WorldWideScience

Sample records for angioscopy

  1. Prospective coronary angioscopy assessment of allograft coronary artery disease in human cardiac transplant recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ashit; Ventura, Hector O.; Collins, Tyrone J.; Ramee, Stephen R.; White, Christopher J.

    1993-09-01

    Annual angiographic assessment to determine the presence or progression of allograft coronary artery disease (CAD) has been unable to modify the natural history of this disease. Coronary angioscopy is a sensitive method to detect the early presence of coronary artery disease and in a retrospective analysis severity of CAD by angioscopy correlated with the time since transplantation. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate progression of coronary artery disease over a one year period in 40 cardiac transplant recipients. The progression of coronary artery disease as assessed by angioscopy is directly related to time after transplantation and therefore angioscopy may be the method of choice for detection and evaluation of therapeutic regimens to control allograft coronary artery disease.

  2. Percutaneous transluminal angioscopy: Advanced evaluation of cerebrovascular disease and optimal control of interventional techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of ultrathin fiberscopes has improved the detection of changes in vessel walls by affording direct three-dimensional visualization. The procedure is likely to prove superior to angiography since even simultaneous biplanar angiography can yield only two-dimensional views. Interventional procedures like percutaneous transluminal angioplasty or laser plaque ablation, developed to avoid surgery, may be guided by angioscopy for more informative visualization of preoperative complex plaque structures and postinterventional vessel wall changes. Until now, angioscopy always has been performed intraoperatively. The authors have developed a new 8-French double-lumen balloon catheter system for the percutaneous transluminal approach. The system itself, extended work in a live-animal model (dogs), and preliminary results in humans will be discussed

  3. Molecular Imaging of Low-density Lipoprotein in Human Coronary Plaques by Color Fluorescent Angioscopy and Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Yasumi; Maezawa, Yuko; Uchida, Yasuto; Hiruta, Nobuyuki; Shimoyama, Ei

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is an important risk factor for coronary artery disease. However, its localization in human coronary plaques is not well understood. The present study was performed to visualize LDL in human coronary artery wall. Methods (1) The fluorescence characteristic of LDL was investigated by color fluorescent microscopy (CFM) with excitation at 470-nm and emission at 515-nm using Nile blue dye (NB) as a biomarker. (2) Native LDL in 40 normal segments, 42 white plaques and 35 yellow plaques (20 with necrotic core) of human coronary arteries was investigated by color fluorescent angioscopy (CFA) and CFM. Results (1) NB elicited a brown, golden and red fluorescence characteristic of LDL, apolipoprotein B-100, and lysophosphatidylcholine/triglyceride, respectively. (2) The % incidence of LDL in normal segments, white, and yellow plaques was 25, 38 and 14 by CFA and 42, 42 and 14 by CFM scan of their luminal surface, respectively, indicating lower incidence (p<0.05) of LDL in yellow plaques than white plaques, and no significant differences in detection sensitivity between CFA and CFM. By CFM transected surface scan, LDL deposited more frequently and more diffusely in white plaques and yellow plaques without necrotic core (NC) than normal segments and yellow plaques with NC. LDL was localized to fibrous cap in yellow plaques with NC. Co-deposition of LDL with other lipid components was observed frequently in white plaques and yellow plaques without NC. Conclusions (1) Taken into consideration of the well-known process of coronary plaque growth, the results of the present study suggest that LDL begins to deposit before plaque formation; increasingly deposits with plaque growth, often co-depositing with other lipid components; and disappears after necrotic core formation. (2) CFA is feasible for visualization of LDL in human coronary artery wall. PMID:23209809

  4. Lipid volume fraction in atherosclerotic plaque phantoms classified under saline conditions by multispectral angioscopy at near-infrared wavelengths around 1200 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Daichi; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2016-05-01

