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Sample records for anhydride-modified hyaluronic acid

  1. Preparation and structural characterisation of novel and versatile amphiphilic octenyl succinic anhydride-modified hyaluronic acid derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eenschooten, Corinne Diane; Guillaumie, Fanny; Kontogeorgis, Georgios;

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to prepare amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives and to study the influence of a selection of reaction parameters on the degree of substitution (DS) of the derivatives. Octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA)–modified HA (OSA–HA) derivatives were prepared and...

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of a Novel Biomaterial:Maleic Anhydride-modified Poly(dl-lactic acid)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Feng LUO; Yuan Liang WANG; Xu Feng NIU; Jun PAN; Liang Ping SHI

    2004-01-01

    A novel modified poly(dl-lactic acid) (PDLLA) was obtained by covalently grafting of maleic anhydride onto the backbone of PDLLA, attempting to improve PDLLA's hydrophilicity and cell affinity and to provide reactive groups for further chemical modification. FTIR, 13C NMR and DSC were used to characterize the maleic anhydride-modified PDLLA.

  3. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis S; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  4. Hyaluronic Acid-Based Nanogels Produced by Microfluidics-Facilitated Self-Assembly Improves the Safety Profile of the Cationic Host Defense Peptide Novicidin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Water, Jorrit J; Kim, YongTae; Maltesen, Morten J;

    2015-01-01

    have hampered their commercial development. To overcome these challenges a novel nanogel-based drug delivery system was designed. METHOD: The peptide novicidin was self-assembled with an octenyl succinic anhydride-modified analogue of hyaluronic acid, and this formulation was optimized using a...... peptide loading of 36 ± 4%. The nanogels exhibited good colloidal stability under different ionic strength conditions and allowed complete release of the peptide over 14 days. Furthermore, self-assembly of novicidin with hyaluronic acid into nanogels significantly improved the safety profile at least five...

  5. Hyaluronic acid and tendon lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaux, Jean-François; Samson, Antoine; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction recently, the viscoelastic properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) on liquid connective tissue have been proposed for the treatment of tendinopathies. Some fundamental studies show encouraging results on hyaluronic acid’s ability to promote tendon gliding and reduce adhesion as well as to improve tendon architectural organisation. Some observations also support its use in a clinical setting to improve pain and function. This literature review analyses studies relating to the use of hyaluronic acid in the treatment of tendinopathies. Methods this review was constructed using the Medline database via Pubmed, Scopus and Google Scholar. The key words hyaluronic acid, tendon and tendinopathy were used for the research. Results in total, 28 articles (in English and French) on the application of hyaluronic acid to tendons were selected for their relevance and scientific quality, including 13 for the in vitro part, 7 for the in vivo animal part and 8 for the human section. Conclusions preclinical studies demonstrate encouraging results: HA permits tendon gliding, reduces adhesions, creates better tendon architectural organisation and limits inflammation. These laboratory observations appear to be supported by limited but encouraging short-term clinical results on pain and function. However, controlled randomised studies are still needed. PMID:26958533

  6. Ions in hyaluronic acid solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Horkay, Ferenc; Basser, Peter J.; Londono, David J.; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is an anionic biopolymer that is almost ubiquitous in biological tissues. An attempt is made to determine the dominant features that account for both its abundance and its multifunctional role, and which set it apart from other types of biopolymers. A combination of osmotic and scattering techniques is employed to quantify its dynamic and static properties in near-physiological solution conditions, where it is exposed both to mono- and divalent counterions. An equation of...

  7. The role of hyaluronic acid in biomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen-Hua; Ren, Xiu-Li; Zhou, Hui-Hui; Li, Xu-Dong

    2012-12-01

    Hyaluronic acid has been extensively investigated due to intrinsic properties of natural origin and strong ability to bind ions in water. Hyaluronic acid is an excellent crystal modifier because its abundant negatively charged carboxyl groups can bind the cations protruding from the crystal lattice. In this review, we mainly present the latest work focus on the role of hyaluronic acid in controlling the crystallization, breaking the symmetry of crystal, and the surface funtionalization of nanocrystals.

  8. Hyaluronic Acid: A Boon in Periodontal Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Parveen Dahiya; Reet Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring linear polysaccharide of the extracellular matrix of connective tissue, synovial fluid, and other tissues. Its use in the treatment of the inflammatory process is established in medical areas such as orthopedics, dermatology, and ophthalmology. The Pubmed/Medline database was searched for keywords "Hyaluronic acid and periodontal disease" and "Hyaluronic acid and gingivitis" which resulted in 89 and 22 articles respectively. Only highly relevant articl...

  9. Metallic gold beads in hyaluronic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dan Sonne; Tran, Thao Phuong; Smidt, Kamille;

    2013-01-01

    exploiting macrophage-induced liberation of gold ions (dissolucytosis) from gold surfaces. Injecting gold beads in hyaluronic acid (HA) as a vehicle into the cavities of the brain can delay clinical signs of disease progression in the MS model, experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE). This study...... effects of hyaluronic acid....

  10. HYALURONIC ACID: OBTAINING, PROPERTIES AND APPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    L. Zadorojnai; A. Zadorojnai

    2012-01-01

    Properties and methods for obtaining hyaluronic acid and its derivatives from raw material of animal origin are reviewed. The importance and practical application of hyaluronic acid in various fields are discussed. This article is an extended abstract of a communication presented at the Conference Ecological Chemistry 2012

  11. Complex coacervates of hyaluronic acid and lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Water, Jorrit J.; Schack, Malthe M.; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian;

    2014-01-01

    Complex coacervates of hyaluronic acid and lysozyme, a model protein, were formed by ionic interaction using bulk mixing and were characterized in terms of binding stoichiometry and protein structure and stability. The complexes were formed at pH 7.2 at low ionic strength (6 mM) and the binding...... stoichiometry was determined using solution depletion and isothermal titration calorimetry. The binding stoichiometry of lysozyme to hyaluronic acid (870 kDa) determined by solution depletion was found to be 225.9 ± 6.6 mol, or 0.1 bound lysozyme molecules per hyaluronic acid monomer. This corresponded well...... with that obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry of 0.09 bound lysozyme molecules per hyaluronic acid monomer. The complexation did not alter the secondary structure of lysozyme measured by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy overlap analysis and had no significant impact on the Tm of...

  12. An improved method for hyaluronic acid radioiodination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlando, P.; De Feo, A.; Orlando, M.; Trenta, R.; Trevisi, R. [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy). Centro Radioisotopi; Binaglia, L. [Perugia Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Biochimica e Chimica Medica

    1995-09-01

    A simple procedure is described for preparing {sup 125}I-labelling hyluronan of high molecular weight. The reducing terminal group of hyaluronic acid was derivatized with tyramine through the formation of a Schiff base which was subsequently reduced with sodium cyanoborohydride. By radioiodination of the aromatic ring, {sup 125}I-labelled hyaluronic acid was obtained in high yield (40%) and high specific activity, 555 GBq/mmol (15 Ci/mmol). (Author).

  13. Hyaluronic Acid Inhibits Polycation Induced Cellular Responses

    OpenAIRE

    lalenti, A.; Lanaro, A.; Brignola, G.; Marotta, P; Di Rosa, M.

    1994-01-01

    Positively charged macromolecules cause a variety of pathological events through their electrostatic interaction with anionic sites present on the membrane of target cells. In the present study we have investigated the effect of hyaluronic acid, a negatively charged molecule, on rat paw oedema induced by poly-L-lysine as well as on histamine release from rat mast cells and nitric oxide formation from rabbit aorta, both induced by this polycation. The results indicate that hyaluronic acid is a...

  14. An improved method for hyaluronic acid radioiodination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple procedure is described for preparing 125I-labelling hyluronan of high molecular weight. The reducing terminal group of hyaluronic acid was derivatized with tyramine through the formation of a Schiff base which was subsequently reduced with sodium cyanoborohydride. By radioiodination of the aromatic ring, 125I-labelled hyaluronic acid was obtained in high yield (40%) and high specific activity, 555 GBq/mmol (15 Ci/mmol). (Author)

  15. Hyaluronic acid: A boon in periodontal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Dahiya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring linear polysaccharide of the extracellular matrix of connective tissue, synovial fluid, and other tissues. Its use in the treatment of the inflammatory process is established in medical areas such as orthopedics, dermatology, and ophthalmology. The Pubmed/Medline database was searched for keywords "Hyaluronic acid and periodontal disease" and "Hyaluronic acid and gingivitis" which resulted in 89 and 22 articles respectively. Only highly relevant articles from electronic and manual search in English literature were selected for the present review article. In the field of dentistry, hyaluronic acid has shown anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial effects in the treatment of periodontal diseases. Due to its tissue healing properties, it could be used as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the treatment of periodontitis. Further studies are required to determine the clinical efficacy of hyaluronic acid in healing of periodontal lesion. The aim of the present review, article is to discuss the role of hyaluronic acid in periodontal therapy.

  16. Hyaluronic acid metabolism is increased in unstable plaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.T. Bot; G. Pasterkamp; M.J. Goumans; C. Strijder; F.L. Moll; J.P. de Vries; S.T. Pals; D.P. de Kleijn; J.J. Piek; I.E. Hoefer

    2010-01-01

    P>Background Hyaluronic acid is expressed in atherosclerotic lesions, but its exact role in atherosclerotic disease remains unknown. As degradation of hyaluronic acid by hyaluronidase into low molecular weight hyaluronic acid (LMW-HA) is associated with inflammation and Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP

  17. Ions in hyaluronic acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horkay, Ferenc; Basser, Peter J.; Londono, David J.; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2009-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is an anionic biopolymer that is almost ubiquitous in biological tissues. An attempt is made to determine the dominant features that account for both its abundance and its multifunctional role, and which set it apart from other types of biopolymers. A combination of osmotic and scattering techniques is employed to quantify its dynamic and static properties in near-physiological solution conditions, where it is exposed both to mono- and divalent counterions. An equation of state is derived for the osmotic pressure Π in the semidilute concentration region, in terms of two variables, the polymer concentration c and the ionic strength J of the added salt, according to which Π =1.4×103c9/4/J3/4 kPa, where c and J are expressed in mole. Over the physiological ion concentration range, the effect of the sodium chloride and calcium chloride on the osmotic properties of HA solutions is fully accounted for by their contributions to the ionic strength. The absence of precipitation, even at high CaCl2 concentrations, distinguishes this molecule from other biopolymers such as DNA. Dynamic light scattering measurements reveal that the collective diffusion coefficient in HA solutions exceeds that in aqueous solutions of typical neutral polymers by a factor of approximately 5. This property ensures rapid adjustment to, and recovery from, stress applied to HA-containing tissue. Small angle x-ray scattering measurements confirm the absence of appreciable structural reorganization over the observed length scale range 10-1000 Å, as a result of calcium-sodium ion exchange. The scattered intensity in the transfer momentum range q >0.03 Å-1 varies as 1/q, indicating that the HA chain segments in semidilute solutions are linear over an extended concentration range. The osmotic compression modulus c ∂Π/∂c, a high value of which is a prerequisite in structural biopolymers, is several times greater than in typical neutral polymer solutions.

  18. Molecular transformations in connective tissue hyaluronic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free radicals, either induced by the action of ionizing radiations or produced by metal ion induced electron transfer reactions in situ, can initiate a marked reduction in the viscoelasticity of the connective tissue matrix. This paper examines the dominant role of hyaluronic acid in controlling this behavior at molecular level. The results indicate that after a dose of 5Gy (500 rads), the average molecular weight of hyaluronic acid in skin would be reduced by a factor of 4, which would lead to a 60-fold reduction in viscosity of the glycosaminoglycan. Shorter chains so produced would further inhibit hyperentanglement and chain-chain interactions which are responsible for the viscoelasticity of the hyaluronic acid-polymer network. The results are relevant to preservation of skin grafts and to the effects of low-dose radiation in vivo

  19. Ultrastructure of a hyaluronic acid matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Hadler, Nortin M.; Dourmashkin, Robert R; Nermut, Milan V.; Williams, Lynn D.

    1982-01-01

    Freeze-etch replicas of a hylauronic acid matrix were visualized by electron microscopy. In water a coarse branching fibrillar network of hyaluronic acid aggregates was seen. The high solvent permeability of this matrix suggests that the spaces observed are relatively devoid of unaggregated polymer. Addition of calcium disordered the matrix, resulting in a more dispersed felt of polymer.

  20. Biophysical properties of phenyl succinic acid derivatised hyaluronic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Klitgaard, Søren; Skovsen, Esben;

    2010-01-01

    Modification of hyaluronic acid (HA) with aryl succinic anhydrides results in new biomedical properties of HA as compared to non-modified HA, such as more efficient skin penetration, stronger binding to the skin, and the ability to blend with hydrophobic materials. In the present study, hyaluronic...

  1. Dietary Hyaluronic Acid Migrates into the Skin of Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Mariko Oe; Koichi Mitsugi; Wataru Odanaka; Hideto Yoshida; Ryosuke Matsuoka; Satoshi Seino; Tomoyuki Kanemitsu; Yasunobu Masuda

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a constituent of the skin and helps to maintain hydration. The oral intake of hyaluronic acid increases water in the horny layer as demonstrated by human trials, but in vivo kinetics has not been shown. This study confirmed the absorption, migration, and excretion of 14C-labeled hyaluronic acid (14C-hyaluronic acid). 14C-hyaluronic acid was orally or intravenously administered to male SD rats aged 7 to 8 weeks. Plasma radioactivity after oral administration showed the highe...

  2. Highly Efficient Syntheses of Hyaluronic Acid Oligosaccharides

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Lijun; Huang, Xuefei

    2007-01-01

    Highly efficient syntheses of hyaluronic acid oligosaccharides have been accomplished through the pre-activation based iterative one-pot strategy. A series of oligosaccharides ranging from di- to hexasaccharides were rapidly assembled using only near stoichiometric amounts of the building blocks without aglycon adjustment or purifications of intermediate oligosaccharides. Deprote...

  3. TOPICAL HYALURONIC ACID IN THE MANAGEMENT OF ORAL ULCERS

    OpenAIRE

    Pranav Kapoor; Shabina Sachdeva; Silonie Sachdeva

    2011-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a hygroscopic macromolecule formed by the polymerisation of glucuronic acid and N-acetylglucosamine disaccharide. It is a primary component of the extracellular matrix in various body tissues. Ihe use of topical Hyaluronic acid in the treatment of oral ulcers has been recently reported. This article reviews the mechanism of action, indications and efficacy of topical Hyaluronic acid gel in the management of oral ulcers.

  4. Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Burdick, Jason A.; Prestwich, Glenn D.

    2011-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), an immunoneutral polysaccharide that is ubiquitous in the human body, is crucial for many cellular and tissue functions and has been in clinical use for over thirty years. When chemically modified, HA can be transformed into many physical forms -- viscoelastic solutions, soft or stiff hydrogels, electrospun fibers, non-woven meshes, macroporous and fibrillar sponges, flexible sheets, and nanoparticulate fluids -- for use in a range of preclinical and clinical settings. M...

  5. Hyaluronic acid in calves defects correction

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzo Rosset; Mario Goisis

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Since the advent of fillers, new techniques are continuously developed for different uses. In this study, we evaluated the use of hyaluronic acid for calf augmentation. Methods: A total of 42 patients were enrolled in this study. All of them underwent augmentation procedure in our centers under local anesthesia, the operations were completed within 1 h with a prompt correction of the defects. Results: Thirty-nine patients were satisfied with the treatment (93%), while three had complicat...

  6. Hyaluronic acid in dermal rejuvenation: an in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Avantaggiato, A; M Pascali; D. Lauritano; Cura, F; PEZZETTI, F.; A. Palmieri

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the role of hyaluronic acid in bio-revitalization by testing several extracellular matrix biological parameters in cultured dermal fibroblasts. To this aim, fibroblastic expressed genes after exposition to three hyaluronic acid medical devices were evaluated. Cells were seeded on a layer of three different medical devices containing 6.2, 10 and 20 mg/ml of hyaluronic acid for 24 h. Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction was performed to investigate gene e...

  7. Influence of Hyaluronic Acid in Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Radojkova-Nikolovska, Vera; Popovska, Mirjana; Minovska, Ana; Belazelkovska, Zlatanka

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a high molecular weight polysaccharide - glycosaminoglycan, which plays a vital role in the functioning of extracellular matrices, including those of mineralized and non-mineralized periodontal tissues. Hyaluronic acid is also important because of its numerous actions in the mechanisms associated with inflammation and the wound healing process. Hyaluronic acid has been identified in all periodontal tissues in varying quantities, being more prominent in ...

  8. Dietary Hyaluronic Acid Migrates into the Skin of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Oe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid is a constituent of the skin and helps to maintain hydration. The oral intake of hyaluronic acid increases water in the horny layer as demonstrated by human trials, but in vivo kinetics has not been shown. This study confirmed the absorption, migration, and excretion of 14C-labeled hyaluronic acid (14C-hyaluronic acid. 14C-hyaluronic acid was orally or intravenously administered to male SD rats aged 7 to 8 weeks. Plasma radioactivity after oral administration showed the highest level 8 hours after administration, and orally administered 14C-hyaluronic acid was found in the blood. Approximately 90% of 14C-hyaluronic acid was absorbed from the digestive tract and used as an energy source or a structural constituent of tissues based on tests of the urine, feces, expired air, and cadaver up to 168 hours (one week after administration. The autoradiographic results suggested that radioactivity was distributed systematically and then reduced over time. The radioactivity was higher in the skin than in the blood at 24 and 96 hours after administration. The results show the possibility that orally administered hyaluronic acid migrated into the skin. No excessive accumulation was observed and more than 90% of the hyaluronic acid was excreted in expired air or urine.

  9. Hyaluronic Acid Production in Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Widner, Bill; Behr, Régine; Von Dollen, Steve; Tang, Maria; Heu, Tia; Sloma, Alan; Sternberg, Dave; DeAngelis, Paul L; Paul H. Weigel; Brown, Steve

    2005-01-01

    The hasA gene from Streptococcus equisimilis, which encodes the enzyme hyaluronan synthase, has been expressed in Bacillus subtilis, resulting in the production of hyaluronic acid (HA) in the 1-MDa range. Artificial operons were assembled and tested, all of which contain the hasA gene along with one or more genes encoding enzymes involved in the synthesis of the UDP-precursor sugars that are required for HA synthesis. It was determined that the production of UDP-glucuronic acid is limiting in...

  10. Different hyaluronic acid morphology modulates primary articular chondrocyte behavior in hyaluronic acid-coated polycaprolactone scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Lebourg, Myriam; Rodenas Rochina, Joaquín; Sousa, Tiago; Mano, J. F.; Gómez Ribelles, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering should promote both adequate biomechanical environment and chondrogenic stimulation. Hyaluronic acid (HA) has been used in cartilage engineering for its chondrogenic and chondroprotective properties, nevertheless its mechanical properties are limited. Influence of HA microstructure in chondrocyte response has not been addressed yet. In this work, polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds were modified using HA following two coating str...

  11. Hyaluronic acid production by irradiated human synovial fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaron, M.; Yaron, I.; Levita, M.; Herzberg, M.

    1977-03-01

    Radioactive particles as well as x irradiation from an external source has been used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. In order to clarify effects of ionizing irradiation on synovial cells, radioactive gold (/sup 198/Au) and yttrium (/sup 90/Y) were added to fibroblast cultures derived from human synovial membranes. Other cultures were irradiated by a Picker x-ray machine. Fibroblast growth and hyaluronic acid production were measured. Radioactive gold and yttrium particles induced a significant increase of hyaluronic acid synthesis rate (pg/cell/day) and inhibited fibroblast growth. Fibroblasts continued to overproduce hyaluronic acid and to show growth inhibition 3 weeks after irradiation with radioactive gold. Hydrocortisone inhibited hyaluronic acid overproduction induced by radioactive gold. Overproduction of hyaluronic acid induced by the x-ray machine was inhibited by hydrocortisone, actinomycin-D, and cycloheximide. Fibroblasts derived from normal and rheumatoid patients responded similarly to ionizing irradiation.

  12. Hyaluronic acid production by irradiated human synovial fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive particles as well as x irradiation from an external source has been used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. In order to clarify effects of ionizing irradiation on synovial cells, radioactive gold (198Au) and yttrium (90Y) were added to fibroblast cultures derived from human synovial membranes. Other cultures were irradiated by a Picker x-ray machine. Fibroblast growth and hyaluronic acid production were measured. Radioactive gold and yttrium particles induced a significant increase of hyaluronic acid synthesis rate (pg/cell/day) and inhibited fibroblast growth. Fibroblasts continued to overproduce hyaluronic acid and to show growth inhibition 3 weeks after irradiation with radioactive gold. Hydrocortisone inhibited hyaluronic acid overproduction induced by radioactive gold. Overproduction of hyaluronic acid induced by the x-ray machine was inhibited by hydrocortisone, actinomycin-D, and cycloheximide. Fibroblasts derived from normal and rheumatoid patients responded similarly to ionizing irradiation

  13. Purification and Structure Identification of Hyaluronic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shui Sheng HONG; Jia CHEN; Jian Guo ZHANG; Yan Chun TAO; Lan Ying LIU

    2004-01-01

    Polysaccharide produced by mutated strain of Streptococcus zooepidemicus was purified by the procedures including Savage method, quaternary ammonium compound precipitation, DEAE-cellulose(DE52) chromatography and Sephadex G-75 gel filtration. The structure of the purified polysaccharide has been characterized by means of chemical composition analysis, 13C NMR spectrum, infrared spectrum and circular dichroism (CD). All the results showed that the purified polysaccharide was hyaluronic acid (HA). The single helix conformation of the purified HA was determined by Congo red experiment. The molecular weight of the HA was about 1.16×106D, which was measured by viscosity method.

  14. Effect of hyaluronic acid on chondrocyte apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Barreto, Ronald Bispo; Sadigursky, David; de Rezende, Marcia Uchoa; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the percentage of apoptotic cells in a contusion model of osteoarthritis (OA) and to assess whether intra-articular injection of high doses of hyaluronic acid (HA) immediately after trauma reduces chondrocyte apoptosis. METHODS: Forty knees from adult rabbits were impacted thrice with a 1 kg block released through a 1 meter tall cylinder (29.4 Joules). Subsequently, 2 mL of HA was injected in one knee and 2 mL saline in the contra-lateral knee. Medication were administ...

  15. Extracellular depolymerization of hyaluronic acid in cultured human skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chain length of [3H]hyaluronic acid synthesized by cultivating human skin fibroblasts in the presence of [3H]glucosamine was investigated. [3H]Hyaluronic acid obtained from the matrix fraction was excluded from a Sepharose CL-2B column irrespective of the incubation period, whereas that from the medium was depolymerized into a constant chain length (Mr = 40,000). The reducing and non-reducing terminals of the depolymerized hyaluronic acid were N-acetylglucosamine and glucuronic acid, respectively. Prolonged incubation produced no oligosaccharides as shown by examination of hyaluronidase digests, suggesting the presence of a novel endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase in cultured human skin fibroblasts

  16. Serum hyaluronic acid in patients with disseminated neoplasm.

    OpenAIRE

    Manley, G.; C. Warren

    1987-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid concentrations were measured by a laser nephelometric assay in serum samples from 50 patients with advanced disseminated neoplasm and 50 healthy controls matched for age and sex. The identity of hyaluronic acid was confirmed by a combination of electrophoretic and enzymatic techniques. The mean serum hyaluronic acid concentration for the control group was 1.09 mg/l, with a range of 0-4 mg/l. The mean concentration for patients with neoplastic disease was 10.38 mg/l, with a ran...

  17. Electrophoretic deposition of silica-hyaluronic acid and titania-hyaluronic acid nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4L7 (Canada); Zhitomirsky, I., E-mail: zhitom@mcmaster.ca [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: > The kinetics of electrodeposition of hyaluronic acid has been studied using quartz crystal microbalance. > Composite films containing silica and titania were prepared by electrophoretic deposition. > The deposition yield and deposit composition can be varied by variation of deposition time, voltage and bath composition. > We concluded that the method offers the advantages of room temperature processing for the fabrication of composite materials for biomedical applications. - Abstract: Thin films of hyaluronic acid were prepared by anodic electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and the deposition kinetics was studied using quartz crystal microbalance. EPD method has been developed for the fabrication of new ceramic-biopolymer nanocomposites containing silica and titania nanoparticles in the matrix of hyaluronic acid. The deposit thickness was varied in the range of 0-10 {mu}m. The composition of the deposits can be varied by the variation of silica and titania concentration in the suspensions. The deposits were studied by thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. The method offers the advantages of room temperature processing of nanocomposite materials for biomedical applications.

  18. Electrophoretic deposition of silica-hyaluronic acid and titania-hyaluronic acid nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The kinetics of electrodeposition of hyaluronic acid has been studied using quartz crystal microbalance. → Composite films containing silica and titania were prepared by electrophoretic deposition. → The deposition yield and deposit composition can be varied by variation of deposition time, voltage and bath composition. → We concluded that the method offers the advantages of room temperature processing for the fabrication of composite materials for biomedical applications. - Abstract: Thin films of hyaluronic acid were prepared by anodic electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and the deposition kinetics was studied using quartz crystal microbalance. EPD method has been developed for the fabrication of new ceramic-biopolymer nanocomposites containing silica and titania nanoparticles in the matrix of hyaluronic acid. The deposit thickness was varied in the range of 0-10 μm. The composition of the deposits can be varied by the variation of silica and titania concentration in the suspensions. The deposits were studied by thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. The method offers the advantages of room temperature processing of nanocomposite materials for biomedical applications.

  19. Streptococcal hyaluronic acid: proposed mechanisms of degradation and loss of synthesis during stationary phase.

    OpenAIRE

    Van De Rijn, I

    1983-01-01

    Streptococcal hyaluronic acid was found to distribute into two discrete sizes. Cellular hyaluronic acid from strain D181 had an average molecular weight of 10 X 10(6), whereas the average molecular weight of extracellular hyaluronic acid from the same strain was 2 X 10(6). Cellular streptococcal hyaluronic acid was purified to homogeneity. Proteases were unable to cleave the purified cellular polymer, indicating that a peptide was not involved in cross-linking five extracellular hyaluronate p...

  20. Hyaluronic acid in calves defects correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Rosset

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Since the advent of fillers, new techniques are continuously developed for different uses. In this study, we evaluated the use of hyaluronic acid for calf augmentation. Methods: A total of 42 patients were enrolled in this study. All of them underwent augmentation procedure in our centers under local anesthesia, the operations were completed within 1 h with a prompt correction of the defects. Results: Thirty-nine patients were satisfied with the treatment (93%, while three had complications, local infection, and lumps, that were resolved quickly (7%. Conclusion: Macrofillers can be injected into the calf to correct any defects. The advantages include short duration of treatment; the procedure performed under local anesthesia and limited side-effects that resolve promptly. This study suggests the use of biocompatible macrofillers for the augmentation of not only calves, but also for augmentation of breast and buttocks.

  1. Rheology and lubricity of hyaluronic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jing; Krause, Wendy E.

    2007-03-01

    The polyelectrolyte hyaluronic acid (HA, hyaluronan) is an important component in synovial fluid (i.e., the fluid that lubricates our freely moving joints). Its presence results in highly viscoelastic solutions. In comparison to healthy synovial fluid, diseased fluid has a reduced viscosity and loss of lubricity. In osteoarthritis the reduction in viscosity results from a decline in both the molecular weight and concentration of HA. In our investigation, we attempt to correlate the rheological properties of HA solutions to changes in lubrication and wear. A nanoindenter will be used to evaluate the coefficient of friction and wear properties between the nanoindenter tip and ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene in both the presence and absence of a thin film of HA solution.

  2. Hyaluronic acid in bronchoalveolar lavage in rats exposed to quartz.

    OpenAIRE

    Tornling, G; Eklund, A; Engström-Laurent, A; Hällgren, R; Unge, G; Westman, B

    1987-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid, a connective tissue component, in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) is correlated with decreased lung volumes in sarcoidosis. To investigate whether hyaluronic acid could be a marker of fibrosis in another interstitial lung disease, silicosis, the level of the substance in BAL fluid from rats exposed to crystalline silica (n = 3), amorphous silica (n = 3), and in one sham injected rat was measured. There was an increase in the total number of alveolar cells recovered in the ...

  3. Radiation protection of hyaluronic acid in the solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of γ irradiation on hyaluronic acid (HA) and its molecular complex with cetyl pyridinium cations have been examined in the solid state. On the basis of the nature of the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra, radical yields, and physical chemical data, there is good evidence that protectin of hyaluronic acid occurs when irradiated in a complex with cetyl pyridinium cations. The radiation protection conferred on the polyanion by the cetyl pyridinium cations is discussed in terms of energy transfer processes

  4. Controlled Degradation and Mechanical Behavior of Photopolymerized Hyaluronic Acid Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Burdick, Jason A.; CHUNG, CINDY; Jia, Xinqiao; Randolph, Mark A.; Langer, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a natural polysaccharide found abundantly throughout the body with many desirable properties for application as a biomaterial, including scaffolding for tissue engineering. In this work, hyaluronic acid with molecular weights ranging from 50 to 1100 kDa was modified with methacrylic anhydride and photopolymerized into networks with a wide range of physical properties. With macromer concentrations from 2 to 20 wt%, networks exhibited volumetric swelling ratios ranging from ~...

  5. Development of novel hyaluronic acid- based viscosupplementation formulations for osteoarthrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kaderli, Sema Gwendolyn

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis is one of the 10 most disabling pathologies worldwide and today, the intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid (viscosupplementation) is a therapeutic option. The principal limitation of this treatment is its limited efficacy, due among other reasons, to its rapid degradation. In order to develop more efficacious formulations, two strategies have been followed; the preparation of a hybrid hydrogel composed of hyaluronic acid and chitosan, a second chondroprotective biopolyme...

  6. Body Shaping and Volume Restoration: The Role of Hyaluronic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Hedén, Per; Sellman, Gabriella; von Wachenfeldt, Mats; Olenius, Michael; Fagrell, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Driven by the rising popularity of minimally invasive techniques, the demand for cosmetic procedures is increasing. Cosmetic body-shaping procedures can be categorized into those that remove tissue and those that add volume. This review focuses on the latter of these categories, particularly on the use of resorbable hyaluronic acid gels specifically developed for minimally invasive volume enhancement. Pilot studies of hyaluronic acid involving its injection to contour various body deformities...

  7. Electrostatic effects on hyaluronic acid configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezney, John; Saleh, Omar

    2015-03-01

    In systems of polyelectrolytes, such as solutions of charged biopolymers, the electrostatic repulsion between charged monomers plays a dominant role in determining the molecular conformation. Altering the ionic strength of the solvent thus affects the structure of such a polymer. Capturing this electrostatically-driven structural dependence is important for understanding many biological systems. Here, we use single molecule manipulation experiments to collect force-extension behavior on hyaluronic acid (HA), a polyanion which is a major component of the extracellular matrix in all vertebrates. By measuring HA elasticity in a variety of salt conditions, we are able to directly assess the contribution of electrostatics to the chain's self-avoidance and local stiffness. Similar to recent results from our group on single-stranded nucleic acids, our data indicate that HA behaves as a swollen chain of electrostatic blobs, with blob size proportional to the solution Debye length. Our data indicate that the chain structure within the blob is not worm-like, likely due to long-range electrostatic interactions. We discuss potential models of this effect.

  8. Hyaluronic acid: A promising mediator for periodontal regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal Jyoti; Kedige Suresh; Anand Samir

    2010-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a natural-non sulphated high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan that forms a critical component of the extracellular matrix and contributes significantly to tissue hydrodynamics, cell migration and proliferation. The use of HA in the treatment of inflammatory process is established in medical areas such as orthopedics, dermatology and ophthalmology. In the field of dentistry, hyaluronate has shown anti-inflammatory, antiedematous and anti-bacterial effects for the trea...

  9. Extracellular depolymerization of hyaluronic acid in cultured human skin fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T.; Takagaki, K.; Kubo, K.; Morikawa, A.; Tamura, S.; Endo, M. (Hirosaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-10-15

    The chain length of ({sup 3}H)hyaluronic acid synthesized by cultivating human skin fibroblasts in the presence of ({sup 3}H)glucosamine was investigated. ({sup 3}H)Hyaluronic acid obtained from the matrix fraction was excluded from a Sepharose CL-2B column irrespective of the incubation period, whereas that from the medium was depolymerized into a constant chain length (Mr = 40,000). The reducing and non-reducing terminals of the depolymerized hyaluronic acid were N-acetylglucosamine and glucuronic acid, respectively. Prolonged incubation produced no oligosaccharides as shown by examination of hyaluronidase digests, suggesting the presence of a novel endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase in cultured human skin fibroblasts.

  10. Comparison of the effects of hyaluronidase and hyaluronic acid on probiotics growth

    OpenAIRE

    Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Aponte, Maria; Esposito, Rita; Bondi, Moreno; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyaluronic acid has several clinical applications. Recent evidences suggested antimicrobial properties against several pathogens. The aim of the present survey was to evaluate the effect of hyaluronic acid, alone or in combination with hyaluronidase, on protechnological or probiotic strains. Results The role of hyaluronic acid and hyaluronidase on in vitro growth rate of different lactic acid bacteria was investigated. Standard methods revealed that low concentrations of hyaluronic...

  11. Chemical functionalization of hyaluronic acid for drug delivery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasi, Ana-Maria [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, 73 Prof. dr. docent Dimitrie Mangeron Street, 700050 Iasi (Romania); Popa, Marcel Ionel, E-mail: mipopa@ch.tuiasi.ro [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, 73 Prof. dr. docent Dimitrie Mangeron Street, 700050 Iasi (Romania); Butnaru, Maria [“Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine Pharmacy, Faculty of Medical Bioengineering, 9-13 Kogalniceanu Street, 700454 Iasi (Romania); Dodi, Gianina [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, 73 Prof. dr. docent Dimitrie Mangeron Street, 700050 Iasi (Romania); SCIENT — Research Center for Instrumental Analysis, S.C. CROMATEC PLUS, 18 Sos. Cotroceni, 060114 Bucharest (Romania); Verestiuc, Liliana [“Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine Pharmacy, Faculty of Medical Bioengineering, 9-13 Kogalniceanu Street, 700454 Iasi (Romania)

    2014-05-01

    Functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives were obtained by ring opening mechanism of maleic anhydride (MA). FTIR and H{sup 1} NMR spectroscopy were used to confirm the chemical linkage of MA on the hyaluronic acid chains. Thermal analysis (TG-DTG and DSC) and GPC data for the new products revealed the formation of new functional groups, without significant changes in molecular weight and thermal stability. New gels based on hyaluronic acid modified derivatives were obtained by acrylic acid copolymerization in the presence of a redox initiation system. The resulted circular and interconnected pores of the gels were visualized by SEM. The release profiles of an ophthalmic model drug, pilocarpine from tested gels were studied in simulated media. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity and cell proliferation properties indicates the potential of the new systems to be used in contact with biological media in drug delivery applications. - Highlights: • New functionalized hyaluronic acid was prepared by ring opening of maleic anhydride. • Gels with circular pores based on acrylic acid copolymerization were formulated. • In vitro drug loading/release profile was evaluated in simulated ophthalmic media. • The cytotoxicity indicates the potential of derivatives to be used in vivo.

  12. Chemical functionalization of hyaluronic acid for drug delivery applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives were obtained by ring opening mechanism of maleic anhydride (MA). FTIR and H1 NMR spectroscopy were used to confirm the chemical linkage of MA on the hyaluronic acid chains. Thermal analysis (TG-DTG and DSC) and GPC data for the new products revealed the formation of new functional groups, without significant changes in molecular weight and thermal stability. New gels based on hyaluronic acid modified derivatives were obtained by acrylic acid copolymerization in the presence of a redox initiation system. The resulted circular and interconnected pores of the gels were visualized by SEM. The release profiles of an ophthalmic model drug, pilocarpine from tested gels were studied in simulated media. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity and cell proliferation properties indicates the potential of the new systems to be used in contact with biological media in drug delivery applications. - Highlights: • New functionalized hyaluronic acid was prepared by ring opening of maleic anhydride. • Gels with circular pores based on acrylic acid copolymerization were formulated. • In vitro drug loading/release profile was evaluated in simulated ophthalmic media. • The cytotoxicity indicates the potential of derivatives to be used in vivo

  13. Patients with fibromyalgia have normal serum levels of hyaluronic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Møller, H J; Schaadt, M;

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the levels of hyaluronic acid (HA) in Danish patients with fibromyalgia (FM). METHODS: Serum levels of HA were determined in 53 patients with established FM and 55 control samples using a radiometric assay. Values were correlated to clinical disease severity variables...

  14. Tunable CD44-specific cellular retargeting with hyaluronic acid nanoshells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Morten F.; Olesen, Morten T. J.; Gjelstrup, Mikkel C.;

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this work we specifically investigate the molecular weight (Mw) dependent combinatorial properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) for exhibiting stealth and targeting properties using different Mw HA nanoshells to tune nanoparticle retargeting to CD44-expressing cancer cells. Methods HA of...

  15. Glucosamine increases hyaluronic acid production in human osteoarthritic synovium explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Uitterlinden (Elian); C.F. Verkoelen; S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); H. Jahr (Holger); H.H. Weinans (Harrie); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); J.L.M. Koevoet (Wendy)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Glucosamine (GlcN) used by patients with osteoarthritis was demonstrated to reduce pain, but the working mechanism is still not clear. Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid (HA) is also described to reduce pain in osteoarthritis. The synthesis of HA requires GlcN as one o

  16. Injectable hyaluronic acid hydrogel for 19F magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, X.; Sun, Y.; Kootala, S.; Hilborn, J.; Heerschap, A.; Ossipov, D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a 19F labeled injectable hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel that can be monitored by both 1H and 19F MR imaging. The HA based hydrogel formed via carbazone reaction can be obtained within a minute by simple mixing of HA-carbazate and HA-aldehyde derivatized polymers. 19F contrast agent was l

  17. The radiation chemistry of connective tissue; hyaluronic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous solutions of hyaluronic acid have been irradiated under various conditions and the amount of strand scission was determined viscometrically. OH radicals were found to be some 1.5 times more potent than H atoms at inducing breaks, methanol, propan-2-ol and t-butanol radicals produced relatively little breakage (potency less than 3% that of .OH). Tetranitromethane (TNM) has been used to measure the yield of reducing radicals produced on OH radical attack on hyaluronic acid, around 80% of the hyaluronic acid radicals reacted with TNM (i.e. are reducing radicals) with a rate constant of 4.5x108 mol-1 dm3 s-1. In contrast similar measurements on the polysaccharide model, β-cyclodextrin, indicated that all the radicals formed were reducing. The presence of TNM or oxygen during radiolysis caused a 30% fall in chain breakage. The majority of radicals produced in both hyaluronic acid and β-cyclodextrin are either 1,2 dihydroxy or 1-hydroxy 2-alkoxy type radicals, both of which form β-carbonyl radicals by the acid (and base) catalysed elimination of water or alcohol. These β-carbonyl radicals are considerably less reducing than their parent α-hydroxy radicals and are not expected to react with TNM. By determining the extent of reaction with TNM as a function of TNM concentration, the first order rate constant for the formation of the β-carbonyl radicals can be calculated on applying simple competition kinetics. The rate constant at pH 4 was found to be about 4x103 s-1 in the case of hyaluronic acid radicals, with the β-cyclodextrin system even at pH 2.8 the rate constant was less than 2x103 s-1. (author). 12 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. Hyaluronic acid changes of the extracellular matrix in colon carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arab MR.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The extracellular matrix is a complex three-dimensional network of proteins and glycosaminoglycans, which have important roles in cellular physiology and cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Any changes in the extracellular matrix of tumors may be implicated in cellular transformation and metastasis. The aim of the present study was to identify changes in the hyaluronic acid of the stroma of colonic carcinoma.Methods: Paraffin blocks of 30 patients with colon carcinoma (10 patients at each histological grade were chosen from the pathology file of Khatam-Al-Anbia Hospital in Zahedan, Iran. Tissue sections (5-6 micrometers thick were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and the alcian blue critical electrolyte concentration histochemical technique at pH=5.8. The intensity of the staining in each section was graded as 1, 2 or 3, referring to low, moderate or severe staining reactivities, respectively. Statistical data was analyzed with nonparametric tests by SPSS (ver. 10 and histopathological reports were prepared.Results: The results of this study showed that there is a good correlation between histopathological grading and staining intensity of tumoral stroma for hyaluronic acid (p<0.005. Analysis using the Mann Whitney test revealed significant differences between staining grades 1 and 3 and grades 2 and 3 (p<0.005 and p<0.002, respectively, although there was no significant difference between staining grades 1 and 2 for hyaluronic acid.Conclusions: The difference in staining intensity of the stroma in colon carcinoma is a result of different amounts of hyaluronic acid in stroma, indicating that increased levels of hyaluronic acid are associated with the invasion and metastasis of neoplastic cells.

  19. Thermosensitive injectable hyaluronic acid hydrogel for adipose tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Huaping; Ramirez, Christina M.; Miljkovic, Natasa; Li, Han; Rubin, J. Peter; Marra, Kacey G.

    2009-01-01

    A series of thermosensitive copolymer hydrogels, aminated hyaluronic acid-g-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (AHA-g-PNIPAAm), were synthesized by coupling carboxylic end-capped PNIPAAm (PNIPAAm-COOH) to AHA through amide bond linkages. AHA was prepared by grafting adipic dihydrazide to the HA backbone and PNIPAAm-COOH copolymer was synthesized via a facile thermo-radical polymerization technique by polymerization of NIPAAm using 4,4′-azobis(4-cyanovaleric acid) as an initiator, respectively. The s...

  20. Tandem MS can Distinguish Hyaluronic Acid from N-Acetylheparosan

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhenqing; Xie, Jin; Liu, Jian; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Isobaric oligosaccharides enzymatically prepared from hyaluronic acid (HA) and N-acetylheparosan (NAH), were distinguished using tandem mass spectrometry. The only difference between the two series of oligosaccharides was the linkage pattern (in HA 1→3 and in NAH 1→4) between glucuronic acid and N-acetylglucosamine residues. Tandem mass spectrometry afforded spectra, in which glycosidic cleavage fragment ions were observed for both HA and NAH oligosaccharides. Cross-ring cleavage ions 0,2An a...

  1. Compatibility of hyaluronic acid hydrogel and skeletal muscle myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Wei; Zhang Li; Sun Liang; Wang Chengyue [Jinzhou Central Hospital, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Fan Ming; Liu Shuhong, E-mail: Weiwang_Ly@yahoo.com.c [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Academy of Military Medical Science, Beijing 100850 (China)

    2009-04-15

    Compatibility of hyaluronic acid hydrogel (HAH) and skeletal muscle myoblasts has been investigated for the first time in the present paper. Skeletal muscle myoblasts were separated from skeletons of rats and incubated with a HAH-containing culture medium. Cell morphology, hydrophilicity and cell adhesion of the HAH scaffold were investigated using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Hoechest33258 fluorescent staining, the immunocytochemistry method and water adsorption rate measurement. It was found that at a proper concentration (around 0.5%) of hyaluronic acid, the hydrogel possessed good compatibility with skeletal muscle myoblasts. The hydrogel can create a three-dimensional structure for the growth of skeletal muscle myoblasts and benefit cell attachment to provide a novel scaffold material for the tissue engineering of skeletal muscle.

  2. 1- and 2-particle Microrheology of Hyaluronic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Austin; Kearns, Sarah; Ross, David; Das, Moumita; Thurston, George; Franklin, Scott

    2015-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid (also called HA or Hyaluronan) is a high molecular weight polysaccaride ubiquitous in the extracellular matrix of soft tissue such as cartilage, skin, the eye's vitreous gel and synovial fluid. It has been shown to play an important role in mechanotransduction, cell migration and proliferation, and in tissue morphodynamics. We present a confocal microrheology study of hyaluronic acid of varying concentrations. The mean squared displacement (MSD) of sub-micron colloidal tracer particles is tracked in two dimensions and shows a transition from diffusive motion at low concentrations to small-time trapping by the protein network as the concentration increases. Correlations between particle motion can be used to determine an effective mean-squared displacement which deviates from the single-particle MSD as the fluid becomes less homogeneous. The real and effective mean-squared displacements are used to probe the local and space-averaged frequency dependent rheological properties of the fluid as the concentration changes.

  3. Compatibility of hyaluronic acid hydrogel and skeletal muscle myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compatibility of hyaluronic acid hydrogel (HAH) and skeletal muscle myoblasts has been investigated for the first time in the present paper. Skeletal muscle myoblasts were separated from skeletons of rats and incubated with a HAH-containing culture medium. Cell morphology, hydrophilicity and cell adhesion of the HAH scaffold were investigated using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Hoechest33258 fluorescent staining, the immunocytochemistry method and water adsorption rate measurement. It was found that at a proper concentration (around 0.5%) of hyaluronic acid, the hydrogel possessed good compatibility with skeletal muscle myoblasts. The hydrogel can create a three-dimensional structure for the growth of skeletal muscle myoblasts and benefit cell attachment to provide a novel scaffold material for the tissue engineering of skeletal muscle.

  4. Preparation and Identification of Hyaluronic Acid From Fresh Pigskin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yuhong; HAN Linlin

    2008-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) had been prepared from pigskin residues with neutral proteinase.The preparing results and conditions were studied.After extracting and purification,HA was detected through ultraviolet spectra and infraction spectrum,and its content and purity were tested by carbazole and Elason-Morgan,respectively.This results indicated that significant quantifies of HA could be prepared in fresh pigskin with biologic enzyme,and the pure HA was cosmetic grade and food grade.

  5. Oil-free hyaluronic acid matrix for serial femtosecond crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Michihiro; Song, Changyong; Suzuki, Mamoru; Masuda, Tetsuya; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Nakane, Takanori; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Nango, Eriko; Tanaka, Rie; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Nureki, Osamu; Numata, Keiji; Iwata, So

    2016-04-01

    The grease matrix was originally introduced as a microcrystal-carrier for serial femtosecond crystallography and has been expanded to applications for various types of proteins, including membrane proteins. However, the grease-based matrix has limited application for oil-sensitive proteins. Here we introduce a grease-free, water-based hyaluronic acid matrix. Applications for proteinase K and lysozyme proteins were able to produce electron density maps at 2.3-Å resolution.

  6. Hyaluronic acid changes of the extracellular matrix in colon carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Arab MR.; Allahyari A.; Sargolzaie Aval F.; Rafighdoost H; Karimi M

    2007-01-01

    Background: The extracellular matrix is a complex three-dimensional network of proteins and glycosaminoglycans, which have important roles in cellular physiology and cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Any changes in the extracellular matrix of tumors may be implicated in cellular transformation and metastasis. The aim of the present study was to identify changes in the hyaluronic acid of the stroma of colonic carcinoma.Methods: Paraffin blocks of 30 patients with colon carc...

  7. Combining Hyaluronic Acid with Chitosan Enhances Gene Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The low gene transfer efficiency of chitosan-DNA polyplexes is a consequence of their high stability and consequent slow DNA release. The incorporation of an anionic polymer is believed to loosen chitosan interactions with DNA and thus promote higher transfection efficiencies. In this work, several formulations of chitosan-DNA polyplexes incorporating hyaluronic acid were prepared and characterized for their gene transfection efficiency on both HEK293 and retinal pigment epithelial cells. The...

  8. In Vivo Response to Dynamic Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Jennifer L; Tuler, Jeremy; Braden, Rebecca; Schüp-Magoffin, Pamela; Schaefer, Jacquelyn; Kretchmer, Kyle; Christman, Karen L; Engler, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue-specific elasticity arises in part from developmental changes in extracellular matrix over time, e.g. ~ 10-fold myocardial stiffening in the chicken embryo. When this time-dependent stiffening is mimicked in vitro with thiolated hyaluronic acid (HA-SH) hydrogels, improved cardiomyocyte maturation has been observed. However, host interactions, matrix polymerization, and stiffening kinetics remain uncertain in vivo, and each plays a critical role in therapeutic applications using HA-SH. ...

  9. Oil-free hyaluronic acid matrix for serial femtosecond crystallography

    OpenAIRE

    Michihiro Sugahara; Changyong Song; Mamoru Suzuki; Tetsuya Masuda; Shigeyuki Inoue; Takanori Nakane; Fumiaki Yumoto; Eriko Nango; Rie Tanaka; Kensuke Tono; Yasumasa Joti; Takashi Kameshima; Takaki Hatsui; Makina Yabashi; Osamu Nureki

    2016-01-01

    The grease matrix was originally introduced as a microcrystal-carrier for serial femtosecond crystallography and has been expanded to applications for various types of proteins, including membrane proteins. However, the grease-based matrix has limited application for oil-sensitive proteins. Here we introduce a grease-free, water-based hyaluronic acid matrix. Applications for proteinase K and lysozyme proteins were able to produce electron density maps at 2.3-Å resolution.

  10. Hyaluronic acid-coated nanoparticles as biofunctional pharmaceutical carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Almalik, Abdulaziz

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of nanotechnology for drug delivery purposes has witnessed a very significant growth aiming to improve the efficacy and/or reduce toxicity of existing drugs. This project aimed to design hyaluronic acid (HA)-coated chitosan-triphosphate (TPP) nanoparticles applicable for the delivery of genetic payload, and predominantly focused on the study of chitosan molecular weight-dependent effects.Firstly, we explored the effect of chitosan molecular weight (MW) on the physico-...

  11. Hydrolytically Degradable Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels with Controlled Temporal Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo, Sujata; CHUNG, CINDY; Khetan, Sudhir; Burdick, Jason A.

    2008-01-01

    Polysaccharides are being processed into biomaterials for numerous biological applications due to their native source in numerous tissues and biological functions. For instance, hyaluronic acid (HA) is found abundantly in the body, interacts with cells through surface receptors, and can regulate cellular behavior (e.g., proliferation, migration). HA was previously modified with reactive groups to form hydrogels that are degraded by hyaluronidases, either added exogenously or produced by cells...

  12. Hyaluronic Acid-Binding Scaffold for Articular Cartilage Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Unterman, Shimon A.; Gibson, Matthew; Lee, Janice H.; Crist, Joshua; Chansakul, Thanissara; Yang, Elaine C.; Jennifer H. Elisseeff

    2012-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is an extracellular matrix molecule with multiple physical and biological functions found in many tissues, including cartilage. HA has been incorporated in a number of biomaterial and scaffold systems. Howegver, HA in the material may be difficult to control if it is not chemically modified and chemical modification of HA may negatively impact biological function. In this study, we developed a poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel with noncovalent HA-binding capabilities and eva...

  13. Upper face rejuvenation using botulinum toxin and hyaluronic acid fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Soni Nanda; Shikha Bansal

    2013-01-01

    The demand for facial rejuvenation is increasing, with each passing day, in all age groups. A number of procedures like chemical peels, microdermabrasion, laser and light therapies, and minimally invasive procedures like botulinum toxin injections (BTX A) and hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers are being extensively used by the dermatologist and plastic surgeons to meet this growing demand. A good knowledge of use of these techniques is becoming imperative for the dermatologist. In the present artic...

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Injection of a Corticosteroid and Hyaluronic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Callegari, Leonardo; Spanò, Emanuela; Bini, Amedeo; Valli, Federico; GENOVESE, EUGENIO; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Stenosing tenosynovitis (trigger finger) is one of the most common causes of pain and disability in the hand, which may often require treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroid injection, or open surgery. However, there is still large room for improvement in the treatment of this condition by corticosteroid injection. The mechanical, viscoelastic, and antinociceptive properties of hyaluronic acid may potentially support the use of this molecule in associ...

  15. Micropatterned Surfaces to Study Hyaluronic Acid Interactions with Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, Laura E.; Gerecht, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Cancer invasion and progression involves a motile cell phenotype, which is under complex regulation by growth factors/cytokines and extracellular matrix (ECM) components within the tumor microenvironment. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one stromal ECM component that is known to facilitate tumor progression by enhancing invasion, growth, and angiogenesis1. Interaction of HA with its cell surface receptor CD44 induces signaling events that promote tumor cell growth, survival, and migration, thereby in...

  16. Hyaluronic acid: A key molecule in skin aging

    OpenAIRE

    Papakonstantinou, Eleni; Roth, Michael; Karakiulakis, George

    2012-01-01

    Skin aging is a multifactorial process consisting of two distinct and independent mechanisms: intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Youthful skin retains its turgor, resilience and pliability, among others, due to its high content of water. Daily external injury, in addition to the normal process of aging, causes loss of moisture. The key molecule involved in skin moisture is hyaluronic acid (HA) that has unique capacity in retaining water. There are multiple sites for the control of HA synthesis, d...

  17. Hyaluronic Acid Bioconjugates for the Delivery of Bioactive Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Mero; Monica Campisi

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) has currently several therapeutic applications: in ophthalmology, osteoarthritis, wound healing, tissue regeneration, postoperative anti-adhesion and anesthetic medicine. In the last ten years, it has also been successfully investigated in the field of drug delivery, in the form of conjugates or hydrogel depot systems. HAylation, the covalent conjugation of HA to bioactive molecules, allows the overcoming of disadvantages associated with some pharmaceuticals, such as inso...

  18. Hyaluronic acid content of deep and subcutaneous bursae of man.

    OpenAIRE

    Canoso, J J; Stack, M T; Brandt, K D

    1983-01-01

    To provide a comparison of the contents of subcutaneous and deep bursae we dissected these structures from unfixed cadavers without apparent joint disease. No free fluid was found within any olecranon or prepatellar bursae (examples of subcutaneous bursae), while viscous fluid was invariably present in the (deep) retrocalcaneal bursae. The hyaluronic acid content of the washings of 5 rectrocalcaneal bursae ranged from 142 to 591 nmol hexosamine (mean = 281 nmol hexosamine). In contrast, the h...

  19. Targeting Hyaluronic Acid Family for Cancer Chemoprevention and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lokeshwar, Vinata B.; Mirza, Summan; Jordan, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid or hyaluronan (HA) is perhaps one of the most uncomplicated large polymers that regulates several normal physiological processes and, at the same time, contributes to the manifestation of a variety of chronic and acute diseases, including cancer. Members of the HA signaling pathway (HA synthases, HA receptors, and HYAL-1 hyaluronidase) have been experimentally shown to promote tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis, and hence each of them is a potential target for cancer t...

  20. Hyaluronic Acid Induces Activation of the κ-Opioid Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Zavan, Barbara; Ferroni, Letizia; Giorgi, Carlotta; Calò, Girolamo; Brun, Paola; Cortivo, Roberta; Abatangelo, Giovanni; Pinton, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Nociceptive pain is one of the most common types of pain that originates from an injury involving nociceptors. Approximately 60% of the knee joint innervations are classified as nociceptive. The specific biological mechanism underlying the regulation of nociceptors is relevant for the treatment of symptoms affecting the knee joint. Intra-articular administration of exogenous hyaluronic acid (HA) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) appears to be particularly effective in reducing...

  1. Glucosamine increases hyaluronic acid production in human osteoarthritic synovium explants

    OpenAIRE

    Uitterlinden EJ; Koevoet JLM; Verkoelen CF; Bierma-Zeinstra SMA; Jahr H; Weinans H; Verhaar JAN; GJVM van Osch

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Glucosamine (GlcN) used by patients with osteoarthritis was demonstrated to reduce pain, but the working mechanism is still not clear. Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid (HA) is also described to reduce pain in osteoarthritis. The synthesis of HA requires GlcN as one of its main building blocks. We therefore hypothesized that addition of GlcN might increase HA production by synovium tissue. Methods Human osteoarthritic synovium explants were obtained at total knee s...

  2. Hyaluronic Acid Based Hydrogels for Regenerative Medicine Applications

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels, obtained by cross-linking HA molecules with divinyl sulfone (DVS) based on a simple, reproducible, and safe process that does not employ any organic solvents, were developed. Owing to an innovative preparation method the resulting homogeneous hydrogels do not contain any detectable residual cross-linking agent and are easier to inject through a fine needle. HA hydrogels were characterized in terms of degradation and biological properties, viscoelasticity, injec...

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Hybrid Hyaluronic Acid-Gelatin Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Camci-Unal, Gulden; Cuttica, Davide; Annabi, Nasim; Demarchi, Danilo; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Biomimetic hybrid hydrogels have generated broad interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Hyaluronic acid (HA) and gelatin (hydrolyzed collagen) are naturally derived polymers and biodegradable under physiological conditions. Moreover, collagen and HA are major components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in most of the tissues (e.g. cardiovascular, cartilage, neural). When used as a hybrid material, HA-gelatin hydrogels may enable mimicking the ECM of native tissues. Althoug...

  4. Hyaluronic acid as a treatment for ankle osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Shu-Fen; Chou, Yi-Jiun; Hsu, Chien-Wei; Chen, Wen-ling

    2009-01-01

    Viscosupplementation refers to the concept of synovial fluid replacement with intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid (HA) for the relief of pain associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Intra-articular viscosupplementation was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1997. It is currently indicated only for the treatment of pain associated with knee OA. However, OA can occur in several of the weight-bearing joints of the foot and ankle. Ankle OA produces chronic disability tha...

  5. Hyaluronic acid hydrogels for vocal fold wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Gaston, Joel; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    The unique vibrational properties inherent to the human vocal fold have a significant detrimental impact on wound healing and scar formation. Hydrogels have taken prominence as a tissue engineered strategy to restore normal vocal structure and function as cellularity is low. The frequent vibrational and shear forces applied to, and present in this connective tissue make mechanical properties of such hydrogels a priority in this active area of research. Hyaluronic acid has been chemically modi...

  6. Place of hyaluronic acid preparations in therapy for osteoarthrosis

    OpenAIRE

    R M Balabanova

    2014-01-01

    The paper gives data on the positive role of hyaluronic acid (HA) preparations in the treatment of knee and hip osteoarthrosis (OA). The clinical effect of intraarticular agents is not only due to their lumbricative, but also, to a greater degree, anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective activities. The efficacy of HA preparations do not practically depend on their molecular weight. Long-term HA cycles can delay the risk of joint replacement in OA.

  7. Chitosan Scaffolds Containing Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Clara R.; Moreira Teixeira, Liliana S.; Moroni, Lorenzo; Reis, Rui L.; Blitterswijk, van, C.A.; Karperien, Marcel; Mano, João F.

    2011-01-01

    Scaffolds derived from natural polysaccharides are very promising in tissue engineering applications and regenerative medicine, as they resemble glycosaminoglycans in the extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we have prepared freeze-dried composite scaffolds of chitosan (CHT) and hyaluronic acid (HA) in different weight ratios containing either no HA (control) or 1%, 5%, or 10% of HA. We hypothesized that HA could enhance structural and biological properties of CHT scaffolds. To test thi...

  8. Biotechnological production of hyaluronic acid: a mini review

    OpenAIRE

    Sze, Jun Hui; Brownlie, Jeremy C.; Love, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a polysaccharide found in the extracellular matrix of vertebrate epithelial, neural and connective tissues. Due to the high moisture retention, biocompatibility and viscoelasticity properties of this polymer, HA has become an important component of major pharmaceutical, biomedical and cosmetic products with high commercial value worldwide. Currently, large scale production of HA involves extraction from animal tissues as well as the use of bacterial expression systems ...

  9. Hyaluronic Acid Binding Peptides Prevent Experimental Staphylococcal Wound Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zaleski, Kathleen J. ; Kolodka, Tadeusz; Cywes-Bentley, Colette; McLoughlin, Rachel M.; Mary L. Delaney; Charlton, Bernard T.; Johnson, Wendy; Tzianabos, Arthur O.

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of surgical wound infections. The development of mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance by this and other bacterial pathogens has prompted the search for new approaches to treat infectious diseases. Hyaluronic acid binding peptides have been shown to modulate cellular trafficking during host responses and were assessed for their ability to treat and possibly prevent experimental surgical wound infections caused by S. aureus. Treatment with these peptides...

  10. Effectiveness and utility of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Migliore, Alberto; Procopio, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative joint disease characterized by pain and progressive functional limitation. Viscosupplementation with intra-articular hyaluronic acid is a treatment option in knee OA that is included in the professional guidelines for treatment of this joint disease, but potentially should apply to all synovial joints in order to reduce pain and improve joint lubrication. Exogenous HA can enhance chondrocyte HA synthesis, prevent the degradation of cartilage and p...

  11. Chemical Sintering Generates Uniform Porous Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Cam, Cynthia; Segura, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Implantation of scaffolds for tissue repair has been met with limited success primarily due to the inability to achieve vascularization within the construct. Many strategies have shifted to incorporate pores into these scaffolds to encourage rapid cellular infiltration and subsequent vascular ingrowth. We utilized an efficient chemical sintering technique to create a uniform network of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microspheres for porous hyaluronic acid hydrogel formation. The porous hydrog...

  12. Surface Functionalization of Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels by Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Films

    OpenAIRE

    Yamanlar, Seda; Sant, Shilpa; Boudou, Thomas; Picart, Catherine; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), an anionic polysaccharide, is one of the major components of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). Although HA has been widely used for tissue engineering applications, it does not support cell attachment and spreading and needs chemical modification to support cellular adhesion. Here, we present a simple approach to functionalize photocrosslinked HA hydrogels by deposition of poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and HA multilayer films made by the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. PLL/...

  13. Place of hyaluronic acid preparations in therapy for osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Balabanova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data on the positive role of hyaluronic acid (HA preparations in the treatment of knee and hip osteoarthrosis (OA. The clinical effect of intraarticular agents is not only due to their lumbricative, but also, to a greater degree, anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective activities. The efficacy of HA preparations do not practically depend on their molecular weight. Long-term HA cycles can delay the risk of joint replacement in OA.

  14. Tranexamic Acid and Hyaluronate/Carboxymethylcellulose Create Cell Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldız, Elif; Yılmaz, Bayram; Dilbaz, Serdar; Üstün, Yusuf; Kumru, Selahattin

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Postoperative pelvic adhesions are associated with chronic pelvic pain, dyspareunia, and infertility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesion prevention effects of tranexamic acid (TA) and hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose (HA/CMC) barrier in the rat uterine horn models on the basis of macroscopic and microscopic adhesion scores and histopathological as well as biochemical parameters of inflammation. Methods: Twenty-one Wistar rats were randomly divided ...

  15. Advances and Refinement in Hyaluronic Acid Facial Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Christopher R; Kordestani, Reza; Small, Kevin H; Rohrich, Rod J

    2016-08-01

    Fillers temporarily augment deflated or ptotic facial compartments to restore a youthful appearance. Hyaluronic acids predominate the fillers market because of their focal volumization, duration of effect, low incidence of adverse reactions, and reversibility. Being able to properly perform these in-office procedures will ensure safety for patients and provide aesthetically optimal results. This communication provides the senior author's (R.J.R.) stepwise approach to facial aging and deflation with soft-tissue injectable fillers. PMID:27465184

  16. Place of hyaluronic acid preparations in therapy for osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Balabanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data on the positive role of hyaluronic acid (HA preparations in the treatment of knee and hip osteoarthrosis (OA. The clinical effect of intraarticular agents is not only due to their lumbricative, but also, to a greater degree, anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective activities. The efficacy of HA preparations do not practically depend on their molecular weight. Long-term HA cycles can delay the risk of joint replacement in OA.

