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Sample records for angle-resolved fluorescence depolarization

  1. Angle-resolved polarimetry of antenna-mediated fluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohtashami, A.; Osorio, C.I.; Koenderink, A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Optical phase-array antennas can be used to control not only the angular distribution but also the polarization of fluorescence from quantum emitters. The emission pattern of the resulting system is determined by the properties of the antenna, the properties of the emitters, and the strength of the

  2. A flexible setup for angle-resolved X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with laboratory sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spanier, M., E-mail: mspanier@physik.tu-berlin.de; Herzog, C.; Grötzsch, D.; Kramer, F.; Mantouvalou, I.; Malzer, W.; Kanngießer, B. [Institute for Optics and Atomic Physics, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Lubeck, J.; Weser, J.; Streeck, C.; Beckhoff, B. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestraße 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is one of the standard tools for the analysis of stratified materials and is widely applied for the investigation of electronics and coatings. The composition and thickness of the layers can be determined quantitatively and non-destructively. Recent work showed that these capabilities can be extended towards retrieving stratigraphic information like concentration depth profiles using angle-resolved XRF (ARXRF). This paper introduces an experimental sample chamber which was developed as a multi-purpose tool enabling different measurement geometries suited for transmission measurements, conventional XRF, ARXRF, etc. The chamber was specifically designed for attaching all kinds of laboratory X-ray sources for the soft and hard X-ray ranges as well as various detection systems. In detail, a setup for ARXRF using an X-ray tube with a polycapillary X-ray lens as source is presented. For such a type of setup, both the spectral and lateral characterizations of the radiation field are crucial for quantitative ARXRF measurements. The characterization is validated with the help of a stratified validation sample.

  3. Isomerization and fluorescence depolarization of merocyanine 540 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MC540) in an aqueous solution of polyacrylic acid (PAA) have been studied using picosecond time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the dynamics of isomerization and depolarization are sensitive enough to monitor the ...

  4. Isomerization and fluorescence depolarization of merocyanine 540 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    isomerization i.e. cis–trans isomerization in excited electronic state, has been studied in a cyclodextrin cavity2, at the water surface 3,4, in the water pool of microemulsion 5, at micellar interface 6, lipids 7, sol–gel glass8 and polymer environments 9. Reorientational dynamics has been studied using fluorescence anisotropy ...

  5. Direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Condensed matter physics; high-c superconductivity; electronic properties; photoemission spectroscopy; angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy; cuprates; films; strain; pulsed laser deposition.

  6. Evidence for a novel mechanism of time-resolved flavin fluorescence depolarization in glutathione reductase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den P.A.W.; Hoek, van A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2004-01-01

    Time-resolved flavin fluorescence anisotropy studies on glutathione reductase (GR) have revealed a remarkable new phenomenon: wild-type GR displays a rapid process of fluorescence depolarization, that is absent in mutant enzymes lacking a nearby tyrosine residue that blocks the NADPH-binding cleft.

  7. Fluorescence depolarization as a probe of molecular dynamics within liquid jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, A. J.; McCaffery, A. J.; Quintella, C. M.

    Preliminary results are presented from a study of fluorescence depolarization within a thin laminar jet of rhodamine 6 G in ethylene glycol. A large number of polarization measurements taken across the jet have enabled us to build up a detailed polarization map of the liquid flow. Relating the degree of depolarization to molecular alignment caused by the presence of shear forces within the jet, we propose that this method may be used as a sensitive probe of the molecular dynamics of liquid flow.

  8. Direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since 1997 we systematically perform direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on in-situ grown thin (< 30 nm) cuprate films. Specifically, we probe low-energy electronic structure and properties of high-c superconductors (HTSC) under different degrees of epitaxial (compressive vs. tensile) strain.

  9. A study of molecular dynamics within liquid flows using fluorescence depolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, A. J.; McCaffery, A. J.; Quintella, C. M.; Winkel, J. F.

    Molecular alignment within thin laminar jets of rhodamine 6G in solution in ethylene glycol has been investigated by measuring the depolarization of laser induced fluorescence. From measurements of a large number of points within the flow, we have built up maps of molecular alignment which display in detail the distribution and evolution of flow alignment. On the basis of these observations, we analyse the evolution of molecular alignment in terms of internal shear forces resulting from velocity distributions within liquid flows.

  10. Fluorescence/depolarization lidar for mid-range stand-off detection of biological agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierczyk, Z.; Kopczyński, K.; Zygmunt, M.; Wojtanowski, J.; Młynczak, J.; Gawlikowski, A.; Młodzianko, A.; Piotrowski, W.; Gietka, A.; Knysak, P.; Drozd, T.; Muzal, M.; Kaszczuk, M.; Ostrowski, R.; Jakubaszek, M.

    2011-06-01

    LIDAR system for real-time standoff detection of bio-agents is presented and preliminary experimental results are discussed. The detection approach is based on two independent physical phenomena: (1) laser induced fluorescence (LIF), (2) depolarization resulting from elastic scattering on non-spherical particles. The device includes three laser sources, two receiving telescopes, depolarization component and spectral signature analyzing spectrograph. It was designed to provide the stand-off detection capability at ranges from 200 m up to several kilometers. The system as a whole forms a mobile platform for vehicle or building installation. Additionally, it's combined with a scanning mechanics and advanced software, which enable to conduct the semi-automatic monitoring of a specified space sector. For fluorescence excitation, 3-rd (355 nm) and 4-th (266 nm) harmonics of Nd:YAG pulsed lasers are used. They emit short (~6 ns) pulses with the repetition rate of 20 Hz. Collecting optics for fluorescence echo detection and spectral content analysis includes 25 mm diameter f/4 Newton telescope, Czerny Turner spectrograph and 32-channel PMT. Depending on the grating applied, the spectral resolution from 20 nm up to 3 nm per channel can be achieved. The system is also equipped with an eye-safe (1.5 μm) Nd:YAG OPO laser for elastic backscattering/depolarization detection. The optical echo signal is collected by Cassegrain telescope with aperture diameter of 12.5 mm. Depolarization detection component based on polarizing beam-splitter serves as the stand-off particle-shape analyzer, which is very valuable in case of non-spherical bio-aerosols sensing.

  11. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Indoor Measurement of Angle Resolved Light Absorption by Black Silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amdemeskel, Mekbib Wubishet; Iandolo, Beniamino; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    Angle resolved optical spectroscopy of photovoltaic (PV) samples gives crucial information on PV panels under realistic working conditions. Here, we introduce measurements of angle resolved light absorption by PV cells, performed indoors using a collimated high radiance broadband light source. Our...... indoor method offers a significant simplification as compared to measurements by solar trackers. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we show characterization of black silicon solar cells. The experimental results showed stable and reliable optical responses that makes our setup suitable for indoor......, angle resolved characterization of solar cells....

  13. NADH fluorescence imaging and the histological impact of cortical spreading depolarization during the acute phase of subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tomohisa; Hishikawa, Tomohito; Nishihiro, Shingo; Shinji, Yukei; Takasugi, Yuji; Haruma, Jun; Hiramatsu, Masafumi; Kawase, Hirokazu; Sato, Sachiko; Mizoue, Ryoichi; Takeda, Yoshimasa; Sugiu, Kenji; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Date, Isao

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although cortical spreading depolarization (CSD) has been observed during the early phase of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in clinical settings, the pathogenicity of CSD is unclear. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effects of loss of membrane potential on neuronal damage during the acute phase of SAH. METHODS Twenty-four rats were subjected to SAH by the perforation method. The propagation of depolarization in the brain cortex was examined by using electrodes to monitor 2 direct-current (DC) potentials and obtaining NADH (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) fluorescence images while exposing the parietal-temporal cortex to ultraviolet light. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was monitored in the vicinity of the lateral electrode. Twenty-four hours after onset of SAH, histological damage was evaluated at the DC potential recording sites. RESULTS Changes in DC potentials (n = 48 in total) were sorted into 3 types according to the appearance of ischemic depolarization in the entire hemisphere following induction of SAH. In Type 1 changes (n = 21), ischemic depolarization was not observed during a 1-hour observation period. In Type 2 changes (n = 13), the DC potential demonstrated ischemic depolarization on initiation of SAH and recovered 80% from the maximal DC deflection during a 1-hour observation period (33.3 ± 15.8 minutes). In Type 3 changes (n = 14), the DC potential displayed ischemic depolarization and did not recover during a 1-hour observation period. Histological evaluations at DC potential recording sites showed intact tissue at all sites in the Type 1 group, whereas in the Type 2 and Type 3 groups neuronal damage of varying severity was observed depending on the duration of ischemic depolarization. The duration of depolarization that causes injury to 50% of neurons (P 50 ) was estimated to be 22.4 minutes (95% confidence intervals 17.0-30.3 minutes). CSD was observed in 3 rats at 6 sites in the Type 1 group 5.1 ± 2.2 minutes after

  14. Photoemission Electron Spectroscopy IV: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, J. D.; Nagatomi, T. (Translator); Mizutani, G. (Translator); Endo, K. (Translation Supervisor)

    2010-01-01

    The angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is a powerful experimental tool to probe themomentum-resolved electronic structure, i.e., the electronic band dispersion ε(k), of solids and their surfaces. ARPES is also an ideal tool to address the question concerning the electron correlation effect on quasiparticle excitations in the low-dimensional (one- or two-dimensional) correlated electron systems. In this issue, we briefly introduce representative studies of ARPES and their fruitf...

  15. Angle-resolved photoluminescence spectrum of a uniform phosphor layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujieda, Ichiro; Ohta, Masamichi

    2017-10-01

    A photoluminescence spectrum depends on an emission angle due to self-absorption in a phosphor material. Assuming isotropic initial emission and Lambert-Beer's law, we have derived simple expressions for the angle-resolved spectra emerging from the top and bottom surfaces of a uniform phosphor layer. The transmittance of an excitation light through the phosphor layer can be regarded as a design parameter. For a strongly-absorbing phosphor layer, the forward flux is less intense and more red-shifted than the backward flux. The red-shift is enhanced as the emission direction deviates away from the plane normal. When we increase the transmittance, the backward flux decreases monotonically. The forward flux peaks at a certain transmittance value. The two fluxes become similar to each other for a weakly-absorbing phosphor layer. We have observed these behaviors in experiment. In a practical application, self-absorption decreases the efficiency of conversion and results in angle-dependent variations in chromaticity coordinates. A patterned phosphor layer with a secondary optical element such as a remote reflector alleviates these problems.

  16. Angle-resolved photoelectron cross section of CF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, T.A.; Fahlman, A.; Svensson, W.A.; Krause, M.O.; Whitley, T.A.; Grimm, F.A.; Piancastelli, M.N.; Taylor, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Partial photoelectron cross sections sigma and angular distribution parameters β were obtained for the first five valence orbitals in CF 4 : 1t 1 , 4t 2 , 1e, 3t 2 , and 4a 1 , as a function of photon energy from 17 to 70 eV. These data were taken with the aid of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation. The results were compared with earlier data on CCl 4 . Substantial differences were found. These are explained partly in terms of the absence of a Cooper minimum with a fluorine compound as opposed to the presence of a Cooper minimum with chlorine compounds and partly in terms of the position of shape resonances. Data on CF 4 were also compared with recent calculations of Stephens et al., who used the multiple-scattering Xα method. Structure in the photoelectron spectrum of CF 4 lying on the low energy side of the third band was identified as due to autoionization and evidence is given as to its specific nature

  17. Angle-resolved photoluminescence spectrum of a uniform phosphor layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Fujieda

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A photoluminescence spectrum depends on an emission angle due to self-absorption in a phosphor material. Assuming isotropic initial emission and Lambert-Beer’s law, we have derived simple expressions for the angle-resolved spectra emerging from the top and bottom surfaces of a uniform phosphor layer. The transmittance of an excitation light through the phosphor layer can be regarded as a design parameter. For a strongly-absorbing phosphor layer, the forward flux is less intense and more red-shifted than the backward flux. The red-shift is enhanced as the emission direction deviates away from the plane normal. When we increase the transmittance, the backward flux decreases monotonically. The forward flux peaks at a certain transmittance value. The two fluxes become similar to each other for a weakly-absorbing phosphor layer. We have observed these behaviors in experiment. In a practical application, self-absorption decreases the efficiency of conversion and results in angle-dependent variations in chromaticity coordinates. A patterned phosphor layer with a secondary optical element such as a remote reflector alleviates these problems.

  18. Precision angle-resolved autoionization resonances in Ar and Ne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrah, N.; Langer, B.; Gorczyca, T.W. [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Theoretical work has shown that the electron angular distribution and the shape of the autoionization resonances are crucial to the understanding of certain types of electron-electron correlation. Autoionization resonances in Ne (Ar) result from the decay of the excited discrete state Ne{sup *} 2s2p{sup 6} np (Ar{sup *} 3s3p{sup 6} np) into the continuum state Ne{sup +} 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 5} + e{sup {minus}} (ks,kd) (Ar{sup +} 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5} + e{sup {minus}} (ks,kd)). Since the continuum can also be reached by direct photoionization, both paths add coherently, giving rise to interferences that produce the characteristic Beutler-Fano line shape. In this work, the authors report on quantitative angle-resolved electron spectrometry studies of (a) the Ne 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 2s2p{sup 6} np (n=3-5) autoionizing resonances and the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 2p{sup 4}3s3p doubly excited resonance, (b) the Ar 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 3s3p{sup 6} np (n=4-9) autoionization resonances and extended R-matrix calculations of the angular-distribution parameters for both Ne and Ar measurements. Their results are compared with previous theoretical work by Taylor.

  19. New Light Source Setup for Angle Resolved Light Absorption measurement of PV samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amdemeskel, Mekbib Wubishet; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff; Thorsteinsson, Sune

    Here, we introduce measurements of angle resolved light absorption by PV cells, using broadband laser driven white light source with a bright, stable, broad spectral range and well collimated light.......Here, we introduce measurements of angle resolved light absorption by PV cells, using broadband laser driven white light source with a bright, stable, broad spectral range and well collimated light....

  20. New Light Source Setup for Angle Resolved Light Absorption measurement of PV sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amdemeskel, Mekbib Wubishet; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff; Thorsteinsson, Sune

    Here, we introduce measurements of angle resolved light absorption by PV cells, using broadband laser driven white light source with a bright, stable, broad spectral range and well collimated light.......Here, we introduce measurements of angle resolved light absorption by PV cells, using broadband laser driven white light source with a bright, stable, broad spectral range and well collimated light....

  1. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc,max ~95 K and (Bi1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc,max 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major di erences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to ( π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is consistent with

  2. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc, max ≈ 95 K and (Bi 1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc, max ≈ 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major differences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to (π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is

  3. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometry: new electron optics and detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoof, H.A. van.

    1980-01-01

    A new spectrometer system is described, designed to measure angle-resolved energy distributions of photoemitted electrons efficiently. Some results are presented of measurements on a Si(001) surface. (Auth.)

  4. Angle-resolved imaging of single-crystal materials with MeV helium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strathman, M.D.; Baumann, S.

    1992-01-01

    The simplest form of angle-resolved mapping for single-crystal materials is the creation of a channeling angular scan. Several laboratories have expanded this simple procedure to include mapping as a function of two independent tilts. These angle-resolved images are particularly suited to the assessment of crystal parameters including disorder, lattice location of impurities, and lattice stress. This paper will describe the use of the Charles Evans and Associates RBS-400 scattering chamber for acquisition, display, and analysis of angle-resolved images obtained from backscattered helium ions. Typical data acquisition times are 20 min for a ±2deg X-Y tilt scan with 2500 pixels (8/100deg resolution), and 10 nC per pixel. In addition, we will present a method for automatically aligning crystals for channeling measurements based on this imaging technology. (orig.)

  5. Electronic structure studies of BaFe2As2 by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fink, J.; Thirupathaiah, R.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Dürr, H.A.; Follath, R.; Huang, Y.; de Jong, S.; Golden, M.S.; Zhang, Y.Z.; Jeschke, H.O.; Valentí, R.; Felser, C.; Dastjani Farahani, S.; Rotter, M.; Johrendt, D.

    2009-01-01

    We report high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of the electronic structure of BaFe2As2, which is one of the parent compounds of the Fe-pnictide superconductors. ARPES measurements have been performed at 20 and 300 K, corresponding to the orthorhombic

  6. Simulation and Measurement of Angle Resolved Reflectance from Black Si Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Wu, Kaiyu; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2015-01-01

    In this work angle-resolved reflectance from nanostructured Si surfaces realized by maskless RIE texturing has been simulated and measured. The simulation and experimental measurement data show the same trend. Experimentally a total reflectance below 1% for incident angles below 30o and specular...

  7. The ALOISA end station at Elettra: a novel multicoincidence spectrometer for angle resolved APECS

    CERN Document Server

    Gotter, R; Morgante, A; Cvetko, D; Floreano, L; Tommasini, F; Stefani, G

    2001-01-01

    Coincidence measurements have been extensively performed in atomic and molecular physics since early 1970s. To apply this methodology to solids and surfaces has been a major target since early days, but the long average time needed to complete a coincidence experiment has hampered its attainment. In particular the coincidence technique has not been yet applied in an angle resolved way such for studying the momentum correlation in the ejection of electron pairs from solid surfaces. The experimental chamber at the ALOISA beamline at Elettra, by means of a set of seven homemade electron analyzers, is the first apparatus able to perform Angle Resolved - Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (AR-APECS) from solid surfaces. In the typical setup ten different pairs of coincident electrons can be measured simultaneously, so reducing the acquisition time by one order of magnitude.

  8. Angle-resolved ion TOF spectrometer with a position sensitive detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Norio [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Heiser, F.; Wieliczec, K.; Becker, U.

    1996-07-01

    A angle-resolved ion time-of-flight mass spectrometer with a position sensitive anode has been investigated. Performance of this spectrometer has been demonstrated by measuring an angular distribution of a fragment ion pair, C{sup +} + O{sup +}, from CO at the photon energy of 287.4 eV. The obtained angular distribution is very close to the theoretically expected one. (author)

  9. Mapping unoccupied electronic states of freestanding graphene by angle-resolved low-energy electron transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Wicki Flavio; Longchamp Jean-Nicolas; Latychevskaia Tatiana; Escher Conrad; Fink Hans-Werner

    2016-01-01

    We report angle-resolved electron transmission measurements through freestanding graphene sheets in the energy range of 18 to 30 eV above the Fermi level. The measurements are carried out in a low-energy electron point source microscope, which allows simultaneously probing the transmission for a large angular range. The characteristics of low-energy electron transmission through graphene depend on its electronic structure above the vacuum level. The experimental technique described here allow...

  10. Electronic structure of Sr2RuO4 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasawa, H.; Aiura, Y.; Saitoh, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Hase, I.; Ikeda, S.I.; Bando, H.; Kubota, M.; Ono, K.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic structure of the monolayer strontium ruthenate Sr 2 RuO 4 was investigated by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We present photon-energy (hν) dependence of the electronic structure near the Fermi level along the ΓM line. The hν dependence has shown a strong spectral weight modulation of the Ru 4d xy and 4d zx bands

  11. Study of High Temperature Superconductors with Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Lisa

    2003-05-13

    The Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) recently emerged as a powerful tool for the study of highly correlated materials. This thesis describes the new generation of ARPES experiment, based on the third generation synchrotron radiation source and utilizing very high resolution electron energy and momentum analyzer. This new setup is used to study the physics of high temperature superconductors. New results on the Fermi surfaces, dispersions, scattering rate and superconducting gap in high temperature superconductors are presented.

  12. Identifiability analysis of rotational diffusion tensor and electronic transition moments measured in time-resolved fluorescence depolarization experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szubiakowski, Jacek P.

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this paper is studies of the deterministic identifiability of molecular parameters, such as rotational diffusion tensor components and orientation of electronic transition moments, resulting from the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy experiment. In the most general case considered, a pair of perpendicularly polarized emissions enables the unique determination of all the rotational diffusion tensor's principal components. The influence of the tensor's symmetry and the associated degeneration of its eigenvalues on the identifiability of the electronic transitions moments is systematically investigated. The analysis reveals that independently of the rotational diffusion tensor's symmetry, the transition moments involved in photoselection and emission processes cannot be uniquely identified without a priori information about their mutual orientation or their orientation with respect to the principal axes of the tensor. Moreover, it is shown that increasing the symmetry of the rotational diffusion tensor deteriorates the degree of the transition moments identifiability. To obtain these results analytically, a novel approach to solve bilinear system of equations for Markov parameters is applied. The effect of the additional information, obtained from fluorescence measurements for different molecular mobilities, to improve the identifiability at various levels of analysis is shown. The effectiveness and reliability of the target analysis method for experimental determination of the molecular parameters is also discussed

  13. Angle resolved characterization of nanostructured and conventionally textured silicon solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Ormstrup, Jeppe; Ommen, Martin Lind

    2015-01-01

    current, open circuit voltage, fill factor (FF) and power conversion efficiency are each measured as function of the relative incident angle between the solar cell and the light source. The relative incident angle is varied from 0° to 90° in steps of 10° in orthogonal axes, such that each solar cell......We report angle resolved characterization of nanostructured and conventionally textured silicon solar cells. The nanostructured solar cells are realized through a single step, mask-less, scalable reactive ion etching (RIE) texturing of the surface. Photovoltaic properties including short circuit...

  14. Electronic structure of superconducting Bi2212 crystal by angle resolved ultra violet photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, N.L.; Shrivastava, P.; Garg, K.B.

    1993-01-01

    The electronic structure of a high quality superconducting Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 Osub(8+δ) (Bi2212) single crystal is studied by angle resolved ultra violet photoemission (ARUPS) using He I (21.2 eV). Our results appear to show two bands crossing the Fermi level in ΓX direction of the Brillouin zone as reported by Takahashi et al. The bands at higher binding energy do not show any appreciable dispersion. The nature of the states near the Fermi level is discussed and the observed band structure is compared with the band structure calculations. (author)

  15. Determination of electronic states in crystalline semiconductors and metals by angle-resolved photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, K.A.

    1979-08-01

    An important part of the theoretical description of the solid state is band structure, which relies on the existence of dispersion relations connecting the electronic energy and wavevector in materials with translational symmetry. These relations determine the electronic behavior of such materials. The elaboration of accurate band structures, therefore, is of considerable fundamental and practical importance. Angle-resolved photoemission (ARP) spectroscopy provides the only presently available method for the detailed experimental investigation of band structures. This work is concerned with its application to both semiconducting and metallic single crystals

  16. Linear and circular dichroism in angle resolved Fe 3p photomission. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, E.; Waddill, G.D.; Tobin, J.G.; Sterne, P.A.

    1994-01-01

    Using a recently developed spin-polarized, fully relativistic, multiple scattering approach based on the layer KKR Green function method, we have reproduced the Fe 3p angle-resolved soft x-ray photoemission spectra and analyzed the associated large magnetic dichroism effects for excitation with both linearly and circularly polarized light. Comparison between theory and experiment yields a spin-orbit splitting of 1.0--1.2 eV and an exchange splitting of 0.9-- 1.0 eV for Fe 3p. These values are 50--100% larger than those hitherto obtained experimentally

  17. Dynamics of Molecular Orientation Observed Using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy during Deposition of Pentacene on Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Han; Kwon, Soonnam

    2016-04-19

    A real-time method to observe both the structural and the electronic configuration of an organic molecule during deposition is reported for the model system of pentacene on graphite. Structural phase transition of the thin films as a function of coverage is monitored by using in situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) results to observe the change of the electronic configuration at the same time. A photoemission theory that uses independent atomic center approximations is introduced to identify the molecular orientation from the ARPES technique. This study provides a practical insight into interpreting ARPES data regarding dynamic changes of molecular orientation during initial growth of molecules on a well-defined surface.

  18. Energy and angle resolved ion scattering spectroscopy: new possibilities for surface analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellings, G.J.A.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis the design and development of a novel, very sensitive and high-resolving spectrometer for surface analysis is described. This spectrometer is designed for Energy and Angle Resolved Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (EARISS). There are only a few techniques that are sensitive enough to study the outermost atomic layer of surfaces. One of these techniques, Low-Energy Ion Scattering (LEIS), is discussed in chapter 2. Since LEIS is destructive, it is important to make a very efficient use of the scattered ions. This makes it attractive to simultaneously carry out energy and angle dependent measurements (EARISS). (Auth.)

  19. Angle-resolved reflection spectroscopy of high-quality PMMA opal crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtsev, Ivan V.; Tambasov, Igor A.; Ivanenko, Alexander A.; Zyryanov, Victor Ya.

    2018-02-01

    PMMA opal crystal was prepared by a simple hybrid method, which includes sedimentation, meniscus formation and evaporation. We investigated three surfaces of this crystal by angle-resolved reflective light spectroscopy and SEM study. The angle-resolved reflective measurements were carried out in the 400-1100 nm range. We have determined the high-quality ordered surface of the crystal region. Narrow particle size distribution of the surface has been revealed. The average particle diameter obtained with SEM was nearly 361 nm. The most interesting result was that reflectivity of the surface turned out up to 98% at normal light incidence. Using a fit of dependences of the maximum reflectivity wavelength from an angle based on the Bragg-Snell law, the wavelength of maximum 0° reflectivity, the particle diameter and the fill factor have been determined. For the best surface maximum reflectivity wavelength of a 0° angle was estimated to be 869 nm. The particle diameter and fill factor were calculated as 372 nm and 0.8715, respectively. The diameter obtained by fitting is in excellent agreement with the particle diameter obtained with SEM. The reflectivity maximum is assumed to increase significantly when increasing the fill factor. We believe that using our simple approach to manufacture PMMA opal crystals will significantly increase the fabrication of high-quality photonic crystal templates and thin films.

  20. Setup for angle-resolved electron spectrometry using monochromatised synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenbach, H.; Franke, C.; Malutzki, R.; Wachter, A.; Schmidt, V.

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus is described which is well suited for angle-resolved electron spectrometry of free atoms and molecules using monochromatised synchrotron radiation. Two variations are presented, one for room temperature gaseous species, the other for metallic vapours. The analyser is of the cylindrical mirror type, designed, however, so as to accept with one sector the entire source volume independently of the photon beam diameter. It can be equipped with a positon-sensitive detector instead of a channeltron, which extends its potentiality. The system consists of up to three cylindrical mirror sector analysers (CMAs) where a double-sector CMA can be rotated around the photon beam direction, allowing angular distribution measurements, and another sector CMA is mounted in a fixed position providing a signal for reference purposes. A detailed description and experimental tests are given for the performance of the CMA, i.e. its imaging properties, resolution and transmissions, as well as for possible instrumental asymmetries affecting angle-resolved experiments. (orig.)

  1. An experimentalist's guide to the matrix element in angle resolved photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An introduction to the art of angle resolved photoemission is presented. • Matrix element effects are described by a nearly free electron final state model. • ARPES spectral weight of a Bloch band can be calculated from the Fourier transform of its Wannier orbital. • Experimental handedness and improper polarization introduce dichroism. • Instructive showcases from modern ARPES are discussed in detail. - Abstract: Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is commonly known as a powerful probe of the one-electron removal spectral function in ordered solid state. With increasing efficiency of light sources and spectrometers, experiments over a wide range of emission angles become more and more common. Consequently, the angular variation of ARPES spectral weight – often times termed “matrix element effect” – enters as an additional source of information. In this tutorial, we develop a simple but instructive free electron final state approach based on the three-step model to describe the intensity distribution in ARPES. We find a compact expression showing that the ARPES spectral weight of a given Bloch band is essentially determined by the momentum distribution (the Fourier transform) of its associated Wannier orbital – times a polarization dependent pre-factor. While the former is giving direct information on the symmetry and shape of the electronic wave function, the latter can give rise to surprising geometric effects. We discuss a variety of modern and instructive experimental showcases for which this simplistic formalism works astonishingly well and discuss the limits of this approach.

  2. Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices studied by Brillouin light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubbiotti, G.; Tacchi, S. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IOM-CNR), Sede di Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Montoncello, F.; Giovannini, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Ferrara, Via G. Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Madami, M.; Carlotti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Ding, J.; Adeyeye, A. O. [Information Storage Materials Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2015-06-29

    The Brillouin light scattering technique has been exploited to study the angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of squared Permalloy antidot lattice. Frequency dispersion of spin waves has been measured for a set of fixed wave vector magnitudes, while varying the wave vector in-plane orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field. The magnonic band gap between the two most dispersive modes exhibits a minimum value at an angular position, which exclusively depends on the product between the selected wave vector magnitude and the lattice constant of the array. The experimental data are in very good agreement with predictions obtained by dynamical matrix method calculations. The presented results are relevant for magnonic devices where the antidot lattice, acting as a diffraction grating, is exploited to achieve multidirectional spin wave emission.

  3. High Resolution Angle Resolved Photoemission Studies on Quasi-Particle Dynamics in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leem, C.S.

    2010-06-02

    We obtained the spectral function of the graphite H point using high resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The extracted width of the spectral function (inverse of the photo-hole lifetime) near the H point is approximately proportional to the energy as expected from the linearly increasing density of states (DOS) near the Fermi energy. This is well accounted by our electron-phonon coupling theory considering the peculiar electronic DOS near the Fermi level. And we also investigated the temperature dependence of the peak widths both experimentally and theoretically. The upper bound for the electron-phonon coupling parameter is 0.23, nearly the same value as previously reported at the K point. Our analysis of temperature dependent ARPES data at K shows that the energy of phonon mode of graphite has much higher energy scale than 125K which is dominant in electron-phonon coupling.

  4. A tunable low-energy photon source for high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harter, John W.; Monkman, Eric J.; Shai, Daniel E.; Nie Yuefeng; Uchida, Masaki; Burganov, Bulat; Chatterjee, Shouvik; King, Philip D. C.; Shen, Kyle M.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a tunable low-energy photon source consisting of a laser-driven xenon plasma lamp coupled to a Czerny-Turner monochromator. The combined tunability, brightness, and narrow spectral bandwidth make this light source useful in laboratory-based high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy experiments. The source supplies photons with energies up to ∼7 eV, delivering under typical conditions >10 12 ph/s within a 10 meV spectral bandwidth, which is comparable to helium plasma lamps and many synchrotron beamlines. We first describe the lamp and monochromator system and then characterize its output, with attention to those parameters which are of interest for photoemission experiments. Finally, we present angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data using the light source and compare its performance to a conventional helium plasma lamp.

  5. Modeling angle-resolved photoemission of graphene and black phosphorus nano structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Han; Kwon, Soonnam

    2016-05-10

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data on electronic structure are difficult to interpret, because various factors such as atomic structure and experimental setup influence the quantum mechanical effects during the measurement. Therefore, we simulated ARPES of nano-sized molecules to corroborate the interpretation of experimental results. Applying the independent atomic-center approximation, we used density functional theory calculations and custom-made simulation code to compute photoelectron intensity in given experimental setups for every atomic orbital in poly-aromatic hydrocarbons of various size, and in a molecule of black phosphorus. The simulation results were validated by comparing them to experimental ARPES for highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite. This database provides the calculation method and every file used during the work flow.

  6. Dimensional Crossover in a Charge Density Wave Material Probed by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, C. W.; Berthod, C.; Puppin, M.; Berger, H.; Wolf, M.; Hoesch, M.; Monney, C.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data reveal evidence of a crossover from one-dimensional (1D) to three-dimensional (3D) behavior in the prototypical charge density wave (CDW) material NbSe3 . In the low-temperature 3D regime, gaps in the electronic structure are observed due to two incommensurate CDWs, in agreement with x-ray diffraction and electronic-structure calculations. At higher temperatures we observe a spectral weight depletion that approaches the power-law behavior expected in one dimension. From the warping of the quasi-1D Fermi surface at low temperatures, we extract the energy scale of the dimensional crossover. This is corroborated by a detailed analysis of the density of states, which reveals a change in dimensional behavior dependent on binding energy. Our results offer an important insight into the dimensionality of excitations in quasi-1D materials.

  7. Robust depth selectivity in mesoscopic scattering regimes using angle-resolved measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, P; Kim, A D; Moscoso, M

    2013-03-01

    We study optical imaging of tissues in the mesoscopic scattering regime in which light multiply scatters in tissues but is not fully diffusive. We use the radiative transport equation to model light propagation and an ℓ1-optimization method to solve the inverse source problem. We show that recovering the location and strength of several point-like sources that are close to each other is not possible when using angle-averaged measurements. The image reliability is limited by a spatial scale that is on the order of the transport mean-free path, even under the most ideal conditions. However, by using just a few angle-resolved measurements, the proposed method is able to overcome this limitation.

  8. Angle-resolved photoemission studies of the superconducting gap symmetry in Fe-based superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-B. Huang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The superconducting gap is the fundamental parameter that characterizes the superconducting state, and its symmetry is a direct consequence of the mechanism responsible for Cooper pairing. Here we discuss about angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements of the superconducting gap in the Fe-based high-temperature superconductors. We show that the superconducting gap is Fermi surface dependent and nodeless with small anisotropy, or more precisely, a function of the momentum location in the Brillouin zone. We show that while this observation seems inconsistent with weak coupling approaches for superconductivity in these materials, it is well supported by strong coupling models and global superconducting gaps. We also suggest that a smaller lifetime of the superconducting Cooper pairs induced by the momentum dependent interband scattering inherent to these materials could affect the residual density of states at low energies, which is critical for a proper evaluation of the superconducting gap.

  9. Angle-resolved photoemission spectra of graphene from first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol-Hwan; Giustino, Feliciano; Spataru, Catalin D; Cohen, Marvin L; Louie, Steven G

    2009-12-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is a powerful experimental technique for directly probing electron dynamics in solids. The energy versus momentum dispersion relations and the associated spectral broadenings measured by ARPES provide a wealth of information on quantum many-body interaction effects. In particular, ARPES allows studies of the Coulomb interaction among electrons (electron-electron interactions) and the interaction between electrons and lattice vibrations (electron-phonon interactions). Here, we report ab initio simulations of the ARPES spectra of graphene including both electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions on the same footing. Our calculations reproduce some of the key experimental observations related to many-body effects, including the indication of a mismatch between the upper and lower halves of the Dirac cone.

  10. A brief update of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on a correlated electron system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W S; Vishik, I M; Lu, D H; Shen, Z-X

    2009-04-22

    In this paper, we briefly summarize the capabilities of state-of-the-art angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) in the field of experimental condensed matter physics. Due to the advancement of the detector technology and the high flux light sources, ARPES has become a powerful tool to study the low energy excitations of solids, especially those novel quantum materials in which many-body physics are at play. To benchmark today's state-of-the-art ARPES technique, we demonstrate that the precision of today's ARPES has advanced to a regime comparable to the bulk-sensitive de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) measurements. Finally, as an example of new discoveries driven by the advancement of the ARPES technique, we summarize some of our recent ARPES measurements on underdoped high-T(c) superconducting cuprates, which have provided further insight into the complex pseudogap problem.

  11. Constant Matrix Element Approximation to Time-Resolved Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Freericks

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We discuss several issues associated with employing a constant matrix element approximation for the coupling of light to multiband electrons in the context of time-resolved angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TR-ARPES. In particular, we demonstrate that the “constant matrix element approximation” —even when reasonable—only holds for specific choices of the one-electron basis, and changing to other bases, requires including nonconstant corrections to the matrix element. We also discuss some simplifying approximations, where a constant matrix element is employed in multiple bases, and the consequences of this further approximation (especially with respect to the calculated TR-ARPES signal becoming negative. We also discuss issues related to gauge invariance of the final spectra.

  12. Integrated experimental setup for angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy of transuranic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Kevin S; Joyce, John J; Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    2013-09-01

    We have developed the Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) system for transuranic materials. The ARPES transuranic system is an endstation upgrade to the Laser Plasma Light Source (LPLS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The LPLS is a tunable light source for photoemission with a photon energy range covering the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and soft x-ray regions (27-140 eV). The LPLS was designed and developed for transuranic materials. Transuranic photoemission is currently not permitted at the public synchrotrons worldwide in the VUV energy range due to sample encapsulation requirements. With the addition of the ARPES capability to the LPLS system there is an excellent opportunity to explore new details centered on the electronic structure of actinide and transuranic materials.

  13. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy for the study of two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Sung-Kwan

    2017-03-01

    Quantum systems in confined geometries allow novel physical properties that cannot easily be attained in their bulk form. These properties are governed by the changes in the band structure and the lattice symmetry, and most pronounced in their single layer limit. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is a direct tool to investigate the underlying changes of band structure to provide essential information for understanding and controlling such properties. In this review, recent progresses in ARPES as a tool to study two-dimensional atomic crystals have been presented. ARPES results from few-layer and bulk crystals of material class often referred as "beyond graphene" are discussed along with the relevant developments in the instrumentation.

  14. Direct observation of superconducting gaps in MgB 2 by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souma, S.; Machida, Y.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.; Matsui, H.; Wang, S.-C.; Ding, H.; Kaminski, A.; Campuzano, J. C.; Sasaki, S.; Kadowaki, K.

    2004-08-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has been carried out to clarify the anomalous superconductivity of MgB 2. We observed three bands crossing the Fermi level, which are ascribed to B2p-σ, π and surface bands. We have succeeded for the first time in directly observing the superconducting gaps of these bands separately. We have found that the superconducting-gap sizes of σ and surface bands are 6.5 ± 0.5 and 6.0 ± 0.5 meV, respectively, while that of the π band is much smaller (1.5 ± 0.5 meV). The present experimental result unambiguously demonstrates the validity of the two-band superconductivity in MgB 2.

  15. Direct observation of superconducting gaps in MgB2 by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souma, S.; Machida, Y.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.; Matsui, H.; Wang, S.-C.; Ding, H.; Kaminski, A.; Campuzano, J.C.; Sasaki, S.; Kadowaki, K.

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has been carried out to clarify the anomalous superconductivity of MgB 2 . We observed three bands crossing the Fermi level, which are ascribed to B2p-σ, π and surface bands. We have succeeded for the first time in directly observing the superconducting gaps of these bands separately. We have found that the superconducting-gap sizes of σ and surface bands are 6.5 ± 0.5 and 6.0 ± 0.5 meV, respectively, while that of the π band is much smaller (1.5 ± 0.5 meV). The present experimental result unambiguously demonstrates the validity of the two-band superconductivity in MgB 2

  16. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser based spectrometer for angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Rui; Mou, Daixiang; Wu, Yun; Huang, Lunan; Kaminski, Adam [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); McMillen, Colin D.; Kolis, Joseph [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Giesber, Henry G.; Egan, John J. [Advanced Photonic Crystals LLC, Fort Mill, South Carolina 29708 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    We have developed an angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer with tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser as a photon source. The photon source is based on the fourth harmonic generation of a near IR beam from a Ti:sapphire laser pumped by a CW green laser and tunable between 5.3 eV and 7 eV. The most important part of the set-up is a compact, vacuum enclosed fourth harmonic generator based on potassium beryllium fluoroborate crystals, grown hydrothermally in the US. This source can deliver a photon flux of over 10{sup 14} photon/s. We demonstrate that this energy range is sufficient to measure the k{sub z} dispersion in an iron arsenic high temperature superconductor, which was previously only possible at synchrotron facilities.

  17. Angle-resolved and resonant photoemission spectroscopy of rare-earth and actinide intermetallics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reihl, Bruno

    1985-07-01

    In this paper, some aspects of our angle-resolved and resonant photoemission work on rare-earth and actinide intermetallics will be summarized. The systems specifically mentioned are Gd(0001), UIr 3(100), UN(100), UO 2, α-γ- Ce 0.9Th 0.1, U xTh 1- xSb, USb xTe 1- x, UPd 3, UCu xNi 5- x, CeCu 2Si 2, UBe 13, U 2Zn 17 , SmAl 2, EuPd 13, YbBe 13, TmS, Yb xY 1- xAl 2, EuPd 2Si 2, TmSe, and UAs xSe 1- x.

  18. Design of angle-resolved illumination optics using nonimaging bi-telecentricity for 193 nm scatterfield microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Martin Y; Barnes, Bryan M; Silver, Richard M

    2018-03-01

    Accurate optics-based dimensional measurements of features sized well-below the diffraction limit require a thorough understanding of the illumination within the optical column and of the three-dimensional scattered fields that contain the information required for quantitative metrology. Scatterfield microscopy can pair simulations with angle-resolved tool characterization to improve agreement between the experiment and calculated libraries, yielding sub-nanometer parametric uncertainties. Optimized angle-resolved illumination requires bi-telecentric optics in which a telecentric sample plane defined by a Köhler illumination configuration and a telecentric conjugate back focal plane (CBFP) of the objective lens; scanning an aperture or an aperture source at the CBFP allows control of the illumination beam angle at the sample plane with minimal distortion. A bi-telecentric illumination optics have been designed enabling angle-resolved illumination for both aperture and source scanning modes while yielding low distortion and chief ray parallelism. The optimized design features a maximum chief ray angle at the CBFP of 0.002° and maximum wavefront deviations of less than 0.06 λ for angle-resolved illumination beams at the sample plane, holding promise for high quality angle-resolved illumination for improved measurements of deep-subwavelength structures using deep-ultraviolet light.

  19. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission investigation of potassium and phosphate tungsten bronzes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Sanhita; Kumari, Spriha; Raj, Satyabrata

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Electronic structure of potassium and phosphate tungsten bronzes. • Origin of transport anomalies in bronzes. • Flat segments of Fermi surfaces are connected by a nesting vector, q. • Nesting driven charge-density wave is responsible for the anomalies. - Abstract: We have performed high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and density functional ab initio theoretical calculation to study the electronic structure of potassium (K 0.25 WO 3 ) and phosphate (P 4 W 12 O 44 ) tungsten bronzes. We have experimentally determined the band dispersions and Fermi surface topology of these bronzes and compared with our theoretical calculations and a fair agreement has been seen between them. Our experimental as well as theoretical investigation elucidates the origin of transport anomalies in these bronzes. The Fermi surfaces of these bronzes consist of flat patches, which can be connected with each other by a constant nesting wave vector, q. The scattering wave vectors found from diffraction measurements match with these nesting vectors and the anomalies in the transport properties of these bronzes can be well explained by the evolution of charge-density wave with a partial nesting between the flat segments of the Fermi surfaces.

  20. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of rare earth LaSb{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michiardi, Matteo; Arnold, Fabian; Faerch Fisher, Karl Frederik; Svane, Axel; Bianchi, Marco; Brummerstedt Iversen, Bo; Hofmann, Philip [Aarhus University (Denmark); Shwetha, G.; Kanchana, V. [IIT-Hyderabad (India); Ganapathy, Vaitheeswaran [University of Hyderabad (India)

    2016-07-01

    Several rare earth diantimonides have been found to exhibit intriguing electronic properties such as anisotropic linear and non-saturating magnetoresistance. Among these materials, LaSb{sub 2} is not only considered for application in magnetoresistive devices but it is also found to be superconducting at low temperatures and it is investigated as candidate material to host charge density wave phases. Despite the several studies on its transport properties, the electronic structure of LaSb{sub 2} is still largely unknown. Here we present an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and ab-initio calculation study of LaSb{sub 2}(001). The observed band structure is found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Our results reveal that LaSb{sub 2} is a semimetal with a strongly nested two-dimensional Fermi surface. The low energy spectrum is characterized by four massive hole pockets and by four shallow, strongly directional, electron pockets that exhibit Dirac-like dispersion. We speculate on the possibility that this peculiar electronic structure drives the magnetoresistance to its quantum limit, explaining its unconventional behavior.

  1. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of metallic surface and interface states of oxide insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, Nicholas C.; Radović, Milan

    2017-11-01

    Over the last decade, conducting states embedded in insulating transition metal oxides (TMOs) have served as gateways to discovering and probing surprising phenomena that can emerge in complex oxides, while also opening opportunities for engineering advanced devices. These states are commonly realized at thin film interfaces, such as the well-known case of LaAlO3 (LAO) grown on SrTiO3 (STO). In recent years, the use of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to investigate the k-space electronic structure of such materials led to the discovery that metallic states can also be formed on the bare surfaces of certain TMOs. In this topical review, we report on recent studies of low-dimensional metallic states confined at insulating oxide surfaces and interfaces as seen from the perspective of ARPES, which provides a direct view of the occupied band structure. While offering a fairly broad survey of progress in the field, we draw particular attention to STO, whose surface is so far the best-studied, and whose electronic structure is probably of the most immediate interest, given the ubiquitous use of STO substrates as the basis for conducting oxide interfaces. The ARPES studies provide crucial insights into the electronic band structure, orbital character, dimensionality/confinement, spin structure, and collective excitations in STO surfaces and related oxide surface/interface systems. The obtained knowledge increases our understanding of these complex materials and gives new perspectives on how to manipulate their properties.

  2. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu; Vishik, Inna M; Yi, Ming; Yang, Shuolong; Liu, Zhongkai; Lee, James J; Chen, Sudi; Rebec, Slavko N; Leuenberger, Dominik; Zong, Alfred; Jefferson, C Michael; Moore, Robert G; Kirchmann, Patrick S; Merriam, Andrew J; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2016-01-01

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with 113.778 nm wavelength (10.897 eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10 MHz, provides a flux of 2 × 10(12) photons/s, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2 meV and 0.012 Å(-1), respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2 meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2 Å(-1), granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source and showcase its performance for rare earth metal tritellurides, high temperature cuprate superconductors, and iron-based superconductors.

  3. Formation of complexes between functionalized chitosan membranes and copper: A study by angle resolved XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurado-López, Belén [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Vieira, Rodrigo Silveira [Chemical Engineering Department, Universidade Federal do Ceará, UFC, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Rabelo, Rodrigo Balloni; Beppu, Marisa Masumi [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6066, 13081-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Casado, Juan [Departamento de Química-Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique, E-mail: castellon@uma.es [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2017-01-01

    Chitosan is a biopolymer with potential applications in various fields. Recently, it has been used for heavy metals removal like copper, due to the presence of amino and hydroxyl groups in its structure. Chitosan membranes were crosslinked with epichlorohydrin and bisoxirano and functionalized with chelating agents, such as iminodiacetic acid, aspartic acid and tris-(2-amino-ethyl) polyamine. These membranes were used for copper adsorption and the formed complexes were characterized. Thermal and crystalline properties of chitosan membranes were studied by TG-DCS and X-ray diffraction. Raman, XPS and FT-IR data confirmed that copper is linked to the modified chitosan membranes by the amino groups. The oxidation state of copper-chitosan membranes were also studied by angle resolved XPS, and by UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Chitosan membranes were crosslinked with epichlorohydrin and bisoxirano and functionalized with chelating agents. • The chelating agent were iminodiacetic acid, aspartic acid and tris-(2-amino-ethyl) polyamine. • The functionalized membranes were used for copper adsorption and studied by ARXPS, Raman, TG-DCS, FT-IR and XRD. • Spectroscopic data confirmed that copper is linked to the modified chitosan membranes by the amino groups.

  4. Field-angle-resolved anisotropy in superconducting CeCoIn5 using realistic Fermi surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tanmoy; Vorontsov, A. B.; Vekhter, I.; Graf, Matthias J.

    2013-05-01

    We compute the field-angle-resolved specific heat and thermal conductivity using realistic model band structures for the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn5 to identify the gap structure and location of nodes. We use a two-band tight-binding parametrization of the band dispersion as input for the self-consistent calculations in the quasiclassical formulation of the superconductivity. Systematic analysis shows that modest in-plane anisotropy in the density of states and Fermi velocity in tetragonal crystals significantly affects the fourfold oscillations in thermal quantities, when the magnetic field is rotated in the basal plane. The Fermi-surface anisotropy substantially shifts the location of the lines in the H-T plane, where the oscillations change sign compared to quasicylindrical model calculations. In particular, at high fields, the anisotropy and sign reversal are found even for isotropic gaps. Our findings imply that a simultaneous analysis of the specific heat and thermal conductivity, with an emphasis on the low-energy sector, is needed to restrict potential pairing scenarios in multiband superconductors. We discuss the impact of our results on recent measurements of the Ce-115 family, namely, CeTIn5 with T= Co, Rh, Ir.

  5. Valence-band structure of cubic CdS as determined by angle-resolved photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfl, A. P. J.; Hofmann, Ph.; Schaff, O.; Bradshaw, A. M.

    1997-04-01

    The valence-band structure of cubic CdS along the Γ-Σ-X direction and at all high-symmetry points has been experimentally determined using angle-resolved photoemission and compared to two local density approximation (LDA) calculations as well as to a recent quasiparticle calculation. The Cd 4d level was found to be semibandlike with an energy dispersion of up to 1 eV. The energy difference between the experimental and our calculated linear-muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) LDA energies falls, as expected, along a line of positive gradient. The quasiparticle calculation by Pollmann and co-workers fits the experimental values somewhat better than the LMTO calculation, although a difference of ~1.0 eV was still found to occur for the Cd 4d band. The self-interaction and relaxation-corrected pseudopotential LDA results by the same group give the best fit to within ~+/-0.5 eV for nearly all critical energies measured. Comparison with previously reported photoemission results on the wurtzite structure shows that energies at equivalent symmetry points agree within experimental error.

  6. Electronic properties of novel topological quantum materials studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yun [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-12-17

    The discovery of quantum Hall e ect has motivated the use of topology instead of broken symmetry to classify the states of matter. Quantum spin Hall e ect has been proposed to have a separation of spin currents as an analogue of the charge currents separation in quantum Hall e ect, leading us to the era of topological insulators. Three-dimensional analogue of the Dirac state in graphene has brought us the three-dimensional Dirac states. Materials with three-dimensional Dirac states could potentially be the parent compounds for Weyl semimetals and topological insulators when time-reversal or space inversion symmetry is broken. In addition to the single Dirac point linking the two dispersion cones in the Dirac/Weyl semimetals, Dirac points can form a line in the momentum space, resulting in a topological node line semimetal. These fascinating novel topological quantum materials could provide us platforms for studying the relativistic physics in condensed matter systems and potentially lead to design of new electronic devices that run faster and consume less power than traditional, silicon based transistors. In this thesis, we present the electronic properties of novel topological quantum materials studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES).

  7. Fourier-domain angle-resolved low coherence interferometry for clinical detection of dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Neil G.; Zhu, Yizheng; Wax, Adam

    2010-02-01

    Improved methods for detecting dysplasia, or pre-cancerous growth are a current clinical need, particularly in the esophagus. The currently accepted method of random biopsy and histological analysis provides only a limited examination of tissue in question while being coupled with a long time delay for diagnosis. Light scattering spectroscopy, in contrast, allows for inspection of the cellular structure and organization of tissue in vivo. Fourier-domain angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a/LCI) is a novel light scattering spectroscopy technique that provides quantitative depth-resolved morphological measurements of the size and optical density of the examined cell nuclei, which are characteristic biomarkers of dysplasia. Previously, clinical viability of the a/LCI system was demonstrated through analysis of ex vivo human esophageal tissue in Barrett's esophagus patients using a portable a/LCI, as was the development of a clinical a/LCI system. Data indicating the feasibility of the technique in other organ sites (colon, oral cavity) will be presented. We present an adaptation of the a/LCI system that will be used to investigate the presence of dysplasia in vivo in Barrett's esophagus patients.

  8. Detection of intestinal dysplasia using angle-resolved low coherence interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Neil; Zhu, Yizheng; Thacker, Julie K. M.; Migaly, John; Guy, Cynthia; Mantyh, Christopher R.; Wax, Adam

    2011-10-01

    Angle-resolved low coherence interferometry (a/LCI) is an optical biopsy technique that allows for depth-resolved, label-free measurement of the average size and optical density of cell nuclei in epithelial tissue to assess the tissue health. a/LCI has previously been used clinically to identify the presence of dysplasia in Barrett's Esophagus patients undergoing routine surveillance. We present the results of a pilot, ex vivo study of tissues from 27 patients undergoing partial colonic resection surgery, conducted to evaluate the ability of a/LCI to identify dysplasia. Performance was determined by comparing the nuclear morphology measurements with pathological assessment of co-located physical biopsies. A statistically significant correlation between increased average nuclear size, reduced nuclear density, and the presence of dysplasia was noted at the basal layer of the epithelium, at a depth of 200 to 300 μm beneath the tissue surface. Using a decision line determined from a receiver operating characteristic, a/LCI was able to separate dysplastic from healthy tissues with a sensitivity of 92.9% (13/14), a specificity of 83.6% (56/67), and an overall accuracy of 85.2% (69/81). The study illustrates the extension of the a/LCI technique to the detection of intestinal dysplasia, and demonstrates the need for future in vivo studies.

  9. Angle Resolved Core-Level Spectroscopy of Zr1Nb Alloy Oxidation by Oxygen, Water and Hydrogen Peroxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bastl, Zdeněk; Senkevich, A. I.; Spirovová, Ilona; Vrtílková, V.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 34, - (2002), s. 477-480 ISSN 0142-2421 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : Zr-Nb alloy * oxide films * angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.071, year: 2002

  10. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2x1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2x2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2x1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16±2 degree from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94±0.02 Angstrom. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27±0.04 Angstrom, up from 1.10 Angstrom for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25 Angstrom Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20 Angstrom and 15--23 degrees) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16 Angstrom and 19 degrees. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95 Angstrom for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals' radius ∼ 1.5 Angstrom for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2x2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS χ(k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system

  11. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-20

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ~ 7 eV) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν >/~ 400 eV) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of CeMIn5(M = Rh, Ir, and Co) and YbRh2Si2 with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant U5f compounds such as UFeGa5, their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all U5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized U5f compounds such as UPd3 and UO2 are essentially explained by the localized model that treats U5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion U-based compounds such as the hidden-order compound URu2Si2, their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures are generally well-explained by the band-structure calculation, whereas the states in the vicinity of EF show some deviations due to electron correlation effects. Furthermore, the electronic structures of URu2Si2 in the paramagnetic and hidden-order phases are

  12. Measurements of polarization-dependent angle-resolved light scattering from individual microscopic samples using Fourier transform light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, JaeHwang; Kim, Jinhyung; Seo, Min-Kyo; Park, YongKeun

    2018-03-01

    We present a method to measure the vector-field light scattering of individual microscopic objects. The polarization-dependent optical field images are measured with quantitative phase imaging at the sample plane, and then numerically propagated to the far-field plane. This approach allows the two-dimensional polarization-dependent angle-resolved light scattered patterns from individual object to be obtained with high precision and sensitivity. Using this method, we present the measurements of the polarization-dependent light scattering of a liquid crystal droplet and individual silver nanowires over scattering angles of 50{\\deg}. In addition, the spectroscopic extension of the polarization-dependent angle-resolved light scattering is demonstrated using wavelength-scanning illumination.

  13. Soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission with micro-positioning techniques for metallic V2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hidenori; Kiss, Takayuki; Wakabayashi, Yuki K.; Nishitani, Yoshito; Mori, Takeo; Nakata, Yuki; Kitayama, Satoshi; Fukushima, Kazuaki; Ikeda, Shinji; Fuchimoto, Hiroto; Minowa, Yosuke; Mo, Sung-Kwan; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Allen, James W.; Metcalf, Patricia; Imai, Masaki; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi; Suga, Shigemasa; Muro, Takayuki; Sekiyama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission has been performed for metallic V2O3. By combining a microfocus beam (40 µm × 65 µm) and micro-positioning techniques with a long-working-distance microscope, it has been possible to observe band dispersions from tiny cleavage surfaces with a typical size of several tens of µm. The photoemission spectra show a clear position dependence, reflecting the morphology of the cleaved sample surface. By selecting high-quality flat regions on the sample surface, it has been possible to perform band mapping using both photon-energy and polar-angle dependences, opening the door to three-dimensional angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy for typical three-dimensional correlated materials where large cleavage planes are rarely obtained. PMID:25931096

  14. Angle-resolved conical emission spectra from filamentation in a solid with an Airy pattern and a Gaussian laser beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Cheng; Li, ZiXi; Hua, LinQiang; Quan, Wei; Liu, XiaoJun

    2016-09-15

    Filamentation dynamics in fused silica are investigated using an Airy pattern and a Gaussian laser beam. The angle-resolved conical emission spectra are measured and compared with the predictions of several models. Our experimental observations are consistent with the X-waves model in both cases. This indicates that both laser beams spontaneously evolve into nonlinear X-waves and suggests a universal evolution of filaments in fused silica, regardless of the initial laser beam profile.

  15. The use of angle resolved electron and photon stimulated desorption for the determination of molecular structure at surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madey, T.E.; Stockbauer, R.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review of recent data related to the use of angle-resolved electron stimulated desorption and photon stimulated desorption in determining the structures of molecules at surfaces is made. Examples include a variety of structural assignments based on ESIAD (electron stimulated desorption ion angular distributions), the observation of short-range local ordering effects induced in adsorbed molecules by surface impurities, and the application of photon stimulated desorption to both ionic and covalent adsorbate systems. (Author) [pt

  16. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on Electronic Structure and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cuprate Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.J.