    To identify high-risk atherosclerotic lesions, we require detailed information on the stability of atherosclerotic plaques. In this study, we quantitatively classified the lipid volume fractions in atherosclerotic plaque phantoms by a novel angioscope combined with near-infrared multispectral imaging. The multispectral angioscope was operated at peak absorption wavelengths of lipid in vulnerable plaques (1150, 1200, and 1300 nm) and at lower absorption wavelengths of water. The potential of the multispectral angioscope was demonstrated in atherosclerotic plaque phantoms containing 10-60 vol.% lipid and immersed in saline solution. The acquired multispectral data were processed by a spectral angle mapper algorithm, which enhanced the simulated plaque areas. Consequently, we classified the lipid volume fractions into five categories (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-50, and 50-60 vol.%). Multispectral angioscopy at wavelengths around 1200 nm is a powerful tool for quantitatively evaluating the stability of atherosclerotic plaques based on the lipid volume fractions. PMID:26861978

  5. Comparison of the Effect of Rosuvastatin 2.5 mg vs 20 mg on Coronary Plaque Determined by Angioscopy and Intravascular Ultrasound in Japanese With Stable Angina Pectoris (from the Aggressive Lipid-Lowering Treatment Approach Using Intensive Rosuvastatin for Vulnerable Coronary Artery Plaque [ALTAIR] Randomized Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Tadateru; Komatsu, Sei; Ueda, Yasunori; Fukushima, Seiji; Hiro, Takafumi; Hirayama, Atsushi; Saito, Satoshi

    2016-04-15

    Diminishing yellow color, evaluated by coronary angioscopy, is associated with plaque stabilization and regression. Our aim was to assess the effect of aggressive lipid-lowering therapy with rosuvastatin on plaque regression and instability. Thirty-seven patients with stable angina or silent myocardial ischemia who planned to undergo elective percutaneous coronary intervention and had angioscopic yellow plaques of grade 2 or more were randomized to high-dose (group H, 20 mg/day, n = 18) or low-dose (group L, 2.5 mg/day, n = 19) rosuvastatin therapy for 48 weeks. Yellow plaque was graded on a 4-point scale of 0 (white) to 3 (bright yellow) by angioscopy, and plaque volume was determined by intravascular ultrasound for plaques with a length of 5 to 15 mm. Color and volume were assessed at baseline and after 48 weeks by the investigators blinded to the rosuvastatin dosage, and were compared between the 2 dosing groups. The level of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol decreased from 130.3 ± 25.5 mg/dl to 61.7 ± 16.5 mg/dl (-50 ± 19%: high intensity) in group H (p change in plaque volume was significantly larger in group H than in group L (p = 0.005). In conclusion, both high-dose and low-dose rosuvastatin increased plaque stability. However, high-dose rosuvastatin was more effective than low-dose rosuvastatin in inducing plaque volume regression. Clinical Trial Registration No: UMIN-CTR, UMIN000003276. PMID:26879069

  6. Noninvasive coronary angioscopy using electron beam computed tomography and multidetector computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, PMA; Nieman, K; de Feyter, PJ; Oudkerk, M

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of noninvasive coronary imaging techniques like multidetector computed tomography and electron beam computed tomography, new representation methods such as intracoronary visualization. have been introduced. We explore the possibilities of these novel visualization techniques and comp

  7. 77 FR 23269 - Determination That FUNDUSCEIN-25 (fluorescein sodium injection), 25%, and AK-FLUOR (fluorescein...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... injection), 25%, and AK-FLUOR (fluorescein sodium injection), 25%, Were Not Withdrawn From Sale for Reasons...%, and AK-FLUOR (fluorescein sodium injection), 25%, were not withdrawn from sale for reasons of safety... diagnostic fluorescein angiography or angioscopy of the retina and iris vasculature. AK-FLUOR...

  8. New developments in the diagnosis and management of cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Mehra, M. R.; Ventura, H O; Smart, F W; Stapleton, D D; Collins, T J; Ramee, S R; Murgo, J P; White, C. J.

    1995-01-01

    The major cause of late death in cardiac transplant recipients is cardiac allograft vasculopathy, also referred to as cardiac transplant atherosclerosis, which occurs in as many as 45% of transplant recipients who survive longer than 1 year. It differs from typical atherosclerosis in that intimal hyperplasia is concentric and diffuse, the internal elastic lamina remains intact, calcification is rare, and the disease tends to develop rapidly. Intravascular ultrasound and coronary angioscopy ar...