  17. Collagen-Hyaluronic Acid Scaffolds for Adipose Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Davidenko, Natalia; Campbell, J J; Thian, E. S.; C. J. Watson; Cameron, Ruth Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) in vitro models of the mammary gland require a scaffold matrix that supports the development of adipose stroma within a robust freely permeable matrix. 3-D porous collagen-hyaluronic acid (HA: 7.5% and 15%) scaffolds were produced by controlled freeze-drying technique and crosslinking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide hydrochloride. All scaffolds displayed uniform, interconnected pore structure (total porosity approximately 85%). Physical and chemical...

  18. CHEMISTRY OF HYALURONIC ACID AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE IN DRUG DELIVERY STRATEGIES: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    R. Khan*, B. Mahendhiran and V. Aroulmoji

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is an important naturally occurring polysaccharide present in extracellular matrices. The network-forming, viscoelastic and the charge characteristics of hyaluronic acid are important to many biochemical functions of living tissues. Its involvement in many diseases such as cancer, arthritis and osteoporosis, and the fact that it has specific protein receptors present on the cell surfaces, has given new impetus in drug design and synthesis of hyaluronic acid-drug conjugates. As...

  19. CD44 Binding to Hyaluronic Acid Is Redox Regulated by a Labile Disulfide Bond in the Hyaluronic Acid Binding Site

    OpenAIRE

    Kellett-Clarke, Helena; Stegmann, Monika; Barclay, A. Neil; Metcalfe, Clive

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is the primary leukocyte cell surface receptor for hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix. Enzymatic post translational cleavage of labile disulfide bonds is a mechanism by which proteins are structurally regulated by imparting an allosteric change and altering activity. We have identified one such disulfide bond in CD44 formed by Cys77 and Cys97 that stabilises the HA binding groove. This bond is labile on the surface of leukocytes treated with chemical and enzyma...

  20. [Biocompatibility analysis of hyaluronic acid sodium gels for medical application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaning; Yuan, Tun; Jia, Lifang; Zou, Wen; Liang, Jie

    2012-08-01

    Hyaluronan acid sodium gels are used in ophthalmic surgery, orthopedic treatment and cosmetic surgery. In 2009,there were 12 domestic manufacturers in China producing 33 kinds of products. 23 kinds of imported products were allowed by SFDA to sale in the meantime. Since manufacturers use different production processes, product performances are quite different. According to the GB/T 16886. 1-2001, we designed a pilot program to evaluate the sodium hyaluronate gel products comprehensively in this paper. The results showed that, except chromosome aberration test of gel A and subchronic systemic toxicity of gel C appeared positive, the remaining samples of the test results were negative. This article provides a reference to write standard of cross-linked hyaluronic sodium gel and the revision of standard YY0308-2004. PMID:23016423

  1. Production and optimisation of hyaluronic acid extracted from Streptococcus pyogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Kawkab Abdulla Al-Saadiaa; Hassan Fadhil Naji; Ali Hmood Al-Saadi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Because of the less studies in this field in Iraq, this study aimed to use local Streptococcus pyogenes isolates to produce hyluronic acid. Methods The quantitative estimation of hyaluronic acid (HA) produced from eight local S. pyogenes isolates at different pH (6.3, 6.6, 6.9, 7.2, and 7.5) and glucose concentration (4%, 6%, 8%, and 1%) were done using the HA ELISA kit. Results This study showed that the maximum yield of HA was obtained at pH 7.5, and it was found that th...

  2. Nano-encapsulation of coenzyme Q10 using octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch (OSA-ST) was used to encapsulate Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). CoQ10 was dissolved in rice bran oil (RBO), and incorporated into an aqueous OSA-ST solution. High pressure homogenization (HPH) of the mixture was conducted at 170 MPa for 5-6 cycles. The resulting ...

  3. The Hyaluronic Acid Fillers: Current Understanding of the Tissue Device Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jacqueline J; Sidle, Douglas M

    2015-11-01

    The article is a detailed update regarding cosmetic injectable fillers, specifically focusing on hyaluronic acid fillers. Hyaluronic acid-injectable fillers are used extensively for soft tissue volumizing and contouring. Many different hyaluronic acid-injectable fillers are available on the market and differ in terms of hyaluronic acid concentration, particle size, cross-linking density, requisite needle size, duration, stiffness, hydration, presence of lidocaine, type of cross-linking technology, and cost. Hyaluronic acid is a natural component of many soft tissues, is identical across species minimizing immunogenicity has been linked to wound healing and skin regeneration, and is currently actively being studied for tissue engineering purposes. The biomechanical and biochemical effects of HA on the local microenvironment of the injected site are key to its success as a soft tissue filler. Knowledge of the tissue-device interface will help guide the facial practitioner and lead to optimal outcomes for patients. PMID:26505539

  4. Effect of hyaluronic acid on postoperative intraperitoneal adhesion formation in the rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urman, B.; Gomel, V.; Jetha, N. (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada))

    1991-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid solution in preventing intraperitoneal (IP) adhesions. The study design was prospective, randomized and blinded and involved 83 rats. Measured serosal injury was inflicted using a CO2 laser on the right uterine horn of the rat. Animals randomized to groups 1 and 2 received either 0.4% hyaluronic acid or its diluent phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) intraperitoneally before and after the injury. In groups 3 and 4, the same solutions were used only after the injury. Postoperative adhesions were assessed at second-look laparotomy. Histologic assessment of the fresh laser injury was carried out on uteri pretreated with hyaluronic acid, PBS, or nothing. Pretreatment with hyaluronic acid was associated with a significant reduction in postoperative adhesions and a significantly decreased crater depth. Hyaluronic acid appears to reduce postoperative IP adhesion formation by coating the serosal surfaces and decreasing the extent of initial tissue injury.

  5. Soft tissue augmentation - Use of hyaluronic acid as dermal filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedamurthy Maya

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue augmentation has revolutionized the treatment of the aging face. It is a technique in which a substance is injected under the skin. The concept of utilizing materials for soft tissue augmentation actually began around 1950 with the use of fluid silicone. Today we have a large armamentarium of implant materials to delay the tell tale signs of aging. Filling has replaced conventional surgery in facial rejuvenation. In this article, the emphasis will be on hyaluronic acid as this substance is easily available in India and ranks among the most widely used dermal fillers.

  6. Hyaluronic acid regulates normal intestinal and colonic growth in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Riehl, Terrence E.; Ee, Xueping; Stenson, William F

    2012-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix, affects gastrointestinal epithelial proliferation in injury models, but its role in normal growth is unknown. We sought to determine the effects of exogenous HA on intestinal and colonic growth by intraperitoneal injection of HA twice a week into C57BL/6 mice from 3 to 8 wk of age. Similarly, to determine the effects of endogenous HA on intestinal and colonic growth, we administered PEP-1, a peptide that blocks the binding of HA t...

  7. A novel crosslinked hyaluronic Acid nanogel for drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Pedrosa, Sílvia Santos; Gonçalves, Catarina; David, Laurent; Gama, F. M.

    2014-01-01

    An amphiphilic hyaluronic acid conjugate is successfully developed based on grafting a thiolated hydrophobic molecule to the polysaccharide backbone. The engineered conjugate is capable of assembling into nanostructures once dispersed in water, with average diameter of 80.2 ± 0.4 nm (n = 5), stable up to 6 months. The thiolated HyA conjugate is reticulated by dissulfide bond with a homofunctional crosslinker—1,4-Bis(3-[2-pyridyldithio]propionamido)butane (DPDPB). The drug loading efficiency o...

  8. Acetylated Hyaluronic Acid: Enhanced Bioavailability and Biological Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Carmela Saturnino; Maria Stefania Sinicropi; Ortensia Ilaria Parisi; Domenico Iacopetta; Ada Popolo; Stefania Marzocco; Giuseppina Autore; Anna Caruso; Anna Rita Cappello; Pasquale Longo; Francesco Puoci

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a macropolysaccharidic component of the extracellular matrix, is common to most species and it is found in many sites of the human body, including skin and soft tissue. Not only does HA play a variety of roles in physiologic and in pathologic events, but it also has been extensively employed in cosmetic and skin-care products as drug delivery agent or for several biomedical applications. The most important limitations of HA are due to its short half-life and quick degrad...

  9. Hyaluronic Acid-Human Blood Hydrogels for Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Connie Y. Chang; Chan, Angel; Armstrong, Patrick; Luo, Hong-Chang; Higuchi, Takahiro; Strehin, Iossif; Vakrou, Styliani; Lin, Xiaoping; Brown, Sophia; O’Rourke, Brian; Abraham, Theodore P.; Wahl, Richard; Steenbergen, Charles; ELISSEEFF, JENNIFER; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering-based approaches have the potential to improve stem cell engraftment by increasing cell delivery to the myocardium. Our objective was to develop and characterize a naturally-derived, autologous, biodegradable hydrogel in order to improve acute stem cell retention in the myocardium. HA-blood hydrogels(HA-Bl) were synthesized by mixing in a 1:1(v/v) ratio, lysed whole blood and hyaluronic acid(HA), whose carboxyl groups were functionalized with N-hydroxysuccinimide(NHS) to yi...

  10. Synthesis of a C-linked hyaluronic acid disaccharide mimetic

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Zhong-Xu; Yang, Qiang; Price, Kenneth N.; Chen, Tianniu; Nygren, Cara; Turner, John. F. C.; Baker, David C.

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of a C-disaccharide that is designed as a mimetic for the repeating unit disaccharide of hyaluronic acid is described. The target compound was obtained via the SmI2-promoted coupling reaction of the sulfone, 2-acetamido-4,6-O-benzylidene-3-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-1,2-dideoxy-1-pyridinylsulfonyl-β-D-glucopyranose (6), and the aldehyde, p-methoxyphenyl 2,3-di-O-benzyl-4-deoxy-4-C-formyl-6-O-p-methoxybenzyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (14).

  11. Serum hyaluronic acid as a marker of hepatic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the serum hyaluronic acid (HA) levels as biochemical marker of hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis and correlate it with the degree of hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis. This study was performed on 100 patients of chronic liver disease whose liver biopsies had been carried out. Fifty healthy controls were also included in the study. Routine liver function tests, hepatitis serology and serum hyaluronic acid levels were carried out on patients and controls. Liver biopsy of 100 patients revealed that 21 were in stage 0 fibrosis, 38 in stage 1 fibrosis, 26 in stage 3 fibrosis and 15 in stage 4 fibrosis. Mean Serum HA (mean +- SD) concentration in patients were 189 +- 98 mg/L vs. 21 +- 10 mg/L of healthy controls. The difference observed was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Patients in stage 4 fibrosis had significantly higher (p <0.001) mean serum HA concentration as compared to other stages of liver fibrosis. Diagnostic accuracy of serum HA at marginally elevated level of 60 mg/L determined the sensitivity 78.4 %, specificity 80.9%, positive predicted value 93.9% and negative predicted value of 50%. Serum HA is a useful non-invasive marker of liver fibrosis. There is a strong positive correlation between serum HA levels and degree of liver fibrosis. The concentration of serum HA rises according to progression of liver fibrosis and levels are highest in patients with liver cirrhosis. (author)

  12. Hyaluronic acid gel fillers in the management of facial aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredric S Brandt

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Fredric S Brandt1, Alex Cazzaniga21Private Practice in Coral Gables, Florida, USA and Manhattan, NY, USA, and Dermatology Research Institute, Coral Gables, FL, USA; 2Dermatology Research Institute, Coral Gables, Florida, USAAbstract: Time affects facial aging by producing cellular and anatomical changes resulting in the consequential loss of soft tissue volume. With the advent of new technologies, the physician has the opportunity of addressing these changes with the utilization of dermal fillers. Hyaluronic acid (HA dermal fillers are the most popular, non-permanent injectable materials available to physicians today for the correction of soft tissue defects of the face. This material provides an effective, non invasive, non surgical alternative for correction of the contour defects of the face due to its enormous ability to bind water and easiness of implantation. HA dermal fillers are safe and effective. The baby-boomer generation, and their desire of turning back the clock while enjoying an active lifestyle, has expanded the popularity of these fillers. In the US, there are currently eight HA dermal fillers approved for commercialization by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA. This article reviews the innate properties of FDA-approved HA fillers and provides an insight on future HA products and their utilization for the management of the aging face.Keywords: hyaluronic acid, aging face, dermal filler, wrinkles, Restylane, Perlane, Juvéderm

  13. Microbial production of hyaluronic acid: current state, challenges, and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Long

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hyaluronic acid (HA is a natural and linear polymer composed of repeating disaccharide units of β-1, 3-N-acetyl glucosamine and β-1, 4-glucuronic acid with a molecular weight up to 6 million Daltons. With excellent viscoelasticity, high moisture retention capacity, and high biocompatibility, HA finds a wide-range of applications in medicine, cosmetics, and nutraceuticals. Traditionally HA was extracted from rooster combs, and now it is mainly produced via streptococcal fermentation. Recently the production of HA via recombinant systems has received increasing interest due to the avoidance of potential toxins. This work summarizes the research history and current commercial market of HA, and then deeply analyzes the current state of microbial production of HA by Streptococcus zooepidemicus and recombinant systems, and finally discusses the challenges facing microbial HA production and proposes several research outlines to meet the challenges.

  14. Synthesis of a tetrasaccharide fragment of hyaluronic acid having a glucuronic acid at the reducing end

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Slaghek, T.M.; Hyppönen, T.K.; Ogawa, T.; Kamerling, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    A stereocontrolled synthesis of a tetrasaccharide fragment of hyaluronic acid, beta-p-methoxyphenyl glycoside of beta-D-GlcNAc-(1¨4)-beta-D-GlcNAc-(1¨3)-beta-D-GlcNAc-(1¨4)-D-GlcA, is presented.

  15. Protective effect of hyaluronic acid on cryopreserved boar sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Li; Yu, Sijiu; Zhou, Yan

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of supplementing freezing and thawing media with hyaluronic acid (HA) on the quality parameters of frozen-thawed boar spermatozoa. Boar semen samples were collected from seven mature Yorkshire boars once a week using the gloved hand technique; these samples were frozen-thawed in the extender with added HA. Boar sperm was cryopreserved in the extender with HA added at concentrations of 0 (used as control), 4, 6, 8, 8 and 12mg/L, and their effects on the quality of frozen-thawed boar sperm were evaluated. HA addition to the extender significantly improved sperm motility, sperm membrane integrity, mitochondrial activity, acrosomal integrity, superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, but decreased sperm malondialdehyde level (p<0.05). Therefore, HA could be a promising cryoprotectant for boar sperm. PMID:26944660

  16. Kinetics of molecular transformations in connective tissue hyaluronic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When exposed to ionizing radiations or inflammatory disease, the glycosaminolycan component of connective tissue is preferentially degraded, probably by a free-radical mediate pathway. The resulting changes in molecular structure adversely change the properties of the matrix. Rooster comb hyaluronic acid of high molecular weight was used to investigate the mechanisms of these structural changes at macro and molecular level. Intrinsic viscosity and gel permeation chromatography measurements are suitable for demonstrating that random chain session occurs. Fast kinetic techniques are necessary to identify the mechanisms of single strand breaks. Pulse conductivity and low-angle laser light scattering pulse radiolysis can quantify the rate and yield of strand breaks. Competitive radical scavenging methods have also allowed the quantification of the rate of spontaneous and alkali-catalyzed hydrolysis of a-hydroxy radicals on polysaccharide chains, which control molecular structure changes

  17. Enzymatically triggered multifunctional delivery system based on hyaluronic acid micelles

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Tumor targetability and stimuli responsivity of drug delivery systems (DDS) are key factors in cancer therapy. Implementation of multifunctional DDS can afford targetability and responsivity at the same time. Herein, cholesterol molecules (Ch) were coupled to hyaluronic acid (HA) backbones to afford amphiphilic conjugates that can self-assemble into stable micelles. Doxorubicin (DOX), an anticancer drug, and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles (NPs), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, were encapsulated by Ch-HA micelles and were selectively released in the presence of hyaluronidase (Hyals) enzyme. Cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies were done using three cancer cell lines (HeLa, HepG2 and MCF7) and one normal cell line (WI38). Higher Ch-HA micelles uptake was seen in cancer cells versus normal cells. Consequently, DOX release was elevated in cancer cells causing higher cytotoxicity and enhanced cell death. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  18. Perpendicular Strut Injection of Hyaluronic Acid Filler for Deep Wrinkles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiko, Takanobu; Kinoshita, Kahori; Kanayama, Koji; Feng, Jingwei; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2015-11-01

    Although various injection techniques of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler for facial rejuvenation have been developed, correction of deep wrinkles/grooves, such as the nasolabial fold (NLF), with intradermal or subdermal injections remains difficult. We tested the intradermal HA injection method to place multiple HA struts by (1) inserting a small needle perpendicularly to the wrinkle and (2) injecting HA as intradermal struts with the skin fully stretched by the practitioner's fingers. The results of both NLFs in 10 patients suggest that this technique improves NLFs and maintain the effects more consistently than conventional techniques, although the effects of both methods were almost lost after 6 months. Selective and/or combined application of this technique may enhance the current approach to facial rejuvenation with dermal fillers. PMID:26893992

  19. Glucosamine increases hyaluronic acid production in human osteoarthritic synovium explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uitterlinden EJ

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucosamine (GlcN used by patients with osteoarthritis was demonstrated to reduce pain, but the working mechanism is still not clear. Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid (HA is also described to reduce pain in osteoarthritis. The synthesis of HA requires GlcN as one of its main building blocks. We therefore hypothesized that addition of GlcN might increase HA production by synovium tissue. Methods Human osteoarthritic synovium explants were obtained at total knee surgery and pre-cultured for 1 day. The experimental conditions consisted of a 2 days continuation of the culture with addition of N-Acetyl-glucosamine (GlcN-Ac; 5 mM, glucosamine-hydrochloride (GlcN-HCl; 0.5 and 5 mM, glucose (Gluc; 0.5 and 5 mM. Hereafter HA production was measured in culture medium supernatant using an enzyme-linked binding protein assay. Real time RT-PCR was performed for hyaluronic acid synthase (HAS 1, 2 and 3 on RNA isolated from the explants. Results 0.5 mM and 5 mM GlcN-HCl significantly increased HA production compared to control (approximately 2 – 4-fold, whereas GlcN-Ac had no significant effect. Addition of 5 mM Gluc also increased HA production (approximately 2-fold, but 0.5 mM Gluc did not. Gene expression of the HA forming enzymes HAS 1, 2 and 3 was not altered by the addition of GlcN or Gluc. Conclusion Our data suggest that exogenous GlcN can increase HA production by synovium tissue and is more effective at lower concentrations than Gluc. This might indicate that GlcN exerts its potential analgesic properties through stimulation of synovial HA production.

  20. Alginic acid and hyaluronic acid, effective stabilizers of carthamin red colour in aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Saito

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Sodium salts and free forms of two heterosaccharides, alginic and hyaluronic acids were mixed with carthamin in a buffer at pH 5.5 and their preservation effects of carthamin red colour were screened after incubation for 24 h at 3-5oC in the dark. The effects observed were (alginic acid/hyaluronic acid, % on average: 69.3/60.3, for which the values are higher by 40.9 and 29.1%, respectively, compared with those of the control which was conducted with no addition of heterosaccharides. Alginic acid is a more promising stabilizer than haluronic acid, indicating that active groups such as hydroxyls, carboxyls and amino groups on the building units of the macromolecules are associated closely with the carthamin red colour preservation. The empirical outcomes are referred to the practical application of carthamin as a colourant of food products.

  1. Degradation of hyaluronic acid, poly- and monosaccharides, and model compounds by hypochlorite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, C L; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    Degradation of hyaluronic acid by oxidants such as HO. and HOCl/CIO- is believed to be important in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. While reaction of hyaluronic acid with HO. has been investigated extensively, reaction with HOCl/ClO- is less well defined. Thus, little is known about the...... site(s) of HOCl/ClO- attack, the intermediates formed, or the mechanism(s) of polymer degradation. In this study reaction of HOCl/ClO- with amides, sugars, polysaccharides, and hyaluronic acid has been monitored by UV-visible (220-340 nm) and EPR spectroscopy. UV-visible experiments have shown that......--C bond. The nature of the radicals formed has been investigated by EPR spin trapping. Reaction of HOCl/ClO- with hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulphates A and C, N-acetyl sugars, and amides gave novel, carbon-centered, spin adducts, the formation of which is consistent with selective initial attack at the...

  2. Dosimetric influence of hyaluronic acid in patients with prostate cancer treated with RT3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to assess the influence on dosimetry by the introduction of hyaluronic acid and assess the need for the realization of a second CT scan and consequent re-planning of RT3D treatment. (Author)

  3. Cashew apple juice as microbial cultivation medium for non-immunogenic hyaluronic acid production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano H. Oliveira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, natural cashew apple juice was used as cultivation medium as an alternative to substitute brain heart infusion medium. The effect of aeration and juice supplementation with yeast extract on the production of hyaluronic acid in batch fermentation was also investigated. Similar levels of cell mass were obtained in inoculum using cashew apple juice supplemented with yeast extract or the conventional brain heart infusion medium. Fermentation in Erlenmeyer flasks produced low biomass and hyaluronic acid concentrations. The hyaluronic acid concentration and viscosity increased from 0.15 g/L and 3.87 cP (no aeration or medium supplementation to 1.76 g/L and 107 cP, when aeration (2 vvm and 60 g/L of yeast extract were used. The results suggest the production of low-molecular weight hyaluronic acid oligomers instead of the high molecular weight polymer.

  4. Design of Cell-Matrix Interactions in Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Jonathan; Truong, Norman F.; Segura, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    The design of hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel scaffolds to elicit highly controlled and tunable cell response and behavior is a major field of interest in developing tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. This review will begin with an overview of the biological context of hyaluronic acid, knowledge needed to better understand how to engineer cell-matrix interactions in the scaffolds via the incorporation of different types of signals in order to direct and control cell beh...

  5. Agroindustrial Byproducts For The Production Of Hyaluronic Acid By Streptococcus Zooepidemicus ATCC 39920

    OpenAIRE

    Nicole Caldas Pan; Josiane Alessandra Vignoli; Cristiani Baldo; Hanny Cristina Braga Pereira; Rui Srgio dos Santos Ferreira da Silva; Maria Antonia Pedrine Colabone Celligoi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Agroindustrial derivatives are alternative nutritional sources employed in bioprocesses that reduce costs and corroborate with social sustainability. In this study alternative carbon sugarcane juice sugarcane molasses and soy molasses and nitrogen sources corn steep liquor soy protein and whey protein were evaluated for hyaluronic acid production by Streptococcus zooepidemicus ATCC 39920. The medium containing sugarcane molasses archived high yield of hyaluronic acid 0.066 g.g-1 when...

  6. A case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Basora, Jose F.; Fernandez, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Modesto; Adorno, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage Symptoms: Cough dry • short of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: — Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Hyaluronic acid is a substance that is naturally present in the human body, especially in joints and eyes. Hyaluronic acid injectable gels have been available for the general market since 2003 as cosmetic dermal fillers and skin boosters. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is an acute event that threatens ...

  7. A Novel Technique of Supra Superficial Musculoaponeurotic System Hyaluronic Acid Injection for Lower Face Lifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahawatwong, Sinijchaya; Sirithanabadeekul, Punyaphat; Patanajareet, Vasiyapha; Wattanakrai, Penpun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various methods attempting to correct sagging of the lower face focus mainly on manipulation of the superficial musculoaponeurotic System. Each technique has its own limitation. The authors propose a relatively simple, conservative method utilizing hyaluronic acid injection just above the superficial musculoaponeurotic System. Objective: To address a novel hyaluronic injection technique to lift the lower face. Methods: Details of the injection techniques are described. The Position of the hyaluronic acid injected and the effect of hyaluronic acid on the superficial musculoaponeurotic System were confirmed by ultrasonography in one of the cases. Results: Sonogram images demonstrated the location of the injected hyaluronic acid and pressure effect of hyaluronic acid on the superficial musculoaponeurotic System, confirming the ability to manipulate the superficial musculoaponeurotic System by this injection technique. The lifting result of this Single injection technique was immediately visible and maintained for at least 26 weeks. Conclusion: This is a less invasive, reproducible method that provides a sustained face lifting result. The authors propose the term “supraSMAS lift” for this novel injection technique. PMID:27047633

  8. MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL, AND THERMAL PROPERTIES OF MALEIC ANHYDRIDE MODIFIED RICE HUSK FILLED PVC COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Navin Chand; Bhajan Das Jhod

    2008-01-01

    Unmodified and modified rice husk powder filled PVC composites were prepared having different amounts of rice husk powder. Mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of these composites were determined. The tensile strength of rice husk powder PVC composites having 0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 weight percent of rice husk powder was found to be 33.9, 19.4, 18.1, 14.6, and 9.5 MPa, respectively. Adding of maleic anhydride- modified rice husk powder improved the tensile strength of rice husk powder...

  9. The radiation-induced degradation of hyaluronic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free-radical-induced chain scission in hyaluronic acid in aqueous solution has been studied using pulse radiolysis. In the absence of oxygen (nitrous oxide-saturated solutions) the process of chain breakage was monitored by measuring changes in conductivity resulting from the release of condensed counter-ions (K+), originally located in the vicinity of the break. The rate of formation of breaks was found to be first order and was catalysed by acid and base. More than two independent reaction pathways are involved in the cleavage processes. In the presence of oxygen (N2O/O2), chain scission has been measured by pulse radiolysis monitoring changes in scattered light intensity as well as following conductivity changes. In oxygenated solutions, the kinetics of OH-radical-induced chain scission were found to contain a second-order component; the rate of breakage was base catalysed. Yield-dose plots for chain breaks (N2O/O2, pulse-irradiated), showed a marked dependence on pH. Steady-state radiolysis (N2O/O2) was used to determine G-values for oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide formation and peroxide formation. (author)

  10. Viscosupplementation in the hip: evaluation of hyaluronic acid formulations

    OpenAIRE

    van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; Rys, B.; Mulier, M.

    2007-01-01

    This study compares three different hyaluronate formulations and evaluates functionality, time of satisfactory pain relief and also the delay in performing a total hip arthroplasty. One hundred and twenty patients (126 hips) received viscosupplementation with one of the three hyaluronate formulations. All patients were candidate for surgical treatment with a total hip arthroplasty. Three different products were consecutively used: Adant®, Synocrom® or Synvisc®. Patients were assessed 6 weeks ...

  11. Oral absorption of hyaluronic acid and phospholipids complexes in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-Ling Huang; Pei-Xue Ling; Tian-Min Zhang

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To prepare a complex of hyaluronic acid (HA) and phospholipids (PL), and study the improvement effect of PL on the oral absorption of HA.METHODS: The complex of HA-PL (named Haplex) was prepared by film dispersion and sonication method, its physico-chemical properties were identified by infrared spectra and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The oral absorption of Haplex was studied. Thirty-two healthy rats were divided into 4 groups randomly: (1) a normal saline (NS) control group; (2) an HA group; (3) a mixture group and (4) a Haplex group. After intragastric administration, the concentration of HA in serum was determined.RESULTS: The physico-chemical properties of Haplex were different from HA or PL or their mixture. After Haplex was administered to rats orally, the serum concentration of HA was increased when compared with the mixture or HA control groups from 4 h to 10 h (P < 0.05). The ΔAUCo-12 h of Haplex was also greater than that of the other three groups (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: The method of film dispersion and sonication can prepare HA and PL complex, and PL can enhance the oral absorption of exogenous HA.

  12. Viscosity changes in hyaluronic acid: Irradiation and rheological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daar, Eman [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: e.daar@surrey.ac.uk; King, L.; Nisbet, A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Thorpe, R.B. [Fluids and Systems Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a significant component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), particular interest being shown herein in synovial fluid. The present study aims to investigate the degrading effects of X-ray radiation on HA at radiotherapy doses. Measurements of viscosity and shear stresses on HA solutions have been made at different shear rates using various types of viscometer for different concentrations in the range 0.01-1% w/v of HA. The HA has been subjected to doses of 6 MV photon radiation ranging from 0 to 20 Gy, the major emphasis being on doses below 5 Gy. It is found that there is a dose-dependent relationship between viscosity and shear rate, viscosity reducing with radiation dose, this being related to polymer scissions via the action of radiation-induced free radicals. The dependency appears to become weaker at higher concentrations, possibly due to the contribution to viscosity from polymer entanglement becoming dominant over that from mean molecular weight. Present results, for HA solutions in the concentration range 0.01% to 1% w/v, show reduced viscosity with dose over the range 0-4 Gy, the latter covering the dose regime of interest in fractionated radiotherapy. The work also shows agreement with previous Raman microspectrometry findings by others, the possible bond alterations being defined by comparison with available published data.

  13. Hyaluronic acid induces activation of the κ-opioid receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Zavan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Nociceptive pain is one of the most common types of pain that originates from an injury involving nociceptors. Approximately 60% of the knee joint innervations are classified as nociceptive. The specific biological mechanism underlying the regulation of nociceptors is relevant for the treatment of symptoms affecting the knee joint. Intra-articular administration of exogenous hyaluronic acid (HA in patients with osteoarthritis (OA appears to be particularly effective in reducing pain and improving patient function. METHODS: We performed an in vitro study conducted in CHO cells that expressed a panel of opioid receptors and in primary rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons to determine if HA induces the activation of opioid peptide receptors (OPr using both aequorin and the fluorescent dye Fura-2/AM. RESULTS: Selective agonists and antagonists for each OPr expressed on CHO cells were used to test the efficacy of our in vitro model followed by stimulation with HA. The results showed that HA induces stimulatory effects on the κ receptor (KOP. These effects of HA were also confirmed in rat DRG neurons, which express endogenously the OPr. CONCLUSIONS: HA activates the KOP receptor in a concentration dependent manner, with a pEC(50 value of 7.57.

  14. Viscosity changes in hyaluronic acid: Irradiation and rheological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a significant component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), particular interest being shown herein in synovial fluid. The present study aims to investigate the degrading effects of X-ray radiation on HA at radiotherapy doses. Measurements of viscosity and shear stresses on HA solutions have been made at different shear rates using various types of viscometer for different concentrations in the range 0.01-1% w/v of HA. The HA has been subjected to doses of 6 MV photon radiation ranging from 0 to 20 Gy, the major emphasis being on doses below 5 Gy. It is found that there is a dose-dependent relationship between viscosity and shear rate, viscosity reducing with radiation dose, this being related to polymer scissions via the action of radiation-induced free radicals. The dependency appears to become weaker at higher concentrations, possibly due to the contribution to viscosity from polymer entanglement becoming dominant over that from mean molecular weight. Present results, for HA solutions in the concentration range 0.01% to 1% w/v, show reduced viscosity with dose over the range 0-4 Gy, the latter covering the dose regime of interest in fractionated radiotherapy. The work also shows agreement with previous Raman microspectrometry findings by others, the possible bond alterations being defined by comparison with available published data.

  15. Viscosity changes in hyaluronic acid: irradiation and rheological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a significant component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and synovial fluid. Measurements of viscosity and shear stresses at different shear rates are made with rotational viscometers on HA solutions of different concentrations (0.01% - 1% wbv) subjected to doses of 6 MV photon radiation ranging from 0 - 15 Gy. It is found that there is a dose-dependent relationship between viscosity and shear rate, viscosity reducing with radiation dose, this being related to polymer scissions via the action of radiation-induced free radicals. The dependency appears to become weaker at higher concentrations, possibly due to the contribution to viscosity from polymer entanglement becoming dominant over that from mean molecular weight. HA rheology is also found to be adequately described by a power law equation over the shear rate range 0 - 1000 s-1, where the consistency factor K2 = 3.497 ± 0.151 Pa.sn and n = 0.524 ± 0.015

  16. Hyaluronic Acid Based Hydrogels for Regenerative Medicine Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assunta Borzacchiello

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA hydrogels, obtained by cross-linking HA molecules with divinyl sulfone (DVS based on a simple, reproducible, and safe process that does not employ any organic solvents, were developed. Owing to an innovative preparation method the resulting homogeneous hydrogels do not contain any detectable residual cross-linking agent and are easier to inject through a fine needle. HA hydrogels were characterized in terms of degradation and biological properties, viscoelasticity, injectability, and network structural parameters. They exhibit a rheological behaviour typical of strong gels and show improved viscoelastic properties by increasing HA concentration and decreasing HA/DVS weight ratio. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that processes such as sterilization and extrusion through clinical needles do not imply significant alteration of viscoelastic properties. Both SANS and rheological tests indicated that the cross-links appear to compact the network, resulting in a reduction of the mesh size by increasing the cross-linker amount. In vitro degradation tests of the HA hydrogels demonstrated that these new hydrogels show a good stability against enzymatic degradation, which increases by increasing HA concentration and decreasing HA/DVS weight ratio. Finally, the hydrogels show a good biocompatibility confirmed by in vitro tests.

  17. Bioinspired lubricating films of cellulose nanofibrils and hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Delgado, Juan José; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Österberg, Monika

    2016-02-01

    The development of materials that combine the excellent mechanical strength of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) with the lubricating properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) is a new, promising approach to cartilage implants not explored so far. A simple, solvent-free method to produce a very lubricating, strong cellulosic material by covalently attaching HA to the surface of CNF films is described in this work. A detailed analysis of the tribological properties of the CNF films with and without HA is also presented. Surface and friction forces at micro/nanoscale between model hard surfaces (glass microspheres) and the CNF thin films were measured using an atomic force microscope and the colloid probe technique. The effect of HA attachment, the pH and the ionic strength of the aqueous medium on the forces was examined. Excellent lubrication was observed for CNF films with HA attached in conditions where the HA layer was highly hydrated. These results pave the way for the development of new nanocellulose-based materials with good lubrication properties that could be used in biomedical applications. PMID:26674836

  18. Hyaluronic Acid Bioconjugates for the Delivery of Bioactive Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA has currently several therapeutic applications: in ophthalmology, osteoarthritis, wound healing, tissue regeneration, postoperative anti-adhesion and anesthetic medicine. In the last ten years, it has also been successfully investigated in the field of drug delivery, in the form of conjugates or hydrogel depot systems. HAylation, the covalent conjugation of HA to bioactive molecules, allows the overcoming of disadvantages associated with some pharmaceuticals, such as insolubility, instability and fast kidney clearance. These issues can be addressed also by covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEGylation, but HA has the relevant advantages of biodegradability, high loading and specific targeting. In this review, the novel HA derivatives and the latest advances in HA-based drug delivery with a particular focus on the chemistry of conjugation will be discussed. Although, so far, there are no HA-drug conjugates on the market, several derivatives are presently under clinical investigation, and the promising results encourage further investigations and the exploitation of this versatile polysaccharide.

  19. Collagen-hyaluronic acid scaffolds for adipose tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidenko, N; Campbell, J J; Thian, E S; Watson, C J; Cameron, R E

    2010-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) in vitro models of the mammary gland require a scaffold matrix that supports the development of adipose stroma within a robust freely permeable matrix. 3-D porous collagen-hyaluronic acid (HA: 7.5% and 15%) scaffolds were produced by controlled freeze-drying technique and crosslinking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide hydrochloride. All scaffolds displayed uniform, interconnected pore structure (total porosity approximately 85%). Physical and chemical analysis showed no signs of collagen denaturation during the formation process. The values of thermal characteristics indicated that crosslinking occurred and that its efficiency was enhanced by the presence of HA. Although the crosslinking reduced the swelling of the strut material in water, the collagen-HA matrix as a whole tended to swell more and show higher dissolution resistance than pure collagen samples. The compressive modulus and elastic collapse stress were higher for collagen-HA composites. All the scaffolds were shown to support the proliferation and differentiation 3T3-L1 preadipocytes while collagen-HA samples maintained a significantly increased proportion of cycling cells (Ki-67+). Furthermore, collagen-HA composites displayed significantly raised Adipsin gene expression with adipogenic culture supplementation for 8 days vs. control conditions. These results indicate that collagen-HA scaffolds may offer robust, freely permeable 3-D matrices that enhance mammary stromal tissue development in vitro. PMID:20466086

  20. The radiation-induced degradation of hyaluronic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeble, D. J.; Phillips, G. O.; Bothe, E.; Schuchmann, H.-P.; von Sonntag, C.

    Free-radical-induced chain scission in hyaluronic acid in aqueous solution has been studied using pulse radiolysis. In the absence of oxygen (nitrous oxide-saturated solutions) the process of chain breakage was monitored by measuring changes in conductivity resulting from the release of condensed counter-ions (K +), originally located in the vicinity of the break. The rate of formation of breaks was found to be first order and was catalysed by acid and base (overall half-lives at pH values of 4.8, 7 and 10.2 were 0.6, 1 and 0.1 ms). It would seem that more than two independent reaction pathways are involved in the cleavage processes. In the presence of oxygen (N 2O/O 2), chain scission has been measured by pulse radiolysis monitoring changes in scattered light intensity as well as following conductivity changes. In oxygenated solutions, the kinetics of OH-radical-induced chain scission were found to contain a second-order component; the rate of breakage was base catalysed. Yield-dose plots for chain breaks (N 2O/O 2, pulse-irradiated), showed a marked dependence on pH, with G-values (molecules/100 eV) of 0.7, 2.5 and 4.7 at pH values of 7, 9.7 and 10.4, respectively. Steady-state radiolysis (N 2O/O 2) was used to determine G-values for oxygen consumption [ G(-O 2) ≈ 6], carbon dioxide formation [ G(CO 2) = 0.8 in the absence of O 2 and 1.3 in its presence] and peroxide formation [ G(H 2O 2) ≈ 2; G(organic hydroperoxide) < 0.15].

  1. Gelation of photopolymerized hyaluronic acid grafted with glycidyl methacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, S.S.; Weaver, J.M.; Love, B.J., E-mail: bjlove@umich.edu

    2011-12-01

    Experiments have tracked the ambient gelation of a series of hydrophilic hyaluronic acid (HA) resins grafted with glycidyl methacrylate (GM) and photopolymerized as a function of dose. The resin mixtures range in GMHA concentration between 0.5 and 1.5% w/w in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Illuminated at 20 mW/cm{sup 2}, the dynamic viscosity ({eta}(t)) has been tracked and characterized using the Boltzmann log-sigmoidal model. A gelled viscosity of {approx} 10 Pa s was determined at 0.5% w/w which rose to {approx} 50 Pa s at or above 1% w/w. More curing agent marginally increased the gel viscosity at each concentration. Time constants associated with viscosity advancement were shortest at [GMHA] = 1.0%; higher concentrations are attributed with lower quantum efficiency when illuminated. Subsequent frequency sweeps replicated already published work using similar GHMA concentrations in PBS. G' values ranged from 100 to 500 Pa over the formulation range with expected sensitivity to GMHA and curing agent concentration. Overall, the sigmoidal model represented this advancing viscosity data well, and further analysis of the physical significance of these model parameters may help in understanding photopolymerization of this complicated formulation more broadly. Highlights: {yields} The ambient dynamic viscosity of photopolymerized GMHA gels has been measured. {yields} 2 physical parameters and two time constants were extracted from the sigmoidal model. {yields} Higher crosslinker content for a fixed GMHA concentration led to higher gel viscosity. {yields} The time to toggle between the initial and final viscosity ranged between 5 and 10 s. {yields} Dynamic frequency sweep tests on cured gels also revealed G' values between 100 and 500 Pa.

  2. Gelation of photopolymerized hyaluronic acid grafted with glycidyl methacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have tracked the ambient gelation of a series of hydrophilic hyaluronic acid (HA) resins grafted with glycidyl methacrylate (GM) and photopolymerized as a function of dose. The resin mixtures range in GMHA concentration between 0.5 and 1.5% w/w in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Illuminated at 20 mW/cm2, the dynamic viscosity (η(t)) has been tracked and characterized using the Boltzmann log-sigmoidal model. A gelled viscosity of ∼ 10 Pa s was determined at 0.5% w/w which rose to ∼ 50 Pa s at or above 1% w/w. More curing agent marginally increased the gel viscosity at each concentration. Time constants associated with viscosity advancement were shortest at [GMHA] = 1.0%; higher concentrations are attributed with lower quantum efficiency when illuminated. Subsequent frequency sweeps replicated already published work using similar GHMA concentrations in PBS. G' values ranged from 100 to 500 Pa over the formulation range with expected sensitivity to GMHA and curing agent concentration. Overall, the sigmoidal model represented this advancing viscosity data well, and further analysis of the physical significance of these model parameters may help in understanding photopolymerization of this complicated formulation more broadly. Highlights: → The ambient dynamic viscosity of photopolymerized GMHA gels has been measured. → 2 physical parameters and two time constants were extracted from the sigmoidal model. → Higher crosslinker content for a fixed GMHA concentration led to higher gel viscosity. → The time to toggle between the initial and final viscosity ranged between 5 and 10 s. → Dynamic frequency sweep tests on cured gels also revealed G' values between 100 and 500 Pa.

  3. Anti-inflammatory drug delivery from hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sei K; Jelacic, Sandra; Maier, Ronald V; Stayton, Patrick S; Hoffman, Allan S

    2004-01-01

    Two different types of hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels were synthesized by crosslinking HA with divinyl sulfone (DVS) and poly(ethylene glycol)-divinyl sulfone (VS-PEG-VS). Vitamin E succinate (VES), an anti-inflammatory drug, and bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model of anti-inflammatory protein drugs, were loaded into the gels and their release kinetics were measured in vitro. VES and BSA released with a burst from both HA hydrogels during the first few hours, and release continued gradually for several days. The rate of release from HA-VS-PEG-VS-HA hydrogels was faster than that from HA-DVS-HA hydrogels, presumably due to the lower crosslink density in the former. The anti-inflammatory action of released VES was tested by incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) on HA hydrogels with and without VES in the gel. The number of cells adhering on HA hydrogels was very low compared to that on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), which might be one of the important advantages of using HA hydrogels for implant coatings or tissue engineering applications. ELISA test results showed that the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) concentration was very low in the supernatant of the wells containing the HA hydrogel with VES in contact with the activated macrophages compared to that without VES. This is probably the effect of the released VES reducing the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-alpha. HA hydrogels containing anti-inflammatory drugs may have potential for use in tissue engineering and also as biocompatible coatings of implants. PMID:15503629

  4. Elastoviscous Transitions of Articular Cartilage Reveal a Mechanism of Synergy between Lubricin and Hyaluronic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnevie, Edward D.; Galesso, Devis; Secchieri, Cynthia; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    When lubricated by synovial fluid, articular cartilage provides some of the lowest friction coefficients found in nature. While it is known that macromolecular constituents of synovial fluid provide it with its lubricating ability, it is not fully understood how two of the main molecules, lubricin and hyaluronic acid, lubricate and interact with one another. Here, we develop a novel framework for cartilage lubrication based on the elastoviscous transition to show that lubricin and hyaluronic acid lubricate by distinct mechanisms. Such analysis revealed nonspecific interactions between these molecules in which lubricin acts to concentrate hyaluronic acid near the tissue surface and promotes a transition to a low friction regime consistent with the theory of viscous boundary lubrication. Understanding the mechanics of synovial fluid not only provides insight into the progression of diseases such as arthritis, but also may be applicable to the development of new biomimetic lubricants. PMID:26599797

  5. Comparative studies of various hyaluronic acids produced by microbial fermentation for potential topical ophthalmic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillaumie, Fanny; Furrer, Pascal; Felt-Baeyens, Olivia;

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a comparative study of various hyaluronic acids (HA) produced by fermentation of either Bacillus subtilis or Streptococcus towards the selection of an optimal molecular weight (MW) HA for the preparation of topical ophthalmic formulations. The influence of HA MW on water binding...... capacity, sterile filtration, rheological properties, precorneal residence time and ocular tolerance of ophthalmic solutions was investigated. Molecular weight did not affect hydration of hyaluronic acid according to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In general, medium MW HA (0.6–1 MDa) resulted in...... ophthalmoscopy (CLSO) conclusively showed the excellent tolerance of both Bacillus-derived HA and Streptococcus-derived HA after topical instillation onto the corneal surface. Overall, this comprehensive work highlights the superiority of medium MW hyaluronic acid for topical ophthalmic formulations based on...

  6. Detachment variants of Chinese hamster cells. Hyaluronic acid as a modulator of cell detachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnhart, B.J.; Cox, S.H.; Kraemer, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    Variants of the Chinese hamster cell line CHO have been isolated and characterized with respect to attachment and trypsin- or EGTA-mediated detachment kinetics, cell morphologies, and the complex carbohydrates (labeled with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine) of the cell surface. The variant which was more readily detached from the substratum exhibited a more rounded cell shape and had three times more label as hyaluronic acid on the cell surface than the parental cell. The slowly detaching variant had a morphology similar to the parental cell but only half the radioactivity ascribable to hyaluronic acid. Endogenous levels of cAMP were unaltered in the variants. Exogenous db-cAMP caused the cells to elongate and flatten but did not alter the characteristic detachment kinetics. The role of hyaluronic acid as a modulator of the cell substratum interface is discussed.

  7. The nonlinear viscoelasticity of hyaluronic acid and its role in joint lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenhuan; Christopher, Gordon F

    2015-04-01

    Hyaluronic acid solutions have been widely studied due to their relevance to the rheological behavior of synovial fluid and joint lubrication. Ambulatory joint motion is typically large oscillatory deflections; therefore, large amplitude oscillatory shear strain experiments are used to examine the relevant non-linear viscoelastic properties of these solutions. Using the sequence of physical processes method to analyze data provides time dependent viscoelastic moduli, which exhibit a clear physiologically relevant behavior to hyaluronic acids non-linear viscoelasticity. In particular, it is seen that during peak strain/acceleration, the time dependent elastic modulus peaks and the loss modulus is at a minimum. The hyaluronic acid can provide an immediate elastic response to sudden forces, acting like a shock absorber during sudden changes in direction of motion or maximum deflection. However, during peak rate, the elastic modulus is at a minimum and the loss modulus is at a maximum, which provides greater efficacy to hydrodynamic shear lubrication. PMID:25686377

  8. Higher Ratios of Hyaluronic Acid Enhance Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human MSCs in a Hyaluronic Acid–Gelatin Composite Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian G. Pfeifer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs seeded on specific carrier materials are a promising source for the repair of traumatic cartilage injuries. The best supportive carrier material has not yet been determined. As natural components of cartilage’s extracellular matrix, hyaluronic acid and collagen are the focus of biomaterial research. In order to optimize chondrogenic support, we investigated three different scaffold compositions of a hyaluronic acid (HA-gelatin based biomaterial. Methods: Human MSCs (hMSCs were seeded under vacuum on composite scaffolds of three different HA-gelatin ratios and cultured in chondrogenic medium for 21 days. Cell-scaffold constructs were assessed at different time points for cell viability, gene expression patterns, production of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM and for (immuno-histological appearance. The intrinsic transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta uptake of empty scaffolds was evaluated by determination of the TGF-beta concentrations in the medium over time. Results: No significant differences were found for cell seeding densities and cell viability. hMSCs seeded on scaffolds with higher ratios of HA showed better cartilage-like differentiation in all evaluated parameters. TGF-beta uptake did not differ between empty scaffolds. Conclusion: Higher ratios of HA support the chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs seeded on a HA-gelatin composite scaffold.

  9. Radiation induced depolymerization of hyaluronic acid (HA) in aqueous solutions at pH 7.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolytic depolymerization of hyaluronic acid (HA, a heteropolysaccharide) in aqueous solutions under a variety of conditions demonstrates that the damaging effect of radiolytic radical species is in the following order: OH>esub(aq)sup(-)>Osub(2). Cysteine, penicillamine and dithiothreitol were found to protect against primary radiolytic species. The results point out that the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the above three thiols do not protect against the radiolytic species generated by the Mg-irradiation of aerated sodium formate solutions. The results also indicate that the reaction between COsub(2) anion and hyaluronic acid is faster than that between Osub(2) and hyaluronic acid and that COsub(2) anions are not scavenged by superoxide dismutase. The results further suggest that t-buthanol radicals interact with hyaluronic acid and reduce the viscosity of HA solutions. Preliminary pulse radiolysis experiments do demonstrate a reaction between COsub(2) radical and hyaluronic acid. (author)

  10. Radiation induced depolymerization of hyaluronic acid (HA) in aqueous solutions at pH 7. 4. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lal, M.

    1985-10-01

    Radiolytic depolymerization of hyaluronic acid (HA, a heteropolysaccharide) in aqueous solutions under a variety of conditions demonstrates that the damaging effect of radiolytic radical species is in the following order: OH > esub(aq)sup(-) > Osub(2). Cysteine, penicillamine and dithiothreitol were found to protect against primary radiolytic species. The results point out that the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the above three thiols do not protect against the radiolytic species generated by the Mg-irradiation of aerated sodium formate solutions. The results also indicate that the reaction between COsub(2) anion and hyaluronic acid is faster than that between Osub(2) and hyaluronic acid and that COsub(2) anions are not scavenged by superoxide dismutase. The results further suggest that t-buthanol radicals interact with hyaluronic acid and reduce the viscosity of HA solutions. Preliminary pulse radiolysis experiments do demonstrate a reaction between COsub(2) radical and hyaluronic acid.

  11. High and low molecular weight hyaluronic acid differentially regulate human fibrocyte differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu S Maharjan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Following tissue injury, monocytes can enter the tissue and differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes, but little is known about what regulates this differentiation. Extracellular matrix contains high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HMWHA; ∼2×10(6 Da. During injury, HMWHA breaks down to low molecular weight hyaluronic acid (LMWHA; ∼0.8-8×10(5 Da. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this report, we show that HMWHA potentiates the differentiation of human monocytes into fibrocytes, while LMWHA inhibits fibrocyte differentiation. Digestion of HMWHA with hyaluronidase produces small hyaluronic acid fragments, and these fragments inhibit fibrocyte differentiation. Monocytes internalize HMWHA and LMWHA equally well, suggesting that the opposing effects on fibrocyte differentiation are not due to differential internalization of HMWHA or LMWHA. Adding HMWHA to PBMC does not appear to affect the levels of the hyaluronic acid receptor CD44, whereas adding LMWHA decreases CD44 levels. The addition of anti-CD44 antibodies potentiates fibrocyte differentiation, suggesting that CD44 mediates at least some of the effect of hyaluronic acid on fibrocyte differentiation. The fibrocyte differentiation-inhibiting factor serum amyloid P (SAP inhibits HMWHA-induced fibrocyte differentiation and potentiates LMWHA-induced inhibition. Conversely, LMWHA inhibits the ability of HMWHA, interleukin-4 (IL-4, or interleukin-13 (IL-13 to promote fibrocyte differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: We hypothesize that hyaluronic acid signals at least in part through CD44 to regulate fibrocyte differentiation, with a dominance hierarchy of SAP>LMWHA≥HMWHA>IL-4 or IL-13.

  12. Novel self-associative and multiphase nanostructured soft carriers based on amphiphilic hyaluronic acid derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eenschooten, Corinne; Vaccaro, Andrea; Delie, Florence;

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the physicochemical properties in aqueous media of amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives obtained by reaction of HA’s hydroxyl groups with octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA). The self-associative properties of the resulting octenyl succinic...... anhydridemodified hyaluronic acid (OSA-HA) derivatives were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy using Nile Red as fluorophore. The morphology, size and surface charge of the OSA-HA assemblies were determined by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and by measuring their electrophoretic...

  13. Efficacy of a New Topical Nano-hyaluronic Acid in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Jegasothy, S. Manjula; Zabolotniaia, Valentina; Bielfeldt, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new topical low molecular nano-hyaluronic acid preparation in treating wrinkles, skin hydration, and skin elasticity in humans. Methods: Thirty-three women with an average age of 45.2 were studied for a period of eight weeks to measure the anti-wrinkle efficacy of a new nano-hyaluronic acid. The measurements were performed in the periorbital regions by investigating the three-dimensional structure using a DermaTOP for wrinkle...

  14. Improvement of tear trough by monophasic hyaluronic Acid and calcium hydroxylapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, Uwe

    2014-10-01

    Tear trough deformities are a sign of facial aging. The anatomical base is well understood. In many patients, minimal invasive surgical procedures are useful to improve appearance. Here, the authors describe the use of monophasic hyaluronic acid dermal filler and calcium hydroxylapatite injection for correction. Forty female patients with a mean age of 50 years have been treated. On average, an improvement of one class of Hidman's severity score could be achieved by single treatment. Mean duration of the effect was 10.1 months for hyaluronic acid and 12.8 months for calcium hydroxylapatite. Adverse effects were mild and temporary. Patients satisfaction was high (95%). PMID:25371770

  15. Chitosan Scaffolds Containing Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correia, Clara R.; Moreira Teixeira, Liliana S.; Moroni, Lorenzo; Reis, Rui L.; Blitterswijk, van Clemens A.; Karperien, Marcel; Mano, João F.

    2011-01-01

    Scaffolds derived from natural polysaccharides are very promising in tissue engineering applications and regenerative medicine, as they resemble glycosaminoglycans in the extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we have prepared freeze-dried composite scaffolds of chitosan (CHT) and hyaluronic aci

  16. Mechanism involved in enhancement of osteoblast differentiation by hyaluronic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Michinao [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Ariyoshi, Wataru [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Iwanaga, Kenjiro [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Okinaga, Toshinori [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Habu, Manabu [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Yoshioka, Izumi [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Medicine of Sensory and Motor Organs, University of Miyazaki, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Tominaga, Kazuhiro [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Oral Bioresearch Center, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Nishihara, Tatsuji, E-mail: tatsujin@kyu-dent.ac.jp [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Oral Bioresearch Center, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} In this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. {yields} MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. {yields} Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. {yields} HA enhanced BMP-2 induces osteoblastic differentiation in MG63 cells via down-regulation of BMP-2 antagonists and ERK phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Objectives: Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is expected to be utilized to fill bone defects and promote healing of fractures. However, it is unable to generate an adequate clinical response for use in bone regeneration. Recently, it was reported that glycosaminoglycans, including heparin, heparan sulfate, keratan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, chondroitin-4-sulfate, chondroitin-6-sulfate, and hyaluronic acid (HA), regulate BMP-2 activity, though the mechanism by which HA regulates osteogenic activities has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. Materials and methods: Monolayer cultures of osteoblastic lineage MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. To determine osteoblastic differentiation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in the cell lysates was quantified. Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by Western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. To further elucidate the role of HA in enhancement of BMP-2-induced Smad signaling, mRNA expressions of the BMP-2 receptor antagonists noggin and follistatin were detected using real-time RT-PCR. Results: BMP-2-induced ALP activation, Smad 1/5/8 phosphorylation, and

  17. Development and characterization of microemulsions containing hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkrad, Jamal Alyoussef; Mrestani, Yahya; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2016-04-30

    Tween80 and Span20 were used as surfactant mixture for developing non-ionic microemulsions (MEs) containing hyaluronic acid 22 kDa (HA). The effect of Tween80:Span20 ratio (T:S ratio) on microemulsion (ME) water intake and stability was studied. Moreover, the effect of HA on the consumed surfactant amount which is for stabilizing the MEs, for reducing water intake was investigated. Two W/O MEs containing HA were optimized. The first ME was composed of 2% HA, 13.8% Tween:80:Span20 (2:3), 4.2% water and 79.9% isopropylpalmitate (IPP). The second was composed of 2% HA, 16% Span20, 9.6% water:dimethyl sulfoxide (W:DMSO) (6:3.6) and 72.4% medium chain triglycerides (MCTG). The droplet sizes of MEs were determined using dynamic light scattering (DLS). The multilayer membrane system (MLMS) was used for testing the release of HA from both MEs and the released amount of HA was quantified using capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). Furthermore, three phase diagrams and relevant rheological characteristics were generated. The droplet size of the ME without HA decreased and increased with increasing the temperature. Furthermore, the droplet size of the IPP-ME and MCTG-ME without HA and of the MCTG-ME with HA decreased with increasing temperature. In contrast to this results, the droplet size of the IPP-ME with HA increased with increased temperature. This ME belongs to the Newtonian fluids. Compared to the first ME, the second ME shows droplet sizes at 25 °C of 6.5 nm without and 37 nm with HA. The droplet size in the second ME decreased proportionally with an increase of the temperature with and without HA. The release of HA was faster from the IPP ME compared to the MCTG-ME. The two developed MEs were stable, isotropic and their properties comply with ME properties concerning the droplet size and viscosity. PMID:26902172

  18. Mechanism involved in enhancement of osteoblast differentiation by hyaluronic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → In this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. → MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. → Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. → HA enhanced BMP-2 induces osteoblastic differentiation in MG63 cells via down-regulation of BMP-2 antagonists and ERK phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Objectives: Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is expected to be utilized to fill bone defects and promote healing of fractures. However, it is unable to generate an adequate clinical response for use in bone regeneration. Recently, it was reported that glycosaminoglycans, including heparin, heparan sulfate, keratan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, chondroitin-4-sulfate, chondroitin-6-sulfate, and hyaluronic acid (HA), regulate BMP-2 activity, though the mechanism by which HA regulates osteogenic activities has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. Materials and methods: Monolayer cultures of osteoblastic lineage MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. To determine osteoblastic differentiation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in the cell lysates was quantified. Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by Western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. To further elucidate the role of HA in enhancement of BMP-2-induced Smad signaling, mRNA expressions of the BMP-2 receptor antagonists noggin and follistatin were detected using real-time RT-PCR. Results: BMP-2-induced ALP activation, Smad 1/5/8 phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation

  19. Hyaluronic acid algorithm-based models for assessment of liver ifbrosis:translation from basic science to clinical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeinab Babaei; Hadi Parsian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The estimation of liver ifbrosis is usually dependent on liver biopsy evaluation. Because of its disad-vantages and side effects, researchers try to ifnd non-invasive methods for the assessment of liver injuries. Hyaluronic acid has been proposed as an index for scoring the severity of if-brosis, alone or in algorithm models. The algorithm model in which hyaluronic acid was used as a major constituent was more reliable and accurate in diagnosis than hyaluronic acid alone. This review described various hyaluronic acid algo-rithm-based models for assessing liver ifbrosis. DATA SOURCE: A PubMed database search was performed to identify the articles relevant to hyaluronic acid algorithm-based models for estimating liver ifbrosis. RESULT: The use of hyaluronic acid in an algorithm model is an extra and valuable tool for assessing liver ifbrosis. CONCLUSIONS: Although hyaluronic acid algorithm-based models have good diagnostic power in liver ifbrosis assess-ment, they cannot render the need for liver biopsy obsolete and it is better to use them in parallel with liver biopsy. They can be used when frequent liver biopsy is not possible in situa-tions such as highlighting the efifcacy of treatment protocol for liver ifbrosis.

  20. A study on the performance of hyaluronic acid immobilized chitosan film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yingjun; Guo Li; Ren Li; Yin Shiheng [Biomaterial Research Institute, College of Material Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Ge Jian; Gao Qianying [State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510060 (China); Luxbacher, Thomas; Luo Shijing, E-mail: imwangyj@scut.edu.c, E-mail: psliren@scut.edu.c [Anton Paar GmbH, Anton-Paar-Strasse 20, A-8054 Graz (Austria)

    2009-06-15

    In order to improve hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of chitosan, hyaluronic acid was immobilized onto the surface of chitosan film. The structure of films was characterized by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance (ATR-FTIR), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and zeta potential. Results confirmed that hyaluronic acid was successfully immobilized on chitosan film. Transparency, water absorption percentage and contact angle of films were characterized. Results showed that there was no significant variation in transparency (p < 0.05) before and after immobilization, the maximum was up to 99% which was enough for corneal regeneration in clinical applications. After the immobilization, the time-dependent contact angle declined sharply (from 91.8 deg. to 67.7 deg. at 100 s). The hydrophilicity was significantly improved. The methylthiazol tetrazolium (MTT) (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay was used to assess cell viability and proliferation. Results showed that human cornea epithelial cells (HCEC) grew better on hyaluronic acid immobilized chitosan films than on chitosan films. The hyaluronic acid immobilized chitosan film could be a promising candidate material for corneal regeneration.

  1. Bioactivity of immobilized hyaluronic acid derivatives regarding protein adsorption and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köwitsch, Alexander; Yang, Yuan; Ma, Ning;

    2011-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) was chemically modified either by oxidation to obtain aldehyde-HA (aHA) or 3,3'-dithiobis(propanoic hydrazide) to obtain thiol-HA (tHA) that was covalently immobilized on model substrata such as amino-terminated surfaces or gold. Knowledge about the effect of modification with...

  2. A study on the performance of hyaluronic acid immobilized chitosan film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of chitosan, hyaluronic acid was immobilized onto the surface of chitosan film. The structure of films was characterized by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance (ATR-FTIR), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and zeta potential. Results confirmed that hyaluronic acid was successfully immobilized on chitosan film. Transparency, water absorption percentage and contact angle of films were characterized. Results showed that there was no significant variation in transparency (p < 0.05) before and after immobilization, the maximum was up to 99% which was enough for corneal regeneration in clinical applications. After the immobilization, the time-dependent contact angle declined sharply (from 91.8 deg. to 67.7 deg. at 100 s). The hydrophilicity was significantly improved. The methylthiazol tetrazolium (MTT) (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay was used to assess cell viability and proliferation. Results showed that human cornea epithelial cells (HCEC) grew better on hyaluronic acid immobilized chitosan films than on chitosan films. The hyaluronic acid immobilized chitosan film could be a promising candidate material for corneal regeneration.

  3. Magnetic microparticles post-synthetically coated by hyaluronic acid as an enhanced carrier for microfluidic bioanalysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, L.; Knotek, P.; Palarčik, J.; Čadková, M.; Bělina, P.; Vlček, Milan; Korecká, L.; Bílková, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 44, 1 November (2014), s. 345-351. ISSN 0928-4931 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/12/0381 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : coating * hyaluronic acid * hyaluronan Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.088, year: 2014

  4. Isolation and characterisation of high molecular weight ( sup 3 H)hyaluronic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabrecek, P. (Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Inst. of Biotechnology); Soltes, L.; Kallay, Z. (Slovenska Akademia Vied, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Ustav Experimentalnej Farmakologie); Fugedi, A. (Slovenska Akademia, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Computing Centre)

    1990-10-01

    A high-performance gel permeation chromatographic separation method was developed for the isolation and characterisation of high molecular weight ({sup 3}H)hyaluronic acid. The molecular characteristics of the labelled sample were M{sub w}=3.92 x 10{sup 5} Da, M{sub w}/M{sub n}=1.55. (author).

  5. Isolation and characterisation of high molecular weight [3H]hyaluronic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-performance gel permeation chromatographic separation method was developed for the isolation and characterisation of high molecular weight [3H]hyaluronic acid. The molecular characteristics of the labelled sample were Mw=3.92 x 105 Da, Mw/Mn=1.55. (author)

  6. Low serum hyaluronic acid levels associated with spontaneous HBsAg clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkisoen, S.; Arends, J. E.; van den Hoek, A.; van Erpecum, K. J.; Boland, G. J.; Hoepelman, A. I. M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The pathophysiological underlying mechanism of spontaneous HBsAg clearance in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infected patients is largely unknown. However, serum hyaluronic acid (sHA) plays a role in liver fibrosis progression and reversely could serve as a potential biomarker for HBsAg clearance.

