WorldWideScience

Sample records for anemia pathway inhibitors

  1. Signaling Pathways in Pathogenesis of Diamond Blackfan Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0590 TITLE: SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN PATHOGENESIS OF DIAMOND BLACKFAN ANEMIA PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: KATHLEEN M...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0590 SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN PATHOGENESIS OF DIAMOND BLACKFAN ANEMIA 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES None 14. ABSTRACT: Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a disorder that results in pure red cell aplasia, congenital

  2. The Fanconi Anemia Pathway of Genomic Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Levitus

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA, a recessive syndrome with both autosomal and X-linked inheritance, features diverse clinical symptoms, such as progressive bone marrow failure, hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents, chromosomal instability and susceptibility to cancer. At least 12 genetic subtypes have been described (FA-A, B, C, D1, D2, E, F, G, I, J, L, M and all except FA-I have been linked to a distinct gene. Most FA proteins form a complex that activates the FANCD2 protein via monoubiquitination, while FANCJ and FANCD1/BRCA2 function downstream of this step. The FA proteins typically lack functional domains, except for FANCJ/BRIP1 and FANCM, which are DNA helicases, and FANCL, which is probably an E3 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme. Based on the hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents, the FA proteins are thought to function in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links, which block the progression of DNA replication forks. Here we present a hypothetical model, which not only describes the assembly of the FA pathway, but also positions this pathway in the broader context of DNA cross-link repair. Finally, the possible role for the FA pathway, in particular FANCF and FANCB, in the origin of sporadic cancer is discussed.

  3. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reason for blood cell counts to be low. Anemia of Chronic Disease Anemia of chronic disease is a result of chronic inflammation caused by ... benign or malignant tumors, or a variety of chronic medical conditions. Pernicious Anemia ... © 2018 Health ...

  4. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a shortage of iron. This condition is called iron deficiency anemia. There are a few other types of anemia, ... Try to avoid these foods if you have iron deficiency anemia. Foods high in vitamin B12 include: meat and ...

  5. Non-specific chemical inhibition of the Fanconi anemia pathway sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquemont Céline

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platinum compounds such as cisplatin and carboplatin are DNA crosslinking agents widely used for cancer chemotherapy. However, the effectiveness of platinum compounds is often tempered by the acquisition of cellular drug resistance. Until now, no pharmacological approach has successfully overcome cisplatin resistance in cancer treatment. Since the Fanconi anemia (FA pathway is a DNA damage response pathway required for cellular resistance to DNA interstrand crosslinking agents, identification of small molecules that inhibit the FA pathway may reveal classes of chemicals that sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin. Results Through a cell-based screening assay of over 16,000 chemicals, we identified 26 small molecules that inhibit ionizing radiation and cisplatin-induced FANCD2 foci formation, a marker of FA pathway activity, in multiple human cell lines. Most of these small molecules also compromised ionizing radiation-induced RAD51 foci formation and homologous recombination repair, indicating that they are not selective toward the regulation of FANCD2. These compounds include known inhibitors of the proteasome, cathepsin B, lysosome, CHK1, HSP90, CDK and PKC, and several uncharacterized chemicals including a novel proteasome inhibitor (Chembridge compound 5929407. Isobologram analyses demonstrated that half of the identified molecules sensitized ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin. Among them, 9 demonstrated increased efficiency toward FA pathway-proficient, cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. Six small molecules, including bortezomib (proteasome inhibitor, CA-074-Me (cathepsin B inhibitor and 17-AAG (HSP90 inhibitor, synergized with cisplatin specifically in FA-proficient ovarian cancer cells (2008 + FANCF, but not in FA-deficient isogenic cells (2008. In addition, geldanamycin (HSP90 inhibitor and two CHK1 inhibitors (UCN-01 and SB218078 exhibited a significantly stronger synergism with cisplatin in FA

  6. Anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway-Duren, Jacqueline B; Klaassen, Hillary

    2013-12-01

    Anemias continue to present a challenge to the health care profession. Anemia is defined as a reduction in one or more of the RBC indices. Patients presenting with a mild form of anemia may be asymptomatic; however, in more serious cases the anemia can become life threatening. In many cases the clinical presentation also reflects the underlying cause. Anemia may be attributed to various causes, whereas autoimmune RBC destruction may be attributed to intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Laboratory tests are essential in facilitating early detection and differentiation of anemia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. BRCA/Fanconi anemia pathway implicates chemoresistance to gemcitabine in biliary tract cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Shinsuke; Kobayashi, Shogo; Nagano, Hiroaki; Tomokuni, Akira; Tomimaru, Yoshito; Asaoka, Tadafumi; Hama, Naoki; Wada, Hiroshi; Kawamoto, Koichi; Marubashi, Shigeru; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2015-05-01

    The BRCA/Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway plays a key role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks. We focused on this pathway to clarify chemoresistance mechanisms in biliary tract cancer (BTC). We also investigated changes in the CD24(+)/44(+) population that may be involved in chemoresistance, as this population likely includes cancer stem cells. We used three BTC cell lines to establish gemcitabine (GEM)-resistant (GR) cells and evaluated the expression of BRCA/FA pathway components, chemoresistance, and the effect of BRCA/FA pathway inhibition on the CD24(+)/44(+) population. FANCD2 and CD24 expression were evaluated in 108 resected BTC specimens. GR cells highly expressed the BRCA/FA components. The BRCA/FA pathway was upregulated by GEM and cisplatin (CDDP) exposure. Inhibition using siRNA and RAD51 inhibitor sensitized GR cells to GEM or CDDP. The CD24(+)/44(+) population was increased in GR and parent BTC cells treated with GEM or CDDP and highly expressed BRCA/FA genes. FANCD2 was related to CD24 expression in resected BTC specimens. Inhibition of the BRCA/FA pathway under GEM reduced the CD24(+)/44(+) population in MzChA1-GR cells. Thus, high expression of the BRCA/FA pathway is one mechanism of chemoresistance against GEM and/or CDDP and is related to the CD24(+)/44(+) population in BTC. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  8. Ubiquitin-like protein UBL5 promotes the functional integrity of the Fanconi anemia pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oka, Yasuyoshi; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2015-01-01

    in promoting the function of the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway for repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), mediated by a specific interaction with the central FA pathway component FANCI. UBL5-deficient cells display spliceosome-independent reduction of FANCI protein stability, defective FANCI function...

  9. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Woo; Xu, Guozhou; Persky, Nicole S.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Rudge, Derek G.; Buzovetsky, Olga; Elledge, Stephen J.; Pavletich, Nikola P. (Harvard-Med); (Cornell); (MSKCC)

    2011-08-29

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  10. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W Joo; G Xu; n Persky; A Smogorzewska; D Rudge; O Buzovetsky; S Elledge; N Pavletich

    2011-12-31

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  11. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor in paediatric patients with nephrotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is an endogenous protease inhibitor that regulates the initiation of the extrinsic coagulation pathway by producing factor ... plasma TFPI level and total protein and serum albumin, and a positive correlation between the plasma TFPI level and the urinary protein/creatinine ratio (p<0.05).

  12. Signaling Pathways in Pathogenesis of Diamond Blackfan Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    hours in culture. Cells were sorted for green fluorescent protein (GFP) after 3 to 5 days and harvested for downstream assays as indicated in the...hours after transduction, and culture media was harvested 5 days after transduction. TNF-a was detected with a human TNF-a high sensitivity enzyme...cells involving p38 MAPK pathway, GATA-1 and FOG -1 downregulation and GATA-2 upregulation. Biochem Pharmacol. 2008;76(10):1229-1239. 19. Vassilev LT

  13. A Case of Severe Iron Deficiency Anemia Associated with Long-Term Proton Pump Inhibitor Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N. Dado, DO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs in the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases has evolved over recent years. Initially intended for short-term use, PPIs are increasingly being used, often inappropriately, as long-term maintenance medications. The mechanism of action of PPIs is suppression of gastric basal and stimulated acid secretion by inhibiting the parietal cell H+/K+ ATP pump with a resultant increase in gastric pH and hypo- or achlorhydria. Although short-term use is related to few adverse effects, long-term use is associated with numerous complications. We present the case of a 58-year-old man with severe iron deficiency anemia due to malabsorption suspected to be caused by long-term PPI use. An extensive medical work up failed to reveal any definitive source of bleeding. An iron malabsorption test confirmed that iron was not being absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. The Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale and the Horn and Hansten Drug Interaction Probability Scale are suggestive of an association between long-term PPI use and the observed iron deficiency anemia. However, the patient’s death and lack of an autopsy prevented confirmatory follow-up data from being obtained to connect long-term PPI use as the culprit. Although there are currently no recommendations regarding screening for iron deficiency and/or anemia in patients on long-term PPI therapy, physicians should be aware of this potential side effect and consider monitoring in high-risk patients.

