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Sample records for anesthetics local

  1. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W.; Stevens, Markus F.; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk

  2. LOCAL ANESTHETICS IN PATIENTS WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.

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    risto Daskalov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A significant problem in the dental medicine is pain alleviation. Many studies in the dental anesthesiology result in the production of new agents for locoregional anesthesia. Objective: This article aim to present the results of the last studies on the effect of the local anesthetics used in the oral surgery on patients with cardiovascular diseases. Material: A general review of the existing literature on the effect of the adrenaline, included as vasoconstrictor in the local anesthetics, used in patients with cardiovascular diseases is made. The benefits of vasoconstrictors for the quality of the anesthetic effect are proven. Conclusion: A small amount of adrenaline in the anesthetic solution does not result in complications development in patients with controlled cardiovascular diseases. Articaine is recommended agent of first choice for local anesthesia in the oral surgery.

  3. Unusual presentation of local anesthetic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayaran, Nitin; Sardana, Rashi; Nandinie, Hamse; Jain, Aruna

    2017-02-01

    The local anesthetic systemic toxicity can be due to increased blood lignocaine levels or due to increased sensitivity to lignocaine. Several cases of lignocaine-induced central nervous system toxicity have been noted, but none have reported only loss of consciousness without any seizure-like activity. Intravenous lipid emulsion administration for the treatment of local anesthetic systemic toxicity is an emerging topic of discussion, and there are case reports where they had successfully been used. However, majority of them were used in the treatment of cardiovascular manifestations of local anesthetic toxicity. We report a case of a 19-year-old man who had unconsciousness on 2 separate occasions after local lignocaine infiltration to undergo surgery for dental malocclusion and the use of lipid emulsion in its management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Local anesthetic systemic toxicity: Continuing Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Boghdadly, Kariem; Chin, Ki Jinn

    2016-03-01

    Regional anesthesia is enjoying a renaissance due in part to the advent of ultrasound guidance and the development of new techniques such as tissue plane blocks and local infiltration analgesia. The purpose of this Continuing Professional Development module is to provide practitioners with an understanding of the current state of knowledge surrounding local anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST) in order to help them prevent and manage this complication more effectively. The causes of LAST are multifactorial, but recognized risks include patient factors, drug doses, pharmacokinetics, and choice of regional anesthetic technique. Local anesthetic systemic toxicity produces a biphasic course of clinical events that generally begin with central nervous system excitation followed by inhibition. At the same time, it causes cardiovascular compromise due to dysrhythmias, myocardial depression, and reduced systemic vascular resistance. Clinical presentation can be highly variable, however, and atypical presentations are not uncommon. Local anesthetic systemic toxicity is prevented by careful choice and dosing of drugs, aspiration before injection, dose fractionation, use of intravascular markers and ultrasound guidance. The management of LAST includes adequate oxygenation and ventilation, seizure termination, maintenance of circulation, and intravenous lipid emulsion therapy. Local anesthetic systemic toxicity is a potentially lethal condition with protean manifestations, and anesthesiologists must understand its risks, prevention, and safe management.

  5. Knowledge about local anesthetics in odontology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán Alvarez, Rodrigo; Campos Sepúlveda, Alfonso Efraín; Martínez González, Adrian Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the level of knowledge of local anesthetics frequently used in the surgical clinic by third and fourth year dental students in daily practice. The importance of pharmacology in dental practice in underscored by potential drug toxicity. The study was performed with 244 third and fourth grade career dental students (CDS). Eleven items regarding the knowledge over local anesthetics at the clinic; i.e., the appropriate doses, possible toxic effects and side effects were examined. The reference questionnaire which is in a validation process, is a way to evaluate student knowledge about most drugs used in odontology practice such as: NSAIDs, antibiotics and local anesthetics. The results were found to be unsatisfactory with a high percentage of students failing (less than six of eleven items correct). We conclude that determination of practice knowledge is an essential step in informing the institution about cognitive deficiencies identified in order to plan learning solutions.

  6. THE EFFECT OF LOCAL ANESTHETICS ON TEAR PRODUCTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. Anesthetics are drugs which bring about the state of anesthesia and anesthesia is a measure, which produces insensitivity to external expression or a reversible lack of awareness which can be general or local . General anesthetics act on all parts of the body while local anesthetics act on some parts of the ...

  7. Evaluation of local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of Cinchona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of an aqueous extract of Cinchona officinalis (C. officinalis) in experimental animal models. Methods: Various doses of the aqueous extract was tested for its local anesthetic activity in guinea pigs and frogs using intracutaneous and plexus anesthesia, ...

  8. Local anesthetic resistance in a pregnant patient with lumbosacral plexopathy

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    Ting Paul H

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report a case of a patient with apparent resistance to local anesthetics. While similar cases of failure of regional anesthetics are often attributed to technical failure, the overall clinical presentation and history of this patient suggests a true resistance to local anesthetics. Case Presentation This patient presented for elective cesarean section and the decision for regional anesthesia was made. While attempting to place an epidural, the patient failed to achieve adequate skin analgesia despite multiple attempts at local infiltration. When a spinal was ultimately placed, sensory or motor blockade was not obtained despite no evidence of technical problems with technique. Further questioning revealed multiple prior episodes of local anesthetic failure in this patient. Conclusions While the failure rate of spinal anesthesia has been shown range from 4–13% and is often attributed to technical failure, elements of this particular case suggest a true resistance to local anesthetics.

  9. Identifying and Managing Local Anesthetic Allergy in Dermatologic Surgery.

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    Fathi, Ramin; Serota, Marc; Brown, Mariah

    2016-02-01

    Local anesthetic (LA) allergy is a concern for dermatologic surgeons given the large number of procedures performed yearly with LAs. Many patients also have anxiety about past or potential anesthesia allergy. This article will review the symptoms of IgE-mediated allergic reactions, the prevalence of IgE-mediated LA allergy, discuss common mimics of LA, and propose a practical approach for diagnostic and therapeutic options for LA allergy for the dermatologic surgeon in practice. A literature search of Pubmed using keywords "lidocaine," "local anesthetic," "hypersensitivity," and "allergy" was performed. Amide anesthetics result in the most reports of true local anesthetic immediate hypersensitivity. True IgE-mediated anaphylaxis to local anesthesia is very rare. Dermatologic surgeons should be aware of the symptoms of anesthetic allergy and its mimickers, as well as how to manage allergic reactions in their clinical practice.

  10. True resistance to local anesthetics, a case report

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    Noyan Ashraf M.A

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: We report a case with apparent resistance to local anesthetics. While regional anesthetics failure are often attributed to technical failure, the clinical presentation and medical history of this patient suggests a true resistance to local anesthetics. Case report: A 28 years old man was scheduled for elective orthopedic surgery for right sided tibial bone fracture, and decision of spinal anesthesia was made. There was a questionable history of multiple prior episodes of local anesthetic unresponsiveness (Interscalan block, local infiltration for lipoma resection and dental surgery. Spinal anesthesia was performed and sensory or motor blockade was not obtained despite any evidence of technical problems. The surgical procedure performed under general anesthesia and skin analgesia (local infiltration of lidocaine 2% and bupivacaine 0.5% to forearm, did not achieve, the day after surgery. Conclusion: While the failure rate of spinal anesthesia has been shown range from 4 to 13% and is often attributed to technical failure, this particular case showed a true resistance to local anesthetics.

  11. Local and general anesthetics immediate hypersensitivity reactions.

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    Volcheck, Gerald W; Mertes, Paul Michel

    2014-08-01

    Intraoperative anaphylaxis and hypersensitivity reactions in the setting of anesthesia contribute significantly to the morbidity and mortality of surgeries and surgical procedures. Because multiple medications and products are given in a short period of time, identifying the specific cause can be difficult. Neuromuscular blocking agents, antibiotics, and latex are the most common causes of anesthesia-related reactions, though other medications or exposures could be involved. Careful review of anesthetic charts and allergy testing can help identify the underlying cause. The identification of the cause and subsequent prevention of reactions are critical to reduce overall mortality and morbidity related to anesthesia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Local anesthetics for brain tumor resection: Current perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Potters (Jan Willem); M. Klimek (Markus)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractThis review summarizes the added value of local anesthetics in patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumor resection, which is a procedure that is carried out frequently in neurosurgical practice. The procedure can be carried out under general anesthesia, sedation with local

  13. Combined low dose local anesthetics and opioids versus single use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-09-24

    Sep 24, 2014 ... stay of the patients. Therefore, reducing the side effects associated with intrathecal anesthesia is quite helpful to support better postoperative management. Combined low dose local anesthetics and opioids versus single use of LA for transurethral urological surgery: A meta‑analysis. Y Ding, M Li, L Chen1, ...

  14. Trigeminal nerve injury associated with injection of local anesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, Søren; Jensen, Rigmor H.; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2011-01-01

    of three of the four drugs in both national registry data and clinical data. These findings indicate that the main cause of injury was neurotoxicity resulting from administration of the local anesthetic rather than the needle penetration. Clinical Implications. Clinicians may consider avoiding use of high...

  15. Combined low dose local anesthetics and opioids versus single use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The combination of reduced dose of local anesthetics (LA) and highly lipid‑soluble synthetic opioids for patients undergoing transurethral surgery could reduce block duration and side‑effects. However, it remains unclear what are the most appropriate levels of low dose and the extent to which the side‑effects ...

  16. 'Butamben, a specific local anesthetic and aspecific ion channel modulator'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekwilder, Jeroen Petrus

    2008-01-01

    Butamben is a local anesthetic with some unusual characteristics. Epidural application in the form of a suspension leads to long-term selective pain suppression, leaving the motor system intact. The mechanism behind this selective behavior is not understood. In order to see whether this selectivity

  17. Local anesthetic wound infiltration for pain management after periacetabular osteotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Bech, Rune D; Ovesen, Ole; Lindholm, Peter; Overgaard, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose To our knowledge, there is no evidence to support the use of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) for postoperative pain relief after periacetabular osteotomy (PAO). We investigated the effect of wound infiltration with a long-acting local anesthetic (ropivacaine) for postoperative analgesia after PAO. Patients and methods We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00815503) in 53 patients undergoing PAO to evaluate the effec...

  18. The inhibitory potency of local anesthetics on NMDA receptor signalling depends on their structural features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gronwald, Carsten; Vegh, Vladimir; Hollmann, Markus W.; Hahnenkamp, Anke; Garaj, Vladimir; Hahnenkamp, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Development of postoperative hyperalgesia depends on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation. Local anesthetics protect against those hyperalgesic pain states and inhibit NMDA receptor activation. To outline what structural features of local anesthetics are responsible for NMDA receptor

  19. Electronic dental anesthesia in a patient with suspected allergy to local anesthetics: report of case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F; Quinn, C L

    1988-01-01

    A 56-year-old patient with alleged allergy to local anesthetics required restorative dental treatment. Electronic dental anesthesia was used successfully, in lieu of injectable local anesthetics, to manage intraoperative pain associated with the restoration of vital mandibular teeth.

  20. Local anesthetics for brain tumor resection: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potters, Jan-Willem

    2018-01-01

    This review summarizes the added value of local anesthetics in patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumor resection, which is a procedure that is carried out frequently in neurosurgical practice. The procedure can be carried out under general anesthesia, sedation with local anesthesia or under local anesthesia only. Literature shows a large variation in the postoperative pain intensity ranging from no postoperative analgesia requirement in two-thirds of the patients up to a rate of 96% of the patients suffering from severe postoperative pain. The only identified causative factor predicting higher postoperative pain scores is infratentorial surgery. Postoperative analgesia can be achieved with multimodal pain management where local anesthesia is associated with lower postoperative pain intensity, reduction in opioid requirement and prevention of development of chronic pain. In awake craniotomy patients, sufficient local anesthesia is a cornerstone of the procedure. An awake craniotomy and brain tumor resection can be carried out completely under local anesthesia only. However, the use of sedative drugs is common to improve patient comfort during craniotomy and closure. Local anesthesia for craniotomy can be performed by directly blocking the six different nerves that provide the sensory innervation of the scalp, or by local infiltration of the surgical site and the placement of the pins of the Mayfield clamp. Direct nerve block has potential complications and pitfalls and is technically more challenging, but mostly requires lower total doses of the local anesthetics than the doses required in surgical-site infiltration. Due to a lack of comparative studies, there is no evidence showing superiority of one technique versus the other. Besides the use of other local anesthetics for analgesia, intravenous lidocaine administration has proven to be a safe and effective method in the prevention of coughing during emergence from general anesthesia and extubation, which

  1. Infrared image monitoring of local anesthetic poisoning in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Carstens, Angelo Manoel G.; Tambara, Elizabeth Milla; Colman, Daniel; Carstens, Márcio G.; Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives: To evaluate the thermographic predictive value of local anesthetic poisoning in rats that indicates the early recognition of thermal signs of intoxication and enable the immediate start of advanced life support. Methods: Wistar rats underwent intraperitoneal injection of saline and ropivacaine; they were allocated into pairs, and experiments performed at baseline and experimental times. For thermography, central and peripheral compartment were analyzed, c...

  2. Development of lidocaine gels for enhanced local anesthetic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Chul; Cho, Cheong-Weon; Yang, Kyu-Ho

    2004-12-09

    In relieving local pains, lidocaine, one of ester type local anesthetics, has been used. To develop the lidocaine gels of enhanced local anesthetic effects, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) based bioadhesive polymer gel containing an enhancer was formulated. As the drug concentration in the gels increased up to 3%, the permeation rate of drug linearly increased, thereafter reaching a plateau. As the temperature of surrounding solutions increased, the permeation of drug increased. The activation energy of drug permeation was 3.29 kcal/mol for lidocaine. The permeation rate of drug through skin was studied using various enhancers, such as glycols, non-ionic surfactants, and bile salts. Among the enhancers studied, diethylene glycol showed the greatest enhancing effects on drug permeation through skin. The analgesic activity was examined using a tail-flick analgesimeter. In the area under the efficacy curve (AUEC) of the rat-tail flick tests, lidocaine gel containing diethylene glycol showed about 3.89-fold increase in analgesic activity compared with the control. The addition of vasoconstrictor in the gels prolonged the analgesic effects. The result of this study supports that the bioadhesive gel with efficient anesthetic effect could be developed using HPMC with combination of enhancer and vasoconstrictor.

  3. Intralipid Therapy for Inadvertent Peripheral Nervous System Blockade Resulting from Local Anesthetic Overdose

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    Ihab Kamel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although local anesthetics have an acceptable safety profile, significant morbidity and mortality have been associated with their use. Inadvertent intravascular injection of local anesthetics and/or the use of excessive doses have been the most frequent causes of local anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST. Furthermore, excessive doses of local anesthetics injected locally into the tissues may lead to inadvertent peripheral nerve infiltration and blockade. Successful treatment of LAST with intralipid has been reported. We describe a case of local anesthetic overdose that resulted in LAST and in unintentional blockade of peripheral nerves of the lower extremity; both effects completely resolved with administration of intralipid.

  4. In Vivo Quantitation of Local Anesthetic Suppression of Leukocyte Adherence

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    Giddon, D. B.; Lindhe, J.

    1972-01-01

    Using intravital microscopy, topically applied amide-type local anesthetics suppressed the adherence of leukocytes to the venular endothelium within surgical defects in the hamster cheek pouch. The response was reversible with physiologic saline and was localized to venules within the defect. Quantitation in terms of the percent of initially adhering leukocytes remaining in place on the venule wall at each minute following application of lidocaine and physiologic saline, respectively, revealed the suppression to be reliably related to the concentration, viz: 20.0 >10.0 >5.0 >0.0 mg ml of commercially available Xylocaine® (lidocaine) HCl. ImagesFig 1Fig 1 PMID:5049429

  5. Under Utilization of Local Anesthetics in Infant Lumbar Punctures

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    Gorchynski, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar Puncture (LP is an invasive procedure frequently used to diagnose meningitis among the pediatric population. Neonates and infants have not routinely received local anesthesia prior to LP. Study Objective: To determine whether emergency medicine physicians and pediatricians use local analgesics on neonates and infants prior to performing an LP and to identify which local anesthetics, if any, were used. Methods: Prospective, cohort study of all infants, six months of age or less, that received an LP in the emergency department (ED or inpatient pediatric units for suspected meningitis during a period of year at a university tertiary care hospital. Results: A total sample population of 111 infants that received an LP within the study period. A control population of 42 adults received an LP. Only 40.4% (45/111 of the infants received local analgesia prior to LP: either 1% lidocaine, EMLA or a combination of the two. Infants were less likely to receive lidocaine or EMLA prior to LP compared to adult subjects (OR= 0.27; 95% CI0.12 to 0.62. No neonates that were less than one month of age received local procedural anesthesia by emergency medicine or pediatric physicians. ED physicians’ use of local anesthesia prior to LP increased with increasing age of the infant. The pediatricians in this study used local anesthesia prior to LP when the infant was at least five months of age. Discussion: The data objectively support recent literature regarding the under use or lack of use of analgesia prior to LP among neonates and infants. Local anesthetics should be used routinely without exception prior to performing an LP in the pediatric population.

  6. Vasoconstriction Potency Induced by Aminoamide Local Anesthetics Correlates with Lipid Solubility

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    Hui-Jin Sung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoamide local anesthetics induce vasoconstriction in vivo and in vitro. The goals of this in vitro study were to investigate the potency of local anesthetic-induced vasoconstriction and to identify the physicochemical property (octanol/buffer partition coefficient, pKa, molecular weight, or potency of local anesthetics that determines their potency in inducing isolated rat aortic ring contraction. Cumulative concentration-response curves to local anesthetics (levobupivacaine, ropivacaine, lidocaine, and mepivacaine were obtained from isolated rat aorta. Regression analyses were performed to determine the relationship between the reported physicochemical properties of local anesthetics and the local anesthetic concentration that produced 50% (ED50 of the local anesthetic-induced maximum vasoconstriction. We determined the order of potency (ED50 of vasoconstriction among local anesthetics to be levobupivacaine > ropivacaine > lidocaine > mepivacaine. The relative importance of the independent variables that affect the vasoconstriction potency is octanol/buffer partition coefficient > potency > pKa > molecular weight. The ED50 in endothelium-denuded aorta negatively correlated with the octanol/buffer partition coefficient of local anesthetics (r2=0.9563; P<0.001. The potency of the vasoconstriction in the endothelium-denuded aorta induced by local anesthetics is determined primarily by lipid solubility and, in part, by other physicochemical properties including potency and pKa.

  7. Comparison between newer local anesthetics for myofascial pain syndrome management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaralidou, A Th; Amaniti, E N; Maidatsi, P G; Gorgias, N K; Vasilakos, D F

    2007-06-01

    Myofascial pain syndromes are characterized by the presence of painful loci within muscles, tendons or ligaments, called trigger points. Infiltration of these points with local anesthetics is often used as a treatment modality. The aim of the study was to comparatively evaluate 0.25% levobupivacaine and 0.25% ropivacaine for trigger point injection regarding pain on injection, treatment efficacy and duration of symptoms remission. Sixty-eight patients, suffering from myofascial pain syndromes, were randomly assigned to two groups to receive either levobupivacaine or ropivacaine for trigger-point injection. After completion of the procedure, patients were asked to rate pain during injection and efficacy of the treatment, based on immediate relief. Two weeks later, they were asked about the duration of this relief. Statistical analysis did not reveal significant differences between groups with respect to pain during injection, efficacy of the treatment and duration of pain relief. The two local anesthetics seem to be equally effective for trigger point infiltration. (c) 2007 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  8. Peripheral nerve catheters and local anesthetic infiltration in perioperative analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Christopher K; Mariano, Edward R; Kaye, Alan David; Lissauer, Jonathan; Mancuso, Kenneth; Prabhakar, Amit; Urman, Richard D

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters (PNCs) and local infiltration analgesia (LIA) represent valuable options for controlling perioperative pain. PNCs have been increasingly utilized to provide both surgical anesthesia and prolonged postoperative analgesia for a wide variety of procedures. PNCs can be more technically challenging to place than typical single-injection nerve blocks (SINB), and familiarity with the indications, contraindications, relevant anatomy, and appropriate technical skills is a prerequisite for the placement of any PNC. PNCs include risks of peripheral nerve injury, damage to adjacent anatomic structures, local anesthetic toxicity, intravascular injection, risks associated with motor block, risks of unnoticed injury to the insensate limb, and risks of sedation associated with PNC placement. In addition to these common risks, there are specific risks unique to each PNC insertion site. LIA strategies have emerged that seek to provide the benefit of targeted local anesthesia while minimizing collateral motor block and increasing the applicability of durable local anesthesia beyond the extremities. LIA involves the injection and/or infusion of a local anesthetic near the site of surgical incision to provide targeted analgesia. A wide variety of techniques have been described, including single-injection intraoperative wound infiltration, indwelling wound infusion catheters, and the recent high-volume LIA technique associated with joint replacement surgery. The efficacy of these techniques varies depending on specific procedures and anatomic locations. The recent incorporation of ultra-long-acting liposomal bupivacaine preparations has the potential to dramatically increase the utility of single-injection LIA. LIA represents a promising yet under-investigated method of postoperative pain control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of bicarbonate in decreasing pain on intradermal injection of local anesthetics: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Marie N; Elhassan, Amir; Veloso, Patricia M; Lesley, Maggie; Lissauer, Jon; Richman, Jeffrey M; Wu, Christopher L

    2009-01-01

    Intradermal injection of local anesthetic often results in pain on injection due in part to the acidic pH of commercially prepared solutions, which are optimized to prolong shelf life. Although there are other possible explanations (eg, noxious properties of local anesthetics, pressure effect of infiltration), the etiology is most likely multifactorial. Although addition of bicarbonate to local anesthetics may decrease pain on intradermal injection, the extent of this analgesic effect is uncertain. We performed a meta-analysis of available trials investigating pain during intradermal injection of buffered local anesthetic preparations. We searched the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database for all relevant articles published on the topic through November 2006. Inclusion criteria included double-blind, randomized controlled trials and use of a visual analog scale to measure pain on infiltration of local anesthetic buffered with sodium bicarbonate compared with that of unbuffered local anesthetic. Meta-analysis was performed using the Review Manager 4.2.7 (The Cochrane Collaboration, 2004). A random-effects model was used. Our search resulted in 86 abstracts, of which 12 articles met all inclusion criteria. Overall, there were 609 observations for buffered local anesthetic and 615 for unbuffered local anesthetic. Use of buffered local anesthetic resulted in a statistically lower weighted mean difference in visual analog scale of -1.17 (95% confidence interval, -1.68 to -0.67) compared with unbuffered local anesthetic. Our systematic review suggests that the use of buffered local anesthetics seems to be associated with a statistical decrease in pain of infiltration when compared with unbuffered local anesthetic.

  10. [Feasibility assessment of skin permeation for the local anesthetic lidocaine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y H; Sugibayashi, K; Morimoto, Y; Liao, G T; Hou, S X

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of skin permeation for lidocaine and pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) tape formulation containing lidocaine for skin local anesthetic were assessed. Firstly, in vitro skin permeation of the molecular and ionic forms of lidocaine from water and silicone fluid suspensions was measured using a side-by-side two diffusion cells and excised hairless rat skin. Secondly, PSA tape containing lidocaine was prepared by a general casting method using styrene-isoprene-styrene block copolymer. The in vitro release and skin permeation were evaluated and compared with that of Japan marketed xylocaine jelly. The effect of lidocaine concentration on the steady-state flux of skin permeation from 10% to 60% lidocaine PSA tapes was also evaluated.

  11. Dual effect of local anesthetics on the function of excitable rod outer segment disk membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashimo, T.; Abe, K.; Yoshiya, I.

    1986-04-01

    The effects of local anesthetics and a divalent cation, Ca2+, on the function of rhodopsin were estimated from the measurements of light-induced proton uptake. The light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin in the rod outer segment disk membrane was enhanced at lower pH (4) but depressed at higher pHs (6 to 8) by the tertiary amine local anesthetics lidocaine, bupivacaine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. The order of local anesthetic-induced depression of the proton uptake followed that of their clinical anesthetic potencies. The depression of the proton uptake versus the concentration of the uncharged form of local anesthetic nearly describes the same curve for small and large dose of added anesthetic. Furthermore, a neutral local anesthetic, benzocaine, depressed the proton uptake at all pHs between 4 and 7. These results indicate that the depression of the proton uptake is due to the effect of only the uncharged form. It is hypothesized that the uncharged form of local anesthetics interacts hydrophobically with the rhodopsin in the disk membrane. The dual effect of local anesthetics on the proton uptake, on the other hand, suggests that the activation of the function of rhodopsin may be caused by the charged form. There was no significant change in the light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin when 1 mM of Ca2+ was introduced into the disk membrane at varying pHs in the absence or presence of local anesthetics. This fact indicates that Ca2+ ion does not influence the diprotonating process of metarhodopsin; neither does it interfere with the local anesthetic-induced changes in the rhodopsin molecule.

  12. Management of a parturient with a history of local anesthetic allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrieri, Philip J; Ferguson, J E

    2003-05-01

    The management of parturients with a strong history of allergy to local anesthetics poses significant challenges to the obstetric anesthesiologist. We recommend that when such patients have a strong desire to receive labor analgesia with local anesthetics, they undergo provocative challenge testing with preservative-free bupivacaine performed in labor and delivery with preparations for emergent cesarean delivery after 24-wk gestation.

  13. Evaluation of local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of Cinchona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    induced pyrexia in rats, using aspirin (300 mg/kg) as reference. Results: C. officinalis extract, at concentrations of 10 and 20 %, produced significant anesthetic effects, of 72.12 and 88.08 %, respectively, compared with 96.86 % anesthetic ...

  14. [Infrared image monitoring of local anesthetic poisoning in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Angelo Manoel G; Tambara, Elizabeth Milla; Colman, Daniel; Carstens, Márcio G; Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto

    To evaluate the thermographic predictive value of local anesthetic poisoning in rats that indicates the early recognition of thermal signs of intoxication and enable the immediate start of advanced life support. Wistar rats underwent intraperitoneal injection of saline and ropivacaine; they were allocated into pairs, and experiments performed at baseline and experimental times. For thermography, central and peripheral compartment were analyzed, checking the maximum and average differences of temperatures between groups. Thermographic and clinical observations were performed for each experiment, and the times in which the signs of intoxication occurred were recorded. In the thermal analysis, the thermograms corresponding to the times of interest were sought and relevant data sheets extracted for statistical analysis. Basal and experimental: the display of the thermal images at times was possible. It was possible to calculate the heat transfer rate in all cases. At baseline it was possible to see the physiology of microcirculation, characterized by thermal distribution in the craniocaudal direction. It was possible to visualize the pathophysiological changes or thermal dysautonomias caused by intoxication before clinical signs occur, characterized by areas of hyper-radiation, translating Autonomic Nervous System pathophysiological disorders. In animals poisoned by ropivacaine, there was no statistically significant difference in heat transfer rate at the experimental time. The maximum temperature, medium temperature, and heat transfer rate were different from the statistical point of view between groups at the experimental time, thus confirming the systemic thermographic predictive value. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Infrared image monitoring of local anesthetic poisoning in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Manoel G. Carstens

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: To evaluate the thermographic predictive value of local anesthetic poisoning in rats that indicates the early recognition of thermal signs of intoxication and enable the immediate start of advanced life support. Methods: Wistar rats underwent intraperitoneal injection of saline and ropivacaine; they were allocated into pairs, and experiments performed at baseline and experimental times. For thermography, central and peripheral compartment were analyzed, checking the maximum and average differences of temperatures between groups. Thermographic and clinical observations were performed for each experiment, and the times in which the signs of intoxication occurred were recorded. In the thermal analysis, the thermograms corresponding to the times of interest were sought and relevant data sheets extracted for statistical analysis. Results: Basal and experimental: the display of the thermal images at times was possible. It was possible to calculate the heat transfer rate in all cases. At baseline it was possible to see the physiology of microcirculation, characterized by thermal distribution in the craniocaudal direction. It was possible to visualize the pathophysiological changes or thermal dysautonomias caused by intoxication before clinical signs occur, characterized by areas of hyper-radiation, translating autonomic nervous system pathophysiological disorders. In animals poisoned by ropivacaine, there was no statistically significant difference in heat transfer rate at the experimental time. Conclusions: The maximum temperature, medium temperature, and heat transfer rate were different from the statistical point of view between groups at the experimental time, thus confirming the systemic thermographic predictive value.

  16. Infrared image monitoring of local anesthetic poisoning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Angelo Manoel G; Tambara, Elizabeth Milla; Colman, Daniel; Carstens, Márcio G; Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto

    To evaluate the thermographic predictive value of local anesthetic poisoning in rats that indicates the early recognition of thermal signs of intoxication and enable the immediate start of advanced life support. Wistar rats underwent intraperitoneal injection of saline and ropivacaine; they were allocated into pairs, and experiments performed at baseline and experimental times. For thermography, central and peripheral compartment were analyzed, checking the maximum and average differences of temperatures between groups. Thermographic and clinical observations were performed for each experiment, and the times in which the signs of intoxication occurred were recorded. In the thermal analysis, the thermograms corresponding to the times of interest were sought and relevant data sheets extracted for statistical analysis. Basal and experimental: the display of the thermal images at times was possible. It was possible to calculate the heat transfer rate in all cases. At baseline it was possible to see the physiology of microcirculation, characterized by thermal distribution in the craniocaudal direction. It was possible to visualize the pathophysiological changes or thermal dysautonomias caused by intoxication before clinical signs occur, characterized by areas of hyper-radiation, translating autonomic nervous system pathophysiological disorders. In animals poisoned by ropivacaine, there was no statistically significant difference in heat transfer rate at the experimental time. The maximum temperature, medium temperature, and heat transfer rate were different from the statistical point of view between groups at the experimental time, thus confirming the systemic thermographic predictive value. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Interactions of local anesthetics with voltage-gated Na+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, C; Wang, G K

    2004-09-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels are dynamic transmembrane proteins responsible for the rising phase of the action potential in excitable membranes. Local anesthetics (LAs) and structurally related antiarrhythmic and anticonvulsant compounds target specific sites in voltage-gated Na+ channels to block Na+ currents, thus reducing excitability in neuronal, cardiac, or central nervous tissue. A high-affinity LA block is produced by binding to open and inactivated states of Na+ channels rather than to resting states and suggests a binding site that converts from a low- to a high-affinity conformation during gating. Recent findings using site-directed mutagenesis suggest that multiple S6 segments together form an LA binding site within the Na+ channel. While the selectivity filter may form the more extracellular-located part of this binding site, the role of the fast inactivation gate in LA binding has not yet been resolved. The receptor of the neurotoxin batrachotoxin (BTX) is adjacent to or even overlaps with the LA binding site. The close proximity of the LA and BTX binding sites to residues critical for inactivation, together with gating transitions through S6 segments, might explain the strong impact of LAs and BTX on inactivation of voltage-gated Na+ channels and might help elucidate the mechanisms underlying voltage- and frequency-dependent LA block.

  18. Pain and efficacy of local anesthetics for central venous access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C Culp Jr

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available William C Culp Jr1, Mohammed Yousaf2, Benjamin Lowry1, Timothy C McCowan3, William C Culp21Division of Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology, Scott and White Hospital, The Texas A&M University College of Medicine, Temple, TX, USA; 2Division of Interventional Radiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 3Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USAPurpose: To compare pain during injection and efficacy of analgesia of local anesthetics during central venous line placement.Methods: Sixty-two patients were studied in a randomized, double-blinded prospective fashion. Patients received 1% lidocaine (L, buffered 1% lidocaine (LB, or 2% chloroprocaine (CP injected around the internal jugular vein for procedural analgesia for central venous access. Patients reported pain via a standard linear visual analog scale, with 0 representing no pain and 10 being the worst pain imaginable.Results: Overall patient perception of pain was better with CP and L than LB with mean scores of CP 2.4, L 2.6, LB 4.2. Pain with injection mean scores were CP 2.1, L 2.5, LB 3.2. Pain with catheter placement scores were CP 2.5, L 1.7, LB 3.4. Operator assessment of overall pain values were CP 1.9, L 2.2, LB 3.4. LB consistently scored the worst, though compared with CP, this only reached statistical significance in overall patient pain and pain at catheter insertion compared with L.Conclusion: Though chloroprocaine scored better than lidocaine in 3 of 4 parameters, this trend did not achieve statistical significance. Adding sodium bicarbonate to lidocaine isn’t justified in routine practice, nor is routine replacement of lidocaine with chloroprocaine.Keywords: local anesthesia, analgesia, central venous access, lidocaine, chloroprocaine

  19. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorzetto L

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Laura Zorzetto,1 Paola Brambilla,1 Elena Marcello,1 Nora Bloise,2 Manuela De Gregori,3 Lorenzo Cobianchi,4,5 Andrea Peloso,4,5 Massimo Allegri,6 Livia Visai,2,7 Paola Petrini1 1Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering ‘G. Natta’, Politecnico di Milano, Milan, 2Department of Molecular Medicine, Centre for Health Technologies (CHT, INSTM UdR of Pavia, University of Pavia, 3Pain Therapy Service, IRCCS Foundation Policlinico San Matteo Pavia, Pavia, 4General Surgery Department, IRCCS Foundation Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, 5Departments of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, 6Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma, 7Department of Occupational Medicine, Toxicology and Environmental Risks, S. Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Lab of Nanotechnology, Pavia, Italy Abstract: Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured

  20. Local anesthetic block of batrachotoxin-resistant muscle Na+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G K; Quan, C; Wang, S Y

    1998-08-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) are noncompetitive antagonists of batrachotoxin (BTX) in voltage-gated Na+ channels. The putative LA receptor has been delineated within the transmembrane segment S6 in domain IV of voltage-gated Na+ channels, whereas the putative BTX receptor is within segment S6 in domain I. In this study, we created BTX-resistant muscle Na+ channels at segment I-S6 (micro1-N434K, micro1-L437K) to test whether these residues modulate LA binding. These mutant channels were expressed in transiently transfected human embryonic kidney 293T cells, and their sensitivity to lidocaine, QX-314, etidocaine, and benzocaine was assayed under whole-cell, voltage-clamp conditions. Our results show that LA binding in BTX-resistant micro1 Na+ channels was reduced significantly. At -100 mV holding potential, the reduction in LA affinity was maximal for QX-314 (by 17-fold) and much less for neutral benzocaine (by 2-fold). Furthermore, this reduction was residue specific; substitution of positively charged lysine with negatively charged aspartic acid (micro1-N434D) restored or even enhanced the LA affinity. We conclude that micro1-N434K and micro1-L437K residues located near the middle of the I-S6 segment of Na+ channels can reduce the LA binding affinity without BTX. Thus, this reduction of the LA affinity by point mutations at the BTX binding site is not caused by gating changes induced by BTX alone. We surmise that the BTX receptor and the LA receptor within segments I-S6 and IV-S6, respectively, may align near or within the Na+ permeation pathway.

  1. Local anesthesia for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a study comparing eutetic mixture of local anesthetics cream and lidocaine infiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Miskowiak, J; Mogensen, P

    1992-01-01

    A study of the anesthetic efficacy of a eutetic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA cream) versus lidocaine infiltration in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was done. A total of 46 patients had 30 gm. of EMLA cream applied to the skin over the kidney and 45 had subcutaneous infiltration...

  2. Chitosan glutamate hydrogels with local anesthetic activity for buccal application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatello, R; Basile, L; Puglisi, G

    2009-04-01

    Hydrogels for the buccal application of the anesthetic drug lidocaine hydrochloride (LDC) were prepared using chitosan glutamate (CHG), a soluble salt of chitosan, or a binary mixture of CHG and glycerin, at different weight ratios. The in vitro drug release was studied at the pH value of saliva to assess the effect of the different formulations on drug delivery. The anesthetic activity of mucoadhesive LDC-CHG hydrogels was assessed in vivo after application on the buccal mucosa, compared to commercial semisolid formulations containing the same drug. LDC-loaded hydrogels can be proposed for the symptom relief of aphthosis or other painful mouth diseases.

  3. Local anesthetic-induced inhibition of human neutrophil priming: the influence of structure, lipophilicity, and charge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picardi, Susanne; Cartellieri, Sibylle; Groves, Danja; Hahnenekamp, Klaus; Gerner, Peter; Durieux, Marcel E.; Stevens, Markus F.; Lirk, Philipp; Hollmann, Markus W.

    2013-01-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) are widely known for inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels underlying their antiarrhythmic and antinociceptive effects. However, LAs have significant immunomodulatory properties and were shown to affect human neutrophil functions independent of sodium-channel blockade.

  4. Wound infiltration with local anesthetics for post-operative pain relief in lumbar spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, M; Møiniche, S; Olsen, K S

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery.......In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery....

  5. Fast kinetic studies on the allosteric interactions between acetylcholine receptor and local anesthetic binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidmann, T; Changeux, J P

    1979-02-15

    Preincubation of receptor-rich membrane fragments from Torpedo marmorata with tertiary amine local anesthetics and several toxins such as histrionicotoxin, crotoxin and cerulotoxin, modifies the amplitude and time course of the relaxation processes monitored upon rapid mixing of the membrane fragments with the fluorescent agonist, Dns-C6-Cho. In particular, the amplitude of the rapid relaxation process, which is proportional to the fraction of acetylcholine receptor sites in a high-affinity state, increases; accordingly, the rate constant of the 'slow' and 'intermediate' relaxation processes also increases up to ten times (except with histrionicotoxin) whereas in a higher range of local anesthetic concentrations the rate constant of the 'rapid' relaxation process decreases. The data are accounted for by a two-state model of the acetylcholine regulator, assuming distinct binding sites for cholinergic agonists and local anesthetics and allosteric interactions between these two classes of sites; local anesthetics stabilize the regulator in a high-affinity state for agonists even in the absence of agonist, and modify the rate constants for th interconversions between the low-affinity and high-affinity states. The model accounts for the 'slow' fluorescence increase monitored upon addition of local anesthetics to a suspension of receptor-rich membranes supplemented with trace amounts of Dns-C6-Cho. The effect of local anesthetics on the apparent rate constant of the 'rapid' relaxation process can be accounted for on the basis of an additional low-affinity binding of local anesthetics to the acetylcholine receptor site. Finally the increase of the apparent rate constant of the 'intermediate' relaxation process can be simply accounted for by assuming the existence of a third state, corresponding to the 'active' state, to which local anesthetics bind and block ionic transport.

  6. [Peribulbar anesthesia: efficacy of a single injection with a limited local anesthetic volume].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausel, H; Touffet, L; Havaux, M; Lamard, M; Savean, J; Cochener, B; Arvieux, C; Gueret, G

    2008-10-01

    Cataract surgery can be performed with peribulbar anesthesia. The classical technique consists of two injections of local anesthetics. The purpose of our study was to assess peribulbar anesthesia with a single injection and a limited volume of local anesthetics. After local ethics committee agreement and oral consent, patients scheduled for cataract surgery using peribulbar anesthesia were prospectively included. The lower temporal puncture was performed with a peribulbar needle with propofol sedation. The mixture of local anesthetics was administered with tactile control of orbital pressure. The puncture was followed by a 10-min compression of the ocular globe. Akinesia, analgesia, complications, and surgical conditions were noted. A total of 101 successive patients were included. We administered 1.2 mg/kg of propofol. The volume of local anesthetics administered was 5.0 +/- 0.9 ml. Ninety patients had akinesia at 10 min and 6.7% moderate chemosis. No puncture complication occurred. At the end of surgery, the pain noted by the patients was 0.4 +/- 2.1 out of 100 (range, 0-10). Surgical conditions were good for all patients. Peribulbar anesthesia performed with a single injection and a limited volume of local anesthetics allows cataract surgery in good conditions for the surgeon with very good analgesia for the patient.

  7. Uses and Doses of Local Anesthetics in Fish, Amphibians, and Reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatigny, Frederic; Kamunde, Collins; Creighton, Catherine M; Stevens, E Don

    2017-05-01

    Local anesthetics are an integral part of routine pain management in mammals, yet their use is relatively limited in fish, amphibians and reptiles. These animals frequently undergo potentially painful surgical procedures and therefore could possibly benefit from those drugs. Some recommendations are currently available in the literature concerning analgesic use in these animals. However the pharmacological properties, safety and often efficacy of local anesthetic drugs have not been investigated yet in fish, amphibians, or reptiles. This review compiled current information concerning the use of those agents in fish, reptiles and amphibians to help clinicians make an informed decision as to which dose and drug to use. The resulting literature search showed that the literature concerning use of local analgesics in fish and amphibians is very limited while the literature for reptiles is more extensive. We found few experimental studies evaluating the efficacy of local anesthetics. Further studies would provide additional information for developing guidelines to improve the welfare of fish, amphibians and reptiles.

  8. Trigeminal nerve injury associated with injection of local anesthetics: needle lesion or neurotoxicity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, Søren; Jensen, Rigmor H; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The authors used comprehensive national registry and clinical data to conduct a study of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), in particular neurosensory disturbance (NSD), associated with local anesthetics used in dentistry METHODS: The study included data sets of annual sales of local...... of three of the four drugs in both national registry data and clinical data. These findings indicate that the main cause of injury was neurotoxicity resulting from administration of the local anesthetic rather than the needle penetration. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Clinicians may consider avoiding use of high...

  9. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Checklist for Managing Local Anesthetic Systemic Toxicity: 2017 Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Joseph M; Woodward, Crystal M; Harrison, T Kyle

    2018-02-01

    The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) periodically revises and updates its checklist for the management of local anesthetic systemic toxicity. The 2017 update replaces the 2012 version and reflects new information contained in the third ASRA Practice Advisory on Local Anesthetic Systemic Toxicity. Electronic copies of the ASRA checklist can be downloaded from the ASRA Web site (www.asra.com) for inclusion in local anesthetic toxicity rescue kits or perioperative checklist repositories.

  10. Analgesic efficacy of caudal block versus diclofenac suppository and local anesthetic infiltration following pediatric laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkar, Jyoti; Dave, Nandini

    2005-08-01

    To compare the analgesic efficacy of caudal block with diclofenac suppository and local anesthetic infiltration in children undergoing laparoscopy. We studied 50 children undergoing laparoscopy for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Their ages ranged from 3 to 13 years, and all belonged to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class I or II. Anesthesia was carried out using the standard procedure. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Group 1 received caudal block with bupivacaine 1 mL/kg after anesthetic induction. Group 2 received diclofenac suppository 3 mg/kg postinduction and local anesthetic infiltration at the port sites at the end of the procedure. Pain was assessed using the Hannallah objective pain scale at 15, 30, 60, 120, and 360 minutes postextubation. The pain scores were comparable in both groups at all times. Twelve percent of caudal block patients and 20% of diclofenac patients needed rescue analgesic, a statistically insignificant difference. In 2 patients, caudal block was technically difficult and they were excluded from the study. The incidence of side effects was low in our study. We find the analgesic efficacy of diclofenac suppository combined with local anesthetic infiltration at port sites comparable to caudal block. Given the necessarily invasive nature of caudal block, we suggest the combined use of diclofenac suppository with local anesthetic infiltration at port sites as a useful and more economical alternative for analgesia following pediatric laparoscopy.

  11. Life threatening medullary injury following adenoidectomy and local anesthetic infiltration of the operative bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershman, Eli; Halberthal, Michael; Goldsher, Dorit; Golz, Avishai; Bar-Joseph, Gad

    2009-02-01

    To draw attention to a rare, life threatening complication of a rather common procedure, namely medullary injury following adenoidectomy and local anesthetic infiltration of the operative bed. Case report. A tertiary pediatric critical care unit. A healthy 7-year-old girl underwent adenoidectomy and local anesthetic infiltration of the adenoid bed with lidocaine and adrenaline. In the recovery room, nystagmus, dysarthria, dyspnea, inability to cough and right hemiparesis were noticed. Because of her inability to remove secretions tracheal intubation was performed, followed by severe, life threatening respiratory failure. Tracheal intubation, hemodynamic support, prolonged mechanical ventilation, nitric oxide, and tracheostomy. In children, local anesthetic infiltration of the adenoid bed may cause life-threatening medullary injury and its routine use should be re-considered.

  12. A Nomogram for Calculation of Maximum Recommended Dose by Volume of Local Anesthetic in Pediatric Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David; Splaver, Theodore; Walker, Jason

    2017-03-15

    Calculation of maximum recommended doses for local anesthetic agents and added vasopressors is complex and error-prone with potentially fatal consequences. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a nomogram to calculate the maximum recommended doses, expressed as volumes (number of cartridges or ml) of local anesthetic for healthy U.S. pediatric dental patients based on body weight, and test its accuracy and reproducibility. Standard mathematical techniques were used to draft the nomogram. Validation was performed using simulated patient data, and Bland-Altman analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy and repeatability of the nomogram. The nomogram was found to have a bias of 0.01 ml, with limits of agreement -0.04ml to 0.06ml and, thus, was considered to be within an acceptable range for clinical use. Our nomogram rapidly calculated the maximum recommended doses by volume of local anesthetic agents in common use to a high degree of accuracy and repeatability.

  13. Adding low dose rocuronium to local anesthetic mixture: Effect on quality of peribulbar blockade for vitreoretinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed T. Ghanem

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Adding low dose rocuronium to local anesthetics prolongs duration of peribulbar anesthesia and offers an optimal surgical condition without serious adverse effects for patients undergoing VR surgery.

  14. Allergic Reactions to Local Anesthetics in Dental Patients: Analysis of Intracutaneous and Challenge Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Mukae, Kazuo; Suda, Michiyo; Hayashi, Tomoko; Ishii, Minako; Sakaguchi, Mai; Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Jinzenji, Ayako; Arai, Yukiko; Higuchi, Hitoshi; Maeda, Shigeru; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2011-01-01

    Some dental patients have histories of adverse reactions to local anesthesia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency of allergy to local anesthetics of dental patients who had histories of adverse reactions to local anesthesia based on the results of allergy tests in our institute over a period of 5 years. We investigated the past medical records of dental patients retrospectively, and twenty patients were studied. Three of the 20 showed a positive or false-positive rea...

  15. Temporary blindness and ophthalmoplegia due to local anesthetic infiltration of the nasal septum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Devrim; Kul, Neslihan; Akyol, Nurettin; Ural, Ahmet; Caylan, Refik

    2012-06-01

    We report the case of a 35-year-old man who developed blindness and ophthalmoplegia during local anesthetic infiltration of the nasal septum. The complications were temporary, and the patient had full recovery without treatment. The vascular anatomy of the area and possible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed, with some suggestions on the prevention of this complication.

  16. Intradermal Infiltration of Local Anesthetic-Rapid and Bloodless Deepithelialization of the Breast Pedicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Katelyn G; Gilman, Robert H

    2017-02-01

    Breast reduction is one of the most commonly performed plastic surgery procedures, and pedicle deepithelialization remains a time-consuming step of the operation. This is especially true when using an inferior pedicle. We present a novel technique of intradermal infiltration of the breast pedicle with local anesthetic to facilitate efficient, bloodless deepithelialization. The senior author uses a 20-ml syringe to inject 0.25% lidocaine and 1:400,000 epinephrine just beneath the epidermis of the breast pedicle to create a series of wheals. Approximately 20 ml of local anesthetic is used per pedicle. After injection of local anesthetic, the breast pedicle is deepithelialized in less than 3 minutes. The plane is bloodless, allowing improved visualization secondary to the epinephrine-induced hemostasis. The senior author has had only one case of nipple necrosis in 20 years of experience. Intradermal infiltration of local anesthetic with epinephrine hydrodissects between the epidermis and dermis and provides hemostasis to facilitate rapid deepithelialization.

  17. Probing the dynamics of complexed local anesthetics via neutron scattering spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longo Martins, Murillo; Eckert, Juergen; Jacobsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Since potential changes in the dynamics and mobility of drugs upon complexation for delivery may affect their ultimate efficacy, we have investigated the dynamics of two local anesthetic molecules, bupivacaine (BVC, C18H28N2O) and ropivacaine (RVC, C17H26N2O), in both their crystalline forms and ...

  18. Molecular mechanism of allosteric modification of voltage-dependent sodium channels by local anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel; Muroi, Yukiko; Chowdhury, Sandipan; Chanda, Baron

    2010-11-01

    The hallmark of many intracellular pore blockers such as tetra-alkylammonium compounds and local anesthetics is their ability to allosterically modify the movement of the voltage sensors in voltage-dependent ion channels. For instance, the voltage sensor of domain III is specifically stabilized in the activated state when sodium currents are blocked by local anesthetics. The molecular mechanism underlying this long-range interaction between the blocker-binding site in the pore and voltage sensors remains poorly understood. Here, using scanning mutagenesis in combination with voltage clamp fluorimetry, we systematically evaluate the role of the internal gating interface of domain III of the sodium channel. We find that several mutations in the S4-S5 linker and S5 and S6 helices dramatically reduce the stabilizing effect of lidocaine on the activation of domain III voltage sensor without significantly altering use-dependent block at saturating drug concentrations. In the wild-type skeletal muscle sodium channel, local anesthetic block is accompanied by a 21% reduction in the total gating charge. In contrast, point mutations in this critical intracellular region reduce this charge modification by local anesthetics. Our analysis of a simple model suggests that these mutations in the gating interface are likely to disrupt the various coupling interactions between the voltage sensor and the pore of the sodium channel. These findings provide a molecular framework for understanding the mechanisms underlying allosteric interactions between a drug-binding site and voltage sensors.

  19. Memory-impairing effects of local anesthetics in an elevated plus-maze test in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Blatt

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Post-training intracerebroventricular administration of procaine (20 µg/µl and dimethocaine (10 or 20 µg/µl, local anesthetics of the ester class, prolonged the latency (s in the retention test of male and female 3-month-old Swiss albino mice (25-35 g body weight; N = 140 in the elevated plus-maze (mean ± SEM for 10 male mice: control = 41.2 ± 8.1; procaine = 78.5 ± 10.3; 10 µg/µl dimethocaine = 58.7 ± 12.3; 20 µg/µl dimethocaine = 109.6 ± 5.73; for 10 female mice: control = 34.8 ± 5.8; procaine = 55.3 ± 13.4; 10 µg/µl dimethocaine = 59.9 ± 12.3 and 20 µg/µl dimethocaine = 61.3 ± 11.1. However, lidocaine (10 or 20 µg/µl, an amide class type of local anesthetic, failed to influence this parameter. Local anesthetics at the dose range used did not affect the motor coordination of mice exposed to the rota-rod test. These results suggest that procaine and dimethocaine impair some memory process(es in the plus-maze test. These findings are interpreted in terms of non-anesthetic mechanisms of action of these drugs on memory impairment and also confirm the validity of the elevated plus-maze for the evaluation of drugs affecting learning and memory in mice

  20. Trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid and fluorodinitrobenzene: probes to study local anesthetic effects in cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, P; Marinetti, G V

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of local anesthetics with intact erythrocytes was studied by monitoring the extent of reaction of phospholipids with trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid and fluorodinitrobenzene. Incubating erythrocytes with local anesthetics increases the amount of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine available for reaction with trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid and fluorodinitrobenzene. The order of potency of the local anesthetics corresponded to that reported for blocking nerve conduction: dibucaine greater than tetracaine greater than butacaine greater than lidocaine greater than procaine. Treatment of intact erythrocytes with 1 mM tetracaine at 37 degrees C allows 4-5% more of the phosphatidylethanolamine to react with trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid as compared to control cells. Treatment with tetracaine has no effect at 0 degrees C, a temperature at which there is only limited partitioning of the anesthetic into the bilayer. Kinetic analysis of the reaction with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid showed that the increased number of reactive phosphatidylethanolamine molecules are located mainly on the outer half of the erythrocyte membrane. Tetracaine also increases the number of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine molecules in the erythrocyte membrane which are available to react with the penetrating probe fluorodinitrobenzene. The reaction with PE is increased from 67 to 77% and the reaction of PS is increased from 44 to 57%. Thus tetracaine affects both halves of the lipid bilayer.

  1. A Comparative Study between the Effect of Combined Local Anesthetic and Low-dose Ketamine with Local Anesthetic on Postoperative Complications after Impacted Third Molar Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anuj; Kale, Tejraj Pundalik

    2015-12-01

    Postoperative pain, swelling and trismus are the most common outcome after third molar surgery. Many methods have been tried to improve postoperative comfort after surgery. Ketamine is a phencyclidine derivative that induces a state of dissociative anesthesia. It is a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist and has a distinct suppression effect on central nervous system (CNS) sensitization. Ketamine in a subanesthetic dose is set to produce analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect. Sixty patients, between the age group of 18 and 38 years, undergoing the extraction of impacted mandibular third molar, reporting to the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery were included in the study. Patients were divided randomly into two groups: local anesthetic alone (LAA) and local anesthetic and ketamine (LAK). Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U/unpaired--t-test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. There was a significant difference in mouth opening in the LAA and LAK group in the immediate postoperative period. There was a significant difference between the two groups after 1 hour (LAA: 2.37; LAK: 1.40), and 4 hours (LAA: 2.37; LAK: 1.40). There was a significant difference in terms of facial swelling in the immediate postoperative period and day 1 between the LAA and LAK group. Use of subanesthetic dose of ketamine is not only safe but also valuable in reducing patient morbidity after third molar surgery. Combination of a local anesthetic and subanesthetic dose of ketamine during surgical extraction of third molars provides good postoperative analgesia with less swelling and significantly less trismus.

  2. Letter: Transient peripheral facial nerve paralysis after local anesthetic procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmaninho, Aristóteles; Lobo, Inês; Caetano, Mónica; Taipa, Ricardo; Magalhães, Marina; Costa, Virgílio; Selores, Manuela

    2012-04-15

    Complications may arise after laser therapy of the face. The most common ones are bleeding and infections; facial nerve paresis or paralysis is rarely reported. We describe a case of a transient peripheral facial nerve paralysis after laser therapy of an epidermal verrucous nevus localized at the left preauricular area.

  3. Evaluation and Management of Hypersensitivity to Local Anesthetics in Pediatric Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Shapira, Joseph; Rubinow, Alan

    1987-01-01

    The clinical histories of four children with a history of adverse reactions to local anesthesia and who required dental treatment are reviewed retrospectively. The children described had been referred to the allergy unit for evaluation between 1984 and 1985 and are representative of the dilemma of cases of suspected hypersensitivity to local anesthetics. The first two cases had been previously treated without the use of regional anesthesia because of a family history of atopic reactions as we...

  4. Local anesthesia for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a study comparing eutetic mixture of local anesthetics cream and lidocaine infiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Miskowiak, J; Mogensen, P

    1992-01-01

    A study of the anesthetic efficacy of a eutetic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA cream) versus lidocaine infiltration in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was done. A total of 46 patients had 30 gm. of EMLA cream applied to the skin over the kidney and 45 had subcutaneous infiltration...... anesthesia with 20 ml. 1% lidocaine with epinephrine. All patients received an intravenous dose of morphine just before ESWL. The patients were comparable with regard to age, sex, weight, morphine dosage, number of shock waves given and duration of treatment. Median pain score and the amount of supplementary...

  5. Local anesthesia for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a study comparing eutetic mixture of local anesthetics cream and lidocaine infiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Miskowiak, J; Mogensen, P

    1992-01-01

    A study of the anesthetic efficacy of a eutetic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA cream) versus lidocaine infiltration in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was done. A total of 46 patients had 30 gm. of EMLA cream applied to the skin over the kidney and 45 had subcutaneous infiltration...... analgesics were not significantly different between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences between the groups with regard to post-ESWL skin changes. Therefore, EMLA cream can be recommended for ESWL provided it is applied correctly....

  6. New procedure to synthesize silver nanoparticles and their interaction with local anesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocanu A

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aurora Mocanu,1 Roxana Diana Pasca,1 Gheorghe Tomoaia,2 Corina Garbo,1 Petre T Frangopol,1 Ossi Horovitz,1 Maria Tomoaia-Cotisel11Chemical Engineering Department, Babes-Bolyai University, 2Orthopedic Department, Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, RomaniaAbstract: Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs were prepared in aqueous colloid dispersions by the reduction of Ag+ with glucose in alkaline medium. Tetraethyl orthosilicate and l-asparagine were added as stabilizers of NPs. The AgNPs were characterized, and their interaction with three local anesthetics (procaine, dibucaine, or tetracaine was investigated. Optical spectra show the characteristic absorption band of AgNPs, due to surface plasmon resonance. Modifications in the position and shape of this band reflect the self-assembly of metal NPs mediated by anesthetic molecules and the progress in time of the aggregation process. Zeta-potential measuring was applied in order to characterize the electrostatic stability of the NPs. The size and shape of the AgNPs, as well as the features of the assemblies formed by their association in the presence of anesthetics, were evidenced by transmission electron microscopy images. Atomic force microscopy images showed the characteristics of the films of AgNPs deposited on glass support. The effect of the anesthetics could be described in terms of electrostatic forces between the negatively charged AgNPs and the anesthetic molecules, existing also in their cationic form at the working pH. But also hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions between the coated nanoparticles and anesthetics molecular species should be considered.Keywords: self-assembled nanostructures, UV-vis spectra, TEM, AFM, zeta potential

  7. Evaluation of novel local anesthetic wound infiltration techniques for postoperative pain following colorectal resection surgery: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventham, Nicholas T; O'Neill, Stephen; Johns, Neil; Brady, Richard R; Fearon, Kenneth C H

    2014-02-01

    Novel local anesthetic blocks have become increasingly popular in the multimodal pain management following abdominal surgery, but have not been evaluated in a procedure-specific manner in colorectal surgery. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of novel local anesthetic techniques in colorectal surgery. Electronic literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases (date range, January 1990 to February 2013) STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials comparing a novel local anesthetic technique with placebo/routine analgesia in adults undergoing open or laparoscopic colonic or rectal resection were selected. This is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials evaluating novel local anesthetic wound infiltration techniques such as wound catheter, transversus abdominis plane block, and intraperitoneal instillation in colorectal surgical procedures. The comparator group was defined as placebo/routine analgesia. The primary outcome was opiate requirement at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes included opiate requirements at 48 hours, pain numerical rating score at 24 and 48 hours at rest and on movement, recovery (length of stay, nausea and vomiting, time until bowel movement and diet resumption), and complications. Subgroup analysis was performed to evaluate specific local anesthetic techniques and open and laparoscopic surgery. Twelve randomized controlled trials compared local anesthetic techniques with placebo/routine analgesia. Local anesthetic techniques demonstrated a significant reduction in opiate requirement at 48 hours. Local anesthetic techniques were also associated with lower pain scores on movement at 24 and 48 hours, shorter length of stay, and earlier resumption of diet. The diverse study design led to statistical heterogeneity in several analyses. Novel local anesthetic wound infiltration techniques in colorectal surgery appear to reduce opiate requirements, to reduce pain scores, and to improve recovery in comparison with placebo

  8. Safety of combined use of local anesthetic infiltration and reinfusion drains in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David A; Coolican, Myles R J; Mather, Laurence E; Graham, David A; Dewall, Matthew J

    2009-09-01

    Injection of local anesthetic during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been shown to aid postoperative pain relief. Reinfusion drains have also proven useful in decreasing allogenic blood transfusion. Combined use carries the risk of reinfusion of local anesthetic from drainage bag. We examined plasma ropivacaine concentrations from 20 patients undergoing TKA, who were treated with these 2 techniques. Samples were taken from a dedicated venous cannula and from the reinfusion drainage bag. The average amount of ropivacaine reinfused was 1.9 mg, a fraction of the injected dose (150 mg), and venous plasma concentrations reached peaks of 0.5 to 1.5 microg/mL, well below demonstrated levels of toxicity. Patients tolerated the treatment well, with no adverse outcomes. This study demonstrates the safety of combining these 2 techniques in TKA.

  9. [Preemptive local anesthetic infiltration in hallux valgus one-day surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gądek, Artur; Liszka, Henryk

    2015-01-01

    The surgical treatment of hallux valgus deformity is connected with significant postoperative pain. Spinal and general anesthesia as well as peripheral blocks are successfully used in foot surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of local anesthetic infiltration before hallux valgus one-day surgery on postoperative pain and the need for analgesics. 134 patients underwent chevron or miniinvasive Mitchell-Kramer osteotomy of the first distal metatarsal. After general anesthesia each patient randomly received an infiltration of 7ml of local anesthetic (4 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine and 3 ml of 2% lidocaine) or the same amount of normal saline 15 minutes before the skin incision. Both the patient and the surgeon were blinded. The patient was discharged after approximately 2 hours of observation. 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 24 and 72 hours after the release of the tourniquet the level of pain was assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS). Rescue analgesia, side effects and the use of painkillers were noted. Preemptive local anesthetic infiltration significantly decreased pain during the first 24 hours after the surgery. None of the patients from the injected group and 38 from the placebo group received 100 mg of ketoprofen intravenously for rescue analgesia in the first 2 hours after the release of the tourniquet. During the first 24 hours we noted significantly decreased use of 1000 mg of paracetamol and 100 mg mg of ketoprofen orally in the injected group. No systemic adverse effects were noted. One patient from placebo group had allergic rush after use of 100 mg ketoprofen. Preemptive local anesthetic infiltration in one-day hallux valgus surgery significantly decreases postoperative pain. It is safe, efficient and allows fast discharge.

  10. Intradermal Infiltration of Local Anesthetic?Rapid and Bloodless Deepithelialization of the Breast Pedicle

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Katelyn G.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2017-01-01

    Summary: Breast reduction is one of the most commonly performed plastic surgery procedures, and pedicle deepithelialization remains a time-consuming step of the operation. This is especially true when using an inferior pedicle. We present a novel technique of intradermal infiltration of the breast pedicle with local anesthetic to facilitate efficient, bloodless deepithelialization. The senior author uses a 20-ml syringe to inject 0.25% lidocaine and 1:400,000 epinephrine just beneath the epid...

  11. The anesthetic techniques of local anesthesia during the rumenotomi in cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Dashamir Mamuti; Paskal Gjino

    2013-01-01

    The present study comprises 12 female cows on one farm in Tirana district. The purpose of this study is to investigate and evaluate the efficiency of three common local anesthetics techniques used during rumenotomi. The purpose was to compare different conditions and types of foreign bodies syndrome which precipitated the need to perform the surgical intervention. The selected cows were divided into four groups with three cows belonging to each one of them. Rumenotomi was performed under the ...

  12. Tolerance of local anesthetic for transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy: our experience and a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, M.R.E.; Bryant, N.J.; Brown, J.A.; Tiwari, P.; Cooperberg, P.L.; Wong, A.D. [St Paul' s Hospital, Ultrasound Dept., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: twong@providcencehealth.bc.ca

    2006-06-15

    To determine whether local anesthetic injection or gel reduced pain during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies and whether there was significant difference between quadrant and apex-only anesthesia. Between September 2001 and May 2002, 240 male patients with elevated prostate-specific antigen and (or) abnormal digital rectal examination were randomized into 1 of 4 groups: 1) transrectal lidocaine gel, 2) quadrant lidocaine injections, 3) apex-only lidocaine injections, or 4) no local anesthetic. Patients scored their pain on a numerical rating scale where 0 indicated no pain and 10 indicated worst pain. We analyzed mean and standard deviations of scores, using a 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc multiple comparisons with Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) studentized range test to determine whether there were significant differences across the groups. There was no significant difference between local anesthetic gel (mean 3.1, SD 1.9) and no anesthetic (mean 3.5, SD 1.9) or between quadrant (mean 1.7, SD 1.7) and apex-only (mean 2.0, SD 1.8) local anesthetic injections. There was significant difference between quadrant injections (mean 1.7, SD 1.7) and no local anesthetic (mean 3.5, SD 1.9) and between apex-only injections (mean 2.0, SD 1.8) and no local anesthetic (mean 3.5, SD 1.9). There was significant pain reduction with local anesthetic injections but not with gel, and since there was no significant difference in efficacy between quadrant and apex-only injections, we recommend apex-only local anesthetic injections for transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies because it simplifies the injection procedure. (author)

  13. [Axillary local anesthetic spread after the thoracic interfacial ultrasound block - a cadaveric and radiological evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Patricia Alfaro de la; Jones, Jerry Wayne; Álvarez, Servando López; Garcia, Paula Diéguez; Miguel, Francisco Javier Garcia de; Rubio, Eva Maria Monzon; Boeris, Federico Carol; Sacramento, Monir Kabiri; Duany, Osmany; Pérez, Mario Fajardo; Gordon, Borja de la Quintana

    Oral opioid analgesics have been used for management of peri- and postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing axillary dissection. The axillary region is a difficult zone to block and does not have a specific regional anesthesia technique published that offers its adequate blockade. After institutional review board approval, anatomic and radiological studies were conducted to determine the deposition and spread of methylene blue and local anesthetic injected respectively into the axilla via the thoracic inter-fascial plane. Magnetic Resonance Imaging studies were then conducted in 15 of 34 patients scheduled for unilateral breast surgery that entailed any of the following: axillary clearance, sentinel node biopsy, axillary node biopsy, or supernumerary breasts, to ascertain the deposition and time course of spread of solution within the thoracic interfascial plane in vivo. Radiological and cadaveric studies showed that the injection of local anesthetic and methylene blue via the thoracic inter-fascial plane, using ultrasound guide technique, results in reliable deposition into the axilla. In patients, the injection of the local anesthetic produced a reliable axillary sensory block. This finding was supported by Magnetic Resonance Imaging studies that showed hyper-intense signals in the axillary region. These findings define the anatomic characteristics of the thoracic interfascial plane nerve block in the axillary region, and underline the clinical potential of this novel nerve block. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Postoperative pain and preemptive local anesthetic infiltration in hallux valgus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gądek, Artur; Liszka, Henryk; Wordliczek, Jerzy

    2015-03-01

    Several techniques of anesthesia are used in foot surgery. Preemptive analgesia helps to prevent the development of hypersensitivity in the perioperative period. The aim of our study was to assess the role of preemptive local anesthetic infiltration and postoperative pain after hallux valgus surgery. We evaluated 118 patients who underwent modified chevron and mini-invasive Mitchell-Kramer bunionectomy of the first distal metatarsal. After spinal anesthesia each patient randomly received an infiltration of local anesthetic or the same amount of normal saline 10 minutes before the skin incision. We measured the intensity of pain 4, 8, 12, 16, 24, and 72 hours after the release of the tourniquet using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Rescue analgesia and all other side effects were noted. Preemptive analgesia resulted in less pain during the first 24 hours after surgery. The decrease of VAS score was significantly lower in the study group during all the short postoperative periods measured. The rescue analgesia was administered in 11.9% of patients in the injected group and 42.4% in the placebo group (P local anesthetic infiltration was an efficient and safe method to reduce postoperative pain after hallux valgus surgery. The analgesic effect was satisfactory in both traditional and minimally invasive techniques. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. [Intravenous regional anesthesia with long-acting local anesthetics. An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassoff, P G; Lobato, A; Aguilar, J L

    2014-02-01

    Intravenous regional anesthesia is a widely used technique for brief surgical interventions, primarily on the upper limbs and less frequently, on the lower limbs. It began being used at the beginning of the 20th century, when Bier injected procaine as a local anesthetic. The technique to accomplish anesthesia has not changed much since then, although different drugs, particularly long-acting local anesthetics, such as ropivacaine and levobupivacaine in low concentrations, were introduced. Additionally, drugs like opioids, muscle relaxants, paracetamol, neostigmine, magnesium, ketamine, clonidine, and ketorolac, have all been investigated as adjuncts to intravenous regional anesthesia, and were found to be fairly useful in terms of an increased onset of operative anesthesia and longer lasting perioperative analgesia. The present article provides an overview of current knowledge with emphasis on long-acting local anesthetic drugs. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Axillary local anesthetic spread after the thoracic interfacial ultrasound block - a cadaveric and radiological evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Alfaro de la Torre

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral opioid analgesics have been used for management of peri- and postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing axillary dissection. The axillary region is a difficult zone to block and does not have a specific regional anesthesia technique published that offers its adequate blockade. Methods After institutional review board approval, anatomic and radiological studies were conducted to determine the deposition and spread of methylene blue and local anesthetic injected respectively into the axilla via the thoracic inter-fascial plane. Magnetic Resonance Imaging studies were then conducted in 15 of 34 patients scheduled for unilateral breast surgery that entailed any of the following: axillary clearance, sentinel node biopsy, axillary node biopsy, or supernumerary breasts, to ascertain the deposition and time course of spread of solution within the thoracic interfascial plane in vivo. Results Radiological and cadaveric studies showed that the injection of local anesthetic and methylene blue via the thoracic inter-fascial plane, using ultrasound guide technique, results in reliable deposition into the axilla. In patients, the injection of the local anesthetic produced a reliable axillary sensory block. This finding was supported by Magnetic Resonance Imaging studies that showed hyper-intense signals in the axillary region. Conclusions These findings define the anatomic characteristics of the thoracic interfascial plane nerve block in the axillary region, and underline the clinical potential of this novel nerve block.

  17. Local anesthetics after total knee arthroplasty: intraarticular or extraarticular administration? A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L.O.; Kristensen, B.B.; Husted, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-volume local infiltration analgesia with additional intraarticular and wound administration of local anesthetic has been shown to be effective after knee replacement, but the optimum site of administration of the local anesthetic (i.e. intraarticular or extraarticular) has not been......-volume infiltration analgesia technique. Further studies are required to define the optimal site of administration of local anesthetic following knee replacement surgery Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12...... or to receive 20 mL ropivacaine (0.2%) intraarticularly plus 30 mL ropivacaine (0.2%) in the extraarticular wound space 24 hours postoperatively. Pain intensity at rest and with mobilization was recorded for 4 hours after administration of additional local anesthetics. RESULTS: Intensity of pain at rest, during...