  7. Correction of tear trough deformity with a cohesive polydensified matrix hyaluronic acid: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber-Vorländer J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jürgen Huber-Vorländer, Martin KürtenFort Malakoff Klinik, Mainz, GermanyAbstract: The tear trough or infraorbital hollow is a challenging area to treat, and only a few fillers are suitable for this delicate area. We report on a European case series of six subjects with mild to severe tear troughs who received treatment with cohesive polydensified matrix (CPM® technology hyaluronic acid gel (Belotero® Balance. The product was injected as small depots (up to ten small boli 0.2 mL maximum each per side at the supraperiosteal level along or below the orbital rim. Follow-up visits took place at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months after injection for independent evaluation of the clinical effect using the Merz Aesthetics Scale™ for infraorbital hollows and the Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale. Adverse events were also recorded. Mean hollowness scores were considerably improved compared with baseline in all subjects. In all women, the improvements remained throughout the 9-month study, with none reverting to their baseline score. Subjects’ satisfaction with treatment was very high throughout the study, and all women stated that they would repeat treatment with the same product. The CPM hyaluronic acid gel was well tolerated. CPM hyaluronic acid gel is a safe and effective treatment for the tear trough area.Keywords: Belotero® Balance, cohesive polydensified matrix (CPM®, hyaluronic acid, infraorbital hollow, tear trough

  8. A novel biocompatible hyaluronic acid-chitosan hybrid hydrogel for osteoarthrosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaderli, S; Boulocher, C; Pillet, E; Watrelot-Virieux, D; Rougemont, A L; Roger, T; Viguier, E; Gurny, R; Scapozza, L; Jordan, O

    2015-04-10

    A conventional therapy for the treatment of osteoarthrosis is intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid, which requires repeated, frequent injections. To extend the viscosupplementation effect of hyaluronic acid, we propose to associate it with another biopolymer in the form of a hybrid hydrogel. Chitosan was chosen because of its structural similarity to synovial glycosaminoglycans, its anti-inflammatory effects and its ability to promote cartilage growth. To avoid polyelectrolyte aggregation and obtain transparent, homogeneous gels, chitosan was reacetylated to a 50% degree, and different salts and formulation buffers were investigated. The biocompatibility of the hybrid gels was tested in vitro on human arthrosic synoviocytes, and in vivo assessments were made 1 week after subcutaneous injection in rats and 1 month after intra-articular injection in rabbits. Hyaluronic acid-chitosan polyelectrolyte complexes were prevented by cationic complexation of the negative charges of hyaluronic acid. The different salts tested were found to alter the viscosity and thermal degradation of the gels. Good biocompatibility was observed in rats, although the calcium-containing formulation induced calcium deposits after 1 week. The sodium chloride formulation was further tested in rabbits and did not show acute clinical signs of pain or inflammation. Hybrid HA-Cs hydrogels may be a valuable alternative viscosupplementation agent. PMID:25666331

  9. Electrophoretic deposition of composite halloysite nanotube–hydroxyapatite–hyaluronic acid films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deen, I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada); Zhitomirsky, I., E-mail: zhitom@mcmaster.ca [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: ► Composite halloysite nanotubes–hydroxyapatite–hyaluronic acid films were prepared. ► Electrophoretic deposition method was used for deposition. ► Natural hyaluronic acid was used as a dispersing, charging and film forming agent. ► Film composition and deposition yield can be varied. ► The films can be used for biomedical implants with controlled release of drugs. -- Abstract: Electrophoretic deposition method has been developed for the deposition of biocomposite films containing halloysite nanotubes (HNTs), hydroxyapatite (HA) and hyaluronic acid. The method is based on the use of natural hyaluronate biopolymer as a dispersing and charging agent for HNT and HA and film forming agent for the fabrication of the composite films. The deposition kinetics was studied by the quartz crystal microbalance method. The composite films were studied by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis and electron microscopy. The composite films are promising materials for the fabrication of biomedical implants with advanced functional properties.

  10. Electrophoretic deposition of composite halloysite nanotube–hydroxyapatite–hyaluronic acid films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Composite halloysite nanotubes–hydroxyapatite–hyaluronic acid films were prepared. ► Electrophoretic deposition method was used for deposition. ► Natural hyaluronic acid was used as a dispersing, charging and film forming agent. ► Film composition and deposition yield can be varied. ► The films can be used for biomedical implants with controlled release of drugs. -- Abstract: Electrophoretic deposition method has been developed for the deposition of biocomposite films containing halloysite nanotubes (HNTs), hydroxyapatite (HA) and hyaluronic acid. The method is based on the use of natural hyaluronate biopolymer as a dispersing and charging agent for HNT and HA and film forming agent for the fabrication of the composite films. The deposition kinetics was studied by the quartz crystal microbalance method. The composite films were studied by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis and electron microscopy. The composite films are promising materials for the fabrication of biomedical implants with advanced functional properties

  11. DETERMINATION OF THE STABILITY AND SHELF LIFE OF OINTMENT WITH ZINC SALT OF HYALURONIC ACID AND THIOTRIAZOLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezrukaviy Y.A.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of physical-chemical andmicrobiological research investigated the stability andshelf life of ointment with zinc salt of hyaluronic acid andthiotriazoline. Ointment which stored in aluminum tubes,during all term of researches met all the indicators ofdrugs QC. Ointment which kept in jars from orange glassdid not meet the indicator "acidic number" in defining ofindicators per 24 months of storage. Was established shelflife of medication with zinc salt of hyaluronic acid andthiotriazoline - 2 years.

  12. MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL, AND THERMAL PROPERTIES OF MALEIC ANHYDRIDE MODIFIED RICE HUSK FILLED PVC COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Chand

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Unmodified and modified rice husk powder filled PVC composites were prepared having different amounts of rice husk powder. Mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of these composites were determined. The tensile strength of rice husk powder PVC composites having 0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 weight percent of rice husk powder was found to be 33.9, 19.4, 18.1, 14.6, and 9.5 MPa, respectively. Adding of maleic anhydride- modified rice husk powder improved the tensile strength of rice husk powder PVC composites. Flexural strength and flexural modulus of composites increased on treatment of rice husk powder due to the improved bonding between rice husk powder and PVC matrix. Arc-resistance of rice husk powder PVC composites was not affected on increasing loading of the powder. Volume resistivity and surface resistivity decreased with increasing loading due to the presence of impurities and water molecules. Vicat softening temperature increased with rice husk powder loading. Addition of rice husk increased the melting temperature of the composite matrix as compared to pure PVC.

  13. Isolation and characterization of hyaluronic acid from the liver of marine stingray Aetobatus narinari.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhasivam, Giji; Muthuvel, Arumugam; Pachaiyappan, Abirami; Thangavel, Balasubramanian

    2013-03-01

    Although hyaluronic acid research pursuits ahead in exploring its biomedical perspective, very limited investigations were carried out in their isolation shape view point, furthermore, most of the investigations were targeted towards the terrestrial source. To swerve from that, the present study was projected through the marine superstore, where in high molecular weight hyaluronic acid of 13, 65,863 Da was isolated from the liver of stingray Aetobatus narinari. The purified HA was confirmed at the preliminary level by their stains all dye binding nature. Their analytical composition including carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, N-acetyl glucosamine, glucuronic acid contents was analysed. The HA was characterized by agarose-gel electrophoresis, FTIR, HPTLC, and (1)H NMR. The DPPH radical scavenging activity of HA and its reducing power was evident to all the tested concentrations, but lower than that of ascorbic acid. HA showed significant inhibition against the proliferation of cells, substantiating its influence in regulation of cell functions. PMID:23220595

  14. Determination of the parameters of crystallization of maleic anhydride modified polypropylene in model composites with glass fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Janevski, Aco; Bogoeva-Gaceva, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal and nonisothermal crystallizations of maleic anhydride-modified iPP in glass fibres model composites with unsized and sized glass fibres were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), to evaluate the influence of glass fibres on crystallization behavior. Isothermal crystallization was followed in the temperature range from 391 K to 403 K, and the rate constant and Avrami exponents were determined. Nonisothermal crystallization was carried out at different cooling rates (1...

  15. Effects of hyaluronic acid- chitosan-gelatin complex on the apoptosis and cell cycle of L929 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Jinshu; WANG Xianghui; CUI Yuanlu; YAO Kangde

    2003-01-01

    With the development in the field of tissue engineering, the interaction between biomaterials and cells has been deeply studied. Viewing the cells seeded on the surface of materials as an organic whole, cell cycle and apoptosis are analyzed to deepen the study of cell compatibility on biomaterials, while cellproliferation and differentiation are studied at the same time. In this paper, hyaluronic acid is incorporated into the chitosan-gelatin system. Propidium iodide (PI) was used in cell cycle analysis and the double-staining of cells with annexin-V and PI was applied in cell apoptosis analysis. The results show that incorporated hyaluronic acid shortens the adaptation period of cells on the material surface, and then cells enter the normal cell cycle quickly. In addition, added hyaluronic acid inhibits cell apoptosis triggered by the membranes. Therefore,hyaluronic acid improves the cell compatibility of chitosan-gelatin system and benefits the design of biomimetic materials.

  16. Hyaluronic Acid-Coated Carbon Nonwoven Fabrics as Potential Material for Repair of Osteochondral Defects for medical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rajzer, I.; Menaszek, E.; Bačáková, Lucie; Orzelski, M.; Blazewicz, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2013), s. 102-107. ISSN 1230-3666 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cartilage * carbon fibres * nonwoven scaffolds * hyaluronic acid Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 0.541, year: 2013

  17. 3D composites based on the blends of chitosan and collagen with the addition of hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sionkowska, Alina; Kaczmarek, Beata; Lewandowska, Katarzyna; Grabska, Sylwia; Pokrywczyńska, Marta; Kloskowski, Tomasz; Drewa, Tomasz

    2016-08-01

    3D porous composites based on blends of chitosan, collagen and hyaluronic acid were obtained through the lyophilization process. Mechanical properties, swelling behavior and thermal stability of the blends were studied. Moreover, SEM images were taken and the structure of the blends was studied. Biological properties of the materials obtained were investigated by analyzing of proliferation rate of fibroblast cells incubated with biomaterial extract using MTT assay (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide). The results showed that the properties of 3D composites based on the blends of chitosan and collagen were altered after the addition 1%, 2% and 5% of hyaluronic acid. Mechanical properties and thermal stability of chitosan/collagen blends were improved in the presence of hyaluronic acid in the composite. New 3D materials based on the blends of chitosan, collagen and hyaluronic acid were non-toxic and did not significantly affect cell morphology. PMID:27151670

  18. Separation and purification of hyaluronic acid by glucuronic acid imprinted microbeads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akdamar, H.Acelya; Sarioezlue, Nalan Yilmaz [Department of Biology, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); Ozcan, Ayca Atilir; Ersoez, Arzu [Department of Chemistry, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Say, Ridvan, E-mail: rsay@anadolu.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); BIBAM (Plant, Drug and Scientific Researches Center), Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2009-05-05

    The purification of hyaluronic acid (HA) is relatively significant to use in biomedical applications. The structure of HA is formed by the repetitive units of glucuronic acid and N-acetyl glucosamine. In this study, glucuronic acid-imprinted microbeads have been supplied for the purification of HA from cell culture (Streptococcus equi). Histidine-functional monomer, methacryloylamidohistidine (MAH) was chosen as the metal-complexing monomer. The glucuronic acid-imprinted poly(ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate-MAH-Copper(II)) [p(EDMA-MAH-Cu{sup 2+})] microbeads have been synthesized by typical suspension polymerization procedure. The template glucuronic acid has been removed by employing 5 M methanolic KOH solution. p(EDMA-MAH-Cu{sup 2+}) microbeads have been characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and swelling studies. Moreover, HA adsorption experiments have been performed in a batch experimental set-up. Purification of HA from cell culture supernatant has been also investigated by determining the hyaluronidase activity using purified HA as substrate. The glucuronic acid imprinted p(EDMA-MAH-Cu{sup 2+}) particles can be used many times with no significant loss in adsorption capacities. Also, the selectivity of prepared molecular imprinted polymers (MIP) has been examined. Results have showed that MIP particles are 19 times more selective for glucuronic acid than N-acetylglucose amine.

  19. Separation and purification of hyaluronic acid by glucuronic acid imprinted microbeads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purification of hyaluronic acid (HA) is relatively significant to use in biomedical applications. The structure of HA is formed by the repetitive units of glucuronic acid and N-acetyl glucosamine. In this study, glucuronic acid-imprinted microbeads have been supplied for the purification of HA from cell culture (Streptococcus equi). Histidine-functional monomer, methacryloylamidohistidine (MAH) was chosen as the metal-complexing monomer. The glucuronic acid-imprinted poly(ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate-MAH-Copper(II)) [p(EDMA-MAH-Cu2+)] microbeads have been synthesized by typical suspension polymerization procedure. The template glucuronic acid has been removed by employing 5 M methanolic KOH solution. p(EDMA-MAH-Cu2+) microbeads have been characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and swelling studies. Moreover, HA adsorption experiments have been performed in a batch experimental set-up. Purification of HA from cell culture supernatant has been also investigated by determining the hyaluronidase activity using purified HA as substrate. The glucuronic acid imprinted p(EDMA-MAH-Cu2+) particles can be used many times with no significant loss in adsorption capacities. Also, the selectivity of prepared molecular imprinted polymers (MIP) has been examined. Results have showed that MIP particles are 19 times more selective for glucuronic acid than N-acetylglucose amine.

  20. A clinical study to assess the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based procedure for treatment of premature ejaculation

    OpenAIRE

    Littara, A; Palmieri, B.; Rottigni, V; Iannitti, T

    2013-01-01

    Premature ejaculation is a sexual debilitating condition affecting a large number of men worldwide and leading to important dysfunctions influencing the patients' affective and emotional life. Hyaluronic acid is a natural and safe compound that has been widely used not only in the aesthetic medicine clinic, but also for treatment of osteoarthritis. The present study shows the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based procedure for treatment of premature ejaculation. A hundred and ten male pati...

  1. Chronic Ultraviolet B Irradiation Causes Loss of Hyaluronic Acid from Mouse Dermis Because of Down-Regulation of Hyaluronic Acid Synthases

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Guang; Freudenberger, Till; Zipper, Petra; Melchior, Ariane; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Rabausch, Berit; de Groot, Jens; Twarock, Sören; Hanenberg, Helmut; Homey, Bernhard; Krutmann, Jean; Reifenberger, Julia; Fischer, Jens W.

    2007-01-01

    Remodeling of the dermal extracellular matrix occurs during photoaging. Here, the effect of repetitive UVB irradiation on dermal hyaluronic acid (HA) was examined. C57/BL6 mice were chronically (182 days) irradiated with UVB, and consecutive skin biopsies were collected during the irradiation period and afterward (300 and 400 days of age). UVB caused marked loss of HA from the papillary dermis and down-regulation of HA synthase 1 (HAS1), HAS2, and HAS3 mRNA expression. In contrast, hyaluronid...

  2. Electrophoretic deposition and electrochemical behavior of novel graphene oxide-hyaluronic acid-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Liu, Qian; Jia, Zhaojun; Xu, Xuchen; Shi, Yuying; Cheng, Yan; Zheng, Yufeng; Xi, Tingfei; Wei, Shicheng

    2013-11-01

    Novel ternary graphene oxide-hyaluronic acid-hydroxyapatite (GO-HY-HA) nanocomposite coatings were prepared on Ti substrate using anodic electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Hyaluronic acid was employed as charging additive and dispersion agent during EPD. The kinetics and mechanism of the deposition, and the microstructure of the coated samples were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrum, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and microscopic Fourier transform infrared analysis. The results showed that the addition of GO sheets into the HY-HA suspensions could increase the deposition rate and inhibit cracks creation and propagation in the coatings. The corrosion resistant of the resulting samples were evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization method in simulated body fluid, and the GO-HY-HA coatings could effectively improve the anti-corrosion property of the Ti substrate.

  3. Design, Synthesis and Applications of Hyaluronic Acid-Paclitaxel Bioconjugatesâ€

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldo Marini Bettolo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Paclitaxel (1a, a well known antitumor agent adopted mainly for the treatmentof breast and ovarian cancer, suffers from significant disadvantages such as low solubility,certain toxicity and specific drug-resistance of some tumor cells. To overcome theseproblems extensive research has been carried out. Among the various proposed strategies,the conjugation of paclitaxel (1a to a biocompatible polymer, such as hyaluronic acid(HA, 2, has also been considered. Coupling a bioactive compound to a biocompatiblepolymer offers, in general, many advantages such as better drug solubilization, betterstabilization, specific localization and controlled release. Hereafter the design, synthesisand applications of hyaluronic acid-paclitaxel bioconjugates are reviewed. An overview ofHA-paclitaxel combinations is also given.

  4. Electrophoretic deposition and electrochemical behavior of novel graphene oxide-hyaluronic acid-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel ternary graphene oxide-hyaluronic acid-hydroxyapatite (GO-HY-HA) nanocomposite coatings were prepared on Ti substrate using anodic electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Hyaluronic acid was employed as charging additive and dispersion agent during EPD. The kinetics and mechanism of the deposition, and the microstructure of the coated samples were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrum, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and microscopic Fourier transform infrared analysis. The results showed that the addition of GO sheets into the HY-HA suspensions could increase the deposition rate and inhibit cracks creation and propagation in the coatings. The corrosion resistant of the resulting samples were evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization method in simulated body fluid, and the GO-HY-HA coatings could effectively improve the anti-corrosion property of the Ti substrate

  5. Delayed-type Necrosis after Soft-tissue Augmentation with Hyaluronic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz De Almeida Balassiano, Laila; Roos Mariano Da Rocha, Camila; Barbosa De Sousa Padilha, Carolina; Martinezt Torrado, Carolina; Teixeira Da Silva, Roberta; Carlos Regazzi Avelleira, João

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of dermal fillers, specifically the use of hyaluronic acid, can be explained by their effectiveness and versatility as well as their favorable safety profiles. Nevertheless, early and late complications with varying levels of severity may occur. The incidence of complications is low and the majority of adverse events are mild (edema, erythema, and local ecchymosis) and of limited duration. However, more severe events, such as ischemia and necrosis, may occur. The symptoms of ischemia can occur immediately after the injection or several hours after the procedure. Here, the authors report three cases of necrosis after hyaluronic acid injection with the first symptoms presenting only several hours after the procedure. The patients were treated immediately after the diagnosis. The aim of this review is to communicate the possibility of the delayed-type presentation of necrosis, present the signs and symptoms that lead to early diagnosis, and review the treatment possibilities of this severe complication. PMID:26705447

  6. The hyaluronic acid-HDAC3-miRNA network in allergic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngmi eKim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported the anti-allergic effect of high molecular weight form of hyaluronic acid (HMW-HA. In doing so, HA targets CD44 and inhibits FcεRI signaling and cross-talk between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and FcεRI. We previously reported the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs in allergic inflammation and allergic inflammation-promoted enhanced tumorigenic potential. We reported regulatory role of HA in the expression of HDAC3. In this review, we will discuss molecular mechanisms associated with anti-allergic effect of hyaluronic acid in relation with HDACs. The role of microRNAs (miRNAs in allergic inflammation has been reported. We will also discuss the role of miRNAs in allergic inflammation in relation with HA-mediated anti-allergic effects.

  7. Injectable hyaluronic-acid-doxycycline hydrogel therapy in experimental rabbit osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Hsien-Tsung; Sheu, Ming-Thau; Lin, Yung-Feng; Lan, Jai; Chin, Yi-Ping; Hsieh, Ming-Shium; Cheng, Chao-Wen; Chen, Chien-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common joint disease that causes disabilities in elderly adults. However, few long-lasting pharmacotherapeutic agents with low side effects have been developed to treat OA. We evaluated the therapeutic effects of intra-articular injections of hydrogels containing hyaluronic acid (HA) and doxycycline (DOX) in a rabbit OA model. Results Thirteen week old New Zealand White rabbits undergone a partial meniscectomy and unilateral fibular ligament transection wer...

  8. Surface-modified hyaluronic acid hydrogels to capture endothelial progenitor cells†‡

    OpenAIRE

    Camci-Unal, Gulden; Aubin, Hug; Ahari, Amirhossein Farajzadeh; Bae, Hojae; Nichol, Jason William; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge to the effective treatment of injured cardiovascular tissues is the promotion of endothelialization of damaged tissues and implanted devices. For this reason, there is a need for new biomaterials that promote endothelialization to enhance vascular repair. The goal of this work was to develop antibody-modified polysaccharide-based hydrogels that could selectively capture endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). We showed that CD34 antibody immobilization on hyaluronic acid (HA) h...

  9. Delayed-type Necrosis after Soft-tissue Augmentation with Hyaluronic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Souza Felix Bravo, Bruna; Klotz De Almeida Balassiano, Laila; Roos Mariano Da Rocha, Camila; Barbosa De Sousa Padilha, Carolina; Martinezt Torrado, Carolina; Teixeira Da Silva, Roberta; Carlos Regazzi Avelleira, João

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of dermal fillers, specifically the use of hyaluronic acid, can be explained by their effectiveness and versatility as well as their favorable safety profiles. Nevertheless, early and late complications with varying levels of severity may occur. The incidence of complications is low and the majority of adverse events are mild (edema, erythema, and local ecchymosis) and of limited duration. However, more severe events, such as ischemia and necrosis, may occur. The symptoms of i...

  10. Comb-like ionic complexes of hyaluronic acid with alkyltrimethylammonium surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    Tolentino, Ainhoa; Alla Bedahnane, Abdelilah; Martínez de Ilarduya Sáez de Asteasu, Domingo Antxon; Muñoz Guerra, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Stoichiometric complexes of hyaluronic acid with alkyltrimethylammonium surfactants bearing octadecyl, eicosyl and docosyl groups were prepared by ionic coupling in aqueous solution. The complexes were non soluble in water but soluble in organic solvents. In the solid state they self-assembled in a biphasic layered structure with the alkyl side chains forming a separate phase that melted in the 50–60 °C range. They were stable to heating up to above 200 °C.

  11. Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels with Controlled Degradation Properties for Oriented Bone Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    J. Patterson; Siew, R; Herring, SW; Lin, ASP; Guldberg, R; Stayton, PS

    2010-01-01

    Non-healing fractures can result from trauma, disease, or age-related bone loss. While many treatments focus on restoring bone volume, few try to recapitulate bone organization. However, the native architecture of bone is optimized to provide its necessary mechanical properties. Hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel scaffold systems with tunable degradation properties were developed for the controlled delivery of osteoinductive and angiogenic growth factors, thus affecting the quantity and quality of...

  12. Glans Penis Augmentation Using Hyaluronic Acid Gel as an Injectable Filler

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Du Geon; Kwak, Tae Il; Kim, Je Jong

    2015-01-01

    Glans penis augmentation (GPA) has received little attention from experts despite the existence of a subset of patients who may be dissatisfied with a small glans or poor tumescence of the glans during erection. Recently, GPA using an injectable filler or implantation of a graft or filler has been developed. Despite a demanding injection technique and inevitable uneven undulation of the glandular surface, GPA using injectable hyaluronic acid (HA) gel is a novel and useful therapy and an effec...

  13. Intra-Articular Hyaluronic Acid Injections Vs. Dextrose Prolotherapy in the Treatment of Osteoarthritic Knee Pain

    OpenAIRE

    S Nasiripour; F Hassanzadeh Kiyabi; M Nikooseresht; Razavi, S; F Madadi; SM Hashemi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Conservative treatment needs to be tried prior to surgical treatment of knee osteoarthritis. This study was designed to evaluate the short-term effects of dextrose prolotherapy on pain relief and functional improvement in knee osteoarthritis in comparison with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections. Methods: In this double blind clinical trial, 100 patients, aged 40-70 years, with complaints of knee pain lasting >3 months were recruited in Akhtar hospital during the years 2010...

  14. Silk-Fibrin/Hyaluronic Acid Composite Gels for Nucleus Pulposus Tissue Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sang-Hyug; Cho, Hongsik; Gil, Eun Seok; Mandal, Biman B.; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Scaffold designs are critical for in vitro culture of tissue-engineered cartilage in three-dimensional environments to enhance cellular differentiation for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In the present study we demonstrated silk and fibrin/hyaluronic acid (HA) composite gels as scaffolds for nucleus pulposus (NP) cartilage formation, providing both biochemical support for NP outcomes as well as fostering the retention of size of the scaffold during culture due to the combined f...

  15. Solvent Composition is Critical for Carbodiimide Cross-Linking of Hyaluronic Acid as an Ophthalmic Biomaterial

    OpenAIRE

    Jui-Yang Lai

    2012-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of the most important ophthalmic biomaterials, while also being used for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Although chemical cross-linking is an effective way to improve the material performance, it may as a consequence be detrimental to the living cells/tissues. Given that the cross-linking efficiency is mediated by the solvent composition during the chemical modification, this study aims to explore the stability and biocompatibility of carbodiimide cross-link...

  16. The Design of In Vitro Liver Sinusoid Mimics Using Chitosan–Hyaluronic Acid Polyelectrolyte Multilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yeonhee; Larkin, Adam L.; Davis, Richey M.; Rajagopalan, Padmavathy

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between hepatocytes and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are essential for the development and maintenance of hepatic phenotypic functions. We report the assembly of three-dimensional liver sinusoidal mimics comprised of primary rat hepatocytes, LSECs, and an intermediate chitosan–hyaluronic acid polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM). The height of the PEMs ranged from 30 to 55 nm and exhibited a shear modulus of ∼100 kPa. Hepatocyte–PEM cellular constructs exhibited stable ...

  17. Aesthetic breast augmentation with hyaluronic acid: imaging findings and implications for radiological assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divanei Aparecida Bottaro Criado

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available New injectable fillers such as hyaluronic acid have recently been employed as a non-surgical alternative to implants such as silicone for aesthetic breast enhancement. Although their utilization is not yet widespread in Brazil, radiologists should be aware of the imaging findings in this context and of the implications of the presence of this filler for the radiological evaluation in the screening for breast cancer.

  18. Aesthetic breast augmentation with hyaluronic acid: imaging findings and implications for radiological assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Divanei Aparecida Bottaro Criado; Fernanda Del Campo Braojos; Ulysses dos Santos Torres; Marcos Pontes Muniz

    2012-01-01

    New injectable fillers such as hyaluronic acid have recently been employed as a non-surgical alternative to implants such as silicone for aesthetic breast enhancement. Although their utilization is not yet widespread in Brazil, radiologists should be aware of the imaging findings in this context and of the implications of the presence of this filler for the radiological evaluation in the screening for breast cancer.

  19. Hyaluronic acid-recombinant gelatin gels as a scaffold for soft tissue regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    A Tuin; J Zandstra; SG Kluijtmans; JB Bouwstra; MC Harmsen; MJA Van Luyn

    2012-01-01

    An array of different types of hyaluronic acid (HA)- and collagen-based products is available for filling soft-tissue defects. A major drawback of the current soft-tissue fillers is their inability to induce cell infiltration and new tissue formation. Our aim is to develop novel biodegradable injectable gels which induce soft tissue regeneration, initially resulting in integration and finally replacement of the gel with new autologous tissue. Two reference gels of pure HA, monophasic HA-1 and...

  20. Severe Acute Local Reactions to a Hyaluronic Acid-derived Dermal Filler

    OpenAIRE

    Dyke, Susan Van; Hays, Geoffrey P.; Caglia, Anthony E.; Caglia, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Injectable fillers are normally well tolerated by patients with little or no adverse effects. The most common side effects include swelling, redness, bruising, and pain at the injection site. This report describes three cases in which patients injected with a hyaluronic acid-derived injectable filler that is premixed with lidocaine developed adverse reactions including persistent swelling, pain, and nodule formation. Two of the three patients' abscesses were cultured for aerobic and anaerobic...

  1. Correction of tear trough deformity with a cohesive polydensified matrix hyaluronic acid: a case series

    OpenAIRE

    Huber-Vorländer J; Kürten M

    2015-01-01

    Jürgen Huber-Vorländer, Martin KürtenFort Malakoff Klinik, Mainz, GermanyAbstract: The tear trough or infraorbital hollow is a challenging area to treat, and only a few fillers are suitable for this delicate area. We report on a European case series of six subjects with mild to severe tear troughs who received treatment with cohesive polydensified matrix (CPM®) technology hyaluronic acid gel (Belotero® Balance). The product was injected as small depo...

  2. Improvement of Tear Trough by Monophasic Hyaluronic Acid and Calcium Hydroxylapatite

    OpenAIRE

    Wollina, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Tear trough deformities are a sign of facial aging. The anatomical base is well understood. In many patients, minimal invasive surgical procedures are useful to improve appearance. Here, the authors describe the use of monophasic hyaluronic acid dermal filler and calcium hydroxylapatite injection for correction. Forty female patients with a mean age of 50 years have been treated. On average, an improvement of one class of Hidman’s severity score could be achieved by single treatment. Mean dur...

  3. Diplopia after hyaluronic acid gel injection for correction of facial tear trough deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashkouli, Mohsen Bahmani; Heirati, Abtin; Pakdel, Farzad; Kiavash, Victoria

    2012-10-01

    A 38 Year-old-female presented with diplopia and bilateral lower eyelid swelling 1.5 months after hyaluronic acid filler injection of tear trough deformity. Comprehensive eye examination showed an inferior oblique muscle restriction on the right eye. Diplopia and bilateral lower eyelid puffiness were treated by injection of hyaluronidase which resulted in disappearance of both diplopia and bilateral lower eyelid puffiness. PMID:22571493

  4. The Efficacy, Longevity, and Safety of Combined Radiofrequency Treatment and Hyaluronic Acid Filler for Skin Rejuvenation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyuk; Park, Kui Young; Choi, Sun Young; Koh, Hyun-Ju; Park, Sun-Young; Park, Won-Seok; Bae, Il-Hong; Kim, Beom Joon

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent advances in hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers and radiofrequency (RF) devices have been made in the context of skin rejuvenation and cosmetic surgery. Moreover, combination regimens with both techniques are currently being developed. Objective The present study was designed to examine the clinical and histologic effects of a new needle that incorporates an RF device for HA injections. Methods A new intradermal needle RF device (INNOfill; Pacific Pharma, Korea) was assessed in the...

  5. In vitro evaluation of antiviral and virucidal activity of a high molecular weight hyaluronic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Blasi Elisabetta; Ardizzoni Andrea; Neglia Rachele G; Bettua Clotilde; Scuri Monica; Cuoghi Alessandro; Cermelli Claudio; Iannitti Tommaso; Palmieri Beniamino

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background hyaluronic acid (HA), a non-sulphated glycosaminoglycan, is present in synovial fluid, vitreous humour serum and many connective tissues. Pharmaceutical preparations of HA are used in clinical practice for wound healing, joint pain, kerato-conjunctivitis, asthma, mouth care, oesophageal-reflux, and gastritis. Moreover, it is used as a filler to counteract ageing and facial lipoatrophy. Our study aims at investigating the in vitro antiviral activity of a high molecular weig...

  6. Synthesis, Structural and Micromechanical Properties of 3D Hyaluronic Acid-Based Cryogel Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelschlaeger, C; Bossler, F; Willenbacher, N

    2016-02-01

    In this study, macroporous, elastic, three-dimensional scaffolds formed of hyaluronic acid mixed with ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether as a chemical cross-linker have been prepared by cryogelation for application in tissue engineering. These cryogels are characterized by large interconnected pores of size ∼50-300 μm and pore wall thickness of ∼5-30 μm as determined from confocal microscopy images. Variation of pH, freezing temperature, and polymerization time allows for control of pore size and shape as well as matrix thickness. These structural properties then determine mechanical strength as well as swelling capacity. Furthermore, increasing hyaluronic acid concentration decreases cryogel pore size, reduces swelling properties, and reinforces mechanical properties. On the other hand, decreasing cross-linker concentration, at a constant hyaluronic acid concentration, increases pore size and swelling capacity but provides less rigidity. Additionally, for the first time, local elastic properties of the polymer matrix and viscous properties of the pores have been characterized using multiple particle tracking microrheology. Local matrix elasticity, relaxation time of hyaluronic acid chains, and the degree of heterogeneity are discussed in detail. These latter properties are crucial for the development of new tissue engineering constructs and will help to understand how local matrix viscoelasticity affects cell cultivation. Finally, elastic moduli obtained in bulk rheology are much higher than corresponding values deduced from microrheology. This discrepancy might be explained by the formation of very highly cross-linked cores in the network where no tracer particle can penetrate. PMID:26785355

  7. Nasal Alar Necrosis Following Hyaluronic Acid Injection into Nasolabial Folds: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Manafi, Ali; Barikbin, Behrooz; Manafi, Amir; Hamedi, Zahra Sadat; Ahmadi Moghadam, Shokoofeh

    2015-01-01

    Injection of synthetic fillers for soft tissue augmentation is increasing over the last decade. One of the most common materials used is hyaluronic acid (HA) that is safe and temporary filler for soft tissue augmentation. We present a case of 54-year-old female who experienced vascular occlusion and nasal alar necrosis following HA injection to the nasolabial folds. She suffered from pain, necrosis, infection, and alar loss that finally required a reconstructive surgery for cosmetic appearanc...

  8. Fabrication and in vitro evaluation of stable collagen/hyaluronic acid biomimetic multilayer on titanium coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Ao, Haiyong; Xie, Youtao; Tan, Honglue; Yang, Shengbing; Li, Kai; Wu, Xiaodong; Zheng, Xuebin; TANG, TINGTING

    2013-01-01

    Layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique has been proved to be a highly effective method to immobilize the main components of the extracellular matrix such as collagen and hyaluronic acid on titanium-based implants and form a polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) film by electrostatic interaction. However, the formed PEM film is unstable in the physiological environment and affects the long-time effectiveness of PEM film. In this study, a modified LBL technology has been developed to fabricate...

  9. Design, Synthesis and Applications of Hyaluronic Acid-Paclitaxel Bioconjugatesâ€

    OpenAIRE

    Rinaldo Marini Bettolo; Luisa Maria Migneco; Angela La Bella; Francesca Leonelli

    2008-01-01

    Paclitaxel (1a), a well known antitumor agent adopted mainly for the treatmentof breast and ovarian cancer, suffers from significant disadvantages such as low solubility,certain toxicity and specific drug-resistance of some tumor cells. To overcome theseproblems extensive research has been carried out. Among the various proposed strategies,the conjugation of paclitaxel (1a) to a biocompatible polymer, such as hyaluronic acid(HA, 2), has also been considered. Coupling a bioactive compound to a...

  10. Endoscopic Treatment of Vesicoureteral Reflux with Dextranomer/Hyaluronic Acid in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Cerwinka, Wolfgang H.; Hal C. Scherz; Andrew J. Kirsch

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. The goal of this review is to present current indications, injectable agents, techniques, success rates, complications, and potential future applications of endoscopic treatment for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children. Materials and Methods. The endoscopic method currently achieving one of the highest success rates is the double hydrodistention-implantation technique (HIT). This method employs dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer, which has been used in pediatric urology for ove...

  11. Endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux with polyacrylate polyalcohol copolymer and dextranomer/hyaluronic acid in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Akif Turk; Ahmet Selimoglu; Kadir Demir; Osman Celik; Erkin Saglam; Fatih Tarhan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer and polyacrylate polyalcohol copolymer in endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux disease in adult patients with and without chronic renal failure. Materials and Methods Thirty two patients (12 female, 20 male) with a total of 50 renal units were treated for vesicoureteral reflux. There were 26 (81%) chronic renal failure patients. The success of treatment was evaluated by voiding cyst...

  12. Endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux with dextranomer/ hyaluronic acid-our experience

    OpenAIRE

    Prasad Mylarappa; Prathvi; Puvvada Sandeep; Kailash B Banale; D. Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: We report our experience with subureteral submucosal injection therapy for vesicoureteral reflux and determine the safety and efficacy in patients treated with dextranomer/ hyaluronic acid co-polymer. Background: Vesicoureteral reflux affects 1% of children and increases the chances of urinary tract infection, pyelonephritis, hypertension and chronic renal insufficiency. The aim of identifying and treating vesicoureteral reflux in children is to prevent occurrence of long term c...

  13. Endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux with dextranomer/ hyaluronic acid-our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Mylarappa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We report our experience with subureteral submucosal injection therapy for vesicoureteral reflux and determine the safety and efficacy in patients treated with dextranomer/ hyaluronic acid co-polymer. Background: Vesicoureteral reflux affects 1% of children and increases the chances of urinary tract infection, pyelonephritis, hypertension and chronic renal insufficiency. The aim of identifying and treating vesicoureteral reflux in children is to prevent occurrence of long term complications. Method: A total of sixty three patients aged between 1-21 years with grade III – V vesicoureteral reflux, who had failed on conservative treatment were considered for this study during February 2004 to May 2012.Vesicoureteral reflux was diagnosed by voiding cysto-urethrogram (VCUG. They underwent subureteral injection of dextranomer/ hyaluronic acid co-polymer. Results: Among the sixty three patients treated, 51(81% were cured with single injection while a second injection raised the cure rate to 60(95%. Conclusion: The minimally invasive treatment of vesicoureteral reflux with deflux (dextranomer/ hyaluronic acid co-polymer is an effective alternative procedure to open surgical technique requiring minimal operating time with low morbidity.

  14. Research on the Construction of Tissue Engineering Scaffolds by Alginate-hyaluronic Acid with Different Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qin-hua; LIU Li; LIN Dong-qing

    2014-01-01

    This research uses alginate and hyaluronic acid as the main component to prepare support, then explores the possibilities as a tissue engineering scaffold. Firstly, prepare HA with various average molecular weight and alginate with different viscosity, mix them up at a certain proportion and make it into a AlgCa 2+-HA composite scaffold with a film-forming method. This article discusses the feasibility of this scaffold used in tissue engineering field according to the consequence of moisture content testing, mechanical analysis, and scanning electron microscopy analysis. The structure and properties of AlgCa2+-HA composite scaffold are closely related to some factors such as average molecular weight of hyaluronic acid, hyaluronic acid concentration, alginate viscosity, cross-linking agents and processing technology. The AlgCa 2+-HA composite material, which is at different proportions and adding different cross-linking agent,has some certain characteristics:moisture content ranging from 50%to 95%, tensile strength between 2.69 N/mm2 and 4.299 N/mm2, and elongation at break is about 58%to 160%. The prepared AlgCa2+-HA composite scaffolds can be used as tissue engineering scaffolds resulting from its high moisture content, good mechanical properties and ideal pore structure.

  15. Preparation and characterization of the high molecular weight [3H]hyaluronic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods of preparation were investigated. In the first, hydrogen atoms in the molecule are replaced by tritium. This isotopic substitution was performed in aqueous solution using Pd/CaCO3 as catalyst. In the second method, the high molecular weight hyaluronic acid was alkylated with [3H]methyl bromide in liquid ammonia at a temperature of -33.5 degC. High-performance gel permeation chromatographic separation was used for the separation and characterization of the high molecular weight [3H]hyaluronic acid. Molecular weight parameters for the labelled biopolymers were: M-barw=128 kDa, M-barw/M-barn=1.88 (first method) and M-barw=268 kDa, M-barw/M-barn=1.55 (second method). The high molecular weight [3H]hyaluronic acid with M-barw=268 kDa was degraded further by specific hyaluronidase. Products of the enzymatic depolymerization were observed to be identical for both the labelled and cold biopolymer. This finding indicates that the described labelling procedure using [3H]methyl bromide does not induce any major structural rearrangements in the molecule. (author) 3 figs., 2 tabs., 13 refs

  16. Secretion of hyaluronic acid by mucosal and submucosal gland epithelial cell cultures derived from human trachea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The respiratory epithelium is a target tissue for numerous airborne toxicants. We have established epithelial cell cultures form the mucosa and submucosal glands of human trachea. These epithelial cells exhibit numerous microvilli, desmosomes, and secretory granules. The objective of this study was to characterize the secretory products of these cell cultures. Neat confluent cultures at third passage were labeled with 10 μCi/ml tritiated glucosamine for 20 hours. The culture media was collected, adjusted to 5 mm DTT, and spun at 800 x g for 10 minutes to remove cellular debris. Aliquots were run on a Sepharose CL-4B column in PBS, 1 mm DTT, and 0.02% sodium azide. Void volume fractions were collected and counted by liquid scintillation. The void volume material was found to be susceptible to degradation by bovine testicular and Streptomyces Hyaluronidase. This indicates that hyaluronic acid is the major secretory product (>95%) of these cells. Submucosal gland cell secretion of hyaluronic acid was 175-200% greater than that of mucosal cells. Secretion of hyaluronic acid by the cultured cells indicates that HA may be one of the major secretory products of tracheal epithelial cells in vivo. This model provides an excellent opportunity for studying the affects of environmental agents on the target cell population

  17. Hyaluronic Acid Modified Hollow Prussian Blue Nanoparticles Loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin for Targeting Thermochemotherapy of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lijia; shao, shangmin; Wang, Yang; Yang, Yongbo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei

    2016-01-01

    This paper reported the fabrication of a multifunctional nanoplatform by modifying hollow Prussian blue nanoparticles with hyaluronic acid grafting polyethylene glycol, followed by loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin for tumor-targeted thermochemotherapy. It was found that the surface modification of hollow Prussian blue nanoparticles with hyaluronic acid grafting polyethylene endowed a great colloidal stability, long blood circulation time and the capability for targeting Hela cells over-expressing the CD44 receptor. The obtained nanoagent exhibited efficient photothermal effect and a light triggered and stepwise release behavior of 10-hydroxycamptothecin due to the strong optical absorption in the near-infrared region. The investigations on the body weight change, histological injury and blood biochemical indexes showed that such nanoagent had excellent biocompatibility for medical application. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments proved that the combination of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy through the agent of hyaluronic acid modified Prussian blue nanoparticles loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin could significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy compared with either therapy alone because of a good synergetic effect. PMID:26722372

  18. Hyaluronic acid liposomal gel sustains delivery of a corticoid to the inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kechai, Naila; Mamelle, Elisabeth; Nguyen, Yann; Huang, Nicolas; Nicolas, Valérie; Chaminade, Pierre; Yen-Nicolaÿ, Stéphanie; Gueutin, Claire; Granger, Benjamin; Ferrary, Evelyne; Agnely, Florence; Bochot, Amélie

    2016-03-28

    The inner ear is one of the most challenging organs for drug delivery, mainly because of the blood-perilymph barrier. Therefore, local rather than systemic drug delivery methods are being developed for inner ear therapy. In this work, we have evaluated the benefit of a hyaluronic acid liposomal gel for sustained delivery of a corticoid to the inner ear after local injection into the middle ear in a guinea pig model. The liposomal gel was easily injectable as a result of the shear-thinning behavior of hyaluronic acid. A prolonged residence time at the site of injection as well as in the round window were achieved without any negative effect on the hearing thresholds of the animals. The presence of liposomes in the formulation resulted in sustained release of the drug in the perilymph for 30days and promoted the conversion of the prodrug loaded within the liposomes (dexamethasone phosphate) into its active form (dexamethasone). In this way, therapeutic doses were attained in the perilymph. A small amount of intact liposomes was visualized in the perilymph, whereas the main proportion of liposomes seemed to be trapped in the round window resulting in a reservoir effect. Thus, the administration of hyaluronic acid liposomal gel to the middle ear is an efficient strategy for delivering corticoids to the inner ear in a sustained manner. PMID:26860286

  19. Correction of Tear Trough Deformity With a Cohesive Polydensified Matrix Hyaluronic Acid: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber-Vorländer, Jürgen; Kürten, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The tear trough or infraorbital hollow is a challenging area to treat, and only a few fillers are suitable for this delicate area. We report on a European case series of six subjects with mild to severe tear troughs who received treatment with cohesive polydensified matrix (CPM®) technology hyaluronic acid gel (Belotero® Balance). The product was injected as small depots (up to ten small boli 0.2 mL maximum each per side) at the supraperiosteal level along or below the orbital rim. Follow-up visits took place at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months after injection for independent evaluation of the clinical effect using the Merz Aesthetics Scale™ for infraorbital hollows and the Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale. Adverse events were also recorded. Mean hollowness scores were considerably improved compared with baseline in all subjects. In all women, the improvements remained throughout the 9-month study, with none reverting to their baseline score. Subjects' satisfaction with treatment was very high throughout the study, and all women stated that they would repeat treatment with the same product. The CPM hyaluronic acid gel was well tolerated. CPM hyaluronic acid gel is a safe and effective treatment for the tear trough area. PMID:26605822

  20. Effect of fermentation conditions on the production of hyaluronic acid by Streptococcus zooepidemicus ATCC 39920

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Caldas Pan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The production of hyaluronic acid by Streptococcus zooepidemicus ATCC 39920 with varying rates of pH (6.0, 7.0, 8.0, temperature (34; 37; 40°C, agitation (100, 150, 200 rpm, glucose (10, 20, 30 g L-1 and yeast extract concentration (10, 20, 30 g L-1 was evaluated by statistical approaches. The best conditions for the production of hyaluronic acid was pH 8.0, 37°C and 100 rpm in a medium containing 30 g L-1 glucose and yeast extract, for a production of 0.787 g L-1. Temperature, pH and yeast extract were significant variables (p < 0.05. Yeast extract and pH had a positive effect on the production of the polymer. Lactate, formate and acetate synthesis were also analyzed. Current assay showed the feasibility of statistical tools to optimize the physical and nutritional parameters for the production of hyaluronic acid and the improvement of the fermentation process.

  1. Effect of Mannitol on Hyaluronic Acid Stability in Two in Vitro Models of Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite Rinaudo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose the evaluation of the mannitol’s ability to reduce hyaluronic acid (HA degradation using two different models of oxidative stress. Firstly, a solution of hyaluronan and a solution of the same HA including mannitol in PBS buffer were submitted to an oxidative stress generated by the addition of xanthine + xanthine oxidase generating oxygen free radicals. Different enzyme concentrations were used and the HA properties were studied after 24 h of contact at ambient temperature. Decreases of the viscosity of the solution were assessed by rheometry (viscous and elastic module and that of HA molecular weight was determined by steric exclusion chromatography. Rheologic behavior was assessed on identical HA solutions subjected to another model of oxidative stress imposed by addition of hydrogen peroxide. The influence of mannitol concentration on HA degradation was also demonstrated. Whatever the stress applied, it appears very clearly that mannitol protects hyaluronic acid from mediated oxygen free radicals degradation. These in vitro results suggest that mannitol could be a simple way to significantly increase the intra-articular residence time of the injected hyaluronic acid and therefore might improve viscosupplementation effectiveness.

  2. "Hyaluronic acid"和"Hyaluronan"一词的来历及其中译名

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭学平; 张天民

    2006-01-01

    @@ 1934年美国哥伦比亚大学的Karl Meyer和JohnW.Palmer从牛眼玻璃体(hyaloid body or vitreous humor)分离出一种含糖醛酸(uronic acid)和氨基糖的高分子多糖,并将其命名为"hyaluronic acid"[1],该词由"hyaloid"(透明的、玻璃状的)和"uronic acid"组合而成,中译名为"透明质酸"[2].

  3. Biodegradable hyaluronic acid hydrogels to control release of dexamethasone through aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry for adipose tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Ming; Ma, Ye; Zhang, Ziwei; Mao, Jiahui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China); Tan, Huaping, E-mail: hptan@njust.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China); Hu, Xiaohong [School of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing (China)

    2015-11-01

    A robust synthetic strategy of biopolymer-based hydrogels has been developed where hyaluronic acid derivatives reacted through aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry without the involvement of chemical catalysts, allowing for control and sustain release of dexamethasone. To conjugate the hydrogel, furan and maleimide functionalized hyaluronic acid were synthesized, respectively, as well as furan functionalized dexamethasone, for the covalent immobilization. Chemical structure, gelation time, morphologies, swelling kinetics, weight loss, compressive modulus and dexamethasone release of the hydrogel system in PBS at 37 °C were studied. The results demonstrated that the aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry provides an extremely selective reaction and proceeds with high efficiency for hydrogel conjugation and covalent immobilization of dexamethasone. Cell culture results showed that the dexamethasone immobilized hydrogel was noncytotoxic and preserved proliferation of entrapped human adipose-derived stem cells. This synthetic approach uniquely allows for the direct fabrication of biologically functionalized gel scaffolds with ideal structures for adipose tissue engineering, which provides a competitive alternative to conventional conjugation techniques such as copper mediated click chemistry. - Highlights: • A biodegradable hyaluronic acid hydrogel was crosslinked via aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry. • Dexamethasone was covalently immobilized into the hyaluronic acid hydrogel via aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry. • Dexamethasone could be released from the Diels–Alder hyaluronic acid hydrogel in a controlled fashion.

  4. Biodegradable hyaluronic acid hydrogels to control release of dexamethasone through aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry for adipose tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A robust synthetic strategy of biopolymer-based hydrogels has been developed where hyaluronic acid derivatives reacted through aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry without the involvement of chemical catalysts, allowing for control and sustain release of dexamethasone. To conjugate the hydrogel, furan and maleimide functionalized hyaluronic acid were synthesized, respectively, as well as furan functionalized dexamethasone, for the covalent immobilization. Chemical structure, gelation time, morphologies, swelling kinetics, weight loss, compressive modulus and dexamethasone release of the hydrogel system in PBS at 37 °C were studied. The results demonstrated that the aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry provides an extremely selective reaction and proceeds with high efficiency for hydrogel conjugation and covalent immobilization of dexamethasone. Cell culture results showed that the dexamethasone immobilized hydrogel was noncytotoxic and preserved proliferation of entrapped human adipose-derived stem cells. This synthetic approach uniquely allows for the direct fabrication of biologically functionalized gel scaffolds with ideal structures for adipose tissue engineering, which provides a competitive alternative to conventional conjugation techniques such as copper mediated click chemistry. - Highlights: • A biodegradable hyaluronic acid hydrogel was crosslinked via aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry. • Dexamethasone was covalently immobilized into the hyaluronic acid hydrogel via aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry. • Dexamethasone could be released from the Diels–Alder hyaluronic acid hydrogel in a controlled fashion

  5. Synthesis of hyaluronic-acid-related oligosaccharides and analogues, as their 4-methoxyphenyl glycosides, having N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine at the reducing end

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Halkes, K.M.; Slaghek, T.M.; Hyppönen, T.K.; Kruiskamp, P.H.; Ogawa, T.; Kamerling, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    To contribute to the possibilities to study the ability of oligosaccharide fragments of hyaluronic acid to induce angiogenesis, several hyaluronic-acid-related oligosaccharides and their 6-O-sulfated analogues were synthesised as their 4-methoxyphenyl glycosides having 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucopyr

  6. Determination of the unsaturated disaccharides of hyaluronic acid in equine synovial fluid by high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection

    OpenAIRE

    Aaltonen, Kaisa; NiemelÀ, Tytti; Sankari, Satu; Tulamo, Riitta-Mari

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an analytical method to determine the presence of hyaluronic acid derived disaccharides in equine synovial fluid. Findings A high-performance liquid chromatography method for the determination of hyaluronic acid derived unsaturated disaccharides in equine synovial fluid was developed and vali...

  7. Purification and characterization of hyaluronic acid produced by Streptococcus zooepidemicus strain 3523-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jagadeeswara Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA is a hydrated gel and comprises repeating units of glucuronic acid and N-acetylglucosamine. Production and recovery of HA has gained great importance due to its vast clinical applications. In pursuit of obtaining highly pure HA, we have developed a fed-batch fermentation process using Streptococcus zooepidemicus in a 25 L bioreactor that resulted in a maximum yield of 2.3 g/L HA. In addition, we have devised an efficient method for separation and recovery of hyaluronic acid from a highly viscous broth by treating with trichloroacetic acid (0.1% and charcoal (1-2%, passing through filtration (0.45 μm and ultrafiltration that resulted in recovery of 72.2% of clinical grade HA with molecular weight of 2.5×106 Da. We have also characterized our purified HA using FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. These studies revealed the similarity in both the FTIR spectrum as well as NMR spectrum of both reference standard and purified HA from S. zooepidemicus indicating that the reported process is more efficient in terms of better yield and high quality (99.2%.

  8. Magnetic microparticles post-synthetically coated by hyaluronic acid as an enhanced carrier for microfluidic bioanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holubova, Lucie [Department of Biological and Biochemical Sciences, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentska 573, 53210 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentska 573, 53210 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Knotek, Petr [Joint Laboratory of Solid State Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentska 573, 53210 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Palarcik, Jiri [Institute of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentska 573, 53210 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Cadkova, Michaela [Department of Biological and Biochemical Sciences, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentska 573, 53210 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentska 573, 53210 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Belina, Petr [Department of Inorganic Technology, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Doubravice 41, 53210 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Vlcek, Milan [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovskeho sq. 2, 16206 Prague (Czech Republic); Korecka, Lucie [Department of Biological and Biochemical Sciences, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentska 573, 53210 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Bilkova, Zuzana, E-mail: Zuzana.Bilkova@upce.cz [Department of Biological and Biochemical Sciences, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentska 573, 53210 Pardubice (Czech Republic)

    2014-11-01

    Iron oxide based particles functionalized by bioactive molecules have been utilized extensively in biotechnology and biomedicine. Despite their already proven advantages, instability under changing reaction conditions, non-specific sorption of biomolecules on the particles' surfaces, and iron oxide leakage from the naked particles can greatly limit their application. As confirmed many times, surface treatment with an appropriate stabilizer helps to minimize these disadvantages. In this work, we describe enhanced post-synthetic surface modification of superparamagnetic microparticles varying in materials and size using hyaluronic acid (HA) in various chain lengths. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, phase analysis light scattering and laser diffraction are the methods used for characterization of HA-coated particles. The zeta potential and thickness of HA-layer of HA-coated Dynabeads M270 Amine were − 50 mV and 85 nm, respectively, and of HA-coated p(GMA-MOEAA)-NH{sub 2} were − 38 mV and 140 nm, respectively. The electrochemical analysis confirmed the zero leakage of magnetic material and no reactivity of particles with hydrogen peroxide. The rate of non-specific sorption of bovine serum albumin was reduced up to 50% of the naked ones. The coating efficiency and suitability of biopolymer-based microparticles for magnetically active microfluidic devices were confirmed. - Highlights: • Post-synthetic surface modification of magnetic microparticles by hyaluronic acidHyaluronic acid — polymer of unique physicochemical and biological characteristics • Panel of particle characterization methods was introduced. • HA-coated microparticles gain characteristics suited for microfluidic bioanalysis.

  9. The evolving role of hyaluronic acid fillers for facial volume restoration and contouring: a Canadian overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhn C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Channy Muhn,1 Nathan Rosen,1 Nowell Solish,2 Vince Bertucci,2 Mark Lupin,3 Alain Dansereau,4 Fred Weksberg,5 B Kent Remington,6 Arthur Swift71Division of Dermatology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, 2Division of Dermatology, New Women's College Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, 3Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, 4Private Practice, Repentigny, Québec, 5Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, 6Private Practice, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 7St Mary's Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, CanadaAbstract: Recent advancements, including more versatile facial fillers, refined injection techniques and the adoption of a global facial approach, have contributed to improved patient outcome and increased patient satisfaction. Nine Canadian specialists (eight dermatologists, one plastic surgeon collaborated to develop an overview on volume restoration and contouring based on published literature and their collective clinical experience. The specialists concurred that optimal results in volume restoration and contouring depend on correcting deficiencies at various layers of the facial envelope. This includes creating a foundation for deep structural support in the supraperiosteal or submuscular plane; volume repletion of subcutaneous fat compartments; and the reestablishment of dermal and subdermal support to minimize cutaneous rhytids, grooves and furrows. It was also agreed that volume restoration and contouring using a global facial approach is essential to create a natural, youthful appearance in facial aesthetics. A comprehensive non-surgical approach should therefore incorporate combining fillers such as high-viscosity, low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (LMWHA for structural support and hyaluronic acid (HA for lines, grooves and furrows with neuromodulators, lasers and energy devices.Keywords: hyaluronic acid filler, volumizing, facial

  10. Magnetic microparticles post-synthetically coated by hyaluronic acid as an enhanced carrier for microfluidic bioanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron oxide based particles functionalized by bioactive molecules have been utilized extensively in biotechnology and biomedicine. Despite their already proven advantages, instability under changing reaction conditions, non-specific sorption of biomolecules on the particles' surfaces, and iron oxide leakage from the naked particles can greatly limit their application. As confirmed many times, surface treatment with an appropriate stabilizer helps to minimize these disadvantages. In this work, we describe enhanced post-synthetic surface modification of superparamagnetic microparticles varying in materials and size using hyaluronic acid (HA) in various chain lengths. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, phase analysis light scattering and laser diffraction are the methods used for characterization of HA-coated particles. The zeta potential and thickness of HA-layer of HA-coated Dynabeads M270 Amine were − 50 mV and 85 nm, respectively, and of HA-coated p(GMA-MOEAA)-NH2 were − 38 mV and 140 nm, respectively. The electrochemical analysis confirmed the zero leakage of magnetic material and no reactivity of particles with hydrogen peroxide. The rate of non-specific sorption of bovine serum albumin was reduced up to 50% of the naked ones. The coating efficiency and suitability of biopolymer-based microparticles for magnetically active microfluidic devices were confirmed. - Highlights: • Post-synthetic surface modification of magnetic microparticles by hyaluronic acidHyaluronic acid — polymer of unique physicochemical and biological characteristics • Panel of particle characterization methods was introduced. • HA-coated microparticles gain characteristics suited for microfluidic bioanalysis

  11. Dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (Deflux) implants mimicking distal ureteral calculi on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Caleb P. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Urology, Boston, MA (United States); Chow, Jeanne S. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-01-15

    Periureteral or subtrigonal injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid (Dx/HA) copolymer (Deflux, Q-Med, Uppsala, Sweden) is an increasingly common endoscopic treatment for vesicoureteral reflux. We report a confusing radiographic finding of bilateral calcified Dx/HA injections initially thought to represent bilateral distal ureteral stones in a boy who presented with intermittent periumbilical pain. Urologists, radiologists, and emergency room physicians should be aware of the potential for calcification of ureteral implants of Dx/HA, and of the potentially confusing radiographic images that may result. (orig.)

  12. Length Scale Dependence of the Dynamic Properties of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horkay, Ferenc; Falus, Peter; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik (CNRS-UMR); (NIH); (ILL)

    2010-12-07

    In solutions of the charged semirigid biopolymer hyaluronic acid in salt-free conditions, the diffusion coefficient D{sub NSE} measured at high transfer momentum q by neutron spin echo is more than an order of magnitude smaller than that determined by dynamic light scattering, D{sub DLS}. This behavior contrasts with neutral polymer solutions. With increasing salt content, D{sub DLS} approaches D{sub NSE}, which is independent of ionic strength. Contrary to theoretical expectation, the ion-polymer coupling, which dominates the low q dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions, already breaks down at distance scales greater than the Debye-Hueckel length.

  13. Treating atopic dermatitis: safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of a ceramide hyaluronic acid emollient foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacha O

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Omar Pacha, Adelaide A HebertDepartment of Dermatology, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Advances in current understanding of the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis have led to improved targeting of the structural deficiencies in atopic skin. Ceramide deficiency appears to be one of the major alterations in atopic dermatitis and the replenishment of this epidermal component through topically applied ceramide based emollients appears to be safe, well tolerated, and effective. Recently a ceramide hyaluronic acid foam has become commercially available and increasing evidence supports its safety and efficacy in patients who suffer from atopic dermatitis.Keywords: atopic dermatitis, ceramide, Hylatopic, eczema, non-steroidal, dermatology

  14. A novel use of reticulated hyaluronic acid (Healaflow) for hypotony eyes in patients with uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, R E; Juma, Z; Turner, S; Jones, L D; Sung, V C T

    2016-06-01

    Persistent ocular hypotony is a complex and ongoing challenge faced in ophthalmology. It can result in early ocular phthisis and associated visual decline, pain and deformity. We present the first case series, in which repeated intracameral injections of highly reticulated hyaluronic acid (Healaflow) have successfully prevented the complications of ocular hypotony in the long term. We believe it is a viable management option that can bring about a significant improvement to the quality of life in this subgroup of patients while avoiding frequent intervention. PMID:27016504

  15. Length Scale Dependence of the Dynamic Properties of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In solutions of the charged semirigid biopolymer hyaluronic acid in salt-free conditions, the diffusion coefficient DNSE measured at high transfer momentum q by neutron spin echo is more than an order of magnitude smaller than that determined by dynamic light scattering, DDLS. This behavior contrasts with neutral polymer solutions. With increasing salt content, DDLS approaches DNSE, which is independent of ionic strength. Contrary to theoretical expectation, the ion-polymer coupling, which dominates the low q dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions, already breaks down at distance scales greater than the Debye-Hueckel length.

  16. Dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (Deflux) implants mimicking distal ureteral calculi on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Periureteral or subtrigonal injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid (Dx/HA) copolymer (Deflux, Q-Med, Uppsala, Sweden) is an increasingly common endoscopic treatment for vesicoureteral reflux. We report a confusing radiographic finding of bilateral calcified Dx/HA injections initially thought to represent bilateral distal ureteral stones in a boy who presented with intermittent periumbilical pain. Urologists, radiologists, and emergency room physicians should be aware of the potential for calcification of ureteral implants of Dx/HA, and of the potentially confusing radiographic images that may result. (orig.)

  17. Effect of irradiation on antioxidant properties and structural characteristics of hyaluronic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of 60Co γ-rays irradiation on molecular weight, viscosity and antioxidant of hyaluronic acid (HA) were studied in this research. The results showed that molecular weight and viscosity of irradiated HA decreased, the scavenging ability of hydroxyl radicals (OH·) and superoxide radicals (O2·) weakened gradually with the increasing of irradiation dose. However, the DPPH. scavenging ability and reducing power increased with the increasing of irradiation dose. The quality and appearance of HA did not change significantly after irradiation, but the rheology enhanced. The infrared spectra structure of HA did not show significant change after irradiation. (authors)

  18. Synthesis of conjugate consisting of hyaluronic acid grafted to luminiscent nanodiamond particles for cancer diagnosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lokajová, Jana; Štursa, Jan; Štursa, Jan; Nesládek, M.; Ledvina, Miroslav

    Tel-Aviv: -, 2013. P16. [EuroCarb17. European Carbohydrate Symposium /17./. 07.07.2013-11.07.2013, Tel-Aviv] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA02010760; GA TA ČR TA01011165; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E11071 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 245122 - DINAMO Grant ostatní: European Social Fund(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0306 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : hyaluronic acid * nanodiamonds * reductive amination Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  19. Duration of wrinkle correction following repeat treatment with Juvéderm hyaluronic acid fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Stacy R.; Jones, Derek; Thomas, Jane A.; Murphy, Diane K.; Beddingfield, Frederick C.