  14. Sulfonation pathway inhibitors block reactivation of latent HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murry, Jeffrey P; Godoy, Joseph; Mukim, Amey; Swann, Justine; Bruce, James W; Ahlquist, Paul; Bosque, Alberto; Planelles, Vicente; Spina, Celsa A; Young, John A T

    2014-12-01

    Long-lived pools of latently infected cells are a significant barrier to the development of a cure for HIV-1 infection. A better understanding of the mechanisms of reactivation from latency is needed to facilitate the development of novel therapies that address this problem. Here we show that chemical inhibitors of the sulfonation pathway prevent virus reactivation, both in latently infected J-Lat and U1 cell lines and in a primary human CD4+ T cell model of latency. In each of these models, sulfonation inhibitors decreased transcription initiation from the HIV-1 promoter. These inhibitors block transcription initiation at a step that lies downstream of nucleosome remodeling and affects RNA polymerase II recruitment to the viral promoter. These results suggest that the sulfonation pathway acts by a novel mechanism to regulate efficient virus transcription initiation during reactivation from latency, and further that augmentation of this pathway could be therapeutically useful. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Hedgehog pathway as a drug target: Smoothened inhibitors in development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin TL

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tara L Lin1, William Matsui21Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas, Kansas City, MO, USA; 2Division of Hematologic Malignancies, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Emerging laboratory and clinical investigations demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling (Hh represents a novel therapeutic target in various human cancers. This conserved signaling pathway precisely regulates self-renewal and terminal differentiation in embryonic development, but is typically silenced in adult tissues, with reactivation usually only during tissue repair. Aberrant Hh pathway signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis, self-renewal, and chemotherapy resistance of a growing number of solid and hematologic malignancies. Major components of the Hh pathway include the Hh ligands (Sonic, Desert, and Indian, the transmembrane receptor Patched, the signal transducer Smoothened (Smo, and transcription factors Gli1–3 which regulate the transcription of Hh target genes. Mutations in Hh pathway genes, increased Hh signaling in tumor stroma, and Hh overexpression in self-renewing cells (cancer stem cells have been described, and these different modes of Hh signaling have implications for the design of Hh pathway inhibitors and their integration into conventional treatment regimens. Discovery of a naturally-occurring Smo inhibitor, cyclopamine, and the identification of Hh pathway mutations and over expression in cancer cells prompted the development of several cyclopamine derivatives. Encouraging laboratory and in vivo data has resulted in Phase I and II clinical trials of Smo inhibitors. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of Hh pathway signaling in malignancy and Smo antagonists in development. Recent data with these agents shows that they are well-tolerated and may be effective for subsets of patients. Challenges remain

  16. Treatment of Medulloblastoma with Hedgehog Pathway Inhibitor GDC-0449

    OpenAIRE

    Rudin, Charles M.; Hann, Christine L.; Laterra, John; Yauch, Robert L.; Callahan, Christopher A.; Fu, Ling; Holcomb, Thomas; Stinson, Jeremy; Gould, Stephen E.; Coleman, Barbara; LoRusso, Patricia M.; Von Hoff, Daniel D.; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Low, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Aberrant activation of the hedgehog signaling pathway is strongly implicated in the development of some cases of medulloblastoma. A 26-year-old man with metastatic medulloblastoma that was refractory to multiple therapies was treated with a novel hedgehog pathway inhibitor, GDC-0449; treatment resulted in rapid (although transient) regression of the tumor and reduction of symptoms. Molecular analyses of tumor specimens obta...

  17. The Fanconi anemia pathway: Repairing the link between DNA damage and squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romick-Rosendale, Lindsey E. [Division of Oncology, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Lui, Vivian W.Y.; Grandis, Jennifer R. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Wells, Susanne I., E-mail: Susanne.Wells@cchmc.org [Division of Oncology, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited recessive disease caused by mutations in one of fifteen genes known to encode FA pathway components. In response to DNA damage, nuclear FA proteins associate into high molecular weight complexes through a cascade of post-translational modifications and physical interactions, followed by the repair of damaged DNA. Hematopoietic cells are particularly sensitive to the loss of these interactions, and bone marrow failure occurs almost universally in FA patients. FA as a disease is further characterized by cancer susceptibility, which highlights the importance of the FA pathway in tumor suppression, and will be the focus of this review. Acute myeloid leukemia is the most common cancer type, often subsequent to bone marrow failure. However, FA patients are also at an extreme risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck and gynecological tract, with an even greater incidence in those individuals who have received a bone marrow transplant and recovered from hematopoietic disease. FA tumor suppression in hematopoietic versus epithelial compartments could be mechanistically similar or distinct. Definition of compartment specific FA activities is now critical to assess the effects of today's bone marrow failure treatments on tomorrow's solid tumor development. It is our hope that current therapies can then be optimized to decrease the risk of malignant transformation in both hematopoietic and epithelial cells. Here we review our current understanding of the mechanisms of action of the Fanconi anemia pathway as it contributes to stress responses, DNA repair and squamous cell carcinoma susceptibility.

  18. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor in paediatric patients with nephrotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pathway inhibitor levels in plasma were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results. The plasma TFPI level was higher in nephrotic patients during relapse (group I) and during remission (group II) (mean 102.53. (standard deviation (SD) 14.23) and 82.93 (SD 3.83) ng/ml, respectively) compared ...

  19. Hedgehog pathway inhibitors – current status and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Asfandyar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Hedgehog (Hh proteins comprise a group of secreted proteins that regulate cell growth, differentiation and survival. Inappropriate activation of the Hh signaling pathway has been implicated in the development of a variety of cancers. Hedgehog pathway inhibitors are a relatively new class of therapeutic agents that act by targeting the proteins involved in the regulation of Hh pathway (PTCH, SMO and Gli. Together, they serve as exciting new prospects, with a bright future, both alone or as an adjuvant to the more traditional anti-cancer drugs.

  20. Developmental defects in zebrafish for classification of EGF pathway inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruvot, Benoist; Curé, Yoann; Djiotsa, Joachim; Voncken, Audrey; Muller, Marc

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges when testing drug candidates targeted at a specific pathway in whole animals is the discrimination between specific effects and unwanted, off-target effects. Here we used the zebrafish to define several developmental defects caused by impairment of Egf signaling, a major pathway of interest in tumor biology. We inactivated Egf signaling by genetically blocking Egf expression or using specific inhibitors of the Egf receptor function. We show that the combined occurrence of defects in cartilage formation, disturbance of blood flow in the trunk and a decrease of myelin basic protein expression represent good indicators for impairment of Egf signaling. Finally, we present a classification of known tyrosine kinase inhibitors according to their specificity for the Egf pathway. In conclusion, we show that developmental indicators can help to discriminate between specific effects on the target pathway from off-target effects in molecularly targeted drug screening experiments in whole animal systems. - Highlights: • We analyze the functions of Egf signaling on zebrafish development. • Genetic blocking of Egf expression causes cartilage, myelin and circulatory defects. • Chemical inhibition of Egf receptor function causes similar defects. • Developmental defects can reveal the specificity of Egf pathway inhibitors

  1. Hedgehog pathway as a drug target: Smoothened inhibitors in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tara L; Matsui, William

    2012-01-01

    Emerging laboratory and clinical investigations demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling (Hh) represents a novel therapeutic target in various human cancers. This conserved signaling pathway precisely regulates self-renewal and terminal differentiation in embryonic development, but is typically silenced in adult tissues, with reactivation usually only during tissue repair. Aberrant Hh pathway signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis, self-renewal, and chemotherapy resistance of a growing number of solid and hematologic malignancies. Major components of the Hh pathway include the Hh ligands (Sonic, Desert, and Indian), the transmembrane receptor Patched, the signal transducer Smoothened (Smo), and transcription factors Gli1-3 which regulate the transcription of Hh target genes. Mutations in Hh pathway genes, increased Hh signaling in tumor stroma, and Hh overexpression in self-renewing cells (cancer stem cells) have been described, and these different modes of Hh signaling have implications for the design of Hh pathway inhibitors and their integration into conventional treatment regimens. Discovery of a naturally-occurring Smo inhibitor, cyclopamine, and the identification of Hh pathway mutations and over expression in cancer cells prompted the development of several cyclopamine derivatives. Encouraging laboratory and in vivo data has resulted in Phase I and II clinical trials of Smo inhibitors. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of Hh pathway signaling in malignancy and Smo antagonists in development. Recent data with these agents shows that they are well-tolerated and may be effective for subsets of patients. Challenges remain for appropriate patient selection and the optimal combination and sequence of these targeted therapies into current treatment paradigms.

