me why.I will tell you they are very lovely.I like many animals,such as pandas,monkeys and elephants.

  3. Industralization of Animal Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Oya S. Erdogdu; David Hennessy

    2003-01-01

    The economic concerns and the technological developments increased control over nature and nurture in the animal agriculture. That changed the seasonality pattern of the supply side and lead to structural change in the animal agriculture together with the demand side factors. In this study we focused on the supply side factors and document the ‘industralization’ of the animal agricultural production.

  4. Bioethics in animal experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popa V.I.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Animal experiments are used on a large scale worldwide in order to develop or to refine new medicines, medicinal products or surgical procedures. It is morally wrong to cause animals to suffer, this is why animal experimentation causes serious moral problems.

  5. Trends in Scientific Publishing at Springer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Guenther

    Scientific publishing has undergone tremendous changes in the last decade, and it is still evolving rapidly. This article describes some of the issues that are facing scientific publishers, and shows some examples of what one of the commercial publishers, Springer, has done and is working on, in order to stay abreast of these changes and to embrace the new technologies that become available. Springer has moved rapidly into the digital age and has by now digitized almost all its journal content and a significant part of its book content. We have developed new capabilities that make use of the new technologies available and are in the process of further utilizing these new possibilities. Web products like AuthorMapper, SpringerProtocols, and Social Networking sites explore some of these new capabilities. We will continue to explore enhancements of our scientific publishing efforts to provide new possibilities for communicating scientific research.

  6. Hydrography, Published in 2008, Paulding County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hydrography dataset, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2008. Data by this publisher are often provided in State Plane coordinate...

  7. Landfills, landfill, Published in 2004, Duchesne County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Landfills dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2004. It is described as 'landfill'. Data by this publisher are often provided in...

  8. Shapers of Published NNS Research Articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrough-Boenisch, Joy

    2003-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive picture of the shapers of a published nonnative speaker research article by including the language professionals and indicating how they fit into the pre-publication processing of a text. (Author/VWL)

  9. Contours, Published in 2006, Steuben County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Contours dataset, was produced all or in part from LIDAR information as of 2006. Data by this publisher are often provided in State Plane coordinate system; in...

  10. Contours, Published in unknown, Sheboygan county.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Contours dataset as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Sheboygan County Coordinate Grid coordinate system; in a Mercator projection; The...

  11. Water Distribution Lines, Published in 2006, Farmer.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Water Distribution Lines dataset, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2006. Data by this publisher are often provided in Not...

  12. Hydrography, Published in 2008, Cerro Gordo County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hydrography dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2008. Data by this publisher are often provided in State Plane coordinate...

  13. Open Access publishing in physics gains momentum

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The first meeting of European particle physics funding agencies took place on 3 November at CERN to establish a consortium for Open Access publishing in particle physics, SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics). Open Access could transform the academic publishing world, with a great impact on research. The traditional model of research publication is funded through reader subscriptions. Open Access will turn this model on its head by changing the funding structure of research results, without increasing the overall cost of publishing. Instead of demanding payment from readers, publications will be distributed free of charge, financed by funding agencies via laboratories and the authors. This new concept will bring greater benefits and broaden opportunities for researchers and funding agencies by providing unrestricted distribution of the results of publicly funded research. The meeting marked a positive step forward, with international support from laboratories, fundin...

  14. Railroad Lines, Published in Not Provided, Embarq.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Railroad Lines dataset, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of Not Provided. Data by this publisher are often provided in State...

  15. Grocery Stores, Published in 2009, Trempealeau County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Grocery Stores dataset, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2009. Data by this publisher are often provided in UTM coordinate...

  16. Geographic Place Names, Published in unknown, SWGRC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geographic Place Names dataset as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Geographic coordinate system; in a Not Sure projection; The extent...

  17. Watershed Boundaries, Published in unknown, SWGRC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Watershed Boundaries dataset, was produced all or in part from Road Centerline Files information as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in...

  18. Address Points, Published in unknown, SWGRC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Address Points dataset as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Geographic coordinate system; in a Not Sure projection; The extent of these...

  19. Airports and Airfields, Published in unknown, SWGRC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Airports and Airfields dataset as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Geographic coordinate system; in a Not Sure projection; The extent...

  20. Community Colleges, Published in unknown, Douglas County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Community Colleges dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Other (please list)...

  1. Recreational Areas, Published in unknown, Douglas County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Recreational Areas dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Other (please list)...

  2. Demographic Data, Published in unknown, Douglas County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Demographic Data dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Other (please list)...

  3. State Boundaries, Published in unknown, Douglas County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This State Boundaries dataset, was produced all or in part from Road Centerline Files information as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Other...

  4. Zoning Districts, Published in unknown, Douglas County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Zoning Districts dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Other (please list)...

  5. Soils, Published in unknown, Douglas County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Soils dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Other (please list) coordinate...

  6. Contours, Published in unknown, Douglas County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Contours dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Other (please list) coordinate...

  7. Emergency Shelters, Published in unknown, Douglas County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Emergency Shelters dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Other (please list)...

  8. Legislative Districts, Published in unknown, Douglas County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Legislative Districts dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Other (please...

  9. School Districts, Published in unknown, Douglas County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This School Districts dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Other (please list)...

  10. Internet Provider Facilities, Published in 2006, Farmer.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Internet Provider Facilities dataset, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2006. Data by this publisher are often provided in...

  11. 18th International Conference on Electronic Publishing

    CERN Document Server

    Dobreva, Milena

    2014-01-01

    The ways in which research data is used and handled continue to capture public attention and are the focus of increasing interest. Electronic publishing is intrinsic to digital data management, and relevant to the fields of data mining, digital publishing and social networks, with their implications for scholarly communication, information services, e-learning, e-business and the cultural heritage sector. This book presents the proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Electronic Publishing (ELPUB), held in Thessaloniki, Greece, in June 2014. The conference brings together researchers and practitioners to discuss the many aspects of electronic publishing, and the theme this year is 'Let's put data to use: digital scholarship for the next generation'. As well as examining the role of cultural heritage and service organisations in the creation, accessibility, duration and long-term preservation of data, it provides a discussion forum for the appraisal, citation and licensing of research data and the n...

  12. Hydrography, Streams, Published in 2003, Daggett County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hydrography dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2003. It is described as 'Streams'. Data by this publisher are often provided in...

  13. Hydrography, Lakes, Published in 2007, Daggett County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hydrography dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as 'Lakes'. Data by this publisher are often provided in...

  14. Animal Production and Health Newsletter. No. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This newsletter contains brief reports of the five FAO/IAEA Research Coordination Meetings held in the first half of 1991, focussing on improving animal reproduction research and animal disease diagnosis in Asia through the application of immunoassay techniques, improving the productivity of indiginous African livestock using radioimmunoassay and related techniques, improving the diagnosis and control of trypanosomiasis and other vector-borne diseases of African livestock using immunoassay methods, and an inter-regional network for improving the productivity of camelids. The FAO/IAEA International Symposium on ''Nuclear and Related Techniques in Animal Production and Health'' is summarily described (the Symposium Proceedings should be published in October, 1991), and applications are invited for a new coordinated research programme on the development of supplementation strategies for milk-producing animals in tropical and subtropical environments

  15. a reputational study of academic publishers

    OpenAIRE

    Metz, P.; Stemmer, J.