  18. Topical anesthesia with eutetic mixture of local anesthetics cream in vasectomy: 2 randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Krogh, J; Rye, B

    1992-01-01

    Two paired randomized trials testing topical anesthesia with a eutetic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA cream*) in vasectomy were performed. In 1 trial EMLA cream was applied on 1 side of the scrotum, while infiltration anesthesia into the skin and subcutaneous tissue with mepivacaine was used...... less pain on the sides with the anesthetic cream (p less than 0.001). Many patients would pay the price of the cream. In conclusion, EMLA cream cannot replace but it can supplement infiltration anesthesia during vasectomy....... on the contralateral side. All but 1 of the 13 patients (p less than 0.05) preferred infiltration anesthesia because of pain as the incision reached the subcutaneous tissue. In the other trial 29 patients received EMLA cream on 1 side of the scrotum before bilateral mepivacaine infiltration. There was significantly...

  19. Topical anesthesia with eutetic mixture of local anesthetics cream in vasectomy: 2 randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Krogh, J; Rye, B

    1992-01-01

    Two paired randomized trials testing topical anesthesia with a eutetic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA cream*) in vasectomy were performed. In 1 trial EMLA cream was applied on 1 side of the scrotum, while infiltration anesthesia into the skin and subcutaneous tissue with mepivacaine was used...... on the contralateral side. All but 1 of the 13 patients (p less than 0.05) preferred infiltration anesthesia because of pain as the incision reached the subcutaneous tissue. In the other trial 29 patients received EMLA cream on 1 side of the scrotum before bilateral mepivacaine infiltration. There was significantly...... less pain on the sides with the anesthetic cream (p less than 0.001). Many patients would pay the price of the cream. In conclusion, EMLA cream cannot replace but it can supplement infiltration anesthesia during vasectomy....

  20. Factors prompting sneezing in intravenously sedated patients receiving local anesthetic injections to the eyelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Ana M S; Jazayeri, Fiona; Ali, Syed; Malhotra, Raman

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the frequency of sneezing among patients receiving intravenous sedation and periocular local anesthetic for oculoplastic procedures in a single center. To identify potential risk factors involved. Prospective, consecutive, interventional case series in a single tertiary-referral oculoplastic unit. A total of 294 patients undergoing 314 isolated oculoplastic procedures, performed under intravenous sedation with periocular local anesthetic from November 2007 to November 2008. Prospective data collection on patient demographics, history of photic sneezing, intravenous sedative, depth of sedation, nasal oxygen, and periocular infiltration site. Standard local anesthetic was used in all cases, but the intravenous sedation was at the discretion of the attending anesthesiologist (7 in total). Sneezing or attempted sneezing within 5 minutes of injection of the local anesthetic, as determined by agreed observation between attending staff. Sneezing was observed in 16% of cases. No association was found between sneezing and patient age or presence of nasal oxygen. A weakly positive association was observed with male gender (55% sneezers vs. 37% non-sneezers, P = 0.03, relative risk [RR] = 1.5, confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.0), bilateral infiltration (65% vs. 40%, P = 0.005, RR = 1.6, CI, 1.2-2.1), and upper eyelid infiltration (73% vs. 54%, P = 0.01, RR = 1.4, CI, 1.1-1.7). Photic sneezing was described in 47% of sneezers and 19% of non-sneezers (P = 0.0004, RR = 2.6, CI, 1.6-4.0). Because propofol was given to 95% of patients, no association with sneezing could be ascertained. However, opioid derivatives were found to be protective (12% vs. 43%, Plocal anesthetic injections, induces sneezing in approximately one sixth of general oculoplastic cases. Male gender, a history of photic sneezing, bilateral or upper eyelid infiltration, deep sedation, and the concurrent administration of midazolam all increased the risk, whereas adjunctive opioid use reduced the

  1. Pain perception and procedural tolerance with computer controlled and conventional local anesthetic technique: An in vivo comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Goyal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the Pain Perception and Procedural Tolerance (PPPT by the pediatric patients, while experiencing ′Computer Controlled Local Anesthetic Technique′ (CCLAD, Wand and ′Conventional local anesthetic technique′. Material and Methods: Fifteen subjects, of age 8-10 years requiring local anesthesia on both sides of the dental arch for the purpose of extraction were selected for this study. In this cross-over design study, randomization was done to allocate the type of local anesthetic technique to be used first, children who received CCLAD (Wand during ′First Anesthetic Exposure′ (FAE visit subsequently received ′Conventional anesthetic technique′ during ′Second Anesthetic Exposure′ (SAE visit and vice versa. Behavior assessment using ′Frankel′s Behavior Rating Scale′ (FBRS and anxiety assessment using ′Faces Version of Modified Child′s Dental Anxiety Scale′ (MCDAS f were done prior to the anesthetic exposure. ′Wong Baker′s Facial Pain Scale′ (WBFPS was used to assess the child′s pain perception to each of the two techniques, immediately after the injection. Various physiological parameters like ′Heart Rate′(HR, ′Respiratory Rate′(RR, and ′Oxygen Saturation′ were measured during pre-operative phase, LA-phase, post LA-phase, Extraction phase and post Extraction phase, during FAE and SAE. Results: Paired t-test revealed a very highly significant (P = 0.001 difference between CCLAD (Wand and conventional during SAE. Non-significant difference was observed when physiological parameters were compared at various intervals between the two anesthetic techniques. Conclusion: CCLAD (Wand provides lesser pain perception as compared to conventional local anesthetic technique.

  2. Local anesthetics: comparison of effects on batrachotoxin-elicited sodium flux and phosphoinositide breakdown in guinea pig cerebral cortical synaptoneurosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Y; Gusovsky, F; Daly, J W

    1988-11-01

    Local anesthetics inhibited the sodium influx and the inositol phosphate accumulation elicited by the sodium channel activator batrachotoxin in guinea pig cortical synaptoneurosomes. Inhibitory effects of local anesthetics on sodium influx correlated with inhibitory effects on binding of a tritiated batrachotoxin analog to sodium channels in synaptoneurosomes. There was also a correlation between inhibitory effects on sodium influx and on inositol phosphate accumulation; most local anesthetics inhibited sodium influx at concentrations similar to those required for inhibition of inositol phosphate accumulation. Indeed, euprocin, bupivacaine, lidocaine, and certain analogs were nearly equipotent with respect to inhibition of sodium influx and inositol phosphate accumulation. Local anesthetics also inhibited inositol phosphate accumulation that was induced by carbamylcholine through both a tetrodotoxin-sensitive and tetrodotoxin-insensitive pathway. Certain local anesthetics, such as dibucaine, inhibited the tetrodotoxin-sensitive pathway with higher potency than for the tetrodotoxin-insensitive pathway, while others, such as quinacrine, inhibited tetrodotoxin-sensitive and tetrodotoxin-insensitive pathways with equal potency. Diphenhydramine and chlorpromazine appeared to inhibit carbamylcholine-elicited phosphoinositide breakdown through blockade of muscarinic cholinergic receptors rather than because of local anesthetic activity of inhibitory effects on phospholipase C.

  3. Improvement of Lidocaine Local Anesthetic Action Using Lallemantia royleana Seed Mucilage as an Excipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabaki, Rabi; Hassanpour-Ezatti, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Lallemantia royleana (Balangu) is a well known Iranian medicinal plant that its seed mucilage has many applications in modern pharmacology. Plant mucilage traditionally was used as a gel supplement, and natural matrix for sustained release of drugs. But it seems that these compounds are not a simple additive and also have many undiscovered pharmacological properties. In this research, the anesthetic action of gel prepared from Balangu mucilage alone and its mixture with lidocaine hydrochloride are compared with the effect of commercial 2% lidocaine gel by rat tail flick test. Mucilage of Balangu seed alone showed analgesic effect. Duration and potency of anesthesia induced by gel containing mucilage alone (0.01 g/mL) were identical to commercial 2% lidocaine gel. But, local anesthetic potency and duration of gel made from 2% lidocaine-mucilage gel mixture was significantly higher than commercial 2% lidocaine gel. The gel prepared from mucilage causes a good analgesia with unknown mechanism. Besides, mixture of Balangu mucilage prepared gel with lidocaine improves lidocaine anesthesia. The increase in potency of lidocaine action results from mucilage dermal penetration enhancing effects; and longer anesthetic duration of this mixture are related to the capability of mucilage based gel for sustained drug release.

  4. Preparation and evaluation of bioadhesive benzocaine gels for enhanced local anesthetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Chul; Lee, Jin-Woo; Yang, Kyu-Ho; Lee, Chi H

    2003-07-09

    This study was performed to develop new enhanced anesthetic benzocaine gels with a suitable bioadhesive property for local anesthetic effects. As the concentration of benzocaine in the HPMC gels increased up to 15%, the permeation of drug increased, thereafter slightly increased. The activation energy of drug permeation was 11.29 kcal/mol. Bioadhesive forces were also measured. The permeation rate of drug through the skin was studied using various enhancers, such as glycols, non-ionic surfactants or fatty acids. Among the enhancers used, diethylene glycol showed the most enhancing effects. Analgesic activity was examined using a tail-flick analgesimeter. According to the rat tail-flick test, the value of AUEC (0 - 360min) of 15% benzocaine gels containing diethylene glycol was 4662 +/- 200 s min, while that of gels without diethylene glycol was 3353 +/- 132 s min, showing about 1.39-fold increase in analgesic activity. Fifteen percentage of benzocaine gels containing diethylene glycol showed the most enhanced, prolonged analgesic effects, showing the maximum anesthetic effects at 240 min, while the gels without diethylene glycol showed maximum effect at 180 min.

  5. The efficacy of six local anesthetic formulations used for posterior mandibular buccal infiltration anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulwahab, Mohammad; Boynes, Sean; Moore, Paul; Seifikar, Shahrooz; Al-Jazzaf, Abdulaziz; Alshuraidah, Abdullah; Zovko, Jayme; Close, John

    2009-08-01

    The authors conducted a randomized, double-blind clinical trial to evaluate pulpal anesthesia achieved after mandibular infiltration of five commonly marketed dental local anesthetic formulations as compared with a control formulation of lidocaine with epinephrine. The authors evaluated 2 percent lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine (L100) against 4 percent articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine (A100), 4 percent articaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (A200), 4 percent prilocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (P200), 3 percent mepivacaine without vasoconstrictor (Mw/o) and 0.5 percent bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (B200). This repeated-treatment trial involved 18 healthy participants. The investigators administered mandibular infiltration injections (six sessions per participant) of 0.9 milliliters of anesthetic into the buccal fold adjacent to the distal root of the mandibular first molar. The authors determined anesthetic efficacy across a 20-minute period by measuring changes in sensory threshold to electrical pulp test (EPT) stimulation. Twelve female and six male participants (mean age, 24.9 years; range, 18-53 years) completed the study. The maximum mean increase from baseline of EPT measurements for the six formulations were 43.5 percent for L100, 44.8 percent for B200, 51.2 percent for P200, 66.9 percent for A200, 68.3 percent for Mw/o and 77.3 percent for A100 (A100 versus L100, P = .029). Adverse reactions were minor and not formulation dependent. The authors found that mandibular infiltration with 0.9 mL of the tested dental anesthetics could induce only partial pulpal anesthesia, a level likely to be inadequate for most dental procedures. When compared with L100, only the A100 induced statistically greater pulpal anesthesia after mandibular buccal infiltration.

  6. The effect of local anesthetic infiltration around nephrostomy tract on postoperative pain control after percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzel, Emre; Kızıltepe, Günes; Akdoğan, Bülent

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of a long acting local anesthetic infiltration around nephrostomy tract on pain control after percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Forty-six patients with kidney stones of >2 cm undergoing single access subcostal percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomized to levobupivacaine (Group I) and saline (Group II) infiltration groups. Group I patients (n = 23) had 75 mg/30 cc levobupivacaine infiltration around the access site after placement of nephrostomy catheter. Group II patients had 30 cc saline infiltration. Postoperatively the patients were given narcotics on demand. Pain scores were collected using a visual analog scale (VAS) at 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24 h postoperatively. The VAS scores, time to analgesic demand, ambulation, and duration of nephrostomy tube were compared between two groups. The mean age was 44 and 45 years in group I and II patients. There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to demographics, surgery or stone characteristics. Comparison of pain scores at all postoperative time points was not statistically significant between the two groups. Time to first analgesic demand and total narcotic analgesic dose per patient were 1.2 ± 1.05 and 4.04 ± 1.57 h; and 96 and 112 mg for group I and II patients (p = 0.009 and p = 0.41, respectively). Ambulation time and duration of nephrostomy tube were also similar. Infiltration of nephrostomy tract site with levobupivacaine does not have a superior effect compared to saline on postoperative pain control in patients undergoing PCNL.To prolong analgesia, the effect of intermittent tract injections or continuous infusion of local anesthetics for the postoperative maintenance of the local anesthetic effect seems worth to investigate in future studies.

  7. Challenge-proven immediate type multiple local anesthetic hypersensitivity in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertoy Karagol, I; Yilmaz, O; Bakirtas, A

    2016-01-01

    Adverse reactions to local anesthetics (LA) are commonly reported in patients undergoing dental procedures and other minor surgical procedures. Most of these reactions, however, originate from psychosomatic, vasovagal or toxic conditions and are not immune-mediated. True immune-mediated reactions are considered extremely rare and are estimated to account for less than 1% of all adverse reactions to LA. On the other hand, almost all of the immune-mediated LA reactions that have been reported are related to adult patients. Here, however, we will present a pediatric case proven to be hypersensitive to two different amide-derivative LA's.

  8. [Choice of local anesthetic volume at the infiltration anesthesia on the upper jaw].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babikov, A S; Rabinovich, S A; Moskovets, O N; Antonenkov, R V; Chernikov, D N; Sherstkin, I S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of volume and pressure, at which the solution of local anesthetic is injected into the tissue, on the effectiveness of infiltration anesthesia of the periosteum on the upper jaw. We used the technique of tooth pain sensitivity thresholds. According to the rate of development and the duration of the maximum analgesia effect, the optimum volume for different levels of pressure was determined. The influence of the tissue density at the injection site on the effect criteria of analgesia was demonstrated.

  9. Evaluating complications during intraoral administration of local anesthetics in a rural, portable special needs dental clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynes, Sean; Riley, Amah; Milbee, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and quantify complications with local anesthetic administration on consecutive patients seen for dental care in a portable dental clinic providing care to patients with special needs. This prospective study includes data on the patients seen by the portable dental team. A standardized form is used to determine complications and associated information for 172 dental visits in which local anesthetic is administered. After statistical analysis of 172 consecutive cases, the overall complication rate is 8.1%. All of the complications are considered to be mild or moderate; there are no reports of severe events. The complications encountered most frequently are associated with self-inflicted soft tissue injury or inadequate anesthesia. Comprehensive care with local anesthesia delivered by a portable dental clinic has a low risk of complication. The administration of an inferior alveolar nerve block or body-mass status appears to affect the incidence of complications. © 2013 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The efficacy of local anesthetics in reducing post operative pain after appendectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Baghaee vaji

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Reducing post operative pain is a common issue in surgeries. This study was to evaluate the efficacy of wound infiltration with local anesthetics in reducing postoperative pain after appendectomy. This is a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial on 40 patients with non-complicated acute appendicitis. Cases received a combination of lidocaine hydrochloride and bupivacaine hydrochloride after appendectomy and before closing the wound. Controls received the same volume of saline solution. Injections were done both under the fascia of external oblique muscle and intradermal. Pain assessment was done by two pain measuring scales, VAS and NRS, in 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours after the operation. Cases and controls were the same in age, sex, and history of opium addiction. Pain peaked in the 8th hour after operation in both groups and reduced afterwards. Pain assessments showed the same pattern using the NRS and VAS measuring scales. T-test showed the pain to be significantly less in cases comparing with the controls in all time points. No significant difference was seen in the time of receiving the first analgesic after the operation but the frequency of analgesic consumption was significantly lower in controls. This study showed local anesthetic infiltration to be effective in reducing the postoperative pain in patients undergoing appendectomy which is in contrast with the previous studies. This may be due to a different infiltration technique or pain assessment in the first 24 hours after the operation.

  11. Femoral nerve blockade using various concentrations of local anesthetic for knee arthroscopy in the pediatric population

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    Veneziano G

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio Veneziano,1,2 Jennifer Tripi,1 Dmitry Tumin,1 Mumin Hakim,1 David Martin,1,2 Ralph Beltran,1,2 Kevin Klingele,3,4 Tarun Bhalla,1,2 Joseph D Tobias1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 4Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA Background: Femoral nerve blockade (FNB provides effective postoperative analgesia in children undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery as evidenced by their opioid-sparing effects and decreased postoperative pain scores. Increasing the local anesthetic concentration in peripheral nerve blockade for adults undergoing orthopedic surgery has been shown to be beneficial, increasing block success rate, and providing a longer duration of analgesia. The effect of increasing the concentration of local anesthetic in extremity blocks in children remains largely unexplored.Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of FNB using three concentrations of local anesthetic (ropivacaine 0.2%, bupivacaine 0.25%, and ropivacaine 0.5% in children and adolescents undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery. The primary outcome evaluated was postoperative opioid consumption before discharge. Secondary outcomes included post-anesthesia care unit (PACU and hospital discharge times, first pain score in PACU, and the incidence of adverse events.Results: Two hundred and sixty-nine children and adolescents who received a FNB for arthroscopic knee surgery from January 2010 to December 2013 were included for analysis. Local anesthetic used in FNB was ropivacaine 0.2% in 116 (43% cases, ropivacaine 0.5% in 75 (28% cases, and bupivacaine 0.25% in 78 (29% cases. Median postoperative opioid consumption (mg/kg intravenous morphine equivalents in the ropivacaine 0.5% group was 0

  12. Which one is more effective for analgesia in infratentorial craniotomy? The scalp block or local anesthetic infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcil, Eren Fatma; Dilmen, Ozlem Korkmaz; Vehid, Hayriye; Ibısoglu, Lutfiye Serap; Tunali, Yusuf

    2017-03-01

    The most painful stages of craniotomy are the placement of the pin head holder and the skin incision. The primary aim of the present study is to compare the effects of the scalp block and the local anesthetic infiltration with bupivacaine 0.5% on the hemodynamic response during the pin head holder application and the skin incision in infratentorial craniotomies. The secondary aims are the effects on pain scores and morphine consumption during the postoperative 24h. This prospective, randomized and placebo controlled study included forty seven patients (ASA I, II and III). The scalp block was performed in the Group S, the local anesthetic infiltration was performed in the Group I and the control group (Group C) only received remifentanil as an analgesic during the intraoperative period. The hemodynamic response to the pin head holder application and the skin incision, as well as postoperative pain intensity, cumulative morphine consumption and opioid related side effects were compared. The scalp block reduced the hemodynamic response to the pin head holder application and the skin incision in infratentorial craniotomies. The local anesthetic infiltration reduced the hemodynamic response to the skin incision. As well as both scalp block and local anesthetic infiltration reduced the cumulative morphine consumption in postoperative 24h. Moreover, the pain intensity was lower after scalp block in the early postoperative period. The scalp block may provide better analgesia in infratentorial craniotomies than local anesthetic infiltration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative effects of vitamin C on the effects of local anesthetics ropivacaine, bupivacaine, and lidocaine on human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Intra-articular injections of local anesthetics are commonly used to enhance post-operative analgesia following orthopedic surgery as arthroscopic surgeries. Nevertheless, recent reports of severe complications due to the use of intra-articular local anesthetic have raised concerns. The study aims to assess use of vitamin C in reducing adverse effects of the most commonly employed anesthetics - ropivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine - on human chondrocytes. The chondrocyte viability following exposure to 0.5% bupivacaine or 0.75% ropivacaine or 1.0% lidocaine and/or vitamin C at doses 125, 250 and 500 μM was determined by LIVE/DEAD assay and annexin V staining. Expression levels of caspases 3 and 9 were assessed using antibodies by Western blotting. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze the generation of reactive oxygen species. On exposure to the local anesthetics, chondrotoxicity was found in the order ropivacaineC effectively improved the reduced chondrocyte viability and decreased the raised apoptosis levels following exposure to anesthesia. At higher doses, vitamin C was found efficient in reducing the generation of reactive oxygen species and as well down-regulate the expressions of caspases 3 and 9. Vitamin C was observed to effectively protect chondrocytes against the toxic insult of local anesthetics ropivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. [Comparative effects of vitamin C on the effects of local anesthetics ropivacaine, bupivacaine, and lidocaine on human chondrocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Intra-articular injections of local anesthetics are commonly used to enhance post-operative analgesia following orthopedic surgery as arthroscopic surgeries. Nevertheless, recent reports of severe complications due to the use of intra-articular local anesthetic have raised concerns. The study aims to assess use of vitamin C in reducing adverse effects of the most commonly employed anesthetics - ropivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine - on human chondrocytes. The chondrocyte viability following exposure to 0.5% bupivacaine or 0.75% ropivacaine or 1.0% lidocaine and/or vitamin C at doses 125, 250 and 500μM was determined by Live/Dead assay and annexin V staining. Expression levels of caspases 3 and 9 were assessed using antibodies by Western blotting. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze the generation of reactive oxygen species. On exposure to the local anesthetics, chondrotoxicity was found in the order ropivacaineC effectively improved the reduced chondrocyte viability and decreased the raised apoptosis levels following exposure to anesthesia. At higher doses, vitamin C was found efficient in reducing the generation of reactive oxygen species and as well down-regulate the expressions of caspases 3 and 9. Vitamin C was observed to effectively protect chondrocytes against the toxic insult of local anesthetics ropivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Extracorporeal Shock Wave-Mediated Transdermal Local Anesthetic Drug Delivery on Rat Caudal Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, Jer-Junn; Huang, Wan-Ting; Lin, Kwan-Hwa; Huang, Yi-You; Kuo, Po-Ling; Chen, Wen-Shiang

    2018-01-01

    Cavitation plays a substantial role in the clinical effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT). It is also generally accepted as a major mechanism in sonophoresis. To identify the enhancing effect of extracorporeal shock wave-mediated transdermal drug delivery, 24 Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: (i) topical application of a eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA); (ii) 1-MHz ultrasound; (iii) ESWT pre-treatment combined with EMLA application; (iv) ESWT concurrent with EMLA application on rat tails. The degree of anesthesia was assessed using the amplitude and latency of sensory nerve action potentials within 5 min after a 60-min EMLA application. The results indicated that ESWT pre-treatment and concurrent ESWT accelerated the anesthetic effects of the EMLA cream on the tail nerve (p < 0.05). This finding might indicate that shock wave-mediated transdermal drug delivery is possible during the ESWT period. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Topical amethocaine (Ametop) is superior to EMLA for intravenous cannulation. Eutectic mixture of local anesthetics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Browne, J

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: A eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) is commonly used to provide topical anesthesia for intravenous (i.v.) cannulation. One of its side effects is vasoconstriction, which may render cannulation more difficult. A gel formulation of amethocaine (Ametop) is now commercially available. The aim of this study was to compare EMLA and Ametop with regard to the degree of topical anesthesia afforded, the incidence of vasoconstriction and the ease of i.v. cannulation. METHODS: Thirty two ASA I adult volunteers had a #16 gauge i.v. cannula inserted on two separate occasions using EMLA and Ametop applied in a double blind fashion for topical anesthesia. Parameters that were recorded after each cannulation included visual analogue pain scores (VAPS), the presence of vasoconstriction and the ease of cannulation, graded as: 1 = easy, 2 = moderately difficult, 3 = difficult and 4 = failed. RESULTS: The mean VAPS +\\/- SD after cannulation with Ametop M was 12+\\/-9.9 and with EMLA was 25.3+\\/-16.6 (P = 0.002). Vasoconstriction occurred after EMLA application on 17 occasions and twice after Ametop (P = 0.001). The grade of difficulty of cannulation was 1.44+\\/-0.88 following EMLA and 1.06+\\/-0.25 with Ametop (P = 0.023). CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous cannulation was less painful following application of Ametop than EMLA. In addition, Ametop caused less vasoconstriction and facilitated easier cannulation. Its use as a topical anesthetic agent is recommended, especially when i.v. access may be problematic.

  17. Update on emerging regional techniques and novel local anesthetics in ambulatory anesthesia

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    Szafran MJ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Martin J Szafran, Eldhose Abrahams, Tong Joo Gan Department of Anesthesiology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA Abstract: New regional anesthetic techniques have been incorporated into the multimodal approach to postoperative analgesia. Blocks such as the transversus abdominis plane block, adductor canal block, and pectoral nerves blocks all show promise as potential tools used in opioid-sparing techniques, but at the same time have significant limitations to their utility. Novel long-acting formulations of local anesthetics further add to the possible benefit of these blocks, but their application to peripheral nerve blocks is currently being investigated and is not well defined. This review focuses on evaluating the relevant anatomy, technique, and indications of several newer peripheral nerve blocks, the emerging evidence supporting the use of liposomal bupivacaine and SABER®-Bupivacaine, and the application of both in ambulatory anesthesia. Keywords: transversus abdominis plane (TAP block, adductor canal block, pectoral nerves block, regional anesthesia, liposomal bupivacaine, SABER®-Bupivacaine

  18. Is transverse abdominis plane block effective following local anesthetic infiltration in laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal hernia repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mun Gyu; Kim, Soon Im; Ok, Si Young; Kim, Sang Ho; Lee, Se-Jin; Park, Sun Young; Yoo, Jae-Hwa; Cho, Ana; Hur, Kyung Yul; Kim, Myung Jin

    2014-12-01

    Transverse abdominis plane (TAP) block can be recommended as a multimodal method to reduce postoperative pain in laparoscopic abdominal surgery. However, it is unclear whether TAP block following local anesthetic infiltration is effective. We planned this study to evaluate the effectiveness of the latter technique in laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal hernia repair (TEP). We randomly divided patients into two groups: the control group (n = 37) and TAP group (n = 37). Following the induction of general anesthesia, as a preemptive method, all of the patients were subjected to local anesthetic infiltration at the trocar sites, and the TAP group was subjected to ultrasound-guided bilateral TAP block with 30 ml of 0.375% ropivacaine in addition before TEP. Pain was assessed in the recovery room and post-surgery at 4, 8, and 24 h. Additionally, during the postoperative 24 h, the total injected dose of analgesics and incidence of nausea were recorded. On arrival in the recovery room, the pain score of the TAP group (4.33 ± 1.83) was found to be significantly lower than that of the control group (5.73 ± 2.04). However, the pain score was not significantly different between the TAP group and control group at 4, 8, and 24 h post-surgery. The total amounts of analgesics used in the TAP group were significantly less than in the control group. No significant difference was found in the incidence of nausea between the two groups. TAP block following local infiltration had a clinical advantage only in the recovery room.

  19. Application of a three-microneedle device for the delivery of local anesthetics

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    Ishikawa K

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Kayoko Ishikawa,1 Hidekazu Fukamizu,1 Tetsuya Takiguchi,1 Yusuke Ohta,1 Yoshiki Tokura2 1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan; 2Department of Dermatology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan Purpose: We investigated the effectiveness of a newly developed device for the delivery of local anesthetics in the treatment of axillary osmidrosis and hyperhidrosis. We developed a device with three fine, stainless steel needles fabricated with a bevel angle facing outside (“three-microneedle device” [TMD] to release a drug broadly and homogeneously into tissue in the horizontal plane. Use of this device could reduce the risk of complications when transcutaneous injections are undertaken.Patients and methods: Sixteen Japanese patients were enrolled. The mean volume of lidocaine hydrochloride per unit area needed to elicit anesthesia when using a TMD was compared with that the volume required when using a conventional 27-gauge needle. The visual analog scale (VAS score of needlestick pain and injection-associated pain was also compared.Results: The mean volume of lidocaine hydrochloride per unit area to elicit anesthesia using the TMD was significantly lower than that the volume required when using the conventional 27-gauge needle. The VAS score of needlestick pain for the TMD was significantly lower than that the VAS score for the 27-gauge needle.Conclusion: These data suggest that the TMD could be useful for the delivery of local anesthetics in terms of clinical efficacy and avoidance of adverse effects. Keywords: three-microneedle device, transcutaneous drug delivery, local anesthesia, lidocaine, pain

  20. Ultrasound guided rectus sheath blockade compared to peri-operative local anesthetic infiltration in infants undergoing supraumbilical pyloromyotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anoop; Wilson, Graham A M; Engelhardt, Thomas E

    2014-04-01

    Provision of appropriate analgesia for supraumbilical pyloromyotomy in infants is limited by concerns about sensitivity to opioids and other medication groups, due to immature metabolism. Local anesthetic infiltration and ultrasound guided rectus sheath blockade are two techniques commonly employed to provide perioperative analgesia. The aim of this review was to compare the quality of post-operative analgesia afforded by these two techniques. A retrospective chart analysis of hospital records of all patients who underwent supraumbilical pyloromyotomy at a tertiary pediatric hospital between March 2009 and February 2011. Analysis of the anesthetic technique employed and post-operative acetaminophen requirements were performed. Additional information as to time to first post-operative feed, any complications and time of discharge from the hospital were collected by reviewing the post-operative nursing notes. A total of 30 patients underwent supraumbilical pyloromyotomy during this period. A total of 18 received local anesthetic infiltration at the end of the procedure and 12 patients underwent ultrasound guided pre-incisional rectus sheath block for post-operative analgesia. Patients who had post-operative local anesthetic infiltration had a median (range) of 2 (1-3) doses of acetaminophen in the first 24 h. In the group of patients who received a rectus sheath block, the median (range) number of doses of acetaminophen in the first 24 h was also 2 (1-3). There were no differences in time to first feed and time to hospital discharge between the groups. The volume of local anesthetic administered was significantly smaller in the group receiving analgesia via rectus sheath block. Local anesthetic infiltration and pre-incisional ultrasound guided rectus sheath block provide similar degrees of post-operative analgesia. There were no differences between the two groups in time for first post-operative feed and time to hospital discharge.

  1. Ultrasound guided rectus sheath blockade compared to peri-operative local anesthetic infiltration in infants undergoing supraumbilical pyloromyotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Provision of appropriate analgesia for supraumbilical pyloromyotomy in infants is limited by concerns about sensitivity to opioids and other medication groups, due to immature metabolism. Local anesthetic infiltration and ultrasound guided rectus sheath blockade are two techniques commonly employed to provide perioperative analgesia. The aim of this review was to compare the quality of post-operative analgesia afforded by these two techniques. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart analysis of hospital records of all patients who underwent supraumbilical pyloromyotomy at a tertiary pediatric hospital between March 2009 and February 2011. Analysis of the anesthetic technique employed and post-operative acetaminophen requirements were performed. Additional information as to time to first post-operative feed, any complications and time of discharge from the hospital were collected by reviewing the post-operative nursing notes. Results: A total of 30 patients underwent supraumbilical pyloromyotomy during this period. A total of 18 received local anesthetic infiltration at the end of the procedure and 12 patients underwent ultrasound guided pre-incisional rectus sheath block for post-operative analgesia. Patients who had post-operative local anesthetic infiltration had a median (range of 2 (1-3 doses of acetaminophen in the first 24 h. In the group of patients who received a rectus sheath block, the median (range number of doses of acetaminophen in the first 24 h was also 2 (1-3. There were no differences in time to first feed and time to hospital discharge between the groups. The volume of local anesthetic administered was significantly smaller in the group receiving analgesia via rectus sheath block. Conclusion: Local anesthetic infiltration and pre-incisional ultrasound guided rectus sheath block provide similar degrees of post-operative analgesia. There were no differences between the two groups in time for first post

  2. Systematic review of the effect of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy for local anesthetic toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgberg, Lotte Christine Groth; Bania, Theodore C; Lavergne, Valéry

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Following national and regional recommendations, intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) has become established in clinical practice as a treatment for acute local anesthetic (LA) toxicity, although evidence of efficacy is limited to animal studies and human case reports. A collaborative lipid......-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Pre-treatment experiments, pharmacokinetic studies not involving toxicity and studies that did not address antidotal use of ILE were excluded. RESULTS: We included 113 studies and reports. Of these, 76 were human and 38 animal studies. One publication included both a human...... case report and an animal study. Human studies included one randomized controlled crossover trial involving 16 healthy volunteers. The subclinical LA toxicity design did not show a difference in the effects of ILE versus saline. There was one case series and 73 case reports of ILE use in the context...

  3. Intravenous Thiamylal and Local Anesthetic Infiltration for Pediatric Facial Repair Procedures Performed in Emergency Departments

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    Ching-Kuo Lin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Thiamylal is widely used for procedural sedation in emergency departments (ED; however, there are limited safety data for doses of thiamylal > 5 mg/kg in children. We investigated whether intravenous thiamylal in combination with local anesthetics is safe and effective for pediatric procedural sedation in the ED and to identify the association between increasing doses thiamylal and adverse events. Between July 2004 and June 2008, 227 children who underwent procedural sedation met the inclusion criteria, including 105 males (46.3% and 122 females (53.7%. Facial laceration was the most common indication for procedural sedation. All children received an intravenous injection of thiamylal, with a loading dose of 5 mg/kg. Eighty-one children (35.7% received a supplemental dose of 2.5 mg/kg thiamylal because of inadequate sedation. Of these, 27 (11.9% received a second supplemental dose of 2.5 mg/kg because of inadequate sedation. Sixty-six patients (29.1% experienced 75 mild and self-resolving adverse events, and most of which (15/75; 20% were drowsiness. Four (1.8% patients experienced oxygen saturation below 96%, which was related to the supplemental dose of thiamylal (p = 0.002. No children suffered from any lasting or potentially serious complications. Our results indicate that intravenous thiamylal in combination with local anesthetic infiltration is a well tolerated for therapeutic procedures in the ED. Thiamylal offers rapid onset of sedation without compromising the patient's cardiorespiratory function during pediatric procedural sedation.

  4. Intravenous thiamylal and local anesthetic infiltration for pediatric facial repair procedures performed in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Kuo; Lau, Yu-Wa; Chan, Hon-Man; Wang, Fu-Yuan; Lin, Tzeng-Jih; Cheng, Kuang-I; Feng, Yu-Tung; Hung, Chung-Long

    2010-04-01

    Thiamylal is widely used for procedural sedation in emergency departments (ED); however, there are limited safety data for doses of thiamylal > 5 mg/kg in children. We investigated whether intravenous thiamylal in combination with local anesthetics is safe and effective for pediatric procedural sedation in the ED and to identify the association between increasing doses thiamylal and adverse events. Between July 2004 and June 2008, 227 children who underwent procedural sedation met the inclusion criteria, including 105 males (46.3%) and 122 females (53.7%). Facial laceration was the most common indication for procedural sedation. All children received an intravenous injection of thiamylal, with a loading dose of 5 mg/kg. Eighty-one children (35.7%) received a supplemental dose of 2.5 mg/kg thiamylal because of inadequate sedation. Of these, 27 (11.9%) received a second supplemental dose of 2.5 mg/kg because of inadequate sedation. Sixty-six patients (29.1%) experienced 75 mild and self-resolving adverse events, and most of which (15/75; 20%) were drowsiness. Four (1.8%) patients experienced oxygen saturation below 96%, which was related to the supplemental dose of thiamylal (p = 0.002). No children suffered from any lasting or potentially serious complications. Our results indicate that intravenous thiamylal in combination with local anesthetic infiltration is a well tolerated for therapeutic procedures in the ED. Thiamylal offers rapid onset of sedation without compromising the patient's cardiorespiratory function during pediatric procedural sedation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of local anesthetic effect of lidocaine by jet injection vs needle infiltration in lumbar puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajimaghsoudi, Majid; Vahidi, Elnaz; Momeni, Mehdi; Arabinejhad, Abbas; Saeedi, Morteza

    2016-07-01

    Usual routes of drug administration are often painful and invasive. Nowadays, using jet injection has been introduced successfully, as a noninvasive and painless method of anesthetic delivery in performing different procedures. The objective of the study is to compare the local anesthetic effect of lidocaine by jet injection vs needle infiltration in performing lumbar puncture in the emergency department (ED). A randomized single-blind controlled study was performed in 65 patients needing lumbar puncture recruited from the ED from July to November 2014. We enrolled 44 patients and excluded 21 patients by the exclusion criteria. Local lidocaine was delivered in 1 group by jet injector (group B), whereas in the other group conventional method, needle infiltration was used (group A). In both groups, intravenous midazolam 1 mg was administered as an anxiolytic drug before the procedure. Patients' pain score (visual analog scale [VAS]) from 0 to 10 was recorded both during drug delivery and performing the procedure itself. The observer who collected patients' data and fulfill the questionnaire was blinded to the study. During lidocaine injection, the mean ± SD VAS score was 5.27 ± 1.77 in group A and 2.95 ± 1.81 in group B (mean difference, 2.31; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-3.41) (P= .000). During performing the procedure, the mean ± SD VAS score in groups A and B was 3.77 ± 1.77 vs 2.18 ± 1.50 (mean difference, 1.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.59-2.58) (P= .003). Injecting lidocaine by jet injector is less painful than infiltrating it by needle and syringe. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Novel molecular determinants in the pore region of sodium channels regulate local anesthetic binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Toshio; Xiong, Wei; Kondratiev, Andre; Vélez, Patricio; Méndez-Fitzwilliam, Ailsa; Balser, Jeffrey R; Marbán, Eduardo; Tomaselli, Gordon F

    2009-10-01

    The pore of the Na+ channel is lined by asymmetric loops formed by the linkers between the fifth and sixth transmembrane segments (S5-S6). We investigated the role of the N-terminal portion (SS1) of the S5-S6 linkers in channel gating and local anesthetic (LA) block using site-directed cysteine mutagenesis of the rat skeletal muscle (Na(V)1.4) channel. The mutants examined have variable effects on voltage dependence and kinetics of fast inactivation. Of the cysteine mutants immediately N-terminal to the putative DEKA selectivity filter in four domains, only Q399C in domain I and F1236C in domain III exhibit reduced use-dependent block. These two mutations also markedly accelerated the recovery from use-dependent block. Moreover, F1236C and Q399C significantly decreased the affinity of QX-314 for binding to its channel receptor by 8.5- and 3.3-fold, respectively. Oddly enough, F1236C enhanced stabilization of slow inactivation by both hastening entry into and delaying recovery from slow inactivation states. It is noteworthy that symmetric applications of QX-314 on both external and internal sides of F1236C mutant channels reduced recovery from use-dependent block, indicating an allosteric effect of external QX-314 binding on the recovery of availability of F1236C. These observations suggest that cysteine mutation in the SS1 region, particularly immediate adjacent to the DEKA ring, may lead to a structural rearrangement that alters binding of permanently charged QX-314 to its receptor. The results lend further support for a role for the selectivity filter region as a structural determinant for local anesthetic block.

  7. Bisphenol A binds to the local anesthetic receptor site to block the human cardiac sodium channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrias O O'Reilly

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA has attracted considerable public attention as it leaches from plastic used in food containers, is detectable in human fluids and recent epidemiologic studies link BPA exposure with diseases including cardiovascular disorders. As heart-toxicity may derive from modified cardiac electrophysiology, we investigated the interaction between BPA and hNav1.5, the predominant voltage-gated sodium channel subtype expressed in the human heart. Electrophysiology studies of heterologously-expressed hNav1.5 determined that BPA blocks the channel with a K(d of 25.4±1.3 µM. By comparing the effects of BPA and the local anesthetic mexiletine on wild type hNav1.5 and the F1760A mutant, we demonstrate that both compounds share an overlapping binding site. With a key binding determinant thus identified, an homology model of hNav1.5 was generated based on the recently-reported crystal structure of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NavAb. Docking predictions position both ligands in a cavity delimited by F1760 and contiguous with the DIII-IV pore fenestration. Steered molecular dynamics simulations used to assess routes of ligand ingress indicate that the DIII-IV pore fenestration is a viable access pathway. Therefore BPA block of the human heart sodium channel involves the local anesthetic receptor and both BPA and mexiletine may enter the closed-state pore via membrane-located side fenestrations.

  8. Evaluation of the effect of locally administered amitriptyline gel as adjunct to local anesthetics in irreversible pulpitis pain

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    Moghadamnia A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amitriptyline is one of the most common tricyclic antidepressants, which binds to pain sensory nerve fibers close to the sodium channel; hence, it could interact to some degree with receptors of local anesthetics. This study was designed to assess the additional analgesic effects of 2% Amitriptyline local gel administration in irreversible pulpitis pain of the molars. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized, double-blind clinical trial that was performed on 56 consented adult patients who did not receive enough analgesia after a lidocaine nerve block for their tooth pulpitis pain. Patients were treated with 0.2 ml of either 2% amitriptyline or placebo, which was directly injected into their mandibular molar pulp chamber after they had received two routine lidocaine injections. Patients were asked to score their pain as a mark on a 10-cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS at different timepoints: 0 (just before gel administration, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 minutes after the treatments. Results: There was a 92.5% decrease in VAS scores of patients 9 minutes after amitriptyline administration compared to Time 0, while in the placebo group this difference was only 13.5%. Further, in the amitriptyline group, the VAS score at all timepoints was statistically different from Time 0 ( P < 0.01. The overall pain reduction and its trend was significantly higher in the amitriptyline group compared with the placebo group ( P < 0.001. Conclusion: Inter-pulp space administration of amitriptyline 2% gel for completing analgesia in irreversible pulpitis pain could be effective and useful as a conjunctive therapy to injections of local anesthetics.

  9. An alternative choice of lidocaine-loaded liposomes: lidocaine-loaded lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles for local anesthetic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianguo; Zhang, Laizhu; Chi, Huimin; Wang, Shilei

    2016-05-01

    The skin permeation enhancement of local anesthetics by newer innovative nanotechnologies has been an appealing field recently. However, which nanocarrier is better for drug loading and has better stability? Therefore, the aim of our study was to compare two kinds of nanocarriers: liposomes and lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (LPNs) for lidocaine (LA) delivery. LA-loaded liposomes (LA-LPs) and LPNs (LA-LPNs) were prepared. Two kinds of nanocarriers were characterized in terms of particle size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation efficiency (EE), drug release, and stability. Their in vitro skin permeation was studied using a Franz diffusion cell mounted with depilated mouse skin in vitro. In vivo local anesthetic effects of LA containing formulations were evaluated by tail flick latency (TFL) test using a tail-flick measuring device. Compared with LA-LPs, LA-LPNs showed significantly better in vitro skin permeation ability and in vivo local anesthetic effects. The results demonstrated that LPNs could improve the efficacy of drugs to higher levels than LPs and free drugs, thus could serve as an effective drug system for LA loading for local anesthetic therapy.

  10. No antiinflammatory effect of short-term topical and subcutaneous administration of local anesthetics on postburn inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Dahl, J B; Brennum, J

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES. To investigate the effect of topical and subcutaneous administration of local anesthetics on the inflammatory response to thermal injury in human volunteers. METHODS. Sixteen healthy volunteers received identical burn injuries (49 degrees C for 6 minutes) on the right...

  11. Effectiveness of continuous wound infusion of local anesthetics after abdominal surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanapal, Baskaran; Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Badhe, Ashok Shankar; Ali, Sheikh Manwar; Ravichandran, Niranjan T; Galidevara, Indira

    2017-05-15

    To assess the effectiveness of continuous preperitoneal wound infusion of local anesthetic drug bupivacaine in providing pain relief, reducing opioid consumption, and enhancing postoperative recovery. Eligible patients were randomly allocated to two groups (study group: bupivacaine and control group: normal saline). There were 47 patients in each group. The patients received continuous infusion of either 0.25% bupivacaine or 0.9% normal saline at 6 mL/h, for 48 h, based on their group allocation, through a multiholed wound infiltration catheter placed preperitoneally. All patients also received intravenous morphine through patient-controlled analgesia pump. Pain scores at rest and on cough, morphine consumption, and peak expiratory flow rate were assessed at 12, 24, and 48 h postoperatively. The time to first perception of bowel sounds and first passage of flatus was noted. All patients were assessed for postoperative nausea and vomiting and any local or systemic complications. Chi-square test was used to compare categorical variables. The morphine consumption was compared using Student t-test, the visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were compared using repeated-measures analysis of variance. The mean total morphine consumption in the study group was significantly lower than the control group (18.8 ± 2.21 versus 30.8 ± 2.58 mg, P = 0.001). The median VAS scores were significantly lower in the study group than those in the control group both at rest (3 [1-4] versus 4 [2-5], P = 0.04) and during cough (4 [3-6] versus 6 [4-6] P = 0.03), except at 48 h, when the median VAS score at rest was similar (3 [1-4] versus 3 [2-4], P = 0.56). Bowel function returned earlier in study group (67.34 ± 2.61 versus 76.34 ± 5.29 h, P = 0.03). Postoperative nausea and vomiting was less in study group. Respiratory function, assessed by peak expiratory flow rate, was better in the study group (192.55 ± 12.93 versus 165.31 ± 9.32 mL, P = 0.03). The

  12. Effect of long acting local anesthetic on postoperative pain in teeth with irreversible pulpitis: Randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kahtani, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare the effect of long acting anesthetics on postoperative pain in teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Methodology Forty patients were randomly assigned into two groups of twenty patients each. Each patient who fit the inclusion criteria was administered local anesthesia before undergoing root canal treatment. The anesthetic solution was either 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine or 0.5% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine. Patients were instructed to complete a VAS pain score at 6, 12, 24 h after single visit root canal treatment. Data were analyzed by Mann–Whitney, Cochrane Q analysis and t test to compare qualitative and quantitative data between the groups. Results The results showed the levels of pain of the patients who received lidocaine as the anesthetic agent and had significantly more postoperative pain after root canal treatment (P irreversible pulpitis. PMID:24493972

  13. Comparison of topical lidocaine/prilocaine anesthetic cream and local infiltration of 2% lidocaine for episioplasty in mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkert, R S; Macallister, C G; Campbell, G; Payton, M E; Shawley, R; Clarke, C R

    2005-06-01

    Local anesthesia and tissue inflammation associated with lidocaine infiltration and lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic cream for episioplasty in mares were compared. Twenty-two mares were randomly assigned to lidocaine or lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic cream treatment groups. Perineum and vulva were cleaned, 8-12 g (approximately 1 g/cm per side of vulva) of topical anesthetic cream was applied, and the area was covered by plastic wrap 30 min prior to beginning procedure. Alternately, lidocaine was injected (1 mL) every centimeter just prior to the procedure. Episioplasty was conducted using standard methods, but employing simple interrupted sutures. Horses were not sedated and use of a twitch was recorded. Four millimeter punch biopsies were harvested 1, 3, and 10 days following episioplasty and scored for degree of inflammation by a blinded pathologist. Clinical inflammation scores were assigned when biopsies were obtained. Seven of 11 horses receiving lidocaine infiltration required twitching, but none of the horses that received the anesthetic cream required twitching. Six of 11 and seven of 11 of the lidocaine and anesthetic cream groups, respectively, required twitching for episioplasty. Except for the clinical scores on day 3, no statistical differences for clinical and histopathologic scores between samples from the two treatment groups for a given day were identified. Use of lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic cream was as effective as lidocaine infiltration in providing local anesthesia when performing episioplasty in mares. Its use decreased the need for twitching horses as well as the risk of deformation of the labia caused by lidocaine infiltration.

  14. Effect of gamma-hydroxybutyrate on local and global glucose metabolism in the anesthetized cat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, C; Mende, M; Schuier, F; Schuh, R; Schröck, H; Kuschinsky, W

    1990-07-01

    This study addresses three topics in the chloralose-anesthetized cat: (a) distribution of local CMRglc: values ranging from 5 to 109 mumols/100 g/min were found in 37 brain structures and the mean CMRglc over all examined structures was 30.6 mumols/100 g/min; (b) effect of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB, 250 mg/kg i.v.) on local CMRglc, which was significantly (p less than 0.05) depressed in 16 of 37 structures, most prominently in the auditory system, and the mean CMRglc over all structures after GHB was 20.4 mumols/100 g/min; and (c) global values of CMRglc, CMRO2, and CBF before and after GHB: in these experiments, a modified Kety-Schmidt technique was employed measuring saturation/desaturation of inhaled H2 and concentrations of glucose and oxygen in aortic and sagittal sinus blood. CBF and CMRO2 were not altered after GHB, whereas CMRglc was significantly decreased from 35.7 to 28.8 mumols/100 g/min. The values of CMRglc obtained with both techniques (autoradiography and the Kety-Schmidt technique) are concordant, especially when considering the different sampling areas of both methods. The main finding of the present study is a reduction in cerebral glucose consumption after GHB, irrespective of the technique of measurement. This reduction occurs at an unchanged CMRO2 and CBF.

  15. Prolonged local anesthetic action through slow release from poly (lactic acid co castor oil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolsky-Papkov, Marina; Golovanevski, Ludmila; Domb, Abraham J; Weiniger, Carolyn F

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate a new formulation of bupivacaine loaded in an injectable fatty acid based biodegradable polymer poly(lactic acid co castor oil) in prolonging motor and sensory block when injected locally. The polyesters were synthesized from DL: -lactic acid and castor oil with feed ratio of 4:6 and 3:7 w/w. Bupivacaine was dispersed in poly(fatty ester) liquid and tested for drug release in vitro. The polymer p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 loaded with 10% bupivacaine was injected through a 22G needle close to the sciatic nerve of ICR mice and the duration of sensory and motor nerve blockade was measured. The DL: -lactic acid co castor oil p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 released 65% of the incorporated bupivacaine during 1 week in vitro. Single injection of 10% bupivacaine loaded into this polymer caused motor block that lasted 24 h and sensory block that lasted 48 h. Previously we developed a ricinoleic acid based polymer with incorporated bupivacaine which prolonged anesthesia to 30 h. The new polymer poly(lactic acid co castor oil) 3:7 provides slow release of effective doses of the incorporated local anesthetic agent and prolongs anesthesia to 48 h.

  16. Local anesthetic effects of bupivacaine loaded lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles: In vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pengju; Li, Ting; Xing, Huaixin; Wang, Suzhen; Sun, Yingui; Sheng, Xiugui; Wang, Kaiguo

    2017-05-01

    There is a compelling need for prolonged local anesthetic that would be used for analgesia with a single administration. However, due to the low molecular weight of local anesthetics (LA) (lidocaine, bupivacaine, procaine, dibucaine, etc), they present fast systemic absorption. The aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate bupivacaine lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (BVC LPNs), and compared with BVC loaded PLGA nanoparticles (BVC NPs). Their morphology, particle size, zeta potential and drug loading capacity were evaluated. In vitro release study, stability and cytotoxicity were studied. In vivo evaluation of anesthetic effects was performed on animal models. A facile nanoprecipitation and self-assembly method was optimized to obtain BVC LPNs, composed of PLGA, lecithin and DSPE-PEG 2000 , of ∼175nm particle size. Compared to BVC NPs, BVC LPNs exhibited prolonged in vitro release in phosphate-buffered saline (pH=7.4). Further, BVC LPNs displayed enhanced in vitro stability in 10% FBS and lower cytotoxicity (the concentration of BVC ranging from 1.0μM to 20μM). In addition, BVC LPNs exhibited significantly prolonged analgesic duration. These results demonstrate that the LPNs could function as promising drug delivery system for overcoming the drawbacks of poor stability and rapid drug leakage, and prolonging the anesthetic effect with slight toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of Local Anesthetic Effect of Bupivacaine versus Bupivacaine plus Dexamethasone in Nasal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhosein Ma’somi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: Adequate pain control is an important consideration in the post-surgical management of patients. Local nerve blockade added to general anesthesia can provide excellent pain control during and after most nasal surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the combined effect of local anesthetic drugs with corticosteroids in nasal surgery. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind clinical study, 60 patients who underwent different nasal surgical procedures were matched and divided into two equal groups. Bilateral local nerve blockade was used in both groups. Bupivacaine or bupivacaine plus dexamethasone was administered by injection (groups B and B+D, respectively. Postoperative visual analog scale (VAS pain values and the need for oral/intramuscular analgesic treatment in the first 24 h were recorded in all patients. Results: Thirty-eight male (63.3% and 22 female (36.7% patients were included in this study, with a mean age of 28.3 ± 8.2 years. At 1, 2, 4, 6, and 12 h post surgery, VAS pain values were significantly lower in the B+D group than in the B group. The analgesic requirement was significantly lower in the B+D group compared with the B group. No relevant complications were seen during surgery or postoperative hospitalization. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the positive effect of a combination of a dexamethasone with a bupivacaine in reducing pain and the need for analgesic drugs after different nasal surgeries. No acute or short-term post-surgical complications were observed in this study.   

  18. Novel methods of local anesthetic delivery in the perioperative and postoperative setting-potential for fibrin hydrogel delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Laura; Whelan, Derek; O'Donnell, Brian D; Clover, Anthony J P

    2016-12-01

    The benefits of high-quality postoperative analgesia are well documented and include earlier mobilization, fewer respiratory and cardiovascular complications, and shorter hospital stay. Local anesthesia-based acute pain regimens are at worst equal to and at best superior to opiate-based regimens from the perspective of analgesia. A multimodal approach limiting opioids by combining with local anesthetics has additional beneficial effect on outcomes such as nausea and vomiting, pruritus, gastrointestinal function, respiratory complications, and neutrophil function. Wound catheters providing continuous infiltration of local anesthetics offer a rational approach to effective perioperative analgesia, but their use is limited by a short duration of action. There is an identified need for further methods to optimize longer-acting delivery of these agents. This article reviews current and evolving longer-acting techniques and their limitations with particular focus on the potential advantages of a fibrin hydrogel-based system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Actions of Bupivacaine, a Widely Used Local Anesthetic, on NMDA Receptor Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Meaghan A.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors mediate excitatory neurotransmission in brain and spinal cord and play a pivotal role in the neurological disease state of chronic pain, which is caused by central sensitization. Bupivacaine is the indicated local anesthetic in caudal, epidural, and spinal anesthesia and is widely used clinically to manage acute and chronic pain. In addition to blocking Na+ channels, bupivacaine affects the activity of many other channels, including NMDA receptors. Importantly, bupivacaine inhibits NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, an area critically involved in central sensitization. We used recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in HEK293 cells and found that increasing concentrations of bupivacaine decreased channel open probability in GluN2 subunit- and pH-independent manner by increasing the mean duration of closures and decreasing the mean duration of openings. Using kinetic modeling of one-channel currents, we attributed the observed current decrease to two main mechanisms: a voltage-dependent “foot-in-the-door” pore block and an allosteric gating effect. Further, the inhibition was state-independent because it occurred to the same degree whether the drug was applied before or after glutamate stimulation and was mediated by extracellular and intracellular inhibitory sites, via hydrophilic and hydrophobic pathways. These results predict that clinical doses of bupivacaine would decrease the peak and accelerate the decay of synaptic NMDA receptor currents during normal synaptic transmission. These quantitative predictions inform possible applications of bupivacaine as preventative and therapeutic approaches in chronic pain. PMID:25589775

  20. Residues in Na(+) channel D3-S6 segment modulate both batrachotoxin and local anesthetic affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S Y; Nau, C; Wang, G K

    2000-09-01

    Batrachotoxin (BTX) alters the gating of voltage-gated Na(+) channels and causes these channels to open persistently, whereas local anesthetics (LAs) block Na(+) conductance. The BTX and LA receptors have been mapped to several common residues in D1-S6 and D4-S6 segments of the Na(+) channel alpha-subunit. We substituted individual residues with lysine in homologous segment D3-S6 of the rat muscle mu1 Na(+) channel from F1274 to N1281 to determine whether additional residues are involved in BTX and LA binding. Two mutant channels, mu1-S1276K and mu1-L1280K, when expressed in mammalian cells, become completely resistant to 5 microM BTX during repetitive pulses. The activation and/or fast inactivation gating of these mutants is substantially different from that of wild type. These mutants also display approximately 10-20-fold reduction in bupivacaine affinity toward their inactivated state but show only approximately twofold affinity changes toward their resting state. These results demonstrate that residues mu1-S1276 and mu1-L1280 in D3-S6 are critical for both BTX and LA binding interactions. We propose that LAs interact readily with these residues from D3-S6 along with those from D1-S6 and D4-S6 in close proximity when the Na(+) channel is in its inactivated state. Implications of this state-dependent binding model for the S6 alignment are discussed.

  1. Mechanisms underlying changes in indomethacin solubility with local anesthetics and related basic additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yohsuke; Tateuchi, Ryo; Chatani, Hitoshi; Goto, Satoru

    2018-03-01

    Indomethacin (IND), an acidic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and lidocaine (LID), a local anesthetic (LA), form a eutectic complex when mixed, with a lower melting point. The aqueous solubility of the mixture is greater than that of IND or LID alone, improving the bioavailability of IND. Therefore, IND and LID can be used to model changes in efficacy caused by physicochemical interactions between drugs. In this study, the intermolecular interactions between IND and structurally similar LAs were examined by measuring solubility and analyzing thermodynamics using differential scanning calorimetry. The results indicate that the solubility of IND (log S'IND) varies with LA hydrophobicity. Reductions in melting point resulting from mixing IND and LAs contributed to changes in IND solubility, attributable to direct intermolecular interactions between IND and the LAs. In addition, binding energy of IND-LA as in water was calculated, and the values were correlating with the solubility of IND in experiments. Understanding these interactions will help address some of the problems encountered in polypharmacy.

  2. The challenge of evaluating pain and a pre-incisional local anesthetic block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn M. McKune

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Our objective was to test the effectiveness of a local anesthetic line block administered before surgery in reducing postoperative pain scores in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy (OVHX.Methods. This study is a prospective, randomized, blinded, clinical trial involving 59 healthy female dogs. An algometric pressure-measuring device was used to determine nociceptive threshold, and compared to three subjective pain scales. Group L/B received a line block of lidocaine (4 mg/kg and bupivacaine (1 mg/kg subcutaneously in the area of the incision site and saline subcutaneously as premedication; group L/BM (positive control received a similar block and morphine (0.5 mg/kg subcutaneously for premedication; and group SS (negative control received a saline line block and saline premedication. Criteria for rescue analgesia were defined before the study. Dogs were assessed prior to surgery, at extubation (time 0 and at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 24 h post-recovery. The data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA, and a Split Plot Repeated Measures ANOVA with one grouping factor and one repeat factor (time. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results. Approximately 33% of dogs required rescue analgesia at some point during the study, with no significant difference between groups. There was no significant difference between treatment groups with any assessment method.Conclusions. As there were no statistically significant differences between positive and negative controls, the outcome of this technique cannot be proven.

  3. Prediction of compensatory hyperhidrosis with botulinum toxin A and local anesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin Yong; Park, Soo Seog; Sim, Sung Bo; Jo, Keon Hyon; Lee, Jongho; Oh, Saecheol; Shin, Jae Seong

    2015-08-01

    Compensatory hyperhidrosis (CH) is one of the most problematic complications of sympathectomy, which occurs often and is hard to treat. A predictive procedure (PP) for CH can help patients experience compensatory sweating before sympathectomy to determine whether or not to perform sympathectomy. Our study aimed to evaluate the CH after the PP and sympathectomy in patients with primary palmar hyperhidrosis using multiple drugs. We reviewed 83 patients who underwent a PP between July 2009 and August 2013 with primary palmar hyperhidrosis. In group A, we used levobupivacaine (n = 39). In group B, we used botulinum toxin A plus ropivacaine for the PP in group B (n = 44). The CH rate after the PP was 44 % (group A) and 25 % (group B), and after sympathectomy 80 % (group A) and 75 % (group B). The prediction value between the PP and the sympathectomy was statistically significant in group A (p < 0.05). The positive prediction rate was 73 % and the negative prediction rate was 27 % in group A. Local anesthetic alone has a better predictive value. From our finding, patients should be made aware that CH after sympathectomy is less severe in 73 % of cases than that experienced in the PP.

  4. Faster onset time of supraclavicular brachial plexus block using local anesthetic diluted with dextrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jin Lim

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: A high sodium concentration is known to antagonize local anesthetics when infiltrated around neural tissue. Thus, we hypothesized that the onset time for sensory and motor blockade, in supraclavicular brachial plexus block using ropivacaine diluted with dextrose would be shorter than with saline. Methods: Patients scheduled for upper limb surgery were randomized to receive ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine. Evaluation of sensory and motor blockade was performed every 5 min for 60 min. Patients were followed-up on postoperative day 1, and between days 7 and 10 for the presence of any complications. Twenty-five patients in each group were analyzed. Results: Mean time for onset of analgesia for the dextrose group was 37.6 ± 12.9 min while the mean time for the saline group was 45.2 ± 13.9 min with a p-value of 0.05. The effect size was 0.567, which was moderate to large. No major complications were observed. Conclusion: We conclude that there was a decrease in onset time of analgesia when dextrose was used as a diluent instead of saline for ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

  5. A National Survey of Undergraduate Suture and Local Anesthetic Training in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufai, Sohaib R; Holland, Luke C; Dimovska, Eleonora O F; Bing Chuo, Cher; Tilley, Simon; Ellis, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Suturing is a skill expected to be attained by all medical students on graduation, according to the General Medical Council's (GMC) Tomorrow's Doctors. There are no GMC recommendations for the amount of suture training required at medical school nor the level of competence to be achieved. This study examines the state of undergraduate suture training by surveying a sample of medical students across the United Kingdom. We distributed a survey to 17 medical schools to be completed by undergraduates who have undergone curricular suture training. The survey included questions relating to career intention, hours of curricular suture training, hours of additional paid training, confidence in performing various suture techniques and knowledge of their indications. We also asked about the students' perceived proficiency at injecting local anesthetic and their overall opinion of medical school suture training. We received responses from 705 medical students at 16 UK medical schools. A total of 607 (86.1%) medical students had completed their scheduled curricular suture training. Among them, 526 (86.5%) students reported inadequate suture training in medical school and 133 (21.9%) students had paid for additional training. Results for all competence markers were significantly lower than the required GMC standards (p Students who had paid for additional training were significantly more confident across all areas examined (p students surveyed. These findings suggest that medical schools should provide more opportunities for students to develop their suturing skills to achieve the GMC standard. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Thermal effect of sonophoresis for accelerating the analgesic effect of local anesthetics on rat tail nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Hui; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Luh, Jer-Junn; Chong, Fok-Ching

    2008-01-01

    Sonophoresis is an ultrasound transdermal drugs delivery system. The eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) has been used clinically for anesthesia but requires at least one hour to take effect and lacks of analgesia's objective assessment. We proposed that sonophoresis could reduce the duration of EMLA analgesia effect onset and be assessed by sensory conduction studies. Thirty Wistar adult rats were randomized into normal, control, ultrasound-, and heat-treatment groups. Normal group was received no EMLA cream or ultrasound and heat treatment. The control group received the EMLA cream on the rat tail at 3.5 cm distal to the rat tail base for local anesthesia of tail nerve. Ultrasound- and heat-treatment groups were received ultrasound with different parameters and heat treatment, respectively, before EMLA cream applied. Sensory conduction studies of tail nerve were made before and after treatment every 5 min at least for 60 min in all rats. There was no significant difference between the EMLA control group and heat treatment group. All rats in ultrasound-treatment group exhibit significant difference with EMLA control group and heat-treatment group in time for decreased 20% SNCV except for the 2 W/cm(2), 25 min, 20% in ultrasound-treatment group having no significant difference with heat-treatment group. There was no significant difference between ultrasound-treatment subgroups. In the decrease of amplitude, only the 2 W/cm(2), 5 min, 100% and the 2 W/cm(2), 10 min, 50% in ultrasound-treatment group had significant difference between EMLA control and heat-treatment groups. We have objectively examined the sonophoresis effect of ultrasound by investigating the effects of EMLA. Applying ultrasound for 5 min reduces the onset time of EMLA analgesia from 60 min to less than 20 min. Ultrasound sonophoresis of analgesic drugs is potentially useful in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome, tooth extraction, and other applications of analgesia.

  7. Port site infiltration of local anesthetic after laparoendoscopic single site surgery for benign adnexal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Shim, Seung-Hyuk; Dong, Meari; Lee, Hyojin; Hwang, Han Sung; Kwon, Han Sung; Lee, Sun Joo; Lee, Ji Young; Sohn, In Sook; Kim, Soo-Nyung; Kang, Soon-Beom

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether local bupivacaine injection into the incision site after gynecologic laparoendoscopic single site surgery (LESS) improves postoperative pain. This prospective cohort study included consecutive 158 patients who had LESS for benign adnexal disease from March 2013 to December 2015. Chronologically, 82 patients (March 2013 to August 2014) received no bupivacaine (group 1) and 76 (August 2014 to December 2015) received a bupivacaine block (group 2). For group 2, 10 mL 0.25% bupivacaine was injected into the 20 mm-incision site through all preperitoneal layers after LESS completion. Primary outcome is postoperative pain score using the visual analog scale (VAS). There was no difference in clinicopathological characteristics between the groups. Operating time (expressed as median [range], 92 [55-222] vs. 100 [50-185] minutes, P =0.137) and estimated blood loss (50 [30-1,500] vs. 125 [30-1,000] mL, P =0.482) were similar between the groups. Post-surgical VAS pain scores after 3 hours (3.5 [2-6] vs. 3.5 [2-5], P =0.478), 6 to 8 hours (3.5 [2-6] vs. 3 [1-8], P =0.478), and 16 to 24 hours (3 [2-4] vs. 3 [1-7], P =0.664) did not differ between groups. Bupivacaine injection into the trocar site did not improve postoperative pain after LESS. Randomized trials are needed to evaluate the benefits of local bupivacaine anesthetic for postoperative pain reduction.

  8. Inadvertent brachial plexus anesthesia associated with local anesthetic infiltration during internal jugular venous cannulation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabiyik, L; Tezer, T

    2011-01-01

    In the development of neurological complications due to central venous cannulation, the properties of the anatomical region and the experience of the practitioner are important. In this case report, an inadvertent brachial plexus anesthesia after repeated local anesthetic infiltrations during failed attempts of internal jugular venous cannulation by an inexperienced practitioner in cardiovascular intensive care unit is described. The neurological complications due to central venous cannulation are reviewed in the light of actual literature data.

  9. Ultrasound guided rectus sheath blockade compared to peri-operative local anesthetic infiltration in infants undergoing supraumbilical pyloromyotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Anoop; Wilson, Graham A. M.; Engelhardt, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Provision of appropriate analgesia for supraumbilical pyloromyotomy in infants is limited by concerns about sensitivity to opioids and other medication groups, due to immature metabolism. Local anesthetic infiltration and ultrasound guided rectus sheath blockade are two techniques commonly employed to provide perioperative analgesia. The aim of this review was to compare the quality of post-operative analgesia afforded by these two techniques. Materials and Methods: A retrospectiv...

  10. Hemodynamic response after injection of local anesthetics with or without adrenaline in adult Nigerian subjects undergoing simple tooth extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olutayo James

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to determine the changes in the blood pressure (BP and the pulse rate (PR of normotensive patients having dental extraction under the administration of 2% lignocaine local anesthetic with or without adrenaline. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was carried out on 325 consecutive normotensive patients who presented at the exodontia clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH, Lagos, Yoruba State, Nigeria from December 2004 to August 2005 for simple tooth extraction. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups according to the type of anesthetic solution employed. Group A had tooth extraction done under the administration of 2% lignocaine with adrenaline (1:80,000 while group B had tooth extraction done under the administration of 2% lignocaine local anesthetic without vasoconstrictor (plain lignocaine. Each patient had single tooth extracted. The following parameters were monitored in each of the surgical interventions: systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, and PR. Measurements were taken in the waiting room before surgery, during the surgery after local anesthesia, during tooth extraction, and 15 min after tooth extraction. Results: The sample consisted of 176 females and 149 males. Age range of the patients was 18-89 years with the mean age of 35.08 ± 15.60 years. The hemodynamic responses to lignocaine with adrenaline (1:80,000 and plain lignocaine essentially follow the same pattern in the study. There was no statistically significant difference between the measured parameters in the two groups after the administration of local anesthetics. Conclusion: This study, therefore, shows that there was no difference in the hemodynamic changes observed with the use of lignocaine with adrenaline or plain lignocaine during a simple tooth extraction in healthy adults.

  11. Hemodynamic response after injection of local anesthetics with or without adrenaline in adult Nigerian subjects undergoing simple tooth extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Olutayo James; Akinola L Ladeinde; Mobolanle O Ogunlew; Janet N. A. Ajuluchukwu; Wasiu L Adeyemo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to determine the changes in the blood pressure (BP) and the pulse rate (PR) of normotensive patients having dental extraction under the administration of 2% lignocaine local anesthetic with or without adrenaline. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was carried out on 325 consecutive normotensive patients who presented at the exodontia clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Lagos, Yoruba State, Nigeria from December 2004 to August...

  12. Analgesic Effect of Botulinum Toxin A in Myofascial Pain Syndrome Patients Previously Treated with Local Infiltration of Anesthetic and Steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena-Sevilla, Joaquín; García-Fernández, María R; Vicente-Villena, Juan P

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effect of botulinum toxin A (BoNTA) injections in patients with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) who were previously treated with the local infiltration of anesthetic and steroids (LIAS). The study included a retrospective phase and a longitudinal open-label prospective phase, which were conducted on consecutive patients with MPS previously treated with the local infiltration of anesthetic (levobupivacaíne 0.25%) and steroids (triamcinolone 40 mg). Eligible patients were treated with a single intramuscular injection of BoNTA (Botox; Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA). The treatment efficacy was determined according to the degree of pain relief obtained. Eighty-two patients met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were included in the study. Successful results were obtained for 32 (39.0%) and 30 (36.6%) patients, during treatment with BoNTA and LIAS, respectively. The mean (standard deviation) length of the analgesic effect was significantly longer with BoNTA (29.6 [SD = 17.7] weeks) than with LIAS (8.5 [SD = 6.4] weeks), P local infiltration of anesthetic and steroids who then received a single injection of BoNTA experienced significantly reduced pain for a relatively long time.