  2. The Fanconi Anemia BRCA Pathway as a Predictor of Benefit from Bevacizumab in a Large Phase 3 Clinical Trial in Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0421 TITLE: The Fanconi Anemia BRCA Pathway as a Predictor of Benefit from Bevacizumab in a Large Phase III Clinical...DATES COVERED 30Sep2013 - 29Sep2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0421 The Fanconi Anemia BRCA Pathway as a Predictor of...another upfront clinical trial GOG262. We found that germline or somatic mutations in the BRCA -Fanconi anemia pathway was significantly associated with

  3. Phase 1 study of the E-selectin inhibitor GMI 1070 in patients with sickle cell anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Wun

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder of hemoglobin that leads to a variety of acute and chronic complications. Abnormal cellular adhesion, mediated in part by selectins, has been implicated in the pathophysiology of the vaso-occlusion seen in sickle cell anemia, and selectin inhibition was able to restore blood flow in a mouse model of sickle cell disease.We performed a Phase 1 study of the selectin inhibitor GMI 1070 in patients with sickle cell anemia. Fifteen patients who were clinically stable received GMI 1070 in two infusions.The drug was well tolerated without significant adverse events. There was a modest increase in total peripheral white blood cell count without clinical symptoms. Plasma concentrations were well-described by a two-compartment model with an elimination T1/2 of 7.7 hours and CLr of 19.6 mL/hour/kg. Computer-assisted intravital microscopy showed transient increases in red blood cell velocity in 3 of the 4 patients studied.GMI 1070 was safe in stable patients with sickle cell anemia, and there was suggestion of increased blood flow in a subset of patients. At some time points between 4 and 48 hours after treatment with GMI 1070, there were significant decreases in biomarkers of endothelial activation (sE-selectin, sP-selectin, sICAM, leukocyte activation (MAC-1, LFA-1, PM aggregates and the coagulation cascade (tissue factor, thrombin-antithrombin complexes. Development of GMI 1070 for the treatment of acute vaso-occlusive crisis is ongoing.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00911495.

  4. Phase 1 study of the E-selectin inhibitor GMI 1070 in patients with sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wun, Ted; Styles, Lori; DeCastro, Laura; Telen, Marilyn J; Kuypers, Frans; Cheung, Anthony; Kramer, William; Flanner, Henry; Rhee, Seungshin; Magnani, John L; Thackray, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder of hemoglobin that leads to a variety of acute and chronic complications. Abnormal cellular adhesion, mediated in part by selectins, has been implicated in the pathophysiology of the vaso-occlusion seen in sickle cell anemia, and selectin inhibition was able to restore blood flow in a mouse model of sickle cell disease. We performed a Phase 1 study of the selectin inhibitor GMI 1070 in patients with sickle cell anemia. Fifteen patients who were clinically stable received GMI 1070 in two infusions. The drug was well tolerated without significant adverse events. There was a modest increase in total peripheral white blood cell count without clinical symptoms. Plasma concentrations were well-described by a two-compartment model with an elimination T1/2 of 7.7 hours and CLr of 19.6 mL/hour/kg. Computer-assisted intravital microscopy showed transient increases in red blood cell velocity in 3 of the 4 patients studied. GMI 1070 was safe in stable patients with sickle cell anemia, and there was suggestion of increased blood flow in a subset of patients. At some time points between 4 and 48 hours after treatment with GMI 1070, there were significant decreases in biomarkers of endothelial activation (sE-selectin, sP-selectin, sICAM), leukocyte activation (MAC-1, LFA-1, PM aggregates) and the coagulation cascade (tissue factor, thrombin-antithrombin complexes). Development of GMI 1070 for the treatment of acute vaso-occlusive crisis is ongoing. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00911495.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  9. Biochemical principles and inhibitors to interfere with viral capping pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decroly, Etienne; Canard, Bruno

    2017-06-01

    Messenger RNAs are decorated by a cap structure, which is essential for their translation into proteins. Many viruses have developed strategies in order to cap their mRNAs. The cap is either synthetized by a subset of viral or cellular enzymes, or stolen from capped cellular mRNAs by viral endonucleases ('cap-snatching'). Reverse genetic studies provide evidence that inhibition of viral enzymes belonging to the capping pathway leads to inhibition of virus replication. The replication defect results from reduced protein synthesis as well as from detection of incompletely capped RNAs by cellular innate immunity sensors. Thus, it is now admitted that capping enzymes are validated antiviral targets, as their inhibition will support an antiviral response in addition to the attenuation of viral mRNA translation. In this review, we describe the different viral enzymes involved in mRNA capping together with relevant inhibitors, and their biochemical features useful in inhibitor discovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Fanconi Anemia BRCA Pathway as a Predictor of Benefit from Bevacizumab in a Large Phase-3 Clinical Trial in Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0421 TITLE: The Fanconi Anemia BRCA Pathway as a Predictor of Benefit from Bevacizumab in a Large Phase III Clinical...Annual report 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2013 - 29 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER The Fanconi Anemia BRCA Pathway as a Predictor of...gene. Women with BRCA1/2 mutations are known to have an improved overall survival compared to women with sporadic ovarian carcinoma. The FA- BRCA pathway

  11. Systems Biology-Based Identification of Crosstalk between E2F Transcription Factors and the Fanconi Anemia Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moe Tategu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital abnormalities, bone marrow failure, chromosome fragility, and cancer susceptibility. At least eleven members of the FA gene family have been identified using complementation experiments. Ubiquitin-proteasome has been shown to be a key regulator of FA proteins and their involvement in the repair of DNA damage. Here, we identifi ed a novel functional link between the FA/BRCA pathway and E2F-mediated cell cycle regulome. In silico mining of a transcriptome database and promoter analyses revealed that a significant number of FA gene members were regulated by E2F transcription factors, known to be pivotal regulators of cell cycle progression – as previously described for BRCA1. Our findings suggest that E2Fs partly determine cell fate through the FA/BRCA pathway.

  12. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, Kalindi; D'Andrea, Alan; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis of proliferating cells. To date, 13 complementation groups of Fanconi anemia were identified. Five of these genes have been deleted or mutated in the mouse, as well as a sixth key regulatory gene, to create mouse models of Fanconi anemia. This review summarizes the phenotype of each of the Fanconi anemia mouse models and highlights how genetic and interventional studies using the strains have yielded novel insight into therapeutic strategies for Fanconi anemia and into how the Fanconi anemia pathway protects against genomic instability.

  13. Hypoxia disrupts the Fanconi anemia pathway and sensitizes cells to chemotherapy through regulation of UBE2T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramaekers, Chantal H.M.A.; Beucken, Twan van den; Meng, Alice; Kassam, Shaqil; Thoms, John; Bristow, Robert G.; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hypoxia is a common feature of the microenvironment of solid tumors which has been shown to promote malignancy and poor patient outcome through multiple mechanisms. The association of hypoxia with more aggressive disease may be due in part to recently identified links between hypoxia and genetic instability. For example, hypoxia has been demonstrated to impede DNA repair by down-regulating the homologous recombination protein RAD51. Here we investigated hypoxic regulation of UBE2T, a ubiquitin ligase required in the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway. Materials and methods: We analysed UBE2T expression by microarray, quantitative PCR and western blot analysis in a panel of cancer cell lines as a function of oxygen concentration. The importance of this regulation was assessed by measuring cell survival in response to DNA damaging agents under normoxia or hypoxia. Finally, HIF dependency was determined using knockdown cell lines and RCC4 cells which constitutively express HIF1α. Results: Hypoxia results in rapid and potent reductions in mRNA levels of UBE2T in a panel of cancer cell lines. Reduced UBE2T mRNA expression is HIF independent and was not due to changes in mRNA or protein stability, but rather reflected reduced promoter activity. Exposure of tumor cells to hypoxia greatly increased their sensitivity to treatment with the interstrand crosslinking (ICL) agent mitomycin C. Conclusions: Exposure to hypoxic conditions down-regulates UBE2T expression which correlates with an increased sensitivity to crosslinking agents consistent with a defective Fanconi anemia pathway. This pathway can potentially be exploited to target hypoxic cells in tumors.