    1996-01-01

    In both selecting individual titles and designing gathering plans, collection development librarians are strongly influenced by the perceptions they have about publishers. In the near absence of data that might indicate the overall perceptions the collection development community has about academic publishers, the authors distributed a reputational assessment survey to a national sample of heads of collection development in academic libraries. The resulting data on perceptions of the quality ...

  16. Web-Based Computing Resource Agent Publishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Web-based Computing Resource Publishing is a efficient way to provide additional computing capacity for users who need more computing resources than that they themselves could afford by making use of idle computing resources in the Web.Extensibility and reliability are crucial for agent publishing. The parent-child agent framework and primary-slave agent framework were proposed respectively and discussed in detail.

  17. Student Publishing: An Open, Global Learning Module

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Philip; Walz, Anita R.; Hover, Paul; Nardine, Jennifer; Pennington, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The University Libraries is contributing a learning module on student publishing to the international course “Open Knowledge”, organized by the Public Knowledge Project. The course, scheduled to begin in September 2014, will be taken for credit by students in Ghana, Mexico, Canada, and the U.S., and by anyone around the world with an internet connection as a non-credit MOOC. The learning module supports an increased focus on publishing student research at the undergraduate and graduate le...

  18. The Faustian Grip of Academic Publishing

    OpenAIRE

    Robert P. Parks

    2002-01-01

    The journal acquisition budget of libraries is not increasing at the same rate as subscription rates creating the serials' crisis. Many solutions have been proposed including the freely available electronic journal. However, all the solutions suffer the same Faustian Grip - namely that the actors in the academic publishing game have little or no incentive to stop publishing in the current journals. We examine those incentives concluding that even with a better more efficient technology, the a...

  19. The ethics of open access publishing.

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Should those who work on ethics welcome or resist moves to open access publishing? This paper analyses arguments in favour and against the increasing requirement for open access publishing and considers their implications for bioethics research. In the context of biomedical science, major funders are increasingly mandating open access as a condition of funding and such moves are also common in other disciplines. Whilst there has been some debate about the implications of open-access for the s...

  20. Non-Publishers in European Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Kwiek, Marek

    2015-01-01

    In a traditional account of the scientific community, full-time academics employed in European universities who do not conduct research, should not be regarded as part of the scientific community. No publications means no research. And no research does not fit the profile of the European university sector. Or does it? There are a few hundred thousand non-publishers across European universities. Is non-publishing increasingly becoming compatible with academic work in current mas...

  1. E-Transformation in the publishing industry

    OpenAIRE

    Daut Mohmud, Dahlina

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents the findings and conclusions of research that was undertaken with the purpose of understanding the issues and challenges of e-transformation in the publishing industry, particularly the editorial phase, and in a government controlled environment of Malaysia. The research followed an exploratory inquiry and a case study approach, was conducted in a publishing house in Kuala Lumpur. This study was based upon data collected through in depth interview with 1...

  2. Flipping journals to open: Rethinking publishing infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Fecher, Benedikt; Wagner, Gert G.

    2015-01-01

    The resignation of the editorial board of an Elsevier-owned linguistics journal and its open access reorganization could get the ball rolling for other journals to follow suit. This case is a reminder that open access means more than just providing access to an article; it means rethinking the whole process of publishing. Open access also raises important questions about who owns the critical information infrastructure for online publishing.

  3. Huddersfield Open Access Publishing final report

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Graham; White, Sue; Robinson, Denise; Pitchford, Ian; Edmunds, Cherry

    2012-01-01

    The Huddersfield Open Access Publishing (HOAP) Project aimed to develop a low cost sustainable journal publishing platform using EPrints software. The development of the HOAP platform has three main outcomes as part of the project. It has been used to convert the University journal, Teaching in Lifelong Learning, from its existing model of a print subscription journal to an open access e-journal. A specific front end has been created for the journal, with content being archived in the Uni...

  4. Research and Publishing: Relevance and Irreverence

    OpenAIRE

    Brester, Gary W.

    2006-01-01

    The value, relevance, and efficacy of conducting and publishing research has been widely debated throughout the agricultural economics profession. On the one hand, some argue that the research process creates little value and directly competes with teaching/outreach output. On the other hand, others argue that research provides answers to important questions, improves human capital, and complements teaching/outreach activities. I argue that the research and publishing process develops human c...

  5. Comparison of chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in two-year bioassays in female Sprague-Dawley rats

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Nigel J.; Wyde, Michael E.; Fischer, Lawrence J.; Nyska, Abraham; Bucher, John R

    2006-01-01

    The cancer bioassay for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) conducted by the Dow Chemical company in the mid 70s been used extensively for conducting quantitative cancer risk assessments for human exposure to TCDD. More recently the National Toxicology Program (NTP) conducted a cancer bioassay of similar design as part of its evaluation of the dioxin TEF methodology. This report compares the design and the results of these two cancer bioassays. This comparison confirms, in most cases, ...

  6. Assessment of estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities of the mycotoxin zearalenone and its metabolites using in vitro receptor-specific bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Molina, José-Manuel; Real, Macarena; Jimenez-Diaz, Inmaculada; Belhassen, Hidaya; Hedhili, Abderazzak; Torné, Pablo; Fernández, Mariana F; Olea, Nicolás

    2014-12-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a well-known mycotoxin present in numerous agricultural products. Humans and animals are therefore at a risk of exposure to zearalenone through consumption of contaminated food. After intake, ZEN is reduced to α- and β-zearalenol (α-ZEL and β-ZEL), zearalanone (ZAN), and α- and β-zearalanol (α-ZAL and β-ZAL). Although their estrogenicity has been well characterized, much less is known about their interaction with other nuclear receptors. This study was undertaken to investigate interactions of ZEN and its five metabolites, with the human androgen receptor (hAR) and estrogen receptor alpha (hERα). Their ability to induce hAR-mediated reporter gene expression was examined in androgen-sensitive PALM cells, whereas the effects on hERα function were assessed in MCF-7 cells using the E-Screen bioassay. We confirm that ZEN and its metabolites are full agonists for hERα and demonstrate that all six compounds tested possess hAR-mediated antagonistic activity in PALM cells, in which ZAN, α-ZAL, and β-ZAL were the most effective hAR antagonists. Overall, the observed estrogenic and anti-androgenic potencies of ZEN and its metabolites suggest that these compounds may interfere with the endocrine system by various modes of action and that further investigation is warranted into their role as endocrine disrupters in animals and humans. PMID:25455890