  9. Removal of focal atheromatous lesions by angioscopically guided high-speed rotary atherectomy. Preliminary experimental observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new high-speed rotary atherectomy device, inserted over a guide wire and directed with an angioscope, offers the potential of restoring patency of outflow vessels by boring out the atheromatous lesion of the orifices of runoff vessels. The device was tested on 68 cadaver arteries with atheromatous lesions involving the superficial femoral, popliteal, and tibial arteries. This was performed with either free segments or in situ with the device placed through a popliteal arteriotomy. The gross results of rotary atherectomy were assessed by angioscopy, angiography, or both. The luminal surfaces were studied with scanning electron microscopy and transverse sections of vessels were studied with light microscopy. The pulverized atheroma, in colloidal suspension, was analyzed for particle size by Coulter counter. The effect of a colloidal suspension of atheromatous particles on distal capillary circulation was measured in animal experiments. Obstructive lesions were successfully removed in 36 of 37 stenotic arteries (97%) and 18 of 31 completely occluded arteries (58%), an overall efficacy of 54 of 68 (79%). In successfully atherectomized arteries, angioscopy and angiography demonstrated a widely patent, smooth, polished surface. Light microscopy demonstrated removal of the diseased intima with maintenance of the outer media and adventitia. The pulverized atheroma particles were generally smaller than red blood cells and injection of the colloidal atheroma into canine femoral arteries failed to produce local tissue injury. We conclude that in the human cadaver this atherectomy device effectively enlarges and recanalizes obstructed superficial femoral, popliteal, and tibial arteries

  10. Fiberoptic observation of thrombosis and thrombolysis in isolated human coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Y; Masuo, M; Tomaru, T; Kato, A; Sugimoto, T

    1986-10-01

    Coronary arteries isolated from cadavers autopsied within 7 hours after death were perfused with canine arterial blood, and the processes of thrombus formation at the segments stenosed with atheroma and the thrombolytic effects of urokinase were investigated by angioscopy. Ten minutes of blood perfusion caused thin mural thrombi localized at the stenotic or nonstenotic segments. During 30 minutes of blood perfusion, the thin mural thrombi of the outlet or inlet of the segment grew into a doughnut-shaped thrombus. Also, the thin mural thrombi in the stenotic segment grew into a streamer-like thrombus and drifted downstream. These thrombi grew in size with increasing perfusion time and finally obstructed the stenotic segment. Globular thrombi close to the outlet also were formed in a few preparations. Unlike the thrombi at the stenotic segment, the mural thrombi in the nonstenotic segments did not grow into massive thrombi. The thrombi were reduced in size within 10 minutes of perfusion with 320 U/ml or more of urokinase. During thrombolysis, sandstorm-like dispersion of the blood cells occurred, small fragments detached from the mother thrombus and flew downstream, or the fibrin core of the thrombus was exposed. The results indicate the usefulness of angioscopy for the dynamic and serial investigation of thrombosis and thrombolysis. PMID:3766368

  11. Renal Cell Carcinoma with IVC Thrombi; Current Concepts and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ahmed Abdel-Muneem Nouh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of venous extension to the inferior vena cava (IVC in renal cell carcinoma (RCC is markedly increased recently mostly due to the advances in diagnostic modalities. Such vascular invasion implies a heightened biologic behavior and a surgical challenge during the course of treatment. In this study, we reviewed the classification guidelines, recent diagnostic tools and up-to-date therapeutic modalities for RCC with IVC tumor thrombi added to the prognostic significance regarding the pathologic nature of vascular invasion; cephalad extent of thrombi and any associated distant metastasis. Also, we are providing our suggestion regarding the use of angioscopy for removal of IVC thrombi in a relatively bloodless field without aggressive surgical manipulations or shunt techniques for maintenance of hemodynamic stability.