  14. Ouabain, a cardiac glycoside, inhibits the Fanconi anemia/BRCA pathway activated by DNA interstrand cross-linking agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wha Jun

    Full Text Available Modulation of the DNA repair pathway is an emerging target for the development of anticancer drugs. DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs, one of the most severe forms of DNA damage caused by anticancer drugs such as cisplatin and mitomycin C (MMC, activates the Fanconi anemia (FA/BRCA DNA repair pathway. Inhibition of the FA/BRCA pathway can enhance the cytotoxic effects of ICL-inducing anticancer drugs and can reduce anticancer drug resistance. To find FA/BRCA pathway inhibitory small molecules, we established a cell-based high-content screening method for quantitating the activation of the FA/BRCA pathway by measuring FANCD2 foci on DNA lesions and then applied our method to chemical screening. Using commercial LOPAC1280 chemical library screening, ouabain was identified as a competent FA/BRCA pathway inhibitory compound. Ouabain, a member of the cardiac glycoside family, binds to and inhibits Na(+/K(+-ATPase and has been used to treat heart disease for many years. We observed that ouabain, as well as other cardiac glycoside family members--digitoxin and digoxin--down-regulated FANCD2 and FANCI mRNA levels, reduced monoubiquitination of FANCD2, inhibited FANCD2 foci formation on DNA lesions, and abrogated cell cycle arrest induced by MMC treatment. These inhibitory activities of ouabain required p38 MAPK and were independent of cellular Ca(2+ ion increase or the drug uptake-inhibition effect of ouabain. Furthermore, we found that ouabain potentiated the cytotoxic effects of MMC in tumor cells. Taken together, we identified an additional effect of ouabain as a FA/BRCA pathway-inhibiting chemosensitization compound. The results of this study suggest that ouabain may serve as a chemosensitizer to ICL-inducing anticancer drugs.

  15. Live-cell microscopy reveals small molecule inhibitor effects on MAPK pathway dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Anderson

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutations in the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway are prevalent in human tumors, making this pathway a target of drug development efforts. Recently, ATP-competitive Raf inhibitors were shown to cause MAPK pathway activation via Raf kinase priming in wild-type BRaf cells and tumors, highlighting the need for a thorough understanding of signaling in the context of small molecule kinase inhibitors. Here, we present critical improvements in cell-line engineering and image analysis coupled with automated image acquisition that allow for the simultaneous identification of cellular localization of multiple MAPK pathway components (KRas, CRaf, Mek1 and Erk2. We use these assays in a systematic study of the effect of small molecule inhibitors across the MAPK cascade either as single agents or in combination. Both Raf inhibitor priming as well as the release from negative feedback induced by Mek and Erk inhibitors cause translocation of CRaf to the plasma membrane via mechanisms that are additive in pathway activation. Analysis of Erk activation and sub-cellular localization upon inhibitor treatments reveals differential inhibition and activation with the Raf inhibitors AZD628 and GDC0879 respectively. Since both single agent and combination studies of Raf and Mek inhibitors are currently in the clinic, our assays provide valuable insight into their effects on MAPK signaling in live cells.

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding ... oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption of iron. If you are pregnant, talk to ...

  17. Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    prostate cancer patients have abnormalities in the AKT signaling pathway. These abnormalities are driven by mutations in the PTEN and AKT proteins as...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0560 TITLE: Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase Pathway...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase

  18. Predictors of early treatment discontinuation and severe anemia in a Brazilian cohort of hepatitis C patients treated with first-generation protease inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Miotto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine risk factors for adverse events (AE-related treatment discontinuation and severe anemia among patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 1 infection, treated with first-generation protease inhibitor (PI-based therapy. We included all patients who initiated treatment with PI-based therapy at a Brazilian university hospital between November 2013 and December 2014. We prospectively collected data from medical records using standardized questionnaires and used Epi Info 6.0 for analysis. Severe anemia was defined as hemoglobin ≤8.5 mg/dL. We included 203 patients: 132 treated with telaprevir (TVR and 71 treated with boceprevir (BOC. AE-related treatment discontinuation rate was 19.2% and anemia was the main reason (38.5%. Risk factors for treatment discontinuation were higher comorbidity index (OR=1.85, CI=1.05-3.25 for BOC, and higher bilirubin count (OR=1.02, CI=1.01-1.04 and lower BMI (OR=0.98, CI=0.96-0.99 for TVR. Severe anemia occurred in 35 (17.2% patients. Risk factors for this outcome were lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; OR=0.95, CI=0.91-0.98 for patients treated with TVR, and higher comorbidity index (OR=2.21, CI=1.04-4.67 and ribavirin dosage (OR=0.84, CI=0.72-0.99 for those treated with BOC. Fifty-five (57.3% patients treated with TVR and 15 (27.3% patients treated with BOC achieved sustained virological response (SVR. Among patients who received TVR and interrupted treatment due to AE (n=19, only 26.3% (n=5 achieved SVR (P=0.003. Higher number of comorbidities, lower eGFR and advanced liver disease are associated with severe anemia and early treatment cessation, which may compromise SVR achievement.

  19. SALO, a novel classical pathway complement inhibitor from saliva of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis

    OpenAIRE

    Viviana P. Ferreira; Vladimir Fazito Vale; Michael K. Pangburn; Maha Abdeladhim; Antonio Ferreira Mendes-Sousa; Iliano V. Coutinho-Abreu; Manoochehr Rasouli; Elizabeth A. Brandt; Claudio Meneses; Kolyvan Ferreira Lima; Ricardo Nascimento Araújo; Marcos Horácio Pereira; Michalis Kotsyfakis; Fabiano Oliveira; Shaden Kamhawi

    2016-01-01

    Blood-feeding insects inject potent salivary components including complement inhibitors into their host's skin to acquire a blood meal. Sand fly saliva was shown to inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, the molecular identity of the inhibitor remains unknown. Here, we identified SALO as the classical pathway complement inhibitor. SALO, an 11 kDa protein, has no homology to proteins of any other organism apart from New World sand flies. rSALO anti-complement activity has the sa...

  20. Targeting the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in cancer: Update on effectors and inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Nithya; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2018-01-01

    The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is a family of proteins that is implicated in many vital cellular functions such as stem cell regeneration and organogenesis. Several intra-cellular signal transduction pathways are induced by Wnt, notably the Wnt/beta-catenin dependent pathway or canonical pathway and the non-canonical or beta-catenin-independent pathway; the latter includes the Wnt/Ca2+ and Planar Cell Polarity pathway (PCP). Wnt activation occurs at the intestinal crypt floor, and is critical to optimal maintenance of stem cells. Colorectal cancers show evidence of Wnt signaling pathway activation and this is associated with loss of function of the tumor regulator APC. Wnt activation has been observed in breast, lung, and hematopoietic malignancies and contributes to tumor recurrence. The Wnt pathway cross talks with the Notch and Sonic Hedgehog pathways, which has implications for therapeutic interventions in cancers. There are significant challenges in targeting the Wnt pathway, including finding agents that are efficacious without damaging the system of normal somatic stem cell function in cellular repair and tissue homeostasis. Here, we comprehensively review the Wnt pathway and its interactions with the Notch and Sonic Hedgehog pathways. We present the state of the field in effectors and inhibitors of Wnt signaling, including updates on clinical trials in various cancers with inhibitors of Wnt, Notch, and Sonic Hedgehog. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor in paediatric patients with nephrotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    elevated TFPI blood levels could therefore be accounted for by excessive endothelial release of this inhibitor .... that diastolic blood pressure was higher in the proteinuria group than in either the remission or the control .... dilated veins around the umbilicus, renal biopsy findings of fibrin deposition inside the glomeruli and in ...