  13. Ischemia of postmastectomy skin after infiltration of local anesthetic with epinephrine: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Tristan L; Sangji, Naveen F; Hertl, Mary C

    2010-12-01

    The goals of this study were to review the literature regarding the use of local anesthetic with epinephrine and to report an observation of prolonged ischemia and necrosis in postmastectomy skin. A PubMed literature review was performed and the patient's medical record was reviewed. Prior skin necrosis with epinephrine use in acral areas was often due to physician or manufacturing overdose. Many large studies have confirmed subsequently epinephrine's safety in acral areas. There are reports of prolonged ischemia in the dermatology literature when used in areas with impaired venous and lymphatic drainage. Our case report suggests that the impaired clearance mechanisms in postmastectomy skin with an underlying implant can lead to ischemia when using local anesthetic with epinephrine. The addition of epinephrine to local anesthetic increases the duration of analgesia and provides for a relatively bloodless operating field. In the past many surgeons were reluctant to use it because of concerns about arterial vasospasm and tissue necrosis. However, perceptions have recently changed as large reviews have documented its safe use in acral areas. Based on our review of the literature and this case, epinephrine use may not be appropriate in patients with compromised venous and lymphatic drainage.

  14. Wound infiltration with local anesthetics for post-operative pain relief in lumbar spine surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjærgaard, M; Møiniche, S; Olsen, K S

    2012-03-01

    In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery. Medline, the Cochrane Library and Google Scholar were searched for appropriate trials. Qualitative analysis of post-operative effectiveness was evaluated by assessment of significant difference (P local anesthetic infiltration was observed averaging between 8 and 40 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale. In six out of 12 comparisons, the local anesthetic infiltration significantly reduced the supplemental opioid consumption after surgery. Observed reductions in analgesic consumption over the first 24 h averaged between 2.5 mg and approximately 15 mg of morphine. Data on opioid-related adverse effects were incomplete and difficult to interpret. Interpretation of the results was difficult because of diversity of the studies. However, clinical significance was in general questionable, with only a few trials showing a small or a modest reduction in pain intensity, which was observed mainly immediately after the operation. Similarly, although more frequently observed, only a minor and probably not clinically relevant reduction in opioid consumption was shown. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  15. Evaluation of local anesthetic effects of Lidocaine-Ibuprofen ionic liquid stabilized silver nanoparticles in Male Swiss mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiliang; Yu, Shashuang; Li, Xingwang; Ma, Chuangen; Li, Aixiang

    2018-01-01

    A simple approach for the synthesis of Lidocaine-Ibuprofen ionic liquid stabilized silver nanoparticles (IL-AgNPs) was reported in this work. The shape, size and surface morphology of the Lidocaine-Ibuprofen ionic liquid stabilized AgNPs were characterized by using spectroscopic and microscopic techniques such as Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Visible), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Selected area electron diffraction (SAED), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM analysis showed the formation of 20-30nm size of IL-AgNPs with very clear lattice fringes. SAED pattern confirmed the highly crystalline nature of fabricated IL stabilized AgNPs. EDS results confirmed the formation of nanosilver. The fabricated IL-AgNPs were studied for their local anesthetic effect in rats. The results of local anesthetic effect showed that the time for onset of action by IL-AgNPs is 10min, which is significantly higher than that for EMLA. Further, tactile test results confirmed the stronger and faster local anesthetic effect of IL-AgNPs when compared to that of EMLA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Prevalence of hypersensitivity to dental local anesthetic drugs in patients referred to Tehran Allergy clinic (2005-2007

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    Akhlaghi F.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: According to controversies in the prevalence of hypersensitivity to dental local anesthetic drugs and patients who claim hypersensitivity to these drugs, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of hypersensitivity to dental amide local anesthetic drugs in patients referred to Tehran Allergy Clinic in 2005-2007. "nMaterials and Methods: In this Study (Review of existing data, records of 130 patients who were referred to "Tehran allergy Clinic" (2005-2007 were studied. "nResults: The average age of patients was 29.5±18.8 years. 34% of cases showed positive skin reactions to at least one of the tested Lidocain concentrations and 10% of cases showed positive skin reactions to at least one of the tested Prilocain concentrations. There was a statistically significant difference in hypersensitivity to Lidocain 0.01 and 0.001 (p=0.017 and also between Lidocain 0.001 and 0.0001 (p<0.01. There was no statistically significant difference between other tested drug concentrations (p>0.05. "nConclusion: Many patients with history of hypersensitivity, show positive reaction to local dental anesthetic drugs. Prilocain hypersensitivity reactions are less than Lidocain. So application of Prilocain accompanies with less risk but its application should not be considered completely safe.

  17. Reduction of Environmental Temperature Mitigates Local Anesthetic Cytotoxicity in Bovine Articular Chondrocytes

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    Tarik Onur, Alexis Dang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess whether reducing environmental temperature will lead to increased chondrocyte viability following injury from a single-dose of local anesthetic treatment. Bovine articular chondrocytes from weight bearing portions of femoral condyles were harvested and cultured. 96-well plates were seeded with 15,000 chondrocytes per well. Chondrocytes were treated with one of the following conditions: ITS Media, 1x PBS, 2% lidocaine, 0.5% bupivacaine, or 0.5% ropivacaine. Each plate was then incubated at 37°C, 23°C, or 4°C for one hour and then returned to media at 37°C. Chondrocyte viability was assessed 24 hours after treatment. Chondrocyte viability is presented as a ratio of the fluorescence of the treatment group over the average of the media group at that temperature (ratio ± SEM. At 37°C, lidocaine (0.35 ± 0.04 and bupivacaine (0.30 ± 0.05 treated chondrocytes show low cell viability when compared to the media (1.00 ± 0.03 control group (p < 0.001. Lidocaine treated chondrocytes were significantly more viable at 23°C (0.84 ± 0.08 and 4°C (0.86±0.085 than at 37°C (p < 0.001. Bupivacaine treated chondrocytes were significantly more viable at 4°C (0.660 ± 0.073 than at 37°C or 23°C (0.330 ± 0.069 (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002 respectively. Reducing the temperature from 37°C to 23°C during treatment with lidocaine increases chondrocyte viability following injury. Chondrocytes treated with bupivacaine can be rescued by reducing the temperature to 4°C.

  18. Effectiveness of local anesthetic on postoperative pain in different levels of laparoscopic gynecological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, Selcuk; Api, Murat; Polat, Mesut; Arinkan, Arzu; Aksoy, Bilge; Akca, Tijen; Karateke, Ates

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of preemptive and preclosure analgesia on postoperative pain intensity in patients undergoing different levels of laparoscopic surgery. Two hundred and twenty-six patients who underwent laparoscopic gynecological surgery were enrolled in this quasi-randomized, prospective, placebo controlled study. The operations were classified as level 1 or level 2 according to the extent of the surgery. Lidocaine 1 % was administered at the port sites before making the incision in the preincisional study group. In preincisional control group, same amount of saline was infiltrated in same manner. Lidocaine 1 % was infiltrated at the port site immediately after removing the trocars in preclosure study group. In preclosure control group, the same amount of saline was infiltrated in the same manner. Postoperative pain intensity was evaluated by linear visual analogue scale. It was found that preclosure lidocaine infiltration was more effective on postoperative pain intensity than its placebo group in level 1 and level 2 surgery groups at 1 and 2 h postoperatively. The administration of preincisional lidocaine improved postoperative pain scores significantly more than its placebo group in level 1 laparoscopic surgery group at 1 and 2 h postoperatively and in level 2 laparoscopic surgery group at 1 h postoperatively. Lidocaine infiltration at port sites had beneficial effects on pain intensity in the early postoperative period after laparoscopic gynecological surgery. However, the results of present study showed that the analgesic effect mechanism of local anesthetic was unrelated to the preemptive analgesia hypothesis.

  19. Efficacy of postoperative continuous wound infiltration with local anesthetic after major abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadir, Adel R; Nicolas, Fred; Gharabawy, Ramiz; Shah, Trusha; Michael, Rafik

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic efficacy, safety, opioid sparing effects and improvement of respiratory function when using 0.2% ropivacaine continuous wound infiltration after major intra-abdominal surgery. Forty patients undergoing major intra-abdominal surgery requiring a midline incision of > or = 20 cm were enrolled into this IRB-approved, randomized, prospective controlled study. Group 1: 20 patients, parenteral analgesia (control group). Group II: 20 patients, with local anesthetic wound infiltration (pain pump group). At the end of the procedure, in the pain pump group of patients, a multi hole, 20-gauge catheter was inserted percutaneously, above the fascia. An initial dose of 10 ml of 0.2% ropivacaine was injected in the wound through the catheter. A device provided continuous delivery of 0.2% ropivacaine; the infusion was initiated at 6 ml/h for the following two days. The total "rescue" morphine and oxycodone/acetaminophen tablets administered were significantly lower in the pain pump group. At all time intervals, resting pain scores were significantly lower in the pain pump group when compared with the control group. However, at the 4-48 and 12-48 hours pain scores generated after leg raise and coughing, respectively, were significantly lower in group II. The patient vital capacities were insignificantly higher in group II. We conclude that after major abdominal surgery, infiltration and continuous wound instillation with 0.2% ropivacaine decreases postoperative pain, opioid requirements and oral analgesia. Early patient rehabilitation, hastening convalescence, and preventing respiratory complications are expected outcomes of this approach.

  20. Spectroscopic and voltammetric characterizations of the interaction of two local anesthetics with bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi Shuyun, E-mail: sy_bi@sina.co [College of Chemistry, Changchun Normal University, Changchun 130032 (China); Yan Lili; Wang Binbin; Bian Jiangyu [College of Chemistry, Changchun Normal University, Changchun 130032 (China); Sun Yantao [College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Sipin 136000 (China)

    2011-05-15

    The interactions of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with two local anesthetics, procaine hydrochloride (PCH) and tetracaine hydrochloride (TCH) were studied using spectroscopic methods such as fluorescence and ultraviolet visible (UV-vis), and electrochemical techniques including cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulsed stripping voltammetry (DPSV). The results obtained from these techniques turned out that both PCH and TCH could bind to BSA. The binding constants (K{sub A}) and the number of binding sites (n) of the two drugs with BSA at different temperatures were determined, respectively. At 291 K, K{sub A} was found as 2.40x10{sup 4} and 1.42x10{sup 4} L mol{sup -1} and n was 1.03 and 0.99 for PCH-BSA and TCH-BSA, respectively. According to van't Hoff equation, the thermodynamic parameters, {Delta}G, {Delta}H and {Delta}S, were obtained, showing the involvement of hydrophobic and electrostatic force in these interactions. Based on the theory of the Foerster energy transference, the distance between the acceptor (PCH or TCH) and the donor (BSA) were determined as 2.32 and 3.62 nm for PCH and TCH, respectively. The effects of Fe{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+} on the binding of PCH or TCH to BSA were also evaluated. - Research highlights: Procaine or tetracaine hydrochloride quenching the fluorescence of Trp in BSA was a static quenching process. Synchronous fluorescence was applied to study the structural change of BSA. Binding constant, binding site and binding force were determined. Voltammetry techniques further characterized the nature of the interactions of the two drugs with BSA.

  1. Disparate role of Na(+) channel D2-S6 residues in batrachotoxin and local anesthetic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S Y; Barile, M; Wang, G K

    2001-05-01

    Batrachotoxin (BTX) stabilizes the voltage-gated Na(+) channels in their open conformation, whereas local anesthetics (LAs) block Na(+) conductance. Site-directed mutagenesis has identified clusters of common residues at D1-S6, D3-S6, and D4-S6 segments within the alpha-subunit Na(+) channel that are critical for binding of these two types of ligands. In this report, we address whether segment D2-S6 is similarly involved in both BTX and LA actions. Thirteen amino acid positions from G783 to L795 of the rat skeletal muscle Na(+) channel ((mu)1/Skm1) were individually substituted with a lysine residue. Four mutants (N784K, L785K, V787K, and L788K) expressed sufficient Na(+) currents for further studies. Activation and/or inactivation gating was altered in mutant channels; in particular, mu1-V787K displays enhanced slow inactivation and exhibited use-dependent inhibition of peak Na(+) currents during repetitive pulses. Two of these four mutants, (mu)1-N784K and (mu)1-L788K, were completely resistant to 5 microM BTX. This BTX-resistant phenotype could be caused by structural perturbations induced by a lysine point mutation in the D2-S6 segment. However, these two BTX-resistant mutants remained quite sensitive to bupivacaine block with affinity for inactivated Na(+) channels (K(I)) of approximately 10 microM or less, which suggests that (mu)1-N784 and (mu)1-L788 residues are not in close proximity to the LA binding site.

  2. Oxidative stress, metabolomics profiling, and mechanism of local anesthetic induced cell death in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory H.T. Boone

    2017-08-01

    glutathione to combat the oxidative cellular environment, glycolytic to PPP cycling of carbon generating NADPH, obstruction of carbon flow through the TCA cycle, decreased ATP generation, and metacaspase dependent apoptotic cell death. Keywords: Local anesthetic toxicity, Oxidative stress, Metabolomics profiling, Apoptotic cell death pathways, Flow cytometry, Mass spectrometry

  3. Multi-regional local anesthetic infiltration during laparoscopic cholecystectomy in patients receiving prophylactic multi-modal analgesia: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, T; Klarskov, B; Kristiansen, V B

    1999-01-01

    Pain is the dominant complaint after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. No study has examined the combined effects of a somato-visceral blockade during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Therefore, we investigated the effects of a somato-visceral local anesthetic blockade on pain and nausea in patients und...... cholecystectomy. Incisional pain dominated during the first postoperative week. Incisional infiltration of local anesthetics is recommended in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.......Pain is the dominant complaint after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. No study has examined the combined effects of a somato-visceral blockade during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Therefore, we investigated the effects of a somato-visceral local anesthetic blockade on pain and nausea in patients...... dominated over other pain localizations in both groups (P local anesthetic blockade reduced overall pain during the first 2 postoperative h, and nausea, morphine requirements, and incisional pain were reduced during the first 3 postoperative h in patients...

  4. Local Anesthetic Activity from Extracts, Fractions and Pure Compounds from the Roots of Ottonia anisum Spreng. (Piperaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Kelvin S E; Marques, André M; Moreira, Davyson DE L; Velozo, Leosvaldo S; Sudo, Roberto T; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Guimarães, Elsie F; Kaplan, Maria Auxiliadora C

    2016-01-01

    Piperaceae species can be found worldwide in tropical and subtropical areas and many of them have been used for centuries in traditional folk medicine and in culinary. In Brazil, species of Piperaceae are commonly used in some communities as local anesthetic and analgesic. Countrified communities have known some species of the genus Ottonia as "anestesia" and it is a common habit of chewing leaves and roots of Ottonia species to relief toothache. The purpose of this study is to report our findings on new molecules entities obtained from the roots of Ottonia anisum Spreng, in which local anesthetic activity (sensory blockage) is demonstrated for the first time in vivo guinea pig model. Phytochemical investigation led to the isolation of three amides (pipercallosidine, piperine and valeramide) and in an enriched mixture of seven amides (valeramide, 4,5-dihydropiperlonguminine, N-isobutil-6-piperonil-2-hexenamide, piperovatine, dihydropipercallosidine, pipercallosidine and pipercallpsine). Our findings demonstrated the anesthetic potential for the methanolic extract from roots, its n-hexane partition and amides from O. anisum and it is in agreement with ethnobotanical survey.

  5. Local anesthetic interaction with human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) channels: role of aromatic amino acids Y652 and F656

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebrands, Cornelia C; Schmitt, Nicole; Friederich, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) potassium channels constitute a potential target involved in cardiotoxic side effects of amino-amide local anesthetics. The molecular interaction site of these low-affinity blockers with HERG channels is currently unknown. The aim of this study...... (r > 0.9). CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that local anesthetics specifically but not exclusively interact with the aromatic residues Y652 and F656 in S6 of HERG channels....

  6. Irreversible inhibition of sodium current and batrachotoxin binding by a photoaffinity-derivatized local anesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, J; Mok, W M; Wang, G K; Strichartz, G

    1995-02-01

    We have synthesized a model local anesthetic (LA), N-(2-di-N-butyl-aminoethyl)-4-azidobenzamide (DNB-AB), containing the photoactivatable aryl azido moiety, which is known to form a covalent bond to adjacent molecules when exposed to UV light (Fleet, G.W., J.R. Knowles, and R.R. Porter. 1972. Biochemical Journal. 128:499-508. Ji, T.H. 1979. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta. 559:39-69). We studied the effects of DNB-AB on the sodium current (INa) under whole-cell voltage clamp in clonal mammalian GH3 cells and on 3[H]-BTX-B binding to sheep brain synaptoneurosomes. In the absence of UV illumination, DNB-AB behaved similarly to known LAs, producing both reversible block of peak INa (IC50 = 26 microM, 20 degrees C) and reversible inhibition of 3[H]-BTX-B (50 nM in the presence of 0.12 microgram/liter Leiurus quinquestriatus scorpion venom) binding (IC50 = 3.3 microM, 37 degrees C), implying a noncovalent association between DNB-AB and its receptor(s). After exposure to UV light, both block of INa and inhibition of 3[H]-BTX-B binding were only partially reversible (INa = 42% of control; 3[H]-BTX-B binding = 23% of control) showing evidence of a light-dependent, covalent association between DNB-AB and its receptor(s). In the absence of drug, UV light had less effect on INa (post exposure INa = 96% of control) or on 3[H]-BTX-B binding (post exposure binding = 70% of control). The irreversible block of INa was partially protected by coincubation of DNB-AB with 1 mM bupivacaine (IC50 = 45 microM, for INa inhibition at 20 degrees C, Wang, G.K., and S.Y. Wang. 1992. Journal of General Physiology. 100:1003-1020), (post exposure INa = 73% of control). The irreversible inhibition of 3[H]-BTX-B binding also was partially protected by coincubation with bupivacaine (500 microM, 37 degrees C) (post exposure binding = 51% of control), suggesting that the site of irreversible inhibition of both INa and 3[H]-BTX-B binding is shared with the clinical LA bupivacaine.

  7. Addition of buprenorphine to local anesthetic in adductor canal blocks after total knee arthroplasty improves postoperative pain relief: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Sandeep H; Gilbert, Lisa A; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Applefield, Daniel J; Kassab, Safa S; Ellis, Terry A

    2016-09-01

    For the hundreds of thousands of patients who undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the United States each year, early mobilization has been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes and reduce complications. Management of postoperative pain is a critical factor in achieving early mobilization. Recent studies have shown that the use of an adductor canal block (ACB) after TKA results in increased preservation of quadriceps muscle strength, without significant difference in postoperative pain when compared to femoral nerve block. This increased preservation of quadriceps muscle strength leads to earlier mobilization. Studies have also demonstrated a prolongation of analgesia with the addition of buprenorphine to local anesthetic for regional block placement. This study examined the effect on postoperative opioid consumption when adding buprenorphine to an ACB vs an ACB with local anesthetic alone, for postoperative analgesia after unilateral TKA. A total of 100 patients scheduled for TKA were randomized to receive postoperative ACB with local anesthetic alone or with local anesthetic and buprenorphine. The primary outcome examined was total opioid analgesic (milligrams of hydrocodone equivalent) consumption in the first 24 hours postsurgery. The secondary outcomes examined were the reported incidence of the opioid side effects nausea, vomiting, and pruritis. Postoperative opioid consumption decreased significantly in the group that received an ACB with local anesthetic and buprenorphine compared to an ACB with local anesthetic only (25.34±2.62 vs 35.84±2.86; P=.0076). Secondary outcomes showed no statistical difference between the 2 groups in terms of the incidence of nausea, vomiting, or pruritus. The addition of buprenorphine to an adductor canal block decreases postoperative opioid consumption when compared to an ACB with local anesthetic alone. This reduction in opioid consumption, without significant increase in side effects, makes this an attractive

  8. Effects of single injection of local anesthetic agents on intervertebral disc degeneration: ex vivo and long-term in vivo experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Iwasaki

    Full Text Available Analgesic discography (discoblock can be used to diagnose or treat discogenic low back pain by injecting a small amount of local anesthetics. However, recent in vitro studies have revealed cytotoxic effects of local anesthetics on intervertebral disc (IVD cells. Here we aimed to investigate the deteriorative effects of lidocaine and bupivacaine on rabbit IVDs using an organotypic culture model and an in vivo long-term follow-up model.For the organotypic culture model, rabbit IVDs were harvested and cultured for 3 or 7 days after intradiscal injection of local anesthetics (1% lidocaine or 0.5% bupivacaine. Nucleus pulposus (NP cell death was measured using confocal microscopy. Histological and TUNEL assays were performed. For in vivo study, each local anesthetic was injected into rabbit lumbar IVDs under a fluoroscope. Six or 12 months after the injection, each IVD was prepared for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and histological analysis.In the organotypic culture model, both anesthetic agents induced time-dependent NP cell death; when compared with injected saline solution, significant effects were detected within 7 days. Compared with the saline group, TUNEL-positive NP cells were significantly increased in the bupivacaine group. In the in vivo study, MRI analysis did not show any significant difference. Histological analysis revealed that IVD degeneration occurred to a significantly level in the saline- and local anesthetics-injected groups compared with the untreated control or puncture-only groups. However, there was no significant difference between the saline and anesthetic agents groups.In the in vivo model using healthy IVDs, there was no strong evidence to suggest that discoblock with local anesthetics has the potential of inducing IVD degeneration other than the initial mechanical damage of the pressurized injection. Further studies should be performed to investigate the deteriorative effects of the local injection of analgesic agents

  9. Intramuscular Local Anesthetic Infiltration at Closure for Postoperative Analgesia in Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Andrea P; Chari, Aswin; Kostusiak, Milosz; Khan, Akbar Ali; Luoma, Astri Mv; Casey, Adrian T H

    2017-07-15

    Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis OBJECTIVE.: To identify whether intramuscular local anesthetic infiltration prior to wound closure was effective in reducing postoperative pain and facilitating early discharge following lumbar spine surgery. Local anesthetic infiltration prior to wound closure may form part of the multimodal strategy for postoperative analgesia, facilitating early mobilization and discharge. Although there are a number of small studies investigating its utility, a quantitative meta-analysis of the data has never been performed. This review was conducted according the PRISMA statement and was registered with the PROSPERO database. Only randomized controlled trials were eligible for inclusion. Key outcomes of interest included time to first analgesic demand, total postoperative opiate usage in the first 24 hours, visual analogue score (VAS) at 1, 12 and 24 hours and postoperative length of stay. Eleven publications fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A total of 438 patients were include; 212 in the control group and 226 in the intervention group. Local anesthetic infiltration resulted in a prolonged time to first analgesic demand (mean difference (MD) 65.88 minutes, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 23.70 to 108.06, P.0.002) as well as a significantly reduced postoperative opiate demand (M.D. -9.71 mg, 95% CI -15.07, -4.34, p = 0.0004). There was a small but statistically significant reduction in postoperative visual analogue score (VAS) at 1 hour (M.D. -0.87 95%CI -1.55, -0.20, p = 0.01), but no significant reduction at 12 or 24 hours (p = 0.93 and 0.85 respectively). This systematic review and meta-analysis provides evidence that postoperative intramuscular local anaesthetic infiltration reduces postoperative analgesic requirements and the time to first analgesic demands for patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Key research priorities include optimization of the choice and strength of local anaesthetic agent and health

  10. Comparison between analgesic effect of bupivacaine thoracic epidural and ketamine infusion plus wound infiltration with local anesthetics in open cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megahed, Nagwa Ahmed Ebrahim; Ellakany, Mohamed; Elatter, Ahmed Mohammed Ibrahim; Moustafa Teima, Mohamed Ahmed Ali

    2014-01-01

    Neuraxial blocks result in sympathetic block, sensory analgesia and motor block. Continuous epidural anesthesia through a catheter offers several options for perioperative analgesia. Local anesthetic boluses or infusions can provide profound analgesia. Although the role of low-dose ketamine (local anesthetic can be used for wound infiltration intra-operative to minimized the surgical pain. A prospective randomized study was performed in which 40 patients scheduled for elective open cholecystectomy under general anesthesia admitted to the Medical Research Institute were included and further subdivided into two groups, group A, received thoracic epidural catheter at T7-8, activation was done 20 min before induction of anesthesia with plain bupivacaine at a concentration of 0.25% at a volume of 1 ml/segment aiming to block sensory supply from T4-L2, then received continuous thoracic epidural infusion intra and postoperatively with plain bupivacaine at a concentration of 0.125% at a rate of 5 ml/h for 24 h, group B received 0.3 mg/kg bolus of ketamine at the time of induction then 0.1 mg/kg/h ketamine IV infusion during surgery followed by wound infiltration with 15 ml of plain bupivacaine 0.5% at the time of skin closure. Bupivacaine thoracic epidural analgesia had better control on heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure than ketamine infusion plus wound infiltration with local anesthetic in patients undergoing open cholecystectomy. Thoracic epidural analgesia had better control on hemodynamic changes intra-and postoperatively than ketamine infusion with local wound infiltration in open cholecystectomy.

  11. Clinical parameters of the local anesthetic effects of bupivacaine applied with and without a vasoconstrictor in oral implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duka Miloš

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Bupivacaine (Marcaine®, homologue of mepivacaine, chemically related to lidocaine, is used as a local anesthetic for local infiltration, peripheral nerve block, retrobulbar block, symphathetic block, and caudal and epidural anesthesia. The aim of this investigation was to determine and to compare clinical parameters of the local anesthetic effects of bupivacaine applied with and without a vasoconstrictor. Methods. This investigation included a total of 30 randomly selected patients, who ranged in age from 30−60 years, with partial or total anodontia in the molar region of the mandible. These patients with total or partial edentulous molar part of the mandible, scheduled for dental implantation placement, were asked to participate in the study. In the first phase of the investigation, the patients were subjected to local anesthesia with 3.5 cm3 of 0.5% bupivacaine with a vasoconstrictor (adrenalin, 1: 200 000 in the right side of the mandible. After administering local anesthesia, the placement of blade, cylindrical, transdental (B.C.T. implants was performed. In the second stage of the investigation, in 7−10 days period after the first oral surgery, the patients were subjected to local anesthesia with 3.5 cm3 of 0.5% bupivacaine, but without a vasoconstrictor, in the left side of the mandible. After administering local anesthesia, the placement of B.C.T. implants was performed. During the performance of both oral surgery procedures, the following clinical parameters of the local anesthetic effects were monitored: latent period, duration and the potency of anesthesia, and the evaluation of the postoperative pain level. Results. The latent period under local anesthesia with 3.5 cm3 of 0.5% bupivacaine and vasoconstrictor was statistically significantly shorter than without vasoconstrictor. The duration of local anesthesia was longer without vasoconstrictor. There was no difference in the potency of anesthesia with or without a

  12. Improvement of Lidocaine Local Anesthetic Action Using Lallemantia royleana Seed Mucilage as an Excipient

    OpenAIRE

    Atabaki, Rabi; Hassanpour-ezatti, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Lallemantia royleana (Balangu) is a well known Iranian medicinal plant that its seed mucilage has many applications in modern pharmacology. Plant mucilage traditionally was used as a gel supplement, and natural matrix for sustained release of drugs. But it seems that these compounds are not a simple additive and also have many undiscovered pharmacological properties. In this research, the anesthetic action of gel prepared from Balangu mucilage alone and its mixture with lidocaine hydrochlorid...

  13. Should we add clonidine to local anesthetic for peripheral nerve blockade? A qualitative systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Colin J L; Duggan, Edel; Apatu, Emma

    2007-01-01

    Although clonidine has been shown to prolong analgesia in central neuraxial blocks, its use in peripheral nerve blocks remains controversial. We performed a systematic review of the current literature to determine the benefit of adding clonidine to peripheral nerve blocks. A systematic, qualitative review of double-blind randomized controlled trials on the benefit of clonidine as an adjunct to peripheral nerve block was performed. Studies were identified by searching PubMed (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez) and EMBASE (www.embase.com) databases (July 1991 to October 2006) for terms related to clonidine as an adjunct to peripheral nerve blocks. Studies were classified as supportive if the use of clonidine demonstrated reduced pain and total analgesic consumption, or prolonged block duration versus negative if no difference was found. Twenty-seven studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. Five studies included a systemic control group. The total number of patients reviewed was 1,385. The dose of clonidine varied from 30 to 300 mug. Overall 15 studies supported the use of clonidine as an adjunct to peripheral nerve blocks with 12 studies failing to show a benefit. Based on qualitative analysis, clonidine appeared to prolong analgesia when added to intermediate-acting local anesthetics for axillary and peribulbar blocks. Clonidine improves duration of analgesia and anesthesia when used as an adjunct to intermediate-acting local anesthetics for some peripheral nerve blocks. Side-effects appear to be limited at doses up to 150 mug. Evidence is lacking for the use of clonidine as an adjunct to local anesthetics for continuous catheter techniques. Further research is required to examine the peripheral analgesic mechanism of clonidine.

  14. Local anesthetics QX 572 and benzocaine act at separate sites on the batrachotoxin-activated sodium channel

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    We have studied the effect of local anesthetics QX 572, which is permanently charged, and benzocaine, which is neutral, on batrachotoxin- activated sodium channels in mouse neuroblastoma N18 cells. The dose- response curves for each drug suggest that QX 752 and benzocaine each act on a single class of binding sites. The dissociation constants are 3.15 X 10(-5) M for QX 572 and 2.65 X 10(-4) M for benzocaine. Equilibrium and kinetic experiments indicate that both drugs are competitive inhibito...

  15. [Beginning of continuous wound infusion with local anesthetics : With special emphasis on the contributions from Walter Capelle and Ewald Fulde].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerig, M; Gottschalk, A

    2017-07-01

    Wound infusion with local anesthetics is a proven and safe analgesic procedure for modern perioperative patient care. Even the pioneers of local anesthesia practiced wound analgesia and emphasized the shortcomings of "single-shot" wound infusions. At the same time, they drew attention to the importance of long-lasting pain relief to prevent sequelae, especially after upper abdominal surgery with pneumonia, embolic events or postoperative ileus. In the early 1930s there were first sustained efforts to improve the efficiency and quality of pain therapy, especially after upper abdominal surgery by continuous wound infiltration with local anesthetics via intraoperatively introduced special cannulas. This measure was carried out to enable reduction in pain and allow early postoperative mobilization. The conceptual development of this pioneering analgesia method is closely connected with the names of the Berlin surgeons Walter Capelle and Ewald Fulde; however, their inaugurated and propagated therapy concept did not find the attention and dissemination that it deserved. This is a reason for us to remember their pioneering ideas on pain management in the context of current developments.

  16. Host-guest complexes of local anesthetics with cucurbit[6]uril and para-sulphonatocalix[8]arene in the solid state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylyuk, Oksana; Butkiewicz, Helena; Coleman, Anthony W.; Suwinska, Kinga

    2017-12-01

    Here we describe the host-guest inclusion complexes of local anesthetic drugs with two macrocyclic hosts cucurbit[6]uril and para-sulphonatocalix[8]arene in the solid state. The anesthetic agents used in the co-crystallization with the supramolecular hosts are lidocaine, procaine, procainamide, prilocaine and proparacaine. Both macrocycles encapsulate the alkylammonium moieties of anestetics guests into their cavities although the mechanism of complexation, host-guest stoichiometry and geometry differ depending on the nature of the supramolecular host.

  17. USING OF FIRST GENERATION OF Hl ANTIHISTAMINES As ALTERNATIVE OF LOCAL ANESTHETIC IN ODONTOLOGIC USE IN ANESTHESIA INFILTRATIVE TECHNICS. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN ANIMALS

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Alfaro, Miguel; Burga Sánchez, Jonny; Chumpitaz Cerrate, Victor; Varas Hilario, Roberto; López Bellido, Roger; Chuquihuaccha Granda, Vilma; Zegarra Cuya, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The presence of adverse drug reactions with local anesthetics takes us to the search of effective alternatives to this drugs. 60 albino rabbits divided into 6 groups were submifted to infiltrative anesthetic technique in the maxilla with lidocaine, mepivacaine, bupivacaine, chlorpheniramine and dimenhidrinate, in front of sodium chloride 0,9%. The pain threshold belzavior was evaluated with electrical stimulation from Ruhnkorff s bobbin behind the drllg application and comparison between grou...

  18. Psoas Compartment Block vs Periarticular Local Anesthetic Infiltration for Pain Management After Anterior Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Prospective, Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahs, Adam M; Koueiter, Denise M; Kurdziel, Michael D; Huynh, Kristine A; Perry, Clayton R; Verner, James J

    2018-02-21

    The psoas compartment block (PCB) or periarticular soft-tissue local anesthetic injection are forms of regional anesthesia often used as one of the components in multimodal anesthesia applied during total hip arthroplasty (THA). The most efficacious form of regional anesthesia for THA has yet to be determined. In a single-surgeon, prospective, clinical trial, patients undergoing THA via direct anterior approach were randomized to receive an intraoperative periarticular local anesthetic infiltration (periarticular injection) or a PCB. Postoperative pain scores, narcotic consumption, and complications were recorded. Forty-nine patients were randomized to the PCB and 50 were randomized to the periarticular injection. The resting pain score 3 hours postoperatively was statistically significantly lower in the periarticular injection group by 1.1 point (2.9 ± 2.2 vs 4.0 ± 2.2, P = .036). No difference was found in resting pain scores or ambulatory pain scores in the morning or evening of postoperative day 1, 2, or at the 3-week follow-up visit. There was no difference in in-hospital narcotic consumption between groups (P = 1.0). There were no major complications directly related to the block in either group. A total of 6 patients reported complaints of transient numbness, 5 in the PCB group (5/49, 10.2%), and one in the periarticular injection group (1/50, 2%, P = .087). These results demonstrate similarity between the 2 methods. We prefer periarticular anesthetic infiltration over PCB due to improved immediate postoperative pain scores and avoidance of potential symptoms associated with nerve blockade. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Onset and duration of anesthesia for local anesthetic combinations commonly used in forefoot surgery; surprise results with sequential blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, Marie Mantini; Petrozzi, Rocco; Harris, Samantha Y; Greer, Hillary; Goldfarb, Jacqueline; Biernacki, Tomasz; Kawalec, Jill S

    2015-06-01

    Local anesthetic nerve blocks are frequently used for postoperative analgesia and to the best of our knowledge no studies have evaluated the effects of injecting bupivacaine into an area previously injected with lidocaine. Sensation was tested in three groups of subjects receiving local anesthetic digital blocks. Group A received bupivacaine 0.25% plain. Group B received a 1:1 mixture of lidocaine 1% plain and bupivacaine 0.25%. Group C received an initial block of lidocaine 1% plain sequentially followed by bupivacaine 0.25% 1h later. Bupivacaine exhibited a delayed onset and the longest duration when compared to the other two groups. The group receiving the 1:1 mixture showed a rapid onset that resembled that of lidocaine and a shortened duration that did not resemble bupivacaine. The group receiving the sequential injections showed that even after a 1h interval following the lidocaine infiltration, there was a deleterious effect on duration of action of the bupivacaine. Using bupivacaine as a post-surgical block in the presence of residual lidocaine from a preoperative block is not warranted as once again, the extended duration of bupivacaine is mitigated. Bupivacaine alone as an initial operative block affords clinically acceptable onset of anesthesia while also providing extended duration of action. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of the analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block and local anesthetic infiltration for laparoscopic percutaneous extraperitoneal closure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchinami, Yuka; Sakuraya, Fumika; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Hoshino, Koji; Mikami, Eri; Ishikawa, Taro; Fujii, Hitomi; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Morimoto, Yuji

    2017-05-01

    Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block and local anesthetic infiltration are the standard options to improve postoperative pain for children undergoing surgery with a midline incision. However, there is no study comparing the effect of ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block with local anesthetic infiltration for children undergoing laparoscopic surgery. The aim of this trial was to compare the onset of ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block with that of local anesthetic infiltration for laparoscopic percutaneous extraperitoneal closure in children. We performed an observer-blinded, randomized, prospective trial. Enrolled patients were assigned to either an ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block group or a local anesthetic infiltration group. The ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block group (n = 17) received ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block with 0.2 ml·kg -1 of 0.375% ropivacaine per side in the posterior rectus sheath compartment. The local anesthetic infiltration group (n = 17) received local anesthetic infiltration with 0.2 ml·kg -1 of 0.75% ropivacaine. The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability (FLACC) pain scores were recorded at 0, 30, 60 min after arrival at the postanesthesia care unit. Of the 37 patients enrolled in this study, 34 completed the study protocol. A significant difference in the pain scale between the ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block group and local anesthetic infiltration group was found at 0 min (median: 0, interquartile range [IQR]: 0-1.5, vs median: 1, IQR 0-5, confidence interval of median [95% CI]: 0-3, P = 0.048), but no significant difference was found at 30 min (median: 1, IQR: 0-4 vs median: 6, IQR: 0-7, 95% CI: 0-5, P = 0.061), or 60 min (median: 0, IQR: 0-2 vs median: 1, IQR: 0-3, 95% CI: -1 to 1, P = 0.310). No significant difference was found in anesthesia time between the ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block and local anesthetic infiltration groups. No procedure-related complications were observed in either group

  1. Non-centralized and functionally localized nervous system of ophiuroids: evidence from topical anesthetic experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiya Matsuzaka

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ophiuroids locomote along the seafloor by coordinated rhythmic movements of multi-segmented arms. The mechanisms by which such coordinated movements are achieved are a focus of interest from the standpoints of neurobiology and robotics, because ophiuroids appear to lack a central nervous system that could exert centralized control over five arms. To explore the underlying mechanism of arm coordination, we examined the effects of selective anesthesia to various parts of the body of ophiuroids on locomotion. We observed the following: (1 anesthesia of the circumoral nerve ring completely blocked the initiation of locomotion; however, initiation of single arm movement, such as occurs during the retrieval of food, was unaffected, indicating that the inability to initiate locomotion was not due to the spread of the anesthetic agent. (2 During locomotion, the midsegments of the arms periodically made contact with the floor to elevate the disc. In contrast, the distal segments of the arms were pointed aborally and did not make contact with the floor. (3 When the midsegments of all arms were anesthetized, arm movements were rendered completely uncoordinated. In contrast, even when only one arm was left intact, inter-arm coordination was preserved. (4 Locomotion was unaffected by anesthesia of the distal arms. (5 A radial nerve block to the proximal region of an arm abolished coordination among the segments of that arm, rendering it motionless. These findings indicate that the circumoral nerve ring and radial nerves play different roles in intra- and inter-arm coordination in ophiuroids.

  2. Effects of tertiary amine local anesthetics on the assembly and disassembly of brain microtubules in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genna, J M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1980-09-01

    From kinetic and electron microscopy studies on the effects of procaine, tetracaine and dibucaine on the polymerization and depolymerization of the microtubules isolated from pig and rat brains the following results were obtained. 1. Procaine or tetracaine, at the concentration range of 0.5--20 mM and of 0.5--5 mM respectively, increases the rate of tubulin polymerization (24 degrees C or 37 degrees C) and of microtubule depolymerization (4 degrees C) as a linear function of the concentration of the anesthetics, while identical amounts of microtubules are formed. In the absence of microtubule-associated proteins the polymerization of tubulin is not induced by 10 mM procaine, furthermore, the critical concentration of microtubule proteins necessary for assembly into microtubules is not affected at this concentration level of the anesthetic. This suggests that procaine affects not the nucleation, but rather the elongation process. 2. Dibucaine, from 0.5 mM to 3 mM increases the lag time of the polymerization reaction, while from 0.5 mM to 2 mM it linearly decreases both tubulin polymerization (24 degrees C) and microtubule depolymerization (4 degrees C) rates. Dibucaine, up to mM concentration, does not affect the extent of tubulin polymerization; however, above this concentration it induces the formation of amorphous aggregates. 3. Procaine or tetracaine enhances the depolymerizing effect of calcium on microtubules. The half-maximal values for the depolymerizing effect of calcium were 0.96, 0.71 and 0.51 mM for the control, in the presence of 10 mM procaine and 5 mM tetracaine respectively.

  3. Prospective comparison between buffered 1% lidocaine-epinephrine and skin cooling in reducing the pain of local anesthetic infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shahwan, Mohammed A

    2012-10-01

    Pain associated with the infiltration of local anesthesia is attributed to the acidity of the solution. Buffering with sodium bicarbonate has been used widely to reduce this affect. Growing evidence supports skin cooling (cryoanalgesia) as a measure to reduce infiltration pain. To compare the effect of 1% lidocaine-epinephrine [1:100,000] buffered with sodium bicarbonate with skin cooling for 2 minutes with ice in reducing the pain of infiltration of anesthetic solution. Sixty healthy volunteers were recruited for this prospective study. Each subject received an intradermal injection of buffered solution in one arm and injection of unbuffered solution after ice application in the other arm. Immediately after each injection, subjects rated pain of infiltration on a 100-mm visual analog scale. Pain scores were compared using the paired t-test. Sixty percent of subjects reported that pain of infiltration was greater after skin cooling than with buffered solution. Mean ± standard deviation pain scores were 24.8 ± 21.7 for skin cooling and 21.1 ± 20.8 for buffered solution; this difference was not statistically significant. There is no significant difference between buffered anesthetic solution (buffering) and skin cooling in reducing the pain of infiltration of 1% lidocaine - epinephrine. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Use of local anesthetic (0.25% bupivacaine) for pain control after pediatric cardiac catheterization: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Amy; Viegas, Jacqueline; Manlhiot, Cedric; McCrindle, Brian; Benson, Lee

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the effects of local infiltration of 0.25% bupivacaine on post-operative pain and analgesic use in children undergoing cardiac catheterization procedures. In pediatric catheterization procedures performed under general anesthesia, a local anesthetic is often used prior to femoral sheath removal. There are no published reports of the impact of local anesthetic infiltration on pain after pediatric procedures, and mixed reports on its effectiveness in adults. A randomized controlled trial was undertaken of 140 children, aged 7-18 years undergoing cardiac catheterization under general anesthesia via the femoral vein or artery. Participants received a subcutaneous infiltration of 0.25% bupivacaine at the access site prior to sheath removal, or usual care without bupivacaine. Outcomes included patient reported pain scores and analgesic use up to 6 hr after the procedure. Pain scores were similar between groups through the 6-hr post-procedure period. The proportion of children reporting a maximal pain score of ≤2/10 was higher in the bupivacaine group (64% vs. 44%, P = 0.03). A significantly higher proportion of children in the control group required IV morphine (18.8% vs. 4.5%, P = 0.02). Morphine use can be reduced with the use of 0.25% bupivacaine given prior to femoral sheath removal and should be considered for post-procedural pain control for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. This study is the first to contribute evidence to the effectiveness of 0.25% bupivacaine after pediatric cardiac catheterization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Development of a local anesthetic lidocaine-loaded redox-active injectable gel for postoperative pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaki, Yukio; Mizukoshi, Yutaro; Gao, Zhenyu; Feliciano, Chitho P; Chang, Kyungho; Sekiyama, Hiroshi; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-15

    Although local anesthesia is commonly applied for pain relief, there are several issues such as its short duration of action and low effectiveness at the areas of inflammation due to the acidic pH. The presence of excessive amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to induce inflammation and aggravate pain. To resolve these issues, we developed a redox-active injectable gel (RIG) with ROS-scavenging activity. RIG was prepared by mixing polyamine-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-polyamine with nitroxide radical moieties as side chains on the polyamine segments (PMNT-b-PEG-b-PMNT) with a polyanion, which formed a flower-type micelle via electrostatic complexation. Lidocaine could be stably incorporated in its core. When the temperature of the solution was increased to 37°C, the PIC-type flower micelle transformed to gel. The continuous release of lidocaine from the gel was observed for more than three days, without remarkable initial burst, which is probably owing to the stable entrapment of lidocaine in the PIC core of the gel. We evaluated the analgesic effect of RIG in carrageenan-induced arthritis mouse model. Results showed that lidocaine-loaded RIG has stronger and longer analgesic effect when administered in inflamed areas. In contrast, while the use of non-complexed lidocaine did not show analgesic effect one day after its administration. Note that no effect was observed when PIC-type flower micelle without ROS-scavenging ability was used. These findings suggest that local anesthetic-loaded RIG can effectively reduce the number of injection times and limit the side effects associated with the use of anti-inflammatory drugs for postoperative pain management. 1. We have been working on nanomaterials, which effectively eliminate ROS, avoiding dysfunction of mitochondria in healthy cells. 2. We designed redox injectable gel using polyion complexed flower type micelle, which can eliminates ROS locally. 3. We could prepare local anesthesia-loaded redox injectable

  6. Local anesthetics QX 572 and benzocaine act at separate sites on the batrachotoxin-activated sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L M; Ehrenstein, G

    1981-02-01

    We have studied the effect of local anesthetics QX 572, which is permanently charged, and benzocaine, which is neutral, on batrachotoxin-activated sodium channels in mouse neuroblastoma N18 cells. The dose-response curves for each drug suggest that QX 752 and benzocaine each act on a single class of binding sites. The dissociation constants are 3.15 X 10(-5) M for QX 572 and 2.65 X 10(-4) M for benzocaine. Equilibrium and kinetic experiments indicate that both drugs are competitive inhibitors of batrachotoxin. When benzocaine and QX 572 are present with batrachotoxin, they are much more effective at inhibiting Na+ flux than would be predicted by a one-site model. Our results indicate that QX 572 and benzocaine bind to separate sites, each of which interacts competitively with batrachotoxin.

  7. Analgesic and Sensory Effects of the Pecs Local Anesthetic Block in Patients with Persistent Pain after Breast Cancer Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijayasinghe, Nelun; Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Kehlet, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    experienced analgesia (P = 0.008) and reduced hypoesthesia areas to cold (P = 0.004) and warmth (P = 0.01) after 30 minutes. The reported pain relief (P = 0.02) and reduced sleep interference (P = 0.01) persisted for 7 days after the block. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study suggests that the pectoral nerves play......BACKGROUND: Persistent pain after breast cancer surgery (PPBCS) develops in 15% to 25% of patients, sometimes years after surgery. Approximately 50% of PPBCS patients have neuropathic pain in the breast, which may be due to dysfunction of the pectoral nerves. The Pecs local anesthetic block...... quantitative sensory testing [QST]) in eight patients with PPBCS. SPI and QST measurements were recorded before and 30 minutes after administration of the Pecs block (20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine). Pain intensity and sleep interference were measured daily before and after the block for 7 days. RESULTS: Patients...

  8. Adductor Canal Block With 10 mL Versus 30 mL Local Anesthetics and Quadriceps Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Pia; Koscielniak-Nielsen, Zbigniew J; Hilsted, Karen Lisa

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Adductor canal block (ACB) is predominantly a sensory nerve block, but excess volume may spread to the femoral triangle and reduce quadriceps strength. We hypothesized that reducing the local anesthetic volume from 30 to 10 mL may lead to fewer subjects with quadriceps...... weakness. METHODS: We performed a paired, blinded, randomized trial including healthy men. All subjects received bilateral ACBs with ropivacaine 0.1%; 10 mL in 1 leg and 30 mL in the other leg. The primary outcome was the difference in number of subjects with quadriceps strength reduced by more than 25......% from baseline in 2 consecutive assessments. Secondary outcomes were quadriceps strength as a percentage of baseline at predefined time points, functional outcome assessed by the 30-Second Chair Stand Test (1 leg at a time), and sensory block. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01981746. RESULTS: We...

  9. Lumbar transversus abdominis plane block: the role of local anesthetic volume and concentration-a pilot, prospective, randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero, Mauricio; Heikkila, Andrew; Paul, James E; Cheng, Ji; Thabane, Lehana

    2015-01-01

    The lumbar transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block has become an optional part of multimodal analgesia following several abdominal surgeries. There remains a lack of consensus regarding the extent of dermatomal blockade following lumber TAP block, as well as the optimal local anesthetic volumes and concentrations. The objectives of this pilot trial were to assess the feasibility of conducting a similar full-scale trial and gather information on relevant clinical outcomes, namely whether greater local anesthetic volumes would lead to more cephalad dermatomal blockade. The study was a prospective, double-blinded pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) with three arms, each representing different local anesthetic volumes: 20 ml 0.5% ropivacaine, 30 ml 0.33% ropivacaine, and 40 ml 0.25% ropivacaine. We planned to recruit 30 females undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy for non-malignant pathology, who would then receive bilateral ultrasound-guided midaxillary TAP blocks at the completion of surgery. Randomized patients would be followed for 48 h post-block and would receive multimodal analgesia. The primary outcomes were measurements of patient recruitment and safety, to inform the feasibility of a larger trial. The main secondary outcome was the clinically pertinent endpoint of dermatomal blockade, which was assessed by loss of sensation to ice and pinprick. Our target sample size was reached in 8 months, and the recruitment rate was 52% (31/60). A total of 58 TAP blocks were performed among 29 patients. All but one of the patients who received interventions were successfully followed and assessed up to 48 h. No patient safety-related adverse events were reported during the study period. The mean highest dermatome blocked in each group at any time point was T8. The 20 ml 0.5% ropivacaine group achieved a T9-L1 block that lasted for 48 h. The 30 ml 0.33% ropivacaine group had a sensory block from T9-L1 that regressed to T10-T12 between 24 and 48 h. The 40

  10. Serine-401 as a batrachotoxin- and local anesthetic-sensing residue in the human cardiac Na+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sho-Ya; Tikhonov, Denis B; Zhorov, Boris S; Mitchell, Jane; Wang, Ging Kuo

    2007-05-01

    Sequence alignment of four S6 segments in the human cardiac Na+ channel suggests that serine-401 (hNav1.5-S401) at D1S6 along with asparagine-927 (N927) at D2S6, serine-1458 (S1458) at D3S6, and phenylalanine-1760 (F1760) at D4S6 may jointly form a pore-facing S(401)N(927)S(1458)F(1760) ring. Importantly, this pore-facing structure is adjacent to the putative gating-hinge (G(400)G(926)G(1457)S(1759)) and close to the selectivity filter. Within this SNSF ring, only S401 has not yet been identified as a batrachotoxin (BTX) sensing residue. We therefore created S401 mutants with 12 substitutions (S401C,W,P,A,K,F,R,E,L,N,D,G) and assayed their BTX sensitivity. All S401 mutants expressed Na+ currents but often with altered gating characteristics. Ten mutants were found sensitive to 5 muM BTX, which eliminated Na+ channel fast inactivation after repetitive pulses. However, S401K and S401R became BTX resistant. In addition, the block of open and inactivated hNav1.5-S401K Na+ channels by local anesthetic bupivacaine was reduced by approximately 8-10-fold, but not the block of resting Na+ channels. Qualitatively, these ligand-sensing phenotypes of hNav1.5-S401K channels resemble those of S1458K and F1760K channels reported earlier. Together, our results support that residue hNav1.5-S401 at D1S6 is facing the inner cavity and is in close proximity to the receptor sites for BTX and for local anesthetics.

  11. Effect of addition of magnesium to local anesthetics for peribulbar block: A prospective randomized double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, R; Sharma, A; Ray, B R; Chandiran, R; Chandralekha, C; Sinha, R

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium sulphate has been used along with local anesthetics in different regional blocks and found to be effective in decreasing the time of onset of the block and increasing the duration of the block. To evaluate the effect of addition of magnesium sulfate to standard local anesthetics mixture on the time for onset of the globe and lid akinesia for peribulbar block in ophthalmic surgeries. Sixty patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists status I to III undergoing ophthalmic surgery under peribulbar block were included in this study. Patients were randomized into two groups. Both the groups received 4.5 ml of 2% lidocaine, 4.5 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine with150 IU hyaluronidase. Group NS received normal saline 1 ml in the peribulbar block and Group MS, magnesium sulfate 50 mg in 1 ml normal saline. The onset of akinesia, satisfactory block and complications were observed by an independent observer. Demographic data was statistically similar. In the Group NS at 3, 5, 10 and 15 min after the block, complete akinesia was seen in 0, 2, 11 and 28 patients respectively. In the Group MS, at 3, 5, 10 and 15 min after the block, complete akinesia was seen in 13, 23, 27 and 28 patients respectively. Patients received magnesium sulfate showed the statistically significant rapid onset of lid and globe akinesia than the control group till 10 min (P block and had complications during the surgery. Addition of 50 mg of magnesium sulfate to the lidocaine-bupivacaine mixture for peribulbar block decreases the onset of akinesia without any obvious side effect.

  12. Severe Bradycardia Possibly due to a Local Anesthetic Oral Mucosal Injection during General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Satoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Local anesthesia may induce systemic complications leading to parasympathetic activity leading to bradycardia and hypotension. We report a case of a 50-year-old man undergoing dental surgery under general anesthesia who experienced severe bradycardia and hypotension after local anesthesia infiltration. Concerns regarding the utilization of a relatively large lumen injection needle for local anesthesia during general anesthesia are discussed.

  13. Ultrasound-guided intermediate cervical plexus block and perivascular local anesthetic infiltration for carotid endarterectomy : A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, R; Zukowski, K; Wree, A; Schulze, M

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasound-guided blocks of the cervical plexus are established anesthetic procedures for carotid endarterectomy. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study tested the hypothesis that an additional ultrasound-guided periarterial injection of local anesthetic leads to a lower frequency of periarterial supplementation by the surgeon. A total of 40 patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. In both groups an ultrasound-guided intermediate cervical plexus block (20 ml of 0.75 % ropivacaine) at the level of the fourth cervical vertebra was performed. In a second step, the needle was inserted from posterolateral to anteromedial (in-plane technique) relative to the internal carotid artery and then, depending on the randomized group assignment, 5 ml of 0.75 % ropivacaine (group 2) or 5 ml of 0.9 % saline (group 1) was injected. The parameters investigated included the need for supplementation, patient comfort, the incidence of side effects and circulatory changes. The two groups did not significantly differ (p = 0.459) in terms of the need for intraoperative supplementation with 1 % prilocaine with a mean (range) in group 2 of 4.9 ml (0-20 ml), in group 1 of 3.7 ml (0-16 ml) and patient comfort (p = 0.144). In addition, a trend towards a higher complication rate was observed in group 2. For ultrasound-guided intermediate blocks of the cervical plexus, an additional periarterial infiltration showed no advantage. Abandoning this technique leads to a relevant simplification of the blocking technique and tends to reduce block-related side effects.

  14. Local anesthetic interaction with human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) channels: role of aromatic amino acids Y652 and F656

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebrands, Cornelia C; Schmitt, Nicole; Friederich, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    by bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine. Whole cell patch clamp recordings were performed at room temperature. RESULTS: Inhibition of HERG wild-type and mutant channels by the different local anesthetics was concentration dependent, stereoselective, and reversible. The sensitivity decreased in the order...

  15. Acute physiological responses to castration-related pain in piglets: the effect of two local anesthetics with or without meloxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonastre, C; Mitjana, O; Tejedor, M T; Calavia, M; Yuste, A G; Úbeda, J L; Falceto, M V

    2016-09-01

    Methods to reduce castration-related pain in piglets are still issues of concern and interest for authorities and producers. Our objectives were to estimate the effectiveness of two protocols of local anesthesia (lidocaine and the combination of lidocaine+bupivacaine) as well as the use of meloxicam as a postoperative analgesic in alleviating castration-related pain, measured by acute physiological responses. Eight groups (15 piglets/group) were included in the study: (1) castration without anesthesia or analgesia, without meloxicam (TRAD WITHOUT), (2) castration without anesthesia or analgesia, but with meloxicam (TRAD WITH), (3) handling without meloxicam (SHAM WITHOUT), (4) handling with meloxicam (SHAM WITH), (5) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine but without meloxicam (LIDO WITHOUT), (6) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine and meloxicam (LIDO WITH), (7) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine+bupivacaine without meloxicam (LIDO+BUPI WITHOUT), (8) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine+bupivacaine and meloxicam (LIDO+BUPI WITH). Acute physiological responses measured included skin surface temperature and serum glucose and cortisol concentrations. On days 4 and 11 post-castration BW was recorded and average daily gain was calculated over this period. Furthermore, piglet mortality was recorded over the 11-day post-castration period. Administration of local anesthetic or meloxicam did not prevent the decrease in skin surface temperature associated with castration. Lidocaine reduced the increase in glucose concentration associated with castration. For castrated pigs, the joint use of lidocaine and meloxicam caused a significant decrease in cortisol concentration; the combination of intratesticular lidocaine and bupivacaine did not seem to be more effective than lidocaine alone. No effect of treatments on mortality and growth were detected.

  16. Severe central nervous system and cardiovascular toxicity in a pediatric patient after ingestion of an over-the-counter local anesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelsen, Jamie; Holland, Michael; Dougherty, Michelle; Bernad, Jason; Stork, Christine; Marraffa, Jeanna

    2009-10-01

    Dibucaine is considered one of the most potent and consequently toxic amide anesthetics available, and despite withdrawal from the US market as a spinal anesthetic, it remains accessible as an over-the-counter preparation in the United States. Dibucaine exposures in children are infrequently encountered, but to date, all reported consequential ingestions have resulted in death. We report the first case of a potentially fatal dibucaine-induced wide-complex arrhythmia in a child who survived her clinical course without sequelae. It is our hope that this report will highlight the toxicity of dibucaine and prompt a review of its over-the-counter status. The rationale and success of a new antidote, 20% lipid emulsion, for the management of local anesthetic toxicity is discussed.

  17. COMPARISON OF GLYCEMIC EFFECT OF ADRENALIN CONTAINING LOCAL ANESTHETIC IN DIABETIC AND NON-DIABETIC PATIENTS UNDERGOING MINOR ORAL SURGICAL PROCEDURE

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    Pradeep

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM To compare the changes in blood glucose level associated with administration of adrenaline containing local anesthetic in diabetic and non-diabetic patients undergoing minor oral surgical procedures. METHODS AND MATERIAL The study included 150 well controlled diabetic patients and 150 non-diabetic healthy patients in age group of 40-60 years who underwent minor oral surgical procedures (trans alveolar extractions, alveoplasty and flap surgeries. Patients in both the group were administered 1.8ml of local anesthetic agent containing 1:100,000 adrenaline for inferior alveolar nerve block and 0.2 ml of anesthetic agent for long buccal nerve block. Blood glucose levels were assessed and compared during pre-operative and one hour post-operative period. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS The comparison of the random blood sugar levels preop and postop in both the groups were compared using paired t test and RBS levels between two groups were analysed using unpaired t test. P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS No statistically significant change in post-operative blood glucose level was noted between the diabetic and non-diabetic patients. CONCLUSION The study concluded that it is safe to administer local anesthetic containing 1:100,000 adrenaline in smaller volumes to well controlled diabetic patients.

  18. A study of regional nerve blocks and local anesthetic creams (Prilox) for donor sites in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amit; Bhandari, P S; Shrivastava, Prabhat

    2007-02-01

    Burn patient requires multiple visits to the operation theatres and undergoing anesthesia with its attendant risks and post anesthesia recovery. It is possible now with the availability of local anesthetic creams like Prilox to conduct these procedures in the minor OT without any discomfort to the patient. Hundred patients of post burn raw areas were selected. These patients had at least one area of healthy skin on anterior, medial or lateral thigh. No patient had a known drug allergy. The age group varied from 5 to 75 years with no bias towards any sex. These patients were then given anesthesia according to the group, and were assessed for the ease of grafting, amount of graft being harvested, subjective pain score, post operative pain relief and any post operative complication. The nerve block technique being used was either femoral and/or LCT block or 3-in-1 block and popliteal fossa block. Both the group of patients had a virtual painless process of skin grafting. It is safe in selected patients to combine the two techniques in order to harvest larger areas. Both techniques of local anesthestic creams and nerve block are safe and convenient to use. Nerve blocks are more useful where larger grafts are required, the creams being more useful in children and where less graft is required.

  19. Subdural spread of injected local anesthetic in a selective transforaminal cervical nerve root block: a case report

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    Tofuku Katsuhiro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Although uncommon, selective cervical nerve root blocks can have serious complications. The most serious complications that have been reported include cerebral infarction, spinal cord infarction, transient quadriplegia and death. Case presentation A 40-year-old Japanese woman with a history of severe right-sided cervical radicular pain was scheduled to undergo a right-sided C6 selective cervical nerve root block using a transforaminal approach under fluoroscopic guidance. An anterior oblique view of the C5-C6 intervertebral foramen was obtained, and a 23-gauge spinal needle, connected to the normal extension tube with a syringe filled with contrast medium, was introduced into the posterior-caudal aspect of the C5-C6 intervertebral foramen on the right side. In the anteroposterior view, the placement of the needle was considered satisfactory when it was placed no more medial than halfway across the width of the articular pillar. Although the spread of the contrast medium along the C6 nerve root was observed with right-sided C6 radiculography, the subdural flow of the contrast medium was not observed with real-time fluoroscopy. The extension tube used for the radiculography was removed from the spinal needle and a normal extension tube with a syringe filled with lidocaine connected in its place. We performed a negative aspiration test and then injected 1.5 mL of 1.0% lidocaine slowly around the C6 nerve root. Immediately after the injection of the local anesthetic, our patient developed acute flaccid paralysis, complained of breathing difficulties and became unresponsive; her respiratory pattern was uncoordinated. After 20 minutes, she regained consciousness and became alert, and her muscle strength in all four limbs returned to normal without any sensory deficits after receiving emergent cardiorespiratory support. Conclusions We believe that confirming maintenance of the appropriate needle position in the anteroposterior

  20. Local anesthetic wound infiltration for pain management after periacetabular osteotomy. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial with 53 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Rune D; Ovesen, Ole; Lindholm, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To our knowledge, there is no evidence to support the use of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) for postoperative pain relief after periacetabular osteotomy (PAO). We investigated the effect of wound infiltration with a long-acting local anesthetic (ropivacaine......) for postoperative analgesia after PAO. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00815503) in 53 patients undergoing PAO to evaluate the effect of local anesthetic infiltration on postoperative pain and on postoperative opioid consumption. All...... subjects received intraoperative infiltration followed by 5 postoperative injections in 10-hour intervals through a multi-holed catheter placed at the surgical site. 26 patients received ropivacaine and 27 received saline. The intervention period was 2 days and the observational period was 4 days. All...

  1. Analgesic effects of local anesthetic cream in cryotherapy for warts: a meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin-Yu; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Liu, Chia-Yu; Wang, Shu-Hui; Chi, Ching-Chi

    2018-03-01

    Local anesthetic cream (LAC) has been used for analgesia in various procedures. However, the analgesic effect of LAC in cryotherapy for warts is unclear. We aimed to evaluate the effects of LAC in cryotherapy for warts. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of LAC in cryotherapy for warts. We searched MEDLINE, CENTRAL, and EMBASE on 31 March 2017 for relevant RCTs. Two authors independently selected trials, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data. Disagreement was resolved by discussion with a third author. We included three RCTs with 228 participants. Two included RCTs had a high risk of reporting bias, with one having a high risk of other bias as well. Use of LAC decreased the pain associated with cryotherapy for warts on the hardened skin of children (visual analogue scale, mean difference -20.80, 95 % confidence interval -40.71 to -0.89), but not in adults or on the nonhardened skin of either adults or children. The available evidence does not support the routine use of LAC applied for ≤ 60 min in cryotherapy for warts. © 2018 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Infiltration of bupivacaine local anesthetic to trocar insertion sites after laparoscopy: a randomized, double-blind, stratified, and controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Teresa; Harkins, Gerald; Wegrzyniak, Lindsey; Ehrgood, Suzanne; Kunselman, Allen; Davies, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    To determine if injection of local anesthetic into trocar insertion sites after laparoscopy improves postoperative pain. A prospective, 2-arm, randomized, double-blind, stratified, and controlled trial (Canadian Task Force classification I). A university-based teaching hospital. This study was performed on women who had a laparoscopic gynecologic procedure for benign indications from March 2013 to June 2013. One hundred thirty-five subjects were stratified by chronic pelvic pain or no chronic pelvic pain. Chronic pelvic pain was defined as pelvic pain occurring for 6 months or more in duration. Randomization was performed for this trial, with 68 receiving a bupivacaine block and 67 receiving no bupivacaine block. Of the 71 patients with chronic pelvic pain, 35 patients were in group 1 (i.e., bupivacaine block) and 36 patients were in group 2 (i.e., no bupivacaine block). After the laparoscopic surgery was completed, the trocar incision sites were closed. For subjects randomized to receive a local anesthesia block, bupivacaine (0.25%) was injected. Incisions 8 mm or greater were injected with 10 mL 0.25% bupivacaine. Incisions 5 mm or less were infiltrated with 5 mL. Injecting the local anesthetic through all preperitoneal layers provided a full-thickness local injection. Group 2 did not receive a local injection. At the preoperative suite, the nurses gauged the patient's pain using the Numeric Rating Scale. This score was used as the baseline pain level with which the postoperative pain scores were compared. The primary objective was to measure changes in pain scores, from preoperative to postoperative time frames of 2 to 4 hours, 6 to 8 hours, 18 to 24 hours, and 3 to 7 days postoperatively. These score changes were measured as the main objective. Secondary objectives include estimated blood loss, operating time, length of hospital stay, and histopathologic diagnosis. The hospital personnel caring for the patient during the preoperative and postoperative course

  3. [Preformulation study of a potential local anesthetic from a group of phenylcarbamic acid derivatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procházka, I

    2002-03-01

    Within pre-formulation studies of phenylcarbamic acid derivatives with local anaesthetic effects, potential drug IV with the chemical name N-(2-(2-ethylphenylcarbamoyloxy)-ethyl)-piperidiniumchloride was examined. The study evaluated the effect of polyhydric alcohols--glycerol, propylene glycol, sorbitol and their concentrations of 5; 10; 15, and 20 wt % on the values of the partition coefficient in the system n-octanol/water, surface tension, and viscosity of the solutions of potential drug IV. The optimal auxiliary substance seems to be glycerol of a concentration of 15-20 wt %, as it does not affect the values of the partition coefficient and surface tension of potential drug IV solutions in a statistically significant manner.

  4. The Knowledge of Eye Physicians on Local Anesthetic Toxicity and Intravenous Lipid Treatment: Questionnaire Study

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    Aykut Urfalıoğlu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the knowledge of ophthalmologists regarding local anesthesia toxicity syndrome (LATS and intravenous lipid emulsion used in treatment, and to raise awareness of this issue. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire comprising 14 questions about demographics, local anesthesia (LA use, toxicity, and treatment methods was administered to ophthalmologists at different hospitals. Results: The study included 104 ophthalmologists (25% residents, 67.3% specialists, 7.7% faculty members with a mean age of 35.71±6.53 years. The highest number of participants was from state hospitals (65.4%, and 34.6% of the physicians had been working in ophthalmology for more than 10 years. Seventy-six percent of the participants reported using LA every day or more than twice a week, but 56.7% had received no specific training on this subject. No statistically significant difference was observed between different education levels and the rates of training (p=0.419. Bupivacaine was the most preferred LA and the majority of respondents (97.1% did not use a test dose. Allergy (76% and hypotension (68.3% were the most common responses for early findings of LATS, while cardiac arrest (57.4% and hepatotoxicity (56.4% were given for late findings. The most common responses concerning the prevention of LATS included monitorization (72.4% and use of appropriate doses (58.2%. Symptomatic treatment was selected by 72.4% of respondents and cardiopulmonary resuscitation and antihistamine treatment by 58.8%. Of the ophthalmologists in the study, 62.5% had never encountered LATS. The use of 20% intravenous lipid emulsion therapy for toxicity was known by 65% of the physicians, but only 1 participant stated having used it previously. Conclusion: The importance of using 20% lipid emulsion in LATS treatment and having it available where LA is administered must be emphasized, and there should be compulsory training programs for ophthalmologists on this subject.

  5. Efficacy of continuous wound infiltration of local anesthetic for pain relief after gynecologic laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Tae-Wook; Park, Hyogyeong; Cheong, Ji-Yoon; Min, Sang-Ki; Ryu, Hee-Sug

    2014-03-01

    To assess the efficacy of analgesia provided by continuous ropivacaine wound infiltration after gynecologic laparoscopy. Sixty patients who underwent gynecologic laparoscopy at Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea, between March and May 2012 were randomized to receive either intravenous fentanyl and ketorolac infusion on demand by patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA group, n=31) or continuous wound infiltration of local ropivacaine (CWI group, n=29). Postoperative pain and postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) were assessed via a visual analog scale. The number of patients who requested rescue analgesia was recorded. There was no significant difference in postoperative pain between the 2 groups, but more patients requested rescue analgesia in the CWI group than in the IV PCA group in 24 hours (18 versus 9 patients, respectively; P=0.010). The PONV scores at 12 and 24 hours were, respectively, 0.28 and 0.27 in the CWI group, and 0.71 and 0.73 in the IV PCA group (P=0.004). Nine patients requested cessation of IV PCA because of severe nausea or vomiting. Continuous ropivacaine wound infiltration was found to be as effective as patient-controlled analgesia for postoperative pain relief after gynecologic laparoscopy. This technique provides good analgesia with less opioid analgesic requirement and few adverse effects. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of wound soaker catheters for the administration of local anesthetic for post-operative analgesia: 56 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Amanda L; McCobb, Emily C; Shaw, Scott; Armitage-Chan, Elizabeth; Wetmore, Lois A; Karas, Alicia Z; Blaze, Cheryl

    2009-11-01

    To describe the administration of local anesthetic through wound soaker catheters for post-operative veterinary patients and to characterize complications. Retrospective study of hospital records. Records of patients in which a wound soaker catheter was placed post-operatively between November 1, 2004 and July 1, 2006 at a veterinary teaching hospital. Records in which a limb amputation was performed between January 1, 2002 and August 1, 2007 and in which a wound soaker catheter was not placed were reviewed for historic control. A total of 56 cases were identified in which a wound soaker catheter was placed post-operatively including 52 dogs, 2 cats, and 2 goats. Twenty canine cases were identified in which limb amputation was performed and no wound soaker catheter was placed. The majority of surgical procedures for which a wound soaker catheter was placed included thoracic limb amputation (46.4%) and pelvic limb amputation (35.7%). Wound soaker catheters remained in place for an average of 1.6 +/- 0.5 days. Feline and caprine patients received intermittent bupivacaine boluses every 6 hours. Canine patients received continuous lidocaine infusions. Complications included disconnection of the catheter from the infusion (7.7%), one seroma, and one suspected lidocaine neurotoxicity. Incisional infections were noted in 3/56 (5.3%) limb amputations with wound soaker catheters placed which was not higher than the incisional infection rate found in the historic control cases 3/20 (15%). Use of the wound soaker catheter was a viable means of providing local analgesia in post-operative veterinary patients. Studies are needed to evaluate efficacy of pain management, and to further investigate techniques for catheter placement and maintenance which may help to optimize the analgesia achieved using this technique.