    2010-01-01

    Many patients elect to have repeat treatments with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers to maintain wrinkle correction, but the clinical performance of these products after repeat treatments has not been formally assessed. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Juvéderm injectable gel (Juvéderm Ultra, Juvéderm Ultra Plus, and Juvéderm 30) through 1 year after repeat treatment of nasolabial folds (NLFs) that were previously treated with Juvéderm or Zyplast 6–9 month...

  20. Treatment of glabella skin necrosis following injection of hyaluronic acid filler using platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Boo Kyoung; Kang, In Jung; Jeong, Ki Heon; Shin, Min Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers have been widely used for soft-tissue augmentation. However, there can be various complications following HA filler injection. Skin necrosis is rare but one of the most disastrous side effects that, if not treated promptly and effectively, can result in permanent and potentially disfiguring scarring. Thus, early proper management is important. Herein we report a patient who experienced tissue necrosis of the glabellar area after receiving filler injections that was successfully treated using platelet-rich plasma and provide full follow-up clinical photographs. PMID:26052808

  1. Effects of corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid on torn rotator cuff tendons in vitro and in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hidehiro; Gotoh, Masafumi; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Ohta, Keisuke; Nakamura, Keiichirou; Honda, Hirokazu; Ohzono, Hiroki; Shimokobe, Hisao; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Shirachi, Isao; Okawa, Takahiro; Higuchi, Fujio; Shirahama, Masahiro; Shiba, Naoto; Matsueda, Satoko

    2015-10-01

    Corticosteroids (CS) or hyaluronic acid (HA) is used in subacromial injection for the conservative treatment of rotator cuff tears (RCT); this study addresses the question of how CS and HA affect the tendon tissue and fibroblasts in vitro and in rats. Cell proliferation assays were performed in human tendon fibroblasts from RCT. Rats underwent surgery to create RCT, and the surgical sites were injected with CS or HA. The rotator cuff tendons were subjected to biomechanical testing, microscopic and immunohistochemical analysis of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and ultrastructural analysis. Cell proliferation was significantly decreased with CS in vitro (p site. PMID:26174562

  2. Clinical and biometrological efficacy of a hyaluronic acid-based mesotherapy product: a randomised controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Baspeyras, Martine; Rouvrais, Céline; Liégard, Laetitia; Delalleau, Alexandre; Letellier, Sandrine; Bacle, Irène; Courrech, Laetitia; Murat, Pascale; Mengeaud, Valérie; Schmitt, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Data demonstrating the efficacy of hyaluronic acid (HA)-based mesotherapy for skin rejuvenation are scarce. The aim of the study is to assess the efficacy of non-reticulated HA-based mesotherapy on skin elasticity and complexion radiance. 55 women with cutaneous ageing signs included in the Full Analysis Set (FAS) population blindly received intradermal micro-injections (50 × 0.02 mL) of non-cross-linked HA filler with mannitol (Glytone 1, HA concentration: 14 mg/g) in one cheek and saline ph...

  3. Release of Ciprofloxacin-HCl and Dexamethasone Phosphate by Hyaluronic Acid Containing Silicone Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Lyndon Jones; Elizabeth Joyce; Heather Sheardown; Miriam Heynen; Andrea Weeks; Alex Hui; Darrene Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the covalent incorporation of hyaluronic acid (HA) into conventional hydrogel and hydrogels containing silicone as models for contact lens materials on the uptake and release of the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin and the anti-inflammatory steroid dexamethasone phosphate. A 3 mg/mL ciprofloxacin solution (0.3% w/v) and a 1 mg/mL dexamethasone phosphate solution (0.1%) was prepared in borate buffered saline. Three hydrogel mater...

  4. Effect of fermentation conditions on the production of hyaluronic acid by Streptococcus zooepidemicus ATCC 39920

    OpenAIRE

    Nicole Caldas Pan; Josiane Alessandra Vignoli; Cristiani Baldo; Hanny Cristina Braga Pereira; Rui Sérgio dos Santos Ferreira Silva; Maria Antonia Pedrine Colabone Celligoi

    2015-01-01

    The production of hyaluronic acid by Streptococcus zooepidemicus ATCC 39920 with varying rates of pH (6.0, 7.0, 8.0), temperature (34; 37; 40°C), agitation (100, 150, 200 rpm), glucose (10, 20, 30 g L-1) and yeast extract concentration (10, 20, 30 g L-1) was evaluated by statistical approaches. The best conditions for the production of hyaluronic acid was pH 8.0, 37°C and 100 rpm in a medium containing 30 g L-1 glucose and yeast extract, for a production of 0.787 g L-1. Temperature, pH and ye...

  5. Effect of gamma irradiation on hyaluronic acid and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohd, Hur Munawar Kabir; Taqiyuddin Mawardi bin Ayob, Muhammad; Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md; Mohamed, Faizal; Radiman, Shahidan; Rahman, Irman Abdul [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    DPPC lipids are the major component constituting the biological membrane, and their importances in various physiological functions are well documented. Hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial joint fluid functions as a lubricant, shock absorber and a nutrient carrier. Gamma irradiation has also been found to be effective in depolymerizing and cleaving molecular chains related to free radicals, thus extends with changes in chemical composition as well as its physiological functions. This research are conducted to investigate the hyaluronic acid (HA) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction in form of vesicles and its effect to gamma radiation. The size of DPPC vesicles formed via gentle hydration method is between 100 to 200 nm in diameter. HA (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml) was added into the vesicles and characterized by using TEM to determine vesicle size distributions, fusion and rupture of DPPC structure. The results demonstrated that the size of the vesicles approximately between 200 to 300 nm which caused by vesicles fusion with HA and formed even larger vesicles. After being irradiated by 0 to 200 Gy, the size of vesicles decreased as HA was degraded. To elucidate the mechanism of these effects, FTIR spectra were carried out and have shown that at absorption bands at 1700–1750 cm{sup −1} due to formation of carboxylic acid and leads to alteration of HA structure.

  6. Effect of gamma irradiation on hyaluronic acid and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohd, Hur Munawar Kabir; bin Ayob, Muhammad Taqiyuddin Mawardi; Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md; Mohamed, Faizal; Radiman, Shahidan; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2014-09-01

    DPPC lipids are the major component constituting the biological membrane, and their importances in various physiological functions are well documented. Hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial joint fluid functions as a lubricant, shock absorber and a nutrient carrier. Gamma irradiation has also been found to be effective in depolymerizing and cleaving molecular chains related to free radicals, thus extends with changes in chemical composition as well as its physiological functions. This research are conducted to investigate the hyaluronic acid (HA) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction in form of vesicles and its effect to gamma radiation. The size of DPPC vesicles formed via gentle hydration method is between 100 to 200 nm in diameter. HA (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml) was added into the vesicles and characterized by using TEM to determine vesicle size distributions, fusion and rupture of DPPC structure. The results demonstrated that the size of the vesicles approximately between 200 to 300 nm which caused by vesicles fusion with HA and formed even larger vesicles. After being irradiated by 0 to 200 Gy, the size of vesicles decreased as HA was degraded. To elucidate the mechanism of these effects, FTIR spectra were carried out and have shown that at absorption bands at 1700-1750 cm-1 due to formation of carboxylic acid and leads to alteration of HA structure.

  7. Polyamine/salt-assembled microspheres coated with hyaluronic acid for targeting and pH sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pan; Yang, Hui; Wang, Guojun; Tong, Weijun; Gao, Changyou

    2016-06-01

    The poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/trisodium citrate aggregates were fabricated and further covalently crosslinked via the coupling reaction of carboxylic sites on trisodium citrate with the amine groups on polyamine, onto which poly-L-lysine and hyaluronic acid were sequentially assembled, forming stable microspheres. The pH sensitive dye and pH insensitive dye were further labeled to enable the microspheres with pH sensing property. Moreover, these microspheres could be specifically targeted to HeLa tumor cells, since hyaluronic acid can specifically recognize and bind to CD44, a receptor overexpressed on many tumor cells. Quantitative pH measurement by confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that the microspheres were internalized into HeLa cells, and accumulated in acidic compartments. By contrast, only a few microspheres were adhered on the NIH 3T3 cells surface. The microspheres with combined pH sensing property and targeting ability can enhance the insight understanding of the targeted drug vehicles trafficking after cellular internalization. PMID:26954089

  8. Effect of gamma irradiation on hyaluronic acid and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DPPC lipids are the major component constituting the biological membrane, and their importances in various physiological functions are well documented. Hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial joint fluid functions as a lubricant, shock absorber and a nutrient carrier. Gamma irradiation has also been found to be effective in depolymerizing and cleaving molecular chains related to free radicals, thus extends with changes in chemical composition as well as its physiological functions. This research are conducted to investigate the hyaluronic acid (HA) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction in form of vesicles and its effect to gamma radiation. The size of DPPC vesicles formed via gentle hydration method is between 100 to 200 nm in diameter. HA (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml) was added into the vesicles and characterized by using TEM to determine vesicle size distributions, fusion and rupture of DPPC structure. The results demonstrated that the size of the vesicles approximately between 200 to 300 nm which caused by vesicles fusion with HA and formed even larger vesicles. After being irradiated by 0 to 200 Gy, the size of vesicles decreased as HA was degraded. To elucidate the mechanism of these effects, FTIR spectra were carried out and have shown that at absorption bands at 1700–1750 cm−1 due to formation of carboxylic acid and leads to alteration of HA structure

  9. Perspectives in the selection of hyaluronic acid fillers for facial wrinkles and aging skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah E John, Richard D Price

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Hannah E John, Richard D PriceDepartment of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Cambridge, UKAbstract: Aesthetic surgery is, in the USA at least, no longer a taboo subject. Outside North America, public acceptance continues to grow as more procedures are performed each year. While there appears, anecdotally, to be a decrease in patients undergoing cosmetic treatments because of the global financial crisis, the overall trend remains upward. Although popular television programs espouse the benefits of surgery, it is nonsurgical procedures that account, numerically, for the majority of procedures performed; in the USA, there was a 48% growth from 2000 to 2008 in nonsurgical treatments undertaken by women, and 64% in men and while the average surgeon might perform 60 blepharoplasty operations in 2007, (she would also undertake 375 botulinum injections, and almost 200 filler injections of varying sorts. Clearly there is enthusiasm for nonsurgical treatments, and this trend appears to be rising. With this in mind, we present an overview of the commonest filler injection material, hyaluronic acid. We present the mechanism of action, the purported risks and benefits, and briefly discuss technique.Keywords: hyaluronic acid, filler injection, nonsurgical procedures, technique

  10. In vitro and ex vivo effect of hyaluronic acid on erythrocyte flow properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palatnik S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyaluronic acid (HA is present in many tissues; its presence in serum may be related to certain inflammatory conditions, tissue damage, sepsis, liver malfunction and some malignancies. In the present work, our goal was to investigate the significance of hyaluronic acid effect on erythrocyte flow properties. Therefore we performed in vitro experiments incubating red blood cells (RBCs with several HA concentrations. Afterwards, in order to corroborate the pathophysiological significance of the results obtained, we replicated the in vitro experiment with ex vivo RBCs from diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients, a serum HA-increasing pathology. Methods Erythrocyte deformability (by filtration through nucleopore membranes and erythrocyte aggregability (EA were tested on blood from healthy donors additioned with purified HA. EA was measured by transmitted light and analyzed with a mathematical model yielding two parameters, the aggregation rate and the size of the aggregates. Conformational changes of cytoskeleton proteins were estimated by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR. Results In vitro, erythrocytes treated with HA showed increased rigidity index (RI and reduced aggregability, situation strongly related to the rigidization of the membrane cytoskeleton triggered by HA, as shown by EPR results. Also, a significant correlation (r: 0.77, p Conclusions Our results lead us to postulate the hypothesis that HA interacts with the erythrocyte surface leading to modifications in erythrocyte rheological and flow properties, both ex vivo and in vitro.

  11. Crosslinked collagen-gelatin-hyaluronic acid biomimetic film for cornea tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang; Ren, Li, E-mail: psliren@scut.edu.cn; Wang, Yingjun, E-mail: imwangyj@163.com

    2013-01-01

    Cornea disease may lead to blindness and keratoplasty is considered as an effective treatment method. However, there is a severe shortage of donor corneas worldwide. This paper presents the crosslinked collagen (Col)-gelatin (Gel)-hyaluronic acid (HA) films developed by making use of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) as the crosslinker. The test results on the physical and biological properties indicate that the CGH631 film (the mass ratio of Col:Gel:HA = 6:3:1) has appropriate optical performance, hydrophilicity and mechanical properties. The diffusion properties of the CGH631 film to NaCl and tryptophan are also satisfactory and the measured data are 2.43 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} cm{sup 2}/s and 7.97 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2}/s, respectively. In addition, cell viability studies demonstrate that the CGH631 film has good biocompatibility, on which human corneal epithelial cells attached and proliferated well. This biocompatible film may have potential use in cornea tissue engineering. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crosslinked collagen-gelatin-hyaluronic acid films were fabricated in this study. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The film had appropriate physical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diffusion coefficient of the film was comparable with the human cornea. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCEC viability studies confirmed the biocompatibility of the film.

  12. Treatment with the Hyaluronic Acid Synthesis Inhibitor 4-Methylumbelliferone Suppresses SEB-Induced Lung Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga N. Uchakina

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to bacterial superantigens, such as staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB, can lead to the induction of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS. To date, there are no known effective treatments for SEB-induced inflammation. In the current study we investigated the potential use of the hyaluronic acid synthase inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU on staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB induced acute lung inflammation. Culturing SEB-activated immune cells with 4-MU led to reduced proliferation, reduced cytokine production as well as an increase in apoptosis when compared to untreated cells. Treatment of mice with 4-MU led to protection from SEB-induced lung injury. Specifically, 4-MU treatment led to a reduction in SEB-induced HA levels, reduction in lung permeability, and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Taken together, these results suggest that use of 4-MU to target hyaluronic acid production may be an effective treatment for the inflammatory response following exposure to SEB.

  13. Crosslinked collagen–gelatin–hyaluronic acid biomimetic film for cornea tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornea disease may lead to blindness and keratoplasty is considered as an effective treatment method. However, there is a severe shortage of donor corneas worldwide. This paper presents the crosslinked collagen (Col)–gelatin (Gel)–hyaluronic acid (HA) films developed by making use of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) as the crosslinker. The test results on the physical and biological properties indicate that the CGH631 film (the mass ratio of Col:Gel:HA = 6:3:1) has appropriate optical performance, hydrophilicity and mechanical properties. The diffusion properties of the CGH631 film to NaCl and tryptophan are also satisfactory and the measured data are 2.43 × 10−6 cm2/s and 7.97 × 10−7 cm2/s, respectively. In addition, cell viability studies demonstrate that the CGH631 film has good biocompatibility, on which human corneal epithelial cells attached and proliferated well. This biocompatible film may have potential use in cornea tissue engineering. - Highlights: ► Crosslinked collagen–gelatin–hyaluronic acid films were fabricated in this study. ► The film had appropriate physical properties. ► Diffusion coefficient of the film was comparable with the human cornea. ► HCEC viability studies confirmed the biocompatibility of the film.

  14. Simple and efficient radiolabeling of hyaluronic acid and its in vivo evaluation via oral administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to synthesize hyaluronic acid-tyramine (HA-Tm) conjugate and label it with radioisotopes for in vivo biodistribution study. Radiolabeling of HA-Tm was carried out using 125I and 131I and the observed radiochemical yield were 96 and 98 % respectively. Biodistribution study of radiolabeled HA-Tm was performed with normal Balb/c mice via oral administration. The uptake values of [131I]HA-Tm in organs were measured by gamma-counter at different time points. Biodistribution results showed that most radioactivities were observed in the gastrointestinal tract at initial time point. A small part of [131I]HA-Tm was then absorbed into the bloodstream from the small intestine and distributed in some organs. SPECT/CT images of orally administered [125I]HA-Tm were well matched with the biodistribution data. The results in the present study would provide an efficient radiolabeling method of hyaluronic acid and also present quantitative organ distributions of orally administered HA. (author)

  15. Proteome analysis of the hyaluronic acid-producing bacterium, Streptococcus zooepidemicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archer Colin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus is a commensal of horses and an opportunistic pathogen in many animals and humans. Some strains produce copious amounts of hyaluronic acid, making S. zooepidemicus an important industrial microorganism for the production of this valuable biopolymer used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry. Encapsulation by hyaluronic acid is considered an important virulence factor in other streptococci, though the importance in S. zooepidemicus remains poorly understood. Proteomics may provide a better understanding of virulence factors in S. zooepidemicus, facilitate the design of better diagnostics and treatments, and guide engineering of superior production strains. Results Using hyaluronidase to remove the capsule and by optimising cellular lysis, a reference map for S. zooepidemicus was completed. This protocol significantly increased protein recovery, allowing for visualisation of 682 spots and the identification of 86 proteins using mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF; of which 16 were membrane proteins. Conclusion The data presented constitute the first reference map for S. zooepidemicus and provide new information on the identity and characteristics of the more abundantly expressed proteins.

  16. Hyaluronic acid fat graft myringoplasty vs fat patch fat graft myringoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Musaed; Saliba, Issam

    2015-08-01

    We aim to compare the hyaluronic acid to fat graft myringoplasty (HAFGM) technique to a recently described modified-FGM (M-FGM) in the repair of tympanic membrane perforation (TMP). We also aim to evaluate the hearing level improvement postoperatively. We conducted a prospective study in an adult tertiary care center between 2012 and 2013. Adult patients presenting with simple TMP were operated on randomly using either HAFGM or M-FGM under local anesthesia in outpatients' settings. Success was considered when complete closure is achieved. Audiometric parameters were evaluated pre and postoperatively. Twenty-four patients were included in the study (HAFGM: 10 patients and M-FGM: 14 patients). Complete closure was achieved in 80 % in HAFGM vs 42.8 % in the M-FGM (p = 0.03). The study was abandoned due to the low success rate in first 14 patients of the M-FGM group. The pure tone audiometry was improved postoperatively in the HAFGM only. The study was aborted because of the unsatisfactory obtained results using the MFGM. It also shows the beneficial effect of hyaluronic acid application to FGM for a successful TMP repair. PMID:24633245

  17. Posterior Ciliary Artery Occlusion Caused by Hyaluronic Acid Injections Into the Forehead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiu Zhuo; Hu, Jun Yan; Wu, Peng Sen; Yu, Sheng Bo; Kikkawa, Don O.; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although cosmetic facial soft tissue fillers are generally safe and effective, improper injections can lead to devastating and irreversible consequences. We represent the first known case of posterior ciliary artery occlusion caused by hyaluronic acid. A 41-year-old female presented with right visual loss 7 hours after receiving cosmetic hyaluronic acid injections into her forehead. Examination revealed no light perception in the right eye and multiple dark ischemic area of injection over the forehead and nose. The right fundus revealed a pink retina with optic nerve edema. Fluorescein angiogram showed several filling defects in the choroidal circulation and late hyperfluorescence in the choroid. A right posterior ciliary artery occlusion and embolic occlusion of facial artery braches was diagnosed. With hyaluronidase injection, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, oral aspirin, oral acetazolamide and dexamethasone venotransfuse treatment, the patient's forehead and nasal skin improved and vision recovered to hand movements. With proper technique, vascular occlusion is rare following facial filler injection. Vision consequences can be severe if filler emboli enter the ocular circulation. Physicians should be aware of this potential side effect, recognize its presentation, and be knowledgeable of effective management. PMID:26986163

  18. Posterior Ciliary Artery Occlusion Caused by Hyaluronic Acid Injections Into the Forehead: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiu Zhuo; Hu, Jun Yan; Wu, Peng Sen; Yu, Sheng Bo; Kikkawa, Don O; Lu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Although cosmetic facial soft tissue fillers are generally safe and effective, improper injections can lead to devastating and irreversible consequences. We represent the first known case of posterior ciliary artery occlusion caused by hyaluronic acid. A 41-year-old female presented with right visual loss 7 hours after receiving cosmetic hyaluronic acid injections into her forehead. Examination revealed no light perception in the right eye and multiple dark ischemic area of injection over the forehead and nose. The right fundus revealed a pink retina with optic nerve edema. Fluorescein angiogram showed several filling defects in the choroidal circulation and late hyperfluorescence in the choroid. A right posterior ciliary artery occlusion and embolic occlusion of facial artery braches was diagnosed. With hyaluronidase injection, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, oral aspirin, oral acetazolamide and dexamethasone venotransfuse treatment, the patient's forehead and nasal skin improved and vision recovered to hand movements. With proper technique, vascular occlusion is rare following facial filler injection. Vision consequences can be severe if filler emboli enter the ocular circulation. Physicians should be aware of this potential side effect, recognize its presentation, and be knowledgeable of effective management. PMID:26986163

  19. Contact sensitizers induce skin inflammation via ROS production and hyaluronic acid degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp R Esser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD represents a severe health problem with increasing worldwide prevalence. It is a T cell-mediated skin disease induced by protein-reactive organic and inorganic chemicals. A key feature of contact allergens is their ability to trigger an innate immune response that leads to skin inflammation. Previous evidence from the mouse contact hypersensitivity (CHS model suggests a role for endogenous activators of innate immune signaling. Here, we analyzed the role of contact sensitizer induced ROS production and concomitant changes in hyaluronic acid metabolism on CHS responses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed in vitro and in vivo ROS production using fluorescent ROS detection reagents. HA fragmentation was determined by gel electrophoresis. The influence of blocking ROS production and HA degradation by antioxidants, hyaluronidase-inhibitor or p38 MAPK inhibitor was analyzed in the murine CHS model. Here, we demonstrate that organic contact sensitizers induce production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and a concomitant breakdown of the extracellular matrix (ECM component hyaluronic acid (HA to pro-inflammatory low molecular weight fragments in the skin. Importantly, inhibition of either ROS-mediated or enzymatic HA breakdown prevents sensitization as well as elicitation of CHS. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data identify an indirect mechanism of contact sensitizer induced innate inflammatory signaling involving the breakdown of the ECM and generation of endogenous danger signals. Our findings suggest a beneficial role for anti-oxidants and hyaluronidase inhibitors in prevention and treatment of ACD.

  20. The use of hyaluronic acid based dressings to treat burns: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Longinotti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Deep cutaneous lesions such as burns, traumas or ulcers are all conditions characterized by a massive loss of dermis, bringing several important consequences. For the treatment of these conditions, the evolution of material science has made available new dressings based on natural and synthetic polymers. Hyaluronic acid (HA is involved in many steps of the wound healing process, such as inflammation, granulation and re-epithelialization. In order to overcome the poor physical properties of the native polymer, such as solubility and rapid degradation, insoluble molecules starting from the natural compound were produced via esterification. Thanks to their improved structural properties, the dressings based on these hyaluronic acid derivatives represent a valuable ­option for the treatment of deep burns. This narrative monograph describes the development and the outcome of the use of these products in burns. The currently available clinical experience suggests that these HA medical devices represent a safe therapeutic method useful for the treatment of acute wounds.

  1. Hyaluronic acid receptor Stabilin-2 regulates Erk phosphorylation and arterial--venous differentiation in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan S Rost

    Full Text Available The hyaluronic acid receptor for endocytosis Stabilin-2/HARE mediates systemic clearance of multiple glycosaminoglycans from the vascular and lymphatic circulations. In addition, recent in vitro studies indicate that Stab2 can participate in signal transduction by interacting with hyaluronic acid (HA, which results in Erk phosphorylation. However, it is not known whether Stab2 function or HA-Stab2 signaling play any role in embryonic development. Here we show that Stab2 functions in a signal transduction pathway regulating arterial-venous differentiation during zebrafish embryogenesis. Stab2 morpholino knockdown embryos (morphants display an absence of intersegmental vessels and defects in the axial vessel formation. In addition, Stab2 morphants show defects in arterial-venous differentiation including the expansion of venous marker expression. Simultaneous knockdown of Stabilin-2 and Has2, an HA synthetase, results in a synergistic effect, arguing that HA and Stab2 interact during vasculature formation. Stab2 morphants display reduced Erk phosphorylation in the arterial progenitors, which is a known transducer of VEGF signaling, previously associated with arterial-venous differentiation. In addition, VEGF signaling acts as a negative feedback loop to repress stab2 expression. These results argue that Stab2 is involved in a novel signaling pathway that plays an important role in regulating Erk phosphorylation and establishing arterial-venous identity.

  2. Diclofenac in hyaluronic acid gel: an alternative treatment for actinic cheilitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giana da Silveira Lima

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Actinic cheilitis (AC is a precancerous lesion of the lip vermillion caused by prolonged exposure to ultraviolet light. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 3% diclofenac in 2.5% hyaluronic acid gel in the treatment of AC. METHODS: Thirty-four patients with chronic AC were treated twice a day with topical diclofenac during a period of 30 to 180 days. The individuals were followed up every 15 days by means of clinical examination and digital photographic documentation. RESULTS: Of the 27 patients that completed the study, 12 (44% showed complete remission of the whitish plaques and exfoliative areas, and 15 (56% had partial remission of the clinical picture of cheilitis. The latter group was submitted to excision of the leukoplakic areas which diagnosis varied from mild to moderate epithelial dysplasia. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest a promising role for diclofenac in hyaluronic acid gel in the treatment of AC. This treatment has the advantages of not being invasive and showing few side effects.

  3. Hyaluronic acid-based medical device and oral disorders: can it be used in paediatric dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ercole, S; Nanussi, A; Tieri, M; Barattini, D F; Tripodi, D

    2015-01-01

    Due to its physical and biological characteristics and safety profile, hyaluronic acid is very widely used in numerous clinical conditions, ranging from its best-known use in cosmetic surgery (as a filler and for its ability to promote tissue regeneration and therefore minimise scarring) to lesser-known fields such as ophthalmic surgery, major abdominal surgery (where it is used to prevent the complication of adhesion bands) and intra-articular use. Studies were recently published in which this type of device was also used in paediatric patients for the management of inflammatory disorders of the oral cavity and teething symptoms. As this is a highly topical field for dentists, we felt it would be useful to review the efficacy and safety of the device in the paediatric population treated, and analyse any discrepancies with the results obtained in the adult population. The preparations of hyaluronic acid used in pediatric dentistry, thanks to their anti-inflammatory and angiogenic properties, proved to be very effective in therapy of oral diseases in children. Further clinical research is needed to confirm the effectiveness of these products to dispel doubts about any side effects. PMID:26753667

  4. Topical administration of hyaluronic acid in children with recurrent or chronic middle ear inflammations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torretta, Sara; Marchisio, Paola; Rinaldi, Vittorio; Gaffuri, Michele; Pascariello, Carla; Drago, Lorenzo; Baggi, Elena; Pignataro, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) treatment has been successfully performed in patients with recurrent upper airway infections or rhinitis. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of the topical nasal administration of an HA-based compound by investigating its effects in children with recurrent or chronic middle ear inflammations and chronic adenoiditis. A prospective, single-blind, 1:1 randomised controlled study was performed to compare otoscopy, tympanometry and pure-tone audiometry in children which received the daily topical administration of normal 0.9% sodium chloride saline solution (control group) or 9 mg of sodium hyaluronate in 3 mL of a 0.9% sodium saline solution. The final analysis was based on 116 children (49.1% boys; mean age, 62.9 ± 17.9 months): 58 in the control group and 58 in the study group. At the end of follow-up, the prevalence of patients with impaired otoscopy was significantly lower in the study group (P value = 0.024) compared to baseline but not in the control group. In comparison with baseline, the prevalence of patients with impaired tympanometry at the end of the follow-up period was significantly lower in the study group (P value = 0.047) but not in the control group. The reduction in the prevalence of patients with conductive hearing loss (CHL) (P value = 0.008) and those with moderate CHL (P value = 0.048) was significant in the study group, but not in the control group. The mean auditory threshold had also significantly improved by the end of treatment in the study group (P value = 0.004) but not in the control group. Our findings confirm the safety of intermittent treatment with a topical nasal sodium hyaluronate solution and are the first to document its beneficial effect on clinical and audiological outcomes in children with recurrent or chronic middle ear inflammations associated with chronic adenoiditis. PMID:27481884

  5. Hyaluronic Acid Gel Injection to Prevent Thermal Injury of Adjacent Gastrointestinal Tract during Percutaneous Liver Radiofrequency Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Takaaki, E-mail: hasegawat@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Takaki, Haruyuki; Miyagi, Hideki; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Uraki, Junji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Fujimori, Masashi; Sakuma, Hajime; Yamakado, Koichiro [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and clinical utility of hyaluronic acid gel injection to separate the gastrointestinal tract from the tumor during liver radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Eleven patients with liver tumors measuring 0.9-3.5 cm (mean {+-} standard deviation, 2.1 {+-} 0.8 cm) that were adjacent to the gastrointestinal tracts received RFA after the mixture of hyaluronic acid gel and contrast material (volume, 26.4 {+-} 14.5 mL; range, 10-60 mL) was injected between the tumor and the gastrointestinal tract under computed tomographic-fluoroscopic guidance. Each tumor was separated from the gastrointestinal tract by 1.0-1.5 cm (distance, 1.2 {+-} 0.2 cm) after injection of hyaluronic acid gel, and subsequent RFA was performed without any complications in all patients. Although tumor enhancement disappeared in all patients, local tumor progression was found in a patient (9.1 %, 1 of 11) during the follow-up of 5.5 {+-} 3.2 months (range, 0.4-9.9 months). In conclusion, hyaluronic acid gel injection is a safe and useful technique to avoid thermal injury of the adjacent gastrointestinal tract during liver RFA.

  6. Hyaluronic Acid Immobilized Polyacrylamide Nanoparticle Sensors for CD44 Receptor Targeting and pH Measurement in Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Honghao; Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki; Almdal, Kristoffer;

    2012-01-01

    the CD44 receptor, which is overexpressed on the surface of a broad variety of cancer cells, we have synthesized an NP pH sensor system that targets CD44. We used a polyacrylamide nanoparticle matrix bearing hyaluronic acid (HA) on the surface as a CD44 targeting ligand. The HA-coated NPs were...

  7. Hyaluronic acid levels predict risk of hepatic encephalopathy and liver-related death in HIV/viral hepatitis coinfected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Mocroft, Amanda; Soriano, Vincent;

    2013-01-01

    Whereas it is well established that various soluble biomarkers can predict level of liver fibrosis, their ability to predict liver-related clinical outcomes is less clearly established, in particular among HIV/viral hepatitis co-infected persons. We investigated plasma hyaluronic acid's (HA...

  8. Hyaluronic Acid Gel Injection to Prevent Thermal Injury of Adjacent Gastrointestinal Tract during Percutaneous Liver Radiofrequency Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and clinical utility of hyaluronic acid gel injection to separate the gastrointestinal tract from the tumor during liver radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Eleven patients with liver tumors measuring 0.9–3.5 cm (mean ± standard deviation, 2.1 ± 0.8 cm) that were adjacent to the gastrointestinal tracts received RFA after the mixture of hyaluronic acid gel and contrast material (volume, 26.4 ± 14.5 mL; range, 10–60 mL) was injected between the tumor and the gastrointestinal tract under computed tomographic–fluoroscopic guidance. Each tumor was separated from the gastrointestinal tract by 1.0–1.5 cm (distance, 1.2 ± 0.2 cm) after injection of hyaluronic acid gel, and subsequent RFA was performed without any complications in all patients. Although tumor enhancement disappeared in all patients, local tumor progression was found in a patient (9.1 %, 1 of 11) during the follow-up of 5.5 ± 3.2 months (range, 0.4–9.9 months). In conclusion, hyaluronic acid gel injection is a safe and useful technique to avoid thermal injury of the adjacent gastrointestinal tract during liver RFA

  9. Identification of csrR/csrS, a genetic locus that regulates hyaluronic acid capsule synthesis in group A Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, J C; Wessels, M R

    1998-10-01

    The hyaluronic acid capsule of group A Streptococcus (GAS) is an important virulence factor, but little is known about mechanisms that regulate capsule expression. Transposon Tn916 mutagenesis of the poorly encapsulated M-type 3 GAS strain DLS003 produced a transconjugant that exhibited a mucoid colony morphology, reflecting increased hyaluronic acid capsule production. Analysis of chromosomal DNA sequence immediately downstream of the transposon insertion identified two open reading frames, designated csrR and csrS, which exhibited sequence similarity to bacterial two-component regulatory systems. We constructed an in-frame deletion mutation within csrR, which encodes the putative response component. Replacement of the native csrR gene in the DLS003 chromosome with the mutant allele resulted in a sixfold increase in capsule production and a corresponding increase in transcription of the has operon, which contains the essential genes for hyaluronic acid synthesis. Increased capsule production by the csrR mutant strain was associated with enhanced resistance to complement-mediated opsonophagocytic killing in vitro and with a 500-fold increase in virulence in mice. These results establish CsrR as a negative regulator of hyaluronic acid capsule synthesis and suggest that it is part of a two-component regulatory system that influences capsule expression and virulence. PMID:9786197

  10. PKCa Agonists Enhance the Protective Effect of Hyaluronic Acid on Nitric Oxide-Induced Apoptosis of Articular Chondrocytes in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-lin Zhou

    2013-12-01

    The results may be showed that PKCa regulate the expresion of caspase-3, which contribute to the apoptosis of chondrocytes induced by NO. PKC α agonists enhance the protective effect of hyaluronic acid on nitric oxide-induced articular chondrocytes apoptosis.

  11. Injectable In Situ Forming Hybrid Iron Oxide-Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Drug Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y; Sun, Y.; Yang, X.; Hilborn, J.; Heerschap, A.; Ossipov, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    The development of multimodal in situ cross-linkable hyaluronic acid nanogels hybridized with iron oxide nanoparticles is reported. Utilizing a chemoselective hydrazone coupling reaction, the nanogels are converted to a macroscopic hybrid hydrogel without any additional reagent. Hydrophobic cargos r

  12. Hyaluronic acid as a biomarker of fibrosis in chronic liver diseases of different etiologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ORASAN, OLGA HILDA; CIULEI, GEORGE; COZMA, ANGELA; SAVA, MADALINA; DUMITRASCU, DAN LUCIAN

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases represent a significant public health problem worldwide. The degree of liver fibrosis secondary to these diseases is important, because it is the main predictor of their evolution and prognosis. Hyaluronic acid is studied as a non-invasive marker of liver fibrosis in chronic liver diseases, in an attempt to avoid the complications of liver puncture biopsy, considered the gold standard in the evaluation of fibrosis. We review the advantages and limitations of hyaluronc acid, a biomarker, used to manage patients with chronic viral hepatitis B or C infection, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, HIV-HCV coinfection, alcoholic liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, biliary atresia, hereditary hemochromatosis and cystic fibrosis. PMID:27004022

  13. Ionically cross-linked hyaluronic acid: wetting, lubrication, and viscoelasticity of a modified adhesion barrier gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Vorvolakos

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Katherine Vorvolakos1, Irada S Isayeva1, Hoan-My Do Luu1, Dinesh V Patwardhan1, Steven K Pollack21Division of Chemistry and Material Science, 2Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD, USAAbstract: Hyaluronic acid (HA, in linear or cross-linked form, is a common component of cosmetics, personal care products, combination medical products, and medical devices. In all cases, the ability of the HA solution or gel to wet surfaces and/or disrupt and lubricate interfaces is a limiting feature of its mechanism of action. We synthesized ferric ion–cross-linked networks of HA based on an adhesion barrier, varied the degree of cross-linking, and performed wetting goniometry, viscometry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. As cross-linking increases, so do contact angle, viscosity, storage modulus, and loss modulus; thus, wetting and lubrication are compromised. These findings have implications in medical device materials, such as adhesion barriers and mucosal drug delivery vehicles.Keywords: hyaluron, adhesion barrier, wetting, contact angle, viscosity, lubrication, elasticity, viscoelastic, hydrogel, ferric

  14. INTRAARTICULAR INJECTION OF HYALURONIC ACID AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC LAVAGE OF THE KNEE: LONG-TERM RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Vladimirovna Luchikhina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of arthroscopic lavage in combination with subsequent injection of hyaluronic acid into the joint cavity at shortand long-term follow-ups. Subjects and methods. Eighty-two patients with knee osteoarthrosis (OA were examined in accordance with the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Group 1 consisted of 40 patients only after arthroscopic lavage; Group 2 comprised 42 patients who were administered hyaluronic acid after arthroscopic lavage. Clinical evaluation encompassed pain while walking, resting, and moving (by a visual analogue scale, limited ability in covering 100 m (by a 5-point scale, general clinical evaluation (by a 5-point ordinal scale, the presence or absence of pain after 100-m walking, as well as resting pain (its presence or absence. Results. The treatment effect evaluated using different indicators was comparably positive in both groups within 3 months. Following 3 months of therapy, its effect remained stable and even better in Group 2. The latter showed a particularly noticeable superiority a year later. Thus, there were excellent and good results in 88 and 47.5% in Groups 2 and 1, respectively. The clinical symptoms of the disease were absent in 58% in Group 2 and in only 15% in Group 1. Moreover, Group 1 showed worsening and 20% of the patients had no effect. This trend was also seen while evaluating the therapeutic effectiveness in different periods. Thus, after therapy, no substantial difference was found in both groups, but 3 months later this difference was as many as 0.8 scores and a year later Group 2 had many points in its favor (1.2 scores. Conclusion. Arthroscopic lavage followed by the administration of hyaluronic acid makes it possible to prevent the negative effect of a washing liquid on the metabolism and structure of the articular cartilage and to achieve a long-term effect against the major clinical symptoms (joint pain and function affecting the quality of life. The

  15. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  16. Targeting cancer with hyaluronic acid-based nanocarriers: recent advances and translational perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadete, Ana; Alonso, María José

    2016-09-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a natural polysaccharide that has been widely explored for the development of anticancer therapies due to its ability to target cancer cells. Moreover, advances made in the last decade have revealed the versatility of this biomaterial in the design of multifunctional carriers, intended for the delivery of a variety of bioactive molecules, including polynucleotides, immunomodulatory drugs and imaging agents. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the major recent achievements in this field, highlighting the application of the newly developed nanostructures in combination therapies, immunomodulation and theranostics. Finally, we will discuss the main challenges and technological advances that will allow these carriers to be considered as candidates for clinical development. PMID:27526874

  17. Chitosan-Based Hyaluronic Acid Hybrid Polymer Fibers as a Scaffold Biomaterial for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintarou Yamane

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An ideal scaffold material is one that closely mimics the natural environment in the tissue-specific extracellular matrix (ECM. Therefore, we have applied hyaluronic acid (HA, which is a main component of the cartilage ECM, to chitosan as a fundamental material for cartilage regeneration. To mimic the structural environment of cartilage ECM, the fundamental structure of a scaffold should be a three-dimensional (3D system with adequate mechanical strength. We structurally developed novel polymer chitosan-based HA hybrid fibers as a biomaterial to easily fabricate 3D scaffolds. This review presents the potential of a 3D fabricated scaffold based on these novel hybrid polymer fibers for cartilage tissue engineering.

  18. Formulation and characterization of poloxamer 407®: thermoreversible gel containing polymeric microparticles and hyaluronic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Garrastazu Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the composition and preparation method on the sol-gel transition temperature (Tsol-gel and rheological response of poloxamer-based formulations was determined. Manual and more complex mechanical stirring were found to provide similar results. In addition, a linear dependence of Tsol-gel on the poloxamer content was observed in the range of concentrations analyzed, and a Poloxamer 407® concentration of 18% was selected. The addition of hyaluronic acid did not lead to significant changes in the Tsol-gel values. In contrast, the addition of microparticles caused a reduction in Tsol-gel without a significant reduction in gel strength, and pseudoplastic characteristics were observed, indicating that a thermoreversible gel was obtained with a rheology suitable for application in the treatment of burn wounds.

  19. Cheese whey: A cost-effective alternative for hyaluronic acid production by Streptococcus zooepidemicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, Isabel R; Vázquez, José A; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Teixeira, José A

    2016-05-01

    This study focuses on the optimisation of cheese whey formulated media for the production of hyaluronic acid (HA) by Streptococcus zooepidemicus. Culture media containing whey (W; 2.1g/L) or whey hydrolysate (WH; 2.4 g/L) gave the highest HA productions. Both W and WH produced high yields on protein consumed, suggesting cheese whey is a good nitrogen source for S. zooepidemicus production of HA. Polysaccharide concentrations of 4.0 g/L and 3.2g/L were produced in W and WH in a further scale-up to 5L bioreactors, confirming the suitability of the low-cost nitrogen source. Cheese whey culture media provided high molecular weight (>3000 kDa) HA products. This study revealed replacing the commercial peptone by the low-cost alternative could reduce HA production costs by up to a 70% compared to synthetic media. PMID:26769504

  20. Facile method to prepare silk fibroin/hyaluronic acid films for vascular endothelial growth factor release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Juan; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Xunwei; Shi, Lijun; Zhu, Jun; Wei, Daixu; Zhong, Jian; Sun, Gang; He, Dannong

    2016-06-01

    A facile approach was proposed to prepare silk fibroin (SF) and hyaluronic acid (HA) composite films from aqueous solution without crosslinking or any post treatment. Only by controlling the HA content and film formation temperature during the film casting, the HA/SF films with different composition were prepared. The films were then characterized by structural characteristics, thermal stability, morphology, water stability, water absorption, mechanical properties. After immersing in water for 24h, all of the films showed good structural integrity. The degradation rate of the HA/SF films in protease XIV can be controlled by changing the film formation temperature and HA content. Decreasing the temperature and adding HA resulted in the rapid release of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) from the HA/SF films. Overall, the 5% HA/SF films formed at 37°C with more rapid VEGF release exhibited great potential in drug delivery, especially when the rapid vascularization was needed. PMID:27083373

  1. Detection of hyaluronic acid and laminin in serum of patients with urinary bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the serum Hyaluronic Acid (HA) and laminin (LN) level and its clinical significance in bladder tumors. Methods: Serum samples from 34 patients with bladder tumor and 30 cases as control group were analyzed by radioimmunoassay. Results: The results showed that the HA and LN levels of serum in patients with bladder tumors were significantly higher than that in control group (P<0.01) before operation, and decreased significantly after operation. The serum levels of HA and LN in infiltrated tumors were higher than that in superficial tumors (P<0.05). The markers in patients with lymph node metastasis were higher than that without lymph node metastasis (P<0.01). Conclusion: HA and LN take part in the malignant biology behavior of bladder tumors. They may be the important markers in assisting diagnosis and disease monitoring

  2. Emergent Molecular Recognition through Self-Assembly: Unexpected Selectivity for Hyaluronic Acid among Glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Takao; Roy, Bappaditya; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Junji; Yamamoto, Tatsuhiro; Shinkai, Seiji

    2016-05-01

    Oligophenylenevinylene (OPV)-based fluorescent (FL) chemosensors exhibiting linear FL responses toward polyanions were designed. Their application to FL sensing of glycosaminoglycans (heparin: HEP, chondroitin 4-sulfate: ChS, and hyaluronic acid: HA) revealed that the charge density encoded as the unit structure directs the mode of OPV self-assembly: H-type aggregate for HEP with 16-times FL increase and J-type aggregate for HA with 93-times FL increase, thus unexpectedly achieving the preferential selectivity for HA in contrast to the conventional HEP selective systems. We have found that the integral magnitude of three factors consisting of binding mechanism, self-assembly, and FL response can amplify the structural information on the target input into the characteristic FL output. This emergent property has been used for a novel molecular recognition system that realizes unconventional FL sensing of HA, potentially applicable to the clinical diagnosis of cancer-related diseases. PMID:27060601

  3. Surface functionalization of styrenic block copolymer elastomeric biomaterials with hyaluronic acid via a "grafting to" strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomeng; Luan, Shifang; Yuan, Shuaishuai; Song, Lingjie; Zhao, Jie; Ma, Jiao; Shi, Hengchong; Yang, Huawei; Jin, Jing; Yin, Jinghua

    2013-12-01

    As a biostable elastomer, the hydrophobicity of styrenic block copolymer (SBC) intensely limits its biomedical applications. In order to overcome such shortcoming, the SBC films were grafted with hyaluronic acid (HA) using a coupling agent. The surface chemistry of the modified films was examined by ATR-FTIR and XPS techniques, and the surface morphology was visually described by AFM. The biological performances of the HA-modified films were evaluated by a series of experiments, such as protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, and in vitro cytocompatibility. It was found that the HA-modified samples showed a low adhesiveness to fibroblast at the initial stage; however, it stimulated the growth of fibroblast. The L929 fibroblast growth presented a strong dependence on the molecular weight (MW) of HA. The samples modified with 17kDa HA exhibited the worst wettability and platelet adhesion, while providing the best results of supporting fibroblast proliferation. PMID:23974002

  4. Controlled synthesis and inclusion ability of a hyaluronic acid derivative bearing beta-cyclodextrin molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlot, Aurélia; Heyraud, Alain; Guenot, Pierre; Rinaudo, Marguerite; Auzély-Velty, Rachel

    2006-03-01

    A new synthetic route to beta-cyclodextrin-linked hyaluronic acid (HA-CD) was developed. This was based on the preparation of a HA derivative selectively modified with adipic dihydrazide (HA-ADH) and a beta-cyclodextrin derivative possessing an aldehyde function on the primary face, followed by their coupling by a reductive amination-type reaction. The CD-polysaccharide was fully characterized in terms of chemical integrity and purity by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. The complexation ability of the grafted CD was further demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry using sodium adamantane acetate (ADAc) and Ibuprofen as model guest molecules. The thermodynamic parameters for the complexation of these negatively charged guest molecules by the beta-CD grafted on negatively charged HA were shown to be largely influenced by the ionic strength of the aqueous medium. PMID:16529430

  5. [Aminoacids and hyaluronic acid in topical treatment of bedsores. Clinical report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiummariello, S; Arleo, S; Alfano, C

    2010-05-01

    Pressure ulcers are evolutive tissue of the skin, derma and subcutaneous layer. If not treated properly, but sometimes despite that, they may even reach muscles and bones. Nutritional status of the patient is the most important and potentially reversible factor which can contribute to wound recovery. Several studies underline in particular the importance of the proteic and caloric intake in order to stimulate the formation of granulation tissue and collagen. We thought giving the nutrients for wound repair directly on the wound bed, topically, therefore using the wound bed as exchange surface and presuming the wounded tissues are able to absorb, metabolize and ultimately use the aminoacids to repair the damage. The goal of our work is to describe the clinical case patient treated with a new active wound dressing releasing aminoacids and hyaluronic acid. PMID:20615371

  6. Production of Hyaluronic Acid by Streptococcus zooepidemicus on Protein Substrates Obtained from Scyliorhinus canicula Discards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, José A; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Piñeiro, Carmen; Teixeira, José A; Pérez-Martín, Ricardo I; Amado, Isabel R

    2015-10-01

    This work investigates the production of hyaluronic acid (H) by Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus in complex media formulated with peptones obtained from Scyliorhinus canicula viscera by-products. Initially, in batch cultures, the greatest productions were achieved using commercial media (3.03 g/L) followed by peptones from alcalase hydrolyzed viscera (2.32 g/L) and peptones from non-hydrolyzed viscera (2.26 g/L). An increase of between 12% and 15% was found in subsequent fed-batch cultures performed on waste peptones. Such organic nitrogen sources were shown to be an excellent low-cost substrate for microbial H, saving more than 50% of the nutrient costs. PMID:26512678

  7. Hyaluronic acid grafted PLGA copolymer nanoparticles enhance the targeted delivery of Bromelain in Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Pant, Aditya Bhushan; Shukla, Yogeshwer; Panda, Amulya; Gupta, Kailash Chand

    2016-08-01

    Rapidly increasing malignant neoplastic disease demands immediate attention. Several dietary compounds have recently emerged as strong anti-cancerous agents. Among, Bromelain (BL), a protease from pineapple plant, was used to enhance its anti-cancerous efficacy using nanotechnology. In lieu of this, hyaluronic acid (HA) grafted PLGA copolymer, having tumor targeting ability, was developed. BL was encapsulated in copolymer to obtain BL-copolymer nanoparticles (NPs) that ranged between 140 to 281nm in size. NPs exhibited higher cellular uptake and cytotoxicity in cells with high CD44 expression as compared with non-targeted NPs. In vivo results on tumor bearing mice showed that NPs were efficient in suppressing the tumor growth. Hence, the formulation could be used as a self-targeting drug delivery cargo for the remission of cancer. PMID:27287553

  8. Hyaluronic acid-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for efficient photodynamic therapy of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary-Bobo, Magali; Brevet, David; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia; Raehm, Laurence; Maillard, Philippe; Garcia, Marcel; Durand, Jean-Olivier

    2012-09-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) for photodynamic therapy (PDT) were coated with poly-(L-lysine) and hyaluronic acid (HA) by using the layer-by-layer method. HA is able to target cancer cells over-expressing the corresponding CD44 receptor. MSN functionalized with HA (MSN-HA) were more efficient than MSN without the targeting moiety when PDT was performed at low fluence (14 Jcm(-2)) and low dosage of MSN (20 μgmL(-1)) on HCT 116 colorectal cancer cells, known to over-express the CD44 receptor. Incubation of HCT-116 cancer cells with an excess of HA impaired the PDT effect with MSN-HA thus demonstrating that an active endocytosis mechanism was involved in the uptake of MSN-HA by these cells. PMID:22959805

  9. Production of Hyaluronic Acid by Streptococcus zooepidemicus on Protein Substrates Obtained from Scyliorhinus canicula Discards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Vázquez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the production of hyaluronic acid (H by Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus in complex media formulated with peptones obtained from Scyliorhinus canicula viscera by-products. Initially, in batch cultures, the greatest productions were achieved using commercial media (3.03 g/L followed by peptones from alcalase hydrolyzed viscera (2.32 g/L and peptones from non-hydrolyzed viscera (2.26 g/L. An increase of between 12% and 15% was found in subsequent fed-batch cultures performed on waste peptones. Such organic nitrogen sources were shown to be an excellent low-cost substrate for microbial H, saving more than 50% of the nutrient costs.

  10. Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux by Endoscopic Injection of Dextranomer/Hyaluronic Acid in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Timothy W; Lacy, John M; Preston, David M

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old man presented for evaluation after discovery of a left bladder-wall tumor. He underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) operation for treatment of low-grade, Ta urothelial cancer of the bladder. The patient developed recurrent disease and returned to the operating room for repeat TURBT, circumcision, and administration of intravesical mitomycin C. The patient developed balanitis xerotica obliterans 4 years post-circumcision, requiring self-dilation with a catheter. He subsequently developed 3 consecutive episodes of left-sided pyelonephritis. Further investigation with voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) revealed Grade 3, left-sided vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Due to existing comorbidities, the patient elected treatment with endoscopic dextranomer/hyaluronic acid injection. A post-operative VCUG demonstrated complete resolution of left-sided VUR. This patient has remained symptom free for 8 months post-injection, with no episodes of pyelonephritis. PMID:27162514

  11. Hyaluronic acid biodegradable material for reconstruction of vascular wall: a preliminary study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandis, Laura; Zavan, Barbara; Bassetto, Franco; Ferroni, Letizia; Iacobellis, Laura; Abatangelo, Giovanni; Lepidi, Sandro; Cortivo, Roberta; Vindigni, Vincenzo

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to develop a reabsorbable vascular patch that did not require in vitro cell or biochemical preconditioning for vascular wall repair. Patches were composed only of hyaluronic acid (HA). Twenty male Wistar rats weighing 250-350 g were used. The abdominal aorta was exposed and isolated. A rectangular breach (1 mm × 5 mm) was made on vessel wall and arterial defect was repaired with HA made patch. Performance was assessed at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks after surgery by histology and immunohistochemistry. Extracellular matrix components were evaluated by molecular biological methods. After 16 weeks, the biomaterial was almost completely degraded and replaced by a neoartery wall composed of endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, collagen, and elastin fibers organized in layers. In conclusion, HA patches provide a provisional three-dimensional support to interact with cells for the control of their function, guiding the spatially and temporally multicellular processes of artery regeneration. PMID:21268111

  12. Serum hyaluronic acid as a noninvasive marker of hepatic fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geramizadeh Bita

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Chronic hepatitis B is a serious global health problem. Liver biopsy is currently recommended as the gold standard for the evaluation of the degree of fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B. This procedure, however, is invasive and has potential complications. In this study, we attempted to validate the level of hyaluronic acid as a simple laboratory test to discriminate between patients with and without significant fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B. Methods: This study included 93 patients with chronic hepatitis B who had undergone percutaneous liver biopsy from 2003 to 2006. At the time of biopsy, a sample of serum was taken for the hyaluronic acid (HA assay. Histological assessment consisted of the semiquantitative analysis of the degree of fibrosis according to the criteria proposed by the Ishak system. These findings were then compared by using statistical analysis. Results: HA levels and stage groups of fibrosis were well correlated (Spearman r = 0.945, P < 0.005. There was a significant increase in HA levels when considering S0 to S6. The mean values of HA concentrations were 59.7 ± 10.5 ng/mL for stages 0-2, 149.4 ± 15.9 ng/mL for stages 3-4 , and 284.5 ± 14.5 ng/mL for the last group (stages 5-6. There were significant differences between the three groups. Serum HA levels of cases with extensive fibrosis were significantly higher than in those with mild and moderate fibrosis ( P = 0.0001, P = 0.0005, and P = 0.0001, respectively. Conclusion: Serum HA level is a precise predictor of extensive liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B. HA is well correlated with the stage of fibrosis and can reflect the severity of fibrosis. Thus, it can be used as a noninvasive test to monitor these patients.

  13. Association of Cross Linked C-Telopeptide II Collagen and Hyaluronic Acid with Knee Osteoarthritis Severity

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    John Butar Butar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study was carried out to investigate the association of Cross Linked C-Telopeptide Type I & II Collagen (CTX-I and II and hyaluronic acid (HA with knee osteoarthritis (OA severity. METHODS: Sixty menopause women with primary knee OA were enrolled in this study during their visits to the Outpatient Department. Patients with knee pain during weight bearing, active or passive range of motion, or tenderness with Kellgren-Lawrence (KL grade of more than I were included. Patients with injury, inflammatory and metabolic diseases were excluded. Patients were put in a 10-hour fasting prior to withdrawal of morning blood samples for examinations of HA, CTX-I, interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β, and high sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP level. Second void morning urine specimens were taken for CTXII assessment. HA, CTX-I and II levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Sixty menopausal female patients were included in this study, 35 with KL grade II, 17 grade III, and 8 grade IV. Means of CTX-II were significantly different between subjects KL grade IV and III (p=0.021. Correlation of KL grade was significant with CTX-II (p=0.001, r=0.412 and HA (p=0.0411, r=0.269. KL grades were not significantly associated with CTX-I (p=0.8364, r=-0.0272; IL-1β (p=0.5773, r=0.0853 and hs-CRP (p=0.2625, r=0.1470. CONCLUSIONS: CTX-II and HA were associated with severity of knee OA, suggesting that CTX-II and HA can be used as marker for knee OA severity. KEYWORDS: CTX-II, hyaluronic acid, otestoarthritis, knee.

  14. Endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux with polyacrylate polyalcohol copolymer and dextranomer/hyaluronic acid in adults

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    Akif Turk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer and polyacrylate polyalcohol copolymer in endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux disease in adult patients with and without chronic renal failure. Materials and Methods Thirty two patients (12 female, 20 male with a total of 50 renal units were treated for vesicoureteral reflux. There were 26 (81% chronic renal failure patients. The success of treatment was evaluated by voiding cystouretrography at 3rd and 12th months after subureteric injection. The persistence of reflux was considered as failure. Patients were divided into two groups according to injected material. Age, sex, grade of reflux and treatment results were recorded and evaluated. Results Reflux was scored as grade 1 in seven (14%, grade 2 in 16 (32%, grade 3 in 21 (42% and grade 4 in six (12% renal units. There was not patient with grade 5 reflux. Fourteen renal units (28% were treated with dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (group 1 and 36 renal units (72% were treated with polyacrylate polyalcohol copolymer (group 2. The overall treatment success was achieved at 40 renal units (80%. The treatment was successful at 11 renal units (79% in group 1 and 29 renal units (81% in group 2 (p = 0.71. There was not statistically significant difference between two groups with patients with chronic renal failure in terms of treatment success (p = 1.00. Conclusions The effectiveness of two bulking agents was similar in treatment of vesicoureteral reflux disease in adult patients and patients with chronic renal failure.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of hyaluronic acid/human-like collagen hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Injectable hydrogel plays an important role in soft tissue filling and repair. We report an injectable hydrogel based on hyaluronic acid (HA) and human-like collagen (HLC), both with favorable biocompatibility and biodegradability. These two types of biomacromolecules were crosslinked with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether to form a three-dimensional network. The redundant crosslinker was removed by dialysis and distillation. An HA-based hydrogel prepared by the same method was used as a control. The cytocompatibility was studied with a Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) test. Carbazole colorimetry was used to analyze the in vitro degradation rate. The histocompatibility was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) staining analysis and immunohistochemical analysis. The CCK-8 assay demonstrated that the HA/HLC hydrogel was less cytotoxic than the HA-based hydrogel and could promote baby hamster kidney cell (BHK) proliferation. The cell adhesion indicated that BHK could grow well on the surface of the materials and maintain good cell viability. The in vitro degradation test showed that the HA/HLC hydrogel had a longer degradation time and an excellent antienzyme ability. In vivo injection showed that there was little inflammatory response to HA/HLC after 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Therefore, the HA/HLC hydrogel is a promising biomaterial for soft tissue filling and repair. - Highlights: • Human-like collagen was used with hyaluronic acid to prepare soft tissue filling meterials. • 1,4-Butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDE) was introduced to treat the hydrogels. • The addition of human-like collagen could improve the biological properties of hydrogels

  16. Hyaluronic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor-targeting MRI contrast agent

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    Hou L

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lin Hou,* Huijuan Zhang,* Yating Wang, Lili Wang, Xiaomin Yang, Zhenzhong ZhangSchool of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: A tumor-targeting carrier, hyaluronic acid (HA-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, was explored to deliver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents (CAs targeting to the tumor cells specifically. In this system, HA surface modification for SWCNTs was simply accomplished by amidation process and could make this nanomaterial highly hydrophilic. Cellular uptake was performed to evaluate the intracellular transport capabilities of HA-SWCNTs for tumor cells and the uptake rank was HA-SWCNTs> SWCNTs owing to the presence of HA, which was also evidenced by flow cytometry. The safety evaluation of this MRI CAs was investigated in vitro and in vivo. It revealed that HA-SWCNTs could stand as a biocompatible nanocarrier and gadolinium (Gd/HA-SWCNTs demonstrated almost no toxicity compared with free GdCl3. Moreover, GdCl3 bearing HA-SWCNTs could significantly increase the circulation time for MRI. Finally, to investigate the MRI contrast enhancing capabilities of Gd/HA-SWCNTs, T1-weighted MR images of tumor-bearing mice were acquired. The results suggested Gd/HA-SWCNTs had the highest tumor-targeting efficiency and T1-relaxivity enhancement, indicating HA-SWCNTs could be developed as a tumor-targeting carrier to deliver the CAs, GdCl3, for the identifiable diagnosis of tumor.Keywords: gadolinium, magnetic resonance, SWCNTs, hyaluronic acid, contrast agent

  17. Synthesis and characterization of hyaluronic acid/human-like collagen hydrogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Ma, Xiaoxuan, E-mail: xiaoxuanma@163.com; Fan, Daidi, E-mail: fandaidi@nwu.edu.cn; Zhu, Chenhui; Deng, Jianjun; Hui, Junfeng; Ma, Pei

    2014-10-01

    Injectable hydrogel plays an important role in soft tissue filling and repair. We report an injectable hydrogel based on hyaluronic acid (HA) and human-like collagen (HLC), both with favorable biocompatibility and biodegradability. These two types of biomacromolecules were crosslinked with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether to form a three-dimensional network. The redundant crosslinker was removed by dialysis and distillation. An HA-based hydrogel prepared by the same method was used as a control. The cytocompatibility was studied with a Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) test. Carbazole colorimetry was used to analyze the in vitro degradation rate. The histocompatibility was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) staining analysis and immunohistochemical analysis. The CCK-8 assay demonstrated that the HA/HLC hydrogel was less cytotoxic than the HA-based hydrogel and could promote baby hamster kidney cell (BHK) proliferation. The cell adhesion indicated that BHK could grow well on the surface of the materials and maintain good cell viability. The in vitro degradation test showed that the HA/HLC hydrogel had a longer degradation time and an excellent antienzyme ability. In vivo injection showed that there was little inflammatory response to HA/HLC after 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Therefore, the HA/HLC hydrogel is a promising biomaterial for soft tissue filling and repair. - Highlights: • Human-like collagen was used with hyaluronic acid to prepare soft tissue filling meterials. • 1,4-Butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDE) was introduced to treat the hydrogels. • The addition of human-like collagen could improve the biological properties of hydrogels.

  18. β-TCP granules mixed with reticulated hyaluronic acid induce an increase in bone apposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    β beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules are suitable for repair of bone defects. They have an osteoconductive effect shortly after implantation. However, dry granules are difficult to handle in the surgical room because of low weight and lack of cohesion. Incorporation of granules in a hydrogel could be a satisfactory solution. We have investigated the use of hyaluronic acid (HyA) as an aqueous binder of the granules. β-TCP granules were prepared by the polyurethane foam technology. Commercially available linear (LHya) and reticulated hyaluronic acid (RHyA) in aqueous solution were used to prepare a pasty mixture that can be handled more easily than granules alone. Thirteen New Zealand White rabbits (3.5–3.75 kg) were used; a 4 mm hole was drilled in each femoral condyle. After flushing, holes were filled with either LHyA, RHyA, dry β-TCP granules alone, β-TCP granules + LHyA and β-TCP granules + RHyA. Rabbits were allowed to heal for one month, sacrificed and femurs were harvested and analysed by microCT and histomorphometry. The net amount of newly formed bone was derived from measurements done after thresholding the microCT images for the material and for the material+bone. LHyA and RHyA did not result in healing of the grafted area. LHyA was rapidly eluted from the grafted zone but allowed deposition of more granules, although the amount of formed bone was not significantly higher than with β-TCP granules alone. RHyA permitted the deposition of more granules which induced significantly more bone trabeculae without inducing an inflammatory reaction. RHyA appears to be a good vehicle to implant granules of β-TCP, since HyA does not interfere with bone remodeling. (paper)

  19. Unraveling the confusion behind hyaluronic acid efficacy in the treatment of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller LE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Larry E Miller,1 Roy D Altman,2 Louis F McIntyre3 1Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc., Asheville, NC, 2Department of Rheumatology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 3Northwell Physician Partners, Sleepy Hollow, NY, USA Abstract: Hyaluronic acid (HA is a commonly prescribed treatment for knee pain resulting from osteoarthritis (OA. Although numerous HA products have been approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration, the efficacy of HA injections for knee OA remains disputed with meta-analyses and societal clinical guidelines drawing disparate conclusions. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS recently published a best-evidence systematic review and concluded that available data did not support the routine use of HA for knee OA. The purpose of the current article is to highlight issues that confound interpretation of meta-analyses on HA for knee OA, to provide realistic estimates of the true efficacy of HA injections in knee OA, and to provide commentary on the methods and conclusions from the AAOS systematic review. In general, the clinical benefit of HA is underestimated using conventional meta-analytic techniques. When accounting for differential control group effects in HA studies, it can be reasonably concluded that HA injections may be beneficial to an appreciable number of patients with knee OA. In addition, the systematic review methodology used by AAOS was questionable due to exclusion of numerous relevant studies and inclusion of studies that used HAs not approved for use in the US, both of which underestimated the true efficacy of HA injections. Overall, the efficacy of HA injections for knee OA is likely better than previously reported. Future clinical trials and meta-analyses should account for differential control group effects in order to avoid the continued confusion surrounding HA injection efficacy. Keywords: effect size, hyaluronic acid, injection, knee, minimal important difference

  20. EXTRACTION, QUANTIFICATION, AND MOLAR MASS DETERMINATION OF HYALURONIC ACID EXTRACTED FROM CHICKEN CREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. ROSA

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available

    Hyaluronic acid (HA is part of the connective tissue. The polymer is composed of alternating units of ß-d-glucuronic acid and N-acetyl-ß-d-glucosamine linked, respectively, via 1-3 and 1-4 bonds. The chicken crest is one of the richest tissues in this polysaccharide. Since Brazil is one of the main chicken exporters in the world, the utilization of the crests of abated animals for the HA obtaining is particularly attractive. The present work sought to extract HA from chicken crest and to determine the molar mass of the extracted acid. Extraction was accomplished by proteolytic digestion with papain during 24 h at 60oC, followed by precipitation with cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC. Hexuronic acid content was determined via the carbazole method, the intrinsic viscosity was measured using the ball viscosimeter, and the molar mass was calculated by extrapolating the calibration line to zero. In addition, qualitative infrared spectroscopy was carried out on the sample using the Bomem MB spectrophotometer. The results show that the extraction method was effective: the extracted acid possesses a large molecular mass, and the extract contains a signifi cant amount of HA.