  12. Autofluorescence maps of atherosclerotic human arteries - A new technique in medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new medical imaging technique for arterial walls based on laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy is reported. The internal surface of isolated arteries with or without atherosclerosis is irradiated with an argon ion laser (458 nm) and the peak intensity of the excited autofluorescence spectrum is related to the composition of the arterial wall. The higher autofluorescence intensity in the range between approximately 480 and 630 nm for grossly calcified tissue compared to normal or noncalcified atherosclerotic tissue is used to produce maps of the arterial wall. These images delineate the calcified areas of the sample with good spatial resolution. If this technique can be adapted to the endoscopic visualization of arteries in vivo (angioscopy), it could become an important tool for the diagnosis of atherosclerosis and for the monitoring of atheroma ablation during laser angioplasty

  13. Interventional radiology. 2. tot. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book is an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference and a textbook for 'interventionalists', and even a systematic toolbook for physicians who are beginners in this field or wish to enlarge their spectrum. For the new edition, existing contributions have been completely revised and updated, and many new contributions have been added covering the front-edge state-of-the art in the following subject areas: accession techniques in interventional radiology - interventional radiology in the out-patient department - accompanying drug treatment and control - angioscopy and intravascular US - stents (endovascular, in the gastro-intestinal tract and the tracheobronchial system) - TIPPS - embolisation of spinal and peripheral a.-v. malformations - embolisation in cases of venous impotence - ballooning and stenting of the prostate - percutaneous tubal recanalisation - percutaneous pain therapy. Step-by-step explanations and textual information enhanced by various types of illustrations confer the required technical know-how. Indications, contraindications and specific risks are explained in full, and materials and supply sources are given. (orig./CB)

  14. Ophthalmological and angiographic findings in workers exposed to carbon disulfide (author's transl)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savic, S.

    1982-01-01

    Microaneurysms are important in the diagnosis of vascular changes caused by carbon disulfide. They can be diagnosed by ophtholmoscopy, angiography or angioscopy. In our opinion even a careful ophthalmoscopic investigation is sufficient for diagnosis, so that angiography is not absolutely necessary for any mass survey. The incidence of microaneurysms correlates with the duration (both daily and total) as well as with the intensity of exposure to carbon disulfide. The quantity correlates closely with the intensity of exposure. The incidence of microaneurysms is not correlated to age; however it was found to be highest in 40-50-year-old men working with staple fibers, whereas in the spinning department it occurred in 50-55-old men. Microaneurysms are found equally frequently in active workers and invalids. There was no difference between the two groups with regard to degenerative changes of the macula. However, the changes found in the eyes of men from the staple fiber department were more pronounced than in those from the spinning department.

  15. Multidetector row computed tomography may accurately estimate plaque vulnerability. Does MDCT accurately estimate plaque vulnerability? (Pro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past decade, multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) has become the most reliable and established of the noninvasive examination techniques for detecting coronary heart disease. Now MDCT is chasing intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in terms of spatial resolution. Among the components of vulnerable plaque, MDCT may detect lipid-rich plaque, the lipid pool, and calcified spots using computed tomography number. Plaque components are detected by MDCT with high accuracy compared with IVUS and angioscopy when assessing vulnerable plaque. The TWINS study and TOGETHAR trial demonstrated that angioscopic loss of yellow color occurred independently of volumetric plaque change by statin therapy. These 2 studies showed that plaque stabilization and regression reflect independent processes mediated by different mechanisms and time course. Noncalcified plaque and/or low-density plaque was found to be the strongest predictor of cardiac events, regardless of lesion severity, and act as a potential marker of plaque vulnerability. MDCT may be an effective tool for early triage of patients with chest pain who have a normal electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac enzymes in the emergency department. MDCT has the potential ability to analyze coronary plaque quantitatively and qualitatively if some problems are resolved. MDCT may become an essential tool for detecting and preventing coronary artery disease in the future. (author)

  16. Coronary plaque morphology on multi-modality imagining and periprocedural myocardial infarction after percutaneous coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Sato