  2. SALO, a novel classical pathway complement inhibitor from saliva of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Viviana P; Fazito Vale, Vladimir; Pangburn, Michael K; Abdeladhim, Maha; Mendes-Sousa, Antonio Ferreira; Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V; Rasouli, Manoochehr; Brandt, Elizabeth A; Meneses, Claudio; Lima, Kolyvan Ferreira; Nascimento Araújo, Ricardo; Pereira, Marcos Horácio; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ribeiro, Jose M C; Gontijo, Nelder F; Collin, Nicolas; Valenzuela, Jesus G

    2016-01-13

    Blood-feeding insects inject potent salivary components including complement inhibitors into their host's skin to acquire a blood meal. Sand fly saliva was shown to inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, the molecular identity of the inhibitor remains unknown. Here, we identified SALO as the classical pathway complement inhibitor. SALO, an 11 kDa protein, has no homology to proteins of any other organism apart from New World sand flies. rSALO anti-complement activity has the same chromatographic properties as the Lu. longipalpis salivary gland homogenate (SGH)counterparts and anti-rSALO antibodies blocked the classical pathway complement activity of rSALO and SGH. Both rSALO and SGH inhibited C4b deposition and cleavage of C4. rSALO, however, did not inhibit the protease activity of C1s nor the enzymatic activity of factor Xa, uPA, thrombin, kallikrein, trypsin and plasmin. Importantly, rSALO did not inhibit the alternative or the lectin pathway of complement. In conclusion our data shows that SALO is a specific classical pathway complement inhibitor present in the saliva of Lu. longipalpis. Importantly, due to its small size and specificity, SALO may offer a therapeutic alternative for complement classical pathway-mediated pathogenic effects in human diseases.

  3. Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lead to hemolytic anemia in a fetus or newborn. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications The signs and symptoms of hemolytic anemia will depend on the type and severity of the disease. People who have mild hemolytic anemia often have ...

  4. Hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  5. Endocannabinoids are conserved inhibitors of the Hedgehog pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliullina, Helena; Bilgin, Mesut; Sampaio, Julio L; Shevchenko, Andrej; Eaton, Suzanne

    2015-03-17

    Hedgehog ligands control tissue development and homeostasis by alleviating repression of Smoothened, a seven-pass transmembrane protein. The Hedgehog receptor, Patched, is thought to regulate the availability of small lipophilic Smoothened repressors whose identity is unknown. Lipoproteins contain lipids required to repress Smoothened signaling in vivo. Here, using biochemical fractionation and lipid mass spectrometry, we identify these repressors as endocannabinoids. Endocannabinoids circulate in human and Drosophila lipoproteins and act directly on Smoothened at physiological concentrations to repress signaling in Drosophila and mammalian assays. Phytocannabinoids are also potent Smo inhibitors. These findings link organismal metabolism to local Hedgehog signaling and suggest previously unsuspected mechanisms for the physiological activities of cannabinoids.

  6. Hedgehog pathway as a drug target: Smoothened inhibitors in development

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Tara; Matsui,William

    2012-01-01

    Tara L Lin1, William Matsui21Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas, Kansas City, MO, USA; 2Division of Hematologic Malignancies, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Emerging laboratory and clinical investigations demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling (Hh) represents a novel therapeutic target in various human cancers. This conserved signaling pathway precisely reg...

  7. Lung Cancer Cell Line Screen Links Fanconi Anemia/BRCA Pathway Defects to Increased Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi; Ghosh, Priyanjali; Magpayo, Nicole [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Testa, Mauro; Tang, Shikui [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gheorghiu, Liliana [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Biggs, Peter; Paganetti, Harald [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Held, Kathryn D. [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Willers, Henning, E-mail: hwillers@mgh.harvard.edu [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Growing knowledge of genomic heterogeneity in cancer, especially when it results in altered DNA damage responses, requires re-examination of the generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 of protons. Methods and Materials: For determination of cellular radiosensitivity, we irradiated 17 lung cancer cell lines at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer, 2.5 keV/μm). For comparison, 250-kVp X rays and {sup 137}Cs γ-rays were used. To estimate the RBE of protons relative to {sup 60}Co (Co60eq), we assigned an RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to X rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor damage responses. FANCD2 was depleted using RNA interference. Results: Five lung cancer cell lines (29.4%) exhibited reduced clonogenic survival after proton irradiation compared with X-irradiation with the same physical doses. This was confirmed in a 3-dimensional sphere assay. Corresponding proton RBE(Co60Eq) estimates were statistically significantly different from 1.1 (P≤.05): 1.31 to 1.77 (for a survival fraction of 0.5). In 3 of these lines, increased RBE was correlated with alterations in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway of DNA repair. In Calu-6 cells, the data pointed toward an FA pathway defect, leading to a previously unreported persistence of proton-induced RAD51 foci. The FA/BRCA-defective cells displayed a 25% increase in the size of subnuclear 53BP1 foci 18 hours after proton irradiation. Conclusions: Our cell line screen has revealed variations in proton RBE that are partly due to FA/BRCA pathway defects, suggesting that the use of a generic RBE for cancers should be revisited. We propose that functional biomarkers, such as size of residual 53BP1 foci, may be used to identify cancers with increased sensitivity to proton radiation.

  8. Endogenous tissue factor pathway inhibitor has a limited effect on host defence in murine pneumococcal pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Florry E.; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Broze, George J.; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. Coagulation and inflammation interact in the host response to infection. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a natural anticoagulant protein that inhibits tissue factor (TF), the main activator

  9. An Ixodes ricinus Tick Salivary Lectin Pathway Inhibitor Protects Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato from Human Complement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagemakers, Alex; Coumou, Jeroen; Schuijt, Tim J.; Oei, Anneke; Nijhof, Ard M.; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom; Bins, Adriaan D.; Hovius, Joppe W. R.

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified tick salivary lectin pathway inhibitor (TSLPI) in Ixodes scapularis, a vector for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) in North America. TSLPI is a salivary protein facilitating B. burgdorferi s.s. transmission and acquisition by inhibiting the host lectin complement

  10. Kinase inhibitors can produce off-target effects and activate linked pathways by retroactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wynn Michelle L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown in experimental and theoretical work that covalently modified signaling cascades naturally exhibit bidirectional signal propagation via a phenomenon known as retroactivity. An important consequence of retroactivity, which arises due to enzyme sequestration in covalently modified signaling cascades, is that a downstream perturbation can produce a response in a component upstream of the perturbation without the need for explicit feedback connections. Retroactivity may, therefore, play an important role in the cellular response to a targeted therapy. Kinase inhibitors are a class of targeted therapies designed to interfere with a specific kinase molecule in a dysregulated signaling pathway. While extremely promising as anti-cancer agents, kinase inhibitors may produce undesirable off-target effects by non-specific interactions or pathway cross-talk. We hypothesize that targeted therapies such as kinase inhibitors can produce off-target effects as a consequence of retroactivity alone. Results We used a computational model and a series of simple signaling motifs to test the hypothesis. Our results indicate that within physiologically and therapeutically relevant ranges for all parameters, a targeted inhibitor can naturally induce an off-target effect via retroactivity. The kinetics governing covalent modification cycles in a signaling network were more important for propagating an upstream off-target effect in our models than the kinetics governing the targeted therapy itself. Our results also reveal the surprising and crucial result that kinase inhibitors have the capacity to turn "on" an otherwise "off" parallel cascade when two cascades share an upstream activator. Conclusions A proper and detailed characterization of a pathway's structure is important for identifying the optimal protein to target as well as what concentration of the targeted therapy is required to modulate the pathway in a safe and effective

  11. Targeting Hypoxia-Inducible Factors for the Treatment of Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Francesco; Fishbane, Steven; Block, Geoffrey A; Macdougall, Iain C

    2017-01-01

    Anemia, a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD), has previously been attributed primarily to decreased production of erythropoietin. More recently, it has become apparent that the etiology of anemia involves several other factors, most notably dysfunctional iron metabolism, mediated via increased hepcidin activity and reduced clearance. Current management of anemia in patients with advanced CKD is based on erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and iron supplementation, along with red blood cell transfusions when necessary; however, safety considerations associated with these therapies highlight the need to pursue alternative treatment options targeting other mechanisms such as hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) that act as central regulators of erythropoiesis by coordinating a series of graded hypoxic responses. This review discusses the discovery of the HIF pathway and its regulation via HIF prolyl hydroxylase enzymes in the context of erythropoiesis and iron metabolism. The rationale for targeting this pathway and the clinical development of HIF prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors are reviewed, with a commentary on the potential implications of this class of agents in CKD anemia management. Key Messages: Pharmacologic activation of the HIF pathway results in a transient pseudo-hypoxic state that stimulates erythropoiesis in CKD patients with anemia. Results from clinical studies of a number of HIF prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors are increasingly available and provide support for the continued evaluation of the risk-benefit ratio of this novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of anemia in CKD. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Unusual Anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughety, Molly Maddock; DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Many processes lead to anemia. This review covers anemias that are less commonly encountered in the United States. These anemias include hemoglobin defects like thalassemia, bone marrow failure syndromes like aplastic anemia and pure red cell aplasia, and hemolytic processes such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. The pathogenesis, diagnostic workup, and treatment of these rare anemias are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. IGF-1R Inhibitor Ameliorates Diabetic Nephropathy with Suppressed HMGN1/TLR4 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiali, Yu; Jingjing, Da; Rong, Dong; Yi, Sun; Yingjie, Nie; Fuxun, Yu; Lima, Zuo; Yan, Zha