  7. Effects of cysteamine on pituitary, MTTW15 tumor, and serum prolactin levels measured by rat lymphoma cell bioassay and radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cysteamine (CSH), a sulfhydryl compound, reduces both serum and anterior pituitary (AP) PRL measured by RIA. We have used the Nb2 lymphoma cell bioassay (BIO) for PRL to evaluate possible CSH-related changes in PRL levels in sera and tissues of male and MtTW15 mammosomatotropic tumor-bearing female rats. Experimental animals received a single sc injection of CSH (300 mg/kg), and samples were collected 0.5-24 h later. Since CSH and serum from CSH rats were toxic in BIO, samples were dialyzed before assay. All samples were evaluated for PRL and GH by RIA as well. A significant decrease (P less than 0.05) in BIO serum PRL was evident in male rats 0.5 h after CSH; levels remained low for 24 h. Serum PRL by RIA was significantly depressed at 4 h but not at 0.5 h or 24 h. PRL in AP extracts was decreased (60-90%) at all times by BIO and RIA. Significant decreases of BIO- and RIA-detectable PRL were recorded in serum and tissues (AP and tumors) at 4 h in tumor rats. Sequentially bled (0.5-4 h) CSH-treated tumor-bearing rats showed 50% and 80% reductions in serum PRL at 1 and 4 h by both BIO and RIA. CSH had no effect on GH levels in sera and tissues of any animal studied at any time interval. Our results substantiate earlier reports on CSH-induced decreases in RIA-detectable PRL. They show that such changes cannot be attributed to assay effects alone, as significant decreases in circulating and stored PRL (both AP and tumor) were evident by BIO. Results with tissue extracts were the most dramatic. They suggest an action of CSH or a metabolic intermediate with stored PRL which reduces both extractable PRL and hormone release. Such an effect of CSH on PRL extraction has been suggested by others. Whatever the mechanism, it appears to be relatively specific, since GH cells were not affected

  8. Guidance document for prepermit bioassay testing of low-level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S.L.; Harrison, F.L.

    1990-11-01

    In response to the mandate of Public Law 92-532, the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) of 1972, as amended, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed a program to promulgate regulations and criteria to control the ocean disposal of radioactive wastes. The EPA seeks to understand the mechanisms for biological response of marine organisms to the low levels of radioactivity that may arise from the release of these wastes as a result of ocean-disposal practices. Such information will play an important role in determining the adequacy of environmental assessments provided to the EPA in support of any disposal permit application. Although the EPA requires packaging of low-level radioactive waste to prevent release during radiodecay of the materials, some release of radioactive material into the deep-sea environment may occur when a package deteriorates. Therefore, methods for evaluating the impact on biota are being evaluated. Mortality and phenotypic responses are not anticipated at the expected low environmental levels that might occur if radioactive materials were released from the low-level waste packages. Therefore, traditional bioassay systems are unsuitable for assessing sublethal effects on biota in the marine environment. The EPA Office of Radiation Programs (ORP) has had an ongoing program to examine sublethal responses to radiation at the cellular level, using cytogenetic end points. This technical guidance report represents prepermit bioassay procedures that potentially may be applicable to the assessment of effects from a mixture of radionuclides that could be released from a point source at the ocean bottom. Methodologies along with rationale and a discussion of uncertainty are presented for the sediment benthic bioassay protocols identified in this report.

  9. Guidance document for prepermit bioassay testing of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to the mandate of Public Law 92-532, the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) of 1972, as amended, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed a program to promulgate regulations and criteria to control the ocean disposal of radioactive wastes. The EPA seeks to understand the mechanisms for biological response of marine organisms to the low levels of radioactivity that may arise from the release of these wastes as a result of ocean-disposal practices. Such information will play an important role in determining the adequacy of environmental assessments provided to the EPA in support of any disposal permit application. Although the EPA requires packaging of low-level radioactive waste to prevent release during radiodecay of the materials, some release of radioactive material into the deep-sea environment may occur when a package deteriorates. Therefore, methods for evaluating the impact on biota are being evaluated. Mortality and phenotypic responses are not anticipated at the expected low environmental levels that might occur if radioactive materials were released from the low-level waste packages. Therefore, traditional bioassay systems are unsuitable for assessing sublethal effects on biota in the marine environment. The EPA Office of Radiation Programs (ORP) has had an ongoing program to examine sublethal responses to radiation at the cellular level, using cytogenetic end points. This technical guidance report represents prepermit bioassay procedures that potentially may be applicable to the assessment of effects from a mixture of radionuclides that could be released from a point source at the ocean bottom. Methodologies along with rationale and a discussion of uncertainty are presented for the sediment benthic bioassay protocols identified in this report

  10. Evaluation of internal exposure of nuclear medicine staff through in vivo and in vitro bioassay techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manipulation of a wide variety of unsealed sources in Nuclear Medicine results in a significant risk of internal exposure of the workers. 131I should be highlighted among the most frequently used radionuclides because of its large application for diagnosis and therapy of thyroid diseases. The increasing use of radionuclides for medical purposes creates a demand for feasible methodologies to perform occupational control of internal contamination. Currently in Brazil, there are ∼300 nuclear medicine centres in operation but individual monitoring is still restricted to the control of external exposure. This work presents the development of in vivo and in vitro bioassay techniques aimed to quantify incorporation of radionuclides used in Nuclear Medicine. It is also presented the results of a preliminary survey of internal exposure of a group of workers involved in the preparation of therapeutic doses of 131I. Workers were monitored with a gamma camera available in the Nuclear Medicine Service of the University Hospital of Rio de Janeiro and at the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry Whole-Body Counter (IRDWBC). The in vivo detection systems were calibrated with a neck-thyroid phantom developed in IRD. Urine samples from radiopharmacy workers were collected after preparation and administration of therapeutic doses (10-250 mCi) of 131I and measured with a HPGe detection system available in the Bioassay Laboratory of IRD. The results show that the bioassay methods developed in this work present enough sensitivity for routine monitoring of nuclear medicine workers. All workers monitored in this survey presented positive results for 131I in urine samples and two workers presented detectable activities in thyroid when measured at the IRD-WBC. The highest committed effective dose per preparation was estimated to be 17 μSv. (authors)

  11. A novel method for standardized application of fungal spore coatings for mosquito exposure bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knols Bart GJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interest in the use of fungal entomopathogens against malaria vectors is growing. Fungal spores infect insects via the cuticle and can be applied directly on the insect to evaluate infectivity. For flying insects such as mosquitoes, however, application of fungal suspensions on resting surfaces is more realistic and representative of field settings. For this type of exposure, it is essential to apply specific amounts of fungal spores homogeneously over a surface for testing the effects of fungal dose and exposure time. Contemporary methods such as spraying or brushing spore suspensions onto substrates do not produce the uniformity and consistency that standardized laboratory assays require. Two novel fungus application methods using equipment developed in the paint industry are presented and compared. Methods Wired, stainless steel K-bars were tested and optimized for coating fungal spore suspensions onto paper substrates. Different solvents and substrates were evaluated. Two types of coating techniques were compared, i.e. manual and automated coating. A standardized bioassay set-up was designed for testing coated spores against malaria mosquitoes. Results K-bar coating provided consistent applications of spore layers onto paper substrates. Viscous Ondina oil formulations were not suitable and significantly reduced spore infectivity. Evaporative Shellsol T solvent dried quickly and resulted in high spore infectivity to mosquitoes. Smooth proofing papers were the most effective substrate and showed higher infectivity than cardboard substrates. Manually and mechanically applied spore coatings showed similar and reproducible effects on mosquito survival. The standardized mosquito exposure bioassay was effective and consistent in measuring effects of fungal dose and exposure time. Conclusions K-bar coating is a simple and consistent method for applying fungal spore suspensions onto paper substrates and can produce coating layers