    2010-04-30

    In addition to the record high superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}), high temperature cuprate superconductors are characterized by their unusual superconducting properties below T{sub c}, and anomalous normal state properties above T{sub c}. In the superconducting state, although it has long been realized that superconductivity still involves Cooper pairs, as in the traditional BCS theory, the experimentally determined d-wave pairing is different from the usual s-wave pairing found in conventional superconductors. The identification of the pairing mechanism in cuprate superconductors remains an outstanding issue. The normal state properties, particularly in the underdoped region, have been found to be at odd with conventional metals which is usually described by Fermi liquid theory; instead, the normal state at optimal doping fits better with the marginal Fermi liquid phenomenology. Most notable is the observation of the pseudogap state in the underdoped region above T{sub c}. As in other strongly correlated electrons systems, these unusual properties stem from the interplay between electronic, magnetic, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom. Understanding the microscopic process involved in these materials and the interaction of electrons with other entities is essential to understand the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. Since the discovery of high-T{sub c} superconductivity in cuprates, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has provided key experimental insights in revealing the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors. These include, among others, the earliest identification of dispersion and a large Fermi surface, an anisotropic superconducting gap suggestive of a d-wave order parameter, and an observation of the pseudogap in underdoped samples. In the mean time, this technique itself has experienced a dramatic improvement in its energy and momentum resolutions, leading to a series of new discoveries not

  17. Intra- and intercycle interference of angle-resolved electron emission in laser-assisted XUV atomic ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramajo, A. A.; Della Picca, R.; López, S. D.; Arbó, D. G.

    2018-03-01

    A theoretical study of ionization of the hydrogen atom due to an XUV pulse in the presence of an infrared (IR) laser is presented. Well-established theories are usually used to describe the laser-assisted photoelectron effect: the well-known soft-photon approximation firstly posed by Maquet et al (2007 J. Mod. Opt. 54 1847) and Kazansky’s theory in (2010 Phys. Rev. A 82, 033420). However, these theories completely fail to predict the electron emission perpendicularly to the polarization direction. Making use of a semiclassical model (SCM), we study the angle-resolved energy distribution of PEs for the case that both fields are linearly polarized in the same direction. We thoroughly analyze and characterize two different emission regions in the angle-energy domain: (i) the parallel-like region with contribution of two classical trajectories per optical cycle and (ii) the perpendicular-like region with contribution of four classical trajectories per optical cycle. We show that our SCM is able to assess the interference patterns of the angle-resolved PE spectrum in the two different mentioned regions. Electron trajectories stemming from different optical laser cycles give rise to angle-independent intercycle interferences known as sidebands. These sidebands are modulated by an angle-dependent coarse-grained structure coming from the intracycle interference of the electron trajectories born during the same optical cycle. We show the accuracy of our SCM as a function of the time delay between the IR and the XUV pulses and also as a function of the laser intensity by comparing the semiclassical predictions of the angle-resolved PE spectrum with the continuum-distorted wave strong field approximation and the ab initio solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  18. Electronic states localized at surface defects on Cu(755) studied by angle-resolved ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ogawa, K; Namba, H

    2003-01-01

    'Regularly stepped' and 'defective' surfaces of Cu(755) were prepared by low- and high-temperature annealing, respectively, of a clean specimen. Electronic states on both surfaces were studied by angle-resolved ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. On the defective Cu(755), we found a new photoelectron peak due to surface defects just below the Fermi level. The dispersion profile of the defect state is derived to be almost flat, which demonstrates the localized nature of the defects. High activity to oxygen adsorption of the defect state was revealed. (author)

  19. Crank-angle resolved imaging of biacetyl laser-induced fluorescence in an optical internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. D.; Sick, V.

    2005-09-01

    The use of a frequency-tripled, diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser in combination with a CMOS camera lens-coupled to a three-stage image intensifier allowed the visualization of the fuel distribution with crank angle resolution for hundreds of consecutive engine cycles. Biacetyl, doped into iso-octane, was excited at rates of 12 kHz with 100 ns pulses. Pulse energies are high enough to allow single-pulse imaging of the vapor-phase fuel distribution for motored and fired operation in an optical engine. The repetition rate of the setup is adequate to resolve critical steps in the development of the fuel cloud around the spark plug of a direct-injection gasoline engine.

  20. Reorientational motion of a cross-link junction in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) network measured by time-resolved fluorescence depolarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, A.D.; Hoffman, D.A.; Frank, C.W.; Fayer, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    The reorientational dynamics of a cross-link junction in poly(dimethylsiloxane) networks, measured by the fluorescence anisotropy decay of a chromophore tagged to the cross-link, have been investigated over a range of temperatures from T g +75 to T g +150. The probe chromophore, 1-dimethylamino-5-sulfonylnaphthalene amide (dansyl amide), is pendant to a trifunctional silane that acts as a cross-linking molecule. In cyclohexanol, the fluorescence anisotropy decay is in agreement with Debye--Stokes--Einstein hydrodynamic theory (rotational diffusion) demonstrating that the cross-linker can be used as a probe of orientational relaxation. The fluorescence anisotropy decays at a rapid rate in an end-linked poly(dimethyl siloxane) network reflecting fast reorientational motion of the cross-link junction. This reorientation appears diffusive and has a temperature dependence in accord with the Williams--Landel--Ferry equation. A model is proposed that suggests that reorientation and translational motion of the cross-link occur simultaneously and are both coupled to fluctuations of the polymer chain ends

  1. Assessment of waveguiding properties of gallium oxide nanostructures by angle resolved cathodoluminescence in a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogales, Emilio; Mendez, Bianchi; Piqueras, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) of Ga 2 O 3 nanowires and planar microstructures has been studied in a scanning electron microscope, as a function of the orientation angle of the structures relative to the position of the light detection system in the microscope chamber. CL contrast shows a marked dependence on the detection angle due to the waveguiding behaviour of the structures. The angle resolved cathodoluminescence (ARCL) measurements enable to evaluate the optical losses of guided blue-ultraviolet light in nanowires with diameters in the sub-wavelength range, deposited on graphite tape or silicon. In planar, branched feather-like microstructures, ARCL images demonstrate the directional-dependant light guiding behaviour of the nano-branches. -- Highlights: → Waveguiding behaviour of gallium oxide nanowires is studied using angle resolved CL. → Quantitative analysis of optical losses in sub-wavelength nanowires is carried out. → There is a strong dependence of the optical losses on the substrate. → Directional-dependant light guiding is observed in branched planar microstructures.

  2. Beamline for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy at low-temperature constructed at NTT Atsugi R and D Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Satoru; Yamamoto, Hideki; Maeda, Fumihiko; Watanabe, Yoshio; Yamada, Koji; Kiyokura, Takanori

    2005-01-01

    A vacuum ultra-violet beamline for in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of MBE-grown high-T c superconductors at low temperature has been constructed at beamline ABL-6B of the normal-conducting ring in the synchrotron radiation facility of the NTT Atsugi R and D Center. The constant-deviation-angle varied-line-spacing plane grating monochromator covers the energy range of 20-200 eV by using two gratings. A photon flux of the order of 10 11 s -1 with a resolving power of 2000 or more was achieved in the whole energy range. The endstation is equipped with an angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometer, an rf-stimulated He discharge lamp, a custom-designed sample manipulator for low-temperature measurements and a loadlock system for in situ measurements. Total energy resolution of about 13 meV has been obtained for the photoemission spectrum of the Au Fermi edge, in spite of the bending-magnet light source of a second-generation synchrotron radiation ring

  3. Gauge invariance in the theoretical description of time-resolved angle-resolved pump/probe photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freericks, J. K.; Krishnamurthy, H. R.; Sentef, M. A.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2015-10-01

    Nonequilibrium calculations in the presence of an electric field are usually performed in a gauge, and need to be transformed to reveal the gauge-invariant observables. In this work, we discuss the issue of gauge invariance in the context of time-resolved angle-resolved pump/probe photoemission. If the probe is applied while the pump is still on, one must ensure that the calculations of the observed photocurrent are gauge invariant. We also discuss the requirement of the photoemission signal to be positive and the relationship of this constraint to gauge invariance. We end by discussing some technical details related to the perturbative derivation of the photoemission spectra, which involve processes where the pump pulse photoexcites electrons due to nonequilibrium effects.

  4. Angle-resolved light scattering of individual rod-shaped bacteria based on Fourier transform light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, YoungJu; Jung, JaeHwang; Lee, Jee Woong; Shin, Della; Park, HyunJoo; Nam, Ki Tae; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2014-05-28

    Two-dimensional angle-resolved light scattering maps of individual rod-shaped bacteria are measured at the single-cell level. Using quantitative phase imaging and Fourier transform light scattering techniques, the light scattering patterns of individual bacteria in four rod-shaped species (Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus casei, Synechococcus elongatus, and Escherichia coli) are measured with unprecedented sensitivity in a broad angular range from -70° to 70°. The measured light scattering patterns are analyzed along the two principal axes of rod-shaped bacteria in order to systematically investigate the species-specific characteristics of anisotropic light scattering. In addition, the cellular dry mass of individual bacteria is calculated and used to demonstrate that the cell-to-cell variations in light scattering within bacterial species is related to the cellular dry mass and growth.

  5. Method to map one-dimensional electronic wave function by using multiple Brillouin zone angle resolved photoemission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Wook Lee

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES is a powerful tool to investigate electronic structures in solids and has been widely used in studying various materials. The electronic structure information by ARPES is obtained in the momentum space. However, in the case of one-dimensional system, we here show that we extract the real space information from ARPES data taken over multiple Brillouin zones (BZs. Intensities in the multiple BZs are proportional to the photoemission matrix element which contains information on the coefficient of the Bloch wave function. It is shown that the Bloch wave function coefficients can be extracted from ARPES data, which allows us to construct the real space wave function. As a test, we use ARPES data from proto-typical one-dimensional system SrCuO2 and construct the real space wave function.

  6. Soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of heavily boron-doped superconducting diamond films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yokoya, T. Nakamura, T. Matushita, T. Muro, H. Okazaki, M. Arita, K. Shimada, H. Namatame, M. Taniguchi, Y. Takano, M. Nagao, T. Takenouchi, H. Kawarada and T. Oguchi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have performed soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SXARPES of microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition diamond films with different B concentrations in order to study the origin of the metallic behavior of superconducting diamond. SXARPES results clearly show valence band dispersions with a bandwidth of ~23 eV and with a top of the valence band at gamma point in the Brillouin zone, which are consistent with the calculated valence band dispersions of pure diamond. Boron concentration-dependent band dispersions near the Fermi level (EF exhibit a systematic shift of EF, indicating depopulation of electrons due to hole doping. These SXARPES results indicate that diamond bands retain for heavy boron doping and holes in the diamond band are responsible for the metallic states leading to superconductivity at low temperature. A high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy spectrum near EF of a heavily boron-doped diamond superconductor is also presented.

  7. Direct observation of superconducting gaps in MgB{sub 2} by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souma, S.; Machida, Y.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.; Matsui, H.; Wang, S.-C.; Ding, H.; Kaminski, A.; Campuzano, J.C.; Sasaki, S.; Kadowaki, K

    2004-08-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has been carried out to clarify the anomalous superconductivity of MgB{sub 2}. We observed three bands crossing the Fermi level, which are ascribed to B2p-{sigma}, {pi} and surface bands. We have succeeded for the first time in directly observing the superconducting gaps of these bands separately. We have found that the superconducting-gap sizes of {sigma} and surface bands are 6.5 {+-} 0.5 and 6.0 {+-} 0.5 meV, respectively, while that of the {pi} band is much smaller (1.5 {+-} 0.5 meV). The present experimental result unambiguously demonstrates the validity of the two-band superconductivity in MgB{sub 2}.

  8. Characterization of the α-SN/CDTE(110) interface by angle-resolved X-ray photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, T.S.; Partin, W.J.; Chung, Y.W.

    1987-01-01

    Stoichiometric and atomically clean CdTe(110) surfaces have been prepared by suitable chemical etching, followed by argon sputtering, and sample annealing in ultra-high vacuum. Cubic (α) -tin was grown on CdTe(110) by tin evaporation from a tungsten filament at a substrate temperature of 30 0 C. Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) was used to determine the α-Sn growth mechanism and the composition profile of this semiconductor heterostructure nondestructively. From their analyses, the authors conclude that α-Sn grows on CdTe(110) at 30 0 C by a layer by layer mechanism and forms an abrupt junction with CdTe(110)

  9. Electronic anisotropies revealed by detwinned angle-resolved photo-emission spectroscopy measurements of FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Matthew D.; Haghighirad, Amir A.; Rhodes, Luke C.; Hoesch, Moritz; Kim, Timur K.

    2017-10-01

    We report high resolution angle-resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements of detwinned FeSe single crystals. The application of a mechanical strain is used to promote the volume fraction of one of the orthorhombic domains in the sample, which we estimate to be 80 % detwinned. While the full structure of the electron pockets consisting of two crossed ellipses may be observed in the tetragonal phase at temperatures above 90 K, we find that remarkably, only one peanut-shaped electron pocket oriented along the longer a axis contributes to the ARPES measurement at low temperatures in the nematic phase, with the expected pocket along b being not observed. Thus the low temperature Fermi surface of FeSe as experimentally determined by ARPES consists of one elliptical hole pocket and one orthogonally-oriented peanut-shaped electron pocket. Our measurements clarify the long-standing controversies over the interpretation of ARPES measurements of FeSe.

  10. Nano-Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on Topological insulator Sb2Te3 nanowires responsible of quantum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, José; Chen, Chaoyu; Arango, Yulieth C.; Huang, Liubing; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lüth, Hans; Lu, J. Grace; Schäpers, Thomas; Asensio, Maria C.

    2017-06-01

    Using high-resolution Nano-Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (Nano-ARPES), we have determined the electronic structure of the surface and bulk states of topological insulator Sb2Te3 nanowires, which have been also characterized by magnetoresistance measurements. The observed Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations could be unambiguously related to the transport by topological protected surface states directly recorded by photoemission. We have measured Nano-ARPES on individual nanowires of a few nanometers wide to provide direct evidence of the existence of the nontrivial topological surface states, as well as their doping. Our findings are consistent with theoretical predictions and confirm that the surface states of intrinsically doped unidimensional topological insulator nanowires are responsible for the quantum transport.

  11. Direct Observation of Localized Spin Antiferromagnetic Transition in PdCrO2 by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Han-Jin; Jeong, Jinwon; Chang, Bin; Jeong, Dahee; Moon, Hyun Sook; Cho, En-Jin; Ok, Jong Mok; Kim, Jun Sung; Kim, Kyoo; Min, B. I.; Lee, Han-Koo; Kim, Jae-Young; Park, Byeong-Gyu; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Lee, Seongsu

    2014-01-01

    We report the first case of the successful measurements of a localized spin antiferromagnetic transition in delafossite-type PdCrO2 by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This demonstrates how to circumvent the shortcomings of ARPES for investigation of magnetism involved with localized spins in limited size of two-dimensional crystals or multi-layer thin films that neutron scattering can hardly study due to lack of bulk compared to surface. Also, our observations give direct evidence for the spin ordering pattern of Cr3+ ions in PdCrO2 suggested by neutron diffraction and quantum oscillation measurements, and provide a strong constraint that has to be satisfied by a microscopic mechanism for the unconventional anomalous Hall effect recently reported in this system. PMID:24419488

  12. Evidence of the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The authors present a unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level photoemission satellites by examining the satellite diffraction pattern in the Angle Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) mode. They show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. They present ARPEFS data for the carbon 1s from (√3x√3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2xl)CO/Ni(110), nitrogen 1s from c(2x2) N 2 /Ni(100), cobalt 1s from p(1x1)Co/Cu(100), and nickel 3p from clean nickel (111). The satellite peaks and tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature

  13. Evidence of the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The authors present a unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level photoemission satellites by examining the satellite diffraction pattern in the Angle Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) mode. They show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. They present ARPEFS data for the carbon 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2xl)CO/Ni(110), nitrogen 1s from c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100), cobalt 1s from p(1x1)Co/Cu(100), and nickel 3p from clean nickel (111). The satellite peaks and tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature.

  14. Electronic structure of K0.5CoO2 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, H.; Iwasawa, H.; Hirose, M.; Maeda, Y.; Saitoh, T.; Osada, H.; Kyomen, T.; Hanaya, M.; Aiura, Y.; Kotani, Y.; Kubota, M.; Ono, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure of K 0.5 CoO 2 in the metallic phase by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy at a low temperature. An observed Fermi surface of K 0.5 CoO 2 was a large hexagonal one around the Γ point only, with no hole pockets on the Γ-K lines which was typically predicted by band-structure calculations with local-density approximation (LDA). We also found that a modulation of the Fermi velocity, which was the largest at K point and the smallest at M point, was again opposite to the prediction by LDA band-theory. In spite of this conflicting with LDA band-theory, our results are both in agreement with what was observed in Na x CoO 2 .

  15. Selective inhibition of paraffin deposition under high flow rate as a function of the crude oil paraffin type and content by fluorescence depolarization: polypropylene and high-density polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintella, Cristina M; Lima, Angelo M V; Silva, Eduardo B

    2006-04-13

    High-density polyethylene (HDPE) and polypropylene (PP) were studied to identify tailor-made materials for walls of pipelines and ducts for crude paraffinic oil that inhibit paraffin depositions. The interfacial interaction was investigated from 50 to 70 degrees C and as a function of the n-C(36)H(74) paraffin concentration added to the paraffinic crude oil. The static and the dynamic interfacial tensions were observed, respectively, by traditional contact angle measurements and by fluorescence depolarization of the natural fluorescent probes of the crude oil, flowing at a high rate. The static interaction showed a low dependence on the n-paraffin content for both surfaces. For PP, it decreased slightly as the n-paraffin concentration increased, evidencing an increase in the liquid-liquid interaction. The dynamic interfacial tension with PP clearly decreased as temperature and n-paraffin concentration increased, the latter effect being attributed to the PP methyl groups hindering the interaction between the n-paraffin and the PP main chain. For the flow on HDPE, the interaction proved to be highly dependent on the n-paraffin concentration and temperature. It increased as n-paraffin was added and temperature decreased. The former effect is attributed to the alignment of the n-paraffin chains within the high rate flowing liquid and the similar molecular geometry of the n-paraffin and the linear polymer surface (almost without branches), which increases the number of sites available for interaction. PP proved to be more suitable for transportation of crude oil rich in paraffins with more than 36 carbon atoms, while HDPE was more suitable for those with smaller paraffinic chains.

  16. Combined angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, density functional theory and kinetic study of nitridation of gallium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, H.; Monier, G.; Hoggan, P. E.; Bideux, L.; Robert-Goumet, C.; Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2018-01-01

    The high density of interface and surface states that cause the strong Fermi pinning observed on GaAs surfaces can be reduced by depositing GaN ultra-thin films on GaAs. To further improve this passivation, it is necessary to investigate the nitridation phenomena by identifying the distinct steps occurring during the process and to understand and quantify the growth kinetics of GaAs nitridation under different conditions. Nitridation of the cleaned GaAs substrate was performed using N2 plasma source. Two approaches have been combined. Firstly, an AR-XPS (Angle Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy) study is carried out to determine the chemical environments of the Ga, As and N atoms and the composition depth profile of the GaN thin film which allow us to summarize the nitridation process in three steps. Moreover, the temperature and time treatment have been investigated and show a significant impact on the formation of the GaN layer. The second approach is a refined growth kinetic model which better describes the GaN growth as a function of the nitridation time. This model clarifies the exchange mechanism of arsenic with nitrogen atoms at the GaN/GaAs interface and the phenomenon of quasi-saturation of the process observed experimentally.

  17. Electronic band structure of epitaxial PbTe (111) thin films observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhenyu; Cui, Shengtao; Shu, Tianyu; Ma, Songsong; Liu, Yang; Sun, Zhe; Luo, Jun-Wei; Wu, Huizhen

    2017-04-01

    Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we studied bulk and surface electronic band structures of narrow-gap semiconductor lead telluride (PbTe) thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy both perpendicular and parallel to the Γ -L direction. The comparison of ARPES data with the first-principles calculation reveals the details of band structures, orbital characters, spin-orbit splitting energies, and surface states. The photon-energy-dependent spectra show the bulk character. Both the L and Σ valence bands are observed and their energy difference is determined. The spin-orbit splitting energies at L and Γ points are 0.62 eV and 0.88 eV, respectively. The surface states below and close to the valence band maximum are identified. The valence bands are composed of a mixture of Pb 6 s and Te 5 pz orbitals with dominant in-plane even parity, which is attributed to the layered distortion in the vicinity of the PbTe (111) surface. These findings provide insights into PbTe fundamental properties and shall benefit relevant thermoelectric and optoelectronic applications.

  18. Evidence for Itinerant Carriers in an Anisotropic Narrow-Gap Semiconductor by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Sailong; Bai, Wei; Wu, Liming; Lin, Hua; Xiao, Chong; Cui, Shengtao; Li, Zhou; Kong, Shuai; Liu, Yi; Liu, Dayong; Zhang, Guobin; Sun, Zhe; Xie, Yi

    2018-01-01

    The ability to accurately determine the electronic structure of solids has become a key prerequisite for modern functional materials. For example, the precise determination of the electronic structure helps to balance the three thermoelectric parameters, which is the biggest challenge to design high-performance thermoelectric materials. Herein, by high-resolution, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), the itinerant carriers in CsBi 4 Te 6 (CBT) are revealed for the first time. CBT is a typical anisotropic, narrow-gap semiconductor used as a practical candidate for low-temperature thermoelectric applications, and p-doped CBT series show superconductivity at relatively low carrier concentrations. The ARPES results show a significantly larger bandwidth near the Fermi surface than calculations, which means the carriers transport anisotropically and itinerantly in CBT. It is reasonable to believe that these newly discovered features of carriers in narrow-gap semiconductors are promising for designing optimal thermoelectric materials and superconductors. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Anisotropic electronic band structure of intrinsic Si(110) studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Stephane Yu; Takayama, Akari; Kawamoto, Erina; Hu, Chunping; Hagiwara, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Takashi; Suto, Shozo

    2017-09-01

    We have studied the electronic band structure of the hydrogen-terminated Si(110)-(1 ×1 ) [H:Si(110)-(1 ×1 )] surface using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and first-principles calculations in the framework of density functional theory with local density approximation (LDA). The bulk-truncated H:Si(110)-(1 ×1 ) surface is a good template to investigate the electronic band structure of the intrinsic Si(110). In the ARPES spectra, seven bulk states and one surface state due to the H-H interaction are observed clearly. The four bulk states consisting of Si 3 px y orbitals exhibit anisotropic band dispersions along the high symmetric direction of Γ ¯-X ¯ and Γ ¯-X¯' directions, where one state shows one-dimensional character. The calculated band structures show a good agreement with the experimental results except the surface state. We discuss the exact nature of electronic band structures and the applicability of LDA. We have estimated the anisotropic effective masses of electrons and holes of Si(110) for device application.

  20. Thermal Stability of Au/NbOx/Nb and Au/Nb2O5/W Model Catalysts Studied by Angle-resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lykhach, Yaroslava; Plšek, Jan; Spirovová, Ilona; Bastl, Zdeněk

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 10 (2003), s. 1791-1804 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/02/0664 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : model metal catalysts * angle resolved photoemission * depth profiles Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.041, year: 2003

  1. Insights from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on the metallic states of YbB6(001): E(k) dispersion, temporal changes, and spatial variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frantzeskakis, E.; de Jong, N.; Zhang, J.X.; Zhang, X.; Li, Z.; Liang, C.L.; Wang, Y.; Varykhalov, A.; Huang, Y.K.; Golden, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    We report high-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) results on the (001) cleavage surface of YbB6, a rare-earth compound that has been recently predicted to host surface electronic states with topological character. We observe two types of well-resolved metallic states, whose

  2. Dissimilarities between the electronic structure of chemically doped and chemically pressurized iron pnictides from an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thirupathaiah, S.; Rienks, E.D.L.; Jeevan, H.S.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Slooten, E.; Kaas, J.; van Heumen, E.; de Jong, S.; Duerr, H.A.; Siemensmeyer, K.; Follath, R.; Gegenwart, P.; Golden, M.S.; Fink, J.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the electronic structure of EuFe2As2-xPx using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Upon substituting As with the isovalent P, which leads to chemical pressure and to superconductivity, we observe a nonrigid-band-like change of the electronic structure along the

  3. Momentum-resolved electronic structure at a buried interface from soft X-ray standing-wave angle-resolved photoemission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gray, A.X.; Minar, J.; Plucinski, L.; Huijben, Mark; Bostwick, A.; Rotenberg, E.; Yang, S.-H.; Braun, J.; Winkelmann, A.; Conti, G.; Eiteneer, D.; Rattanachata, A.; Greer, A.A.; Ciston, J.; Ophus, C.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Blank, David H.A.; Doennig, D.; Pentcheva, R.; Kortright, J.B.; Schneider, C.M.; Ebert, H.; Fadley, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is a powerful technique for the study of electronic structure, but it lacks a direct ability to study buried interfaces between two materials. We address this limitation by combining ARPES with soft X-ray standing-wave (SW) excitation (SWARPES), in

  4. Dissimilarities between the electronic structure of chemically doped and chemically pressurized iron pnictides from an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thirupathaiah, S.; Rienks, E.D.L.; Jeevan, H.S.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Slooten, E.; Kaas, J.; van Heumen, E.; de Jong, S.; Dürr, H.A.; Siemensmeyer, K.; Follath, R.; Gegenwart, P.; Golden, M.S.; Fink, J.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the electronic structure of EuFe2As2-xPx using high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Upon substituting As with the isovalent P, which leads to a chemical pressure and to superconductivity, we observe a non-rigid-band like change of the electronic structure along

  5. Construção e avaliação de célula de fluxo para estudo da tensão interfacial dinâmica da interface fluxo líquido - sólido por despolarização da fluorescência Development of a flow cell to study dynamic interfacial tension of solid-liquid flow by fluorescence depolarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha T. P. O. Castro

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A simple low-cost flow cell was developed, built and optimized in order to observe dynamic interfacial tension of continuous flow systems. Distinct materials can be used in one of the cell walls in order to observe the intermolecular forces between the flowing liquid and the chemical constitution of the walls. The fluorescence depolarization was evaluated using Rhodamine B as fluorescent probe seeded in ethylene glycol. The effects of the positioning angles on the data acquired across the cell are reported. The reproducibility of the data was evaluated with a spectrometer assembled in-house and the relative standard deviation was below 3%.

  6. Angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) analysis of lanthanum oxide for micro-flexography printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, S.; Yusof, M. S.; Embong, Z.; Maksud, M. I.

    2016-01-01

    Micro-flexography printing was developed in patterning technique from micron to nano scale range to be used for graphic, electronic and bio-medical device on variable substrates. In this work, lanthanum oxide (La2O3) has been used as a rare earth metal candidate as depositing agent. This metal deposit was embedded on Carbon (C) and Silica (Si) wafer substrate using Magnetron Sputtering technique. The choose of Lanthanum as a target is due to its wide application in producing electronic devices such as thin film battery and printed circuit board. The La2O3 deposited on the surface of Si wafer substrate was then analyzed using Angle Resolve X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS). The position for each synthetic component in the narrow scan of Lanthanum (La) 3d and O 1s are referred to the electron binding energy (eV). The La 3d narrow scan revealed that the oxide species of this particular metal is mainly contributed by La2O3 and La(OH)3. The information of oxygen species, O2- component from O 1s narrow scan indicated that there are four types of species which are contributed from the bulk (O2-), two chemisorb component (La2O3) and La(OH)3 and physisorp component (OH). Here, it is proposed that from the adhesive and surface chemical properties of La, it is suitable as an alternative medium for micro-flexography printing technique in printing multiple fine solid lines at nano scale. Hence, this paper will describe the capability of this particular metal as rare earth metal for use in of micro-flexography printing practice. The review of other parameters contributing to print fine lines will also be described later.

  7. Angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) analysis of lanthanum oxide for micro-flexography printing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, S., E-mail: suhaimihas@uthm.edu.my; Yusof, M. S., E-mail: mdsalleh@uthm.edu.my; Maksud, M. I., E-mail: midris1973@gmail.com [Faculty of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia); Embong, Z., E-mail: zaidi@uthm.edu.my [Faculty of Science, Technology and Human Development, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Micro-flexography printing was developed in patterning technique from micron to nano scale range to be used for graphic, electronic and bio-medical device on variable substrates. In this work, lanthanum oxide (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has been used as a rare earth metal candidate as depositing agent. This metal deposit was embedded on Carbon (C) and Silica (Si) wafer substrate using Magnetron Sputtering technique. The choose of Lanthanum as a target is due to its wide application in producing electronic devices such as thin film battery and printed circuit board. The La{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposited on the surface of Si wafer substrate was then analyzed using Angle Resolve X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS). The position for each synthetic component in the narrow scan of Lanthanum (La) 3d and O 1s are referred to the electron binding energy (eV). The La 3d narrow scan revealed that the oxide species of this particular metal is mainly contributed by La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and La(OH){sub 3}. The information of oxygen species, O{sup 2-} component from O 1s narrow scan indicated that there are four types of species which are contributed from the bulk (O{sup 2−}), two chemisorb component (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and La(OH){sub 3} and physisorp component (OH). Here, it is proposed that from the adhesive and surface chemical properties of La, it is suitable as an alternative medium for micro-flexography printing technique in printing multiple fine solid lines at nano scale. Hence, this paper will describe the capability of this particular metal as rare earth metal for use in of micro-flexography printing practice. The review of other parameters contributing to print fine lines will also be described later.

  8. Electronic structure of R Sb (R =Y , Ce, Gd, Dy, Ho, Tm, Lu) studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun; Lee, Yongbin; Kong, Tai; Mou, Daixiang; Jiang, Rui; Huang, Lunan; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kaminski, Adam

    2017-07-01

    We use high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and electronic structure calculations to study the electronic properties of rare-earth monoantimonides RSb (R = Y, Ce, Gd, Dy, Ho, Tm, Lu). The experimentally measured Fermi surface (FS) of RSb consists of at least two concentric hole pockets at the Γ point and two intersecting electron pockets at the X point. These data agree relatively well with the electronic structure calculations. Detailed photon energy dependence measurements using both synchrotron and laser ARPES systems indicate that there is at least one Fermi surface sheet with strong three-dimensionality centered at the Γ point. Due to the "lanthanide contraction", the unit cell of different rare-earth monoantimonides shrinks when changing the rare-earth ion from CeSb to LuSb. This results in the differences in the chemical potentials in these compounds, which are demonstrated by both ARPES measurements and electronic structure calculations. Interestingly, in CeSb, the intersecting electron pockets at the X point seem to be touching the valence bands, forming a fourfold-degenerate Dirac-like feature. On the other hand, the remaining rare-earth monoantimonides show significant gaps between the upper and lower bands at the X point. Furthermore, similar to the previously reported results of LaBi, a Dirac-like structure was observed at the Γ point in YSb, CeSb, and GdSb, compounds showing relatively high magnetoresistance. This Dirac-like structure may contribute to the unusually large magnetoresistance in these compounds.

  9. An Angle Resolved Photoemission Study of a Mott Insulator and Its Evolution to a High Temperature Superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronning, Filip

    2002-03-19

    One of the most remarkable facts about the high temperature superconductors is their close proximity to an antiferromagnetically ordered Mott insulating phase. This fact suggests that to understand superconductivity in the cuprates we must first understand the insulating regime. Due to material properties the technique of angle resolved photoemission is ideally suited to study the electronic structure in the cuprates. Thus, a natural starting place to unlocking the secrets of high Tc would appears to be with a photoemission investigation of insulating cuprates. This dissertation presents the results of precisely such a study. In particular, we have focused on the compound Ca{sub 2-x}Na{sub x}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. With increasing Na content this system goes from an antiferromagnetic Mott insulator with a Neel transition of 256K to a superconductor with an optimal transition temperature of 28K. At half filling we have found an asymmetry in the integrated spectral weight, which can be related to the occupation probability, n(k). This has led us to identify a d-wave-like dispersion in the insulator, which in turn implies that the high energy pseudogap as seen by photoemission is a remnant property of the insulator. These results are robust features of the insulator which we found in many different compounds and experimental conditions. By adding Na we were able to study the evolution of the electronic structure across the insulator to metal transition. We found that the chemical potential shifts as holes are doped into the system. This picture is in sharp contrast to the case of La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} where the chemical potential remains fixed and states are created inside the gap. Furthermore, the low energy excitations (ie the Fermi surface) in metallic Ca{sub 1.9}Na{sub 0.1}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} is most well described as a Fermi arc, although the high binding energy features reveal the presence of shadow bands. Thus, the results in this dissertation provide a

  10. Evidence for Anionic Excess Electrons in a Quasi-Two-Dimensional Ca2N Electride by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Seop; Kang, Chang-Jong; Kim, Ye Ji; Sinn, Soobin; Han, Moonsup; Chang, Young Jun; Park, Byeong-Gyu; Kim, Sung Wng; Min, Byung Il; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Noh, Tae Won

    2016-03-02

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) study of a layered electride Ca2N was carried out to reveal its quasi-two-dimensional electronic structure. The band dispersions and the Fermi-surface map are consistent with the density functional theory results except for a chemical potential shift that may originate from the high reactivity of surface excess electrons. Thus, the existence of anionic excess electrons in the interlayer region of Ca2N is strongly supported by ARPES.

  11. Electronic structure studies of ferro-pnictide superconductors and their parent compounds using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setti, Thirupathaiah

    2011-07-14

    The discovery of high temperature superconductivity in the iron pnictide compound LaO{sub 1-x}F{sub x}FeAs with T{sub c} = 26 K as created enormous interest in the high-T{sub c} superconductor community. So far, four prototypes of crystal structures have been found in the Fe-pnictide family. All four show a structural deformation followed or accompanied by a magnetic transition from a high temperature paramagnetic conductor to a low temperature antiferromagnetic metal whose transition temperature T{sub N} varies between the compounds. Charge carrier doping, isovalent substitution of the As atoms or the application of pressure suppresses the antiferromagnetic spin density wave (SDW) order and leads to a superconducting phase. More recently high Tc superconductivity has been also detected in iron chalchogenides with similar normal state properties. Since superconductivity is instability of the normal state, the study of normal state electronic structure in comparison with superconducting state could reveal important information on the pairing mechanism. Therefore, it is most important to study the electronic structure of these new superconductors, i.e., to determine Fermi surfaces and band dispersions near the Fermi level at the high symmetry points in order to obtain a microscopic understanding of the superconducting properties. Using the technique angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) one measures the electrons ejected from a sample when photons impinge on it. In this way one can map the Fermi surface which provides useful information regarding the physics behind the Fermi surface topology of high T{sub c} superconductors. Furthermore, this technique provides information on the band dispersion, the orbital character of the bands, the effective mass, the coupling to bosonic excitations, and the superconducting gap. This emphasizes the importance of studying the electronic structure of the newly discovered Fe-pnictides using ARPES. In this work we have

  12. Unusually large chemical potential shift in a degenerate semiconductor: Angle-resolved photoemission study of SnSe and Na-doped SnSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, M.; Yamamoto, K.; Mizokawa, T.; Saini, N. L.; Arita, M.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.; Tan, G.; Zhao, L. D.; Kanatzidis, M. G.

    2018-03-01

    We have studied the electronic structure of SnSe and Na-doped SnSe by means of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The valence-band top reaches the Fermi level by the Na doping, indicating that Na-doped SnSe can be viewed as a degenerate semiconductor. However, in the Na-doped system, the chemical potential shift with temperature is unexpectedly large and is apparently inconsistent with the degenerate semiconductor picture. The large chemical potential shift and anomalous spectral shape are key ingredients for an understanding of the novel metallic state with the large thermoelectric performance in Na-doped SnSe.

  13. Angle-resolved electron and ion spectroscopy apparatus on the soft X-ray photochemistry beamline BL27SU at SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Ueda, K; Senba, Y; Okada, K; Shimizu, Y; Chiba, H; Ohashi, H; Tamenori, Y; Okumura, H; Saitô, N; Nagaoka, S; Hiraya, A; Ishiguro, E; Ibuki, T; Suzuki, I H; Koyano, I

    2001-01-01

    We have designed and constructed the apparatus for the angular distribution measurements of photoejected electrons and ions from free molecules, as a part of the endstation of the c-branch of the beamline BL27SU, a soft X-ray photochemistry beamline at SPring-8. The experimental procedures are described in combination with the use of a capability to switch the horizontal and vertical directions of the linear polarization of the light produced by the figure-8 undulator. As a typical example of the experimental results, we present angle-resolved energetic ion yield spectra in the O 1s excitation region of CO sub 2.

  14. Angle-resolved spectral Fabry-Pérot interferometer for single-shot measurement of refractive index dispersion over a broadband spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J. T.; Ji, F.; Xia, H. J.; Liu, Z. J.; Zhang, T. D.; Yang, L.

    2018-01-01

    An angle-resolved spectral Fabry-Pérot interferometer is reported for fast and accurate measurement of the refractive index dispersion of optical materials with parallel plate shape. The light sheet from the wavelength tunable laser is incident on the parallel plate with converging angles. The transmitted interference light for each angle is dispersed and captured by a 2D sensor, in which the rows and the columns are used to simultaneously record the intensities as a function of wavelength and incident angle, respectively. The interferogram, named angle-resolved spectral intensity distribution, is analyzed by fitting the phase information instead of finding the fringe peak locations that present periodic ambiguity. The refractive index dispersion and the physical thickness can be then retrieved from a single-shot interferogram within 18 s. Experimental results of an optical substrate standard indicate that the accuracy of the refractive index dispersion is less than 2.5  ×  10-5 and the relative uncertainty of the thickness is 6  ×  10-5 mm (3σ) due to the high stability and the single-shot measurement of the proposed system.

  15. Acute ethanol causes hepatic mitochondrial depolarization in mice: role of ethanol metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhong

    Full Text Available An increase of ethanol metabolism and hepatic mitochondrial respiration occurs in vivo after a single binge of alcohol. Here, our aim was to determine how ethanol intake affects hepatic mitochondrial polarization status in vivo in relation to ethanol metabolism and steatosis.Hepatic mitochondrial polarization, permeability transition (MPT, and reduce pyridine nucleotides, and steatosis in mice were monitored by intravital confocal/multiphoton microscopy of the fluorescence of rhodamine 123 (Rh123, calcein, NAD(PH, and BODIPY493/503, respectively, after gavage with ethanol (1-6 g/kg.Mitochondria depolarized in an all-or-nothing fashion in individual hepatocytes as early as 1 h after alcohol. Depolarization was dose- and time-dependent, peaked after 6 to 12 h and maximally affected 94% of hepatocytes. This mitochondrial depolarization was not due to onset of the MPT. After 24 h, mitochondria of most hepatocytes recovered normal polarization and were indistinguishable from untreated after 7 days. Cell death monitored by propidium iodide staining, histology and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL was low throughout. After alcohol, mitochondrial NAD(PH autofluorescence increased and decreased, respectively, in hepatocytes with polarized and depolarized mitochondria. Ethanol also caused steatosis mainly in hepatocytes with depolarized mitochondria. Depolarization was linked to ethanol metabolism, since deficiency of alcohol dehydrogenase and cytochrome-P450 2E1 (CYP2E1, the major ethanol-metabolizing enzymes, decreased mitochondrial depolarization by ∼ 70% and ∼ 20%, respectively. Activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase decreased depolarization, whereas inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase enhanced depolarization. Activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase also markedly decreased steatosis.Acute ethanol causes reversible hepatic mitochondrial depolarization in vivo that may contribute to steatosis and increased mitochondrial

  16. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberger, H., E-mail: Hubertus.Bromberger@mpsd.mpg.de; Liu, H.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Gierz, I. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Travers, J. C. [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Günther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Calegari, F. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Cavalleri, A. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Rd. Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-31

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  17. Probing long-range structural order in SnPc/Ag(111) by umklapp process assisted low-energy angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauernik, Stephan; Hein, Petra; Gurgel, Max; Falke, Julian; Bauer, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Laser-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is performed on tin-phthalocyanine (SnPc) adsorbed on silver Ag(111). Upon adsorption of SnPc, strongly dispersing bands are observed which are identified as secondary Mahan cones formed by surface umklapp processes acting on photoelectrons from the silver substrate as they transit through the ordered adsorbate layer. We show that the photoemission data carry quantitative structural information on the adsorbate layer similar to what can be obtained from a conventional low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) study. More specifically, we compare photoemission data and LEED data probing an incommensurate-to-commensurate structural phase transition of the adsorbate layer. Based on our results we propose that Mahan-cone spectroscopy operated in a pump-probe configuration can be used in the future to probe structural dynamics at surfaces with a temporal resolution in the sub-100-fs regime.

  18. Tuning across the BCS-BEC crossover in the multiband superconductor Fe1+ySe x Te1-x: An angle-resolved photoemission study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinott, Shahar; Chashka, K B; Ribak, Amit; Rienks, Emile D L; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Le Fevre, Patrick; Bertran, François; Randeria, Mohit; Kanigel, Amit

    2017-04-01

    The crossover from Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superconductivity to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is difficult to realize in quantum materials because, unlike in ultracold atoms, one cannot tune the pairing interaction. We realize the BCS-BEC crossover in a nearly compensated semimetal, Fe 1+ y Se x Te 1- x , by tuning the Fermi energy ε F via chemical doping, which permits us to systematically change Δ/ε F from 0.16 to 0.50, where Δ is the superconducting (SC) gap. We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure the Fermi energy, the SC gap, and characteristic changes in the SC state electronic dispersion as the system evolves from a BCS to a BEC regime. Our results raise important questions about the crossover in multiband superconductors, which go beyond those addressed in the context of cold atoms.

  19. Enhanced ultrafast relaxation rate in the Weyl semimetal phase of MoTe2 measured by time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaldi, A.; Autès, G.; Gatti, G.; Roth, S.; Sterzi, A.; Manzoni, G.; Zacchigna, M.; Cacho, C.; Chapman, R. T.; Springate, E.; Seddon, E. A.; Bugnon, Ph.; Magrez, A.; Berger, H.; Vobornik, I.; Kalläne, M.; Quer, A.; Rossnagel, K.; Parmigiani, F.; Yazyev, O. V.; Grioni, M.

    2017-12-01

    MoTe2 has recently been shown to realize in its low-temperature phase the type-II Weyl semimetal (WSM). We investigated by time- and angle- resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (tr-ARPES) the possible influence of the Weyl points on the electron dynamics above the Fermi level EF, by comparing the ultrafast response of MoTe2 in the trivial and topological phases. In the low-temperature WSM phase, we report an enhanced relaxation rate of electrons optically excited to the conduction band, which we interpret as a fingerprint of the local gap closure when Weyl points form. By contrast, we find that the electron dynamics of the related compound WTe2 is slower and temperature independent, consistent with a topologically trivial nature of this material. Our results shows that tr-ARPES is sensitive to the small modifications of the unoccupied band structure accompanying the structural and topological phase transition of MoTe2.

  20. Bulk electronic structure of superconducting LaRu2P2 single crystals measured by soft-X-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzoli, E; Kobayashi, M; Strocov, V N; Delley, B; Bukowski, Z; Karpinski, J; Plumb, N C; Radovic, M; Chang, J; Schmitt, T; Patthey, L; Mesot, J; Shi, M

    2012-06-22

    We present a soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SX-ARPES) study of the stoichiometric pnictide superconductor LaRu(2)P(2). The observed electronic structure is in good agreement with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. However, it is significantly different from its counterpart in high-temperature superconducting Fe pnictides. In particular, the bandwidth renormalization present in the Fe pnictides (~2-3) is negligible in LaRu(2)P(2) even though the mass enhancement is similar in both systems. Our results suggest that the superconductivity in LaRu(2) P(2) has a different origin with respect to the iron pnictides. Finally, we demonstrate that the increased probing depth of SX-ARPES, compared to the widely used ultraviolet ARPES, is essential in determining the bulk electronic structure in the experiment.

  1. Nodal gap structure of superconducting BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 from angle-resolved thermal conductivity in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, M.; Senshu, Y.; Shibauchi, T.; Kasahara, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Watanabe, D.; Ikeda, H.; Terashima, T.; Vekhter, I.; Vorontsov, A. B.; Matsuda, Y.

    2011-08-01

    The structure of the superconducting order parameter in the iron-pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As0.67P0.33)2 (Tc=31 K) with line nodes is studied by the angle-resolved thermal conductivity measurements in a magnetic field rotated within the basal plane. We find that the thermal conductivity displays distinct fourfold oscillations with minima when the field is directed at ±45∘ with respect to the tetragonal a axis. We discuss possible gap structures that can account for the data, and conclude that the observed results are most consistent with the closed nodal loops located at the flat parts of the electron Fermi surface with high Fermi velocity.

  2. Multiple Nodeless Superconducting Gaps in (Ba0.6K0.4)Fe2As2 Superconductor from Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Zhao; Hai-Yun, Liu; Wen-Tao, Zhang; Jian-Qiao, Meng; Xiao-Wen, Jia; Guo-Dong, Liu; Xiao-Li, Dong; Wei, Lu; Xing-Jiang, Zhou; Gen-Fu, Chen; Jian-Lin, Luo; Nan-Lin, Wang; Gui-Ling, Wang; Yong, Zhou; Zu-Yan, Xu; Yong, Zhu; Xiao-Yang, Wang; Chuang-Tian, Chen

    2008-01-01

    High resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements have been carried out to study the superconducting gap in the (Ba 0.6 K 0.4 )Fe 2 As 2 superconductor with T e = 35 K. Two hole-like Fermi surface sheets around the I' point exhibit different superconducting gaps. The inner Fermi surface sheet shows larger (10 ∼ 12 meV) and slightly momentum-dependent gap while the outer one has smaller (7 ∼ 8meV) and nearly isotropic gap. The lack of gap node in both Fermi surface sheets favours s-wave superconducting gap symmetry. Superconducting gap opening is also observed at the M(π, π) point. The two Fermi surface spots near the M point are gapped below T e but the gap persists above T e. The rich and detailed superconducting gap information will provide key insights and constraints in understanding pairing mechanism in the iron-based superconductors

  3. The complementary nature of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and angle-resolved x-ray diffraction part II: Analysis of oxides on dental alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, S. J.; Barr, T. L.; Mann, G. P.; Brantley, W. A.; Papazoglou, E.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1998-06-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and angle-resolved x-ray diffraction (ARXRD) were used to analyze the oxide layer on three palladium-gallium-based dental casting alloys. The oxide layers were approximately 10 Μm thick. The use of the techniques helped to determine which mechanism was responsible for oxide formation—either (a) oxide layer growth via diffusion of oxygen through the scale to the metal, causing the scale to grow at the metal-oxide interface, or (b) an oxide layer formed by metal ions diffusing through the scale to the surface and reacting with oxygen, causing the scale to grow at the oxide-air interface. The oxide growth mechanisms were correlated to previous layer adhesion results determined with biaxial flexure testing.

  4. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy for VO{sub 2} thin films grown on TiO{sub 2} (0 0 1) substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraoka, Y., E-mail: ymuraoka@cc.okayama-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Faculty of Science, Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Saeki, K.; Yao, Y. [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Wakita, T. [Faculty of Science, Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Hirai, M.; Yokoya, T. [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Faculty of Science, Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Eguchi, R.; Shin, S. [RIKEN/SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    We present the results of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements of metallic VO{sub 2} thin films. The VO{sub 2} thin films have been grown on TiO{sub 2} (0 0 1) single crystal substrates using pulsed laser deposition. The films exhibit a first-order metal-insulator transition (MIT) at 305 K. In the ARPES spectra of the metallic phase for the films, the O 2p band shows highly dispersive feature in the binding energy range of 3-8 eV along the {Gamma}-Z direction. The periodicity of the dispersive band is found to be 2.2 A{sup -1} which is almost identical with the periodicity expected from the c-axis length of the VO{sub 2} thin films. The overall feature of the experimental band structure is similar to the band structure calculations, supporting that we have succeeded in observing the dispersive band of the O 2p state in the metallic VO{sub 2} thin film. The present work indicates that the ARPES measurements using epitaxial thin films are promising for determining the band structure of VO{sub 2}.

  5. Cation profiling of passive films on stainless steel formed in sulphuric and acetic acid by deconvolution of angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Högström, Jonas, E-mail: jhogstrom@gmail.com; Fredriksson, Wendy, E-mail: wendy.fredriksson@kemi.uu.se; Edstrom, Kristina, E-mail: kristina.edstrom@kemi.uu.se; Björefors, Fredrik, E-mail: fredrik.bjorefors@kemi.uu.se; Nyholm, Leif, E-mail: leif.nyholm@kemi.uu.se; Olsson, Claes-Olof A., E-mail: drclabbe@kth.se

    2013-11-01

    An approach for determining depth gradients of metal-ion concentrations in passive films on stainless steel using angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) is described. The iterative method, which is based on analyses of the oxidised metal peaks, provides increased precision and hence allows faster ARXPS measurements to be carried out. The method was used to determine the concentration depth profiles for molybdenum, iron and chromium in passive films on 316L/EN 1.4432 stainless steel samples oxidised in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and acetic acid diluted with 0.02 M Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} · 10H{sub 2}O and 1 M H{sub 2}O, respectively. The molybdenum concentration in the film is pin-pointed to the oxide/metal interface and the films also contained an iron-ion-enriched surface layer and a chromium-ion-dominated middle layer. Although films of similar composition and thickness (i.e., about 2 nm) were formed in the two electrolytes, the corrosion currents were found to be three orders of magnitude larger in the acetic acid solution. The differences in the layer composition, found for the two electrolytes as well as different oxidation conditions, can be explained based on the oxidation potentials of the metals and the dissolution rates of the different metal ions.

  6. Si(111)-sq root 21 x sq root 21 -(Ag+Cs) surface studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, C; Morikawa, H; Okino, H; Hasegawa, S; Okuda, T; Kinoshita, T

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) were used to study the atomic and electronic structures of the Si(111)-sq root 21 x sq root 21-(Ag + Cs) surface (sq root 21-Cs in short), which was induced by depositing caesium atoms on the Si(111)-sq root 3 x sq root 3-Ag surface at room temperature (RT). Compared with previously reported STM images of noble-metal induced sq root 21 x sq root 21 phases including the Si(111)-sq root 21 x sq root 21-(Ag+Ag) and Si(111)-sq root 21 x sq root 21-(Ag+Au) surfaces (sq root 21-Ag and sq root 21-Au, respectively), the sq root 21-Cs surface displayed quite different features in STM images. The ARPES data of the sq root 21-Cs surface revealed an intrinsic dispersive surface-state band, together with a non-dispersive one near the Fermi level, which was also different from those of the sq root 21-Ag and sq root 21-Au surfaces. These results strongly suggest different atomic arrangements between Cs- and noble-metal induced sq root ...

  7. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission studies of high Tc superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Rong.

    1990-01-01

    An angle-resolved photoemission study of the normal and superconducting states in Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 was performed. Measurements in the normal state show bands dispersing through the Fermi level from at least 350 meV below E F . The Fermi level crossings are consistant with local-density band calculation, including a point calculated to be of Bi-O character. Additional measurements were made where bands crossed the Fermi level between 100 and 250K, along with measurements on an adjacent Pt foil. The Fermi edges of both materials agree to within the noise. Below the Fermi level, the spectra show correlation effects on the form of an increased effective mass. The shape of the spectra can be explained by a lifetime-broadened photohole and secondary electrons. The effective inverse photohole lifetime is linear in energy. A superconducting gap has been measured at a number of points where there is density at the Fermi level in the normal state. By proper modeling, a gap of 24 meV was obtained for all these points, including points of Cu-O and Bi-O character respectively, according to band calculation. The lack of gap anisotropy in the basal plane suggests that pinning in this material is not d-wave pairing

  8. Electronic Structure of Epitaxial Thin Films of the Transparent Conducting Oxide La:BaSnO3 Measured By In-Situ Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochocki, Edward; Paik, Hanjong; Uchida, Masaki; Schlom, Darrell; Shen, Kyle

    Lanthanum-doped barium stannate (La:BaSnO3) is a transparent conducting oxide where single crystals have exhibited unusually high mobility and oxygen stability. Here we present in-situ angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) measurements of La:BaSnO3 epitaxial films that were co-deposited onto lattice-matched rare-earth scandate substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations agree well with the observed valence bands and predict a parabolic conduction band. However, the features observed near the Fermi energy (EF) are non-dispersive yet localized in momentum space. This unusual appearance may be the result of quasi-localized charge carriers or out-of-plane momentum broadening. Over long measurement periods, we also observe changes to the valence band and near-EF feature that bear a strong resemblance to the beam-induced two-dimensional electron gases previously reported in SrTiO3 and KTaO3. The origin of these unexpected phenomena and their relationship to the structural and transport properties of these films will be discussed.

  9. Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with optimized high-harmonic pulses using frequency-doubled Ti:Sapphire lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eich, S.; Stange, A.; Carr, A.V.; Urbancic, J.; Popmintchev, T.; Wiesenmayer, M.; Jansen, K.; Ruffing, A.; Jakobs, S.; Rohwer, T.; Hellmann, S.; Chen, C.; Matyba, P.; Kipp, L.; Rossnagel, K.; Bauer, M.; Murnane, M.M.; Kapteyn, H.C.; Mathias, S.; Aeschlimann, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a scheme to generate high intensity XUV pulses from HHG with variable time-bandwidth product. • Shorter-wavelength driven high-harmonic XUV trARPES provides higher photon flux and increased energy resolution. • High-quality high-harmonic XUV trARPES data with sub 150 meV energy and sub 30 fs time resolution is presented. - Abstract: Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) using femtosecond extreme ultraviolet high harmonics has recently emerged as a powerful tool for investigating ultrafast quasiparticle dynamics in correlated-electron materials. However, the full potential of this approach has not yet been achieved because, to date, high harmonics generated by 800 nm wavelength Ti:Sapphire lasers required a trade-off between photon flux, energy and time resolution. Photoemission spectroscopy requires a quasi-monochromatic output, but dispersive optical elements that select a single harmonic can significantly reduce the photon flux and time resolution. Here we show that 400 nm driven high harmonic extreme-ultraviolet trARPES is superior to using 800 nm laser drivers since it eliminates the need for any spectral selection, thereby increasing photon flux and energy resolution to <150 meV while preserving excellent time resolution of about 30 fs

  10. Rapid high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with pulsed laser source and time-of-flight spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlieb, K; Hussain, Z; Bostwick, A; Lanzara, A; Jozwiak, C

    2013-09-01

    A high-efficiency spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) spectrometer is coupled with a laboratory-based laser for rapid high-resolution measurements. The spectrometer combines time-of-flight (TOF) energy measurements with low-energy exchange scattering spin polarimetry for high detection efficiencies. Samples are irradiated with fourth harmonic photons generated from a cavity-dumped Ti:sapphire laser that provides high photon flux in a narrow bandwidth, with a pulse timing structure ideally matched to the needs of the TOF spectrometer. The overall efficiency of the combined system results in near-E(F) spin-resolved ARPES measurements with an unprecedented combination of energy resolution and acquisition speed. This allows high-resolution spin measurements with a large number of data points spanning multiple dimensions of interest (energy, momentum, photon polarization, etc.) and thus enables experiments not otherwise possible. The system is demonstrated with spin-resolved energy and momentum mapping of the L-gap Au(111) surface states, a prototypical Rashba system. The successful integration of the spectrometer with the pulsed laser system demonstrates its potential for simultaneous spin- and time-resolved ARPES with pump-probe based measurements.

  11. Identification of Ni2C electronic states in graphene-Ni(111) growth through resonant and dichroic angle-resolved photoemission at the C K -edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drera, G.; Cepek, C.; Patera, L. L.; Bondino, F.; Magnano, E.; Nappini, S.; Africh, C.; Lodi-Rizzini, A.; Joshi, N.; Ghosh, P.; Barla, A.; Mahatha, S. K.; Pagliara, S.; Giampietri, A.; Pintossi, C.; Sangaletti, L.

    2017-10-01

    The graphene-Ni(111) (GrNi) growth via chemical vapor deposition has been explored by resonant, angle-resolved, and dichroic photoemission spectroscopy (soft x-ray Res-ARPES) in order to identify the possible contributions to the electronic structure deriving from different phases that can coexist in this complex system. We provide evidences of electronic states so far unexplored at the Γ ¯ point of GrNi, appearing at the C K -edge resonance. These states show both circular dichroism (CD) and k dependence, suggesting a long-range orbital ordering, as well as a coherent matching with the underlying lattice. Through a comparison of core-level photoemission, valence band resonances, and constant initial-state spectroscopy, we demonstrate that these states are actually induced by a low residual component of nickel carbide (Ni2C ). These results also show that caution must be exercised while interpreting x-ray magnetic circular dichroism collected on C K -edge with Auger partial yield method, due to the presence of CD in photoelectron spectra unrelated to magnetic effects.

  12. Multiple π-bands and Bernal stacking of multilayer graphene on C-face SiC, revealed by nano-Angle Resolved Photoemission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Leif I; Armiento, Rickard; Avila, Jose; Xia, Chao; Lorcy, Stephan; Abrikosov, Igor A; Asensio, Maria C; Virojanadara, Chariya

    2014-02-24

    Only a single linearly dispersing π-band cone, characteristic of monolayer graphene, has so far been observed in Angle Resolved Photoemission (ARPES) experiments on multilayer graphene grown on C-face SiC. A rotational disorder that effectively decouples adjacent layers has been suggested to explain this. However, the coexistence of μm-sized grains of single and multilayer graphene with different azimuthal orientations and no rotational disorder within the grains was recently revealed for C-face graphene, but conventional ARPES still resolved only a single π-band. Here we report detailed nano-ARPES band mappings of individual graphene grains that unambiguously show that multilayer C-face graphene exhibits multiple π-bands. The band dispersions obtained close to the K-point moreover clearly indicate, when compared to theoretical band dispersion calculated in the framework of the density functional method, Bernal (AB) stacking within the grains. Thus, contrary to earlier claims, our findings imply a similar interaction between graphene layers on C-face and Si-face SiC.