  7. Comparative evaluation of effectiveness of intra-pocket anesthetic gel and injected local anesthesia during scaling and root planing – A split-mouth clinical trial

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    Kalyan Chintala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Pain control is an important outcome measure for successful periodontal therapy. Injected local anesthesia has been used to secure anesthesia for scaling and root planing (SRP and continues to be the anesthetic of choice for pain control. Alternatively, intra-pocket anesthetic gel has been used as an anesthetic during SRP. Hence, this clinical trial was done to compare the effectiveness of intra-pocket anesthetic gel and injected local anesthesia during SRP and also to assess the influence of intra-pocket anesthetic gel on treatment outcomes in chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: Fifteen systemically healthy chronic periodontitis patients were recruited. The dental quadrants on right side received either intra-pocket 20% benzocaine gel (Gel group or infiltration/block by 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 adrenaline (injection group. Quadrants on the left side received the alternative. Pain perception and patients preference for the type of anesthesia was recorded. Clinical parameters: plaque index, modified gingival index, modified sulcular bleeding index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level were recorded at baseline and 1 month after treatment. Results: No difference was observed in visual analog scale (P > 0.05 and verbal rating scale (P > 0.05 pain perception between gel group and injection group. A slightly increased preference to gel as anesthesia (53% vs. 47% was observed. The treatment outcome after SRP did not show a significant difference between gel and injection group (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Intra-pocket administration of 20% benzocaine gel may be effective for pain control during SRP and may offer an alternative to conventional injection anesthesia.

  8. Use of intravenous lipid emulsion to reverse central nervous system toxicity of an iatrogenic local anesthetic overdose in a patient on peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, D Bruce; Schwartz, Daniel; DaRoza, Gerald; Gair, Robert

    2012-12-01

    To describe a case of severe central nervous system toxicity after an overdose of lidocaine by local infiltration in a peritoneal dialysis patient and subsequent treatment of the toxicity with lipid emulsion. A 31-year-old male received an iatrogenic overdose of 1600 mg of lidocaine 2% by infiltration during an attempt to remove and replace a peritoneal dialysis catheter. Within 10 minutes after the last lidocaine injection, the patient exhibited features of local anesthetic toxicity, which included tachycardia, hypertension, shortness of breath, dizziness, and a choking sensation that progressed to hallucinations, dysarthria, and uncoordinated, weak limb movement. Within 10 minutes after administration of a single 1.5-mg/kg intravenous bolus of 1.5 mL/kg [corrected], the patient improved dramatically. After observation overnight in a monitored care setting, the patient was discharged home with no apparent neurologic sequelae. Systemic toxicity due to regional anesthesia with local anesthetic agents such as lidocaine has been well described in the medical literature. The use of lipid emulsion as an antidote to the toxicity of local anesthetics and other lipophilic drugs has been suggested as a valuable intervention in both early, rapidly progressive toxicity, as well as toxicity that is refractory to standard treatment. Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease may be more susceptible to systemic effects of lidocaine due to decreased drug elimination. Central nervous system toxicity due to an overdose of lidocaine was quickly reversed by intravenous lipid emulsion in our patient.

  9. β–Cyclodextrin–Propyl Sulfonic Acid Catalysed One-Pot Synthesis of 1,2,4,5-Tetrasubstituted Imidazoles as Local Anesthetic Agents

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    Yan Ran

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Some functionalized 1,2,4,5-tetrasubstituted imidazole derivatives were synthesized using a one-pot, four component reaction involving 1,2-diketones, aryl aldehydes, ammonium acetate and substituted aromatic amines. The synthesis has been efficiently carried out in a solvent free medium using β-cyclodextrin-propyl sulfonic acid as a catalyst to afford the target compounds in excellent yields. The local anesthetic effect of these derivatives was assessed in comparison to lidocaine as a standard using a rabbit corneal and mouse tail anesthesia model. The three most potent promising compounds were subjected to a rat sciatic nerve block assay where they showed considerable local anesthetic activity, along with minimal toxicity. Among the tested analogues, 4-(1-benzyl-4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl-N,N-dimethylaniline (5g was identified as most potent analogue with minimal toxicity. It was further characterized by a more favourable therapeutic index than the standard.

  10. The Pathophysiology of Early Hypotension Following Epinephrine-containing Local Anesthetic Infiltration of the Nasal Mucosa in Patients Undergoing Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Hypophysectomy: A Prospective, Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Matthew D; Sanders, Matthew I; Sinha, Saurabh; Mirza, Showkat; Andrzejowski, John C

    2017-07-01

    In patients undergoing endoscopic transsphenoidal hypophysectomy, the nasal mucosa is often infiltrated with local anesthetic solutions that contain epinephrine to aid hemostasis. This may, however, result in hemodynamic changes, especially hypotension. We characterized the cardiovascular changes using a LiDCOrapid monitor in 13 patients after the infiltration of 4% articaine containing 1:200,000 epinephrine. Nine (69%) had a >20% decrease in mean arterial pressure at a median time of 116 seconds after the infiltration of articaine with epinephrine. Analysis of the cardiac output data revealed that this was caused by a sustained reduction in systemic vascular resistance. The arterial blood pressure normalized over a period of 60 to 90 seconds secondary to increases in stroke volume and heart rate producing an elevation in cardiac output. Transient hypotension following the infiltration of epinephrine-containing local anesthetics may be caused by epinephrine stimulation of β2-adrenoceptors producing vasodilation.

  11. The Effect of Local Anesthetic Infiltration Around Nephrostomy Tract on Postoperative Pain Control after Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiawu; Zhang, Chengyao; Tan, Dan; Tan, Guangzhong; Yang, Bo; Chen, Wenkai; Tang, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of local anesthetic infiltration around nephrostomy tract on postoperative pain control after percutaneous nephrolithotomy. This systematic review was performed based on randomized clinic trials about local anesthetic infiltration around nephrostomy tract on postoperative pain control. The weighted mean difference (WMD), with their corresponding 95% CI, was calculated to compare continuous variables. Our results showed that the consumption of analgesic was less in the experimental group than in the control group (WMD -25.32, 95% CI -48.09 to -2.55, p = 0.003). There was no significant difference between the mean Visual Analog Scale (VAS) in the experimental group than the control group after 6 h while significantly lower after 24 h. The time of first analgesic demand was significantly longer in the experimental group (WMD 2.19, 95% CI 0.98-3.41). There was no significant difference between 2 groups in terms of operation time, hemoglobin (Hb) alteration, and hospital stay. Local anesthetic infiltration around nephrostomy tract had similar efficacy in the control group in terms of operation time, Hb alteration, and hospital stay, but offers some potential advantages in terms of analgesia requirement, the time of first analgesic demand, and VAS-24 h. However, good quality and large studies with long-term follow-up are warranted for further research. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Bilateral transversus abdominis plane block does not decrease postoperative pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy when compared with local anesthetic infiltration of trocar insertion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Jaime; Suliburk, James W; Wu, Kenneth; Bailard, Neil S; Mason, Chawla; Minard, Charles G; Palvadi, Raja R

    2012-01-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic requirements after abdominal surgery. Our hypothesis was that bilateral TAP blocks decrease pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy when compared with local anesthetic infiltration of trocar insertion sites. Eighty patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomized to receive either bilateral TAP blocks or local anesthetic infiltration of trocar insertion sites with ropivacaine 0.5%. Postoperative pain scores and analgesic use for the first 24 hrs were recorded. Eighty patients were enrolled in the study. After exclusions, data were analyzed on 39 patients in group T (bilateral TAP block) and 35 patients in group I (infiltration). There was no statistically significant difference in pain scores on the numeric analog scale (0-10) between the groups at 4 hrs after surgery (P = 0.18) or during the 24 hrs after surgery (P = 0.23). The time interval from anesthesia start to surgery start was greater in group T than group I (48 vs 35 mins, P local anesthetic infiltration of trocar insertion sites for overall postoperative pain in a heterogeneous group of patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  13. Reduction in sodium content of local anesthetics for peripheral nerve blocks: a comparative evaluation of saline with 5% dextrose--a randomized controlled double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Shalini; Tureanu, Luminita; Bouzari, Amir; Masood, Amna; Francispragasam, Mario; Ganapathy, Sugantha

    2012-06-01

    Commercially available local anesthetic drugs when diluted with normal saline have high sodium content. High perineural sodium concentration has been implicated in antagonizing the analgesic effects of local anesthetics by preventing and/or delaying neural blockade. Five percent dextrose is not known to cause any short- or long-term injury when injected around neural tissue. In this study, we prospectively compared and evaluated block characteristics when local anesthetic drug was diluted with these 2 different agents. Patients scheduled for upper limb surgery were randomly assigned to receive axillary brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine (1% diluted with either 5% dextrose or normal saline). Motor and sensory block were tested every 5 minutes for 30 minutes. Postoperatively, a telephone interview was conducted after 24 hours and 7 days along with surgical follow-up at days 3, 10, and/or 14 to 28 days to document side effects, patient satisfaction, and time for block resolution. Any nerve deficits were followed until resolution. The primary outcome was time to onset of sensory nerve block. Five hundred fifty patients were recruited for this study. The mean time to complete sensory block was 18.3 ± 6.1 minutes in the dextrose group and 22.5 ± 6.4 minutes in the saline group (P block with ropivacaine.

  14. Is referring patients with a positive history of allergic drug reactions or atopy for allergy testing to local anesthetics justified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdeljic, Viktorija; Francetic, Igor; Likic, Robert; Bakran, Ivan; Makar-Ausperger, Ksenija; Simic, Petra

    2009-04-01

    Although no more than 1% of adverse reactions to local anesthetics (LA) are thought to be immunologically mediated, many patients continue to be referred to allergy clinics for allergy workup. We evaluated the impact of a history of drug hypersensitivity or atopy on results of allergy testing to LA, with the aim of determining the appropriateness of allergy testing to LA in such patients. We retrospectively analyzed medical records of 112 consecutive patients referred for allergy testing to LA in a 9-year period (1996-2005). Intradermal tests with diluted (1:10) LA were performed to identify patients at risk for immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated hypersensitivity reaction. The odds for being testpositive were calculated with regard to the defined risk factors (atopy, history of adverse reactions to LA or other drugs, underlying autoimmune disease). Eleven of 112 patients (9.8%) tested positive for allergy to LA. Atopy, history of adverse reactions to LA or other drugs and underlying autoimmune disease did not increase the odds for being test-positive. The prevalence of multiple drug hypersensitivity, IgE values and eosinophil count were not significantly higher among the patients who tested positive as compared to the patients who tested negative. According to our data, allergy testing to LA is not justified in patients with atopy or histories of adverse drug reactions other than to LA. Further studies using validated methods of allergy testing to LA coupled with analysis of defined risk factors are needed to definitively establish the indications for referral of patients for allergy testing to LA. Copyright 2009 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  15. Treatment of acute sciatica with transforaminal epidural corticosteroids and local anesthetic: design of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Meulen, Bastiaan C; Maas, Esther T; Vyas, Amrita; van der Vegt, Marinus; de Priester, Koo; de Boer, Michiel R; van Tulder, Maurits W; Weinstein, Henry C; Ostelo, Raymond W J G

    2017-05-25

    Transforaminal epidural injections with steroids (TESI) are used increasingly for patients with sciatica. However there is much debate about their safety and effectiveness. It is important to identify patients that benefit most from TESI and only few trials have yet evaluated the effects in patients with acute sciatica. We describe a prospective, randomized controlled trial (RCT), with the aim to evaluate the hypothesis that TESI plus Levobupivacaine (TESI-plus) added to oral pain medication is more effective compared to pain medication alone or compared to transforaminal injection with a local anesthetic of short duration among patients with acute sciatica. We will recruit a total of 264 patients with sciatica (scale (VAS)), and global perceived recovery (GPR, reported on a 7-point Likert scale, dichotomized into 'recovered' and 'not recovered'). The secondary outcomes are health-related quality of life (EQ5D-5 L) and patient satisfaction (7-point Likert scale). We will also collect information on healthcare utilization and costs, to perform an economic evaluation. All outcomes are measured at three and six weeks, three and six months after randomization. We defined a minimal clinically relevant difference between groups as a difference between both intervention groups and the control group of 20 points for pain (100-point VAS), four points for functional status (24-point RDQ) and a 20% difference on dichotomized GPR (recovered versus not recovered). A clinically relevant outcome in favor of TESI-plus implies that future patients with acute sciatica should be recommended TESI-plus within the first few weeks rather than being treated with pain medication alone in order to relieve pain and improve their functioning. In case of a negative result (no relevant differences in outcome between the three study arms), pain medication will remain the mainstay of treatment in the acute stages of sciatica. Dutch National trial register: NTR4457 (March, 6th, 2014).

  16. Molecular insights into the local anesthetic receptor within voltage-gated sodium channels using hydroxylated analogues of mexiletine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François eDesaphy

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We previously showed that the β-adrenoceptor modulators, clenbuterol and propranolol, directly blocked voltage-gated sodium channels, whereas salbutamol and nadolol did not (Desaphy et al., 2003, suggesting the presence of two hydroxyl groups on the aromatic moiety of the drugs as a molecular requisite for impeding sodium channel block. To verify such an hypothesis, we synthesized five new mexiletine analogues by adding one or two hydroxyl groups to the aryl moiety of the sodium channel blocker and tested these compounds on hNav1.4 channels expressed in HEK293 cells. Concentration-response relationships were constructed using an holding potential of -120 mV at 0.1 Hz (tonic block and 10 Hz (use-dependent block stimulation frequencies. The half-maximum inhibitory concentrations (IC50 were linearly correlated to drug lipophilicity: the less lipophilic the drug, minor was the block. The same compounds were also tested on F1586C and Y1593C hNav1.4 channel mutants, to gain further information on the molecular interactions of mexiletine with its receptor within the sodium channel pore. Alteration of tonic block suggests that the aryl moiety of mexiletine may interact either directly or indirectly with Phe1586 in the closed sodium channel to produce low-affinity binding block, and that this interaction depends on the electrostatic potential of the drug aromatic tail. Alteration of use-dependent block suggests that addition of hydroxyl groups to the aryl moiety may modify high-affinity binding of the drug ammine terminal to Phe1586 through cooperativity between the two pharmacophores, this effect being mainly related to drug lipophilicity. Mutation of Tyr1593 further impaired such cooperativity. In conclusion, these results confirm our former hypothesis showing that the presence of hydroxyl groups to the aryl moiety of mexiletine greatly reduced sodium channel block, and provide molecular insights into the intimate interaction of local anesthetics with

  17. Analgesic efficacy of ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block versus local anesthetic infiltration in adult patients undergoing single incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bava, Ejas P; Ramachandran, Rashmi; Rewari, Vimi; Chandralekha; Bansal, Virinder Kumar; Trikha, Anjan

    2016-01-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block has been used to provide intra- and post-operative analgesia with single incision laparoscopic (SIL) bariatric and gynecological surgery with mixed results. Its efficacy in providing analgesia for SIL cholecystectomy (SILC) via the same approach remains unexplored. The primary objective of our study was to compare the efficacy of bilateral TAP block with local anesthetic infiltration for perioperative analgesia in patients undergoing SILC. This was a prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blinded trial performed in a tertiary care hospital. Forty-two patients undergoing SILC were randomized to receive either ultrasound-guided (USG) bilateral mid-axillary TAP blocks with 0.375% ropivacaine or local anesthetic infiltration of the port site. The primary outcome measure was the requirement of morphine in the first 24 h postoperatively. The data were analyzed using t -test, Mann-Whitney test or Chi-square test. The 24 h morphine requirement (mean ± standard deviation) was 34.57 ± 14.64 mg in TAP group and 32.76 ± 14.34 mg in local infiltration group ( P = 0.688). The number of patients requiring intraoperative supplemental fentanyl in TAP group was 8 and in local infiltration group was 16 ( P = 0.028). The visual analog scale scores at rest and on coughing were significantly higher in the local infiltration group in the immediate postoperative period ( P = 0.034 and P = 0.007, respectively). USG bilateral TAP blocks were not effective in decreasing 24 h morphine requirement as compared to local anesthetic infiltration in patients undergoing SILC although it provided some analgesic benefit intraoperatively and in the initial 4 h postoperatively. Hence, the benefits of TAP blocks are not worth the effort and time spent for administering them for this surgery.

  18. Effect of tramadol as an adjuvant to local anesthetics for brachial plexus block: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Won Shin

    Full Text Available Tramadol, a 4-phenyl-piperidine analog of codeine, has a unique action in that it has a central opioidergic, noradrenergic, serotonergic analgesic, and peripheral local anesthetic (LA effect. Many studies have reported contradictory findings regarding the peripheral analgesic effect of tramadol as an adjuvant to LA in brachial plexus block (BPB. This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effects of tramadol as an adjunct to LA in BPB during shoulder or upper extremity surgery.We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, KoreaMed databases, and Google Scholar for eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs that compared BPB with LA alone and BPB with LA and tramadol. Primary outcomes were the effects of tramadol as an adjuvant on duration of sensory block, motor block, and analgesia. Secondary outcomes were the effects of tramadol as an adjuvant on time to onset of sensory block and motor block and on adverse effects. We performed the meta-analysis using Review Manager 5.3 software.We identified 16 RCTs with 751 patients. BPB with tramadol prolonged the duration of sensory block (mean difference [MD], -61.5 min; 95% CI, -95.5 to -27.6; P = 0.0004, motor block (MD, -65.6 min; 95% CI, -101.5 to -29.7; P = 0.0003, and analgesia (MD, -125.5 min; 95% CI, -175.8 to -75.3; P < 0.0001 compared with BPB without tramadol. Tramadol also shortened the time to onset of sensory block (MD, 2.1 min; 95% CI, 1.1 to 3.1; P < 0.0001 and motor block (MD, 1.2 min; 95% CI, 0.2 to 2.1; P = 0.010. In subgroup analysis, the duration of sensory block, motor block, and analgesia was prolonged for BPB with tramadol 100 mg (P < 0.05 but not for BPB with tramadol 50 mg. The quality of evidence was high for duration of analgesia according to the GRADE system. Adverse effects were comparable between the studies.In upper extremity surgery performed under BPB, use of tramadol 100 mg as an adjuvant to LA appears to prolong the duration of sensory block, motor block, and analgesia, and

  19. Anesthetic strategy during endovascular therapy: General anesthesia or conscious sedation? (GOLIATH - General or Local Anesthesia in Intra Arterial Therapy) A single-center randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Claus Z; Sørensen, Leif H; Juul, Niels; Johnsen, Søren P; Yoo, Albert J; Andersen, Grethe; Rasmussen, Mads

    2016-12-01

    Endovascular therapy after acute ischemic stroke due to large vessel occlusion is now standard of care. There is equipoise as to what kind of anesthesia patients should receive during the procedure. Observational studies suggest that general anesthesia is associated with worse outcomes compared to conscious sedation. However, the findings may have been biased. Randomized clinical trials are needed to determine whether the choice of anesthesia may influence outcome. The objective of GOLIATH (General or Local Anestesia in Intra Arterial Therapy) is to examine whether the choice of anesthetic regime during endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke influence patient outcome. Our hypothesis is that that conscious sedation is associated with less infarct growth and better functional outcome. GOLIATH is an investigator-initiated, single-center, randomized study. Patients with acute ischemic stroke, scheduled for endovascular therapy, are randomized to receive either general anesthesia or conscious sedation. The primary outcome measure is infarct growth after 48-72 h (determined by serial diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging). Secondary outcomes include 90-day modified Rankin Scale score, time parameters, blood pressure variables, use of vasopressors, procedural and anesthetic complications, success of revascularization, radiation dose, and amount of contrast media. Choice of anesthesia may influence outcome in acute ischemic stroke patients undergoing endovascular therapy. The results from this study may guide future decisions regarding the optimal anesthetic regime for endovascular therapy. In addition, this study may provide preliminary data for a multicenter randomized trial. © 2016 World Stroke Organization.

  20. Interaction of batrachotoxin with the local anesthetic receptor site in transmembrane segment IVS6 of the voltage-gated sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, N J; Cantrell, A R; Qu, Y; Scheuer, T; Catterall, W A

    1998-11-10

    The voltage-gated sodium channel is the site of action of more than six classes of neurotoxins and drugs that alter its function by interaction with distinct, allosterically coupled receptor sites. Batrachotoxin (BTX) is a steroidal alkaloid that binds to neurotoxin receptor site 2 and causes persistent activation. BTX binding is inhibited allosterically by local anesthetics. We have investigated the interaction of BTX with amino acid residues I1760, F1764, and Y1771, which form part of local anesthetic receptor site in transmembrane segment IVS6 of type IIA sodium channels. Alanine substitution for F1764 (mutant F1764A) reduces tritiated BTX-A-20-alpha-benzoate binding affinity, causing a 60-fold increase in Kd. Alanine substitution for I1760, which is adjacent to F1764 in the predicted IVS6 transmembrane alpha helix, causes only a 4-fold increase in Kd. In contrast, mutant Y1771A shows no change in BTX binding affinity. For wild-type and mutant Y1771A, BTX shifted the voltage for half-maximal activation approximately 40 mV in the hyperpolarizing direction and increased the percentage of noninactivating sodium current to approximately 60%. In contrast, these BTX effects were eliminated completely for the F1764A mutant and were reduced substantially for mutant I1760A. Our data suggest that the BTX receptor site shares overlapping but nonidentical molecular determinants with the local anesthetic receptor site in transmembrane segment IVS6 as well as having unique molecular determinants in transmembrane segment IS6, as demonstrated in previous work. Evidently, BTX conforms to a domain-interface allosteric model of ligand binding and action, as previously proposed for calcium agonist and antagonist drugs acting on L-type calcium channels.

  1. Local anesthetic wound infiltration for pain management after periacetabular osteotomy. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial with 53 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Rune D; Ovesen, Ole; Lindholm, Peter; Overgaard, Søren

    2014-04-01

    To our knowledge, there is no evidence to support the use of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) for postoperative pain relief after periacetabular osteotomy (PAO). We investigated the effect of wound infiltration with a long-acting local anesthetic (ropivacaine) for postoperative analgesia after PAO. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00815503) in 53 patients undergoing PAO to evaluate the effect of local anesthetic infiltration on postoperative pain and on postoperative opioid consumption. All subjects received intraoperative infiltration followed by 5 postoperative injections in 10-hour intervals through a multi-holed catheter placed at the surgical site. 26 patients received ropivacaine and 27 received saline. The intervention period was 2 days and the observational period was 4 days. All subjects received patient-controlled opioid analgesia without any restrictions on the total daily dose. Pain was assessed at specific postoperative time points and the daily opioid usage was registered. Infiltration with 75 mL (150 mg) of ropivacaine did not reduce postoperative pain or opioid requirements during the first 4 days. The clinical importance of ropivacaine as single component in postoperative treatment of pain is questionable, and we are planning further studies to explore the potential of LIA in larger volume-and also a multimodal regimen-to treat pain in this category of patients.

  2. Lipid emulsion injection-induced reversal of cardiac toxicity and acceleration of emergence from general anesthesia after scalp infiltration of a local anesthetic: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Rintaro; Kamiya, Yoshinori; Fujii, Yuka; Tsubokawa, Tsunehisa

    2017-01-01

    A scalp block or wound infiltration of local anesthetic is thought to effectively control post-craniotomy pain. However, it can result in local anesthetic toxicity (LAST), which is difficult to distinguish from brain damage due to the surgical procedure when emergence from general anesthesia is delayed. Lipid rescue (infusion of a lipid emulsion) is a widely accepted treatment for LAST. A 64-year-old man underwent surgical resection of a glioma in the brainstem. While still under general anesthesia, and before suturing of the wound, he received a 20-mL scalp infusion of ropivacaine 0.75%. His emergence from anesthesia was delayed, his respiration was suppressed, and premature ventricular contractions occurred; all of which are symptoms of LAST. Injection of a 20% lipid emulsion rapidly alleviated these symptoms. Interestingly, the blood concentration of ropivacaine increased after lipid rescue. The increase in ropivacaine concentration in the blood after lipid rescue suggests that the intravenously administered lipid emulsion absorbed the ropivacaine from the intoxicated brain and heart tissue. This finding is consistent with the lipid sink theory as a mechanistic explanation of lipid rescue.

  3. A randomized controlled trial comparing Ametop™ with placebo for reducing pain associated with local anesthetic skin infiltration before neuraxial anesthesia in parturients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, T; Dube, A; Albert, A; Gunka, V

    2016-08-01

    Between 10-22% of the general population experience needle phobia. Needle phobic parturients are at increased risk of adverse outcomes. We assessed the efficacy of topical Ametop™ (tetracaine 4%) gel in reducing the pain associated with local anesthetic skin infiltration before neuraxial block in non-laboring women. This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Ametop™ or placebo was applied to the skin of the lower back at least 20min before neuraxial block using a standardized technique with 1% lidocaine skin infiltration. The primary outcome was numeric pain score (0-10) 30s after lidocaine infiltration. Groups were compared using Welch's t-test. Thirty-six subjects in each group were analyzed. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean (standard deviation) pain score between the Ametop™ and the placebo groups: 2.36±1.80 and 3.51±2.22, respectively (P=0.019). There were no significant adverse events. The mean numeric pain score in the Ametop™ group was 33% lower compared to the placebo group. Topical Ametop™ gel applied at least 20min before local anesthetic infiltration of the skin prior to neuraxial block in elective cesarean delivery may be a useful adjunct in needle phobic women. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anesthetic death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauwers, P

    1978-01-01

    Death due to anesthesia is a tragic paradox. The numbers about the frequency of anesthesia-related-death published in many reports have a relative value, as it is impossible to compare them one to another. A synoptic table of 20 important studies made on this subject, shows a great variation in figures concerning the incidence of death related to anesthesia. The most common causes of "anesthetic-death" are mentioned and some suggestions are made to decrease the frequency of death due to anesthesia.

  5. Ultrasonography-guided bilateral rectus sheath block vs local anesthetic infiltration after pediatric umbilical hernia repair: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingeman, R Scott; Barus, Lindsay M; Chung, Hyun Kee; Clendenin, David J; Lee, Christopher S; Tracy, Sarah; Johnson, Victor M; Dennett, Kate V; Zurakowski, David; Chen, Catherine

    2013-08-01

    Regional anesthetic techniques can be used to alleviate postoperative pain in children undergoing pediatric surgical procedures. Use of ultrasonographic guidance for bilateral rectus sheath block (BRSB) has been shown to improve immediate pain scores and reduce use of postoperative analgesia in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). To compare efficacy of ultrasonography-guided BRSB and local anesthetic infiltration (LAI) in providing postoperative analgesia after pediatric umbilical hernia repair. Prospective, observer-blinded, randomized clinical trial. Tertiary-referral urban children's hospital. Eligible children 3 to 12 years of age undergoing elective umbilical hernia repair from November 16, 2009, through May 31, 2011. Ropivacaine hydrochloride administered at the conclusion of surgery as LAI by the surgeon (n = 25) or as ultrasonography-guided BRSB by the anesthesiologist (n = 27). Scores on the FACES Pain Rating Scale measured at 10-minute intervals and all use of analgesic medications in the PACU. Median FACES scores in the PACU were lower in the BRSB group compared with the LAI group at 10 minutes (0 vs 1; P = .04), 30 minutes (0 vs 1; P = .01), and 40 minutes or later (0 vs 1; P = .03). Fewer doses of opioid and nonopioid medications were given to the BRSB group compared with the LAI group (5 vs 11 doses for opioids; 5 vs 10 for nonopioids). In the PACU, ultrasonography-guided BRSB after umbilical hernia repair in children is associated with lower median FACES scores and decreased use of opioid and nonopioid medications compared with LAI. Future studies could examine the use of longer-acting anesthetic agents with ultrasonography-guided BRSB. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01015053.

  6. Local anesthetic delivery via surgical drain provides improved pain control versus direct skin infiltration following axillary node dissection for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khpal, Muska; Miller, James R C; Petrovic, Zika; Hassanally, Delilah

    2018-03-01

    Axillary node dissection has a central role in the surgical management of breast cancer; however, it is associated with a significant risk of lymphoedema and chronic pain. Peri-operative administration of local anesthesia reduces acute and persistent post-surgical pain, but there is currently no consensus on the optimal method of local anesthetic delivery. Patients undergoing axillary dissection for breast cancer were randomly assigned to receive a one-off dose of levobupivacaine 0.5% (up to 2 mg/kg) following surgery, either via the surgical drain or by direct skin infiltration. Post-operative pain control at rest and on shoulder abduction was assessed using a numerical rating scale. Total analgesia consumption 48 h after surgery was also recorded. Pain scores were significantly lower when local anesthesia was administered via surgical drain at both 3 and 12 h after surgery; this trend extended to 24 h post-operatively. However, pain scores on shoulder abduction did not differ at the 12 or 24 h time points. No differences were found in the total analgesia consumption or length of hospital stay between treatment groups. This study demonstrates that local anesthetic delivery via a surgical drain provides improved pain control compared to direct skin infiltration following axillary node dissection. This is likely to be important for the management of acute pain in the immediate post-operative period; however, further studies may be required to validate this in specific patient subgroups, e.g., breast-conserving surgery versus mastectomy.

  7. Effects of local anesthetic or systemic analgesia on pain associated with cautery disbudding in calves: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Charlotte B; Miltenburg, Cynthia L; Sargeant, Jan M; LeBlanc, Stephen J; Haley, Derek B; Lissemore, Kerry D; Godkin, M Ann; Duffield, Todd F

    2018-03-14

    Disbudding is a common management procedure performed on dairy farms and, when done without pain mitigation, is viewed as a key welfare issue. Use of pain control has increased in recent years, but full adoption of anesthesia and analgesia by veterinarians or dairy producers has not been achieved. This may in part be due to the lack of a consistent recommendations of treatment protocols between studies examining pain control methods for disbudding. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effects of these pain control practices for the most common method of disbudding, cautery, on outcomes associated with disbudding pain in calves. The outcomes were plasma cortisol concentrations, pressure sensitivity of the horn bud area, and validated pain behaviors (ear flick, head shake, head rub, foot stamp, and vocalization). Intervention studies describing cautery disbudding in calves 12 wk of age or younger were eligible, provided they compared local anesthesia, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), or local anesthesia and NSAID to 1 or more of local anesthesia, NSAID, or no pain control. The search strategy used the Agricola, Medline (via OvidSP), and Web of Science databases, as well as the Searchable Proceedings of Animal Conferences (S-PAC), ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Database, and Open Access Theses and Dissertations. Meta-analysis was performed for all outcomes measured at similar time points with more than 2 studies. Local anesthetic was associated with reduced plasma cortisol until 2 h postdisbudding; however, a rise in cortisol was observed in the meta-analysis of studies reporting at 4 h postdisbudding. Heterogeneity was present in several of the analyses for this comparison. The addition of NSAID to local anesthetic showed reduction in plasma cortisol at 4 h, and a reduction in pressure sensitivity and pain behaviors in some analyses between 3 and 6 h postdisbudding. Heterogeneity was present in some meta-analyses, including

  8. Studies concerning the interaction between local anesthetics and lipid membrane by phosphorus-31, deuterium and proton NMR; Estudo da interacao entre anestesicos locais e membranas lipidicas por ressonancia magnetica de fosforo ({sup 31} P), deuterio ({sup 2} H) e proton ({sup 1} H)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Eneida de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica; Jarrell, Harold C. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Inst. for Biological Sciences; Schreier, Shirley [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    1993-12-31

    Local anesthetics block the conduction of nervous stimulus by impeding the entrance of sodium ion and the consequently depolarization of the nervous membrane. The action mechanism of local anesthetics, however, is not fully understood yet. In the present work the interaction between local anesthetics and membranes are studied by the perspective of lipid phase perturbation using NMR to elucidate the mechanism. Results are presented and discussed 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Comparing the effects of single shot sciatic nerve block versus posterior capsule local anesthetic infiltration on analgesia and functional outcome after total knee arthroplasty: a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safa, Ben; Gollish, Jeffrey; Haslam, Lynn; McCartney, Colin J L

    2014-06-01

    Peripheral nerve blocks appear to provide effective analgesia for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Although the literature supports the use of femoral nerve block, addition of sciatic nerve block is controversial. In this study we investigated the value of sciatic nerve block and an alternative technique of posterior capsule local anesthetic infiltration analgesia. 100 patients were prospectively randomized into three groups. Group 1: sciatic nerve block; Group 2: posterior local anesthetic infiltration; Group 3: control. All patients received a femoral nerve block and spinal anesthesia. There were no differences in pain scores between groups. Sciatic nerve block provided a brief clinically insignificant opioid sparing effect. We conclude that sciatic nerve block and posterior local anesthetic infiltration do not provide significant analgesic benefits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Long QT 1 mutation KCNQ1A344V increases local anesthetic sensitivity of the slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebrands, Cornelia C; Binder, Stephan; Eckhoff, Ulrike

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anesthesia in patients with long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a matter of concern. Congenital LQTS is most frequently caused by mutations in KCNQ1 (Kv7.1), whereas drug-induced LQTS is a consequence of HERG (human ether-a-go-go-related gene) channel inhibition. The aim of this study...... was to investigate whether the LQT1 mutation A344V in the S6 region of KCNQ1, at a position corresponding to the local anesthetic binding site in HERG, may render drug insensitive KCNQ1 channels into a toxicologically relevant target of these pharmacologic agents. This may suggest that LQTS constitutes not only...... a nonspecific but also a specific pharmacogenetic risk factor for anesthesia. METHODS: The authors examined electrophysiologic and pharmacologic properties of wild-type and mutant KCNQ1 channels. The effects of bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine were investigated using two-electrode voltage clamp...

  11. Risk of Immediate-Type Allergy to Local Anesthetics is Overestimated-Results from 5 Years of Provocation Testing in a Danish Allergy Clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisselgaard, Ask D; Mosbech, Holger F; Fransson, Sara

    2017-01-01

    : The main aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of immediate-type allergy to LAs in our regional allergy clinic over the 5-year period 2010 to 2014. METHODS: This was a retrospective single-center study of patients referred to a regional allergy clinic (excluding patients with perioperative......BACKGROUND: Local anesthetics (LAs) are used in many health care settings and exposure during a lifetime is almost inevitable. Immediate-type allergy to LAs is considered rare among allergy experts but is commonly suspected by health care workers from other specialties, and by patients. OBJECTIVE...... reactions) with suspected immediate allergy to LAs, who had undergone subcutaneous provocation with 1 or more LAs. Patients were identified in the hospital clinical coding system and clinical information about the reaction and investigation results was obtained from their medical records. RESULTS: A total...

  12. A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing the Efficacy of Fascia Iliaca Compartment Block Versus Local Anesthetic Infiltration After Hip Arthroscopic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Malgorzata; Alshameeri, Zeiad; Sardesai, Anand; Khanduja, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of fascia iliaca compartment block (FICB) with local anesthetic infiltration (LAI) of the arthroscopy portals for pain control after hip arthroscopy. A prospective single-blinded randomized controlled trial that involved patients who underwent hip arthroscopy was performed. Participants were randomized to receiving either FICB or LAI of the portal tracts with local anesthetic. Supplemental analgesia was also used in both groups on an on-demand basis. The primary outcome measure was the postoperative level of pain as assessed by numeric pain score at 1, 3, 6, and 24 hours after the procedure in both groups. Secondary outcome measures were the frequency and the dose of morphine and other medications consumed at 1 and 24 hours after surgery as well as any other adverse events relating to pain or medications used for pain relief in both the groups. The study had to be terminated early because there was a significant statistical difference in the primary outcome measure after the recruitment of 46 patients: 20 in the LAI group and 26 in the FICB group. Severity of pain in the FICB group was higher especially during the first hour postoperatively (P = .02). This was associated with a higher consumption of opioids and other analgesics, which resulted in more side effects such as nausea and vomiting. LAI provided a better analgesia after arthroscopic surgery of the hip in comparison with FICB and was also associated with reduced consumption of opioids and a lower rate of side effects. Level I, single-blinded randomized controlled study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. All rights reserved.

  13. Port Site Local Anesthetic Infiltration Vs Single-dose Intrathecal Opioid Injection to Control Perioperative Pain in Children Undergoing Minimal Invasive Surgery: A Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Arun K; Shrivastava, Dhiren; Kurzweil, Rebecca E; Weiss, Dana A; Long, Christopher J; Shukla, Aseem R

    2016-11-01

    To compare the efficacy of the intrathecal opiate vs wound site local anesthetic infiltration for perioperative pain control during and after surgery in patients undergoing minimally invasive pediatric urologic procedures. Using an Institutional Review Board-approved registry database, we identified patients who underwent minimally invasive urologic procedures at our institution between 2009 and 2013. We collected all relevant preoperative variables and postoperative outcomes. Patients in intrathecal injection of opioids (ITO) group were matched with patients who received local anesthetic infiltration (LAI) based on age, diagnosis, and procedure. Perioperative analgesic requirements were converted to morphine equivalents standardized to body weight. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS, and parametric comparisons were completed to determine difference in morphine equivalents between the 2 groups. One hundred thirty children (78 girls and 52 boys) were included in our study. Sixty-six patients underwent ITO and 66 received LAI. Sixty-six patients underwent ureteral reimplantation, 60 underwent pyeloplasty, and 4 underwent nephrectomy. Ages ranged from 0.5 to 19.9 years. There was no significant difference in cumulative morphine equivalents or weight administered between the ITO and LAI groups for the total period of hospitalization (0.76 units vs 0.79 units, P > .05). Multivariate regression analysis predicted that older age corresponds to higher analgesic requirements. ITO does not impact total analgesic requirements during the hospital stay compared to LAI following minimally invasive surgery. Considering the potential complications of ITO, LAI may be the preferred modality for pain management for minimally invasive surgery in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transversus abdominis-plane block versus local anesthetic wound infiltration in lower abdominal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nanze; Long, Xiao; Lujan-Hernandez, Jorge R; Succar, Julien; Xin, Xin; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative pain management is of great importance in perioperative anesthetic care. Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block has been described as an effective technique to reduce postoperative pain and morphine consumption after open lower abdominal operations. Meanwhile, local anesthetic infiltration (LAI) is also commonly used as a traditional method. However, the effectiveness of these two methods has not been compared before. A meta-analysis of all relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted to compare the efficacy of single shot TAP block with that of single shot LAI for postoperative analgesia in adults. Major medical databases and trial registries were searched for published and unpublished RCTs. The endpoints include postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, morphine requirement, and rate of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). For continuous data, weighted mean differences (WMDs) were formulated; for dichotomous data, risk ratios (RR) were calculated. Results were derived using a random-/fixed-effects model with 95% confidence interval (CI). Four RCTs, encompassing 96 TAP-block and 100 LAI patients, were included in the final analysis. Patients in the TAP-block group had lower VAS pain scores 24 hours postoperatively compared with the LAI group, both at rest (WMD [95% CI] = -0.67 [p < 0.01] and with movement (WMD = -0.89, p < 0.01). There were no significant between-group differences in 24-hour postoperative morphine requirements, the rates if PONV or VAS pain scores at 2 and 4 h postoperatively. TAP block and LAI provide comparable short-term postoperative analgesia, but TAP block has better long-lasting effect.

  15. Effects of Epidural Labor Analgesia With Low Concentrations of Local Anesthetics on Obstetric Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Ting; Sun, Shen; Huang, Shao-Qiang

    2017-05-01

    Low concentrations of local anesthetics (LCLAs) are increasingly popular for epidural labor analgesia. The effects of epidural analgesia with low concentrations of anesthetics on the duration of the second stage of labor and the instrumental birth rate, however, remain controversial. A systematic review was conducted to compare the effects of epidural analgesia with LCLAs with those of nonepidural analgesia on obstetric outcomes. The databases of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane controlled trials register were independently searched by 2 researchers, and randomized controlled trials that compared epidural labor analgesia utilizing LCLAs with nonepidural analgesia were retrieved. The primary outcomes were the duration of the second stage of labor and the instrumental birth rate; secondary outcomes included the cesarean delivery rate, the spontaneous vaginal delivery rate, and the duration of the first stage of labor. Ten studies (1809 women) were included. There was no significant difference between groups in the duration of the second stage of labor (mean difference = 5.71 minutes, 95% confidence interval [CI], -6.14 to 17.83; P = .36) or the instrumental birth rate (risk ratio [RR] = 1.52, 95% CI, 0.97-2.4; P = .07). There was no significant difference between groups in the cesarean delivery rate (RR = 0.8, 95% CI, 0.6-1.05; P = .11), the spontaneous vaginal delivery rate (RR = 0.98, 95% CI, 0.91-1.06; P = .62), or the duration of the first stage of labor (mean difference = 17.34 minutes, 95% CI, -5.89 to 40.56; P = .14). Compared with nonepidural analgesia, epidural analgesia with LCLAs is not associated with a prolonged duration of the second stage of labor or an increased instrumental birth rate. The results of this meta-analysis are based on small trials of low quality. These conclusions require confirmation by large-sample and high-quality trials in the future.

  16. The effect of IV dexamethasone versus local anesthetic infiltration technique in postoperative nausea and vomiting after tonsillectomy in children: A randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naja, Zoher; Kanawati, Saleh; Al Khatib, Rania; Ziade, Fouad; Naja, Zeina Z; Naja, Ahmad Salah; Rajab, Mariam

    2017-01-01

    Local anesthetic infiltration and corticosteroids had shown effectiveness in reducing post tonsillectomy nausea, vomiting and pain. To compare the effect of intravenous dexamethasone versus pre-incision infiltration of local anesthesia in pediatric tonsillectomy on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). The secondary objective was postoperative pain. A randomized double-blind clinical trial was conducted at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Children admitted to undergo tonsillectomy aged between 4 and 13 years from January 2015 to August 2015 were enrolled and divided into two groups. Both groups had general anesthesia. Group I received intravenous dexamethasone 0.5 mg/kg (maximum dose 16 mg) with placebo pre-incision infiltration. Group II received pre-incision infiltration a total of 2-4 ml local anesthesia mixture with saline and an equivalent volume of intravenous saline. Group I consisted of 64 patients while group II had 65 patients. In the PACU, 15.6% of patients in group I experienced vomiting compared to 3.1% in group II (p-value = 0.032). After 24 h, the incidence of PONV was significantly higher in group I compared to group II (26.6% vs. 9.2% respectively, p-value = 0.019). At 48 h postoperatively, PONV was significantly higher in group I (p-value = 0.013). The incidence was similar in both groups after three, four and five postoperative days. Baseline pain and pain during swallowing were significantly different at 6, 12 and 24 h as well as days 1 through 5. Pain upon jaw opening was significantly different at 6, 12 and 24 h between the two groups. Pain while eating soft food was significantly different at 24 h and days 2 through 5. In the PACU, 20.3% of patients in group I received diclofenac compared to 3.1% in group II (p-value = 0.005). From day 1 till day 5, analgesic consumption was significantly higher in group I. Local anesthetic infiltration in addition to NSAIDS and paracetamol could serve as a multimodal analgesia and

  17. Side effects of subarachnoid and epidural sufentanil associated with a local anesthetic in patients undergoing labor analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Salem, Isabel C.F. [UNESP; Fukushima, Fernanda Bono [UNESP; Nakamura, Giane [UNESP; Ferrari, Fábio [UNESP; Navarro, Laís C. [UNESP; Castiglia, Yara Marcondes Machado [UNESP; Ganem, Eliana Marisa [UNESP

    2007-01-01

    JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A associação do opióide ao anestésico local melhora a qualidade da analgesia de parto e reduz o risco de toxicidade sistêmica pelo anestésico local. Os opióides, entretanto, podem determinar efeitos colaterais. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi comparar os efeitos adversos determinados pelo sufentanil, administrado por via subaracnóidea, associado à bupivacaína, com aquele determinado pelo sufentanil por via peridural, associado à ropivacaína, nas doses utilizadas no Se...

  18. Does pain relief by CT-guided indirect cervical nerve root injection with local anesthetics and steroids predict pain relief after decompression surgery for cervical nerve root compression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, Alexander; Dietrich, Tobias J; Farshad, Mazda

    2016-10-01

    The relationship of pain relief from a recently presented CT-guided indirect cervical nerve root injection with local anesthetics and steroids to surgical decompression as a treatment for single-level cervical radiculopathy is not clear. This retrospective study aimed to compare the immediate and 6-week post-injection effects to the short- and long-term outcomes after surgical decompression, specifically in regard to pain relief. Patients (n = 39, age 47 ± 10 years) who had undergone CT-guided indirect injection with local anesthetics and steroids as an initial treatment for single cervical nerve root radiculopathy and who subsequently needed surgical decompression were included retrospectively. Pain levels (VAS scores) were monitored before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after injection (n = 34), as well as 6 weeks (n = 38) and a mean of 25 months (SD ± 12) after surgical decompression (n = 36). Correlation analysis was performed to find potential associations of pain relief after injection and after surgery to investigate the predictive value of post-injection pain relief. There was no correlation between immediate pain relief after injection (-32 ± 27 %) and 6 weeks later (-7 ± 19 %), (r = -0.023, p = 0.900). There was an association by tendency between immediate pain relief after injection and post-surgical pain relief at 6 weeks (-82 ± 27 %), (r = 0.28, p = 0.08). Pain relief at follow-up remained high at -70 ± 21 % and was correlated with the immediate pain amelioration effect of the injection (r = 0.37, p = 0.032). Five out of seven patients who reported no pain relief from injection had a pain relief from surgery in excess of 50 %. The amount of immediate radiculopathic pain relief after indirect cervical nerve root injection is associated with the amount of pain relief achieved at long-term follow-up after surgical decompression of single-level cervical radiculopathy

  19. Anesthetics interacting with lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeiras, Cátia; Serro, Ana Paula; Luzyanin, Konstantin; Fernandes, Anabela; Saramago, Benilde

    2013-01-23

    The exact mechanism by which anesthetics induce cell membrane-mediated modifications is still an open question. Although the fluidization effect of the anesthetic molecules on the cellular membrane is widely recognized, it is not known if anesthetics show any preference for specific membrane domains, namely the lipid rafts. The importance of these membrane micro-domains derives from the fact that they have been associated with cell signaling pathways, as well as with specific drug interactions. The objective of this work is to contribute for the elucidation of this question through the comparison of the anesthetic interactions with membranes of various lipid compositions. Liposomes prepared with an equimolar mixture of POPC, sphingomyelin and cholesterol, were chosen as models for lipid rafts. The interactions of these liposomes with two local anesthetics, tetracaine and lidocaine, and one general anesthetic, propofol, were studied. The effect of cholesterol was investigated by comparing anesthetic interactions with POPC/SM liposomes and POPC/SM/CHOL liposomes. The following experimental techniques were used: quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, differential scanning calorimetry and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance. Although the liposomes investigated by the different techniques are not in the same conditions, it is possible to assemble the information obtained from all experimental techniques employed to reach a general conclusion. Tetracaine interacts more with raftlike domains, lidocaine induces stronger modifications on POPC/SM liposomes and the results for propofol are not fully conclusive but it seems to be the least prone to lipid interactions. The results were compared with those obtained with DMPC-containing liposomes, reported in a previous work. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hemodynamic changes following injection of local anesthetics with different concentrations of epinephrine during simple tooth extraction: A prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Mostafa, Nedal; Al-Showaikhat, Fatimah; Al-Shubbar, Fatimah; Al-Zawad, Kawther; Al-Zawad, Fatimah

    2015-10-01

    Presence of epinephrine in local anesthetic cartridge increases the duration of local anesthesia (LA), decreases the risk of toxicity, and provides hemostasis. However, the unfavorable effects are increasing heart rate (HR) and raising blood pressure (BP). The aim was to evaluate hemodynamic changes in the BP, HR, and oxygen saturation (SpO2) of normal patients undergoing tooth extraction using LA with various epinephrine concentrations. A prospective randomized clinical trial was conducted on 120 patients who were divided randomly into 3 parallel groups according to the LA received. Group 1: lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:80,000 (L80). Group 2: articaine 4% with epinephrine 1:100,000 (A100). Group 3: articaine 4% with epinephrine 1:200,000 (A200). normal patients whose BP extraction. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) significantly increased after injection of L80 and continued after extraction to be significant than pre-injection. SBP significantly increased after injection of A100 then decreased after extraction. In the group of A200, SBP insignificantly decreased after injection then increased after extraction. The increasing of SBP between time point 1and 2 was significantly higher in G1 than G3 (p=0.014). Diastolic blood pressure decreased after LA in the 3 groups; however it was significant only with L80, then increased after extraction for all. The changings of DBP, HR and SpO2 after anesthesia and extraction showed no significant difference among the three groups. However, A200 had significant lesser effect on SBP than L80 and the least effect on other parameters. Therefore, A200 is considered safer than L80 and A100 and is recommended for LA before teeth extraction in normal patient. Local anesthesia, lidocaine, epinephrine 1:80,000, articaine, epinephrine 1:100,000, epinephrine 1:200,000, tooth extraction.

  1. [Wound infiltration with local anesthetics for postoperative analgesia. Results of a national survey about its practice in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaussier, M; Bouaziz, H; Aubrun, F; Belbachir, A; Binhas, M; Bloc, S; Fuzier, R; Jochum, D; Nouette-Gaulain, K; Paqueron, X

    2012-02-01

    Local wound infiltration is a component of multimodal postoperative (p.o.) analgesia. Its implementation in current clinical practice remains unknown. Pain and Regional Anesthesia Committee of the French Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Society (Sfar) aimed to appraise its practice. Postal sample survey based on representative sample of national activity were sent to heads of anaesthesiology departments. The questionnaires included 36 items on single-shot and continuous wound infiltrations (CWI) with considerations about modality of administration, drugs and development limitations. Results in mean [CI95 %]. Response rate was 32 % (n=120). Sample was in accordance with national representation of health institutions. Local infiltration was included in 85 % [79-91] of the p.o. analgesia protocols. Regardless of the surgery, single-shot wound infiltration and CWI were used in more than 50 % of the patients by respectively 58 % [49-67] and 18 % [11-25] of the responders. However, a significant part of the surgeons remained reluctant to CWI. Lack of information and fear of septic complications were the most reported barriers. Peritoneal instillation after laparoscopy was rarely performed, in contrast with intra-articular infiltration after knee arthroscopy, performed systematically or very frequently by 60 % [50-70] of the responders. The practice of local wound infiltration for p.o. analgesia seems presently well established, especially for single-shot injections. CWI is less commonly performed. Several surgical reluctances remain to be overcome. Better information about effectiveness and safety are likely to still improve their practices. Copyright © 2011 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Reducing persistent postoperative pain and disability 1 year after breast cancer surgery: a randomized, controlled trial comparing thoracic paravertebral block to local anesthetic infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Michelle; Bryson, Gregory L; Lui, Anne; Watters, James M; Taljaard, Monica; Nathan, Howard J

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect of thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) and local anesthetic (LA) on persistent postoperative pain (PPP) 1 year following breast cancer surgery. Secondary objectives were to compare the effect on arm morbidity and quality of life. Women scheduled for elective breast cancer surgery were randomly assigned to either TPVB or LA followed by general anesthesia. An NRS value of >3 at rest or with movement 1 year following surgery defined PPP. Blinded interim analysis suggested rates of PPP much lower than anticipated, making detection of the specified 20 % absolute reduction in the primary outcome impossible. Recruitment was stopped, and all enrolled patients were followed to 1 year. A total of 145 participants were recruited; 65 were randomized to TPVB and 64 to LA. Groups were similar with respect to demographic and treatment characteristics. Only 9 patients (8 %; 95 % CI 4-14 %) met criteria for PPP 1 year following surgery; 5 were in the TPVB and 4 in the LA group. Brief Pain Inventory severity and interference scores were low in both groups. Arm morbidity and quality of life were similar in both groups. The 9 patients with PPP reported shoulder-arm morbidity and reduced quality of life. This study reports a low incidence of chronic pain 1 year following major breast cancer surgery. Although PPP was uncommon at 1 year, it had a large impact on the affected patients' arm morbidity and quality of life.

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Comparing Ultrasound-Guided Transversus Abdominis Plane Block with Local Anesthetic Infiltration in Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Tang, Xiaohong; Tao, Tian; Zhang, Wenjuan; Qin, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Li, Zi

    2017-11-22

    The ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block has been demonstrated as a useful analgesia technique in lower-abdomen surgeries. We hypothesized that it could be the principal anesthesia technique for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter (PDC) implantation using the open dissection method. This was a single-center, prospective, randomized, and double-blinded study. All eligible patients were randomized into 2 groups: the TAP block group (n = 20) and the local anesthetic infiltration (LAI) group (n = 20). Compared with the LAI group, the TAP block group revealed a remarkably lower visual analogue score, lower switching rate into general anesthesia, higher satisfaction rate, and less rescuing analgesic consumption during operation (p < 0.05). Both PD- and anesthesia-related complications were rare in the 4-week follow-up. The ultrasound-guided TAP block had better analgesic effect than LAI and can be used as a principal anesthesia technique for PDC implantation in ESRD patients without previous abdominal surgery. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. The conformational stability, solvation and the assignments of the experimental infrared, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Förner, Wolfgang; Ali, Shaikh A.

    2015-05-01

    The structure, vibrational and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine were investigated by the B3LYP/6-311G∗∗ calculations. The molecule was predicted to have the non-planar cis (NCCN ∼ 0°) structures being about 2-6 kcal/mol lower in energy than the corresponding trans (NCCN ∼ 180°) forms. The calculated NCCN (9.6°) and CNCC (-132.2°) torsional angles were in a good qualitative agreement with the reported X-ray angles (3.1 and 13.0°, -102.67 and -77.9°, respectively, for H-bonded dimers). The Gibbs energy of solution of lidocaine in formamide, water, dimethylsulfoxide, acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol and chloroform solutions was estimated at the B3LYP level. The predicted affinity of lidocaine toward the alcohols, acetonitrile and chloroform solutions was in excellent agreement with the reported experimental solubility of the drug in organic solvents. The analysis of the observed vibrational spectra is consistent with the presence of lidocaine in only one conformation at room temperature. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of lidocaine were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the drug. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for lidocaine is 0.47 and 8.26 ppm, respectively.

  5. Novel serine-based gemini surfactants as chemical permeation enhancers of local anesthetics: A comprehensive study on structure-activity relationships, molecular dynamics and dermal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Raquel S; Cova, Tânia F G G; Silva, Sérgio M C; Oliveira, Rita; do Vale, M Luísa C; Marques, Eduardo F; Pais, Alberto A C C; Veiga, Francisco J B

    2015-06-01

    This work aims at studying the efficacy of a series of novel biocompatible, serine-based surfactants as chemical permeation enhancers for two different local anesthetics, tetracaine and ropivacaine, combining an experimental and computational approach. The surfactants consist of gemini molecules structurally related, but with variations in headgroup charge (nonionic vs. cationic) and in the hydrocarbon chain lengths (main and spacer chains). In vitro permeation and molecular dynamics studies combined with cytotoxicity profiles were performed to investigate the permeation of both drugs, probe skin integrity, and rationalize the interactions at molecular level. Results show that these enhancers do not have significant deleterious effects on the skin structure and do not cause relevant changes on cell viability. Permeation across the skin is clearly improved using some of the selected serine-based gemini surfactants, namely the cationic ones with long alkyl chains and shorter spacer. This is noteworthy in the case of ropivacaine hydrochloride, which is not easily administered through the stratum corneum. Molecular dynamics results provide a mechanistic view of the surfactant action on lipid membranes that essentially corroborate the experimental observations. Overall, this study suggests the viability of these serine-based surfactants as suitable and promising delivery agents in pharmaceutical formulations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. The Amide Local Anesthetic Lidocaine in Cancer Surgery—Potential Antimetastatic Effects and Preservation of Immune Cell Function? A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiên-Nga Chamaraux-Tran

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgical removal of the primary tumor in solid cancer is an essential component of the treatment. However, the perioperative period can paradoxically lead to an increased risk of cancer recurrence. A bimodal dynamics for early-stage breast cancer recurrence suggests a tumor dormancy-based model with a mastectomy-driven acceleration of the metastatic process and a crucial role of the immunosuppressive state during the perioperative period. Recent evidence suggests that anesthesia could also influence the progress of the disease. Local anesthetics (LAs have long been used for their properties to block nociceptive input. They also exert anti-inflammatory capacities by modulating the liberation or signal propagation of inflammatory mediators. Interestingly, LAs can reduce viability and proliferation of many cancer cells in vitro as well. Additionally, retrospective clinical trials have suggested that regional anesthesia for cancer surgery (either with or without general anesthesia might reduce the risk of recurrence. Lidocaine, a LA, which can be administered intravenously, is widely used in clinical practice for multimodal analgesia. It is associated with a morphine-sparing effect, reduced pain scores, and in major surgery probably also with a reduced incidence of postoperative ileus and length of hospital stay. Systemic delivery might therefore be efficient to target residual disease or reach cells able to form micrometastasis. Moreover, an in vitro study has shown that lidocaine could enhance the activity of natural killer (NK cells. Due to their ability to recognize and kill tumor cells without the requirement of prior antigen exposure, NKs are the main actor of the innate immune system. However, several perioperative factors can reduce NK activity, such as stress, pain, opioids, or general anesthetics. Intravenous lidocaine as part of the perioperative anesthesia regimen would be of major interest for clinicians, as it might bear the potential

  7. Exploring the Structure of the Voltage-gated Na+ Channel by an Engineered Drug Access Pathway to the Receptor Site for Local Anesthetics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Cervenka, Rene; Ke, Song; Koenig, Xaver; Rubi, Lena; Zarrabi, Touran; Hilber, Karlheinz; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna; Todt, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of several crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated Na+ channels, the structure of eukaryotic Na+ channels is still undefined. We used predictions from available homology models and crystal structures to modulate an external access pathway for the membrane-impermeant local anesthetic derivative QX-222 into the internal vestibule of the mammalian rNaV1.4 channel. Potassium channel-based homology models predict amino acid Ile-1575 in domain IV segment 6 to be in close proximity to Lys-1237 of the domain III pore-loop selectivity filter. The mutation K1237E has been shown previously to increase the diameter of the selectivity filter. We found that an access pathway for external QX-222 created by mutations of Ile-1575 was abolished by the additional mutation K1237E, supporting the notion of a close spatial relationship between sites 1237 and 1575. Crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated Na+ channels predict that the side chain of rNaV1.4 Trp-1531 of the domain IV pore-loop projects into the space between domain IV segment 6 and domain III pore-loop and, therefore, should obstruct the putative external access pathway. Indeed, mutations W1531A and W1531G allowed for exceptionally rapid access of QX-222. In addition, W1531G created a second non-selective ion-conducting pore, bypassing the outer vestibule but probably merging into the internal vestibule, allowing for control by the activation gate. These data suggest a strong structural similarity between bacterial and eukaryotic voltage-gated Na+ channels. PMID:24947510

  8. Exploring the structure of the voltage-gated Na+ channel by an engineered drug access pathway to the receptor site for local anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S; Cervenka, Rene; Ke, Song; Koenig, Xaver; Rubi, Lena; Zarrabi, Touran; Hilber, Karlheinz; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna; Todt, Hannes

    2014-08-01

    Despite the availability of several crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated Na(+) channels, the structure of eukaryotic Na(+) channels is still undefined. We used predictions from available homology models and crystal structures to modulate an external access pathway for the membrane-impermeant local anesthetic derivative QX-222 into the internal vestibule of the mammalian rNaV1.4 channel. Potassium channel-based homology models predict amino acid Ile-1575 in domain IV segment 6 to be in close proximity to Lys-1237 of the domain III pore-loop selectivity filter. The mutation K1237E has been shown previously to increase the diameter of the selectivity filter. We found that an access pathway for external QX-222 created by mutations of Ile-1575 was abolished by the additional mutation K1237E, supporting the notion of a close spatial relationship between sites 1237 and 1575. Crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated Na(+) channels predict that the side chain of rNaV1.4 Trp-1531 of the domain IV pore-loop projects into the space between domain IV segment 6 and domain III pore-loop and, therefore, should obstruct the putative external access pathway. Indeed, mutations W1531A and W1531G allowed for exceptionally rapid access of QX-222. In addition, W1531G created a second non-selective ion-conducting pore, bypassing the outer vestibule but probably merging into the internal vestibule, allowing for control by the activation gate. These data suggest a strong structural similarity between bacterial and eukaryotic voltage-gated Na(+) channels. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Comparison of interscalene brachial plexus block and intra-articular local anesthetic administration on postoperative pain management in arthroscopic shoulder surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Aksu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In this study, the aim was to compare postoperative analgesia effects of the administration of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block and intra-articular bupivacaine carried out with bupivacaine. METHODS: In the first group of patients 20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine and ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISPB were applied, while 20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine was given via intra-articular (IA administration to the second group patients after surgery. Patients in the third group were considered the control group and no block was performed. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA with morphine was used in all three groups for postoperative analgesia. RESULTS: In the ISPB group, morphine consumption in the periods between 0-4, 6-12 and 12-24 postoperative hours and total consumption within 24 h was lower than in the other two groups. Morphine consumption in the IA group was lower than in the control group in the period from 0 to 6 h and the same was true for total morphine consumption in 24 h. Postoperative VASr scores in the ISPB group were lower than both of the other groups in the first 2 h and lower than the control group in the 4th and 6th hours (p < 0.05. In the IA group, VASr and VASm scores in the 2nd, 4th and 6th hours were lower than in the control group (p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Interscalene brachial plexus block was found to be more effective than intra-articular local anesthetic injection for postoperative analgesia.

  10. Bilateral Paravertebral Blockade (T7-10) Versus Incisional Local Anesthetic Administration for Pediatric Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Prospective, Randomized Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visoiu, Mihaela; Cassara, Antonio; Yang, Charles Inshik

    2015-05-01

    Single-injection paravertebral nerve blocks (PVBs) provide effective postoperative analgesia after adult laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). We sought to compare PVBs with local anesthetic injections at laparoscopic port sites in a pediatric population. Eighty-three patients (8-17 years old) scheduled for LC were randomized prospectively to 2 treatment groups: the PVB group received ropivacaine 0.5% injected in the paravertebral space and normal saline injections at laparoscopic instrument sites, and the port infiltration group received normal saline in the paravertebral space and ropivacaine 0.5% at instrument sites. Postoperative analgesia was provided with hydromorphone via patient-controlled analgesia for up to 12 hours, followed by oxycodone and hydromorphone. The total amount of analgesic, serial visual analog scale scores for pain and subject pain control satisfaction, type and characteristics of pain, and complications were recorded for 24 hours. The intraoperative fentanyl requirement (ng/kg/min) was lower in the PVB group than in the port infiltration group (12.81 vs 16.57, P = 0.007). Total postoperative analgesic consumption and mean visual analog scale scores were not different between the groups. Baseline pain recorded before surgery correlated with self-reported postoperative pain scores only in the port infiltration group. The rate of complications was low and similar between groups. There was no difference in incidence of patient-reported incisional, visceral, or gas pain. Shoulder pain, however, was 49% less (95% confidence interval, 0.269-0.893) in the port infiltration group. PVBs did not reduce postoperative pain associated with pediatric LC but decreased intraoperative fentanyl requirements.

  11. Risk of Immediate-Type Allergy to Local Anesthetics is Overestimated-Results from 5 Years of Provocation Testing in a Danish Allergy Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvisselgaard, Ask D; Mosbech, Holger F; Fransson, Sara; Garvey, Lene H

    2017-10-04

    Local anesthetics (LAs) are used in many health care settings and exposure during a lifetime is almost inevitable. Immediate-type allergy to LAs is considered rare among allergy experts but is commonly suspected by health care workers from other specialties, and by patients. The main aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of immediate-type allergy to LAs in our regional allergy clinic over the 5-year period 2010 to 2014. This was a retrospective single-center study of patients referred to a regional allergy clinic (excluding patients with perioperative reactions) with suspected immediate allergy to LAs, who had undergone subcutaneous provocation with 1 or more LAs. Patients were identified in the hospital clinical coding system and clinical information about the reaction and investigation results was obtained from their medical records. A total of 164 patients (123 women/41 men; median age, 56 years; range, 7-89 years) who had 189 provocations with LAs were included over the 5-year period 2010 to 2014. All 164 patients had negative subcutaneous provocations to all 189 tests with LAs (95% CI, 0%-1.83%). Another allergen was identified in 10% (n = 17) of the patients. None of the 164 patients with suspected immediate-type allergy to LAs reacted on provocation. Thus, no patients have been diagnosed with an immediate allergy to LAs in our regional allergy clinic in the 5-year period studied, and allergy to LAs must be considered very rare. Alternative mechanisms should be considered, but if symptoms are consistent with allergy, other potential allergens should be investigated. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nonallergic hypersensitivity to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, radiocontrast media, local anesthetics, volume substitutes and medications used in general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurakić Toncić, Ruzica; Marinović, Branka; Lipozencić, Jasna

    2009-01-01

    Urticaria and angioedema are common allergic manifestations and medications are one of common triggering factors. The most severe immediate drug reaction is anaphylaxis. Apart from the well established IgE-mediated immediate type hypersensitivity reactions, the pathogenesis of drug-induced urticaria, angioedema and anaphylaxis often remains obscure. In this article, emphasis is put on nonallergic reactions to the most commonly used drug groups of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, radiocontrast media, volume expanders and drugs used in general anesthesia. Urticaria is the second most common drug eruption after maculopapular exanthema. The mechanisms of acute urticarial reactions are multiple, mostly IgE mediated, but some drugs can induce immune complex reactions and activate complement cascade, while others can induce direct activation of mast cells and degranulation or activation of complement by non-immune mechanisms. With different types of medications different pathomechanisms are involved. Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs are thought to cause reaction due to cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition and overproduction of leukotrienes, blamed for cutaneous and respiratory symptoms. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors can cause fatal angioedema, which is partially explained with bradykinin excess and impairment of aminopeptidase P and dipeptidyl peptidase IV that are involved in the metabolism of substance P and bradykinin. It remains unknown what additional mechanisms are involved. Radiocontrast media and local anesthetics mostly cause nonallergic hypersensitivity reaction, but in rare cases true allergic reaction can occur. Dextran is known to cause IgG mediated, immune complex anaphylaxis and it is recommended to use human serum albumin as the safest colloid.