  12. Using a macroalgal δ15N bioassay to detect cruise ship waste water effluent inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Green macroalgae exposed to nutrient solutions exhibited changes in tissue 15N signatures. → Macroalgae exhibited no fractionation with NO3 and slight fractionation with NH4. → Algae exposed to cruise ship waste water had increased tissue δ15N indicating a heavy N source. → Field bioassays exhibited decreased δ15N indicating isotopically light riverine δ15N-NO3 was likely the dominant N source. → Algal bioassays could not detect a δ15N cruise ship waste water signal in this system. - Abstract: Green macroalgae bioassays were used to determine if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in a small harbor. Opportunistic green macroalgae (Ulva spp.) were collected, cultured under nutrient depleted conditions and characterized with regard to N content and δ15N. Samples of algae were used in controlled incubations to evaluate the direction of isotope shift from exposure to CSWWE. Algae samples exposed to CSWWE exhibited an increase of 1-2.5 per mille in δ15N values indicating that the CSWWE had an enriched isotope signature. In contrast, algae samples exposed to field conditions exhibited a significant decrease in the observed δ15N indicating that a light N source was used. Isotopically light, riverine nitrogen derived from N2-fixing trees in the watershed may be a N source utilized by algae. These experiments indicate that the δ15N CSWWE signature was not detectable under the CSWWE loading conditions of this experiment.

  13. Development of marine sediment bioassays and toxicity tests for monitoring and regulation in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thain, J.; Matthiessen, P.

    1995-12-31

    There is a need in Europe and elsewhere for a broad suite of whole-sediment bioassays and toxicity tests which can be used for routine monitoring and assessment of the marine environment and for evaluating the toxic effects of chemicals which may find their way into sediments. Until recently, few European species had been incorporated into such tests but the availability of suitable methodologies is now increasing rapidly. Perhaps the most important recent activity in this area consisted of an international ring test of acute sediment toxicity test methods which was organized by the Oslo and Paris Commissions in 1993, using up to 4 offshore chemicals as test materials. It evaluated the performance of 4 acute (5--10 day) tests involving: the sea urchin Echinocardium cordatum, the bivalve mollusc Abra alba, the amphipod crustacean Corophium volutator, and the polychaete worm Arenicola marina. The ring test concluded that the C. volutator test was the most appropriate for evaluating offshore chemicals, but all these methods are now widely used in Europe, both as toxicity tests and as bioassays. For example, the A. marina procedure (which has both lethal and sublethal endpoints), in combination with the C. volutator method, is now routinely used in the UK for monitoring the toxicity of estuarine sediments. Further activities are in progress. Perhaps the most important is the development of chronic marine sediment tests and bioassays which can be used to assess the long-term effects of the many sedimentary contaminants which are able to persist in this type of habitat and possibly cause delayed effects on the growth and reproduction, etc. of benthic fauna.

  14. A rapid radio-bioassay method for strontium estimation in nuclear/radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strontium (Sr) is a by-product of the nuclear fission of uranium and plutonium in nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons. It is an important radionuclide in spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste and is considered as one of the most hazardous constituents of nuclear wastes. Also during a nuclear/radiological emergency, workers as well as members of the public may get internally contaminated with Sr. Hence, a truly rapid radio-bioassay method will be needed to screen a large number of people for assessment of internal contamination and facilitate decision making on subsequent medical intervention. The current precipitation method used at Bioassay Lab., BARC, Trombay is quite lengthy and laborious. Efforts are being made to optimize bioassay methods at BARC using solid extraction chromatography (SEC) technique for emergency response. The present work reports standardization of SEC using Sr-Spec (Sr-Specific, make Eichrom Technologies, Darien, Illinois, USA) resin for rapid estimation of Sr in urine samples. Adsorbed Sr is eluted from the resin using 0.05M HNO3, precipitated as carbonate and estimated using a low background gas flow Geiger-Müller counter (make ECIL, Hyderabad, India). The average recovery of stable Sr is ∼ 80% and comparable to radioactive recovery observed in spiked samples. The minimum detectable activity (MDA) achieved by this technique is ∼ 4 mBq/mL for 90Sr that is well below the required generic emergency action level of 19 Bq for 20 mL urine sample. The advantage of this method is its simplicity, fast turnaround time and an increase in the sample throughput. (author)

  15. Development of a cell-based bioassay for phospholipase A2-triggered liposomal drug release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Arouri

    Full Text Available The feasibility of exploiting secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2 enzymes, which are overexpressed in tumors, to activate drug release from liposomes precisely at the tumor site has been demonstrated before. Although the efficacy of the developed formulations was evaluated using in vitro and in vivo models, the pattern of sPLA2-assisted drug release is unknown due to the lack of a suitable bio-relevant model. We report here on the development of a novel bioluminescence living-cell-based luciferase assay for the monitoring of sPLA2-triggered release of luciferin from liposomes. To this end, we engineered breast cancer cells to produce both luciferase and sPLA2 enzymes, where the latter is secreted to the extracellular medium. We report on setting up a robust and reproducible bioassay for testing sPLA2-sensitive, luciferin remote-loaded liposomal formulations, using 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine/1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol (DSPC/DSPG 7:3 and DSPC/DSPG/cholesterol 4:3:3 as initial test systems. Upon their addition to the cells, the liposomes were degraded almost instantaneously by sPLA2 releasing the encapsulated luciferin, which provided readout from the luciferase-expressing cells. Cholesterol enhanced the integrity of the formulation without affecting its susceptibility to sPLA2. PEGylation of the liposomes only moderately broadened the release profile of luciferin. The provided bioassay represents a useful tool for monitoring active drug release in situ in real time as well as for testing and optimizing of sPLA2-sensitive lipid formulations. In addition, the bioassay will pave the way for future in-depth in vitro and in vivo studies.

  16. Applicability of the CALUX bioassay for screening of dioxin levels in human milk samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laier, P.; Cederberg, Tommy Licht; Larsen, John Christian; Vinggaard, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The CALUX (chemically activated luciferase expression) bioassay based on rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells is a sensitive assay for the detection of Ah receptor agonists like 2,3,7,8-substituted chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and related PCBs. In this paper, the assay was optimized and...... additively, indicating that the usual assumption of additivity in the risk assessment process is valid. In general the relative potencies (REPs) of the single agents were in accordance with their TEFs assigned by the World Health Organisation, except for the mono-ortho-substituted PCB118 that had a 40-fold...