  13. Orbital character and electron correlation effects on two- and three-dimensional Fermi surfaces in KFe2As2 revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teppei eYoshida

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated orbital character and electron correlation effects on Fermi surfaces in the hole-overdoped iron pnictide superconductor KFe2As2, which shows a low Tc of ~4 K, by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. From the polarization-dependence of the ARPES spectra, we have determined the orbital character of each Fermi surface. Electron mass renormalization of each band is quantitatively consistent with de Haas-van Alphen results. The outer beta and middle zeta Fermi surfaces show large renormalization factor of m*/mb ~6-7, while the inner Fermi surface has a smaller factor m*/mb ~2. Middle hole Fermi surface zeta has strong three-dimensionality compared to other Fermi surfaces, indicating the d3z2-r2 orbital character, which may be related to the octet-line nodes recently observed by laser ARPES. The observed orbital-dependent mass renormalization would give constraints on the pairing mechanism with line nodes of this system.

  14. Electronic structure and polar catastrophe at the surface of LixCoO2 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Y.; Matsumoto, R.; Yagihara, T.; Iwai, C.; Miyoshi, K.; Takeuchi, J.; Horiba, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Ono, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Saini, N. L.; Mizokawa, T.

    2017-09-01

    We report an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) study of LixCoO2 single crystals which have a hole-doped CoO2 triangular lattice. Similar to NaxCoO2 , the Co 3 d a1 g band crosses the Fermi level with strongly renormalized band dispersion while the Co 3 d eg' bands are fully occupied in LixCoO2 (x =0.46 and 0.71). At x =0.46 , the Fermi surface area is consistent with the bulk hole concentration indicating that the ARPES result represents the bulk electronic structure. On the other hand, at x =0.71 , the Fermi surface area is larger than the expectation which can be associated with the inhomogeneous distribution of Li reported in the previous scanning tunneling microscopy study by Iwaya et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 126104 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.126104]. However, the Co 3 d peak is systematically shifted towards the Fermi level with hole doping excluding phase separation between hole rich and hole poor regions in the bulk. Therefore, the deviation of the Fermi surface area at x =0.71 can be attributed to hole redistribution at the surface avoiding polar catastrophe. The bulk Fermi surface of Co 3 d a1 g is very robust around x =0.5 even in the topmost CoO2 layer due to the absence of the polar catastrophe.

  15. Site-specific intermolecular valence-band dispersion in α-phase crystalline films of cobalt phthalocyanine studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Nobuhiro

    2014-12-14

    The valence band structure of α-phase crystalline films of cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) grown on Au(111) is investigated by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) with synchrotron radiation. The photo-induced change in the ARPES peaks is noticed in shape and energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, C 2p) and HOMO-1 (Co 3d) of CoPc, and is misleading the interpretation of the electronic properties of CoPc films. From the damage-free normal-emission ARPES measurement, the clear valence-band dispersion has been first observed, showing that orbital-specific behaviors are attributable to the interplay of the intermolecular π-π and π-d interactions. The HOMO band dispersion of 0.1 eV gives the lower limit of the hole mobility for α-CoPc of 28.9 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 15 K. The non-dispersive character of the split HOMO-1 bands indicates that the localization of the spin state is a possible origin of the antiferromagnetism.

  16. Quantum Transport and Nano Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on the Topological Surface States of Single Sb2Te3 Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, Yulieth C.; Huang, Liubing; Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, Jose; Asensio, Maria C.; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lüth, Hans; Lu, Jia Grace; Schäpers, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on low-temperature transport and electronic band structure of p-type Sb2Te3 nanowires, grown by chemical vapor deposition. Magnetoresistance measurements unravel quantum interference phenomena, which depend on the cross-sectional dimensions of the nanowires. The observation of periodic Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations is attributed to transport in topologically protected surface states in the Sb2Te3 nanowires. The study of universal conductance fluctuations demonstrates coherent transport along the Aharonov-Bohm paths encircling the rectangular cross-section of the nanowires. We use nanoscale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on single nanowires (nano-ARPES) to provide direct experimental evidence on the nontrivial topological character of those surface states. The compiled study of the bandstructure and the magnetotransport response unambiguosly points out the presence of topologically protected surface states in the nanowires and their substantial contribution to the quantum transport effects, as well as the hole doping and Fermi velocity among other key issues. The results are consistent with the theoretical description of quantum transport in intrinsically doped quasi-one-dimensional topological insulator nanowires. PMID:27581169

  17. Determining the thickness of aliphatic alcohol monolayers covalently attached to silicon oxide surfaces using angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Austin W. H.; Kim, Dongho; Gates, Byron D.

    2018-04-01

    The thickness of alcohol based monolayers on silicon oxide surfaces were investigated using angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). Advantages of using alcohols as building blocks for the formation of monolayers include their widespread availability, ease of handling, and stability against side reactions. Recent progress in microwave assisted reactions demonstrated the ease of forming uniform monolayers with alcohol based reagents. The studies shown herein provide a detailed investigation of the thickness of monolayers prepared from a series of aliphatic alcohols of different chain lengths. Monolayers of 1-butanol, 1-hexanol, 1-octanol, 1-decanol, and 1-dodecanol were each successfully formed through microwave assisted reactions and characterized by ARXPS techniques. The thickness of these monolayers consistently increased by ∼1.0 Å for every additional methylene (CH2) within the hydrocarbon chain of the reagents. Tilt angles of the molecules covalently attached to silicon oxide surfaces were estimated to be ∼35° for each type of reagent. These results were consistent with the observations reported for thiol based or silane based monolayers on either gold or silicon oxide surfaces, respectively. The results of this study also suggest that the alcohol based monolayers are uniform at a molecular level.

  18. Adsorption site and structure determination of c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100) using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The authors have determined the atomic spatial structure of c(2x2) N2Ni(100) with Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the nitrogen 1s core level using monochromatized x-rays from beamline 6.1 at SSRL and beamline 9.3.2 at the ALS. The chemically shifted N 1s peak intensities were summed together to obtain ARPEFS curves for both nitrogen atoms in the molecule. They used a new, highly-optimized program based on the Rehr-Albers scattering matrix formalism to find the adsorption site and to quantitatively determine the bond-lengths. The nitrogen molecule stands upright at an atop site, with a N-Ni bond length of 2.25(1) {angstrom}, a N-N bond length of 1.10(7) {angstrom}, and a first layer Ni-Ni spacing of 1.76(4) {angstrom}. The shake-up peak shows an identical ARPEFS diffraction pattern, confirming its intrinsic nature and supporting a previous use of this feature to decompose the peak into contributions from the chemically inequivalent nitrogen atoms. Comparison to a previously published theoretical treatment of N-N-Ni and experimental structures of analogous adsorbate systems demonstrates the importance of adsorbate-adsorbate interactions in weakly chemisorbed systems.

  19. Time- and angle-resolved x-ray diffraction to probe structural and chemical evolution during Al-Ni intermetallic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Choong-Shik; Wei, Haoyan; Chen, Jing-Yin; Shen, Guoyin; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming

    2011-11-01

    We present novel time- and angle-resolved x-ray diffraction (TARXD) capable of probing structural and chemical evolutions during rapidly propagating exothermic intermetallic reactions between Ni-Al multilayers. The system utilizes monochromatic synchrotron x-rays and a two-dimensional (2D) pixel array x-ray detector in combination of a fast-rotating diffraction beam chopper, providing a time (in azimuth) and angle (in distance) resolved x-ray diffraction image continuously recorded at a time resolution of ~30 μs over a time period of 3 ms. Multiple frames of the TARXD images can also be obtained with time resolutions between 30 and 300 μs over three to several hundreds of milliseconds. The present method is coupled with a high-speed camera and a six-channel optical pyrometer to determine the reaction characteristics including the propagation speed of 7.6 m/s, adiabatic heating rate of 4.0 × 10(6) K/s, and conductive cooling rate of 4.5 × 10(4) K/s. These time-dependent structural and temperature data provide evidences for the rapid formation of intermetallic NiAl alloy within 45 μs, thermal expansion coefficient of 1.1 × 10(-6) K for NiAl, and crystallization of V and Ag(3)In in later time. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  20. Characterization of weakly absorbing thin films by multiple linear regression analysis of absolute unwrapped phase in angle-resolved spectral reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jingtao; Lu, Rongsheng

    2018-04-30

    The simultaneous determination of t, n(λ), and κ(λ) of thin films can be a tough task for the high correlation of fit parameters. The strong assumptions about the type of dispersion relation are commonly used as a consequence to alleviate correlation concerns by reducing the free parameters before the nonlinear regression analysis. Here we present an angle-resolved spectral reflectometry for the simultaneous determination of weakly absorbing thin film parameters, where a reflectance interferogram is recorded in both angular and spectral domains in a single-shot measurement for the point of the sample being illuminated. The variations of the phase recovered from the interferogram as functions of t, n, and κ reveals that the unwrapped phase is monotonically related to t, n, and κ, thereby allowing the problem of correlation to be alleviated by multiple linear regression. After removing the 2π ambiguity of the unwrapped phase, the merit function based on the absolute unwrapped phase performs a 3D data cube with variables of t, n and κ at each wavelength. The unique solution of t, n, and κ can then be directly determined from the extremum of the 3D data cube at each wavelength with no need of dispersion relation. A sample of GaN thin film grown on a polished sapphire substrate is tested. The experimental data of t and [n(λ), κ(λ)] are confirmed by the scanning electron microscopy and the comparison with the results of other related works, respectively. The consistency of the results shows the proposed method provides a useful tool for the determination of the thickness and optical constants of weakly absorbing thin films.

  1. Photoelectron spectra of N2 +: Rotational line profiles studied with He;I endash excited angle-resolved spectroscopy and with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehrwall, G.; Baltzer, P.; Bozek, J.

    1999-01-01

    We have recorded angle-resolved He I photoelectron spectra of the three outermost valence states in N 2 + , with high enough resolution to observe rotational line profiles. For the two Σ states, the X 2 Σ g + and the B 2 Σ u + , we found that the rotational branches corresponding to different changes in rotational quantum number can differ dramatically in β value. The well-known difference in β value for the ν=0 and ν=1 vibrations of the X 2 Σ g + state was found to be due to different rotational branching ratios and also different β values of the rotational branches. For the ν=0 endash 2 vibrations of the A 2 Π u state, the β value difference between rotational branches is much less pronounced than in the X and B states. We have also recorded synchrotron-radiation-excited photoelectron spectra of the ν=0 vibrational peaks of the X 2 Σ g + and B 2 Σ u + states where rotational line profiles are resolved. The intensities of the rotational branches were studied as function of photon energy, the X state between 23 and 65 eV, and the B state between 23 and 45 eV. The results for the X state have recently been presented in a Letter [G. Oehrwall, P. Baltzer, and J. Bozek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 546, 1998]. The rotational branching ratios of the two states have very different behaviors as functions of photon energy. The relative intensities of the rotational branches in the X state change significantly over the studied energy range. The 3σ g →kσ u shape resonance apparently gives rise to a non-Franck-Condon-like behavior for the rotational branching ratio of the X state. In the B state, the rotational branching ratios remain essentially constant over the studied energy range. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  2. Donor-acceptor-pair emission characterization in N-B doped fluorescent SiC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Kamiyama, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, we investigated donor-acceptor-pair emission in N-B doped fluorescent 6H-SiC, by means of photoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy, and angle-resolved photoluminescence. The photoluminescence results were interpreted by using a band diagram with Fermi-Dirac statistics. It is shown...... intensity in a large emission angle range was achieved from angle-resolved photoluminescence. The results indicate N-B doped fluorescent SiC as a good wavelength converter in white LEDs applications....

  3. First Observation of a Snake Depolarizing Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, R.; Anferov, V.; Blinov, B.; Crandell, D.; Koutin, S.; Krisch, A.; Liu, T.; Ratner, L.; Wong, V.; Chu, C.; Lee, S.; Rinckel, T.; Schwandt, P.; Sperisen, F.; Stephenson, E.; von Przewoski, B.; Sato, H.

    1997-01-01

    Using a 104MeV stored polarized proton beam and a full Siberian snake, we recently found evidence for a so-called open-quotes snakeclose quotes depolarizing resonance. A full Siberian snake forces the spin tune ν s to be a half integer. Thus, if the vertical betatron tune ν y is set near a quarter integer, then the ν s =n±2ν y second-order snake resonance can depolarize the beam. Indeed, with a full Siberian snake, we found a deep depolarization dip when ν y was equal to 4.756; moreover, when ν y was changed to 4.781, the deep dip disappeared and the polarization was preserved. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  4. Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy Studies of the Mott Insulator to Superconductor Evolution in Ca2-xNaxCuO2Cl2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Kyle Michael

    2005-09-02

    It is widely believed that many of the exotic physical properties of the high-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors arise from the proximity of these materials to the strongly correlated, antiferromagnetic Mott insulating state. Therefore, one of the fundamental questions in the field of high-temperature superconductivity is to understand the insulator-to-superconductor transition and precisely how the electronic structure of Mott insulator evolves as the first holes are doped into the system. This dissertation presents high-resolution, doping dependent angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) studies of the cuprate superconductor Ca{sub 2-x}Na{sub x}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, spanning from the undoped parent Mott insulator to a high-temperature superconductor with a T{sub c} of 22 K. A phenomenological model is proposed to explain how the spectral lineshape, the quasiparticle band dispersion, and the chemical potential all progress with doping in a logical and self-consistent framework. This model is based on Franck-Condon broadening observed in polaronic systems where strong electron-boson interactions cause the quasiparticle residue, Z, to be vanishingly small. Comparisons of the low-lying states to different electronic states in the valence band strongly suggest that the coupling of the photohole to the lattice (i.e. lattice polaron formation) is the dominant broadening mechanism for the lower Hubbard band states. Combining this polaronic framework with high-resolution ARPES measurements finally provides a resolution to the long-standing controversy over the behavior of the chemical potential in the high-T{sub c} cuprates. This scenario arises from replacing the conventional Fermi liquid quasiparticle interpretation of the features in the Mott insulator by a Franck-Condon model, allowing the reassignment of the position of the quasiparticle pole. As a function of hole doping, the chemical potential shifts smoothly into the valence band while spectral weight is transferred

  5. Modeling of thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Dipole–dipole interaction; relaxation; modeling; TSDC; activation energy; PVC; ABS. Abstract. The study of thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) using the dipole–dipole interaction model is described in this work. The dipole–dipole interactionmodel (DDIM) determines the TSDC peak successfully ...

  6. Depolarization of diffusing spins by paramagnetic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillaci, M.E.; Hutson, R.L.; Heffner, R.H.; Leon, M.; Dodds, S.A.; Estle, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    The depolarization of diffusing spins (muons) interacting with dilute paramagnetic impurities in a solid was studied using a simple computational model which properly treats the muon motion and preserves correct muon-impurity distances. Long-range (dipolar) and nearest-neighbor (contact) interactions are treated together. Diffusion parameters are deduced and model comparisons made for AuGd

  7. Depolarization of UCN stored in material traps

    CERN Document Server

    Serebrov, A; Lasakov, M; Rudnev, Y; Krasnoschekova, I A; Geltenbort, P; Butterworth, J; Bowles, T; Morris, C; Seestrom, S; Smith, D; Young, A R

    2000-01-01

    Depolarization of ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) stored in material traps was first observed. The probability of UCN spin flip per reflection depends on the trap material and varies from 7x10 sup - sup 6 (beryllium) to 10 sup - sup 4 (glass).

  8. Depolarization of UCN stored in material traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serebrov, A.; Vasiliev, A.; Lasakov, M.; Rudnev, Yu.; Krasnoshekova, I.; Geltenbort, P.; Butterworth, J.; Bowles, T.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Smith, D.; Young, A.R

    2000-02-11

    Depolarization of ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) stored in material traps was first observed. The probability of UCN spin flip per reflection depends on the trap material and varies from 7x10{sup -6} (beryllium) to 10{sup -4} (glass)

  9. Recording, analysis, and interpretation of spreading depolarizations in neurointensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Jens P; Fabricius, Martin; Ayata, Cenk

    2017-01-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SD) are waves of abrupt, near-complete breakdown of neuronal transmembrane ion gradients, are the largest possible pathophysiologic disruption of viable cerebral gray matter, and are a crucial mechanism of lesion development. Spreading depolarizations are increasingly r...

  10. Electronic structure of single crystal UPd{sub 3}, UGe{sub 2}, and USb{sub 2} from hard X-ray and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaux, M.F., E-mail: mbeaux@lanl.gov [MPA Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Durakiewicz, T. [MPA Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Moreschini, L.; Grioni, M. [IPN, Ecole Polytechnique Federale (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Offi, F. [CNISM and Dipartimento de Fisica, Universita Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, 1-00146 Rome (Italy); Monaco, G. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Panaccione, G. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali CNR, Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park, Basovizza S.S. 14 Km 163.5, I-34012 Trieste, 9 (Italy); Joyce, J.J.; Bauer, E.D.; Sarrao, J.L. [MPA Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Butterfield, M.T. [KLA-Tencor, 1 Technology Drive, Milpitas, CA (United States); Guziewicz, E. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Electronic structure of single crystal UPd{sub 3}, UGe{sub 2}, and USb{sub 2} was measured by hard X-ray and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. {yields} Angle resolved photoemission results demonstrate hybridization between U 5f and Pd 4d electrons within UPd{sub 3}. {yields} HAXPES probing of bulk features within of UPd{sub 3}, UGe{sub 2}, and USb{sub 2} samples with native oxide contamination demonstrated. {yields} Two distinct spectral features identified for Sb I and Sb II sites within USb{sub 2} HAXPES spectrum. {yields} Line shape analysis reveals correlations between Doniach-Sunjic asymmetry coefficients and 5f localization. - Abstract: Electronic structure of single crystal UPd{sub 3}, UGe{sub 2}, and USb{sub 2} has been measured from hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) with 7.6 keV photons at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). Lower photon energy angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) was also performed at the Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC). Herein the following results are presented: (i) ARPES results demonstrate hybridization between the U 5f and Pd 4d electrons within UPd{sub 3}. (ii) The greatly reduced surface sensitivity of HAXPES enabled observation of the bulk core levels in spite of surface oxidation. Photoelectron mean-free-path versus oxide layer thickness considerations were used to model the effectiveness of HAXPES for probing bulk features of in-air cleaved samples. (iii) Two distinct features separated by 800 meV were observed for the Sb 3d core level. These two features are attributed to manifestations of two distinct Sb sites within the USb{sub 2} single crystal as supported by consideration of interatomic distances and enthalpy-of-formation. (iv) Doniach-Sunjic line shape analysis of core level spectral features revealed correlations between asymmetry coefficients and 5f localization.

  11. Resonant depolarization in electron storage rings equipped with ''siberia snakes''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buon, J.

    1984-11-01

    Resonant depolarization induced by field errors and quantum emissions in an electron ring equipped with two ''siberian snakes'' is investigated with a first order perturbation calculation. It is shown that this depolarization is not reduced by the snakes when the operating energy is set out of the depolarization resonances [fr

  12. Entanglement degradation in depolarizing light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiello, A.; Woerdman, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In the classical regime, when a beam of light is scattered by a medium, it may emerge partially or completely depolarized depending on the optical properties of the medium. Correspondingly, in the quantum regime, when an entangled two-photon pair is scattered, the classical depolarization may result in an entanglement degradation. Here, relations between photon scattering, entanglement and multi-mode detection are investigated. We establish a general framework in which one- and two-photon elastic scattering processes can be discussed, and we focus on the study of the intrinsic entanglement degradation caused by a multi-mode detection. We show that any multi-mode scattered state cannot maximally violate the Bell-CHSH inequality because of the momentum spread. The results presented here have general validity and can be applied to both deterministic and random scattering processes. (author)

  13. Strong electron correlations in the normal state of the iron-based FeSe0.42Te0.58 superconductor observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, A; Ganin, A Y; Rozbicki, E; Bacsa, J; Meevasana, W; King, P D C; Caffio, M; Schaub, R; Margadonna, S; Prassides, K; Rosseinsky, M J; Baumberger, F

    2010-03-05

    We investigate the normal state of the "11" iron-based superconductor FeSe0.42Te0.58 by angle-resolved photoemission. Our data reveal a highly renormalized quasiparticle dispersion characteristic of a strongly correlated metal. We find sheet dependent effective carrier masses between approximately 3 and 16m{e} corresponding to a mass enhancement over band structure values of m{*}/m{band} approximately 6-20. This is nearly an order of magnitude higher than the renormalization reported previously for iron-arsenide superconductors of the "1111" and "122" families but fully consistent with the bulk specific heat.

  14. Molecular anisotropy effects in carbon K-edge scattering: depolarized diffuse scattering and optical anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Kevin H.

    2014-07-14

    Some polymer properties, such as conductivity, are very sensitive to short- and intermediate-range orientational and positional ordering of anisotropic molecular functional groups, and yet means to characterize orientational order in disordered systems are very limited. We demonstrate that resonant scattering at the carbon K-edge is uniquely sensitive to short-range orientation correlations in polymers through depolarized scattering at high momentum transfers, using atactic polystyrene as a well-characterized test system. Depolarized scattering is found to coexist with unpolarized fluorescence, and to exhibit pronounced anisotropy. We also quantify the spatially averaged optical anisotropy from low-angle reflectivity measurements, finding anisotropy consistent with prior visible, x-ray absorption, and theoretical studies. The average anisotropy is much smaller than that in the depolarized scattering and the two have different character. Both measurements exhibit clear spectral signatures from the phenyl rings and the polyethylene-like backbone. Discussion focuses on analysis considerations and prospects for using this depolarized scattering for studies of disorder in soft condensed matter.

  15. Depolarization-induced calcium-independent synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis at frog motor nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdrakhmanov, M M; Petrov, A M; Grigoryev, P N; Zefirov, A L

    2013-10-01

    The transmitter release and synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis induced by constant current depolarization of nerve terminals were studied by microelectode extracellular recording of miniature endplate currents and fluorescent microscopy (FM 1-43 styryl dye). Depolarization of the plasma membrane of nerve terminals in the control specimen was shown to significantly increase the MEPC frequency (quantal transmitter release) and exocytotic rate (FM 1-43 unloading from the synaptic vesicles preliminarily stained with the dye), which was caused by a rise in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration due to opening of voltage-gated Ca channels. A slight increase in the MEPC frequency and in the rate of synaptic vesicle exocytosis was observed under depolarization in case of blockade of Ca channels and chelating of intracellular Ca(2+) ions (cooperative action of Cd(2+) and EGTA-AM). The processes of synaptic vesicle endocytosis (FM 1-43 loading) were proportional to the number of synaptic vesicles that had undergone exocytosis both in the control and in case of cooperative action of Cd(2+) and EGTA-AM. A hypothesis has been put forward that Ca-independent synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis that can be induced directly by depolarization of the membrane exists in the frog motor terminal in addition to the conventional Ca-dependent process.

  16. Multifaceted roles for astrocytes in spreading depolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Jessica L.; Escartin, Carole; Ayata, Cenk; Bonvento, Gilles; Shuttleworth, C. William

    2015-01-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SD) are coordinated waves of synchronous depolarization, involving large numbers of neurons and astrocytes as they spread slowly through brain tissue. The recent identification of SDs as likely contributors to pathophysiology in human subjects has led to a significant increase in interest in SD mechanisms, and possible approaches to limit the numbers of SDs or their deleterious consequences in injured brain. Astrocytes regulate many events associated with SD. SD initiation and propagation is dependent on extracellular accumulation of K+ and glutamate, both of which involve astrocytic clearance. SDs are extremely metabolically demanding events, and signaling through astrocyte networks is likely central to the dramatic increase in regional blood flow that accompanies SD in otherwise healthy tissues. Astrocytes may provide metabolic support to neurons following SD, and may provide a source of adenosine that inhibits neuronal activity following SD. It is also possible that astrocytes contribute to the pathophysiology of SD, as a consequence of excessive glutamate release, facilitation of NMDA receptor activation, brain edema due to astrocyte swelling, or disrupted coupling to appropriate vascular responses after SD. Direct or indirect evidence has accumulated implicating astrocytes in many of these responses, but much remains unknown about their specific contributions, especially in the context of injury. Conversion of astrocytes to a reactive phenotype is a prominent feature of injured brain, and recent work suggests that the different functional properties of reactive astrocytes could be targeted to limit SDs in pathophysiological conditions. PMID:26301517

  17. Spreading convulsions, spreading depolarization and epileptogenesis in human cerebral cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Jens P; Major, Sebastian; Pannek, Heinz-Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    channels initiates spreading depression of brain activity. In contrast, epileptic seizures show modest ion translocation and sustained depolarization below the inactivation threshold for action potential generating channels. Such modest sustained depolarization allows synchronous, highly frequent neuronal...... stimulations. Eventually, epileptic field potentials were recorded during the period that had originally seen spreading depression of activity. Such spreading convulsions are characterized by epileptic field potentials on the final shoulder of the large slow potential change of spreading depolarization. We...... depolarizations in contrast to only three patients (12%) with 55 ictal epileptic events isolated from spreading depolarizations. Spreading depolarization frequency and depression periods per 24 h recording episodes showed an early and a delayed peak on Day 7. Patients surviving subarachnoid haemorrhage with poor...

  18. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of (Ca, Na) sub 2 CuO sub 2 Cl sub 2 crystals: Fingerprints of a magnetic insulator in a heavily underdoped superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Kohsaka, Y; Ronning, F

    2003-01-01

    Electric evolution from an antiferromagnet to a high-T sub c superconductor is revealed by angle-resolved photoemission experiments on tetragonal Ca sub 1 sub . sub 9 Na sub 0 sub . sub 1 CuO sub 2 Cl sub 2 single crystals, which were successfully grown for the first time under high pressures. In this underdoped superconductor, we found clear fingerprints of the parent insulator: a shadow band and a large pseudogap. These observations are most likely described by a 'chemical potential shift', which contrasts clearly with the prevailing wisdom of the pinned chemical potential' learned from the prototype La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 , demonstrating that the route to a high-T sub c superconductor is not unique. (author)

  19. Absence of a holelike fermi surface for the iron-based K0.8F1.7Se2 superconductor revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, T; Wang, X-P; Jin, W-C; Zhang, P; Richard, P; Xu, G; Dai, X; Fang, Z; Guo, J-G; Chen, X-L; Ding, H

    2011-05-06

    We have performed an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of the new iron-based superconductor K(0.8)Fe(1.7)Se(2) (T(c)∼30 K). Clear band dispersion is observed with the overall bandwidth renormalized by a factor of 2.5 compared to our local density approximation calculations, indicating relatively strong correlation effects. Only an electronlike band crosses the Fermi energy, forming a nearly circular Fermi surface (FS) at M (π, 0). The holelike band at Γ sinks ∼90 meV below the Fermi energy, with an indirect band gap of 30 meV, to the bottom of the electronlike band. The observed FS topology in this superconductor favors (π, π) inter-FS scattering between the electronlike FSs at the M points, in sharp contrast to other iron-based superconductors which favor (π, 0) inter-FS scattering between holelike and electronlike FSs.

  20. Reaffirming the d(x2-y2) superconducting gap using the autocorrelation angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of Bi1.5Pb0.55Sr1.6La0.4CuO(6+δ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, M; He, R-H; Testaud, J P; Meevasana, W; Moore, R G; Lu, D H; Yoshida, Y; Eisaki, H; Devereaux, T P; Hussain, Z; Shen, Z-X

    2011-04-22

    Knowledge of the gap function is important to understand the pairing mechanism for high-temperature (T(c)) superconductivity. However, Fourier transform scanning tunneling spectroscopy (FT STS) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) in the cuprates have reported contradictory gap functions, with FT-STS results deviating strongly from a canonical d(x2-y2) form. By applying an "octet model" analysis to autocorrelation ARPES, we reveal that a contradiction occurs because the octet model does not consider the effects of matrix elements and the pseudogap. This reaffirms the canonical d(x2-y2) superconducting gap around the node, which can be directly determined from ARPES. Further, our study suggests that the FT-STS reported fluctuating superconductivity around the node at far above T(c) is not necessary to explain the existence of the quasiparticle interference at low energy.

  1. Differences between GaAs/GaInP and GaAs/AlInP interfaces grown by movpe revealed by depth profiling and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Escalante, M.C., E-mail: mclopez@uma.es [Nanotech Unit, Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficies, Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Gabás, M. [The Nanotech Unit, Depto. de Física Aplicada I, Andalucía Tech, Universidad de Málaga, Campus de Teatinos s/n, 29071 Málaga Spain (Spain); García, I.; Barrigón, E.; Rey-Stolle, I.; Algora, C. [Instituto de Energía Solar, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Avda. Complutense 30, 28040 Madrid Spain (Spain); Palanco, S.; Ramos-Barrado, J.R. [The Nanotech Unit, Depto. de Física Aplicada I, Andalucía Tech, Universidad de Málaga, Campus de Teatinos s/n, 29071 Málaga Spain (Spain)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • GaAs, AlInP and GaInP epi-layers grown in a MOVPE facility. • GaAs/GaInP and GaAs/AlInP interfaces studied through the combination of angle resolved and depth profile X-ray photoelectros spectroscopies. • GaAs/GaInP interface shows no features appart from GaAs, GaInP and mixed GaInAs or GaInAsP phases. • GaAs/AlInP interface shows traces of an anomalous P environment, probably due to P-P clusters. - Abstract: GaAs/GaInP and GaAs/AlInP interfaces have been studied using photoelectron spectroscopy tools. The combination of depth profile through Ar{sup +} sputtering and angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy provides reliable information on the evolution of the interface chemistry. Measurement artifacts related to each particular technique can be ruled out on the basis of the results obtained with the other technique. GaAs/GaInP interface spreads out over a shorter length than GaAs/AlInP interface. The former could include the presence of the quaternary GaInAsP in addition to the nominal GaAs and GaInP layers. On the contrary, the GaAs/AlInP interface exhibits a higher degree of compound mixture. Namely, traces of P atoms in a chemical environment different to the usual AlInP coordination were found at the top of the GaAs/AlInP interface, as well as mixed phases like AlInP, GaInAsP or AlGaInAsP, located at the interface.

  2. Depolarization Lidar Determination of Cloud-Base Microphysical Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donovan, D.P.; Klein Baltink, H; Henzing, J. S.; de Roode, S.R.; Siebesma, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    The links between multiple-scattering induced depolarization and cloud microphysical properties (e.g. cloud particle number density, effective radius, water content) have long been recognised. Previous efforts to use depolarization information in a quantitative manner to retrieve cloud

  3. Single neuron dynamics during experimentally induced anoxic depolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandt, B.; Stigen, Tyler; ten Haken, Bernard; Netoff, Theoden; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2013-01-01

    We studied single neuron dynamics during anoxic depolarizations, which are often observed in cases of neuronal energy depletion. Anoxic and similar depolarizations play an important role in several pathologies, notably stroke, migraine, and epilepsy. One of the effects of energy depletion was

  4. Neutron depolarization in ferromagnets in terms of correlation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valk, H.J.L. van der; Rekveldt, M.T.

    1982-01-01

    The change of the polarization vector of monochromatic neutron beam after transmitting a ferromagnet can be described by a depolarization matrix. The contributions of different domain structure parameters to the depolarization can be obtained by considering neutron trajectories either passing a number of domains or passing a magnetization distribution described in terms of correlation functions. Both approaches are compared with each other and it is found that they deliver about the same results for ferromagnets composed by small domains. The method of analysing depolarization measurements in terms of domain structure parameters based on correlation functions is useful for ferromagnets close to magnetic saturation. (orig.)

  5. Direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [3] Karl Alex Mueller, personal communications (2006). In contrast, see P W Anderson, Nature Phys. 2, 626 (2006) or the whole issue Nature. Phys. - 20 years of HTSC (March 2006). [4] G Baskaran, personal communication, Kanpur (2006), also CM9910161v1. [5] T Timusk and B Statt, Rep. Prog. Phys. 62(1), 61 (1999).

  6. Direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We gratefully acknowledge financial support by the EPFL and the Swiss National. Fund for Scientific Research. This work is based upon research conducted at the. Synchrotron Radiation Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, which is sup- ported by the NSF under Award No. DMR-0084402. DP gratefully acknowledges.

  7. Angle-resolved catholdoluminescence imaging polarimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio, C.I.; Coenen, T.; Brenny, B.J.M.; Polman, A.; Koenderink, A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence spectroscopy (CL) allows characterizing light emission in bulk and nanostructured materials and is a key tool in fields ranging from materials science to nanophotonics. Previously, CL measurements focused on the spectral content and angular distribution of emission, while the

  8. Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi L. Dakovski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark in the cuprate family of high-temperature superconductors is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. In this regard, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES has proven especially powerful, providing band structure information directly in energy-momentum space. Time-resolved ARPES (trARPES holds great promise of adding ultrafast temporal information, in an attempt to identify different interaction channels in the time domain. Previous studies of the cuprates using trARPES were handicapped by the low probing energy, which significantly limits the accessible momentum space. Using 20.15 eV, 12 fs pulses, we show for the first time the evolution of quasiparticles in the antinodal region of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and demonstrate that non-monotonic relaxation dynamics dominates above a certain fluence threshold. The dynamics is heavily influenced by transient modification of the electron-phonon interaction and phase space restrictions, in stark contrast to the monotonic relaxation in the nodal and off-nodal regions.

  9. Electronic structure of ThRu2Si2 studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy: Elucidating the contribution of U 5 f states in URu2Si2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Kobata, Masaaki; Takeda, Yukiharu; Okane, Tetsuo; Saitoh, Yuji; Fujimori, Atsushi; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Yuji; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Tateiwa, Naoyuki; Haga, Yoshinori

    2017-09-01

    The electronic structure of ThRu2Si2 was studied using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) with incident photon energies of h ν =655 -745 eV. Detailed band structure and the three-dimensional shapes of Fermi surfaces were derived experimentally, and their characteristic features were mostly explained by means of band-structure calculations based on density-functional theory. Comparison of the experimental ARPES spectra of ThRu2Si2 with those of URu2Si2 shows that they have considerably different spectral profiles, particularly in the energy range of 1 eV from the Fermi level, suggesting that U 5 f states are substantially hybridized in these bands. The relationship between the ARPES spectra of URu2Si2 and ThRu2Si2 is very different from the one between the ARPES spectra of CeRu2Si2 and LaRu2Si2 , where the intrinsic difference in their spectra is limited only in the very vicinity of the Fermi energy. The present result suggests that the U 5 f electrons in URu2Si2 have strong hybridization with ligand states and have an essentially itinerant character.

  10. Spatial structure determination of ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{degrees} and (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees}CO on Cu(111) using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The authors report a study of the spatial structure of ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{degrees} (low coverage) and (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees} (intermediate coverage) CO adsorbed on Cu(111), using the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) technique at beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source. The CO molecule adsorbs on an atop site for both adsorption phases. Full multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) calculations were used to extract the C-Cu. bond length and the first Cu-Cu layer spacing for each adsorption phase. The authors find that the C-Cu bond length remains unchanged with increasing coverage, but the 1st Cu-Cu layer spacing contracts at the intermediate coverage. They calculate the bending mode force constant in the (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees} phase to be K{sub {delta}} = 2.2 (1) x 10{sup {minus}12} dyne-cm/rad from their experimentally determined bond lengths combined with previously published infra-red absorption frequencies.

  11. Depolarizing collisions with hydrogen: Neutral and singly ionized alkaline earths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manso Sainz, Rafael; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; Bueno, Javier Trujillo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Roncero, Octavio; Sanz-Sanz, Cristina [Instituto de Física Fundamental (IFF-CSIC), CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Aguado, Alfredo, E-mail: octavio.roncero@csic.es [Departamento de Química Física, Unidad Asociada UAM-CSIC, Facultad de Ciencias M-14, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-06-20

    Depolarizing collisions are elastic or quasielastic collisions that equalize the populations and destroy the coherence between the magnetic sublevels of atomic levels. In astrophysical plasmas, the main depolarizing collider is neutral hydrogen. We consider depolarizing rates on the lowest levels of neutral and singly ionized alkali earths Mg I, Sr I, Ba I, Mg II, Ca II, and Ba II, due to collisions with H°. We compute ab initio potential curves of the atom-H° system and solve the quantum mechanical dynamics. From the scattering amplitudes, we calculate the depolarizing rates for Maxwellian distributions of colliders at temperatures T ≤ 10,000 K. A comparative analysis of our results and previous calculations in the literature is completed. We discuss the effect of these rates on the formation of scattering polarization patterns of resonant lines of alkali earths in the solar atmosphere, and their effect on Hanle effect diagnostics of solar magnetic fields.

  12. Neuronal Depolarization Drives Increased Dopamine Synaptic Vesicle Loading via VGLUT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Jenny I; Dunn, Matthew; Mingote, Susana; Karam, Caline S; Farino, Zachary J; Sonders, Mark S; Choi, Se Joon; Grygoruk, Anna; Zhang, Yuchao; Cela, Carolina; Choi, Ben Jiwon; Flores, Jorge; Freyberg, Robin J; McCabe, Brian D; Mosharov, Eugene V; Krantz, David E; Javitch, Jonathan A; Sulzer, David; Sames, Dalibor; Rayport, Stephen; Freyberg, Zachary

    2017-08-30

    The ability of presynaptic dopamine terminals to tune neurotransmitter release to meet the demands of neuronal activity is critical to neurotransmission. Although vesicle content has been assumed to be static, in vitro data increasingly suggest that cell activity modulates vesicle content. Here, we use a coordinated genetic, pharmacological, and imaging approach in Drosophila to study the presynaptic machinery responsible for these vesicular processes in vivo. We show that cell depolarization increases synaptic vesicle dopamine content prior to release via vesicular hyperacidification. This depolarization-induced hyperacidification is mediated by the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT). Remarkably, both depolarization-induced dopamine vesicle hyperacidification and its dependence on VGLUT2 are seen in ventral midbrain dopamine neurons in the mouse. Together, these data suggest that in response to depolarization, dopamine vesicles utilize a cascade of vesicular transporters to dynamically increase the vesicular pH gradient, thereby increasing dopamine vesicle content. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Magnetic investigations using neutron diffraction and neutron depolarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the basic principles of neutron diffraction and neutron depolarization are presented along with the results of some important magnetic materials. In particular, the recent results of the rare earth based high magnetocaloric effect materials, semi-Heusler spintronics alloys, molecular magnets, layered spin system, and core-shell type magnetic nanoparticles have been described. The usefulness of the neutron diffraction and neutron depolarization techniques to understand structural and magnetic properties is brought out. (author)

  14. Depolarization of light by rough surface of scattering phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Markhvida, Igor; Lee, Tim K.; Doronin, Alexander; Meglinski, Igor

    2013-02-01

    The growing interest in biomedical optics to the polarimetric methods push researchers to better understand of light depolarization during scattering in and on the surface of biological tissues. Here we study the depolarization of light propagated in silicone phantoms. The phantoms with variety of surface roughness and bulk optical properties are designed to imitate human skin. Free-space speckle patterns in parallel (III) and perpendicular (I⊥) direction in respect to incident polarization are used to get the depolarization ratio of backscattered light DR = (III - I⊥)/( III + I⊥). The Monte Carlo model developed in house is also applied to compare simulated DR with experimentally measured. DR dependence on roughness, concentration and size of scattering particles is analysed. A weak depolarization and negligible response to scattering of the medium are observed for phantoms with smooth surfaces, whereas for the surface roughness in order to the mean free path the depolarization ratio decreases and reveals dependence on the bulk scattering coefficient. In is shown that the surface roughness could be a key factor triggering the ability of tissues' characterization by depolarization ratio.

  15. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Study of the Evolution of Band Structure And Charge Density Wave Properties in Rte (3) (R=Y, La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Tb, And Dy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouet, V.; Yang, W.L.; Zhou, X.J.; Hussain, Z.; Moore, R.G.; He, R.; Lu, D.H.; Shen, Z.X.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.B.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.

    2009-05-12

    We present a detailed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation of the RTe{sub 3} family, which sets this system as an ideal 'textbook' example for the formation of a nesting driven charge density wave (CDW). This family indeed exhibits the full range of phenomena that can be associated to CDW instabilities, from the opening of large gaps on the best nested parts of Fermi surface (up to 0.4 eV), to the existence of residual metallic pockets. ARPES is the best suited technique to characterize these features, thanks to its unique ability to resolve the electronic structure in k space. An additional advantage of RTe{sub 3} is that the band structure can be very accurately described by a simple two dimensional tight-binding (TB) model, which allows one to understand and easily reproduce many characteristics of the CDW. In this paper, we first establish the main features of the electronic structure by comparing our ARPES measurements with the linear muffin-tin orbital band calculations. We use this to define the validity and limits of the TB model. We then present a complete description of the CDW properties and of their strong evolution as a function of R. Using simple models, we are able to reproduce perfectly the evolution of gaps in k space, the evolution of the CDW wave vector with R, and the shape of the residual metallic pockets. Finally, we give an estimation of the CDW interaction parameters and find that the change in the electronic density of states n(E{sub F}), due to lattice expansion when different R ions are inserted, has the correct order of magnitude to explain the evolution of the CDW properties.

  16. A study of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure as applied to the Ni 3p, Cu 3s, and Cu 3p core levels of the respective clean (111) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huff, W.R.A.; Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The first non-s initial state angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) study of clean surfaces for the purpose of further understanding the technique is reported. The surface structure sensitivity of ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces and to arbitrary initial states is studied using normal photoemission data taken from the Ni 3p core levels of a Ni(111) single crystal and the Cu 3s and the Cu 3p core-levels of a Cu(111) single crystal. The Fourier transforms of these clean surface data are dominated by backscattering. Unlike the s initial state data, the p initial state data show a peak in the Fourier transform corresponding to in-plane scattering from the six nearest-neighbors to the emitter. Evidence was seen for single-scattering events from in the same plane as the emitters and double-scattering events. Using a newly developed, multiple-scattering calculation program, ARPEFS data from clean surfaces and from p initial states can be modeled to high precision. Although there are many layers of emitters when measuring photoemission from a clean surface, test calculations show that the ARPEFS signal is dominated by photoemission from atoms in the first two crystal layers. Thus, ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces is sensitive to surface reconstruction. The known contraction of the first two Cu(111) layers is confirmed. The best-fit calculation for clean Ni(111) indicates an expansion of the first two layers. To better understand the ARPEFS technique, the authors studied s and non-s initial state photoemission from clean metal surfaces.

  17. Laboratory investigations of mineral dust near-backscattering depolarization ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Järvinen, E.; Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Kociok, T.; Möhler, O.; Leisner, T.; Schnaiter, M.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest to derive the fractions of fine- and coarse-mode dust particles from polarization lidar measurements. For this, assumptions of the backscattering properties of the complex dust particles have to be made either by using empirical data or particle models. Laboratory measurements of dust backscattering properties are important to validate the assumptions made in the lidar retrievals and to estimate their uncertainties. Here, we present laboratory measurements of linear and circular near-backscattering (178°) depolarization ratios of over 200 dust samples measured at 488 and 552 nm wavelengths. The measured linear depolarization ratios ranged from 0.03 to 0.36 and were strongly dependent on the particle size. The strongest size-dependence was observed for fine-mode particles as their depolarization ratios increased almost linearly with particle median diameter from 0.03 to 0.3, whereas the coarse-mode particle depolarization values stayed rather constant with a mean linear depolarization ratio of 0.27. The depolarization ratios were found to be insensitive to the dust source region or thin coating of the particles or to changes in relative humidity. We compared the measurements with results of three different scattering models. With certain assumptions for model particle shape, all the models were capable of correctly describing the size-dependence of the measured dust particle, albeit the model particles significantly differed in composition, shape and degree of complexity. Our results show potential for distinguishing the dust fine- and coarse-mode distributions based on their depolarization properties and, thus, can serve the lidar community as an empirical reference.

  18. Laboratory investigations of mineral dust near-backscattering depolarization ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, E.; Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Kociok, T.; Möhler, O.; Leisner, T.; Schnaiter, M.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest to derive the fractions of fine- and coarse-mode dust particles from polarization lidar measurements. For this, assumptions of the backscattering properties of the complex dust particles have to be made either by using empirical data or particle models. Laboratory measurements of dust backscattering properties are important to validate the assumptions made in the lidar retrievals and to estimate their uncertainties. Here, we present laboratory measurements of linear and circular near-backscattering (178°) depolarization ratios of over 200 dust samples measured at 488 and 552 nm wavelengths. The measured linear depolarization ratios ranged from 0.03 to 0.36 and were strongly dependent on the particle size. The strongest size-dependence was observed for fine-mode particles as their depolarization ratios increased almost linearly with particle median diameter from 0.03 to 0.3, whereas the coarse-mode particle depolarization values stayed rather constant with a mean linear depolarization ratio of 0.27. The depolarization ratios were found to be insensitive to the dust source region or thin coating of the particles or to changes in relative humidity. We compared the measurements with results of three different scattering models. With certain assumptions for model particle shape, all the models were capable of correctly describing the size-dependence of the measured dust particle, albeit the model particles significantly differed in composition, shape and degree of complexity. Our results show potential for distinguishing the dust fine- and coarse-mode distributions based on their depolarization properties and, thus, can serve the lidar community as an empirical reference.

  19. Three-channel single-wavelength lidar depolarization calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Emily M.; Sica, Robert J.; Drummond, James R.; Nott, Graeme J.; Perro, Christopher; Duck, Thomas J.

    2018-02-01

    Linear depolarization measurement capabilities were added to the CANDAC Rayleigh-Mie-Raman lidar (CRL) at Eureka, Nunavut, in the Canadian High Arctic in 2010. This upgrade enables measurements of the phases (liquid versus ice) of cold and mixed-phase clouds throughout the year, including during polar night. Depolarization measurements were calibrated according to existing methods using parallel- and perpendicular-polarized profiles as discussed in ). We present a new technique that uses the polarization-independent Rayleigh elastic channel in combination with one of the new polarization-dependent channels, and we show that for a lidar with low signal in one of the polarization-dependent channels this method is superior to the traditional method. The optimal procedure for CRL is to determine the depolarization parameter using the traditional method at low resolution (from parallel and perpendicular signals) and then to use this value to calibrate the high-resolution new measurements (from parallel and polarization-independent Rayleigh elastic signals). Due to its use of two high-signal-rate channels, the new method has lower statistical uncertainty and thus gives depolarization parameter values at higher spatial-temporal resolution by up to a factor of 20 for CRL. This method is easily adaptable to other lidar systems which are considering adding depolarization capability to existing hardware.

  20. Three-channel single-wavelength lidar depolarization calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. McCullough

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Linear depolarization measurement capabilities were added to the CANDAC Rayleigh–Mie–Raman lidar (CRL at Eureka, Nunavut, in the Canadian High Arctic in 2010. This upgrade enables measurements of the phases (liquid versus ice of cold and mixed-phase clouds throughout the year, including during polar night. Depolarization measurements were calibrated according to existing methods using parallel- and perpendicular-polarized profiles as discussed in . We present a new technique that uses the polarization-independent Rayleigh elastic channel in combination with one of the new polarization-dependent channels, and we show that for a lidar with low signal in one of the polarization-dependent channels this method is superior to the traditional method. The optimal procedure for CRL is to determine the depolarization parameter using the traditional method at low resolution (from parallel and perpendicular signals and then to use this value to calibrate the high-resolution new measurements (from parallel and polarization-independent Rayleigh elastic signals. Due to its use of two high-signal-rate channels, the new method has lower statistical uncertainty and thus gives depolarization parameter values at higher spatial–temporal resolution by up to a factor of 20 for CRL. This method is easily adaptable to other lidar systems which are considering adding depolarization capability to existing hardware.

  1. Spreading depolarizations in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbok, Raimund; Schiefecker, Alois Josef; Friberg, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Pathophysiologic mechanisms of secondary brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage and in particular mechanisms of perihematomal-edema progression remain incompletely understood. Recently, the role of spreading depolarizations in secondary brain injury was established in ischemic stroke......, subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury patients. Its role in intracerebral hemorrhage patients and in particular the association with perihematomal-edema is not known. A total of 27 comatose intracerebral hemorrhage patients in whom hematoma evacuation and subdural electrocorticography......-edema progression (85% of patients) was significantly associated with occurrence of isolated and clustered spreading depolarizations. Monitoring of spreading depolarizations may help to better understand pathophysiologic mechanisms of secondary insults after intracerebral hemorrhage. Whether they may serve...

  2. Spreading Depression, Spreading Depolarizations, and the Cerebral Vasculature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayata, Cenk; Lauritzen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a transient wave of near-complete neuronal and glial depolarization associated with massive transmembrane ionic and water shifts. It is evolutionarily conserved in the central nervous systems of a wide variety of species from locust to human. The depolarization spreads......, such as action potentials and synaptic transmission. Seventy years after its discovery by Leão, the mechanisms of SD and its profound metabolic and hemodynamic effects are still debated. What we did learn of consequence, however, is that SD plays a central role in the pathophysiology of a number of diseases...

  3. Spin Depolarization due to Beam-Beam Interaction in NLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Kathleen A

    2001-01-04

    Calculations of spin depolarization effects due to the beam-beam interaction are presented for several NLC designs. The depolarization comes from both classical (Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi precession) and quantum (Sokolov-Ternov spin-flip) effects. It is anticipated that some physics experiments at future colliders will require a knowledge of the polarization to better than 0.5% precision. We compare the results of CAIN simulations with the analytic estimates of Yokoya and Chen for head-on collisions. We also study the effects of transverse offsets and beamstrahlung-induced energy spread.

  4. Experimental techniques for the calibration of lidar depolarization channels in EARLINET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belegante, Livio; Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Nemuc, Anca; Ene, Dragos; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Amodeo, Aldo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Amato, Francesco; Engelmann, Ronny; Baars, Holger; Wandinger, Ulla; Papayannis, Alexandros; Kokkalis, Panos; Pereira, Sérgio N.

    2018-02-01

    Particle depolarization ratio retrieved from lidar measurements are commonly used for aerosol-typing studies, microphysical inversion, or mass concentration retrievals. The particle depolarization ratio is one of the primary parameters that can differentiate several major aerosol components but only if the measurements are accurate enough. The accuracy related to the retrieval of particle depolarization ratios is the driving factor for assessing and improving the uncertainties of the depolarization products. This paper presents different depolarization calibration procedures used to improve the quality of the depolarization data. The results illustrate a significant improvement of the depolarization lidar products for all the selected lidar stations that have implemented depolarization calibration procedures. The calibrated volume and particle depolarization profiles at 532 nm show values that fall within a range that is generally accepted in the literature.

  5. Depolarization temperature and piezoelectric properties of Na1/2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1/2Bi1/2(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3, was synthesized using the two-stage calcination method and depolarization temperatures and piezoelectric properties were also investigated. The XRD analysis showed that the ceramics system had a morphotropic ...

  6. Depolarization temperature and piezoelectric properties of TiO3 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Lead-free piezoelectric ceramics; depolarization temperature; perovskite structure; piezoelectric properties. 1. Introduction. Increasing interest concerning the environmental pro- blems of Pb(Zr, Ti)O3(PZT)-based ceramics has led to the demand of lead-free ferroelectric ceramics in electronic applications (Shieh et al 2007).

  7. The problem of radiative depolarization in the 'Siberian Snake'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwitters, R.

    1979-01-01

    As pointed out by Derbenev and Kondratenko and by the LEP Study Group, a 'Siberian Snake' may be a convenient method for providing longitudinally polarized beams at LEP. The author shows that at the highest LEP energies (approximately>60 GeV) synchrotron radiation with spin-flip may depolarize the beams. (Auth.)

  8. Magnetic correlations in oxides: neutron diffraction and neutron depolarization study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    We have studied magnetic correlations in several oxide materials that belong to colossal magnetoresistive, naturally occurring layered oxide showing low-dimensional magnetic ordering, solid oxide fuel cell interconnect materials, and magnetic nanoparticles using neutron diffraction and neutron depolarization techniques. In this paper, an overview of some of these results is given. (author)

  9. The continuum of spreading depolarizations in acute cortical lesion development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Shuttleworth, C William; Kirov, Sergei A

    2017-01-01

    A modern understanding of how cerebral cortical lesions develop after acute brain injury is based on Aristides Leão's historic discoveries of spreading depression and asphyxial/anoxic depolarization. Treated as separate entities for decades, we now appreciate that these events define a continuum ...

  10. Temporal coding at the immature depolarizing GABAergic synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzel Valeeva

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the developing hippocampus, GABA exerts depolarizing and excitatory actions and contributes to the generation of neuronal network driven Giant Depolarizing Potentials (GDPs. Here, we studied spike time coding at immature GABAergic synapses and its impact on synchronization of the neuronal network during GDPs in the neonatal (postnatal days P2-6 rat hippocampal slices. Using extracellular recordings, we found that the delays of action potentials (APs evoked by synaptic activation of GABA(A receptors are long (mean, 65 ms and variable (within a time window of 10-200 ms. During patch-clamp recordings, depolarizing GABAergic responses were mainly subthreshold and their amplification by persistent sodium conductance was required to trigger APs. AP delays at GABAergic synapses shortened and their variability reduced with an increase in intracellular chloride concentration during whole-cell recordings. Negative shift of the GABA reversal potential (EGABA with low concentrations of bumetanide, or potentiation of GABA(A receptors with diazepam reduced GDPs amplitude, desynchronized neuronal firing during GDPs and slowed down GDPs propagation. Partial blockade of GABA(A receptors with bicuculline increased neuronal synchronization and accelerated GDPs propagation. We propose that spike-timing at depolarizing GABA synapses is determined by intracellular chloride concentration. At physiological levels of intracellular chloride GABAergic depolarization does not reach the action potential threshold and amplification of GABAergic responses by non-inactivating sodium conductance is required for postsynaptic AP initiation. Slow and variable excitation at GABAergic synapse determines the level of neuronal synchrony and the rate of GDPs propagation in the developing hippocampus.

  11. Photoelectron spectroscopy at a free-electron laser. Investigation of space-charge effects in angle-resolved and core-level spectroscopy and realizaton of a time-resolved core-level photoemission experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marczynski-Buehlow, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) is a very interesting light source with which to perform photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments. Its special characteristics include highly intense photon pulses (up to 100 J/pulse), a photon energy range of 30 eV to 1500 eV, transverse coherence as well as pulse durations of some ten femtoseconds. Especially in terms of time-resolved PES (TRPES), the deeper lying core levels can be reached with photon energies up to 1500 eV with acceptable intensity now and, therefore, element-specific, time-resolved core-level PES (XPS) is feasible at FLASH. During the work of this thesis various experimental setups were constructed in order to realize angle-resolved (ARPES), core-level (XPS) as well as time-resolved PES experiments at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH. Existing as well as newly developed systems for online monitoring of FEL pulse intensities and generating spatial and temporal overlap of FEL and optical laser pulses for time-resolved experiments are successfully integrated into the experimental setup for PES. In order to understand space-charge effects (SCEs) in PES and, therefore, being able to handle those effects in future experiments using highly intense and pulsed photon sources, the origin of energetic broadenings and shifts in photoelectron spectra are studied by means of a molecular dynamic N-body simulation using a modified Treecode Algorithm for sufficiently fast and accurate calculations. It turned out that the most influencing parameter is the ''linear electron density'' - the ratio of the number of photoelectrons to the diameter of the illuminated spot on the sample. Furthermore, the simulations could reproduce the observations described in the literature fairly well. Some rules of thumb for XPS and ARPES measurements could be deduced from the simulations. Experimentally, SCEs are investigated by means of ARPES as well as XPS measurements as a function of FEL pulse

  12. Photoelectron spectroscopy at a free-electron laser. Investigation of space-charge effects in angle-resolved and core-level spectroscopy and realizaton of a time-resolved core-level photoemission experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marczynski-Buehlow, Martin

    2012-01-30

    The free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) is a very interesting light source with which to perform photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments. Its special characteristics include highly intense photon pulses (up to 100 J/pulse), a photon energy range of 30 eV to 1500 eV, transverse coherence as well as pulse durations of some ten femtoseconds. Especially in terms of time-resolved PES (TRPES), the deeper lying core levels can be reached with photon energies up to 1500 eV with acceptable intensity now and, therefore, element-specific, time-resolved core-level PES (XPS) is feasible at FLASH. During the work of this thesis various experimental setups were constructed in order to realize angle-resolved (ARPES), core-level (XPS) as well as time-resolved PES experiments at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH. Existing as well as newly developed systems for online monitoring of FEL pulse intensities and generating spatial and temporal overlap of FEL and optical laser pulses for time-resolved experiments are successfully integrated into the experimental setup for PES. In order to understand space-charge effects (SCEs) in PES and, therefore, being able to handle those effects in future experiments using highly intense and pulsed photon sources, the origin of energetic broadenings and shifts in photoelectron spectra are studied by means of a molecular dynamic N-body simulation using a modified Treecode Algorithm for sufficiently fast and accurate calculations. It turned out that the most influencing parameter is the ''linear electron density'' - the ratio of the number of photoelectrons to the diameter of the illuminated spot on the sample. Furthermore, the simulations could reproduce the observations described in the literature fairly well. Some rules of thumb for XPS and ARPES measurements could be deduced from the simulations. Experimentally, SCEs are investigated by means of ARPES as well as XPS measurements as a function of

  13. Spreading depolarizations increase delayed brain injury in a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamming, Arend M.; Wermer, Marieke J. H.; Rudrapatna, S. Umesh; Lanier, Christian; van Os, Hine J. A.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Ferrari, Michel D.; van der Toorn, Annette; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Stowe, Ann M.; Dijkhuizen, Rick M.