  1. Multi-functionalized hyaluronic acid nanogels crosslinked with carbon dots as dual receptor-mediated targeting tumor theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xu; Han, Yu; Pei, Mingliang; Zhao, Xubo; Tian, Kun; Zhou, Tingting; Liu, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based theranostic nanogels were designed for the tumor diagnosis and chemotherapy, by crosslinking the folate-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) modified hyaluronic acid (FA-PEG-HA) with carbon dots (CDs) for the first time. Due to the extraordinary fluorescence property of the integrated CDs, the theranostic nanogels could be used for the real-time and noninvasive location tracking to cancer cells. HA could load Doxorubicin (DOX) via electrostatic interaction with a drug-loading capacity (DLC) of 32.5%. The nanogels possessed an ideal release of DOX in the weak acid environment, while it was restrained in the neutral media, demonstrating the pH-responsive controlled release behavior. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake results clearly illustrated that most DOX was released and accumulated in the cell nuclei and killed the cancer cells efficaciously, due to their dual receptor-mediated targeting characteristics. PMID:27516286

  2. Inhaled hyaluronic acid as ancillary treatment in children with bacterial acute rhinopharyngitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varricchio, A; Capasso, M; Avvisati, F; Varricchio, A M; De Lucia, A; Brunese, F P; Ciprandi, G

    2014-01-01

    Acute rhinopharyngitis (ARP) is the most common upper respiratory infection in children and represents a social problem for both the pharmaco-economic impact and a burden for the family. Topical antibiotic therapy is usually effective in bacterial ARP, but ancillary treatment might improve its efficacy. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a promising molecule that has been recently proposed in upper respiratory disorders. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ancillary HA treatment in children with bacterial ARP. Globally, 51 children (27 males, mean age 5.9 ± 2.1 years) with bacterial ARP were enrolled in the study. At baseline, children were randomly assigned to the treatment with: 125 mg of thiamphenicol diluted in 4 mL of saline isotonic solution twice daily (group A) or with 125 mg of thiamphenicol plus 4 ml of sodium hyaluronate 0.2% plus xylitol 5% (Aluneb, Sakura Italia) twice daily (group B) administered by the nasal device Rinowash (Airliquide Medical System, Italy) and connected to an aerosol nebulizer with pneumatic compressor (1.5 bar per 5 L/min) Nebula (Airliquide Medical System, Italy), for 10 days. sVAS, nasopharyngeal spotting, neutrophils and bacteria were assessed at baseline and after the treatment. Both treatments induced significant reduction of symptom perception, spotting, neutrophil and bacteria count. However, thiamphenicol plus HA was able to significantly induce a greater effect on sVAS (p=0.006), neutrophil count (p=0.01), and bacteria count (p=0.0003) than thiamphenicol alone. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence that intranasal HA, as ancillary treatment, may be able to improve topical antibiotic efficacy in children with bacterial ARP. PMID:25316142

  3. Amine-modified hyaluronic acid-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles for targeting breast cancer tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Patrick V.; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei; Kaasalainen, Martti; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A.

    2014-08-01

    Active targeting of nanoparticles to receptor-overexpressing cancer cells has great potential for enhancing the cellular uptake of nanoparticles and for reducing fast clearance of the nanoparticles from the body. Herein, we present a preparation method of a porous silicon (PSi)-based nanodelivery system for breast cancer targeting, by covalently conjugating a synthesized amide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA+) derived polymer on the surface of undecylenic acid-modified thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (UnTHCPSi) nanoparticles. The resulting UnTHCPSi-HA+ nanoparticles showed relatively small size, reduced polydispersibility, high biocompatibility, improved colloidal and human plasma stability, as well as enhanced cellular interactions and internalization. Moreover, we demonstrated that the enhanced cellular association of UnTHCPSi-HA+ relies on the capability of the conjugated HA+ to bind and consequently target CD44 receptors expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells, thus making the HA+-functionalized UnTHCPSi nanoparticles a suitable and promising nanoplatform for the targeting of CD44-overexpressing breast tumors and for drug delivery.Active targeting of nanoparticles to receptor-overexpressing cancer cells has great potential for enhancing the cellular uptake of nanoparticles and for reducing fast clearance of the nanoparticles from the body. Herein, we present a preparation method of a porous silicon (PSi)-based nanodelivery system for breast cancer targeting, by covalently conjugating a synthesized amide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA+) derived polymer on the surface of undecylenic acid-modified thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (UnTHCPSi) nanoparticles. The resulting UnTHCPSi-HA+ nanoparticles showed relatively small size, reduced polydispersibility, high biocompatibility, improved colloidal and human plasma stability, as well as enhanced cellular interactions and internalization. Moreover, we demonstrated that the enhanced cellular association of Un

  4. Self-assembled ternary complexes stabilized with hyaluronic acid-green tea catechin conjugates for targeted gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kun; Bae, Ki Hyun; Lee, Fan; Xu, Keming; Chung, Joo Eun; Gao, Shu Jun; Kurisawa, Motoichi

    2016-03-28

    Nanosized polyelectrolyte complexes are attractive delivery vehicles for the transfer of therapeutic genes to diseased cells. Here we report the application of self-assembled ternary complexes constructed with plasmid DNA, branched polyethylenimine and hyaluronic acid-green tea catechin conjugates for targeted gene delivery. These conjugates not only stabilize plasmid DNA/polyethylenimine complexes via the strong DNA-binding affinity of green tea catechin, but also facilitate their transport into CD44-overexpressing cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. The hydrodynamic size, surface charge and physical stability of the complexes are characterized. We demonstrate that the stabilized ternary complexes display enhanced resistance to nuclease attack and polyanion-induced dissociation. Moreover, the ternary complexes can efficiently transfect the difficult-to-transfect HCT-116 colon cancer cell line even in serum-supplemented media due to their enhanced stability and CD44-targeting ability. Confocal microscopic analysis demonstrates that the stabilized ternary complexes are able to promote the nuclear transport of plasmid DNA more effectively than binary complexes and hyaluronic acid-coated ternary complexes. The present study suggests that the ternary complexes stabilized with hyaluronic acid-green tea catechin conjugates can be widely utilized for CD44-targeted delivery of nucleic acid-based therapeutics. PMID:26855049

  5. Deterioration of autoimmune condition associated with repeated injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuto Suda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 6-year-old girl underwent ureterocystoneostomy (UCN because of left flank pain due to delayed onset of ureteral stenosis one and a half years after endoscopic dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (Deflux injection for the treatment of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. Histopathological examination indicated chronic inflammation with abundant eosinophils characteristic of a reaction to Deflux. Several autoimmune diseases developed during the treatment for ureteral stenosis. First, 2 weeks prior to the onset of left flank pain, she was diagnosed as having systemic lupus erythematosus. Finally, she died of pulmonary hemorrhage due to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura 4 months after UCN. The fatal outcome in this case was suspected to be caused by autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants, which in this case was the hyaluronic acid polymer injected into the ureteric orifice for the treatment of VUR.

  6. Serum Collagen Type II Cleavage Epitope and Serum Hyaluronic Acid as Biomarkers for Treatment Monitoring of Dogs with Hip Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, José M.; Rubio, Mónica; Spinella, Giuseppe; Cuervo, Belén; Sopena, Joaquín; Cugat, Ramón; Garcia-Balletbó, Montserrat; Dominguez, Juan M.; Granados, Maria; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Ceron, José J.; Carrillo, José M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of serum type II collagen cleavage epitope and serum hyaluronic acid as biomarkers for treatment monitoring in osteoarthritic dogs. For this purpose, a treatment model based on mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue combined with plasma rich in growth factors was used. This clinical study included 10 dogs with hip osteoarthritis. Both analytes were measured in serum at baseline, just before applying the treatment, and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. These results were compared with those obtained from force plate analysis using the same animals during the same study period. Levels of type II collagen cleavage epitope decreased and those of hyaluronic acid increased with clinical improvement objectively verified via force plate analysis, suggesting these two biomarkers could be effective as indicators of clinical development of joint disease in dogs. PMID:26886592

  7. STYLAGE®: a range of hyaluronic acid dermal fillers containing mannitol. Physical properties and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos-e-Silva M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Marcia Ramos-e-Silva, Lívia Arcanjo Fonteles, Cecília Schubert Xavier Lagalhard, Ana Paula Cercal Fucci-da-CostaSector of Dermatology, University Hospital and School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilAbstract: Dermatological procedures which are considered as being minimally invasive, such as those using injectable fillers based on hyaluronic acid, revolutionized aging treatment, especially of the face. By promoting the replacement of lost volume and attenuating grooves and wrinkles, they ensure a more youthful appearance and certain functional recovery of facial aesthetics. The authors review some of the main physicochemical characteristics of these dermal fillers, highlighting the product line Stylage®, the manufacture of which includes mannitol.Keywords: fillers, hyaluronic acid, mannitol, facial aging, wrinkles, stylage®

  8. Co-culture of vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells by hyaluronic acid micro-pattern on titanium surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingan; Li, Guicai; Zhang, Kun; Liao, Yuzhen; Yang, Ping; Maitz, Manfred F.; Huang, Nan

    2013-05-01

    Micro-patterning as an effective bio-modification technique is increasingly used in the development of biomaterials with superior mechanical and biological properties. However, as of now, little is known about the simultaneous regulation of endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) by cardiovascular implants. In this study, a co-culture system of EC and SMC was built on titanium surface by the high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HMW-HA) micro-pattern. Firstly, the micro-pattern sample with a geometry of 25 μm wide HMW-HA ridges, and 25 μm alkali-activated Ti grooves was prepared by microtransfer molding (μTM) for regulating SMC morphology. Secondly, hyaluronidase was used to decompose high molecular weight hyaluronic acid into low molecular weight hyaluronic acid which could promote EC adhesion. Finally, the morphology of the adherent EC was elongated by the SMC micro-pattern. The surface morphology of the patterned Ti was imaged by SEM. The existence of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid on the modified Ti surface was demonstrated by FTIR. The SMC micro-pattern and EC/SMC co-culture system were characterized by immunofluorescence microscopy. The nitric oxide release test and cell retention calculation were used to evaluate EC function on inhibiting hyperplasia and cell shedding, respectively. The results indicate that EC in EC/SMC co-culture system displayed a higher NO release and cell retention compared with EC cultured alone. It can be suggested that the EC/SMC co-culture system possessed superiority to EC cultured alone in inhibiting hyperplasia and cell shedding at least in a short time of 24 h.

  9. A Review of the Effect of Injected Dextranomer/Hyaluronic Acid Copolymer Volume on Reflux Correction Following Endoscopic Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Dave

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The current literature suggests that multiple variables affect vesicoureteric reflux (VUR resolution rates following dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (Dx/HA injection. This article reviews the evidence pertaining to the effect of injected Dx/HA volume on success rates following endoscopic correction. Lack of prospective studies which use injected volume as a continuous variable coupled with a nonstandardized injection technique and endpoint hinders the ability to reach a definite conclusion.

  10. Production of Hyaluronic Acid by Ferentation Method%发酵法生产透明质酸

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉; 张朝中

    2006-01-01

    透明质酸(hyaluronic acid,HA),又名玻璃酸,是一种酸性黏多糖.1934年美国Meyer[1]等首先从牛眼玻璃体中分离出该物质.此后,人们利用现代发酵技术和设备,以提高HA产率为目的,对发酵生产HA进行了较全面地研究.

  11. Desire for penile girth enhancement and the effects of the self-injection of hyaluronic acid gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enis Rauf Coskuner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile girth enhancement is a controversial subject but demands for enhancement are increasing steadily. Although various fillers have been widely used for soft tissue augmentation, there is no reliable material for this particular situation. Here we report a case of an acute hypersensitivity reaction in a man after his first self-injection of a filler material, which, he claimed, was hyaluronic acid gel for penile girth enhancement and glans penis augmentation.

  12. STYLAGE®: a range of hyaluronic acid dermal fillers containing mannitol. Physical properties and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia; Fonteles, Lívia Arcanjo; Lagalhard, Cecília Schubert Xavier; Fucci-da-Costa, Ana Paula Cercal

    2013-01-01

    Dermatological procedures which are considered as being minimally invasive, such as those using injectable fillers based on hyaluronic acid, revolutionized aging treatment, especially of the face. By promoting the replacement of lost volume and attenuating grooves and wrinkles, they ensure a more youthful appearance and certain functional recovery of facial aesthetics. The authors review some of the main physicochemical characteristics of these dermal fillers, highlighting the product line St...

  13. STYLAGE®: a range of hyaluronic acid dermal fillers containing mannitol. Physical properties and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-e-Silva M; Fonteles LA; Lagalhard CSX; Fucci-da-Costa APC

    2013-01-01

    Marcia Ramos-e-Silva, Lívia Arcanjo Fonteles, Cecília Schubert Xavier Lagalhard, Ana Paula Cercal Fucci-da-CostaSector of Dermatology, University Hospital and School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilAbstract: Dermatological procedures which are considered as being minimally invasive, such as those using injectable fillers based on hyaluronic acid, revolutionized aging treatment, especially of the face. By promoting the replacement of lost ...

  14. STYLAGE®: a range of hyaluronic acid dermal fillers containing mannitol. Physical properties and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    Marcia Ramos-e-Silva, Lívia Arcanjo Fonteles, Cecília Schubert Xavier Lagalhard, Ana Paula Cercal Fucci-da-CostaSector of Dermatology, University Hospital and School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilAbstract: Dermatological procedures which are considered as being minimally invasive, such as those using injectable fillers based on hyaluronic acid, revolutionized aging treatment, especially of the face. By promoting the replacement ...

  15. A fibrin/hyaluronic acid hydrogel for the delivery of mesenchymal stem cells and potential for articular cartilage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, Timothy N; Madhavan, Krishna; Intrator, Miranda; Dregalla, Ryan C.; Park, Daewon

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease affecting approximately 27 million Americans, and even more worldwide. OA is characterized by degeneration of subchondral bone and articular cartilage. In this study, a chondrogenic fibrin/hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogel seeded with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) was investigated as a method of regenerating these tissues for OA therapy. This chondrogenic hydrogel system can be delivered in a minimally invas...

  16. The influence of hyaluronic acid hydrogel crosslinking density and macromolecular diffusivity on human MSC chondrogenesis and hypertrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, Liming; Hou, Chieh; Tous, Elena; Rai, Reena; Mauck, Robert L.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2012-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels formed via photocrosslinking provide stable 3D hydrogel environments that support the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Crosslinking density has a significant impact on the physical properties of hydrogels, including their mechanical stiffness and macromolecular diffusivity. Variations in the HA hydrogel crosslinking density can be obtained by either changes in the HA macromer concentration (1, 3, or 5% w/v at 15 min exposure) or the extent of rea...

  17. The prevention of peritoneal adhesions by in-situ cross-linking hydrogels of hyaluronic acid and cellulose derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Taichi; Yeo, Yoon; Highley, Christopher B.; Bellas, Evangelia; Benitez, Carlos A; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2006-01-01

    Postoperative peritoneal adhesions can cause pelvic pain, infertility, and potentially lethal bowel obstruction. We have designed and synthesized injectable hydrogels that are formed by mixing hydrazide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA) with aldehyde-modified versions of cellulose derivatives such as carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC), and methyl cellulose (MC). Gelation of these hydrogels occurred in less than 1 min, and had higher shear moduli than that of HA-HA ...

  18. Biocompatibility Assessment of Novel Collagen-Sericin Scaffolds Improved with Hyaluronic Acid and Chondroitin Sulfate for Cartilage Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Sorina Dinescu; Bianca Gălăţeanu; Mădălina Albu; Adriana Lungu; Eugen Radu; Anca Hermenean; Marieta Costache

    2013-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering (CTE) applications are focused towards the use of implantable biohybrids consisting of biodegradable scaffolds combined with in vitro cultured cells. Hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) were identified as the most potent prochondrogenic factors used to design new biomaterials for CTE, while human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) were proved to display high chondrogenic potential. In this context, our aim was not only to build novel 3D porous scaffol...

  19. Self-consistent field theory investigation of the behavior of hyaluronic acid chains in aqueous salt solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogovitsin, E. A.; Budkov, Yu. A.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we continue to develop a field-theoretic methodology, which combines the technique of Gaussian equivalent representation for the calculation of functional integrals with the continuous Gaussian thread model of flexible polymers for solving statistical-mechanical problems of polyelectrolyte solutions. We present new analytic expressions for the osmotic pressure, the potential of mean force, and the monomer-monomer pair distribution function, and employ them to investigate the structural and thermodynamic quantities of the polyelectrolyte system. We demonstrate the applicability of the method for systems of polyelectrolyte chains in which the monomers interact via a Yukawa-type pair potential. As a specific example, the present work focuses on aqueous solutions of hyaluronic acid with added salts NaCl and CaCl2. Hyaluronic acid is a high molecular weight linear polysaccharide, which has a multitude of roles in biological tissues. We conclude that the effect of sodium chloride and calcium chloride on the osmotic properties of hyaluronic acid solutions can be accounted for by their contributions to the ionic strength. Nevertheless, the effects of coiling and self-association can be stimulated in solution by added salt.

  20. Implanting hydroxyapatite-coated porous titanium with bone morphogenetic protein-2 and hyaluronic acid into distal femoral metaphysis of rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Lei; BIAN Wei-guo; LIANG Fang-hui; XU Hua-zi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the osseointegration capability of hydroxyapatite-coated porous titanium with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and hyaluronic acid to repair defects in the distal femur metaphysis in rabbits. Methods: Porous titanium implants were made by sintering titanium powder at high temperature, which were coated with hydroxyapatite by alkali and heat treatment and with BMP-2 combined with bone regeneration materials. And hyaluronic acid was further used as delivery system to prolong the effect of BMP-2. The implants were inserted into the metaphysis of the distal femur of rabbits. The animals were killed at 6, 12 and 24 weeks to accomplish histological and biomechanical analyses. Results: According to the result of histological analysis, the osseointegration in BMP-2 group was better than that of the HA-coated porous titanium group. In push-out test, all the samples had bigger shear stress as time passed by. There was statistical difference between the two groups in 6 and 12 weeks but not in 24 weeks. Conclusion: Hydroxyapatite-coated porous titanium with BMP-2 and hyaluronic acid has a good effect in repairing defects of distal fumur in rabbits, which is a fine biotechnology for future clinical application.

  1. Hypocrellin B and paclitaxel-encapsulated hyaluronic acid-ceramide nanoparticles for targeted photodynamic therapy in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ji-Eun; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Yi, Eunjue; Kim, Dae-Duk; Jheon, Sanghoon

    2016-05-01

    To increase the therapeutic efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in treating lung cancer, we developed both photosensitizer and anticancer drug encapsulated hyaluronic acid-ceramide nanoparticles. Based on our previous study, a co-delivery system of photosensitizers and anticancer agents greatly improves the therapeutic effect of PDT. Furthermore, hyaluronic acid-ceramide-based nanoparticles are ideal targeting carriers for lung cancer. In vitro phototoxicity in A549 (human lung adenocarcinoma) cells and in vivo antitumor efficacy in A549 tumor-bearing mice treated with hypocrellin B (HB)-loaded nanoparticles (HB-NPs) or hypocrellin B and paclitaxel loaded nanoparticles (HB-P-NPs) were evaluated. Cell viability assay, microscopic analysis and FACS analysis were performed for the in vitro studies and HB-P-NPs showed enhanced phototoxicity compared with HB-NPs. In the animal study, the tumor volume change and the histological analysis was studied and the anticancer efficacy improved in the order of free HBhyaluronic acid-ceramide nanoparticle-based targeted delivery improved the effects of PDT in lung cancer in mice. PMID:26967521

  2. Delayed immune mediated adverse effects to hyaluronic acid fillers: report of five cases and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ora Bitterman-Deutsch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA fillers in cosmetic medicine have been considered relatively safe, though fillers used in European countries and throughout the world are not necessarily approved by the Food and Drug Administration. As their use continues to expand worldwide, physicians in a wide range of medical specialties are authorized to perform HA injections, including general medicine practitioners and even dentists. An increasing number of reports have appeared regarding side effects to these products. It is now known that reactions to Hyaluronic acid are related not only to technical faults of the injections, but also to immune responses, including delayed hypersensitivity and granulomatous reactions. Herein, we describe five cases treated by a variety of treatment modalities, all with delayed reactions to different brands of hyaluronic acid fillers. As there is currently no standardization of treatment options of adverse effects, these cases accentuate the debate regarding the approach to the individual patient and the possible need for pre-testing in patients with an atopic tendency.

  3. Solution structure of hyaluronic acid oligomers by experimental and theoretical NMR, and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, A; Magnani, A; Bonechi, C; Barbucci, R; Rossi, C

    2001-11-01

    The conformational properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) oligomers in aqueous solution were investigated by combining high-resolution NMR experimental results, theoretical simulation of NMR two-dimensional (2D) spectra by Complete Relaxation Matrix Analysis (CORMA), and molecular dynamics calculations. New experimental findings recorded for the tetra- and hexasaccharides enabled the stiffness of the HA and its viscoelastic properties to be interpreted. In particular, rotating frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy spectra provided new information about the arrangement of the glycosidic linkage. From (13)C NMR relaxation the rotational correlation time (tau(c)) were determined. The tau(c) were employed in the calculation of geometrical constraints, by using the MARDIGRAS algorithm. Restrained simulated annealing and 1 ns of unrestrained molecular dynamic simulations were performed on the hexasaccharide in a box of 1215 water molecules. The beta(1 --> 3) and beta(1 --> 4) glycosidic links were found to be rigid. The lack of rotational degree of freedom is due to direct and/or water-mediated interresidue hydrogen bonding. Both single or tandem water bridges were found between carboxylate group and N-acetil group. The carboxylate group of glucuronic acid is not involved in a direct link with the amide group of N-acetyl glucosamine and this facilitated bonding between the residue and the water molecules. PMID:11598878

  4. Changes in the viscosity of hyaluronic acid after exposure to a myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, M.S.; Green, S.P.; Lowther, D.A.

    1989-04-01

    Both purified hyaluronic acid (HA) and bovine synovial fluid react with OCI-, the major oxidant produced by the myeloperoxidase (MPO)/H/sub 2/O/sub 2//CI- system, resulting in a decrease in their specific viscosity. This reaction is inhibited in the presence of excess methionine. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ alone decreases the viscosity of HA, presumably by the Fenton reaction, in the absence (but not in the presence) of the iron chelator, diethyltriaminepentacetic acid (DETAPAC). In the presence of DETAPAC, incubation of HA with the complete MPO/H/sub 2/O/sub 2//CI- system lowered the viscosity of HA. Analysis of 3H-HA exposed to OCI- by gel filtration chromatography indicated that cleavage of HA occurred only at higher OCI- concentrations. We suggest that the reduction in viscosity of HA by the MPO/H/sub 2/O/sub 2//CI- system may be due to a combination of oxidative cleavage and changes in the conformation of the molecule. We speculate that the changes in the molecular size of rheumatoid synovial fluid HA may be due to the action of the neutrophil MPO/H/sub 2/O/sub 2//CI- system.

  5. From modeling to remodeling of upper airways: Centrality of hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelnuovo, P; Tajana, G; Terranova, P; Digilio, E; Bignami, M; Macchi, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    After traumatic events (accidental or surgical), the respiratory tract activates specific and prolix repairing mechanisms which tend to claw back the primitive differentiated state. The attempt of reactivation of the normal tissue functions is called 'remodeling' and its aim is to reinstate the modeling mechanisms that existed before the damaging event or the pathology's establishment. Endoscopic sinus surgery represents the gold standard treatment for inflammatory, malformative, benign, and, in selected cases, malignant diseases. The surgical technique is commonly described as minimally invasive as the nostrils are used as an access route and therefore does not leave any external scars. Currently, the surgical procedures, even though minimally invasive regarding the way in, are in fact widely destructive towards the surgical target. The healing process and re-epithelialization will depend on the amount of bony tissue that has been exposed and it will be important to stratify the different surgical typologies in order to foresee the increasing difficulty of mucosal healing process. As far as upper inflammatory diseases are concerned, recent studies demonstrated how intranasal hyaluronic acid can positively regulate mucosal glands secretion and modulate inflammatory response, being a useful tool for the improvement of remodeling after endoscopic sinus surgery. Acid has shown to be able to regulate mucosal glands secretion and modulate the inflammatory response. PMID:25899549

  6. Changes in the viscosity of hyaluronic acid after exposure to a myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both purified hyaluronic acid (HA) and bovine synovial fluid react with OCI-, the major oxidant produced by the myeloperoxidase (MPO)/H2O2/CI- system, resulting in a decrease in their specific viscosity. This reaction is inhibited in the presence of excess methionine. H2O2 alone decreases the viscosity of HA, presumably by the Fenton reaction, in the absence (but not in the presence) of the iron chelator, diethyltriaminepentacetic acid (DETAPAC). In the presence of DETAPAC, incubation of HA with the complete MPO/H2O2/CI- system lowered the viscosity of HA. Analysis of 3H-HA exposed to OCI- by gel filtration chromatography indicated that cleavage of HA occurred only at higher OCI- concentrations. We suggest that the reduction in viscosity of HA by the MPO/H2O2/CI- system may be due to a combination of oxidative cleavage and changes in the conformation of the molecule. We speculate that the changes in the molecular size of rheumatoid synovial fluid HA may be due to the action of the neutrophil MPO/H2O2/CI- system

  7. Genetic basis for hyper production of hyaluronic acid in natural and engineered microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Juliana Davies; Carvalho, Lucas Silva; Gomes, Antônio Milton Vieira; Queiroz, Lúcio Rezende; Magalhães, Beatriz Simas; Parachin, Nádia Skorupa

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid, or HA, is a rigid and linear biopolymer belonging to the class of the glycosaminoglycans, and composed of repeating units of the monosaccharides glucuronic acid and N-acetylglucosamine. HA has multiple important functions in the human body, due to its properties such as bio-compatibility, lubricity and hydrophilicity, it is widely applied in the biomedical, food, health and cosmetic fields. The growing interest in this molecule has motivated the discovery of new ways of obtaining it. Traditionally, HA has been extracted from rooster comb-like animal tissues. However, due to legislation laws HA is now being produced by bacterial fermentation using Streptococcus zooepidemicus, a natural producer of HA, despite it being a pathogenic microorganism. With the expansion of new genetic engineering technologies, the use of organisms that are non-natural producers of HA has also made it possible to obtain such a polymer. Most of the published reviews have focused on HA formulation and its effects on different body tissues, whereas very few of them describe the microbial basis of HA production. Therefore, for the first time this review has compiled the molecular and genetic bases for natural HA production in microorganisms together with the main strategies employed for heterologous production of HA. PMID:27370777

  8. Spontaneous arrangement of a tumor targeting hyaluronic acid shell on irinotecan loaded PLGA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarra, Simona; Serri, Carla; Russo, Luisa; Zeppetelli, Stefania; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Borzacchiello, Assunta; Biondi, Marco; Ambrosio, Luigi; Mayol, Laura

    2016-04-20

    The arrangement of tumor targeting hyaluronic acid (HA) moieties on irinotecan (IRIN)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) has been directed by means of a gradient of lipophilicity between the oil and water phases of the emulsion used to produce the NPs. PLGA constitutes the NP bulk while HA is superficially exposed, with amphiphilic poloxamers acting as a bridge between PLGA and HA. Differential scanning calorimetry, zeta potential analyses and ELISA tests were employed to support the hypothesis of polymer assembly in NP formulations. The presence of flexible HA chains on NP surface enhances NP size stability over time due to an increased electrostatic repulsion between NPs and a higher degree of hydration of the device surface. IRIN in vitro release kinetics can be sustained up to 7-13 days. In vitro biologic studies indicated that HA-containing NPs were more toxic than bare PLGA NPs against CD44-overexpressing breast carcinoma cells (HS578T), therefore indicating their ability to target CD44 receptor. PMID:26876867

  9. Emerging roles of hyaluronic acid bioscaffolds in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Thushara, Ram M; Chandranayaka, Siddaiah; Sherman, Larry S; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S

    2016-05-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), is a glycosaminoglycan comprised of repeating disaccharide units of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid. HA is synthesized by hyaluronan synthases and reaches sizes in excess of 2MDa. It plays numerous roles in normal tissues but also has been implicated in inflammatory processes, multiple drug resistance, angiogenesis, tumorigenesis, water homeostasis, and altered viscoelasticity of extracellular matrix. The physicochemical properties of HA including its solubility and the availability of reactive functional groups facilitate chemical modifications on HA, which makes it a biocompatible material for use in tissue regeneration. HA-based biomaterials and bioscaffolds do not trigger allergies or inflammation and are hydrophilic which make them popular as injectable dermal and soft tissue fillers. They are manufactured in different forms including hydrogels, tubes, sheets and meshes. Here, we review the pathophysiological and pharmacological properties and the clinical uses of native and modified HA. The review highlights the therapeutic applications of HA-based bioscaffolds in organ-specific tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:26893053

  10. Iodinated hyaluronic acid oligomer-based nanoassemblies for tumor-targeted drug delivery and cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Young; Chung, Suk-Jae; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2016-04-01

    Nano-sized self-assemblies based on amphiphilic iodinated hyaluronic acid (HA) were developed for use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) was conjugated to an HA oligomer as a computed tomography (CT) imaging modality and a hydrophobic residue. Nanoassembly based on HA-TIBA was fabricated for tumor-targeted delivery of doxorubicin (DOX). Cellular uptake of DOX from nanoassembly, compared to a DOX solution group, was enhanced via an HA-CD44 receptor interaction, and subsequently, the in vitro antitumor efficacy of DOX-loaded nanoassembly was improved in SCC7 (CD44 receptor positive squamous cell carcinoma) cells. Cy5.5, a near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye, was attached to the HA-TIBA conjugate and the in vivo tumor targetability of HA-TIBA nanoassembly, which is based on the interaction between HA and CD44 receptor, was demonstrated in a NIRF imaging study using an SCC7 tumor-xenografted mouse model. Tumor targeting and cancer diagnosis with HA-TIBA nanoassembly were verified in a CT imaging study using the SCC7 tumor-xenografted mouse model. In addition to efficient cancer diagnosis using NIRF and CT imaging modalities, improved antitumor efficacies were shown. HA and TIBA can be used to produce HA-TIBA nanoassembly that may be a promising theranostic nanosystem for cancers that express the CD44 receptor. PMID:26874284

  11. Preliminary characterization of dexamethasone-loaded cross-linked hyaluronic acid films for topical ocular therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calles, J A; López-García, A; Vallés, E M; Palma, S D; Diebold, Y

    2016-07-25

    The aim of this work was to design and characterize cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA)-itaconic acid (IT) films loaded with dexamethasone sodium phosphate salt (DEX) for topical therapy of inflammatory ocular surface diseases. Films were chemically cross-linked with polyethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (PEGDE), then physical and mechanical characterization by stress-strain, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and swelling assays was conducted. A sequential in vitro therapeutic efficacy model was designed to assess changes in interleukin (IL)-6 production in an inflamed human corneal epithelial (HCE) cell line after film exposure. Changes in cell proliferation after film exposure were assessed using the alamarBlue(®) proliferation assay. Experimental findings showed desirable mechanical properties and in vitro efficacy to reduce cell inflammation. A moderately decreased proliferation rate was induced in HCE cells by DEX-loaded films, compared to commercial DEX eye drops. These results suggest that DEX and HA have opposite effects. The sequential in vitro therapeutic efficacy model arises as an efficient tool to study drug release from delivery systems by indirect measurement of a biological response. PMID:27242313

  12. pH-responsive targeted and controlled doxorubicin delivery using hyaluronic acid nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurav, Deepanjali D; Kulkarni, Anuja S; Khan, Ayesha; Shinde, Vaishali S

    2016-07-01

    Biocompatible nanogels were prepared using thiol modified hyaluronic acid and diacrylated pluronic F127 polymer. A simple Michael type addition reaction of activated thiol groups on acrylate moiety lead to the formation of these nanogels, which were further effectively fabricated with an anticancer drug for evaluating sustained drug release approach. Nanogels prepared were of 150nm in diameter with a narrow size distribution pattern. DOX released from these nanogels showed a slow and sustained release at acidic pH 5.0 as compared to minimal release at physiological pH 7.4. Cytotoxicity data revealed the higher efficiency of DOX loaded nanogels as compared to free DOX in Hela cell lines. Cellular uptake images supported the cytotoxicity data and displayed DOX intercalation at nuclear level of cells. The sustained drug delivery system showed DOX release after 24h and continued thereafter without affecting normal cells. Based on these findings, such nanogel system may be useful for delivering anticancer drug without hampering their toxicity value over longer durations and reducing the total dose amount in anticancer therapy. PMID:27022876

  13. In situ supramolecular hydrogel based on hyaluronic acid and dextran derivatives as cell scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing-Xiao; Cao, Lu-Juan; Shi, Yu; Wang, Ping; Chen, Jing-Hua

    2016-09-01

    In this study, hyaluronic acid-β-cyclodextrin conjugate (HA-CD) and dextran-2-naphthylacetic acid conjugate (Dex-NAA) were synthesized as two gelators. The degrees of substitution (DS) of these two gelators were determined to be 15.5 and 7.4%, respectively. Taking advantages of the strong and selective host-guest interaction between β-CD and 2-NAA, the mixture of two gelators could form supramolecular hydrogel in situ. Moreover, the pore size, gelation time, swelling ratio as well as modulus of the hydrogel could be adjusted by simply varying the contents of HA-CD and Dex-NAA. NIH/3T3 cells that entrapped in hydrogel grew well as compared with that cultured in plates, indicating a favorable cytocompatibility of the hydrogel. Collectively, the results demonstrated that the HA-Dex hydrogel could potentially be applied in tissue engineering as cell scaffold. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2263-2270, 2016. PMID:27087451

  14. In Vitro Investigation of Self-Assembled Nanoparticles Based on Hyaluronic Acid-Deoxycholic Acid Conjugates for Controlled Release Doxorubicin: Effect of Degree of Substitution of Deoxycholic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hao Wei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembled nanoparticles based on a hyaluronic acid-deoxycholic acid (HD chemical conjugate with different degree of substitution (DS of deoxycholic acid (DOCA were prepared. The degree of substitution (DS was determined by titration method. The nanoparticles were loaded with doxorubicin (DOX as the model drug. The human cervical cancer (HeLa cell line was utilized for in vitro studies and cell cytotoxicity of DOX incorporated in the HD nanoparticles was accessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. In addition, cellular uptake of fluorescently labeled nanoparticles was also investigated. An increase in the degree of deoxycholic acid substitution reduced the size of the nanoparticles and also enhanced their drug encapsulation efficiency (EE, which increased with the increase of DS. A higher degree of deoxycholic acid substitution also lead to a lower release rate and an initial burst release of doxorubicin from the nanoparticles. In summary, the degree of substitution allows the modulation of the particle size, drug encapsulation efficiency, drug release rate, and cell uptake efficiency of the nanoparticles. The herein developed hyaluronic acid-deoxycholic acid conjugates are a good candidate for drug delivery and could potentiate therapeutic formulations for doxorubicin–mediated cancer therapy.

  15. The impact of hyaluronic acid oligomer content on physical, mechanical, and biologic properties of divinyl sulfone-crosslinked hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Samir; Kang, Qian K; Ramamurthi, Anand

    2010-08-01

    In recent studies, we showed that exogenous hyaluronic acid oligomers (HA-o) stimulate functional endothelialization, though native long-chain HA is more bioinert and possibly more biocompatible. Thus, in this study, hydrogels containing high molecular weight (HMW) HA (1 x 10(6) Da) and HA-o mixtures (HA-o: 0.75-10 kDa) were created by crosslinking with divinyl sulfone (DVS). The incorporation of HA-o was found to compromise the physical and mechanical properties of the gels (rheology, apparent crosslinking density, swelling ratio, degradation) and to very mildly enhance inflammatory cell recruitment in vivo; increasing the DVS crosslinker content within the gels in general, had the opposite effect, though the relatively high concentration of DVS within these gels (necessary to create a solid gel) also stimulated a mild subcutaneous inflammatory response in vivo and VCAM-1 expression by endothelial cells (ECs) cultured atop; ICAM-expression levels remained very low irrespective extent of DVS crosslinking or HA-o content. The greatest EC attachment and proliferation (MTT assay) was observed on gels that contained the highest amount of HA-o. The study shows that the beneficial EC response to HA-o and biocompatibility of HA is mostly unaltered by their chemical derivatization and crosslinking into a hydrogel. However, the study also demonstrates that the relatively high concentrations of DVS, necessary to create solid gels, compromise their biocompatibility. Moreover, the poor mechanics of even these heavily crosslinked gels, in the context of vascular implantation, necessitates the investigation of other, more appropriate crosslinking agents. Alternately, the outcomes of this study may be used to guide an approach based on chemical immobilization and controlled surface-presentation of both bioactive HA-o and more biocompatible HMW HA on synthetic or tissue engineered grafts already in use, without the use of a crosslinker, so that improved, predictable, and

  16. Nanostructured lipid carrier-loaded hyaluronic acid microneedles for controlled dermal delivery of a lipophilic molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SG

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sang Gon Lee,1,* Jae Han Jeong,1,* Kyung Min Lee,1 Kyu Ho Jeong,1 Huisuk Yang,2 Miroo Kim,2 Hyungil Jung,2 Sangkil Lee,3 Young Wook Choi11College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, South Korea; 2Department of Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea; 3College of Pharmacy, Keimyung University, Daegu, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs were employed to formulate a lipophilic drug into hydrophilic polymeric microneedles (MNs. Hyaluronic acid (HA was selected as a hydrophilic and bioerodible polymer to fabricate MNs, and nile red (NR was used as a model lipophilic molecule. NR-loaded NLCs were consolidated into the HA-based MNs to prepare NLC-loaded MNs (NLC-MNs. A dispersion of NLCs was prepared by high-pressure homogenization after dissolving NR in Labrafil and mixing with melted Compritol, resulting in 268 nm NLCs with a polydispersity index of 0.273. The NLC dispersion showed a controlled release of NR over 24 hours, following Hixson–Crowell's cube root law. After mixing the NLC dispersion with the HA solution, the drawing lithography method was used to fabricate NLC-MNs. The length, base diameter, and tip diameter of the NLC-MNs were approximately 350, 380, and 30 µm, respectively. Fluorescence microscopic imaging of the NLC-MNs helped confirm that the NR-loaded NLCs were distributed evenly throughout the MNs. In a skin permeation study performed using a Franz diffusion cell with minipig dorsal skin, approximately 70% of NR was localized in the skin after 24-hour application of NLC-MNs. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (z-series of the skin at different depths showed strong fluorescence intensity in the epidermal layer, which appeared to spread out radially with the passage of time. This study indicated that incorporation of drug-loaded NLCs into MNs could represent a promising strategy for controlled dermal delivery of lipophilic drugs

  17. The Efficacy of Topical Hyaluronic Acid 0.2% in the Management of Symptomatic Oral Lichen Planus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burde, Krishna Nagappa; Guttal, Kruthika Satyabodh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a condition frequently referred to the specialist dental clinic for diagnosis and management. It is a disease of the skin and mucous membranes with oral manifestations too. It varies in appearance from keratotic to erythematous and ulcerative form. Immunosuppressants are frequently used for patients but some of these drugs could be implicated in malignant transformation, thus there is a clear need to find an alternative therapy for OLP. Aim To evaluate the relief of symptoms and reduction in the size of the lesions of lichen planus with 0.2% hyaluronic acid topical application and to compare the efficacy of topical hyaluronic acid (0.2%) with that of patients on placebo. Materials and Methods A randomized controlled study was conducted on 50 symptomatic and biopsy proven patients with lichen planus. The subjective symptoms like Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the objective symptoms like degree of erythema and mean area of the lesion were recorded preoperatively and on day 7, day 14, day 21 and day 28. The selected patients were divided randomly into group-I comprising of 25 patients who received topical 0.2% hyaluronic acid therapy for 14 days and group-II comprising of 25 patients who received topical application of placebo for 14 days. The statistical tests used were Mann-Whitney U test, t-test, Wilcoxon matched pairs test by ranks and paired t-test. Results Symptomatic effect of soreness evaluation- there was a significant reduction in VAS scores in the test group as compared to placebo, similarly there was also significant reduction in the degree of erythema, change in the size of the lesion and area of the lesion in the test group. There was significant improvement in relief of symptoms, in the degree of erythema and mean area of the lesion in Group-I when compared with group-II. Conclusion Topical application of 0.2% Hyaluronic acid showed a significant clinical response when compared to topical placebo. It is easy to

  18. Current Research Of Hyaluronic Acid%透明质酸的研究现状综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋磊; 王腾飞

    2012-01-01

    透明质酸(hyaluronic acid,简称HA)是由葡萄糖醛酸和N-乙酰氨基葡萄糖胺为双糖单位交替连接而成的粘多糖物质。本文论述了透明质酸的特性、应用、制备等研究现状,分析了目前存在的主要问题及解决途径,并对其前景进行了展望。%Hyaluronic acid(HA)is a linear polysaccharide chain composed of alternating glucuronic acid(GlcA) and N-acetylglucosamine(GlcNAc) moieties.In this paper,We described the current reasearch of hyaluronic acid in its production.In addition,the main problems in HA production were also discussed and the methods were put forward for the research.Moreover,the prospect of this research was proposed.

  19. Comparison of the Hyaluronic Acid Vaginal Cream and Conjugated Estrogen Used in Treatment of Vaginal Atrophy of Menopause Women: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokar, Azam; Davari, Tayebe; Asadi, Nasrin; Ahmadi, Fateme; Foruhari, Sedighe

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vaginal atrophy is a common complication in menopause which does not improve with time and, if untreated, can affect the quality of life for women. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of the vaginal cream of hyaluronic acid and conjugated estrogen (Premarin) in treatment of vaginal atrophy. Methods: This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial on 56 menopausal women with symptoms of vaginal atrophy; they were randomly allocated to two groups (recipient conjugated estrogen and hyaluronic acid). The severity of each sign of atrophy was evaluated by visual analog signals (VAS) and on the basis of a four point scale. Also to recognize the cellular maturation with pap smear and the maturation degree were calculated according to the formula and scores 0-100. As to the vaginal PH, we used PH marker band, the rate of which was divided into 4 degrees. Data were analyzed using SPSS, version 20, and P≤0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The results of this study showed that the symptoms of vaginal atrophy compared with the baseline level were relieved significantly in both groups. Dryness, itching, maturation index, PH and composite score of the vaginal symptoms were relieved significantly in both groups (P<0.001). Dyspareunia in Premarin (P<0.05) and hyaluronic acid (P<0.001) decreased compared with pre-treatment. Urinary incontinence only showed improvement in the hyaluronic acid group (P<0.05). Improvement in urinary incontinence, dryness, maturation index (P<0.05) and composite score of vaginal symptoms (P<0.001) in the hyaluronic acid group was better than those in the Premarin group. Conclusion: According to the results of the present study, hyaluronic acid and conjugated estrogen improved the symptoms of vaginal atrophy. But hyaluronic acid was more effective and this drug is suggested for those who do not want to or cannot take local hormone treatment. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2013022712644N1 PMID:26793732

  20. Can we decrease the skin reaction in breast cancer patients using hyaluronic acid during radiation therapy? Results of phase III randomised trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radio-induced early skin reactions still remain a clinical challenge. Preliminary results with Hyaluronic acid, one of the most recent topical products used in this indication are proving interesting. To evaluate the efficacy of Hyaluronic acid compared to placebo. Material and methods: Breast cancer patients with grade 1-2 radio-induced dermatitis during postoperative radiotherapy were eligible. They were randomised to receive either hyaluronic acid (A) or a simple emollient (B). The primary endpoint was the clinical evaluation of the erythema (success versus failure). Secondary endpoints were the evaluation of skin colorimetry, pain, and quality of life. Results: Two-hundred patients were enroled (A = 99, B = 101). Ninety-five patients per treatment arm could be evaluated. Failures occurred in 23 patients (24%) in the hyaluronic acid arm, and 32 (34%) in the emollient arm (p = 0.15). Seventy-three patients (36.5%) prematurely stopped the treatment without any ensuing difference between the two arms. Body mass index and the size of the epithelitis were both independently associated with the failure of the local treatment. The relative reduction of colorimetric levels was 20% in the hyaluronic acid group, and 13% in the emollient group (p = 0.46). Concerning the quality of life assessment, there was a trend towards a lower level of pain in patients receiving hyaluronic acid (p = 0.053). Conclusions: The present study showed no significant difference between hyaluronic acid and simple emollient in the treatment of acute radio-induced dermatitis. There was however a trend towards an improvement in both pain level and skin colorimetry.

  1. Comparison of the Hyaluronic Acid Vaginal Cream and Conjugated Estrogen Used in Treatment of Vaginal Atrophy of Menopause Women: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Jokar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vaginal atrophy is a common complication in menopause which does not improve with time and, if untreated, can affect the quality of life for women. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of the vaginal cream of hyaluronic acid and conjugated estrogen (Premarin in treatment of vaginal atrophy. Methods: This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial on 56 menopausal women with symptoms of vaginal atrophy; they were randomly allocated to two groups (recipient conjugated estrogen and hyaluronic acid. The severity of each sign of atrophy was evaluated by visual analog signals (VAS and on the basis of a four point scale. Also to recognize the cellular maturation with pap smear and the maturation degree were calculated according to the formula and scores 0-100. As to the vaginal PH, we used PH marker band, the rate of which was divided into 4 degrees. Data were analyzed using SPSS, version 20, and P≤0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The results of this study showed that the symptoms of vaginal atrophy compared with the baseline level were relieved significantly in both groups. Dryness, itching, maturation index, PH and composite score of the vaginal symptoms were relieved significantly in both groups (P<0.001. Dyspareunia in Premarin (P<0.05 and hyaluronic acid (P<0.001 decreased compared with pre-treatment. Urinary incontinence only showed improvement in the hyaluronic acid group (P<0.05. Improvement in urinary incontinence, dryness, maturation index (P<0.05 and composite score of vaginal symptoms (P<0.001 in the hyaluronic acid group was better than those in the Premarin group. Conclusion: According to the results of the present study, hyaluronic acid and conjugated estrogen improved the symptoms of vaginal atrophy. But hyaluronic acid was more effective and this drug is suggested for those who do not want to or cannot take local hormone treatment.

  2. Phytosome-hyaluronic acid systems for ocular delivery of L-carnosine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkader H

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hamdy Abdelkader,1,2 Michael R Longman,1 Raid G Alany,1,3 Barbara Pierscionek4 1Drug Discovery, Delivery and Patient Care (DDDPC Theme, School of Life Sciences, Pharmacy and Chemistry, Kingston University London, Kingston Upon Thames, London, UK; 2Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Minia University, Mina, Egypt; 3School of Pharmacy, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 4Vision Cognition and Neuroscience Theme, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing, Kingston University London, Kingston Upon Thames, London, UK Abstract: This study reports on L-carnosine phytosomes as an alternative for the prodrug N-acetyl-L-carnosine as a novel delivery system to the lens. L-carnosine was loaded into lipid-based phytosomes and hyaluronic acid (HA-dispersed phytosomes. L-carnosine-phospholipid complexes (PC of different molar ratios, 1:1 and 1:2, were prepared by the solvent evaporation method. These complexes were characterized with thermal and spectral analyses. PC were dispersed in either phosphate buffered saline pH 7.4 or HA (0.1% w/v in phosphate buffered saline to form phytosomes PC1:1, PC1:2, and PC1:2 HA, respectively. These phytosomal formulations were studied for size, zeta potential, morphology, contact angle, spreading coefficient, viscosity, ex vivo transcorneal permeation, and cytotoxicity using primary human corneal cells. L-carnosine-phospholipid formed a complex at a 1:2 molar ratio and phytosomes were in the size range of 380–450 nm, polydispersity index of 0.12–0.2. The viscosity of PC1:2 HA increased by 2.4 to 5-fold compared with HA solution and PC 1:2, respectively; significantly lower surface tension, contact angle, and greater spreading ability for phytosomes were also recorded. Ex vivo transcorneal permeation parameters showed significantly controlled corneal permeation of L-carnosine with the novel carrier systems without any significant impact on primary human corneal cell viability. Ex vivo

  3. Perspectives in the selection of hyaluronic acid fillers for facial wrinkles and aging skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Hannah E; Price, Richard D

    2009-01-01

    Aesthetic surgery is, in the USA at least, no longer a taboo subject. Outside North America, public acceptance continues to grow as more procedures are performed each year. While there appears, anecdotally, to be a decrease in patients undergoing cosmetic treatments because of the global financial crisis, the overall trend remains upward. Although popular television programs espouse the benefits of surgery, it is nonsurgical procedures that account, numerically, for the majority of procedures performed; in the USA, there was a 48% growth from 2000 to 2008 in nonsurgical treatments undertaken by women, and 64% in men and while the average surgeon might perform 60 blepharoplasty operations in 2007, (s)he would also undertake 375 botulinum injections, and almost 200 filler injections of varying sorts. Clearly there is enthusiasm for nonsurgical treatments, and this trend appears to be rising. With this in mind, we present an overview of the commonest filler injection material, hyaluronic acid. We present the mechanism of action, the purported risks and benefits, and briefly discuss technique. PMID:19936165

  4. Key importance of compression properties in the biophysical characteristics of hyaluronic acid soft-tissue fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavard Molliard, Samuel; Albert, Séverine; Mondon, Karine

    2016-08-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) soft-tissue fillers are the most popular degradable injectable products used for correcting skin depressions and restoring facial volume loss. From a rheological perspective, HA fillers are commonly characterised through their viscoelastic properties under shear-stress. However, despite the continuous mechanical pressure that the skin applies on the fillers, compression properties in static and dynamic modes are rarely considered. In this article, three different rheological tests (shear-stress test and compression tests in static and dynamic mode) were carried out on nine CE-marked cross-linked HA fillers. Corresponding shear-stress (G', tanδ) and compression (E', tanδc, normal force FN) parameters were measured. We show here that the tested products behave differently under shear-stress and under compression even though they are used for the same indications. G' showed the expected influence on the tissue volumising capacity, and the same influence was also observed for the compression parameters E'. In conclusion, HA soft-tissue fillers exhibit widely different biophysical characteristics and many variables contribute to their overall performance. The elastic modulus G' is not the only critical parameter to consider amongst the rheological properties: the compression parameters E' and FN also provide key information, which should be taken into account for a better prediction of clinical outcomes, especially for predicting the volumising capacity and probably the ability to stimulate collagen production by fibroblasts. PMID:27093589

  5. Generation of Vascular Graft Biomaterials via the Modification of Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Amaliris

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the United States, necessitating surgical interventions such as small diameter (I.D. hyaluronic acid (HA), a native glycosaminoglycan that possesses anti-thrombotic properties as well as the ability to modulate endothelial cell proliferation in a molecular weight-dependent manner. The goal of the present work was to assess in detail the impact of 1) HA molecular weight, 2) HA quantity, and 3) the method of HA incorporation (bulk vs. surface-grafted) on the vascular-specific performance of polyurethane-HA (PU-HA) materials, under static conditions and upon exposure to physiological shear stresses. The initial findings presented in this thesis indicate that these PU-HA materials possess many of the physical and biological properties that are necessary for implementation in vascular applications. These materials were able to simultaneously address the three major design criteria in vascular graft fabrication: hemocompatibility, endothelialization, and vascular-appropriate mechanics, which has not been possible with other currently available materials. Moreover, the information presented herein will help the potential clinical translation of these PU-HA materials as a vascular graft product, as we aim to optimize the HA oligosaccharide content, molecular weight and incorporation method that will result in 3-D scaffolds that are hemocompatible and possess both vascular-appropriate mechanics and the ability to support a viable endothelial cell population.

  6. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy: Injection of Hyaluronic Acid to Better Preserve The Rectal Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.chapet@chu-lyon.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Udrescu, Corina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Devonec, Marian [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Tanguy, Ronan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Sotton, Marie-Pierre [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Enachescu, Ciprian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Colombel, Marc [Department of Urology, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Val d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Jalade, Patrice [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Ruffion, Alain [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) between the rectum and the prostate for reducing the dose to the rectal wall in a hypofractionated irradiation for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In a phase 2 study, 10 cc of HA was injected between the rectum and prostate. For 16 patients, the same intensity modulated radiation therapy plan (62 Gy in 20 fractions) was optimized on 2 computed tomography scans: CT1 (before injection) and CT2 (after injection). Rectal parameters were compared: dose to 2.5 cc (D2.5), 5 cc (D5), 10 cc (D10), 15 cc (D15), and 20 cc (D20) of rectal wall and volume of rectum covered by the 90% isodose line (V90), 80% (V80), 70% (V70), 60% (V60), and 50% (V50). Results: The mean V90, V80, V70, V60, and V50 values were reduced by 73.8% (P<.0001), 55.7% (P=.0003), 43.0% (P=.007), 34% (P=.002), and 25% (P=.036), respectively. The average values of D2.5, D5, D10, D15, and D20 were reduced by 8.5 Gy (P<.0001), 12.3 Gy (P<.0001), 8.4 Gy (P=.005), 3.7 Gy (P=.026), and 1.2 Gy (P=.25), respectively. Conclusions: The injection of HA significantly limited radiation doses to the rectal wall.

  7. Use of hyaluronic acid preparations in the combination therapy of osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Olyunin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current recommendations for the pharmacotherapy of osteoarthritis (OA primarily focus on analgesics and main concern is with the use of paracetamol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. Intraarticular injections of first of all hyaluronic acid (HA preparations that have proven to be effective in clinical practice are a promising treatment for OA. By taking into account the favorable safety profile of HA preparations, it may be suggested that these injections may be an acceptable alternative to NSAIDs or successfully used in combination with the latter. There have been recently the recommendations for the administration of HA preparations in OA treatment, which characterize the current practice of HA use for OA and had been prepared by a group of experts from 5 European countries. The experts consider that there is today rather solid evidence to demonstrate the efficacy of HA in mild and moderately severe knee OA; moreover, its effect is clinically significant in such patients. In the authors’ view, topical HA therapy should be a compulsory component of treatment for knee OA, since the alternative possibilities of therapy for this disease are limited. Although the optimal effect of HA is observed when it is applied in the early stage of OA, this treatment may be also useful in its late stage. HA should be regarded as an adjunct method that must be applied if surgery cannot be performed in these patients.

  8. Novel crosslinked alginate/hyaluronic acid hydrogels for nerve tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min-Dan; Zhai, Peng; Schreyer, David J.; Zheng, Ruo-Shi; Sun, Xiao-Dan; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Chen, Xiong-Biao

    2013-09-01

    Artificial tissue engineering scaffolds can potentially provide support and guidance for the regrowth of severed axons following nerve injury. In this study, a hybrid biomaterial composed of alginate and hyaluronic acid (HA) was synthesized and characterized in terms of its suitability for covalent modification, biocompatibility for living Schwann cells and feasibility to construct three dimensional (3D) scaffolds. Carbodiimide mediated amide formation for the purpose of covalent crosslinking of the HA was carried out in the presence of calciumions that ionically crosslink alginate. Amide formation was found to be dependent on the concentrations of carbodiimide and calcium chloride. The double-crosslinked composite hydrogels display biocompatibility that is comparable to simple HA hydrogels, allowing for Schwann cell survival and growth. No significant difference was found between composite hydrogels made from different ratios of alginate and HA. A 3D BioPlotter™ rapid prototyping system was used to fabricate 3D scaffolds. The result indicated that combining HA with alginate facilitated the fabrication process and that 3D scaffolds with porous inner structure can be fabricated from the composite hydrogels, but not from HA alone. This information provides a basis for continuing in vitro and in vivo tests of the suitability of alginate/HA hydrogel as a biomaterial to create living cell scaffolds to support nerve regeneration.

  9. Hyaluronic acid fragments evoke Kupffer cells via TLR4 signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Kupffer cells, expressing toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), play a central role in hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Hyaluronic acid (HA) fragments, degradative products of high-molecular-weight HA (HMW-HA), acquire the ability to activate immune cells under inflammatory conditions. Here we inves- tigated whether HA fragments could activate Kupffer cells and analyzed the underlying mechanism. Kupffer cells were isolated from wild-type mice (WT, C3H/HeN) and TLR4 mutant mice (C3H/HeJ) and HA fragments were produced by the methods of enzyme digestion and chromatography. Then Kupffer cells were stimulated by HA fragments or other control stimuli. The activation of Kupffer cells was estimated as the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The activation of p38 MAPK pathway of Kupffer cells was checked and blocking experiments were done as well. The results indicated that HA fragments acquired the ability to activate Kupffer cells in vitro, which was TLR4 dependent and not due to contamination of lipopolysaccharide. Experiments of p38 MAPK kinase inhibition by SB-203580 verified p38 MAPK was required in HA fragments induced Kupffer cells activation. This suggests that HA fragments, degradative products of one of the major glycosaminoglycans of the extracellular matrix, play critical roles in Kupffer cell activation mediated by TLR4 signaling pathway, which is, at least partially, de- pendent on p38 MAPK activation.

  10. Hyaluronic acid enhancement of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene for small diameter vascular grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nicole R.

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States and other developed countries. In the United States alone, 8 million people are diagnosed with peripheral arterial disease per year and over 250,000 patients have coronary bypass surgery each year. Autologous blood vessels are the standard graft used in small diameter (hyaluronic acid (HA), evaluate thrombogenic potential of ePTFE-HA grafts, and evaluate graft mechanical properties and coating durability. The results in this work indicate the successful production of ePTFE-HA materials using a solvent infiltration technique. Surface interactions with blood show increased platelet adhesion on HA-modified surfaces, though evidence may suggest less platelet activation and erythrocyte lysis. Significant changes in mechanical properties of HA-modified ePTFE materials were observed. Further investigation into solvent selection, uniformity of HA, endothelialization, and dynamic flow testing would be beneficial in the evaluation of these materials for use in small diameter vascular graft bypass procedures.

  11. Detection of Serum Hyaluronic Acid and Laminin in Patients with Bladder Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李令勋; 丁国富

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate the changes of serum hyaluronic acid (HA) and laminin (LN) levels and their clinical implication in the patients with bladder tumors, the serum HA and LN levels in 34 patients with bladder tumor and 30 cases of control group were detected by radioimmunoassay before and after operation. The results showed that the serum HA and LN levels in the patients with bladder tumors were significantly higher than those in control group (P<0. 01) before operation, and decreased significantly after operation (P<0. 05). The serum levels of HA and LN in infiltration tumors were higher than those in superficial tumors (P<0.05). The serum HA and LN levels in patients with lymph node metastasis were higher than those without lymph node metastasis (P<0.01 ). The investigation revealed that HA and LN might be involved in the malignant biology behavior of bladder tumors and could be used as important markers of assistant diagnosis and condition monitoring.

  12. Rheological and Biological Characteristics of Hyaluronic Acid Derivative Modified by Polyethylene Glycol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jinghua; CHEN Jingtao; XU Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) was chemically modified by polyethylene glycol. Meanwhile,the dynamic mechanics properties of HA derivative and its viscoelastic changes were measured on 3ARES3 Rheometer (Japan) at 25 ℃. Dried cross-linked films of 10×10 mm2 were immersed in phosphate buffered saline(PBS: pH 7.4) at 37 ℃ with different time periods to measure its water content and in vitro degradation. Moreover, cell cultured solutions, which were in the different cultivation vesse with 1 mg/mL Solution of HA derivative as doing experimental sample for 2 d, 4 d and 7 d, were observed, respectively, by an inverted discrepancy microscope. The cell relative growth rate was analyzed with the SPSS10.0 mathematic statistic software. Based on the above experiments,structure-modified HA derivative can meet the requirements of biomaterials in view of rheological and degradation in vitro and cytotoxicity charactereistics from clinical medical aspect under this experiment conditions.

  13. Ionic Driven Embedment of Hyaluronic Acid Coated Liposomes in Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Films for Local Therapeutic Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Stephen L.; Francis, David M.; Sis, Matthew J.; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-10-01

    The ability to control the spatial distribution and temporal release of a therapeutic remains a central challenge for biomedical research. Here, we report the development and optimization of a novel substrate mediated therapeutic delivery system comprising of hyaluronic acid covalently functionalized liposomes (HALNPs) embedded into polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) platform via ionic stabilization. The PEM platform was constructed from sequential deposition of Poly-L-Lysine (PLL) and Poly(Sodium styrene sulfonate) (SPS) “(PLL/SPS)4.5” followed by adsorption of anionic HALNPs. An adsorption affinity assay and saturation curve illustrated the preferential HALNP deposition density for precise therapeutic loading. (PLL/SPS)2.5 capping layer on top of the deposited HALNP monolayer further facilitated complete nanoparticle immobilization, cell adhesion, and provided nanoparticle confinement for controlled linear release profiles of the nanocarrier and encapsulated cargo. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the successful embedment of a translatable lipid based nanocarrier into a substrate that allows for temporal and spatial release of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs. Specifically, we have utilized our platform to deliver chemotherapeutic drug Doxorubicin from PEM confined HALNPs. Overall, we believe the development of our HALNP embedded PEM system is significant and will catalyze the usage of substrate mediated delivery platforms in biomedical applications.