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI may be complicated by periprocedural myocardial infarction (PMI as manifested by elevated cardiac biomarkers such as creatine kinase (CK-MB or troponin T. The occurrence of PMI has been shown to be associated with worse short- and long-term clinical outcome. However, recent studies suggest that PMI defined by biomarker levels alone is a marker of atherosclerosis burden and procedural complexity but in most cases does not have independent prognostic significance. Diagnostic multi-modality imaging such as intravascular ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, coronary angioscopy, near-infrared spectroscopy, multidetector computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging can be used to closely investigate the atherosclerotic lesion in order to detect morphological markers of unstable and vulnerable plaques in the patients undergoing PCI. With the improvement of technical aspects of multimodality coronary imaging, clinical practice and research are increasingly shifting toward defining the clinical implication of plaque morphology and patients outcomes. There were numerous published data regarding the relationship between pre-PCI lesion subsets on multi-modality imaging and post-PCI biomarker levels. In this review, we discuss the relationship between coronary plaque morphology estimated by invasive or noninvasive coronary imaging and the occurrence of PMI. Furthermore, this review underlies that the value of the multimodality coronary imaging approach will become the gold standard for invasive or noninvasive prediction of PMI in clinical practice.

  17. Four-dimensional coronary morphology and computational hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, Andreas; Mitchell, Steven C.; Ramaswamy, Sharan D.; Chandran, Krishnan B.; Sonka, Milan

    2001-07-01

    Conventional reconstructions from intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) stack the frames as acquired during the pullback of the catheter to form a straight three-dimensional volume, thus neglecting the vessel curvature and merging images from different heart phases. We are developing a comprehensive system for fusion of the IVUS data with the pullback path as determined from x-ray angiography, to create a geometrically accurate 4-D (3-D plus time) model of the coronary vasculature as basis for computational hemodynamics. The overall goal of our work is to correlate shear stress with plaque thickness. The IVUS data are obtained in a single pullback using an automated pullback device; the frames are afterwards assigned to their respective heart phases based upon the ECG signal. A set of 3-D models is reconstructed by fusion of IVUS and angiographic data corresponding to the same ECG-gated heart phase; methods of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are applied to obtain important hemodynamic data. Combining these models yields the final 4-D reconstruction. Visualization is performed using the platform-independent VRML standard for a user-friendly manipulation of the scene. An extension for virtual angioscopy allows an easy assessment of the vessel features within their local context. Validation was successfully performed both in-vitro and in-vivo.

  18. Pulmonary embolism. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Barrios Fuentes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The case of a male, white skin, 38 years old patient who came to the emergency department because of a severe respiratory distress is reported. The left patella fracture history was collected and an immobilization cast was implemented. The posterior to anterior chest X-ray showed opacities in the form of a veil at the base of the left hemithorax as well as increased cardiothoracic rates. A lung computed tomography angiography scan was performed using a SIEMENS SESATION 64 multislice computed tomography scanner. The study was rebuilt using volume rendering technique and 3D applications with virtual angioscopy. Thrombus occlusion was evident at the trunk of the left pulmonary artery and its branches. The patient was admitted for anticoagulation treatment. Patients with patellar fracture as a trigger for this serious condition involving life-risk had not been treated in this hospital, that is why it was decided to publish this case, as well as for the implementation of such an innovative, useful and quick diagnosis aided by multislice computed tomography angiography.

  19. Lymph node enlargement in pulmonary arterial hypertension due to chronic thromboembolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and location of enlarged mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) due to chronic pulmonary thromboembolism (CPTE) and to identify possible causes. Thoracic CT images of 85 patients(43 men and 42 women, aged 18-80 years) with PAH in whom CPTE was confirmed at surgery (n = 75) or angiography and angioscopy (n = 10) were evaluated by two thoracic radiologists to determine the presence, size and location of lymph nodes more than 1 cm in the short axis. The presence of pleural and pericardial effusions and parenchymal abnormalities were also noted. Enlarged lymph nodes were identified in 38 patients (44.7%), including 11 with possible causes of lymphadenopathy other than CPTE. In the 27 patients with CPTE alone, 67 enlarged lymph nodes were detected (average 2.5 per patient). Nine patients had three or more enlarged lymph nodes. The most common sites of lymph node enlargement were American Thoracic Society locations 7 (n = 13), 6 (n = 10), 11L (n = 9), 10R (n = 7) and 4R (n = 7). Pleural and pericardial effusions were more common in patients with CPTE who also had lymphadenopathy than in the group with no lymphadenopathy (P < 0.05). Lymph node enlargement is common in patients with PAH caused by CPTE. The frequent association of lymphadenopathy with pleural and pericardial effusions suggest a possible pathophysiological mechanism of increased lymphatic flow caused by right heart failure.