    Spreading depolarizations may contribute to delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, but the effect of spreading depolarizations on brain lesion progression after subarachnoid hemorrhage has not yet been assessed directly. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that

  14. Spreading depolarizations occur in human ischemic stroke with high incidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohmen, C.; Sakowitz, O.W.; Fabricius, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Cortical spreading depression (CSD) and periinfarct depolarization (PID) have been shown in various experimental models of stroke to cause secondary neuronal damage and infarct expansion. For decades it has been questioned whether CSD or PID occur in human ischemic stroke. Here, we...... for decompressive hernicraniectomy, an electrode strip was placed on the periinfarct region, from which four FCoG channels were acquired. Results: A total of 1,638 hours was recorded; mean monitoring time per patient was 109.2 hours. A total of 127 CSD and 42 PID events were observed. In CSD, a stereotyped slow...... frequency in this study of patients with malignant middle cerebral artery infarction. This suggests that the large volume of experimental studies of occlusive stroke that implicate spreading depolarizations in its pathophysiology can be translated, with appropriate caution, to patients and their treatment...

  15. Muscarinic depolarization of layer II neurons of the parasubiculum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Glasgow

    Full Text Available The parasubiculum (PaS is a component of the hippocampal formation that sends its major output to layer II of the entorhinal cortex. The PaS receives strong cholinergic innervation from the basal forebrain that is likely to modulate neuronal excitability and contribute to theta-frequency network activity. The present study used whole cell current- and voltage-clamp recordings to determine the effects of cholinergic receptor activation on layer II PaS neurons. Bath application of carbachol (CCh; 10-50 µM resulted in a dose-dependent depolarization of morphologically-identified layer II stellate and pyramidal cells that was not prevented by blockade of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Bath application of the M1 receptor antagonist pirenzepine (1 µM, but not the M2-preferring antagonist methoctramine (1 µM, blocked the depolarization, suggesting that it is dependent on M1 receptors. Voltage-clamp experiments using ramped voltage commands showed that CCh resulted in the gradual development of an inward current that was partially blocked by concurrent application of the selective Kv7.2/3 channel antagonist XE-991, which inhibits the muscarine-dependent K(+ current I M. The remaining inward current also reversed near EK and was inhibited by the K(+ channel blocker Ba(2+, suggesting that M1 receptor activation attenuates both I M as well as an additional K(+ current. The additional K(+ current showed rectification at depolarized voltages, similar to K(+ conductances mediated by Kir 2.3 channels. The cholinergic depolarization of layer II PaS neurons therefore appears to occur through M1-mediated effects on I M as well as an additional K(+ conductance.

  16. Elastodynamic metasurface: Depolarization of mechanical waves and time effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutin, Claude, E-mail: claude.boutin@entpe.fr [Ecole Nationale des Travaux Publics de l' Etat, Université de Lyon, LGCB, UMR CNRS 5513, Vaulx-en-Velin (France); Schwan, Logan [Acoustics Research Center, University of Salford, Newton Building, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Dietz, Matthew S. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Bristol, Queen' s Building, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-14

    We report the concept of microstructured surfaces with inner resonance in the field of elastodynamics, so-called elastodynamic metasurfaces. Such metasurfaces allow for wavefield manipulation of mechanical waves by tuning the boundary conditions at specific frequencies. In particular, they can be used to depolarize elastic waves without introducing heterogeneities in the medium itself; the physical means to do so in homogeneous elastic media used to remain, surprisingly, an open question while depolarization is commonplace in electromagnetism. The principle relies on the anisotropic behaviour of a subwavelength array of resonators: Their subwavelength configuration confines the Bragg interferences scattered by resonators into a boundary layer. The effective behaviour of the resonating array is expressed with homogenization as an unconventional impedance, the frequency-dependence, and anisotropy of which lead to depolarization and time effects. The concept of the elastodynamic metasurface is tested experimentally and results bear testament to its efficacy and robustness. Elastodynamic metasurfaces are easily realized and analytically predictable, opening new possibilities in tomography techniques, ultrasonics, geophysics, vibration control, materials and structure design.

  17. Energy and Beam-Offset dependence of the Luminosity weighted depolarization for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Esberg, Jakob; Uggerhoj, Ulrik; Dalena, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    We report on simulations of e+e- depolarization due to beam-beam effects. These effects are studied for CLIC at 3 TeV, using GUINEA PIG++. We find a strong energy dependence of the luminosity weighted depolarization. In the luminosity peak at CLIC the total luminosity weighted depolarization remains below the one per-mil level. The effect of a vertical offset on the energy dependent depolarization is investigated. The depolarization in the luminosity peak remains below per-cent level even for 5sy offsets.

  18. Spreading depolarizations have prolonged direct current shifts and are associated with poor outcome in brain trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Watanabe, Tomas; Bullock, M Ross

    2011-01-01

    depolarizations are associated with worse clinical outcome after traumatic brain injury. Furthermore, based on animal models of brain injury, the prolonged durations of depolarizations raise the possibility that these events may contribute to maturation of cortical lesions. Prolonged depolarizations, measured......Cortical spreading depolarizations occur spontaneously after ischaemic, haemorrhagic and traumatic brain injury. Their effects vary spatially and temporally as graded phenomena, from infarction to complete recovery, and are reflected in the duration of depolarization measured by the negative direct...... current shift of electrocorticographic recordings. In the focal ischaemic penumbra, peri-infarct depolarizations have prolonged direct current shifts and cause progressive recruitment of the penumbra into the core infarct. In traumatic brain injury, the effects of spreading depolarizations are unknown...

  19. Apricot melanoidins prevent oxidative endothelial cell death by counteracting mitochondrial oxidation and membrane depolarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Cossu

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular benefits associated with diets rich in fruit and vegetables are thought to be due to phytochemicals contained in fresh plant material. However, whether processed plant foods provide the same benefits as unprocessed ones is an open question. Melanoidins from heat-processed apricots were isolated and their presence confirmed by colorimetric analysis and browning index. Oxidative injury of endothelial cells (ECs is the key step for the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases (CVD, therefore the potential protective effect of apricot melanoidins on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative mitochondrial damage and cell death was explored in human ECs. The redox state of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial compartments was detected by using the redox-sensitive, fluorescent protein (roGFP, while the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP was assessed with the fluorescent dye, JC-1. ECs exposure to hydrogen peroxide, dose-dependently induced mitochondrial and cytoplasmic oxidation. Additionally detected hydrogen peroxide-induced phenomena were MMP dissipation and ECs death. Pretreatment of ECs with apricot melanoidins, significantly counteracted and ultimately abolished hydrogen peroxide-induced intracellular oxidation, mitochondrial depolarization and cell death. In this regard, our current results clearly indicate that melanoidins derived from heat-processed apricots, protect human ECs against oxidative stress.

  20. Paeonia lactiflora Inhibits Cell Wall Synthesis and Triggers Membrane Depolarization in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heung-Shick; Kim, Younhee

    2017-02-28

    Fungal cell walls and cell membranes are the main targets of antifungals. In this study, we report on the antifungal activity of an ethanol extract from Paeonia lactiflora against Candida albicans , showing that the antifungal activity is associated with the synergistic actions of preventing cell wall synthesis, enabling membrane depolarization, and compromising permeability. First, it was shown that the ethanol extract from P. lactiflora was involved in damaging the integrity of cell walls in C. albicans . In isotonic media, cell bursts of C. albicans by the P. lactiflora ethanol extract could be restored, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the P. lactiflora ethanol extract against C. albicans cells increased 4-fold. In addition, synthesis of (1,3)-β- D -glucan polymer was inhibited by 87% and 83% following treatment of C. albicans microsomes with the P. lactiflora ethanol extract at their 1× MIC and 2× MIC, respectively. Second, the ethanol extract from P. lactiflora influenced the function of C. albicans cell membranes. C. albicans cells treated with the P. lactiflora ethanol extract formed red aggregates by staining with a membrane-impermeable dye, propidium iodide. Membrane depolarization manifested as increased fluorescence intensity by staining P. lactiflora -treated C. albicans cells with a membrane-potential marker, DiBAC 4 (3) (( bis -1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol). Membrane permeability was assessed by crystal violet assay, and C. albicans cells treated with the P. lactiflora ethanol extract exhibited significant uptake of crystal violet in a concentration-dependent manner. The findings suggest that P. lactiflora ethanol extract is a viable and effective candidate for the development of new antifungal agents to treat Candida -associated diseases.

  1. Neutron depolarization effects in a high-Tc superconductor (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C.; Pickart, S. J.; Crow, L.; Goyette, R.; McGuire, T. R.; Shinde, S.; Shaw, T. M.

    1988-11-01

    Using the polarized beam small-angle neutron scattering spectrometer at the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center Reactor, we have observed significant depolarization of a neutron beam by passage through polycrystalline high-Tc superconductors, specifically 123 Y-Ba-Cu-O prepared and characterized at the IBM Watson Research Center. We believe that this technique will prove useful in studying aspects of these materials, such as the penetration depth of shielding currents, the presence and structure of trapped flux vortices, and grain size effects on the supercurrent distribution in polycrystalline samples. The two samples showed sharp transitions at 87 and 89 K, and have been studied at temperatures of 77 K; the second sample has also been studied at 4 K. The transition to the superconducting state was monitored by the shift in resonant frequency of a coil surrounding the sample. No measurable depolarization was observed in either sample at 77 K in both the field-cooled and zero-field-cooled states, using applied fields of 0 (nominal), 54, and 1400 Oe. This negative result may be connected with the fact that the material is still in the reversible region as indicated by susceptibility measurements, but it allows an estimate of the upper bound of possible inhomogeneous internal fields, assuming a distance scale for the superconducting regions. For the 10-μm grain size suggested by photomicrographs, this upper bound for the field turns out to be 1.2 kOe, which seems reasonable. At 4 K a significant depolarization was observed when the sample was cooled in low fields and a field of 1400 Oe was subsequently applied. This result suggests that flux lines are penetrating the sample. Further investigations are being carried out to determine the field and temperature dependence of the depolarization, and attempts will be made to model it quantitatively in terms of possible internal field distributions. We are also searching for possible diffraction effects from ordered vortex

  2. Chloride regulates afferent arteriolar contraction in response to depolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B; Jensen, B L; Skott, O

    1998-01-01

    afferent arterioles. In 70% of vessels examined, K+-induced contraction was abolished by acute substitution of bath chloride. Consecutive addition of Cl- (30, 60, 80, 100, 110, and 117 mmol/L) restored the sensitivity to K+, and half-maximal response was observed at 82 mmol/L chloride. The calcium channel...... antagonist diltiazem (10(-6) mol/L) abolished K+-induced contractions. Bicarbonate did not modify the sensitivity to chloride. Norepinephrine (10(-6) mol/L) induced full contraction in depolarized vessels even in the absence of chloride. Iodide and nitrate were substituted for chloride with no inhibitory...

  3. Towards a tomographic reconstruction of neutron depolarization data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Michael; Neubauer, Andreas; Muehlbauer, Martin; Schillinger, Burkhard; Pfleiderer, Christian; Boeni, Peter; Masalovich, Sergey; Calzada, Elbio

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we show a first approach to the three dimensional reconstruction of spatially resolved neutron depolarization data. We will show measurements with a position sensitive CCD detector on a longitudinal polarization analysis setup using 3 He polarizers and analyzers installed at the radiography beamline ANTARES at FRM II, Munich. A tomographic reconstruction of data acquired with an inhomogeneous Pd 1-x Ni x sample shows that this method is a powerful tool to identify regions of different magnetic properties inside the sample.

  4. Towards a tomographic reconstruction of neutron depolarization data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Michael; Neubauer, Andreas; Muehlbauer, Martin; Schillinger, Burkhard; Pfleiderer, Christian; Boeni, Peter [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department, E21, James Franck Str, 85748 Garching (Germany); Masalovich, Sergey; Calzada, Elbio, E-mail: michael.schulz@frm2.tum.d [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier Leibnitz (FRM II), Lichtenbergstr. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-02-01

    In this paper we show a first approach to the three dimensional reconstruction of spatially resolved neutron depolarization data. We will show measurements with a position sensitive CCD detector on a longitudinal polarization analysis setup using {sup 3}He polarizers and analyzers installed at the radiography beamline ANTARES at FRM II, Munich. A tomographic reconstruction of data acquired with an inhomogeneous Pd{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x} sample shows that this method is a powerful tool to identify regions of different magnetic properties inside the sample.

  5. Spreading depolarizations and late secondary insults after traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Strong, Anthony J; Fabricius, Martin

    2009-01-01

    -contusional cortex in 32 patients who underwent surgical treatment for TBI. Prospective electrocorticography was performed during neurointensive care with retrospective analysis of hourly nursing chart data. Recordings were 84 hr (median) per patient and 2,503 hr in total. In 17 patients (53%), 280 spreading...... temperatures suggests that the labile balance of energy supply and demand is an important determinant of their occurrence. Monitoring of depolarizations might serve as a functional measure to guide therapeutic efforts and their blockade may provide an additional line of defense against the effects of secondary...

  6. Thermally stimulated depolarization currents in ThO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, L.L.

    1979-01-01

    Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) have been detected in polycrystalline samples of ThO 2 in the temperature range 100K - 350K. The induced polarization is found to be due to migration of charge carriers over microscopic distances with trapping at grain boundaries. Moreover the density of charges carriers released from trapping sites, upon heating the cooled previously dc biased specimen, decreases for increasing sintering temperature, suggesting the use of the technique to the study of grain growth in the bulk of ceramic nuclear oxides [pt

  7. Analysis of spin depolarizing effects in electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boege, M.

    1994-05-01

    In this thesis spin depolarizing effects in electron storage rings are analyzed and the depolarizing effects in the HERA electron storage ring are studied in detail. At high beam energies the equilibrium polarization is limited by nonlinear effects. This will be particularly true in the case of HERA, when the socalled ''spin rotators'' are inserted which are designed to provide longitudinal electron polarization for the HERMES experiment in 1994 and later for the H1 and ZEUS experiment. It is very important to quantify the influence of these effects theoretically by a proper modelling of HERA, so that ways can be found to get a high degree of polarization in the real machine. In this thesis HERA is modelled by the Monte-Carlo tracking program SITROS which was originally written by J. Kewisch in 1982 to study the polarization in PETRA. The first part of the thesis is devoted to a detailed description of the fundamental theoretical concepts on which the program is based. Then the approximations which are needed to overcome computing time limitations are explained and their influence on the simulation result is discussed. The systematic and statistical errors are studied in detail. Extensions of the program which allow a comparison of SITROS with the results given by ''linear'' theory are explained. (orig.)

  8. Storage ring lattice calibration using resonant spin depolarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Wootton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents measurements of the GeV-scale electron beam energy for the storage rings at the synchrotron light source facilities Australian Synchrotron (AS and SPEAR3 at SLAC. Resonant spin depolarization was employed in the beam energy measurement, since it is presently the highest precision technique and an uncertainty of order 10^{-6} was achieved at SPEAR3 and AS. Using the resonant depolarization technique, the beam energy was measured at various rf frequencies to measure the linear momentum compaction factor. This measured linear momentum compaction factor was used to evaluate models of the beam trajectory through combined-function bending magnets. The main bending magnets of both lattices are rectangular, horizontally defocusing gradient bending magnets. Four modeling approaches are compared for the beam trajectory through the bending magnet: a circular trajectory, linear and nonlinear hyperbolic cosine trajectories, and numerical evaluation of the trajectory through the measured magnetic field map. Within the uncertainty of the measurement the momentum compaction factor is shown to agree with the numerical model of the trajectory within the bending magnet, and disagree with the hyperbolic cosine approximation.

  9. Preliminary evidence that ketamine inhibits spreading depolarizations in acute human brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakowitz, Oliver W; Kiening, Karl L; Krajewski, Kara L

    2009-01-01

    , they cause or augment damage in the ischemic brain. A fraction of spreading depolarizations is abolished by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists. Summary of Case- In 2 patients with severe acute brain injury (traumatic and spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage), spreading depolarizations were inhibited...... by the noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine. This restored electrocorticographic activity. CONCLUSIONS: These anecdotal electrocorticographic findings suggest that ketamine has an inhibitory effect on spreading depolarizations in humans. This is of potential interest for future...

  10. [Intramural chronotopography of depolarization of myocardium of heart ventricles of pig (Sus scrofa domesticus)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyaeva, A S; Roshchecskaya, I M; Roshchevsky, M P

    2014-01-01

    Sequence of depolarization of myocardium of pig heart ventricles was studied by the method of multichannel synchronous cardioelectrotopography. There is established formation of areas of early depolarization in subendocardium of interventricular septum and in the base of left ventricle papillary muscles; of multiple foci--in the depth of walls; of areas of late depolarization--in subepicardium of the left ventricle dorsolateral side. As compared with other species of ungulate animals (reindeer and sheep, in pig heart ventricles, differences are revealed in locations of early and late depolarization, a breakdown of the excitation wave into subepicardium.

  11. [The role of neuroglobin in oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation-induced mitochondrial depolarization and reactive oxygen species production in SH-SY5Y cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, S Y; Ai, Y H; Zhang, L N; Wu, L; Chen, C X; Wang, Y M; Liu, Z Y; Huang, L; Peng, Q Y

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of neuroglobin (NGB) in oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R) induced mitochondrial depolarization and reactive oxygen species (ROS)production in a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y). Methods: SH-SY5Y cells were transfected with lentivirus to establish a stable cell line of NGB knockdown (KD). After treated with OGD/R, cells were collected at different time points to analyze NGB mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, cells were stained with JC-1 and DCFH-DA to evaluate mitochondrial depolarization and ROS production by inverted fluorescence microscope. Also, to determine the neurotoxicity, we measured the lactate dehydrogenase(LDH)level in the cell culture medium. Results: After the treatment of OGD/R, the NGB mRNA and protein started to elevate and peak at 4 h and 8 h (2.04±0.35 fold, 1.69±0.18 fold). Compared with the vector group, NGB KD group had much more mitochondrial depolarization [JC-1 red/green (1.10±0.10) vs (1.46±0.11), P <0.05] and ROS production [DCFH-DA fluorescence (36.30±5.32) vs (16.26±2.97), P <0.05]. Furthermore, NGB KD groups had a higher level of LDH release [(63.42±6.14)%vs (49.65±5.09)%, P <0.05]. Conclusions: NGB plays an important role in the homeostasis of mitochondria. Knockdown of NGB results in increased mitochondrial depolarization, ROS production and neurotoxicity under hypoxia circumstances.

  12. Compensating Faraday Depolarization by Magnetic Helicity in the Solar Corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Ashurova, Mohira B. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Jabbari, Sarah, E-mail: brandenb@nordita.org [School of Mathematical Sciences and Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2017-08-20

    A turbulent dynamo in spherical geometry with an outer corona is simulated to study the sign of magnetic helicity in the outer parts. In agreement with earlier studies, the sign in the outer corona is found to be opposite to that inside the dynamo. Line-of-sight observations of polarized emission are synthesized to explore the feasibility of using the local reduction of Faraday depolarization to infer the sign of helicity of magnetic fields in the solar corona. This approach was previously identified as an observational diagnostic in the context of galactic magnetic fields. Based on our simulations, we show that this method can be successful in the solar context if sufficient statistics are gathered by using averages over ring segments in the corona separately for the regions north and south of the solar equator.

  13. Resonant depolarized dynamic light scattering of silver nanoplatelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimbone, M., E-mail: massimo.zimbone@ct.infn.it [CNR-IMM (Italy); Messina, E. [IPCF-CNR Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici (Italy); Compagnini, G.; Fragalà, M. E. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche (Italy); Calcagno, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Polarized and depolarized dynamic light scattering (DDLS) methodology was carried out on silver nanoplatelets showing strong plasmon-enhanced scattering. The hydrodynamic properties of the nanoparticles were determined by measuring the translation diffusion coefficient for “out resonant” condition and the rotational diffusion coefficient for “in resonant” condition. The results have been interpreted by applying an oblate ellipsoidal model, which allows a direct evaluation of nanoplatelets’ size and shape in agreement with scanning electron microscopy. The characterised nanoplatelets reveal a transversal size of 20 nm and a longitudinal length in the range 65–92 nm. Our investigation shows that DDLS in resonant condition is a simple and powerful technique to determine the size and shape of plasmonic nanoparticles and it can be successfully applied to characterise the dynamics of metallic nanoplatelets.

  14. Experimental verification of depolarization effects in bioelectrical impedance measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Lv, Xinqiang; Du, Meng

    2014-01-01

    The electrode polarization effects on bioelectrical impedance measurement at low-frequency cannot be ignored. In this paper, the bioelectrical data of mice livers are measured to specify the polarization effects on the bio-impedance measurement data. We firstly introduce the measurement system and methodology. Using the depolarization method, the corrected results are obtained. Besides, the specific effects of electrode polarization on bio-impedance measurement results are investigated using comparative analysis of the previous and posterior correction results from dielectric spectroscopy, Cole-Cole plot, conductivity and spectroscopy of dissipation tangent. Experimental results show that electrode polarization has a significant influence on the characteristic parameters of mouse liver tissues. To be specific, we see a low-frequency limit resistance R0 increase by 19.29%, a reactance peak XP increase by 8.50%, a low-frequency limit conductivity Kl decrease by 17.65% and a dissipation peak tangent decrease by 160%.

  15. Linear Depolarization of Lidar Returns by Aged Smoke Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    We use the numerically exact (superposition) T-matrix method to analyze recent measurements of the backscattering linear depolarization ratio (LDR) for a plume of aged smoke at lidar wavelengths ranging from 355 to 1064 nm. We show that the unique spectral dependence of the measured LDRs can be modeled, but only by assuming expressly nonspherical morphologies of smoke particles containing substantial amounts of nonabsorbing (or weakly absorbing) refractory materials such as sulfates. Our results demonstrate that spectral backscattering LDR measurements can be indicative of the presence of morphologically complex smoke particles, but additional (e.g., passive polarimetric or bistatic lidar) measurements may be required for a definitive characterization of the particle morphology and composition.

  16. Depolarization in the ILC Linac-To-Ring Positron beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Valentyn; Ushakov, Andriy [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Riemann, Sabine [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    To achieve the physics goals of future Linear Colliders, it is important that electron and positron beams are polarized. The positron source planned for the International Linear Collider (ILC) is based on a helical undulator system and can deliver a polarised beam with vertical stroke Pe{sup +} vertical stroke {>=} 60%. To ensure that no significant polarization is lost during the transport of the electron and positron beams from the source to the interaction region, spin tracking has to be included in all transport elements which can contribute to a loss of polarization. These are the positron source, the damping ring, the spin rotators, the main linac and the beam delivery system. In particular, the dynamics of the polarized positron beam is required to be investigated. The results of positron spin tracking and depolarization study at the Positron-Linac-To-Ring (PLTR) beamline are presented. (orig.)

  17. Cortical spreading depolarization: Pathophysiology, implications, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Daniel R; Fujii, Tatsuhiro; Ohiorhenuan, Ifije; Liu, Charles Y

    2016-02-01

    Cortical spreading depolarization (CSD) is a spreading loss of ion homeostasis, altered vascular response, change in synaptic architecture, and subsequent depression in electrical activity following an inciting neurological injury. First described by Leão in 1944, this disturbance in neuronal electrophysiology has since been demonstrated in a number of animal studies, and recently a few human studies that examine the occurrence of this depolarizing phenomenon in the setting of a variety of pathological states, including migraines, cerebrovascular accidents, epilepsy, intracranial hemorrhages, and traumatic brain injuries. The onset of CSD has been demonstrated experimentally following a disruption in the neuronal environment leading to glutamate-induced toxicity. This initial event leads to pathological changes in the activity of ion channels that maintain membrane potential. Recovery mechanisms such as sodium-potassium pumps that aim to restore homeostasis fail, leading to osmolar shifts of fluid, swelling of the neuron, and ultimately a measurable depression in cortical activity that spreads in the order of millimeters per minute. Equally important is the resulting change in vascular response. In healthy tissue, increased electrical activity is coupled with release of vasodilatory factors such as nitric oxide and arachidonic acid metabolites that increase local blood flow to meet increased energy expenditure. In damaged tissue, not only is the restorative vascular response lacking but a vasoconstrictive response is promoted and the ischemia that follows adds to the severity of the initial injury. Tissue threatened by this ischemic response is then at elevated risk for CSD propagation and falls into a vicious cycle of electrical and hemodynamic disturbance. Efforts have been made to halt this spreading cortical depression using N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists and other ion channel blockers to minimize the damaging effects of CSD that can persist long

  18. A rotational diffusion coefficient of the 70s ribosome determined by depolarized laser light scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruining, J.; Fijnaut, H.M.

    We have obtained a rotational diffusion coefficient of the 70S ribosome isolated from Escherichia-coli (MRE-600), from the depolarized light scattering spectrum measured by photon correlation spectroscopy. The intensity correlation function of depolarized scattered light contains contributions due

  19. Simple non-Markovian microscopic models for the depolarizing channel of a single qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca Romero, K M; Lo Franco, R

    2012-01-01

    The archetypal one-qubit noisy channels - depolarizing, phase-damping and amplitude-damping channels - describe both Markovian and non-Markovian evolution. Simple microscopic models for the depolarizing channel, both classical and quantum, are considered. Microscopic models that describe phase-damping and amplitude-damping channels are briefly reviewed.

  20. Modulation of electromagnetic fields by a depolarizer of random polarizer array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ning; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The statistical properties of the electric fields with random changes of the polarization state in space generated by a depolarizer are investigated on the basis of the coherence matrix. The depolarizer is a polarizer array composed of a multitude of contiguous square cells of polarizers with ran......The statistical properties of the electric fields with random changes of the polarization state in space generated by a depolarizer are investigated on the basis of the coherence matrix. The depolarizer is a polarizer array composed of a multitude of contiguous square cells of polarizers...... with randomly distributed polarization angles, where the incident fields experience a random polarization modulation after passing through the depolarizer. The propagation of the modulated electric fields through any quadratic optical system is examined within the framework of the complex ABCD matrix to show...

  1. The role of spreading depolarization in subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Porras, R; Zheng, Z; Santos, E; Schöll, M; Unterberg, A W; Sakowitz, O W

    2013-08-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating disease associated with death and poor functional outcome. Despite decades of intense research and improvements in clinical management, delayed cerebral ischaemia (DCI) remains the most important cause of morbidity and mortality after SAH. The key role of angiographic cerebral vasospasm, thought to be the main cause of DCI, has been questioned. Emerging evidence suggests that DCI is likely to have a multifactorial etiology. Over the last few years, spreading depolarization (SD) has been identified as a potential pathophysiological mechanism contributing to DCI. The presence of cortical spreading ischaemia, due to an inverse hemodynamic response to SD, offers a possible explanation for DCI and requires more intensive research. Understanding the role of SD as another mechanism inducing DCI and its relationship with other pathological factors could instigate the development of new approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of DCI in order to improve the clinical outcome. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  2. Light depolarization effects in tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy of silicon (001 and gallium arsenide (001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Gucciardi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on the effects of light depolarization induced by sharp metallic tips in Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (TERS. Experiments on Si(001 and GaAs(001 crystals show that the excitation field depolarization induces a selective enhancement of specific Raman modes, depending on their Raman tensor symmetry. A complete polarization analysis of the light backscattered from the tip confirms the TERS findings. The spatial confinement of the depolarization field is studied and its dependence on the excitation wavelength and power are explored.

  3. Thermally stimulated depolarization currents in the natural fluorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valerio, Mario Ernesto Giroldo

    1986-01-01

    The present work deals with natural calcium fluoride from Criciuma, Santa Catarina. Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) can be used to determine the properties of dipole defects present in this crystal. The TSDC spectrum of this material shows three bands in the temperature range of 80 to 450 K. The first one, at 130 K, is due the dipoles formed by a trivalent impurity and an interstitial fluorine ion in the next nearest position of an impurity ion (nn R s 3+ -F i - ). The second one, at 102 k, is due to the presence of small aggregates of dipoles (like a dimer). The last band, at 360 k is due to the formation of Large Clusters. The continuous distribution model gave the best fit for these bands with mean activation energies of 0.41 eV, 0.595 eV and 1.02 eV for the first, second and third band respectively. Thermal treatments can modify the number of dipoles, dimers and clusters present in the crystal. The variation in the areas under each band can be used to measure this effect. In this work we used thermal treatments between 15 minutes and 10 hours and temperatures between 200 deg C and 500 deg C. For thermal treatments at 300 deg C, the dipoles and dimers are created and the clusters are destroyed as the time of thermal treatment increases. At 400 deg C the clusters are created and the dipoles and dimers and 350 deg C for the clusters. (author)

  4. Methods and apparatus for using gas and liquid phase cathodic depolarizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides methods for using gas and liquid phase cathodic depolarizers in an electrochemical cell having a cation exchange membrane in intimate contact with the anode and cathode. The electrochemical conversion of cathodic depolarizers at the cathode lowers the cell potential necessary to achieve a desired electrochemical conversion, such as ozone evolution, at the anode. When gaseous cathodic depolarizers, such as oxygen, are used, a gas diffusion cathode having the cation exchange membrane bonded thereto is preferred. When liquid phase cathodic depolarizers are used, the cathode may be a flow-by electrode, flow-through electrode, packed-bed electrode or a fluidized-bed electrode in intimate contact with the cation exchange membrane.

  5. A rate-equation model for polarized laser-induced fluorescence to measure electric field in glow discharge He plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takiyama, K.; Watanabe, M.; Oda, T.

    1998-01-01

    Possibility of applying polarized laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy for measuring the electric field in a plasma with a large collisional depolarization has been investigated. A rate equation model including the depolarization process was employed to analyze the time evolution of LIF polarization components. The polarized LIF pulse shapes observed in the sheath of a He glow discharge plasma were successfully reproduced, and the electric field distribution was obtained with high accuracy. (author)

  6. Antipsychotic drugs rapidly induce dopamine neuron depolarization block in a developmental rat model of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Valenti, Ornella; Cifelli, Pierangelo; Gill, Kathryn M.; Grace, Anthony A.

    2011-01-01

    Repeated administration of antipsychotic drugs to normal rats has been shown to induce a state of dopamine neuron inactivation known as depolarization block, which correlates with the ability of the drugs to exhibit antipsychotic efficacy and extrapyramidal side-effects in schizophrenia patients. Nonetheless, in normal rats depolarization block requires weeks of antipsychotic drug administration, whereas schizophrenia patients exhibit initial effects soon after initiating antipsychotic drug t...

  7. Circular depolarization ratios of single water droplets and finite ice circular cylinders: a modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nicolet

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Computations of the phase matrix elements for single water droplets and ice crystals in fixed orientations are presented to determine if circular depolarization δC is more accurate than linear depolarization for phase discrimination. T-matrix simulations were performed to calculate right-handed and left-handed circular depolarization ratios δ+C, respectively δ−C and to compare them with linear ones. Ice crystals are assumed to have a circular cylindrical shape where their surface-equivalent diameters range up to 5 μm. The circular depolarization ratios of ice particles were generally higher than linear depolarization and depended mostly on the particle orientation as well as their sizes. The fraction of non-detectable ice crystals (δ<0.05 was smaller considering a circular polarized light source, reaching 4.5%. However, water droplets also depolarized light circularly for scattering angles smaller than 179° and size parameters smaller than 6 at side- and backscattering regions. Differentiation between ice crystals and water droplets might be difficult for experiments performed at backscattering angles which deviate from 180° unlike LIDAR applications. Instruments exploiting the difference in the P44/P11 ratio at a scattering angle around 115° are significantly constrained in distinguishing between water and ice because small droplets with size parameters between 5 and 10 do cause very high circular depolarizations at this angle. If the absence of the liquid phase is confirmed, the use of circular depolarization in single particle detection is more sensitive and less affected by particle orientation.

  8. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) depolarizes a subset of inspiratory neurons in the newborn mouse brain stem in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Champagnat, J; Denavit-Saubié, M

    1996-01-01

    %. An increase in the interdischarge noise on the XII nerve was recorded in the early phase of the TRH application. 3. Anatomically identified hypoglossal motoneurons (7 cells) responded to bath applied TRH with a depolarization eliciting spikes between the inspiratory potentials. The depolarization...... superfusion. With tetrodoxin (TTX, 1 microM) present in the superfusing solution TRH induced a prolonged depolarization (3 cells) or a transient depolarization (1 cell), demonstrating that type-1 inspiratory neurons are depolarized postsynaptically by TRH. The input resistance was not changed during...... markedly during TRH. Four cells showed a transient depolarization with an increase in input resistance during TRH with TTX present in the superfusing solution. Thus type-3 neurons are depolarized postsynaptically by TRH. 7. We conclude that TRH increases the frequency of the respiratory rhythm in newborn...

  9. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with quantum gas microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrdt, A.; Greif, D.; Demler, E.; Knap, M.; Grusdt, F.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum gas microscopes are a promising tool to study interacting quantum many-body systems and bridge the gap between theoretical models and real materials. So far, they were limited to measurements of instantaneous correlation functions of the form 〈O ̂(t ) 〉 , even though extensions to frequency-resolved response functions 〈O ̂(t ) O ̂(0 ) 〉 would provide important information about the elementary excitations in a many-body system. For example, single-particle spectral functions, which are usually measured using photoemission experiments in electron systems, contain direct information about fractionalization and the quasiparticle excitation spectrum. Here, we propose a measurement scheme to experimentally access the momentum and energy-resolved spectral function in a quantum gas microscope with currently available techniques. As an example for possible applications, we numerically calculate the spectrum of a single hole excitation in one-dimensional t -J models with isotropic and anisotropic antiferromagnetic couplings. A sharp asymmetry in the distribution of spectral weight appears when a hole is created in an isotropic Heisenberg spin chain. This effect slowly vanishes for anisotropic spin interactions and disappears completely in the case of pure Ising interactions. The asymmetry strongly depends on the total magnetization of the spin chain, which can be tuned in experiments with quantum gas microscopes. An intuitive picture for the observed behavior is provided by a slave-fermion mean-field theory. The key properties of the spectra are visible at currently accessible temperatures.

  10. A high performance angle-resolving electron spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Rossnagel, K; Skibowski, M; Harm, S

    2001-01-01

    We report on our new versatile photoelectron spectrometer Angular Spectrometer for Photoelectrons with High Energy REsolution (ASPHERE) which is part of beamline W3.2 (photon energies from 5 to 40 eV) but also compatible with beamline BW3 (40-1500 eV) at the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB). ASPHERE is a 180 deg. spherical analyzer (r sub 0 =100 mm) with a four-element input lens and is mounted on a two-axes goniometer with computer-controlled stepper motors which enables sequential angle-scanned measurements. The input lens is equipped with an iris aperture so that the angular resolution can be continuously adjusted from 0.2 deg. to 5 deg. sign . The fringe field of the condenser has been corrected for by tilting the angle of the input lens against the base plane of the hemispheres resulting in an overall energy resolution of 10 meV. To improve the speed of data acquisition three standard channeltron detectors are installed in the image plane of the analyzer which will be replaced by a multidet...

  11. Theory of angle-resolved photoemission from the cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedegard, P.; Pedersen, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    We show that the photoemission spectrum for an RVB state with bosonic spins and fermionic charges consists of a peak on top of a broad background. The 'Fermi surface' corresponds to hole pockets around certain k-vectors. The theoretical predictions are compared with the available experimental data, and with the results obtained by other approaches. (orig.)

  12. Angle Resolved Performance Measurements on PV Glass and Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juutilainen, Line Tollund; Thorsteinsson, Sune; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff

    2016-01-01

    The angular response of PV-modules has significant impact on the energy production. This is especially pronounced in BIPV where installation angles often are far from optimal. Nevertheless, a gain in energy yield may be obtained by choosing a proper glass as superstrate. In this work we present t...

  13. Insect monitoring with fluorescence lidar techniques: field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zuguang; Brydegaard, Mikkel; Lundin, Patrik; Wellenreuther, Maren; Runemark, Anna; Svensson, Erik I; Svanberg, Sune

    2010-09-20

    Results from field experiments using a fluorescence lidar system to monitor movements of insects are reported. Measurements over a river surface were made at distances between 100 and 300 m, detecting, in particular, damselflies entering the 355 nm pulsed laser beam. The lidar system recorded the depolarized elastic backscattering and two broad bands of laser-induced fluorescence, with the separation wavelength at 500 nm. Captured species, dusted with characteristic fluorescent dye powders, could be followed spatially and temporally after release. Implications for ecological research are discussed.

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses the foundati......Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  15. Effects of D-600 on intramembrane charge movement of polarized and depolarized frog muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, C; Bolaños, P

    1989-07-01

    Intramembrane charge movement has been measured in frog cut skeletal muscle fibers using the triple vaseline gap voltage-clamp technique. Ionic currents were reduced using an external solution prepared with tetraethylammonium to block potassium currents, and O sodium + tetrodotoxin to abolish sodium currents. The internal solution contained 10 mM EGTA to prevent contractions. Both the internal and external solutions were prepared with impermeant anions. Linear capacitive currents were subtracted using the P-P/4 procedure, with the control pulses being subtracted either at very negative potentials, for the case of polarized fibers, or at positive potentials, for the case of depolarized fibers. In 63 polarized fibers dissected from Rana pipiens or Leptodactylus insularis frogs the following values were obtained for charge movement parameters: Qmax = 39 nC/microF, V = 36 mV, k = 18.5 mV. After depolarization we found that the total amount of movable charge was not appreciably reduced, while the voltage sensitivity was much changed. For 10 fibers, in which charge movement was measured at -100 and at 0 mV, Qmax changed from 46 to 41 nC/microF, while V changed from -41 to -103 mV and k changed from 20.5 to 30 mV. Thus membrane depolarization to 0 mV produces a shift of greater than 50 mV in the Q-V relationship and a decrease of the slope. Membrane depolarization to -20 and -30 mV, caused a smaller shift of the Q-V relationship. In normally polarized fibers addition of D-600 at concentrations of 50-100 microM, does not cause important changes in charge movement parameters. However, the drug appears to have a use-dependent effect after depolarization. Thus in depolarized fibers, total charge is reduced by approximately 20%. D-600 causes no further changes in the voltage sensitivity of charge movement in fibers depolarized to 0 mV, while in fibers depolarized to -20 and -30 mV it causes the same effects as that obtained with depolarization to 0 mV. These results are

  16. Mechanism of blue-light-induced plasma-membrane depolarization in etiolated cucumber hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    A large, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane precedes the rapid blue-light (BL)-induced growth suppression in etiolated seedlings of Cucumis sativus L. The mechanism of this voltage transient was investigated by applying inhibitors of ion channels and the plasma-membrane H(+)-ATPase, by manipulating extracellular ion concentrations, and by measuring cell input resistance and ATP levels. The depolarizing phase was not affected by Ca(2+)-channel blockers (verapamil, La3+) or by reducing extracellular free Ca2+ by treatment with ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). However, these treatments did reduce the rate of repolarization, indicating an inward movement of Ca2+ is involved. No effects of the K(+)-channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA+) were detected. Vanadate and KCN, used to inhibit the H(+)-ATPase, reduced or completely inhibited the BL-induced depolarization. Levels of ATP increased by 11-26% after 1-2 min of BL. Input resistance of trichrome cells, measured with double-barreled microelectrodes, remained constant during the onset of the depolarization but decreased as the membrane voltage became more positive than -90 mV. The results indicate that the depolarization mechanism initially involves inactivation of the H(+)-ATPase with subsequent transient activation of one or more types of ion channels.

  17. Intracellular Ca2+ and TRPM5-mediated membrane depolarization produce ATP secretion from taste receptor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yijen A; Roper, Stephen D

    2010-01-01

    ATP is a transmitter secreted from taste bud receptor (Type II) cells through ATP-permeable gap junction hemichannels most probably composed of pannexin 1. The elevation of intracellular Ca2+ and membrane depolarization are both believed to be involved in transmitter secretion from receptor cells, but their specific roles have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we show that taste-evoked ATP secretion from mouse vallate receptor cells is evoked by the combination of intracellular Ca2+ release and membrane depolarization. Unexpectedly, ATP secretion is not blocked by tetrodotoxin, indicating that transmitter release from these cells still takes place in the absence of action potentials. Taste-evoked ATP secretion is absent in receptor cells isolated from TRPM5 knockout mice or in taste cells from wild type mice where current through TRPM5 channels has been eliminated. These findings suggest that membrane voltage initiated by TRPM5 channels is required for ATP secretion during taste reception. Nonetheless, even in the absence of TRPM5 channel activity, ATP release could be triggered by depolarizing cells with KCl. Collectively, the findings indicate that taste-evoked elevation of intracellular Ca2+ has a dual role: (1) Ca2+ opens TRPM5 channels to depolarize receptor cells and (2) Ca2+ plus membrane depolarization opens ATP-permeable gap junction hemichannels. PMID:20498227

  18. Intracellular Ca(2+) and TRPM5-mediated membrane depolarization produce ATP secretion from taste receptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yijen A; Roper, Stephen D

    2010-07-01

    ATP is a transmitter secreted from taste bud receptor (Type II) cells through ATP-permeable gap junction hemichannels most probably composed of pannexin 1. The elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and membrane depolarization are both believed to be involved in transmitter secretion from receptor cells, but their specific roles have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we show that taste-evoked ATP secretion from mouse vallate receptor cells is evoked by the combination of intracellular Ca(2+) release and membrane depolarization. Unexpectedly, ATP secretion is not blocked by tetrodotoxin, indicating that transmitter release from these cells still takes place in the absence of action potentials. Taste-evoked ATP secretion is absent in receptor cells isolated from TRPM5 knockout mice or in taste cells from wild type mice where current through TRPM5 channels has been eliminated. These findings suggest that membrane voltage initiated by TRPM5 channels is required for ATP secretion during taste reception. Nonetheless, even in the absence of TRPM5 channel activity, ATP release could be triggered by depolarizing cells with KCl. Collectively, the findings indicate that taste-evoked elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) has a dual role: (1) Ca(2+) opens TRPM5 channels to depolarize receptor cells and (2) Ca(2+) plus membrane depolarization opens ATP-permeable gap junction hemichannels.

  19. Parent-molecule rotational depolarization of photofragment angular momentum distributions: diatomic and polyatomic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2011-05-14

    We extend the A(q)(k) polarization-parameter model, which describes product angular momentum polarization from one photon photodissociation of polyatomic molecules in the molecular frame [J. Chem. Phys., 2010, 132, 224310], to the case of rotating parent molecules. The depolarization of the A(q)(k) is described by a set of rotational depolarization factors that depend on the angle of rotation of the molecular axis γ. We evaluate these rotational depolarization factors for the case of dissociating diatomic molecules and demonstrate that they are in complete agreement with the results of Kuznetsov and Vasyutinskii [J. Chem. Phys., 2005, 123, 034307] obtained from a fully quantum mechanical approach of the same problem, showing the effective equivalence of the two approaches. We further evaluate the set of rotational depolarization factors for the case of dissociating polyatomic molecules that have three (near) equal moments of inertia, thus extending these calculations to polyatomic systems. This ideal case yields insights for the dissociation of polyatomic molecules of various symmetries when we compare the long lifetime limit with the results obtained for the diatomic case. In particular, in the long lifetime limit the depolarization factors of the A(0)(k) (odd k), Re(A(1)(k)) (even k) and Im(A(1)(k)) (odd k) for diatomic molecules vanish; in contrast, for polyatomic molecules the depolarization factors for the A(0)(k) (odd k) reduce to a value of 1/3, whereas for the Re(A(1)(k)) (even k) and Im(A(1)(k)) (odd k) they reduce to 1/5.

  20. Zero-field Spin Depolarization of Low-Energy Muons in Ferromagnetic Nickel and Silver Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadaoui, H.; Salman, Z.; Prokscha, T.; Suter, A.; Wojek, B. M.; Morenzoni, E.

    We present zero-field muon-spin depolarization measurements in nickel and silver performed using low-energy muon-spin relaxation technique.Ni or Ag are usually used in this depth-resolved technique as a backing material to enable background subtraction when studying small crystals or materials with weak magnetism. The depolarization rate of the asymmetry in silver and that of the slow relaxing part of the asymmetry in nickel are small(≤ 0.05 μs-1), and weakly temperature and energy-dependent.

  1. Detection of spreading depolarization with intraparenchymal electrodes in the injured human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeffcote, Toby; Hinzman, Jason M; Jewell, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spreading depolarization events following ischemic and traumatic brain injury are associated with poor patient outcome. Currently, monitoring these events is limited to patients in whom subdural electrodes can be placed at open craniotomy. This study examined whether these events can...... be detected using intra-cortical electrodes, opening the way for electrode insertion via burr hole. METHODS: Animal work was carried out on adult Sprague-Dawley rats in a laboratory setting to investigate the feasibility of recording depolarization events. Subsequently, 8 human patients requiring craniotomy...... for craniotomy. The method provides a new investigative tool for the evaluation of the contribution of these events to secondary brain injury in human patients....

  2. Number of independent parameters in the Mueller matrix representation of homogeneous depolarizing media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Oriol

    2013-04-01

    In general the transmission of polarized light through a homogeneous depolarizing sample has motion-reversal symmetry because the response remains the same for light traveling in the opposite direction. As a consequence, the optical properties of a sample, characterized by the differential Mueller matrix, must be invariant upon motion reversal. This Letter shows that the 16 parameters of the differential Mueller matrix must therefore obey six conditions to satisfy this symmetry. This limits the number of independent parameters to 10. The 10 elementary optical properties of a depolarizing homogeneous medium are defined and discussed.

  3. Mitochondrial aquaporin-8 knockdown in human hepatoma HepG2 cells causes ROS-induced mitochondrial depolarization and loss of viability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchissio, Maria Julia; Francés, Daniel Eleazar Antonio; Carnovale, Cristina Ester; Marinelli, Raúl Alberto, E-mail: rmarinel@unr.edu.ar

    2012-10-15

    Human aquaporin-8 (AQP8) channels facilitate the diffusional transport of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} across membranes. Since AQP8 is expressed in hepatic inner mitochondrial membranes, we studied whether mitochondrial AQP8 (mtAQP8) knockdown in human hepatoma HepG2 cells impairs mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release, which may lead to organelle dysfunction and cell death. We confirmed AQP8 expression in HepG2 inner mitochondrial membranes and found that 72 h after cell transfection with siRNAs targeting two different regions of the human AQP8 molecule, mtAQP8 protein specifically decreased by around 60% (p < 0.05). Studies in isolated mtAQP8-knockdown mitochondria showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release, assessed by Amplex Red, was reduced by about 45% (p < 0.05), an effect not observed in digitonin-permeabilized mitochondria. mtAQP8-knockdown cells showed an increase in mitochondrial ROS, assessed by dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (+ 120%, p < 0.05) and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (− 80%, p < 0.05), assessed by tetramethylrhodamine-coupled quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoTempol prevented ROS accumulation and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential. Cyclosporin A, a mitochondrial permeability transition pore blocker, also abolished the mtAQP8 knockdown-induced mitochondrial depolarization. Besides, the loss of viability in mtAQP8 knockdown cells verified by MTT assay, LDH leakage, and trypan blue exclusion test could be prevented by cyclosporin A. Our data on human hepatoma HepG2 cells suggest that mtAQP8 facilitates mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release and that its defective expression causes ROS-induced mitochondrial depolarization via the mitochondrial permeability transition mechanism, and cell death. -- Highlights: ► Aquaporin-8 is expressed in mitochondria of human hepatoma HepG2 cells. ► Aquaporin-8 knockdown impairs mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release and increases ROS. ► Aquaporin

  4. Observation of depolarized guided acoustic-wave Brillouin scattering in partially uncoated optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Neisei; Set, Sze Yun; Yamashita, Shinji

    2018-02-01

    We observed the depolarized guided acoustic-wave Brillouin scattering (GAWBS) spectrum in a highly nonlinear fiber with a partially side-stripped polymer coat. The linewidth of the GAWBS spectral line at 941 MHz was measured to be 6.4 MHz, which was 0.9 times that of a coated fiber.

  5. Electroanatomic Correlates of Depolarization Abnormalities in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia/Cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanawuttiwat, Tanyanan; Te Riele, Anneline S J M; Philips, Binu; James, Cynthia A; Murray, Brittney; Tichnell, Crystal; Sawant, Abhishek C; Calkins, Hugh; Tandri, Harikrishna

    BACKGROUND: Epsilon waves and other depolarization abnormalities in the right precordial leads are thought to represent delayed activation of the right ventricular outflow tract in arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C). However, no study has directly correlated cardiac

  6. Depolarization calibration and measurements using the CANDAC Rayleigh-Mie-Raman lidar at Eureka, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Emily M.; Sica, Robert J.; Drummond, James R.; Nott, Graeme; Perro, Christopher; Thackray, Colin P.; Hopper, Jason; Doyle, Jonathan; Duck, Thomas J.; Walker, Kaley A.

    2017-11-01

    The Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC) Rayleigh-Mie-Raman lidar (CRL) at Eureka, Nunavut, has measured tropospheric clouds, aerosols, and water vapour since 2007. In remote and meteorologically significant locations, such as the Canadian High Arctic, the ability to add new measurement capability to an existing well-tested facility is extremely valuable. In 2010, linear depolarization 532 nm measurement hardware was installed in the lidar's receiver. To minimize disruption in the existing lidar channels and to preserve their existing characterization so far as is possible, the depolarization hardware was placed near the end of the receiver cascade. The upstream optics already in place were not optimized for preserving the polarization of received light. Calibrations and Mueller matrix calculations are used to determine and mitigate the contribution of these upstream optics on the depolarization measurements. The results show that with appropriate calibration, indications of cloud particle phase (ice vs. water) through the use of the depolarization parameter are now possible to a precision of ±0.05 absolute uncertainty ( ≤ 10 % relative uncertainty) within clouds at time and altitude resolutions of 5 min and 37.5 m respectively, with higher precision and higher resolution possible in select cases. The uncertainty is somewhat larger outside of clouds at the same altitude, typically with absolute uncertainty ≤ 0.1. Monitoring changes in Arctic cloud composition, including particle phase, is essential for an improved understanding of the changing climate locally and globally.

  7. Normal chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum cells with a depolarized plasma membrane potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, Bert van; Vogelzang, Sake A.; Ypey, Dirk L.; Molen, Loek G. van der; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1990-01-01

    We examined a possible role for the plasma membrane potential in signal transduction during cyclic AMP-induced chemotaxis in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Chemotaxis, cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP responses in cells with a depolarized membrane potential were measured. Cells can be

  8. Weaver mutant mouse cerebellar granule cells respond normally to chronic depolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Annette; Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Hack, N

    1997-01-01

    We studied the effects of chronic K(+)-induced membrane depolarization and treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) from weaver mutant mice and non-weaver litter-mates. The weaver mutation is a Gly-to-Ser substitution in a conserved region of the Girk2 G prote...

  9. Charge movement and depolarization-contraction coupling in arthropod vs. vertebrate skeletal muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Scheuer, T; Gilly, W F

    1986-01-01

    Voltage-dependent charge movement has been characterized in arthropod skeletal muscle. Charge movement in scorpion (Centuroides sculpturatus) muscle is distinguishable from that in vertebrate skeletal muscle by criteria of kinetics, voltage dependence, and pharmacology. The function of scorpion charge movement is gating of calcium channels in the sarcolemma, and depolarization-contraction coupling relies on calcium influx through these channels.

  10. Charge movement and depolarization-contraction coupling in arthropod vs. vertebrate skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuer, T; Gilly, W F

    1986-11-01

    Voltage-dependent charge movement has been characterized in arthropod skeletal muscle. Charge movement in scorpion (Centuroides sculpturatus) muscle is distinguishable from that in vertebrate skeletal muscle by criteria of kinetics, voltage dependence, and pharmacology. The function of scorpion charge movement is gating of calcium channels in the sarcolemma, and depolarization-contraction coupling relies on calcium influx through these channels.

  11. Membrane depolarization and carbamoylcholine stimulate phosphatidylinositol turnover in intact nerve terminals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audigier, S.M.P.; Wang, J.K.T.; Greengard, P.

    1988-01-01

    Synaptosomes, purified from rat cerebral cortex, were prelabeled with [ 3 H]inositol to study phosphatidylinositol turnover in nerve terminals. Labeled synaptosomes were either depolarized with 40 mM K + or exposed to carbamoylcholine (carbachol). K + depolarization increased the level of inositol phosphates in a time-dependent manner. The inositol bisphosphate level also increased rapidly, but its elevated level was sustained during continued depolarization. The elevated level of inositol bisphosphate was reversed upon repolarization of the synaptosomes. The level of inositol monophosphate increased slowly to 120-130% of control. These effects of K + depolarization depended on the presence of Ca 2+ in the incubation medium. Carbachol stimulated the turnover of phosphatidylinositol in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The level of inositol bisphosphate increased to 210% of control, and this maximal response was seen from 15 to 60 min. Accumulation of inositol monophosphate was larger than that of inositol bisphosphate, but its time course was slower. Atropine and pirenzepine inhibited the carbachol effect with high affinities. These data show that both Ca 2+ influx and M 1 muscarinic receptor activation stimulate phospholipase C activity in synaptosomes, suggesting that phosphatidylinositol turnover may be involved in regulating neurotransmitter release from nerve terminals

  12. Fluorocitrate-mediated depolarization of astrocytes in the retrotrapezoid nucleus stimulates breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrinho, Cleyton R; Gonçalves, Christopher M; Takakura, Ana C; Mulkey, Daniel K; Moreira, Thiago S

    2017-09-01

    Evidence indicates that CO 2 /H + -evoked ATP released from retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) astrocytes modulates the activity of CO 2 -sensitive neurons. RTN astrocytes also sense H + by inhibition of Kir4.1 channels; however, the relevance of this pH-sensitive current remains unclear since ATP release appears to involve CO 2 -dependent gating of connexin 26 hemichannels. Considering that depolarization mediated by H + inhibition of Kir4.1 channels is expected to increase sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBC) conductance and favor Ca 2+ influx via the sodium calcium exchanger (NCX), we hypothesize that depolarization in the presence of CO 2 is sufficient to facilitate ATP release and enhance respiratory output. Here, we confirmed that acute exposure to fluorocitrate (FCt) reversibly depolarizes RTN astrocytes and increased activity of RTN neurons by a purinergic-dependent mechanism. We then made unilateral injections of FCt into the RTN or two other putative chemoreceptor regions (NTS and medullary raphe) to depolarize astrocytes under control conditions and during P2-recepetor blockade while measuring cardiorespiratory activities in urethane-anesthetized, vagotomized, artificially ventilated male Wistar rats. Unilateral injection of FCt into the RTN increased phrenic (PNA) amplitude and frequency without changes in arterial pressure. Unilateral injection of pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonate (PPADS, a P2-receptor antagonist) into the RTN dampened both PNA amplitude and frequency responses to FCt. Injection of MRS2179 (P2Y1-receptor antagonist) into the RTN did not affect the FCt-induced respiratory responses. Fluorocitrate had no effect on breathing when injected into the NTS or raphe. These results suggest that depolarization can facilitate purinergic enhancement of respiratory drive from the RTN. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Astrocytes in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) are known to function as respiratory chemoreceptors; however, it is not clear whether

  13. Failure of feedback as a putative common mechanism of spreading depolarizations in migraine and stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlem, Markus A.; Schneider, Felix M.; Schöll, Eckehard

    2008-06-01

    The stability of cortical function depends critically on proper regulation. Under conditions of migraine and stroke a breakdown of transmembrane chemical gradients can spread through cortical tissue. A concomitant component of this emergent spatio-temporal pattern is a depolarization of cells detected as slow voltage variations. The propagation velocity of ˜3mm/min indicates a contribution of diffusion. We propose a mechanism for spreading depolarizations (SD) that rests upon a nonlocal or noninstantaneous feedback in a reaction-diffusion system. Depending upon the characteristic space and time scales of the feedback, the propagation of cortical SD can be suppressed by shifting the bifurcation line, which separates the parameter regime of pulse propagation from the regime where a local disturbance dies out. The optimization of this feedback is elaborated for different control schemes and ranges of control parameters.