  14. Polyelectrolyte complexes via desalting mixtures of hyaluronic acid and chitosan-Physicochemical study and structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalevée, G; Sudre, G; Montembault, A; Meadows, J; Malaise, S; Crépet, A; David, L; Delair, T

    2016-12-10

    Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) were prepared from Chitosan (CS) and Hyaluronic Acid (HYA) homogeneous mixtures of aqueous solutions. The method consisted of preparing a homogeneous mixture of the two polysaccharides via charge screening at high salt concentrations. Then, the mixture was dialyzed, leading to the controlled self-assembly of the two polyelectrolytes. Critical parameters like the chitosan degree of acetylation (DA) and molar mass (Mw), the residual salt concentration and the molar charge ratio r=nNH3(+) (CS)/nCOO(-) (HYA) accounted for the transition from homogeneous aqueous solutions to colloidal suspensions (r=0.1) or gel coacervates (r=0.5). The influence of the DA and Mw of CS was evaluated by visual observations, light scattering and rheological measurements. For low values of r, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) experiments revealed that the HYA nanostructure was weakly affected by the presence of PECs. On the contrary, the structure was impacted when increasing r, revealing a heterogeneous aggregate morphology with ladder-like chain interactions. PMID:27577900

  15. Layered Double Hydroxide Modified by PEGylated Hyaluronic Acid as a Hybrid Nanocarrier for Targeted Drug Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董岸杰; 李雪; 王伟伟; 韩尚聪; 刘鉴锋; 刘金剑; 赵军强; 许舒欣; 邓联东

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, organic-inorganic hybrid nanocarriers are explored for effective drug delivery and pref-erable disease treatments. In this study, using 5-fluorouracil(5-FU)as electronegative model drug, a new type of organic-inorganic hybrid drug delivery system(LDH/HA-PEG/5-FU)was conceived and manufactured by the ad-sorption of PEGylated hyaluronic acid(HA-PEG)on the surface of layered double hydroxide(LDH, prepared via hydrothermal method)and the intercalation of 5-FU in the interlamination of LDH via ion exchange strategy. The drug loading amount of LDH/HA-PEG/5-FU achieved as high as 34.2%. LDH, LDH/5-FU and LDH/HA-PEG/5-FU were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, TGA, laser particle size analyzer and SEM. With the benefit of pH-degradable feature of LDH and enzyme-degradable feature of HA, LDH/HA-PEG/5-FU showed pH-degradable and enzyme-degradable capacity inin vitro drug release. Moreover, the drug carrier LDH/HA-PEG contained biocom-patible PEG and tumor-targeted HA, resulting in lower cytotoxicity and better endocytosis compared with LDHin vitro. It was suggested that the organic-inorganic hybrid drug delivery system, which was endowed with the proper-ties of controlled release, low toxicity and tumor-targeting delivery for ameliorative cancer therapy, was advisable and might be applied further to fulfill other treatments.

  16. Preparation and Kinetics of a Novel Glutathione Peroxidase Mimic——Selenium-modified Hyaluronic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jia; HONG Shui-sheng; AN Yang; JIANG Guang-zhi; ZHANG Bo-xun; FANG Xiang-yang; LIU Lan-ying; TENG Li-rong

    2007-01-01

    A selenium-modified hyaluronic acid(HA) compound(SeHA) was synthesized as a mimic of glutathione peroxidase(GPX). IR and NMR spectra of SeHA predict that the -CH2OH group of the N-acetyl-D-glucosamine in HA was modified by group -SeH. There are averagely 152 -SeH groups in one SeHA molecule. The GPX activities are 103.88, 32.15 and 152.71 U/μmol, respectively, when the substrates were H2O2, BuOOH and CuOOH. Ping-pong mechanism was observed in the steady-state kinetic studies of the reactive oxygen species(ROS) consuming reaction. Result of reactions of SeHA with free radical capturer 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol(BHT) shows that the catalysis is based on a non-free radical-mechanism and the SeHA can not be inhibited by iodoacetate, an enzyme inhibitor.

  17. Characteristics of Hyaluronic Acid Derivative Cross-linked by Polyethylene Glycol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Characteristic and dynamic viscosities of Hyaluronic acid ( HA ) derivative modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG) were tested with different reaction times (6 h,12 h,18 h and 24 h ) , different molar ratio of HA/PEG ( 1/10,1/5,1/3 and 1/2), different molecular weight of PEG(400,6 000 and 20 000) and mass fraction is 0.4% by Wushi Viscosimeter and L- 90 Rheometer at 25 ℃. Characteristic viscosity of HA derivative had the largest value in 12 h, which decreased with increasing of PEG molecular weight, but its aqueous dynamic viscosity increased with increment of PEG molecular weight. Meanwhile, we tested dynamic mechanic properties of HA derivative by 3ARES3 Rheometer at 25 ℃ to study viscoelastic changes and to compare change difference from viscosity to elasticity with the changes of vibration frequency between unmodified HA and HA derivative.Change from low vibrated frequency to high one of solution resulted in change from viscosity to elasticity of solution. In conclusion, as to the rheological properties, structure-modified HA derivative meets the requirement of biomnterial .

  18. Cisplatin Loaded Hyaluronic Acid Modified TiO2 Nanoparticles for Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy of Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enling Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel tumor-targeting titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles modified with hyaluronic acid (HA were developed to explore the feasibility of exploiting the pH-responsive drug release property of TiO2 and the tumor-targeting ability of HA to construct a tumor-targeting cisplatin (CDDP delivery system (HA-TiO2 for potential neoadjuvant chemotherapy of ovarian cancer. The experimental results indicated that CDDP release from the HA-TiO2 nanoparticles was significantly accelerated by decreasing pH from 7.4 to 5.0, which is of particular benefit to cancer therapy. CDDP-loaded HA-TiO2 nanoparticles increased the accumulation of CDDP in A2780 ovarian cancer cells via HA-mediated endocytosis and exhibited superior anticancer activity in vitro. In vivo real-time imaging assay revealed that HA-TiO2 nanoparticles possessed preferable tumor-targeting ability which might potentially minimize the toxic side effects of CDDP in clinical application.

  19. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Meihua; Jambhrunkar, Siddharth; Thorn, Peter; Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yu, Chengzhong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a targeted drug delivery system has been developed based on hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). HA-MSNs possess a specific affinity to CD44 over-expressed on the surface of a specific cancer cell line, HCT-116 (human colon cancer cells). The cellular uptake performance of fluorescently labelled MSNs with and without HA modification has been evaluated by confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Compared to bare MSNs, HA-MSNs exhibit a higher cellular uptake via HA receptor mediated endocytosis. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox), has been loaded into MSNs and HA-MSNs as drug delivery vehicles. Dox loaded HA-MSNs show greater cytotoxicity to HCT-116 cells than free Dox and Dox-MSNs due to the enhanced cell internalization behavior of HA-MSNs. It is expected that HA-MSNs have a great potential in targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to CD44 over-expressing tumors.

  20. Endoscopic Treatment of Vesicoureteral Reflux with Dextranomer/Hyaluronic Acid in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Kirsch

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The goal of this review is to present current indications, injectable agents, techniques, success rates, complications, and potential future applications of endoscopic treatment for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR in children. Materials and Methods. The endoscopic method currently achieving one of the highest success rates is the double hydrodistention-implantation technique (HIT. This method employs dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer, which has been used in pediatric urology for over 10 years and may be at present the first choice injectable agent due to its safety and efficacy. Results. While most contemporary series report cure rates of greater than 85% for primary VUR, success rates of complicated cases of VUR may be, depending on the case, significantly lower. Endoscopic treatment offers major advantages to patients while avoiding potentially complicated open surgery. As the HIT method continues to be applied to complex cases of VUR and more outcome data become available, the indication for endoscopic treatment may exceed the scope of primary VUR. Conclusions. Endoscopic injection is emerging as the treatment of choice for VUR in children.

  1. Hyaluronic acid binding, endocytosis and degradation by sinusoidal liver endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding, endocytosis, and degradation of 125I-hyaluronic acid (125I-HA) by liver endothelial cells (LEC) was studied under several conditions. The dissociation of receptor-bound 125I-HA was rapid, with a half time of ∼31 min and a Koff of 6.3 x 10-4/sec. A large reversible increase in 125I-HA binding to LEC at pH 5.0 was due to an increase in the observed affinity of the binding interaction. Pronase digestion suggested the protein nature of the receptor and the intracellular location of the digitonin exposed binding activity. Binding and endocytosis occur in the presence of 10 mM EGTA indicating that divalent cations are not required for receptor function. To study the degradation of 125I-HA by LEC, a cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) precipitation assay was characterized. The minimum HA length required for precipitation was elucidated. The fate of the LEC HA receptor after endocytosis was examined

  2. Improved cartilage repair via in vitro pre-maturation of MSC-seeded hyaluronic acid hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional repair of focal cartilage defects requires filling the space with neotissue that has compressive properties comparable to native tissue and integration with adjacent host cartilage. While poor integration is a common complication with current clinical treatments, reports of tissue engineering advances in the development of functional compressive properties rarely include analyses of their potential for integration. Our objective was thus to assess both the maturation and integration of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-laden hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels in an in vitro cartilage defect model. Furthermore, we considered the effects of an initial period of pre-maturation as well as various material formulations to maximize both construct compressive properties and integration strength. MSCs were encapsulated in 1%, 3% and 5% methacrylated HA (MeHA) or 2% agarose (Ag) and gelled directly (in situ) within an in vitro cartilage defect or were formed and then pre-cultured for 4 weeks before implantation. Results showed that the integration strength of pre-cultured repair constructs was equal to (1% MeHA) or greater than (2% Ag) the integration of in situ repaired cartilage. Moreover, MSC chondrogenesis and maturation was restricted by the in situ repair environment with constructs maturing to a much lesser extent than pre-matured constructs. These results indicate that construct pre-maturation may be an essential element of functional cartilage repair. (paper)

  3. Thiol-ene crosslinking polyamidoamine dendrimer-hyaluronic acid hydrogel system for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiangdong; Liang, Aiye; Tan, Yu; Maturavongsadit, Panita; Higginbothem, Ashley; Gado, Togor; Gramling, Abigail; Bahn, Hanna; Wang, Qian

    2016-06-01

    A series of alkene functionalized polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers were synthesized to prepare in situ forming hydrogels with varied gelation time and mechanical properties through crosslinking with thiolated hyaluronic acid (HS-HA). By varying the alkenyl groups on the dendrimers, the gelation time displayed a large range from 8 seconds to 18 hours, and the modulus of the hydrogels ranged from 36 to 183 Pa under experimental conditions. Investigation by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy revealed that the gelation time and the stiffness of the hydrogels were governed by the degree of electron deficiency of alkenyl groups on the dendrimers. This research provided a systematic study on the relationship between chemical structures versus gelation time and mechanical properties of hydrogels, which could guide the way to synthesize in situ forming hydrogels with designated gelation time and stiffness for biomedical applications. Further, a RGD peptide was attached to the PAMAM dendrimers to enhance cell attachment and proliferation. Viability assays of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) in the synthesized hydrogels demonstrated the biocompatibility of the hydrogels after 48 hours of culturing, and the RGD peptide improved the viability of HUVEC cells in hydrogels. We believe the PAMAM/HA hydrogel system is a tuneable and biocompatible system for diverse biomedical applications. PMID:26923639

  4. Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels Formed in Situ by Transglutaminase-Catalyzed Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranga, Adrian; Lutolf, Matthias P; Hilborn, Jöns; Ossipov, Dmitri A

    2016-05-01

    Enzymatically cross-linked hydrogels can be formed in situ and permit highly versatile and selective tethering of bioactive molecules, thereby allowing for a wealth of applications in cell biology and tissue engineering. While a number of studies have reported the bioconjugation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and peptides into such matrices, the site-specific incorporation of biologically highly relevant polysaccharides such as hyaluronic acid (HA) has thus far not been reported, limiting our ability to reconstruct this key feature of the in vivo ECM. Here we demonstrate a novel strategy for transglutaminase-mediated covalent linking of HA moieties to a synthetic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) macromer resulting in the formation of hybrid HA-PEG hydrogels. We characterize the ensuing matrix properties and demonstrate how these cytocompatible gels can serve to modulate the cellular phenotype of human mammary cancer epithelial cells as well as mouse myoblasts. The use of HA as a novel building block in the increasingly varied library of synthetic PEG-based artificial ECMs should have applications as a structural as well as a signaling component and offers significant potential as an injectable matrix for regenerative medicine. PMID:27014785

  5. Sustained Effect of Hyaluronic Acid in Subcutaneous Administration to the Cochlear Spiral Ganglion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Yozo; Fujioka, Masato; Kanzaki, Sho; Watanabe, Kotaro; Oishi, Naoki; Itakura, Go; Yasuda, Akimasa; Shibata, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hirotaka James; Okano, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    The spatiotemporal distribution of drugs in the inner ear cannot be precisely evaluated because of its small area and complex structure. In the present study, we used hyaluronic acid (HA)-dispersed luciferin to image transgenic mice and to determine the effect of HA on controlled drug delivery to the cochlea. GFAP-luc mice, which express luciferase in cochlear spiral ganglion cells, were subcutaneously administered HA-luciferin (HA-sc) or luciferin dissolved in saline (NS-sc) or intraperitoneally administered luciferin dissolved in saline (NS-ip). The bioluminescence of luciferin was monitored in vivo in real time. The peak time and half-life of fluorescence emission were significantly increased in HA-sc-treated mice compared with those in NS-sc- and NS-ip-treated mice; however, significant differences were not observed in peak photon counts. We detected differences in the pharmacokinetics of luciferin in the inner ear, including its sustained release, in the presence of HA. The results indicate the clinical potential of using HA for controlled drug delivery to the cochlea. PMID:27099926

  6. Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles modified with tumor-shedable hyaluronic acid as carriers for doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Sun, Yujie; Tian, Baocheng; Li, Keke; Wang, Lele; Liang, Yan; Han, Jingtian

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a CD44-targeted and redox-responsive drug delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) was synthesized by conjugating tumor-shedable hyaluronic acid (HA) on the surface of MSNs via disulfide bonds. Doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX·HCl) was physically encapsulated into HA modified MSNs (MSNs/SS/HA@DOX) as a model drug. MSNs/SS/HA@DOX (40nm) had a high drug loading (14.1%) and redox-responsive drug release property. The cellular uptake behaviors of MSNs/SS/HA@DOX by HeLa and LO2 cells were evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry (FCM). MSNs/SS/HA@DOX exhibited higher cellular uptake efficacy via CD44-mediated endocytosis by HeLa cells (CD44 over-expressed cells) than by LO2 cells (CD44 deficient cells). The in vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that MSNs/SS/HA@DOX exhibited higher cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than to LO2 cells. These results indicated that MSNs/SS/HA@DOX might be promising as a multifunctional drug delivery system to improve the anti-tumor efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:27107383

  7. Hyaluronic acid binding, endocytosis and degradation by sinusoidal liver endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGary, C.T.

    1988-01-01

    The binding, endocytosis, and degradation of {sup 125}I-hyaluronic acid ({sup 125}I-HA) by liver endothelial cells (LEC) was studied under several conditions. The dissociation of receptor-bound {sup 125}I-HA was rapid, with a half time of {approx}31 min and a K{sub off} of 6.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}/sec. A large reversible increase in {sup 125}I-HA binding to LEC at pH 5.0 was due to an increase in the observed affinity of the binding interaction. Pronase digestion suggested the protein nature of the receptor and the intracellular location of the digitonin exposed binding activity. Binding and endocytosis occur in the presence of 10 mM EGTA indicating that divalent cations are not required for receptor function. To study the degradation of {sup 125}I-HA by LEC, a cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) precipitation assay was characterized. The minimum HA length required for precipitation was elucidated. The fate of the LEC HA receptor after endocytosis was examined.

  8. Effect of hyaluronic acid in bone formation and its applications in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ningbo; Wang, Xin; Qin, Lei; Zhai, Min; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Ji; Li, Dehua

    2016-06-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), the simplest glycosaminoglycan, participates in several important biological procedures, including mediation of cellular signaling, regulation of cell adhesion and proliferation, and manipulation of cell differentiation. The effect of HA on cell proliferation and differentiation depends on its molecular weight (MW) and concentration. Moreover, the properties of high viscosity, elasticity, highly negative charge, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and nonimmunogenicity make HA attractive in tissue engineering and disease treatment. This review comprises an overview of the effect of HA on cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro, the role of HA in bone regeneration in vivo, and the clinical applications of HA in dentistry, focusing on the mechanism underlining the effect of MW and concentration of HA on cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. It is expected that practical progress of HA both in laboratory-based experiments and clinical applications will be achieved in the next few years. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1560-1569, 2016. PMID:27007721

  9. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy: Injection of Hyaluronic Acid to Better Preserve The Rectal Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) between the rectum and the prostate for reducing the dose to the rectal wall in a hypofractionated irradiation for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In a phase 2 study, 10 cc of HA was injected between the rectum and prostate. For 16 patients, the same intensity modulated radiation therapy plan (62 Gy in 20 fractions) was optimized on 2 computed tomography scans: CT1 (before injection) and CT2 (after injection). Rectal parameters were compared: dose to 2.5 cc (D2.5), 5 cc (D5), 10 cc (D10), 15 cc (D15), and 20 cc (D20) of rectal wall and volume of rectum covered by the 90% isodose line (V90), 80% (V80), 70% (V70), 60% (V60), and 50% (V50). Results: The mean V90, V80, V70, V60, and V50 values were reduced by 73.8% (P<.0001), 55.7% (P=.0003), 43.0% (P=.007), 34% (P=.002), and 25% (P=.036), respectively. The average values of D2.5, D5, D10, D15, and D20 were reduced by 8.5 Gy (P<.0001), 12.3 Gy (P<.0001), 8.4 Gy (P=.005), 3.7 Gy (P=.026), and 1.2 Gy (P=.25), respectively. Conclusions: The injection of HA significantly limited radiation doses to the rectal wall

  10. Topical Delivery of Hyaluronic Acid into Skin using SPACE-peptide Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Gupta, Vivek; Anselmo, Aaron C.; Muraski, John A.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Topical penetration of macromolecules into skin is limited by their low permeability. Here, we report the use of a skin penetrating peptide, SPACE peptide, to enhance topical delivery of a macromolecule, hyaluronic acid (HA, MW: 200–325 kDa). The peptide was conjugated to phospholipids and used to prepare an ethosomal carrier system (~110 nm diameter), encapsulating HA. The SPACE-ethosomal system (SES) enhanced HA penetration into porcine skin in vitro by 7.8+/−1.1-fold compared to PBS. The system also enhanced penetration of HA in human skin in vitro, penetrating deep into the epidermis and dermis in skin of both species. In vivo experiments performed using SKH1 hairless mice also confirmed increased dermal penetration of HA using the delivery system; a 5-fold enhancement in penetration was found compared to PBS control. Concentrations of HA in skin were about 1000-fold higher than those in blood; confirming the localized nature of HA delivery into skin. The SPACE-ethosomal delivery system provides a formulation for topical delivery of macromolecules that are otherwise difficult to deliver into skin. PMID:24129342

  11. Chitosan-hyaluronic acid/nano silver composite sponges for drug resistant bacteria infected diabetic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisha, B S; Biswas, Raja; Chennazhi, K P; Jayakumar, R

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an antimicrobial sponge composed of chitosan, hyaluronic acid (HA) and nano silver (nAg) as a wound dressing for diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) infected with drug resistant bacteria. nAg (5-20 nm) was prepared and characterized. The nanocomposite sponges were prepared by homogenous mixing of chitosan, HA and nAg followed by freeze drying to obtain a flexible and porous structure. The prepared sponges were characterized using SEM and FT-IR. The porosity, swelling, biodegradation and haemostatic potential of the sponges were also studied. Antibacterial activity of the prepared sponges was analysed using Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia. Chitosan-HA/nAg composite sponges showed potent antimicrobial property against the tested organisms. Sponges containing higher nAg (0.005%, 0.01% and 0.02%) concentrations showed antibacterial activity against MRSA. Cytotoxicity and cell attachment studies were done using human dermal fibroblast cells. The nanocomposite sponges showed a nAg concentration dependent toxicity towards fibroblast cells. Our results suggest that this nanocomposite sponges could be used as a potential material for wound dressing for DFU infected with antibiotic resistant bacteria if the optimal concentration of nAg exhibiting antibacterial action with least toxicity towards mammalian cells is identified. PMID:24060281

  12. Coating Solid Lipid Nanoparticles with Hyaluronic Acid Enhances Antitumor Activity against Melanoma Stem-like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hongxin; Shi, Sanjun; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Successful anticancer chemotherapy requires targeting tumors efficiently and further potential to eliminate cancer stem cell (CSC) subpopulations. Since CD44 is present on many types of CSCs, and it binds specially to hyaluronic acid (HA), we tested whether coating solid lipid nanoparticles with hyaluronan (HA-SLNs)would allow targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to CD44-overexpressing B16F10 melanoma cells. First, we developed a model system based on melanoma stem-like cells for experiments in vitro and in mouse xenografts, and we showed that cells expressing high levels of CD44 (CD44+) displayed a strong CSC phenotype while cells expressing low levels of CD44 (CD44-) did not. This phenotype included sphere and colony formation, higher proportion of side population cells, expression of CSC-related markers (ALDH, CD133, Oct-4) and tumorigenicity in vivo. Next we showed that administering PTX-loaded HA-SLNs led to efficient intracellular delivery of PTX and induced substantial apoptosis in CD44+ cells in vitro. In the B16F10-CD44+ lung metastasis model, PTX-loaded HA-SLNs targeted the tumor-bearing lung tissues well and subsequently exhibited significant antitumor effects with a relative low dose of PTX, which provided significant survival benefit without evidence of adverse events. These findings suggest that the HA-SLNs targeting system shows promise for enhancing cancer therapy. PMID:25897340

  13. Amphiphilic hyaluronic acid derivatives toward the design of micelles for the sustained delivery of hydrophobic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayol, Laura; Biondi, Marco; Russo, Luisa; Malle, Birgitte M; Schwach-Abdellaoui, Khadija; Borzacchiello, Assunta

    2014-02-15

    The idea of this study was to combine hyaluronic acid (HA) viscosupplementation and a local/controlled delivery of a hydrophobic anti-inflammatory drug. To this aim, we investigated the ability of an octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA) modified HA (OSA-HA), to act as a solubility enhancer and as a platform for slow release of hydrophobic drug(s). This novel HA derivative could act as a viscosupplementation agent and, for this reason, a rheological study was conducted along with calorimetric analysis. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results revealed that the ability of HA to sequester water is enhanced by the introduction of lipophilic functions within HA molecules, resulting in a decrease of the fraction of free water able to freeze compared to the unmodified HA. Moreover, OSA-HA solutions appear to be an appropriate tool to be used in viscosupplementation therapy owing to their suitable viscoelastic features. Our results indicate that OSA-HA is able to self-assemble into micelles, load a hydrophobic drug and release the active molecule with controlled kinetics. In particular, the analysis of release profiles showed that, in all cases, drug diffusion into the gel is faster compared to gel/drug dissolution, being the dissolution contribution more relevant as the OSA-HA concentration increases. PMID:24507262

  14. Self assembled hyaluronic acid nanoparticles as a potential carrier for targeting the inflamed intestinal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaei, Seyed Yaser; Esmaeili, Motahareh; Amini, Mohsen; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ostad, Seyed Naser; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2016-06-25

    To develop a nanoparticulate drug carrier for targeting of the inflamed intestinal mucosa, amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugates were synthesized, which could form self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous solution and budesonide (BDS) was loaded into the HANPs. Their particle sizes were in the range of 177 to 293nm with negative surface charge. The model of inflammatory CACO-2 cells was utilized to investigate the therapeutic potential of budesonide loaded HA nanocarriers. The highest expression of CD44 receptors was found on inflamed Caco-2 cells, as determined by flow cytometry. FITC-labeled HANPs revealed greater uptake in inflamed CACO-2 cells compared to untreated CACO-2 and CD44-negative cell lines, NIH3T3. BDS loaded HANPs displayed almost no toxicity indicating HANPs are excellent biocompatible nano-carriers. BDS loaded HANPs demonstrated higher anti-inflammatory effect on IL-8 and TNF-α secretion in inflamed cell model compared to the same dose of free drug. These results revealed the promising potential of HA nanoparticles as a targeted drug delivery system for IBD treatment. PMID:27083829

  15. Tumor spheroid assembly on hyaluronic acid-based structures: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marco P; Costa, Elisabete C; Miguel, Sónia P; Correia, Ilídio J

    2016-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell culture is the main methodology used for screening anticancer therapeutics. However, these 2D cellular models misrepresent the architecture of native tumors, leading, in some cases, to unsuccessful prediction of cancer cell response to drugs. To overcome such limitations, cell growth in three dimensions (3D) arises as an alternative to reproduce in vitro the cellular arrangement found in tumors. Among the 3D cancer models developed so far, spheroids are the most attractive since these are cellular aggregates that broadly mimic many features of solid tumors affecting humans, like cell-cell interactions. One of the most applied techniques for producing spheroids is the liquid overlay technique, in which cells aggregate due to their limited adhesion to certain biomaterials, usually agarose or agar. Recently, the suitability of hyaluronic acid (HA) for spheroids assembly and HA-cell surface receptor interactions has been investigated. Ergo, this review gathers a summary of different studies where HA-based structures were developed and used for tumor spheroids production in order to be used in vitro as reliable 3D tumor models for therapeutic screening purposes. PMID:27312623

  16. Science of Hyaluronic Acid Beyond Filling: Fibroblasts and Their Response to the Extracellular Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Marina; Fagien, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Loss of viscoelasticity is one of the primarily signs of skin aging, followed by appearance of visible wrinkles. Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based fillers are widely used to fill wrinkles and compensate for volume loss. Recent clinical observations demonstrate persistence of the filling effect longer than the biological availability of the filler. Stimulation of new collagen by cross-linked HA and up-regulation of elastin have been suggested as possible explanation to this observation and have been supported experimentally. Cross-linked HA substitutes for fragmented collagen in restoring extracellular matrix required for normal activity of fibroblasts, such as collagen and elastin production. To restore extracellular matrix efficiently, serial monthly treatments are required. Boosting of facial and nonfacial skin through fibroblast activation is a new indication for HA-based products. Injectable HA has also been recently registered in Europe as agents specific for the improvement of skin quality (Restylane Skinboosters). Further explanation of the possible mechanisms supported by long-term clinical examples is presented herein. PMID:26441098

  17. An injectable hyaluronic acid-tyramine hydrogel system for protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Fan; Chung, Joo Eun; Kurisawa, Motoichi

    2009-03-19

    Previously, we reported the independent tuning of mechanical strength (crosslinking density) and gelation rate of an injectable hydrogel system composed of hyaluronic acid-tyramine (HA-Tyr) conjugates. The hydrogels were formed through the oxidative coupling of tyramines which was catalyzed by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Herein, we studied the encapsulation and release of model proteins using the HA-Tyr hydrogel. It was shown that the rapid gelation achieved by an optimal concentration of HRP could effectively encapsulate the proteins within the hydrogel network and thus prevented the undesired leakage of proteins into the surrounding tissues after injection. Hydrogels with different mechanical strengths were formed by changing the concentration of H(2)O(2) while maintaining the rapid gelation rate. The mechanical strength of the hydrogel controlled the release rate of proteins: stiff hydrogels released proteins slower compared to weak hydrogels. In phosphate buffer saline, alpha-amylase (negatively charged) was released sustainably from the hydrogel. Conversely, the release of lysozyme (positively charged) discontinued after the fourth hour due to electrostatic interactions with HA. In the presence of hyaluronidase, lysozymes were released continuously and completely from the hydrogel due to degradation of the hydrogel network. The activities of the released proteins were mostly retained which suggested that the HA-Tyr hydrogel is a suitable injectable and biodegradable system for the delivery of therapeutic proteins. PMID:19121348

  18. Injectable hyaluronic acid-dextran hydrogels and effects of implantation in ferret vocal fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ying; Kobler, James B; Heaton, James T; Jia, Xinqiao; Zeitels, Steven M; Langer, Robert

    2010-05-01

    Injectable hydrogels may potentially be used for augmentation/regeneration of the lamina propria of vocal fold tissue. In this study, hyaluronic acid (HA) and dextran were chemically modified and subsequently crosslinked via formation of hydrazone bonds in phosphate buffer. Swelling ratios, degradation, and compressive moduli of the resulting hydrogels were investigated. It was found that the properties of HA-dextran hydrogels were variable and the trend of variation could be correlated with the hydrogel composition. The biocompatibility of three injectable HA-dextran hydrogels with different crosslinking density was assessed in the vocal fold region using a ferret model. It was found that HA-dextran hydrogels implanted for three weeks stimulated mild foreign-body reactions. Distinct tissue-material interactions were also observed for hydrogels made from different formulations: the hydrogel with the lowest crosslinking density was completely degraded in vivo; while material residues were visible for other types of hydrogel injections, with or without cell penetration into the implantation depending on the hydrogel composition. The in vivo results suggest that the HA-dextran hydrogel matrices can be further developed for applications of vocal fold tissue restoration. PMID:20151459

  19. Comparison of chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic Acid doped conductive polypyrrole films for adipose stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björninen, Miina; Siljander, Aliisa; Pelto, Jani; Hyttinen, Jari; Kellomäki, Minna; Miettinen, Susanna; Seppänen, Riitta; Haimi, Suvi

    2014-09-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) is a conductive polymer that has aroused interest due to its biocompatibility with several cell types and high tailorability as an electroconductive scaffold coating. This study compares the effect of hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) doped PPy films on human adipose stem cells (hASCs) under electrical stimulation. The PPy films were synthetized electrochemically. The surface morphology of PPy-HA and PPy-CS was characterized by an atomic force microscope. A pulsed biphasic electric current (BEC) was applied via PPy films non-stimulated samples acting as controls. Viability, attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hASCs were evaluated by live/dead staining, DNA content, Alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization assays. Human ASCs grew as a homogenous cell sheet on PPy-CS surfaces, whereas on PPy-HA cells clustered into small spherical structures. PPy-CS supported hASC proliferation significantly better than PPy-HA at the 7 day time point. Both substrates equally triggered early osteogenic differentiation of hASCs, although mineralization was significantly induced on PPy-CS compared to PPy-HA under BEC. These differences may be due to different surface morphologies originating from the CS and HA dopants. Our results suggest that PPy-CS in particular is a potential osteogenic scaffold coating for bone tissue engineering. PMID:24823653

  20. Structural Analysis and Mechanical Characterization of Hyaluronic Acid-Based Doubly Cross-Linked Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Amit K; Hule, Rohan A; Jiao, Tong; Teller, Sean S; Clifton, Rodney J; Duncan, Randall L; Pochan, Darrin J; Jia, Xinqiao

    2009-01-01

    We have created a new class of hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogel materials with HA hydrogel particles (HGPs) embedded in and covalently cross-linked to a secondary network. HA HGPs with an average diameter of ∼900 nm and narrow particle size distribution were synthesized using a refined reverse micelle polymerization technique. The average mesh size of the HGPs was estimated to be approximately 5.5 to 7.0 nm by a protein uptake experiment. Sodium periodate oxidation not only introduced aldehyde groups to the particles but also reduced the average particle size. The aldehyde groups generated were used as reactive handles for subsequent cross-linking with an HA derivative containing hydrazide groups. The resulting macroscopic gels contain two distinct hierarchical networks (doubly cross-linked networks, DXNs): one within individual particles and another among different particles. Bulk gels (BGs) formed by direct mixing of HA derivatives with mutually reactive groups were included for comparison. The hydrogel microstructures were collectively characterized by microscopy and neutron scattering techniques. Their viscoelasticity was quantified at low frequencies (0.1-10 Hz) using a controlled stress rheometer and at high frequencies (up to 200 Hz) with a home-built torsional wave apparatus. Both BGs and DXNs are stable elastic gels that become stiffer at higher frequencies. The HA-based DXN offers unique structural hierarchy and mechanical properties that are suitable for soft tissue regeneration. PMID:20046226

  1. In vitro biocompatibility of chitosan/hyaluronic acid-containing calcium phosphate bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesaraki, Saeed; Nezafati, Nader

    2014-08-01

    The need for bone repair has increased as the population ages. In this research, calcium phosphate cements, with and without chitosan (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA), were synthesized. The composition and morphological properties of cements were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The acellular in vitro bioactivity revealed that different apatite morphologies were formed on the surfaces of cements after soaking in simulated body fluid. The in vitro osteoblastic cell biocompatibility of in situ forming cements was evaluated and compared with those of conventional calcium phosphate cements (CPCs). The viability and growth rate of the cells were similar for all CPCs, but better alkaline phosphatase activity was observed for CPC with CS and HA. Calcium phosphate cements supported attachment of osteoblastic cells on their surfaces. Spindle-shaped osteoblasts with developed cytoplasmic membrane were found on the surfaces of cement samples after 7 days of culture. These results reveal the potential of the CPC-CS/HA composites to be used in bone tissue engineering. PMID:24399509

  2. Chasing bacteria within the cells using levofloxacin-loaded hyaluronic acid nanohydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, E; D'Arrigo, G; Di Meo, C; Virga, A; Coviello, T; Passariello, C; Matricardi, P

    2014-08-01

    In the present work, an innovative approach based on the delivery of levofloxacin (LVF) from polysaccharide nanohydrogels for the treatment of bacterial intracellular infections is described. The nanohydrogels (NHs) were obtained by self-assembling of the hyaluronic acid-cholesterol amphiphilic chains in aqueous environment. LVF, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic scarcely efficient in intracellular infections, was entrapped within such NHs by nanoprecipitation, thus forming a drug delivery system (LVF-NHs) that was tested for its activity on different bacteria strains. The MIC values of levofloxacin-loaded nanohydrogels were determined for Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains and compared to those obtained using free LVF. The intracellular antimicrobial activity of LVF-NHs and free LVF was compared on HeLa epithelial cell line infected by the above mentioned bacteria, and the increase in antibacterial efficacy of LVF-NHs with respect to that of free LVF was evidenced. The obtained results allow to conclude that this new approach can be considered as really promising method for intracellular infection treatments. PMID:24642185

  3. Electrosprayed nanocomposites based on hyaluronic acid derivative and Soluplus for tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Song Yi; Lee, Jeong-Jun; Park, Ju-Hwan; Lee, Jae-Young; Ko, Seung-Hak; Shim, Jae-Seong; Lee, Jongkook; Heo, Moon Young; Kim, Dae-Duk; Cho, Hyun-Jong

    2016-09-01

    Nanocomposite (NC) based on hyaluronic acid-ceramide (HACE) and Soluplus (SP) was fabricated by electrospraying for the tumor-targeted delivery of resveratrol (RSV). Amphiphilic property of both HACE and SP has been used to entrap RSV in the internal cavity of NC. Electrospraying with established experimental conditions produced HACE/SP/RSV NC with 230nm mean diameter, narrow size distribution, negative zeta potential, and >80% drug entrapment efficiency. Sustained and pH-dependent drug release profiles were observed in drug release test. Cellular uptake efficiency of HACE/SP NC was higher than that of SP NC, mainly based on HA-CD44 receptor interaction, in MDA-MB-231 (CD44 receptor-positive human breast cancer) cells. Selective tumor targetability of HACE/SP NC, compared to SP NC, was also confirmed in MDA-MB-231 tumor-xenograted mouse model using a near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging. According to the results of pharmacokinetic study in rats, decreased in vivo clearance and increased half-life of RSV in NC group, compared to drug solution group, were shown. Given that these experimental results, developed HACE/SP NC can be a promising theranostic nanosystem for CD44 receptor-expressed cancers. PMID:27208440

  4. High-titer biosynthesis of hyaluronic acid by recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fangyu; Gong, Qianying; Yu, Huimin; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) plays important roles in human tissue system, thus it is highly desirable for various applications, such as in medical, clinic and cosmetic fields. The wild microbial producer of HA, streptococcus, was restricted by its potential pathogens, hence different recombinant hosts are being explored. In this work, we engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum, a GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) organism free of exotoxins and endotoxins to produce HA with high titer and satisfied Mw . The ssehasA gene encoding hyaluronan synthase (HasA) was artificially synthesized with codon preference of C. glutamicum. Other genes involved in the HA synthetic pathway were directly cloned from the C. glutamicum genome. The operon structures and constitutive or inducible promoters were particularly compared and the preferred environmental conditions were also optimized. Using glucose and corn syrup powder as carbon and nitrogen sources, batch cultures of the engineered C.glutamicum with operon ssehasA-hasB driven by Ptac promoter were performed in a 5 L fermentor. The maximal HA titer, productivity and yield reached 8.3 g/L, 0.24 g/L/h and 0.22 gHA/gGlucose, respectively; meanwhile the maximal Mw was 1.30 MDa. This work provides a safe and efficient novel producer of HA with huge industrial prospects. PMID:26709615

  5. Antimicrobial Hyaluronic Acid-Cefoxitin Sodium Thin Films Produced by Electrospraying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahire, Jayesh J; Dicks, Leon M T

    2016-08-01

    The healing properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) in the recovery of wounds are well known. Cefoxitin (Cef), a cephalosporin antibiotic, is generally used to prevent and treat postoperative infections. In this study, we describe the incorporation of Cef in HA thin films (Cef-HAF) by using electrospraying. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that HA-containing thin films (HAF) were composed of numerous nanoparticles (255 ± 177 nm in diameter) with irregular surfaces, connected to each other with nanofibers of 50 ± 11 nm in diameter. Cef-HAF contained fewer, but larger, particles (551 ± 293 nm) with smooth surfaces and were interconnected with nanofibers of 61 ± 13 nm in diameter. Differences in surface morphology between HAF and Cef-HAF were confirmed by atomic force microscopy. Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that Cef was not modified when incorporated into Cef-HAF and remained active against Klebsiella pneumoniae Xen 39, Staphylococcus aureus Xen 36 and Listeria monocytogenes EDGe. Nanofiber scaffolds of HA-containing Cef may be used in dressings to control postoperative infections. PMID:27146506

  6. Electroactivity and biocompatibility of polypyrrole-hyaluronic acid multi-walled carbon nanotube composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelto, Jani; Haimi, Suvi; Puukilainen, Esa; Whitten, Philip G; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Bahrami-Samani, Mehrdad; Ritala, Mikko; Vuorinen, Tommi

    2010-06-01

    Electroactivity of polypyrrole hyaluronic acid, electropolymerized in the presence of oxidized carbon nanotubes (PPyHA-CNT) was studied in situ by electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) in physiological electrolyte solution. In situ Raman spectroscopic and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies were conducted on layers of the polymer grown on AT-cut 5 MHz quartz crystals. Human adipose stem cell (ASC) attachment and viability were studied by Live/Dead staining, and the proliferation was evaluated by WST-1 Cell proliferation assay for polypyrrole samples electropolymerized on titanium. According to cyclic voltammetry, the measured specific capacitance of the material on gold is roughly 20% of the reference polypyrrole dodecylbenzene sulfonate (PPyDBS). Electrochemical-QCM (EC-QCM) analysis of a 210-nm thick film reveals that the material is very soft G' approximately 100 kPa and swells upon reduction. EC-AFM of samples polymerized on microelectrodes show that there are areas of varying electroactivity, especially for samples without a hydrophopic backing PPyDBS layer. AFM line scans show typically 20-25% thickness change during electrochemical reduction. Raman spectroscopic analysis suggests that the material supports noticeable polaron conduction. Biocompatibility study of the PPyHA-CNT on titanium with adipose stem cells showed equal or better cell attachment, viability, and proliferation compared with the reference polylactide. PMID:19753624

  7. Current approach to male infertility treatment: sperm selection procedure based on hyaluronic acid binding ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zobova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracytoplasmic sperm injection into an oocyte is widely used throughout the world in assisted reproductive technologies programs in the presence of male infertility factor. However, this approach can allow selection of a single sperm, which is carrying different types of pathologies. Minimizing of any potential risks, entailing the occurrence of abnormalities in the embryos development (apoptosis, fragmentation of embryos, alterations in gene expression, aneuploidies is a very important condition for reducing the potential negative consequences resulting the manipulation with gametes. Processes that could be influenced by the embryologist must be fulfilled in safe and physiological way as much as it is possible. Data of numerous publications reporting about the positive effects of using the technology of sperm selection by hyaluronic acid binding, let make a conclusion about the high prospects of this approach in the treatment of male infertility by methods of in vitro fertilization. The selection of sperm with improved characteristics, which determine the maturity and genetic integrity, provides an opportunity to improve the parameters of pre-implantation embryogenesis, having thus a positive effect on clinical outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies programs.

  8. Tough and elastic hydrogel of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate as potential cell scaffold materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yilu; Tang, Zhurong; Cao, Wanxu; Lin, Hai; Fan, Yujiang; Guo, Likun; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-03-01

    Natural polysaccharides are extensively investigated as cell scaffold materials for cellular adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation due to their excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, and biofunctions. However, their application is often severely limited by their mechanical behavior. In this study, a tough and elastic hydrogel scaffold was prepared with hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS). HA and CS were conjugated with tyramine (TA) and the degree of substitution (DS) was 10.7% and 11.3%, respectively, as calculated by (1)H NMR spectra. The hydrogel was prepared by mixing HA-TA and CS-TA in presence of H2O2 and HRP. The sectional morphology of hydrogels was observed by SEM, static and dynamic mechanical properties were analyzed by Shimadzu electromechanical testing machine and dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer Q800. All samples showed good ability to recover their appearances after deformation, the storage modulus (E') of hydrogels became higher as the testing frequency went up. Hydrogels also showed fatigue resistance to cyclic compression. Mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in hydrogels showed good cell viability as detected by CLSM. This study suggests that the hydrogels have both good mechanical properties and biocompatibility, and may serve as model systems to explore mechanisms of deformation and energy dissipation or find some applications in tissue engineering. PMID:25445680

  9. Target-specific intracellular delivery of siRNA using degradable hyaluronic acid nanogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyukjin; Mok, Hyejung; Lee, Soohyeon; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Park, Tae Gwan

    2007-06-01

    Novel hyaluronic acid (HA) nanogels physically encapsulating small interfering RNA (siRNA) were fabricated by an inverse water-in-oil emulsion method. Thiol-conjugated HA dissolved in aqueous emulsion droplets was ultrasonically crosslinked via the formation of disulfide linkages to produce HA nanogels with a size distribution from 200 to 500 nm. Green fluorescence protein (GFP) siRNA was physically entrapped within the HA nanogels during the emulsion/crosslinking process. The HA/siRNA nanogels were readily taken up by HA receptor positive cells (HCT-116 cells) having HA-specific CD44 receptors on the surface. Release rates of siRNA from the HA nanogels could be modulated by changing the concentration of glutathione (GSH) in the buffer solution, indicating that the degradation/erosion of disulfide crosslinked HA nanogels, triggered by an intracellular reductive agent, controlled the release pattern of siRNA. When HA nanogels containing GFP siRNA were co-transfected with GFP plasmid/Lipofectamine to HCT-116 cells, a significant extent of GFP gene silencing was observed in both serum and non-serum conditions. The gene silencing effect was reduced in the presence of free HA in the transfection medium, revealing that HA nanogels were selectively taken up by HCT-116 cells via receptor mediated endocytosis. PMID:17408798

  10. Hyaluronic acid production and hyaluronidase activity in the newt iris during lens regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of lens regeneration in newts involves the dedifferentiation of pigmented iris epithelial cells and their subsequent conversion into lens fibers. In vivo this cell-type conversion is restricted to the dorsal region of the iris. We have examined the patterns of hyaluronate accumulation and endogenous hyaluronidase activity in the newt iris during the course of lens regeneration in vivo. Accumulation of newly synthesized hyaluronate was estimated from the uptake of [3H]glucosamine into cetylpyridinium chloride-precipitable material that was sensitive to Streptomyces hyaluronidase. Endogenous hyaluronidase activity was determined from the quantity of reducing N-acetylhexosamine released upon incubation of iris tissue extract with exogenous hyaluronate substrate. We found that incorporation of label into hyaluronate was consistently higher in the regeneration-activated irises of lentectomized eyes than in control irises from sham-operated eyes. Hyaluronate labeling was higher in the dorsal (lens-forming) region of the iris than in ventral (non-lens-forming) iris tissue during the regeneration process. Label accumulation into hyaluronate was maximum between 10 and 15 days after lentectomy, the period of most pronounced dedifferentiation in the dorsal iris epithelium. Both normal and regenerating irises demonstrated a high level of endogenous hyaluronidase activity with a pH optimum of 3.5-4.0. Hyaluronidase activity was 1.7 to 2 times higher in dorsal iris tissue than in ventral irises both prior to lentectomy and throughout the regeneration process. We suggest that enhanced hyaluronate accumulation may facilitate the dedifferentiation of iris epithelial cells in the dorsal iris and prevent precocious withdrawal from the cell cycle. The high level of hyaluronidase activity in the dorsal iris may promote the turnover and remodeling of extracellular matrix components required for cell-type conversion

  11. Hyaluronic acid production and hyaluronidase activity in the newt iris during lens regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulyk, W.M.; Zalik, S.E.; Dimitrov, E.

    1987-09-01

    The process of lens regeneration in newts involves the dedifferentiation of pigmented iris epithelial cells and their subsequent conversion into lens fibers. In vivo this cell-type conversion is restricted to the dorsal region of the iris. We have examined the patterns of hyaluronate accumulation and endogenous hyaluronidase activity in the newt iris during the course of lens regeneration in vivo. Accumulation of newly synthesized hyaluronate was estimated from the uptake of (/sup 3/H)glucosamine into cetylpyridinium chloride-precipitable material that was sensitive to Streptomyces hyaluronidase. Endogenous hyaluronidase activity was determined from the quantity of reducing N-acetylhexosamine released upon incubation of iris tissue extract with exogenous hyaluronate substrate. We found that incorporation of label into hyaluronate was consistently higher in the regeneration-activated irises of lentectomized eyes than in control irises from sham-operated eyes. Hyaluronate labeling was higher in the dorsal (lens-forming) region of the iris than in ventral (non-lens-forming) iris tissue during the regeneration process. Label accumulation into hyaluronate was maximum between 10 and 15 days after lentectomy, the period of most pronounced dedifferentiation in the dorsal iris epithelium. Both normal and regenerating irises demonstrated a high level of endogenous hyaluronidase activity with a pH optimum of 3.5-4.0. Hyaluronidase activity was 1.7 to 2 times higher in dorsal iris tissue than in ventral irises both prior to lentectomy and throughout the regeneration process. We suggest that enhanced hyaluronate accumulation may facilitate the dedifferentiation of iris epithelial cells in the dorsal iris and prevent precocious withdrawal from the cell cycle. The high level of hyaluronidase activity in the dorsal iris may promote the turnover and remodeling of extracellular matrix components required for cell-type conversion.

  12. Hyaluronic acid based hydroxamate and conjugates with biologically active amines: In vitro effect on matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponedel'kina, Irina Yu; Gaskarova, Aigul R; Khaybrakhmanova, Elvira A; Lukina, Elena S; Odinokov, Victor N

    2016-06-25

    In this study, water soluble hyaluronic acid (HA) based hydroxamate and conjugates with biologically active amines and hydrazides such as p- and o-aminophenols, anthranilic, 4- and 5-aminosalicylic acids, nicotinic, N-benzylnicotinic and isonicotinic hydrazides, p-aminobenzenesulfonamide (Streptocide), p-aminobenzoic acid diethylaminoethyl ester (Procaine), and 4-amino-2,3-dimethyl-1-phenyl-3-pyrazolin-5-one (4-aminoantipyrene) were examined as matrix metalloproteinase-2 inhibitors (MMPIs). In a dose of 0.27-270μM, the most efficient MMPIs were HA conjugates with o-aminophenol=4-aminoantipyrine>4-aminosalicylic acid>5-aminosalicylic acid. Conjugates with Streptocide, Procaine and HA hydroxamate showed 40-50% inhibitory effect at all used concentrations. Conjugates with anthranilic acid and isonicotinic hydrazide (Isoniazid) in a dose of 0.27μM inhibited enzyme activity by ∼70%, but with the concentration increase their inhibitory effect was decreased. PMID:27083788

  13. Reparative regeneration of cornea at nanostructured biopolymer of hyaluronic acid application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Kanyukov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose. Estimation of corneal reparative regeneration processes course at application of bioplastic material – nanostructured biopolymer of hyaluronic acid on the model of chemical (alkaline and acid cornea burn. Material and methods. Experimental modeling of cornea chemical burn was carried out on 36 rabbits (72 eyes. The study had two series of cornea burn: alkaline (18 rabbits – 36 eyes and acid (18 rabbits – 36 eyes corneal burns. In each of the series there was identified: an experimental group, which used the applique of bioplastic material «hyamatrix» according to the method of prof. V.N. Kanyukov and control one with Solcoseryl instillations. The clinical study included an examination of the eye anterior segment using the focus and side lighting and photographic recording. At the of period of 3, 7, 14, 30 and 90 days the animals were removed from the experiment for the light-optical, immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy studies. Results. At conducting «hyamatrix» application conjunctiva edema and injection, corneal edema were reversed faster that reduced neovascularization risk in the outcome of corneal alkaline burn. Morphological studies at different periods of the experiment made it possible to determine the sequence of processes from the moment of cornea chemical burns application until the completion of its restoration, which were different in the experimental and control groups. Symptoms of toxic effect of the damaged cells decay products were determined morphologically. Endothelial cells remained intact. The use of «hyamatrix» application allowed reducing the recovery time with the improvement of cornea reparative processes. Conclusion. 1. Application of bioplastic material to the cornea in the early stages of cornea injuries treatment (alkaline and acid burn reduces the severity of edema and hyperemia, and as a result reduces the exudative phase of inflammation. 2. As a result of clinical and

  14. Hyaluronic acid production by Streptococcus zooepidemicus in marine by-products media from mussel processing wastewaters and tuna peptone viscera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murado Miguel A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyaluronic acid is one of the biopolymers most commonly used by the pharmaceutical industry. Thus, there is an increasing number of recent works that deal with the production of microbial hyaluronic acid. Different properties and characteristics of the fermentation process have been extensively optimised; however, new carbon and protein sources obtained from by-products or cheap substrates have not yet been studied. Results Mussel processing wastewater (MPW was used as a sugar source and tuna peptone (TP from viscera residue as a protein substrate for the production of hyaluronic acid (HA, biomass and lactic acid (LA by Streptococcus zooepidemicus in batch fermentation. Commercial medium formulated with glucose and tryptone was used as the control. The parametric estimations obtained from logistic equations and maintenance energy model utilized for modelling experimental data were compared in commercial and low-cost media. Complete residual media achieved high production (3.67, 2.46 and 30.83 g l-1 of biomass, HA and LA respectively and a high molecular weight of HA (approximately 2500 kDa. A simple economic analysis highlighted the potential viability of this marine media for reducing the production costs by more than 50%. Conclusions The experimental data and mathematical descriptions reported in this article demonstrate the potential of media formulated with MPW and TP to be used as substrates for HA production by S. zooepidemicus. Furthermore, the proposed equations accurately simulated the experimental profiles and generated a set of interesting parameters that can be used to compare the different bacterial cultures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work in which a culture media formed by marine by-products has been successfully used for microbial HA production.

  15. CdS and ZnS quantum dots embedded in hyaluronic acid films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatryan, G.; Khachatryan, K. [Department of Chemistry, Agricultural University, Balicka 122, 30-149 Krakow (Poland); Stobinski, L. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 48/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Woloska 141, 02-507 Warszawa (Poland)], E-mail: lstob@ichf.edu.pl; Tomasik, P.; Fiedorowicz, M. [Department of Chemistry, Agricultural University, Balicka 122, 30-149 Krakow (Poland); Lin, H.M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tatung University, Taipei 104, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2009-07-29

    An in situ synthesis of ZnS and CdS quantum dots (QDs) in an aqueous solution of sodium hyaluronate (Hyal) produced foils emitting light on excitation with a UV light. The wavelength of emission was only slightly QDs size and more QDs concentration dependent and reached up to {approx}320 nm in the case of ZnS and {approx}400-450 nm in the case of CdS. Nanoparticles remained as non-agglomerated 10-20 nm nanoclusters. CdS/Hyal and ZnS/Hyal-QDs biocomposites were characterized using photoluminescence (PL), IR spectrometric techniques, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The absolute molecular weights, radii of gyration, R{sub g}, and thermodynamic properties of the obtained foils are given. Electric resistivity studies performed for the hyaluronic foil in the 100-1000 V range have revealed that the hyaluronate foil has very weak conducting properties and QDs only insignificantly affect those properties as QDs practically did not interact with the foil. Size exclusion chromatography showed a decrease in the molecular weight of the hyaluronate after generation of QDs in its solution, particularly in the lower molecular fraction of the hyaluronate. The generation of CdS QDs was more destructive for the polysaccharide matrix.

  16. CdS and ZnS quantum dots embedded in hyaluronic acid films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in situ synthesis of ZnS and CdS quantum dots (QDs) in an aqueous solution of sodium hyaluronate (Hyal) produced foils emitting light on excitation with a UV light. The wavelength of emission was only slightly QDs size and more QDs concentration dependent and reached up to ∼320 nm in the case of ZnS and ∼400-450 nm in the case of CdS. Nanoparticles remained as non-agglomerated 10-20 nm nanoclusters. CdS/Hyal and ZnS/Hyal-QDs biocomposites were characterized using photoluminescence (PL), IR spectrometric techniques, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The absolute molecular weights, radii of gyration, Rg, and thermodynamic properties of the obtained foils are given. Electric resistivity studies performed for the hyaluronic foil in the 100-1000 V range have revealed that the hyaluronate foil has very weak conducting properties and QDs only insignificantly affect those properties as QDs practically did not interact with the foil. Size exclusion chromatography showed a decrease in the molecular weight of the hyaluronate after generation of QDs in its solution, particularly in the lower molecular fraction of the hyaluronate. The generation of CdS QDs was more destructive for the polysaccharide matrix.

  17. Design, preparation and characterization of novel poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid-hyaluronic acid implants containing triptorelin acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nersi Jafary Omid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormones and their derivatives are widely used to treat different types of diseases such as prostate cancer which is treated by agonists of gonadotropin-releasing hormone. Triptoreline salts are the first therapeutics of this group launched into the market in the form of microparticles (microspheres. Implants, as one of attractive injectable dosage forms, have many advantages over multi-particulate systems. Some of these advantages are dose adjustability, drug absorption improvement, constant release profile, etc. In this research, a new composite of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid and hyaluronic acid was designed and prepared in the form of implants containing triptorelin acetate for administration as an injection under the skin (subcutaneously in arm or thigh area. The manufactured implants characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermas gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy to assess different aspects of structure and morphology. The drug release profile was assessed by high performance liquid chromatography. These characterizations confirmed that the newly designed drug delivery has a good stability during manufacturing process. The release pattern of the implant was also studied and revealed that the release of the model drug follows a zero-order and erosion mechanism. The compatibility between the components of the newly designed implants and the release profile of the delivery system make it a promising device for drug delivery.

  18. Dual Enzyme-Responsive Capsules of Hyaluronic Acid-block-Poly(Lactic Acid) for Sensing Bacterial Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tücking, Katrin-Stephanie; Grützner, Verena; Unger, Ronald E; Schönherr, Holger

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of novel amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HYA) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) block copolymers is reported as the key element of a strategy to detect the presence of pathogenic bacterial enzymes. In addition to the formation of defined HYA-block-PLA assemblies, the encapsulation of fluorescent reporter dyes and the selective enzymatic degradation of the capsules by hyaluronidase and proteinase K are studied. The synthesis of the dual enzyme-responsive HYA-b-PLA is carried out by copper-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The resulting copolymers are assembled in water to form vesicular structures, which are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). DLS measurements show that both enzymes cause a rapid decrease in the hydrodynamic diameter of the nanocapsules. Fluorescence spectroscopy data confirm the liberation of encapsulated dye, which indicates the disintegration of the capsules and validates the concept of enzymatically triggered payload release. Finally, cytotoxicity assays confirm that the HYA-b-PLA nanocapsules are biocompatible with primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:25940300

  19. Hyaluronic acid-functionalized polymeric nanoparticles for colon cancer-targeted combination chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Han, Moon Kwon; Viennois, Emilie; Wang, Lixin; Zhang, Mingzhen; Si, Xiaoying; Merlin, Didier

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticle (NP)-based combination chemotherapy has been proposed as an effective strategy for achieving synergistic effects and targeted drug delivery for colon cancer therapy. Here, we fabricated a series of hyaluronic acid (HA)-functionalized camptothecin (CPT)/curcumin (CUR)-loaded polymeric NPs (HA-CPT/CUR-NPs) with various weight ratios of CPT to CUR (1 : 1, 2 : 1 and 4 : 1). The resultant spherical HA-CPT/CUR-NPs had a desirable particle size (around 289 nm), relative narrow size distribution, and slightly negative zeta potential. These NPs exhibited a simultaneous sustained release profile for both drugs throughout the time frame examined. Subsequent cellular uptake experiments demonstrated that the introduction of HA to the NP surface endowed NPs with colon cancer-targeting capability and markedly increased cellular uptake efficiency compared with chitosan-coated NPs. Importantly, the combined delivery of CPT and CUR in one HA-functionalized NP exerted strong synergistic effects. HA-CPT/CUR-NP (1 : 1) showed the highest antitumor activity among the three HA-CPT/CUR-NPs, resulting in an extremely low combination index. Collectively, our findings indicate that this HA-CPT/CUR-NP can be exploited as an efficient formulation for colon cancer-targeted combination chemotherapy.Nanoparticle (NP)-based combination chemotherapy has been proposed as an effective strategy for achieving synergistic effects and targeted drug delivery for colon cancer therapy. Here, we fabricated a series of hyaluronic acid (HA)-functionalized camptothecin (CPT)/curcumin (CUR)-loaded polymeric NPs (HA-CPT/CUR-NPs) with various weight ratios of CPT to CUR (1 : 1, 2 : 1 and 4 : 1). The resultant spherical HA-CPT/CUR-NPs had a desirable particle size (around 289 nm), relative narrow size distribution, and slightly negative zeta potential. These NPs exhibited a simultaneous sustained release profile for both drugs throughout the time frame examined. Subsequent cellular uptake experiments

  20. Comparison of avian and nonavian hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Petrella

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Robert J Petrella, Anthony Cogliano, Joseph DecariaFaculties of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, CanadaBackground: Hyaluronic acid (HA in knee osteoarthritis (OA has been shown to be efficacious and safe, but long-term follow up and head-to-head comparison of products, in particular those of avian versus those of nonavian origin, are lacking.Objective: The objective was to compare the efficacy and safety of avian and nonavian origin HA in the treatment of knee OA during a long-term follow-up.Methods: Patients were enrolled on a consecutive basis from all referrals received from 1997 to 2007 at a large primary care referral center in London, Canada. Patients were allocated to commercially available avian and nonavian origin HA based on their own preference for product. Patients were not randomized to therapy nor did the referral center advocate one product versus another. During the period of investigation, three nonavian and two avian products were available in Canada. Injections were given once weekly over three weeks (one series using a lateral approach. Assessments included body mass index, numbers of medications, number of chronic diseases, duration of knee OA at presentation, visual analog scale (VAS score (0–10 cm for rest and weight-bearing pain, patient satisfaction with treatment (5-point categorical scale, numbers of HA series to the point of analysis, previous intra-articular treatment prior to first injection series, adverse events, serious adverse events, and self-payment versus third party payment. Following the first injection series, patients returned to the clinic of their own volition. Inclusion for a second and subsequent injection series was based on a patient request but also requirement of a resting VAS score > 4.5 cm. All patients had radiographic evidence of at least grade 1 OA. Patients who crossed over to alternate avian or nonavian product were not included in the analysis

  1. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to hyaluronic acid and protection of the skin against dehydration pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    scientific substantiation of a health claim related to hyaluronic acid and protection of the skin against dehydration. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claim, hyaluronic acid, is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect, protection of the skin against dehydration, is a beneficial...... hyaluronic acid and protection of the skin against dehydration....

  2. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Injection of Hyaluronic Acid: Acute Toxicities in a Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.chapet@chu-lyon.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); EMR3738, Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Decullier, Evelyne; Bin, Sylvie [Pole Information Médicale Evaluation Recherche, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); EA SIS, Université de Lyon, Lyon (France); Faix, Antoine [Department of Urology, Clinique Beausoleil, Montpellier (France); Ruffion, Alain [Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Department of Urology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Jalade, Patrice [Department of Medical Physics, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Fenoglietto, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology and Physics, Institut du Cancer de Montpellier, Montpellier (France); Udrescu, Corina; Enachescu, Ciprian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology and Physics, Institut du Cancer de Montpellier, Montpellier (France)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. Results: From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. Conclusions: The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity.

  3. A novel fibrin gel derived from hyaluronic acid-grafted fibrinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chiung L; Chen, Hui W; Wang, Tzu C; Wang, Yng J, E-mail: wang@ym.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, No. 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nung St., Shih-Pai, Taipei, Taiwan 112 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Fibrinogen is a major plasma protein that forms a three-dimensional fibrin gel upon being activated by thrombin. In this study, we report the synthesis and potential applications of hybrid molecules composed of fibrinogen coupled to the reducing ends of short-chain hyaluronic acids (sHAs) by reductive amination. The grafting of sHAs to fibrinogen was verified by analyzing particle size, zeta potential and gel-electrophoretic mobility of the hybrid molecules. The sHA-fibrinogen hybrid molecules with graft ratios (sHA/fibrinogen) of up to 6.5 retained the ability to form gels in response to thrombin activation. The sHA-fibrin gels were transparent in appearance and exhibited high water content, which were characteristics distinct from those of gels formed by mixtures of sHAs and fibrinogen. The potential applications of the sHA-fibrin gels were evaluated. The sHA-fibrinogen gel with a graft ratio of 3.6 (S3.6F) was examined for its ability to encapsulate and support the differentiation of ATDC5 chondrocyte-like cells. Compared with the fibrinogen-formed gel, cells cultured in the S3.6F gel exhibited increased lacunae formation; moreover, the abundance of cartilaginous extracellular matrix molecules and the expression of chondrocyte marker genes, such as aggrecan, collagen II and Sox9, were also significantly increased. Our data suggest that the three-dimensional gel formed by the sHA-fibrinogen hybrid is a better support than the fibrin gel for chondrogenesis induction.