    2018-01-30

    contribution of high mobility group nucleosome-binding protein 1 (HMGN1)/ Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway in diabetic nephropathy (DN). And as an intervention of the potential mechanism above, the insulin growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) inhibitor was examined for its therapeutic effect in the diabetic mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were administered streptozotocin(STZ) to induce diabetes and thus divided into 5 groups: the untreated group (DN group), the benazepril-treated group (BEN-DN group), the insulin-treated group (INS-DN group) and the IGF-1R inhibitor-treated group (IGF-DN group). Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybrization were performed to detect the expression of HMGN1 and TLR4 in renal tissue. To evaluate the effect of IGF-1R inhibitor, levels of blood glucose and kidney/body weight (KW/BW) were measured. And morphological changes and mesangial matrix expansion in kidneys were also detected. Increased expression of HMGN1 and TLR4 in renal tissue of STZ-induced type1 diabetic mellitus (T1DM) mice models was observed. IGF-1R inhibitor attenuate the established nephropathy with reduced expression of TLR4 protein, as revealed by a decrease in mesangial index. IGF-1R inhibitor might have therapeutic potential in DN through inhibition of HMGN1/TLR4 pathway. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Bioinformatic mining of kinase inhibitors that regulate autophagy through kinase signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Ma, Biao; Jin, Ye; Ben, Wei; Zhang, Dandan; Jiang, Keping; Feng, Shujun; Huang, Lu; Zheng, Jianhua

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to predict the kinase inhibitors that may regulate autophagy. A total of 62 kinases were obtained through text mining by importing the keyword 'autophagy' and a 'protein kinase' Excel file to PubMed. Subsequently, 146 kinases were derivated through screening in the PubMed database by importing the 'autophagy‑associated gene' and 'protein kinase' files. Following intersection of the above two methods, 54 candidate autophagy‑associated kinases were obtained. Enrichment analysis indicated that these candidate autophagy‑associated kinases were mainly enriched in pathways such as the calcium, Wnt, HIF‑1 and mTOR signaling pathways. Among the 54 kinases, 24 were identified through text mining to have specific kinase inhibitors that regulate the corresponding functions; a total of 56 kinase inhibitors were found to be involved in the regulation of these 24 kinases. In total, nine of these 56 kinase inhibitors identified had been widely reported in autophagy regulation studies, 23 kinase inhibitors had been seldom reported and 24 had never been reported. Therefore, introducing these kinases into autophagy regulation analysis in subsequent studies may produce important results.

  15. Targeting the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Pathway: Review of Smoothened and GLI Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas K. Rimkus

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway is a major regulator of cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and tissue polarity. Aberrant activation of the Shh pathway has been shown in a variety of human cancers, including, basal cell carcinoma, malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma, leukemias, and cancers of the breast, lung, pancreas, and prostate. Tumorigenesis, tumor progression and therapeutic response have all been shown to be impacted by the Shh signaling pathway. Downstream effectors of the Shh pathway include smoothened (SMO and glioma-associated oncogene homolog (GLI family of zinc finger transcription factors. Both are regarded as important targets for cancer therapeutics. While most efforts have been devoted towards pharmacologically targeting SMO, developing GLI-targeted approach has its merit because of the fact that GLI proteins can be activated by both Shh ligand-dependent and -independent mechanisms. To date, two SMO inhibitors (LDE225/Sonidegib and GDC-0449/Vismodegib have received FDA approval for treating basal cell carcinoma while many clinical trials are being conducted to evaluate the efficacy of this exciting class of targeted therapy in a variety of cancers. In this review, we provide an overview of the biology of the Shh pathway and then detail the current landscape of the Shh-SMO-GLI pathway inhibitors including those in preclinical studies and clinical trials.

  16. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Antagonize Distinct Pathways to Suppress Tumorigenesis of Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terra Vleeshouwer-Neumann

    Full Text Available Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS is the most common soft tissue cancer in children. The prognosis of patients with relapsed or metastatic disease remains poor. ERMS genomes show few recurrent mutations, suggesting that other molecular mechanisms such as epigenetic regulation might play a major role in driving ERMS tumor biology. In this study, we have demonstrated the diverse roles of histone deacetylases (HDACs in the pathogenesis of ERMS by characterizing effects of HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; also known as vorinostat in vitro and in vivo. TSA and SAHA suppress ERMS tumor growth and progression by inducing myogenic differentiation as well as reducing the self-renewal and migratory capacity of ERMS cells. Differential expression profiling and pathway analysis revealed downregulation of key oncogenic pathways upon HDAC inhibitor treatment. By gain-of-function, loss-of-function, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP studies, we show that Notch1- and EphrinB1-mediated pathways are regulated by HDACs to inhibit differentiation and enhance migratory capacity of ERMS cells, respectively. Our study demonstrates that aberrant HDAC activity plays a major role in ERMS pathogenesis. Druggable targets in the molecular pathways affected by HDAC inhibitors represent novel therapeutic options for ERMS patients.

  17. Plasma Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor Levels in Angiographically Defined Coronary Artery Disease Among Saudis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Shahid Habib

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was aimed to determine plasma levels of total (TFPI-T and free (TFPI-F tissue factor pathway inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA in a cohort of Saudi patients with chronic stable angiographically defined coronary artery disease (CAD and to determine its correlation with its severity.Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in the department of physiology and department of cardiology, College of Medicine, and King Khalid University Hospital and King Saud University, Riyadh. Sixty known cases of CAD who had undergone angiography (35 males and 25 females were selected. A control group included 39 (20 males and 19 females healthy subjects. Fasting venous blood samples were analyzed for total (TFPI-T and free (TFPI-F tissue factor pathway inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA. Gensini scores and vessel scores were determined for assessing CAD severity.Results: There were non-significant differences between age, body mass index (BMI and Blood pressure between the controls and CAD subjects. A comparison of hemostatic markers between control and CAD patients showed significantly higher levels of Fibrinogen, PAI-1, TFPI-T and TFPI-F in CAD patients compared to control subjects. But there was no difference in plasma t-PA levels. TFPI-T had a significant positive correlation with severity of disease determined by Gensini Scores (r=0.344; p=0.006 and vessel scores (r=0.338; p=0.015.Conclusion: Plasma levels of total tissue factor pathway inhibitor are significantly related with the presence and severity of CAD. Elevated levels of TFPI-T may be considered as useful diagnostic and prognostic markers in patients with CAD.

  18. Repair pathways independent of the Fanconi anemia nuclear core complex play a predominant role in mitigating formaldehyde-induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Taichi [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Takahashi, Akihisa [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Kondo, Natsuko [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Mori, Eiichiro [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Okamoto, Noritomo [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Nakagawa, Yosuke [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Ohnishi, Ken [Department of Biology, Ibaraki Prefectual University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-mati, Inasiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z. [Department of Molecular Cell Genetics, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus-Copernicus-University in Torun, ul. Sklodowskiej-Curie 9, 85-094 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Thompson, Larry H. [Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, L452, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551-0808 (United States); Helleday, Thomas [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Off Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Asada, Hideo [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); and others

    2011-01-07

    The role of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway for DNA damage induced by formaldehyde was examined in the work described here. The following cell types were used: mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-}, FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-}, FANCD2{sup -/-} and their parental cells, the Chinese hamster cell lines FANCD1 mutant (mt), FANCGmt, their revertant cells, and the corresponding wild-type (wt) cells. Cell survival rates were determined with colony formation assays after formaldehyde treatment. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were detected with an immunocytochemical {gamma}H2AX-staining assay. Although the sensitivity of FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-} and FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-} cells to formaldehyde was comparable to that of proficient cells, FANCD1mt, FANCGmt and FANCD2{sup -/-} cells were more sensitive to formaldehyde than the corresponding proficient cells. It was found that homologous recombination (HR) repair was induced by formaldehyde. In addition, {gamma}H2AX foci in FANCD1mt cells persisted for longer times than in FANCD1wt cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde-induced DSBs are repaired by HR through the FA repair pathway which is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. -- Research highlights: {yields} We examined to clarify the repair pathways of formaldehyde-induced DNA damage. Formaldehyde induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). {yields} DSBs are repaired through the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway. {yields} This pathway is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. {yields} We also found that homologous recombination repair was induced by formaldehyde.