  13. Continuous Transversus Abdominis Plane Nerve Blocks: Does Varying Local Anesthetic Delivery Method-Automatic Repeated Bolus Versus Continuous Basal Infusion-Influence the Extent of Sensation to Cold?: A Randomized, Triple-Masked, Crossover Study in Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibi, Bahareh; Said, Engy T; Sztain, Jacklynn F; Monahan, Amanda M; Gabriel, Rodney A; Furnish, Timothy J; Tran, Johnathan T; Donohue, Michael C; Ilfeld, Brian M

    2017-04-01

    It remains unknown whether continuous or scheduled intermittent bolus local anesthetic administration is preferable for transversus abdominis plane (TAP) catheters. We therefore tested the hypothesis that when using TAP catheters, providing local anesthetic in repeated bolus doses increases the cephalad-caudad cutaneous effects compared with a basal-only infusion. Bilateral TAP catheters (posterior approach) were inserted in 24 healthy volunteers followed by ropivacaine 2 mg/mL administration for a total of 6 hours. The right side was randomly assigned to either a basal infusion (8 mL/h) or bolus doses (24 mL administered every 3 hours for a total of 2 bolus doses) in a double-masked manner. The left side received the alternate treatment. The primary end point was the extent of sensory deficit as measured by cool roller along the axillary line at hour 6 (6 hours after the local anesthetic administration was initiated). Secondary end points included the extent of sensory deficit as measured by cool roller and Von Frey filaments along the axillary line and along a transverse line at the level of the anterior superior iliac spine at hours 0 to 6. Although there were statistically significant differences between treatments within the earlier part of the administration period, by hour 6 the difference in extent of sensory deficit to cold failed to reach statistical significance along the axillary line (mean = 0.9 cm; SD = 6.8; 95% confidence interval -2.0 to 3.8; P = .515) and transverse line (mean = 2.5 cm; SD = 10.1; 95% confidence interval -1.8 to 6.8; P = .244). Although the difference between treatments was statistically significant at various early time points for the horizontal, vertical, and estimated area measurements of both cold and mechanical pressure sensory deficits, no comparison remained statistically significant by hour 6. No evidence was found in this study involving healthy volunteers to support the hypothesis that changing the local anesthetic

  14. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of transversus abdominis plane block with direct infiltration of local anesthetic into surgical incision in lower abdominal gynecological surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapurapu, Vijayalakshmi; Vasudevan, Arumugam; Gupta, Sumanlata; Badhe, Ashok S

    2013-01-01

    Transversus abdominis plane block is a safe, simple and effective technique of providing analgesia for lower abdominal surgeries with easily identifiable landmarks. To compare the analgesic efficacy of transversus abdominis plane block with that of direct infiltration of local anesthetic into surgical incision in lower abdominal procedures. Prospective randomized controlled trial in lower abdominal surgeries done under general anesthesia. 52 ASA I-II patients undergoing lower abdominal gynecological procedures under general anesthesia were divided randomly into two groups each after written informed consent. A bilateral TAP block was performed on Group T with 0.25% bupivacaine 0.6 ml/kg with half the volume on either side intra-operatively after skin closure before extubation using a short bevelled needle, whereas Group I received local infiltration intra-operatively after skin closure with the same amount of drug. The time taken for the first rescue analgesic and visual analog score (VAS) was noted, following which, the patient was administered intravenous morphine 0.1 mg/kg and connected to an intravenous patient controlled analgesia system with morphine for 24 hrs from the time of block administration. 24 h morphine requirement was noted. VAS and sedation scores were noted at 2, 4, 6 and 24 h postoperatively. The results were analyzed with SPSS 16. A P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Duration of analgesia and 24 h morphine requirement was analysed by Student's t-test. VAS scores, with paired comparisons at each time interval, were performed using the t-test or Mann-Whitney U-test, as appropriate. Categorical data were analyzed using Chi square or Fisher's exact test. In Group T, the time to rescue analgesic was significantly more and the VAS scores were lower (P = 0.001 and 0.003 respectively). The 24 hr morphine requirement and VAS at 2, 4, 6 and 24 h were less in the Group T (P = 0.001). Incidence of PONV was significant in Group I (P = 0

  15. Local infiltration analgesia followed by continuous infusion of local anesthetic solution for total hip arthroplasty: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyova, Olga; Lewis, Courtland G; Abrams, Jonathan H; Grady-Benson, John; Joyce, Michael E; Schutzer, Steven F; Arumugam, Sivasenthil; Caminiti, Stephanie; Sinha, Sanjay K

    2013-11-06

    We studied the efficacy of local infiltration analgesia in surgical wounds with 0.2% ropivacaine (50 mL), ketorolac (15 mg), and adrenaline (0.5 mg) compared with that of local infiltration analgesia combined with continuous infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine as a method of pain control after total hip arthroplasty. We hypothesized that as a component of multimodal analgesia, local infiltration analgesia followed by continuous infusion of ropivacaine would result in reduced postoperative opioid consumption and lower pain scores compared with infiltration alone, and that both of these techniques would be superior to placebo. In this prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 105 patients were randomized into three groups: Group I, in which patients received infiltration with ropivacaine, ketorolac, and adrenaline followed by continuous infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine at 5 mL/hr; Group II, in which patients received infiltration with ropivacaine, ketorolac, and adrenaline followed by continuous infusion of saline solution at 5 mL/hr; and Group III, in which patients received infiltration with saline solution followed by continuous infusion of saline solution at 5 mL/hr.All patients received celecoxib, pregabalin, and acetaminophen perioperatively and patient-controlled analgesia; surgery was performed under general anesthesia. Before wound closure, the tissues and periarticular space were infiltrated with ropivacaine, ketorolac, and adrenaline or saline solution and a fenestrated catheter was placed. The catheter was attached to a pump prefilled with either 0.2% ropivacaine or saline solution set to infuse at 5 mL/hr.The primary outcome measure was postoperative opioid consumption and the secondary outcome measures were pain scores, adverse side effects, and patient satisfaction. There were no differences between groups in the administration of opioids in the operating room, in the recovery room, or on the surgical floor. The pain scores on recovery room admission

  16. Altered gating and local anesthetic block mediated by residues in the I-S6 and II-S6 transmembrane segments of voltage-dependent Na+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratiev, Andrei; Tomaselli, Gordon F

    2003-09-01

    The cytoplasmic side of the voltage-dependent Na+ channel pore is putatively formed by the S6 segments of domains I to IV. The role of amino acid residues of I-S6 and II-S6 in channel gating and local anesthetic (LA) block was investigated using the cysteine scanning mutagenesis of the rat skeletal muscle Na+ channel (Nav1.4). G428C uniquely reduced sensitivity to rested state or first-pulse block by lidocaine without alterations in the voltage dependence or kinetics of gating that would otherwise account for the increase in the IC50 for block. Mutations in I-S6 (N434C and I436C) and in II-S6 (L785C and V787C) increased sensitivity to first-pulse block by lidocaine. Enhanced inactivation accounted for the increased sensitivity of N434C to lidocaine and hastening of inactivation of I436C in the absence of drug could account for higher affinity first-pulse block. Mutations in I-S6 (I424C, I425C, and F430C) and in II-S6 (I782C and V786C) reduced the use-dependent lidocaine block. The reduction in use-dependent block of F430C was consistent with alterations in inactivation gating; the other mutants did not exhibit gating changes that could explain the reduced sensitivity to lidocaine. Therefore, several amino acids (I424, I425, G428, I782, and V786), in addition to those previously identified (Yarov-Yarovoy et al., 2002), alter the sensitivity of Nav1.4 to lidocaine, independent of mutation-induced changes in gating. The magnitude of the change in the IC50 values, the isoform, and LA dependence of the changes in affinity suggest that the determinants of binding in I-S6 and II-S6 are subsidiary to those in IV-S6.

  17. Evaluation of Efficacy of Bone Scan With SPECT/CT in the Management of Low Back Pain: A Study Supported by Differential Diagnostic Local Anesthetic Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anuj; Jain, Suruchi; Agarwal, Anil; Gambhir, Sanjay; Shamshery, Chetna; Agarwal, Amita

    2015-12-01

    Conventional radiologic modalities provide details only about the anatomic aspect of the various structures of the spine. Frequently the structures that show abnormal morphology may not be the cause of low back pain (LBP). Functional imaging in the form of bone scan along with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT/CT) may be helpful in identifying structures causing pain, whether morphologically normal or not. The objective of this study is to evaluate the role of bone scan with SPECT/CT in management of patients with LBP. This is randomized double-blinded controlled study performed on 80 patients with LBP aged 20 to 80 years, ASA physical status I to III. Patients were randomized into bone scan and control groups consisting of 40 patients each. On the basis of the clinical features and radiologic findings a clinical diagnosis was made. After making a clinical diagnosis, the patients in bone scan group were subjected to bone scan with SPECT/CT. On the basis of the finding of the bone scan and SPECT/CT, a new working diagnosis was made and intervention was performed according to the new working diagnosis. Diagnostic blocks in the control group were given based on clinical diagnosis. Controlled comparative diagnostic blocks were performed with local anesthetic. The pain score just after the diagnostic block and at the time of discharge (approximately 4 h later) was recorded; the pain relief was recorded in percentage. In both the groups, sacroilitis was the most common diagnosis followed by facet joint arthropathy. The number of patients obtaining pain relief of >50% was significantly higher in the bone scan-positive group as compared with the control group. Three new clinical conditions were identified in the bone scan group. These conditions were multiple myeloma, avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and ankylosing spondylitis. Bone scan with SPECT/CT was found to complement the clinical workup of patients with LBP. Inclusion of bone scan with

  18. Addition of lacal anesthetics to contrast media. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, P.; Almen, T.; Golman, K.; Jonsson, K.; Nyman, U.; Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus

    1988-01-01

    The acute intravenous toxicity (i.v. LD 50 ) of solutions of the ratio 1.5 contrast media metrizoate or diatrizoate and the ratio 3.0 contrast medium metrizamide was determined in mice with and without the addition of local anesthetics to the solutions. The two local anesthetics mepivacaine or lidocaine were added to final concentrations up to 2.0 mg/ml of the contrast medium solutions. This corresponds to clinically used concentrations. All additions of local anesthetics to the solutions increased the mortalities caused by the contrast medium solutions. Addition of local anesthetics to a final concentration of 2 mg/ml approximately doubled the acute intravenous toxicity of the contrast media. The ratio 3 contrast media produce less hypertonic solutions than the ratio 1.5 contrast media and should be preferred for angiography because they cause less pain and do not require the addition of local anesthetics which increase the acute toxicity of the solutions. (orig.)

  19. Anesthetic-induced anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norred, Carol L

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this course is to update nurse anesthetists about anesthetic-induced anaphylaxis. This course discusses the pathophysiologic process of anaphylaxis with descriptions of the allergic immune response and the mediators and mechanisms of mast cell activation. The preoperative identification of patients at high risk and the assessment of potential anesthetic triggers of a hypersensitivity and/or allergic reaction are prudent strategies to minimize the risk of anaphylaxis. Other practices recommended for clinicians include suggestions for anesthetic management to decrease threat of an allergic response in high-risk patients. Furthermore, the identification of the severity grade of hypersensitivity reactions and the appropriate treatment of perioperative anaphylaxis is discussed. In addition, postoperative and follow-up interventions, including testing for patients who have had an anesthetic-induced hypersensitivity reaction, are considered.

  20. Anesthetizing the obese child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Anette; Lenz, Katja; Abildstrøm, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing. The focus of this review is the special anesthetic considerations regarding the perioperative management of obese children. With obesity the risk of comorbidity such as asthma, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, and diabetes increases...... drugs. This has important implications on how to estimate the optimal drug dose. This article offers a review of the literature on definition, prevalence and the pathophysiology of childhood obesity and provides suggestions on preanesthetic evaluation, airway management and dosage of the anesthetic...

  1. Raquianestesia contínua com altas doses de anestésicos locais Raquianestesia continua con altas dosis de anestésicos locales Continuous spinal anesthesia with high dose of local anesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni

    2010-10-01

    been gaining credibility. The objective of this paper is to report the possible safety of the new catheter with a large dose of hyperbaric 0.5% bupivacaine with 1.6% glucose associated with hyperbaric 2% lidocaine with 1.6% glucose. CASE REPORT: Male patient, 78 years old, 85 kg, 168 cm, physical status ASA III, with hypertension, coronary artery disease, and chronic renal failure. The patient was candidate for surgery for huge bilateral inguinal and umbilical hernias, being submitted to preoperative pneumoperitoneum for one week to stretch abdominal cavity. After venoclysis with an 18G catheter, he was monitored with cardioscope, non-invasive blood pressure, and pulse oximetry; he was sedated with 1 mg of midazolam and 100 µg of fentanyl intravenously, and placed in left lateral decubitus. He underwent continuous spinal anesthesia by a median puncture in L3-L4 with a set with a 27G cut-bevel needle and 22G catheter. The total dose of anesthetic used was 25 mg of 0.5% bupivacaine (hyperbaric, with 1.6% glucose, 160 mg of 2% lidocaine (hyperbaric, with 1.6% glucose, and morphine (100 µg. The patient was followed-up until the 30th postoperative day without neurological complaints. CONCLUSIONS: Recently, the poor distribution of the local anesthetic through the microcatheter was attributed as the cause of cauda equina syndrome. This case report showed that, with the administration of high doses of hyperbaric anesthetics through the new catheter, poor distribution or risk of cauda equina syndrome were not observed

  2. Preparation and physico-chemical characterization of inclusion complexes between local anesthetics and hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin; Preparacao e caracterizacao fisico-quimica de complexos de inclusao entre anestesicos locais e hidroxipropil-{beta}-ciclodextrina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Carolina Morales; Abrami, Priscila; Goncalves, Marcos Moises; Andreo Filho, Newton [Universidade de Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, Sergio Antonio; Paula, Eneida de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Bioquimica; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes [UNESP, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Ambiental]. E-mail: leonardo@sorocaba.unesp.br

    2007-07-15

    S(-) Bupivacaine (S(-)BVC) and Lidocaine (LDC) are widely used local anesthetics (LA). Hydroxypropyl {beta}-cyclodextrin (HP-{beta}-CD) is used as a drug-carrier system. The aim of this work was to characterize inclusion complexes between LA and HP-{beta}-CD. The affinity constants determined at different pHs show favourable complexation. The release kinetics experiments showed that S(-)BVC and LDC changed the released profiles in the presence of HP-{beta}-CD. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments gave information about the interaction between LA and the cyclodextrin cavity. This study focused on the physicochemical characterization of drug-delivery formulations that come out as potentially new therapeutic options for pain treatment. (author)

  3. Randomized controlled study of intraincisional infiltration versus intraperitoneal instillation of standardized dose of ropivacaine 0.2% in post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy pain: Do we really need high doses of local anesthetics-time to rethink!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal-Deep, Singh Mathuria; Anees, Afzal; Khan, Shehtaj; Khan, Mohammad Amanullah; Lodhi, Mehershree

    2018-01-16

    Earlier studies done to compare the efficacy of use of local anesthetics at intraperitoneal location versus intraincisional use had utilized equal amount of drugs at the two locations, usually 10-20 ml. Using this large amount of drug in the small space of intraincisional location as compared to similar amount of drug in large intraperitoneal space created an inadvertent bias in favor of patients receiving the drug intraincisionally so these patients naturally experienced less pain. To conduct a randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled study by standardizing dose of local anesthetic, to compare the effectiveness of intraperitoneal against intraincisional use of ropivacaine 0.2% for post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy pain relief. 294 patients underwent elective 4-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients were triple blindly randomized. All patients received ~ 23 ml of solution, of which 20 ml was given intraperitoneally (1 ml/cm; 16 ml along right hemi-dome and 4 ml in gall bladder fossa) and ~ 3 ml intraincisionally (1 ml/cm of length of incision). Solution was either normal saline or drug (0.2% ropivacaine) depending on the group [controls (n = 86), intraperitoneal group (n = 100), and intraincisional group (n = 108)]. 5 different pain scales were used for assessment of overall pain. Pain scores were assessed at 5 points of time. Patients in intraincisional group showed significantly less overall pain and rescue analgesia requirement (p  0.05); and shoulder pain was significantly less in intraperitoneal group (p < 0.05). The intraincisional use of injection ropivacaine at its minimum concentration of 0.2% in minimal doses of 1 ml/cm at the end of procedure provides significantly more post-operative analgesia as compared to intraperitoneal group and controls. However, for controlling shoulder pain, the use of intraperitoneal ropivacaine is desirable.

  4. The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy/American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Recommendations on Local Anesthetics and Adjuvants Dosage in Pediatric Regional Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Santhanam; Ecoffey, Claude; Bosenberg, Adrian; Lonnqvist, Per-Anne; de Oliveira, Gildasio S; de Leon Casasola, Oscar; de Andrés, José; Ivani, Giorgio

    2018-02-01

    Dosage of local anesthetics (LAs) used for regional anesthesia in children is not well determined. In order to evaluate and come to a consensus regarding some of these controversial topics, The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy (ESRA) and the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) developed a Joint Committee Practice Advisory on Local Anesthetics and Adjuvants Dosage in Pediatric Regional Anesthesia. Representatives from both ASRA and ESRA composed the joint committee practice advisory. Evidence-based recommendations were based on a systematic search of the literature. In cases where no literature was available, expert opinion was elicited. Spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine can be performed with a dose of 1 mg/kg for newborn and/or infant and a dose of 0.5 mg/kg in older children (>1 year of age). Tetracaine 0.5% is recommended for spinal anesthesia (dose, 0.07-0.13 mL/kg). Ultrasound-guided upper-extremity peripheral nerve blocks (eg, axillary, infraclavicular, interscalene, supraclavicular) in children can be performed successfully and safely using a recommended LA dose of bupivacaine or ropivacaine of 0.5 to 1.5 mg/kg. Dexmedetomidine can be used as an adjunct to prolong the duration of peripheral nerve blocks in children. High-level evidence is not yet available to guide dosage of LA used in regional blocks in children. The ASRA/ESRA recommendations intend to provide guidance in order to reduce the large variability of LA dosage currently observed in clinical practice.

  5. Efeito de anestésicos locais com e sem vasoconstritor em pacientes com arritmias ventriculares Effect of local anesthetics with and without vasoconstrictor agent in patients with ventricular arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Fernández Cáceres

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A utilização de anestésicos locais associados a vasoconstritores para tratamento odontológico de rotina de pacientes cardiopatas ainda gera controvérsia, em razão do risco de efeitos cardiovasculares adversos. OBJETIVO: Avaliar e comparar os efeitos hemodinâmicos do uso de anestésico local com vasoconstritor não-adrenérgico em pacientes portadores de arritmias ventriculares, em relação ao uso de anestésico sem vasoconstritor. MÉTODOS: Um estudo prospectivo randomizado avaliou 33 pacientes com sorologia positiva para doença de Chagas' e 32 pacientes com doença arterial coronariana, portadores de arritmia ventricular complexa ao Holter (>10 EV/h e TVNS, 21 do sexo feminino, idade de 54,73 + 7,94 anos, submetidos a tratamento odontológico de rotina com anestesia pterigomandibular. Esses pacientes foram divididos em dois grupos: no grupo I, utilizou-se prilocaína a 3% associada a felipressina 0,03 UI/ml, e no grupo II, lidocaína a 2% sem vasoconstritor. Avaliaram-se o número e a complexidade de extra-sístoles, a freqüência cardíaca e a pressão arterial sistêmica dos pacientes no dia anterior, uma hora antes, durante o procedimento odontológico e uma hora após. RESULTADOS: Não foram observadas alterações hemodinâmicas, nem aumento do número e da complexidade da arritmia ventricular, relacionados ao anestésico utilizado, em ambos os grupos. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados sugerem que prilocaína a 3% associada a felipressina 0,03 UI/ml pode ser utilizada com segurança em pacientes chagásicos e coronarianos, com arritmia ventricular complexa.BACKGROUND: The routine use of local anesthetics associated to vasoconstrictors for the dental treatment of patients with cardiopathies is still controversial, due to the risk of adverse cardiovascular effects. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare the hemodynamic effects of the use of local anesthetics with a non-adrenergic vasoconstrictor in patients with ventricular

  6. Influência de vasoconstritores associados a anestésicos locais sobre a pressão arterial de ratos hipertensos e normotensos Influence of vasoconstrictors associated with local anesthetics on the arterial pressure of hypertensive and normotensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apparecido Neri Daniel

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available A utilização de anestésicos locais associados a vasoconstritores em pacientes hipertensos é controversa. Neste estudo, verificamos a influência desta associação sobre a pressão arterial caudal (PA em ratos hipertensos DOCA-sal. Após ligeira anestesia com éter, os anestésicos GRUPO I - lidocaína 2% sem vasoconstritor, GRUPO II - lidocaína com fenilefrina, GRUPO III - lidocaína a 2% com noradrenalina, GRUPO IV - prilocaína 3% com felipressina, GRUPO V - mepivacaína 2% com adrenalina e GRUPO VI - mepivacaína com noradrenalina foram injetados na submucosa da boca (anestesia infiltrativa, em ratos DOCA-sal e controles. A PA foi determinada 5 e 15 minutos após a primeira dose do anestésico e também 5 e 15 minutos após a segunda dose. Os dados obtidos indicaram que: a a PA dos ratos DOCA-sal (193,05 ± 4,25 mmHg; n = 43 foi significativamente superior àquela observada nos animais controles (115,64 ± 2,47 mmHg; n = 43 e, b não houve variação significativa nas PA observadas em animais DOCA-sal e controles pela administração dos anestésicos locais testados. Assim, nossos dados experimentais sugerem que a presença de agentes vasoconstritores associados à lidocaína 2%, à prilocaína 3% e à mepivacaína 2% não interferem na PA desses animais, neste modelo experimental de hipertensão.The utilization of local anesthetics associated with vasoconstrictors in hypertensive patients is controversial. The purpose of this investigation was to verify the influence of this association on the arterial pressure (AP in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. After light ether anesthesia, the anesthetics (Group I - lidocaine 2% without vasoconstrictor; Group II - lidocaine 2% with phenylephrine, Group III - lidocaine 2% with noradrenaline- Group IV - prylocaine 3% with felypressin; Group V - mepivacaine 2% with epinephrine, and Group VI - mepivacaine 2% with norepinephrine were injected into mucobuccal fold (infiltration anesthesia, in DOCA

  7. Children′s behavioral pain reactions during local anesthetic injection using cotton-roll vibration method compared with routine topical anesthesia: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bagherian

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: It may be concluded that the cotton-roll vibration method can be more helpful than the routine topical anesthesia in reducing behavioral pain reactions in children during local anesthesia administration.

  8. Development of a novel training model for dental infiltration anesthetic injections

    OpenAIRE

    クドウ, マサル; シンヤ, ノボル; Masaru, KUDO; Noboru, SHINYA

    2005-01-01

    A new dental training model (M2004IA) for infiltration local anesthetic injection was developed. In this new training model silicon gingival mucosa was designed to expand upon insertion of a needle, his to be followed by introduction of a local anesthetic solution into the silicon gum and silicon gingival mucosa (SGM). This study measured the injection pressure during injection under the SGM. The model M2004IA-HP was designed for hard palate infiltration anesthetic injection training involvin...

  9. Anesthetics Impact the Resolution of Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredman, Gabrielle; Kasuga, Kie; Gelman, Simon; Serhan, Charles N.

    2008-01-01

    Background Local and volatile anesthetics are widely used for surgery. It is not known whether anesthetics impinge on the orchestrated events in spontaneous resolution of acute inflammation. Here we investigated whether a commonly used local anesthetic (lidocaine) and a widely used inhaled anesthetic (isoflurane) impact the active process of resolution of inflammation. Methods and Findings Using murine peritonitis induced by zymosan and a systems approach, we report that lidocaine delayed and blocked key events in resolution of inflammation. Lidocaine inhibited both PMN apoptosis and macrophage uptake of apoptotic PMN, events that contributed to impaired PMN removal from exudates and thereby delayed the onset of resolution of acute inflammation and return to homeostasis. Lidocaine did not alter the levels of specific lipid mediators, including pro-inflammatory leukotriene B4, prostaglandin E2 and anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4, in the cell-free peritoneal lavages. Addition of a lipoxin A4 stable analog, partially rescued lidocaine-delayed resolution of inflammation. To identify protein components underlying lidocaine's actions in resolution, systematic proteomics was carried out using nanospray-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Lidocaine selectively up-regulated pro-inflammatory proteins including S100A8/9 and CRAMP/LL-37, and down-regulated anti-inflammatory and some pro-resolution peptides and proteins including IL-4, IL-13, TGF-â and Galectin-1. In contrast, the volatile anesthetic isoflurane promoted resolution in this system, diminishing the amplitude of PMN infiltration and shortening the resolution interval (Ri) ∼50%. In addition, isoflurane down-regulated a panel of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, as well as proteins known to be active in cell migration and chemotaxis (i.e., CRAMP and cofilin-1). The distinct impact of lidocaine and isoflurane on selective molecules may underlie their opposite actions in resolution of inflammation

  10. Anesthetics impact the resolution of inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Chiang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Local and volatile anesthetics are widely used for surgery. It is not known whether anesthetics impinge on the orchestrated events in spontaneous resolution of acute inflammation. Here we investigated whether a commonly used local anesthetic (lidocaine and a widely used inhaled anesthetic (isoflurane impact the active process of resolution of inflammation.Using murine peritonitis induced by zymosan and a systems approach, we report that lidocaine delayed and blocked key events in resolution of inflammation. Lidocaine inhibited both PMN apoptosis and macrophage uptake of apoptotic PMN, events that contributed to impaired PMN removal from exudates and thereby delayed the onset of resolution of acute inflammation and return to homeostasis. Lidocaine did not alter the levels of specific lipid mediators, including pro-inflammatory leukotriene B(4, prostaglandin E(2 and anti-inflammatory lipoxin A(4, in the cell-free peritoneal lavages. Addition of a lipoxin A(4 stable analog, partially rescued lidocaine-delayed resolution of inflammation. To identify protein components underlying lidocaine's actions in resolution, systematic proteomics was carried out using nanospray-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Lidocaine selectively up-regulated pro-inflammatory proteins including S100A8/9 and CRAMP/LL-37, and down-regulated anti-inflammatory and some pro-resolution peptides and proteins including IL-4, IL-13, TGF-â and Galectin-1. In contrast, the volatile anesthetic isoflurane promoted resolution in this system, diminishing the amplitude of PMN infiltration and shortening the resolution interval (Ri approximately 50%. In addition, isoflurane down-regulated a panel of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, as well as proteins known to be active in cell migration and chemotaxis (i.e., CRAMP and cofilin-1. The distinct impact of lidocaine and isoflurane on selective molecules may underlie their opposite actions in resolution of inflammation

  11. Anesthetic services in Serbia

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    Majstorović Branislava M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Explanation the topic: Due to the development of knowledge and technology our world is becoming a global city where rapidly occur changes in political and economic milieu, such as the introduction of corporate capitalism in the economic crisis, contemporary migrations etc. Health care as a public good on one hand and as the highest individual value of each individual on the other hand, changes and suffers changes. Health care system policy insists on partnership relation of the individual with medical service providers. This refers to the a secure and accessible modern treatment of each individual and to the state as to rationalize and reduce medical costs with effective methods of treatment. Topic position in scientific/professional public: Anesthesiology is evolving along with the surgical disciplines. Highly sophisticated with organized service, anesthesiology is equally important because of the multiplicity of anesthetic services in the surgical treatment of the disease in terms of teamwork and multidisciplinary treatment of the disease. The intention is to provide a description of work, education and our results in the economic, geopolitical and cultural context of the Serbian health system policy as well as to improve safe performance, availability and cost rationalization in anesthesia. The health care system is territorially organized in Serbia. In hospitals, Serbia employs 940 anesthesiologists (1:7,575 inhabitants. According to data from the Regional Medical Chamber of Belgrade,382 anesthesiologists were registered in Belgrade out of total. Anesthesia department network is well organized in all surgical hospitals. Anesthesia services are available depending on the place of residence, type of surgical illness or injury, and the distance to the nearest clinic. Sub-specializations in the field of anesthesiology have not been introduced although pediatric, neurosurgery and cardiosurgical anesthesia have spontaniously singled, as well as

  12. Infiltration of wounds and extraperitoneal space with local anesthetic in patients undergoing laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair of unilateral inguinal hernias: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M H; Hamade, A; Choudhry, M N; Hamza, N; Nadeem, R; Ammori, B J

    2010-01-01

    The potential analgesic benefit of infiltration of the wounds and extraperitoneal space with local anesthetic in patients undergoing laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) repair of inguinal hernias remains unclear. Consenting adults scheduled to undergo laparoscopic TEP repair of unilateral inguinal hernias were recruited to this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial of 0.25% bupivacaine (Group I) versus saline (Group II) infiltration of abdominal wounds and the extraperitoneal space. Pain scores were assessed at 4 and 24 hours postoperatively using the short-form McGill pain questionnaire (SF-MPQ), the Present Pain Index (PPI) score and the visual analogue scale (VAS). The intravenous and oral analgesic requirements were recorded. Each patient completed questionnaire to assess their satisfaction with the postoperative analgesia. 40 patients were randomized (Group I, n = 20; Group II, n = 20). The two groups were comparable for age, gender, body mass index, and operating time. Minor complications occurred in one patient in each group. There were no significant differences in the postoperative SF-MPQ scores, PPI and VAS at 4 hours (p = 0.413, p = 0.631, p = 0.615 respectively) and 24 hours (p = 0.116, p = 0.310, p = 0.100 respectively) post-operatively. The parenteral and oral analgesics consumed post-surgery were comparable (p = 0.605, p = 0.235). No difference was ob-served in the patient satisfaction scores. Infiltration of abdominal wounds and extraperitoneal space with bupivacaine in patients undergoing laparoscopic TEP repair of unilateral inguinal hernias does not appear to offer analgesic benefits.Key words: Laparoscopic; extraperitoneal; inguinal hernia; repair; pain; bupivacaine; analgesia; satisfaction; day case; randomized.

  13. Local anesthetics: interaction with human erythrocyte membranes as studied by {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance; Anestesicos locais: interacao com membranas de eritrocitos de sangue humano, estudada por ressonancia magnetica nuclear de {sup 1}H e {sup 31}P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Paula, Eneida de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Bioquimica]. E-mail: depaula@unicamp.br

    2004-02-01

    The literature carries many theories about the mechanism of action of local anesthetics (LA). We can highlight those focusing the direct effect of LA on the sodium channel protein and the ones that consider the interaction of anesthetic molecules with the lipid membrane phase. The interaction between local anesthetics and human erythrocyte membranes has been studied by {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It was found that lidocaine (LDC) and benzocaine (BZC) bind to the membranes, increase the mobility of the protons of the phospholipids acyl chains, and decrease the mobility and/or change the structure of the polar head groups. The results indicate that lidocaine molecules are inserted across the polar and liquid interface of the membrane, establishing both electrostatic (charged form) and hydrophobic (neutral form) interactions. Benzocaine locates itself a little deeper in the bilayer, between the interfacial glycerol region and the hydrophobic core. These changes in mobility or conformation of membrane lipids could affect the Na{sup +}-channel protein insertion in the bilayer, stabilizing it in the inactivated state, thus causing anesthesia. (author)

  14. Anestésicos locais: interação com membranas biológicas e com o canal de sódio voltagem-dependente Local anesthetics: interaction with biological membranes and with the voltage-gated sodium channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Ribeiro de Araujo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Many theories about the mechanism of action of local anesthetics (LA are described in the literature. Two types of theories can be distinguished: those that focus on the direct effects of LA on their target protein in the axon membranes, i.e. the voltage-gated sodium channel and the ones that take into account the interaction of anesthetic molecules with the lipid membrane phase for the reversible nerve blockage. Since there is a direct correlation between LA hydrophobicity and potency, it is crucial to take this physico-chemical property into account to understand the mechanism of action of LA, be it on the sodium channel protein, lipid(s, or on the whole membrane phase.

  15. Bilateral Fetal Hydrothorax Requiring Intrauterine Fetal Thoracoamniotic Shunts: Anesthetic Considerations and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Hache

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available After prenatal diagnosis of bilateral fetal hydrothorax, ascites, and polyhydramnios, bilateral thoracoamniotic shunts were placed at 29 weeks gestation using an ultrasound-guided, minimally invasive technique. Anesthetic care was managed using intravenous sedation and local anesthesia infiltration. The anesthetic considerations for such procedures are discussed.

  16. Bilateral Fetal Hydrothorax Requiring Intrauterine Fetal Thoracoamniotic Shunts: Anesthetic Considerations and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Hache, John J.; Emery, Stephen P.; Vallejo, Manuel C.

    2009-01-01

    After prenatal diagnosis of bilateral fetal hydrothorax, ascites, and polyhydramnios, bilateral thoracoamniotic shunts were placed at 29 weeks gestation using an ultrasound-guided, minimally invasive technique. Anesthetic care was managed using intravenous sedation and local anesthesia infiltration. The anesthetic considerations for such procedures are discussed.

  17. Bilateral Fetal Hydrothorax Requiring Intrauterine Fetal Thoracoamniotic Shunts: Anesthetic Considerations and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hache, John J.; Emery, Stephen P.; Vallejo, Manuel C.

    2009-01-01

    After prenatal diagnosis of bilateral fetal hydrothorax, ascites, and polyhydramnios, bilateral thoracoamniotic shunts were placed at 29 weeks gestation using an ultrasound-guided, minimally invasive technique. Anesthetic care was managed using intravenous sedation and local anesthesia infiltration. The anesthetic considerations for such procedures are discussed. PMID:19526182

  18. Neurogenesis and developmental anesthetic neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunchai; Berg, Daniel A; Furmanski, Orion; Jackson, William M; Ryu, Yun Kyoung; Gray, Christy D; Mintz, C David

    The mechanism by which anesthetics might act on the developing brain in order to cause long term deficits remains incompletely understood. The hippocampus has been identified as a structure that is likely to be involved, as rodent models show numerous deficits in behavioral tasks of learning that are hippocampal-dependent. The hippocampus is an unusual structure in that it is the site of large amounts of neurogenesis postnatally, particularly in the first year of life in humans, and these newly generated neurons are critical to the function of this structure. Intriguingly, neurogenesis is a major developmental event that occurs during postulated windows of vulnerability to developmental anesthetic neurotoxicity across the different species in which it has been studied. In this review, we examine the evidence for anesthetic effects on neurogenesis in the early postnatal period and ask whether neurogenesis should be studied further as a putative mechanism of injury. Multiple anesthetics are considered, and both in vivo and in vitro work is presented. While there is abundant evidence that anesthetics act to suppress neurogenesis at several different phases, evidence of a causal link between these effects and any change in learning behavior remains elusive. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Day-surgery patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain than those anesthetized with sevoflurane.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, Terry

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: There have been recent studies suggesting that patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain compared with patients anesthetized with volatile anesthetics. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind study, 80 patients undergoing day-case diagnostic laparoscopic gynecological surgery were either anesthetized with IV propofol or sevoflurane. The primary outcome measured was pain on a visual analog scale. RESULTS: Patients anesthetized with propofol had less pain compared with patients anesthetized with sevoflurane (P = 0.01). There was no difference in any of the other measured clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The patients anesthetized with propofol appeared to have less pain than patients anesthetized with sevoflurane.

  20. Short-term outcomes of subacromial injection of combined corticosteroid with low-volume compared to high-volume local anesthetic for rotator cuff impingement syndrome: a randomized controlled non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonard, Manusak; Sumanont, Sermsak; Arirachakaran, Alisara; Apiwatanakul, Punyawat; Boonrod, Artit; Kanchanatawan, Wichan; Kongtharvonskul, Jatupon

    2018-02-08

    In symptomatic tendinosis, a corticosteroid injection into the subacromial space is a palliative treatment option. This study compares high volumes (10 cc) of local anesthetic (LA) combined with triamcinolone acetate (TA) with low volumes (4 cc) of LA combined with TA to see whether the latter would provide similar pain, function and complication outcomes for subacromial injections in patients with impingement syndrome. This single-center, randomized, single-blind, non-inferiority trial included patients with shoulder pain and positive multiple clinical tests supporting the diagnosis of impingement syndrome. All 52 patients received subacromial injections, with either high-volume corticosteroid injections (HCI) (10 mL total volume of 1% lidocaine plus 40 mg TA) in 26 patients or low-volume corticosteroid injections (LCI) (4 mL total volume of 1% lidocaine plus 40 mg TA) in 26 patients. The demographic data were reported with the primary outcomes being VAS and WORC scores measured at 30 min, then 2 and 8 weeks after receiving the injections. A non-inferiority margin of 13% was assumed. Fifty-two patients (26 patients per group) were enrolled in the HCI and LCI. Mean VAS and WORC scores of HCI and LCI at baseline were 6.96, 33.85, 6.81 and 36.54, respectively. The mean VAS measured at 30 min, 2 and 8 weeks was 4.04, 2.08 and 1.20, respectively, in HCI group and 2.65, 1.95 and 1.26, respectively, in LCI group. The mean WORC at 2 and 8 weeks was 67.46 and 81.74, respectively, in HCI group and 65.42 and 80.12 in LCI group. These were not statistically significantly different (P > 0.05 in all). Corticosteroid injections can be used in the treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome. Low-volume (4 cc) corticosteroid injections have non-inferior pain results for VAS score when compared with high-volume (10 cc) corticosteroid injections. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV: NCT03120923. Level I.

  1. Evaluation of two different dosages of local anesthetic solution used for ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block for pain relief and positioning for central neuraxial block in patients of fracture neck of the femur

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    Abhijit A Karmarkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical management of the fracture femur is preferred so as to prevent complications associated with prolonged immobilization. Central neuraxial blockade (CNB is an attractive option for these patients, and an optimal positioning of the patient is a definite requirement. Owing to the pain associated with movement of the fractured limb, it becomes difficult for the patients to give suitable positioning. Femoral nerve block (FNB features as a rescue analgesia so as to provide adequate analgesia for facilitation of satisfactory positioning. Aim: This study aims to compare analgesic effect of two different dosages of local anesthetic (LA solution administered for ultrasonography (USG-guided FNB given to facilitate optimal positioning for conduct of CNB. Materials and Methods: After taking permission from the institutional review board, eighty patients were enrolled in the study to find out the efficacy of dosage of LA solution for FNB in providing pain relief caused by movement of fractured limb during conduct of regional anesthesia. Informed consent was taken. All patients were given USG-guided FNB. Patients were randomized using a computer-generated random number table, into two groups of forty patients each. Group A patients received USG-guided 12 ml of LA solution containing 10 ml lignocaine solution without preservative (2% plus 2 ml normal saline (NS, while Group B patients received USG-guided 15 ml of LA solution containing 13 ml lignocaine solution without preservative (2% plus 2 ml NS for positioning before combined spinal epidural. Results: A total of eighty patients, divided randomly into two groups, were enrolled in the study. Demographics (age, sex, weight, and American Society of Anesthesiologists grades were similar in both groups. No statistical significance was found in the numeric rating scale scores at baseline, zero minutes, 5, and 15 min in both the groups. Conclusion: USG-guided FNB with 12 ml of LA solution was

  2. An estimation of the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasound guidance facilitates precise needle and injectate placement, increasing axillary block success rates, reducing onset times, and permitting local anesthetic dose reduction. The minimum effective volume of local anesthetic in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block is unknown. The authors performed a study to estimate the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (2% LidoEpi) in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

  3. Bloqueio combinado para analgesia de parto: a adição de sufentanil ao anestésico local influencia o apgar dos recém-nascidos? Bloqueo combinado para analgesia de parto: ¿la adición de sufentanil al anestésico local influye en el apgar de los reciÿn nacidos? Combined spinal-epidural for labor analgesia: does the addition of sufentanil to the local anesthetic influence apgar scores of the newborns?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingos Dias Cicarelli

    2007-06-01

    Universidade de São Paulo (USP y evaluar si la utilización de sufentanil asociado al anestésico local en el BC altera el Apgar de los recién nacidos. MÉTODO: Se analizaron las fichas de anestesia en que se realizaron BC para la analgesia de parto durante 12 meses en el Hospital Universitario de la USP. Se registraron el uso y la dosis de sufentanil, la vía de parto utilizada y las puntuaciones de Apgar del 1°, 5° y 10° minutos de los recién nacidos. RESULTADOS: De los 635 BC evaluados, 307 utilizaron sufentanil y anestésico local (Grupo SUF y 328, solo anestésico local (Grupo AL. Ciento veinte y siete (20% fueron realizados a través de la técnica de aguja por dentro de aguja y los otros 508 (80% realizados por la técnica dos punciones. No se verificó diferencia entre el Apgar de los grupos estudiados en el 1°, 5° y 10° minutos. CONCLUSIONES: El sufentanil utilizado en el bloqueo combinado no alteró el Apgar de los recién nacidos.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Combined spinal-epidural (CSE is a very common obstetric technique. However, the literature does not present a standardization regarding the technique, doses, and anesthetics used, besides there is also the controversy about the possibility that the addition of opioids to the local anesthetic causes fetal bradycardia and affects its vitality. The aim of this study was to identify the techniques and anesthetics used in the Anesthesiology Service of the Hospital Universitário of Universidade de São Paulo (USP and determine whether the use of sufentanil associated with the local anesthetic affects Apgar scores of newborns. METHODS: The anesthesiology charts of patients submitted to CSE for labor analgesia over a 12-month period at the Hospital Universitário of USP were analyzed. The use and dose of sufentanil, the type of delivery, and Apgar scores in the 1st, 5th, and 10th minutes were recorded. RESULTS: Of the 635 CSE analyzed, 307 used sufentanil and local anesthetic (SUF Group and 328 only local

  4. The Thermodynamics of General and Local Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Sasse-Middelhoff, Henrike; Heimburg, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    General anesthetics are known to cause depression of the freezing point of transitions in biomembranes. This is a consequence of ideal mixing of the anesthetic drugs in the membrane fluid phase and exclusion from the solid phase. Such a generic law provides physical justification of the famous Meyer-Overton rule. We show here that general anesthetics, barbiturates and local anesthetics all display the same effect on melting transitions. Their effect is reversed by hydrostatic pressure. Thus, the thermodynamic behavior of local anesthetics is very similar to that of general anesthetics. We present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of heat capacity profiles of membranes in the presence of anesthetics. This analysis is able to describe experimentally observed calorimetric profiles and permits prediction of the anesthetic features of arbitrary molecules. In addition, we discuss the thermodynamic origin of the cutoff-effect of long-chain alcohols and the additivity of the effect of general and local anesthetics.

  5. [Infant boy with propionic acidemia: anesthetic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ródenas, L; Hernández-Palazón, J; Burguillos-López, S; Sánchez-Ortega, J L; Castaño-Collado, I; García-Ferreira, J

    2005-01-01

    A 12-month-old boy diagnosed with propionic acidemia underwent gastrostomy. The patient's general state was good and he was alert, but with reduced muscular tone (unstable when seated with support, floppy head) and with dystonic movements in all extremities. An electroencephalogram showed slightly slowed brain activity. The patient was being treated with a low protein diet, phenobarbital, L-carnitine, L-isoleucine, and biotin. Surgery was carried out in satisfactory conditions with general anesthesia without opioids combined with infiltration of the surgical wound with local anesthetic. Recovery from anesthesia was rapid and free of complications. Propionic acidemia is caused by mitochondrial propionyl coenzyme carboxylase deficiency. Most patients have episodes of severe metabolic ketoacidosis as a result of excessive protein intake, delayed development, vomiting, gastroesophageal reflux, lethargy, hypotonia, and convulsions. The anesthetic approach involves avoiding triggers of metabolic acidosis (such as fasting, dehydration, hypoxemia, and hypotension) and preventing airway complications. Agents that metabolize propionic acid (such as succinylcholine, benzylisoquinoline neuromuscular blocking agents, and propofol) are not used, as they can exacerbate acidemia. We also believe that using local or regional anesthesia in combination with general anesthesia without opiates is safe and effective for controlling pain during surgery and postoperative recovery, as that combination avoids respiratory depression in these patients, who are highly sensitive to opiates.

  6. Effects of Anesthetic Management on Early Postoperative Recovery, Hemodynamics and Pain After Supratentorial Craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrian, Eugenia; Kaye, Alan David; Varner, Chelsia L; Guerra, Carolina; Vadivelu, Nalini; Urman, Richard D; Zelman, Vladimir; Lumb, Philip D; Rosa, Giovanni; Bilotta, Federico

    2015-10-01

    Various clinical trials have assessed how intraoperative anesthetics can affect early recovery, hemodynamics and nociception after supratentorial craniotomy. Whether or not the difference in recovery pattern differs in a meaningful way with anesthetic choice is controversial. This review examines and compares different anesthetics with respect to wake-up time, hemodynamics, respiration, cognitive recovery, pain, nausea and vomiting, and shivering. When comparing inhalational anesthetics to intravenous anesthetics, either regimen produces similar recovery results. Newer shorter acting agents accelerate the process of emergence and extubation. A balanced inhalational/intravenous anesthetic could be desirable for patients with normal intracranial pressure, while total intravenous anesthesia could be beneficial for patients with elevated intracranial pressure. Comparison of inhalational anesthetics shows all appropriate for rapid emergence, decreasing time to extubation, and cognitive recovery. Comparison of opioids demonstrates similar awakening and extubation time if the infusion of longer acting opioids was ended at the appropriate time. Administration of local anesthetics into the skin, and addition of corticosteroids, NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors, and PCA therapy postoperatively provided superior analgesia. It is also important to emphasize the possibility of long-term effects of anesthetics on cognitive function. More research is warranted to develop best practices strategies for the future that are evidence-based.

  7. Formulações de anestésicos locais de liberação controlada: aplicações terapêuticas Formulaciones de anestésicos locales de liberación controlada: aplicaciones terapéuticas Drug-delivery systems for local anesthetics: therapeutic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Ribeiro de Araújo

    2003-09-01

    ésicos locales indican una nueva dirección en el desarrollo de formulaciones anestésicas más eficaces y seguras.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Many researchers in the last four decades have been devoted to the development of drug-delivery systems. Since its first application in the pharmaceutical industry, many results have been obtained especially in the molecular manipulation of carriers and their interaction with encapsulated drugs. These new carriers have the advantage of bypassing encapsulated drugs restraining physicochemical properties (such as water or membrane solubility, thus improving pharmacodynamics (therapeutic effect potentiation, pharmacokinetics (control of tissue absorption and distribution and toxic effects (lower local and systemic toxicity. Liposomes and cyclodextrins are among the most important carriers which have shown to be quite advantageous in the development of drug-delivery systems for local anesthetics. This study aimed at reviewing the interaction of local anesthetics with liposomes and cyclodextrins, the development of basic and applied research on the field, in addition to therapeutic applicability of these formulations. CONTENTS: Liposomes have the ability to control drug delivery to target tissues, fractionating drug release in its site of action. Cyclodextrins, on the other hand, change intensity and duration of effects due to low systemic drug absorption. Basic and clinical studies have pointed out that the administration of local anesthetics in liposome or cyclodextrin formulations induces slow release of the drugs, prolonging the anesthetic action and decreasing cardiac and nervous systems toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: Although studies are still in progress, drug-delivery systems are flagging a new direction for the development of safer and more effective local anesthetic formulations.

  8. Scientometrics of anesthetic drugs and their techniques of administration, 1984–2013

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    Vlassakov KV

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kamen V Vlassakov, Igor Kissin Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The aim of this study was to assess progress in the field of anesthetic drugs over the past 30 years using scientometric indices: popularity indices (general and specific, representing the proportion of articles on a drug relative to all articles in the field of anesthetics (general index or the subfield of a specific class of anesthetics (specific index; index of change, representing the degree of growth in publications on a topic from one period to the next; index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000 biomedical journals covered by PubMed; and index of ultimate success, representing a publication outcome when a new drug takes the place of a common drug previously used for the same purpose. Publications on 58 topics were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. Our analysis showed that during 2009–2013, out of seven anesthetics with a high general popularity index (≥2.0, only two were introduced after 1980, ie, the inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane and the local anesthetic ropivacaine; however, only sevoflurane had a high index of expectations (12.1. Among anesthetic adjuncts, in 2009–2013, only one agent, sugammadex, had both an extremely high index of change (>100 and a high index of expectations (25.0, reflecting the novelty of its mechanism of action. The index of ultimate success was positive with three anesthetics, ie, lidocaine, isoflurane, and propofol, all of which were introduced much longer than 30 years ago. For the past 30 years, there were no new anesthetics that have produced changes in scientometric indices indicating real progress. Keywords: anesthetics, anesthetic adjuvants, mortality, safety margins, therapeutic indices

  9. Topical anesthetic versus lidocaine infiltration in arteriovenous fistula cannulation

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    Anisha George

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: End stage renal disease (ESRD patients on maintenance hemodialysis undergo arterio-venous fistula (AVF cannulation prior to each hemodialysis session for blood access. Prior to cannulation lidocaine infiltration is done, which is often perceived as painful. Eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA has been found to significantly reduce pain associated with radial artery cannulation compared with lidocaine infiltration. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of EMLA compared to infiltration of lidocaine in hemodialysis patients for AVF cannulation. Materials and Methods: A single-centre, crossover study of patients with an AVF on regular maintenance hemodialysis was performed in the dialysis unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital. The site of AVF, number of attempts for AVF cannulation and cannula insertion time were recorded. The patients were asked about the acceptability of application of the anesthetic, delay between anesthetic and cannulation and to score the pain on cannulation. Results: Fifty patients were included in the study. With the visual analog scale, pain score on infiltration was 4.8. Pain score on cannulation after topical application was 2.9 and after infiltration, 2.0. The number of attempts for cannulation and the cannula insertion time were similar. Anesthesia was more stressful in the injectable group rather than the topical group (P < 0.001. Delay between anesthetic and cannulation was unacceptable in the topical group (P < 0.001. Patient compliance was better during infiltration compared to topical (P < 0.005. Mean pain score during infiltration of anesthetic was significantly higher than cannulation pain after either anesthetic, although pain on cannulation was higher in the topical group (P < 0.001. Conclusions: EMLA offers a suitable alternative to lidocaine infiltration for patients using AVF for blood access.

  10. Potent Inhalational Anesthetics for Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satuito, Mary; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide and the volatile inhalational anesthetics have defined anxiety and pain control in both dentistry and medicine for over a century. From curious experimentation to spectacular public demonstrations, the initial work of 2 dentists, Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, persists to this day in modern surgery and anesthesia. This article reviews the history, similarities, differences, and clinical applications of the most popular inhalational agents used in contemporary dental surgical settings.

  11. Anesthetic Related Advances with Cyclodextrins

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    Mark Welliver

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrins encapsulate and electrostatically bind to lipophilic molecules. The exterior of cyclodextrins are water-soluble and maintain aqueous solubility despite encapsulation of non-aqueous soluble molecules. This unique ability to encapsulate lipophilic molecules and maintain water solubility confers numerous pharmacologic advantages for both drug delivery and removal. Cyclodextrins, a component part of supramolecular chemistry, may be in its infancy of anesthetic application but recent advances have been described as novel and revolutionary. A review of current research coupled with an understanding of cyclodextrin properties is necessary to fully appreciate the current uses and future potentials of these unique molecules.

  12. Anesthetic consideration for neuromuscular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jeffery A; Murphy, Glenn S

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this review is to examine data relating to perioperative management of the patient with neuromuscular disorders RECENT FINDINGS: Patients with pre-existing neuromuscular disorders are at risk for a number of postoperative complications that are related to anesthetic drugs that are administered intraoperatively. Careful preoperative assessment is necessary to reduce morbidity and mortality. In particular, the risk of postoperative respiratory failure and need for long-term ventilation should be reviewed with patients. The use of succinylcholine should be avoided in muscular dystrophies, motor neuron diseases, and intrinsic muscle disease due to a risk of malignant hyperthermia, hyperkalemia, rhabdomyolysis, and cardiac arrest. The use of quantitative neuromuscular monitoring should be strongly considered whenever nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents are administered. A number of case series and reports have been recently published demonstrating that sugammadex can be safely used in patients with neuromuscular disease; the risk of residual neuromuscular is nearly eliminated when this agent is administered intraoperatively. Careful assessment and management of patients with underlying neuromuscular diseases is required to reduce postoperative complications. This article reviews the anesthetic implications of patients undergoing surgery with neuromuscular disorder.

  13. Anesthetic action of volatile anesthetics by using Paramecium as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Miaomiao; Xia, Huimin; Xu, Younian; Xin, Naixing; Liu, Jiao; Zhang, Shihai

    2012-06-01

    Although empirically well understood in their clinical administration, volatile anesthetics are not yet well comprehended in their mechanism studies. A major conundrum emerging from these studies is that there is no validated model to assess the presumed candidate sites of the anesthetics. We undertook this study to test the hypothesis that the single-celled Paramecium could be anesthetized and served as a model organism in the study of anesthetics. We assessed the motion of Paramecium cells with Expert Vision system and the chemoresponse of Paramecium cells with T-maze assays in the presence of four different volatile anesthetics, including isoflurane, sevoflurane, enflurane and ether. Each of those volatiles was dissolved in buffers to give drug concentrations equal to 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 EC50, respectively, in clinical practice. We could see that after application of volatile anesthetics, the swimming of the Paramecium cells was accelerated and then suppressed, or even stopped eventually, and the index of the chemoresponse of the Paramecium cells (denoted as I ( che )) was decreased. All of the above impacts were found in a concentration-dependent fashion. The biphasic effects of the clinical concentrations of volatile anesthetics on Paramecium simulated the situation of high species in anesthesia, and the inhibition of the chemoresponse also indicated anesthetized. In conclusion, the findings in our studies suggested that the single-celled Paramecium could be anesthetized with clinical concentrations of volatile anesthetics and therefore be utilized as a model organism to study the mechanisms of volatile anesthetics.

  14. Gum chewing during pre-anesthetic fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Thomas J

    2012-03-01

    Many ad hoc fasting guidelines for pre-anesthetic patients prohibit gum chewing. We find no evidence that gum chewing during pre-anesthetic fasting increases the volume or acidity of gastric juice in a manner that increases risk, nor that the occasional associated unreported swallowing of gum risks subsequent aspiration. On the contrary, there is evidence that gum chewing promotes gastrointestinal motility and physiologic gastric emptying. Recommendations against pre-anesthetic gum chewing do not withstand scrutiny and miss an opportunity to enhance comfort and sense of wellbeing for patients awaiting anesthesia. Gum chewing during the pre-anesthetic nil per os (NPO) period would also permit the development of gum-delivered premedications and should be permitted in children old enough to chew gum safely. Gum chewing should cease when sedatives are given and all patients should be instructed to remove any chewing gum from the mouth immediately prior to anesthetic induction. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Comparative study on the localization of adult Schistosoma mansoni worms in albino mice anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium, ether or chlorophorm Estudo comparativo sobre a localização de vermes adultos de Schistosoma mansoni em camundongos albinos anestesiados com pentobarbital sódico, éter ou clorofórmio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Machado e Silva

    1993-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of anesthetic drugs on the localization of adult worms in albino mice was compared. The animals with 56 days of infection were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium, ether or chlorophorm. Perfusion was carried out immediately after, recovering the worms and classifying them in relation to their localization on the liver or portal vein and the mesenteric veins. Our results showed that pentobarbital sodium produced a greater displacement of the worms to the liver (89% than ether (76% and chlorophorm (34% did, when compared to the control group (22%. The difference between pentobarbital sodium and ether was significant (p Comparou-se o efeito de drogas anestésicas na localização de vermes adultos em camundongos albinos. Com 56 dias de infecção os animais foram anestesiados com pentobarbital sódico, éter ou clorofórmio. Imediatamente realizou-se a perfusão, sendo os vermes recolhidos e classificados quanto à localização em fígado ou veia porta e nos vasos mesentéricos. Nossos resultados demonstraram que o pentobarbital sódico produziu maior deslocamento dos vermes para o fígado (89% do que o éter (76% e o clorofórmio (34% quando comparados com o grupo controle (22%. As diferenças para o pentobarbital sódico e o éter foram significativas (P < 0,05. Sugerimos que os anestésicos não sejam utilizados nos estudos sobre a distribuição de vermes adultos nos hospedeiros.

  16. [Anesthetic management of a patient with Ludwig's angina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinohana, M; Saitoh, T; Fukuzato, Y; Kawamoto, K; Inamura, T

    1999-07-01

    A 71-year-old woman with cellulitis of the floor of the mouth, referred to as "Ludwig's angina", underwent emergency tracheostomy under general anesthesia, for the control of airway narrowing caused by sublingual and submandibular swelling with tongue elevation. Because difficult airway had been suspected by preoperative assessment, feasible options of intubation in our hospital, including laryngeal mask, fiberoptic intubation and transtracheal jet ventilation, were prepared prior to induction of anesthesia. Anesthetic induction was carried out with propofol and suxamethonium, and subsequently tracheal intubation could be performed with difficulty under condition of partial visualization of vocal cord. Anesthetic maintenance with local anesthesia and continuous infusion of propofol 6 mg.kg-1.hr-1 was carried out during tracheostomy procedure, and this procedure was done uneventfully. Because airway control still remains a top priority in Ludwig's angina, feasible options of airway control should be prepared before induction of anesthesia if tracheostomy was required in a patient with this disease.

  17. Doxepin Has a Potent and Long-Acting Spinal Anesthetic Effect in Rats

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    Bor-Chin Cheng

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Doxepin, a tricyclic antidepressant, was recently found to be effective in the treatment of various acute and chronic painful conditions. However, the mechanism of its actions was not clear, especially when involving the spine. The aim of our study was to evaluate the spinal anesthetic effect of doxepin. Two commonly used traditional local anesthetics, bupivacaine and lidocaine, were used as controls. The potencies and durations of the drugs' action were evaluated in male Sprague-Dawley rats. We found that intrathecally administered doxepin, like bupivacaine and lidocaine, produced dose-related spinal anesthetic effects on motor activity, proprioception, and nociception. Among the three drugs, doxepin produced spinal anesthetic effects in rats more potent than that of lidocaine (p < 0.001, in each comparison and longer than that of bupivacaine and lidocaine (p < 0.001, in each comparison. The spinal activity of doxepin may provide some explanation of its clinical effect in pain management.

  18. General anesthetics in children: neurotoxic or neuroprotective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Farias Rebouças

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: general anesthetics are involved in neuroprotection in adults after ischemic events and cognitive impairment, thus, they also may be associated with learning disorders in children exposed to them before three years of age. Objective: Describe about the neurotoxic effects of general anesthetics in experimental animals and children. Method: This is a systematic review, performed from search in databases and on PubMed using the keywords "neurotoxicity" and "general anesthetics," and "general anesthetics," "neurotoxicity", "children", "young child "and" pediatric ". Results: The search resulted in 185 articles. Out of these, 78 met our inclusion criteria. We found that there was a significant evidence of neurotoxicity induced by general anesthetics in experimental animals that were just born, resulting in late and permanent cognitive deficits. This effect was associated with multiple exposures, exposure length of time and combination of drugs. However, some studies found cognitive impairment after a single exposure to anesthetic. Conclusion: There is insufficient evidence to state that general anesthetics are neurotoxic and have the potential to trigger learning and behavior disabilities in children. However, we suggest caution in indicating surgery in children under three years old, analyzing risk-benefit and inserting the family in the decision process.   Keywords: Neurotoxicity; Neuroprotection; Cognitive Impairment; Children; General Anesthesics

  19. Efficacy of tramadol as a preincisional infiltration anesthetic in children undergoing inguinal hernia repair: a prospective randomized study

    OpenAIRE

    Numanoğlu, Kemal Varım; Ayoğlu, Hilal; Er, Duygu TatlıEbubekir

    2014-01-01

    Kemal Varim Numanoğlu,1 Hilal Ayoğlu,2 Duygu Tatli,1 Ebubekir Er11Department of Pediatric Surgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Bülent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak, TurkeyBackground: Preincisional local anesthetic infiltration at the surgical site is a therapeutic option for postoperative pain relief for pediatric inguinal hernia. Additionally, tramadol has been used as an analgesic for postoperative pain in children. Recently, the local anesthetic eff...

  20. Anesthetic Efficacy in Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, Carlos E; Sampaio, Roberta M; Horliana, Anna C R T; Armonia, Paschoal L; Rocha, Rodney G; Tortamano, Isabel Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block has a high failure rate in the treatment of mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis. The aim of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine, 2% lidocaine and 2% mepivacaine, all in combination with 1:100,000 epinephrine, in patients with irreversible pulpitis of permanent mandibular molars during a pulpectomy procedure. Sixty-six volunteers from the Emergency Center of the School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, randomly received 3.6 mL of local anesthetic as a conventional inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). The subjective signal of lip numbness, pulpal anesthesia and absence of pain during the pulpectomy procedure were evaluated respectively, by questioning the patient, stimulation using an electric pulp tester and a verbal analogue scale. All patients reported the subjective signal of lip numbness. Regarding pulpal anesthesia success as measured with the pulp tester, the success rate was respectively 68.2% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 63.6% for lidocaine. Regarding patients who reported no pain or mild pain during the pulpectomy, the success rate was, respectively 72.7% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 54.5% for lidocaine. These differences were not statistically significant. Neither of the solutions resulted in 100% anesthetic success in patients with irreversible pulpitis of mandibular molars.

  1. Management of exposure to waste anesthetic gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2010-04-01

    Anesthetic agents were developed in the 1700s, and nitrous oxide was first used in 1884. Research on the effects of waste anesthetic gas exposure started appearing in the literature in 1967. Short-term exposure causes lethargy and fatigue, and long-term exposure may be linked to spontaneous abortion, congenital abnormalities, infertility, premature births, cancer, and renal and hepatic disease. Today, perioperative staff members are exposed to trace amounts of waste anesthetic gas, and although this exposure cannot be eliminated, it can be controlled. Health care facilities are required to develop, implement, measure, and control practices to reduce anesthetic gas exposure to the lowest practical level. Exposure levels must be measured every six months and maintained at less than 25 parts per million for nitrous oxide and 2 parts per million for halogenated agents to be compliant with Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards. Copyright 2010 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Peculiarities of anesthetic aid in myasthenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupriyanova E.D.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data on comparative analysis of two medical cases of myasthenia patients, analysis of general anesthetization and post-surgical process. The influence of previous therapy, overall condition and accompanied pathology is stated

  3. Anesthetic Considerations for Patients Undergoing Bronchial Thermoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saran, Jagroop S; Kreso, Melissa; Khurana, Sandhya; Nead, Michael; Larj, Michael; Karan, Suzanne

    2017-08-30

    Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a novel, Food and Drug Administration-approved nondrug treatment for patients whose asthma remains uncontrolled despite traditional pharmacotherapy. BT involves application of controlled radiofrequency energy to reduce airway smooth muscle in large- and medium-sized airways. Although BT is often performed under general anesthesia, anesthetic management strategies for BT are poorly described. We describe the anesthetic management of 7 patients who underwent 19 BT treatments in a tertiary academic medical center.

  4. Anesthetic efficacy of articaine for inferior alveolar nerve blocks in patients with symptomatic versus asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argueta-Figueroa, Liliana; Arzate-Sosa, Gabriel; Mendieta-Zeron, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to determine the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth and if individual patient factors, pulpal disease characteristics, and previous medication are correlated to local anesthetic success. A second objective was to determine the specificity and sensibility of a cold test for prediction of anesthetic success prior to endodontic treatment. Seventy patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth received 1.6 mL of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine for an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) using a metal guide. The anesthetic solution was injected with a computer-preprogrammed delivery system for local anesthesia. Endodontic access was begun 15 minutes after solution deposition; later, patients rated their discomfort using the visual analog scale (VAS). The success rate for the IA NB using articaine was 64.2% in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis and 86.9% in patients with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Cold test prior to root canal treatment had a specificity and sensibility of 12.5% and 87.1%, respectively. The anesthetic efficacy of articaine in irreversible pulpitis is moderately acceptable, and anesthetic success increases when the patient has been premedicated with NSAIDs. The cold test appears to be a favorable indicator for predicting anesthetic success.

  5. The modifying effect of anesthetic technique on the metabolic and endocrine responses to anesthesia and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    1988-01-01

    and the widespread use of the term "stress free anesthesia" in surgery is therefore not valid. However, continuous administration of local anesthetic agents in the epidural space is the most effective technique in so far as reduction of the stress response is concerned. The clinical implication of a variable...... reduction in the stress response to surgery by different anesthetic techniques remains largely unsettled, since only few controlled studies have been published on the clinical effects of pain relief and general anesthesia. However, a vast amount of data exist from controlled studies comparing regional...... anesthesia with local anesthetics and general anesthesia. The cumulative experience from these studies have demonstrated an advantageous effect on postoperative morbidity parameters such as blood loss, postoperative thromboembolic complications, pulmonary infective complications, gastrointestinal motility...

  6. Effect of anesthetics on the radiosensitivity of a murine tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, P.W.; Chu, A.M.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of four anesthetics on the single dose of x rays required to locally control 50% of implanted MT tumors was investigated. Compared with unanesthetized animals, no change in radiosensitivity was observed if mice were irradiated under either tribromoethanol or fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam anesthesia. However, a small but significant degree of radioprotection was observed under chloral hydrate or pentobarbital anesthesia. Hypothermia or increased hypoxia are considered unlikely mechanisms for the protection, a direct chemical action being most probable. The preferred method for immobilizing the mice in order to locally irradiate the tumors was by simple physical restraint (with care taken to minimize physiological stress). However, if anesthesia was a necessity, the present work suggests that for the MT tumor at least the nonprotecting tribromoethanol and fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam are preferable to the protecting chloral hydrate and pentobarbital. Tribromoethanol is preferable to fetanyl-fluanisone-diazepam in that it produces a smaller drop in temperature. However, it is only a short-acting anesthetic, and prolongation of the state of anesthesia by repeated doses simply prolongs the temperature decline so that there may be no real benefit over fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam

  7. Effect of anesthetics on the radiosensitivity of a murine tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheldon, P.W.; Chu, A.M.

    1979-09-01

    The effect of four anesthetics on the single dose of x rays required to locally control 50% of implanted MT tumors was investigated. Compared with unanesthetized animals, no change in radiosensitivity was observed if mice were irradiated under either tribromoethanol or fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam anesthesia. However, a small but significant degree of radioprotection was observed under chloral hydrate or pentobarbital anesthesia. Hypothermia or increased hypoxia are considered unlikely mechanisms for the protection, a direct chemical action being most probable. The preferred method for immobilizing the mice in order to locally irradiate the tumors was by simple physical restraint (with care taken to minimize physiological stress). However, if anesthesia was a necessity, the present work suggests that for the MT tumor at least the nonprotecting tribromoethanol and fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam are preferable to the protecting chloral hydrate and pentobarbital. Tribromoethanol is preferable to fetanyl-fluanisone-diazepam in that it produces a smaller drop in temperature. However, it is only a short-acting anesthetic, and prolongation of the state of anesthesia by repeated doses simply prolongs the temperature decline so that there may be no real benefit over fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam.

  8. Ensaio mecânico da resistência ao impacto do cimento ósseo puro e associado a duas drogas anestésicas locais Mechanical essay of impact resistance of acrylic bone cement used singly or the cement in combination with two local anesthetic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Giordano

    2007-07-01

    resistência entre os cimentos Simplex® e Biomecânica® para as medicações lidocaína (p = 0,13 e bupivacaína (p = 0,63. No cimento Simplex®, a associação com a bupivacaína apresentou resistência significativamente maior do que com a lidocaína e o polímero puro (p = 0,001 e p = 0,012, respectivamente. Não existe diferença significativa na resistência entre a lidocaína e o polímero puro para o cimento Simplex® (p = 0,39. No cimento Biomecânica®, a associação com a bupivacaína apresentou resistência significativamente maior do que com a lidocaína e o polímero puro (p = 0,0001 e p = 0,0001, respectivamente. Não existe diferença significativa na resistência entre a lidocaína e o polímero puro para o cimento Biomecânica® (p = 0,37. CONCLUSÃO: Nas condições estudadas, não há redução significativa da resistência ao impacto na combinação de cimento ortopédico com anestésicos locais.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the mechanical behavior of cement-local anesthetic combinations in vitro. METHODS: Two bone cements were tested (Simplex® and Biomecânica® with two anesthetic drugs (lidocaine and bupivacaine. Anesthetic drugs were added in powder form. The authors compared six groups based on the association between the cement and the drugs. Two grams of anesthetic were mixed with 40 g of acrylic cement powder. 60 prismatic molds were made, measuring 5 x 120 x 30 mm (n = 30 and 5 x 60 x 30 mm (n = 30. The molds were tested on a pendulum impact resistance apparatus. Statistical analysis was performed to verify the effect of bone cement (Simplex® and Biomecânica® and the medication (lidocaine, bupivacaine, and no combination on the strength of the molds, with a level of significance alpha = 5%. RESULTS: Statistical comparison showed a significant influence of the medication on bone strength (p = 0.0001. Tukey multiple comparison test demonstrated better strength with bupivacaine. CONCLUSION: Cement-bone combination does not harm the strength

  9. Interaction of alcohols and anesthetics with protein kinase Calpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, S J; Kelly, M B; Larkin, J D; Ho, C; Mazurek, A; Taddeo, F J; Yeager, M D; Stubbs, C D

    1997-03-07

    The key signal transduction enzyme protein kinase C (PKC) contains a hydrophobic binding site for alcohols and anesthetics (Slater, S. J., Cox, K. J. A., Lombardi, J. V., Ho, C., Kelly, M. B., Rubin, E., and Stubbs, C. D. (1993) Nature 364, 82-84). In this study, we show that interaction of n-alkanols and general anesthetics with PKCalpha results in dramatically different effects on membrane-associated compared with lipid-independent enzyme activity. Furthermore, the effects on membrane-associated PKCalpha differ markedly depending on whether activity is induced by diacylglycerol or phorbol ester and also on n-alkanol chain length. PKCalpha contains two distinct phorbol ester binding regions of low and high affinity for the activator, respectively (Slater, S. J., Ho, C., Kelly, M. B., Larkin, J. D., Taddeo, F. J., Yeager, M. D., and Stubbs, C. D. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 4627-4631). Short chain n-alkanols competed for low affinity phorbol ester binding to the enzyme, resulting in reduced enzyme activity, whereas high affinity phorbol ester binding was unaffected. Long chain n-alkanols not only competed for low affinity phorbol ester binding but also enhanced high affinity phorbol ester binding. Furthermore, long chain n-alkanols enhanced phorbol ester induced PKCalpha activity. This effect of long chain n-alkanols was similar to that of diacylglycerol, although the n-alkanols alone were weak activators of the enzyme. The cellular effects of n-alkanols and general anesthetics on PKC-mediated processes will therefore depend in a complex manner on the locality of the enzyme (e.g. cytoskeletal or membrane-associated) and activator type, apart from any isoform-specific differences. Furthermore, effects mediated by interaction with the region on the enzyme possessing low affinity for phorbol esters represent a novel mechanism for the regulation of PKC activity.

  10. Administration and monitoring of intravenous anesthetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahinovic, Marko M.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The importance of accuracy in controlling the dose-response relation for intravenous anesthetics is directly related to the importance of optimizing the efficacy and quality of anesthesia while minimizing adverse drug effects. Therefore, it is important to measure and control all

  11. Antimicrobial Properties of Topical Anesthetic Liquids Containing Lidocaine or Benzocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, Mark E.; Berry, Charles W.

    1988-01-01

    Six species of microorganisms commonly found within the oral cavity were exposed for either one minute or two hours to 5% lidocaine liquid topical anesthetic and benzocaine liquid topical anesthetic. Mixtures of microorganisms and anesthetics were diluted and plated onto a brain heart infusion medium. Reduction in cell viability was 73-100% after exposure to the anesthetic agents when compared with the saline/buffer controls. A significant reduction (p < .005) in cell growth by Streptococcus ...