  14. On the nature of the fast depolarization of muons in condensed nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duginov, V.N.; Grebinnik, V.G.; Kirillov, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    Temperature dependences of the depolarization rate, the muon precession initial amplitude and phase in liquid and crystalline nitrogen with the oxygen content of 10 -6 have been measured. It has been shown that muon spin relaxation parameters in nitrogen do not change at the reduction of the oxygen impurity content from 0.7x10 -4 to 10 -6 . The fast depolarization of muons in condensed nitrogen is apparently due to the formation of muonium atoms. The muon precession initial phase has been measured as a function of the perpendicular magnetic field to determine the state of short-lived muonium in nitrogen. It has been determined that muonium in nitrogen is in an excited state. 14 refs.; 3 figs

  15. Backscatter laser depolarization studies of simulated stratospheric aerosols: Crystallized sulfuric acid droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie; Yu, Bing-Kun

    1988-01-01

    The optical depolarizing properties of simulated stratospheric aerosols were studied in laboratory laser (0.633 micrometer) backscattering experiments for application to polarization lidar observations. Clouds composed of sulfuric acid solution droplets, some treated with ammonia gas, were observed during evaporation. The results indicate that the formation of minute ammonium sulfate particles from the evaporation of acid droplets produces linear depolarization ratios of beta equivalent to 0.02, but beta equivalent to 0.10 to 0.15 are generated from aged acid cloud aerosols and acid droplet crystallization effects following the introduction of ammonia gas into the chamber. It is concluded that partially crystallized sulfuric acid droplets are a likely candidate for explaining the lidar beta equivalent to 0.10 values that have been observed in the lower stratosphere in the absence of the relatively strong backscattering from homogeneous sulfuric acid droplet (beta equivalent to 0) or ice crystal (beta equivalent to 0.5) clouds.

  16. Backscatter laser depolarization studies of simulated stratospheric aerosols - Crystallized sulfuric acid droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie; Yu, Bing-Kun

    1989-01-01

    The optical depolarizing properties of simulated stratospheric aerosols were studied in laboratory laser (0.633 micrometer) backscattering experiments for application to polarization lidar observations. Clouds composed of sulfuric acid solution droplets, some treated with ammonia gas, were observed during evaporation. The results indicate that the formation of minute ammonium sulfate particles from the evaporation of acid droplets produces linear depolarization ratios of beta equivalent to 0.02, but beta equivalent to 0.10 to 0.15 are generated from aged acid cloud aerosols and acid droplet crystalization effects following the introduction of ammonia gas into the chamber. It is concluded that partially crystallized sulfuric acid droplets are a likely candidate for explaining the lidar beta equivalent to 0.10 values that have been observed in the lower stratosphere in the absence of the relatively strong backscattering from homogeneous sulfuric acid droplet (beta equivalent to 0) or ice crystal (beta equivalent to 0.5) clouds.

  17. A GABAergic depolarizing potential in the hippocampus disclosed by the convulsant 4-aminopyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoli, M; Perreault, P

    1987-01-01

    Intracellular recordings from hippocampal pyramidal cells in the CA1 subfield of the 'in vitro' slice in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 5-50 microM) revealed a long-lasting (up to 1.5 s) depolarizing potential which occurred either spontaneously or following orthodromic stimulation. This potential was: capable of blocking both direct and synaptic activation of the cell; sensitive to bath application of low concentrations of bicuculline methiodide; and associated to an extracellular current sink in the dendrites as suggested by the extracellular field potentials recorded at different levels along an axis perpendicular to the stratum pyramidale. It is concluded that the long-lasting depolarizing potential evoked by 4-AP is caused by the activation of GABA receptors localized in the dendritic region of the CA1 subfield.

  18. Effect of a partial Siberian snake on an open-quotes Rf-inducedclose quotes depolarizing resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, C.M.; Anferov, V.A.; Baiod, R.

    1993-01-01

    The authors studied the effect of an rf solenoid magnet and a partial Siberian snake on a stored 120 MeV vertically polarized proton beam. The open-quotes rf-inducedclose quotes depolarizing resonance frequencies were measured for several partial Siberian snakes. The snake's longitudinal field tilts the stable spin direction from the vertical and shifts the depolarizing resonances toward higher frequencies. A 4% snake shifts the resonance frequency by 11 kHz which corresponds to a spin tune shift of 0.00688. A partial Siberian snake should be able to overcome the relatively weak imperfection depolarizing resonances in proton accelerators up to about 10 GeV

  19. The proton spin puzzle and depolarization in $\\overline{p}$p --> $\\overline{\\Lambda}\\Lambda$

    CERN Document Server

    Alberg, M A; Kharzeev, Dima E; Ellis, J; Kharzeev, D

    1995-01-01

    We point out that the measurement of target spin depolarization D_{nn} in the \\bar{p}p\\to\\bar{\\Lambda}\\Lambda reaction may test dynamical mechanisms invoked to explain the proton spin puzzle revealed by polarized deep--inelastic scattering experiments. In particular, models with {\\it negatively} polarized \\bar{s}s pairs in the proton wave function predict D_{nn}0.

  20. Light depolarization in off-specular reflection on submicro rough metal surfaces with imperfectly random roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Linsheng; Li, Xuefeng; Nonaka, Kazuhiro

    2015-02-01

    Depolarization at a rough surface relates to its roughness and irregularity (e.g., sags and crests) besides the material property. However, there is still lack of general theory to clearly describe the relationship between depolarization ratios and surface conditions, and one important reason is that the mechanism of depolarization relates to geometric parameters such as microcosmic height/particle distributions of sub-micro to nm levels. To study the mechanism in more detail, a compact laser instrument is developed, and depolarization information of a linearly polarized incident light is used for analyzing the roughness, during which a He-Ne laser source (λ = 632.8 nm) is used. Three nickel specimens with RMS roughness (Rq) less than λ/4 are fabricated and tested. Six different areas in each specimen are characterized in detail using an AFM. Rq are in the range of 34.1-155.0 nm, and the heights are non-Gaussian distribution in the first specimen and near-Gaussian distribution in the others. Off-specular inspection is carried out exactly on these 18 characterized areas, and results show that the cross-polarization ratios match quite well with Rq values of the first sample that has Rq ≤ λ/10 (or Rt ≤ λ), while they match well with maximum height, Rt, values of the other two that have Rt > λ (the maximum derivation is 11%). In addition, since this instrument is simple, portable, stable, and low-cost, it has great potential for practical online roughness testing after a linear calibration.

  1. Hypothermia for Patients Requiring Evacuation of Subdural Hematoma: Effect on Spreading Depolarizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    randomized multi-center clinical study of very early hypothermia in patients with traumatic brain injury who require emergent surgical evacuation of a...injury (TBI) patients undergoing surgical evacuation of acute subdural hematomas (ASDH). The study is conducted under Exception From Informed Consent...electrode arrays will be placed on the brain after surgical ASDH evacuation, and spreading depolarizations will be monitored during the post-operative

  2. Depolarized haze of nano-porous AAO film via porosity and aspect control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chun-Wei; Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Cheng, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2018-01-01

    Multiple scattering induced haze and depolarization effects of nano-porous AAO films controlled by detuning the porosity and aspect ratio of the nano holes are investigated. The nano-porous AAO film with its porosity increasing from 12.6% to 19.3% enhances the scattering of the incident laser beam with its maximal scattering angle enlarged from 5° to 8° under TM-mode incidence and from 6° to 10° under TE-mode incidence. Because of multiple scattering within the porous holes of the AAO, the depolarization on the reflected beam by transferring its electric field from horizontal to the vertical such that the polarization ratio is degraded with a randomized haze. The porosity of AAO surface broadens from 12.6% to 19.3% when increasing the bias voltage from 40 to 60 V during the second-step of the electro-chemical anodization process, which essentially adjusts the polarization ratio under TM-mode and TE-mode incidences raise from 0.31 to 0.35 and from 0.32 to 0.48, respectively. The depolarized haze of the nano-porous AAO film is correlated with its porosity and aspect ratio controlled by the pore size and etched depth of the AAO. Under TM-mode incidence, the simulated polarization ratio increases from 0.35 to 0.38, which correlates well with experimental results. In contrast, the experiment result slightly deviates from the theoretical prediction as the TE-mode field interacts more surface area than the TM-mode field does. Such a nano-porous AAO exhibits tunable depolarized haze via the control porosity and aspect ratio, which is particularly suitable to serve as the catalytic buffer for synthesizing the hydrophobic and hazed solar energy converters.

  3. Antipsychotic drugs rapidly induce dopamine neuron depolarization block in a developmental rat model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Ornella; Cifelli, Pierangelo; Gill, Kathryn M; Grace, Anthony A

    2011-08-24

    Repeated administration of antipsychotic drugs to normal rats has been shown to induce a state of dopamine neuron inactivation known as depolarization block, which correlates with the ability of the drugs to exhibit antipsychotic efficacy and extrapyramidal side effects in schizophrenia patients. Nonetheless, in normal rats depolarization block requires weeks of antipsychotic drug administration, whereas schizophrenia patients exhibit initial effects soon after initiating antipsychotic drug treatment. We now report that, in a developmental disruption rat model of schizophrenia [methyl-azoxymethanol acetate (20 mg/kg, i.p.) injected into G17 pregnant female rats, with offspring tested as adults], the extant hyperdopaminergic state combines with the excitatory actions of a first- (haloperidol; 0.6 mg/kg, i.p.) and a second- (sertindole; 2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) generation antipsychotic drug to rapidly induce depolarization block in ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons. Acute injection of either antipsychotic drug induced an immediate reduction in the number of spontaneously active dopamine neurons (cells per electrode track; termed population activity). Repeated administration of either antipsychotic drug for 1, 3, 7, 15, and 21 d continued to reduce dopamine neuron population activity. Both acute and repeated effects on population activity were reversed by acute apomorphine injections, which is consistent with the reversal of dopamine neuron depolarization block. Although this action may account for the effects of D2 antagonist drugs on alleviating psychosis and the lack of development of tolerance in humans, the drugs appear to do so by inducing an offsetting deficit rather than attacking the primary pathology present in schizophrenia.

  4. Depolarization calibration and measurements using the CANDAC Rayleigh–Mie–Raman lidar at Eureka, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. McCullough

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC Rayleigh–Mie–Raman lidar (CRL at Eureka, Nunavut, has measured tropospheric clouds, aerosols, and water vapour since 2007. In remote and meteorologically significant locations, such as the Canadian High Arctic, the ability to add new measurement capability to an existing well-tested facility is extremely valuable. In 2010, linear depolarization 532 nm measurement hardware was installed in the lidar's receiver. To minimize disruption in the existing lidar channels and to preserve their existing characterization so far as is possible, the depolarization hardware was placed near the end of the receiver cascade. The upstream optics already in place were not optimized for preserving the polarization of received light. Calibrations and Mueller matrix calculations are used to determine and mitigate the contribution of these upstream optics on the depolarization measurements. The results show that with appropriate calibration, indications of cloud particle phase (ice vs. water through the use of the depolarization parameter are now possible to a precision of ±0.05 absolute uncertainty ( ≤ 10 % relative uncertainty within clouds at time and altitude resolutions of 5 min and 37.5 m respectively, with higher precision and higher resolution possible in select cases. The uncertainty is somewhat larger outside of clouds at the same altitude, typically with absolute uncertainty  ≤ 0.1. Monitoring changes in Arctic cloud composition, including particle phase, is essential for an improved understanding of the changing climate locally and globally.

  5. Collisional broadening of depolarized spectral lines of hydrogen gases at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hout, K.D. van den.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the collisional broadening and shift of H 2 , D 2 and HD rotational Raman and depolarized Rayleigh lines at various temperatures between 25 K and 300 K. These are then discussed within the context of current theoretical concepts. For a few temperatures the line broadening cross sections are also reported as a function of the ortho-para composition for H 2 and D 2 . (C.F.)

  6. Characterization of Rain Attenuation and Depolarization at W/V Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-22

    University of New Mexico 1 University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131 22 Mar 2017 Final Report APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION IS...CONTRACT NUMBER Characterization of Rain Attenuation and Depolarization at W/V Bands 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 63401F 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...band attenuation model by the International Telecommunications union (ITU) was found to be lacking based on experimental validation. Furthermore, the

  7. Coherence and polarization speckle generated by a rough-surfaced retardation plate depolarizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ning; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Takeda, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    of position introducing random phase differences between the two orthogonal components of the electric vector. Under the assumption of Gaussian statistics with zero mean, the surface model for the depolarizer of the rough-surfaced retardation plate is obtained. The propagation of the modulated fields through...... any quadratic optical system is examined within the framework of the complex ABCD matrix theory to show how the degree of coherence and polarization of the beam changes on propagation, including propagation in free space...

  8. Ferroelectric behavior of a lead titanate nanosphere due to depolarization fields and mechanical stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade Landeta, J.; Lascano, I.

    2017-07-01

    A theorical model has been developed based on the theory of Ginzburg-Landau-Devonshire to study and predict the effects the decreasing of size particle in a nanosphere of PbTiO3 subjected to the action of depolarization fields and mechanical stress. It was considered that the nanosphere is surrounded by a layer of space charges on its surface, and containing 180° domains generated by minimizing free energy of depolarization. Energy density of depolarization, wall domain and electro-elastic energy have been incorporated into the free energy of the theory Ginzburg-Landau-Devonshire. Free energy minimization was performed to determine the spontaneous polarization and transition temperature system. These results show that the transition temperature for nanosphere is substantially smaller than the corresponding bulk material. Also, it has been obtained that the stability of the ferroelectric phase of nanosphere is favored for configurations with a large number of 180° domains, with the decreasing of thickness space charge layer, and the application of tensile stress and decreases with compressive stress. (Author)

  9. Spreading depolarization in the brainstem mediates sudden cardiorespiratory arrest in mouse SUDEP models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Isamu; Noebels, Jeffrey L

    2015-04-08

    Cardiorespiratory collapse after a seizure is the leading cause of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) in young persons, but why only certain individuals are at risk is unknown. To identify a mechanism for this lethal cardiorespiratory failure, we examined whether genes linked to increased SUDEP risk lower the threshold for spreading depolarization (SD), a self-propagating depolarizing wave that silences neuronal networks. Mice carrying mutations in Kv1.1 potassium channels (-/-) and Scn1a sodium ion channels (+/R1407X) phenocopy many aspects of human SUDEP. In mutant, but not wild-type mice, seizures initiated by topical application of 4-aminopyridine to the cortex led to a slow, negative DC potential shift recorded in the dorsal medulla, a brainstem region that controls cardiorespiratory pacemaking. This irreversible event slowly depolarized cells and inactivated synaptic activity, producing cardiorespiratory arrest. Local initiation of SD in this region by potassium chloride microinjection also elicited electroencephalographic suppression, apnea, bradycardia, and asystole, similar to the events seen in monitored human SUDEP. In vitro study of brainstem slices confirmed that mutant mice had a lower threshold for SD elicited by metabolic substrate depletion and that immature mice were at greater risk than adults. Deletion of the gene encoding tau, which prolongs life in these mutants, also restored the normal SD threshold in Kv1.1-mutant mouse brainstem. Thus, brainstem SD may be a critical threshold event linking seizures and SUDEP. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. The Role of Cell Volume in the Dynamics of Seizure, Spreading Depression, and Anoxic Depolarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Ullah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell volume changes are ubiquitous in normal and pathological activity of the brain. Nevertheless, we know little of how cell volume affects neuronal dynamics. We here performed the first detailed study of the effects of cell volume on neuronal dynamics. By incorporating cell swelling together with dynamic ion concentrations and oxygen supply into Hodgkin-Huxley type spiking dynamics, we demonstrate the spontaneous transition between epileptic seizure and spreading depression states as the cell swells and contracts in response to changes in osmotic pressure. Our use of volume as an order parameter further revealed a dynamical definition for the experimentally described physiological ceiling that separates seizure from spreading depression, as well as predicted a second ceiling that demarcates spreading depression from anoxic depolarization. Our model highlights the neuroprotective role of glial K buffering against seizures and spreading depression, and provides novel insights into anoxic depolarization and the relevant cell swelling during ischemia. We argue that the dynamics of seizures, spreading depression, and anoxic depolarization lie along a continuum of the repertoire of the neuron membrane that can be understood only when the dynamic ion concentrations, oxygen homeostasis,and cell swelling in response to osmotic pressure are taken into consideration. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of a unified framework for a wide range of neuronal behaviors that may be of substantial importance in the understanding of and potentially developing universal intervention strategies for these pathological states.

  11. The SCN9A channel and plasma membrane depolarization promote cellular senescence through Rb pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnier, Marine; Flaman, Jean-Michel; Chouabe, Christophe; Wiel, Clotilde; Gras, Baptiste; Griveau, Audrey; Blanc, Elena; Foy, Jean-Philippe; Mathot, Pauline; Saintigny, Pierre; Van Coppenolle, Fabien; Vindrieux, David; Martin, Nadine; Bernard, David

    2018-02-15

    Oncogenic signals lead to premature senescence in normal human cells causing a proliferation arrest and the elimination of these defective cells by immune cells. Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) prevents aberrant cell division and tumor initiation. In order to identify new regulators of OIS, we performed a loss-of-function genetic screen and identified that the loss of SCN9A allowed cells to escape from OIS. The expression of this sodium channel increased in senescent cells during OIS. This upregulation was mediated by NF-κB transcription factors, which are well-known regulators of senescence. Importantly, the induction of SCN9A by an oncogenic signal or by p53 activation led to plasma membrane depolarization, which in turn, was able to induce premature senescence. Computational and experimental analyses revealed that SCN9A and plasma membrane depolarization mediated the repression of mitotic genes through a calcium/Rb/E2F pathway to promote senescence. Taken together, our work delineates a new pathway, which involves the NF-κB transcription factor, SCN9A expression, plasma membrane depolarization, increased calcium, the Rb/E2F pathway and mitotic gene repression in the regulation of senescence. This work thus provides new insight into the involvement of ion channels and plasma membrane potential in the control of senescence. © 2018 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Large plasma-membrane depolarization precedes rapid blue-light-induced growth inhibition in cucumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Blue-light (BL)-induced suppression of elongation of etiolated Cucumis sativus L. hypocotyls began after a 30-s lag time, which was halved by increasing the fluence rate from 10 to 100 micromoles m-2 s-1. Prior to the growth suppression, the plasma-membrane of the irradiated cells depolarized by as much as 100 mV, then returned within 2-3 min to near its initial value. The potential difference measured with surface electrodes changed with an identical time course but opposite polarity. The lag time for the change in surface potential showed an inverse dependence on fluence rate, similar to the lag for the growth inhibition. Green light and red light caused neither the electrical response nor the rapid inhibition of growth. The depolarization by BL did not propagate to nonirradiated regions and exhibited a refractory period of about 10 min following a BL pulse. Fluence-response relationships for the electrical and growth responses provide correlational evidence that the plasma-membrane depolarization reflects an event in the transduction chain of this light-growth response.

  13. Thermal Stress-Induced Depolarization Loss in Conventional and Panda-Shaped Photonic Crystal Fiber Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Seyedeh Laleh; Sabaeian, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    We report on the modeling of the depolarization loss in the conventional and panda-shaped photonic crystal fiber lasers (PCFLs) due to the self-heating of the fiber, which we call it thermal stress-induced depolarization loss (TSIDL). We first calculated the temperature distribution over the fiber cross sections and then calculated the thermal stresses/strains as a function of heat load per meter. Thermal stress-induced birefringence (TSIB), which is defined as | n x - n y |, in the core and cladding regions was calculated. Finally, TSIDL was calculated for the conventional and panda-shaped PCFLs as a function of fiber length and, respectively, saturated values of 22 and 25 % were obtained which were independent of heat load per meter. For panda-shaped PCFLs, prior to being saturated, an oscillating and damping behavior against the fiber length was seen where in some lengths reached 35 %. The results are close to an experimental value of 30 % reported for a pulsed PCFL (Limpert et al., Opt Express 12:1313-1319, 2004) where the authors reported a degree of polarization of 70 % (i.e., a depolarization of 30 %). The most important result of this work is a saturation behavior of TSIDL at long-enough lengths of the fiber laser which is independent of heat load per meter. To our knowledge, this the first report of TSIBL for PCFLs.

  14. Membrane depolarization regulates intracellular RANKL transport in non-excitable osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notomi, Takuya; Kuno, Miyuki; Hiyama, Akiko; Ezura, Yoichi; Honma, Masashi; Ishizuka, Toru; Ohura, Kiyoshi; Yawo, Hiromu; Noda, Masaki

    2015-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3) are important factors in Ca(2+) homeostasis, and promote osteoclastogenesis by modulating receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) mRNA expression. However, their contribution to RANKL intracellular transport (RANKLiT), including the trigger for RANKL lysosomal vesicle (RANKL-lv) fusion to the cell membrane, is unclear. In neurons, depolarization of membrane potential increases the intracellular Ca(2+) level ([Ca(2+)]i) and promotes neurotransmitter release via fusion of the synaptic vesicles to the cell membrane. To determine whether membrane depolarization also regulates cellular processes such as RANKLiT in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts (OBs), we generated a light-sensitive OB cell line and developed a system for altering their membrane potential via delivery of a blue light stimulus. In the membrane fraction of RANKL-overexpressing OBs, PTH and VD3 increased the membrane-bound RANKL (mbRANKL) level at 10 min after application without affecting the mRNA expression level, and depolarized the cell membrane while transiently increasing [Ca(2+)]i. In our novel OB line stably expressing the channelrhodopsin-wide receiver, blue light-induced depolarization increased the mbRANKL level, which was reversed by treatment of blockers for L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum. In co-cultures of osteoclast precursor-like RAW264.7 cells and light-sensitive OBs overexpressing RANKL, light stimulation induced an increase in tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity and promoted osteoclast differentiation. These results indicate that depolarization of the cell membrane is a trigger for RANKL-lv fusion to the membrane and that membrane potential contributes to the function of OBs. In addition, the non-genomic action of VD3-induced RANKL-lv fusion included the membrane-bound VD3 receptor (1,25D3-MARRS receptor). Elucidating the mechanism of RANKLiT regulation

  15. Involvement of protein synthesis in recovery from refractory period of electrical depolarization induced by osmotic stimulation in Chara corallina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimmen, Teruo

    2011-09-01

    Upon addition of sorbitol to the external medium of an internodal cell of Chara corallina, a transient depolarization is induced at its nodal end (Shimmen in Plant Cell Physiol 44:1215-1224, 2003). In the present study, refractory period was found to be very long, 2-4 h. Recovery from refractoriness was completely inhibited by inhibitors of eukaryote-type protein synthesis, cycloheximide or anisomysin, but not by inhibitors of prokaryote-type protein synthesis. This suggested that proteinous factor(s) responsible for generation of the depolarization is lost or inactivated upon depolarization and synthesized during the resting state. Low temperature, which is supposed to inhibit protein synthesis, also inhibited recovery from refractoriness. When unstimulated internodal cells were incubated in the medium containing an inhibitor of eukaryote-type protein synthesis, generation of the depolarization was almost completely inhibited. This result suggested that the factor is slowly turning over even in the absence of osmotic stimulation.

  16. Observations of the spectral dependence of linear particle depolarization ratio of aerosols using NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, S. P.; Hair, J. W.; Kahnert, M.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Berkoff, T. A.; Seaman, S. T.; Collins, J. E.; Fenn, M. A.; Rogers, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Linear particle depolarization ratio is presented for three case studies from the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar-2 HSRL-2). Particle depolarization ratio from lidar is an indicator of non-spherical particles and is sensitive to the fraction of non-spherical particles and their size. The HSRL-2 instrument measures depolarization at three wavelengths: 355, 532, and 1064 nm. The three measurement cases presented here include two cases of dust-dominated aerosol and one case of smoke aerosol. These cases have partial analogs in earlier HSRL-1 depolarization measurements at 532 and 1064 nm and in literature, but the availability of three wavelengths gives additional insight into different scenarios for non-spherical particles in the atmosphere. A case of transported Saharan dust has a spectral dependence with a peak of 0.30 at 532 nm with smaller particle depolarization ratios of 0.27 and 0.25 at 1064 and 355 nm, respectively. A case of aerosol containing locally generated wind-blown North American dust has a maximum of 0.38 at 1064 nm, decreasing to 0.37 and 0.24 at 532 and 355 nm, respectively. The cause of the maximum at 1064 nm is inferred to be very large particles that have not settled out of the dust layer. The smoke layer has the opposite spectral dependence, with the peak of 0.24 at 355 nm, decreasing to 0.09 and 0.02 at 532 and 1064 nm, respectively. The depolarization in the smoke case may be explained by the presence of coated soot aggregates. We note that in these specific case studies, the linear particle depolarization ratio for smoke and dust-dominated aerosol are more similar at 355 nm than at 532 nm, having possible implications for using the particle depolarization ratio at a single wavelength for aerosol typing.

  17. Raman and fluorescent scattering by molecules embedded in small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, H.W.; McNulty, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    We have formulated a model for fluorescent and Raman scattering by molecules embedded in or in the vicinity of small particles. The model takes into account the size, shape, refractive index, and morphology of the host particles. Analytic and numerical results have been obtained for spherical (one and more layers, including magnetic dipole transitions) cylindrical and spheroidal particles. Particular attention has been given to the spherical case with fluorescent/Raman scatterers uniformly distributed in the particles radiating both coherently and incohorently. Depolarization effects have been studied with suitable averaging process, and good agreement with experiment has been obtained. Analytic and numerical results have been obtained for the elastic scattering of evanescent waves; these results are useful for the study of fluorescent under excitation by evanescent waves

  18. Depolarization-stimulated 42K+ efflux in rat aorta is calcium- and cellular volume-dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magliola, L.; Jones, A.W.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors controlling membrane permeability to potassium of smooth muscle cells from rat aorta stimulated by depolarization. The increase 42 K+ efflux (change in the rate constant) induced by depolarization (application of high concentrations of potassium chloride) was inhibited significantly by the calcium antagonists diltiazem and nisoldipine. Parallel inhibitory effects on contraction were observed. Diltiazem also inhibited potassium-stimulated 36 Cl- efflux. The addition of 25-150 mM KCl to normal physiologic solution stimulated 42 K+ efflux in a concentration-dependent manner. Diltiazem suppressed potassium-stimulated 42 K+ efflux approximately 90% at 25 mM KCl and approximately 40% at 150 mM KCl. The ability of nisoldipine to inhibit 42 K+ efflux also diminished as the potassium chloride concentration was elevated. The component of efflux that was resistant to calcium antagonists probably resulted from a decrease in the electrochemical gradient for potassium. Cellular water did not change during potassium addition. Substitution of 80 and 150 mM KCl for sodium chloride produced cellular swelling and enhanced potassium-stimulated 42 K+ efflux compared with potassium chloride addition. The addition of sucrose to prevent cellular swelling reduced efflux response to potassium substitution toward that of potassium addition. A hypoosmolar physiologic solution produced an increase in the 42 K+ efflux and a contracture that were both prevented by the addition of sucrose. We concluded that the depolarization-mediated 42 K+ efflux has three components: one is calcium dependent; a second is dependent on cellular volume; and a third is resistant to inhibition by calcium antagonists

  19. Characterizing the conductance underlying depolarization-induced slow current in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Shin; Kang, Eunchai; Makino, Yuichi; Park, Sungjin; Shin, Jung Hoon; Song, Hongjun; Launay, Pierre; Linden, David J

    2013-02-01

    Brief strong depolarization of cerebellar Purkinje cells produces a slow inward cation current [depolarization-induced slow current (DISC)]. Previous work has shown that DISC is triggered by voltage-sensitive Ca influx in the Purkinje cell and is attenuated by blockers of vesicular loading and fusion. Here, we have sought to characterize the ion channel(s) underlying the DISC conductance. While the brief depolarizing steps that triggered DISC were associated with a large Ca transient, the onset of DISC current corresponded only with the Ca transient decay phase. Furthermore, substitution of external Na with the impermeant cation N-methyl-d-glucamine produced a complete and reversible block of DISC, suggesting that the DISC conductance was not Ca permeant. Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, members 4 (TRPM4) and 5 (TRPM5) are nonselective cation channels that are opened by Ca transients but do not flux Ca. They are expressed in Purkinje cells of the posterior cerebellum, where DISC is large, and, in these cells, DISC is strongly attenuated by nonselective blockers of TRPM4/5. However, measurement of DISC currents in Purkinje cells derived from TRPM4 null, TRPM5 null, and double null mice as well as wild-type mice with TRPM4 short hairpin RNA knockdown showed a partial attenuation with 35-46% of current remaining. Thus, while the DISC conductance is Ca triggered, Na permeant, and Ca impermeant, suggesting a role for TRPM4 and TRPM5, these ion channels are not absolutely required for DISC.

  20. Axonal sodium channel distribution shapes the depolarized action potential threshold of dentate granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Geraldine J; Dowling, Margaret J; Eisenman, Lawrence N; Mennerick, Steven

    2010-04-01

    Intrinsic excitability is a key feature dictating neuronal response to synaptic input. Here we investigate the recent observation that dentate granule neurons exhibit a more depolarized voltage threshold for action potential initiation than CA3 pyramidal neurons. We find no evidence that tonic GABA currents, leak or voltage-gated potassium conductances, or the expression of sodium channel isoform differences can explain this depolarized threshold. Axonal initial segment voltage-gated sodium channels, which are dominated by the Na(V)1.6 isoform in both cell types, distribute more proximally and exhibit lower overall density in granule neurons than in CA3 neurons. To test possible contributions of sodium channel distributions to voltage threshold and to test whether morphological differences participate, we performed simulations of dentate granule neurons and of CA3 pyramidal neurons. These simulations revealed that cell morphology and sodium channel distribution combine to yield the characteristic granule neuron action potential upswing and voltage threshold. Proximal axon sodium channel distribution strongly contributes to the higher voltage threshold of dentate granule neurons for two reasons. First, action potential initiation closer to the somatodendritic current sink causes the threshold of the initiating axon compartment to rise. Second, the proximity of the action potential initiation site to the recording site causes somatic recordings to more faithfully reflect the depolarized threshold of the axon than in cells like CA3 neurons, with distally initiating action potentials. Our results suggest that the proximal location of axon sodium channels in dentate granule neurons contributes to the intrinsic excitability differences between DG and CA3 neurons and may participate in the low-pass filtering function of dentate granule neurons. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF SINGLE CELL SO2 DEPOLARIZED ELECTROLYZER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J; Timothy Steeper, T

    2006-09-15

    This document reports work performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that further develops the use of a proton exchange membrane or PEM-type electrochemical cell to produce hydrogen via SO{sub 2}-depolarized water electrolysis. This work was begun at SRNL in 2005. This research is valuable in achieving the ultimate goal of an economical hydrogen production process based on the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Cycle. The HyS Process is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by water-splitting. Like all other sulfur-based cycles, HyS utilizes the high temperature thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the acid decomposition portion of the cycle. The focus of this work was to conduct single cell electrolyzer tests in order to prove the concept of SO{sub 2}-depolarization and to determine how the results can be used to evaluate the performance of key components of the HyS Process. A test facility for conducting SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) testing was designed, constructed and commissioned. The maximum cell current is 50 amperes, which is equivalent to a hydrogen production rate of approximately 20 liters per hour. Feed to the anode of the electrolyzer is sulfuric acid solutions containing dissolved sulfur dioxide. The partial pressure of sulfur dioxide may be varied in the range of 1 to 6 atm (15 to 90 psia). Temperatures may be controlled in the range from ambient to 80 C. Hydrogen generated at the cathode of the cell is collected for the purpose of flow measurement and composition analysis. The test facility proved to be easy to

  2. Beam Energy Measurement by Resonant Depolarization Method at VEPP-4M

    CERN Document Server

    Blinov, V E; Kaminskiy, V V; Kudryavtsev, V N; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Shekhtman, L I

    2017-01-01

    Experiments on high precision mass measurement of particles require precise beam energy calibration. The most accurate method of beam energy measurement is the resonant depolarization technique. This article describes the beam energy measurement at the VEPP-4M storage ring using this method together with a Touschek polarimeter. The accuracy achieved is about 10−6. More than thousand energy calibrations were used in the KEDR detector for the precise experiments on the measurement of J/ψ, ψ(2S), ψ(3770), D+, D0 meson and τ lepton masses.

  3. Depolarization in the elastic scattering of 65 MeV polarized protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, M.; Sakaguchi, S.; Imai, K.; Noro, T.; Ohtani, F.

    1980-01-01

    A test measurement has been made of depolarization parameter for proton elastic scattering from 28 Si and 31 P. The experiment was performed using a 65 MeV polarized-proton beam from the RCNP cyclotron and silicon proton polarimeters. The over-all energy resolution estimated from the measured spectra was about 280 keV fwhm. The effective analyzing power of about 0.68 and the detector efficiency of 7 x 10 -6 were obtained for the present silicon polarimeter. Preliminary results were obtained with large errors due to the poor counting statistics. (author)

  4. Depolarization corrections to the coercive field in thin-film ferroelectrics

    CERN Document Server

    Dawber, M; Littlewood, P B; Scott, J F

    2003-01-01

    Empirically, the coercive field needed to reverse the polarization in a ferroelectric increases with decreasing film thickness. For ferroelectric films of 100 mu m to 100 nm in thickness the coercive field has been successfully described by a semi-empirical scaling law. Accounting for depolarization corrections, we show that this scaling behaviour is consistent with field measurements of ultrathin ferroelectric capacitors down to one nanometre in film thickness. Our results also indicate that the minimum film thickness, determined by a polarization instability, can be tuned by the choice of electrodes, and recommendations for next-generation ferroelectric devices are discussed. (letter to the editor)

  5. Polarization-independent optical circulator for high accuracy Faraday depolarization lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Tatsuo; Noguchi, Kazuo; Fukuchi, Tetsuo

    2012-03-01

    A high precision, polarization-independent optical circulator was developed for high accuracy Faraday depolarization lidar. Glan laser prisms and other novel optics were utilized in the circulator optics, resulting in a high extinction ratio of polarization of >30 dB. High accuracy is needed to detect a small rotation angle in the polarization plane of the propagating beam. It is generated by the Faraday effect due to the lightning discharge. The developed circulator delivered high performance of insertion loss and isolation as laser transmitter and echo receiver in the inline lidar optics. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  6. The use of thermally stimulated depolarization currents to study grain growth in ceramic thorium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muccillo, R.; Campos, L.L.

    1979-01-01

    Depolarization Current Spectra resulting from the destruction of the thermoelectret state in polycrystalline ThO 2 samples have been detected in the temperature range 100K-350K. The induced polarization is found to be due to migration of charge carriers over microscopic distances in the bulk of the specimens with trapping at grain boundaries. Moreover the density of charge carriers released from trapping sites, upon heating the cooled previously dc biased specimen decreases for increasing sintering temperature, suggesting the use of the technique to the study of grain growth in the bulk of ceramic oxides. (Author) [pt

  7. Cardiac Body Surface Potentials in Rats with Experimental Pulmonary Hypertension during Ventricular Depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslonova, O V; Smirnova, S L; Roshchevskaya, I M

    2016-11-01

    The spatial and the amplitude-temporal parameters of cardiac body surface potentials were examined in female Wistar rats with experimental pulmonary hypertension during ventricular depolarization. The cardiac body surface potentials have been led from 64 subcutaneous electrodes evenly distributed across the chest surface prior to and 4 weeks after subcutaneous injection of a single dose of monocrotaline (60 mg/kg). Right ventricular hypertrophy and electrophysiological remodeling of the heart developed in rats with experimental pulmonary hypertension in 4 weeks after monocrotaline injection; these changes led to a significant increase in amplitude and temporal characteristics of the cardioelectric field on the body surface in comparison with the initial state.

  8. Accuracy of depolarization and delay spread predictions using advanced ray-based modeling in indoor scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article investigates the prediction accuracy of an advanced deterministic propagation model in terms of channel depolarization and frequency selectivity for indoor wireless propagation. In addition to specular reflection and diffraction, the developed ray tracing tool considers penetration through dielectric blocks and/or diffuse scattering mechanisms. The sensitivity and prediction accuracy analysis is based on two measurement campaigns carried out in a warehouse and an office building. It is shown that the implementation of diffuse scattering into RT significantly increases the accuracy of the cross-polar discrimination prediction, whereas the delay-spread prediction is only marginally improved.

  9. Measurement of cell wall depolarization of polarized hydrogen gas targets in a weak magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.S.; Haeberli, W.

    1994-01-01

    Polarized gas targets using windowless storage cells are being developed for use as internal targets in medium and high energy particle storage rings. Tests were conducted to evaluate wall depolarization for different cell wall materials. Measurements of the target polarization were made on polarized vector H 0 gas targets in a weak magnetic field. Fifteen materials were tested in geometries corresponding to different average number of wall collisions, N 0 , from 40 to 380 collisions, for wall temperatures, T, from 20 K to 300 K. A method was developed to measure the polarization of a vector H 0 target in a 0.5 mT field: a beam of 50 keV D + picks up electrons from the target gas and the vector D 0 acquires a tensor polarization, p zz , which is measured by means of the 3 H( vector d, n) 4 He reaction. A simple model for depolarization at surfaces is proposed. Comparison to the data shows fair agreement, but the model is unrealistic in that it does not include the effects of the recombination of atoms on the surface to form molecules. ((orig.))

  10. Using depolarization to quantify ice nucleating particle concentrations: a new method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zenker

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new method to determine ice nucleating particle (INP concentrations observed by the Texas A&M University continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC under a wide range of operating conditions. In this study, we evaluate differences in particle optical properties detected by the Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer with POLarization (CASPOL to differentiate between ice crystals, droplets, and aerosols. The depolarization signal from the CASPOL instrument is used to determine the occurrence of water droplet breakthrough (WDBT conditions in the CFDC. The standard procedure for determining INP concentration is to count all particles that have grown beyond a nominal size cutoff as ice crystals. During WDBT this procedure overestimates INP concentration, because large droplets are miscounted as ice crystals. Here we design a new analysis method based on depolarization ratio that can extend the range of operating conditions of the CFDC. The method agrees reasonably well with the traditional method under non-WDBT conditions with a mean percent error of ±32.1 %. Additionally, a comparison with the Colorado State University CFDC shows that the new analysis method can be used reliably during WDBT conditions.

  11. Dielectric relaxation of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol around the glass transition by thermally stimulated depolarization currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrese-Igor, S; Alegría, A; Colmenero, J

    2015-06-07

    We explore new routes for characterizing the Debye-like and α relaxation in 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2E1H) monoalcohol by using low frequency dielectric techniques including thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) techniques and isothermal depolarization current methods. In this way, we have improved the resolution of the overlapped processes making it possible the analysis of the data in terms of a mode composition as expected for a chain-like response. Furthermore the explored ultralow frequencies enabled to study dynamics at relatively low temperatures close to the glass transition (Tg). Results show, on the one hand, that Debye-like and α relaxation timescales dramatically approach to each other upon decreasing temperature to Tg. On the other hand, the analysis of partial polarization TSDC data confirms the single exponential character of the Debye-like relaxation in 2E1H and rules out the presence of Rouse type modes in the scenario of a chain-like response. Finally, on crossing the glass transition, the Debye-like relaxation shows non-equilibrium effects which are further emphasized by aging treatment and would presumably emerge as a result of the arrest of the structural relaxation below Tg.

  12. LAP-ND: a new instrument for vector polarization analysis and neutron depolarization measurements at FRJ-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioffe, Alexander; Bussmann, Klaus; Dohmen, Ludwig; Axelrod, Leonid; Gordeev, Gennadi; Brueckel, Thomas

    2004-07-15

    The method of vector analysis of the neutron polarization allows for the determination of both the magnitude and the direction of the magnetization vector in the sample. A directional distribution of the magnetization in a sample results in a spread of the direction of the polarization vector in space and thus in the depolarization of the incident beam. A new neutron depolarization set up is installed at the research reactor FRJ-2 of the Forschungszentrum Juelich. The main feature of the set up is the use of rather long wavelength, {lambda}=(4-6.5) A, neutrons thus allowing for a significant increase in the sensitivity of depolarization measurements. The set up uses a non-cryogenic zero-field sample chamber with the residual magnetic field of about 1 mG. It will be used for the determination of the sample magnetization at mesoscopic and macroscopic levels and for the study of magnetic phase transitions, magnetic nanostructures, magnetic glasses, etc.

  13. Fluorescence detection: SPIE volume 743

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains proceedings arranged into four sessions. They are: Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques; Fluorescence in analysis and materials characterization; Fluorescence in medicine and biochemistry; and Fluorescence in criminalistics

  14. Fluorescence detection: SPIE volume 743

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains proceedings arranged into four sessions. They are: Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques; Fluorescence in analysis and materials characterization; Fluorescence in medicine and biochemistry; and Fluorescence in criminalistics.

  15. Measurement of the broadening and depolarization of a Gaussian beam to transmit in fog water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, G.; Reynoso, E; Davila, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a controlled experimental environment in the laboratory, a waterproof camera where it will introduce artificial fog and become a beam of linearly polarized Gaussian laser light, creating sprawl, broadening and depolarization is studied with a system capable of measuring such phenomena. Most studies on dispersion have focused on the lobes of backscattering, however the correct conditions with the incident light beam a substantial fraction of light is scattered in the forward direction forming a widened light lobe. With this light lobe formed could be studied with extreme precision many factors such as the existence of single or multiple scattering and the amount by which this is carried out. This is of great importance in the estimation of lidar returns because these foundations can learn important information such as extinction and backscatter coefficients, particulate pollutants in the atmosphere and thus understand the operation model of nature. (Author)

  16. Thermally induced depolarization in terbium gallium garnet ceramics rod with natural convection cooling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slezák, Ondřej; Yasuhara, R.; Lucianetti, Antonio; Vojna, David; Mocek, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 6 (2015), s. 1-8, č. článku 065610. ISSN 2040-8978 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/01.0027; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0143; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant - others:HILASE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0027; OP VK 6(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0143; OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : stress-induced birefringence * thermal depolarization * high-power lasers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.847, year: 2015

  17. Whole-exome sequencing and homozygosity analysis implicate depolarization-regulated neuronal genes in autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria H Chahrour

    Full Text Available Although autism has a clear genetic component, the high genetic heterogeneity of the disorder has been a challenge for the identification of causative genes. We used homozygosity analysis to identify probands from nonconsanguineous families that showed evidence of distant shared ancestry, suggesting potentially recessive mutations. Whole-exome sequencing of 16 probands revealed validated homozygous, potentially pathogenic recessive mutations that segregated perfectly with disease in 4/16 families. The candidate genes (UBE3B, CLTCL1, NCKAP5L, ZNF18 encode proteins involved in proteolysis, GTPase-mediated signaling, cytoskeletal organization, and other pathways. Furthermore, neuronal depolarization regulated the transcription of these genes, suggesting potential activity-dependent roles in neurons. We present a multidimensional strategy for filtering whole-exome sequence data to find candidate recessive mutations in autism, which may have broader applicability to other complex, heterogeneous disorders.

  18. Hydrogen depolarized carbon dioxide concentrator performance improvements and cell pair structural tests. [for manned space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, J. D.; Aylward, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The investigations and testing associated with the CO2 removal efficiency and voltage degradation of a hydrogen depolarized carbon oxide concentrator are reported. Also discussed is the vibration testing of a water vapor electrolysis cell pair. Performance testing of various HDC cell pairs with Cs2CO3 electrolyte provided sufficient parametric and endurance data to size a six man space station prototype CO2 removal system as having 36 HDC cell pairs, and to verify a life capability exceeding six moths. Testing also demonstrated that tetramethylammonium carbonate is an acceptable HDC electrolyte for operating over the relative humidity range of 30 to 90 percent and over a temperature range of 50 to 80 F.

  19. Study of depolarization of deuteron and proton beams in the Nuclotron ring

    CERN Document Server

    Golubeva, N Y; Kondratenko, A M; Kondratenko, A M; Mikhajlov, V A; Strokovsky, E A

    2002-01-01

    The scheme for acceleration of polarized deuterons at the Nuclotron accelerator facility includes a cryogenic polarized deuteron source 'Polaris', a 5 MeV/nucl. linac, a superconducting heavy ion synchrotron of a 6 GeV/nucl. energy with 10 s spill slow extraction, thin internal targets and wide net of external beam lines. This scheme also allows one to generate high energy polarized proton and neutron beams with well determined characteristics. There are two principal problems of polarized particle acceleration: to keep spin orientation during beam acceleration and to produce the high ion intensity sufficient for data taking in physics experiments. The first problem is discussed in this paper. The reasons of depolarization effects in the mentioned parts of the Nuclotron have been analysed and four methods of the polarization conserving have been suggested. They are the spin resonance strength compensation increasing of the resonance strength, the betatron tune jump and the spin tune jump. Among their number, ...

  20. Adiabatic Siberian snake turn-on and acceleration through depolarizing resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koulsha, A.V.; Anferov, V.A.; Baiod, R.

    1993-01-01

    The authors plan to install in the IUCF Cooler Ring a rampable partial (30%) Siberian snake to test if the spin polarization is preserved during adiabatic turn-on. They also plan to use this ramped snake to accelerate polarized protons to 370 MeV while passing through two depolarizing resonances. The Siberian snake will consist of two small rampable warm solenoids placed symmetrically on either side of the exciting cold 2 T·m solenoid which would run dc at about 0.5 T·m. Ramping each warm magnet from about -0.25T·m to + 0.25 T·m. Recent experiments showed that turning on the snake in 100 msec at 370 MeV causes no serious beam loss

  1. Erastin-Like Anti-Warburg Agents Prevent Mitochondrial Depolarization Induced by Free Tubulin and Decrease Lactate Formation in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHart, David N; Lemasters, John J; Maldonado, Eduardo N

    2018-01-01

    In Warburg metabolism, suppression of mitochondrial metabolism contributes to a low cytosolic ATP/ADP ratio favoring enhanced aerobic glycolysis. Flux of metabolites across the mitochondrial outer membrane occurs through voltage-dependent anion channels (VDAC). In cancer cells, free dimeric tubulin induces VDAC closure and dynamically regulates mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ). Erastin, a small molecule that binds to VDAC, antagonizes the inhibitory effect of tubulin on VDAC and hyperpolarizes mitochondria in intact cells. Here, our aim was to identify novel compounds from the ChemBridge DIVERSet library that block the inhibitory effect of tubulin on ΔΨ using cell-based screening. HCC4006 cells were treated with nocodazole (NCZ) to increase free tubulin and decrease ΔΨ in the presence or absence of library compounds. Tetramethylrhodamine methylester (TMRM) fluorescence was assessed by high-content imaging to determine changes in ΔΨ. Compounds were considered positive if ΔΨ increased in the presence of NCZ. Using confocal microscopy, we identified and validated six lead molecules that antagonized the depolarizing effect of NCZ. Lead compounds and erastin did not promote microtubule stabilization, so changes in ΔΨ were independent of tubulin dynamics. The most potent lead compound also decreased lactate formation. These novel small molecules represent a potential new class of anti-Warburg drugs.

  2. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields depolarize transmembrane potential via voltage-gated K+, Ca2+ and TRPM8 channels in U87 glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Ryan C; Bardet, Sylvia M; Carr, Lynn; Romanenko, Sergii; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rodney P

    2017-10-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) have a variety of applications in the biomedical and biotechnology industries. Cancer treatment has been at the forefront of investigations thus far as nsPEFs permeabilize cellular and intracellular membranes leading to apoptosis and necrosis. nsPEFs may also influence ion channel gating and have the potential to modulate cell physiology without poration of the membrane. This phenomenon was explored using live cell imaging and a sensitive fluorescent probe of transmembrane voltage in the human glioblastoma cell line, U87 MG, known to express a number of voltage-gated ion channels. The specific ion channels involved in the nsPEF response were screened using a membrane potential imaging approach and a combination of pharmacological antagonists and ion substitutions. It was found that a single 10ns pulsed electric field of 34kV/cm depolarizes the transmembrane potential of cells by acting on specific voltage-sensitive ion channels; namely the voltage and Ca2 + gated BK potassium channel, L- and T-type calcium channels, and the TRPM8 transient receptor potential channel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Myocardial energy metabolism and ultrastructure with polarizing and depolarizing cardioplegia in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aass, Terje; Stangeland, Lodve; Chambers, David J; Hallström, Seth; Rossmann, Christine; Podesser, Bruno K; Urban, Malte; Nesheim, Knut; Haaverstad, Rune; Matre, Knut; Grong, Ketil

    2017-07-01

    This study investigated whether the novel St. Thomas' Hospital polarizing cardioplegic solution (STH-POL) with esmolol/adenosine/magnesium offers improved myocardial protection by reducing demands for high-energy phosphates during cardiac arrest compared to the depolarizing St. Thomas' Hospital cardioplegic solution No 2 (STH-2). Twenty anaesthetised pigs on tepid cardiopulmonary bypass were randomized to cardiac arrest for 60 min with antegrade freshly mixed, repeated, cold, oxygenated STH-POL or STH-2 blood cardioplegia every 20 min. Haemodynamic variables were continuously recorded. Left ventricular biopsies, snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen or fixed in glutaraldehyde, were obtained at Baseline, 58 min after cross-clamp and 20 and 180 min after weaning from bypass. Adenine nucleotides were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography, myocardial ultrastructure with morphometry. With STH-POL myocardial creatine phosphate was increased compared to STH-2 at 58 min of cross-clamp [59.9 ± 6.4 (SEM) vs 44.5 ± 7.4 nmol/mg protein; P  STH-POL (35.4 ± 1.1 vs 32.4 ± 1.2 nmol/mg protein; P  STH-POL; 4.8 ± 0.2 compared to 4.0 ± 0.2 l/min/m 2 ( P  =   0.011) for STH-2 at 180 min. Polarizing STH-POL cardioplegia improved energy status compared to standard STH-2 depolarizing blood cardioplegia during cardioplegic arrest and early after reperfusion. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery.

  4. Rat hypocretin/orexin neurons are maintained in a depolarized state by TRPC channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Cvetkovic-Lopes

    Full Text Available In a previous study we proposed that the depolarized state of the wake-promoting hypocretin/orexin (hcrt/orx neurons was independent of synaptic inputs as it persisted in tetrodotoxin and low calcium/high magnesium solutions. Here we show first that these cells are hyperpolarized when external sodium is lowered, suggesting that non-selective cation channels (NSCCs could be involved. As canonical transient receptor channels (TRPCs are known to form NSCCs, we looked for TRPCs subunits using single-cell RT-PCR and found that TRPC6 mRNA was detectable in a small minority, TRPC1, TRPC3 and TRPC7 in a majority and TRPC4 and 5 in the vast majority (∼90% of hcrt/orx neurons. Using intracellular applications of TRPC antibodies against subunits known to form NSCCs, we then found that only TRPC5 antibodies elicited an outward current, together with hyperpolarization and inhibition of the cells. These effects were blocked by co-application of a TRPC5 antigen peptide. Voltage-clamp ramps in the presence or absence of TRPC5 antibodies indicated the presence of a current with a reversal potential close to -15 mV. Application of the non-selective TRPC channel blocker, flufenamic acid, had a similar effect, which could be occluded in cells pre-loaded with TRPC5 antibodies. Finally, using the same TRPC5 antibodies we found that most hcrt/orx cells show immunostaining for the TRPC5 subunit. These results suggest that hcrt/orx neurons are endowed with a constitutively active non-selective cation current which depends on TRPC channels containing the TRPC5 subunit and which is responsible for the depolarized and active state of these cells.

  5. Depolarization of the electron spin in storage rings by nonlinear spin-orbit coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kewisch, J.

    1985-10-01

    Electrons and positrons which circulate in the storage ring are polarized at the emission of synchrotron radiation by the so called Sokolov-Ternov effect. This polarization is on the one hand of large interest for the study of the weak interaction, on the other hand it can be used for the accurate measurement of the beam energy and by this of the mass of elementary particles. The transverse and longitudinal particle vibrations simultaneously excited by the synchrotron radiation however can effect that this polarization is destroyed. This effect is called spin-orbit coupling. For the calculation of the spin-orbit coupling the computer program SITROS was written. This program is a tracking program: The motion of some sample particles and their spin vectors are calculated for some thousand circulations. From this the mean depolarization and by extrapolation the degree of polarization of the equilibrium state is determined. Contrarily to the known program SLIM which is based on perturbational calculations in SITROS the nonlinear forces in the storage ring can be regarded. By this the calculation of depolarizing higher order resonances is made possible. In this thesis the equations of motion for the orbital and spin motion of the electrons are derived which form the base for the program SITROS. The functions of the program and the approximations necessary for the saving of calculational time are explained. The comparison of the SITROS results with the measurement results obtained at the PETRA storage ring shows that the SITROS program is a useful means for the planning and calculation of storage rings with polarized electron beams. (orig.) [de

  6. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy of Bicyclo[1.1.1]pentane/Tolane-Based Molecular Rods Included in Tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolloni, Marco; Kaleta, Jiří; Mašát, Milan; Dron, Paul I; Shen, Yongqiang; Zhao, Ke; Rogers, Charles T; Shoemaker, Richard K; Michl, Josef

    2015-04-23

    We examine the fluorescence anisotropy of rod-shaped guests held inside the channels of tris( o -phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP) host nanocrystals, characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and solid state NMR spectroscopy. We address two issues: (i) are light polarization measurements on an aqueous colloidal solution of TPP nanocrystals meaningful, or is depolarization by scattering excessive? (ii) Can measurements of the rotational mobility of the included guests be performed at low enough loading levels to suppress depolarization by intercrystallite energy transfer? We find that meaningful measurements are possible and demonstrate that the long axis of molecular rods included in TPP channels performs negligible vibrational motion.

  7. Calcium-dependent displacement of haloperidol-sensitive sigma receptor binding in rat hippocampal slices following tissue depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumaier, J F; Chavkin, C

    1989-10-23

    To evaluate the possible existence of an endogenous ligand for the haloperidol-sensitive sigma receptor, we developed an in vitro competition assay to measure endogenous ligand release. Depolarization of in vitro hippocampal slices by either veratridine or potassium reduced [3H]ditolylguanidine binding in a calcium-dependent and transient manner. None of the drugs or iron substitutions directly affected [3H]ditolylguanidine binding to rat brain membranes. Veratridine-induced depolarization also reduced the binding of [3H](+)3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine, another sigma radioligand, in a calcium-dependent manner. Radioligand displacement was not associated with alteration in sigma receptor dissociation kinetics or receptor degradation in the hippocampal slice. In contrast, KC1 depolarization had no effect on [3H]ditolyguanidine binding to sigma receptors in liver slices. The results suggest that a calcium-dependent, depolarization-induced reduction in sigma receptor binding may have been caused by the release of an endogenous sigma ligand in rat hippocampal tissue.

  8. Ca(2+)-activated anion channels and membrane depolarizations induced by blue light and cold in Arabidopsis seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. D.; Karlin-Neumann, G.; Davis, R. W.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The activation of an anion channel in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls by blue light (BL) is believed to be a signal-transducing event leading to growth inhibition. Here we report that the open probability of this particular anion channel depends on cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) within the concentration range of 1 to 10 microM, raising the possibility that BL activates the anion channel by increasing [Ca2+]cyt. Arabidopsis seedlings cytoplasmically expressing aequorin were generated to test this possibility. Aequorin luminescence did not increase during or after BL, providing evidence that Ca2+ does not play a second-messenger role in the activation of anion channels. However, cold shock simultaneously triggered a large increase in [Ca2+]cyt and a 110-mV transient depolarization of the plasma membrane. A blocker of the anion channel, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, blocked 61% of the cold-induced depolarization without affecting the increase in [Ca2+]cyt. These data led us to propose that cold shock opens Ca2+ channels at the plasma membrane, allowing an inward, depolarizing Ca2+ current. The resulting large increase in [Ca2+]cyt activates the anion channel, which further depolarizes the membrane. Although an increase in [Ca2+]cyt may activate anion channels in response to cold, it appears that BL does so via a Ca(2+)-independent pathway.

  9. Orexins depolarize rostral ventrolateral medulla neurons and increase arterial pressure and heart rate in rats mainly via orexin 2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shang-Cheng; Dai, Yu-Wen E; Lee, Yen-Hsien; Chiou, Lih-Chu; Hwang, Ling-Ling

    2010-08-01

    An injection of orexin A or B into the cisterna magna or the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), where bulbospinal vasomotor neurons are located, elevated arterial pressure (AP) and heart rate (HR). We examined how orexins affected RVLM neurons to regulate cardiovascular functions by using in vitro recordings of neuronal activity of the RVLM and in vivo measurement of cardiovascular functions in rats. Orexin A and B concentration-dependently depolarized RVLM neurons. At 100 nM, both peptides excited 42% of RVLM neurons. Tetrodotoxin failed to block orexin-induced depolarization. In the presence of N-(2-methyl-6-benzoxazolyl)-N'-1, 5-naphthyridin-4-yl urea (SB-334867), an orexin 1 receptor (OX(1)R) antagonist, orexin A depolarized 42% of RVLM neurons with a smaller, but not significantly different, amplitude (4.9 +/- 0.8 versus 7.2 +/- 1.1 mV). In the presence of (2S)-1- (3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-2(1H)-isoquinolinyl)-3,3-dimethyl-2-[(4-pyridinylmethyl)amino]-1-butanone hydrochloride (TCS OX2 29), an orexin 2 receptor (OX(2)R) antagonist, orexin A depolarized 25% of RVLM neurons with a significantly smaller amplitude (1.7 +/- 0.5 mV). Coapplication of both antagonists completely eliminated orexin A-induced depolarization. An OX(2)R agonist, [Ala(11),D-Leu(15)]-orexin B, concentration-dependently depolarized RVLM neurons. Regarding neuronal phenotypes, orexins depolarized 88% of adrenergic, 43% of nonadrenergic, and 36 to 41% of rhythmically firing RVLM neurons. Intracisternal TCS OX2 29 (3 and 10 nmol) suppressed intracisternal orexin A-induced increases of AP and HR, whereas intracisternal SB-334867 (3 and 10 nmol) had no effect on the orexin A-induced increase of HR but suppressed the orexin A-induced pressor response at 10 nmol. We concluded that orexins directly excite RVLM neurons, which include bulbospinal vasomotor neurons, and regulate cardiovascular function mainly via the OX(2)R, with a smaller contribution from the OX(1)R.