  17. Sensitive bioassay for detection of PPAR{alpha} potentially hazardous ligands with gold nanoparticle probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Wei; Wan, Yan-Jian [Minister of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430030 (China); Wang, Xianliang [Division of Environmental Pollution and Human Health, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Li, Yuan-yuan; Yang, Wen-Jie; Wang, Chun-Xiang [Minister of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430030 (China); Xu, Shun-qing, E-mail: shunqing@mails.tjmu.edu.cn [Minister of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430030 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} We develop a sensitive and high throughput method to screen PPAR{alpha} ligands. {yields} This method is based on the ligand-receptor interaction on microplate. {yields} The sensitivity is increased through sliver enhancement on captured gold nanoparticle probes. {yields} There is a significant correlation between the bioassay and LC-MS for water spiked samples. - Abstract: There are so many kinds of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) ligands with hazardous effect for human health in the environment, such as certain herbicides, plasticizers and drugs. Among these agonists, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) are mostly investigated due to their persistence and accumulation in environment and their potential toxicity via PPAR{alpha}. This investigation aims at developing a bioassay method to detect PPAR{alpha} ligands based on the ligand-receptor interaction on microplate. PPAR{alpha}, which formed heterodimers with retinoid X receptor-{alpha} (RXR{alpha}), were activated by PPAR{alpha} ligands to form ligands-PPAR{alpha}-RXR{alpha} complexes. Then the complexes were transferred into a microplate and captured via monoclonal anti-PPAR{alpha} antibody. The PPAR{alpha} responsive elements (PPRE) modified-gold nanoparticle probes were captured by the ligand-PPAR{alpha}-RXR{alpha} complexes immobilized on the microplate, and then could be quantified through measuring the optical density after silver enhancement. The results showed that PFOS was quantified with a linear range from 100 pM to 1 {mu}M and the detection limit was 10 pM. In addition to PFOS, PFOA and MEHP were also quantified within a proper range through the proposed bioassay. This bioassay was compared with that of liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for water spiked samples with a significant correlation (r = 0.9893). This study provides a high-throughput detection

  18. Gamma radiation and ems treatment of black cumin cultivars for mutational bioassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten different types of chlorophyll mutations were induced in two cultivars of black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) after gamma irradiation and EMS treatment. Mutation frequency was proportional to dose for gamma rays, but not for EMS. Higher doses of gamma rays and lower concentration/duration of EMS were most efficient. Difference in the response of both cultivars due to mutagenic treatment indicate variation in the genetic architecture of the two cultivars. Origin and use of black cumin cultivars for mutagen bioassays studies are discussed

  19. Toxicity assessment of effluent from flash light manufacturing industry by bioassay tests in Trigonella foenumgracum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Narendra; Kumar, Sanjeev; Bauddh, Kuldeep; Dwivedi, Neetu; Singh, D P; Barman, S C

    2014-11-01

    A rapid bioassay test was conducted to study heavy metal accumulation and biochemical changes in Trigonella foenumgracum (methi) irrigated with 25, 50, 75 and 100% of effluent from flash light manufacturing industry at 60 days after sowing. Total metal concentration in effluent samples was: Cr = 0.12 effluent followed by a decrease at higher concentration as compared to their respective control.An enhanced lipid peroxidation in the treated plants was observed, which was evident by increased level of antioxidants: proline, cysteine, malondialdehyde and ascorbic acid content. The treated plants accumulated metals in the following order: Cu > Pb > Cr > Cd in the roots and shoots. PMID:25522513

  20. 'In-vivo' and bioassay results from two contrasting cases of plutonium-239 inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'In-vivo' and bioassay measurements following two incidents involving plutonium-239 inhalation are described and contrasted. Incident 1, involving the inhalation of insoluble plutonium oxide, resulted in a lung content of about 20 nCi after the initial clearance. Urine excretion was negligible and the estimation of exposure was based on 'in-vivo' data and faecal excretion. Incident,2, involving the inhalation of soluble plutonium, proved negligible and the estimation of exposure, based on urinary excretion, was 0.6 nCi. (author)

  1. An adaptive nonparametric method in benchmark analysis for bioassay and environmental studies

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, Rabi; Lin, Lizhen

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel nonparametric method for bioassay and benchmark analysis in risk assessment, which averages isotonic MLEs based on disjoint subgroups of dosages. The asymptotic theory for the methodology is derived, showing that the MISEs (mean integrated squared error) of the estimates of both the dose-response curve F and its inverse F−1 achieve the optimal rate O(N−4/5). Also, we compute the asymptotic distribution of the estimate ζ~p of the effective dosage ζp = F−1 (p) which is shown ...

  2. Animal models of dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I. Anna S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2011-01-01

    are here distinguished. These serve as points of orientation in the following discussion of four more specific ethical questions: Does animal species matter? How effective is disease modelling in delivering the benefits claimed for it? What can be done to minimize potential harm to animals in research? Who......This chapter aims to encourage scientists and others interested in the use of animal models of disease – specifically, in the study of dementia – to engage in ethical reflection. It opens with a general discussion of the moral acceptability of animal use in research. Three ethical approaches...... bears responsibility for the use of animals in disease models?...

  3. THE HISTORY OF LABORATORY ANIMALS AND THE 3RS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen

    This talk will give an introduction to the history of the use of laboratory animals with focus on the history of the three Rs (3Rs). We will see how animal experimentation has been performed early in our civilization, and how the suffering of animals has been justified. This will include Rene...... of animals in research, which led to Denmark passing one of Europe's first laws to protect laboratory animals. A law that was later modified after the author Karen Blixen took part in the debate. In the middle of 1950s the Universities Federation for Animal Welfare decided to sponsor research in the...... field of laboratory animal welfare. Two years later two English scientists, zoologist William W.S. Russell and micro-biologist, Rex L. Burch prepared a report on the ethical aspects of using laboratory animals. In 1959 (hundred years after Charles Darwin’s “The Origin of Species”) they published the...

  4. Single-core magnetic markers in rotating magnetic field based homogeneous bioassays and the law of mass action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieckhoff, Jan, E-mail: j.dieckhoff@tu-bs.de [Institut fuer Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Schrittwieser, Stefan; Schotter, Joerg [Molecular Diagnostics, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Remmer, Hilke; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank [Institut fuer Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    In this work, we report on the effect of the magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) concentration on the quantitative detection of proteins in solution with a rotating magnetic field (RMF) based homogeneous bioassay. Here, the phase lag between 30 nm iron oxide single-core particles and the RMF is analyzed with a fluxgate-based measurement system. As a test analyte anti-human IgG is applied which binds to the protein G functionalized MNP shell and causes a change of the phase lag. The measured phase lag changes for a fixed MNP and a varying analyte concentration are modeled with logistic functions. A change of the MNP concentration results in a nonlinear shift of the logistic function with the analyte concentration. This effect results from the law of mass action. Furthermore, the bioassay results are used to determine the association constant of the binding reaction. - Highlights: • A rotating magnetic field based homogeneous bioassay concept was presented. • Here, single-core iron oxide nanoparticles are applied as markers. • The impact of the particle concentration on the bioassay results is investigated. • The relation between particle concentration and bioassay sensitivity is nonlinear. • This finding can be reasonably explained by the law of mass action.