  19. Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... blood cells. There are different types, including Fanconi anemia. Causes include Toxic substances, such as pesticides, arsenic, ...

  20. Hedgehog pathway inhibitor saridegib (IPI-926) increases lifespan in a mouse medulloblastoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle J; Hatton, Beryl A; Villavicencio, Elisabeth H; Khanna, Paritosh C; Friedman, Seth D; Ditzler, Sally; Pullar, Barbara; Robison, Keith; White, Kerry F; Tunkey, Chris; LeBlanc, Michael; Randolph-Habecker, Julie; Knoblaugh, Sue E; Hansen, Stacey; Richards, Andrew; Wainwright, Brandon J; McGovern, Karen; Olson, James M

    2012-05-15

    The Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathway drives a subset of medulloblastomas, a malignant neuroectodermal brain cancer, and other cancers. Small-molecule Shh pathway inhibitors have induced tumor regression in mice and patients with medulloblastoma; however, drug resistance rapidly emerges, in some cases via de novo mutation of the drug target. Here we assess the response and resistance mechanisms to the natural product derivative saridegib in an aggressive Shh-driven mouse medulloblastoma model. In this model, saridegib treatment induced tumor reduction and significantly prolonged survival. Furthermore, the effect of saridegib on tumor-initiating capacity was demonstrated by reduced tumor incidence, slower growth, and spontaneous tumor regression that occurred in allografts generated from previously treated autochthonous medulloblastomas compared with those from untreated donors. Saridegib, a known P-glycoprotein (Pgp) substrate, induced Pgp activity in treated tumors, which likely contributed to emergence of drug resistance. Unlike other Smoothened (Smo) inhibitors, the drug resistance was neither mutation-dependent nor Gli2 amplification-dependent, and saridegib was found to be active in cells with the D473H point mutation that rendered them resistant to another Smo inhibitor, GDC-0449. The fivefold increase in lifespan in mice treated with saridegib as a single agent compares favorably with both targeted and cytotoxic therapies. The absence of genetic mutations that confer resistance distinguishes saridegib from other Smo inhibitors.

  1. Involvement of the Fanconi's anemia protein FAC in a pathway that signals to the cyclin B/cdc2 kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, FAE; Dijkmans, LM; Arwert, F; Joenje, H

    1997-01-01

    Lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from patients with the chromosomal instability disorder Fauconi's anemia (FA) are hyperresponsive to G(2) delay and apoptosis induced by cross-linking agents such as mitomycin C (MMC), Here, we investiPated whether the protein defective in FA complementation group C

  2. Avian anemia's

    OpenAIRE

    Raukar Jelena

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with avian anemia's classified by MCHC/MCV and with types of anemia's. Father hematological and immunological research is needed to secure information on hematological parameters in different avian species at their earliest age. Anemia is a common clinical finding in birds because the avian erythrocyte half - life is much shorter than the mammalian. Therefore anemia should be determined as soon as possible. Researchers should standardize hematologica...

  3. Avian anemia's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raukar Jelena

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with avian anemia's classified by MCHC/MCV and with types of anemia's. Father hematological and immunological research is needed to secure information on hematological parameters in different avian species at their earliest age. Anemia is a common clinical finding in birds because the avian erythrocyte half - life is much shorter than the mammalian. Therefore anemia should be determined as soon as possible. Researchers should standardize hematological parameters for every single avian species.

  4. The Fanconi anemia/BRCA pathway is involved in DNA interstrand cross-link repair of adriamycin-resistant leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chenjiao; Du, Wei; Chen, Haibing; Xiao, Sheng; Huang, Lihua; Chen, Fangping

    2015-03-01

    The Fanconi anemia/BRCA (FA/BRCA) pathway plays a vital role in DNA damage repair induced by DNA cross-linking agents and is closely related to drug response in cancer treatment. Here we demonstrate that the FA/BRCA pathway contributes to acquired drug resistance in adriamycin (ADR)-resistant leukemia cell lines, and disruption of this pathway partially reverses the drug resistance. We observed that ADR-resistant cells have reduced DNA interstrand cross-links (ICL) compared with ADR-sensitive cells. Western blot studies demonstrated enhanced FA protein expression in ADR-resistant cells. Using siRNA to knock down FANCF in K562/R drug-resistant cells showed increases in sensitivity to ADR and ADR-induced DNA damage, and demonstrated a direct relationship between the FA/BRCA pathway and drug sensitivity. Overexpression of FANCF in K562 drug-sensitive cells partially reproduced the drug-resistant phenotype. These results show that the FA/BRCA pathway is involved in acquired ADR resistance of leukemia cells. The FA/BRCA pathway may be a new target to reverse ADR resistance in leukemia treatment.

  5. Angoline: a selective IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway inhibitor isolated from Zanthoxylum nitidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiawei; Zhang, Qing; Ye, Yushan; Li, Wuguo; Qiu, Junxin; Liu, Jingli; Zhan, Ruoting; Chen, Weiwen; Yu, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    STAT3 signaling pathway is an important target for human cancer therapy. Thus, the identification of small-molecules that target STAT3 signaling will be of great interests in the development of anticancer agents. The aim of this study was to identify novel inhibitors of STAT3 pathway from the roots of Zanthoxylum nitidum (Roxb.) DC. The bioassay-guided fractionation of MeOH extract of Z. nitidum using a STAT3-responsive gene reporter assay led to the isolation of angoline (1) as a potent and selective inhibitor of the STAT3 signaling pathway (IC50=11.56 μM). Angoline inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and its target gene expression and consequently induced growth inhibition of human cancer cells with constitutively activated STAT3 (IC50=3.14-4.72 μM). This work provided a novel lead for the development of anti-cancer agents targeting the STAT3 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of WO2014207069 A1: Multitarget Hedgehog pathway inhibitors and uses thereof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetti, Fabrizio; Petricci, Elena

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the involvement of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in various human diseases and dysfunctions has been clearly demonstrated. Smoothened (Smo), one of the upstream signal transducers, has been the most druggable target of the Hh pathway. However, the emergence of resistance to Smo inhibitors and the identification of Smo-independent activation of the Hh pathway led to the need to find new chemical entities able to interfere with downstream components, such as Gli. For this purpose, two different computational approaches have been applied to a small-sized library of natural compounds. As a result, an isoflavone derivative that showed ability to inhibit both Smo and Gli1 has been identified; namely, Glabrescione B. A new synthetic approach has been planned for this compound and its derivatives. Biological evaluation demonstrated the mechanism of action and showed a promising preclinical profile.

  7. Selective Sparing of Human Tregs by Pharmacologic Inhibitors of the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase and MEK Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwang, N. A.; Zhang, R.; Germana, S.; Fan, M. Y.; Hastings, W. D.; Cao, A.; Turka, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated (MEK) signaling are central to the survival and proliferation of many cell types. Multiple lines of investigation in murine models have shown that control of the PI3K pathway is particularly important for regulatory T cell (Treg) stability and function. PI3K and MEK inhibitors are being introduced into the clinic, and we hypothesized that pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K, and possibly MEK, in mixed cultures of human mononuclear cells would preferentially affect CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes compared with Tregs. We tested this hypothesis using four readouts: proliferation, activation, functional suppression, and signaling. Results showed that Tregs were less susceptible to inhibition by both δ and α isoform–specific PI3K inhibitors and by an MEK inhibitor compared with their conventional CD4+ and CD8+ counterparts. These studies suggest less functional reliance on PI3K and MEK signaling in Tregs compared with conventional CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. Therefore, the PI3K and MEK pathways are attractive pharmacologic targets for transplantation and treatment of autoimmunity. PMID:27017850