  12. Impact of hyaluronidase on anesthetic distribution in retrobulbar region following sub-Tenon anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šurbatović Maja

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Sub-Tenon's block is nowadays commonly used in ophthalmic surgery because of its safety and efficacy. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of the anesthetic solution with different amounts of hyaluronidase in the retrobulbar space, following an injection into the Sub-Tenon's space. Methods. In this experimental study, 40 pig cadaver heads were used (80 eyeballs. The material was divided into four groups (of 20 eyeballs each. Each group was administered 4.5 ml of a mixture of 2% lignocaine, 0.5% bupivacaine, and 0.5 ml of Indian ink, with different amounts of hyaluronidase - 15 IU/ml, 75 IU/ml, 150 IU/ml, except the control one. Samples of retrobulbar tissue were analyzed using the standard histopathological procedure. After that, they were also analyzed using the Adobe Photoshop program® (Windows, USA. The retrobulbar space was divided into eight zones by four perpendicular lines, which crossed in the centre of the optic nerve. The presence of ink in fat and muscle tissues and in the sheath of the optic nerve was observed. Results. The presence of the local anesthetic solution was significantly higher in inferonasal and superonasal quadrants of the fat and muscle tissues (p < 0.01. The distribution in optic nerve sheath is similar in each quadrant. Distribution of local anesthetic in each zone of the muscle tissue (I-VIII was strongly influenced by the amount of hyaluronidase added. In the fat tissue, the distribution of local anesthetic under the influence of hyaluronidase was significantly higher (p < 0.05 in the areas which were distant from the place of injection (I-IV. The distribution in the optic nerve sheath is significantly higher (p < 0.01 in the group with 150 IU/ml of hyaluronidase. Conclusions. Following a sub-Tenon block local anesthetic was present in the retrobulbar space in a high percentage of the cases. The presence of local anesthetic solution in retrobulbar space depends on the amount of

  13. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over a...

  14. Anesthetic complications in a rehabilitation hospital: is the incidence related to the pre-anesthetic visit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulises Prieto y Schwartzman

    Full Text Available Introduction:Approximately 234 million surgeries are done annually worldwide. There is a growing concern for the safety of the anesthetic act, and the pre-anesthetic consultation emerges as an important and widely recommended activity, used as a preventive measure for the emergence of a complication.Objectives:To describe the complications related to anesthesia, to identify the factors that contribute to its appearance and to reflect on ways to improve clinical practice.Methods:700 patients, 175 cases and 525 controls, were evaluated over a period of 21 months. The data obtained through the pre-anesthetic consultation were evaluated descriptively and then tested with conditional univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis.Results:175 cases of anesthesia-related complications (2.74% out of 6365 anesthetic acts were evaluated. Hypotension was the most common complication (40 patients, 22.8%, followed by vomiting (24 patients, 13.7% and arrhythmia (24 patients, 13.7%. Among the complications, 55% were due to patient conditions, 26% accidental, 10% predictable and 9% iatrogenic. The complications were classified as mild in 106 (61%, moderate in 63 (36% and severe in six (3% patients.Conclusion:Patients with more impaired physical status (American Society of Anaesthesiology 3 and 4, with airway disease, tumor or parenchymal disease, diabetes or disorder of lipid metabolism, thyroid disease, former smokers and very prolonged anesthetic acts present a higher risk of anesthesia-related complications. Therefore, they should be actively investigated in the pre-anesthetic evaluation consultation.

  15. Characterizing Awake and Anesthetized States Using a Dimensionality Reduction Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsadeghi, M; Behnam, H; Shalbaf, R; Jelveh Moghadam, H

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing between awake and anesthetized states is one of the important problems in surgery. Vital signals contain valuable information that can be used in prediction of different levels of anesthesia. Some monitors based on electroencephalogram (EEG) such as the Bispectral (BIS) index have been proposed in recent years. This study proposes a new method for characterizing between awake and anesthetized states. We validated our method by obtaining data from 25 patients during the cardiac surgery that requires cardiopulmonary bypass. At first, some linear and non-linear features are extracted from EEG signals. Then a method called "LLE"(Locally Linear Embedding) is used to map high-dimensional features in a three-dimensional output space. Finally, low dimensional data are used as an input to a quadratic discriminant analyzer (QDA). The experimental results indicate that an overall accuracy of 88.4 % can be obtained using this method for classifying the EEG signal into conscious and unconscious states for all patients. Considering the reliability of this method, we can develop a new EEG monitoring system that could assist the anesthesiologists to estimate the depth of anesthesia accurately.

  16. Awake craniotomy anesthetic management using dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prontera, Andrea; Baroni, Stefano; Marudi, Andrea; Valzania, Franco; Feletti, Alberto; Benuzzi, Francesca; Bertellini, Elisabetta; Pavesi, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Awake craniotomy allows continuous monitoring of patients’ neurological functions during open surgery. Anesthesiologists have to sedate patients in a way so that they are compliant throughout the whole surgical procedure, nevertheless maintaining adequate analgesia and anxiolysis. Currently, the use of α2-receptor agonist dexmedetomidine as the primary hypnotic–sedative medication is increasing. Methods Nine patients undergoing awake craniotomy were treated with refined monitored anesthesia care (MAC) protocol consisting of a combination of local anesthesia without scalp block, low-dose infusion of dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil, without the need of airways management. Results The anesthetic protocol applied in our study has the advantage of decreasing the dose of each drug and thus reducing the occurrence of side effects. All patients had smooth and rapid awakenings. The brain remained relaxed during the entire procedure. Conclusion In our experience, this protocol is safe and effective during awake brain surgery. Nevertheless, prospective randomized trials are necessary to confirm the optimal anesthetic technique to be used. PMID:28424537

  17. Clinical application of thoracic paravertebral anesthetic block in breast surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Socorro Faria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Optimum treatment for postoperative pain has been of fundamental importance in surgical patient care. Among the analgesic techniques aimed at this group of patients, thoracic paravertebral block combined with general anesthesia stands out for the good results and favorable risk-benefit ratio. Many local anesthetics and other adjuvant drugs are being investigated for use in this technique, in order to improve the quality of analgesia and reduce adverse effects. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the effectiveness and safety of paravertebral block compared to other analgesic and anesthetic regimens in women undergoing breast cancer surgeries. METHODS: Integrative literature review from 1966 to 2012, using specific terms in computerized databases of articles investigating the clinical characteristics, adverse effects, and beneficial effects of thoracic paravertebral block. RESULTS: On the selected date, 16 randomized studies that met the selection criteria established for this literature review were identified. Thoracic paravertebral block showed a significant reduction of postoperative pain, as well as decreased pain during arm movement after surgery. CONCLUSION: Thoracic paravertebral block reduced postoperative analgesic requirement compared to placebo group, markedly within the first 24 h. The use of this technique could ensure postoperative analgesia of clinical relevance. Further studies with larger populations are necessary, as paravertebral block seems to be promising for preemptive analgesia in breast cancer surgery.

  18. Anesthetic management of a labouring parturient with urticaria pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, Valérie; Kaufman, Ian; Weeks, Sally; Deschamps, Alain

    2006-04-01

    To report the anesthetic management of labour pain and Cesarean section in a patient with urticaria pigmentosa at risk for systemic mastocytosis. CLINICAL: A 37-yr-old patient with a history of urticaria pigmentosa and an allergic reaction to a local anesthetic agent was seen in consultation at 36 weeks gestation. She previously tested negative for an allergy test to lidocaine. Recommendations to avoid systemic mastocytosis included: avoidance of histamine-releasing drugs, using lidocaine for labour epidural, and regional anesthesia in case of a Cesarean section. The patient presented at term in labour. Intravenous fentanyl was used for early labour, followed by a combined spinal-epidural. The spinal contained lidocaine and fentanyl, but because of pruritus, the epidural infusion contained lidocaine only. Most likely because of tachyphylaxis to lidocaine, an epidural bolus of lidocaine with epinephrine failed to provide adequate anesthesia for a Cesarean section. The block was supplemented with nitrous oxide by mask, with fentanyl postdelivery. Postoperative pain control was managed with an epidural infusion of lidocaine and fentanyl for three days. The patient was discharged without complications four days postsurgery. Proper allergy testing prior to pregnancy is important to help the management of labour pain and anesthesia for Cesarean section in a patient at risk for systemic mastocytosis.

  19. Anesthetic Block of Pain-related Cortical Activity in Patients with Peripheral Nerve Injury Measured by Magnetoencephalography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theuvenet, P.J.; de Munck, J.C.; Peters, M.J.L.; van Ree, J.M.; da Silva, F.L.; Chen, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study examined whether chronic neuropathic pain, modulated by a local anesthetic block, is associated with cortical magnetic field changes. Methods: In a group of 20 patients with pain caused by unilateral traumatic peripheral nerve injury, a local block with lidocaine 1% was

  20. Distribution of local anesthetics between aqueous and liposome phases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ruokonen, S. K.; Duša, Filip; Rantamäki, A. H.; Robciuc, A.; Holma, P.; Holopainen, J. M.; Abdel-Rehim, M.; Wiedmer, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1479, JAN (2017), s. 194-203 ISSN 0021-9673 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : liposome electrokinetic chromatography * distribution constants * EOF markers Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 3.981, year: 2016

  1. Evaluation of local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of Cinchona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    days prior to the experiment, at a controlled room temperature (24 ± 2 °C; relative humidity 60 – 70. %) under a 12/12-h light-dark cycle. They were given a standard laboratory diet and water ad libitum. The experimental protocol was conducted after approval of the Institutional. Animal Ethics Committee of Xinxiang Medical.

  2. Toxicity and allergy to local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A H

    1998-09-01

    Considering the amount of local anesthetic administered on a daily basis, dental professionals must be familiar with the factors that influence the dose and type of local anesthetic that induces a toxic or allergic reaction. In addition to the route and rate of administration, the patient's physical condition and health may also influence the dose of local anesthetic that could be safely administered. This article reviews the different causes of local anesthesia toxicity and allergy. With prevention and early recognition of the warning signs, poor prognosis can be avoided.

  3. Anesthetic considerations for interventional pulmonary procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, John

    2013-02-01

    To discuss the anesthetic considerations of various procedures now performed by the interventional pulmonologist. With recent technological advances, many of these procedures represent acceptable alternatives to the invasive surgical procedures. For example, the placement of endobronchial valves can substitute for lung reduction surgery and can greatly reduce the postoperative recovery period. However, many of these complex procedures require anesthesia services. The nature and indication for the procedure as well as the patient's overall health will have an impact on the anesthetic choice. New studies have documented common complications from interventional pulmonology procedures and recent ways to avoid these complications have been suggested. Strategies to avoid obstruction, bleeding, pneumothorax and air embolism are discussed in this article. Potential benefits of high frequency jet ventilation in reducing airway pressures and, perhaps, barotraumas are cited. Novel interventional pulmonary procedures are described. As the array of diagnostic and therapeutic pulmonary interventions is expanding, the types of anesthetic techniques and ventilatory modes are varying to fit the procedural requirements. Some pulmonary procedures are best accomplished in the lightly sedated patient, who is breathing spontaneously, whereas procedures that use the working channel of a rigid bronchoscope are better performed in the patient under general anesthesia and mechanical ventilation that often use jet ventilation to minimize respiratory movements.

  4. Increasing topical anesthetic efficacy with microneedle application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhsem, Ömer; Aksoy, Alper; Kececi, Yavuz; Sir, Emin; Güngör, Melike

    2016-10-01

    Since topical anesthetics alone seldom provide adequate analgesia for laser resurfacing procedures, injectable forms of anesthesia are often required. However, their application is uncomfortable for the patient. In this study, it is investigated whether microneedle application would enhance the efficacy of topical anesthetics. Forty-seven patients participated in the study. Topical anesthetic agent EMLA was applied to the whole face of the patients. Microneedle treatment was applied to one side of the face with a roller-type device. Whole-face carbon dioxide laser resurfacing therapy was carried out then. The pain that patients experienced was assessed by using visual analog scale (VAS) method. VAS scores of two sides of the face were compared by using Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The mean of VAS score of the microneedle treated side was 2.1 ± 1.1 while that of the untreated side was 5.9 ± 0.9 and this difference was statistically significant (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, the Z-value is - 5.9683 and the p-value is microneedle application, with a roller-type device, is a safe and easy procedure in providing sufficient anesthesia for facial laser resurfacing without the need for supplementary nerve blocks or injections.

  5. [Anesthetic complications in a rehabilitation hospital: is the incidence related to the pre-anesthetic visit?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, Ulises Prieto Y; Batista, Kátia Torres; Duarte, Leonardo Teixeira D; Saraiva, Renato Ângelo; Fernandes, Maria do Carmo Barreto de C; da Costa, Verônica Vieira; Ferreira, Luciana Souto

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 234 million surgeries are done annually worldwide. There is a growing concern for the safety of the anesthetic act, and the pre-anesthetic consultation emerges as an important and widely recommended activity, used as a preventive measure for the emergence of a complication. To describe the complications related to anesthesia, to identify the factors that contribute to its appearance and to reflect on ways to improve clinical practice. 700 patients, 175 cases and 525 controls, were evaluated over a period of 21 months. The data obtained through the pre-anesthetic consultation were evaluated descriptively and then tested with conditional univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. 175 cases of anesthesia-related complications (2.74%) out of 6365 anesthetic acts were evaluated. Hypotension was the most common complication (40 patients, 22.8%), followed by vomiting (24 patients, 13.7%) and arrhythmia (24 patients, 13.7%). Among the complications, 55% were due to patient conditions, 26% accidental, 10% predictable and 9% iatrogenic. The complications were classified as mild in 106 (61%), moderate in 63 (36%) and severe in six (3%) patients. Patients with more impaired physical status (American Society of Anaesthesiology 3 and 4), with airway disease, tumor or parenchymal disease, diabetes or disorder of lipid metabolism, thyroid disease, former smokers and very prolonged anesthetic acts present a higher risk of anesthesia-related complications. Therefore, they should be actively investigated in the pre-anesthetic evaluation consultation. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of inhaled anesthetics in green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Robert J; Pypendop, Bruno H; Barter, Linda S; Hawkins, Michelle G

    2006-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that differences in anesthetic uptake and elimination in iguanas would counter the pharmacokinetic effects of blood:gas solubility and thus serve to minimize kinetic differences among inhaled agents. 6 green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Iguanas were anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane in a Latin-square design. Intervals from initial administration of an anesthetic agent to specific induction events and from cessation of administration of an anesthetic agent to specific recovery events were recorded. End-expired gas concentrations were measured during anesthetic washout. Significant differences were not detected for any induction or recovery events for any inhalation agent in iguanas. Washout curves best fit a 2-compartment model, but slopes for both compartments did not differ significantly among the 3 anesthetics. Differences in blood:gas solubility for isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane did not significantly influence differences in pharmacokinetics for the inhalation agents in iguanas.

  7. Analgesic and adjuvant anesthetic effect of submucosal tramadol after mandibular third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccheti, Marcelo Minharro; Negrato, Giovana Vigário; Peres, Maria Paula Siqueira de Melo; Deboni, Maria Cristina Zindel; Naclério-Homem, Maria da Graça

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess analgesic and adjuvant anesthetic effects of submucosal tramadol after third molar extraction. In this double-blind, split-mouth, placebo-controlled, single-dose, crossover investigation, 52 patients underwent mandibular third molar extraction under local anesthesia. Surgical side was randomly assigned to submucosal 2 mL 100 mg tramadol injection (group T) or normal saline solution (group P) immediately after surgery. Anesthetic blockade duration, time of intake and amount of analgesic rescue drug, and postoperative pain intensity were recorded immediately after anesthesia cessation and 4, 8, 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Wilcoxon tests. Anesthetic blockade duration between groups was similar. Group T took significantly less rescue drug after 72 hours (P = .008). Time elapsed before first intake of rescue drug was longer (P = .006), and pain intensity was significantly lower (P = .001) in group T. Submucosal tramadol injection after oral surgery improved postoperative analgesia, but did not extend anesthetic action duration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Digital block with or without the addition of epinephrine in the anesthetic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis Júnior, Almiro; Quinto, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Review of various techniques for digital blocks with local anesthetic, with or without epinephrine. Description of various procedures and comparison of results reported in the literature, mainly on latency and quality of anesthesia, details on vasoconstrictor effect of epinephrine, intraoperative bleeding, necessity of tourniquet use, duration of anesthesia and postoperative analgesia, blood flow and digital SpO2 behavior, local and systemic complications, and also approaches and drugs to be used in certain situations of ischemia. The advantages of adding epinephrine to the anesthetic solution are minor when compared to the risks of the procedure, and it seems dangerous to use a vasoconstrictor in the fingers, unless the safety of the technique and the possibility of discarding the tourniquet are definitely proven. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. [Digital block with or without the addition of epinephrine in the anesthetic solution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis Júnior, Almiro Dos; Quinto, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Review of various techniques for digital blocks with local anesthetic, with or without epinephrine. Description of various procedures and comparison of results reported in the literature, mainly on latency and quality of anesthesia, details on vasoconstrictor effect of epinephrine, intraoperative bleeding, necessity of tourniquet use, duration of anesthesia and postoperative analgesia, blood flow and digital SpO2 behavior, local and systemic complications, and also approaches and drugs to be used in certain situations of ischemia. The advantages of adding epinephrine to the anesthetic solution are minor when compared to the risks of the procedure, and it seems dangerous to use a vasoconstrictor in the fingers, unless the safety of the technique and the possibility of discarding the tourniquet are definitely proven. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Gestational trophoblastic disease with hyperthyroidism: Anesthetic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Khanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of hyperthyroidism with gestational trophoblastic disease is a known albeit rare clinical condition. We herein report the successful anesthetic management of such a case in our institute. There are only few case reports in literature of this association. Often, the diagnosis of hyperthyroid state is retrospective one, as it can be missed in the emergency scenario of patient requiring molar evacuation. This case report highlights the perioperative management and optimization of hyperthyroid state prior to surgical evacuation of the invasive hydatidiform mole.

  11. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Vedula; G Brannigan; N Economou; J Xi; M Hall; R Liu; M Rossi; W Dailey; K Grasty; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  12. Direct activation of sleep-promoting VLPO neurons by volatile anesthetics contributes to anesthetic hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jason T; Chen, Jingqiu; Han, Bo; Meng, Qing Cheng; Veasey, Sigrid C; Beck, Sheryl G; Kelz, Max B

    2012-11-06

    Despite seventeen decades of continuous clinical use, the neuronal mechanisms through which volatile anesthetics act to produce unconsciousness remain obscure. One emerging possibility is that anesthetics exert their hypnotic effects by hijacking endogenous arousal circuits. A key sleep-promoting component of this circuitry is the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO), a hypothalamic region containing both state-independent neurons and neurons that preferentially fire during natural sleep. Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry as a biomarker for antecedent neuronal activity, we show that isoflurane and halothane increase the number of active neurons in the VLPO, but only when mice are sedated or unconscious. Destroying VLPO neurons produces an acute resistance to isoflurane-induced hypnosis. Electrophysiological studies prove that the neurons depolarized by isoflurane belong to the subpopulation of VLPO neurons responsible for promoting natural sleep, whereas neighboring non-sleep-active VLPO neurons are unaffected by isoflurane. Finally, we show that this anesthetic-induced depolarization is not solely due to a presynaptic inhibition of wake-active neurons as previously hypothesized but rather is due to a direct postsynaptic effect on VLPO neurons themselves arising from the closing of a background potassium conductance. Cumulatively, this work demonstrates that anesthetics are capable of directly activating endogenous sleep-promoting networks and that such actions contribute to their hypnotic properties. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Survey of thoracic anesthetic practice in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Rocca, Giorgio; Langiano, Nicola; Baroselli, Antonio; Granzotti, Saskia; Pravisani, Chiara

    2013-12-01

    The object of this study was to conduct and analyze the output of a survey involving a cohort of all Italian hospitals performing thoracic surgery to gather data on anesthetic management, one-lung ventilation (OLV) management, and post-thoracotomy pain relief in thoracic anesthesia. Survey. Italy. An invitation to participate in the survey was e-mailed to all the members of the Italian Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine. None. A total of 62 responses were received from 47 centers. The key findings were: Double-lumen tube is still the first choice lung separation technique in current use; pressure-controlled ventilation and volume-controlled ventilation modes are homogenously distributed across the sample and, a tidal volumes (VT) of 4-6 mL/kg during OLV was preferred to all others; moderate or restrictive fluid management were the most used strategies of fluid administration in thoracic anesthesia; thoracic epidural analgesia represented the "gold standard" for post-thoracotomy pain relief in combination with intravenous analgesia. The results of this survey showed that Italian anesthesiologist follow the recommended standard of care for anesthetic management during OLV. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Anesthetic equipment, facilities and services available for pediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Facilities and equipment are known to contribute to improved patient care and outcome. Hospitals for sub‑specialized pediatric anesthetic service are routinely available worldwide. In Nigeria, such hospitals now exist. It is therefore relevant to study the facilities and equipment available for pediatric anesthetic ...

  15. Tolerance to acute isovolemic hemodilution. Effect of anesthetic depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Philippe; de Hert, Stefan; Mathieu, Nathalie; Degroote, Françoise; Schmartz, Denis; Zhang, Haibo; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acceptance of a lower transfusion trigger in the perioperative period requires study of the effects of anesthetic depth on the tolerance to acute isovolemic anemia. Anesthetic agents with negative effects on the cardiovascular system may exert proportionately greater depressant effects

  16. 46 CFR 147.105 - Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines. 147.105 Section 147.105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES HAZARDOUS..., drugs, and medicines. Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines must be stowed and dispensed in accordance with...

  17. Natriuretic effect of rilmenidine in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, R L; van der Mark, J; Cechetto, D F

    1994-12-22

    Rilmenidine binds to alpha 2-adrenoceptors and imidazoline receptors in the central nervous system and the kidney. To test the hypothesis that rilmenidine would increase sodium excretion, renal function was studied in rats with innervated and denervated kidneys to distinguish between indirect (via renal sympathetic nerves) and direct effects of rilmenidine on the kidney. Standard clearance techniques were used in Wistar rats anesthetized with thiobutabarbital to measure renal function during 80 minutes of infusion of 0.9% NaCl or rilmenidine (20 or 50 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 intravenously). Snares on abdominal arteries were used to offset hypotension induced by rilmenidine. Heart rate decreased by 80-120 beats/min with either dose of rilmenidine. At 20 micrograms.kg-1.min-1, rilmenidine increased total and fractional excretion of sodium and clearance of osmoles while decreasing free water clearance from innervated kidneys. There were no changes in these variables in chronically denervated kidneys. Direct recording of renal sympathetic nerve activity showed a progressive, marked decrease in nerve activity during the low-dose infusion of rilmenidine. At 50 micrograms.kg-1.min-1, rilmenidine produced a differential effect on the clearance of osmoles by innervated and denervated kidneys but both kidneys had an increase in free water clearance. The data indicate that rilmenidine increases sodium excretion indirectly in anesthetized rats by decreasing renal sympathetic nerve activity. At doses and infusion periods used in these studies, there was no evidence for a direct effect of rilmenidine on sodium excretion. The increase in free water clearance seen with the high dose of rilmenidine suggests that the inhibitory effect of alpha 2-adrenoceptor activation on vasopressin is involved at this dose.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Blood profiles in unanesthetized and anesthetized guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Wendy R; Johnston, Matthew S; Higgins, Sarah; Izzo, Angelo A; Kendall, Lon V

    2016-01-01

    The guinea pig is a common animal model that is used in biomedical research to study a variety of systems, including hormonal and immunological responses, pulmonary physiology, corticosteroid response and others. However, because guinea pigs are evolutionarily a prey species, they do not readily show behavioral signs of disease, which can make it difficult to detect illness in a laboratory setting. Minimally invasive blood tests, such as complete blood counts and plasma biochemistry assays, are useful in both human and veterinary medicine as an initial diagnostic technique to rule in or rule out systemic illness. In guinea pigs, phlebotomy for such tests often requires that the animals be anesthetized first. The authors evaluated hematological and plasma biochemical effects of two anesthetic agents that are commonly used with guinea pigs in a research setting: isoflurane and a combination of ketamine and xylazine. Hematological and plasma biochemical parameters were significantly different when guinea pigs were under either anesthetic, compared to when they were unanesthetized. Plasma proteins, liver enzymes, white blood cells and red blood cells appeared to be significantly altered by both anesthetics, and hematological and plasma biochemical differences were greater when guinea pigs were anesthetized with the combination of ketamine and xylazine than when they were anesthetized with isoflurane. Overall these results indicate that both anesthetics can significantly influence hematological and plasma biochemical parameters in guinea pigs.

  19. Comparison of anesthetic agents in the sea otter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, T.D.; Kocher, F.H.

    1978-01-01

    Five anesthetic agents (CI744, etorphine, fentanyl, ketamine hydrochloride, and halothane) were tested to establish the dosage of a safe, effective, short-acting anesthetic for use in the sea otter. Etorphine, at a dosage of 0.75 mg per adult otter and used in conjunction with diazepam, at a dosage of 1.25 mg per adult otter, met most of the requirements for use under field conditions. Halothane, administered through an anesthetic machine, proved to be effective for use in a veterinary hospital.

  20. Challenges Encountered Using Ophthalmic Anesthetics in Space Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuse, T.; Law, J.; Alexander, D.; Moynihan, S.; LeBlanc, C.; Langford, K.; Magalhaes, L.

    2015-01-01

    On orbit, ophthalmic anesthetics are used for tonometry and off-nominal corneal examinations. Proparacaine has been flown traditionally. However, the manufacturers recently changed its storage requirements from room temperature storage to refrigerated storage to preserve stability and prolong the shelf-life. Since refrigeration on orbit is not readily available and there were stability concerns about flying proparacaine unrefrigerated, tetracaine was selected as an alternative ophthalmic anesthetic in 2013. We will discuss the challenges encountered flying and using these anesthetics on the International Space Station.

  1. Guidelines for administration of local anesthesia for dermatosurgery and cosmetic dermatology procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysore Venkataram

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction, definition, rationale and scope: Dermatosurgery and Cosmetic dermatology procedures are being performed by increasing number of dermatologists. Most dermatosurgeries are performed in an outpatient setting and as day care surgeries, under local anesthesia. Hence, it is important to improve patient comfort during all procedures. These guidelines seek to lay down directives in the use of local anesthesia, outline the different local anesthetics, the mode of administration, complications arising out of such procedure and management of the same. Facility for administration of local anesthesia: Local anesthesia is usually administered in the dermatologist′s procedure room. The room should be equipped to deal with any emergencies arising from administration of local anesthesia. Qualifications of local anesthesia administrator: Local anesthesia administrator is a person who applies or injects local anesthetic agent for causing analgesia. Procedures done under local anesthesia are classified as Level I office procedures and require the administrator to have completed a course in Basic Cardiac Life Support (BCLS. Evaluation of patients for topical or infiltrative anesthesia: Details of patient′s past medical history and history of medications should be noted. Allergy to any medications should be specifically enquired and documented. Patients for tumescent anesthesia need additional precautions to be observed as described in these guidelines. Methods of administration of local anesthesia: Different methods include topical anesthesia, field block, ring block, local infiltration and nerve block. Also, it includes use of local anesthetics for anesthetizing oral and genital mucosa. Tumescent anesthesia is a special form of local anesthesia used in liposuction and certain selected procedures. Local anesthetic agents: Different local anesthetics are available such as lignocaine, prilocaine, bupivacaine. The dermatologist should be aware of the

  2. Marfan Syndrome: Clinical, Surgical, and Anesthetic Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, José M; Silvay, George; Castillo, Javier G

    2014-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a multisystem connective tissue disorder, with primary involvement of the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal systems. This autosomal heritable disease is mainly attributable to a defect in the FBN1 gene. Clinical diagnosis of Marfan syndrome has been based on the Ghent criteria since 1996. In 2010, these criteria were updated, and the revised guidelines place more emphasis on aortic root dilation, ectopia lentis, and FBN1 mutation testing in the diagnostic assessment of Marfan syndrome. Among its many different clinical manifestations, cardiovascular involvement deserves special consideration, owing to its impact on prognosis. Recent molecular, surgical, and clinical research has yielded profound new insights into the pathological mechanisms that ultimately lead to tissue degradation and weakening of the aortic wall, which has led to exciting new treatment strategies. Furthermore, with the increasing life expectancy of patients with Marfan syndrome, there has been a subtle shift in the spectrum of medical problems. Consequently, this article focuses on recent advances to highlight their potential impact on future concepts of patient care from a clinical, surgical, and anesthetic perspective. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. Anesthetic considerations for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Andrew D; Sobey, Jenna H; Stickles, Eric T

    2017-05-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy is being used more frequently in the treatment of many chronic and acute psychiatric illnesses in children. The most common psychiatric indications for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy are refractory depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, catatonia, and autism. In addition, a relatively new indication is the treatment of pediatric refractory status epilepticus. The anesthesiologist may be called upon to assist in the care of this challenging and vulnerable patient population. Unique factors for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy include the potential need for preoperative anxiolytic and inhalational induction of anesthesia, which must be weighed against the detrimental effects of anesthetic agents on the evoked seizure quality required for a successful treatment. Dexmedetomidine is likely the most appropriate preoperative anxiolytic as oral benzodiazepines are relatively contraindicated. Methohexital, though becoming less available at many institutions, remains the gold standard for induction of anesthesia for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy though ketamine, propofol, and sevoflurane are becoming increasingly viable options. Proper planning and communication between the multidisciplinary teams involved in the care of children presenting for electroconvulsive therapy treatments is vital to mitigating risks and achieving the greatest therapeutic benefit. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. ANESTHETIC MANAGEMENT FOR A PATIENT WITH ACUTE INTERMITTENT PORPHYRIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Savić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria is a rare metabolic disorder resulting from a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase, enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Its inheritance is autosomal dominant. A deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase is not sufficient by its self to produce acute intermittent porphyria, and other activating factors must also be present. These include some drugs, hormones, infection, injury and alcohol. Besides others, anesthetics have been implicated in the triggering of a number of severe porphyric reactions. Although there is no clinical evidence, the fear of hypothesized porphyrinogenicity of repetitive anesthetics exposures still remains. Despite these doubts, we report here the case of uneventful repeated exposure to anesthetics in a patient suffering from acute intermittent porphyria, within a fifteen- month period. On both occasions, the patient was safely exposed to certain anesthetics included: propofol, sevoflurane, rocuronium, midazolam and fentanyl.

  5. Toxic keratopathy due to abuse of topical anesthetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniad, Baris; Canturk, Serife; Esin Ozdemir, Fatma; Alparslan, Nilufer; Akarcay, Koray

    2010-06-01

    To describe 8 cases of toxic keratopathy due to abuse of topical anesthetic drugs. Clinical findings from patients with toxic keratopathy were investigated retrospectively. Two patients had toxic keratopathy bilaterally. Five of 8 patients had an ocular history of a corneal foreign body, 1 had basal membrane dystrophy, 1 had ultraviolet radiation, and 1 had chemical burn. All patients had undergone psychiatric consultation. Four patients had anxiety disorder and 1 had bipolar disease. Clinical signs were improved in all patients with discontinuation of topical anesthetic drug use along with adjunctive psychiatric treatment. Penetrating keratoplasty was performed in 2 patients. Toxic keratopathy due to topical anesthetic abuse is a curable disease. Early diagnosis and prevention of topical anesthetic drug use are the most important steps in the treatment of this condition. As these patients commonly exhibit psychiatric disorders, adjunctive psychiatric treatment may help to break the chemical addiction.

  6. Anesthetic Approach to a Child with Noonan's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Hatipoglu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is characterized by fascial and physical features along with congenital heart disease. In these patients, fascial features include short webbed neck, micrognathia, limited mouth opening and high arched palate. Pulmonary stenosis and hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy are highly prevalent in Noonan's syndrome. The anesthetic management is important because of difficult airway and severe cardiac abnormalities. We reported that anesthetic management of a child with Noonan's syndrome. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 47-50

  7. ACCURACY OF NONINVASIVE ANESTHETIC MONITORING IN THE ANESTHETIZED GIRAFFE (GIRAFFA CAMELOPARDALIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, Mads F; Grøndahl, Carsten; Stegmann, George F; Sauer, Cathrine; Secher, Niels H; Hasenkam, J Michael; Damkjær, Mads; Aalkjær, Christian; Wang, Tobias

    2017-09-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of pulse oximetry, capnography, and oscillometric blood pressure during general anesthesia in giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis). Thirty-two giraffes anesthetized for physiologic experiments were instrumented with a pulse oximeter transmittance probe positioned on the tongue and a capnograph sampling line placed at the oral end of the endotracheal tube. A human size 10 blood pressure cuff was placed around the base of the tail, and an indwelling arterial catheter in the auricular artery continuously measured blood pressure. Giraffes were intermittently ventilated using a Hudson demand valve throughout the procedures. Arterial blood for blood gas analysis was collected at multiple time points. Relationships between oxygen saturation as determined by pulse oximetry and arterial oxygen saturation, between arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure and end-tidal carbon dioxide, and between oscillometric pressure and invasive arterial blood pressure were assessed, and the accuracy of pulse oximetry, capnography, and oscillometric blood pressure monitoring evaluated using Bland-Altman analysis. All three noninvasive methods provided relatively poor estimates of the reference values. Receiver operating characteristic curve fitting was used to determine cut-off values for hypoxia, hypocapnia, hypercapnia, and hypotension for dichotomous decision-making. Applying these cut-off values, there was reasonable sensitivity for detection of hypocapnia, hypercapnia, and hypotension, but not for hypoxemia. Noninvasive anesthetic monitoring should be interpreted with caution in giraffes and, ideally, invasive monitoring should be employed.

  8. Intraoperative awareness risk, anesthetic sensitivity, and anesthetic management for patients with natural red hair: a matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradwohl, Stephen C; Aranake, Amrita; Abdallah, Arbi Ben; McNair, Paul; Lin, Nan; Fritz, Bradley A; Villafranca, Alex; Glick, David; Jacobsohn, Eric; Mashour, George A; Avidan, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    The red-hair phenotype, which is often produced by mutations in the melanocortin-1 receptor gene, has been associated with an increase in sedative, anesthetic, and analgesic requirements in both animal and human studies. Nevertheless, the clinical implications of this phenomenon in red-haired patients undergoing surgery are currently unknown. In a secondary analysis of a prospective trial of intraoperative awareness, red-haired patients were identified and matched with five control patients, and the relative risk for intraoperative awareness was determined. Overall anesthetic management between groups was compared using Hotelling's T(2) statistic. Inhaled anesthetic requirements were compared between cohorts by evaluating the relationship between end-tidal anesthetic concentration and the bispectral index with a linear mixed-effects model. Time to recovery was compared using Kaplan-Meier analysis, and differences in postoperative pain and nausea/vomiting were evaluated with Chi square tests. A cohort of 319 red-haired patients was matched with 1,595 control patients for a sample size of 1,914. There were no significant differences in the relative risk of intraoperative awareness (relative risk = 1.67; 95% confidence interval 0.34 to 8.22), anesthetic management, recovery times, or postoperative pain between red-haired patients and control patients. The relationship between pharmacokinetically stable volatile anesthetic concentrations and bispectral index values differed significantly between red-haired patients and controls (P red-haired patients and controls in response to anesthetic and analgesic agents or in recovery parameters. These findings suggest that perioperative anesthetic and analgesic management should not be altered based on self-reported red-hair phenotype.

  9. Ophthalmologic complications after intraoral local anesthesia: case report and review of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenen, Serge A.; Dubois, Leander; Saeed, Peerooz; de Lange, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Intraoral administration of local anesthetics is one of the most common dental procedures. Ophthalmologic complications can occur after maxillary as well as mandibular local anesthetic injections and may be underreported and sometimes misinterpreted. A review of the literature from the years

  10. The Science of Local Anesthesia: Basic Research, Clinical Application, and Future Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, Philipp; Hollmann, Markus W.; Strichartz, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Local anesthetics have been used clinically for more than a century, but new insights into their mechanisms of action and their interaction with biological systems continue to surprise researchers and clinicians alike. Next to their classic action on voltage-gated sodium channels, local anesthetics

  11. A tunnel shape defect on maxillary bone after accidental injection of formocresol instead of anesthetic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ege, Bilal; Demirkol, Mehmet; Mustafa, Rawand; Aras, Mutan Hamdi

    2014-09-01

    Accidental injection or leakages of various chemical disinfectants used during root canal preparation into adjacent tissues have been shown to have deleterious effects on surrounding tissue. Formocresol (FC) is an effective intracanal disinfectant used in endodontic procedures. However, it is known to have harmful effects into adjacent tissues. The aim of this article is to present an unusual case in which a 28-year-old male patient developed gingival and bone necrosis after the accidental injection of FC instead of local anesthetic solution for tooth extraction and to review cases in the literature where complications have occurred due to the use of FC.

  12. Volume of Anesthetic in 0.5% Marcaine with 1:200,000 Epinephrine Dental Carpule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    to  as  reducing  the  amount  of  time  patients  are  in  the   dental   chair .   Local  anesthesia  has  provided  a...copyrighted material in the thesis manuscript entitled: "Volume of Anesthetic in 0.5% Marcaine with 1:200,000 Epinephrine Dental Carpule" Is...3. School/DepartmenUCenter: Army Postgraduate Dental School, AEGD-2 Program, Fort Hood, TX 4. Phone: (708) 227-2152 5. Type of clearance

  13. Rapid detection of five anesthetics in tilapias by in vivo solid phase microextraction coupling with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuyao; Xu, Jianqiao; Wu, Jiayi; Hong, Haojia; Chen, Guosheng; Jiang, Ruifen; Zhu, Fang; Liu, Yuan; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2017-06-01

    The concentration of five rapidly metabolized anesthetics in living tilapias was determined in this study, by the presented method coupling in vivo solid phase microextraction (SPME) to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), which was the first time that in vivo sampling method was adapted in detecting the anesthetic residue in the living aquatic product. The analytical performance of the developed method was evaluated in homogenized tilapia dorsal muscle, and the results demonstrated that the present method possessed low detection limits 1.7-9.4ngg -1 ), wide linear ranges (10 or 30-5000ngg -1 ), and satisfactory reproducibility (relative standard deviations no more than 8.1% and 10.8% for inter-fiber and intra-fiber assays, respectively). Standard curves were established in homogenized tilapia dorsal muscle for calibrating in vivo SPME in living tilapias. And the concentrations determined by in vivo SPME were close to those determined by the liquid extraction. By using the present method, one anesthetic residue was detected above the detection limit in tilapias from the local markets. Comparing to traditional methods, the present one exhibited superior time-efficiency and cost performance, as the extraction time was only ten minutes, which was short to successfully avoid the possible loss of analytes caused by elimination and sample storage. In addition, owing to the time-efficiency of the present method, the elimination of the anesthetics in tilapias was traced successfully in the laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Surgical and anesthetic considerations in histrelin capsule implantation for the treatment of precocious puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James S; Alkhoury, Fuad; Burnweit, Cathy

    2014-05-01

    Precocious puberty treatment traditionally meant anxiety-provoking monthly depot injections until the advent of the annually implanted histrelin capsule. This study is the first to evaluate the surgical and anesthetic aspects of histrelin implantation for precocious puberty. All cases from one surgeon at a tertiary pediatric hospital were reviewed for patient age, anesthetic type, technical difficulties, and complications. From 12/2007 to 3/2013, 114 cases (49% implantations, 25% removals/re-implantations, 25% removals) were performed. Local anesthesia was employed in 100% of non-general anesthesia cases (n=109, 96%), augmented by inhaled N2O in 49%. Five patients (4%) underwent general anesthesia: three neurologically-impaired and two coordinated with scheduled MRIs. Procedural difficulties (n=18, 16%) included implant fracture during removal (n=16/58 removals, 28%). Fracture never occurred during implantation. Three children (3%) suffered complications. One infection was treated with antibiotics, and two implants were removed for systemic allergic reaction. Six children (5%) had unscheduled post-operative checks for pain (n=3, 3%), allergy to elastic dressing (n=2, 2%), or rash (n=1, 1%). Mean charges for general anesthesia were $10,188±1292 versus $528±147 for N2O or local alone (pLocal anesthesia, with possible N2O supplementation, is well-tolerated and introduces substantial resource and cost savings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Can anesthetic-analgesic technique during primary cancer surgery affect recurrence or metastasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Kathryn; Levins, Kirk J; Buggy, Donal J

    2016-02-01

    Mortality among cancer patients is more commonly due to the effects of metastasis and recurrence as opposed to the primary tumour. Various perioperative factors have been implicated in tumour growth, including anesthetic agents and analgesia techniques. In this narrative review, we integrate this information to present a summary of the best available evidence to guide the conduct of anesthesia for primary cancer surgery. We conducted a search of the PubMed database up to May 31, 2015 to identify relevant literature using the search terms "anesthesia and metastases", "anesthetic drugs and cancer", "volatile anesthetic agents and cancer", and "anesthetic technique and cancer". There is conflicting evidence regarding volatile agents; however, the majority of studies are in vitro, suggesting that these agents are associated with enhanced expression of tumourigenic markers as well as both proliferation and migration of cancer cells. Nitrous oxide has not been shown to have any effect on cancer recurrence. Local anesthetic agents may reduce the incidence of cancer recurrence through systemic anti-inflammatory action in addition to direct effects on the proliferation and migration of cancer cells. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect cancer cells via inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), which leads to reduced resistance of the cancer cell to apoptosis and reduced production of prostaglandins by cancer cells. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs also suppress the cancer cell growth cycle through effects independent of COX-2 inhibition. Opioids have been shown to inhibit the function of natural killer cells and to stimulate cancer cell proliferation through effects on angiogenesis and tumour cell signalling pathways. Supplemental oxygen at the time of surgery has a proangiogenic effect on micrometastases, while the use of perioperative dexamethasone does not affect overall rates of cancer survival. Current laboratory research suggests that perioperative

  16. Hydrogen-1 NMR relaxation time studies in membrane: anesthetic systems; Variacao dos tempos de relaxacao longitudinal de protons em sistemas membranares contendo anestesicos locais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, L.M.A.; Fraceto, L.; Paula, E. de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica; Franzoni, L.; Spisni, A. [Universita degli Studi di Parma, Parma (Italy). Ist. di Chimica Biologica

    1997-12-31

    The study of local anesthetics`(LA) interaction with model phospholipid membranes is justified by the direct correlation between anesthetic`s hydrophobicity and its potency/toxicity. By the same reason, uncharged LA species seems to play a crucial role in anesthesia. Most clinically used LA are small amphiphilics with a protonated amine group (pKa around 8). Although both charged (protonated) and uncharged forms can coexist at physiological pH, it has been shown (Lee, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 514:95, 1978; Screier et al. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 769:231, 1984) that the real anesthetic pka can be down-shifted, due to differential partition into membranes, increasing the ratio of uncharged species at pH 7.4. We have measured {sup 1}H-NMR longitudinal relaxation times (T{sub 1}) for phospholipid and three local anesthetics (tetracaine, lidocaine, benzocaine), in sonicated vesicles at a 3:1 molar ratio. All the LA protons have shown smaller T{sub 1} in this system than in isotropic phases, reflecting LA immobilization caused by insertion in the membrane. T{sub 1} values for the lipid protons in the presence of LA were analyzed, in an attempt to identify specific LA:lipid contact regions. (author) 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tabs.

  17. Local Anaesthetic Neurotoxicity Mimicking Anaphylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz Özçeker; Zeynep Tamay; Nermin Güler

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine and articaine are commonly used in infiltration anesthesia, extremity blockage, topical anesthesia and intravenous regional anesthesia due to high activity and rapid onset effect. Although commonly administered, the allergic drug reactions of local anesthetics are rarely reported. However, reactions related to systemic toxicity can be seen Hereby, we reported two cases related to drug allergy and convulsion after administering of lidocaine and articaine.

  18. Anesthetic management of patients with Melkersson Rosenthal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Murat; Kati, Ismail

    2008-01-01

    Melkersson Rosenthal Syndrome (MRS) is a rare disorder characterized by relapsing facial paralysis, persistent or recurrent orofacial edema, and lingua plicata. It may cause difficult airway, drug allergy, and angioedema. In our anesthetic management of two patients with MRS, preanesthetic immunological blood examination and skin tests for hypersensitivity to anesthetic drugs were applied. Because the principal goal is to avoid all factors that may stimulate, an allergic reaction, anesthetic drugs known to trigger urticaria were avoided. Body and operating room temperatures, changes of which may trigger allergic reactions, were kept constant during the perioperative period. Emergency precautions were taken for probable angioedema. MRS is a rare syndrome, and if its manifestations are misunderstood as simple facial paralysis, it may be overlooked by anesthesiologists. Anesthesiologists must be careful of several problems in patients with MRS.

  19. Ocular blood flow alterations during inferior turbinate radiofrequency reduction under local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Sedat; Şimşek, Ali; Bayraktar, Cem; Yazıcı, Haşmet; Sarıkaya, Yasin; Karataş, Mehmet; Karadağ, Ayşe Sevgi; Çapkın, Musa

    2016-09-14

    Ocular blood flow alterations and blindness are uncommon and less-known adverse effects of nasal local anesthetic infiltrations. Our aim was to investigate ocular blood flow alterations during radiofrequency (RF) tissue reduction of inferior turbinates with the patient under local anesthesia by using a noninvasive method with optical coherence tomography. A total of 120 patients with inferior turbinate hypertrophy were prospectively randomized into two groups. In group 1, a total of 61 patients underwent RF tissue reduction while under local anesthesia with epinephrine. In group 2, a total of 59 patients underwent RF tissue reduction of inferior turbinates while under local anesthesia without epinephrine. Optical coherence tomography measurements were performed before surgery and at 5, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after local anesthetic infiltration. Choroid thickness measurements decreased gradually after local anesthetic infiltration until 30 minutes and increased to the same plane with the baseline at 60 minutes in group 1 (p local anesthetic infiltration at 15 and 45 minutes (p local anesthetic with epinephrine infiltration into inferior turbinates. Otolaryngologists should be careful after local anesthetic infiltration, and monitor the vision. Further studies with larger series would be needed to discuss safety of local anesthetics.

  20. Disconnecting Consciousness: Is There a Common Anesthetic End-Point?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudetz, Anthony G.; Mashour, George A.

    2016-01-01

    A quest for a systems-level neuroscientific basis of anesthetic-induced loss and return of consciousness has been in the forefront of research of the last two decades. Recent advances toward the discovery of underlying mechanisms have been achieved using experimental electrophysiology, multichannel electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, and functional magnetic resonance imaging. By the careful dosing of various volatile and IV anesthetic agents to the level of behavioral unresponsiveness, both specific and common changes in functional and effective connectivity across large-scale brain networks have been discovered and interpreted in the context of how the synthesis of neural information might be affected during anesthesia. The results of most investigations to date converge toward the conclusion that a common neural correlate of anesthetic-induced unresponsiveness is a consistent depression or functional disconnection of lateral frontoparietal networks, which are thought to be critical for consciousness of the environment. A reduction in the repertoire of brain states may contribute to the anesthetic disruption of large-scale information integration leading to unconsciousness. In future investigations, a systematic delineation of connectivity changes with multiple anesthetics using the same experimental design and the same analytical method will be desirable. The critical neural events that account for the transition between responsive and unresponsive states should be assessed at similar anesthetic doses just below and above the loss or return of responsiveness. There will also be a need to identify a robust, sensitive, and reliable measure of information transfer. Ultimately, finding a behavior-independent measure of subjective experience that can track covert cognition in unresponsive subjects and a delineation of causal factors vs. correlated events will be essential to understand the neuronal basis of human consciousness and unconsciousness. PMID

  1. Disconnecting Consciousness: Is There a Common Anesthetic End Point?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudetz, Anthony G; Mashour, George A

    2016-11-01

    A quest for a systems-level neuroscientific basis of anesthetic-induced loss and return of consciousness has been in the forefront of research for the past 2 decades. Recent advances toward the discovery of underlying mechanisms have been achieved using experimental electrophysiology, multichannel electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, and functional magnetic resonance imaging. By the careful dosing of various volatile and IV anesthetic agents to the level of behavioral unresponsiveness, both specific and common changes in functional and effective connectivity across large-scale brain networks have been discovered and interpreted in the context of how the synthesis of neural information might be affected during anesthesia. The results of most investigations to date converge toward the conclusion that a common neural correlate of anesthetic-induced unresponsiveness is a consistent depression or functional disconnection of lateral frontoparietal networks, which are thought to be critical for consciousness of the environment. A reduction in the repertoire of brain states may contribute to the anesthetic disruption of large-scale information integration leading to unconsciousness. In future investigations, a systematic delineation of connectivity changes with multiple anesthetics using the same experimental design, and the same analytical method will be desirable. The critical neural events that account for the transition between responsive and unresponsive states should be assessed at similar anesthetic doses just below and above the loss or return of responsiveness. There will also be a need to identify a robust, sensitive, and reliable measure of information transfer. Ultimately, finding a behavior-independent measure of subjective experience that can track covert cognition in unresponsive subjects and a delineation of causal factors versus correlated events will be essential to understand the neuronal basis of human consciousness and unconsciousness.

  2. Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of anesthetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Jodi; Le, Cathy; Lamers, Vanessa; Eckelman, Matthew

    2012-05-01

    Anesthesiologists must consider the entire life cycle of drugs in order to include environmental impacts into clinical decisions. In the present study we used life cycle assessment to examine the climate change impacts of 5 anesthetic drugs: sevoflurane, desflurane, isoflurane, nitrous oxide, and propofol. A full cradle-to-grave approach was used, encompassing resource extraction, drug manufacturing, transport to health care facilities, drug delivery to the patient, and disposal or emission to the environment. At each stage of the life cycle, energy, material inputs, and emissions were considered, as well as use-specific impacts of each drug. The 4 inhalation anesthetics are greenhouse gases (GHGs), and so life cycle GHG emissions include waste anesthetic gases vented to the atmosphere and emissions (largely carbon dioxide) that arise from other life cycle stages. Desflurane accounts for the largest life cycle GHG impact among the anesthetic drugs considered here: 15 times that of isoflurane and 20 times that of sevoflurane on a per MAC-hour basis when administered in an O(2)/air admixture. GHG emissions increase significantly for all drugs when administered in an N(2)O/O(2) admixture. For all of the inhalation anesthetics, GHG impacts are dominated by uncontrolled emissions of waste anesthetic gases. GHG impacts of propofol are comparatively quite small, nearly 4 orders of magnitude lower than those of desflurane or nitrous oxide. Unlike the inhaled drugs, the GHG impacts of propofol primarily stem from the electricity required for the syringe pump and not from drug production or direct release to the environment. Our results reiterate previous published data on the GHG effects of these inhaled drugs, while providing a life cycle context. There are several practical environmental impact mitigation strategies. Desflurane and nitrous oxide should be restricted to cases where they may reduce morbidity and mortality over alternative drugs. Clinicians should avoid

  3. Validation of the bispectral index as an indicator of anesthetic depth in Thoroughbred horses anesthetized with sevoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokushige, Hirotaka; Kakizaki, Masashi; Ode, Hirotaka; Okano, Atsushi; Okada, Jun; Kuroda, Taisuke; Wakuno, Ai; Ohta, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the bispectral index (BIS) as an indicator of anesthetic depth in Thoroughbred horses, BIS values were measured at multiple stages of sevoflurane anesthesia in five horses anesthetized with guaifenesin and thiopental following premedication with xylazine. There was no significant difference between the BIS values recorded at end-tidal sevoflurane concentrations of 2.8% (median 60 ranging from 47 to 68) and 3.5% (median 71 ranging from 49 to 82) in anesthetized horses. These BIS values during anesthesia were significantly lower (Phorses (median 98 ranging from 98 to 98) or sedated horses (median 92 ranging from 80 to 93). During the recovery phase, the BIS values gradually increased over time but did not significantly increase until the horses showed movement. In conclusion, the BIS value could be useful as an indicator of awakening during the recovery period in horses, as previous reported.

  4. Efficacy of tramadol as a preincisional infiltration anesthetic in children undergoing inguinal hernia repair: a prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Numanoğlu KV

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Kemal Varim Numanoğlu,1 Hilal Ayoğlu,2 Duygu Tatli,1 Ebubekir Er11Department of Pediatric Surgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Bülent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak, TurkeyBackground: Preincisional local anesthetic infiltration at the surgical site is a therapeutic option for postoperative pain relief for pediatric inguinal hernia. Additionally, tramadol has been used as an analgesic for postoperative pain in children. Recently, the local anesthetic effects of tramadol have been reported. The aim of this study was to determine both the systemic analgesic and the local anesthetic effects of tramadol and to determine how it differs from bupivacaine when administered preincisionally.Methods: Fifty-two healthy children, aged 2–7 years, who were scheduled for elective herniorrhaphy were randomly allocated to receive either preincisional infiltration at the surgical site with 2 mg/kg tramadol (Group T, n=26 or 0.25 mL/kg 0.5% bupivacaine (Group B, n=26. At the time of anesthetic administration, perioperative hemodynamic parameters were recorded. The pain assessments were performed 10 minutes after the end of anesthesia and during the first 6-hour period, using pain scores. The time of first dose of analgesia and need for additional analgesia were recorded.Results: Between T and B groups, the anesthesia time, perioperative hemodynamic changes, and pain scores were not statistically different. However, in group B, the postoperative analgesic requirement was higher than in group T.Conclusion: Tramadol shows equal analgesic effect to bupivacaine and decreases additional analgesic requirement, when used for preincisional infiltration anesthesia in children undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy.Keywords: bupivacaine, postoperative analgesia, pain scores

  5. Dose-Dependent Protective Effect of Inhalational Anesthetics Against Postoperative Respiratory Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabitz, Stephanie D; Farhan, Hassan N; Ruscic, Katarina J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inhalational anesthetics are bronchodilators with immunomodulatory effects. We sought to determine the effect of inhalational anesthetic dose on risk of severe postoperative respiratory complications. DESIGN: Prospective analysis of data on file in surgical cases between January 2007 ...

  6. Impact of Anesthetic Regimen on Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in the Rat Heart In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behmenburg, Friederike; van Caster, Patrick; Bunte, Sebastian; Brandenburger, Timo; Heinen, André; Hollmann, Markus W.; Huhn, Ragnar

    2017-01-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) seems to be a promising cardioprotective strategy with contradictive clinical data suggesting the anesthetic regimen influencing the favorable impact of RIPC. This study aimed to investigate whether cardio protection by RIPC is abolished by anesthetic regimens.

  7. Efeitos adversos do sufentanil associado ao anestésico local pelas vias subaracnóidea e peridural em pacientes submetidas à analgesia de parto Efectos adversos del sufentanil asociado al anestésico local por las vías subaracnoidea y peridural en pacientes sometidas a la analgesia de parto Side effects of subarachnoid and epidural sufentanil associated with a local anesthetic in patients undergoing labor analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel C.F. Salem

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A associação do opióide ao anestésico local melhora a qualidade da analgesia de parto e reduz o risco de toxicidade sistêmica pelo anestésico local. Os opióides, entretanto, podem determinar efeitos colaterais. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi comparar os efeitos adversos determinados pelo sufentanil, administrado por via subaracnóidea, associado à bupivacaína, com aquele determinado pelo sufentanil por via peridural, associado à ropivacaína, nas doses utilizadas no Serviço de Anestesia, em gestantes submetidas à analgesia de parto. MÉTODO: Participaram do estudo 60 pacientes, estado físico ASA I e II, com idade entre 15 e 42 anos, com gestação a termo e fetos saudáveis, submetidas à analgesia de parto. Foram distribuídas de forma aleatória em dois grupos: G1 - Duplo bloqueio - bupivacaína a 0,5% (2,5 mg e sufentanil (5 µg pela via subaracnóidea, G2 - Peridural - ropivacaína a 0,2% (20 mg e sufentanil (10 µg pela via peridural. Para doses complementares foi administrada ropivacaína a 0,2% (12 mg e para resolução do parto, ropivacaína a 1% (50 mg. As pacientes foram avaliadas após analgesia (M1 com relação a hipotensão arterial, bradicardia materna, prurido, náusea, vômito, depressão respiratória e sedação. No pós-operatório (M2, quanto à presença de náusea, vômito, prurido, sedação, retenção urinária e dor. Os recém-nascidos foram avaliados pelo índice de Apgar. Para análise estatística, foram utilizados teste t de Student, Mann-Whitney e Qui-quadrado. RESULTADOS: Os grupos foram similares com relação à idade, ao peso, à altura, à duração do período de trabalho de parto após analgesia, ao Apgar dos recém-nascidos, à ocorrência de hipotensão arterial, bradicardia, náusea, vômito, prurido e retenção urinária. A sedação foi mais freqüente nas pacientes de G2, em M1 (50% com diferença estatística significativa. CONCLUSÕES: O sufentanil nas doses

  8. Radiographic assessment of laryngeal reflexes in ketamine-anesthetized cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, E.P.; Johnston, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    The competence of the laryngeal closure reflexes of cats anesthetized with ketamine was assessed. Radiographic evaluations of the respiratory and digestive tracts were made after colloidal barium suspension was instilled into the pharynges of conscious and ketamine-anesthetized cats. There was a significant ketamine dose-related response of spread of contrast medium into the supraglottic laryngeal area and into the stomach 2 minutes after contrast medium was instilled into the pharynx (P less than 0.05). Cats did not aspirate contrast medium into the lower respiratory tract. Three ketamine-anesthetized cats aspirated contrast medium into the subglottic area of the larynx, and 2 of these cats also aspirated the material into the cranial part of the trachea. This material was coughed up and swallowed within 5 minutes. Transit time of contrast medium into the stomach seemed to be increased in 11 of the 15 cats given the larger dosages of ketamine (24, 36, 48 mg/kg of body weight), compared with that in conscious cats and those given ketamine at 12 mg/kg. Competent laryngeal protective reflexes in cats can be maintained with ketamine anesthesia. Contrast radiography could be used as a diagnostic aid in ketamine-anesthetized cats suspected of laryngeal reflex abnormalities

  9. A noninvasive monitoring device for anesthetics in fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Power, Deborah M.; Fuentes, Juan; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2010-01-01

    A noninvasive device capable of recording both gill and lateral fin movements was assembled and used to analyze initial and post-treatment activity frequency (Hz) in fish exposed to anesthetics. Exposure of platy fish (Xiphosphorus maculatus) to saponins from quillaja bark (0.185 mM and 0.555 mM)...

  10. The Anesthetic Efficacy of the Intraosseous Injection in Irreversible Pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of an intraosseous injection in teeth diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis . Fifty...one healthy human subjects with symptomatic maxillary or mandibular posterior teeth diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis were used in this study. The

  11. Anesthetic Challenges in an Adult with Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, Jacqueline; Jansen, Nicholas

    2014-06-15

    The mucopolysaccharidoses are a group of lysosomal storage diseases with many skeletal and airway features that pose a challenge to anesthetists. We present the anesthetic management of a woman with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI undergoing cervical spine surgery and review the perioperative issues that may arise with this disease.

  12. Anesthetic management of a horse with traumatic pneumothorax

    OpenAIRE

    Chesnel, Maud-Aline; Aprea, Francesco; Clutton, R. Eddie

    2012-01-01

    A traumatic pneumothorax and severe hemorrhage were present in a mare with a large thoracic wall defect, lung perforation, and multiple rib fractures. General anesthesia was induced to allow surgical exploration. We describe the anesthetic technique, and discuss the management of the ventilatory, hemodynamic, and metabolic disturbances encountered.

  13. Anesthetic management of cardiac patient for cataract surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, F.B.; Sultan, S.T.

    2003-01-01

    We are reporting the successful anesthetic management of a 6 years old child, who had cyanotic congenital heart disease and underwent an operation for cataract extraction. Ketamine was used for the induction and maintenance of anesthesia. Ventilation was assisted manually by using laryngeal masks. (author)

  14. Activated charcoal effectively removes inhaled anesthetics from modern anesthesia machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgenheier, Nathaniel; Stoker, Robert; Westenskow, Dwayne; Orr, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    If a malignant hyperthermia-susceptible patient is to receive an anesthetic, an anesthesia machine that has been used previously to deliver volatile anesthetics should be flushed with a high fresh gas flow. Conflicting results from previous studies recommend flush times that vary from 10 to 104 minutes. In a previously proposed alternative decontamination technique, other investigators placed an activated charcoal filter in the inspired limb of the breathing circuit. We placed activated charcoal filters on both the inspired and expired limbs of several contaminated anesthesia machines and measured the time needed to flush the machine so that the delivered concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane would be activated charcoal filters limit further exposure. Activated charcoal filters decrease the concentration of volatile anesthetic delivered by a contaminated machine to an acceptable level in charcoal filters in place, the current anesthesia machine may be used for at least 67 minutes before the inspired concentration exceeds 5 ppm. Activated charcoal filters provide an alternative approach to the 10 to 104 minutes of flushing that are normally required to prepare a machine that has been used previously to deliver a volatile anesthetic.

  15. Anesthetic keratopathy presenting as bilateral Mooren-like ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khakshoor H

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hamid Khakshoor,1 Majid Moshirfar,2 Rachel G Simpson,3 Hamid Gharaee,1 Amir H Vejdani,1 Steven M Christiansen,2 Jason N Edmonds,2 Nicholas L Behunin21Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Department of Ophthalmology, Mashad, Iran; 2John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 3The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix, AZ, USAAbstract: This observational case report describes the development of bilateral Mooren-like ulcers in a patient with anesthetic keratopathy. A 42-year-old man with a recent history of minor eye trauma and pain self-treated with tetracaine eye drops presented with complaints of acutely worsening vision and severe pain bilaterally. His visual acuity at presentation was limited to hand motion. Slit-lamp examination revealed bilateral epithelial defects at the center of the cornea, and an area of stromal infiltration and thinning with an undermining leading edge resembling a Mooren's ulcer in both eyes. Corneal haze and hypopyon were visible. Anesthetic use was halted immediately and the patient was started on prednisolone and mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept®, after which visual acuity gradually improved and pain decreased. Despite improvement of symptoms, residual epithelial defects remained, and the patient was ultimately treated with keratoplasty for recovery of vision. We suggest that anesthetic keratopathy should be included in the differential diagnosis for any patient presenting with ring-shaped stromal infiltrates or nonhealing epithelial defects.Keywords: anesthetic abuse, corneal damage, corneal ulceration

  16. Effects of Anesthetic Management on Early Postoperative Recovery, Hemodynamics and Pain After Supratentorial Craniotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Ayrian, Eugenia; Kaye, Alan David; Varner, Chelsia L.; Guerra, Carolina; Vadivelu, Nalini; Urman, Richard D.; Zelman, Vladimir; Lumb, Philip D.; Rosa, Giovanni; Bilotta, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Various clinical trials have assessed how intraoperative anesthetics can affect early recovery, hemodynamics and nociception after supratentorial craniotomy. Whether or not the difference in recovery pattern differs in a meaningful way with anesthetic choice is controversial. This review examines and compares different anesthetics with respect to wake-up time, hemodynamics, respiration, cognitive recovery, pain, nausea and vomiting, and shivering. When comparing inhalational anesthetics to in...

  17. Concentrations of anesthetics across the water-membrane interface; the Meyer-Overton hypothesis revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.; New, M. H.; Chipot, C.

    1998-01-01

    The free energies of transferring a variety of anesthetic and nonanesthetic compounds across water-oil and water-membrane interfaces were obtained using computer simulations. Anesthetics exhibit greatly enhanced concentrations at these interfaces, compared to nonanesthetics. The substitution of the interfacial solubilites of the anesthetics for their bulk lipid solubilities in the Meyer-Overton relation, was found to give a better correlation, indicating that the potency of an anesthetic is directly proportional to its solubility at the interface.

  18. Use of analgesic, anesthetic, and sedative medications during pediatric hospitalizations in the United States 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, Tamar; Ernst, Frank R; Greenspan, Jay

    2012-11-01

    The wide need for analgesia, anesthesia, and sedation in children and the lack of pediatric labeling leads to widespread off-label use of medications for pain and sedation in children. Any attempt to address the lack of labeling will require national estimates of the numbers of children using each medication, their ages, and other factors, to understand the overall use of these medications. We describe use of analgesics, anesthetics, and sedatives in pediatric inpatients by result of conducting a statistical analysis of medication data from >800,000 pediatric hospitalizations in the United States. The purpose was to provide national estimates for the percentage of hospitalized children receiving specific analgesics, anesthetics, and sedatives and their use by age group. Data from the Premier Database, the largest hospital-based, service-level comparative database in the country, were used. We identified all uses of a given medication, selected the first use for each child, and calculated the prevalence of use of specific medications among hospitalized children in 2008 as the number of hospitalizations in which the drug was used per 100 hospitalizations. Dose and number of doses were not considered in these analyses. The dataset contained records for 877,201 hospitalizations of children younger than 18 years of age at the time of admission. Thirty-three medications and an additional 11 combinations were administered in this population, including nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, local and regional anesthetics, opioids, benzodiazepines, sedative-hypnotics, barbiturates, and others. The 10 most frequently administered analgesic, anesthetic, or sedative medications used in this population were acetaminophen (14.7%), lidocaine (11.0%), fentanyl (6.6%), ibuprofen (6.3%), morphine (6.2%), midazolam (4.5%), propofol (4.1%), lidocaine/prilocaine (2.5%), hydrocodone/acetaminophen (2.1%), and acetaminophen/codeine (2.0%). Use changed with age, and the direction of change

  19. Complications of local anesthesia used in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, David R; Yamashita, Dennis-Duke R; McAndrews, James P

    2011-08-01

    Local anesthetics are used routinely in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Local anesthetics are safe and effective drugs but do have risks that practitioners need to be aware of. This article reviews the complications of local anesthesia. A brief history is provided and the regional and systemic complications that can arise from using local anesthesia are discussed. These complications include paresthesia, ocular complications, allergies, toxicity, and methemoglobinemia. Understanding the risks involved with local anesthesia decreases the chances of adverse events occurring and ultimately leads to improved patient care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A comparison of the anesthetic efficacy of articaine and lidocaine in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortamano, Isabel Peixoto; Siviero, Marcelo; Costa, Carina Gisele; Buscariolo, Inês Aparecida; Armonia, Paschoal Laércio

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine with that of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine during pulpectomy in patients with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth. Forty volunteers, patients with irreversible pulpitis admitted to the Emergency Center of the School of Dentistry at the University of São Paulo, randomly received a conventional inferior alveolar nerve block containing 3.6 mL of either 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. During the subsequent pulpectomy, we recorded the patients' subjective assessments of lip anesthesia, the absence/presence of pulpal anesthesia through electric pulp stimulation, and the absence/presence of pain through a verbal analogue scale. All tested patients reported lip anesthesia after the application of either inferior alveolar nerve block. Regarding pulpal anesthesia success as measured with the pulp tester, the lidocaine solution had a higher success rate (70%) than the articaine solution (65%). For patients reporting none or mild pain during pulpectomy, the success rate of the articaine solution (65%) was higher than that of the lidocaine solution (45%). Yet, none of the observed differences between articaine and lidocaine were statistically significant. Apparently, therefore, both local anesthetic solutions had similar effects on the patients with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth. Neither of the solutions, however, resulted in an effective pain control during irreversible pulpitis treatments.

  1. A Survey of Perioperative and Postoperative Anesthetic Practices for Cesarean Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leinani Aiono-Le Tagaloa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this survey was to review cesarean delivery anesthetic practices. An online survey was sent to members of the Society of Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology (SOAP. The mode of anesthesia, preferred neuraxial local anesthetic and opioid agents, postoperative analgesic regimens, and monitoring modalities were assessed. 384 responses from 1,081 online survey requests were received (response rate = 36%. Spinal anesthesia is most commonly used for elective cesarean delivery (85% respondents, with 90% of these respondents preferring hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.75%. 79% used intrathecal fentanyl and 77% used morphine (median [range] dose 200 mcg [50–400]. 91% use respiratory rate, 61% use sedation scores, and 30% use pulse oximetry to monitor for postoperative respiratory depression after administration of neuraxial opioids. Postoperative analgesic regimens include: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, acetaminophen, oxycodone, and hydrocodone by 81%, 45%, 25%, and 27% respondents respectively. The majority of respondents use spinal anesthesia and neuraxial opioids for cesarean delivery anesthesia. There is marked variability in practices for monitoring respiratory depression postdelivery and for providing postoperative analgesia. These results may not be indicative of overall practice in the United States due to the select group of anesthesiologists surveyed and the low response rate.

  2. Effect of certain anesthetic agents on mallard ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, D.R.; Greenwood, R.J.

    1972-01-01

    Four anesthetic agents used in human or veterinary medicine and 3 experimental anesthetic preparations were evaluated for effectiveness in inducing narcosis when administered orally to game-farm mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).Tribromoethanol was the only compound to satisfy criteria of initial tests. Mean duration of the induction, immobilization, and recovery periods was 2.4 minutes, 8.7 minutes, and 1.3 hours, respectively, at the median effective dosage for immobilization (ED50; 100 mg./kg. of body weight). The median lethal dosage (LD50) was 400 mg./kg. of body weight.Tribromoethanol was also tested on mallards during the reproductive season. Effects on the hatchability of eggs or the survival of young were not detected.

  3. Refractometry for quality control of anesthetic drug mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabenow, Jennifer M; Maske, Mindy L; Vogler, George A

    2006-07-01

    Injectable anesthetic drugs used in rodents are often mixed and further diluted to increase the convenience and accuracy of dosing. We evaluated clinical refractometry as a simple and rapid method of quality control and mixing error detection of rodent anesthetic or analgesic mixtures. Dilutions of ketamine, xylazine, acepromazine, and buprenorphine were prepared with reagent-grade water to produce at least 4 concentration levels. The refraction of each concentration then was measured with a clinical refractometer and plotted against the percentage of stock concentration. The resulting graphs were linear and could be used to determine the concentration of single-drug dilutions or to predict the refraction of drug mixtures. We conclude that refractometry can be used to assess the concentration of dilutions of single drugs and can verify the mixing accuracy of drug combinations when the components of the mixture are known and fall within the detection range of the instrument.