  5. Single-core magnetic markers in rotating magnetic field based homogeneous bioassays and the law of mass action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we report on the effect of the magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) concentration on the quantitative detection of proteins in solution with a rotating magnetic field (RMF) based homogeneous bioassay. Here, the phase lag between 30 nm iron oxide single-core particles and the RMF is analyzed with a fluxgate-based measurement system. As a test analyte anti-human IgG is applied which binds to the protein G functionalized MNP shell and causes a change of the phase lag. The measured phase lag changes for a fixed MNP and a varying analyte concentration are modeled with logistic functions. A change of the MNP concentration results in a nonlinear shift of the logistic function with the analyte concentration. This effect results from the law of mass action. Furthermore, the bioassay results are used to determine the association constant of the binding reaction. - Highlights: • A rotating magnetic field based homogeneous bioassay concept was presented. • Here, single-core iron oxide nanoparticles are applied as markers. • The impact of the particle concentration on the bioassay results is investigated. • The relation between particle concentration and bioassay sensitivity is nonlinear. • This finding can be reasonably explained by the law of mass action

  6. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii by PCR and mouse bioassay in commercial cuts of pork from experimentally infected pigs Detecção do Toxoplasma gondii por PCR e bioensaio em camundongo em cortes comerciais de carnes de suínos infectados experimentalmente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Tsutsui

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of T. gondii in commercial cuts of pork (ham, tenderloin, spareribs and arm picnic by PCR and bioassay from experimentally infected pigs, was evaluated. Eighteen mixed breed pigs were divided into two groups (G. The G1 animals (n=10 were infected with 4 x10(4 oocysts of the T. gondii VEG strain and the G2 animals (n=8 were used as control. Pigs of both groups were slaughtered at 59th day after infection, and meat samples were collected for bioassay and PCR. All animals from G1 were positive by at least one or both tests, and all control animals were negative. T. gondii was identified in pork by mouse bioassay and PCR in 27/40 (67.5% and in 9/40 (22.5% of the evaluated samples, respectively. There were no statistical differences in the distribution of tissue cysts from commercial cuts of pork by bioassay (P>0.05. However, statistical differences were observed when mouse bioassay and PCR were compared (PAvaliou-se a presença de T. gondii em cortes comerciais de carne suína (pernil, lombo, costela e paleta, por meio do bioensaio e PCR, em animais experimentalmente inoculados. Dois grupos (G foram formados. Os animais do G1 (n=10 foram inoculados com 4 x10(4 oocistos da cepa VEG e os do G2 (n=8 permaneceram como grupo-controle, não inoculado. Todos os animais foram abatidos no dia 59 após a infecção, quando foram colhidas as amostras de carne para a realização das provas de bioensaio e da PCR. Todos os suínos do G1 apresentaram-se positivos a pelo menos um dos testes de diagnóstico ou a ambos, e os do grupo-controle permaneceram negativos. Não houve diferenças significativas em relação aos tipos de cortes comerciais e à presença do parasita no bioensaio (P>0,05. O bioensaio foi capaz de detectar T. gondii em 27/40 (67,5% amostras e a PCR em 9/40 (22,5%. O estudo mostrou diferença entre o bioensaio e a PCR (P<0,01.

  7. Evaluation of genotoxicity from low exposure rates of ionizing radiation by using Trad-MCN bioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biomonitoring has been recognized as an important tool in the field of environmental studies. Biological assays have been used to evaluate genotoxic agents present in the environment. Among the bioassays using plants, the micronucleus tests of Tradescantia sp. (Trad-MCN) has shown sensitivity to several environmental conditions, including radiation. Several studies have demonstrated that Tradescantia sp. is sensitive to the harmful effects of X-rays, internal and external radioisotopic sources and cosmic rays. The toxicity is evaluated by observing the frequency of broken chromosomes presented as a small rounded structure in the pollen cells (tetrads), called micronucleus. The present study was developed in Centro Experimental Aramar where, since the 80's, an Environmental Monitoring Program has been carried out by the Radioecological Laboratory. The purpose of this work was to evaluate, by using the Trad-MCN bioassay, the genotoxicity from low exposure rates of ionizing radiation on Tradescantia pallida inflorescences exposed to a uranium ore, in a closed dynamic system. The plants were also submitted to a control exposure with filtered air (negative control). The assay was developed according to the usual protocol. Micronuclei frequencies were compared using Kruskal-Wallis variance analysis. The negative control presented a significantly different micronuclei frequency from all the groups exposed to radiation (P -1). The obtained results indicated that T. pallida is sensitive to ionizing radiation even in low exposure rates and it can be used for in vitro environmental monitoring(author)

  8. Bioassay standardization for the detection of allelopathic compounds and environmental toxicants using lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Salomão Simões

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess different experimental conditions to determine a protocol for bioassays based on seed germination and early seedling growth using lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Grand Rapids as indicator species. This protocol aims to provide support for the standardization of assays of various chemicals such as allelochemicals and environmental toxicants. The following tests were performed: time of germination, temperature, light, solution volume and Petri dish size. For each test (except for time of germination, the influence of the conditions investigated was determined by the endpoints germination percentage, germination speed index, root length, seedling fresh weight and total dry weight. The results showed that variations in the methods altered the results. It is recommended that bioassays using L. sativa L. cv. Grand Rapids be carried out for a minimum period of four days for assessments of both germination and initial growth and that the experimental conditions include a temperature of 20°C, 90-mm Petri dishes or larger, 0.1 mL cypsela solution, and continuous light or 12-hour photoperiod.

  9. Automated cytochrome c oxidase bioassay developed for ionic liquids' toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Susana P F; Martins, Bárbara S F; Pinto, Paula C A G; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S

    2016-05-15

    A fully automated cytochrome c oxidase assay resorting to sequential injection analysis (SIA) was developed for the first time and implemented to evaluate potential toxic compounds. The bioassay was validated by evaluation of 15 ionic liquids (ILs) with distinct cationic head groups, alkyl side chains and anions. The assay was based on cytochrome c oxidase activity reduction in presence of tested compounds and quantification of inhibitor concentration required to cause 50% of enzyme activity inhibition (EC50). The obtained results demonstrated that enzyme activity was considerably inhibited by BF4 anion and ILs incorporating non-aromatic pyrrolidinium and tetrabutylphosphonium cation cores. Emim [Ac] and chol [Ac], on contrary, presented the higher EC50 values among the ILs tested. The developed automated SIA methodology is a simple and robust high-throughput screening bioassay and exhibited good repeatability in all the tested conditions (rsd<3.7%, n=10). Therefore, it is expected that due to its simplicity and low cost, the developed approach can be used as alternative to traditional screening assays for evaluation of ILs toxicity and identification of possible toxicophore structures. Additionally, the results presented in this study provide further information about ILs toxicity. PMID:26894289