  20. Multidetector row computed tomography may accurately estimate plaque vulnerability: does MDCT accurately estimate plaque vulnerability? (Pro).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Sei; Imai, Atsuko; Kodama, Kazuhisa

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) has become the most reliable and established of the noninvasive examination techniques for detecting coronary heart disease. Now MDCT is chasing intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in terms of spatial resolution. Among the components of vulnerable plaque, MDCT may detect lipid-rich plaque, the lipid pool, and calcified spots using computed tomography number. Plaque components are detected by MDCT with high accuracy compared with IVUS and angioscopy when assessing vulnerable plaque. The TWINS study and TOGETHAR trial demonstrated that angioscopic loss of yellow color occurred independently of volumetric plaque change by statin therapy. These 2 studies showed that plaque stabilization and regression reflect independent processes mediated by different mechanisms and time course. Noncalcified plaque and/or low-density plaque was found to be the strongest predictor of cardiac events, regardless of lesion severity, and act as a potential marker of plaque vulnerability. MDCT may be an effective tool for early triage of patients with chest pain who have a normal ECG and cardiac enzymes in the emergency department. MDCT has the potential ability to analyze coronary plaque quantitatively and qualitatively if some problems are resolved. MDCT may become an essential tool for detecting and preventing coronary artery disease in the future. PMID:21532180

  1. Localization of oxidized low-density lipoprotein and its relation to plaque morphology in human coronary artery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumi Uchida

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL plays a key role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. However, its localization in human coronary arterial wall is not well understood. The present study was performed to visualize deposition sites and patterns of native oxLDL and their relation to plaque morphology in human coronary artery. METHODS: Evans blue dye (EB elicits a violet fluorescence by excitation at 345-nm and emission at 420-nm, and a reddish-brown fluorescence by excitation at 470-nm and emission at 515-nm characteristic of oxLDL only. Therefore, native oxLDL in excised human coronary artery were investigated by color fluorescent microscopy (CFM using EB as a biomarker. RESULTS: (1 By luminal surface scan with CFM, the % incidence of oxLDL in 38 normal segments, 41 white plaques and 32 yellow plaques that were classified by conventional angioscopy, was respectively 26, 44 and 94, indicating significantly (p<0.05 higher incidence in the latter than the former two groups. Distribution pattern was classified as patchy, diffuse and web-like. Web-like pattern was observed only in yellow plaques with necrotic core. (2 By transected surface scan, oxLDL deposited within superficial layer in normal segments and diffusely within both superficial and deep layers in white and yellow plaques. In yellow plaques with necrotic core, oxLDL deposited not only in the marginal zone of the necrotic core but also in the fibrous cap. CONCLUSION: Taken into consideration of the well-known process of coronary plaque growth, the results suggest that oxLDL begins to deposit in human coronary artery wall before plaque formation and increasingly deposits with plaque growth, exhibiting different deposition sites and patterns depending on morphological changes.

  2. Molecular imaging in atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of cardiovascular disease, which still has the leading position in morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Many risk factors and pathobiological processes are acting together in the development of atherosclerosis. This leads to different remodelling stages (positive and negative) which are both associated with plaque physiology and clinical presentation. The different remodelling stages of atherosclerosis are explained with their clinical relevance. Recent advances in basic science have established that atherosclerosis is not only a lipid storage disease, but that also inflammation has a fundamental role in all stages of the disease. The molecular events leading to atherosclerosis will be extensively reviewed and described. Further on in this review different modalities and their role in the different stages of atherosclerosis will be discussed. Non-nuclear invasive imaging techniques (intravascular ultrasound, intravascular MRI, intracoronary angioscopy and intravascular optical coherence tomography) and non-nuclear non-invasive imaging techniques (ultrasound with Doppler flow, electron-bean computed tomography, coronary computed tomography angiography, MRI and coronary artery MR angiography) will be reviewed. After that we focus on nuclear imaging techniques for detecting atherosclerotic plaques, divided into three groups: atherosclerotic lesion components, inflammation and thrombosis. This emerging area of nuclear imaging techniques can provide measures of biological activity of atherosclerotic plaques, thereby improving the prediction of clinical events. As we will see in the future perspectives, at present, there is no special tracer that can be called the diagnostic tool to diagnose prospective stroke or infarction in patients. Nevertheless, we expect such a tracer to be developed in the next few years and maybe, theoretically, it could even be used for targeted therapy (in the form of a beta-emitter) to combat