  4. Dissociative anesthetic combination reduces intraocular pressure (IOP in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewaldo de Mattos-Junior

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluate the effects of three anesthetic combinations, ketamine-midazolam, ketamine-xylazine and tiletamine-zolazepam, on IOP in rabbits. In a experimental, blind, randomized, crossover study, six rabbits were anesthetized with each of 3 treatments in random order. Groups KM (ketamine, 30 mg/kg + midazolam, 1 mg/kg; KX (ketamine, 30 mg/kg + xylazine, 3 mg/kg; and TZ (tiletamine + zolazepam, 20 mg/kg. The drugs were mixed in the same syringe injected intramuscularly (IM into the quadriceps muscle. IOP was measured before drug administration (baseline and at 5-minute intervals for 30 minutes. The data were analyzed by a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA followed by Bonferroni test. All groups had significant decreases in IOP compared to baseline (p 0.05. Administration of either ketamine-midazolam, ketamine-xylazine, or tiletamine-zolazepam similarly decrease IOP in rabbits within 30 minutes of injection.

  5. Management of Anesthesia in Adult and Pediatric Mastocytosis: A Study of the Spanish Network on Mastocytosis (REMA) Based on 726 Anesthetic Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matito, Almudena; Morgado, José Mario; Sánchez-López, Paula; Álvarez-Twose, Iván; Sánchez-Muñoz, Laura; Orfao, Alberto; Escribano, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The role of anesthesia as an elicitor of mast cell (MC) mediator release symptoms in mastocytosis is poorly investigated. To determine the frequency and type of MC mediator release symptoms during anesthetic procedures in mastocytosis patients. Medical records were reviewed regarding the anesthetic techniques for 501 mastocytosis patients (459 adults and 42 children; 95 and 5% with systemic involvement, respectively) who were subjected to 676 and 50 anesthetic techniques, respectively. General, sedation, epidural, and local anesthetic techniques were used in 66 (10%), 67 (10%), 76 (11%), and 515 (76%) adult patients and in 24 (48%), 8 (16%), 2 (4%), and 25 (50%) pediatric patients. The frequency of perioperative MC mediator-related symptoms and anaphylaxis was 2 and 0.4% in the adult series and 4 and 2% among children. In the adult series, this frequency was significantly higher in patients who previously presented with anaphylaxis (p = 0.03), underwent major surgeries (p anesthesia (p = 0.02), and were not given prophylactic antimediator therapy (PAT) 1 h before the anesthesia (H1/H2 antihistamines and benzodiacepines; p = 0.002).Hypersensitivity and/or allergy to the involved drugs and latex allergy were ruled out in all but one symptomatic case; when PAT was given and sedation was added, some cases later tolerated the same anesthetic drugs. The frequency of perioperative anaphylaxis appears to be higher in mastocytosis patients than in the general population. Mastocytosis should not be a contraindication for anesthesia since PAT and adequate anesthetic management using the drugs with the safest profile appears to be effective in preventing/controlling MC mediator-associated symptoms. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Estudo clínico e histológico das pálpebras e conjuntiva hígidas submetidas ao tratamento tópico com soluções anestésicas em coelhos Clinical and histological evaluation of healthy eyelid and conjunctiva subject to local treatment with anesthetic solutions in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V.C. Amaral

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se as apresentações comerciais de colírios anestésicos aplicados em 63 coelhos da raça Nova Zelândia, distribuídos em três grupos (G1, G2 e G3 de 21 animais cada e que receberam instilação de uma gota em cada olho seis vezes ao dia. Os animais do G1 foram tratados com colírio de cloridrato de proparacaína a 0,5%; os do G2, com colírio de cloridrato de tetracaína a 1% associado à fenilefrina a 0,1%; e os do G3, com solução fisiológica. Cada grupo foi subdividido em três subgrupos com sete animais cada, os quais foram tratados por três, sete e 15 dias. No final de cada tratamento, dois animais de cada subgrupo foram sacrificados para exame histológico de fragmentos retirados da conjuntiva, da terceira pálpebra e das pálpebras. Observou-se, ao exame clínico, episclerite em graus diversos em 100% dos animais do G1, no terceiro, sétimo e 15º dia, e em apenas 17,8% nos do G2, nestes mesmos dias. Ao exame microscópico, observaram-se aumento do número de células califormes, proliferação de folículos linfoides, aumento do número de eosinófilos e aumento do espaço intersticial nas pálpebras dos animais do G1. Pôde-se concluir que o colírio de tetracaína a 1% associado à fenilefrina a 0,1% promoveu maior toxicidade à conjuntiva ocular e às pálpebras de coelhos quando comparado ao colírio de proparacaína a 0,5%.This work aimed to evaluate commercial presentations of anesthetic eye drops in sixty three New Zealand rabbits which were separated equally in three groups (G1, G2 and G3. The G1 group was treated with 0.5% proparacaine chloridrate eye drop, G2 group with 1% tetracaine chloridrate associated with 0.1% phenylephrine eye drop and G3 group with 0.9% physiologic solution eye drop. All of them received one drop in each eye six times a day. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups (seven rabbits, which are treated for 3, 7 and 15 days. At the end of each treatment, two animals in each subgroup

  7. Anesthetic Management for Prolonged Incidental Surgery in Advanced Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kundu, Riddhi; Subramaniam, Rajeshwari; Sardar, Arijit

    2017-01-01

    In spite of advances in perioperative management, operative procedures in patients with chronic liver disease pose a significant challenge for the anesthesiologist due to multisystem involvement, high risk of postoperative hepatic decompensation, and mortality. We describe the anesthetic management of an elderly patient with advanced liver disease (model for end-stage liver disease 16) for prolonged abdominal surgery. The use of invasive hemodynamic monitoring, point-of-care biochemical, and ...

  8. Anesthetic Management in a Gravida with Type IV Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Vue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is an inherited disorder of the connective tissues caused by abnormalities in collagen formation. OI may present many challenges to the anesthesiologist. A literature review reveals a wide range of implications, from basic positioning to management of the difficult airway. We present the anesthetic management of a 25-year-old gravid woman with OI, fetal demise, and possible uterine rupture, admitted for an exploratory laparotomy.

  9. Cardiac evaluation of anesthetized Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adin, Darcy B; Maisenbacher, Herbert W; Ojeda, Nyurka; Fiorello, Christine V; Estrada, Amara H; Prosek, Robert; Citino, Scott B

    2007-02-01

    To determine ECG and echocardiographic measurements in healthy anesthetized Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi). 20 healthy zebras. Auscultation, base-apex ECG, and echocardiography were performed on anesthetized zebras. Low-grade systolic murmurs were detected in the left basilar region in 4 of 20 zebras. Evaluation of ECGs from 19 zebras revealed sinus rhythm with a predominantly negative QRS complex and a mean +/- SD heart rate of 67 +/- 10 beats/min. Echocardiograms of sufficient image quality were obtained for 16 zebras. Interventricular septal thickness in diastole, left ventricular chamber in diastole and systole, left atrial diameter, and left ventricular mass were significantly and moderately correlated with estimated body weight (r values ranged from 0.650 to 0.884). Detectable swirling of blood in the right and sometimes the left ventricles was detected in 9 of 16 zebras, whereas physiologic regurgitation of blood was detected for the aortic valve in 3 zebras, pulmonary valve in 2 zebras, mitral valve in 2 zebras, and tricuspid valve in 1 zebra. Results of this study provide reference information for use in the cardiac evaluation of anesthetized Grevy's zebras.

  10. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy for the Evaluation of Anesthetic Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Hernandez-Meza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The standard-of-care guidelines published by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA recommend monitoring of pulse oximetry, blood pressure, heart rate, and end tidal CO2 during the use of anesthesia and sedation. This information can help to identify adverse events that may occur during procedures. However, these parameters are not specific to the effects of anesthetics or sedatives, and therefore they offer little, to no, real time information regarding the effects of those agents and do not give the clinician the lead-time necessary to prevent patient “awareness.” Since no “gold-standard” method is available to continuously, reliably, and effectively monitor the effects of sedatives and anesthetics, such a method is greatly needed. Investigation of the use of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS as a method for anesthesia or sedation monitoring and for the assessment of the effects of various anesthetic drugs on cerebral oxygenation has started to be conducted. The objective of this paper is to provide a thorough review of the currently available published scientific studies regarding the use of fNIRS in the fields of anesthesia and sedation monitoring, comment on their findings, and discuss the future work required for the translation of this technology to the clinical setting.

  11. Comparison of use of an infrared anesthetic gas monitor and refractometry for measurement of anesthetic agent concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrisko, Tamas D; Klide, Alan M

    2011-10-01

    To assess agreement between anesthetic agent concentrations measured by use of an infrared anesthetic gas monitor (IAGM) and refractometry. SAMPLE-4 IAGMs of the same type and 1 refractometer. Mixtures of oxygen and isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, or N(2)O were used. Agent volume percent was measured simultaneously with 4 IAGMs and a refractometer at the common gas outlet. Measurements obtained with each of the 4 IAGMs were compared with the corresponding refractometer measurements via the Bland-Altman method. Similarly, Bland-Altman plots were also created with either IAGM or refractometer measurements and desflurane vaporizer dial settings. Bias ± 2 SD for comparisons of IAGM and refractometer measurements was as follows: isoflurane, -0.03 ± 0.18 volume percent; sevoflurane, -0.19 ± 0.23 volume percent; desflurane, 0.43 ± 1.22 volume percent; and N(2)O, -0.21 ± 1.88 volume percent. Bland-Altman plots comparing IAGM and refractometer measurements revealed nonlinear relationships for sevoflurane, desflurane, and N(2)O. Desflurane measurements were notably affected; bias ± limits of agreement (2 SD) were small (0.1 ± 0.22 volume percent) at < 12 volume percent, but both bias and limits of agreement increased at higher concentrations. Because IAGM measurements did not but refractometer measurements did agree with the desflurane vaporizer dial settings, infrared measurement technology was a suspected cause of the nonlinear relationships. Given that the assumption of linearity is a cornerstone of anesthetic monitor calibration, this assumption should be confirmed before anesthetic monitors are used in experiments.

  12. Cardiovascular responses to microinjections of GABA or anesthetics into the rostral ventrolateral medulla of conscious and anesthetized rats

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    Lacerda J.E.C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM contains neurons involved in tonic and reflex control of arterial pressure. We describe the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA and anesthetics injected into the RVLM of conscious and urethane (1.2 g/kg, iv anesthetized Wistar rats (300-350 g. In conscious rats, bilateral microinjection of GABA (50 nmol/200 nl induced a small but significant decrease in blood pressure (from 130 ± 3.6 to 110 ± 5.6 mmHg, N = 7. A similar response was observed with sodium pentobarbital microinjection (24 nmol/200 nl. However, in the same animals, the fall in blood pressure induced by GABA (from 121 ± 8.9 to 76 ± 8.8 mmHg, N = 7 or pentobarbital (from 118 ± 4.5 to 57 ± 11.3 mmHg, N = 6 was significantly increased after urethane anesthesia. In contrast, there was no difference between conscious (from 117 ± 4.1 to 92 ± 5.9 mmHg, N = 7 and anesthetized rats (from 123 ± 6.9 to 87 ± 8.7 mmHg, N = 7 when lidocaine (34 nmol/200 nl was microinjected into the RVLM. The heart rate variations were not consistent and only eventually reached significance in conscious or anesthetized rats. The right position of pipettes was confirmed by histology and glutamate microinjection into the RVLM. These findings suggest that in conscious animals the RVLM, in association with the other sympathetic premotor neurons, is responsible for the maintenance of sympathetic vasomotor tone during bilateral RVLM inhibition. Activity of one or more of these premotor neurons outside the RVLM can compensate for the effects of RVLM inhibition. In addition, the effects of lidocaine suggest that fibers passing through the RVLM are involved in the maintenance of blood pressure in conscious animals during RVLM inhibition.

  13. Anesthetic neuroprotection: antecedents and an appraisal of preclinical and clinical data quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Kazuyoshi; Berger, Miles; Nadler, Jacob; Warner, David S

    2014-01-01

    Anesthetics have been studied for nearly fifty years as potential neuroprotective compounds in both perioperative and resuscitation medicine. Although anesthetics present pharmacologic properties consistent with preservation of brain viability in the context of an ischemic insult, no anesthetic has been proven efficacious for neuroprotection in humans. After such effort, it could be concluded that anesthetics are simply not neuroprotective in humans. Moreover, pharmacologic neuroprotection with non-anesthetic drugs has also repeatedly failed to be demonstrated in human acute brain injury. Recent focus has been on rectification of promising preclinical neuroprotection data and subsequent failed clinical trials. This has led to consensus guidelines for the process of transferring purported therapeutics from bench to bedside. In this review we first examined the history of anesthetic neuroprotection research. Then, a systematic review was performed to identify major clinical trials of anesthetic neuroprotection. Both the preclinical neuroprotection portfolio cited to justify a clinical trial and the design and conduct of that clinical trial were evaluated using modern standards that include the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) and Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) guidelines. In publications intended to define anesthetic neuroprotection, we found overall poor quality of both preclinical efficacy analysis portfolios and clinical trial designs and conduct. Hence, using current translational research standards, it was not possible to conclude from existing data whether anesthetics ameliorate perioperative ischemic brain injury. Incorporation of advances in translational neuroprotection research conduct may provide a basis for more definitive and potentially successful clinical trials of anesthetics as neuroprotectants.

  14. Does Immediate Pain Relief After an Injection into the Sacroiliac Joint with Anesthetic and Corticosteroid Predict Subsequent Pain Relief?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Byron J; Huynh, Lisa; Levin, Josh; Rinkaekan, Pranathip; Kordi, Ramin; Kennedy, David J

    2018-02-01

    To determine if immediate pain response following an injection with local anesthetic and corticosteroid predicts subsequent relief. Prospective observational cohort. An institutional review board-approved prospective study from a single academic medical center. Patients with clinical diagnosis of sacroiliac (SIJ) pain and referred for SIJ injection were enrolled; 1 cc of 2% lidocaine and 1 cc of triamcinolone 40 mg/mL were injected into the SIJ. Pain score on 0-10 numeric rating scale (NRS) during provocation maneuvers was recorded immediately before injection, immediately after injection, and at two and four weeks of follow-up. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was also recorded. Various cutoffs were identified to establish positive anesthetic response and successful outcomes at follow-up. These were used to calculated likelihood ratios. Of those with 100% anesthetic response, six of 11 (54.5%, 95% confidence interval [CI]+/-29.4%, +LR 2.6, 95% CI = 1.1-5.9) demonstrated 50% or greater pain relief at follow-up, and four of 11 (36.5%, 95% CI+/-28.4%, +LR 3.00, 95% CI = 1.4-5.1) had 100% relief at two to four weeks. Fourteen of 14 (100%, 95% CI+/-21.5%, -LR 0.0, 95% CI = 0.0-2.1) with an initial negative block failed to achieve 100% relief at follow-up. Patients who fail to achieve initial relief after SIJ injection with anesthetic and steroid are very unlikely to achieve significant pain relief at follow-up; negative likelihood ratios (LR) in this study, based on how success is defined, range between 0 and 0.9. Clinically significant positive likelihood ratios of anesthetic response to SIJ injection are more limited and less robust, but are valuable in predicting 50% relief or 100% relief at two to four weeks. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. The environmental impact of the Glostavent® anesthetic machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltringham, Roger J; Neighbour, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    Because anesthetic machines have become more complex and more expensive, they have become less suitable for use in the many isolated hospitals in the poorest countries in the world. In these situations, they are frequently unable to function at all because of interruptions in the supply of oxygen or electricity and the absence of skilled technicians for maintenance and servicing. Despite these disadvantages, these machines are still delivered in large numbers, thereby expending precious resources without any benefit to patients. The Glostavent was introduced primarily to enable an anesthetic service to be delivered in these difficult circumstances. It is smaller and less complex than standard anesthetic machines and much less expensive to produce. It combines a drawover anesthetic system with an oxygen concentrator and a gas-driven ventilator. It greatly reduces the need for the purchase and transport of cylinders of compressed gases, reduces the impact on the environment, and enables considerable savings. Cylinder oxygen is expensive to produce and difficult to transport over long distances on poor roads. Consequently, the supply may run out. However, when using the Glostavent, oxygen is normally produced at a fraction of the cost of cylinders by the oxygen concentrator, which is an integral part of the Glostavent. This enables great savings in the purchase and transport cost of oxygen cylinders. If the electricity fails and the oxygen concentrator ceases to function, oxygen from a reserve cylinder automatically provides the pressure to drive the ventilator and oxygen for the breathing circuit. Consequently, economy is achieved because the ventilator has been designed to minimize the amount of driving gas required to one-seventh of the patient's tidal volume. Additional economies are achieved by completely eliminating spillage of oxygen from the breathing system and by recycling the driving gas into the breathing system to increase the Fraction of Inspired Oxygen

  16. Anesthetic Management of Pediatric Liver and Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Nicholas R; Deer, Jeremy D; Suresh, Santhanam

    2017-09-01

    Pediatric patients with liver dysfunction and renal failure may exhibit many comorbidities. There are often associated congenital syndromes to be taken into account. Liver and renal transplantation offer a solution and substantial improvement in quality of life. Anesthetic management of pediatric liver and renal transplantation has not been well described. There are key differences between adults and children undergoing these procedures, and acknowledgment of some key principles provide a solid foundation to optimize perioperative outcomes. This article provides an overview of the perioperative management and considerations in pediatric patients undergoing liver and renal transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Anesthetic considerations in Leigh disease: Case report and literature review

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    Abdullah Sulieman Terkawi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leigh disease is an extremely rare disorder, characterized by a progressive neurodegenerative course, with subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy. It usually presents in infancy with developmental delay, seizures, dysarthria, and ataxia. These patients may also develop episodes of lactic acidosis that usually lead to respiratory failure and death. Due to the rarity of the condition, the most appropriate anesthetic plan remains unclear. We present a patient with Leigh disease, who required general anesthesia. The pathogenesis of the disease is discussed and previous reports of perioperative care from the literature are reviewed.

  18. Cimetidine as pre-anesthetic agent for cesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Storm, K; Holmskov, A

    1985-01-01

    In a prospective randomized study of 39 consecutive cesarean sections, 20 patients received cimetidine 400 mg intramuscularly as a pre-anesthetic, an 19 control patients were given NaCl. No perinatal effects on the infants were observed by cardiotocography before delivery, and K, Na, pH, PCO2, HCO......-3 and glucose values in capillary blood were nearly identical in the two groups 2 hours after birth, the difference being non-significant (p greater than 0.05). No respiratory effects or arrhythmias were observed. In another study comprising 8 elective cesarean sections in patients...

  19. Osteopathic musculoskeletal examination and subarachnoid anesthetic administration in a patient with severe scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberg, James J; Adhikary, Sanjib D; McFadden, Andrew T

    2014-07-01

    Physicians primarily use palpation of anatomical landmarks to guide the placement of needles when administering neuraxial anesthetics. For patients with anatomical abnormalities such as scoliosis, it is also important for physicians to understand Fryette mechanics and spinal curvature anatomy, as well as preprocedural radiography and ultrasonography, to ensure accuracy in neuraxial anesthetic procedures. The authors report the case of a patient with severe scoliosis who required neuraxial anesthesia for total hip arthroplasty. Using palpation and imaging, his physicians were able to successfully administer a subarachnoid anesthetic injection on the first attempt. The authors discuss considerations for improving success rates of neuraxial anesthetic administration in these patients. © 2014 The American Osteopathic Association.

  20. Ultrasound-guided multilevel paravertebral block versus local anesthesia for medical thoracoscopy

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    Maha A Abo-Zeid

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Unilateral 3-level TPVB was superior to 2-level TPVB and LA infiltration for anesthetic adequacy for patients undergoing medical thoracoscopy. Moreover, US-guided TPVB was followed by higher FEV1 values and lower pain scores during the next 12 h postthoracoscopy in comparison to local infiltration, so 3-level TPVB is an effective and relatively safe anesthetic technique for adult patients undergoing medical thoracoscopy which may replace local anesthesia.

  1. The anesthetic management of button battery ingestion in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Richard J; Hoagland, Monica; Mayes, Lena; Twite, Mark

    2018-03-01

    Injuries related to button battery ingestion are common in children. This review provides an outline of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, management, and anesthetic implications in children who have ingested a button battery. A literature search was conducted in the United States National Library of Medicine PubMed database using the terms "button battery ingestion" and "children' and "removal" and "surgery" and "anesthesia". Ninety-six articles published in English were found from 1983-2017, and 62 of these articles were incorporated into this review. Additionally, the Internet was searched with the terms "button battery ingestion and children" to identify further entities, organizations, and resources affiliated with button battery ingestion in children. These additional sources were studied and included in this review. Button batteries are ubiquitous in homes and electronic devices. Since 2006, larger-diameter and higher-voltage batteries have become available. These are more likely to become impacted in the esophagus after ingestion and lead to an increase in severe morbidity and mortality due to caustic tissue injury. Children at the highest risk for complications are those under six years of age who have ingested batteries > 20 mm in diameter and sustain prolonged esophageal impaction at the level of the aortic arch with the negative pole oriented anteriorly. Anesthesiologists need to know about the epidemiology, pathophysiology, complications, and anesthetic management of children who have ingested button batteries.

  2. Evaluation of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Anesthetized Dogs with Brachycephalic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Stephanie L; Barbur, Laura A; Jimenez, David A; Brainard, Benjamin M; Cornell, Karen K; Radlinsky, MaryAnn G; Schmiedt, Chad W

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome may predispose to gastroesophageal reflux (GER) because of the high negative intrathoracic pressures required to overcome conformational partial upper airway obstruction. To investigate this, 20 dogs presenting for elective correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome (cases) and 20 non-brachycephalic dogs (controls) undergoing other elective surgeries were prospectively enrolled. Dogs underwent a standardized anesthetic protocol, and esophageal pH was monitored. Signalment, body weight, historical gastrointestinal and respiratory disease, complete blood count, serum biochemical values, radiographic findings, and anesthetic and surgical time were compared between cases and controls, and dogs that did and did not have basic (pH > 7.5), acidic (pH dogs were evaluated, dogs with GER had increased creatinine (P = .01), % positive for esophageal fluid on radiographs (P = .05), and body weight (P = .04) compared to those without GER. GER was common in both cases and controls, and cases had lower esophageal pH; however, greater numbers are required to determine if a true difference exists in % GER.

  3. Pathophysiologic and anesthetic correlations of the prune-belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, J P

    1989-04-01

    "Prune-Belly" is the name given to the disease which is characterized by a congenital wrinkled appearance of the abdomen. Usually, a triad of congenital anomalies highlights the components of the prune-belly syndrome. This triad consists of undescended testicles, abdominal musculature deficiency and urinary tract abnormalities. The previously described triad of the syndrome is by no means the total spectrum of the disease. Prune-belly syndrome is also associated with diseases of the respiratory, cardiovascular, skeletal, gastrointestinal and central nervous systems. Associated diseases of major body systems which are caused by renal and cardiopulmonary anomalies, as well as the surgical procedure to be performed, influence the plan for the administration of anesthesia. The nature of the genitourinary diseases in the prune-belly baby may obviate the need for surgical intervention as early as the neonatal period of life. Although this congenital disease occurs with some rarity, the gravity of the syndrome demands an in-depth knowledge of its pathophysiology in order to assure uncomplicated anesthetic care. Astute surveillance during preanesthetic, anesthetic, and postanesthetic management is germane to the prevention of mishaps.

  4. The cardiac anesthetic index of isoflurane in green iguanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Craig A E; Dyson, Doris; Smith, Dale A

    2003-06-01

    To determine the cardiac anesthetic index (CAI) of isoflurane in green iguanas and whether butorphanol affected the CAI. Prospective randomized controlled trial. 7 healthy mature iguanas. In 5 iguanas, CAI was determined after induction of anesthesia with isoflurane alone, and in 5 iguanas, CAI was determined after induction of anesthesia with isoflurane and IM administration of butorphanol (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb]). Three iguanas underwent both treatments. Animals were equilibrated for 20 minutes at 1.5 times the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane and observed for evidence of cardiovascular arrest. If there was no evidence of cardiovascular arrest, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was increased by 20%, and animals were allowed to equilibrate for another 20 minutes. This process was repeated until cardiovascular arrest occurred or vaporizer output could no longer be consistently increased. The CAI was calculated by dividing the highest end-tidal isoflurane concentration by the MAC. None of the iguanas developed cardiovascular arrest and all survived. Mean +/- SD highest end-tidal isoflurane concentration during anesthesia with isoflurane alone (9.2 +/- 0.60%) was not significantly different from mean concentration during anesthesia with isoflurane and butorphanol (9.0 +/- 0.43%). The CAI was > 4.32. Results suggest that the CAI of isoflurane in green iguanas is > 4.32 and not affected by administration of butorphanol. Isoflurane appears to be a safe anesthetic in green iguanas.

  5. Electrocardiographic effects of toluene in the anesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, H; Magos, G A; Lorenzana-Jimenez, M

    1986-01-01

    The influence of inhalation of near lethal quantities of toluene on some ECG parameters, as well as the possible cardiac sensitizing effect of the solvent, were determined in chloralose-anesthetized rats. These actions were compared with those of its close analogue benzene. Both solvents produced tachycardia; toluene increased the duration of QRS and specially PR, while benzene decreased P wave duration. No other systematic changes in ECG morphology or evidence of arrhythmia were observed. Toluene appeared to decrease the number of ectopic beats induced by epinephrine, in contrast to benzene, which increased it markedly. These results suggest that toluene administered by inhalation up to near lethal doses is devoid of untoward ECG effect in the chloralose-anesthetized rat, its only action being a decrease in intraventricular and particularly AV conduction. It does not share the myocardial sensitizing properties of benzene and in fact appears to elicit some protection from the arrhythmogenic effects of epinephrine, although no definite conclusions as to this action can be derived due to limitations in the experimental model used.

  6. Electroconvulsive therapy in the elderly: Anesthetic considerations and Psychotropic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Garekar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT has been found to be a rapid and effective treatment strategy for psychiatric and neurological conditions in the elderly, but the administration of ECT in the elderly can be challenging due to a high risk of adverse events. The increased risk can be attributed to a declined physiological reserve, the presence of physical comorbidities, and the use of multiple drugs, which interact with the electrical stimulus and the anesthetic medications used during the ECT procedure. The selection of appropriate induction agents and muscle relaxants should be guided by patient's clinical status and the psychotropic drugs being used. Modifications in the doses of psychotropic drugs also need to be carried out before ECT to reduce cardiovascular and neurological side effects. Modification in the conduct of anesthesia can also aid in augmenting seizures and in preventing common side effects of ECT. A vital step in preventing adverse events in the elderly is carrying out a thorough pre.ECT evaluation. Despite these challenges, ECT can be carried out safely in elderly patients with severe comorbidities, provided clinical ECT, and anesthetic parameters are adequately optimized.

  7. Volume of Anesthetic Agents and IANB Success: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Amin Salem; Froughreyhani, Mohammad; Rahimi, Saeed; Zand, Vahid; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an evidence-based answer to the question: "Is 3.6-mL volume of an anesthetic agent more effective than 1.8-mL volume in providing anesthesia for mandibular molars?" Following formulation of research question and keyword selection, a comprehensive search of the following databases was conducted: Cochrane library, PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, ProQuest, and Clinicaltrials.gov. Three-phase eligibility appraisal and quality assessment of the studies were carried out by 2 independent reviewers. To reduce clinical heterogeneity, the included studies were divided into 2 groups: studies on healthy teeth and studies on teeth with pulpitis. The data of included studies were statistically combined through meta-analysis using a fixed-effects model. A total of 20,778 records were initially retrieved from the search. Following screening and eligibility assessment, 8 studies met the eligibility criteria and were included for qualitative synthesis. Of those, 5 studies were qualified for meta-analysis. In the irreversible pulpitis group, increasing the volume of anesthetic agent from 1.8 to 3.6 mL significantly increased the success rate of inferior alveolar nerve block (risk ratio = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.67-3.59, p < .001). However, there was insufficient evidence to draw a conclusion regarding healthy teeth.

  8. Anesthetic and Perioperative Management of Patients With Brugada Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendramis, Gregory; Paleologo, Claudia; Sgarito, Giuseppe; Giordano, Umberto; Verlato, Roberto; Baranchuk, Adrian; Brugada, Pedro

    2017-09-15

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an arrhythmogenic disease reported to be one among the leading causes of cardiac death in subjects under the age of 40 years. In these patients, episodes of lethal arrhythmias may be induced by several factors or situations, and for this reason, management during anesthesia and surgery must provide some precautions and drugs restrictions. To date, it is difficult to formulate guidelines for anesthetic management of patients with BrS because of the absence of prospective studies, and there is not a definite recommendation for neither general nor regional anesthesia, and there are no large studies in merit. For this reason, in the anesthesia management of patients with BrS, the decision of using each drug must be made after careful consideration and always in controlled conditions, avoiding other factors that are known to have the potential to induce arrhythmias and with a close cooperation between anesthetists and cardiologists, which is essential before and after surgery. In conclusion, given the absence of large studies in literature, we want to focus on some general rules, which resulted from case series and clinical practice, to be followed during the perioperative and anesthetic management of patients with BrS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tolerability of NGX-4010, a capsaicin 8% patch, in conjunction with three topical anesthetic formulations for the treatment of neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster LR

    2012-01-01

    , and could be adequately managed by local cooling or short-acting oral opioid analgesics. Although slightly more patients used medication for treatment-related discomfort following pretreatment with Topicaine compared with L.M.X.4 or Betacaine, there were no statistical differences between the topical anesthetics. Neuropathic pain reduction from baseline to weeks 2 through 12 was approximately 30% and was similar among the topical anesthetics; the proportion of responders ranged from 45% to 50%.Conclusion: Treatment with NGX-4010 following pretreatment with any of the three topical anesthetics was generally safe and well tolerated; no significant differences in the parameters measured were noted between the pretreatment groups.Keywords: neuropathic pain, capsaicin patch, tolerability, topical anesthetics

  10. The Science of Local Anesthesia: Basic Research, Clinical Application, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirk, Philipp; Hollmann, Markus W; Strichartz, Gary

    2017-11-17

    Local anesthetics have been used clinically for more than a century, but new insights into their mechanisms of action and their interaction with biological systems continue to surprise researchers and clinicians alike. Next to their classic action on voltage-gated sodium channels, local anesthetics interact with calcium, potassium, and hyperpolarization-gated ion channels, ligand-gated channels, and G protein-coupled receptors. They activate numerous downstream pathways in neurons, and affect the structure and function of many types of membranes. Local anesthetics must traverse several tissue barriers to reach their site of action on neuronal membranes. In particular, the perineurium is a major rate-limiting step. Allergy to local anesthetics is rare, while the variation in individual patient's response to local anesthetics is probably larger than previously assumed. Several adjuncts are available to prolong sensory block, but these typically also prolong motor block. The 2 main research avenues being followed to improve action of local anesthetics are to prolong duration of block, by slow-release formulations and on-demand release, and to develop compounds and combinations that elicit a nociception-selective blockade.

  11. Effect of a training model in local anesthesia teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Baart, J.A.; Maas, N.E.; Bachet, I.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the preclinical use of a training model in local anesthesia teaching on the subsequent clinical administration of a local anesthetic. Sixty-five dental students gave their first injection to a fellow dental student: twenty-two students after previous experience

  12. Influence of different anesthetics on skin oxygenation studied by electron paramagnetic resonance in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovic, Z; Sentjurc, M; Kristl, J; Khan, N; Hou, H; Swartz, H M

    2007-01-01

    The effects of two general anesthetics on skin oxygenation in mice are evaluated by electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry. Up to now no data on the effects of different anesthetics on skin oxygenation could be found. In this study animals were anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine or isoflurane, and partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2)) in the skin, heart rate and hemoglobin oxygen saturation were followed as a function of time and inhaled oxygen concentration. The skin pO(2) significantly increased continuously for about 60 min in mice anesthetized with isoflurane and remained constant after that. During ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, the pO(2) in the skin only slightly decreased. The skin pO(2) increased with higher inspired oxygen concentrations for both anesthetics groups. When breathing 21% oxygen, mice anesthetized with isoflurane had two-fold higher pO(2) in the skin compared to mice anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine. The heart rate was significantly lower in animals anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine, while hemoglobin saturation was almost the same in both groups at all inhaled oxygen concentrations. These results show that the type of anesthesia is an important parameter that needs to be considered in experiments where skin pO(2) is followed. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Frequency of Use and Cost of Selected Anesthetic Induction and Neuromuscular Blocking Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-15

    have attempted to look at anesthetic choice. Katz ( 1973) and Broadman , Mesrobian, and McGill ( 1987) researched anesthetic choice among...1994). Adverse effects of depolarising neuromuscular blocking agents : Incidence, prevention and management. Drug Safety, lQ(S), 331-349. Broadman

  14. Monitoring Anesthetic Depth Modification, Evaluation and Application of the Correlation Dimension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, P.L.C. van den

    2003-01-01

    Anesthesia is administered to patients to facilitate surgical and diagnostic procedures. The anesthesiologist generally determines the amount of anesthetics needed on the basis of body weight. However, the inter-individual variation in sensitivity to anesthetics is wide and the needed level of

  15. Identification of anesthetic binding sites on human serum albumin using a novel etomidate photolabel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bright, Damian P.; Adham, Sara D.; Lemaire, Lucienne C. J. M.; Benavides, Rodrigo; Gruss, Marco; Taylor, Graham W.; Smith, Edward H.; Franks, Nicholas P.

    2007-01-01

    We have synthesized a novel analog of the general anesthetic etomidate in which the ethoxy group has been replaced by an azide group, and which can be used as a photolabel to identify etomidate binding sites. This acyl azide analog is a potent general anesthetic in both rats and tadpoles and, as

  16. An improved method for lifting and transporting anesthetized pigs within an animal facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher-Petersen, Camilla; Hammelev, Karsten Pharao; Flescher, Jens Erik

    2014-01-01

    Transporting anesthetized pigs in a laboratory setting often requires strenuous manual lifting, posing a hazard to the safety of animal care personnel and to the welfare of the pigs. The authors developed an improved approach to lifting and transporting anesthetized pigs weighing up to 350 kg using...

  17. Anesthetic success of 1.8ml lidocaine 2% for mandibular tooth extraction. A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Aravena

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the anesthetic effect of a 1.8ml cartridge of anesthetic lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:100,000 in inferior alveolar nerve block (NAI for the extraction in mandibular teeth. Material and methods: A pilot study with analitic design. Participating patients of Dental Emergency Service volunteers from Valdivia-Chile for mandibular teeth extractions attending between May and July of 2010. The anesthetic technique was performed by a dentist using only one cartridge of anesthetic to the NAI. After 15 minutes, the effect was considered effective when anesthetic not require reinforcement with additional anesthesia during extraction of teeth. We analyzed the relationship between success anesthetic effect with sex, age, diagnosis of tooth and type and level of pain observed (chi-square and logistic regression, p<0.05. Results: 62 patients were selected, of which only 47(75.8% was achieved anesthetic success. There was no statistical association with sex, age, type or dental diagnosis and perceived pain. Conclusion: Using a 1.8ml cartridge of anesthesia was effective in three of four patients treated by extraction of mandibular teeth. It suggests further research in relation to the clinical effectiveness of other anesthetics with the same dose in NAI.

  18. Influence of Ventilation Strategies and Anesthetic Techniques on Regional Cerebral Oximetry in the Beach Chair Position: A Prospective Interventional Study with a Randomized Comparison of Two Anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picton, Paul; Dering, Andrew; Alexander, Amir; Neff, Mary; Miller, Bruce S; Shanks, Amy; Housey, Michelle; Mashour, George A

    2015-10-01

    Beach chair positioning during general anesthesia is associated with cerebral oxygen desaturation. Changes in cerebral oxygenation resulting from the interaction of inspired oxygen fraction (FIO2), end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2), and anesthetic choice have not been fully evaluated in anesthetized patients in the beach chair position. This is a prospective interventional within-group study of patients undergoing shoulder surgery in the beach chair position that incorporated a randomized comparison between two anesthetics. Fifty-six patients were randomized to receive desflurane or total intravenous anesthesia with propofol. Following induction of anesthesia and positioning, FIO2 and minute ventilation were sequentially adjusted for all patients. Regional cerebral oxygenation (rSO2) was the primary outcome and was recorded at each of five set points. While maintaining FIO2 at 0.3 and PETCO2 at 30 mmHg, there was a decrease in rSO2 from 68% (SD, 12) to 61% (SD, 12) (P chair positioning. The combined interventions of increasing FIO2 to 1.0 and increasing PETCO2 to 45 mmHg resulted in a 14% point improvement in rSO2 to 75% (SD, 12) (P chair position. There was no significant interaction effect of the anesthetic at the study intervention points. Increasing FIO2 and PETCO2 resulted in a significant increase in rSO2 that overcomes desaturation in patients anesthetized in the beach chair position and that appears independent of anesthetic choice.

  19. Increased inspiratory pressure for reduction of atelectasis in children anesthetized for CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, Michael A.; Jamieson, Douglas H.; McEachern, Anita M.; Blackstock, Derek

    2002-01-01

    Background: Atelectasis is more frequent and more severe in children anesthetized for CT scan than it is in children sedated for CT scan.Objective: To determine the effect of increased inspiratory pressure on atelectasis during chest CT in anesthetized children. Materials and methods: Atelectasis on chest CT was assessed by two observers in three groups of patients. Group A comprised 13 children (26 lungs) anesthetized at inspiratory pressures up to and including 25 cm H 2 O. Group B included 11 children anesthetized at inspiratory pressures ≥30 cm H 2 O. Group C included 8 children under deep sedation. Results: Atelectasis was significantly more severe in group A than in groups B and C. There was no significant difference between groups B and C. Conclusion: An inspiratory pressure of 30 cm H 2 O is recommended for children anesthetized for CT scan of the chest. (orig.)

  20. Nonpreserved amniotic membrane transplantation for bilateral toxic keratopathy caused by topical anesthetic abuse: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altinok Ayse

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Corneal damage associated with abuse of topical anesthetics is a rare clinic entity. Topical anesthetic abuse is one of the causes of ring keratitis. Ring keratitis is easily overlooked because it can mimic acanthamoeba keratitis or other infectious keratitis. The outcome is often poor, leading to persistent epithelial defects, corneal scarring, and perforations. Case presentation We report the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of a 65-year-old Caucasian man, who worked as a health care worker, with bilateral toxic keratopathy caused by topical anesthetic abuse. Nonpreserved amniotic membrane transplantation was performed for both eyes of the patient. Conclusion It is important to identify and treat patients who abuse topical anesthetics before permanent vision loss ensues. Nonpreserved amniotic membrane transplantation may be useful in relieving pain and improving corneal surface in anesthetic agent abusers.

  1. Anesthetic management for percutaneous aortic valve implantation: an overview of worldwide experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, L; Gerli, C; Franco, A; Barile, L; Magnano di San Lio, M S; Villari, N; Zangrillo, A

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is an emergent technique for high risk patients with aortic stenosis. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation poses significant challenges about its management, due to the procedure itself (i.e. the passage of large stiff sheaths in diseased vessels, the valve dilatation and the prosthesis positioning during a partial cardiac standstill) and the population of elder and high-risk patients who undergo the implantation. Retrograde transfemoral approach is the most popular procedure and a great number of cases is reported. Nevertheless, there is not a consensus regarding the intraoperative anesthesiological strategies, which vary in the different Centers. Sedation plus local anesthesia or general anesthesia are both valid alternatives and can be applied according to patient's characteristics and procedural instances. Most groups started the implantation program with a general anesthesia; indeed, it offers many advantages, mainly regarding the possibility of an early diagnosis and treatment of potential complications, through the use of the transesophageal echocardiography. However, after the initial experiences, many groups began to employ routinely sedation plus local anesthesia for transcatheter aortic valve implantation and their procedural and periprocedural success demonstrates that it is feasible, with many possible advantages. Many aspects about perioperative anesthetic management for transcatheter aortic valve implantation are still to be defined. Aim of this work is to clarify the different management strategies through a review of the available literature published in pubmed till June 2011.

  2. A non-inferiority randomized controlled trial comparing the clinical effectiveness of anesthesia obtained by application of a novel topical anesthetic putty with the infiltration of lidocaine for the treatment of lacerations in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Mark G; Murphy, Diarmaid J; Little, Carol; McDonald, Julie; McCarron, Paul A

    2014-06-01

    We test the hypothesis that anesthesia, measured as pain scores, induced by a novel topical anesthetic putty is non-inferior (margin=1.3) to that provided by conventional lidocaine infiltration for the repair of lacerations. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in the emergency department (ED) of a local hospital. Participants were randomly allocated to receive either infiltration anesthesia or topical anesthetic putty as per the trial protocol. Pain scores were recorded 15 minutes after infiltration and 30 minutes after topical anesthetic putty application. Median pain scores were compared between groups. Wound evaluation scores were conducted after 7 to 10 days and adverse events were monitored for both groups of participants throughout the study. One hundred and ten participants were enrolled in the study, with 56 receiving infiltration and 54 receiving topical anesthetic putty. The median difference between the pain scores of the 2 groups was 0 (95% confidence interval -1 to 0). There were no substantial differences between the 2 groups in terms of either the wound evaluation scores or the incidence of adverse events. The novel topical anesthetic putty was not inferior to infiltration with lidocaine with respect to the pain experienced during suturing, and this putty is a feasible alternative to infiltration anesthesia of lacerations in the ED. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhibition of Nav1.7 channels by methyl eugenol as a mechanism underlying its antinociceptive and anesthetic actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze-Jun; Tabakoff, Boris; Levinson, Simon R; Heinbockel, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Methyl eugenol is a major active component extracted from the Chinese herb Asari Radix et Rhizoma, which has been used to treat toothache and other pain. Previous in vivo studies have shown that methyl eugenol has anesthetic and antinociceptive effects. The aim of this study was to determine the possible mechanism underlying its effect on nervous system disorders. The direct interaction of methyl eugenol with Na(+) channels was explored and characterized using electrophysiological recordings from Nav1.7-transfected CHO cells. In whole-cell patch clamp mode, methyl eugenol tonically inhibited peripheral nerve Nav1.7 currents in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 295 μmol/L at a -100 mV holding potential. Functionally, methyl eugenol preferentially bound to Nav1.7 channels in the inactivated and/or open state, with weaker binding to channels in the resting state. Thus, in the presence of methyl eugenol, Nav1.7 channels exhibited reduced availability for activation in a steady-state inactivation protocol, strong use-dependent inhibition, enhanced binding kinetics, and slow recovery from inactivation compared to untreated channels. An estimation of the affinity of methyl eugenol for the resting and inactivated states of the channel also demonstrated that methyl eugenol preferentially binds to inactivated channels, with a 6.4 times greater affinity compared to channels in the resting state. The failure of inactivated channels to completely recover to control levels at higher concentrations of methyl eugenol implies that the drug may drive more drug-bound, fast-inactivated channels into drug-bound, slow-inactivated channels. Methyl eugenol is a potential candidate as an effective local anesthetic and analgesic. The antinociceptive and anesthetic effects of methyl eugenol result from the inhibitory action of methyl eugenol on peripheral Na(+) channels.

  4. Anesthetic Management for Prolonged Incidental Surgery in Advanced Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Riddhi; Subramaniam, Rajeshwari; Sardar, Arijit

    2017-01-01

    In spite of advances in perioperative management, operative procedures in patients with chronic liver disease pose a significant challenge for the anesthesiologist due to multisystem involvement, high risk of postoperative hepatic decompensation, and mortality. We describe the anesthetic management of an elderly patient with advanced liver disease (model for end-stage liver disease 16) for prolonged abdominal surgery. The use of invasive hemodynamic monitoring, point-of-care biochemical, and hematological surveillance coupled with prompt correction of all abnormalities was responsible for good outcome. The patient's inguinal swellings turned out to be extensions of a large peritoneal mesothelioma, necessitating a large abdominal incision and blood loss. Analgesia was provided by bilateral transversus abdominis plane blocks, which helped to reduce opioid use and rapid extubation.

  5. Eugenol as an anesthetic for juvenile common snook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurandir Joaquim Bernardes Júnior

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of eugenol as an anesthetic for juvenile common snook, and to determine the minimum effective concentration for use in handling procedures. In the first trial, juvenile common snook were subjected to immersion baths at 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, and 150 mg L-1 eugenol concentrations, after which induction and recovery times were evaluated. In the second experiment, the lethal exposure time (LT50 at 75 mg L-1 was estimated. Minimum effective eugenol concentration was 50 mg L-1, andthe stage of deep anesthesia and recovery were, respectively, reached at 126.3 and 208.8 s. At 75 mg L-1, LT50 was 1,314 s, and induction time and recovery were also satisfactory; however, fish cannot tolerate over 229 s exposure.

  6. Electrocardiographic evaluation of two anesthetic combinations in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tárraga K.M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate electrocardiographic changes in dogs aged 5 years or more submitted to two anesthetic combinations: atropine, levomeprazine, thiopental and halothane (ALTH, and atropine, tiletamine and zolazepam (ATZ. Forty dogs (24 males/16 females weighing 5-24kg, were used. Dogs had no cardiac problems and were submitted to tartarectomy. All animals were submitted to two electrocardiograms (ECG, one before anesthesia and other immediately before surgery. The dogs were divided into two groups: group 1 received ALTH and group 2 received ATZ. Alterations in the ST segment, T wave, cardiac rhythm and a significant reduction of vagal tonus index were observed in both groups, but in group 2 a significant reduction of the PR and QT intervals and an increase in heart rate were also observed. These data suggest that the ALTH combination caused fewer changes in the ECG than the ATZ combination.

  7. Anesthetic management of robot-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Karlekar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is a rare disorder involving neuromuscular junction. In conjunction with medical therapy, thymectomy is a known modality of treatment of MG and has shown to increase the probability of remission and overall symptomatic improvement. For minimally invasive thymectomy, video-.assisted thoracoscopic surgery has been the preferred surgical approach till recently. The robotic surgical procedure must necessarily bring new challenges to the anesthesiologists to effectively meet the specific requirements of the technique. At present, there is a paucity of literature regarding the anesthetic concerns of robotic assisted thymectomy, patient in question specifically posed a challenge since different maneuvers and techniques had to be tried to obtain optimum surgical conditions with stable ventilatory and hemodynamic parameters. Concerns of patient positioning and hemodynamic monitoring have also been discussed.

  8. [Anesthetic management for caesarean delivery in a parturient with achondroplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Akira; Hishinuma, Norimasa; Shirotori, Toru; Sasao, Junichi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kawamata, Mikito

    2014-06-01

    A 27-year-old parturient (height, 130 cm; weight, 43 kg) with achondroplasia, which is characterized by rhizomeric short stature, large head and frontal bossing, was scheduled for elective caesarean section (C/S) because of her contracted pelvis. Her first delivery had been performed by C/S under general anesthesia at a regional hospital 6 years before. Preoperative airway assessment showed normal mouth opening and mobile cervical spine. Since she had anxiety about needle puncture and refused neuraxial blockade and since we considered the trachea could be intubated, we decided to perform C/S under general anesthesia at 37 weeks of gestation. The patient and baby had an uneventful perioperative course. Underdevelopment of bone formation results in characteristic craniofacial and vertebral abnormalities in patients with achondroplasia. Anesthetic management of achondroplastic parturients should be specified to individual basis based on careful preoperative assessment of craniofacial and vertebral deformities.

  9. The effects of anesthetic agents on oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakan, Selvinaz; Düzgüner, Vesile

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress can be defined as the instability between antioxidant defense of the body and the production of free radical that causes peroxydation on the lipid layer. Free radicals are reactive oxygen species that are produced in the course of normal metabolisms of aerobe organisms and they may cause disorders in cell structure and organelles by interacting macromolecules, like lipid, protein, nucleic acids. Therefore, they may cause cardiovascular, immune system, liver, kidney illnesses and many other illnesses like cancer, aging, cataract, diabetes. It is known that many drugs used for the purpose of anesthetizing may cause lipid peroxidation in organism. For these reasons, determining the Oxidative stress index of anaesthetic stress chosen in the ones that are exposed to long term anaesthetic agents and anaesthesia appliccations, is so substantial.

  10. Anaphylactic reaction to hydroxyzine in an anesthetized patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, A; Lavaud, F; Gallet, A; Boulay-Malinovsky, C; Mertes, P M; Malinovsky, J M

    2009-08-01

    A case of anaphylaxis occurring during a general anesthesia is presented. The reaction was severe with bronchospasm and hypotension (grade 2 in the severity of per-operative anaphylactic shock). The responsibility of hydroxyzine, administered for premedication was suspected by intradermal testing with the molecule, which was twice positive at a 10(-2) dilution of the commercial solution. The same test remained negative in 5 control subjects. All the other drugs received during anesthesia gave negative results. Using the same protocol excepted for the use of hydroxyzine a new general anesthesia could be performed under a premedication with dexchlorpheniramine without any allergic reaction. Anaphylactic reactions are very rare with hydroxyzine used in premedication for anesthesia in regard to the large prescription of the drug. Only two previous cases were reported but attention of the allergist must be also pointed towards the medications received in the perioperative period as for the anesthetic drugs.

  11. [Anesthetic management of a patient with latex allergy diagnosed preoperatively].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N; Yamada, T; Sekiguchi, M; Kotani, T; Ochiai, R; Takeda, J

    2000-07-01

    Since the first report in 1979, the number of patients with latex allergy has progressively increased. We experienced an anesthetic management of a 3 year-old child who underwent the repair of anal atresia. The first operation was performed in newborn period. After the surgery, the patient developed skin rash and the loss of consciousness every time anal irrigation was made with latex-containing catheter. Latex-allergy was diagnosed at the age of 3 years, with the positive skin test by latex extract. It took enormous time and efforts to find out the possibility of latex-contamination in a wide variety of medical equipments and supplies to prevent allergic reaction during perioperative period. In this patient, perioperative cause was uneventful. It is suggested that preoperative preparation is essential and caution should be also paid to prevent allergic reaction in daily life.

  12. Carcinoid tumors: Challenges and considerations during anesthetic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing neoplasms of neuroendocrine tissues from enterochromaffin or kulchitsky cells, which have the potential to metastasize. The mediators released from these tumors when bypass the hepatic metabolism, can lead to the possible development of carcinoid syndrome. This is a life-threatening complication, which can lead to profound hemodynamic instability, especially in a peri-operative period, when the patient is exposed to various types of noxious stimuli. Off late, use of octreotide, a synthetic analog of somatostatin, has significantly reduced the peri-operative morbidity and mortality. The current review discusses the various anesthetic challenges and considerations during peri-operative management of carcinoid tumors.

  13. [Anesthetic Care of Patient With Heroin Addiction: A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Yi; Kuo, Shu-Yu

    2018-04-01

    The use of illegal drugs in Taiwan is on the rise. Drug addicts often have complex physical, psychological, and social problems. In addition, they often avoid disclosing their illicit drug use by deceit, concealment, or under-reporting. Building and maintaining relationships of trust with drug-addict patients has become a critical issue in achieving better care quality. In this case report, we report on an anesthesia care process for a heroin addict who was admitted for open reduction and internal fixation surgery for the femur and patella fractures after a car accident. During the six-hour perioperative care period, starting from 11pm on November 30th to 5am on December 1st, 2015, the patient was not willing to disclose his illicit drug use before the surgery. However, the nurse anesthetist noticed signs and symptoms of drug use. The nurse empathized with the patient's worries, provided him with a safe communication environment, and gained trust from the patient in a timely manner, which then enabled the patient to fully disclose his illicit drug use with the nurse anesthetist. The anesthesia-care strategy was then modified according to client's condition. The nurse anesthetist played an important role of bridging communications between the patient and medical care staffs and of modifying the care strategies in a timely manner. During the care period, the blood-borne disease contamination was successfully prevented, the client received uneventful pain management, there was a lack of withdrawal symptoms, and the staffs and patient safety was maintained. The literature on the anesthetic care of heroin patients undergoing surgery is relatively limited in Taiwan. The findings in the current case report add information on providing anesthetic care to patients with drug addiction. Publishing additional case reports, research, and clinical recommendations is essential for improving care quality for this vulnerable population.

  14. Spike Timing Rigidity Is Maintained in Bursting Neurons under Pentobarbital-Induced Anesthetic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Risako; Yamanaka, Masanori; Yokota, Eiko; Koshikawa, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Pentobarbital potentiates γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission by prolonging the open time of GABA A receptors. However, it is unknown how pentobarbital regulates cortical neuronal activities via local circuits in vivo . To examine this question, we performed extracellular unit recording in rat insular cortex under awake and anesthetic conditions. Not a few studies apply time-rescaling theorem to detect the features of repetitive spike firing. Similar to these methods, we define an average spike interval locally in time using random matrix theory (RMT), which enables us to compare different activity states on a universal scale. Neurons with high spontaneous firing frequency (>5 Hz) and bursting were classified as HFB neurons ( n = 10), and those with low spontaneous firing frequency (Pentobarbital injection (30 mg/kg) reduced firing frequency in all HFB neurons and in 78% of non-HFB neurons. RMT analysis demonstrated that pentobarbital increased in the number of neurons with repulsion in both HFB and non-HFB neurons, suggesting that there is a correlation between spikes within a short interspike interval (ISI). Under awake conditions, in 50% of HFB and 40% of non-HFB neurons, the decay phase of normalized histograms of spontaneous firing were fitted to an exponential function, which indicated that the first spike had no correlation with subsequent spikes. In contrast, under pentobarbital-induced anesthesia conditions, the number of non-HFB neurons that were fitted to an exponential function increased to 80%, but almost no change in HFB neurons was observed. These results suggest that under both awake and pentobarbital-induced anesthetized conditions, spike firing in HFB neurons is more robustly regulated by preceding spikes than by non-HFB neurons, which may reflect the GABA A receptor-mediated regulation of cortical activities. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording in the IC slice preparation was performed to compare the regularity of

  15. Spike timing rigidity is maintained in bursting neurons under pentobarbital-induced anesthetic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risako Kato

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pentobarbital potentiates γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission by prolonging the open time of GABAA receptors. However, it is unknown how pentobarbital regulates cortical neuronal activities via local circuits in vivo. To examine this question, we performed extracellular unit recording in rat insular cortex under awake and anesthetic conditions. Not a few studies apply time-rescaling theorem to detect the features of repetitive spike firing. Similar to these methods, we define an average spike interval locally in time using random matrix theory (RMT, which enables us to compare different activity states on a universal scale. Neurons with high spontaneous firing frequency (> 5 Hz and bursting were classified as HFB neurons (n = 10, and those with low spontaneous firing frequency (< 10 Hz and without bursting were classified as non-HFB neurons (n = 48. Pentobarbital injection (30 mg/kg reduced firing frequency in all HFB neurons and in 78% of non-HFB neurons. RMT analysis demonstrated that pentobarbital increased in the number of neurons with repulsion in both HFB and non-HFB neurons, suggesting that there is a correlation between spikes within a short interspike interval. Under awake conditions, in 50% of HFB and 40% of non-HFB neurons, the decay phase of normalized histograms of spontaneous firing were fitted to an exponential function, which indicated that the first spike had no correlation with subsequent spikes. In contrast, under pentobarbital-induced anesthesia conditions, the number of non-HFB neurons that were fitted to an exponential function increased to 80%, but almost no change in HFB neurons was observed. These results suggest that under both awake and pentobarbital-induced anesthetized conditions, spike firing in HFB neurons is more robustly regulated by preceding spikes than by non-HFB neurons, which may reflect the GABAA receptor-mediated regulation of cortical activities. Whole-cell patch

  16. Molecular interactions between general anesthetics and the 5HT2B receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Felipe; Gao, Lu; Huang, Xi-Ping; Saven, Jeffery G; Roth, Bryan L; Liu, Renyu

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin modulates many processes through a family of seven serotonin receptors. However, no studies have screened for interactions between general anesthetics currently in clinical use and serotonergic G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Given that both intravenous and inhalational anesthetics have been shown to target other classes of GPCRs, we hypothesized that general anesthetics might interact directly with some serotonin receptors and thus modify their function. Radioligand binding assays were performed to screen serotonin receptors for interactions with propofol and isoflurane as well as for affinity determinations. Docking calculations using the crystal structure of 5-HT2B were performed to computationally confirm the binding assay results and locate anesthetic binding sites. The 5-HT2B class of receptors interacted significantly with both propofol and isoflurane in the primary screen. The affinities for isoflurane and propofol were determined to be 7.78 and .95 μM, respectively, which were at or below the clinical concentrations for both anesthetics. The estimated free energy derived from docking calculations for propofol (-6.70 kcal/mol) and isoflurane (-5.10 kcal/mol) correlated with affinities from the binding assay. The anesthetics were predicted to dock at a pharmacologically relevant binding site of 5HT2B. The molecular interactions between propofol and isoflurane with the 5-HT2B class of receptors were discovered and characterized. This finding implicates the serotonergic GPCRs as potential anesthetic targets.

  17. In Vitro Effect of Local Anesthetics on Candida albicans Germ Tube Formation

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    Acácio Rodrigues

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was planned to clarify the in vitro effect of lidocaine and bupivacaine on germ tube formation by Candida albicans isolates from cases of clinical vaginal candidiasis.

  18. Efficacy of peritubal local anesthetic infiltration in alleviating postoperative pain in percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnavithula, Nirmala; Pisapati, Murthy V L N; Durga, Padmaja; Krishnamurthy, Vijay; Chilumu, Ramreddy; Reddy, Bhargava

    2009-05-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is a safe and effective endourologic procedure in patients with renal calculi. It is less morbid than open surgery. However, the patient complains of pain around the nephrostomy tube and demands for good postoperative analgesia. Skin infiltration with bupivacaine around the nephrostomy tube is not effective, so we hypothesize that peritubal infiltration of bupivacaine from renal capsule to the skin along the nephrostomy tract may alleviate postoperative pain. A randomized controlled study was designed in 40 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade I patients to assess the impact of peritubal bupivacaine infiltration with 23-gauge spinal needle along the nephrostomy tract after PCNL under fluoroscopic guidance. Patients were randomized to receive 20 mL of 0.25% bupivacaine in block group (n = 20) or no infiltration in control group (n = 20) at the conclusion of the procedure. Postoperative pain score and analgesic requirement for the first 24 hours were assessed by visual and dynamic visual analog scales second hourly. Rescue analgesia with injection tramadol Hcl 50-100 mg was given intravenously to a maximum total dose of 400 mg when pain score exceeded 4. Pain scores and analgesic requirement for the first 24 hours postoperatively were significantly lesser in the block group than in the control group of patients at all points of time and were statistically significant (p infiltration of 0.25% bupivacaine solution is efficient in alleviating postoperative pain after PCNL.

  19. Effect of a New Local Anesthetic Buffering Device on Pain Reduction During Nerve Block lnjections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-10

    the nociceptors through synaptic connections in the spinal cord for processing in the cerebral cortex . Once this signal reaches the cerebral cortex ...32. Benson HT, Toleikis JR, Dixit P, Goodman I, Hill JA. Onset, intensity of blockade and somatosensory evoked potential changes of the lumbarsacral

  20. Effect of a local anesthetic lozenge in relief of symptoms in burning mouth syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treldal, Charlotte; Jacobsen, C B; Mogensen, Stine

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS) often represent a clinical challenge as available agents for symptomatic treatment are few and often ineffective. The aim was to evaluate the effect of a bupivacaine lozenge on oral mucosal pain, xerostomia, and taste alterations in patients....... Assessment of oral mucosal pain, xerostomia, and taste alterations was performed in a patient diary on a visual analog scale (ranging from 0 to 100 mm) before and after the lozenge was dissolved. RESULTS: The bupivacaine lozenge significantly reduced the burning oral pain (P ... of taste disturbances (P xerostomia, when adjusted for the treatment period. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that the bupivacaine lozenge offers a novel therapeutic modality to patients with BMS, although without alleviating effect on the associated symptoms, taste...

  1. 4-Drug Nerve Block versus Plain Local Anesthetic for Knee and Hip Arthroplasty Analgesia in Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    intestines , hernias) 1 2 3 4 5 8. Hepatic (liver only) 1 2 3 4 5 9. Renal (kidneys only) 1 2 3 4 5 10. Other GU (ureters, bladder, urethra...Rev. 06/14/2016 12 Appendix A – VA Hospital Codes CONDITION A: Cardiac or respiratory arrest , or when victim is unresponsive

  2. Trigeminal nerve injury associated with injection of local anesthetics: needle lesion or neurotoxicity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, Søren; Jensen, Rigmor H; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2011-01-01

    , prilocaine 3 percent, and articaine 4 percent sold in cartridges. RESULTS: The study results showed a highly significant overrepresentation of NSDs associated with articaine 4 percent, in particular with mandibular blocks. CONCLUSIONS: The distribution of NSDs was disproportionate to the market share...

  3. [Mini-invasive technologies in treatment of acute cholecystitis in patients with high operational and anesthetic risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolov, A S; Guliaev, A A; Ivanov, P A; Samsonov, V T; Rogal', M L; Timerbaev, V Kh; Trofimova, E Iu; Kudriashova, N E; Tlibekova, M A

    2014-01-01

    The treatment results of 769 patients with acute calculous cholecystitis and high operational and anesthetic risk at admission are presented in the retrospective study. High risk was determined by expressed comorbidities, diseases' terms, the complications of acute cholecystitis, age, which was more than 60 years in most cases. The patients were divided into 2 groups depending on the severity of comorbidity and the possible effects of its correction. The first group included 617 perspective patients for cholecystectomy. And the second group included 152 patients unpromising for this. Concept of stage treatment was used in the first group including primary decompression of the gallbladder by using of percutaneous transhepatic micro-cholecystostomy under ultrasound guidance. Cholecystectomy was performed after correction of comorbidities, complications of acute cholecystitis, and readjustment of extrahepatic bile ducts by endoscopy if necessary. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was successfully performed in 587 patients. There was open cholecystectomy in 11 cases. Cholecystectomy was done in 19 patients as a result of conversion. Cholecystostomy from minimal access with extraction of stones under local anesthesia was performed in the second group for decompression and as definitive treatment. There was not observed deaths in patients with high operational and anesthetic risk as a result of such tactics. Postoperatively 1.7% of patients had complications that were successfully resolved.

  4. Anesthetic agents in patients with very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redshaw, Charlotte; Stewart, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    Very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrongenase deficiency (VLCADD) is a rare disorder of fatty acid metabolism that renders sufferers susceptible to hypoglycemia, liver failure, cardiomyopathy, and rhabdomyolysis. The literature about the management of these patients is hugely conflicting, suggesting that both propofol and volatile anesthesia should be avoided. We have reviewed the literature and have concluded that the source papers do not support the statements that volatile anesthetic agents are unsafe. The reports on rhabdomyolysis secondary to anesthesia appear to be due to inadequate supply of carbohydrate not volatile agents. Catabolism must be avoided with minimal fasting, glucose infusions based on age and weight, and attenuation of emotional and physical stress. General anesthesia appears to be protective of stress-induced catabolism and may offer benefits in children and anxious patients over regional anesthesia. Propofol has not been demonstrated to be harmful in VLCADD but is presented in an emulsion containing very long-chain fatty acids which can cause organ lipidosis and itself can inhibit mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism. It is therefore not recommended. Suxamethonium-induced myalgia may mimic symptoms of rhabdomyolysis and cause raised CK therefore should be avoided. Opioids, NSAIDS, regional anesthesia, and local anesthetic techniques have all been used without complication. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A rare case of delayed subarachnoid anesthetic blockade effects in a 103-year-old female patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaly, Ramsis F.; Anantamongkol, Utchariya; Candido, Kenneth D.; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2015-01-01

    Background: The elderly represent a unique challenge for the effects of regional anesthesia, and very few cases of block onset delay have been described. Their delayed response is attributed to a number of factors that include: Physiologic deterioration, musculoskeletal contractures, degenerative joint disease, autonomic regulatory dysfunction, cognitive dysfunction, altered pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of local anesthetics and adjuvants. Case Description: In this report we present the rare case of 45-min delay between the administration and onset of action of a subarachnoid blockade in a 103-year-old female, who was scheduled for left hip pinning, for repair of a femoral neck fracture. Patient received an injection of hyperbaric bupivacaine, 1.5 ml of 0.75% (11.25 mg), with 15 mcg of fentanyl into the subarachnoidal space and underwent the surgical procedure without complications. Conclusions: Delayed responses to subarachnoid anesthesia can be expected in extremely elderly patients. Anesthetic procedures should be monitored and managed on a case-by-case basis. PMID:26060597

  6. Anesthetic Agents and Neuronal Autophagy. What We Know and What We Don't.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lili; Shen, Jianjun; McQuillan, Patrick M; Hu, Zhiyong

    2018-01-01

    Ethanol is known to have both γ-Aminobutyric acid agonist and Nmethyl- D-aspartate antagonist characteristics similar to commonly used volatile anesthetic agents. Recent evidence demonstrates that autophagy can reduce the development of ethanol induced neurotoxicity. Recent studies have found that general anesthesia can cause longterm impairment of both mitochondrial morphogenesis and synaptic transmission in the developing rat brain, both of which are accompanied by enhanced autophagy activity. Autophagy may play an important role in general anesthetic mediated neurotoxicity. This review outlines the role of autophagy in the development of anesthetic related neurotoxicity and includes an explanation of the role of autophagy in neuronal cell survival and death, the relationship between anesthetic agents and neuronal autophagy, possible molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying general anesthetic agent induced activation of neuronal autophagy in the developing brain, and potential therapeutic approaches aimed at modulating autophagic pathways. In a time- and concentration-dependent pattern, general anesthetic agents can disrupt intracellular calcium homeostasis which enhances both autophagy and apoptosis activation. The degree of neural cell injury may be ultimately determined by the interplay between autophagy and apoptosis. It appears likely that the increase in calcium flux associated with some anesthetic agents disrupts lysosomal function. This results in an over-activation of endosomal- lysosomal trafficking causing mitochondrial damage, reactive oxygen species upregulation, and lipid peroxidation. Autophagy may play a role in the development of anesthetic related neurotoxicity. Understanding this may lead to strategies or therapies aimed at preventing or ameliorating general anesthetic agent mediated neurotoxicity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Factors associated with anesthetic-related death in dogs and cats in primary care veterinary hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Nora S; Mohn, Thomas J; Yang, Mingyin; Spofford, Nathaniel; Marsh, Alison; Faunt, Karen; Lund, Elizabeth M; Lefebvre, Sandra L

    2017-03-15

    OBJECTIVE To identify risk factors for anesthetic-related death in pet dogs and cats. DESIGN Matched case-control study. ANIMALS 237 dogs and 181 cats. PROCEDURES Electronic medical records from 822 hospitals were examined to identify dogs and cats that underwent general anesthesia (including sedation) or sedation alone and had death attributable to the anesthetic episode ≤ 7 days later (case animals; 115 dogs and 89 cats) or survived > 7 days afterward (control animals [matched by species and hospital]; 122 dogs and 92 cats). Information on patient characteristics and data related to the anesthesia session were extracted. Conditional multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with anesthetic-related death for each species. RESULTS The anesthetic-related death rate was higher for cats (11/10,000 anesthetic episodes [0.11%]) than for dogs (5/10,000 anesthetic episodes [0.05%]). Increasing age was associated with increased odds of death for both species, as was undergoing nonelective (vs elective) procedures. Odds of death for dogs were significantly greater when preanesthetic physical examination results were not recorded (vs recorded) or when preanesthetic Hct was outside (vs within) the reference range. Odds of death for cats were greater when intra-anesthesia records for oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry were absent. Underweight dogs had almost 15 times the odds of death as nonunderweight dogs; for cats, odds of death increased with increasing body weight (but not with overweight body condition). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Several factors were associated with anesthetic-related death in cats and dogs. This information may be useful for development of strategies to reduce anesthetic-related risks when possible and for education of pet owners about anesthetic risks.

  8. Comparison of O2 saturation, heart and respiratory rate following injection of vasoconstrictor containing anesthetic (lidocaine 2% and without vasoconstrictor anesthetic (Mepivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayat M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Along with higher usage of dental local anesthesia with risks to people health together with their positive role, the important goal of dentistry, patients’ health, has been stressed repeatedly nowadays. This study was conducted to compare O2 saturation, respiratory rate and heart rate of patients following injection of anesthetic containing vasoconstrictor (lidocaine 2% and without vasoconstrictor (Mepivacaine. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted on 32 healthy humans (16 females and 16 males with 25-50 years age range and no history of drug usage. Cases were classified into two matched groups. O2 saturation, heart and respiratory rate were recorded before extraction of a mandibular posterior tooth. In the first group, 3.6 ml lidocaine 2% with 1:80,000 epinephrine and in the second group Mepivacaine 3% was injected, using inferior alveolar dental nerve block with aspiration. Variables were measured and recorded. Tooth extraction was performed and the mentioned variables were recorded again. Data were analyzed with SPSS software using t and Paired t-test with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: After injection of lidocaine, the heart rate was increased (12.25±1.75 bpm, and the time to reach the maximum rate was 64.75±11.26 seconds. After extraction of tooth, heart rate in both groups was increased not considering the type of injection. Conclusion: The study showed that the injection of lidocaine (containing epinephrine in patients without contraindication has no risk. Also, possible increase in heart rate is not risky and is not associated with O2 saturation decrease and respiratory interruption.