  10. Evaluating the performance of the ORTECR DetectiveTM for emergency urine bioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of the ORTECR DetectiveTM as a field deployable tool for emergency urine bioassay of 137Cs, 60Co, 192Ir, 169Yb and 75Se was evaluated against ANSI N13.30. The tested activity levels represent 10 % RL (reference level) and 1 % RL defined by [Li C., Vlahovich S., Dai X., Richardson R. B., Daka J. N. and Kramer G. H. Requirements for radiation emergency urine bioassay techniques for the public and first responders. Health Phys (in press, 99(5), 702-707 (2010)]. The tests were conducted for both single radionuclide and mixed radionuclides at two geometries, one conventional geometry (CG) and one improved geometry (IG) which improved the MDAs (minimum detectable amounts) by a factor of 1.6-2.7. The most challenging radionuclide was 169Yb. The measurement of the mixture radionuclides for 169Yb at the CG did not satisfy the ANSI N13.30 requirements even at 10 % RL. At 1 % RL, 169Yb and 192Ir were not detectable at either geometry, while the measurement of 60Co in the mixed radionuclides satisfied the ANSI N13.30 requirements only at the IG. (authors)

  11. Mimicking Daphnia magna bioassay performance by an electronic tongue for urban water quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • -Daphnia magna bioassay can be simulated with multisensor system. • Urban water toxicity can be predicted from potentiometric ET data. • Independent test set validation confirms statistical significance of the results. - Abstract: Toxicity is one of the key parameters of water quality in environmental monitoring. However, being evaluated as a response of living beings (as their mobility, fertility, death rate, etc.) to water quality, toxicity can only be assessed with the help of these living beings. This imposes certain restrictions on toxicity bioassay as an analytical method: biotest organisms must be properly bred, fed and kept under strictly regulated conditions and duration of tests can be quite long (up to several days), thus making the whole procedure the prerogative of the limited number of highly specialized laboratories. This report describes an original application of potentiometric multisensor system (electronic tongue) when the set of electrochemical sensors was calibrated against Daphnia magna death rate in order to perform toxicity assessment of urban waters without immediate involvement of living creatures. PRM (partial robust M) and PLS (projections on latent structures) regression models based on the data from this multisensor system allowed for prediction of toxicity of unknown water samples in terms of biotests but in the fast and simple instrumental way. Typical errors of water toxicity predictions were below 20% in terms of Daphnia death rate which can be considered as a good result taking into account the complexity of the task

  12. Mimicking Daphnia magna bioassay performance by an electronic tongue for urban water quality control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsanov, Dmitry, E-mail: d.kirsanov@gmail.com [Laboratory of Chemical Sensors, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Laboratory of Artificial Sensor Systems, ITMO University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Legin, Evgeny [Laboratory of Artificial Sensor Systems, ITMO University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Sensor Systems LLC, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zagrebin, Anatoly; Ignatieva, Natalia; Rybakin, Vladimir [Institute of Limnology, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Legin, Andrey [Laboratory of Chemical Sensors, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Laboratory of Artificial Sensor Systems, ITMO University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • -Daphnia magna bioassay can be simulated with multisensor system. • Urban water toxicity can be predicted from potentiometric ET data. • Independent test set validation confirms statistical significance of the results. - Abstract: Toxicity is one of the key parameters of water quality in environmental monitoring. However, being evaluated as a response of living beings (as their mobility, fertility, death rate, etc.) to water quality, toxicity can only be assessed with the help of these living beings. This imposes certain restrictions on toxicity bioassay as an analytical method: biotest organisms must be properly bred, fed and kept under strictly regulated conditions and duration of tests can be quite long (up to several days), thus making the whole procedure the prerogative of the limited number of highly specialized laboratories. This report describes an original application of potentiometric multisensor system (electronic tongue) when the set of electrochemical sensors was calibrated against Daphnia magna death rate in order to perform toxicity assessment of urban waters without immediate involvement of living creatures. PRM (partial robust M) and PLS (projections on latent structures) regression models based on the data from this multisensor system allowed for prediction of toxicity of unknown water samples in terms of biotests but in the fast and simple instrumental way. Typical errors of water toxicity predictions were below 20% in terms of Daphnia death rate which can be considered as a good result taking into account the complexity of the task.

  13. Bioassay-Guided Isolation of Two Flavonoids from Derris scandens with Topoisomerase II Poison Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangmalee, Suphattra; Laorpaksa, Areerat; Sritularak, Boonchoo; Sukrong, Suchada

    2016-04-01

    Derris scandens (ROXB.) BENTH. (Fabaceae) is used as an alternative treatment for cancer in Thai traditional medicine. Investigation of the topoisomerase II (Top2) poison of compounds isolated from this plant may reveal new drug leads for the treatment of cancer. Bioassay-guided isolation was performed on an extract of D. scandens stems using a yeast cell-based assay. A yeast strain expressing the top2-1 temperature-sensitive mutant was used to assay Top2 activity. At the permissive temperature of 25°C, yeast cells were highly sensitive to Top2 poison agents. At the semi-permissive temperature of 30°C, where enzyme activity was present but greatly diminished, cells displayed only marginal sensitivity. The bioassay-guided fractionation of the extract led to the isolation of two known isoflavones: 5,7,4'-trihydroxy-6,8-diprenylisoflavone (1) and lupalbigenin (2). These two compounds also displayed cytotoxicity against three different cancer cell lines, KB, MCF-7 and NCI-H187. In conclusion, Top2 poison agents from D. scandens are reported for the first time, substantiating the use of D. scandens in Thai traditional medicine for cancer treatment. PMID:26754253

  14. Evaluation and modeling of the parameters affecting fluoride toxicity level in aquatic environments by bioassay method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Shamsollahi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fluoride exists in various forms in nature and water resources. , The rising level of fluoride in water resources due to discharge of industrial effluents can cause toxicity in aquatic organisms. To prevent toxicity, it is necessary to determine maximum fluoride toxicity as well as effluent discharge limits. The aim of this study was to determine the maximum fluoride toxicity and the factors affecting fluoride toxicity to provide a model in order to determine the effluent discharge limits. Methods: Daphnia magna bioassay in the absence of confounding factors was used to determine the maximum level of fluoride toxicity. Then, bioassay was repeated in the presence of the confounding factors (hardness, temperature and exposure time to determine their effects. Results: In the absence of intervening factors, fluoride LC50 levels determined after 24, 48 and 72 hours exposure were 4.9, 46.5 and 38.7 mg/l, respectively.. Also, the influence of confounding factors on LC50 values was reported significant by Minitab software. Conclusion: Increasing the water hardness reduced fluoride toxicity, and increasing the water temperature and exposure time increased fluoride toxicity in aquatic environments. Therefore, while determining the wastewater discharge limit in terms of fluoride concentration, it is essential to take the effect of confounding factors on fluoride toxicity into account in order to prevent toxicity in the open water resources.

