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Sample records for angioscopy

  1. [Renal angioscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco Miranda, E; Rodríguez Tolra, J; Díaz Rodrigues, J; Serrallach Mila, N

    1994-01-01

    Presentation as a novelty of the application of endoscopic methods in the display of the renal artery (angioscopy). Review of findings seen in the renal artery of a donor corpse with polytraumatism using direct view with a MiniScope-type rigid urethroscopy and the possible future application of this technique.

  2. Quantitative colorimetry of atherosclerotic plaque using the L*a*b* color space during angioscopy for the detection of lipid cores underneath thin fibrous caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Fumiyuki; Yokoyama, Shinya; Miyahara, Kengo; Dabreo, Alexandra; Weiss, Eric R; Iafrati, Mark; Takano, Masamichi; Okamatsu, Kentaro; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Waxman, Sergio

    2007-12-01

    Yellow plaques seen during angioscopy are thought to represent lipid cores underneath thin fibrous caps (LCTCs) and may be indicative of vulnerable sites. However, plaque color assessment during angioscopy has been criticized because of its qualitative nature. The purpose of the present study was to test the ability of a quantitative colorimetric system to measure yellow color intensity of atherosclerotic plaques during angioscopy and to characterize the color of LCTCs. Using angioscopy and a quantitative colorimetry system based on the L*a*b* color space [L* describes brightness (-100 to +100), b* describes blue to yellow (-100 to +100)], the optimal conditions for measuring plaque color were determined in three flat standard color samples and five artificial plaque models in cylinder porcine carotid arteries. In 88 human tissue samples, the colorimetric characteristics of LCTCs were then evaluated. In in-vitro samples and ex-vivo plaque models, brightness L* between 40 and 80 was determined to be optimal for acquiring b* values, and the variables unique to angioscopy in color perception did not impact b* values after adjusting for brightness L* by manipulating light or distance. In ex-vivo human tissue samples, b* value >/=23 (35.91 +/- 8.13) with L* between 40 and 80 was associated with LCTCs (fibrous caps <100 mum). Atherosclerotic plaque color can be consistently measured during angioscopy with quantitative colorimetry. High yellow color intensity, determined by this system, was associated with LCTCs. Quantitative colorimetry during angioscopy may be used for detection of LCTCs, which may be markers of vulnerability.

  3. Percutaneous angioscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, A.

    1987-01-01

    In dogs and 11 patients a new endoscopic method for arteries has been developed. The approach is transfemoral, and endoscopy is combined with angiography, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), and local lysis. An ultrathin endoscope with a diameter of 2.4 mm is used, which also provides a working channel with a diameter of 0.4 mm. Guide wires, contrast media, and drugs for local lysis can be inserted through this channel. Under fluoroscopic control, the endoscope is placed in the region of interest, followed by a special method for decreasing blood flow. Endoscopy is documented by video or by a high-speed camera. No complications have occurred. In all patients, it was possible to demonstrate the results of dilatation, recanalization, or local lysis before and after the interventional procedure. (orig.) [de

  4. Laser autodyne angioscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordov, Eugeni P.; Makogon, Michail M.; Pekarskii, Vikentii V.; Shipulin, Vladimir M.

    1994-07-01

    A novel approach to imagination of inner surface of arteria during performing laser and balloon angioplasty is suggested. To this end the laser light was transmitted via fiber to the zone of interest and radiation diffused by the walls of the vessel was adopted by receiver. Known technique to determine of contours of an object by measuring the time of the laser pulse propagation is unusable due to the small geometrical scales. Using the CW laser and feeding a portion of the backscattered signal power into the laser cavity (this kind of device was referred to as laser autodyne coherent receiver), the authors have been able to measure the object contour with spatial resolution of up to 2 microns. Such resolution and high sensitivity inherent to this technique should allows one to detect early in the development of the atherosclerosis. To obtain the 3D image of the vessel inside surface we offer two methods. In the first case the vessel side is scanned by moving the end of light quid. In the second one multimode laser is used and the image is drawing by scanning the transverse modes of this laser. The vessel side and atherosclerotic plaques have the different reflectivity spectrum and this fact can be used to increase the image contrast. The correct selection of the laser wavelength makes possible to work into the vessel with circulation of the blood. The calculation of laser autodyne intrascope performance and tentative experimental results are presented in this report. The advantages of this method for the angiography are in speed and adequately of control during performing angioplasty.