  9. Anesthetic management of a parturient with Guillain-Barre syndrome posted for emergency caesarian section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Paul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the anesthetic management of a case of Guillain-Barre syndrome in the 34 th week of gestation coming for an emergency Cesarean section. The perioperative anesthetic challenges have been discussed with emphasis on the medical and anesthetic management which includes the use of plasma-pheresis, intravenous gamma-globulin, and the safety of preservative free 0.75% isobaric ropivacaine, which was administered intrathecally in this difficult medical condition with excellent hemodynamic, maternal, and fetal outcome. The sensory and motor blocks achieved were well suited to the clinical risks and conditions.

  10. Anesthetic management of a large mediastinal mass for tracheal stent placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Rajagopalan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The anesthetic management of patients with large mediastinal masses can be complicated due to the pressure effects of the mass on the airway or major vessels. We present the successful anesthetic management of a 64-year-old female with a large mediastinal mass that encroached on the great vessels and compressed the trachea. A tracheal stent was placed to relieve the tracheal compression under general anesthesia. Spontaneous ventilation was maintained during the perioperative period with the use of a classic laryngeal mask airway. We discuss the utility of laryngeal mask airway for anesthetic management of tracheal stenting in patients with mediastinal masses.

  11. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Novel 2,6-Disubstituted Phenol Derivatives as General Anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Linlin; Ren, Lei; Wan, Songlin; Liu, Guoliang; Luo, Xinfeng; Liu, Zhenhong; Li, Fangqiong; Yu, Yan; Liu, Jianyu; Wei, Yonggang

    2017-05-11

    A novel series of optically active 2,6-disubstituted alkylphenols with improved anesthetic profiles compared to widely used propofol were synthesized. The incorporation of the cyclopropyl group not only increased the steric effect but also introduced stereoselective effects over their anesthetic properties. Compounds 1, 2, and 6 were selected as potential candidates for further preclinical development including studies of their water-soluble prodrugs. Clinical studies of candidate compound 6 (Haisco HSK3486) as a general anesthetic are being performed in Australia and China.

  12. [Anesthetic management and experience in the transcatheter implantation of the CoreValve(®) self-expanding aortic valve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Suárez, F E; del Valle Fernández, R; González Alvarez, A; Sánchez Lasheras, J; Fernández Sánchez, L; Argüelles Tamargo, L

    2013-10-01

    To analyze the experience and anesthetic management in the transcatheter implantation of the CoreValve(®) self-expanding aortic valve, in a university tertiary hospital. Observational analytical review of data incorporated into a prospectively maintained database of 142 patients diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis who underwent implantation of a CoreValve(®) aortic self-expanding aortic valve between December 2007 and December 2012. The mean age of patients was 82.5±6.1 years and the logistic EuroSCORE was 14.9±11.2. General anesthesia was used in 107 patients (75.3%), with local anesthesia with sedation in 35 (24.6%). Local anesthesia and sedation was associated with a lower requirement of vasoactive drugs (P=.003) during implantation. No statistically significant differences were found between the 2 anesthetic techniques in the duration of the procedure, hospital stay, or morbimortality. The success rate was 97.1%. The most common complication was conduction disorders that required implantation of a permanent pacemaker in 46 patients (32.3%). There was no intraoperative mortality, and all-cause mortality at 30 days was 6.3%, with a one-year survival estimated by the Kaplan-Meier of 83.1%. This study confirms that in patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk, transcatheter implantation of aortic valve is a safe and effective alternative. Both, general anesthesia and local anesthesia with sedation are valid options, depending on the experience of the team. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Anesthetic implications of subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Murali; Veerappa, Muralimanohar; Jawali, Vivek; Pandya, Nischal; Krishnamoorthy, Jayaprakash; Muniraju, Geetha; George, Antony; Baishya, Jitumoni

    2016-01-01

    Minimal invasive surgeries are carried out to benefit the patient with less pain, blood loss, mechanical ventilation and hospital stay; a smaller scar is not the aim. Minimal invasive cardiac surgeries are carried out via small sternotomy, small thoracotomy and via robotic arms. Subxiphoid route is a novel method and avoids sternotomy. This case series is an attempt to understand the anesthetic modifications required. Secondly, whether it is feasible to carry out subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery. Elective patients scheduled to undergo subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery were chosen. The surgeries were conducted under general anesthesia with left lung isolation via either endobronchial tube or bronchial blocker. We conducted ten (seven males and 3 females) coronary artery bypass graft surgeries via subxiphoid technique. The mean EuroSCORE was 1.7 and the mean ejection fraction was 53.6. Eight patients underwent surgery via endobronchial tube, while, in the remaining two lung isolation was obtained using bronchial blocker. Mean blood loss intraoperatively was 300 ± 42 ml and postoperatively 2000 ± 95 ml. The pain score on the postoperative day '0' was 4.3 ± 0.6 and 2.3 ± 0.7 on the day of discharge. Length of stay in the hospital was 4.8 ± 0.9 days. There were no complications, blood transfusions, conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. The modifications in the anesthetic and surgical techniques are, use of left lung isolation using either endobronchial tube or bronchial blocker, increased duration for conduit harvesting, grafting, requirement of transesophageal echocardiography monitoring in addition to hemodynamic monitoring. Other minor requirements are transcutaneous pacing and defibrillator pads, a wedge under the chest to 'lift' up the chest, sparing right femoral artery and vein (to serve as vascular access) for an unlikely event of conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. Any anesthesiologist wishing to start this technique must be aware of

  14. Anesthetic implications of subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Chakravarthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Minimal invasive surgeries are carried out to benefit the patient with less pain, blood loss, mechanical ventilation and hospital stay; a smaller scar is not the aim. Minimal invasive cardiac surgeries are carried out via small sternotomy, small thoracotomy and via robotic arms. Subxiphoid route is a novel method and avoids sternotomy. Aim: This case series is an attempt to understand the anesthetic modifications required. Secondly, whether it is feasible to carry out subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery. Methods: Elective patients scheduled to undergo subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery were chosen. The surgeries were conducted under general anesthesia with left lung isolation via either endobronchial tube or bronchial blocker. Results: We conducted ten (seven males and 3 females coronary artery bypass graft surgeries via subxiphoid technique. The mean EuroSCORE was 1.7 and the mean ejection fraction was 53.6. Eight patients underwent surgery via endobronchial tube, while, in the remaining two lung isolation was obtained using bronchial blocker. Mean blood loss intraoperatively was 300 ± 42 ml and postoperatively 2000 ± 95 ml. The pain score on the postoperative day ′0′ was 4.3 ± 0.6 and 2.3 ± 0.7 on the day of discharge. Length of stay in the hospital was 4.8 ± 0.9 days. There were no complications, blood transfusions, conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. The modifications in the anesthetic and surgical techniques are, use of left lung isolation using either endobronchial tube or bronchial blocker, increased duration for conduit harvesting, grafting, requirement of transesophageal echocardiography monitoring in addition to hemodynamic monitoring. Other minor requirements are transcutaneous pacing and defibrillator pads, a wedge under the chest to ′lift′ up the chest, sparing right femoral artery and vein (to serve as vascular access for an unlikely event of conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. Any

  15. Transversus abdominal plane block as a sole anesthetic technique for abdominal wall hematoma drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, N; Golvano, M; Monedero, P

    2016-10-01

    Transversus abdominal plane (TAP) block is a known and useful technique, widely used for postoperative pain management of abdominal wall incisions. During the past years, and following the expansion of ultrasound guided techniques, its use has even gained more adepts. It is usually used as an adjuvant technique, primarily in order to control postoperative pain and reduce opioids consumption. We report the case of an 82 years old patient admitted for drainage of a postoperative abdominal wall hematoma after correction of a McBurney incisional hernia. The corrective surgery had gone on without incident, under general anesthesia with laryngeal mask. Two weeks later, the patient came back to our emergency department with a clear hematoma of the abdominal wall. Surgery was decided. A sole local anesthetic technique was achieved, using a TAP block. The block was performed under ultrasound guidance, using a subcostal approach. The surgery went on without complications. Therefore, TAP block offers a hemodynamic stability, appropriate intra-operative anesthesia and post-surgical analgesia of the abdominal wall. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Auditory cortical and hippocampal-system mismatch responses to duration deviants in urethane-anesthetized rats.

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    Timo Ruusuvirta

    Full Text Available Any change in the invariant aspects of the auditory environment is of potential importance. The human brain preattentively or automatically detects such changes. The mismatch negativity (MMN of event-related potentials (ERPs reflects this initial stage of auditory change detection. The origin of MMN is held to be cortical. The hippocampus is associated with a later generated P3a of ERPs reflecting involuntarily attention switches towards auditory changes that are high in magnitude. The evidence for this cortico-hippocampal dichotomy is scarce, however. To shed further light on this issue, auditory cortical and hippocampal-system (CA1, dentate gyrus, subiculum local-field potentials were recorded in urethane-anesthetized rats. A rare tone in duration (deviant was interspersed with a repeated tone (standard. Two standard-to-standard (SSI and standard-to-deviant (SDI intervals (200 ms vs. 500 ms were applied in different combinations to vary the observability of responses resembling MMN (mismatch responses. Mismatch responses were observed at 51.5-89 ms with the 500-ms SSI coupled with the 200-ms SDI but not with the three remaining combinations. Most importantly, the responses appeared in both the auditory-cortical and hippocampal locations. The findings suggest that the hippocampus may play a role in (cortical manifestation of MMN.

  17. Subacromial Anesthetics Increase Proprioceptive Deficit in the Shoulder and Elbow in Patients With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

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    Lucas R Ettinger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder proprioception gives information regarding arm joint position and movement direction. Several studies have investigated shoulder proprioceptive acuity in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS; however, differences in protocols and between-subjects designs have limited scientific inferences regarding proprioception and SIS. We aimed to determine within-subject differences in shoulder and elbow proprioceptive acuity in 17 patients with stage 2 SIS following treatment of a local anesthetic injection. In addition, we used 17 healthy, age-, sex-, and arm dominance–matched controls to determine the magnitude of differences after treatment. Joint position sense (JPS was measured before and after treatment in both groups in the sagittal plane for the shoulder and elbow. Our results indicate that patients with SIS have less sensitivity to angular position and tended to overshoot their targets with greater variability during angle-matching tasks for the shoulder (1.8° difference, P  = .042 and elbow (5.6° difference, P  = .001 than controls. The disparities in JPS found in patients with SIS were not resolved following subacromial injection; in fact, the magnitude of the errors increased after treatment where postinjection errors were significantly greater ( P  = .046 than controls, with an average difference of 2.4°. These findings suggest that patients with SIS have decrements in either the signaling or processing of proprioceptive information and may use pain to reduce these inequalities.

  18. Subacromial Anesthetics Increase Proprioceptive Deficit in the Shoulder and Elbow in Patients With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Lucas R; Shapiro, Matthew; Karduna, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Shoulder proprioception gives information regarding arm joint position and movement direction. Several studies have investigated shoulder proprioceptive acuity in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS); however, differences in protocols and between-subjects designs have limited scientific inferences regarding proprioception and SIS. We aimed to determine within-subject differences in shoulder and elbow proprioceptive acuity in 17 patients with stage 2 SIS following treatment of a local anesthetic injection. In addition, we used 17 healthy, age-, sex-, and arm dominance-matched controls to determine the magnitude of differences after treatment. Joint position sense (JPS) was measured before and after treatment in both groups in the sagittal plane for the shoulder and elbow. Our results indicate that patients with SIS have less sensitivity to angular position and tended to overshoot their targets with greater variability during angle-matching tasks for the shoulder (1.8° difference, P = .042) and elbow (5.6° difference, P = .001) than controls. The disparities in JPS found in patients with SIS were not resolved following subacromial injection; in fact, the magnitude of the errors increased after treatment where postinjection errors were significantly greater ( P = .046) than controls, with an average difference of 2.4°. These findings suggest that patients with SIS have decrements in either the signaling or processing of proprioceptive information and may use pain to reduce these inequalities.

  19. Spontaneous sleep-like brain state alternations and breathing characteristics in urethane anesthetized mice.

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    Silvia Pagliardini

    Full Text Available Brain state alternations resembling those of sleep spontaneously occur in rats under urethane anesthesia and they are closely linked with sleep-like respiratory changes. Although rats are a common model for both sleep and respiratory physiology, we sought to determine if similar brain state and respiratory changes occur in mice under urethane. We made local field potential recordings from the hippocampus and measured respiratory activity by means of EMG recordings in intercostal, genioglossus, and abdominal muscles. Similar to results in adult rats, urethane anesthetized mice displayed quasi-periodic spontaneous forebrain state alternations between deactivated patterns resembling slow wave sleep (SWS and activated patterns resembling rapid eye movement (REM sleep. These alternations were associated with an increase in breathing rate, respiratory variability, a depression of inspiratory related activity in genioglossus muscle and an increase in expiratory-related abdominal muscle activity when comparing deactivated (SWS-like to activated (REM-like states. These results demonstrate that urethane anesthesia consistently induces sleep-like brain state alternations and correlated changes in respiratory activity across different rodent species. They open up the powerful possibility of utilizing transgenic mouse technology for the advancement and translation of knowledge regarding sleep cycle alternations and their impact on respiration.

  20. [Ambulatory pediatric anesthesia: preanesthetic evaluation, anesthetic techniques, and immediate postoperative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pedrajas, F; Monedero, P

    1993-01-01

    The advantages of pediatric out-patient surgery are: 1) greater psychological ease; 2) lower rate of infection; 3) less impact on patient habits, and 4) lower cost. Surgery must not involve organs, must have a low rate of complications, and be short. The preanesthetic interview should include clinical history and complementary examinations, information on anesthetic technique, perioperative recommendations and psychological preparation of parents and child. Detailed information reassures parents and improves collaboration; their presence during induction may be useful. At this time complete fasting is not recommended; although solids are not permitted, clear liquids should be taken up to 2-3 hours before anesthesia. In this way the child is less irritable and hypoglycemia and hypotension during inhalational induction are prevented. Low doses of midazolam and ketamine have been used for premedication, which though possibly useful, is not recommended because recovery may be prolonged. Halogenated anesthetics are very useful, with nitrous oxide providing an excellent complement. The potentially toxic effect of halothane on the liver does not keep this agent from being the most popular. Recovery is fast with any of the usual hypnotics (etomidate, propofol, thiopentone). Although thiopentone continues to be the hypnotic drug of reference, propofol's versatility is causing it to gain wider acceptance. The use of atracurium or vecuronium is justified if the dose is adjusted in keeping with type of surgery and duration. Intraoperative analgesics include meperidine, fentanyl and alfentanyl; morphine is not recommended. Should tracheal intubation be necessary, laryngeal edema may be avoided by gentle, cautious laryngoscopy, the use of a tube without a balloon, and 3 h of postanesthetic observation. A laryngeal mask may serve as an alternative to tracheal intubation. Local-regional anesthesia, excepting epidural and spinal anesthesia, offers a number of advantages: blockade

  1. Isoflurane inhibits bronchopulmonary C-fiber-mediated apneic response to phenylbiguanide by depressing 5-HT3 receptor function in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenxiong; Zhuang, Jianguo; Zhang, Cancan; Xu, Fadi

    2013-09-27

    A previous study by the authors has shown that isoflurane (ISO), a commonly used volatile anesthetic, has an excitatory effect on bronchopulmonary C-fibers (PCFs). Since selective stimulation of PCFs by action on local 5-HT3 receptors could evoke an apnea, this current study addresses whether inhalation of ISO would facilitate the PCF 5-HT3 receptor-mediated apneic response and, if so, how. In anesthetized and spontaneously breathing rats, inhalation of 5% ISO markedly inhibited the apneic response to intra-atrium injection of phenylbiguanide (PBG, 25 μg/kg), a 5-HT3 receptor agonist, which was contrary to the hypothesis. Extracellular recording of the nodose ganglion neurons in anesthetized, paralyzed and ventilated rats revealed that ISO attenuated the PBG-elicited excitation of pulmonary C neurons. Furthermore, using the patch clamp technique, it was found that ISO depressed the PBG-induced inward current of the pulmonary C neurons labeled with 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) instilled previously into the lungs. These results suggest that ISO inhibits PCF 5-HT3 channel functions, and thereby attenuates PCF excitatory response to PBG, likely contributing to the diminution of the PBG-induced apnea by ISO in rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anesthetic efficacy of the supplemental X-tip intraosseous injection using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline in patients with irreversible pulpitis: An in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, Atool Chandra; Latha, Satheesh Sasidharan; Jain, Shefali; Kataki, Rubi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pain management remains the utmost important qualifying criteria in minimizing patient agony and establishing a strong dentist–patient rapport. Symptomatic irreversible pulpitis is a painful condition necessitating immediate attention and supplemental anesthetic techniques are often resorted to in addition to conventional inferior alveolar nerve block. Aim: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of X-tip intraosseous injection in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis, in mandibular posterior teeth, using 4% Articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline as local anesthetic, when the conventional inferior alveolar nerve block proved ineffective. Materials and Methods: X-tip system was used to administer 1.7 ml of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline in 30 patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis of mandibular posterior teeth with moderate to severe pain on endodontic access after administration of an inferior alveolar nerve block. Results: The results of the study showed that 25 X-tip injections (83.33%) were successful and 5 X-tip injections (16.66%) were unsuccessful. Conclusion: When the inferior alveolar nerve block fails to provide adequate pulpal anesthesia, X-tip system using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline was successful in achieving pulpal anesthesia in patients with irreversible pulpitis. PMID:25506137

  3. The influence of ventilation strategies and anesthetic techniques on regional cerebral oximetry in the beach chair position: a prospective interventional study with a randomized comparison of two anesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picton, Paul; Dering, Andrew; Alexander, Amir; Neff, Mary; Miller, Bruce S.; Shanks, Amy; Housey, Michelle; Mashour, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Beach chair positioning during general anesthesia is associated with cerebral oxygen desaturation. Changes in cerebral oxygenation resulting from the interaction of inspired oxygen fraction, end-tidal carbon dioxide and anesthetic choice have not been fully evaluated in anesthetized patients in the beach chair position. Methods This was a prospective interventional within-group study of patients undergoing shoulder surgery in the beach chair position that incorporated a randomized comparison between two anesthetics. Fifty-six patients were randomized to receive desflurane or total intravenous anesthesia with propofol. Following induction of anesthesia and positioning, inspired oxygen fraction (Fio2) and minute ventilation were sequentially adjusted for all patients. Regional cerebral oxygenation (rSO2) was the primary outcome and was recorded at each of five set points. Results While maintaining Fio2 at 0.3 and end tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2) at 30mmHg there was a decrease in rSO2 from 68%, SD 12 to 61%, SD 12 (pchair positioning. The combined interventions of increasing Fio2 to 1.0 and increasing Petco2 to 45mmHg resulted in a 14% point improvement in rSO2 to 75%, SD 12 (p chair position. There was no significant interaction effect of the anesthetic at the study intervention points. Conclusions Increasing Fio2 and Petco2 resulted in a significant increase in rSO2 that overcomes desaturation in patients anesthetized in the beach chair position and that appears independent of anesthetic choice. PMID:26244887

  4. Early presentation of postintubation tracheoesophageal fistula: Perioperative anesthetic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Depinder Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF in adults occurs as a result of trauma, malignancy, cuff-induced tracheal necrosis from prolonged mechanical ventilation, traumatic endotracheal intubation, foreign body ingestion, prolonged presence of rigid nasogastric tube, and surgical complication. Anesthetic management for repair of TEF is a challenge. Challenges include difficulties in oxygenation or ventilation resulting from placement of endotracheal tube in or above the fistula; large fistula defect causing loss of tidal volume with subsequent gastric dilatation, atelactasis, and maintenance of one lung ventilation. The most common cause of acquired nonmalignant TEF is postintubation fistula, which develops after prolonged intubation for ventilatory support. Acquired TEF, which occurs after prolonged intubation, usually develops after 12-200 days of mechanical ventilation, with a mean of 42 days. We present a rare case of TEF that developed after 7 days of intubation. It was a difficult case to be diagnosed as patient had a history of polytrauma, followed by emergency intubation and both these conditions can contribute to tracheobronchial injury.

  5. Anesthetic Management of a Pediatric Patient with Arginase Deficiency

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    Abdulkadir Atım

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Arginase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of the urea cycle in which a defect in conversion of arginine to urea and ornithine leads to hyperammonemia. Patients with urea cycle disorders may show increased protein catabolism due to inadequate intake of energy, protein and essential amino acids; infections, fever and surgery. A 12-year-old girl with arginase deficiency, ASA II who weighed 40 kg was scheduled for bilateral adductor, quadriceps and gastrocnemius tenotomies. She had mental retardation, spasticity and flexion posture of thelower limbs. Metabolic homeostasis was restored with appropriate diet. Successful anesthetic management allowed the patient to be discharged 48 hours after surgery. Increased levels of arginine and ammonia during or after surgery may lead to serious complications such as hypotension, cerebral edema, convulsions, hypothermia and spasticity. Thus special attention must be given to metabolic homeostasis and nutrition of the patients with arginase deficiency in the perioperative period. Primary goals should be to minimize stress levels by effective anxiolysis, provide an adequate amount of protein-free energy with proper fluid management and to obtain an effective preemptive and postoperative analgesia. In addition to a high level of knowledge, successful anesthesia requires professional communication among nursing staff, dietitians, pediatric metabolism specialist, surgeon and anesthesiologist.

  6. Anesthetic Practices for Laser Rehabilitation of Pediatric Hypertrophic Burn Scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Brendan M; Keilman, Jeffrey; Zuccaro, Jennifer; Kelly, Charis; Maynes, Jason T; Fish, Joel S

    The use of ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser therapy and pulsed dye laser therapy has led to significant improvements in the rehabilitation of hypertrophic burn scars. However, laser procedures are associated with appreciable pain among pediatric patients. Clinical consensus suggests using general anesthesia for pediatric laser procedures; however, guidelines for perioperative care are lacking. The objective of this quality improvement study is to determine whether a difference exists in postoperative pain outcomes in pediatric patients who receive intraoperative opioid regimens compared with patients who receive opioid-sparing regimens for laser therapy of hypertrophic burn scars. A retrospective review of patients who received laser therapy at a pediatric burn center from April 2014 to May 2015 was performed. Overall, 88 of the 92 procedures reviewed were included. A statistically significant difference was not found between the likelihood of postoperative pain when intraoperative opioid regimens (n = 63) were given compared with opioid-sparing regimens (n = 25) X (1, n = 88) = 2.870, P = .0902. There was also no difference between short-acting (n = 48), long-acting (n = 9), or combination (n = 6) intraoperative opioids compared with opioid-sparing regimens (n = 25) in the likelihood of postoperative pain. Despite the small sample size, the low number of postoperative pain cases is encouraging. Ultimately, these data provide a foundation for developing anesthetic guidelines for pediatric laser procedures. Specifically, clinicians should consider the potential to deliver adequate perioperative care via an opioid-sparing regimen ± adjuvant.

  7. Anesthetic and adjunctive drugs for fast-track surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, G; Carli, F

    2009-08-01

    With the changes in health care dictated by economic pressure, there has been a realization that hospital stay could be shortened without compromising quality of care. Advances in surgical technology and anesthetic drugs have made an impact in the way perioperative care is delivered with some emphasis on multidisciplinary approach. From the expansion of ambulatory care, lessons were learnt how to apply same concepts to major surgery with the understanding that interventions to attenuate the surgical stress would facilitate the return to "baseline". Beside minimal invasive approach to surgery, anesthesia interventions are arranged with the intent to decrease the negative effects of surgical stress and pain, to minimize the side effects of drugs and at the same time to facilitate the recuperation which follows after surgery. Fast-track or accelerated care encompasses many aspects of anesthesia care, not only preoperative preparation and prehabilitation, but intraoperative attenuation of surgical stress and postoperative rehabilitation. The anesthesiologist is part of this team with the specific mission to use medications and techniques which have the least side effects on organ functions, provide analgesia which in turn facilitates the intake of food and mobilization out of bed. This chapter has been conceived with the intention to direct the clinician towards procedure-specific protocols where the choice of medications and techniques is based on published evidence. The success of implementing fast-track depends more on dynamic harmony amongst the various participants (surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses, nutrtionists, physiotherapists) than on reaching an optimum level of excellence at each separate organization level.

  8. Differential regional metabolism of glucagon in anesthetized pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deacon, Carolyn F; Kelstrup, Mette; Trebbien, Ramona

    2003-01-01

    -RIA, respectively). Hindlimb extraction of endogenous (17.4 +/- 3.7%, C-RIA) and exogenous (29.1 +/- 4.8 and 19.8 +/- 5.1%, C- and M-RIA) glucagon was detected, indicating M and C cleavage of the molecule. Renal extraction of glucagon was detected by all assays under endogenous (19.4 +/- 6.7, 33.9 +/- 7.1, 29......Glucagon metabolism under basal (endogenous) conditions and during intravenous glucagon infusion was studied in anesthetized pigs by use of midregion (M), COOH-terminal (C), and NH2-terminal (N)-RIAs. Arteriovenous concentration differences revealed a negative extraction of endogenous glucagon...... immunoreactivity across the portal bed (-35.4 +/- 11.0, -40.3 +/- 9.6, -35.6 +/- 16.9%, M-, C-, N-RIA, respectively), reflecting net secretion of pancreatic glucagon and intestinal glicentin and oxyntomodulin, but under exogenous conditions, a net extraction occurred (11.6 +/- 3.6 and 18.6 +/- 5.7%, C- and N...

  9. Radiological contrast media and pancreatic blood perfusion in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, G; Carlsson, P O; Källskog, Ö; Hansell, P; Jansson, L; Riesenfeld Källskog, V

    2007-12-01

    Radiological contrast media (CM) have been suggested to be able to impair pancreatic microcirculation. To evaluate the effects of an iso-osmolar (iodixanol, 290 mOsm/kg H2O) and a low-osmolar (iopromide, 660 mOsm/kg H2O) CM on total pancreatic and islet blood perfusion. Thiobutabarbital-anesthetized rats were injected with iodine equivalent doses (600 mg I/kg body weight) of iodixanol or iopromide. Saline or low-osmolar mannitol (660 mOsm/kg H2O) solutions served as control substances. Blood perfusion measurements were then carried out with a microsphere technique. Iso-osmolar iodixanol had no effects on blood perfusion. Low-osmolar iopromide increased total pancreatic blood perfusion, whereas islet blood perfusion was unchanged. No differences were seen when mannitol solutions were given. Neither an iso-osmolar nor a low-osmolar CM affected pancreatic islet blood perfusion, whereas the low-osmolar CM increased total pancreatic blood perfusion. The absence of hemodynamic effect of low-osmolar mannitol suggests that the hyperosmolality per se of iopromide versus iodixanol does not induce the hemodynamic effect. The consequences of the effect of iopromide for pancreatic function remain to be established.

  10. Differential regional metabolism of glucagon in anesthetized pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deacon, Carolyn F; Kelstrup, Mette; Trebbien, Ramona

    2003-01-01

    Glucagon metabolism under basal (endogenous) conditions and during intravenous glucagon infusion was studied in anesthetized pigs by use of midregion (M), COOH-terminal (C), and NH2-terminal (N)-RIAs. Arteriovenous concentration differences revealed a negative extraction of endogenous glucagon.......5 +/- 6.7%, M-, C-, N-RIA) and exogenous conditions (46.9 +/- 4.8, 46.4 +/- 6.0, 47.0 +/- 7.7%; M-, C-, N-RIA), indicating substantial elimination of the peptide. Hepatic glucagon extraction was undetectable under basal conditions and detected only by M-RIA (10.0 +/- 3.8%) during glucagon infusion......, indicating limited midregional cleavage of the molecule. The plasma half-life determined by C- and N-RIAs (2.7 +/- 0.2 and 2.3 +/- 0.2 min) were similar, but both were shorter than when determined by M-RIA (3.2 +/- 0.2 min, P Metabolic clearance rates were similar regardless of assay (14.4 +/- 1...

  11. Anesthetic management of a patient with multiple sclerosis - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Barbin Zuccolotto

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease of the brain and spinal cord, characterized by muscle weakness, cognitive dysfunction, memory loss, and personality disorders. Factors that promote disease exacerbation are stress, physical trauma, infection, surgery, and hyperthermia. The objective is to describe the anesthetic management of a case referred to urological surgery. Case report: A female patient, 44 years of age, with multiple sclerosis, diagnosed with nephrolithiasis, referred for endoscopic ureterolythotripsy. Balanced general anesthesia was chosen, with midazolam, propofol and remifentanil target-controlled infusion; sevoflurane via laryngeal mask airway; and spontaneous ventilation. Because the patient had respiratory difficulty presenting with chest wall rigidity, it was decided to discontinue the infusion of remifentanil. There was no other complication or exacerbation of disease postoperatively. Conclusion: The use of neuromuscular blockers (depolarizing and non-depolarizing is a problem in these patients. As there was no need for muscle relaxation in this case, muscle relaxants were omitted. We conclude that the combination of propofol and sevoflurane was satisfactory, not resulting in hemodynamic instability or disease exacerbation.

  12. Subcellular distribution of an inhalational anesthetic in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckenhoff, R.G.; Shuman, H. (Univ. of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia (USA))

    1990-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms and sites of anesthetic action, we determined the subcellular partitioning of halothane in a tissue model. A method was found to fix the in vivo distribution of halothane in rat atrial tissue for subsequent electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis. Atrial strips were exposed to various concentrations of halothane, rapidly frozen, cryo-sectioned, and cryo-transferred into an electron microscope. Irradiation of the hydrated cryosections with the electron beam caused halothane radiolysis, which allowed retention of the halogen-containing fragments after dehydration of the sections. The bromine from halothane was detected and quantified with x-ray microanalysis in various microregions of atrial myocytes. Halothane (bromine) partitioned largely to mitochondria, with progressively lower concentrations in sarcolemma, nuclear membrane, cytoplasm, sarcomere, and nucleus. Partitioning could not be explained solely by distribution of cellular lipid, suggesting significant and differential physicochemical solubility in protein. However, we found no saturable compartment in atrial myocytes within the clinical concentration range, which implies little specific protein binding.

  13. Abdominal expiratory muscle activity in anesthetized vagotomized neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Makito

    2009-05-01

    The pattern of respiratory activity in abdominal muscles was studied in anesthetized, spontaneously breathing, vagotomized neonatal rats at postnatal days 0-3. Anesthesia (2.0% isoflurane, 50% O(2)) depressed breathing and resulted in hypercapnia. Under this condition, abdominal muscles showed discharge late in the expiratory phase (E2 activity) in most rats. As the depth of anesthesia decreased, the amplitude of discharges in the diaphragm and abdominal muscles increased. A small additional burst frequently occurred in abdominal muscles just after the termination of diaphragmatic inspiratory activity (E1 or postinspiratory activity). Since this E1 activity is not often observed in adult rats, the abdominal respiratory pattern likely changes during postnatal development. Anoxia-induced gasping after periodic expiratory activity without inspiratory activity, and in most rats, abdominal expiratory activity disappeared before terminal apnea. These results suggest that a biphasic abdominal motor pattern (a combination of E2 and E1 activity) is a characteristic of vagotomized neonatal rats during normal respiration.

  14. Severe preeclampsia: anesthetic implications of the disease and its management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Judi A

    2009-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a significant, multifactorial, multiorgan disease affecting 6%-8% of all pregnancies in the United States and is the third leading cause of maternal mortality. As such, it is incumbent upon any anesthesia provider involved in obstetric cases to be familiar with the varied manifestations of the disease, management goals from an obstetric standpoint, and the implications for provision of anesthesia in this patient group. Despite improvements in the diagnosis and management of preeclampsia, severe complications can occur in both the mother and the fetus. A systematic approach to the anesthetic evaluation is therefore necessary to reduce morbidity and mortality and to improve outcomes. The potential pitfalls of general anesthesia, including failed intubation, in these complicated patients make regional anesthesia the preferred choice in many cases. Recent studies have shown that spinal anesthesia is often appropriate for preeclamptic patients, even in severe cases. Nevertheless, it is important to be aware of the potential contraindications to neuraxial anesthesia and to prepare for the possibility of encountering a difficult airway.

  15. Corneal neurotization: a novel technique for the anesthetic cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Dryer, Marylou M; Bodner, Bruce I

    2010-07-01

    This report describes and evaluates the efficacy of a novel procedure, direct corneal neurotization using contralateral, supraorbital, and supratrochlear nerves in patients with unilateral facial palsy and corneal anesthesia. The charts of 6 patients were thoroughly reviewed. Evaluated outcome parameters included corneal sensibility, improvement in best-corrected visual acuity, blink reflex, donor deficit, synesthesia, long-term corneal health, several psychosocial measures, and overall patient satisfaction. The mean age at time of surgery in our study was 41.7 +/- 9.07 years. Average time from denervation to surgery was 7.00 +/- 8.56 years with an average follow-up time of 16.3 +/- 2.42 years. After surgery, all 6 eyes showed improvement of corneal sensibility, visual acuity, and corneal health and remained free of ulcers without adjunctive surgical treatment. Average time to sensibility was 2.80 +/- 2.17 years, and average corneal sensibility improved from 2.00 +/- 4.47 mm before surgery to 27.8 +/- 22.6 mm after corneal neurotization (P corneal sensibility in patients with unilateral facial palsy and anesthetic cornea. This procedure preserves ocular anatomy and cosmesis while restoring function by improving corneal health and visual acuity and by reestablishing the blink reflex.

  16. Impact of Anesthetic Regimen on Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in the Rat Heart In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behmenburg, Friederike; van Caster, Patrick; Bunte, Sebastian; Brandenburger, Timo; Heinen, André; Hollmann, Markus W; Huhn, Ragnar

    2018-04-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) seems to be a promising cardioprotective strategy with contradictive clinical data suggesting the anesthetic regimen influencing the favorable impact of RIPC. This study aimed to investigate whether cardio protection by RIPC is abolished by anesthetic regimens. Male Wistar rats were randomized to 6 groups. Anesthesia was either maintained by pentobarbital (Pento) alone or a combination of sevoflurane (Sevo) and remifentanil or propofol (Prop) and remifentanil in combination with and without RIPC. RIPC reduced infarct size in Pento- and Sevo-anesthetized rats (Pento-RIPC: 30% ± 9% versus Pento-control [Con]: 65% ± 6%, P < .001; Sevo-RIPC: 31% ± 6% versus Sevo-Con: 61% ± 8%, P < .001), but RIPC did not initiate cardio protection in Prop-anesthetized animals (Prop-RIPC: 59% ± 6% versus Prop-Con: 59% ± 8%, P = 1.000). Cardio protection by RIPC is abolished by Prop.

  17. Transient osteoporosis of pregnancy: A case report and review of anesthetic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Eduardo Anillo Lombana

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed the anesthetic implications of this rare disease, particularly the use of a regional technique that removes the restrictive effect of the hip pain, and therefore increases the risk of a fracture.

  18. Effect of a heat and moisture exchanger on heat loss in isoflurane-anesthetized dogs undergoing single-limb orthopedic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Erik H; Brainard, Benjamin M; Braun, Christina; Figueiredo, Juliana P

    2011-12-15

    To determine whether a heat and moisture exchange device (HME) prevents a decrease in body temperature in isoflurane-anesthetized dogs undergoing orthopedic procedures. Blinded randomized controlled clinical trial. 60 privately owned dogs weighing at least 15 kg (33 lb). Dogs were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups (n = 20/group): HME placed immediately after anesthetic induction with isoflurane, after transfer to the operating room, or not at all. The device consisted of a hygroscopic filter placed between the endotracheal tube and the Y piece of the anesthesia circuit. Each dog was positioned on a circulating warm water blanket and had a forced-air warming blanket placed over its body. Body temperature was monitored after transfer to the operating room with a probe placed in the thoracic aspect of the esophagus. Study groups did not differ significantly with respect to body weight, body condition score, reproductive status, breed, surgical procedure, preoperative sedative and opioid administration, anesthetic induction drug, local nerve block technique, or operating room assignment. There were no significant differences among groups in esophageal temperature variables, interval between anesthetic induction and surgery, surgery duration, anesthesia duration, or oxygen flow rate. However, the relationship between temperature delta and body weight was significant and relevant (R(2) = 0.23), as was the association between temperature nadir and body weight (R(2)= 0.10). As body weight increased, the temperature delta decreased and temperature nadir increased. No other significant relationships were identified. Inclusion of an HME in healthy dogs undergoing anesthesia for an elective orthopedic surgery did not facilitate maintenance of body temperature throughout the procedure.

  19. Anesthetic gases and global warming: Potentials, prevention and future of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadani, Hina; Vyas, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Global warming refers to an average increase in the earth's temperature, which in turn causes changes in climate. A warmer earth may lead to changes in rainfall patterns, a rise in sea level, and a wide range of impacts on plants, wildlife, and humans. Greenhouse gases make the earth warmer by trapping energy inside the atmosphere. Greenhouse gases are any gas that absorbs infrared radiation in the atmosphere and include: water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), halogenated fluorocarbons (HCFCs), ozone (O3), perfluorinated carbons (PFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). Hazardous chemicals enter the air we breathe as a result of dozens of activities carried out during a typical day at a healthcare facility like processing lab samples, burning fossil fuels etc. We sometimes forget that anesthetic agents are also greenhouse gases (GHGs). Anesthetic agents used today are volatile halogenated ethers and the common carrier gas nitrous oxide known to be aggressive GHGs. With less than 5% of the total delivered halogenated anesthetic being metabolized by the patient, the vast majority of the anesthetic is routinely vented to the atmosphere through the operating room scavenging system. The global warming potential (GWP) of a halogenated anesthetic is up to 2,000 times greater than CO2. Global warming potentials are used to compare the strength of different GHGs to trap heat in the atmosphere relative to that of CO2. Here we discuss about the GWP of anesthetic gases, preventive measures to decrease the global warming effects of anesthetic gases and Xenon, a newer anesthetic gas for the future of anesthesia.

  20. Anesthetic management of a child with autistic spectrum disorder and homocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Choudhary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autistic spectrum disorder (ASD is a developmental disability of the central nervous system with rapid worsening. A subset of patients also has mitochondrial dysfunction leading to increased sensitivity to various anesthetic agents. Rarely, gene mutation in these patients results in homocysteinemia which causes higher incidences of thromboembolism, hypoglycemia, and seizures. Anesthetic management of ASD with homocysteinemia and refractory seizures has not been previously reported.

  1. The anesthetics influence (ethilic-eter and urethane) on renal radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramoto, E.; Achando, S.S.; Araujo, E.B. de; Hamada, H.S.; Silva Valente Goncalves, R. da; Pereira, N.P.S. de; Silva, C.P.G. da.

    1990-01-01

    A comparative study was done using anesthetics like ether ethilic and urethane, in rats (Wistar). A significative variation was observed in the results obtained when renal radiopharmaceuticals were investigated. Using urethane, the renal uptake increase progressivelly due to the inhibition of the renal filtration and it starts to recuperate when the anesthetic effect was eliminated. Using ether ethilic the radiopharmaceuticals are quickly eliminated from the kidneys (tubular or glomerular filtration), showing that the renal function was protected. (author) [pt

  2. Cimethidine pre-anesthetic. A prophylactic method against Mendelson's syndrome in cesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Storm, K

    1983-01-01

    Twenty patients undergoing cesarean section received cimethidine 400 mg intramuscularly as pre-anesthetic approximately 70 minutes prior to gastric aspiration. The average pH was 5.05, as against 2.97 in the control group (p less than 0.01). No significant reduction in the aspirated volumes...... in the infants. Hence, cimethidine is a safe and useful pre-anesthetic for patients undergoing cesarean section, irrespective of indication and, consequently, much to be preferred to oral antacids....

  3. Anesthetic activity of Brazilian native plants in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen)

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,Lenise de Lima; Silva,Daniela Thomas da; Garlet,Quelen Iane; Cunha,Mauro Alves; Mallmann,Carlos Augusto; Baldisserotto,Bernardo; Longhi,Solon Jonas; Pereira,Ana Maria Soares; Heinzmann,Berta Maria

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for inexpensive and safe anesthetics that can reduce fish stress caused by some procedures such as capture and handling. In this context, the present study evaluated the potential of essential oils (EO) of three Brazilian native plants (Hesperozygis ringens, Lippia sidoides and Ocotea acutifolia) as anesthetics for the silver catfish - Rhamdia quelen. Moreover, an analysis was made of the chemical composition of these oils and their influence on stress parameter....

  4. Recent trends in the anesthetic management of craniotomy for supratentorial tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Meng, Lingzhong; Bilotta, Federico

    2016-10-01

    The article reviews the recent evidence on the anesthetic management of patients undergoing craniotomy for supratentorial tumor resection. A rapid recovery of neurological function after craniotomy for supratentorial tumor allows for the prompt diagnosis of intracranial complications and possibly an early hospital discharge. Intraoperative esmolol infusion was shown to reduce the anesthetic requirements, and may facilitate a more rapid recovery of neurological function. Outpatient craniotomy for supratentorial tumor resection has been associated with several clinical and economic benefits, but has not gained widespread use because of skepticism and medical-legal concerns. Awake craniotomy is associated with advantageous outcomes compared with surgery under general anesthesia, and is regarded as the standard of care for tumors that reside in or in close proximity to the eloquent brain. Recent studies have demonstrated that intraoperative electroacupuncture, dexmedetomidine, pregabalin, and lidocaine may facilitate postcraniotomy pain management. The use of volatile anesthetic agents in cancer surgery is associated with a worse survival compared with intravenous anesthetics, possibly by hindering immunologic defenses against cancer cells. Recent evidence has yielded valuable information regarding anesthetic management of patients undergoing supratentorial tumor craniotomy. Despite a plethora of studies that compare short-term outcomes using different anesthetic and analgesic regimens, randomized controlled trials that examine the long-term outcomes (i.e., neurocognitive function, quality of life, tumor recurrence, and survival) that are of particular interest to patients are needed.

  5. Ring Keratitis Associated With Topical Abuse of a Dilute Anesthetic After Refractive Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chih Hou

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetic toxic keratitis is rare and presents as a ring keratitis, which is often misdiagnosed as Acanthamoeba keratitis. Here, we report an unusual case of toxic keratitis caused by topical abuse of a dilute anesthetic. A 26-year-old woman presented with bilateral corneal edema, ring infiltrates, pigmented keratic precipitate, Descemet's membrane folding, and strong anterior chamber reactions 2 weeks after laser subepithelial keratomileusis surgery. Tracing back her medical history, topical dilute 0.1% proparacaine was prescribed and frequently used for 1 month. Toxic keratitis was suspected. After discontinuation of the topical anesthetic and initiation of treatment with topical 20% autologous serum, complete corneal epithelialization was achieved within 1 week. Corneal infiltrates and anterior chamber reaction gradually subsided. Vision improved from finger counting to 20/20 in the right eye and 20/25 in the left eye, but confocal microscopy showed decreased corneal endothelial cells. Topical abuse of a dilute topical anesthetic can cause severe toxic keratitis and endothelial cell loss. The physician must be aware of the signs of topical anesthetic abuse and should not prescribe even a dilute anesthetic for long-term use. Autologous serum can help in the recovery of toxic keratitis.

  6. Extraction of mandibular premolars and molars: comparison between local infiltration via pressure syringe and inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiem, Daniel G E; Schnaith, Florian; Van Aken, Caroline M E; Köntges, Anne; Kumar, Vinay V; Al-Nawas, Bilal; Kämmerer, Peer W

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anesthetic efficiency of local infiltration anesthesia administered with a pressure syringe (P-INF) via a special technique versus direct block anesthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve (IANB) for tooth extraction in the posterior mandible. In a prospective randomized study, 101 teeth in 101 patients were extracted in the posterior mandible under local anesthesia whereby two different administration techniques were used (P-INF n = 48; IANB n = 53). Primary objectives were comparisons of anesthetic success rate (yes/no) and efficacy (full/sufficient vs. insufficient). Secondary objectives were patients' pain perception during treatment, pain of injection (numerical rating scale), need for second injections (always IANB), time until onset of anesthetic action (min), and duration of local numbness (min). IANB was successful in all cases, whereas initial P-INF achieved 35% of success only. Furthermore, IANB reached significant higher values of anesthetic efficacy compared to P-INF (P local numbness were found to be equal. For anesthetic efficacy as well as anesthetic success, block anesthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve (IANB) turned out to be more proficient to local infiltration via special delivering system with a special technique. Infiltration, even when performed with 4% articaine and a pressure syringe system, is not a suitable method of anesthesia in the posterior mandible.

  7. Review of knee arthroscopy performed under local anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law Billy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Local anesthesia for knee arthroscopy is a well documented procedure with diagnostic and therapeutic role. Numerous therapeutic procedures including partial menisectomy, meniscus repair, abrasion chondroplasy, synovectomy, loose body removal can be performed safely and comfortably. Appropriate case selection, anesthetic strategy and technical expertise are the key to smooth and successful surgery.

  8. Anesthetic management in a patient with Kindler′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohan Lal Solanki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old male with pan-anterior urethral stricture was scheduled to undergo perineal urethrostomy. He was a known case of Kindler′s syndrome since infancy. He was having a history of blister formation, extensive poikiloderma and progressive cutaneous atrophy since childhood. He had a tendency of trauma-induced blisters with clear or hemorrhagic contents that healed with scarring. The fingers were sclerodermiform with dystrophic nails and inability to completely clench the fist. Airway examination revealed thyromental distance of 7 cm with limited neck extension, limited mouth opening and mallampatti class III with a fixed large tongue. He was reported as grade IV Cormack and Lehane laryngoscopic on previous anesthesia exposure. We described the anesthetic management of such case on guidelines for epidermolysis bullosa. In the operating room, an 18-G cannula was secured in the right upper limb using Coban TM Wrap. The T-piece of the cannula was than inserted into the slit and the tape was wrapped around the extremity. The ECG electrodes were placed on the limbs and fixed with Coban TM . Noninvasive blood pressure cuff was applied over the wrap after wrapping the arm with Webril® cotton. Oral fiberoptic tracheal intubation was done after lubricating the laryngoscope generously with a water-based lubricant with 7-mm endotracheal tube. Surgery proceeded without any complication. After reversing the residual neuromuscular block, trachea was extubated once the patient became awake. He was kept in the postanesthesia care unit for 2 hours and then shifted to urology ward.

  9. Mild Hypothermia Attenuates the Anesthetic Isoflurane-Induced Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Dong, Yuanlin; Chen, Dan; Xie, Zhongcong; Zhang, Yiying

    2017-01-01

    The commonly used inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been reported to induce DNA damage and cytotoxicity. However, the methods to attenuate these effects remain largely to be determined. Mild hypothermia has neuroprotective effects. We therefore set out to assess whether mild hypothermia could protect the isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Moreover, we investigated the underlying mechanisms by assessing the effects of mild hypothermia on the isoflurane-induced changes in ATP levels. H4 human neuroglioma cells were treated with 2% isoflurane for 3 or 6 h with and without mild hypothermia (35°C). We assessed the cell viability by using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. We determined DNA damage by measuring levels of phosphorylation of the histone protein H2A variant X at Ser139 (γH2A.X), the marker of DNA damage. We also measured ATP levels in the cells. Here we showed that the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 6 h induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage in the cells. Moreover, the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 3 h decreased ATP levels without inducing cytotoxicity. Mild hypothermia attenuated the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity, DNA damage, and ATP reduction in the cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels occurred before the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity. Isoflurane may induce DNA damage and cause cytotoxicity through reducing ATP levels. Mild hypothermia would ameliorate isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity by attenuating the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels. These pilot studies have established a system and will promote the future investigations of anesthesia neurotoxicity.

  10. Postoperative infections traced to contamination of an intravenous anesthetic, propofol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, S N; McNeil, M M; Bland, L A; Arduino, M J; Villarino, M E; Perrotta, D M; Burwen, D R; Welbel, S F; Pegues, D A; Stroud, L

    1995-07-20

    Between June 1990 and February 1993, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted investigations at seven hospitals because of unusual outbreaks of bloodstream infections, surgical-site infections, and acute febrile episodes after surgical procedures. We conducted case-control or cohort studies, or both, to identify risk factors. A case patient was defined as any patient who had an organism-specific infection or acute febrile episode after a surgical procedure during the study period in that hospital. The investigations also included reviews of procedures, cultures, and microbiologic studies of infecting, contaminating, and colonizing strains. Sixty-two case patients were identified, 49 (79 percent) of whom underwent surgery during an epidemic period. Postoperative complications were more frequent during the epidemic period than before it. Only exposure to propofol, a lipid-based anesthetic agent, was significantly associated with the postoperative complications at all seven hospitals. In six of the outbreaks, an etiologic agent (Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, Moraxella osloensis, Enterobacter agglomerans, or Serratia marcescens) was identified, and the same strains were isolated from the case patients. Although cultures of unopened containers of propofol were negative, at two hospitals cultures of propofol from syringes currently in use were positive. At one hospital, the recovered organism was identical to the organism isolated from the case patients. Interviews with and observation of anesthesiology personnel documented a wide variety of lapses in aseptic techniques. With the increasing use of lipid-based medications, which support rapid bacterial growth at room temperature, strict aseptic techniques are essential during the handling of these agents to prevent extrinsic contamination and dangerous infectious complications.

  11. [The ozone layer and its modification by N2O and inhalation anesthetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, J; Fabian, P

    1991-08-01

    As a result of human activities the ozone layer in the stratosphere, which is necessary for life on earth, has changed. The main causes of ozone destruction are chlorofluorcarbons (CFCs) 11 and 12. Recently, caring anesthetists have wondered if and to what degree N2O and popular potent inhalation anesthetics may also contribute to ozone loss. Having consulted the literature, we attempt to answer that question. The ozone-destroying N2O is chiefly produced by burning fossil elements and nitrogenous fertilizing used in agriculture; the share of medically used N2O lies below 2%. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane are halogenated anesthetics that contain ozone-destroying halogens (bromine, chlorine, fluorine) to different extents. Complicated experimental calculations for these volatile anesthetics result in a potential for ozone destruction of 0.36 for halothane and 0.02 for enflurane and isoflurane if the potential for ozone destruction by CFCs is set at 1.0. The lifespan of the inhalation anesthetics in the troposphere is with less than 3 years, dramatically less than that of CFCs (70-140 years). The two most important CFCs, 11 and 12, are considered to be currently produced in a quantity of about 800,000 tons per year. On the other hand, the worldwide production of inhalation anesthetics is said to be only 2,000 tons. In view of the experimental calculations and the low worldwide production, the small greenhouse effect, the shorter lifespan in the troposphere, and the low potential for ozone destruction, the negative effects of medically used N2O and inhalation anesthetics on the ozone layer seem negligible. All in all, the inhalation anesthetics are considered to be responsible for only 0.0005% of the ozone destruction at present.

  12. Anesthetic efficacy of four percent articaine for pulpal anesthesia by using inferior alveolar nerve block and buccal infiltration techniques in patients with irreversible pulpitis: a prospective randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorni, Saravanan; Veniashok, Baskaran; Senthilkumar, Ayyampudur Durairaj; Indira, Rajamani; Ramachandran, Sundararaman

    2011-12-01

    The study was designed as a randomized double-blind trial to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) and infiltration anesthetic techniques to anesthetize mandibular molars with irreversible pulpitis. The study was composed of 2 test arms and 1 control arm. Subjects in the test arms received either a standard IANB or a buccal infiltration (B Infil) of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine, whereas the subjects in the control arm received a standard IANB of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Subject's self-reported pain response was recorded on Heft Parker Visual Analogue Scale after local anesthetic administration during access preparation and pulp extirpation. For statistical analysis Pearson χ(2), Student's paired t test, 1-way analysis of variance, and Friedman tests showed no significant difference in success rates among the 3 arms of the trial. Although B Infil and IANB of 4% articaine were equally effective, B Infil can be considered a viable alterative in IANB for pulpal anesthesia in mandibular molars with irreversible pulpitis. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Oesophageal atresia: Are "long gap" patients at greater anesthetic risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Laura; Frawley, Jacinta; Crameri, Joe; Teague, Warwick J; Frawley, Geoff P

    2018-03-01

    anesthetic exposures and require multiple procedures in infancy to achieve oesophageal continuity. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Dexmedetomidine as the primary anesthetic agent during cardiac surgery in an infant with a family history of malignant hyperthermia

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    Aymen Naguib

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant hyperthermia (MH is an acute hypermetabolic crisis triggered in susceptible patients by the administration of succinylcholine or a volatile anesthetic agent. When providing anesthetic care for MH-susceptible agents, a total intravenous anesthetic (TIVA technique is frequently chosen. When choosing the components for TIVA, several options exist including the combination of propofol or dexmedetomidine with an opioid. We present our experience with the use of dexmedetomidine as a key component of the anesthetic regimen in a 5-month-old infant with a family history of MH. Previous reports of the use of dexmedetomidine in MH-susceptible patients are reviewed and its benefits in such patients discussed.

  15. A conserved behavioral state barrier impedes transitions between anesthetic-induced unconsciousness and wakefulness: evidence for neural inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Eliot B; Sun, Yi; Moore, Jason T; Hung, Hsiao-Tung; Meng, Qing Cheng; Perera, Priyan; Joiner, William J; Thomas, Steven A; Eckenhoff, Roderic G; Sehgal, Amita; Kelz, Max B

    2010-07-30

    One major unanswered question in neuroscience is how the brain transitions between conscious and unconscious states. General anesthetics offer a controllable means to study these transitions. Induction of anesthesia is commonly attributed to drug-induced global modulation of neuronal function, while emergence from anesthesia has been thought to occur passively, paralleling elimination of the anesthetic from its sites in the central nervous system (CNS). If this were true, then CNS anesthetic concentrations on induction and emergence would be indistinguishable. By generating anesthetic dose-response data in both insects and mammals, we demonstrate that the forward and reverse paths through which anesthetic-induced unconsciousness arises and dissipates are not identical. Instead they exhibit hysteresis that is not fully explained by pharmacokinetics as previously thought. Single gene mutations that affect sleep-wake states are shown to collapse or widen anesthetic hysteresis without obvious confounding effects on volatile anesthetic uptake, distribution, or metabolism. We propose a fundamental and biologically conserved concept of neural inertia, a tendency of the CNS to resist behavioral state transitions between conscious and unconscious states. We demonstrate that such a barrier separates wakeful and anesthetized states for multiple anesthetics in both flies and mice, and argue that it contributes to the hysteresis observed when the brain transitions between conscious and unconscious states.

  16. A conserved behavioral state barrier impedes transitions between anesthetic-induced unconsciousness and wakefulness: evidence for neural inertia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliot B Friedman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available One major unanswered question in neuroscience is how the brain transitions between conscious and unconscious states. General anesthetics offer a controllable means to study these transitions. Induction of anesthesia is commonly attributed to drug-induced global modulation of neuronal function, while emergence from anesthesia has been thought to occur passively, paralleling elimination of the anesthetic from its sites in the central nervous system (CNS. If this were true, then CNS anesthetic concentrations on induction and emergence would be indistinguishable. By generating anesthetic dose-response data in both insects and mammals, we demonstrate that the forward and reverse paths through which anesthetic-induced unconsciousness arises and dissipates are not identical. Instead they exhibit hysteresis that is not fully explained by pharmacokinetics as previously thought. Single gene mutations that affect sleep-wake states are shown to collapse or widen anesthetic hysteresis without obvious confounding effects on volatile anesthetic uptake, distribution, or metabolism. We propose a fundamental and biologically conserved concept of neural inertia, a tendency of the CNS to resist behavioral state transitions between conscious and unconscious states. We demonstrate that such a barrier separates wakeful and anesthetized states for multiple anesthetics in both flies and mice, and argue that it contributes to the hysteresis observed when the brain transitions between conscious and unconscious states.

  17. Brainstem stimulation augments information integration in the cerebral cortex of desflurane-anesthetized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siveshigan ePillay

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available States of consciousness have been associated with information integration in the brain as modulated by anesthesia and the ascending arousal system. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that electrical stimulation of the oral part of the pontine reticular nucleus (PnO can augment information integration in the cerebral cortex of anesthetized rats. Extracellular unit activity and local field potentials were recorded in freely moving animals from parietal association (PtA and secondary visual (V2 cortices via chronically implanted microwire arrays at three levels of anesthesia produced by desflurane: 3.5%, 4.5%, and 6.0% (where 4.5% corresponds to that critical for the loss of consciousness. Information integration was characterized by integration (multiinformation and interaction entropy, estimated from the statistical distribution of coincident spike patterns. PnO stimulation elicited electrocortical activation as indicated by the reductions in δ- and θ-band powers at the intermediate level of anesthesia. PnO stimulation augmented integration from 1.13 ± 0.03 to 6.12 ± 1.98 x103 bits and interaction entropy from 0.44 ± 0.11 to 2.18 ± 0.72 x103 bits; these changes were most consistent in the PtA at all desflurane concentrations. Stimulation of the retina with discrete light flashes after PnO stimulation elicited an additional 166 ± 25 and 92 ± 12% increase in interaction entropy in V2 during light and intermediate levels. The results suggest that the PnO may modulate spontaneous ongoing and sensory stimulus-related cortical information integration under anesthesia.

  18. Inhibition of gastric emptying and intestinal transit in anesthetized rats by a Tityus serrulatus scorpion toxin

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    Troncon L.E.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a fraction (T1 of Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom prepared by gel filtration on gastric emptying and small intestinal transit were investigated in male Wistar rats. Fasted animals were anesthetized with urethane, submitted to tracheal intubation and right jugular vein cannulation. Scorpion toxin (250 µg/kg or saline was injected iv and 1 h later a bolus of saline (1.0 ml/100 g labeled with 99m technetium-phytate (10 MBq was administered by gavage. After 15 min, animals were sacrificed and the radioactivity remaining in the stomach was determined. Intestinal transit was evaluated by instillation of a technetium-labeled saline bolus (1.0 ml through a cannula previously implanted in the duodenum. After 60 min, the progression of the marker throughout 7 consecutive gut segments was estimated by the geometric center method. Gastric retention of the liquid test meal in rats injected with scorpion toxin (median: 88%; range: 52-95% was significantly higher (P<0.02 than in controls (54%; 21-76%, an effect which was not modified by gastric secretion blockade with ranitidine. The progression of the isotope marker throughout the small intestine was significantly slower (P<0.05 in rats treated with toxin (1.2; 1.0-2.5 than in control animals (2.3; 1.0-3.2. Inhibition of both gastric emptying and intestinal transit in rats injected with scorpion toxin suggests an increased resistance to aboral flow, which might be caused by abnormal neurotransmitter release or by the local effects of venom on smooth muscle cells.

  19. Recognition of anesthetic barbiturates by a protein binding site: a high resolution structural analysis.

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    Simon Oakley

    Full Text Available Barbiturates potentiate GABA actions at the GABA(A receptor and act as central nervous system depressants that can induce effects ranging from sedation to general anesthesia. No structural information has been available about how barbiturates are recognized by their protein targets. For this reason, we tested whether these drugs were able to bind specifically to horse spleen apoferritin, a model protein that has previously been shown to bind many anesthetic agents with affinities that are closely correlated with anesthetic potency. Thiopental, pentobarbital, and phenobarbital were all found to bind to apoferritin with affinities ranging from 10-500 µM, approximately matching the concentrations required to produce anesthetic and GABAergic responses. X-ray crystal structures were determined for the complexes of apoferritin with thiopental and pentobarbital at resolutions of 1.9 and 2.0 Å, respectively. These structures reveal that the barbiturates bind to a cavity in the apoferritin shell that also binds haloalkanes, halogenated ethers, and propofol. Unlike these other general anesthetics, however, which rely entirely upon van der Waals interactions and the hydrophobic effect for recognition, the barbiturates are recognized in the apoferritin site using a mixture of both polar and nonpolar interactions. These results suggest that any protein binding site that is able to recognize and respond to the chemically and structurally diverse set of compounds used as general anesthetics is likely to include a versatile mixture of both polar and hydrophobic elements.

  20. Advanced Pre-clinical Research Approaches and Models to Studying Pediatric Anesthetic Neurotoxicity

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    Cheng eWang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Advances in pediatric and obstetric surgery have resulted in an increase in the duration and complexity of anesthetic procedures. A great deal of concern has recently arisen regarding the safety of anesthesia in infants and children. Because of obvious limitations, it is not possible to thoroughly explore the effects of anesthetic agents on neurons in vivo in human infants or children. However, the availability of some advanced pre-clinical research approaches and models, such as imaging technology both in vitro and in vivo, stem cell and nonhuman primate experimental models, have provided potentially invaluable tools for examining the developmental effects of anesthetic agents. This review discusses the potential application of some sophisticaled research approaches, e.g., calcium imaging, in stem cell-derived in vitro models, especially human embryonic neural stem cells, along with their capacity for proliferation and their potential for differentiation, to dissect relevant mechanisms underlying the etiology of the neurotoxicity associated with developmental exposures to anesthetic agents. Also, this review attempts to discuss several advantages for using the developing rhesus monkey models (in vivo, when combined with dynamic molecular imaging approaches, in addressing critical issues related to the topic of pediatric sedation/anesthesia. These include the relationships between anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity, dose response, time-course and developmental stage at time of exposure (in vivo studies, serving to provide the most expeditious platform toward decreasing the uncertainty in extrapolating pre-clinical data to the human condition.

  1. Anesthetic activity of Brazilian native plants in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen

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    Lenise de Lima Silva

    Full Text Available There is an increasing demand for inexpensive and safe anesthetics that can reduce fish stress caused by some procedures such as capture and handling. In this context, the present study evaluated the potential of essential oils (EO of three Brazilian native plants (Hesperozygis ringens, Lippia sidoides and Ocotea acutifolia as anesthetics for the silver catfish - Rhamdia quelen. Moreover, an analysis was made of the chemical composition of these oils and their influence on stress parameter. EO of H. ringens and O. acutifolia were effective as anesthetics, without behavioral side effects. EO of O. acutifolia (150 µL L-1 promoted an increase in blood glucose level. Regarding to the composition, pulegone accounts for 96.63% of the EO of H. ringens, and caryophyllene oxide amounts to 56.90% of the EO of O. acutifolia. Two chemotypes, thymol and carvacrol (68.40% and 67.89%, respectively were verified for EO of L. sidoides. Both samples of EO of L. sidoides showed anesthetic activity in silver catfish, but exposure also caused loss of mucus and mortality. Thus, only the EO of H. ringens and O. acutifolia are advised for anesthetic use

  2. Hypnosis control based on the minimum concentration of anesthetic drug for maintaining appropriate hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Eiko; Nishigaki, Yuki; Kanda, Chiaki; Takeda, Toshihiro; Shirakami, Gotaro

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel hypnosis control method using Auditory Evoked Potential Index (aepEX) as a hypnosis index. In order to avoid side effects of an anesthetic drug, it is desirable to reduce the amount of an anesthetic drug during surgery. For this purpose many studies of hypnosis control systems have been done. Most of them use Bispectral Index (BIS), another hypnosis index, but it has problems of dependence on anesthetic drugs and nonsmooth change near some particular values. On the other hand, aepEX has an ability of clear distinction between patient consciousness and unconsciousness and independence of anesthetic drugs. The control method proposed in this paper consists of two elements: estimating the minimum effect-site concentration for maintaining appropriate hypnosis and adjusting infusion rate of an anesthetic drug, propofol, using model predictive control. The minimum effect-site concentration is estimated utilizing the property of aepEX pharmacodynamics. The infusion rate of propofol is adjusted so that effect-site concentration of propofol may be kept near and always above the minimum effect-site concentration. Simulation results of hypnosis control using the proposed method show that the minimum concentration can be estimated appropriately and that the proposed control method can maintain hypnosis adequately and reduce the total infusion amount of propofol.

  3. Impact of Anesthetics on Immune Functions in a Rat Model of Vagus Nerve Stimulation.

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    Chloé A Picq

    Full Text Available Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS has been successfully performed in animals for the treatment of different experimental models of inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effect of VNS involves the release of acetylcholine by vagus nerve efferent fibers inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. TNF-α produced by macrophages. Moreover, it has recently been demonstrated that splenic lymphocytic populations may also be involved. As anesthetics can modulate the inflammatory response, the current study evaluated the effect of two different anesthetics, isoflurane and pentobarbital, on splenic cellular and molecular parameters in a VNS rat model. Spleens were collected for the characterization of lymphocytes sub-populations by flow cytometry and quantification of cytokines secretion after in vitro activation. Different results were observed depending on the anesthetic used. The use of isoflurane displayed a non-specific effect of VNS characterized by a decrease of most splenic lymphocytes sub-populations studied, and also led to a significantly lower TNF-α secretion by splenocytes. However, the use of pentobarbital brought to light immune modifications in non-stimulated animals that were not observed with isoflurane, and also revealed a specific effect of VNS, notably at the level of T lymphocytes' activation. These differences between the two anesthetics could be related to the anti-inflammatory properties of isoflurane. In conclusion, pentobarbital is more adapted than isoflurane in the study of the anti-inflammatory effect of VNS on an anesthetized rat model in that it allows more accurate monitoring of subtle immunomodulatory processes.

  4. Anesthesia and Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy: review of 117 anesthetic exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Leal G; Lorenz, Jessica D; Weingarten, Toby N; Scavonetto, Federica; Bojanić, Katarina; Selcen, Duygu; Sprung, Juraj

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are associated with life-threatening perioperative complications, including rhabdomyolysis, hyperkalemia, and hyperthermia. Current recommendations contraindicate use of succinylcholine and volatile anesthetics; however, the latter recommendation remains controversial. To review the perioperative outcomes of patients with DMD and BMD. We reviewed records of patients with DMD or BMD who underwent anesthetic management at our institution from January 1990 through December 2011. We identified 47 patients (DMD, 37; BMD, 10) who underwent 117 anesthetic exposures (DMD, 101; BMD, 16). Volatile anesthetic agents were used 66 times (DMD, 59; BMD, 7). One patient with undiagnosed BMD received succinylcholine and developed acute rhabdomyolysis and hyperkalemic cardiac arrest. All other major complications were attributed to the procedure (i.e., large bleeding), to preexisting comorbidities (i.e., respiratory failure, cardiac disease), or to both. Use of succinylcholine in children with dystrophinopathy is contraindicated. These patients have significant comorbidities and are frequently undergoing extensive operations; complications related to these factors can develop, as evidenced by our series. These complications may occur with use of volatile and nonvolatile anesthetics. However, because most of our patients were older than 8 years at the time of surgery, our observation cannot be generalized to younger dystrophin-deficient children. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Central Sensitization Is Modulated Following Trigger Point Anesthetization in Patients with Chronic Pain from Whiplash Trauma. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrom, N Ake; Freeman, Michael D

    2018-01-01

    Central sensitization (CS) with low peripheral pain thresholds (PPTs) is a common finding among patients with chronic pain after whiplash (CPWI). While it has been proposed that myofascial myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) may act as modulators of central sensitization, previously reported findings are conflicting and inconclusive. The present study was designed to investigate immediate responsiveness of CS to alterations in nociceptive input. Controlled, double-blind, cross-over. Thirty-one patients with chronic pain (trapezius myalgia) and CS after whiplash. Participants were referred by randomization to group A for injection of a single peripheral pain generator (MTrP or other discrete tender point) with local anesthetic or to group B for sham injection and cross-over. Documentation of PPT (Algometer), maximum jaw opening (caliper), and grip strength (Vigorimeter), as well as subjective overall pain (visual analog scale [VAS]), was made before and after each intervention. Statistical analysis of data (Student's t test, analysis of variance) confirmed that peripheral pain thresholds were significantly higher and maximum jaw opening significantly greater after anesthetizing a focal pain generator in the trapezius, but not after a sham injection. In contrast with the objective variables, subjective generalized pain improved (VAS) after not only an injection of local anesthetic, but also, and to a similar extent, after a sham injection. CS, as expressed by lowered PPT, is a rapidly adjusting physiological response to nociceptive stimuli in some patients with chronic pain after whiplash. PPT are likely modulated by myofascial tender points in selected patients with CS. With reference to the present findings, surgical ablation of MTrPs is discussed as a potential treatment modality for CS. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Randomized comparison of the feasibility of three anesthetic techniques for day-case open inguinal hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pere, Pertti; Harju, Jukka; Kairaluoma, Pekka; Remes, Veikko; Turunen, Päivi; Rosenberg, Per H

    2016-11-01

    Comparison of local anesthetic infiltration (LAI), spinal anesthesia (SPIN) and total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) for open inguinal herniorrhaphy. We hypothesized that patients receiving LAI could be discharged faster than SPIN and TIVA patients. Randomized, prospective trial. University hospital day-surgery center. 156 adult male patients (ASA 1-3) undergoing day-case open inguinal herniorrhaphy. Patients were randomized to either LAI (lidocaine+ropivacaine), SPIN (bupivacaine+fentanyl) or TIVA (propofol+remifentanil). Perioperative Ringer infusion was 1.5mL/h. Urinary bladder was scanned before and after surgery. Interviews were performed on postoperative days 1, 7 and 90. Duration of surgery, duration of the patients' stay in the operating room and time until their readiness for discharge home. Patient satisfaction and adverse effects were registered. Surgery lasted longer in LAI group (median 40min) than in SPIN group (35min) (P=.003) and TIVA group (33min) (Pinfiltration was given to 32 LAI patients, and IV fentanyl to 29 LAI and 4 SPIN patients. Ephedrine was required in 34 TIVA, 5 LAI and 5 SPIN patients. One SPIN and three LAI patients had to be given TIVA and another SPIN patient LAI to com