  10. Slow Bursting Neurons of Mouse Cortical Layer 6b Are Depolarized by Hypocretin/Orexin and Major Transmitters of Arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger Combremont, Anne-Laure; Bayer, Laurence; Dupré, Anouk; Mühlethaler, Michel; Serafin, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Neurons firing spontaneously in bursts in the absence of synaptic transmission have been previously recorded in different layers of cortical brain slices. It has been suggested that such neurons could contribute to the generation of alternating UP and DOWN states, a pattern of activity seen during slow-wave sleep. Here, we show that in layer 6b (L6b), known from our previous studies to contain neurons highly responsive to the wake-promoting transmitter hypocretin/orexin (hcrt/orx), there is a set of neurons, endowed with distinct intrinsic properties, which displayed a strong propensity to fire spontaneously in rhythmic bursts. In response to small depolarizing steps, they responded with a delayed firing of action potentials which, upon higher depolarizing steps, invariably inactivated and were followed by a depolarized plateau potential and a depolarizing afterpotential. These cells also displayed a strong hyperpolarization-activated rectification compatible with the presence of an I h current. Most L6b neurons with such properties were able to fire spontaneously in bursts. Their bursting activity was of intrinsic origin as it persisted not only in presence of blockers of ionotropic glutamatergic and GABAergic receptors but also in a condition of complete synaptic blockade. However, a small number of these neurons displayed a mix of intrinsic bursting and synaptically driven recurrent UP and DOWN states. Most of the bursting L6b neurons were depolarized and excited by hcrt/orx through a direct postsynaptic mechanism that led to tonic firing and eventually inactivation. Similarly, they were directly excited by noradrenaline, histamine, dopamine, and neurotensin. Finally, the intracellular injection of these cells with dye and their subsequent Neurolucida reconstruction indicated that they were spiny non-pyramidal neurons. These results lead us to suggest that the propensity for slow rhythmic bursting of this set of L6b neurons could be directly impeded by hcrt

  11. Manipulation of cellular light from green fluorescent protein by a femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hao; Li, Shiyang; Wang, Shaoyang; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2012-10-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most widely studied and exploited proteins in biochemistry and cell biology. It emits fluorescence following optical excitation, which is usually provided by a laser. Here, we report that fluorescence from enhanced GFP can be `turned off' by exposing cells to laser light. A short flash of femtosecond laser light is shown to deplete calcium in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells. Calcium-release-activated calcium channels are then activated by stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1). The rise in intracellular Ca2+ depolarizes mitochondria and increases the leakage of reactive oxygen species, which then permanently bleach the GFP. This controllable optical scheme for reactive oxygen species generation can also be used to modulate the photoconversion of GFP fluorescence from green to red emission and provide a mechanism for influencing cellular molecular dynamics.

  12. Nanoparticle metrology standards based on the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy of silica colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apperson, Kathleen; Karolin, Jan; Martin, Robert W.; Birch, David J. S.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate nanoparticle size measurement using time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay in relation to establishing a nanometrology standard. The rotational correlation time equivalent to the isotropic Brownian rotation of a fluorescent 6-methoxyquinolinium dye attached to amorphous silica nanoparticles was determined in three different LUDOXLUDOX is a registered trademark of DuPont Corporation. colloids from the complex fluorescence anisotropy decay observed. Once competing depolarization and nanoparticle aggregation had been taken into account, good agreement was found of 4.0 ± 0.4 nm, 6.4 ± 0.5 nm and 11.0 ± 1.6 nm corresponding to the manufacturer's reported particle radii of 3.5 nm, 6 nm and 11 nm, for LUDOX SM30, AM30 and AS40 respectively. We describe the measurement science required for acquisition and interpretation of fluorescence anisotropy decay data in order to determine nanoparticle size while highlighting the limitations and useful range of measurement.

  13. Nanoparticle metrology standards based on the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy of silica colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apperson, Kathleen; Karolin, Jan; Martin, Robert W; Birch, David J S

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate nanoparticle size measurement using time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay in relation to establishing a nanometrology standard. The rotational correlation time equivalent to the isotropic Brownian rotation of a fluorescent 6-methoxyquinolinium dye attached to amorphous silica nanoparticles was determined in three different LUDOX colloids from the complex fluorescence anisotropy decay observed. Once competing depolarization and nanoparticle aggregation had been taken into account, good agreement was found of 4.0 ± 0.4 nm, 6.4 ± 0.5 nm and 11.0 ± 1.6 nm corresponding to the manufacturer's reported particle radii of 3.5 nm, 6 nm and 11 nm, for LUDOX SM30, AM30 and AS40 respectively. We describe the measurement science required for acquisition and interpretation of fluorescence anisotropy decay data in order to determine nanoparticle size while highlighting the limitations and useful range of measurement

  14. Photofragment angular momentum polarization in the photolysis of symmetric top molecules: Production, detection, and rotational depolarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shternin, Peter S.; Suits, Arthur G.; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We describe the product polarization in the photolysis of symmetric top molecules. ► The polarization is written in terms of the anisotropy transforming coefficients. ► We studied the role of the angular momentum depolarization due to molecular rotation. ► We present a compact spherical tensor expression for the 2 + 1 REMPI absorption signal. - Abstract: We present the fully quantum mechanical distribution of the photofragment angular momentum polarization in the photolysis of an isotropic ensemble of symmetric top molecules. The distribution is written in terms of the recently established anisotropy transforming coefficients c k d q k K (P.S. Shternin, O.S. Vasyutinskii, Chem. Phys. 128 (2008) 194314) which contain all dynamical information on the photolysis dynamics and can be either determined from experiment, or calculated from theory. Explicit expressions for the coefficients c k d q k K for the case of photolysis of symmetric top molecules were obtained within the full quantum mechanical approach and then simplified using the quasiclassical approximation in the high-J limit. The role of the photofragment angular momentum depolarization due to molecular rotation was analyzed for three important particular cases: photolysis of diatomic molecules, photolysis of symmetric top molecules when the angular momentum polarization of atomic photofragments are detected, photolysis of symmetric top molecules when the angular momentum polarization of molecular photofragments are detected. The obtained rotation factors were compared with the results of previous studies. The paper also presents a compact spherical tensor expression for the 2 + 1 REMPI absorption signal which can be used for direct determination of the coefficients c k d q k K from experiment. A comparison was made between the anisotropy transforming coefficients c k d q k K and the polarization parameters A q K introduced very recently by (T.P. Rakitzis, A.J. Alexander, J. Chem. Phys

  15. Rapid procoagulant phosphatidylserine exposure relies on high cytosolic calcium rather than on mitochondrial depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachiche, Amal; Kerbiriou-Nabias, Danièle; Garcin, Isabelle; Letellier, Thierry; Dachary-Prigent, Jeanne

    2009-11-01

    Relationships between intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](cyt)) and apoptotic events, such as mitochondrial depolarization (DeltaPsim loss) and Bcl-2 and Bad phosphorylation, were analyzed in platelets and Jurkat cells in relation to rapid procoagulant phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure. Platelets were stimulated with A23187, thapsigargin (TG) and thrombin plus convulxin (Thr/Cvx), and Jurkat cells with ionomycin, in the presence or absence of cyclosporin A (CsA), a mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitor. DeltaPsim loss occurred when platelets were stimulated in Ca(2+) medium in conditions exposing PS, but also in EGTA medium. CsA inhibited PS exposure, [Ca(2+)](cyt) increase, and DeltaPsim loss in platelets stimulated with TG and Thr/Cvx, but had no inhibitory effect on A23187 stimulation. CsA reduced TG-induced Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum and, consequently, external Ca(2+) influx. In ionomycin-stimulated Jurkat cells, rapid PS exposure was evidenced but not DeltaPsim loss, and CsA did not inhibit the process. The status of phosphorylated Bad and Bcl-2 in both cell types remained unchanged on stimulation. Whether DeltaPsim loss occurs or not, PS exposure is triggered by a high [Ca(2+)](cyt) increase. Data further demonstrate that CsA prevents membrane scrambling by inhibiting the high [Ca(2+)](cyt) increase, independently of its effect on mitochondrial permeability transition pore.

  16. Study of the cathodic depolarization theory with hydrogen permeation and the bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, M. F. de; Duque, Z.; Rinco, O. T. de; Perez, O.; Araujo, I.

    2003-01-01

    A Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ssp. desulfuricans (SRB) was used to study the permeation of hydrogen, using a Devanatan and Stachurski cell and a palladium sheet. The aim was to evaluate cathodic depolarization as a Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria action mechanisms in Microbiologically Induced Corrosion. The permeation tests were run with and without cathodic polarization, using a sterile deaerated culture medium inoculated with 10% SRB concentrated at 10''8 cell/ml. the results indicate bacterial growth in the order of 10''9-10''10 cel/ml after 18 h both in the polarized and non-polarized, tests, indicating that SRB developed regardless of the surface polarized as a source of H''0, generating H 2 S as a product of the anaerobic respiration. It was also determined that, without cathodic polarization, the conditions are not enough to reduce the H* generated by the H 2 S dissociation (pd is not susceptible to corrosion at this condition). On the other hand, cathodic polarization increased the permeation current, which was associated with the maximum enzymatic activity phase of the bacteria. (Author) 8 refs

  17. Ketamine modulation of the haemodynamic response to spreading depolarization in the gyrencephalic swine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Porras, Renán; Santos, Edgar; Schöll, Michael; Kunzmann, Kevin; Stock, Christian; Silos, Humberto; Unterberg, Andreas W; Sakowitz, Oliver W

    2017-05-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD) generates significant alterations in cerebral haemodynamics, which can have detrimental consequences on brain function and integrity. Ketamine has shown an important capacity to modulate SD; however, its impact on SD haemodynamic response is incompletely understood. We investigated the effect of two therapeutic ketamine dosages, a low-dose of 2 mg/kg/h and a high-dose of 4 mg/kg/h, on the haemodynamic response to SD in the gyrencephalic swine brain. Cerebral blood volume, pial arterial diameter and cerebral blood flow were assessed through intrinsic optical signal imaging and laser-Doppler flowmetry. Our findings indicate that frequent SDs caused a persistent increase in the baseline pial arterial diameter, which can lead to a diminished capacity to further dilate. Ketamine infused at a low-dose reduced the hyperemic/vasodilative response to SD; however, it did not alter the subsequent oligemic/vasoconstrictive response. This low-dose did not prevent the baseline diameter increase and the diminished dilative capacity. Only infusion of ketamine at a high-dose suppressed SD and the coupled haemodynamic response. Therefore, the haemodynamic response to SD can be modulated by continuous infusion of ketamine. However, its use in pathological models needs to be explored to corroborate its possible clinical benefit.

  18. Pacemaker rate and depolarization block in nigral dopamine neurons: a somatic sodium channel balancing act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Kristal R.; Huertas, Marco A.; Horn, John P.; Canavier, Carmen C.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2012-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons are slow intrinsic pacemakers that undergo depolarization (DP) block upon moderate stimulation. Understanding DP block is important because it has been correlated with the clinical efficacy of chronic antipsychotic drug treatment. Here we describe how voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels regulate DP block and pacemaker activity in DA neurons of the substantia nigra using rat brain slices. The distribution, density and gating of NaV currents were manipulated by blocking native channels with tetrodotoxin and by creating virtual channels and anti-channels with dynamic clamp. Although action potentials initiate in the axon initial segment (AIS) and NaV channels are distributed in multiple dendrites, selective reduction of NaV channel activity in the soma was sufficient to decrease pacemaker frequency and increase susceptibility to DP block. Conversely, increasing somatic NaV current density raised pacemaker frequency and lowered susceptibility to DP block. Finally, when NaV currents were restricted to the soma, pacemaker activity occurred at abnormally high rates due to excessive local subthreshold NaV current. Together with computational simulations, these data show that both the slow pacemaker rate and the sensitivity to DP block that characterizes DA neurons result from the low density of somatic NaV channels. More generally, we conclude that the somatodendritic distribution of NaV channels is a major determinant of repetitive spiking frequency. PMID:23077037

  19. Low temperature dielectric relaxation of poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) by Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra Patidar, Manju; Jain, Deepti; Nath, R.; Ganesan, V.

    2016-10-01

    Poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) is a biodegradable and biocompatible polyester that can be produced by renewable resources, like corn. Being non-toxic to human body, PLLA is used in biomedical applications, like surgical sutures, bone fixation devices, or controlled drug delivery. Besides its application studies, very few experiments have been done to study its dielectric relaxation in the low temperature region. Keeping this in mind we have performed a low temperature thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) studies over the temperature range of 80K-400K to understand the relaxation phenomena of PLLA. We could observe a multi modal broad relaxation of small but significant intensity at low temperatures while a sharp and high intense peak around glass transition temperature, Tg∼ 333K, of PLLA has appeared. The fine structure of the low temperature TSDC peak may be attributed to the spherulites formation of crystallite regions inter twinned with the polymer as seen in AFM and appear to be produced due to an isothermal crystallization process. XRD analysis also confirms the semicrystalline nature of the PLLA film.

  20. Empirical intermolecular potential from depolarized interaction-induced light scattering spectra for tetrafluoromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, Mohamed Sayed Abdel

    2002-07-01

    Depolarized interaction-induced light scattering spectra of tetrafluoromethane in the frequency range 2-150 cm-1 at 294.5 K and 0.91 mol/l with the interaction pressure virial coefficient and viscosity have been used for deriving the empirical multiparameter Morse-Morse-Morse-Spline-van der Waals (M3SV), Lennard-Jones, Kihara, and exp-6 intermolecular potentials. The line shape at relatively low frequencies is determined largely by the effect of bound and free transitions. At intermediate frequencies it is sensitive to both the attractive part of the potential and the short-range part of the polarizability anisotropy. The high frequency wings are discussed in terms of the collision-induced rotational Raman effect and estimates for the dipole-quadrupole and dipole-octopole polarizabilities A and E, respectively, are obtained. Absolute zeroth and second moments have been measured and compared with theoretical calculations using these models of the intermolecular potentials. The results show that M3SV is the most accurate potential yet reported for this system.

  1. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  2. ACh-induced depolarization in inner ear artery is generated by activation of a TRP-like non-selective cation conductance and inactivation of a potassium conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ke-Tao; Guan, Bing-Cai; Yang, Yu-Qin; Zhao, Hui; Jiang, Zhi-Gen

    2008-05-01

    Adequate cochlear blood supply by the spiral modiolar artery (SMA) is critical for normal hearing. ACh may play a role in neuroregulation of the SMA but several key issues including its membrane action mechanisms remain poorly understood. Besides its well-known endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizing action, ACh can induce a depolarization in vascular cells. Using intracellular and whole-cell recording techniques on cells in guinea pig in vitro SMA, we studied the ionic mechanism underlying the ACh-depolarization and found that: (1) ACh induced a DAMP-sensitive depolarization when intermediate conductance KCa channels were blocked by charybdotoxin or nitrendipine. The ACh-depolarization was associated with a decrease in input resistance (R(input)) in high membrane potential (V(m)) ( approximately -40 mV) cells but with no change or an increase in R input in low Vm ( approximately -75 mV) cells. ACh-depolarization was attenuated by background membrane depolarization from approximately -70 mV in the majority of cells; (2) ACh-induced inward current in smooth muscle cells embedded in a SMA segment often showed a U-shaped I/V curve, the reversal potential of its two arms being near EK and 0 mV, respectively; (3) ACh-depolarization was reduced by low Na+, zero K+ or 20mM K+ bath solutions; (4) ACh-depolarization was inhibited by La3+ in all cells tested, by 4-AP and flufenamic acid in low Vm cells, but was not sensitive to Cd2+, Ni2+, nifedipine, niflumic acid, DIDS, IAA94, linopirdine or amiloride. We conclude that ACh-induced vascular depolarization was generated mainly by activation of a TRP-like non-selective cation channel and by inactivation of an inward rectifier K+ channel.

  3. Depolarization-induced release of [(3)H]D-aspartate from GABAergic neurons caused by reversal of glutamate transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Pickering, D S; Schousboe, A

    2000-01-01

    Cultured neocortical neurons, which predominantly consist of GABAergic neurons exhibit a pronounced stimulus-coupled GABA release. Since the cultures may contain a small population of glutamatergic neurons and the GABAergic neurons have a high content of glutamate it was of interest to examine...... if glutamate in addition to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) could be released from these cultures. The neurons were preloaded with [(3)H]D-aspartate and subsequently its release was followed during depolarization induced by a high potassium concentration or the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4......-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonists, AMPA and kainate. Depolarization of the neurons with 55 mM potassium increased the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate by more than 10-fold. When the non-specific calcium-channel blockers cobalt or lanthanum were included in the stimulation buffer with potassium...

  4. Rf Depolarizing Resonances In The Presence Of A Full Siberian Snake And Full Snake Spin-flipping

    CERN Document Server

    Blinov, B B

    2000-01-01

    Frequent polarization reversals, or spin-flips, of a stored polarized beam in high energy scattering asymmetry experiments may greatly reduce systematic errors of spin asymmetry measurements. A spin-flipping technique is being developed by using rf magnets running at a frequency close to the spin precession frequency, thereby creating spin-depolarizing resonances; the spin can then be flipped by ramping the rf magnet's frequency through the resonance. We studied, at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility Cooler Ring, properties of such rf depolarizing resonances in the presence of a nearly-full Siberian snake and their possible application for spin- flipping. By using an rf-solenoid magnet, we reached a 98.7 ± 1% efficiency of spin-flipping. However, an rf-dipole magnet is more practical at high energies; hence, studies of spin-flipping by an rf-dipole are underway at IUCF.

  5. Recovery of slow potentials in AC-coupled electrocorticography: application to spreading depolarizations in rat and human cerebral cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Watanabe, Tomas; Dreier, Jens P

    2009-01-01

    -band waveforms from AC-coupled recordings. We constructed digital filters that reproduced the phase and amplitude distortions introduced by specific AC-coupled amplifiers and, based on this characterization, derived digital inverse filters to remove these distortions from ECoG recordings. Performance....... The spreading SPCs of depolarization waves are observed in human cortex with AC-coupled electrocorticography (ECoG), although SPC morphology is distorted by the high-pass filter stage of the amplifiers. Here, we present a signal processing method to reverse these distortions and recover approximate full...... recovered full-band waveforms with morphologic characteristics typical of the negative DC shifts recorded in animals. Compared with those recorded in the rat cortex with the same analog and digital methods, the negative DC shifts of human depolarizations had significantly greater durations (1:47 vs. 0...

  6. Contribution of α-adrenoceptors to depolarization and contraction evoked by continuous asynchronous sympathetic nerve activity in rat tail artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, J A; McLachlan, E M; Rayner, S E

    1997-01-01

    The effects of continuous but asynchronous nerve activity induced by ciguatoxin (CTX-1) on the membrane potential and contraction of smooth muscle cells have been investigated in rat proximal tail arteries isolated in vitro. These effects have been compared with those produced by the continuous application of phenylephrine (PE).CTX-1 (0.4 nM) and PE (10 μM) produced a maintained depolarization of the arterial smooth muscle that was almost completely blocked by α-adrenoceptor blockade. In both cases, the depolarization was more sensitive to the selective α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, idazoxan (0.1 μM), than to the selective α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin (0.01 μM).In contrast, the maintained contraction of the tail artery induced by CTX-1 (0.2 nM) and PE (2 and 10 μM) was more sensitive to prazosin (0.01) μM, than to idazoxan (0.01 μM). In combination, these antagonists almost completely inhibited contraction to both agents.Application of the calcium channel antagonist, nifedipine (1 μM), had no effect on the depolarization induced by either CTX-1 or PE but maximally reduced the force of the maintained contraction to both agents by about 50%.We conclude that the constriction of the tail artery induced by CTX-1, which mimics the natural discharge of postganglionic perivascular axons, is due almost entirely to α-adrenoceptor activation. The results indicate that neuronally released noradrenaline activates more than one α-adrenoceptor subtype. The depolarization is dependent primarily on α2-adrenoceptor activation whereas the contraction is dependent primarily on α1-adrenoceptor activation. The links between α-adrenoceptor activation and the voltage-dependent and voltage-independent mechanisms that deliver Ca2+ to the contractile apparatus appear to be complex. PMID:9113373

  7. Intercellular K⁺ accumulation depolarizes Type I vestibular hair cells and their associated afferent nerve calyx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contini, D; Zampini, V; Tavazzani, E; Magistretti, J; Russo, G; Prigioni, I; Masetto, S

    2012-12-27

    Mammalian vestibular organs contain two types of sensory receptors, named Type I and Type II hair cells. While Type II hair cells are contacted by several small afferent nerve terminals, the basolateral surface of Type I hair cells is almost entirely enveloped by a single large afferent nerve terminal, called calyx. Moreover Type I, but not Type II hair cells, express a low-voltage-activated outward K(+) current, I(K,L), which is responsible for their much lower input resistance (Rm) at rest as compared to Type II hair cells. The functional meaning of I(K,L) and associated calyx is still enigmatic. By combining the patch-clamp whole-cell technique with the mouse whole crista preparation, we have recorded the current- and voltage responses of in situ hair cells. Outward K(+) current activation resulted in K(+) accumulation around Type I hair cells, since it induced a rightward shift of the K(+) reversal potential the magnitude of which depended on the amplitude and duration of K(+) current flow. Since this phenomenon was never observed for Type II hair cells, we ascribed it to the presence of a residual calyx limiting K(+) efflux from the synaptic cleft. Intercellular K(+) accumulation added a slow (τ>100ms) depolarizing component to the cell voltage response. In a few cases we were able to record from the calyx and found evidence for intercellular K(+) accumulation as well. The resulting depolarization could trigger a discharge of action potentials in the afferent nerve fiber. Present results support a model where pre- and postsynaptic depolarization produced by intercellular K(+) accumulation cooperates with neurotransmitter exocytosis in sustaining afferent transmission arising from Type I hair cells. While vesicular transmission together with the low Rm of Type I hair cells appears best suited for signaling fast head movements, depolarization produced by intercellular K(+) accumulation could enhance signal transmission during slow head movements. Copyright

  8. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  9. Reviews in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2010-01-01

    This volume serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence spectroscopy. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications as well as includes authoritative analytical reviews.

  10. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Verveer, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques allow the quantification of fluorescent molecules present at the nanomolar concentration level. After a brief introduction to the technique, this chapter presents a protocol including background information in order to measure and quantify the

  11. Depolarization per bounce of ultracold neutrons in collision with material guides within varying ambient magnetic holding fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearmitt, Damien; Chakrabarty, Sanjay; Holley, A. T.

    2017-09-01

    Material depolarization of `ultracold' neutrons (UCN), neutrons with energies of 100 neV, is studied to understand and control systematic effects in experiments where polarized UCN interact with materials, such as polarized beta-decay experiments. A number of `PPM Depol' experiments have been performed by the Los Alamos National Lab UCN team to test the probability of depolarization per bounce of UCN within material test guides. In one of these experiments, different guides were mounted within a varying ambient longitudinal holding field adjustable from 10G to 260G, which allowed the measurement to be repeated with different holding field strengths. Following analysis of the data from this experiment, Monte Carlo simulations were used to investigate systematic effects associated with poorly-constrained properties of the experiment, such as guide specularity and guide loss per bounce, and the UCN energy spectrum. The method of analysis as well as extracted depolarization probabilities per bounce for copper guides of various surface preparations and stainless steel guides, all as a function of holding field strength, will be presented. Comparisons between simulations and data will also be used to discuss systematic effects present in the analysis. Supported by NSF Grant 1553861.

  12. Strong dependence of rain-induced lidar depolarization on the illumination angle: experimental evidence and geometrical-optics interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, G; Bissonnette, L R

    2001-09-20

    Backscatter and depolarization lidar measurements from clouds and precipitation are reported as functions of the elevation angle of the pointing lidar direction. We recorded the data by scanning the lidar beam (Nd:YAG) at a constant angular speed of ~3.5 degrees /s while operating at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. We show that in rain there is an evident and at times spectacular dependence on the elevation angle. That dependence appears to be sensitive to raindrop size. We have developed a three-dimensional polarization-dependent ray-tracing algorithm to calculate the backscatter and the depolarization ratio by large nonspherical droplets. We have applied it to raindrop shapes derived from existing static and dynamic (oscillating) models. We show that many of the observed complex backscatter and depolarization features can be interpreted to a good extent by geometrical optics. These results suggest that there is a definite need for more extensive calculations of the scattering phase matrix elements for large deformed raindrops as functions of the direction of illumination. Obvious applications are retrieval of information on the liquid-solid phase of precipitation and on the size and the vibration state of raindrops.

  13. Depolarized light scattering from prolate anisotropic particles: The influence of the particle shape on the field autocorrelation function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, Christopher; ten Hagen, Borge; Löwen, Hartmut; Wagner, Joachim

    2015-07-28

    We provide a theoretical analysis for the intermediate scattering function typically measured in depolarized dynamic light scattering experiments. We calculate the field autocorrelation function g1(VH)(Q,t) in dependence on the wave vector Q and the time t explicitly in a vertical-horizontal scattering geometry for differently shaped solids of revolution. The shape of prolate cylinders, spherocylinders, spindles, and double cones with variable aspect ratio is expanded in rotational invariants flm(r). By Fourier transform of these expansion coefficients, a formal multipole expansion of the scattering function is obtained, which is used to calculate the weighting coefficients appearing in the depolarized scattering function. In addition to translational and rotational diffusion, especially the translational-rotational coupling of shape-anisotropic objects is considered. From the short-time behavior of the intermediate scattering function, the first cumulants Γ(Q) are calculated. In a depolarized scattering experiment, they deviate from the simple proportionality to Q(2). The coefficients flm(Q) strongly depend on the geometry and aspect ratio of the particles. The time dependence, in addition, is governed by the translational and rotational diffusion tensors, which are calculated by means of bead models for differently shaped particles in dependence on their aspect ratio. Therefore, our analysis shows how details of the particle shape--beyond their aspect ratio--can be determined by a precise scattering experiment. This is of high relevance in understanding smart materials which involve suspensions of anisotropic colloidal particles.

  14. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) activation of astrocytes decreases spreading depolarization susceptibility and increases potassium clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Jessica L; Faideau, Mathilde; Aiba, Isamu; Pannasch, Ulrike; Escartin, Carole; Rouach, Nathalie; Bonvento, Gilles; Shuttleworth, C William

    2015-01-01

    Waves of spreading depolarization (SD) have been implicated in the progressive expansion of acute brain injuries. SD can persist over several days, coincident with the time course of astrocyte activation, but little is known about how astrocyte activation may influence SD susceptibility. We examined whether activation of astrocytes modified SD threshold in hippocampal slices. Injection of a lentiviral vector encoding Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) into the hippocampus in vivo, led to sustained astrocyte activation, verified by up-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) at the mRNA and protein levels, as compared to controls injected with vector encoding LacZ. In acute brain slices from LacZ controls, localized 1M KCl microinjections invariably generated SD in CA1 hippocampus, but SD was never induced with this stimulus in CNTF tissues. No significant change in intrinsic excitability was observed in CA1 neurons, but excitatory synaptic transmission was significantly reduced in CNTF samples. mRNA levels of the predominantly astrocytic Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase pump α2 subunit were higher in CNTF samples, and the kinetics of extracellular K(+) transients during matched synaptic activation were consistent with increased K(+) uptake in CNTF tissues. Supporting a role for the Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase pump in increased SD threshold, ouabain, an inhibitor of the pump, was able to generate SD in CNTF tissues. These data support the hypothesis that activated astrocytes can limit SD onset via increased K(+) clearance and suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting these glial cells could improve the outcome following acute brain injuries associated with SD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Highly Active and Stable Fe-N-C Catalyst for Oxygen Depolarized Cathode Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingkun; Jia, Qingying; Ghoshal, Shraboni; Liang, Wentao; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2017-09-19

    Anion immunity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has tremendous implications in electrocatalysis with applications for fuel cells, metal-air batteries, and oxygen depolarized cathodes (ODCs) in the anodic evolution of chlorine. The necessity of exploring ORR catalysts with immunity to anion adsorption is particularly significant considering that platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts are costly and highly vulnerable to impurities such as halides. Herein, we report a metal organic framework (MOF)-derived Fe-N-C catalyst that exhibits a dramatically improved half-wave potential of 240 mV compared to the state-of-the-art Rh x S y /C catalyst in a rotating disk electrode in the presence of Cl - . The Fe-N 4 active sites in Fe-N-C are intrinsically immune to Cl - poisoning, in contrast to Pt/C, which is severely susceptible to Cl - poisoning. As a result, the activity of Fe-N-C decreases only marginally in the presence of Cl - , far exceeding that of Pt/C. The viability of this catalyst as ODCs is further demonstrated in real-life hydrochloric acid electrolyzers using highly concentrated HCl solution saturated with Cl 2 gas as the electrolyte. The introduction of Fe-N-C materials as ODC catalysts here overcomes the limitations of (i) the low intrinsic ORR activity of Rh x S y /C as the state-of-the-art ODC catalyst; (ii) the vulnerability to Cl - poisoning of Pt/C as the state-of-the-art ORR catalyst; and (iii) the high cost of precious metals in these two materials, resulting in a cost-effective ODC catalyst with the overall performance exceeding that of all previously reported materials.

  16. The role of glutamate in neuronal ion homeostasis: A case study of spreading depolarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Hübel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous changes in ion concentrations, glutamate, and cell volume together with exchange of matter between cell network and vasculature are ubiquitous in numerous brain pathologies. A complete understanding of pathological conditions as well as normal brain function, therefore, hinges on elucidating the molecular and cellular pathways involved in these mostly interdependent variations. In this paper, we develop the first computational framework that combines the Hodgkin-Huxley type spiking dynamics, dynamic ion concentrations and glutamate homeostasis, neuronal and astroglial volume changes, and ion exchange with vasculature into a comprehensive model to elucidate the role of glutamate uptake in the dynamics of spreading depolarization (SD-the electrophysiological event underlying numerous pathologies including migraine, ischemic stroke, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hematoma, and trauma. We are particularly interested in investigating the role of glutamate in the duration and termination of SD caused by K+ perfusion and oxygen-glucose deprivation. Our results demonstrate that glutamate signaling plays a key role in the dynamics of SD, and that impaired glutamate uptake leads to recovery failure of neurons from SD. We confirm predictions from our model experimentally by showing that inhibiting astrocytic glutamate uptake using TFB-TBOA nearly quadruples the duration of SD in layers 2-3 of visual cortical slices from juvenile rats. The model equations are either derived purely from first physical principles of electroneutrality, osmosis, and conservation of particles or a combination of these principles and known physiological facts. Accordingly, we claim that our approach can be used as a future guide to investigate the role of glutamate, ion concentrations, and dynamics cell volume in other brain pathologies and normal brain function.

  17. Thermally stimulated depolarization currents in the natural fluorite; Correntes de despolarizacao termicamente estimuladas na fluorita natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valerio, Mario Ernesto Giroldo

    1986-12-31

    The present work deals with natural calcium fluoride from Criciuma, Santa Catarina. Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) can be used to determine the properties of dipole defects present in this crystal. The TSDC spectrum of this material shows three bands in the temperature range of 80 to 450 K. The first one, at 130 K, is due the dipoles formed by a trivalent impurity and an interstitial fluorine ion in the next nearest position of an impurity ion (nn R{sub s}{sup 3+} -F{sub i}{sup -}). The second one, at 102 k, is due to the presence of small aggregates of dipoles (like a dimer). The last band, at 360 k is due to the formation of Large Clusters. The continuous distribution model gave the best fit for these bands with mean activation energies of 0.41 eV, 0.595 eV and 1.02 eV for the first, second and third band respectively. Thermal treatments can modify the number of dipoles, dimers and clusters present in the crystal. The variation in the areas under each band can be used to measure this effect. In this work we used thermal treatments between 15 minutes and 10 hours and temperatures between 200 deg C and 500 deg C. For thermal treatments at 300 deg C, the dipoles and dimers are created and the clusters are destroyed as the time of thermal treatment increases. At 400 deg C the clusters are created and the dipoles and dimers and 350 deg C for the clusters. (author) 60 refs., 41 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Electrical characterization of polymer matrix — TiO2 filler composites through isothermal polarization / depolarization currents and I-V tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakas, Ilias; Triantis, Dimos; Hloupis, George; Moutzouris, Konstantinos

    2014-04-01

    Specimens of polymer matrix — ceramic TiO2 filler composites were prepared. The contribution of the filler content on the electrical conductivity and energy storage properties of the samples was examined. I-V and Isothermal Polarization/Depolarization Current (IPC/IDC) measurements were conducted. Dc conductivity values directly calculated from the I-V curves exhibited excellent agreement with corresponding values derived from the IPC/IDC recordings. Standard models were employed for fitting the IPC/IDC data. In specific, the short and the very long depolarization times were fitted by use of power laws of different slopes, while the intermediate depolarization times were fitted as a sum of three exponential decays. The present study reveals a strong dependence of the depolarization and polarization processes, as well as of the dc conductivity, on the filler concentration.

  19. [Fluorescent and Raman scattering by molecules embedded in small particles]: Annual report, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, H.; McNulty, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is given of the model formulated for fluorescent and Raman scattering by molecules embedded in or in the vicinity of small particles. The model takes into account the size, shape, refractive index, and morphology of the host particles. Analytic and numerical results have been obtained for spherical (one and more layers, including magnetic dipole transitions), cylindrical, and spheroidal particles. Particular attention has been given to the spherical case with fluorescent/Raman scatterers uniformly distributed in the particles radiating both coherently and incoherently. Depolarization effects have been studied with suitable averaging process, and good agreement with experiment has been obtained. Analytic and numerical results have been obtained for the elastic scattering of evanescent waves; these results are useful for the study of fluorescence under excitation by evanescent waves

  20. Discovery of a complex linearly polarized spectrum of Betelgeuse dominated by depolarization of the continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurière, M.; López Ariste, A.; Mathias, P.; Lèbre, A.; Josselin, E.; Montargès, M.; Petit, P.; Chiavassa, A.; Paletou, F.; Fabas, N.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Donati, J.-F.; Grunhut, J. H.; Wade, G. A.; Herpin, F.; Kervella, P.; Perrin, G.; Tessore, B.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Betelgeuse is an M supergiant that harbors spots and giant granules at its surface and presents linear polarization of its continuum. Aims: We have previously discovered linear polarization signatures associated with individual lines in the spectra of cool and evolved stars. Here, we investigate whether a similar linearly polarized spectrum exists for Betelgeuse. Methods: We used the spectropolarimeter Narval, combining multiple polarimetric sequences to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio spectra of individual lines, as well as the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) approach, to investigate the presence of an averaged linearly polarized profile for the photospheric lines. Results: We have discovered the existence of a linearly polarized spectrum for Betelgeuse, detecting a rather strong signal (at a few times 10-4 of the continuum intensity level), both in individual lines and in the LSD profiles. Studying its properties and the signal observed for the resonant Na I D lines, we conclude that we are mainly observing depolarization of the continuum by the absorption lines. The linear polarization of the Betelgeuse continuum is due to the anisotropy of the radiation field induced by brightness spots at the surface and Rayleigh scattering in the atmosphere. We have developed a geometrical model to interpret the observed polarization, from which we infer the presence of two brightness spots and their positions on the surface of Betelgeuse. We show that applying the model to each velocity bin along the Stokes Q and U profiles allows the derivation of a map of the bright spots. We use the Narval linear polarization observations of Betelgeuse obtained over a period of 1.4 yr to study the evolution of the spots and of the atmosphere. Conclusions: Our study of the linearly polarized spectrum of Betelgeuse provides a novel method for studying the evolution of brightness spots at its surface and complements quasi-simultaneous observations obtained with PIONIER at the

  1. Steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging under evanescent excitation for visualisation of FRET at the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Devauges

    Full Text Available We present a novel imaging system combining total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy with measurement of steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy in order to perform live cell Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET imaging at the plasma membrane. We compare directly the imaging performance of fluorescence anisotropy resolved TIRF with epifluorescence illumination. The use of high numerical aperture objective for TIRF required correction for induced depolarization factors. This arrangement enabled visualisation of conformational changes of a Raichu-Cdc42 FRET biosensor by measurement of intramolecular FRET between eGFP and mRFP1. Higher activity of the probe was found at the cell plasma membrane compared to intracellularly. Imaging fluorescence anisotropy in TIRF allowed clear differentiation of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor from negative control mutants. Finally, inhibition of Cdc42 was imaged dynamically in live cells, where we show temporal changes of the activity of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor.

  2. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the probe fluorescence in the study of human blood protein dynamic structure on SR beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobretsov, G.E.; Kurek, N.K.; Syrejshchikova, T.I.; Yakimenko, M.N.; Clarke, D.T.; Jones, G.R.; Munro, I.H.

    2000-01-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopy on the SRS of the Daresbury Laboratory was used for the study of the human serum lipoproteins and human blood albumins with fluorescent probes K-37 and K-35, developed in Russia. The probe K-37 was found sensitive to the difference in dynamic properties of the lipid objects. Two sets of the parameters were used for the description of lipid dynamic structure: (1) time-resolved fluorescence spectra and (2) time-resolved fluorescence depolarization as a function of rotational mobility of lipid molecules. Each measured dynamic parameter reflected the monotonous changes of dynamic properties in the range: lipid spheres-very low density lipoproteins-low density lipoproteins-high density lipoproteins-phospholipid liposomes. The range is characterized by the increase of the ratio polar/ nonpolar lipids. Thus, time-resolved fluorescence could be used to detect some structural modifications in lipoproteins related to atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular diseases development

  3. Retinal ganglion cells: mechanisms underlying depolarization block and differential responses to high frequency electrical stimulation of ON and OFF cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameneva, T.; Maturana, M. I.; Hadjinicolaou, A. E.; Cloherty, S. L.; Ibbotson, M. R.; Grayden, D. B.; Burkitt, A. N.; Meffin, H.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. ON and OFF retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are known to have non-monotonic responses to increasing amplitudes of high frequency (2 kHz) biphasic electrical stimulation. That is, an increase in stimulation amplitude causes an increase in the cell’s spike rate up to a peak value above which further increases in stimulation amplitude cause the cell to decrease its activity. The peak response for ON and OFF cells occurs at different stimulation amplitudes, which allows differential stimulation of these functional cell types. In this study, we investigate the mechanisms underlying the non-monotonic responses of ON and OFF brisk-transient RGCs and the mechanisms underlying their differential responses. Approach. Using in vitro patch-clamp recordings from rat RGCs, together with simulations of single and multiple compartment Hodgkin-Huxley models, we show that the non-monotonic response to increasing amplitudes of stimulation is due to depolarization block, a change in the membrane potential that prevents the cell from generating action potentials. Main results. We show that the onset for depolarization block depends on the amplitude and frequency of stimulation and reveal the biophysical mechanisms that lead to depolarization block during high frequency stimulation. Our results indicate that differences in transmembrane potassium conductance lead to shifts of the stimulus currents that generate peak spike rates, suggesting that the differential responses of ON and OFF cells may be due to differences in the expression of this current type. We also show that the length of the axon’s high sodium channel band (SOCB) affects non-monotonic responses and the stimulation amplitude that leads to the peak spike rate, suggesting that the length of the SOCB is shorter in ON cells. Significance. This may have important implications for stimulation strategies in visual prostheses.

  4. Temporo-spectral imaging of intrinsic optical signals during hypoxia-induced spreading depression-like depolarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mané

    Full Text Available Spreading depression (SD is characterized by a sustained near-complete depolarization of neurons, a massive depolarization of glia, and a negative deflection of the extracellular DC potential. These electrophysiological signs are accompanied by an intrinsic optical signal (IOS which arises from changes in light scattering and absorption. Even though the underlying mechanisms are unclear, the IOS serves as non-invasive tool to define the spatiotemporal dynamics of SD in brain slices. Usually the tissue is illuminated by white light, and light reflectance or transmittance is monitored. Using a polychromatic, fast-switchable light source we now performed temporo-spectral recordings of the IOS associated with hypoxia-induced SD-like depolarization (HSD in rat hippocampal slices kept in an interface recording chamber. Recording full illumination spectra (320-680 nm yielded distinct reflectance profiles for the different phases of HSD. Early during hypoxia tissue reflectance decreased within almost the entire spectrum due to cell swelling. HSD was accompanied by a reversible reflectance increase being most pronounced at 400 nm and 460 nm. At 440 nm massive porphyrin absorption (Soret band was detected. Hypotonic solutions, Ca(2+-withdrawal and glial poisoning intensified the reflectance increase during HSD, whereas hypertonic solutions dampened it. Replacement of Cl(- inverted the reflectance increase. Inducing HSD by cyanide distorted the IOS and reflectance at 340-400 nm increased irreversibly. The pronounced changes at short wavelengths (380 nm, 460 nm and their cyanide sensitivity suggest that block of mitochondrial metabolism contributes to the IOS during HSD. For stable and reliable IOS recordings during HSD wavelengths of 460-560 nm are recommended.

  5. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  6. Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhturova, N.F.; Yudelevich, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry, a comparatively new method for the analysis of trace quantities, has developed rapidly in the past ten years. Theoretical and experimental studies by many workers have shown that atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry (AFS) is capable of achieving a better limit than atomic absorption for a large number of elements. The present review examines briefly the principles of atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry and the types of fluorescent transition. The excitation sources, flame and nonflame atomizers, used in AFS are described. The limits of detection achieved up to the present, using flame and nonflame methods of atomization are given

  7. Pitch angle resolved measurements of escaping charged fusion products in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweben, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the flux of charged fusion products escaping from the TFTR plasma have been made with a new type of detector which can resolve the particle flux vs. pitch angle, energy, and time. The design of this detector is described, and results from the 1987 TFTR run are presented. These results are roughly consistent with predictions from a simple first-orbit particle loss model with respect to the pitch angle, energy, time, and plasma current dependence of the signals. 11 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Angle-resolved energy distributions of laser ablated silver ions in vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.N.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    The energy distributions of ions ablated from silver in vacuum have been measured in situ for pulsed laser irradiation at 355 nm. We have determined the energy spectra for directions ranging from 5 degrees to 75 degrees with respect to the normal in the intensity range from 100 to 400 MW/cm(2...

  9. Angle-Resolved Electron Spectra of {{\\rm{F}}}^{-} Ions by Few-Cycle Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Hong; Zhao, Song-Feng; Wang, Guo-Li; Zheng, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Zheng-Rong

    2017-06-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 11647150, 11464026, 11664035 and 11364038, the Young Talents Program of Gansu Province in 2016, the Scientific Research Program of the Higher Education Institutions of Gansu Province under Grant No 2016A-068, and the Doctoral Scientific Research Foundation of Lanzhou City University under Grant No LZCU-BS2015-04.

  10. On angle resolved RF magnetron sputtering of Ge-Sb-Te thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gutwirth, J.; Wágner, T.; Bezdička, Petr; Hrdlička, M.; Vlček, Milan; Frumar, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 355, 37-42 (2009), s. 1935-1938 ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC523; GA ČR GA203/06/1368 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : amorphous semiconductors * films and coatings * sputtering Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.252, year: 2009

  11. Indoor measurement of angle resolved light absorption by antireflective glass in solar panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amdemeskel, Mekbib Wubishet; Benatto, Gisele Alves dos Reis; Riedel, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    measurements with trackers. The experimental results showed optical responses that are stable and suitable for indoor characterization of solar cells. We find the characteristic optical response of six different antireflective glasses, and based on such measurements, we perform PVsyst simulations and present...

  12. Studies of Dirac and Weyl fermions by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lunan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation consists of three parts. First, we study magnetic domains in Nd2Fe14B single crystals using high resolution magnetic force microscopy (MFM). In addition to the elongated, wavy nano-domains reported by a previous MFM study, we found that the micrometer size, star-shaped fractal pattern is constructed of an elongated network of nano-domains about 20 nm in width, with resolution-limited domain walls thinner than 2 nm. Second, we studied extra Dirac cones of multilayer graphene on SiC surface by ARPES and SPA-LEED. We discovered extra Dirac cones on Fermi surface due to SiC 6 x 6 and graphene 6√ 3 6√ 3 coincidence lattice on both single-layer and three-layer graphene sheets. We interpreted the position and intensity of the Dirac cone replicas, based on the scattering vectors from LEED patterns. We found the positions of replica Dirac cones are determined mostly by the 6 6 SiC superlattice even graphene layers grown thicker. Finally, we studied the electronic structure of MoTe2 by ARPES and experimentally con rmed the prediction of type II Weyl state in this material. By combining the result of Density Functional Theory calculations and Berry curvature calculations with out experimental data, we identi ed Fermi arcs, track states and Weyl points, all features predicted to exist in a type II Weyl semimetal. This material is an excellent playground for studies of exotic Fermions.

  13. Angle-resolved investigation of ion dynamics in high power impulse magnetron sputtering deposition system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čada, Martin; Adámek, Petr; Straňák, V.; Kment, Štěpán; Olejníček, Jiří; Hubička, Zdeněk; Hippler, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 549, DEC (2013), s. 177-183 ISSN 0040-6090 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12002 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : HiPIMS * titania * Katsumata probe * ion sensitive probe * IVDF * angular resolution Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.867, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0040609013011127

  14. Theory of angle-resolved photoemission experiments on a two-band model

    OpenAIRE

    De Cao, Tian

    2008-01-01

    Considering the electron states inside and outside the solid, we derive a formula of photoemission intensity. A general theoretical way to determine electronic structures of solids from ARPES experiments is outlined. It is shown that the spectral function inside the solids cannot be measured directly by ARPES, the effects of free electron states on the electronic structure observed by ARPES measurements must be considered, and the results from ARPES experiments cannot be understood until thes...

  15. Electrostatic mass spectrometer for concurrent mass-, energy- and angle-resolved measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golikov, Yu.K.; Krasnova, N.K.

    1999-01-01

    A new electron-optical scheme is considered. An energy- and mass-analyser with angular resolution are combined in one device, in which a time-of-flight principle of mass separation is used. The tool is created on the basis of electrostatic field of quasi-conical systems possessing the high-energy dispersion and high-angular resolution. A regime of simultaneous angular and energy resolution is found. If there is an ion-pulsed source then the ion groups of equal mass will be registered at the same time at a position-sensitive detector located at the edge of the field. Real parameters of the suggested scheme are calculated

  16. Electronic structure of ion arsenic high temperature superconductors studied by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chang [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of the present thesis is to present our ARPES results on the iron arsenic superconductors. As revealed by a series of ARPES measurements on both the AEFe2As2 and the RFeAs(O,F) families (parent compound and carrier-doped systems), the electronic structures of the pnictides are complicated, three dimensional, and closely linked to their superconducting behavior (13; 14; 15; 16; 17; 18; 19). Parent compounds of these materials exhibit the basic hole-electron pocket dual plus an apparent Fermi surface reconstruction caused by long range antiferromagnetism (13; 15). When carriers are introduced, the chemical potential shifts in accordance with the Luttinger theorem and the rigid band shifting picture (13). Importantly, both the appearance and disappearance of the superconducting dome at low and high doping levels have intimate relation with topological changes at the Fermi surfaces, resulting in a specific Fermi topology being favored by superconductivity (15; 16). On the low doping side, superconductivity emerges in the phase diagram once the antiferromagnetic reconstruction disappears below the Fermi level, returning the Fermi surface to its paramagnetic-like appearance. On the high doping side, superconductivity disappears around a doping level at which the central hole pocket vanishes due to increasing electron concentration. Such phenomena are evidence for the governing role the electronic structure plays in their superconducting behavior.

  17. Multimodal fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopel, Martijn H W; Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod; Engelborghs, Yves; Visser, Anthonie J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal fluorescence imaging is a versatile method that has a wide application range from biological studies to materials science. Typical observables in multimodal fluorescence imaging are intensity, lifetime, excitation, and emission spectra which are recorded at chosen locations at the sample.

  18. Nicotine-evoked cytosolic Ca2+ increase and cell depolarization in capillary endothelial cells of the bovine adrenal medulla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAÚL VINET

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells are directly involved in many functions of the cardiovascular system by regulating blood flow and blood pressure through Ca2+ dependent exocitosis of vasoactive compounds. Using the Ca2+ indicator Fluo-3 and the patch-clamp technique, we show that bovine adrenal medulla capillary endothelial cells (B AMCECs respond to acetylcholine (ACh with a cytosolic Ca2+ increase and depolarization of the membrane potential (20.3±0.9 mV; n=23. The increase in cytosolic Ca2+ induced by 10µM ACh was mimicked by the same concentration of nicotine but not by muscarine and was blocked by 100 µM of hexamethonium. On the other hand, the increase in cytosolic Ca2+ could be depressed by nifedipine (0.01 -100 µM or withdrawal of extracellular Ca2+. Taken together, these results give evidence for functional nicotinic receptors (nAChRs in capillary endothelial cells of the adrenal medulla. It suggests that nAChRs in B AMCECs may be involved in the regulation of the adrenal gland's microcirculation by depolarizing the membrane potential, leading to the opening of voltage-activated Ca2+ channels, influx of external Ca2+ and liberation of vasoactive compounds.

  19. Protonophoric action of triclosan causes calcium efflux from mitochondria, plasma membrane depolarization and bursts of miniature end-plate potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Lyudmila B; Nosikova, Ekaterina S; Kotova, Elena A; Tarasova, Ekaterina O; Nazarov, Pavel A; Khailova, Lyudmila S; Balezina, Olga P; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2018-01-06

    The formerly widely used broad-spectrum biocide triclosan (TCS) has now become a subject of special concern due to its accumulation in the environment and emerging diverse toxicity. Despite the common opinion that TCS is an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, there have been so far no studies of protonophoric activity of this biocide on artificial bilayer lipid membranes (BLM). Yet only few works have indicated the relationship between TCS impacts on mitochondria and nerve cell functioning. Here, we for the first time report data on a high protonophoric activity of TCS on planar BLM. TCS proved to be a more effective protonophore on planar BLM, than classical uncouplers. Correlation between a strong depolarizing effect of TCS on bacterial membranes and its bactericidal action on Bacillus subtilis might imply substantial contribution of TCS protonophoric activity to its antimicrobial efficacy. Protonophoric activity of TCS, monitored by proton-dependent mitochondrial swelling, resulted in Ca 2+ efflux from mitochondria. A comparison of TCS effects on molluscan neurons with those of conventional mitochondrial uncouplers allowed us to ascribe the TCS-induced neuronal depolarization and suppression of excitability to the consequences of mitochondrial deenergization. Also similar to the action of common uncouplers, TCS caused a pronounced increase in frequency of miniature end-plate potentials at neuromuscular junctions. Thus, the TCS-induced mitochondrial uncoupling could alter neuronal function through distortion of Ca 2+ homeostasis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Three-dimensional magnetic spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering and neutron depolarization: A comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekveldt, M. Theo; Dijk, Niels H. van; Grigoriev, Serguei V.; Kraan, Wicher H.; Bouwman, Wim G.

    2006-01-01

    The recently developed magnetic spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique provides unique information about the distance correlation of the local vector magnetization as a function of the spin-echo length within a magnetic material. The technique probes the magnetic correlations on a length scale from 10 nm up to 10 μm within the bulk of a magnetic material by evaluating the Larmor precession of a polarized neutron beam in a spin-echo setup. The characteristics of the spin-echo SANS technique are discussed and compared to those of the more conventional neutron depolarization technique. Both of these techniques probe the average size of the magnetic inhomogeneities and the local magnetic texture. The magnetic spin-echo SANS technique gives information on the size distribution of these magnetic inhomogeneities perpendicular to the beam and, in principle, independent on the local magnetic induction. This information is not accessible by the neutron depolarization technique that gives the average size parallel to the beam multiplied with the square of the local magnetic induction. The basic possibilities of the magnetic spin-echo SANS technique are demonstrated by experiments on samples with a strong magnetic texture

  1. Simulation of spreading depolarization trajectories in cerebral cortex: Correlation of velocity and susceptibility in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denny Milakara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In many cerebral grey matter structures including the neocortex, spreading depolarization (SD is the principal mechanism of the near-complete breakdown of the transcellular ion gradients with abrupt water influx into neurons. Accordingly, SDs are abundantly recorded in patients with traumatic brain injury, spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH and malignant hemispheric stroke using subdural electrode strips. SD is observed as a large slow potential change, spreading in the cortex at velocities between 2 and 9 mm/min. Velocity and SD susceptibility typically correlate positively in various animal models. In patients monitored in neurocritical care, the Co-Operative Studies on Brain Injury Depolarizations (COSBID recommends several variables to quantify SD occurrence and susceptibility, although accurate measures of SD velocity have not been possible. Therefore, we developed an algorithm to estimate SD velocities based on reconstructing SD trajectories of the wave-front's curvature center from magnetic resonance imaging scans and time-of-SD-arrival-differences between subdural electrode pairs. We then correlated variables indicating SD susceptibility with algorithm-estimated SD velocities in twelve aSAH patients. Highly significant correlations supported the algorithm's validity. The trajectory search failed significantly more often for SDs recorded directly over emerging focal brain lesions suggesting in humans similar to animals that the complexity of SD propagation paths increase in tissue undergoing injury.

  2. The depolarizing action of GABA in cultured hippocampal neurons is not due to the absence of ketone bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaylyn Waddell

    Full Text Available Two recent reports propose that the depolarizing action of GABA in the immature brain is an artifact of in vitro preparations in which glucose is the only energy source. The authors argue that this does not mimic the physiological environment because the suckling rats use ketone bodies and pyruvate as major sources of metabolic energy. Here, we show that availability of physiologically relevant levels of ketone bodies has no impact on the excitatory action of GABA in immature cultured hippocampal neurons. Addition of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB, the primary ketone body in the neonate rat, affected neither intracellular calcium elevation nor membrane depolarizations induced by the GABA-A receptor agonist muscimol, when assessed with calcium imaging or perforated patch-clamp recording, respectively. These results confirm that the addition of ketone bodies to the extracellular environment to mimic conditions in the neonatal brain does not reverse the chloride gradient and therefore render GABA hyperpolarizing. Our data are consistent with the existence of a genuine "developmental switch" mechanism in which GABA goes from having a predominantly excitatory role in immature cells to a predominantly inhibitory one in adults.

  3. Fluorescence live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Andreas; Wittmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein (FP) tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate FP constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Thermal-induced structural transition and depolarization behavior in (Bi0.5Na0.5)TiO3-BiAlO3 ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ping; Nie, Hengchang; Cheng, Guofeng; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Genshui; Dong, Xianlin

    2018-03-01

    The depolarization temperature Td determines the upper temperature limit for the application of piezoelectric materials. However, the origin of depolarization behavior for Bi-based materials still remains controversial and the mechanism is intricate for different (Bi0.5Na0.5)TiO3-based systems. In this work, the structure and depolarization behavior of (1-x)(Bi0.5Na0.5)TiO3-xBiAlO3 (BNT-BA, x = 0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.07) ceramics were investigated using a combination of X-ray diffraction and electrical measurements. It was found that as temperature increased, the induced long-range ferroelectric phase irreversibly transformed to the relaxor phase as evidenced by the temperature-dependent ferroelectric and dielectric properties, which corresponded to a gradual structural change from the rhombohedral to the pseudocubic phase. Therefore, the thermal depolarization behavior of BNT-BA ceramics was proposed to be directly related to the rhombohedral-pseudocubic transition. Furthermore, Td (obtained from thermally stimulated depolarization currents curves) was higher than the induced ferroelectric-relaxor phase transition temperature TFR (measured from dielectric curves). The phenomenon was quite different from other reported BNT-based systems, which may suggest the formation of polar nanoregions (PNRs) within macrodomains prior to the detexturation of short-range ferroelectric domains with PNRs or nanodomains.

  5. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  6. Depolarization by K+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in GABAergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Schousboe, A

    1993-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release and changes in the concentration of intracellular free calcium ([Ca++]i) were studied in cultured GABAergic cerebral cortical neurons, from mice, upon depolarization with either an unphysiologically high potassium concentration (55 mM) or the physiological excitatory...... neurotransmitter glutamate (100 microM). Both depolarizing stimuli exerted prompt increases in the release of preloaded [3H]GABA as well as in [Ca++]i. However, the basic properties of transmitter release and the increase in [Ca++]i under a variety of conditions were different during stimulation with K...... in nature whereas that induced by the neurotransmitter glutamate is not....

  7. Reviews in fluorescence 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Lakowicz, Joseph R; Geddes, Chris D

    2009-01-01

    This fourth volume in the Springer series summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough for professional researchers, yet also appealing to a wider audience of scientists in related fields.

  8. Introduction to fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, David M

    2014-01-01

    "An essential contribution to educating scientists in the principles of fluorescence. It will also be an important addition to the libraries of practitioners applying the principles of molecular fluorescence."-Ken Jacobson, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"An exquisite compendium of fluorescence and its applications in biochemistry enriched by a very exciting historical perspective. This book will become a standard text for graduate students and other scientists."-Drs. Zygmunt (Karol) Gryczynski and Ignacy Gryczynski, University of North Texas Health Science Center"… truly a masterwork, combining clarity, precision, and good humor. The reader, novice or expert, will be pleased with the text and will not stop reading. It is a formidable account of the fluorescence field, which has impacted the life sciences so considerably in the last 60 years."-Jerson L. Silva, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Director, National Institute of Science and Tech...