  4. Hyaluronic acid influence on platelet-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte B., E-mail: ann-charlotte.svensson@liu.se [Division of Drug Research/Pharmacology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Experimental Pathology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linkoeping University, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Bengtsson, Torbjoern [Department of Biomedicine, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Oerebro University, SE-70182 Oerebro (Sweden); Grenegard, Magnus; Lindstroem, Eva G. [Division of Drug Research/Pharmacology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2012-03-10

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of the main components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and is expressed throughout the body including the lung and mostly in areas surrounding proliferating and migrating cells. Furthermore, platelets have been implicated as important players in the airway remodelling process, e.g. due to their ability to induce airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of HA, the HA-binding surface receptor CD44 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Proliferation of ASMC was measured using the MTS-assay, and we found that the CD44 blocking antibody and the HA synthase inhibitor 4-Methylumbelliferone (4-MU) significantly inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. The interaction between ASMC and platelets was studied by fluorescent staining of F-actin. In addition, the ability of ASMC to synthesise HA was investigated by fluorescent staining using biotinylated HA-binding protein and a streptavidin conjugate. We observed that ASMC produced HA and that a CD44 blocking antibody and 4-MU significantly inhibited platelet binding to the area surrounding the ASMC. Furthermore, the FAK-inhibitor PF 573228 inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Co-culture of ASMC and platelets also resulted in increased phosphorylation of FAK as detected by Western blot analysis. In addition, 4-MU significantly inhibited the increased FAK-phosphorylation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that ECM has the ability to influence platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Specifically, we propose that HA produced by ASMC is recognised by platelet CD44. The platelet/HA interaction is followed by FAK activation and increased proliferation of co-cultured ASMC. We also suggest that the mitogenic effect of platelets represents a potential important and novel mechanism that may contribute to airway remodelling.

  5. Serum levels of hyaluronic acid during the perioperative period of hepatic resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, in order to evaluate liver function during the perioperative period, serum levels of hyaluronic acid (HA) were measured. Blood samples were collected from 19 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma before hepatic resection and on the 1st, 3rd and 7th postoperative days (POD), and serum levels of HA were measured by the sandwich binding protein assay. The subjects were divided into 2 groups as follows. Group A, 14 patients, had an uneventful postoperative course, and Group B, 5 patients, had postoperative complications such as hepatic failure, liver abscess and intraperitoneal hemorrhage. The preoperative serum levels of HA had a significant correlation with the indocyanine green retention rate (ICG R15), the portal vein pressure, and the results of 99mTc-GSA scintigraphy. The preoperative serum levels of HA in the patients with clinical stage II were significantly higher than those of the patients with clinical stage I (p<0.02). The rates of the postoperative complications in the patients with preoperative HA serum levels over 100 ng/ml were significantly higher than those in the patients with HA serum levels below 50 ng/ml (p<0.05). Moreover, the postoperative serum levels of HA in Group B tended to be higher than those in Group A. On the 1st POD, there was a significant difference in the serum levels of HA between Groups A and B (p<0.01), whereas there were no significant differences in other parameters of liver function. These results suggest that serum levels of HA are useful parameters for evaluating liver function and predicting the outcome after hepatic resection. (author)

  6. Serum levels of hyaluronic acid during the perioperative period of hepatic resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizoe, Akihiko; Fujioka, Hikaru; Azuma, Takashi; Furui, Junichiro; Tomioka, Tsutomu; Kanematsu, Takashi [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, in order to evaluate liver function during the perioperative period, serum levels of hyaluronic acid (HA) were measured. Blood samples were collected from 19 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma before hepatic resection and on the 1st, 3rd and 7th postoperative days (POD), and serum levels of HA were measured by the sandwich binding protein assay. The subjects were divided into 2 groups as follows. Group A, 14 patients, had an uneventful postoperative course, and Group B, 5 patients, had postoperative complications such as hepatic failure, liver abscess and intraperitoneal hemorrhage. The preoperative serum levels of HA had a significant correlation with the indocyanine green retention rate (ICG R15), the portal vein pressure, and the results of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA scintigraphy. The preoperative serum levels of HA in the patients with clinical stage II were significantly higher than those of the patients with clinical stage I (p<0.02). The rates of the postoperative complications in the patients with preoperative HA serum levels over 100 ng/ml were significantly higher than those in the patients with HA serum levels below 50 ng/ml (p<0.05). Moreover, the postoperative serum levels of HA in Group B tended to be higher than those in Group A. On the 1st POD, there was a significant difference in the serum levels of HA between Groups A and B (p<0.01), whereas there were no significant differences in other parameters of liver function. These results suggest that serum levels of HA are useful parameters for evaluating liver function and predicting the outcome after hepatic resection. (author)

  7. A novel fibrin gel derived from hyaluronic acid-grafted fibrinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fibrinogen is a major plasma protein that forms a three-dimensional fibrin gel upon being activated by thrombin. In this study, we report the synthesis and potential applications of hybrid molecules composed of fibrinogen coupled to the reducing ends of short-chain hyaluronic acids (sHAs) by reductive amination. The grafting of sHAs to fibrinogen was verified by analyzing particle size, zeta potential and gel-electrophoretic mobility of the hybrid molecules. The sHA-fibrinogen hybrid molecules with graft ratios (sHA/fibrinogen) of up to 6.5 retained the ability to form gels in response to thrombin activation. The sHA-fibrin gels were transparent in appearance and exhibited high water content, which were characteristics distinct from those of gels formed by mixtures of sHAs and fibrinogen. The potential applications of the sHA-fibrin gels were evaluated. The sHA-fibrinogen gel with a graft ratio of 3.6 (S3.6F) was examined for its ability to encapsulate and support the differentiation of ATDC5 chondrocyte-like cells. Compared with the fibrinogen-formed gel, cells cultured in the S3.6F gel exhibited increased lacunae formation; moreover, the abundance of cartilaginous extracellular matrix molecules and the expression of chondrocyte marker genes, such as aggrecan, collagen II and Sox9, were also significantly increased. Our data suggest that the three-dimensional gel formed by the sHA-fibrinogen hybrid is a better support than the fibrin gel for chondrogenesis induction.

  8. Plasma hyaluronic acid level as a prognostic and monitoring marker of metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cike; Wallwiener, Markus; Rudolph, Anja; Ćuk, Katarina; Eilber, Ursula; Celik, Muhabbet; Modugno, Caroline; Trumpp, Andreas; Heil, Jörg; Marmé, Frederik; Madhavan, Dharanija; Nees, Juliane; Riethdorf, Sabine; Schott, Sarah; Sohn, Christof; Pantel, Klaus; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Yang, Rongxi; Burwinkel, Barbara

    2016-05-15

    Conventional tumor markers have limited value for prognostication and treatment monitoring in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients and novel circulating tumor markers therefore need to be explored. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a major macropolysaccharide in the extracellular matrix and is reported to be associated with tumor progression. In our study, we investigated plasma HA level with respect to progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), as well as the treatment monitoring value in MBC patients. The prognostic value of plasma HA level was investigated in a discovery cohort of 212 MBC patients with 2.5-year follow-up and validated in an independent validation cohort of 334 patients with 5-year follow-up. The treatment monitoring value of plasma HA level was investigated in 61 MBC patients from discovery cohort who had been radiographically examined after first complete cycle of chemo therapy. We found a robust association between high plasma HA level and poor prognosis of MBC patients in both discovery (pPFS  = 7.92 × 10(-6) and pOS  = 5.27 × 10(-5) ) and validation studies (pPFS  = 3.66 × 10(-4) and pOS  = 1.43 × 10(-4) ). In the discovery cohort, the plasma HA level displayed independent prognostic value after adjusted for age and clinicopathological factors, with respect to PFS and OS. Further, the decrease of plasma HA level displayed good concordance with treatment response evaluated by radiographic examination (AUC = 0.79). Plasma HA level displays prognostic value, as well as treatment monitoring value for MBC patients. PMID:26686298

  9. Hyaluronic acid influence on platelet-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of the main components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and is expressed throughout the body including the lung and mostly in areas surrounding proliferating and migrating cells. Furthermore, platelets have been implicated as important players in the airway remodelling process, e.g. due to their ability to induce airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of HA, the HA-binding surface receptor CD44 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Proliferation of ASMC was measured using the MTS-assay, and we found that the CD44 blocking antibody and the HA synthase inhibitor 4-Methylumbelliferone (4-MU) significantly inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. The interaction between ASMC and platelets was studied by fluorescent staining of F-actin. In addition, the ability of ASMC to synthesise HA was investigated by fluorescent staining using biotinylated HA-binding protein and a streptavidin conjugate. We observed that ASMC produced HA and that a CD44 blocking antibody and 4-MU significantly inhibited platelet binding to the area surrounding the ASMC. Furthermore, the FAK-inhibitor PF 573228 inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Co-culture of ASMC and platelets also resulted in increased phosphorylation of FAK as detected by Western blot analysis. In addition, 4-MU significantly inhibited the increased FAK-phosphorylation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that ECM has the ability to influence platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Specifically, we propose that HA produced by ASMC is recognised by platelet CD44. The platelet/HA interaction is followed by FAK activation and increased proliferation of co-cultured ASMC. We also suggest that the mitogenic effect of platelets represents a potential important and novel mechanism that may contribute to airway remodelling.

  10. Conjugation of Hyaluronic Acid onto Surfaces via the Interfacial Polymerization of Dopamine to Prevent Protein Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Renliang; Liu, Xia; Ye, Huijun; Su, Rongxin; Qi, Wei; Wang, Libing; He, Zhimin

    2015-11-10

    A versatile, convenient, and cost-effective method that can be used for grafting antifouling materials onto different surfaces is highly desirable in many applications. Here, we report the one-step fabrication of antifouling surfaces via the polymerization of dopamine and the simultaneous deposition of anionic hyaluronic acid (HA) on Au substrates. The water contact angle of the Au surfaces decreased from 84.9° to 24.8° after the attachment of a highly uniform polydopamine (PDA)/HA hybrid film. The results of surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that the Au-PDA/HA surfaces adsorbed proteins from solutions of bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, β-lactoglobulin, fibrinogen, and soybean milk in ultralow or low amounts (4.8-31.7 ng/cm(2)). The hydrophilicity and good antifouling performance of the PDA/HA surfaces is attributable to the HA chains that probably attached onto their upper surface via hydrogen bonding between PDA and HA. At the same time, the electrostatic repulsion between PDA and HA probably prevents the aggregation of PDA, resulting in the formation of a highly uniform PDA/HA hybrid film with the HA chains (with a stretched structure) on the upper surface. We also developed a simple method for removing this PDA/HA film and recycling the Au substrates by using an aqueous solution of NaOH as the hydrolyzing agent. The Au surface remained undamaged, and a PDA/HA film could be redeposited on the surface, with the surface exhibiting good antifouling performance even after 10 such cycles. Finally, it was found that this grafting method is applicable to other substrates, including epoxy resins, polystyrene, glass, and steel, owing to the strong adhesion of PDA with these substrates. PMID:26488547

  11. Glans Penis Augmentation Using Hyaluronic Acid Gel as an Injectable Filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Du Geon; Kwak, Tae Il; Kim, Je Jong

    2015-08-01

    Glans penis augmentation (GPA) has received little attention from experts despite the existence of a subset of patients who may be dissatisfied with a small glans or poor tumescence of the glans during erection. Recently, GPA using an injectable filler or implantation of a graft or filler has been developed. Despite a demanding injection technique and inevitable uneven undulation of the glandular surface, GPA using injectable hyaluronic acid (HA) gel is a novel and useful therapy and an effective and safe procedure for soft tissue enhancement. For long-term presence of implants, timed supplementation can be used similar to that for fascial plasty. In complications such as mucosal necrosis of the glans penis, most cases occur from the use of non-HA gel or an unpurified form and misunderstanding of the management protocol for immediate side effects. Currently, GPA using injectable HA gel is not recommended in the International Society for Sexual Medicine guideline due to possible sensory loss. In a 5-year long-term follow-up of GPA by subcutaneous injection of HA gel, the residual volume of implants decreased by 15% of the maximal glandular circumference, but was still effective for alleviating the hypersensitivity of the glans penis in premature ejaculation patients. For efficacy in premature ejaculation, selection of appropriate candidates is the most important factor for success. GPA does not harm erectile function and is less invasive and irreversible compared to dorsal neurectomy. To refine the procedure, more interest and well-designed studies are required for the establishment of the procedure. PMID:26331121

  12. Hyaluronic acid and alginate covalent nanogels by template cross-linking in polyion complex micelle nanoreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Serena; Diociaiuti, Marco; Cametti, Cesare; Masci, Giancarlo

    2014-01-30

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) and alginate (AL) covalent nanogels cross-linked with l-lysine ethyl ester were prepared by template chemical cross-linking of the polysaccharide in polyion complex micelle (PIC) nanoreactors. By using this method we were able to prepare HA and AL nanogels without organic solvents. PICs were prepared by using poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly[(3-acrylamidopropyl)-trimethylammonium chloride] (PEO-b-PAMPTMA) or poly[(N-isopropylacrylamide)-block-PAMPTMA] (PNIPAAM-b-PAMPTMA). Only PNIPAAM-b-PAMPTMA block copolymers allowed to prepare PIC with small and controlled size. Short polysaccharide chains (Xn=50 and 63 for AL and HA, respectively, where Xn is the number of monosaccharidic units present in the polysaccharide) where used to optimize PIC formation. The remarkable difference in charge density and rigidity of HA and AL did not have a significant influence on the formation of PICs. PICs with small size (diameter of about 50-80 nm) and low polydispersity were obtained up to 5mg/mL of polymer. After cross-linking with l-lysine ethyl ester, the nanoreactors were dissociated by adding NaCl. The nanogels were easily purified and isolated by dialysis. The dissociation of the nanoreactors and the formation of the nanogels were confirmed by (1)H NMR, DLS, TEM and ζ-potential measurements. The size of the smallest nanogels in solution in the swollen state was 50-70 nm in presence of salt and 80-100 nm in water. PMID:24299754

  13. Solvent Composition is Critical for Carbodiimide Cross-Linking of Hyaluronic Acid as an Ophthalmic Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Yang Lai

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA is one of the most important ophthalmic biomaterials, while also being used for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Although chemical cross-linking is an effective way to improve the material performance, it may as a consequence be detrimental to the living cells/tissues. Given that the cross-linking efficiency is mediated by the solvent composition during the chemical modification, this study aims to explore the stability and biocompatibility of carbodiimide cross-linked HA in relation to material processing conditions by varying the acetone/water volume ratio (from 70:30 to 95:5 at a constant 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl carbodiimide (EDC concentration of 100 mM. Our results indicated that after the EDC treatment in the presence of an acetone/water mixture (85:15, v/v, the HA hydrogel membranes have the lowest equilibrium water content, the highest stress at break and the greatest resistance to hyaluronidase digestion. Live/Dead assays and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression analyses showed that the cross-linked HA hydrogel membranes, irrespective of the solvent composition, are compatible with human RPE cell lines without causing toxicity and inflammation. However, it should be noted that the test samples prepared by the cross-linking in the presence of acetone/water mixtures containing 70, 75, and 95 vol % of acetone slightly inhibit the metabolic activity of viable ARPE-19 cultures, probably due to the alteration in the ionic interaction between the medium nutrients and polysaccharide biomaterials. In summary, the water content, mechanical strength and RPE cell proliferative capacity strongly depends on the solvent composition for carbodiimide cross-linking of HA materials.

  14. High molecular weight hyaluronic acid limits astrocyte activation and scar formation after spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaing, Zin Z.; Milman, Brian D.; Vanscoy, Jennifer E.; Seidlits, Stephanie K.; Grill, Raymond J.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2011-08-01

    A major hurdle for regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) is the ability of axons to penetrate and grow through the scar tissue. After SCI, inflammatory cells, astrocytes and meningeal cells all play a role in developing the glial scar. In addition, degradation of native high molecular weight (MW) hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix, has been shown to induce activation and proliferation of astrocytes. However, it is not known if the degradation of native HA actually enhances glial scar formation. We hypothesize that the presence of high MW HA (HA with limited degradation) after SCI will decrease glial scarring. Here, we demonstrate that high MW HA decreases cell proliferation and reduces chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) production in cultured neonatal and adult astrocytes. In addition, stiffness-matched high MW HA hydrogels crosslinked to resist degradation were implanted in a rat model of spinal dorsal hemisection injury. The numbers of immune cells (macrophages and microglia) detected at the lesion site in animals with HA hydrogel implants were significantly reduced at acute time points (one, three and ten days post-injury). Lesioned animals with HA implants also exhibited significantly lower CSPG expression at ten days post-injury. At nine weeks post-injury, animals with HA hydrogel implants exhibited a significantly decreased astrocytic response, but did not have significantly altered CSPG expression. Combined, these data suggest that high MW HA, when stabilized against degradation, mitigates astrocyte activation in vitro and in vivo. The presence of HA implants was also associated with a significant decrease in CSPG deposition at ten days after SCI. Therefore, HA-based hydrogel systems hold great potential for minimizing undesired scarring as part of future repair strategies after SCI.

  15. Nanostructured lipid carrier-loaded hyaluronic acid microneedles for controlled dermal delivery of a lipophilic molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Gon; Jeong, Jae Han; Lee, Kyung Min; Jeong, Kyu Ho; Yang, Huisuk; Kim, Miroo; Jung, Hyungil; Lee, Sangkil; Choi, Young Wook

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were employed to formulate a lipophilic drug into hydrophilic polymeric microneedles (MNs). Hyaluronic acid (HA) was selected as a hydrophilic and bioerodible polymer to fabricate MNs, and nile red (NR) was used as a model lipophilic molecule. NR-loaded NLCs were consolidated into the HA-based MNs to prepare NLC-loaded MNs (NLC-MNs). A dispersion of NLCs was prepared by high-pressure homogenization after dissolving NR in Labrafil and mixing with melted Compritol, resulting in 268 nm NLCs with a polydispersity index of 0.273. The NLC dispersion showed a controlled release of NR over 24 hours, following Hixson-Crowell's cube root law. After mixing the NLC dispersion with the HA solution, the drawing lithography method was used to fabricate NLC-MNs. The length, base diameter, and tip diameter of the NLC-MNs were approximately 350, 380, and 30 μm, respectively. Fluorescence microscopic imaging of the NLC-MNs helped confirm that the NR-loaded NLCs were distributed evenly throughout the MNs. In a skin permeation study performed using a Franz diffusion cell with minipig dorsal skin, approximately 70% of NR was localized in the skin after 24-hour application of NLC-MNs. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (z-series) of the skin at different depths showed strong fluorescence intensity in the epidermal layer, which appeared to spread out radially with the passage of time. This study indicated that incorporation of drug-loaded NLCs into MNs could represent a promising strategy for controlled dermal delivery of lipophilic drugs. PMID:24403833

  16. Hyaluronic acid-recombinant gelatin gels as a scaffold for soft tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Tuin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An array of different types of hyaluronic acid (HA- and collagen-based products is available for filling soft-tissue defects. A major drawback of the current soft-tissue fillers is their inability to induce cell infiltration and new tissue formation. Our aim is to develop novel biodegradable injectable gels which induce soft tissue regeneration, initially resulting in integration and finally replacement of the gel with new autologous tissue. Two reference gels of pure HA, monophasic HA-1 and micronised HA-2, were used. Furthermore, both gels were mixed with recombinant gelatin (RG resulting in HA-1+RG and HA-2+RG. All gels were subcutaneously injected on the back of rats and explanted after 4 weeks. Addition of RG to HA-1 resulted in stroma formation (neovascularisation and ECM deposition which was restricted to the outer rim of the HA-1+RG gel. In contrast, addition of RG to HA-2 induced stroma formation throughout the gel. The RG component of the gel was degraded by macrophages and giant cells and subsequently replaced by new vascularised tissue. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the extracellular matrix components collagen I and III were deposited throughout the gel. In conclusion, this study shows the proof of principle that addition of RG to HA-2 results in a novel injectable gel capable of inducing soft tissue regeneration. In this gel HA has a scaffold function whereas the RG component induces new tissue formation, resulting in proper vascularisation and integration of the HA-2+RG gel with the autologous tissue.

  17. Glans Penis Augmentation Using Hyaluronic Acid Gel as an Injectable Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Tae Il; Kim, Je Jong

    2015-01-01

    Glans penis augmentation (GPA) has received little attention from experts despite the existence of a subset of patients who may be dissatisfied with a small glans or poor tumescence of the glans during erection. Recently, GPA using an injectable filler or implantation of a graft or filler has been developed. Despite a demanding injection technique and inevitable uneven undulation of the glandular surface, GPA using injectable hyaluronic acid (HA) gel is a novel and useful therapy and an effective and safe procedure for soft tissue enhancement. For long-term presence of implants, timed supplementation can be used similar to that for fascial plasty. In complications such as mucosal necrosis of the glans penis, most cases occur from the use of non-HA gel or an unpurified form and misunderstanding of the management protocol for immediate side effects. Currently, GPA using injectable HA gel is not recommended in the International Society for Sexual Medicine guideline due to possible sensory loss. In a 5-year long-term follow-up of GPA by subcutaneous injection of HA gel, the residual volume of implants decreased by 15% of the maximal glandular circumference, but was still effective for alleviating the hypersensitivity of the glans penis in premature ejaculation patients. For efficacy in premature ejaculation, selection of appropriate candidates is the most important factor for success. GPA does not harm erectile function and is less invasive and irreversible compared to dorsal neurectomy. To refine the procedure, more interest and well-designed studies are required for the establishment of the procedure. PMID:26331121

  18. Differential effect of hypoxia on human mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis and hypertrophy in hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Meiling; Feng, Qian; Bian, Liming

    2014-03-01

    Photocrosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels provide a conducive 3-D environment that supports the chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The HA macromer concentration in the hydrogels has a significant impact on the chondrogenesis of the encapsulated MSCs due to changes in the physical properties of the hydrogels. Meanwhile, hypoxia has been shown to promote MSC chondrogenesis and suppress subsequent hypertrophy. This study investigates the combinatorial effect of tuning HA macromer concentration (1.5-5%w/v) and hypoxia on MSC chondrogenesis and hypertrophy. To decouple the effect of HA concentration from that of crosslinking density, the HA hydrogel crosslinking density was adjusted by varying the extent of the reaction through the light exposure time while keeping the HA concentration constant (5%w/v at 5 or 15 min). It was found that hypoxia had no significant effect on the chondrogenesis and cartilaginous matrix synthesis of hMSCs under all hydrogel conditions. In contrast, the hypoxia-mediated positive or negative regulation of hMSC hypertrophy in HA hydrogels is dependent on the HA concentration but independent of the crosslinking density. Specifically, hypoxia significantly suppressed hMSC hypertrophy and neocartilage calcification in low HA concentration hydrogels, whereas hypoxia substantially enhanced hMSC hypertrophy, leading to elevated tissue calcification in high HA concentration hydrogels irrespective of their crosslinking density. In addition, at a constant high HA concentration, increasing hydrogel crosslinking density promoted hMSC hypertrophy and matrix calcification. To conclude, the findings from this study demonstrate that the effect of hypoxia on hMSC chondrogenesis and hypertrophy is differentially influenced by the encapsulating HA hydrogel properties. PMID:24342044

  19. Multivalent hyaluronic acid bioconjugates improve sFlt-1 activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altiok, Eda I; Santiago-Ortiz, Jorge L; Svedlund, Felicia L; Zbinden, Aline; Jha, Amit K; Bhatnagar, Deepika; Loskill, Peter; Jackson, Wesley M; Schaffer, David V; Healy, Kevin E

    2016-07-01

    Anti-VEGF drugs that are used in conjunction with laser ablation to treat patients with diabetic retinopathy suffer from short half-lives in the vitreous of the eye resulting in the need for frequent intravitreal injections. To improve the intravitreal half-life of anti-VEGF drugs, such as the VEGF decoy receptor sFlt-1, we developed multivalent bioconjugates of sFlt-1 grafted to linear hyaluronic acid (HyA) chains termed mvsFlt. Using size exclusion chromatography with multiangle light scattering (SEC-MALS), SDS-PAGE, and dynamic light scattering (DLS), we characterized the mvsFlt with a focus on the molecular weight contribution of protein and HyA components to the overall bioconjugate size. We found that mvsFlt activity was independent of HyA conjugation using a sandwich ELISA and in vitro angiogenesis assays including cell survival, migration and tube formation. Using an in vitro model of the vitreous with crosslinked HyA gels, we demonstrated that larger mvsFlt bioconjugates showed slowed release and mobility in these hydrogels compared to low molecular weight mvsFlt and unconjugated sFlt-1. Finally, we used an enzyme specific to sFlt-1 to show that conjugation to HyA shields sFlt-1 from protein degradation. Taken together, our findings suggest that mvsFlt bioconjugates retain VEGF binding affinity, shield sFlt-1 from enzymatic degradation, and their movement in hydrogel networks (in vitro model of the vitreous) is controlled by both bioconjugate size and hydrogel network mesh size. These results suggest that a strategy of multivalent conjugation could substantially improve drug residence time in the eye and potentially improve therapeutics for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27086270

  20. Nanotubes-Embedded Indocyanine Green-Hyaluronic Acid Nanoparticles for Photoacoustic-Imaging-Guided Phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guohao; Zhang, Fan; Tian, Rui; Zhang, Liwen; Fu, Guifeng; Yang, Lily; Zhu, Lei

    2016-03-01

    Phototherapy is a light-triggered treatment for tumor ablation and growth inhibition via photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photothermal therapy (PTT). Despite extensive studies in this area, a major challenge is the lack of selective and effective phototherapy agents that can specifically accumulate in tumors to reach a therapeutic concentration. Although recent attempts have produced photosensitizers complexed with photothermal nanomaterials, the tedious preparation steps and poor tumor efficiency of therapy still hampers the broad utilization of these nanocarriers. Herein, we developed a CD44 targeted photoacoustic (PA) nanophototherapy agent by conjugating Indocyanine Green (ICG) to hyaluronic acid nanoparticles (HANPs) encapsulated with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), resulting in a theranostic nanocomplex of ICG-HANP/SWCNTs (IHANPT). We fully characterized its physical features as well as PA imaging and photothermal and photodynamic therapy properties in vitro and in vivo. Systemic delivery of IHANPT theranostic nanoparticles led to the accumulation of the targeted nanoparticles in tumors in a human cancer xenograft model in nude mice. PA imaging confirmed targeted delivery of the IHANPT nanoparticles into tumors (T/M ratio = 5.19 ± 0.3). The effect of phototherapy was demonstrated by low-power laser irradiation (808 nm, 0.8 W/cm(2)) to induce efficient photodynamic effect from ICG dye. The photothermal effect from the ICG and SWCNTs rapidly raised the tumor temperature to 55.4 ± 1.8 °C. As the result, significant tumor growth inhibition and marked induction of tumor cell death and necrosis were observed in the tumors in the tumors. There were no apparent systemic and local toxic effects found in the mice. The dynamic thermal stability of IHANPT was studied to ensure that PTT does not affect ICG-dependent PDT in phototherapy. Therefore, our results highlight imaging property and therapeutic effect of the novel IHANPT theranostic nanoparticle for CD44

  1. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Injection of Hyaluronic Acid: Acute Toxicities in a Phase 2 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. Results: From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. Conclusions: The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity

  2. Development of chitosan nanoparticles coated with hyaluronic acid for topical ocular delivery of dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalam, Mohd Abul

    2016-08-01

    The present study involved design of dexamethasone-sodium phosphate (DEX) loaded mucoadhesive chitosan nanoparticles for topical ocular delivery to improve its precorneal retention and corneal permeability. The chitosan-sodium tripolyphosphate nanoparticle (CS-NPs) was developed through ionotropic-gelation technique. The developed CS-NPs were coated with hyaluronic-acid (HA) to make discrete, free-flowing NPs and to improve their mucoadhesive characteristics. The particle-size, zeta-potential and polydispersity-index were determined by Malvern-Zetasizer. The average size of the CS-NPs ranged from 305.25±14.29nm (without HA-coating and before freeze-drying) to 400.57±15.23nm (HA-coated and after freeze-drying). Due to the polyanionic nature of HA, reversing of zeta-potentials from +32.55±4.15 to -33.74±3.45 was observed. Polydispersity-indices varied from 0.178±0.067 (before freeze-drying of HA-coated F2) to 0.427±0.028 (after freeze-drying of HA-coated F2). The encapsulation and loading capacity of around 72.95% and 14.51% respectively were found in optimized CS-NPs. In simulated tear fluid 75.84% cumulative amount of released drug was detected and the in-vitro release results suggested the mechanism of drug release was Fickian-diffusion type. The clarity, pH, refractive index, surface tension and viscosity of the suspensions of DEX-CS-NPs were found promising for ocular use. Stability study on nanoparticles revealed no significant changes were observed in particle-size, encapsulation, drug release and physicochemical characteristics at 25°C for 3-months storage. PMID:27126165

  3. Hyaluronic acid embedded cellulose acetate phthlate core/shell nanoparticulate carrier of 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ashish; Rai, Gopal; Lodhi, Santram; Jain, Alok Pal; Yadav, Awesh K

    2016-06-01

    Aim of this research was to prepare hyaluronic acid-modified-cellulose acetate phthalate (HAC) core shell nanoparticles (NPs) of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). HAC copolymer was synthesized and confirmed by fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. HAC NPs with 5-FU were prepared using HAC copolymer and compared with 5-FU loaded cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP) NPs. NPs were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, entrapment efficiency, in-vitro release, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). HAC NPs were found slower release (97.30% in 48h) than (99.25% in 8h) CAP NPs. In cytotoxicity studies, showed great cytotoxic potential of 5-FU loaded HAC NPs in A549, MDA-MD-435 and SK-OV-3 cancer cellline. HAC NPs showing least hemolytic than CAP NPs and 5-FU. Area under curve (AUC), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), mean residence time (MRT) and time to reach maximum plasma concentration Tmax), were observed 4398.1±7.90μgh/mL, 145.45±2.25μg/L, 45.74±0.25h, 72±0.50h, respectively of HAC NPs and 119.92±1.78μgh/mL, 46.38±3.42μg/L, 1.2±0.25h, 0.5±0.02h were observed in plain 5-FU solution. In conclusion, HAC NPs is effective deliver carrier of 5-FU for lung cancer. PMID:26955748

  4. Release of Ciprofloxacin-HCl and Dexamethasone Phosphate by Hyaluronic Acid Containing Silicone Polymers

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    Lyndon Jones

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the covalent incorporation of hyaluronic acid (HA into conventional hydrogel and hydrogels containing silicone as models for contact lens materials on the uptake and release of the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin and the anti-inflammatory steroid dexamethasone phosphate. A 3 mg/mL ciprofloxacin solution (0.3% w/v and a 1 mg/mL dexamethasone phosphate solution (0.1% was prepared in borate buffered saline. Three hydrogel material samples (pHEMA; pHEMA TRIS; DMAA TRIS were prepared with and without the covalent incorporation of HA of molecular weight (MW 35 or 132 kDa. Hydrogel discs were punched from a sheet of material with a uniform diameter of 5 mm. Uptake kinetics were evaluated at room temperature by soaking the discs for 24 h. Release kinetics were evaluated by placing the drug-loaded discs in saline at 34 °C in a shaking water bath. At various time points over 6–7 days, aliquots of the release medium were assayed for drug amounts. The majority of the materials tested released sufficient drug to be clinically relevant in an ophthalmic application, reaching desired concentrations for antibiotic or anti-inflammatory activity in solution. Overall, the silicone-based hydrogels (pHEMA TRIS and DMAA TRIS, released lower amounts of drug than the conventional pHEMA material (p < 0.001. Materials with HA MW132 released more ciprofloxacin compared to materials with HA MW35 and lenses without HA (p < 0.02. Some HA-based materials were still releasing the drug after 6 days.

  5. Phytosome-hyaluronic acid systems for ocular delivery of L-carnosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader, Hamdy; Longman, Michael R; Alany, Raid G; Pierscionek, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on L-carnosine phytosomes as an alternative for the prodrug N-acetyl-L-carnosine as a novel delivery system to the lens. L-carnosine was loaded into lipid-based phytosomes and hyaluronic acid (HA)-dispersed phytosomes. L-carnosine-phospholipid complexes (PC) of different molar ratios, 1:1 and 1:2, were prepared by the solvent evaporation method. These complexes were characterized with thermal and spectral analyses. PC were dispersed in either phosphate buffered saline pH 7.4 or HA (0.1% w/v) in phosphate buffered saline to form phytosomes PC1:1, PC1:2, and PC1:2 HA, respectively. These phytosomal formulations were studied for size, zeta potential, morphology, contact angle, spreading coefficient, viscosity, ex vivo transcorneal permeation, and cytotoxicity using primary human corneal cells. L-carnosine-phospholipid formed a complex at a 1:2 molar ratio and phytosomes were in the size range of 380-450 nm, polydispersity index of 0.12-0.2. The viscosity of PC1:2 HA increased by 2.4 to 5-fold compared with HA solution and PC 1:2, respectively; significantly lower surface tension, contact angle, and greater spreading ability for phytosomes were also recorded. Ex vivo transcorneal permeation parameters showed significantly controlled corneal permeation of L-carnosine with the novel carrier systems without any significant impact on primary human corneal cell viability. Ex vivo porcine lenses incubated in high sugar media without and with L-carnosine showed concentration-dependent marked inhibition of lens brunescence indicative of the potential for delaying changes that underlie cataractogenesis that may be linked to diabetic processes. PMID:27366062

  6. Review of long-term adverse effects associated with the use of chemically-modified animal and nonanimal source hyaluronic acid dermal fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Edwards

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Paul C Edwards1, John E Fantasia21Associate Professor (Clinical, Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, Pathology and Oncology, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor MI, USA; 2Chief, Division of Oral Pathology, Department of Dental Medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY, USAAbstract: Although only recently introduced, chemically-modified hyaluronic acid dermal fillers have gained widespread acceptance as “redefining” dermal fillers in the fields of dermatology and cosmetic facial surgery. Although hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers have a low overall incidence of long term side effects, occasional adverse outcomes, ranging from chronic lymphoplasmacytic inflammatory reactions to classic foreign body-type granulomatous reactions have been documented. These long-term adverse events are reviewed.Keywords: hyaluronic acid, Restylane®, Hylaform®, injectable dermal filler, foreign body reaction, granuloma

  7. Double-blind, randomized clinical study comparing hyaluronic acid cream to placebo in patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The effect of hyaluronic acid (Ialugen[reg] cream) on acute skin reactions after radiotherapy, was assessed in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Material and methods: Out of the 152 patients presenting with head and neck, breast or pelvic carcinomas and registered in the study, 134 cases - 70 in the Ialugen group (IA) and 64 in the placebo group (PBO) - completed their IA or PBO treatment. At the time of randomisation, these two groups were balanced for sex, age, weight and height. The mean total dose of radiation given during the study was 60.6±10.9 Gy in the IA group and 64.3±10.8 Gy in the PBO group (P =0.47). Results: Acute radio-epithelitis scores were significantly higher in the PBO group than in the IA group, starting from the control at week 3 and throughout the 6 weeks of treatment (P<0.01 from week 3 to week 7; P<0.05 at weeks 8 and 10). Likewise, the global efficacy judgement expressed, at the end of treatment, by both the physician and the patient showed a significant difference in favour of Ialugen (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). There was no significant difference of tolerance between the IA and PBO treatments (P=0.18 according to the physician and P=0.42 from the patient's viewpoint). Conclusion: The prophylactic use of a cream with hyaluronic acid is shown to reduce the incidence of high grade radio-epithelitis, suggesting an interesting role of the hyaluronic acid cream as supportive treatment to improve compliance and quality of life in patients undergoing radiation therapy

  8. Development of an optimized hyaluronic acid-based lipidic nanoemulsion co-encapsulating two polyphenols for nose to brain delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Maha

    2016-05-01

    The development of mucoadhesive lipidic nanoemulsion based on hyaluronic acid, co-encapsulating two polyphenols (resveratrol and curcumin) for the transnasal treatment of neurodegenerative diseases was attempted in the current manuscript. Nanoemulsions were prepared by the spontaneous emulsification method, and were characterized for their particle size, zeta potential, mucoadhesive strength and morphology. The selected formula was tested for its antioxidant potential, in vitro and ex vivo release of the two polyphenols, safety on nasal mucosa and in vivo quantification of the two drugs in rat brains. Its stability was tested by monitoring the change in particle size, zeta potential, drugs' content and antioxidant potential upon storage for 3 months. The optimized hyaluronic acid based nanoemulsion formula displayed a particle size of 115.2 ± 0.15 and a zeta potential of -23.9 ± 1.7. The formula displayed a spherical morphology and significantly higher mucoadhesive strength compared to its non mucoadhesive counterpart. In addition, the nanoemulsion was able to preserve the antioxidant ability of the two polyphenols and protect them from degradation. Diffusion controlled release of the two drugs was achievable till 6 hours, with an ex vivo flux across sheep nasal mucosa of 2.86 and 2.09 µg/cm(2)hr for resveratrol and curcumin, respectively. Moreover, the mucoadhesive nanoemulsion was safe on nasal mucosa and managed to increase the amounts of the two polypehnols in the brain (about 7 and 9 folds increase in AUC0-7 h for resveratrol and curcumin, respectively). Hyaluronic acid based lipidic nanoemulsion proved itself as a successful carrier enhancing the solubility, stability and brain targetability of polyphenols. PMID:26401600

  9. Hyaluronic acid-coated liposomes for targeted delivery of paclitaxel, in-vitro characterization and in-vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravar, Fatemeh; Saadat, Ebrahim; Gholami, Mehdi; Dehghankelishadi, Pouya; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Azami, Samira; Dorkoosh, Farid A

    2016-05-10

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women. Chemotherapy is regarded as the most essential strategy in inhibiting the proliferation of tumor cells. Paclitaxel is a widely used taxane; however, the side effects of available Cremophor-based formulations and also the limitations of passive targeting uncovered an essential need to develop tumor-specific targeted nanocarriers. A hyaluronic acid targeted liposomal formulation of paclitaxel was prepared in which, hyaluronic acid was electrostatistically attracted to the surface of liposomes. Liposomes, had a particle size of 106.4±3.2nm, a weakly negative zeta potential of -9.7±0.8mV and an acceptable encapsulation efficiency of 92.1±1.7%. The release profile of liposomes in buffer showed that 95% of PTX was released during 40h. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry analysis showed the greater cellular internalization of coumarin-loaded liposomes compared to free coumarin. MTT assay on 4T1 and T47D cells demonstrated the stronger cytotoxic activity of liposomes in comparison to free paclitaxel. Cell cycle analysis showed that cells were mainly blocked at G2/M phases after 48h treatment with liposomes. In vivo real time imaging on 4T1 tumor-bearing mice revealed that the liposomal formulation mainly accumulated in the tumor area. Liposomes also had better antitumor efficacy against Cremophor-based formulation. In conclusion, hyaluronic acid targeted paclitaxel liposome can serve as a promising targeted formulation of paclitaxel for future cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26968799

  10. New Adipose Tissue Formation by Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells with Hyaluronic Acid Gel in Immunodeficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Shu-Hung; Lin, Yun-Nan; Lee, Su-Shin; Chai, Chee-Yin; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Lin, Tsai-Ming; Lai, Chung-Sheng; Lin, Sin-Daw

    2015-01-01

    Background: Currently available injectable fillers have demonstrated limited durability. This report proposes the in vitro culture of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) on hyaluronic acid (HA) gel for in vivo growth of de novo adipose tissue. Methods: For in vitro studies, hASCs were isolated from human adipose tissue and were confirmed by multi-lineage differentiation and flow cytometry. hASCs were cultured on HA gel. The effectiveness of cell attachment and proliferation on HA gel was...

  11. Hyaluronic acid preparations in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Synvisk®(Hylan G-F 20: Efficacy and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Vladimirovna Chichasova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents data on osteoarthrosis treatment using hyaluronic acid (HA preparations, on the functions of hyaluronan (HN in synovial fluid (SF, synovial tissue, and articular cartilage, and on differences in the symptom-modifying effect of HN with varying molecular weight. HN with average molecular weight demonstrates its benefits. The analgesic effect of HA preparations is shown to be determined by not only the improvement of SF elastoviscous properties and by the protection of pain receptors in joint tissues, but by their anti-rheumatic properties.

  12. Hyaluronic acid scaffold has a neuroprotective effect in hemisection spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushchayev, Sergiy V; Giers, Morgan B; Hom Eng, Doris; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Eschbacher, Jennifer M; Mortazavi, Martin M; Theodore, Nicholas; Panitch, Alyssa; Preul, Mark C

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal cord injury occurs in 2 phases. The initial trauma is followed by inflammation that leads to fibrous scar tissue, glial scarring, and cavity formation. Scarring causes further axon death around and above the injury. A reduction in secondary injury could lead to functional improvement. In this study, hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels were implanted into the gap formed in the hemisected spinal cord of Sprague-Dawley rats in an attempt to attenuate damage and regenerate tissue. METHODS A T-10 hemisection spinal cord injury was created in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats; the rats were assigned to a sham, control (phosphate-buffered saline), or HA hydrogel-treated group. One cohort of 23 animals was followed for 12 weeks and underwent weekly behavioral assessments. At 12 weeks, retrograde tracing was performed by injecting Fluoro-Gold in the left L-2 gray matter. At 14 weeks, the animals were killed. The volume of the lesion and the number of cells labeled from retrograde tracing were calculated. Animals in a separate cohort were killed at 8 or 16 weeks and perfused for immunohistochemical analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Samples were stained using H & E, neurofilament stain (neurons and axons), silver stain (disrupted axons), glial fibrillary acidic protein stain (astrocytes), and Iba1 stain (mononuclear cells). RESULTS The lesions were significantly smaller in size and there were more retrograde-labeled cells in the red nuclei of the HA hydrogel-treated rats than in those of the controls; however, the behavioral assessments revealed no differences between the groups. The immunohistochemical analyses revealed decreased fibrous scarring and increased retention of organized intact axonal tissue in the HA hydrogel-treated group. There was a decreased presence of inflammatory cells in the HA hydrogel-treated group. No axonal or neuronal regeneration was observed. CONCLUSIONS The results of these experiments show that HA hydrogel had a

  13. Hyaluronic acid-coated bovine serum albumin nanoparticles loaded with brucine as selective nanovectors for intra-articular injection

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    Chen Z

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Zhipeng Chen,* Juan Chen,* Li Wu, Weidong Li, Jun Chen, Haibo Cheng, Jinhuo Pan, Baochang CaiDepartment of Pharmacy, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: To evaluate the potential of hyaluronic acid (HA-coated bovine serum albumin nanoparticles (BSANPs as a novel chondrocyte-targeting drug-delivery nanomedicine.Methods: The HA-BSANPs were characterized by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction. Fluorescence imaging was used to visualize the distribution of nanoparticles after intra-articular injection. The chondrocyte-targeting efficiency and cellular uptake mechanism of HA-BSANPs were investigated using endocytic inhibitors.Results: HA-BSANPs were successfully prepared with HA coating the surface and amorphous drug in the core. Compared with BSANPs, HA-BSANPs exhibited improved uptake by chondrocytes through a receptor-mediated active uptake mechanism. The endocytosis process of BSANPs and HA-BSANPs involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis, caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and macropinocytosis. No apparent thickening or hyperplasia of the synovium was observed in either BSANPs or HA-BSANPs. The HA-BSANPs could reside in the articular cavity of rats for more than 14 days, which was significantly longer than BSANPs.Conclusion: HA-BSANPs are a promising carrier for articular-related diseases due to elongated articular residence and improved chondrocytic accumulation.Keywords: chondrocyte, intra-articular injection, hyaluronic acid, BSA, nanoparticles

  14. pH-Responsive Hyaluronic Acid-Based Mixed Micelles for the Hepatoma-Targeting Delivery of Doxorubicin

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    Jing-Liang Wu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The tumor targetability and stimulus responsivity of drug delivery systems are crucial in cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this study, hepatoma-targeting mixed micelles composed of a hyaluronic acid–glycyrrhetinic acid conjugate and a hyaluronic acid-l-histidine conjugate (HA–GA/HA–His were prepared through ultrasonic dispersion. The formation and characterization of the mixed micelles were confirmed via 1H-NMR, particle size, and ζ potential measurements. The in vitro cellular uptake of the micelles was evaluated using human liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells. The antitumor effect of doxorubicin (DOX-loaded micelles was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Results indicated that the DOX-loaded HA–GA/HA–His micelles showed a pH-dependent controlled release and were remarkably absorbed by HepG2 cells. Compared with free DOX, the DOX-loaded HA–GA/HA–His micelles showed a higher cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells. Moreover, the micelles effectively inhibited tumor growth in H22 cell-bearing mice. These results suggest that the HA–GA/HA–His mixed micelles are a good candidate for drug delivery in the prevention and treatment of hepatocarcinoma.

  15. pH-Responsive Hyaluronic Acid-Based Mixed Micelles for the Hepatoma-Targeting Delivery of Doxorubicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing-Liang; Tian, Gui-Xiang; Yu, Wen-Jing; Jia, Guang-Tao; Sun, Tong-Yi; Gao, Zhi-Qin

    2016-01-01

    The tumor targetability and stimulus responsivity of drug delivery systems are crucial in cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this study, hepatoma-targeting mixed micelles composed of a hyaluronic acid–glycyrrhetinic acid conjugate and a hyaluronic acid-l-histidine conjugate (HA–GA/HA–His) were prepared through ultrasonic dispersion. The formation and characterization of the mixed micelles were confirmed via 1H-NMR, particle size, and ζ potential measurements. The in vitro cellular uptake of the micelles was evaluated using human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The antitumor effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded micelles was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Results indicated that the DOX-loaded HA–GA/HA–His micelles showed a pH-dependent controlled release and were remarkably absorbed by HepG2 cells. Compared with free DOX, the DOX-loaded HA–GA/HA–His micelles showed a higher cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells. Moreover, the micelles effectively inhibited tumor growth in H22 cell-bearing mice. These results suggest that the HA–GA/HA–His mixed micelles are a good candidate for drug delivery in the prevention and treatment of hepatocarcinoma. PMID:27043540

  16. Hyaluronic acid and glucosamine sulfate for adult Kashin-Beck disease: a cluster-randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chuan-Tao; Yu, Fang-Fang; Ren, Feng-Ling; Fang, Hua; Guo, Xiong

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of hyaluronic acid (HA) and glucosamine sulfate (GS) in alleviating symptoms and improving function of Kashin-Beck disease (KBD). A cluster-randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 150 patients with KBD. Participants were randomly allocated to receive intra-articular injection hyaluronic acid (IAHA) for 4 weeks, oral GS for 12 weeks, or oral placebo for 12 weeks. The primary outcome measures were 20 % and 50 % reductions in pain from baseline measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) index. Secondary outcome measures included WOMAC index parameters of pain, stiffness, and physical function. The third outcome measure was mean change in Lequence score. HA and GS were effective in reducing WOMAC pain by 20 % (differences of 43.5 % and 25.4 %) and 50 % (differences of 43.4 % and 26.9 %). Both HA and GS significantly reduced WOMAC pain, WOMAC stiffness, and WOMAC normalized score compared with placebo group (all P < 0.05). IAHA was significantly more effective than oral GS in improving WOMAC normalized score (P = 0.034), pain (P = 0.002), stiffness (P = 0.018), and function (P = 0.044). The results indicate that HA and GS were more effective than placebo in treating KBD and HA was more effective than GS. PMID:25388643

  17. Suppression of glycosaminoglycan synthesis by articular cartilage, but not of hyaluronic acid synthesis by synovium, after exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently found that injection of 2 mCi of yttrium 90 (90Y; approximately 23,000 rads) into normal canine knees stimulated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis by femoral condylar cartilage. The present investigation was conducted to determine whether radiation affects cartilage metabolism directly. Rates of GAG synthesis and degradation in normal canine articular cartilage were studied following irradiation. Cultured synovium from the same knees was treated similarly, to determine the effects of irradiation on hyaluronic acid synthesis. Twenty-four hours after exposure to 1,000 rads, 10,000 rads, or 50,000 rads, 35S-GAG synthesis by the cartilage was 93%, 69%, and 37%, respectively, of that in control, nonirradiated cartilage. The effect was not rapidly reversible: 120 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, GAG synthesis remained at only 28% of the control level. Autoradiography showed marked suppression of 35S uptake by chondrocytes after irradiation. Cartilage GAG degradation was also increased following irradiation: 4 hours and 8 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, the cartilage GAG concentration was only 66% and 54%, respectively, of that at time 0, while corresponding values for control, nonirradiated cartilage were 90% and 87%. In contrast to its effects on cartilage GAG metabolism, radiation at these levels had no effect on synovial hyaluronic acid synthesis

  18. Characterization of a two-component system in Streptococcus pyogenes which is involved in regulation of hyaluronic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernish, B; van de Rijn, I

    1999-02-19

    Hyaluronic acid production by group A streptococci is regulated by transcriptional control. In this study, transposon mutagenesis of an unencapsulated strain yielded an encapsulated mutant. Two genes homologous to sensors and response regulators of bacterial two-component systems were identified downstream of the transposon insertion. Inactivation of the putative sensor gene, csrS, in three different unencapsulated strains yielded encapsulated mutant strains. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays determined factor(s) in a cytoplasmic extract of an unencapsulated group A streptococcal strain was binding to a double-stranded DNA fragment derived from the has operon promoter. In contrast, similarly prepared cytoplasmic extracts from a csrS deletion mutant did not shift the fragment. The putative response regulator, CsrR, was partially purified and was shown to bind the has operon promoter fragment. The affinity and specificity of CsrR for the fragment were increased significantly after incubation with acetyl phosphate. DNase I footprinting determined that the acetyl phosphate-treated CsrR was binding to key sequences in the promoter and the coding region of hasA. Therefore, a two-component system is repressing the production of hyaluronic acid in group A streptococci using a phosphorylation-dependent binding interaction between the response regulator CsrR and the promoter region of the has operon. PMID:9988717

  19. Suppression of glycosaminoglycan synthesis by articular cartilage, but not of hyaluronic acid synthesis by synovium, after exposure to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugenberg, S.T.; Myers, S.L.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-04-01

    We recently found that injection of 2 mCi of yttrium 90 (90Y; approximately 23,000 rads) into normal canine knees stimulated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis by femoral condylar cartilage. The present investigation was conducted to determine whether radiation affects cartilage metabolism directly. Rates of GAG synthesis and degradation in normal canine articular cartilage were studied following irradiation. Cultured synovium from the same knees was treated similarly, to determine the effects of irradiation on hyaluronic acid synthesis. Twenty-four hours after exposure to 1,000 rads, 10,000 rads, or 50,000 rads, 35S-GAG synthesis by the cartilage was 93%, 69%, and 37%, respectively, of that in control, nonirradiated cartilage. The effect was not rapidly reversible: 120 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, GAG synthesis remained at only 28% of the control level. Autoradiography showed marked suppression of 35S uptake by chondrocytes after irradiation. Cartilage GAG degradation was also increased following irradiation: 4 hours and 8 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, the cartilage GAG concentration was only 66% and 54%, respectively, of that at time 0, while corresponding values for control, nonirradiated cartilage were 90% and 87%. In contrast to its effects on cartilage GAG metabolism, radiation at these levels had no effect on synovial hyaluronic acid synthesis.

  20. Enhancement of skin wound healing with decellularized scaffolds loaded with hyaluronic acid and epidermal growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Zhongchun; Ma, Huan; Wu, Zhengzheng [Institute of Biomedicine, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Key Lab for Genetic Medicine of Guangdong Province, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zeng, Huilan [Department of Hematology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Li, Zhizhong [Department of Bone, The First Affiliated Hospital, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Wang, Yuechun; Liu, Gexiu [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Xu, Bin; Lin, Yongliang; Zhang, Peng [Grandhope Biotech Co., Ltd., Building D, #408, Guangzhou International Business Incubator, Guangzhou Science Park, Guangzhou 510663, Guangdong (China); Wei, Xing, E-mail: wei70@hotmail.com [Institute of Biomedicine, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Key Lab for Genetic Medicine of Guangdong Province, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2014-11-01

    Current therapy for skin wound healing still relies on skin transplantation. Many studies were done to try to find out ways to replace skin transplantation, but there is still no effective alternative therapy. In this study, decellularized scaffolds were prepared from pig peritoneum by a series of physical and chemical treatments, and scaffolds loaded with hyaluronic acid (HA) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were tested for their effect on wound healing. MTT assay showed that EGF increased NIH3T3 cell viability and confirmed that EGF used in this study was biologically active in vitro. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that HA stably attached to scaffolds even after soaking in PBS for 48 h. ELISA assay showed that HA increased the adsorption of EGF to scaffolds and sustained the release of EGF from scaffolds. Animal study showed that the wounds covered with scaffolds containing HA and EGF recovered best among all 4 groups and had wound healing rates of 49.86%, 70.94% and 87.41% respectively for days 10, 15 and 20 post-surgery compared to scaffolds alone with wound healing rates of 29.26%, 42.80% and 70.14%. In addition, the wounds covered with scaffolds containing EGF alone were smaller than no EGF scaffolds on days 10, 15 and 20 post-surgery. Hematoxylin–Eosin (HE) staining confirmed these results by showing that on days 10, 15 and 20 post-surgery, the thicker epidermis and dermis layers were observed in the wounds covered with scaffolds containing HA and EGF than scaffolds alone. In addition, the thicker epidermis and dermis layers were also observed in the wounds covered with scaffolds containing EGF than scaffolds alone. Skin appendages were observed on day 20 only in the wound covered with scaffolds containing HA and EGF. These results demonstrate that the scaffolds containing HA and EGF can enhance wound healing. - Highlights: • HA can increase the adsorption of EGF to decellularized scaffolds. • HA can sustain the release of EGF from

  1. Influence of BOL on hyaluronic acid, laminin and hyperplasia in hepatofibrotic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yao; Zhen-Min Yao; Tao Yu

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the anti-hepatofibrosis mechanism of Bie Jie Jian oral liquid (BOL). METHODS: The model was induced by subcutaneous injection of CCl4. BOL was administered and the change of serum hyaluronic acid (HA) and laminin (LN) was observed and the degeneration of liver cells and the degree of fibre hyperplasia analyzed. Changes of ultra micro-structure in liver cells were observed in some samples. RESULTS: HA was reduced in both the groups with Iow and high dosage of BOL, which showed a remarkable difference as compared with that of the model group ( Iow dosage group: 376.15 μg/L ± 35.48 μg/L vs 806.07 μg/L ± 98.49 μg/L, P < 0.05; high dosage group: 340.14 μg/L ± 30.18 μg/L vs 806.07μg/L± 98.49 μg/L, P<0.05). The LN content of Iow and high dosage group of BOL was lower than that of model group (Iow dosage group: 71.99 μg/L± 8.15 μg/L vs 133.94μg/L± 14.45 μg/L, P< 0.01; high dosage group: 71.68 ig/L± 11.62 μg/L vs 133.94 μg/L ± 14.45 μg/L, P<0.01) and colchicine group (Iow dosage group: 71.99 μg/L ± 8.15 μg/Lvs 118.28 μg/L ± 16.13 μg/L, P< 0.05; high dosage group:71.68 μg/L ± 11.62 μg/L vs 118.28 μg/L ± 16.13 μg/L,P<0.05). Examined by Ridit, BOL could reduce the degeneration and necrosis of liver cells (X2 = 11.99P<0.05), the degree of fibre hyperplasia (X2 = 13.24P<0.05) and the pathological change of ultra micro-structure as well. CONCLUSION: The BOL has certain therapeutic effect on the experiment hepatofibrosis. Its mechanisms might include:protecting the function of liver cells, inhibiting excessive synthesis and secretion of extraceiluar matrix from hepatic stellate cells, relieving the cepillarization of hepatic sinueoid, improving liver micro-circulation, and regulating immune function.

  2. Efficacy of hyaluronic acid binding assay in selecting motile spermatozoa with normal morphology at high magnification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauri Ana L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the hyaluronic acid (HA binding assay in the selection of motile spermatozoa with normal morphology at high magnification (8400x. Methods A total of 16592 prepared spermatozoa were selected and classified into two groups: Group I, spermatozoa which presented their head attached to an HA substance (HA-bound sperm, and Group II, those spermatozoa that did not attach to the HA substance (HA-unbound sperm. HA-bound and HA-unbound spermatozoa were evaluated according to the following sperm forms: 1-Normal morphology: normal nucleus (smooth, symmetric and oval configuration, length: 4.75+/-2.8 μm and width: 3.28+/-0.20 μm, no extrusion or invagination and no vacuoles occupied more than 4% of the nuclear area as well as acrosome, post-acrosomal lamina, neck, tail, besides not presenting a cytoplasmic droplet or cytoplasm around the head; 2-Abnormalities of nuclear form (a-Large/small; b-Wide/narrow; c-Regional disorder; 3-Abnormalities of nuclear chromatin content (a-Vacuoles: occupy >4% to 50% of the nuclear area and b-Large vacuoles: occupy >50% of the nuclear area using a high magnification (8400x microscopy system. Results No significant differences were obtained with respect to sperm morphological forms and the groups HA-bound and HA-unbound. 1-Normal morphology: HA-bound 2.7% and HA-unbound 2.5% (P = 0.56. 2-Abnormalities of nuclear form: a-Large/small: HA-bound 1.6% vs. HA-unbound 1.6% (P = 0.63; b-Wide/narrow: HA-bound 3.1% vs. HA-unbound 2.7% (P = 0.13; c-Regional disorders: HA-bound 4.7% vs. HA-unbound 4.4% (P = 0.34. 3. Abnormalities of nuclear chromatin content: a-Vacuoles >4% to 50%: HA-bound 72.2% vs. HA-unbound 72.5% (P = 0.74; b-Large vacuoles: HA-bound 15.7% vs. HA-unbound 16.3% (P = 0.36. Conclusions The findings suggest that HA binding assay has limited efficacy in selecting motile spermatozoa with normal morphology at high magnification.

  3. Inhibition of Hyaluronic Acid Synthesis Suppresses Angiogenesis in Developing Endometriotic Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Carla N.; Alaniz, Laura D.; Menger, Michael D.; Barañao, Rosa I.; Laschke, Matthias W.; Meresman, Gabriela F.

    2016-01-01

    Background The development and long-term survival of endometriotic lesions is crucially dependent on an adequate vascularization. Hyaluronic acid (HA) through its receptor CD44 has been described to be involved in the process of angiogenesis. Objective To study the effect of HA synthesis inhibition using non-toxic doses of 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) on endometriosis-related angiogenesis. Materials and Methods The cytotoxicity of different in vitro doses of 4-MU on endothelial cells was firstly tested by means of a lactate dehydrogenase assay. The anti-angiogenic action of non-cytotoxic doses of 4-MU was then assessed by a rat aortic ring assay. In addition, endometriotic lesions were induced in dorsal skinfold chambers of female BALB/c mice, which were daily treated with an intraperitoneal injection of 0.9% NaCl (vehicle group; n = 6), 20mg/kg 4-MU (n = 8) or 80mg/kg 4-MU (n = 7) throughout an observation period of 14 days. The effect of 4-MU on their vascularization, survival and growth were studied by intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology and immunohistochemistry. Main Results Non-cytotoxic doses of 4-MU effectively inhibited vascular sprout formation in the rat aortic ring assay. Endometriotic lesions in dorsal skinfold chambers of 4-MU-treated mice dose-dependently exhibited a significantly smaller vascularized area and lower functional microvessel density when compared to vehicle-treated controls. Histological analyses revealed a downregulation of HA expression in 4-MU-treated lesions. This was associated with a reduced density of CD31-positive microvessels within the lesions. In contrast, numbers of PCNA-positive proliferating and cleaved caspase-3-positive apoptotic cells did not differ between 4-MU-treated and control lesions. Conclusions The present study demonstrates for the first time that targeting the synthesis of HA suppresses angiogenesis in developing endometriotic lesions. Further studies have to clarify now whether in the future this

  4. Enhancement of skin wound healing with decellularized scaffolds loaded with hyaluronic acid and epidermal growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current therapy for skin wound healing still relies on skin transplantation. Many studies were done to try to find out ways to replace skin transplantation, but there is still no effective alternative therapy. In this study, decellularized scaffolds were prepared from pig peritoneum by a series of physical and chemical treatments, and scaffolds loaded with hyaluronic acid (HA) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were tested for their effect on wound healing. MTT assay showed that EGF increased NIH3T3 cell viability and confirmed that EGF used in this study was biologically active in vitro. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that HA stably attached to scaffolds even after soaking in PBS for 48 h. ELISA assay showed that HA increased the adsorption of EGF to scaffolds and sustained the release of EGF from scaffolds. Animal study showed that the wounds covered with scaffolds containing HA and EGF recovered best among all 4 groups and had wound healing rates of 49.86%, 70.94% and 87.41% respectively for days 10, 15 and 20 post-surgery compared to scaffolds alone with wound healing rates of 29.26%, 42.80% and 70.14%. In addition, the wounds covered with scaffolds containing EGF alone were smaller than no EGF scaffolds on days 10, 15 and 20 post-surgery. Hematoxylin–Eosin (HE) staining confirmed these results by showing that on days 10, 15 and 20 post-surgery, the thicker epidermis and dermis layers were observed in the wounds covered with scaffolds containing HA and EGF than scaffolds alone. In addition, the thicker epidermis and dermis layers were also observed in the wounds covered with scaffolds containing EGF than scaffolds alone. Skin appendages were observed on day 20 only in the wound covered with scaffolds containing HA and EGF. These results demonstrate that the scaffolds containing HA and EGF can enhance wound healing. - Highlights: • HA can increase the adsorption of EGF to decellularized scaffolds. • HA can sustain the release of EGF from

  5. Optimization and translation of MSC-based hyaluronic acid hydrogels for cartilage repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Isaac E.