  5. Automatic navigation path generation based on two-phase adaptive region-growing algorithm for virtual angioscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Yeon; Chung, Sung-Mo; Park, Jong-Won

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a fast and automated navigation path generation algorithm to visualize inside of carotid artery using MR angiography images. The carotid artery is one of the body regions not accessible by real optical probe but can be visualized with virtual endoscopy. By applying two-phase adaptive region-growing algorithm, the carotid artery segmentation is started at the initial seed, which is located on the initially thresholded binary image. This segmentation algorithm automatically detects the branch position with stack feature. Combining with a priori knowledge of anatomic structure of carotid artery, the detected branch position is used to separate the carotid artery into internal carotid artery and external carotid artery. A fly-through path is determined to automatically move the virtual camera based on the intersecting coordinates of two bisectors on the circumscribed quadrangle of segmented carotid artery. In consideration of the interactive rendering speed and the usability of standard graphic hardware, endoscopic view of carotid artery is generated by using surface rendering algorithm with perspective projection method. In addition, the endoscopic view is provided with ray casting algorithm for off-line navigation of carotid artery. Experiments have been conducted on both mathematical phantom and clinical data sets. This algorithm is more effective than key-framing and topological thinning method in terms of automated features and computing time. This algorithm is also applicable to generate the centerline of renal artery, coronary artery, and airway tree which has tree-like cylinder shape of organ structures in the medical imagery.

  6. Pulmonary vascular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedullo, P.F.; Shure, D.

    1987-03-01

    A wide range of pulmonary vascular imaging techniques are available for the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonary vascular disease. The characteristics of any ideal technique would include high sensitivity and specificity, safety, simplicity, and sequential applicability. To date, no single technique meets these ideal characteristics. Conventional pulmonary angiography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of acute thromboembolic disease despite the introduction of newer techniques such as digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance imaging. Improved noninvasive lower extremity venous testing methods, particularly impedance plethysmography, and ventilation-perfusion scanning can play significant roles in the noninvasive diagnosis of acute pulmonary emboli when properly applied. Ventilation-perfusion scanning may also be useful as a screening test to differentiate possible primary pulmonary hypertension from chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. And, finally, angioscopy may be a useful adjunctive technique to detect chronic thromboembolic disease and determine operability. Optimal clinical decision-making, however, will continue to require the proper interpretation of adjunctive information obtained from the less-invasive techniques, applied with an understanding of the natural history of the various forms of pulmonary vascular disease and with a knowledge of the capabilities and shortcomings of the individual techniques.

  7. Coronary plaque morphology on multi-modality imagining and periprocedural myocardial infarction after percutaneous coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Sato

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI may be complicated by periprocedural myocardial infarction (PMI as manifested by elevated cardiac biomarkers such as creatine kinase (CK-MB or troponin T. The occurrence of PMI has been shown to be associated with worse short- and long-term clinical outcome. However, recent studies suggest that PMI defined by biomarker levels alone is a marker of atherosclerosis burden and procedural complexity but in most cases does not have independent prognostic significance. Diagnostic multi-modality imaging such as intravascular ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, coronary angioscopy, near-infrared spectroscopy, multidetector computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging can be used to closely investigate the atherosclerotic lesion in order to detect morphological markers of unstable and vulnerable plaques in the patients undergoing PCI. With the improvement of technical aspects of multimodality coronary imaging, clinical practice and research are increasingly shifting toward defining the clinical implication of plaque morphology and patients outcomes. There were numerous published data regarding the relationship between pre-PCI lesion subsets on multi-modality imaging and post-PCI biomarker levels. In this review, we discuss the relationship between coronary plaque morphology estimated by invasive or noninvasive coronary imaging and the occurrence of PMI. Furthermore, this review underlies that the value of the multimodality coronary imaging approach will become the gold standard for invasive or noninvasive prediction of PMI in clinical practice.