  9. Analysis of mitochondrial mechanical dynamics using a confocal fluorescence microscope with a bent optical fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongbo; Honda, Satoshi; Iwami, Kentaro; Ohta, Yoshihiro; Umeda, Norihiro

    2015-11-01

    The cells in the cardiovascular system are constantly subjected to mechanical forces created by blood flow and the beating heart. The effect of forces on cells has been extensively investigated, but their effect on cellular organelles such as mitochondria remains unclear. We examined the impact of nano-Newton forces on mitochondria using a bent optical fibre (BOF) with a flat-ended tip (diameter exceeding 2 μm) and a confocal fluorescence microscope. By indenting a single mitochondrion with the BOF tip, we found that the mitochondrial elastic modulus was proportional to the (-1/2) power of the mitochondrial radius in the 9.6-115 kPa range. We stained the mitochondria with a potential-metric dye (TMRE) and measured the changes in TMRE fluorescence intensity. We confirmed that more active mitochondria exhibit a higher frequency of repetitive transient depolarization. The same trend was observed at forces lower than 50 nN. We further showed that the depolarization frequency of mitochondria decreases under an extremely large force (nearly 100 nN). We conclude that mitochondrial function is affected by physical environmental factors, such as external forces at the nano-Newton level. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  10. Linear Polarization, Circular Polarization, and Depolarization of Gamma-ray Bursts: A Simple Case of Jitter Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Jirong; Wang, Jiancheng, E-mail: jirongmao@mail.ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 650011 Kunming, Yunnan Province (China)

    2017-04-01

    Linear and circular polarizations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected recently. We adopt a simplified model to investigate GRB polarization characteristics in this paper. A compressed two-dimensional turbulent slab containing stochastic magnetic fields is considered, and jitter radiation can produce the linear polarization under this special magnetic field topology. Turbulent Faraday rotation measure (RM) of this slab makes strong wavelength-dependent depolarization. The jitter photons can also scatter with those magnetic clumps inside the turbulent slab, and a nonzero variance of the Stokes parameter V can be generated. Furthermore, the linearly and circularly polarized photons in the optical and radio bands may suffer heavy absorptions from the slab. Thus we consider the polarized jitter radiation transfer processes. Finally, we compare our model results with the optical detections of GRB 091018, GRB 121024A, and GRB 131030A. We suggest simultaneous observations of GRB multi-wavelength polarization in the future.

  11. Postsynaptic GABA(B Receptors Contribute to the Termination of Giant Depolarizing Potentials in CA3 Neonatal Rat Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilgam Khalilov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available During development, hippocampal CA3 network generates recurrent population bursts, so-called Giant Depolarizing Potentials (GDPs. GDPs are characterized by synchronous depolarization and firing of CA3 pyramidal cells followed by afterhyperpolarization (GDP-AHP. Here, we explored the properties of GDP-AHP in CA3 pyramidal cells using gramicidin perforated patch clamp recordings from neonatal rat hippocampal slices. We found that GDP-AHP occurs independently of whether CA3 pyramidal cells fire action potentials (APs or remain silent during GDPs. However, the amplitude of GDP-AHP increased with the number of APs the cells fired during GDPs. The reversal potential of the GDP-AHP was close to the potassium equilibrium potential. During voltage-clamp recordings, current-voltage relationships of the postsynaptic currents activated during GDP-AHP were characterized by reversal near the potassium equilibrium potential and inward rectification, similar to the responses evoked by the GABA(B receptor agonists. Finally, the GABA(B receptor antagonist CGP55845 strongly reduced GDP-AHP and prolonged GDPs, eventually transforming them to the interictal and ictal-like discharges. Together, our findings suggest that the GDP-AHP involves two mechanisms: (i postsynaptic GABA(B receptor activated potassium currents, which are activated independently on whether the cell fires or not during GDPs; and (ii activity-dependent, likely calcium activated potassium currents, whose contribution to the GDP-AHP is dependent on the amount of firing during GDPs. We propose that these two complementary inhibitory postsynaptic mechanisms cooperate in the termination of GDP.

  12. Depolarization and electrical stimulation enhance in vitro and in vivo sensory axon growth after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goganau, Ioana; Sandner, Beatrice; Weidner, Norbert; Fouad, Karim; Blesch, Armin

    2018-02-01

    Activity dependent plasticity is a key mechanism for the central nervous system (CNS) to adapt to its environment. Whether neuronal activity also influences axonal regeneration in the injured CNS, and whether electrical stimulation (ES) can activate regenerative programs in the injured CNS remains incompletely understood. Using KCl-induced depolarization, in vivo ES followed by ex-vivo neurite growth assays and ES after spinal cord lesions and cell grafting, we aimed to identify parameters important for ES-enhanced neurite growth and axonal regeneration. Using cultures of sensory neurons, neurite growth was analyzed after KCl-induced depolarization for 1-72h. Increased neurite growth was detected after short-term stimulation and after longer stimulation if a sufficient delay between stimulation and growth measurements was provided. After in vivo ES (20Hz, 2× motor threshold, 0.2ms, 1h) of the intact sciatic nerve in adult Fischer344 rats, sensory neurons showed a 2-fold increase in in vitro neurite length one week later compared to sham animals, an effect not observed one day after ES. Longer ES (7h) and repeated ES (7days, 1h each) also increased growth by 56-67% one week later, but provided no additional benefit. In vivo growth of dorsal column sensory axons into a graft of bone marrow stromal cells 4weeks after a cervical spinal cord lesion was also enhanced with a single post-injury 1h ES of the intact sciatic nerve and was also observed after repeated ES without inducing pain-like behavior. While ES did not result in sensory functional recovery, our data indicate that ES has time-dependent influences on the regenerative capacity of sensory neurons and might further enhance axonal regeneration in combinatorial approaches after SCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition of Kv channel expression by NSAIDs depolarizes membrane potential and inhibits cell migration by disrupting calpain signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Kristopher; Littlejohn, Alaina; Thomas, Laurel; Marsh, Elizabeth; Lillich, James D

    2015-12-15

    Clinical use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is well known to cause gastrointestinal ulcer formation via several mechanisms that include inhibiting epithelial cell migration and mucosal restitution. The drug-affected signaling pathways that contribute to inhibition of migration by NSAIDs are poorly understood, though previous studies have shown that NSAIDs depolarize membrane potential and suppress expression of calpain proteases and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel subunits. Kv channels play significant roles in cell migration and are targets of NSAID activity in white blood cells, but the specific functional effects of NSAID-induced changes in Kv channel expression, particularly on cell migration, are unknown in intestinal epithelial cells. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of NSAIDs on expression of Kv1.3, 1.4, and 1.6 in vitro and/or in vivo and evaluated the functional significance of loss of Kv subunit expression. Indomethacin or NS-398 reduced total and plasma membrane protein expression of Kv1.3 in cultured intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). Additionally, depolarization of membrane potential with margatoxin (MgTx), 40mM K(+), or silencing of Kv channel expression with siRNA significantly reduced IEC-6 cell migration and disrupted calpain activity. Furthermore, in rat small intestinal epithelia, indomethacin and NS-398 had significant, yet distinct, effects on gene and protein expression of Kv1.3, 1.4, or 1.6, suggesting that these may be clinically relevant targets. Our results show that inhibition of epithelial cell migration by NSAIDs is associated with decreased expression of Kv channel subunits, and provide a mechanism through which NSAIDs inhibit cell migration and may contribute to NSAID-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Acute stress increases depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the rat prefrontal/frontal cortex: the dampening action of antidepressants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Musazzi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral stress is recognized as a main risk factor for neuropsychiatric diseases. Converging evidence suggested that acute stress is associated with increase of excitatory transmission in certain forebrain areas. Aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism whereby acute stress increases glutamate release, and if therapeutic drugs prevent the effect of stress on glutamate release.Rats were chronically treated with vehicle or drugs employed for therapy of mood/anxiety disorders (fluoxetine, desipramine, venlafaxine, agomelatine and then subjected to unpredictable footshock stress. Acute stress induced marked increase in depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex in superfusion, and the chronic drug treatments prevented the increase of glutamate release. Stress induced rapid increase in the circulating levels of corticosterone in all rats (both vehicle- and drug-treated, and glutamate release increase was blocked by previous administration of selective antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (RU 486. On the molecular level, stress induced accumulation of presynaptic SNARE complexes in synaptic membranes (both in vehicle- and drug-treated rats. Patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex revealed that stress increased glutamatergic transmission through both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, and that antidepressants may normalize it by reducing release probability.Acute footshock stress up-regulated depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex. Stress-induced increase of glutamate release was dependent on stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor by corticosterone. Because all drugs employed did not block either elevation of corticosterone or accumulation of SNARE complexes, the dampening action of the drugs on glutamate release must be downstream of these processes. This novel effect of antidepressants on the response to stress

  15. Depolarization in Delivering Public Services? Impacts of Minimum Service Standards (MSS on the Quality of Health Services in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Roudo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Some scholars argue that decentralization policy tends to create polarization, i.e. an increase of inequality/disparity among districts. To deal with this problem, Minimum Service Standards (MSS were introduced as a key strategy in decentralizing Indonesia. In this research, we tried to find out through MSS performance measurements whether imposing standards can be effective in a decentralized system by seeking its impacts on polarization/depolarization in the delivery of public services, specifically in the health sector. This question is basically a response to the common criticism that decentralization is good to create equality between central government and local governments but often does not work to achieve equality among local governments. Using self-assessment data from a sample of 54 districts from 534 districts in Indonesia, from 2010 to 2013, we found that the existence of depolarization in the delivery of public services could potentially occur among regions by reducing the gap between their public service performance and the targets of MSS. We acknowledge that there are weaknesses in the validity of the self-assessment data, caused by a lack of knowledge and skills to execute the self-assessment according to the official guidelines, by the overrating of target achievements, as well as the lack of data from independent sources to confirm the self-assessment outcomes. We also acknowledge that differences in financial capacity are still the main determinant why one district is more successful in achieving the MSS targets compared to other districts. Keywords. Decentralization, Public Service, Minimum Standard Service

  16. Further insights into blood pressure induced premature beats: Transient depolarizations are associated with fast myocardial deformation upon pressure decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemers, Peter; Sutherland, George; Cikes, Maja; Jakus, Nina; Holemans, Patricia; Sipido, Karin R; Willems, Rik; Claus, Piet

    2015-11-01

    An acute increase in blood pressure is associated with the occurrence of premature ventricular complexes (PVCs). We aimed to study the timing of these PVCs with respect to afterload-induced changes in myocardial deformation in a controlled, preclinically relevant, novel closed-chest pig model. An acute left ventricular (LV) afterload challenge was induced by partial balloon inflation in the descending aorta, lasting 5-10 heartbeats (8 pigs; 396 inflations). Balloon inflation enhanced the reflected wave (augmentation index 30% ± 8% vs 59% ± 6%; P blood pressure by 35% ± 4%. This challenge resulted in a more abrupt LV pressure decline, which was delayed beyond ventricular repolarization (rate of pressure decline 0.16 ± 0.01 mm Hg/s vs 0.27 ± 0.04 mm Hg/ms; P pressure 1 ± 12 ms vs 36 ± 9 ms; P = .008), during which the velocity of myocardial shortening at the basal septum increased abruptly (ie, postsystolic shortening) (peak strain rate -0.6 ± 0.5 s(-1) vs -2.5 ± 0.8 s(-1); P pressure decline, with increased postsystolic shortening, and not at peak pressure, that PVCs occur (22% of inflations). These PVCs preferentially occurred at the basal and apical segments. In the same regions, monophasic action potentials demonstrated the appearance of delayed afterdepolarization-like transient depolarizations as origin of PVCs. An acute blood pressure increase results in a more abrupt LV pressure decline, which is delayed after ventricular repolarization. This has a profound effect on myocardial mechanics with enhanced postsystolic shortening. Coincidence with induced transient depolarizations and PVCs provides support for the mechanoelectrical origin of pressure-induced premature beats. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, N.V.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectra have been obtained from several variants of green fluorescent protein: blue fluorescent protein (BFP), enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), all from Aequorea victoria, and the red

  18. The collisional depolarization of OH(A {sup 2}Σ{sup +}) and NO(A {sup 2}Σ{sup +}) with Kr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, H.; Brouard, M., E-mail: mark.brouard@chem.ox.ac.uk; Chang, Y.-P.; Eyles, C. J.; McCrudden, G.; Perkins, T.; Seamons, S. A. [The Department of Chemistry, The Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Kłos, J., E-mail: jklos@umd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Alexander, M. H., E-mail: mha@umd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Institute of Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Dagdigian, P. J., E-mail: pjdagdigian@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Herráez-Aguilar, D.; Aoiz, F. J., E-mail: aoiz@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Química, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-02-07

    Quantum beat spectroscopy has been used to measure rate coefficients at 300 K for collisional depolarization for NO(A {sup 2}Σ{sup +}) and OH(A {sup 2}Σ{sup +}) with krypton. Elastic depolarization rate coefficients have also been determined for OH(A) + Kr, and shown to make a much more significant contribution to the total depolarization rate than for NO(A) + Kr. While the experimental data for NO(A) + Kr are in excellent agreement with single surface quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) calculations carried out on the upper 2A{sup ′} potential energy surface, the equivalent QCT and quantum mechanical calculations cannot account for the experimental results for OH(A) + Kr collisions, particularly at low N. This disagreement is due to the presence of competing electronic quenching at low N, which requires a multi-surface, non-adiabatic treatment. Somewhat improved agreement with experiment is obtained by means of trajectory surface hopping calculations that include non-adiabatic coupling between the ground 1A{sup ′} and excited 2A{sup ′} states of OH(X/A) + Kr, although the theoretical depolarization cross sections still significantly overestimate those obtained experimentally.

  19. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  20. Green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfie, M

    1995-10-01

    Several bioluminescent coelenterates use a secondary fluorescent protein, the green fluorescent protein (GFP), in an energy transfer reaction to produce green light. The most studied of these proteins have been the GFPs from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria and the sea pansy Renilla reniformis. Although the proteins from these organisms are not identical, they are thought to have the same chromophore, which is derived from the primary amino acid sequence of GFP. The differences are thought to be due to changes in the protein environment of the chromophore. Recent interest in these molecules has arisen from the cloning of the Aequorea gfp cDNA and the demonstration that its expression in the absence of other Aequorea proteins results in a fluorescent product. This demonstration indicated that GFP could be used as a marker of gene expression and protein localization in living and fixed tissues. Bacterial, plant and animal (including mammalian) cells all express GFP. The heterologous expression of the gfp cDNA has also meant that it could be mutated to produce proteins with different fluorescent properties. Variants with more intense fluorescence or alterations in the excitation and emission spectra have been produced.

  1. Effects of Ca2+, Mg2+, and depolarizing agents, on the 32Pi-labeling and degradation of phosphatidylinositols in rat brain synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinetti, G V; Morris, T W; Leaky, P

    1993-03-01

    In isolated synaptosomes from rat brain, 100 microM antimycin A and 10 microM oxamic acid inhibit the 32Pi-labeling of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP) by 90% and 95-99% respectively. 10 mM sodium fluoride inhibits the labeling by 50-60% and 10 mM A23187 inhibits the labeling by 63-70%. Phospholipase A2 inhibits the labeling of PIP2 and PIP by 93-94% and stimulates their degradation by 84-92%. Depolarization of synaptosomes with 75 mM K+ or 100 microM veratrine decreases the labeling of PIP2 and PIP by 66-74%. The decreased labeling results in large part from the Ca(2+)-dependent degradation of 32P-labeled PIP2 and PIP as shown by pulse-chase experiments in which PIP2 and PIP were prelabeled with 32Pi. Depolarization of synaptosomes results in the stimulation of 45Ca2+ uptake with the concomitant hydrolysis of PIP and PIP2. Addition of 1 mM Ca2+ accounts for 25% of the enhanced degradation whereas depolarization with 75 mM K+ accounts for 75% of the enhanced degradation of PIP2 and PIP. Depolarization with 100 mM veratrine results in a 223% increase in inositol trisphosphate as evidenced by stimulation of 45Ca2+ uptake. EGTA (10 mM) and Mg2+ (5-10 mM) inhibit the degradation of PIP and PIP2 and counteract the action of 1 mM Ca2+. Our data demonstrate that 45Ca2+, Mg2+, and membrane depolarization play an important role in the turnover of membrane phosphatidylinositols.

  2. Electric field effects on fluorescence of the green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Kinjo, Masataka; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2008-05-01

    External electric field effects on state energy and photoexcitation dynamics have been examined for a mutant of UV-excited green fluorescent protein (GFPuv5) in a PVA film. The electrofluorescence spectrum of GFPuv5 is reproduced by a linear combination between the fluorescence spectrum and its second derivative spectrum, indicating the field-induced fluorescence quenching and the difference in electric dipole moment between the fluorescent state and the ground state. The direct measurements of the field-induced change in fluorescence decay show that the field-induced quenching results from the field-induced increase in the rate of the non-radiative process from the fluorescent state.

  3. Concentrators using fluorescent substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashibara, M.; Tsukamoto, M. (Hitachi Seisakusho K.K., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    In luminescent concentrators - plates of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or other transparent material with a fluorescent compound dispersed within them - incident light is trapped and concentrated by internal reflection, and shifted to a longer wavelength, as it interacts with fluorescent particles. Experience with the use of luminescent concentrators for electricity generation in conjunction with solar cells, in solar heaters, in amplifiers for light intensity, in long-wave converters and in display panels is discussed. Solar energy conversion efficiencies of 4-5% have been obtained in generating systems combining concentrators containing Fluorol 555 or Rhodamin 6G with GaAs solar cells. (author).

  4. Fluorescence uranium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Cellini, R.; Crus Castillo, F. de la; Barrera Pinero, R.

    1960-01-01

    An equipment for analysis of uranium by fluorescence was developed in order to determine it at such a low concentration that it can not be determined by the most sensible analytical methods. this new fluorimeter was adapted to measure the fluorescence emitted by the phosphorus sodium fluoride-sodium carbonate-potasium carbonate-uranyl, being excited by ultraviolet light of 3,650 A the intensity of the light emitted was measure with a photomultiplicator RCA 5819 and the adequate electronic equipment. (Author) 19 refs

  5. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence spectrosc......Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...... spectroscopy approaches provide very valuable structurally and dynamically related information on membranes, they generally produce mean parameters from data collected on bulk solutions of many vesicles and lack direct information on the spatial organization at the level of single membranes, a quality that can...... be provided by microscopy-related techniques. In this chapter, I will attempt to summarize representative examples concerning how microscopy (which provides information on membrane lateral organization by direct visualization) and spectroscopy techniques (which provides information about molecular interaction...

  6. Fluorescence lifetime based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is a robust intrinsic property and material constant of fluorescent matter. Measuring this important physical indicator has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a powerful and established technique for a variety of applications in drug discovery, medical diagnostics and basic biological research. This distinct trend was mainly driven by improved and meanwhile affordable laser and detection instrumentation on the one hand, and the development of suitable FLT probes and biological assays on the other. In this process two essential working approaches emerged. The first one is primarily focused on high throughput applications employing biochemical in vitro assays with no requirement for high spatial resolution. The second even more dynamic trend is the significant expansion of assay methods combining highly time and spatially resolved fluorescence data by fluorescence lifetime imaging. The latter approach is currently pursued to enable not only the investigation of immortal tumor cell lines, but also specific tissues or even organs in living animals. This review tries to give an actual overview about the current status of FLT based bioassays and the wide range of application opportunities in biomedical and life science areas. In addition, future trends of FLT technologies will be discussed.

  7. Statistical filtering in fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin

    Roč. 406 , č. 20 (2014), s. 4797-4813 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Filtered fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014

  8. Characterization of the overall and internal dynamics of short oligonucleotides by depolarized dynamic light scattering and NMR relaxation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eimer, W.; Williamson, J.R.; Boxer, S.G.; Pecora, R.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamics of three synthetic oligonucleotides d(CG) 4 , d(CG) 6 , and d(CGCGTTGTTCGCG) of different length and shape were studied in solution by depolarized dynamic light scattering (DDLS) and time-resolved nuclear Overhauser effect cross-relaxation measurements. For cylindrically symmetric molecules the DDLS spectrum is dominated by the rotation of the main symmetry axis of the cylinder. The experimental correlation times describe the rotation of the oligonucleotides under hydrodynamic stick boundary conditions. It is shown that the hydrodynamic theory of Tirado and Garcia de la Torre gives good predictions of the rotational diffusion coefficients of cylindrically symmetric molecules of the small axial ratios studied here. These relations are used to calculate the solution dimensions of the DNA fragments from measured correlation times. The DDLS relaxations measurements provide a power method for distinguishing between different conformations of the oligonucleotides. Furthermore, the rotational correlation times are a very sensitive probe of the length of different fragments. The NMR results reflect the anisotropic motion of the molecules as well as the amount of local internal motion present. The experimental correlation time from NMR is determined by the rotation of both the short and long axes of the oligonucleotide. The authors results are compared with those from NMR relaxation measurements on other short oligonucleotides with lengths of up to 20 base pairs. Various dynamic models for the reorientation of the internuclear vector are applied to their interpretation

  9. Achiral Mannich-Base Curcumin Analogs Induce Unfolded Protein Response and Mitochondrial Membrane Depolarization in PANC-1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor J. Szebeni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Achiral Mannich-type curcumin analogs have been synthetized and assayed for their cytotoxic activity. The anti-proliferative and cytotoxic activity of curcuminoids has been tested on human non-small-cell lung carcinoma (A549, hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 and pancreatic cancer cell line (PANC-1. Based on the highest anti-proliferative activity nine drug candidates were further tested and proved to cause phosphatidylserine exposure as an early sign of apoptosis. Curcumin analogs with the highest apoptotic activity were selected for mechanistic studies in the most sensitive PANC-1 cells. Cytotoxic activity was accompanied by cytostatic effect since curcumin and analogs treatment led to G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Moreover, cytotoxic effect could be also detected via the accumulation of curcuminoids in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and the up-regulation of ER stress-related unfolded protein response (UPR genes: HSPA5, ATF4, XBP1, and DDIT3. The activated UPR induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase-3 activation and subsequent DNA breakdown in PANC-1 cells. Achiral curcumin analogs, C509, C521 and C524 possessed superior, 40-times more potent cytotoxic activity compared to natural dihydroxy-dimetoxycurcumin in PANC-1 cells.

  10. Quinuclidine compounds differently act as agonists of Kenyon cell nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and induced distinct effect on insect ganglionic depolarizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Swale, Daniel; Leray, Xavier; Benzidane, Yassine; Lebreton, Jacques; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Thany, Steeve H

    2013-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a new quinuclidine benzamide compound named LMA10203 acted as an agonist of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Its specific pharmacological profile on cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons (DUM) helped to identify alpha-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2 receptors. In the present study, we tested its effect on cockroach Kenyon cells. We found that it induced an inward current demonstrating that it bounds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on Kenyon cells. Interestingly, LMA10203-induced currents were completely blocked by the nicotinic antagonist α-bungarotoxin. We suggested that LMA10203 effect occurred through the activation of α-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors and did not involve α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2, previously identified in DUM neurons. In addition, we have synthesized two new compounds, LMA10210 and LMA10211, and compared their effects on Kenyon cells. These compounds were members of the 3-quinuclidinyl benzamide or benzoate families. Interestingly, 1 mM LMA10210 was not able to induce an inward current on Kenyon cells compared to LMA10211. Similarly, we did not find any significant effect of LMA10210 on cockroach ganglionic depolarization, whereas these three compounds were able to induce an effect on the central nervous system of the third instar M. domestica larvae. Our data suggested that these three compounds could bind to distinct cockroach nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  11. Who's who in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2008-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's sixth Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working lives. This is a unique reference.

  12. Who's who in fluorescence 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's third Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, photographs, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working livesThe directory provides company contact details with a brief list of fluorescence-related products.

  13. Image calibration in fluorescence microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, J.M.; van Rooij, G.J.; Hofstraat, J.W.; Brakenhoff, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    A fluorescence image calibration method is presented based on the use of standardized uniformly fluorescing reference layers. It is demonstrated to be effective for the correction of non-uniform imaging characteristics across the image (shading correction) as well as for relating fluorescence

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhmutov, D; Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined

  15. Photophysical properties of a surfactive long-chain styryl merocyanine dye as fluorescent probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, L.F.M., E-mail: Lailafmi@yahoo.com [Al-Azhar University, Faculty of Science, Chemistry Department, Nasr City, 12 Ibrahim El-Nagar, El-Hegaz Sq. Heliopolis, Cairo 11315 (Egypt)

    2012-09-15

    This work deals with detailed investigations of the photophysical properties of a styryl merocyanine dye, namely 1-cetyl-4-[4 Prime -(methoxy) styryl]-pyridinium bromide (CMSPB) of molecular rotor type. The solvatochromic analyses of the data in different solvents using the Kamlet-Taft parameters ({alpha}, {beta}, {pi}{sup Low-Asterisk }) were discussed. Optical excitation of the studied merocyanine dye populates a CT S{sub 1} state with about 22.64 folds higher dipole moment value relative to that in the S{sub 0} state. Moreover, the effect of solvent viscosity (glycerol at various temperatures (299.0-351.0 K)) on CMSPB fluorescent properties is analyzed to understand the molecular mechanisms of the characteristic increase in CMSPB fluorescence intensity. The results indicate that CMSPB exhibits fluorescent properties typical for molecular rotors. The results show that torsional relaxation dynamics of molecular rotors in high-viscosity solvents cannot be described by the simple stick boundary hydrodynamics defined by the Debye-Stokes-Einstein (DSE) equation. The fluorescence depolarization behavior in glycerol at various temperatures (299.0-351.0 K) shows that the molecular rotational diffusion is controlled by the free volume of the medium. Furthermore, excited state studies in ethanol/chloroform mixture revealed the formation of weak complex with chloroform of stoichiometry 1:1 with formation constant of 0.004l mol{sup -1}. Moreover, the increase of the quantum yield values in micellar solutions of CTAB and SDS relative to that of water indicates that the guest dye molecules are microencapsulated into the hydrophobic interior of host micelle. The obtained non-zero values of fluorescence polarization in micellar solution imply reduced rotational depolarization of dye molecules via association with the surfactant. Upon comparing the spectral data in micelles with those in homogeneous solvent systems, more can be learned of the structural details of the micellar

  16. Domain wall motion and magnetization reversal processes in a FeSi picture frame single crystal studied by the time-dependent neutron depolarization technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaik, F.J. van.

    1979-01-01

    The three dimensional neutron depolarization technique, which gives detailed information about the static properties of ferromagnetic materials, has been extended to a method by means of which the time dependence of magnetic phenomena can be studied. The measurement of the neutron depolarization against time is made possible by applying a periodical magnetic field on the investigated specimen and by continuous sampling of the transmitted neutron intensity in time channels, which are started synchronously with the applied field. The technique has been used in the study of the magnetic domain structure at room temperature of a (010) [001] picture frame FeSi single crystal (3.5 wt.% Si) with outer dimensions of (15 x 10 x 0.26) mm and a frame width of 2.78 mm. (Auth.)

  17. Depolarization by K+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in GABAergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1993-01-01

    differences in the mode of action of the two depolarizing stimuli were reflected in the properties of the increase in [Ca++]i elicited by 55 mM K+ and 100 microM glutamate, respectively. The K(+)-induced increase in [Ca++]i was reduced by both verapamil and Ca(++)-free media whereas the corresponding...... neurotransmitter glutamate (100 microM). Both depolarizing stimuli exerted prompt increases in the release of preloaded [3H]GABA as well as in [Ca++]i. However, the basic properties of transmitter release and the increase in [Ca++]i under a variety of conditions were different during stimulation with K...... was also reduced by organic (verapamil) and inorganic (Co++) Ca++ channel blockers but was insensitive to the GABA transport inhibitor SKF 89976A. In contrast, the second phase was less sensitive to nocodazole and Ca++ channel antagonists but could be inhibited by SKF 89976A. The glutamate-induced [3H...

  18. Fluorescent quantification of melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Bruno Pacheco; Matamá, Maria Teresa; Guimarães, Diana Isabel Pereira; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Melanin quantification is reportedly performed by absorption spectroscopy, commonly at 405 nm. Here, we propose the implementation of fluorescence spectroscopy for melanin assessment. In a typical in vitro assay to assess melanin production in response to an external stimulus, absorption spectroscopy clearly overvalues melanin content. This method is also incapable of distinguishing non-melanotic/amelanotic control cells from those that are actually capable of performing melanogenesis. Theref...

  19. Enhancement of Endocannabinoid-dependent Depolarization-induced Suppression of Excitation in Glycinergic Neurons by Prolonged Exposure to High Doses of Salicylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugaib, João; Leão, Ricardo M

    2018-02-17

    The Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus (DCN) is a region which has been traditionally linked to the genesis of tinnitus, the constant perception of a phantom sound. Sodium salicylate, a COX-2 inhibitor, can induce tinnitus in high doses. Hyperactivity of DCN neurons is observed in several animal models of tinnitus, including salicylate-induced tinnitus. The DCN presents several forms of endocannabinoid (EC)-dependent synaptic plasticity and COX-2 can also participate in the oxidative degradation of ECs. We recently demonstrated that short-term perfusion of sodium salicylate and other inhibitors of both oxidative and hydrolytic EC degradation did not affect depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE), a form of EC-dependent short-term synaptic plasticity. Here, we show that prolonged incubation with high doses of sodium salicylate (1.4 mM) enhances DSE of synapses onto glycinergic DCN interneurons but not those innervating glutamatergic DCN fusiform neurons. This effect was not reproduced with lower doses of salicylate (140 µM) or with ibuprofen, another inhibitor of COX-2. This effect was not observed in the presence of AM251, an antagonist/inverse agonist of cannabinoid CB1 receptors, showing that it was dependent on EC release. Finally we demonstrated that incubation with salicylate potentiated the increase in intracellular calcium during the depolarization. Our results point to an increased inhibition of DCN inhibitory CW neuron during depolarizations, probably by an enhanced EC release during the depolarizations, which is potentially significant for DCN hyperactivity and tinnitus generation. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Activation of muscarinic receptors by ACh release in hippocampal CA1 depolarizes VIP but has varying effects on parvalbumin-expressing basket cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L Andrew; Bell, Karen A; McQuiston, A Rory

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetically released acetylcholine (ACh) from medial septal afferents activates muscarinic receptors on both vasoactive intestinal peptide-expressing (VIP) and parvalbumin-expressing (PV) basket cells (BCs) in mouse hippocampal CA1. ACh release depolarized VIP BCs whereas PV BCs depolarized, hyperpolarized or produced biphasic responses. Depolarizing responses in VIP or PV BCs resulted in increased amplitudes and frequencies of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in CA1 pyramidal neurons. The instantaneous frequency of sIPSCs that result from excitation of VIP or PV BCs primarily occurred within the low gamma frequency band (25-50 Hz). We investigated the effect of acetylcholine release on mouse hippocampal CA1 perisomatically projecting interneurons. Acetylcholine was optogenetically released in hippocampal slices by expressing the excitatory optogenetic protein oChIEF-tdTomato in medial septum/diagonal band of Broca cholinergic neurons using Cre recombinase-dependent adeno-associated virally mediated transfection. The effect of optogenetically released acetylcholine was assessed on interneurons expressing Cre recombinase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or parvalbumin (PV) interneurons using whole cell patch clamp methods. Acetylcholine released onto VIP interneurons that innervate pyramidal neuron perisomatic regions (basket cells, BCs) were depolarized by muscarinic receptors. Although PV BCs were also excited by muscarinic receptor activation, they more frequently responded with hyperpolarizing or biphasic responses. Muscarinic receptor activation resulting from ACh release increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in downstream hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with peak instantaneous frequencies occurring in both the gamma and theta bandwidths. Both PV and VIP BCs contributed to the increased sIPSC frequency in pyramidal neurons and optogenetic suppression of PV or VIP BCs inhibited s

  1. Plasma membrane potential depolarization and cytosolic calcium flux are early events involved in tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) plant-to-plant communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebelo, Simon A; Matsui, Kenji; Ozawa, Rika; Maffei, Massimo E

    2012-11-01

    Tomato plants respond to herbivory by emitting volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are released into the surrounding atmosphere. We analyzed the tomato herbivore-induced VOCs and tested the ability of tomato receiver plants to detect tomato donor volatiles by analyzing early responses, including plasma membrane potential (V(m)) variations and cytosolic calcium ([Ca²⁺](cyt)) fluxes. Receiver tomato plants responded within seconds to herbivore-induced VOCs with a strong V(m) depolarization, which was only partly recovered by fluxing receiver plants with clean air. Among emitted volatiles, we identified by GC-MS some green leaf volatiles (GLVs) such as (E)-2-hexenal, (Z)-3-hexenal, (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, the monoterpene α-pinene, and the sesquiterpene β-caryophyllene. GLVs were found to exert the stronger V(m) depolarization, when compared to α-pinene and β-caryophyllene. Furthermore, V(m) depolarization was found to increase with increasing GLVs concentration. GLVs were also found to induce a strong [Ca²⁺](cyt) increase, particularly when (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate was tested both in solution and with a gas. On the other hand, α-pinene and β-caryophyllene, which also induced a significant V(m) depolarization with respect to controls, did not exert any significant effect on [Ca²⁺](cyt) homeostasis. Our results show for the first time that plant perception of volatile cues (especially GLVs) from the surrounding environment is mediated by early events, occurring within seconds and involving the alteration of the plasma membrane potential and the [Ca²⁺](cyt) flux. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Short communication: genetic ablation of L-type Ca2+ channels abolishes depolarization-induced Ca2+ release in arterial smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Tenorio, Miguel; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Porras, Cristina; Castellano, Antonio; Moosmang, Sven; Hofmann, Franz; Ureña, Juan; López-Barneo, José

    2010-04-16

    In arterial myocytes, membrane depolarization-induced Ca(2+) release (DICR) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) occurs through a metabotropic pathway that leads to inositol trisphosphate synthesis independently of extracellular Ca(2+) influx. Despite the fundamental functional relevance of DICR, its molecular bases are not well known. Biophysical and pharmacological data have suggested that L-type Ca(2+) channels could be the sensors coupling membrane depolarization to SR Ca(2+) release. This hypothesis was tested using smooth muscle-selective conditional Ca(v)1.2 knockout mice. In aortic myocytes, the decrease of Ca(2+) channel density was paralleled by the disappearance of SR Ca(2+) release induced by either depolarization or Ca(2+) channel agonists. Ca(v)1.2 channel deficiency resulted in almost abolition of arterial ring contraction evoked by DICR. Ca(2+) channel-null cells showed unaltered caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release and contraction. These data suggest that Ca(v)1.2 channels are indeed voltage sensors coupled to the metabolic cascade, leading to SR Ca(2+) release. These findings support a novel, ion-independent, functional role of L-type Ca(2+) channels linked to intracellular signaling pathways in vascular myocytes.

  3. Depolarization of the conductance-voltage relationship in the NaV1.5 mutant, E1784K, is due to altered fast inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin H Peters

    Full Text Available E1784K is the most common mixed long QT syndrome/Brugada syndrome mutant in the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5. E1784K shifts the midpoint of the channel conductance-voltage relationship to more depolarized membrane potentials and accelerates the rate of channel fast inactivation. The depolarizing shift in the midpoint of the conductance curve in E1784K is exacerbated by low extracellular pH. We tested whether the E1784K mutant shifts the channel conductance curve to more depolarized membrane potentials by affecting the channel voltage-sensors. We measured ionic currents and gating currents at pH 7.4 and pH 6.0 in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Contrary to our expectation, the movement of gating charges is shifted to more hyperpolarized membrane potentials by E1784K. Voltage-clamp fluorimetry experiments show that this gating charge shift is due to the movement of the DIVS4 voltage-sensor being shifted to more hyperpolarized membrane potentials. Using a model and experiments on fast inactivation-deficient channels, we show that changes to the rate and voltage-dependence of fast inactivation are sufficient to shift the conductance curve in E1784K. Our results localize the effects of E1784K to DIVS4, and provide novel insight into the role of the DIV-VSD in regulating the voltage-dependencies of activation and fast inactivation.

  4. Measurement of the depolarization in the elastic proton scattering on 1H, 27Al, and 89Y in the low energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.

    1986-01-01

    With the Erlangen QDQ magnetic spectrometer angular distributions of the depolarization in the elastic scattering of protons on 27 Al, 89 Y at 11 MeV and 1 H at 12 MeV were measured. The evaluation was performed for yttrium and aluminium by adding of additional terms in the optical model which regard the spin-spin interaction. The optical-model parameter without spin-spin potentials were stated by measurements of the cross section and the analyzing power in the 4π scattering chamber in Erlangen at several energies. The calculation of the depolarization which emerges because of the spin-spin interaction was performed by means of DWBA. The depolarization of the proton-proton scattering was evaluated by scattering-phase analysis. The fits were thereby performed on analyzing-power data. The electrical P-wave scattering phases resulted to δ 10 = 4.442±0.121, δ 11 = -2.515±0.026, and δ 12 = 0.937±0.038 (all in degrees). (orig./HSI) [de

  5. Naturally occurring fluorescence in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Carlos; Brunetti, Andrés E; Pedron, Federico N; Carnevale Neto, Fausto; Estrin, Darío A; Bari, Sara E; Chemes, Lucía B; Peporine Lopes, Norberto; Lagorio, María G; Faivovich, Julián

    2017-04-04

    Fluorescence, the absorption of short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation reemitted at longer wavelengths, has been suggested to play several biological roles in metazoans. This phenomenon is uncommon in tetrapods, being restricted mostly to parrots and marine turtles. We report fluorescence in amphibians, in the tree frog Hypsiboas punctatus, showing that fluorescence in living frogs is produced by a combination of lymph and glandular emission, with pigmentary cell filtering in the skin. The chemical origin of fluorescence was traced to a class of fluorescent compounds derived from dihydroisoquinolinone, here named hyloins. We show that fluorescence contributes 18-29% of the total emerging light under twilight and nocturnal scenarios, largely enhancing brightness of the individuals and matching the sensitivity of night vision in amphibians. These results introduce an unprecedented source of pigmentation in amphibians and highlight the potential relevance of fluorescence in visual perception in terrestrial environments.

  6. Magel2 is required for leptin-mediated depolarization of POMC neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E Mercer

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi Syndrome is the most common syndromic form of human obesity and is caused by the loss of function of several genes, including MAGEL2. Mice lacking Magel2 display increased weight gain with excess adiposity and other defects suggestive of hypothalamic deficiency. We demonstrate Magel2-null mice are insensitive to the anorexic effect of peripherally administered leptin. Although their excessive adiposity and hyperleptinemia likely contribute to this physiological leptin resistance, we hypothesized that Magel2 may also have an essential role in intracellular leptin responses in hypothalamic neurons. We therefore measured neuronal activation by immunohistochemistry on brain sections from leptin-injected mice and found a reduced number of arcuate nucleus neurons activated after leptin injection in the Magel2-null animals, suggesting that most but not all leptin receptor-expressing neurons retain leptin sensitivity despite hyperleptinemia. Electrophysiological measurements of arcuate nucleus neurons expressing the leptin receptor demonstrated that although neurons exhibiting hyperpolarizing responses to leptin are present in normal numbers, there were no neurons exhibiting depolarizing responses to leptin in the mutant mice. Additional studies demonstrate that arcuate nucleus pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC expressing neurons are unresponsive to leptin. Interestingly, Magel2-null mice are hypersensitive to the anorexigenic effects of the melanocortin receptor agonist MT-II. In Prader-Willi Syndrome, loss of MAGEL2 may likewise abolish leptin responses in POMC hypothalamic neurons. This neural defect, together with increased fat mass, blunted circadian rhythm, and growth hormone response pathway defects that are also linked to loss of MAGEL2, could contribute to the hyperphagia and obesity that are hallmarks of this disorder.

  7. Imaging rapid redistribution of sensory-evoked depolarization through existing cortical pathways after targeted stroke in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigler, Albrecht; Mohajerani, Majid H; Murphy, Timothy H

    2009-07-14

    Evidence suggests that recovery from stroke damage results from the production of new synaptic pathways within surviving brain regions over weeks. To address whether brain function might redistribute more rapidly through preexisting pathways, we examined patterns of sensory-evoked depolarization in mouse somatosensory cortex within hours after targeted stroke to a subset of the forelimb sensory map. Brain activity was mapped with voltage-sensitive dye imaging allowing millisecond time resolution over 9 mm(2) of brain. Before targeted stroke, we report rapid activation of the forelimb area within 10 ms of contralateral forelimb stimulation and more delayed activation of related areas of cortex such as the hindlimb sensory and motor cortices. After stroke to a subset of the forelimb somatosensory cortex map, function was lost in ischemic areas within the forelimb map center, but maintained in regions 200-500 microm blood flow deficits indicating the size of a perfused, but nonfunctional, penumbra. In many cases, stroke led to only partial loss of the forelimb map, indicating that a subset of a somatosensory domain can function on its own. Within the forelimb map spared by stroke, forelimb-stimulated responses became delayed in kinetics, and their center of activity shifted into adjacent hindlimb and posterior-lateral sensory areas. We conclude that the focus of forelimb-specific somatosensory cortex activity can be rapidly redistributed after ischemic damage. Given that redistribution occurs within an hour, the effect is likely to involve surviving accessory pathways and could potentially contribute to rapid behavioral compensation or direct future circuit rewiring.

  8. Spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC) energies and the possibility to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles

    OpenAIRE

    Baryshevsky, V. G.

    2015-01-01

    We study the phenomena of spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals in the range of high energies that will be available at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC). It is shown that these phenomena can be used to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles in this range of energies. We also demonstrate that the phenomenon of particle spin depolarization in crystals provides a unique possibility of measuring the anomalous magneti...

  9. Fluorescent Silicon Clusters and Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    von Haeften, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The fluorescence of silicon clusters is reviewed. Atomic clusters of silicon have been at the focus of research for several decades because of the relevance of size effects for material properties, the importance of silicon in electronics and the potential applications in bio-medicine. To date numerous examples of nanostructured forms of fluorescent silicon have been reported. This article introduces the principles and underlying concepts relevant for fluorescence of nanostructured silicon su...

  10. Development of a fluorescent cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Epstein, R.I.; Gosnell, T.R.; Mungan, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    Recent work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated the physical principles for a new type of solid-state cryocooler based on anti-Stokes fluorescence. Design studies indicate that a vibration-free, low-mass ''fluorescent cryocooler'' could operate for years with efficiencies and cooling powers comparable to current commercial systems. This paper presents concepts for a fluorescent cryocooler, design considerations and expected performance

  11. Depolarization ratio of polar stratospheric clouds in coastal Antarctica: comparison analysis between ground-based Micro Pulse Lidar and space-borne CALIOP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Córdoba-Jabonero

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs play an important role in polar ozone depletion, since they are involved in diverse ozone destruction processes (chlorine activation, denitrification. The degree of that ozone reduction is depending on the type of PSCs, and hence on their occurrence. Therefore PSC characterization, mainly focused on PSC-type discrimination, is widely demanded. The backscattering (R and volume linear depolarization (δV ratios are the parameters usually used in lidar measurements for PSC detection and identification. In this work, an improved version of the standard NASA/Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL-4, which includes a built-in depolarization detection module, has been used for PSC observations above the coastal Antarctic Belgrano II station (Argentina, 77.9° S 34.6° W, 256 m a.s.l. since 2009. Examination of the MPL-4 δV feature as a suitable index for PSC-type discrimination is based on the analysis of the two-channel data, i.e., the parallel (p- and perpendicular (s- polarized MPL signals. This study focuses on the comparison of coincident δV-profiles as obtained from ground-based MPL-4 measurements during three Antarctic winters with those reported from the space-borne lidar CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization aboard the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation satellite in the same period (83 simultaneous cases are analysed for 2009–2011 austral winter times. Three different approaches are considered for the comparison analysis between both lidar profile data sets in order to test the degree of agreement: the correlation coefficient (CC, as a measure of the relationship between both PSC vertical structures; the mean differences together with their root mean square (RMS values found between data sets; and the percentage differences (BIAS, parameter also used in profiling comparisons between CALIOP and other ground-based lidar systems. All of them are examined as a function

  12. Real-time optical diagnosis of the rat brain exposed to a laser-induced shock wave: observation of spreading depolarization, vasoconstriction and hypoxemia-oligemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunichi Sato

    Full Text Available Despite many efforts, the pathophysiology and mechanism of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI have not yet been elucidated, partially due to the difficulty of real-time diagnosis and extremely complex factors determining the outcome. In this study, we topically applied a laser-induced shock wave (LISW to the rat brain through the skull, for which real-time measurements of optical diffuse reflectance and electroencephalogram (EEG were performed. Even under conditions showing no clear changes in systemic physiological parameters, the brain showed a drastic light scattering change accompanied by EEG suppression, which indicated the occurrence of spreading depression, long-lasting hypoxemia and signal change indicating mitochondrial energy impairment. Under the standard LISW conditions examined, hemorrhage and contusion were not apparent in the cortex. To investigate events associated with spreading depression, measurement of direct current (DC potential, light scattering imaging and stereomicroscopic observation of blood vessels were also conducted for the brain. After LISW application, we observed a distinct negative shift in the DC potential, which temporally coincided with the transit of a light scattering wave, showing the occurrence of spreading depolarization and concomitant change in light scattering. Blood vessels in the brain surface initially showed vasodilatation for 3-4 min, which was followed by long-lasting vasoconstriction, corresponding to hypoxemia. Computer simulation based on the inverse Monte Carlo method showed that hemoglobin oxygen saturation declined to as low as ∼35% in the long-term hypoxemic phase. Overall, we found that topical application of a shock wave to the brain caused spreading depolarization/depression and prolonged severe hypoxemia-oligemia, which might lead to pathological conditions in the brain. Although further study is needed, our findings suggest that spreading depolarization/depression is one of

  13. Dry versus wet marine particle optical properties: RH dependence of depolarization ratio, backscatter, and extinction from multiwavelength lidar measurements during SALTRACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haarig

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Triple-wavelength lidar observations of the depolarization ratio and the backscatter coefficient of marine aerosol as a function of relative humidity (RH are presented with a 5 min time resolution. The measurements were performed at Barbados (13° N, 59° W during the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud interaction Experiment (SALTRACE winter campaign in February 2014. The phase transition from spherical sea salt particles to cubic-like sea salt crystals was observed with a polarization lidar. The radiosonde and water-vapor Raman lidar observations show a drop in RH below 50 % in the marine aerosol layer simultaneously with a strong increase in particle linear depolarization ratio, which reaches values up to 0.12 ± 0.08 (at 355 nm, 0.15 ± 0.03 (at 532 nm, and 0.10 ± 0.01 (at 1064 nm. The lidar ratio (extinction-to-backscatter ratio increased from 19 and 23 sr for spherical sea salt particles to 27 and 25 sr (at 355 and 532 nm, respectively for cubic-like particle ensembles. Furthermore the scattering enhancement due to hygroscopic growth of the marine aerosol particles under atmospheric conditions was measured. Extinction enhancement factors from 40 to 80 % RH of 1.94 ± 0.94 at 355 nm, 3.70 ± 1.14 at 532 nm, and 5.37 ± 1.66 at 1064 nm were found. The enhanced depolarization ratios and lidar ratios were compared to modeling studies of cubic sea salt particles.

  14. Dry versus wet marine particle optical properties: RH dependence of depolarization ratio, backscatter, and extinction from multiwavelength lidar measurements during SALTRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarig, Moritz; Ansmann, Albert; Gasteiger, Josef; Kandler, Konrad; Althausen, Dietrich; Baars, Holger; Radenz, Martin; Farrell, David A.

    2017-11-01

    Triple-wavelength lidar observations of the depolarization ratio and the backscatter coefficient of marine aerosol as a function of relative humidity (RH) are presented with a 5 min time resolution. The measurements were performed at Barbados (13° N, 59° W) during the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) winter campaign in February 2014. The phase transition from spherical sea salt particles to cubic-like sea salt crystals was observed with a polarization lidar. The radiosonde and water-vapor Raman lidar observations show a drop in RH below 50 % in the marine aerosol layer simultaneously with a strong increase in particle linear depolarization ratio, which reaches values up to 0.12 ± 0.08 (at 355 nm), 0.15 ± 0.03 (at 532 nm), and 0.10 ± 0.01 (at 1064 nm). The lidar ratio (extinction-to-backscatter ratio) increased from 19 and 23 sr for spherical sea salt particles to 27 and 25 sr (at 355 and 532 nm, respectively) for cubic-like particle ensembles. Furthermore the scattering enhancement due to hygroscopic growth of the marine aerosol particles under atmospheric conditions was measured. Extinction enhancement factors from 40 to 80 % RH of 1.94 ± 0.94 at 355 nm, 3.70 ± 1.14 at 532 nm, and 5.37 ± 1.66 at 1064 nm were found. The enhanced depolarization ratios and lidar ratios were compared to modeling studies of cubic sea salt particles.

  15. Fluorescence Spectra of Highlighter Inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; King, Damon

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra excited by laser pointers have been the subject of several papers in "TPT". These papers all describe a fluorescence phenomenon in which the reflected laser light undergoes a change in color: this color change results from the combination of some partially reflected laser light and additional colors generated by…

  16. ANTAGONISTIC POTENTIAL OF FLUORESCENT Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth performance of Lycopersicon esculentum in Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani infested soil. Biochemical characteristics of fluorescent Pseudomonas showed that all ten isolates were positive ...

  17. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  18. K+-dependent paradoxical membrane depolarization and Na+ overload, major and reversible contributors to weakness by ion channel leaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Weber, Marc-André; Fauler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    M, in accordance with their permanent weakness, and up to 99% were in P2 at a [K(+)](o) of 1.5 mM, in accordance with their paralytic attacks. Of 36 HypoPP patients, 25 had permanent weakness and myoplasmic intracellular Na(+) ([Na(+)](i)) overload (up to 24 mM) as shown by in vivo (23)Na-MRI. Acetazolamide...... that the principle of paradoxical depolarization and loss of function upon [K(+)](o) reduction may apply to other tissues, such as heart or brain, when they become leaky (e.g., because of ischemia)....

  19. Intra-leukocytic hemosiderin inclusions detected as pseudoeosinophils by automated depolarization analysis in a patient with beta-thalassaemia major and immune hemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, George T; Perry, J Leonard; Al-Jefri, Abdullah; Scott, Colin Stephen

    2005-01-01

    This report describes a patient with intra-leukocytic hemosiderin inclusions associated with iron overload and acute infection. These inclusions resulted in a false identification of eosinophils rather than neutrophils using an automated analyzer. The analyzer interpreted the aberrant increased depolarization as a reflection of eosinophils. No eosinophils were found by examination of the blood smear. The implications for the hematology morphologist is that visual inspection of a blood smear is nearly always indicated whenever any departure from strict normality is noted in the output from an automated blood cell counter.

  20. The free radical spin-trap alpha-PBN attenuates periinfarct depolarizations following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats without reducing infarct volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Bruhn, Torben; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2003-01-01

    (control: 28.3+/-16.3 mm3 vs. alpha-PBN 23.7+/-7.4 mm3). In the second series of experiments, periinfarct depolarizations (PIDs) were recorded with an extracellular DC electrode at two locations in the ischemic penumbra for the initial 3 h following MCAO. alpha-PBN (100 mg/kg, single dose in conjunction...... with occlusion) significantly reduced the total number (median value of 3 PIDs in the control groups vs. 1 PID in alpha-PBN groups, p...

  1. Depolarization of the 4{sup 1}D{sub 2} state of a helium atom by charged particles in beam plasma discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazantsev, S.A.; Luchinkina, V.V.; Mezentsev, A.P.; Mustafaev, A.S.; Rebane, V.N.; Rys, A.G.; Stepanov, Yu.L. [St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1994-06-01

    Depolarization of the 4{sup 1}D{sub 2}-2{sup 1}P{sub 1} spectra line of He atoms caused by collisions with charged particles in beam plasma discharge is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. A comparison is made between the values of the rate constant for the collisional breakdown of alignment of helium atoms in the 4{sup 1}D{sub 2} state calculated from the theory of collisional relaxation of atomic polarization moments and determined from the experimentally observed broadening of the Hanle signal contour with the increase of the beam discharge current. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  3. On the mechanism of isoprenaline- and forskolin-induced depolarization of single guinea-pig ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, T M; Noble, D; Noble, S J; Powell, T; Twist, V W; Yamaoka, K

    1988-06-01

    1. Isoprenaline (10 nM to 1 microM) and forskolin (0.6-100 microM) depolarized single guinea-pig myocytes studied in vitro. Under voltage clamp both agents caused an inward current to flow. 2. These effects were abolished by propranolol (100 nM) and the beta1-antagonist metoprolol (100-200 nM), but not by the beta2-agonist [corrected] salbutamol (1 microM). 3. The interaction of isoprenaline with forskolin, caffeine or isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) on current amplitude was as expected if all of these drugs were causing inward current by increasing intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP). Low concentrations of forskolin (less than 600 nM) or IBMX (less than 20 microM) potentiated the effect of isoprenaline, whereas isoprenaline caused no further inward current in cells in which high concentrations of forskolin (600 nM-100 microM) or IBMX (20 microM-1 mM) were already evoking maximum inward current. 4. Isoprenaline-induced inward current was reduced 30-50% by acetylcholine (10-30 microM). This action of acetylcholine was blocked by atropine (100 nM). 5. The effect of isoprenaline on holding current was critically dependent on temperature. The onset of the current was delayed and its amplitude reduced as the myocyte was cooled from 37 degrees C to ambient temperature (22-24 degrees C). 6. Isoprenaline-induced inward current was not affected by the potassium channel blockers barium (2 mM) or tetraethylammonium (TEA; 10-20 mM). The amplitude of the inward current did not vary as a function of [K+]o. 7. The inward current was not affected by the calcium channel blockers cadmium 1 mM, or nifedipine (10 microM), or when internal calcium was reduced by including EGTA in the recording electrode filling solution. 8. The amplitude of the current was also unaffected by caesium (5 mM), which blocks the hyperpolarization-activated, non-specific channel if, or by strophanthidin (10 microM) which blocks the Na+-K+ pump. It was unchanged by substitution

  4. Shedding Some Light on Fluorescent Bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Nicholas R.

    1996-01-01

    Explores some of the principles behind the working of fluorescent bulbs using a specially prepared fluorescent bulb with the white inner fluorescent coating applied along only half its length. Discusses the spectrum, the bulb plasma, and light production. (JRH)

  5. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  6. Fluorescent standards for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belko, N.; Kavalenka, S.; Samtsov, M.

    2016-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is an evolving technique for treatment of various oncological diseases. This method employs photosensitizers - species that lead to death of tumor cells after the photoactivation. For further development and novel applications of photodynamic therapy new photosensitizers are required. After synthesis of a new photosensitizer it is important to know its concentration in different biological tissues after its administration and distribution. The concentration is frequently measured by the extraction method, which has some disadvantages, e.g. it requires many biological test subjects that are euthanized during the measurement. We propose to measure the photosensitizer concentration in tissue by its fluorescence. For this purpose fluorescent standards were developed. The standards are robust and simple to produce; their fluorescence signal does not change with time. The fluorescence intensity of fluorescent standards seems to depend linearly on the dye concentration. A set of standards thus allow the calibration of a spectrometer. Finally, the photosensitizer concentration can be determined by the fluorescence intensity after comparing the corresponding spectrum with spectra of the set of fluorescent standards. A biological test subject is not euthanized during this kind of experiment. We hope this more humane technique can be used in future instead of the extraction method.

  7. Angle - resolved photoemission study of two phases of the GaAs(100)-c(4x4) surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cukr, Miroslav; Jiříček, Petr; Bartoš, Igor; Sadowski, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 100, - (2008), 072017/1-072017/4 ISSN 1742-6588 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100628; GA ČR GA202/07/0601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : gallium arsenide * molecular beam epitaxy * photoelectron spectroscopy * surface reconstruction * surface phases * electron states Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  8. The electronic structure of clean and adsorbate-covered Bi2Se3: an angle-resolved photoemission study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianchi, Marco; Hatch, Richard; Guan, Dandan

    2012-01-01

    , the Dirac point moves to higher binding energies, indicating an increasingly strong downward bending of the bands near the surface. This time-dependent band bending is related to a contamination of the surface and can be accelerated by intentionally exposing the surface to carbon monoxide and other species...

  9. Angle-resolved photoemission studies of lattice polaron formation in the cuprate Ca2CuO2Cl2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, K.M.

    2010-05-03

    To elucidate the nature of the single-particle excitations in the undoped parent cuprates, we have performed a detailed study of Ca{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} using photoemission spectroscopy. The photoemission lineshapes of the lower Hubbard band are found to be well-described by a polaron model. By comparing the lineshape and temperature dependence of the lower Hubbard band with additional O 2p and Ca 3p states, we conclude that the dominant broadening mechanism arises from the interaction between the photohole and the lattice. The strength of this interaction was observed to be strongly anisotropic and may have important implications for the momentum dependence of the first doped hole states.