    2011-12-01

    Traumatic injury and disease disrupt the ability of cartilage to carry joint stresses and, without an innate regenerative response, often lead to degenerative changes towards the premature development of osteoarthritis. Surgical interventions have yet to restore long-term mechanical function. Towards this end, tissue engineering has been explored for the de novo formation of engineered cartilage as a biologic approach to cartilage repair. Research utilizing autologous chondrocytes has been promising, but clinical limitations in their yield have motivated research into the potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as an alternative cell source. MSCs are multipotent cells that can differentiate towards a chondrocyte phenotype in a number of biomaterials, but no combination has successfully recapitulated the native mechanical function of healthy articular cartilage. The broad objective of this thesis was to establish an MSC-based tissue engineering approach worthy of clinical translation. Hydrogels are a common class of biomaterial used for cartilage tissue engineering and our initial work demonstrated the potential of a photo-polymerizable hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel to promote MSC chondrogenesis and improved construct maturation by optimizing macromer and MSC seeding density. The beneficial effects of dynamic compressive loading, high MSC density, and continuous mixing (orbital shaker) resulted in equilibrium modulus values over 1 MPa, well in range of native tissue. While compressive properties are crucial, clinical translation also demands that constructs stably integrate within a defect. We utilized a push-out testing modality to assess the in vitro integration of HA constructs within artificial cartilage defects. We established the necessity for in vitro pre-maturation of constructs before repair to achieve greater integration strength and compressive properties in situ. Combining high MSC density and gentle mixing resulted in integration strength over 500 k

  6. Hyaluronic acid based hydrogel system for soft tissue regeneration and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Amit Kumar

    We have developed hyaluronic acid (HA)-based, biomimetic hydrogel matrices that are hierarchically structured, mechanically robust and biologically active. Specifically, HA-based hydrogel particles (HGPs) with controlled sizes, defined porosity, and improved stability were synthesized using different inverse emulsion systems and crosslinking chemistries. The resultant particles either contained residual functional groups or were rendered reactive by subsequent chemical modifications. HA-based doubly crosslinked networks (DXNs) were synthesized via covalent crosslinking of HA HGPs with soluble HA macromers carrying mutually reactive functional groups. These hybrid matrices are hierarchical in nature, consisting of densely crosslinked HGPs integrated in a loosely connected secondary matrix. Their mechanical properties and degradation kinetics can be readily tuned by varying the particle size, functional group density, intra- and interparticle crosslinking. To improve the biological functions of HA HGPs, perlecan domain I (PlnDI), a basement membrane proteoglycan that has strong affinity for various heparin binding growth factors (HBGFs), was successfully conjugated to the particles through the core protein via a flexible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) linker. The immobilized PlnDI maintains its ability to bind bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2) and modulates its in vitro release. A similar, sustained release of BMP-2 was achieved by encapsulating BMP-2-loaded HGPs within a photocrosslinked HA matrix. When encapsulated in HA DXNs, primary bovine chondrocytes were able to maintain their phenotype, proliferate readily and produce abundant glycosaminoglycan. Finally, cell-adhesive HA DXNs were fabricated by encapsulating gelatin-decorated HA HGPs in a secondary HA matrix. Human MSCs were shown to adhere to the composite matrix through the focal adhesion sites clustered on particle surface. The cell-adhesive composite matrices supported hMSC proliferation and migration into

  7. In vitro evaluation of antiviral and virucidal activity of a high molecular weight hyaluronic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blasi Elisabetta

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background hyaluronic acid (HA, a non-sulphated glycosaminoglycan, is present in synovial fluid, vitreous humour serum and many connective tissues. Pharmaceutical preparations of HA are used in clinical practice for wound healing, joint pain, kerato-conjunctivitis, asthma, mouth care, oesophageal-reflux, and gastritis. Moreover, it is used as a filler to counteract ageing and facial lipoatrophy. Our study aims at investigating the in vitro antiviral activity of a high molecular weight HA. Methods the MTT test was used to rule out the potential toxic effects of HA on the different cell lines used in the antiviral assays. The antiviral activity of HA against Coxsackievirus B5, Herpes Simplex Virus-1, Mumps Virus, Adenovirus-5, Influenza Virus A/H1N1, Human Herpesvirus-6, Porcine Parvovirus, Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus was assessed by virus yield assays. Results the most effective inhibition was observed against Coxsackievirus B5, with 3Log reduction of the virus yield at 4 mg/ml, and a reduction of 3.5Log and 2Log, at 2 mg/ml and 1 mg/ml, respectively: the selectivity index was 16. Mumps virus was highly inhibited too showing a reduction of 1.7Log at 1 mg/ml and 1Log at 4 mg/ml and 2 mg/ml (selectivity index = 12. The selectivity index for Influenza Virus was 12 with the highest inhibition (1Log observed at 4 mg/ml. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Porcine Parvovirus were mildly inhibited, whereas no antiviral activity was observed with respect to Adenovirus-5, Human Herpesvirus-6, Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus. No HA virucidal activity was ever observed against any of the viruses tested. Kinetic experiments showed that both Coxsackievirus B5 and Herpes simplex virus-1 replication were consistently inhibited, not influenced by the time of HA addition, during the virus replication cycle. Conclusions the spectrum of the antiviral activity exhibited by HA against both RNA and DNA viruses, known to have

  8. Clinical and biometrological efficacy of a hyaluronic acid-based mesotherapy product: a randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baspeyras, Martine; Rouvrais, Céline; Liégard, Laetitia; Delalleau, Alexandre; Letellier, Sandrine; Bacle, Irène; Courrech, Laetitia; Murat, Pascale; Mengeaud, Valérie; Schmitt, Anne-Marie

    2013-10-01

    Data demonstrating the efficacy of hyaluronic acid (HA)-based mesotherapy for skin rejuvenation are scarce. The aim of the study is to assess the efficacy of non-reticulated HA-based mesotherapy on skin elasticity and complexion radiance. 55 women with cutaneous ageing signs included in the Full Analysis Set (FAS) population blindly received intradermal micro-injections (50 × 0.02 mL) of non-cross-linked HA filler with mannitol (Glytone 1, HA concentration: 14 mg/g) in one cheek and saline physiological solution in the other according to hemifacial randomisation in 3 monthly sessions. Elasticity (E1 and E2 stiffness parameters) and dermis thickness were measured by cutometry and 20 MHz echography, before (D0) treatment and 1 (1M) and 3 months (3M) after the last injection. A trained panel blindly scored skin complexion radiance from standardised and calibrated photographs, using 100 mm analogue scales. In the FAS population, only HA filler significantly decreased E1 at 1M (-10.9 %, p = 0.026) and 3M (-10.5 %, p = 0.035) compared with D0; its effect versus the control tended to be more persistent, with a difference between treatments at 3M close to significance (p = 0.063). E2 also decreased at 1M (-8.2 %, p = 0.027 in the per protocol population, n = 53) and 3M after HA-treatment only. Dermis thickness significantly increased after HA-treatment at 1M (+3.4 %, p = 0.028) and 3M (+4 %, p = 0.008), and after control-treatment at 1M only (+2.5 %, p = 0.015). The HA filler significantly improved complexion radiance at 3M compared with the control (p = 0.012) and for 51 % of subjects, their skin status. Non-reticulated HA-based mesotherapy significantly and sustainably improves skin elasticity and complexion radiance. PMID:23715889

  9. Inhibition of Hyaluronic Acid Synthesis Suppresses Angiogenesis in Developing Endometriotic Lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla N Olivares

    Full Text Available The development and long-term survival of endometriotic lesions is crucially dependent on an adequate vascularization. Hyaluronic acid (HA through its receptor CD44 has been described to be involved in the process of angiogenesis.To study the effect of HA synthesis inhibition using non-toxic doses of 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU on endometriosis-related angiogenesis.The cytotoxicity of different in vitro doses of 4-MU on endothelial cells was firstly tested by means of a lactate dehydrogenase assay. The anti-angiogenic action of non-cytotoxic doses of 4-MU was then assessed by a rat aortic ring assay. In addition, endometriotic lesions were induced in dorsal skinfold chambers of female BALB/c mice, which were daily treated with an intraperitoneal injection of 0.9% NaCl (vehicle group; n = 6, 20 mg/kg 4-MU (n = 8 or 80 mg/kg 4-MU (n = 7 throughout an observation period of 14 days. The effect of 4-MU on their vascularization, survival and growth were studied by intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology and immunohistochemistry.Non-cytotoxic doses of 4-MU effectively inhibited vascular sprout formation in the rat aortic ring assay. Endometriotic lesions in dorsal skinfold chambers of 4-MU-treated mice dose-dependently exhibited a significantly smaller vascularized area and lower functional microvessel density when compared to vehicle-treated controls. Histological analyses revealed a downregulation of HA expression in 4-MU-treated lesions. This was associated with a reduced density of CD31-positive microvessels within the lesions. In contrast, numbers of PCNA-positive proliferating and cleaved caspase-3-positive apoptotic cells did not differ between 4-MU-treated and control lesions.The present study demonstrates for the first time that targeting the synthesis of HA suppresses angiogenesis in developing endometriotic lesions. Further studies have to clarify now whether in the future this anti-angiogenic effect can be used beneficially for the

  10. Liver-targeting self-assembled hyaluronic acid-glycyrrhetinic acid micelles enhance hepato-protective effect of silybin after oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaofeng; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Manyuan; Li, Jing; Xu, Yongsong; He, Rui; Guan, Hongyu; Yue, Zhujun; Gong, Muxin

    2016-06-01

    In order to enhance oral bioavailability and liver targeting delivery of silybin, two amphiphilic hyaluronic acid derivatives, hyaluronic acid-deoxycholic acid (HA-adh-DOCA) and hyaluronic acid-glycyrrhetinic acid (HA-adh-GA) conjugates, were designed and synthesized. Silybin was successfully loaded in HA-adh-DOCA and HA-adh-GA micelles with high drug-loading capacities (20.3% ± 0.5% and 20.6% ± 0.6%, respectively). The silybin-loaded micelles were spherical in shape with the average size around 130 nm. In vitro release study showed that two silybin-loaded micelles displayed similar steady continued-release pattern in simulated gastrointestinal fluids and PBS. Single-pass intestinal perfusion studies indicated that silybin-loaded micelles were absorbed in the whole intestine and transported via a passive diffusion mechanism. Compared with suspension formulation, silybin-loaded HA-adh-DOCA and HA-adh-GA micelles achieved significantly higher AUC and Cmax level. Moreover, liver targeting drug delivery of micelles was confirmed by in vivo imaging analysis. In comparison between the two micellar formulations, HA-adh-GA micelles possessed higher targeting capacity than HA-adh-DOCA micelles, owing to the active hepatic targeting properties of glycyrrhetinic acid. In the treatment of acute liver injury induced by CCl4, silybin-loaded HA-adh-GA micelles displayed better effects over suspension control and silybin-loaded HA-adh-DOCA micelles. Overall, pharmaceutical and pharmacological indicators suggested that the HA-adh-GA conjugates can be successfully utilized for liver targeting of orally administered therapeutics. PMID:26556526

  11. Synthesis of two hyaluronic-acid-related oligosaccharide 4-methoxyphenyl glycosides having a beta-D-glucuronic acid residue at the reducing end

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halkes, K.M.; Slaghek, T.M.; Hypponen, T.K.; Kamerling, J.P.; Vliegenthart, J.F.G.

    1999-01-01

    Synthesis of two hyaluronic-acid-related oligosaccharides, the 4-methoxyphenyl β-glycosides of β-D-GlcpA-(1→3)-β-D-GlcpNAc-(1→4)-D-GlcpA and β-D-GlcpA-(1→3)-β-D-GlcpNAc-(1→4)-β-D-GlcpA-(1→3)- β-D-GJcpNAc-(1→4)-D-GlcpA, is described. D-Glucopyranosyluronic acid residues were obtained by selective oxi

  12. An In Vivo Study of Composite Microgels Based on Hyaluronic Acid and Gelatin for the Reconstruction of Surgically Injured Rat Vocal Folds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppoolse, Jiska M. S.; Van Kooten, T. G.; Heris, Hossein K.; Mongeau, Luc; Li, Nicole Y. K.; Thibeault, Susan L.; Pitaro, Jacob; Akinpelu, Olubunm; Daniel, Sam J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate local injection with a hierarchically microstructured hyaluronic acid-gelatin (HA-Ge) hydrogel for the treatment of acute vocal fold injury using a rat model. Method: Vocal fold stripping was performed unilaterally in 108 Sprague-Dawley rats. A volume of 25 µl saline (placebo controls),…

  13. Hyaluronic acid levels predict increased risk of non-AIDS death in hepatitis-coinfected persons interrupting antiretroviral therapy in the SMART Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Mocroft, Amanda;

    2011-01-01

    In the SMART study, HIV-viral-hepatitis-coinfected persons were, compared with HIV-monoinfected persons, at higher risk of non-AIDS death if randomized to the antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption strategy. We hypothesized that a marker of liver fibrosis, hyaluronic acid (HA), would be...

  14. Cell adhesion molecules and hyaluronic acid as markers of inflammation, fibrosis and response to antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Granot

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cell adhesion molecules (intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 and hyaluronic acid, markers of inflammation and fibrosis were monitored in hepatitis C patients to determine whether changes in plasma levels, during antiviral treatment, can predict long-term response to therapy.

  15. Exploring reasons for the observed inconsistent trial reports on intra-articular injections with hyaluronic acid in the treatment of osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mette; Bahrt, Henriette; Altman, Roy D;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to identify factors explaining inconsistent observations concerning the efficacy of intra-articular hyaluronic acid compared to intra-articular sham/control, or non-intervention control, in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis, based on randomized clinical trials (RCTs)...

  16. Auto-cross-linked hyaluronic acid gel does not reduce intra-abdominal adhesions or abscess formation in a rat model of peritonitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkink, C.J.J.M.; Man, B.M. de; Bleichrodt, R.P.; Goor, H. van

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prevention of adhesion and abscess formation would decrease mortality and morbidity after peritonitis. In this study the effect of a new anti-adhesive, auto-cross-linked hyaluronic acid polysaccharide (ACP) gel, on adhesion and abscess formation was studied in a rat peritonitis model. MA

  17. Topical Hyaluronic Acid vs. Standard of Care for the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Single-Blind Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L.; Arriaga, Lisa [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Yu, T. Kuan, E-mail: tkyu@houstonprecisioncc.com [Houston Precision Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of {>=}Grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation compared with best supportive care. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast radiotherapy to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast and to use the control gel on the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis. Results: The study closed early on the basis of a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed a significantly higher rate of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel: 61.5% (40/65) vs. 47.7% (31/65) (p = 0.027). Only 1ne patient developed Grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than in that treated with petrolatum gel at the end of radiotherapy (42% vs. 14%, p = 0.003). Conclusion: We found no benefit from the use of a topical hyaluronic acid-based gel for reducing the development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop.

  18. 透明质酸在骨组织工程研究中的应用现状%Application of hyaluronic acid in bone tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛秋华; 徐普

    2013-01-01

      背景:用组织工程学方法促进骨组织再生,是近年来骨缺损修复的研究热点。支架材料是骨组织工程研究的重要内容。目的:分析透明质酸作为骨组织工程支架材料的应用进展。方法:对CNKI、PubMed数据库进行文献检索,以“透明质酸,骨”为中文检索词、“hyaluronic acid, bone“为英文检索词。提取文献进行透明质酸作为骨组织工程支架材料的应用研究的分析。分析了透明质酸的物理特性,透明质酸在骨组织工程中的应用,以及相关文献的发表情况。结果与结论:透明质酸是一种重要的细胞外基质,透明质酸及其衍生物有优良的特性,是构建组织工程支架的优良材料,且可作为生长因子及细胞的输送载体。国家自然科学基金是资助透明质酸作为骨组织工程支架材料的应用的相关文献最多的基金,湖北中医学院、解放军总医院、广州中医药大学、华南理工大学发表相关文献较多。近年透明质酸在骨组织工程上的应用研究引起了越来越多的关注,但其临床研究较少。%BACKGROUND: Using tissue engineering method to promote bone tissue regeneration is a hot research point of bone defect repair in recent years, and scaffold materials are the important content for bone tissue engineering research. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the application progress of hyaluronic acid used as a tissue engineering scaffold material. METHODS: The CNKI database and PubMed database were searched with the key words of “hyaluronic acid, bone”. The literatures about the analysis on the application of hyaluronic acid as the tissue engineering scaffold material were selected. The physical characteristics of hyaluronic acid and application of hyaluronic acid in bone tissue engineering were analyzed, as wel as the publishing of related literatures. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Hyaluronic acid is an important component of the

  19. Effect of vitamin D therapy on interleukin-6, visfatin, and hyaluronic acid levels in chronic hepatitis C Egyptian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dina Sabry,1 Mohamed AS Al-Ghussein,2 Gehan Hamdy,3 Amr Abul-Fotouh,4 Tarek Motawi,5 Amany Y El Kazaz,6 Ahmed Eldemery,7 Marwa Shaker8,9 1Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt; 2Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Gaza, State of Palestine, 3Internal Medicine Department, 4Tropical Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, 5Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt; 6Medical Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismaileya, Egypt; 7Medical Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Medicine, October 6 University, Giza, Egypt; 8Tropical Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt; 9Tropical Medicine Department, Bny Swif University, Bny Swif, Egypt Objectives: We aimed to compare serum levels of interleukin-6, visfatin, and hyaluronic acid in chronic hepatitis C Egyptian patients who received standard of care (SOC therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV consisting of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN and ribavirin (RBV and in those who received SOC with vitamin D (vit D for 48 weeks in HCV genotype 4a subjects. Design and methods: One hundred chronic HCV patients were classified into two groups: study 50 patients received SOC therapy PEG-IFN/RBV + vit D and control 50 patients received SOC PEG-IFN/RBV without vit D. Both groups were followed up at 12 weeks, 24 weeks, and 48 weeks of treatment. Results: Results showed a significant elevation in vit D levels in the group treated with SOC and vit D compared to SOC group and a reduction in HCV RNA from the 12th week to reach zero level in the 24th week. Interleukin-6, visfatin, and hyaluronic acid levels were also reduced significantly. Alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase biomarkers were significantly reduced, indicating decreased liver injury. Conclusion: SOC PEG-IFN/RBV + vit D therapy for chronic HCV led

  20. Platelet Rich Plasma and Hyaluronic Acid Blend for the Treatment of Osteoarthritis: Rheological and Biological Evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Russo

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common musculoskeletal disease. Current treatments for OA are mainly symptomatic and inadequate since none results in restoration of fully functional cartilage. Hyaluronic Acid (HA intra-articular injections are widely accepted for the treatment of pain associated to OA. The goal of HA viscosupplementation is to reduce pain and improve viscoelasticity of synovial fluid. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP has been also employed to treat OA to possibly induce cartilage regeneration. The combination of HA and PRP could supply many advantages for tissue repair. Indeed, it conjugates HA viscosupplementation with PRP regenerative properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rheological and biological properties of different HA compositions in combination with PRP in order to identify (i the viscoelastic features of the HA-PRP blends, (ii their biological effect on osteoarthritic chondrocytes and (iii HA formulations suitable for use in combination with PRP.HA/PRP blends have been obtained mixing human PRP and three different HA at different concentrations: 1 Sinovial, 0.8% (SN; 2 Sinovial Forte 1.6% (SF; 3 Sinovial HL 3.2% (HL; 4 Hyalubrix 1.5% (HX. Combinations of phosphate buffered saline (PBS and the four HA types were used as control. Rheological measurements were performed on an Anton PaarMCR-302 rheometer. Amplitude sweep, frequency sweep and rotational measurements were performed and viscoelastic properties were evaluated. The rheological data were validated performing the tests in presence of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA up to ultra-physiological concentration (7%. Primary osteoarthritic chondrocytes were cultured in vitro with the HA and PRP blends in the culture medium for one week. Cell viability, proliferation and glycosaminoglycan (GAG content were assessed.PRP addition to HA leads to a decrease of viscoelastic shear moduli and increase of the crossover point, due to a pure dilution effect. For viscosupplements

  1. Topical Hyaluronic Acid vs. Standard of Care for the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Single-Blind Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of ≥Grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation compared with best supportive care. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast radiotherapy to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid–based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast and to use the control gel on the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of ≥Grade 2 dermatitis. Results: The study closed early on the basis of a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed a significantly higher rate of ≥Grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel: 61.5% (40/65) vs. 47.7% (31/65) (p = 0.027). Only 1ne patient developed Grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than in that treated with petrolatum gel at the end of radiotherapy (42% vs. 14%, p = 0.003). Conclusion: We found no benefit from the use of a topical hyaluronic acid–based gel for reducing the development of ≥Grade 2 dermatitis after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid–based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop

  2. Regenerative surgery of the complications with Morton's neuroma surgery: use of platelet rich plasma and hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Barbara; Lucarini, Lucilla; Orlandi, Fabrizio; Agovino, Annarita; Migner, Alessia; Cervelli, Valerio; Izzo, Valentina; Curcio, Cristiano

    2013-08-01

    Morton's neuroma is an entrapment neuropathy of the plantar digital nerve. We treated five patients with wound dehiscence and tendon exposure, after Morton's neuroma surgery excision using a dorsal approach. In this article we describe our technique. From July 2010 to August 2011, at the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', five patients (four females and one male), with ages ranging between 35 and 52 years, were treated with a combination of PRP (platelet rich plasma) and HA (hyaluronic acid). Thirty days following surgery, all patients showed a complete healing of the wound. The use of this technique for the treatment of postoperative wound dehiscence and tendon exposure has proven as satisfactory. PMID:22694086

  3. "Click" Chemistry-Tethered Hyaluronic Acid-Based Contact Lens Coatings Improve Lens Wettability and Lower Protein Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xudong; Korogiannaki, Myrto; Rastegari, Banafsheh; Zhang, Jianfeng; Chen, Mengsu; Fu, Qiang; Sheardown, Heather; Filipe, Carlos D M; Hoare, Todd

    2016-08-31

    Improving the wettability of and reducing the protein adsorption to contact lenses may be beneficial for improving wearer comfort. Herein, we describe a simple "click" chemistry approach to surface functionalize poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA)-based contact lenses with hyaluronic acid (HA), a carbohydrate naturally contributing to the wettability of the native tear film. A two-step preparation technique consisting of laccase/TEMPO-mediated oxidation followed by covalent grafting of hydrazide-functionalized HA via simple immersion resulted in a model lens surface that is significantly more wettable, more water retentive, and less protein binding than unmodified pHEMA while maintaining the favorable transparency, refractive, and mechanical properties of a native lens. The dipping/coating method we developed to covalently tether the HA wetting agent is simple, readily scalable, and a highly efficient route for contact lens modification. PMID:27509015

  4. Hyaluronic acid hydrogels with IKVAV peptides for tissue repair and axonal regeneration in an injured rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Y T [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Tian, W M [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Yu, X [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Cui, F Z [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Hou, S P [Beijing Institute of Neuroscience, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100054 (China); Xu, Q Y [Beijing Institute of Neuroscience, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100054 (China); Lee, In-Seop [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, and Atomic-scale Surface Science Research Center, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    A biocompatible hydrogel of hyaluronic acid with the neurite-promoting peptide sequence of IKVAV was synthesized. The characterization of the hydrogel shows an open porous structure and a large surface area available for cell interaction. Its ability to promote tissue repair and axonal regeneration in the lesioned rat cerebrum is also evaluated. After implantation, the polymer hydrogel repaired the tissue defect and formed a permissive interface with the host tissue. Axonal growth occurred within the microstructure of the network. Within 6 weeks the polymer implant was invaded by host-derived tissue, glial cells, blood vessels and axons. Such a hydrogel matrix showed the properties of neuron conduction. It has the potential to repair tissue defects in the central nervous system by promoting the formation of a tissue matrix and axonal growth by replacing the lost tissue.

  5. Pilot Study on Hyaluronic Acid Fermentation%透明质酸发酵条件的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田毅红

    2004-01-01

    采用兽瘟链球菌(Streptococcus zooepidemicus)进行发酵生产透明质酸(hyaluronic acid,HA).摇瓶研究表明:葡萄糖的补加量和补加方式对HA发酵有着较大的影响,采用40g·L-1的初始葡萄糖浓度及维持培养过程10g·L-1的糖浓度,可使HA的产量达到4.0g·L-1,分子量在2.0×106Da以上.

  6. Synthesis and Kinetics of a Novel Mimic with Glutathione Peroxidase Activity-Tellurium-containing Hyaluronic Acid (TeHA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Bo CHEN; Lan Ying LIU; Bo Xun ZHANG; Zhong Xiu HUANG; Qing Lin PENG; Jia CHEN; Yu WANG; Jian Guo ZHANG; Guang Zhi JIANG; Wen Shu LI

    2006-01-01

    A novel mimic was synthesized by modifying hyaluronic acid (HA) with tellurium,whose function is similar to that of glutathione peroxidase (GPX). The structure of TeHA was characterized by means of IR and NMR, the target-Te was located at -CH2OH of the N-acetyl-D-glucosamine of HA. The H2O2 reducing activity of TeHA, by glutathione (GSH), was 163.6U/μmol according to Wilson's method. In contrast to other mimics, TeHA displayed the highest activity. Moreover, TeHA accepted many hydroperoxides as its substrates, such as H2O2, cumenyl hydroperoxide (CuOOH) and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH), and CuOOH was the optimal substrate of TeHA. A ping-pong mechanism was observed in the steady-state kinetic studies of the reactions catalyzed by TeHA.

  7. Incorporation of hyaluronic acid into collagen scaffolds for the control of chondrocyte-mediated contraction and chondrogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Shunqing [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Spector, Myron [Tissue Engineering, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA 02130 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a principal matrix molecule in many tissues, is present in high amounts in articular cartilage. HA contributes in unique ways to the physical behavior of the tissue, and has been shown to have beneficial effects on chondrocyte activity. The goal of this study was to incorporate graduated amounts of HA into type I collagen scaffolds for the control of chondrocyte-mediated contraction and chondrogenesis in vitro. The results demonstrated that the amount of contraction of HA/collagen scaffolds by adult canine articular chondrocytes increased with the HA content of the scaffolds. The greatest amount of chondrogenesis after two weeks was found in the scaffolds which had undergone the most contraction. HA can play a useful role in adjusting the mechanical behavior of tissue engineering scaffolds and chondrogenesis in chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds.

  8. Stoichiometric C6-oxidation of hyaluronic acid by oxoammonium salt TEMPO⁺Cl⁻ in an aqueous alkaline medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponedel'kina, Irina Yu; Khaibrakhmanova, Elvira A; Tyumkina, Tatyana V; Romadova, Irina V; Odinokov, Victor N

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the selective oxidation of hyaluronic acid (HA) by stoichiometric quantity of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxoammonium chloride (TEMPO(+)) in aqueous alkaline medium. High efficiency of the HA oxidation and quantitative yield of carboxy-HA per starting TEMPO(+), as well as unusual behavior of the oxidation system generating an oxygen upon alkali-induced oxoammonium chloride decomposition are demonstrated. The scheme for HA oxidation involving both TEMPO(+) and oxygen produced upon the TEMPO(+)Cl(-) decomposition and/or air oxygen is proposed. For comparison, the data on stoichiometric oxidation of such substrates as dermatan sulfate, water-soluble potato starch, methyl 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-d-glucopyranoside and ethanol are presented. PMID:26076602

  9. Growth factors-loaded stents modified with hyaluronic acid and heparin for induction of rapid and tight re-endothelialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dong Hoon; Kang, Sung Nam; Kim, Seong Min; Gobaa, Samy; Park, Bang Ju; Kim, Ik Hwan; Joung, Yoon Ki; Han, Dong Keun

    2016-05-01

    Rapid re-endothelialization of damaged vessel lining efficiently prevents restenosis and thrombosis and restores original vascular functions. In this study, we designed a novel metallic stent with a heparin-modified surface and used different methods, including 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and divinyl sulfone (DVS), to load growth factors. First we loaded heparin into a dopamine-conjugated hyaluronic acid (HA) coating to serve as a growth factor reservoir. In a second step, we took advantage of the heparin-binding domain of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) to gain advanced re-endothelialization capabilities. We demonstrated that DVS technique offered higher amount of growth factor loading. In vitro assessment also showed better capillary-like structure formation and localized gap junctions when DVS coating was employed. This study suggested that growth factor loaded stent modified by HA and heparin provided the advantage to rapid and tight restoration of endothelium. PMID:26928466

  10. Incorporation of hyaluronic acid into collagen scaffolds for the control of chondrocyte-mediated contraction and chondrogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a principal matrix molecule in many tissues, is present in high amounts in articular cartilage. HA contributes in unique ways to the physical behavior of the tissue, and has been shown to have beneficial effects on chondrocyte activity. The goal of this study was to incorporate graduated amounts of HA into type I collagen scaffolds for the control of chondrocyte-mediated contraction and chondrogenesis in vitro. The results demonstrated that the amount of contraction of HA/collagen scaffolds by adult canine articular chondrocytes increased with the HA content of the scaffolds. The greatest amount of chondrogenesis after two weeks was found in the scaffolds which had undergone the most contraction. HA can play a useful role in adjusting the mechanical behavior of tissue engineering scaffolds and chondrogenesis in chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds

  11. Construction of antibacterial poly(ethylene terephthalate) films via layer by layer assembly of chitosan and hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Hoyo-Gallego, Sara; Pérez-Álvarez, Leyre; Gómez-Galván, Flor; Lizundia, Erlantz; Kuritka, Ivo; Sedlarik, Vladimir; Laza, Jose Manuel; Vila-Vilela, Jose Luis

    2016-06-01

    Polyelectrolytic multilayers (PEMs) with enhanced antibacterial properties were built up onto commercial poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films based on the layer by layer assembling of bacterial contact killing chitosan and bacterial repelling highly hydrated hyaluronic acid. The optimization of the aminolysis modification reaction of PET was carried out by the study of the mechanical properties and the surface characterization of the modified polymers. The layer by layer assembly was successfully monitored by TEM microscopy, surface zeta-potential, contact angle measurements and, after labeling with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FTIC) by absorption spectroscopy and confocal fluorescent microscopy. Beside, the stability of the PEMs was studied at physiological conditions in absence and in the presence of lysozyme and hyaluronidase enzymes. Antibacterial properties of the obtained PEMs against Escherichia coli were compared with original commercial PET. PMID:27083341

  12. Effect of Hyaluronic Acid on the Self Assembling Behaviour of PEO-PPO Copolymers in Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayol, L.; Borzacchiello, A.; Quaglia, F.; La Rotonda, M. I.; Ambrosio, L.

    2008-07-01

    The influence of hyaluronic acid (HA) on the self assembling properties of pluronic (PEO-PPO-PEO block copolymers) blends has been studied with the aim of engineering thermosensitive and mucoadhesive polymeric platforms for drug delivery. The gelation temperature (Tgel), viscoelastic properties and mucoadhesive force of the systems were investigated and optimised by means of rheological analyses. Pluronic micellar radius was evaluated by Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS). The addition of Low Molecular Weight HA did not hamper the self assembling process of pluronics just delaying the gelation temperature of few Celsius degrees. Furthermore, HA presence led to a strong increase of the pluronics gel rheological properties. PCS results show, in formulations containing HA, aggregates with hydrodynamic diameters values much higher than those of pluronic micelles. Mucoadhesive experiments indicate the possibility of interactions between the pluronic/HA gel and mucus glycoproteins.

  13. Hyaluronic acid hydrogels with IKVAV peptides for tissue repair and axonal regeneration in an injured rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y. T.; Tian, W. M.; Yu, X.; Cui, F. Z.; Hou, S. P.; Xu, Q. Y.; Lee, In-Seop

    2007-09-01

    A biocompatible hydrogel of hyaluronic acid with the neurite-promoting peptide sequence of IKVAV was synthesized. The characterization of the hydrogel shows an open porous structure and a large surface area available for cell interaction. Its ability to promote tissue repair and axonal regeneration in the lesioned rat cerebrum is also evaluated. After implantation, the polymer hydrogel repaired the tissue defect and formed a permissive interface with the host tissue. Axonal growth occurred within the microstructure of the network. Within 6 weeks the polymer implant was invaded by host-derived tissue, glial cells, blood vessels and axons. Such a hydrogel matrix showed the properties of neuron conduction. It has the potential to repair tissue defects in the central nervous system by promoting the formation of a tissue matrix and axonal growth by replacing the lost tissue.

  14. Hyaluronic acid hydrogels with IKVAV peptides for tissue repair and axonal regeneration in an injured rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biocompatible hydrogel of hyaluronic acid with the neurite-promoting peptide sequence of IKVAV was synthesized. The characterization of the hydrogel shows an open porous structure and a large surface area available for cell interaction. Its ability to promote tissue repair and axonal regeneration in the lesioned rat cerebrum is also evaluated. After implantation, the polymer hydrogel repaired the tissue defect and formed a permissive interface with the host tissue. Axonal growth occurred within the microstructure of the network. Within 6 weeks the polymer implant was invaded by host-derived tissue, glial cells, blood vessels and axons. Such a hydrogel matrix showed the properties of neuron conduction. It has the potential to repair tissue defects in the central nervous system by promoting the formation of a tissue matrix and axonal growth by replacing the lost tissue

  15. Uptake of silica covered Quantum Dots into living cells: Long term vitality and morphology study on hyaluronic acid biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Michele; Fiorica, Calogero; Palumbo, Fabio Salvatore; Militello, Valeria; Leone, Maurizio; Dubertret, Benoit; Pitarresi, Giovanna; Giammona, Gaetano

    2016-10-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are promising very bright and stable fluorescent probes for optical studies in the biological field but water solubility and possible metal bio-contamination need to be addressed. In this work, a simple silica-QD hybrid system is prepared and the uptake in bovine chondrocytes living cells without any functionalization of the external protective silica shield is demonstrated. Moreover, long term treated cells vitality (up to 14days) and the transfer of silica-QDs to the next cell generations are here reported. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was also used to determine the morphology of the so labelled cells and the relative silica-QDs distribution. Finally, we employ silica-QD stained chondrocytes to characterize, as proof of concept, hydrogels obtained from an amphiphilic derivative of hyaluronic acid (HA-EDA-C18) functionalized with different amounts of the RGD peptide. PMID:27287118

  16. Chemical hydrogels based on a hyaluronic acid-graft-α-elastin derivative as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palumbo, Fabio Salvatore [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari e Biomolecolari, Sezione di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Via Archirafi 32, 90123, Palermo (Italy); Pitarresi, Giovanna, E-mail: giovanna.pitarresi@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari e Biomolecolari, Sezione di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Via Archirafi 32, 90123, Palermo (Italy); Institute of Biophysics at Palermo, Italian National Research Council, Via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy); Fiorica, Calogero [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari e Biomolecolari, Sezione di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Via Archirafi 32, 90123, Palermo (Italy); Rigogliuso, Salvatrice; Ghersi, Giulio [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari e Biomolecolari, Sezione di Biologia Cellulare, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze ed. 16, 90128, Palermo (Italy); Giammona, Gaetano [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari e Biomolecolari, Sezione di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Via Archirafi 32, 90123, Palermo (Italy); IBIM-CNR, Via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    In this work hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized with ethylenediamine (EDA) has been employed to graft α-elastin. In particular a HA-EDA derivative bearing 50 mol% of pendant amino groups has been successfully employed to produce the copolymer HA-EDA-g-α-elastin containing 32% w/w of protein. After grafting with α-elastin, remaining free amino groups reacted with ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EGDGE) for producing chemical hydrogels, proposed as scaffolds for tissue engineering. Swelling degree, resistance to chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis, as well as preliminary biological properties of HA-EDA-g-α-elastin/EGDGE scaffold have been evaluated and compared with a HA-EDA/EGDGE scaffold. The presence of α-elastin grafted to HA-EDA improves attachment, viability and proliferation of primary rat dermal fibroblasts and human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells. Biological performance of HA-EDA-g-α-elastin/EGDGE scaffold resulted comparable to that of a commercial collagen type I sponge (Antema®), chosen as a positive control. - Highlights: ► Hyaluronic acid (HA) has been functionalized with ethylenediamine (EDA). ► Amino groups of HA-EDA allow the reaction with α-elastin and ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EGDGE). ► Chemical scaffolds of HA-EDA-graft-α-elastin/EGDGE have been characterized. ► The presence of α-elastin affects porosity, swelling and enzymatic degradation of scaffolds. ► The presence of α-elastin improves attachment, viability and proliferation of fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells.

  17. Chemical hydrogels based on a hyaluronic acid-graft-α-elastin derivative as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized with ethylenediamine (EDA) has been employed to graft α-elastin. In particular a HA-EDA derivative bearing 50 mol% of pendant amino groups has been successfully employed to produce the copolymer HA-EDA-g-α-elastin containing 32% w/w of protein. After grafting with α-elastin, remaining free amino groups reacted with ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EGDGE) for producing chemical hydrogels, proposed as scaffolds for tissue engineering. Swelling degree, resistance to chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis, as well as preliminary biological properties of HA-EDA-g-α-elastin/EGDGE scaffold have been evaluated and compared with a HA-EDA/EGDGE scaffold. The presence of α-elastin grafted to HA-EDA improves attachment, viability and proliferation of primary rat dermal fibroblasts and human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells. Biological performance of HA-EDA-g-α-elastin/EGDGE scaffold resulted comparable to that of a commercial collagen type I sponge (Antema®), chosen as a positive control. - Highlights: ► Hyaluronic acid (HA) has been functionalized with ethylenediamine (EDA). ► Amino groups of HA-EDA allow the reaction with α-elastin and ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EGDGE). ► Chemical scaffolds of HA-EDA-graft-α-elastin/EGDGE have been characterized. ► The presence of α-elastin affects porosity, swelling and enzymatic degradation of scaffolds. ► The presence of α-elastin improves attachment, viability and proliferation of fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells

  18. Dosimetric influence of hyaluronic acid in patients with prostate cancer treated with RT3D; Influencia dosimetrica del acido hialuronico en pacientes cancer de prostata tratados con RT3D externa+HDR braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J.; Vazquez, J. A.; Garcia Blanco, A. S.; Gomez, F.; Montejo, A.; Raba, J. I.; Pacheco, M. T.; Cardenal Carro, J.; Mendigueren, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    This study aims to assess the influence on dosimetry by the introduction of hyaluronic acid and assess the need for the realization of a second CT scan and consequent re-planning of RT3D treatment. (Author)

  19. Controllably local gene delivery mediated by polyelectrolyte multilayer films assembled from gene-loaded nanopolymersomes and hyaluronic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng W

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Wei Teng,1,* Qinmei Wang,2,* Ying Chen,2 Hongzhang Huang1 1Hospital of Stomatology, Institute of Stomatological Research, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Key Laboratory on Assisted Circulation, Ministry of Health, Cardiovascular Division, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: To explore a spatiotemporally controllable gene delivery system with high efficiency and safety, polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM films were constructed on titanium or quartz substrates via layer-by-layer self-assembly technique by using plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid-loaded lipopolysaccharide–amine nanopolymersomes (pNPs as polycations and hyaluronic acid (HA as polyanions. pNPs were chosen because they have high transfection efficiency (>95% in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and induce significant angiogenesis in zebrafish in conventional bolus transfection. The assembly process of PEM films was confirmed by analyses of quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared, contact angle, and zeta potential along with atomic force microscopy observation. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation analysis reveals that this film grows in an exponential mode, pNPs are the main contributor to the film mass, and the film mass can be modulated in a relatively wide range (1.0–29 µg/cm2 by adjusting the deposition layer number. Atomic force microscopy observation shows that the assembly leads to the formation of a patterned film with three-dimensional tree-like nanostructure, where the branches are composed of beaded chains (pNP beads are strung on HA molecular chains, and the incorporated pNPs keep structure intact. In vitro release experiment shows that plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid can be gradually released from films over 14 days, and the released plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid exists in

  20. A pH-sensitive hyaluronic acid prodrug modified with lactoferrin for glioma dual-targeted treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yatao; Fu, Chaoping; Li, Mei; Li, Xiangpen; Wang, Mengying; He, Lei; Zhang, Li-Ming; Peng, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Gliomas are the most common and lethal type of primary malignant brain tumor. But the existence of blood brain barrier (BBB) and blood-tumor barrier (BTB) hinder drug from reaching the tumor site. To address this problem, we developed a novel prodrug (Lf-HA-DOX) by conjugating hyaluronic acid with doxorubicin (HA-DOX) by an acid-labile hydrazone linkage, which is released in an acidic environment and accumulates in tumor tissues. Lactoferrin (Lf) was coupled for transporting across the BBB. In vitro, the release of DOX from Lf-HA-DOX was pH-dependent. At lower pH (5.0 and 6.0), the release of DOX was much quicker than that at pH7.4. In the cellular uptake studies, flow cytometry analyses and confocal laser scanning microscopy results showed significantly enhanced cellular uptake of Lf-HA-DOX and HA-DOX in C6 cells compared to DOX. In BALB/C mice bearing C6 glioma, enhanced accumulation of Lf-HA-DOX in the glioma was observed by real time fluorescence image. Correspondingly, glioma-bearing mice treated with Lf-HA-DOX displayed the longest median survival time, which was 2-fold longer than that of saline group. In conclusion, Lf-HA-DOX was able to significantly increase drug delivery to the glioma, which might provide a promising strategy for antiglioma therapy. PMID:27287110

  1. [Effectiveness and safety of intra-articular use of hyaluronic acid (Suplasyn I-Shot) in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzysztof, Miśkowiec; Artur, Gadek; Alicja, Jurecka; Justyna, Sówka; Jakub, Slusarski; Henryk, Liszka; Jerzy, Wordliczek

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the leading causes of disability in the elderly. The changes in the lubricating properties of synovial fluid lead to significant pain and loss of function. Viscosupplementation, in which hyaluronic acid (HA) is injected into the knee joint, has evolved into an important part of our current therapeutic regimen in addressing the patient with knee pain due to OA. Intra-articular HA has proven to be an effective, safe, and tolerable treatment for symptomatic knee OA. In an effort to limit cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and renal safety concerns with COX-2 selective and nonselective NSAIDs and maximize HA efficacy, it is even proposed using HA earlier in the treatment paradigm for knee OA and also as part of a comprehensive treatment strategy. Our study reconfirmed effectiveness and safety of intra-articular use of hyaluronic acid (Suplasyn) in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27526423

  2. New Treatment of Medullary and Papillary Human Thyroid Cancer: Biological Effects of Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel Loaded With Quercetin Alone or in Combination to an Inhibitor of Aurora Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quagliariello, Vincenzo; Armenia, Emilia; Aurilio, Caterina; Rosso, Francesco; Clemente, Ottavia; de Sena, Gabriele; Barbarisi, Manlio; Barbarisi, Alfonso

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is based on the use of a hyaluronic acid hydrogel of Quercetin tested alone and in combination to an inhibitor of Aurora Kinase type A and B (SNS-314) on human medullary and papillary thyroid cancer cells. Biological investigations were focused on the cellular uptake of the hydrogel, cell viability, antioxidant, and cytokines secretion studies. Quercetin delivered from hydrogel show a time and CD44 dependent interaction with both cell lines with significant anti-inflammatory effects. Combination of Quercetin and SNS-314 leads to a synergistic cytotoxic effect on medullary TT and papillary BCPAP cell lines with a significant reduction of the IC50 value. These results, highlights the importance of synergistic effect of the hyaluronic acid hydrogel of Quercetin with SNS-314 in the regulation of human thyroid cancer cell proliferation and emphasize the anti-tumor activity of these molecules. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1784-1795, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26660542

  3. Can combined use of low-level lasers and hyaluronic acid injections prolong the longevity of degenerative knee joints?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ip D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available David Ip, Nga Yue FuAsia Medical Pain Centre, Grand Plaza, Mong Kok, Hong KongBackground: This study evaluated whether half-yearly hyaluronic acid injection together with low-level laser therapy in addition to standard conventional physical therapy can successfully postpone the need for joint replacement surgery in elderly patients with bilateral symptomatic tricompartmental knee arthritis.Methods: In this prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 70 consecutive unselected elderly patients with bilateral tricompartmental knee arthritis were assigned at random to either one of two conservative treatment protocols to either one of the painful knees. Protocol A consisted of conventional physical therapy plus a sham light source plus saline injection, and protocol B consisted of protocol A with addition of half-yearly hyaluronic acid injection as well as low-level laser treatment instead of using saline and a sham light source. Treatment failure was defined as breakthrough pain necessitating joint replacement.Results: Among the 140 painful knees treated with either protocol A or protocol B, only one of the 70 painful knees treated by protocol B required joint replacement, whereas 15 of the 70 painful knees treated by protocol A needed joint replacement surgery (P<0.05.Conclusion: We conclude that half-yearly hyaluronic acid injections together with low-level laser therapy should be incorporated into the standard conservative treatment protocol for symptomatic knee arthritis, because it may prolong the longevity of the knee joint without the need for joint replacement.Keywords: knee osteoarthritis, hyaluronic acid injection, low-level laser, outcome

  4. Improvement of Distribution and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Hyaluronic Acid and β-Tricalcium Phosphate-Coated Polymeric Scaffold In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Muwan; Le, Dang Q. S.; Kjems, Jørgen; Bünger, Cody; Lysdahl, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bone tissue engineering requires a well-designed scaffold that can be biodegradable, biocompatible, and support the stem cells to osteogenic differentiation. Porous polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold prepared by fused deposition modeling is an attractive biomaterial that has been used in clinic. However, PCL scaffolds lack biological function and osteoinductivity. In this study, we functionalized the PCL scaffolds by embedding them with a matrix of hyaluronic acid/β-tricalcium phosphate...

  5. Additive Effects of Intra-articular Injection of Growth Hormone and Hyaluronic Acid in Rabbit Model of Collagenase-induced Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang Beom; Kwon, Dong Rak; Kwak, Hyun; Shin, Yong Beom; Han, Hyun-jung; Lee, Jong Hwa; Choi, Seok Hwa

    2010-01-01

    In a rabbit model of collagenase-induced osteoarthritis, the additive effects of intra-articular recombinant human growth hormone (GH) administration to hyaluronic acid (HA) were evaluated. After intra-articular collagenase injection, mature New Zealand white rabbits (n=30) were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 (control rabbits) received once weekly intra-articular saline injections for 4 weeks. Group 2 rabbits received 6 mg HA injections, and group 3 rabbits were injected with 6 mg HA and 3 mg...

  6. A prospective, open-label, multicenter, observational, postmarket study of the use of a 15 mg/mL hyaluronic acid dermal filler in the lips

    OpenAIRE

    Philipp-Dormston, Wolfgang G; Hilton, Said; Nathan, Myooran

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based injectable fillers three-dimensionally restore the natural contours of the lips and perioral area, thereby reducing some signs of aging lips. To evaluate the short-term aesthetic impact of treatment with the HA dermal filler Juvéderm® VOLBELLA® with Lidocaine, formulated utilizing VYCROSS™ technology, for enhancement or correction of asymmetry of the lips, evaluated using a patient-centric approach. Sixty-two subjects were enrolled in this study, conducted at two si...

  7. Review of long-term adverse effects associated with the use of chemically-modified animal and nonanimal source hyaluronic acid dermal fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Paul C Edwards1, John E Fantasia21Associate Professor (Clinical), Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, Pathology and Oncology, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor MI, USA; 2Chief, Division of Oral Pathology, Department of Dental Medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY, USAAbstract: Although only recently introduced, chemically-modified hyaluronic acid dermal fillers have gained widespread acceptance as “redefining” dermal f...

  8. Review of long-term adverse effects associated with the use of chemically-modified animal and nonanimal source hyaluronic acid dermal fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Paul C.; John E Fantasia

    2007-01-01

    Paul C Edwards1, John E Fantasia21Associate Professor (Clinical), Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, Pathology and Oncology, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor MI, USA; 2Chief, Division of Oral Pathology, Department of Dental Medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY, USAAbstract: Although only recently introduced, chemically-modified hyaluronic acid dermal fillers have gained widespread acceptance as “redefining” dermal f...

  9. Effect of Hyaluronic Acid on Fixing of Tobacco Flavors%透明质酸对烟用香料的定香效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白新亮; 宋瑜冰; 黄华; 范坚强; 赵明月; 曾世通; 胡军

    2011-01-01

    为考察透明质酸在加香过程中对香料单体定香效果的影响,采用同时蒸馏萃取、气相色谱-质谱( GC/MS)和内标法定量考察了不添加透明质酸只加香料单体、同时添加透明质酸和香料单体、先加香料单体再添加透明质酸3种不同方式下,烟丝中香料单体的持留率.结果表明:①透明质酸具有较好的定香作用,可有效提高烟丝中香料单体的持留量;②与常用保润剂丙二醇和丙三醇相比较,其定香效果优于丙二醇和丙三醇.%In order to investigate the effect of hyaluronic acid on fixing of flavor monomers during tobacco flavoring, the flavors added into cut tobacco were extracted with simultaneous distillation and extraction and the contents of flavors retained in cut tobacco were determined by GC/MS. Three different conditions were studied: first, only flavors were added; second, flavors and hyaluronic acid added simultaneously; third, flavors added prior to hyaluronic acid. The flavor's retention ratios in cut tobacco were compared, the results indicated that hyaluronic acid raised the retention ratios of flavors in cut tobacco effectively, and was better in flavor retention comparing with conventional humectants, propanediol and glycerol.

  10. A pilot study comparing the efficacy of radiofrequency and microwave diathermy in combination with intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid in knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hashimoto, Sanshiro; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Kato, Kazuo; Majima, Tokifumi; Shindo, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Mochizuki, Yusuke; Takai, Shinro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to compare the efficacy of radiofrequency diathermy with that of microwave diathermy in combination with intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid into the knee of patients with osteoarthritis (OA). [Subjects] A total of 17 patients with knee OA were enrolled. The participants were randomly divided into two groups: a radiofrequency diathermy group (RF group, 9 subjects), and a microwave diathermy group (MW group, 8 subjects). [Methods] Subjects received radiofrequency or microwave thermal therapy 3 times at 1-week intervals. Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid was administered 10 min before every thermal therapy session. The outcome was evaluated using the Japan Orthopaedic Association (JOA) and the Lequesne Index (LI) at baseline, at weeks 1 (1 week after the first thermal therapy) and 3 (1 week after the last thermal therapy). [Results] The JOA scale increased significantly after three sessions of thermal therapy in the RF group, while no significant increase was observed in the MW group. LI decreased significantly after 3 weeks in the RF group. In the MW group, there was no significant difference in LI between the two time points. [Conclusion] This study revealed that symptom relief in patients with knee OA was greater with radiofrequency diathermy than with microwave diathermy with concurrent use of hyaluronic acid injection, presumably due to the different heating characteristics of the two methods. PMID:27065540

  11. LBL coating of type I collagen and hyaluronic acid on aminolyzed PLLA to enhance the cell-material interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Zhao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work is to assemble extracellular matrix components onto poly (L-lactic acid (PLLA films using layer-by-layer (LBL depositing method to enhance the cell-material interaction. To introduce charges onto the hydrophobic and neutral PLLA surface so that the electronic assembly can be processed, poly (ethylene imine (PEI was covalently bonded to modify the PLLA films. Positively charged collagen I (Col I was then deposited onto the aminolyzed PLLA film surface in a LBL assembly manner using hyaluronic acid (HA as a negatively charged polyelectrolyte. The PEI modification efficiency was monitored via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS measurements. The results of Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR and Water contact angle (WCA monitoring the LBL assemble process presented that the HA/Col I deposited alternately onto the PLLA surface. The surface topography of the films was observed by Atomic force microscope (AFM. In vitro osteoblast culture found that the presence of Col I layer greatly improved the cytocompatibility of the PLLA films in terms of cell viability, cell proliferation and Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP expression. Furthermore, osteoblast extensions were found to be directed by contact guidance of the aligned Col I fibrils. Thus, these very flexible systems may allow broad applications for improve the bioactivity of polymeric materials, which might be a potential application for bone tissue engineering.

  12. Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of horseradish peroxidase with hyaluronic acid-ionic liquid-cadmium sulfide nanorod composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Zhihong [Institute of Nano-Science and Technology Center, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Li Xia; Wang Yan [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Zeng Yan [Institute of Nano-Science and Technology Center, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Sun Wei, E-mail: sunwei@qust.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Huang Xintang [Institute of Nano-Science and Technology Center, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2010-06-18

    A new composite material consisted of hyaluronic acid (HA), ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]BF{sub 4}) and cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorod was fabricated and used for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on the surface of a carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE), which was prepared with 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium ethylsulphate ([EMIM]EtOSO{sub 3}) as modifier. Spectroscopic results indicated that HRP remained its native structure in the composite film. Based on the synergistic effect of the materials used, an obvious promotion to the direct electron transfer efficient between HRP and CILE was achieved with a pair of well-defined redox peaks appeared in 0.1 mol L{sup -1} phosphate buffer solution, indicating the realization of the direct electrochemistry of HRP. The immobilized HRP showed good electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of trichloroacetic acid and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the electrochemical parameters calculated. Based on the fabricated electrode, a new third-generation electrochemical biosensor was constructed with good stability and reproducibility.

  13. Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of horseradish peroxidase with hyaluronic acid-ionic liquid-cadmium sulfide nanorod composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new composite material consisted of hyaluronic acid (HA), ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]BF4) and cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorod was fabricated and used for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on the surface of a carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE), which was prepared with 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium ethylsulphate ([EMIM]EtOSO3) as modifier. Spectroscopic results indicated that HRP remained its native structure in the composite film. Based on the synergistic effect of the materials used, an obvious promotion to the direct electron transfer efficient between HRP and CILE was achieved with a pair of well-defined redox peaks appeared in 0.1 mol L-1 phosphate buffer solution, indicating the realization of the direct electrochemistry of HRP. The immobilized HRP showed good electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of trichloroacetic acid and H2O2 with the electrochemical parameters calculated. Based on the fabricated electrode, a new third-generation electrochemical biosensor was constructed with good stability and reproducibility.

  14. Hyaluronic Acid-Modified Cationic Lipid-PLGA Hybrid Nanoparticles as a Nanovaccine Induce Robust Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanxia; Cao, Fengqiang; Liu, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Chao; Sun, Hongfan; Wang, Chun; Leng, Xigang; Song, Cunxian; Kong, Deling; Ma, Guilei

    2016-05-18

    Here, we investigated the use of hyaluronic acid (HA)-decorated cationic lipid-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) hybrid nanoparticles (HA-DOTAP-PLGA NPs) as vaccine delivery vehicles, which were originally developed for the cytosolic delivery of genes. Our results demonstrated that after the NPs uptake by dendritic cells (DCs), some of the antigens that were encapsulated in HA-DOTAP-PLGA NPs escaped to the cytosolic compartment, and whereas some of the antigens remained in the endosomal/lysosomal compartment, where both MHC-I and MHC-II antigen presentation occurred. Moreover, HA-DOTAP-PLGA NPs led to the up-regulation of MHC, costimulatory molecules, and cytokines. In vivo experiments further revealed that more powerful immune responses were induced from mice immunized with HA-DOTAP-PLGA NPs when compared with cationic lipid-PLGA nanoparticles and free ovalbumin (OVA); the responses included antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses, the production of antigen-specific IgG antibodies and the generation of memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Overall, these data demonstrate the high potential of HA-DOTAP-PLGA NPs for use as vaccine delivery vehicles to elevate cellular and humoral immune responses. PMID:27088457

  15. Metabolic engineering of Bacillus subtilis for the efficient biosynthesis of uniform hyaluronic acid with controlled molecular weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuning; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Xiaofei; Tang, Dongyang; Su, Ding; Yao, Wenbing; Gao, Xiangdong

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus subtilis was engineered into an efficient hyaluronic acid (HA) producer by introducing two inducible artificial operons carrying HA synthase gene from Pasteurella multocida and precursor genes encoding enzymes involved in synthesis of the sugar precursors. A two-stage induction strategy was established for metabolic engineering of recombinant B. subtilis to efficiently produce uniform HA with controlled molecular weights. Strain TPG223 produced larger HA molecules (yield=6.8 g/L; molecular weight=4.5 MDa) than strain PG6181 (yield=2.4 g/L; molecular weight=13 KDa), indicating that the enzymes involved in the synthesis of UDP-glucuronic acid are essential for HA biosynthesis. Strain TPG223 was able to synthesize HA molecules ranging in molecular weight from 8 KDa to 5.4 MDa indicating that size control is achievable in vivo through appropriate tools. The work reported here not only advanced mechanisms research of size control in vivo, but also could be an attractive alternative for commercial preparation of uniform size-defined HA. PMID:23433979

  16. Hyaluronic acid reagent functional chitosan-PEI conjugate with AQP2-siRNA suppressed endometriotic lesion formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao MD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Meng-Dan Zhao,1 Jin-Lin Cheng,2 Jing-Jing Yan,1 Feng-Ying Chen,1 Jian-Zhong Sheng,3 Dong-Li Sun,1 Jian Chen,4 Jing Miao,4 Run-Ju Zhang,1 Cai-Hong Zheng,1 He-Feng Huang1,5 1Women’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 2State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, 3Department of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, 4The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 5International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: To identify a new drug candidate for treating endometriosis which has fewer side effects, a new polymeric nanoparticle gene delivery system consisting of polyethylenimine-grafted chitosan oligosaccharide (CSO-PEI with hyaluronic acid (HA and small interfering RNA (siRNA was designed. There was no obvious difference in sizes observed between (CSO-PEI/siRNAHA and CSO-PEI/siRNA, but the fluorescence accumulation in the endometriotic lesion was more significant for (CSO-PEI/siRNAHA compared with CSO-PEI/siRNA due to the specific binding of HA to CD44. In addition, the (CSO-PEI/siRNAHA nanoparticle gene therapy significantly decreased the endometriotic lesion sizes with atrophy and degeneration of the ectopic endometrium. The epithelial cells of ectopic endometrium from rat models of endometriosis showed a significantly lower CD44 expression than control after treatment with (CSO-PEI/siRNAHA. Furthermore, observation under an electron microscope showed no obvious toxic effect on the reproductive organs. Therefore, (CSO-PEI/siRNAHA gene delivery system can be used as an effective method for the treatment of endometriosis. Keywords: chitosan-PEI, hyaluronic acid, AQP2-siRNA, endometriosis, targeted therapy 

  17. COMPARATIVE EFFICACY AND TOLERABILITY OF AVOCADO / SOYBEAN UNSAPONIFIABLES AND THEIR COMBINATION WITH INTRA-ARTICULAR HYALURONIC ACID IN PATIENTS WITH KNEE AND HIP OSTEOARTHROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. I. Shmidt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the comparative efficacy and tolerability of avocado / soybean unsaponifiables (ASU and their combination with intra-articular hyaluronic acid in patients with knee and hip osteoarthrosis (OA.Subjects and methods. A randomized observational non-interventional non-placebo controlled trial was conducted. It included 18 patients who were randomized to 2 groups with 9 in each. One patient group took only ASU along with nonsteroidal anti-nflammatory drugs (NSAIDs; the other received ASU in combination with intra-articular hyaluronic acid. Their treatment was performed for 6 months, followed by a 6-month follow-up. The results were assessed by the WOMAC index. Account was taken of the opinions of a patient and his / her physician on therapeutic effectiveness, as well as altered needs for NSAIDs during treatment and after the follow-up.Results. There was a gradual reduction in joint pain, stiffness, and dysfunction (as shown by the visual analog scale in both groups just one month posttherapy. This trend remained for 3 months. After 6 months of therapy, there were slight increases in the values of joint pain, stiffness, and dysfunction in the combined therapy group whereas the values continued to decrease in the monotherapy group. Six months after termination of treatment, the examined values doubled in the ASU monotherapy group and remained at posttreatment visit levels in the combined therapy group. Just the same, six months after termination of 6-month therapy, both groups displayed the significantly lower values of pain, stiffness, and dysfunction than those prior to treatment. ASU used both alone and in combination with hyaluronic acid was noted to be well tolerated. The considerable reduction in the needs for NSAIDs in both groups and, in a number of cases, the possibility of reducing their intake proved the efficiency of ASU used alone and in combination with hyaluronic acid. The important result of this trial

  18. Non-surgical treatment of deep wounds triggered by harmful physical and chemical agents: a successful combined use of collagenase and hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onesti, Maria G; Fino, Pasquale; Ponzo, Ida; Ruggieri, Martina; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2016-02-01

    Some chronic ulcers often occur with slough, not progressing through the normal stages of wound healing. Treatment is long and other therapies need to be performed in addition to surgery. Patients not eligible for surgery because of ASA class (American Society of Anesthesiologists class) appear to benefit from chemical therapy with collagenase or hydrocolloids in order to prepare the wound bed, promoting the healing process. We describe four cases of traumatic, upper limb deep wounds caused by different physical and chemical agents, emphasising the effectiveness of treatment based on topical application of collagenase and hyaluronic acid (HA) before standardised surgical procedures. We performed careful disinfection of lesions combined with application of topical cream containing hyaluronic acid, bacterial fermented sodium hyaluronate (0·2%w/w) salt, and bacterial collagenase obtained from non-pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus (>2·0 nkat1/g). In one patient a dermo-epidermal graft was used to cover the wide loss of substance. In two patients application of a HA-based dermal substitute was done. We obtained successful results in terms of wound healing, with satisfactory aesthetic result and optimal recovery of the affected limb functionality. Topical application of collagenase and HA, alone or before standardised surgical procedures allows faster wound healing. PMID:24698215

  19. Silk fibroin/gelatin–chondroitin sulfate–hyaluronic acid effectively enhances in vitro chondrogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawatjui, Nopporn [Biomedical Sciences, Graduate School, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Centre for Research and Development of Medical Diagnostic Laboratories, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Damrongrungruang, Teerasak [Department of Oral Diagnosis, Faculty of Dentistry, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat [Stem Cell Therapy and Transplantation Research Group, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); School of Microbiology, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Jearanaikoon, Patcharee [Centre for Research and Development of Medical Diagnostic Laboratories, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Hongeng, Suradej [Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Limpaiboon, Temduang, E-mail: temduang@kku.ac.th [Centre for Research and Development of Medical Diagnostic Laboratories, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)

    2015-07-01

    Tissue engineering is becoming promising for cartilage repair due to the limited self-repair capacity of cartilage tissue. We previously fabricated and characterized a three-dimensional silk fibroin/gelatin–chondroitin sulfate–hyaluronic acid (SF–GCH) scaffold and showed that it could promote proliferation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). This study aimed to evaluate its biological performance as a new biomimetic material for chondrogenic induction of BM-MSCs in comparison to an SF scaffold and conventional pellet culture. We found that the SF–GCH scaffold significantly enhanced the proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs compared to the SF scaffold and pellet culture in which the production of sulfated glycoaminoglycan was increased in concordance with the up-regulation of chondrogenic-specific gene markers. Our findings indicate the significant role of SF–GCH by providing a supportive structure and the mimetic cartilage environment for chondrogenesis which enables cartilage regeneration. Thus, our fabricated SF–GCH scaffold may serve as a potential biomimetic material for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • SF–GCH scaffold enhances proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs. • SF–GCH acts as a supportive and biomimetic material for BM-MSC chondrogenesis. • SF–GCH is a potential biomimetic scaffold suitable for cartilage tissue engineering.

  20. The Effect of Chondroitin Sulphate and Hyaluronic Acid on Chondrocytes Cultured within a Fibrin-Alginate Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Little

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is a painful degenerative joint disease that could be better managed if tissue engineers can develop methods to create long-term engineered articular cartilage tissue substitutes. Many of the tissue engineered cartilage constructs currently available lack the chemical stimuli and cell-friendly environment that promote the matrix accumulation and cell proliferation needed for use in joint cartilage repair. The goal of this research was to test the efficacy of using a fibrin-alginate hydrogel containing hyaluronic acid (HA and/or chondroitin sulphate (CS supplements for chondrocyte culture. Neonatal porcine chondrocytes cultured in fibrin-alginate hydrogels retained their phenotype better than chondrocytes cultured in monolayer, as evidenced by analysis of their relative expression of type II versus type I collagen mRNA transcripts. HA or CS supplementation of the hydrogels increased matrix glycosaminoglycan (GAG production during the first week of culture. However, the effects of these supplements on matrix accumulation were not additive and were no longer observed after two weeks of culture. Supplementation of the hydrogels with CS or a combination of both CS and HA increased the chondrocyte cell population after two weeks of culture. Statistical analysis indicated that the HA and CS treatment effects on chondrocyte numbers may be additive. This research suggests that supplementation with CS and/or HA has positive effects on cartilage matrix production and chondrocyte proliferation in three-dimensional (3D fibrin-alginate hydrogels.