  3. Current status of vulnerable plaque detection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sharif, Faisal

    2012-02-01

    Critical coronary stenoses have been shown to contribute to only a minority of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and sudden cardiac death. Autopsy studies have identified a subgroup of high-risk patients with disrupted vulnerable plaque and modest stenosis. Consequently, a clinical need exists to develop methods to identify these plaques prospectively before disruption and clinical expression of disease. Recent advances in invasive and noninvasive imaging techniques have shown the potential to identify these high-risk plaques. The anatomical characteristics of the vulnerable plaque such as thin cap fibroatheroma and lipid pool can be identified with angioscopy, high frequency intravascular ultrasound, intravascular MRI, and optical coherence tomography. Efforts have also been made to recognize active inflammation in high-risk plaques using intravascular thermography. Plaque chemical composition by measuring electromagnetic radiation using spectroscopy is also an emerging technology to detect vulnerable plaques. Noninvasive imaging with MRI, CT, and PET also holds the potential to differentiate between low and high-risk plaques. However, at present none of these imaging modalities are able to detect vulnerable plaque neither has been shown to definitively predict outcome. Nevertheless in contrast, there has been a parallel development in the physiological assessment of advanced atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Thus recent trials using fractional flow reserve in patients with modest non flow-limiting stenoses have shown that deferral of PCI with optimal medical therapy in these patients is superior to coronary intervention. Further trials are needed to provide more information regarding the natural history of high-risk but non flow-limiting plaque to establish patient-specific targeted therapy and to refine plaque stabilizing strategies in the future.

  4. Pulmonary embolism. A case report Trombo embolismo pulmonar. Presentación de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Martínez Chavarría

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The case of a male, white skin, 38 years old patient who came to the emergency department because of a severe respiratory distress is reported. The left patella fracture history was collected and an immobilization cast was implemented. The posterior to anterior chest X-ray showed opacities in the form of a veil at the base of the left hemithorax as well as increased cardiothoracic rates. A lung computed tomography angiography scan was performed using a SIEMENS SESATION 64 multislice computed tomography scanner. The study was rebuilt using volume rendering technique and 3D applications with virtual angioscopy. Thrombus occlusion was evident at the trunk of the left pulmonary artery and its branches. The patient was admitted for anticoagulation treatment. Patients with patellar fracture as a trigger for this serious condition involving life-risk had not been treated in this hospital, that is why it was decided to publish this case, as well as for the implementation of such an innovative, useful and quick diagnosis aided by multislice computed tomography angiography.Se presenta el caso de un paciente del sexo masculino, de color de piel blanca, de 38 años de edad que acudió al Servicio de Urgencias por padecer de dificultad respiratoria. Se recogió el antecedente de fractura a nivel de rótula izquierda e inmovilización con yeso. El rayos X del tórax en posición postero anterior mostró opacidades en forma de velo en la base del hemitórax izquierdo e índice cardiotorácico aumentado. Se realizó angiotomagrafía pulmonar en tomógrafo multicorte SIEMENS SESATION 64. Se reconstruyó el estudio con las aplicaciones VRT y 3D con angioscopia virtual. Se evidenció oclusión por trombo a nivel del tronco de la arteria pulmonar izquierda y sus ramas. Se ingresó para tratamiento de anticoagulación. Por no haber sido observado en este medio, en pacientes con fractura de rótula como factor desencadenante de esta afección grave que puede