  10. Review of the theoretical description of time-resolved angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy in electron-phonon mediated superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemper, A.F. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Sentef, M.A. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Moritz, B. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences (SIMES), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Devereaux, T.P. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences (SIMES), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Freericks, J.K. [Department of Physics, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-09-15

    We review recent work on the theory for pump/probe photoemission spectroscopy of electron-phonon mediated superconductors in both the normal and the superconducting states. We describe the formal developments that allow one to solve the Migdal-Eliashberg theory in nonequilibrium for an ultrashort laser pumping field, and explore the solutions which illustrate the relaxation as energy is transferred from electrons to phonons. We focus on exact results emanating from sum rules and approximate numerical results which describe rules of thumb for relaxation processes. In addition, in the superconducting state, we describe how Anderson-Higgs oscillations can be excited due to the nonlinear coupling with the electric field and describe mechanisms where pumping the system enhances superconductivity. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Exploring electronic structure of one-atom thick polycrystalline graphene films: A nano angle resolved photoemission study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, José; Razado, Ivy; Lorcy, Stéphane; Fleurier, Romain; Pichonat, Emmanuelle; Vignaud, Dominique; Wallart, Xavier; Asensio, María C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to produce large, continuous and defect free films of graphene is presently a major challenge for multiple applications. Even though the scalability of graphene films is closely associated to a manifest polycrystalline character, only a few numbers of experiments have explored so far the electronic structure down to single graphene grains. Here we report a high resolution angle and lateral resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (nano-ARPES) study of one-atom thick graphene films on thin copper foils synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. Our results show the robustness of the Dirac relativistic-like electronic spectrum as a function of the size, shape and orientation of the single-crystal pristine grains in the graphene films investigated. Moreover, by mapping grain by grain the electronic dynamics of this unique Dirac system, we show that the single-grain gap-size is 80% smaller than the multi-grain gap recently reported by classical ARPES. PMID:23942471

  12. Angle-resolved XPS analysis and characterization of monolayer and multilayer silane films for DNA coupling to silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shircliff, Rebecca A; Stradins, Paul; Moutinho, Helio; Fennell, John; Ghirardi, Maria L; Cowley, Scott W; Branz, Howard M; Martin, Ina T

    2013-03-26

    We measure silane density and Sulfo-EMCS cross-linker coupling efficiency on aminosilane films by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. We then characterize DNA immobilization and hybridization on these films by (32)P-radiometry. We find that the silane film structure controls the efficiency of the subsequent steps toward DNA hybridization. A self-limited silane monolayer produced from 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane (APDMES) provides a silane surface density of ~3 nm(-2). Thin (1 h deposition) and thick (19 h deposition) multilayer films are generated from 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), resulting in surfaces with increased roughness compared to the APDMES monolayer. Increased silane surface density is estimated for the 19 h APTES film, due to a ∼32% increase in surface area compared to the APDMES monolayer. High cross-linker coupling efficiencies are measured for all three silane films. DNA immobilization densities are similar for the APDMES monolayer and 1 h APTES. However, the DNA immobilization density is double for the 19 h APTES, suggesting that increased surface area allows for a higher probe attachment. The APDMES monolayer has the lowest DNA target density and hybridization efficiency. This is attributed to the steric hindrance as the random packing limit is approached for DNA double helices (dsDNA, diameter ≥ 2 nm) on a plane. The heterogeneity and roughness of the APTES films reduce this steric hindrance and allow for tighter packing of DNA double helices, resulting in higher hybridization densities and efficiencies. The low steric hindrance of the thin, one to two layer APTES film provides the highest hybridization efficiency of nearly 88%, with 0.21 dsDNA/nm(2). The XPS data also reveal water on the cross-linker-treated surface that is implicated in device aging.

  13. Superconducting gap structure of heavy-Fermion compound URu2Si2 determined by angle-resolved thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Y.; Shishido, H.; Shibauchi, T.; Haga, Y.; Matsuda, T. D.; Onuki, Y.; Matsuda, Y.

    2009-05-01

    In heavy-Fermion compound URu2Si2, unusual superconductivity is embedded in an enigmatic 'hidden order' phase. Recently, it has been shown that URu2Si2 is essentially a multiband superconductor associated with the semimetallic compensated electronic structure. Here, to pin down the detailed superconducting gap structure, we have performed thermal transport measurements on ultraclean URu2Si2 single crystals in magnetic fields rotating various directions relative to the crystal axes. By changing the amplitude of magnetic fields, we determined the nodal topology of electron and hole band separately. The results indicate a new type of unconventional superconductivity with two distinct gaps, in which horizontal line nodes lie within the basal ab plane of the light-hole band with small gap and point nodes along the c-axis in the heavy electron band with large gap. This gap structure is consistent with 'chiral' d-wave symmetry with a form {\\hat{k}}_{z}({\\hat{k}}_{x}+i{\\hat{k}}_{y}) .

  14. Superconducting gap structure of heavy-Fermion compound URu2Si2 determined by angle-resolved thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasahara, Y; Shishido, H; Shibauchi, T; Matsuda, Y; Haga, Y; Matsuda, T D; Onuki, Y

    2009-01-01

    In heavy-Fermion compound URu 2 Si 2 , unusual superconductivity is embedded in an enigmatic 'hidden order' phase. Recently, it has been shown that URu 2 Si 2 is essentially a multiband superconductor associated with the semimetallic compensated electronic structure. Here, to pin down the detailed superconducting gap structure, we have performed thermal transport measurements on ultraclean URu 2 Si 2 single crystals in magnetic fields rotating various directions relative to the crystal axes. By changing the amplitude of magnetic fields, we determined the nodal topology of electron and hole band separately. The results indicate a new type of unconventional superconductivity with two distinct gaps, in which horizontal line nodes lie within the basal ab plane of the light-hole band with small gap and point nodes along the c-axis in the heavy electron band with large gap. This gap structure is consistent with 'chiral' d-wave symmetry with a form k-circumflex z (k-circumflex x +ik-circumflex y ).

  15. Ultrasound Attenuation in Sr2RuO4: An Angle-Resolved Study of the Superconducting Gap Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupien, C.; Macfarlane, W. A.; Proust, Cyril; Taillefer, Louis; Mao, Z. Q.; Maeno, Y.

    2001-06-01

    We present a study of the electronic ultrasound attenuation α in the unconventional superconductor Sr2RuO4. The power law behavior of α at temperatures down to Tc/30 clearly indicates the presence of nodes in the gap. In the normal state, we find an enormous anisotropy of α in the basal plane of the tetragonal structure. In the superconducting state, the temperature dependence of α also exhibits significant anisotropy. We discuss these results in relation to possible gap functions.

  16. Fluorescence Spectra of Highlighter Inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; King, Damon

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra excited by laser pointers have been the subject of several papers in TPT. These papers all describe a fluorescence phenomenon in which the reflected laser light undergoes a change in color: this color change results from the combination of some partially reflected laser light and additional colors generated by fluorescent emission. Here we examine the fluorescence spectra of highlighter inks using green and violet laser pointers. We use an RSpec Explorer spectrometer to obtain spectra and compare the emission spectra of blue, green, yellow, orange, pink, and purple highlighters. The website Compound Interest details the chemical composition of highlighter inks; in addition, the site discusses how some base dye colors can be combined to produce the variety commercially available colors. Spectra obtained in this study were qualitatively consistent with the Compound Interest site. We discuss similarities and differences between various highlighter colors and conclude with the relevance of such studies to physics students.

  17. Fluorescence diagnosis in tissue injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Vitória H.; Ferreira, Juliana; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2009-06-01

    Background and Objectives: The paper aim was to evaluate the efficacy of the fluorescence spectroscopy in the detection of UV-induced skin change of Wistar rats. Study Design/ Materials and Methods: In a group male Wistar rats, the skin damage was produced by an UV-C lamp, periodically monitored using the laser-induced fluorescence, until complete healing process. After determining a characteristic emission band present in the fluorescence spectra of the induced injuries, the amplitude band monitoring allowed the follow up on the injury and the recovery. Results: We observed the appearance of two new emission bands more evident at the injury spectra when compared to the spectrums from normal non-exposed tissue. Following such spectral bands was possible to observe the establishment and recovery. Conclusions: The fluorescence spectroscopy is a promising technique in distinguishing between normal and UV induced skin change helping the evaluation of changes which are irreversible cancer tissue characteristics.

  18. Instructive for disposal of fluorescent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar Vargas, Gerlin

    2014-01-01

    An instructive is established for the management system of waste fluorescent lamps, ensuring the storage, collection, transportation, and final disposal. The lamp is changed by an official of the Seccion de Matenimiento Construccion of the Oficina de Servicios Generales or is produced with the support of an official of the unit. The fluorescent should be deposited in stock of materials of the building maintenance section or unit specified with the help of a staff and in appropriate conditions. The fluorescent lamp is transported according to the guidelines in the manual. A responsible company is contracted by la Vicerrectoria de Administracion of the Universidad de Costa Rica dedicated to the transport and proper handling of fluorescent lamps [es

  19. Fluorescence axial nanotomography with plasmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, Nicholas I; Fruhwirth, Gilbert O; Krasavin, Alexey V; Ng, Tony; Richards, David

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel imaging technique with super-resolution axial sensitivity, exploiting the changes in fluorescence lifetime above a plasmonic substrate. Using conventional confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging, we show that it is possible to deliver down to 6 nm axial position sensitivity of fluorophores in whole biological cell imaging. We employ this technique to map the topography of the cellular membrane, and demonstrate its application in an investigation of receptor-mediated endocytosis in carcinoma cells.

  20. Fluorescence Studies of Lysozyme Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence is one of the most powerful tools available for the study of macromolecules. For example, fluorescence can be used to study self association through methods such as anisotropy (the rotational rate of the molecule in solution), quenching (the accessibility of a bound probe to the bulk solution), and resonance energy transfer (measurement of the distance between two species). Fluorescence can also be used to study the local environment of the probe molecules, and the changes in that environment which accompany crystal nucleation and growth. However fluorescent techniques have been very much underutilized in macromolecular growth studies. One major advantage is that the fluorescent species generally must be at low concentration, typically ca 10-5 to 10-6 M. Thus one can study a very wide range of solution conditions, ranging from very high to very low protein concentration, he latter of which are not readily accessible to scattering techniques. We have prepared a number of fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL). Fluorescent probes have been attached to two different sites, ASP 101 and the N-terrninal amine, with a sought for use in different lines of study. Preliminary resonance energy transfer studies have been -carried out using pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 mn, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and cascade blue (Ex 377 run, Em 423 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. The emission of both the pyrene and cascade blue probes was followed as a function of the salt protein concentrations. The data show an increase in cascade blue and a concomitant decrease in the pyrene fluorescence as either the salt or protein concentrations are increased, suggesting that the two species are approaching each other close enough for resonance energy transfer to occur. This data can be analyzed to measure the distance between the probe molecules and, knowing their locations on the protein molecule their distances from and orientations with respect to each

  1. FLUORESCENCE DIAGNOSIS FOR RECURRENT BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Ulyanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical case of successful use of local fluorescence spectroscopy combined with fluorescence imaging during cystoscopy for diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer is represented in the article. Histological study of fluorescent foci confirmed tumor growth (urothelial carcinoma in all areas with high levels of diagnostic parameter. In the fluorescent focus with low diagnostic parameter inflammation was detected.

  2. The free radical spin-trap alpha-PBN attenuates periinfarct depolarizations following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats without reducing infarct volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Bruhn, Torben; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2003-01-01

    (control: 28.3+/-16.3 mm3 vs. alpha-PBN 23.7+/-7.4 mm3). In the second series of experiments, periinfarct depolarizations (PIDs) were recorded with an extracellular DC electrode at two locations in the ischemic penumbra for the initial 3 h following MCAO. alpha-PBN (100 mg/kg, single dose in conjunction...... with occlusion) significantly reduced the total number (median value of 3 PIDs in the control groups vs. 1 PID in alpha-PBN groups, p...... with a single dose of alpha-PBN (100 mg/kg) or saline. Body temperature was measured and controlled for the first 24 h to obtain identical temperature curves in the two groups. Cortical infarct volumes were determined on histological sections 7 days later. alpha-PBN did not significantly reduce infarct volume...

  3. Classification of Particle Shapes from Lidar Depolarization Ratios in Convective Ice Clouds Compared to in situ Observations During CRYSTAL-FACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Vincent; Winker, David; McGill, Matthew; Lawson, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This manuscript describes a method to class@ cirrus cloud ice particle shape using lidar depolarization measurements as a basis for segregating different particle shape regimes. Measurements from the ER-2 Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) system during CRYSTAL-FACE provide the basis for this work. While the CPL onboard the ER-2 aircraft was providing remote sensing measurements of cirrus clouds, the Cloud Particle Imager (CPI) onboard the WB-57 aircraft was flying inside those same clouds to sample particle sizes. The results of classifying particle shapes using the CPL data are compared to the in situ measurements made using the CPI , and there is found to be good agreement between the particle shape inferred from the CPL data and that actually measured by the CPI. If proven practical, application of this technique to spaceborne observations could lead to large-scale classification of cirrus cloud particle shapes.

  4. Glucose stimulates neurotensin secretion from the rat small intestine by mechanisms involving SGLT1 and GLUT2 leading to cell depolarization and calcium influx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Bechmann, Louise Ellegaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2015-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is a neurohormone produced in the central nervous system and in the gut epithelium by the enteroendocrine N cell. NT may play a role in appetite regulation and may have potential in obesity treatment. Glucose ingestion stimulates NT secretion in healthy young humans......, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. Here, we show that rats express NT in the gut and that glucose gavage stimulates secretion similarly to oral glucose in humans. Therefore, we conducted experiments on isolated perfused rat small intestine with a view to characterize the cellular pathways...... of secretion. Luminal glucose (20% wt/vol) stimulated secretion but vascular glucose (5, 10, or 15 mmol/l) was without effect. The underlying mechanisms depend on membrane depolarization and calcium influx, since the voltage-gated calcium channel inhibitor nifedipine and the KATP channel opener diazoxide...

  5. Total internal reflection fluorescence anisotropy imaging microscopy: setup, calibration, and data processing for protein polymerization measurements in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströhl, Florian; Wong, Hovy H. W.; Holt, Christine E.; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence anisotropy imaging microscopy (FAIM) measures the depolarization properties of fluorophores to deduce molecular changes in their environment. For successful FAIM, several design principles have to be considered and a thorough system-specific calibration protocol is paramount. One important calibration parameter is the G factor, which describes the system-induced errors for different polarization states of light. The determination and calibration of the G factor is discussed in detail in this article. We present a novel measurement strategy, which is particularly suitable for FAIM with high numerical aperture objectives operating in TIRF illumination mode. The method makes use of evanescent fields that excite the sample with a polarization direction perpendicular to the image plane. Furthermore, we have developed an ImageJ/Fiji plugin, AniCalc, for FAIM data processing. We demonstrate the capabilities of our TIRF-FAIM system by measuring β -actin polymerization in human embryonic kidney cells and in retinal neurons.

  6. L-type calcium channels and MAP kinase contribute to thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced depolarization in thalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaj, Miloslav; Zhang, Li; Renaud, Leo P

    2016-06-01

    In rat paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT) neurons, activation of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors enhances neuronal excitability via concurrent decrease in a G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K (GIRK)-like conductance and opening of a cannabinoid receptor-sensitive transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC)-like conductance. Here, we investigated the calcium (Ca(2+)) contribution to the components of this TRH-induced response. TRH-induced membrane depolarization was reduced in the presence of intracellular BAPTA, also in media containing nominally zero [Ca(2+)]o, suggesting a critical role for both intracellular Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) influx. TRH-induced inward current was unchanged by T-type Ca(2+) channel blockade, but was decreased by blockade of high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels (HVACCs). Both the pharmacologically isolated GIRK-like and the TRPC-like components of the TRH-induced response were decreased by nifedipine and increased by BayK8644, implying Ca(2+) influx via L-type Ca(2+) channels. Only the TRPC-like conductance was reduced by either thapsigargin or dantrolene, suggesting a role for ryanodine receptors and Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release in this component of the TRH-induced response. In pituitary and other cell lines, TRH stimulates MAPK. In PVT neurons, only the GIRK-like component of the TRH-induced current was selectively decreased in the presence of PD98059, a MAPK inhibitor. Collectively, the data imply that TRH-induced depolarization and inward current in PVT neurons involve both a dependency on extracellular Ca(2+) influx via opening of L-type Ca(2+) channels, a sensitivity of a TRPC-like component to intracellular Ca(2+) release via ryanodine channels, and a modulation by MAPK of a GIRK-like conductance component. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. The “Funny” Current (If Inhibition by Ivabradine at Membrane Potentials Encompassing Spontaneous Depolarization in Pacemaker Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Yaniv

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent clinical trials have shown that ivabradine (IVA, a drug that inhibits the funny current (If in isolated sinoatrial nodal cells (SANC, decreases heart rate and reduces morbidity and mortality in patients with cardiovascular diseases. While IVA inhibits If, this effect has been reported at essentially unphysiological voltages, i.e., those more negative than the spontaneous diastolic depolarization (DD between action potentials (APs. We tested the relative potency of IVA to block If over a wide range of membrane potentials, including those that encompass DD governing to the SANC spontaneous firing rate. A clinically relevant IVA concentration of 3 μM to single, isolated rabbit SANC slowed the spontaneous AP firing rate by 15%. During voltage clamp the maximal If was 18 ± 3 pA/pF (at −120 mV and the maximal If reduction by IVA was 60 ± 8% observed at −92 ± 4 mV. At the maximal diastolic depolarization (~−60 mV If amplitude was only −2.9 ± 0.4 pA/pF, and was reduced by only 41 ± 6% by IVA. Thus, If amplitude and its inhibition by IVA at physiologically relevant membrane potentials are substantially less than that at unphysiological (hyperpolarized membrane potentials. This novel finding more accurately describes how IVA affects SANC function and is of direct relevance to numerical modeling of SANC automaticity.

  8. A method for recording resistance changes non-invasively during neuronal depolarization with a view to imaging brain activity with electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilad, Ori; Ghosh, Anthony; Oh, Dongin; Holder, David S

    2009-05-30

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a recently developed medical imaging method which has the potential to produce images of fast neuronal depolarization in the brain. The principle is that current remains in the extracellular space at rest but passes into the intracellular space during depolarization through open ion channels. As current passes into the intracellular space across the capacitance of cell membranes at higher frequencies, applied current needs to be below 100 Hz. A method is presented for its measurement with subtraction of the contemporaneous evoked potentials which occur in the same frequency band. Neuronal activity is evoked by stimulation and resistance is recorded from the potentials resulting from injection of a constant current square wave at 1 Hz with amplitude less than 25% of the threshold for stimulating neuronal activity. Potentials due to the evoked activity and the injected square wave are removed by subtraction. The method was validated with compound action potentials in crab walking leg nerve. Resistance changes of -0.85+/-0.4% (mean+/-SD) occurred which decreased from -0.97+/-0.43% to -0.46+/-0.16% with spacing of impedance current application electrodes from 2 to 8 mm but did not vary significantly with applied currents of 1-10 microA. These tallied with biophysical modelling, and so were consistent with a genuine physiological origin. This method appears to provide a reproducible and artefact free means for recording resistance changes during neuronal activity which could lead to the long-term goal of imaging of fast neural activity in the brain.

  9. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan

    2017-05-12

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  10. Fluorescence and phosphorescence of rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarev, Stanislav L., E-mail: bondarev@imaph.bas-net.by [Minsk State Higher Radioengineering College, 220005 Minsk (Belarus); Knyukshto, Valeri N. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 220072 Minsk (Belarus)

    2013-10-15

    Rutin is one of the most promising flavonoid from a pharmacological and biochemical point of view. Here we have explored its spectroscopic and photophysical properties at room temperature and 77 K using steady-state absorption-luminescence methods and pulse spectroscopy equipment. By excitation into the absorption band 1 of rutin in methanol at room temperature the normal Stokes' shifted fluorescence with a maximum at 415 nm and quantum yield of 2×10{sup −4} was revealed. However, by excitation into the bands 2 and 3 any emission wasn’t observed. At 77 K in ethanol glass we have observed fluorescence at 410 nm and phosphorescence at 540 nm for the first time. As a result the adequate energetic scheme including the lowest electronic excited singlet at 26000 cm{sup −1} and triplet at 19600 cm{sup −1} states was proposed. -- Highlights: • Rutin fluorescence and phosphorescence at 77 K were revealed for the first time. • Room temperature fluorescence is determined by maximum at 415 nm and yield of 2×10{sup −4}. • Violation of Vavilov–Kasha rule by excitation into the absorption bands 2 and 3. • Fluorescence and phosphorescence in rutin are caused by the allowed π, π{sup (⁎)} transitions.

  11. Fluorescence properties of Neurospora tyrosinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltramini, M; Lerch, K

    1982-01-01

    Some structural properties of Neurospora tyrosinase have been studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. The emission spectra observed for oxy-, deoxy-, met- and apo-tyrosinase and the Co2+-substituted form are indicative of a protein containing buried tryptophan residues. By using acrylamide and iodide, part of the emission is quenched, indicating heterogeneity in the tryptophan environment. Upon binding of Cu2+ or Co2+ to apo-tyrosinase, a marked decrease of the tryptophan quantum yield is observed. A further decrease in emission intensity results from the binding of molecular O2 to the deoxy form. The fluorescent probe 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulphonate binds to tyrosinase only when the metal ions are removed. Reconstitution of apo-tyrosinase with Cu2+ completely displaces the probe, suggesting that 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulphonate binds to apo-tyrosinase at the active site. The fluorescence properties of Neurospora tyrosinase are compared with those of haemocyanin. PMID:6215031

  12. Use of fluorescent Ca2+ dyes with green fluorescent protein and its variants: problems and solutions.

    OpenAIRE

    Bolsover, S; Ibrahim, O; O'luanaigh, N; Williams, H; Cockcroft, S

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the degree to which fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator dyes, and green fluorescent protein and its variants, can be used together. We find that the most commonly used fluorescent protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), seriously contaminates fura 2 signals. We suggest two alternative combinations for which there is no detectable contamination of the Ca(2+) indicator signal by the fluorescent protein. Blue fluorescent protein can be used with the Ca(2+) indicator Fura Red...

  13. Fluorescence-tracking of activation gating in human ERG channels reveals rapid S4 movement and slow pore opening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeineb Es-Salah-Lamoureux

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available hERG channels are physiologically important ion channels which mediate cardiac repolarization as a result of their unusual gating properties. These are very slow activation compared with other mammalian voltage-gated potassium channels, and extremely rapid inactivation. The mechanism of slow activation is not well understood and is investigated here using fluorescence as a direct measure of S4 movement and pore opening.Tetramethylrhodamine-5-maleimide (TMRM fluorescence at E519 has been used to track S4 voltage sensor movement, and channel opening and closing in hERG channels. Endogenous cysteines (C445 and C449 in the S1-S2 linker bound TMRM, which caused a 10 mV hyperpolarization of the V((1/2 of activation to -27.5+/-2.0 mV, and showed voltage-dependent fluorescence signals. Substitution of S1-S2 linker cysteines with valines allowed unobstructed recording of S3-S4 linker E519C and L520C emission signals. Depolarization of E519C channels caused rapid initial fluorescence quenching, fit with a double Boltzmann relationship, F-V(ON, with V((1/2 (,1 = -37.8+/-1.7 mV, and V((1/2 (,2 = 43.5+/-7.9 mV. The first phase, V((1/2 (,1, was approximately 20 mV negative to the conductance-voltage relationship measured from ionic tail currents (G-V((1/2 = -18.3+/-1.2 mV, and relatively unchanged in a non-inactivating E519C:S620T mutant (V((1/2 = -34.4+/-1.5 mV, suggesting the fast initial fluorescence quenching tracked S4 voltage sensor movement. The second phase of rapid quenching was absent in the S620T mutant. The E519C fluorescence upon repolarization (V((1/2 = -20.6+/-1.2, k = 11.4 mV and L520C quenching during depolarization (V((1/2 = -26.8+/-1.0, k = 13.3 mV matched the respective voltage dependencies of hERG ionic tails, and deactivation time constants from -40 to -110 mV, suggesting they detected pore-S4 rearrangements related to ionic current flow during pore opening and closing.THE DATA INDICATE: 1 that rapid environmental changes occur at the

  14. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.L. de.

    1976-01-01

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of Literature on x-ray fluorescence spectrometry starts with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. It is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is subdivided according to spectra, equipment, applications and absorption analysis

  15. Fluorescence for high school students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultheiss, N.G.; Kool, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    In a not obligatory series of lessons for high school students in the Netherlands we discuss the fluorescence aspects of anthracene. These lessons were developed because HiSPARC (High school Project on Astrophysics Research with Cosmics) detection of cosmic rays are available for different secondary

  16. Fluorescence Spectroscopy in a Shoebox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq Wahab, M.

    2007-08-01

    This article describes construction of a simple, inexpensive fluorometer. It utilizes a flashlight or sunlight source, highlighter marker ink, bowl of water with mirror as dispersing element, and colored cellophane sheets as filters. The human eye is used as a detector. This apparatus is used to demonstrate important concepts related to fluorescence spectroscopy. Using ink from a highlighter marker, one can demonstrate the difference between light scattering and fluorescence emission, the need for an intense light source, phenomenon of the Stokes shift, the choice of filters, the preferred geometry of excitation source and emission detector, and the low detection limits that can be achieved by fluorescence measurements. By reflecting the fluorescence emission from a compact disk, it can be seen that the light emitted by molecules is not monochromatic. Furthermore, a spectrofluorometer is constructed using gratings made from a DVD or a CD. The shoebox fluorometer and spectrofluorometer can serve as useful teaching aids in places where commercial instruments are not available, and it avoids the black box problem of modern instruments.

  17. Fluorescence Spectroscopy and its Applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    derstanding of the chemical kinetics and molecular dynamics of the excited molecule. This special issue contains eighteen articles dealing with many dif- ferent aspects of fluorescence spectroscopy and applications in chemistry, which I hope would be useful to both chemists and spectroscopists. I thank the Indian Academy ...

  18. Fluorescence Spectra of Blowfly Metaxanthopsins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruizinga, B.; Stavenga, D.G.

    The main visual pigment of blowflies (xanthopsin) photoconverts into two thermostable metaxanthopsin states M and M’. The fluorescence spectra of the two photoproducts were studied by microspectrofluorometry in vivo. The emission spectra of M and M’ are very similar and peak at 660 nm. The

  19. Copper-induced activation of TRP channels promotes extracellular calcium entry and activation of CaMs and CDPKs leading to copper entry and membrane depolarization in Ulva compressa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa eGómez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify channels involved in membrane depolarization, Ulva compressa was incubated with agonists of TRP channels C5, A1 and V1 and the level of intracellular calcium was detected. Agonists of TRPC5, A1 and V1 induced increases in intracellular calcium at 4, 9 and 12 min of exposure, respectively, and antagonists of TRPC5, A1 and V1 corresponding to SKF-96365 (SKF, HC-030031 (HC and capsazepin (CPZ, respectively, inhibited calcium increases indicating that functional TRPs exist in U. compressa. In addition, copper excess induced increases in intracellular calcium at 4, 9 and 12 min which were inhibited by SKF, HC and CPZ, respectively, indicating that copper activate TRPC5, A1 and V1 channels. Moreover, copper-induced calcium increases were inhibited by EGTA, a non-permeable calcium chelating agent, but not by thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER calcium ATPase, indicating that activation of TRPs leads to extracellular calcium entry. Furthermore, copper-induced calcium increases were not inhibited by W-7, an inhibitor of CaMs, and staurosporine, an inhibitor of CDPKs, indicating that extracellular calcium entry did not require CaMs and CDPKs activation. In addition, copper induced membrane depolarization events at 4, 8 and 11 min and these events were inhibited by SKF, HC, CPZ and bathocuproine, a specific copper chelating agent, indicating copper entry through TRP channels leading to membrane depolarization. Moreover, membrane depolarization events were inhibited by W-7 and staurosporine, indicating that CaMs and CDPKs are required in order to activate TRPs to allow copper entry. Thus, light-dependent copper-induced activation TRPC5, A1 and V1 promotes extracellular calcium entry leading to activation of CaMs and CDPKs which, in turn, promotes copper entry through these TRP channels leading to membrane depolarization.

  20. Preparation and Application of Fluorescent Carbon Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent carbon dots (CDs are a novel type of fluorescent nanomaterials, which not only possess the specific quantum confinement effects of nanomaterials due to the small size of nanomaterials, but also have good biocompatibility and high fluorescence. Meanwhile, fluorescence CDs overcome the shortcomings of high toxicity of traditional nanomaterials. Moreover, the preparation procedure of fluorescent CDs is simple and easy. Therefore, fluorescent CDs have great potential applied in photocatalysis, biochemical sensing, bioimaging, drug delivery, and other related areas. In this paper, recent hot researches on fluorescent CDs are reviewed and some problems in the progress of fluorescent CDs are also summarized. At last, a future outlook in this direction is presented.

  1. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B. Hogue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP, fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and pseudorabies virus (PRV structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer.

  2. Characterizing the Vertical Profile of Aerosol Particle Extinction and Linear Depolarization over Southeast Asia and the Maritime Continent: The 2007-2009 View from CALIOP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James R.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Jianglong; Tackett, Jason L.; Chew, Boon Ning; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Aoki, Kazuma; hide

    2012-01-01

    Vertical profiles of 0.532 µm aerosol particle extinction coefficient and linear volume depolarization ratio are described for Southeast Asia and the Maritime Continent. Quality-screened and cloud-cleared Version 3.01 Level 2 NASA Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) 5-km Aerosol Profile datasets are analyzed from 2007 to 2009. Numerical simulations from the U.S. Naval Aerosol Analysis and Predictive System (NAAPS), featuring two-dimensional variational assimilation of NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Multi-angle Imaging Spectro- Radiometer quality-assured datasets, combined with regional ground-based lidar measurements, are considered for assessing CALIOP retrieval performance, identifying bias, and evaluating regional representativeness. CALIOP retrievals of aerosol particle extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth (AOD) are high over land and low over open waters relative to NAAPS (0.412/0.312 over land for all data points inclusive, 0.310/0.235 when the per bin average is used and each is treated as single data points; 0.102/0.151 and 0.086/0.124, respectively, over ocean). Regional means, however, are very similar (0.180/0.193 for all data points and 0.155/0.159 when averaged per normalized bin), as the two factors offset one another. The land/ocean offset is investigated, and discrepancies attributed to interpretation of particle composition and a-priori assignment of the extinction-to-backscatter ratio ("lidar ratio") necessary for retrieving the extinction coefficient from CALIOP signals. Over land, NAAPS indicates more dust present than CALIOP algorithms are identifying, indicating a likely assignment of a higher lidar ratio representative of more absorptive particles. NAAPS resolvesmore smoke overwater than identified with CALIOP, indicating likely usage of a lidar ratio characteristic of less absorptive particles to be applied that biases low AOD there. Over open waters except within the Bay of Bengal

  3. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer on the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Spatial relationship and site coupling between the batrachotoxin and Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus alpha-scorpion toxin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelides, K J; Brown, G B

    1984-05-25

    A fluorescent N- methylanthraniloyl derivative of the potent depolarizing agent batrachotoxin has been used to probe the structural and conformational properties of the neurotoxin receptor site on the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Batrachotoxin A 20-alpha-N- methylanthranilate (BTX-NMA) retains high affinity for its receptor site on the synaptosomal sodium channel with a Kd between 78 and 91 nM and an average site capacity of 2 pmol/mg of synaptosomal protein in the presence of Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus alpha-scorpion toxin. The fluorescence emission of BTX-NMA upon binding to synaptosomes indicates a hydrophobic environment. Toxin V from L. quinquestriatus, an allosteric activator, effects a 20-nm red shift in the spectrum of bound BTX-NMA and a 4-fold enhancement in the fluorescence quantum yield disclosing a conformational change into a hydrophilic environment. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements show that the distance separating the receptor sites is 37 +/- 10 A. Thus, the binding of alpha-scorpion toxin must involve conformational changes that extend over large distances from the batrachotoxin-binding locus. This information together with the distance measurements between the tetrodotoxin and alpha-scorpion toxin receptors and the conformational transition associated with this distance upon batrachotoxin addition indicate a conformationally flexible channel with coupling of sites through the polyatomic framework of individual subunits or through extensive alterations in subunit/subunit interactions.

  4. Activation of fluorescent protein chromophores by encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Anthony; Samanta, Shampa R; Jayaraj, Nithyanandhan; Ramamurthy, V; Tolbert, Laren M

    2010-02-10

    Chromophores related to fluorescent proteins, when sequestered into the "octaacid" capsule, recover their fluorescence. The fluorescence recovery is related to the inhibition of torsional motions within the cavity, implicating the single-bond torsion as an important contributor to internal conversion within this important class of chromophores.

  5. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  6. Multi Spectral Fluorescence Imager (MSFI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Genetic transformation with in vivo reporter genes for fluorescent proteins can be performed on a variety of organisms to address fundamental biological questions. Model organisms that may utilize an ISS imager include unicellular organisms (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), plants (Arabidopsis thaliana), and invertebrates (Caenorhabditis elegans). The multispectral fluorescence imager (MSFI) will have the capability to accommodate 10 cm x 10 cm Petri plates, various sized multi-well culture plates, and other custom culture containers. Features will include programmable temperature and light cycles, ethylene scrubbing (less than 25 ppb), CO2 control (between 400 ppm and ISS-ambient levels in units of 100 ppm) and sufficient airflow to prevent condensation that would interfere with imaging.

  7. Ruby fluorescence pressure scale: Revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lei; Bi Yan; Xu Ji-An

    2013-01-01

    Effect of non-hydrostatic stress on X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) is studied. The pressure gradient in the sample chamber leads to the broadening of the diffraction peaks, which increase with the hkl index of the crystal. It is found that the difference between the determined d-spacing compressive ratio d/d 0 and the real d-spacing compressive ratio d r /d 0 is determined by the yield stress of the pressure transmitting media (if used) and the shear modulus of the sample. On the basis of the corrected experiment data of Mao et al. (MXB86), which was used to calibrate the most widely used ruby fluorescence scale, a new relationship of ruby fluorescence pressure scale is corrected, i.e., P = (1904/9.827)[(1 + Δλ/λ 0 ) 9.827 −1]. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  8. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  9. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A; Vdovin, Yu; Biryukova, T

    2010-01-01

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 – 645 nm and 340 – 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy

  10. X-ray fluorescence holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu, Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-03-07

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy.

  11. X-ray fluorescence holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy. (topical review)

  12. Fluorescent scattering by molecules embedded in small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Studies are reported in these areas: double resonance in fluorescent and Raman scattering; surface enhanced Raman scattering; fluorescence by molecules embedded in small particles; fluorescence by a liquid droplet; and fluorescence by conical pits in surfaces

  13. Fluorescence spectroscopy of synthetic melanin in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perna, G.; Frassanito, M.C. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy); Palazzo, G. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Gallone, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy); Mallardi, A. [ICPS-CNR, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Biagi, P.F. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Universita di Bari, Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Capozzi, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy)], E-mail: v.capozzi@unifg.it

    2009-01-15

    We report a detailed investigation of fluorescence properties of synthetic eumelanin pigment in solution. A complete set of fluorescence spectra in the near-UV and visible range is analysed. Excitation spectra at a few selected emission energies are also investigated. Our measurements support the hypothesis that fluorescence in eumelanin is related to chemically distinct oligomeric units that can be selectively excited. Fluorescence due to large oligomer systems is spectrally differentiated from that due to monomers and small oligomer systems. Fluorescence excitation measurements show the contribution of 5,6-dihydroxyndole-2-carboxylic acid and 5,6-dihydroxyndole monomers to the emission of small-size oligomers.

  14. Bowen fluorescence on the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, S. O.; Behring, W. E.

    1981-01-01

    An identification is made of a weak line in the high-resolution EUV solar spectrum, and the contribution of the Bowen fluorescence mechanism to line emission is considered. The line at 303.625 A is noted to coincide with the 2p 3d(3P2 0) - 2p2(3P1) transition of O III at 303.621 A, which could be excited by He II line excitation of the O III 2p2(3P2) - 2p 3d(3P2 0) transition at 303.799 A. Computations of the collisionally induced intensities of the 2p2(3P) - 2p3d(3P 0) multiplet are shown to result in values not observed in the solar spectrum, indicating that Bowen fluorescence, rather than collisional excitation, is the source of the line. The Bowen fluorescence mechanism is noted to have implications for the identification of other spectral lines, and for models of the solar corona.

  15. Hydrogen bond dynamics and water structure in glucose-water solutions by depolarized Rayleigh scattering and low-frequency Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolantoni, Marco; Sassi, Paola; Morresi, Assunta; Santini, Sergio

    2007-07-01

    The effect of glucose on the relaxation process of water at picosecond time scales has been investigated by depolarized Rayleigh scattering (DRS) experiments. The process is assigned to the fast hydrogen bonding dynamics of the water network. In DRS spectra this contribution can be safely separated from the slower relaxation process due to the sugar. The detected relaxation time is studied at different glucose concentrations and modeled considering bulk and hydrating water contributions. As a result, it is found that in diluted conditions the hydrogen bond lifetime of proximal water molecules becomes about three times slower than that of the bulk. The effect of the sugar on the hydrogen bond water structure is investigated by analyzing the low-frequency Raman (LFR) spectrum sensitive to intermolecular modes. The addition of glucose strongly reduces the intensity of the band at 170cm-1 assigned to a collective stretching mode of water molecules arranged in cooperative tetrahedral domains. These findings indicate that proximal water molecules partially lose the tetrahedral ordering typical of the bulk leading to the formation of high density environments around the sugar. Thus the glucose imposes a new local order among water molecules localized in its hydration shell in which the hydrogen bond breaking dynamics is sensitively retarded. This work provides new experimental evidences that support recent molecular dynamics simulation and thermodynamics results.

  16. Enhanced depolarization temperature in 0.90NBT-0.05KBT-0.05BT ceramics induced by BT nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, W. P.; Li, W. L.; Feng, Y.; Xu, D.; Wang, W.; Hou, Y. F.; Zhang, T. D.; Fei, W. D.

    2015-03-01

    The depolarization temperature (Td) of piezoelectric materials is an important figure of merit for their application at elevated temperatures. This study focuses on the effect of BaTiO3 (BT) nanowires on Td and piezoelectric properties of morphotropic-phase-boundary 0.90NBT-0.05KBT-0.05BT ceramics. The results reveal that BaTiO3 nanowires can pin the domain wall, leading to the increase of coercive field (Ec) from 21.06 kV/cm to 34.99 kV/cm. The Td value of 0.90NBT-0.05KBT-0.05BT ceramics can be enhanced approximately 20 °C when using BT nanowires instead of BT solution as the raw material. Meanwhile, at the same polarization conditions, the piezoelectric constant of the ceramic added BT nanowires (172 pC/N) is decreased but still remains a larger value compared with those of other lead-free ceramics. The results imply that the addition of BT nanowires into NBT-KBT is a very effective route to improve Td.

  17. An operational fluorescence system for crop assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzile, Charles; Belanger, Marie-Christine; Viau, Alain A.; Chamberland, Martin; Roy, Simon

    2004-03-01

    The development of precision farming requires new tools for plant nutritional stress monitoring. An operational fluorescence system has been designed for vegetation status mapping and stress detection at plant and field scale. The instrument gives relative values of fluorescence at different wavelengths induced by the two-excitation sources. Lightinduced fluorescence has demonstrated successful crop health monitoring and plant nutritional stress detection capabilities. The spectral response of the plants has first been measured with an hyperspectral imager using laser-induced fluorescence. A tabletop imaging fluorometer based on flash lamp technology has also been designed to study the spatial distribution of fluorescence on plant leaves. For field based non-imaging system, LED technology is used as light source to induce fluorescence of the plant. The operational fluorescence system is based on ultraviolet and blue LED to induce fluorescence. Four narrow fluorescence bands centered on 440, 520, 690 and 740nm are detected. The instrument design includes a modular approach for light source and detector. It can accommodate as many as four different light sources and six bands of fluorescence detection. As part of the design for field application, the instrument is compatible with a mobile platform equipped with a GPS and data acquisition system. The current system developed by Telops/GAAP is configured for potato crops fluorescence measurement but can easily be adapted for other crops. This new instrument offers an effective and affordable solution for precision farming.

  18. Basic investigation of concentrator using fluorescent substance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashibara, Mitsuo

    1986-12-01

    A concentrator was manufactured on an experimental basis to improve the performance of the concentrator using fluorescent substance and the analysis based on the test result of optical characteristics of the materials composing the concentrator was made. The concentrator is composed of fluorescent substance sandwiched between two acrylic sheets. Organic fluorescent solution prepared by dissolving eosin to alcohol and capsulating with transparent encapsulant was used as the fluorescent substance. The concentration ratio based on the characteristic tests of the fluorescent substance and material of acrylic sheet composing the concentrator and the numerical calculation model was calculated. The results show that the difference between the experimental and calculated values is 10%. The result of calculation based on the numerical model indicates that the energy efficiency is decreased through the concentration ratio is increased in a thin concentrator, because the fluorescence is decreased by the absorption during passing more frequently through the fluorescent layer. (1 ref, 10 figs)

  19. Metal enhanced fluorescence with gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Shaina LaRissa Strating

    A novel hybrid nanocomposite of Au nanoparticle-modified silicon nanowire was developed for surface enhanced fluorescence applications. The designed nanocomposite contained a silicon nanowire, gold nanoparticles and a silica layer doped with dye molecules. The hybrid nanomaterial was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), fluorescence measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the gold nanoparticles were uniformly adhered on the silicon nanowires and covered by a thin silica layer. The nanostructure exhibited strong capacity for surface enhanced fluorescence. Different enhancement factors were obtained by changing synthetic conditions. The second goal of the project was to determine if the shape of gold nanoparticles affects the extent of its fluorescence enhancement under constant external factors. Two shapes of gold nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by SEM, STEM, zeta potential and absorbance measurements. Then they were coated with fluorescent dye-doped silica and the fluorescence intensity was measured and compared to the pure fluorescent dye. Gold nanorods enhanced fluorescence more than gold nanostars and that the fluorescent dye Alexafluor 700 showed a greater fluorescence intensity change in the presence of nanoparticles than methylene blue.

  20. Multispectral open-air intraoperative fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrooz, Ali; Waterman, Peter; Vasquez, Kristine O; Meganck, Jeff; Peterson, Jeffrey D; Faqir, Ilias; Kempner, Joshua

    2017-08-01

    Intraoperative fluorescence imaging informs decisions regarding surgical margins by detecting and localizing signals from fluorescent reporters, labeling targets such as malignant tissues. This guidance reduces the likelihood of undetected malignant tissue remaining after resection, eliminating the need for additional treatment or surgery. The primary challenges in performing open-air intraoperative fluorescence imaging come from the weak intensity of the fluorescence signal in the presence of strong surgical and ambient illumination, and the auto-fluorescence of non-target components, such as tissue, especially in the visible spectral window (400-650 nm). In this work, a multispectral open-air fluorescence imaging system is presented for translational image-guided intraoperative applications, which overcomes these challenges. The system is capable of imaging weak fluorescence signals with nanomolar sensitivity in the presence of surgical illumination. This is done using synchronized fluorescence excitation and image acquisition with real-time background subtraction. Additionally, the system uses a liquid crystal tunable filter for acquisition of multispectral images that are used to spectrally unmix target fluorescence from non-target auto-fluorescence. Results are validated by preclinical studies on murine models and translational canine oncology models.

  1. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Walters, Jamie D.; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. ► Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. ► Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  2. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J., E-mail: mjruedas@ugr.esmailto [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Walters, Jamie D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, UK CB2 1QT (United Kingdom); Orte, Angel [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Hall, Elizabeth A.H., E-mail: lisa.hall@biotech.cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  3. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Krom, Bastiaan P; Janus, Marleen M; Ten Cate, Jacob M; de Soet, Johannes J; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  4. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M C Volgenant

    Full Text Available Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation. Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  5. Far-Field Fluorescence Nanoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    The resolution of a far-field optical microscopy is usually limited to d=λ/ λ( 2,α ) . - ( 2,α ) > 200 nm, with nα denoting the numerical aperture of the lens and λ the wavelength of light. While the diffraction barrier has prompted the invention of electron, scanning probe, and x-ray microscopy, the 3D-imaging of the interior of (live) cells requires the use of focused visible light. I will discuss new developments of optical microscopy that I anticipate to have a lasting impact on our understanding of living matter. Emphasis will be placed on physical concepts that have overcome the diffraction barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy. To set the scene for future directions, I will show that all these concepts share a common strategy: exploiting selected states and transitions of the fluorescent marker to neutralize the limiting role of diffraction. The first viable concept of this kind was Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy where the spot diameter followsd λ/ λ( 2,α√1+I / I Is . - Is ) . - ( 2,α√1+I / I Is . - Is ); I / I Is . - Isis a measure of the strength with which the molecule is send from the fluorescent state to the dark ground state. For I / I Is . - Is->∞ it follows that d->0, meaning that the resolution that can, in principle, be molecular. The concept underlying STED microscopy can be expanded by employing other transitions that shuffle the molecule between a dark and a bright state, such as (i) shelving the fluorophore in a dark triplet state, and (ii) photoswitching between a `fluorescence activated' and a `fluorescence deactivated' conformational state. Examples for the latter include photochromic organic compounds, and fluorescent proteins which undergo a cis-trans photoisomerizations. Photoswitching provides ultrahigh resolution at ultralow light levels. Switching can be performed in an ensemble or individually in which case the image is assembled molecule by molecule at high resolution. By providing molecular

  6. Membrane depolarization-induced RhoA/Rho-associated kinase activation and sustained contraction of rat caudal arterial smooth muscle involves genistein-sensitive tyrosine phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Yanagihara, Hayato; Nakagawa, Jun-ichi; Hishinuma, Shigeru; Sutherland, Cindy; Walsh, Michael P.; Shoji, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase (ROK) activation plays an important role in K+-induced contraction of rat caudal arterial smooth muscle (Mita et al., Biochem J. 2002; 364: 431–40). The present study investigated a potential role for tyrosine kinase activity in K+-induced RhoA activation and contraction. The non-selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, but not the src family tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2, inhibited K+-induced sustained contraction (IC50 = 11.3 ± 2.4 µM). Genistein (10 µM) inhibited the K+-induced increase in myosin light chain (LC20) phosphorylation without affecting the Ca2+ transient. The tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate induced contraction that was reversed by genistein (IC50 = 6.5 ± 2.3 µM) and the ROK inhibitor Y-27632 (IC50 = 0.27 ± 0.04 µM). Vanadate also increased LC20 phosphorylation in a genistein- and Y-27632-dependent manner. K+ stimulation induced translocation of RhoA to the membrane, which was inhibited by genistein. Phosphorylation of MYPT1 (myosin-targeting subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase) was significantly increased at Thr855 and Thr697 by K+ stimulation in a genistein- and Y-27632-sensitive manner. Finally, K+ stimulation induced genistein-sensitive tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins of ∼55, 70 and 113 kDa. We conclude that a genistein-sensitive tyrosine kinase, activated by the membrane depolarization-induced increase in [Ca2+]i, is involved in the RhoA/ROK activation and sustained contraction induced by K+. Ca2+ sensitization, myosin light chain phosphatase, RhoA, Rho-associated kinase, tyrosine kinase PMID:24133693

  7. Differential effects of nitric oxide gas and nitric oxide donors on depolarization-induced release of [3H]norepinephrine from rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, A K; Woodward, J J

    1994-11-01

    The NO-generating compounds sodium nitroprusside (NP), nitroglycerin (NTG), and isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) all significantly inhibited N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-stimulated release of tritiated norepinephrine ([3H]NA) from preloaded hippocampal slices of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with IC50's of 114 microM, 1.2 mM, and 1.7 mM respectively. NTG and ISDN also inhibited KCl-stimulated release, while NP had no significant effect on KCl-stimulated release. Although these results suggest that the inhibitory effects of these compounds were mediated by release of NO, NTG and ISDN did not generate detectable levels of NO, and iron-cyanide complexes similar in structure to NP but lacking NO also inhibited release. In contrast, both S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) and authentic NO gas significantly enhanced NMDA-stimulated release of [3H]NA (EC50's: 331 and 3.4 microM respectively). This enhancement was not selective for NMDA-stimulated release, since both SNAP and NO potentiated KCl-stimulated release as well. In addition, NO gas significantly enhanced NMDA-stimulated release of tritiated dopamine ([3H]DA) from striatal slices and [3H]NA from cortical and cerebellar slices. Analogs of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) had no significant effect on NMDA-stimulated transmitter release, suggesting that the observed increase in release is via a cGMP-independent mechanism. While exogenous NO enhanced both NMDA- and KCl-stimulated neurotransmitter release, it appears that endogenous NO does not play a role in this depolarization-induced release since NO synthase inhibitors did not significantly reduce NMDA-stimulated [3H]NA release. The possibility remains that endogenous NO could modulate neurotransmitter release in other circumstances.

  8. Detection of Counterfeit Tequila by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel de la Rosa Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultraviolet (UV light induced fluorescence study to discriminate fake tequila from genuine ones is presented. A portable homemade system based on four light emitting diodes (LEDs from 255 to 405 nm and a miniature spectrometer was used. It has been shown that unlike fake and silver tequila, which produce weak fluorescence signal, genuine mixed, rested, and aged tequilas show high fluorescence emission in the range from 400 to 750 nm. The fluorescence intensity grows with aging in 100% agave tequila. Such fluorescence differences can even be observed with naked eyes. The presented results demonstrate that the fluorescence measurement could be a good method to detect counterfeit tequila.

  9. [Fluorescence polarization immunoassay of ractopamine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvereva, E A; Shpakova, N A; Zherdev, A V; Kiu, L; Xu, C; Eremin, S A; Dzantiev, B B

    2016-01-01

    A technique was developed for fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) of ractopamine, a toxic low molecular weight nonsteroidal growth regulator belonging to the most controlled contaminants of food products of animal origin. The assay is based on the competition between a sample containing ractopamine and ractopamine–fluorophore conjugate for binding to antibodies. The competition is monitored via changes in the degree of fluorescence polarization for plane-polarized excitation light, which differs for the free and antibody-bound forms of the conjugate. The optimal assay conditions were established, ensuring a high accuracy and minimal detection limit. The developed assay demonstrated a detection limit of 1 ng/mL and a range of detectable concentrations of 2.3–50 ng/mL, which met the requirements of sanitary control. The duration of the analysis was 10 min. The possible application of the developed FPIA was demonstrated with testing of turkey meat. The speed and simplicity of the proposed assay define its efficiency as a screening tool for safety of foods.

  10. FAA Fluorescent Penetrant Laboratory Inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WINDES,CONNOR L.; MOORE,DAVID G.

    2000-08-02

    The Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center currently assesses the capability of various non-destructive inspection (NDI) methods used for analyzing aircraft components. The focus of one such exercise is to evaluate the sensitivity of fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection. A baseline procedure using the water-washable fluorescent penetrant method defines a foundation for comparing the brightness of low cycle fatigue cracks in titanium test panels. The analysis of deviations in the baseline procedure will determine an acceptable range of operation for the steps in the inspection process. The data also gives insight into the depth of each crack and which step(s) of the inspection process most affect penetrant sensitivities. A set of six low cycle fatigue cracks produced in 6.35-mm thick Ti-6Al-4V specimens was used to conduct the experiments to produce sensitivity data. The results will document the consistency of the crack readings and compare previous experiments to find the best parameters for water-washable penetrant.

  11. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael W; Loftus, Andrew F; Dunn, Sarah E; Joens, Matthew S; Fitzpatrick, James A J

    2015-01-05

    The development of confocal microscopy techniques introduced the ability to optically section fluorescent samples in the axial dimension, perpendicular to the image plane. These approaches, via the placement of a pinhole in the conjugate image plane, provided superior resolution in the axial (z) dimension resulting in nearly isotropic optical sections. However, increased axial resolution, via pinhole optics, comes at the cost of both speed and excitation efficiency. Light sheet fluorescent microscopy (LSFM), a century-old idea made possible with modern developments in both excitation and detection optics, provides sub-cellular resolution and optical sectioning capabilities without compromising speed or excitation efficiency. Over the past decade, several variations of LSFM have been implemented each with its own benefits and deficiencies. Here we discuss LSFM fundamentals and outline the basic principles of several major light-sheet-based imaging modalities (SPIM, inverted SPIM, multi-view SPIM, Bessel beam SPIM, and stimulated emission depletion SPIM) while considering their biological relevance in terms of intrusiveness, temporal resolution, and sample requirements. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), part A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  13. X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, S.; Sparks, C.J. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental set-up for x-ray fluorescence analysis with synchrotron radiation was built and installed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project. X-ray spectra were taken from numerous and varied samples in order to assess the potential of synchrotron radiation as an excitation source for multielement x-ray fluorescence analysis. For many applications, the synchrotron radiation technique is shown to be superior to other x-ray fluorescence methods, especially those employing electrons and protons as excitation sources

  14. Fluorescence lidar monitoring of historic buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, V; Cecchi, G; Pantani, L; Chiari, R

    1998-02-20

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectra detected with high-spectral-resolution lidar on the facades of the Baptistery and the Cathedral in Parma are presented and discussed. The data show fluorescence features that are due to the stone materials that constitute the coating of the monuments and to photosynthetically active colonizations on their surfaces. This underlines the feasibility of a remote fluorescence analysis of historic facades. The data were also compared with the fluorescence lidar spectra obtained from similar lithotypes, sampled either in historic extraction areas or in sites exploited recently. The results open good prospects for spectral characterization of historic materials and identification of their provenance.

  15. Time variation of fluorescence lifetime in enhanced cyan fluorescence protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soonhyouk; Kim, Soo Yong; Park, Kyoungsook; Jeong, Jinyoung; Chung, Bong Hyun; Kim, Sok Won

    2010-01-01

    The lifetime variations of enhanced cyan fluorescence protein (ECFP) in relatively short integration time bins were studied via time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) measurement. We observed that minimum photon counts are necessary for the lifetime estimation to achieve a certain range of variance. The conditions to decrease the variance of lifetime were investigated and the channel width of the measurement of TCSPC data was found to be another important factor for the variance of lifetime. Though the lifetime of ECFP is best fit by a double exponential, a mono exponential fit for the same integration time is more stable. The results may be useful in the analysis of photophysical dynamics for ensemble molecules in short measurement time windows.

  16. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-06-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding.

  17. Optimal fluorescence waveband determination for detecting defect cherry tomatoes using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defect cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface, and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-...

  18. Fluorescence spectroscopy for medical and environmental diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Jonas.

    1993-09-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy can be used for diagnostics in medical and environmental applications. The many aspects of fluorescence emission are utilized to enhance the accuracy of the diagnosis. A fluorescence detection system, based on nitrogen laser or dye laser excitation and optical multichannel detection, was constructed, and fluorescence spectra from human malignant tumours of various origins, were recorded. Tumour demarcation was observed using exogenous chromophores, as well as the endogenous tissue fluorescence. In particular, δ-amino levulinic acid was found to provide very good tumour demarcation. A multi-colour imaging system capable of simultaneous recording of four fluorescence images at selected wavelengths, was developed. Examples of processed images, based on the four sub-images, are shown for malignant tumours. In addition, data from photodynamic treatment of human malignant tumours are presented. Autofluorescence spectra from excised pieces of human atherosclerotic aorta and atherosclerotic coronary segment were found to be different from those of non-diseased vessels. Furthermore, fluorescence decay curves from atherosclerotic samples were found to differ from those of non-diseased samples. It is concluded that both spectral and temporal information should be utilized to enhance the demarcation. Methods for obtaining fluorescence data free from interference from blood, with applications to in vivo laser angioplasty of atherosclerosis, are discussed. The optical multichannel system and the multi-colour imaging system were integrated with a remote sensing system, originally used for environmental measurements, to obtain fluorescence spectra as well as fluorescence images of plants at a distance of up to 100 m. The fluorescence data from plants subject to environmental stress or senescent plants were found to differ from those obtained from healthy vegetation. 359 refs

  19. ULTRAFINE FLUORESCENT DIAMONDS IN NANOTECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanyuk M. I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work is to summarize the literature data concerning ultrafine diamonds, namely their industrial production, as well as considerable photostability and biocompatibility that promote their use in modern visualization techniques. It is shown that due to the unique physical properties, they are promising materials for using in nanotechnology in the near future. Possibility of diverse surface modification, small size and large absorption surface are the basis for their use in different approaches for drug and gene delivery into a cell. The changes in the properties of nanodiamond surface modification methods of their creation, stabilization and applications are described. It can be said that fluorescent surface-modified nanodiamonds are a promising target in various research methods that would be widely used for labeling of living cells, as well as in the processes of genes and drugs delivery into a cell.

  20. A sensitive fluorescent sensor of lanthanide ions

    CERN Document Server

    Bekiari, V; Lianos, P

    2003-01-01

    A fluorescent probe bearing a diazostilbene chromophore and a benzo-15-crown-5 ether moiety is a very efficient sensor of lanthanide ions. The ligand emits strong fluorescence only in the presence of specific ions, namely lanthanide ions, while the emission wavelength is associated with a particular ion providing high sensitivity and resolution.