  15. Relative proportions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons differ between accumulation bioassays and chemical methods to predict bioavailability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical methods to predict the bioavailable fraction of organic contaminants are usually validated in the literature by comparison with established bioassays. A soil spiked with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was aged over six months and subjected to butanol, cyclodextrin and tenax extractions as well as an exhaustive extraction to determine total PAH concentrations at several time points. Earthworm (Eisenia fetida) and rye grass root (Lolium multiflorum) accumulation bioassays were conducted in parallel. Butanol extractions gave the best relationship with earthworm accumulation (r2 ≤ 0.54, p ≤ 0.01); cyclodextrin, butanol and acetone-hexane extractions all gave good predictions of accumulation in rye grass roots (r2 ≤ 0.86, p ≤ 0.01). However, the profile of the PAHs extracted by the different chemical methods was significantly different (p < 0.01) to that accumulated in the organisms. Biota accumulated a higher proportion of the heavier 4-ringed PAHs. It is concluded that bioaccumulation is a complex process that cannot be predicted by measuring the bioavailable fraction alone. - The ability of chemical methods to predict PAH accumulation in Eisenia fetida and Lolium multiflorum was hindered by the varied metabolic fate of the different PAHs within the organisms.

  16. Dose selection as it pertains to testing a prodrug in carcinogenicity bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczech, G M; Tucker, W E

    1983-01-01

    Toxicologists need more information than is usually available in the early stages of development of a drug in order to choose proper dose levels for testing in the bioassays. The approach most likely to result in successful bioassays involves an early multidisciplinary effort in which there is pharmacokinetic characterization of the test material in both rats and mice. Preliminary 3 month studies are desirable. Periodic sampling of plasma is essential to detect possible non-linear kinetics (as in the example we report herein) reflected as accumulation of the test material or metabolites. This is true regardless of the test substance. However, if one tests prodrugs it may be particularly helpful to know if chemical or enzymatic conversion of the prodrug is linear and if there is reversion to prodrug or other abberant metabolism. Failure to rule out these possibilities could result in subsequent clinically irrelevant organ damage or could compromise longevity or the interpretation of results in lifetime studies. Pharmacokinetic considerations are as valid as the more traditional biologic or morphologic end points used to estimate maximum tolerated or no-effect dose levels. PMID:6681397

  17. DOSEXPRT: A bioassay dosimetry code for Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, R.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1992-04-01

    The bioassay code DOSEXPRT was developed for Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., to provide compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480, Chapter 11. DOSEXPRT computes the intake of a radionuclide in any year (considering both acute and chronic intakes) from in vivo measurements of the retained activity and/or measurements of the activity in excreta. The committed effective and organ doses for the intake are computed as well as the effective and organ doses expected to be received in each calendar year out to 50 years beyond the year of intake. The bioassay records used as input for DOSEXPRT are extracted from the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Occupational Health Information System (OHIS). DOSEXPRT implements a set of algorithms with parameters governing the translocation, retention, and excretion of the nuclide contained in data files specific to the nuclide. These files also contain dose-per-unit-intake coefficients used to compute the committed dose equivalent for the intakes in the year. Annual organ and effective doses are computed using additional dose-rate files that contain data on the dose rate at various times following a unit intake. If measurements are presented for more than one assay for a given nuclide, DOSEXPRT estimates the intake by applying weights assigned in the nuclide file for each assay. DOSEXPRT is accessed off the OHIS MENU No. 4 and designed to be run as a batch processor, but can also be run interactively for testing purposes.

  18. DOSEXPRT: A bioassay dosimetry code for Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, R.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1992-04-01

    The bioassay code DOSEXPRT was developed for Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., to provide compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480, Chapter 11. DOSEXPRT computes the intake of a radionuclide in any year (considering both acute and chronic intakes) from in vivo measurements of the retained activity and/or measurements of the activity in excreta. The committed effective and organ doses for the intake are computed as well as the effective and organ doses expected to be received in each calendar year out to 50 years beyond the year of intake. The bioassay records used as input for DOSEXPRT are extracted from the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Occupational Health Information System (OHIS). DOSEXPRT implements a set of algorithms with parameters governing the translocation, retention, and excretion of the nuclide contained in data files specific to the nuclide. These files also contain dose-per-unit-intake coefficients used to compute the committed dose equivalent for the intakes in the year. Annual organ and effective doses are computed using additional dose-rate files that contain data on the dose rate at various times following a unit intake. If measurements are presented for more than one assay for a given nuclide, DOSEXPRT estimates the intake by applying weights assigned in the nuclide file for each assay. DOSEXPRT is accessed off the OHIS MENU No. 4 and designed to be run as a batch processor, but can also be run interactively for testing purposes.

  19. Potential risk of biochar-amended soil to aquatic systems: an evaluation based on aquatic bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, A C; Prodana, M; Abrantes, N; Keizer, J J; Soares, A M V M; Loureiro, S

    2014-11-01

    It is vital to address potential risks to aquatic ecosystems exposed to runoff and leachates from biochar-amended soils, before large scale applications can be considered. So far, there are no established approaches for such an assessment. This study used a battery of bioassays and representative aquatic organisms for assessing the acute toxicity of water-extractable fractions of biochar-amended soil, at reported application rates (80 t ha(-1)). Biochar-amended aqueous soil extracts contained cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg) (Σmetals 96.3 µg l(-1)) as well as the 16 priority PAHs defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Σ16PAHs 106 ng l(-1)) at contents in the range of current EU regulations for surface waters. Nevertheless, acute exposure to soil-biochar (SB) extracts resulted in species-specific effects and dose-response patterns. While the bioluminescent marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri was the most sensitive organism to aqueous SB extracts, there were no effects on the growth of the microalgae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. In contrast, up to 20 and 25% mobility impairment was obtained for the invertebrate Daphnia magna upon exposure to 50 and 100% SB extract concentrations (respectively). Results suggest that a battery of rapid and cost-effective aquatic bioassays that account for ecological representation can complement analytical characterization of biochar-amended soils and risk assessment approaches for surface and groundwater protection. PMID:25213286

  20. Metal toxicity and biodiversity in serpentine soils: application of bioassay tests and microarthropod index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visioli, Giovanna; Menta, Cristina; Gardi, Ciro; Conti, Federica Delia

    2013-01-01

    Eco-toxicological or bioassay tests have been intensively discussed as tools for the evaluation of soil quality. Tests using soil organisms, including microarthropods and plants, allow direct estimates to be made of important soil characteristics and functions. In this study we compared the results obtained by two in vitro standard bioassays following ISO or OECD guidelines: (i) the short term-chronic phytotoxicity germination and root elongation test using three different plant species Cucumis sativus L. (Cucurbitaceae), Lepidium sativum L. (Brassicaceae), and Medicago sativa L. (Fabaceae) and (ii) the inhibition of reproduction of Folsomia candida (Collembola) by soil pollutants to investigate the toxicity of a serpentine soil present in the Italian Apennines, rich in heavy metals such as Ni, Cr, and Co. In addition, microarthropod communities were characterised to evaluate the effects of metal contents on the soil fauna in natural conditions. Abundances, Acari/Collembola ratio, biodiversity indices and the QBS-ar index were calculated. Our results demonstrate that the two in vitro tests distinguish differences correlated with metal and organic matter contents in four sub-sites within the serpentinite. Soil fauna characterisation, not previously performed on serpentine soils, revealed differences in the most vulnerable and adapted groups of microarthropods to soil among the four sub-sites: the microarthropod community was found to be rich in term of biodiversity in the sub-site characterised by a lower metal content and a higher organic matter content and vegetation. PMID:23107056