  8. Laser speckle imaging of atherosclerotic plaques through optical fiber bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Seemantini K.; Bouma, Brett E.; Yelin, Dvir; Gulati, Amneet; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2009-01-01

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI), a new technique that measures an index of plaque viscoelasticity, has been investigated recently to characterize atherosclerotic plaques. These prior studies demonstrated the diagnostic potential of LSI for detecting high-risk plaques and were conducted ex vivo. To conduct intracoronary LSI in vivo, the laser speckle pattern must be transmitted from the coronary wall to the image detector in the presence of cardiac motion. Small-diameter, flexible optical fiber bundles, similar to those used in coronary angioscopy, may be incorporated into an intravascular catheter for this purpose. A key challenge is that laser speckle is influenced by inter-fiber leakage of light, which may be exacerbated during bundle motion. In this study, we tested the capability of optical fiber bundles to transmit laser speckle patterns obtained from atherosclerotic plaques and evaluated the influence of motion on the diagnostic accuracy of fiber bundle-based LSI. Time-varying helium-neon laser speckle images of aortic plaques were obtained while cyclically moving the flexible length of the bundle to mimic coronary motion. Our results show that leached fiber bundles may reliably transmit laser speckle images in the presence of cardiac motion, providing a viable option to conduct intracoronary LSI. PMID:19021396

  9. Pulmonary vascular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedullo, P.F.; Shure, D.

    1987-01-01

    A wide range of pulmonary vascular imaging techniques are available for the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonary vascular disease. The characteristics of any ideal technique would include high sensitivity and specificity, safety, simplicity, and sequential applicability. To date, no single technique meets these ideal characteristics. Conventional pulmonary angiography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of acute thromboembolic disease despite the introduction of newer techniques such as digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance imaging. Improved noninvasive lower extremity venous testing methods, particularly impedance plethysmography, and ventilation-perfusion scanning can play significant roles in the noninvasive diagnosis of acute pulmonary emboli when properly applied. Ventilation-perfusion scanning may also be useful as a screening test to differentiate possible primary pulmonary hypertension from chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. And, finally, angioscopy may be a useful adjunctive technique to detect chronic thromboembolic disease and determine operability. Optimal clinical decision-making, however, will continue to require the proper interpretation of adjunctive information obtained from the less-invasive techniques, applied with an understanding of the natural history of the various forms of pulmonary vascular disease and with a knowledge of the capabilities and shortcomings of the individual techniques

  10. Localization of oxidized low-density lipoprotein and its relation to plaque morphology in human coronary artery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumi Uchida

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL plays a key role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. However, its localization in human coronary arterial wall is not well understood. The present study was performed to visualize deposition sites and patterns of native oxLDL and their relation to plaque morphology in human coronary artery. METHODS: Evans blue dye (EB elicits a violet fluorescence by excitation at 345-nm and emission at 420-nm, and a reddish-brown fluorescence by excitation at 470-nm and emission at 515-nm characteristic of oxLDL only. Therefore, native oxLDL in excised human coronary artery were investigated by color fluorescent microscopy (CFM using EB as a biomarker. RESULTS: (1 By luminal surface scan with CFM, the % incidence of oxLDL in 38 normal segments, 41 white plaques and 32 yellow plaques that were classified by conventional angioscopy, was respectively 26, 44 and 94, indicating significantly (p<0.05 higher incidence in the latter than the former two groups. Distribution pattern was classified as patchy, diffuse and web-like. Web-like pattern was observed only in yellow plaques with necrotic core. (2 By transected surface scan, oxLDL deposited within superficial layer in normal segments and diffusely within both superficial and deep layers in white and yellow plaques. In yellow plaques with necrotic core, oxLDL deposited not only in the marginal zone of the necrotic core but also in the fibrous cap. CONCLUSION: Taken into consideration of the well-known process of coronary plaque growth, the results suggest that oxLDL begins to deposit in human coronary artery wall before plaque formation and increasingly deposits with plaque growth, exhibiting different deposition sites and patterns depending on morphological changes.

  11. Comparison of early-phase arterial repair following cobalt-chrome everolimus-eluting stent and slow-release zotarolimus-eluting stent: an angioscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Takayuki; Iida, Osamu; Fujita, Masashi; Masuda, Masaharu; Okamoto, Shin; Nanto, Kiyonori; Kanda, Takashi; Tsujimura, Takuya; Sunaga, Akihiro; Awata, Masaki; Nanto, Shinsuke; Uematsu, Masaaki

    2018-04-01

    Whether arterial repair following implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES) of the second generation differs among stent types remains unknown. We examined 41 DES placed in 28 patients (age 72 ± 7 years, male 89%) presenting with stable angina pectoris due to de novo lesions in native coronary arteries. Coronary angioscopy was performed 4 ± 1 months after stent implantation. Patients were divided into two groups based on the DES types: 22 cobalt-chrome everolimus-eluting stents (CoCr-EES) in 13 patients and 19 slow-release zotarolimus-eluting stents (R-ZES) in 15 patients. Neointimal coverage (NIC) was graded as: grade 0, stent struts exposed; grade 1, struts bulging into the lumen, although covered; grade 2, struts embedded in the neointima, but translucent; grade 3, struts fully embedded and invisible. NIC was defined as heterogeneous when the NIC grade variation was ≥1. Presence of thrombus was also investigated. Distribution of dominant NIC grade (CoCr-EES: grade 0, 9%; grade 1, 77%; grade 2, 9%; grade 3, 5%; R-ZES: grade 0, 16%; grade 1: 47%; grade 2, 37%; grade 3, 0%, P = 0.38) and heterogeneity of NIC (P = 0.43) were similar between CoCr-EES and R-ZES groups. Existence of thrombus was not significantly different in CoCr-EES and R-ZES (18 versus 42%, P = 0.17). Arterial repair occurred without significant differences between CoCr-EES and R-ZES 4 months after implantation.

  12. Current status of vulnerable plaque detection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sharif, Faisal

    2012-02-01

    Critical coronary stenoses have been shown to contribute to only a minority of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and sudden cardiac death. Autopsy studies have identified a subgroup of high-risk patients with disrupted vulnerable plaque and modest stenosis. Consequently, a clinical need exists to develop methods to identify these plaques prospectively before disruption and clinical expression of disease. Recent advances in invasive and noninvasive imaging techniques have shown the potential to identify these high-risk plaques. The anatomical characteristics of the vulnerable plaque such as thin cap fibroatheroma and lipid pool can be identified with angioscopy, high frequency intravascular ultrasound, intravascular MRI, and optical coherence tomography. Efforts have also been made to recognize active inflammation in high-risk plaques using intravascular thermography. Plaque chemical composition by measuring electromagnetic radiation using spectroscopy is also an emerging technology to detect vulnerable plaques. Noninvasive imaging with MRI, CT, and PET also holds the potential to differentiate between low and high-risk plaques. However, at present none of these imaging modalities are able to detect vulnerable plaque neither has been shown to definitively predict outcome. Nevertheless in contrast, there has been a parallel development in the physiological assessment of advanced atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Thus recent trials using fractional flow reserve in patients with modest non flow-limiting stenoses have shown that deferral of PCI with optimal medical therapy in these patients is superior to coronary intervention. Further trials are needed to provide more information regarding the natural history of high-risk but non flow-limiting plaque to establish patient-specific targeted therapy and to refine plaque stabilizing strategies in the future.

  13. Cherry Grove Nursing Home, Priesthaggard, Campile, New Ross, Wexford.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sharif, Faisal

    2012-02-01

    Critical coronary stenoses have been shown to contribute to only a minority of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and sudden cardiac death. Autopsy studies have identified a subgroup of high-risk patients with disrupted vulnerable plaque and modest stenosis. Consequently, a clinical need exists to develop methods to identify these plaques prospectively before disruption and clinical expression of disease. Recent advances in invasive and noninvasive imaging techniques have shown the potential to identify these high-risk plaques. The anatomical characteristics of the vulnerable plaque such as thin cap fibroatheroma and lipid pool can be identified with angioscopy, high frequency intravascular ultrasound, intravascular MRI, and optical coherence tomography. Efforts have also been made to recognize active inflammation in high-risk plaques using intravascular thermography. Plaque chemical composition by measuring electromagnetic radiation using spectroscopy is also an emerging technology to detect vulnerable plaques. Noninvasive imaging with MRI, CT, and PET also holds the potential to differentiate between low and high-risk plaques. However, at present none of these imaging modalities are able to detect vulnerable plaque neither has been shown to definitively predict outcome. Nevertheless in contrast, there has been a parallel development in the physiological assessment of advanced atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Thus recent trials using fractional flow reserve in patients with modest non flow-limiting stenoses have shown that deferral of PCI with optimal medical therapy in these patients is superior to coronary intervention. Further trials are needed to provide more information regarding the natural history of high-risk but non flow-limiting plaque to establish patient-specific targeted therapy and to refine plaque stabilizing strategies in the future.