  8. Heart failure with anemia: novel findings on the roles of renal disease, interleukins, and specific left ventricular remodeling processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Eileen; Rouleau, Jean L; White, Michel; Roy, Karine; Blondeau, Lucie; Ducharme, Anique; Neagoe, Paul-Eduard; Sirois, Martin G; Lavoie, Joël; Racine, Normand; Liszkowski, Mark; Madore, François; Tardif, Jean-Claude; de Denus, Simon

    2014-09-01

    Anemia is a highly prevalent and strong independent prognostic marker in heart failure (HF), yet this association is not completely understood. Whether anemia is simply a marker of disease severity and concomitant chronic kidney disease or represents the activation of other detrimental pathways remains uncertain. We sought to determine which pathophysiological pathways are exacerbated in patients with HF, reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and anemia in comparison with those without anemia. In a prospective study involving 151 patients, selected biomarkers were analyzed, each representing proposed contributive mechanisms in the pathophysiology of anemia in HF. We compared clinical, echocardiographic, and circulating biomarkers profiles among patients with HFrEF and anemia (group 1), HFrEF without anemia (group 2), and chronic kidney disease with preserved EF, without established HF (chronic kidney disease control group 3). We demonstrate here that many processes other than those related to chronic kidney disease are involved in the anemia-HF relationship. These are linked to the pathophysiological mechanisms pertaining to left ventricular systolic dysfunction and remodeling, systemic inflammation and volume overload. We found that levels of interleukin-6 and interleukin-10, specific markers of cardiac remodeling (procollagen type III N-terminal peptide, matrix metalloproteinase-2, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1, left atrial volume), myocardial stretch (NT-proBNP [N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide]), and myocyte death (troponin T) are related to anemia in HFrEF. Anemia is strongly associated not only with markers of more advanced and active heart disease but also with the level of renal dysfunction in HFrEF. Increased myocardial remodeling, inflammation, and volume overload are the hallmarks of patients with anemia and HF. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00834691. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Self-renewal of acute lymphocytic leukemia cells is limited by the Hedgehog pathway inhibitors cyclopamine and IPI-926.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tara L; Wang, Qiuju H; Brown, Patrick; Peacock, Craig; Merchant, Akil A; Brennan, Sarah; Jones, Evan; McGovern, Karen; Watkins, D Neil; Sakamoto, Kathleen M; Matsui, William

    2010-12-28

    Conserved embryonic signaling pathways such as Hedgehog (Hh), Wingless and Notch have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several malignancies. Recent data suggests that Hh signaling plays a role in normal B-cell development, and we hypothesized that Hh signaling may be important in precursor B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-ALL). We found that the expression of Hh pathway components was common in human B-ALL cell lines and clinical samples. Moreover, pathway activity could be modulated by Hh ligand or several pathway inhibitors including cyclopamine and the novel SMOOTHENED (SMO) inhibitor IPI-926. The inhibition of pathway activity primarily impacted highly clonogenic B-ALL cells expressing aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) by limiting their self-renewal potential both in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that Hh pathway activation is common in B-ALL and represents a novel therapeutic target regulating self-renewal and persistence of the malignant clone.

  10. Self-renewal of acute lymphocytic leukemia cells is limited by the Hedgehog pathway inhibitors cyclopamine and IPI-926.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara L Lin

    Full Text Available Conserved embryonic signaling pathways such as Hedgehog (Hh, Wingless and Notch have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several malignancies. Recent data suggests that Hh signaling plays a role in normal B-cell development, and we hypothesized that Hh signaling may be important in precursor B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-ALL. We found that the expression of Hh pathway components was common in human B-ALL cell lines and clinical samples. Moreover, pathway activity could be modulated by Hh ligand or several pathway inhibitors including cyclopamine and the novel SMOOTHENED (SMO inhibitor IPI-926. The inhibition of pathway activity primarily impacted highly clonogenic B-ALL cells expressing aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH by limiting their self-renewal potential both in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that Hh pathway activation is common in B-ALL and represents a novel therapeutic target regulating self-renewal and persistence of the malignant clone.

  11. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... online community Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  12. Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Icon View public health webinars on blood disorders Inhibitors Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... because treatment of bleeds becomes less effective. About Inhibitors People with hemophilia, and many with VWD type ...

  13. Scabies mite inactive serine proteases are potent inhibitors of the human complement lectin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone L Reynolds

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Scabies is an infectious skin disease caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei and has been classified as one of the six most prevalent epidermal parasitic skin diseases infecting populations living in poverty by the World Health Organisation. The role of the complement system, a pivotal component of human innate immunity, as an important defence against invading pathogens has been well documented and many parasites have an arsenal of anti-complement defences. We previously reported on a family of scabies mite proteolytically inactive serine protease paralogues (SMIPP-Ss thought to be implicated in host defence evasion. We have since shown that two family members, SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have the ability to bind the human complement components C1q, mannose binding lectin (MBL and properdin and are capable of inhibiting all three human complement pathways. This investigation focused on inhibition of the lectin pathway of complement activation as it is likely to be the primary pathway affecting scabies mites. Activation of the lectin pathway relies on the activation of MBL, and as SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have previously been shown to bind MBL, the nature of this interaction was examined using binding and mutagenesis studies. SMIPP-S D1 bound MBL in complex with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs and released the MASP-2 enzyme from the complex. SMIPP-S I1 was also able to bind MBL in complex with MASPs, but MASP-1 and MASP-2 remained in the complex. Despite these differences in mechanism, both molecules inhibited activation of complement components downstream of MBL. Mutagenesis studies revealed that both SMIPP-Ss used an alternative site of the molecule from the residual active site region to inhibit the lectin pathway. We propose that SMIPP-Ss are potent lectin pathway inhibitors and that this mechanism represents an important tool in the immune evasion repertoire of the parasitic mite and a potential target for therapeutics.

  14. Clinical development of VEGF signaling pathway inhibitors in childhood solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glade Bender, Julia; Yamashiro, Darrell J; Fox, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a target shared by both adult epithelial cancers and the mesenchymal or embryonal tumors of childhood. Development of antiangiogenic agents for the pediatric population has been complicated by largely theoretical concern for toxicities specific to the growing child and prioritization among the many antiangiogenic agents being developed for adults. This review summarizes the mechanism of action and preclinical data relevant to childhood cancers and early-phase clinical trials in childhood solid tumors. Single-agent adverse event profiles in adults and children are reviewed with emphasis on cardiovascular, bone health, and endocrine side effects. In addition, pharmacological factors that may be relevant for prioritizing clinical trials of these agents in children are reviewed. Considerations for further clinical evaluation should include preclinical data, relative potency, efficacy in adults, and the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval status. Toxicity profiles of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway inhibitors may be age dependent and ultimately, their utility in the treatment of childhood cancer will require combination with standard cytotoxic drugs or other molecularly targeted agents. In combination studies, toxicity profiles, potential drug interactions, and late effects must be considered. Studies to assess the long-term impact of VEGF signaling pathway inhibitors on cardiovascular, endocrine, and bone health in children with cancer are imperative if these agents are to be administered to growing children and adolescents with newly diagnosed cancers.

  15. The role of tissue factor pathway inhibitor in tumor growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirkhosravi, Ali; Meyer, Todd; Amaya, Mildred; Davila, Monica; Mousa, Shaker A; Robson, Theresa; Francis, John L

    2007-10-01

    Clotting activation occurs frequently in cancer. Tissue factor (TF), the most potent initiator of coagulation, is expressed aberrantly in many types of malignancy and is involved not only in tumor-associated hypercoagulability but also in promoting tumor angiogenesis and metastasis via coagulation-dependent and coagulation-independent (signaling) mechanisms. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is the natural inhibitor of TF coagulant and signaling activities. Studies have shown that TFPI exhibits antiangiogenic and antimetastatic effects in vitro and in vivo. In animal models of experimental metastasis, both circulating and tumor cell-associated TFPI are shown to significantly reduce tumor cell-induced coagulation activation and lung metastasis. Heparins and heparin derivatives, which induce the release of TFPI from the vascular endothelium, also exhibit antitumor effects, and TFPI may contribute significantly to those effects. Indeed, a non-anticoagulant low-molecular-weight heparin with intact TFPI-releasing capacity has been shown to have significant antimetastatic effect in a similar experimental mouse model. The evidence supporting the dual inhibitory functions on TF-driven coagulation and signaling strengthen the rationale for considering TFPI as a potential anticancer agent. This article primarily summarizes the evidence for antiangiogenic and antimetastatic effects of TFPI and describes its potential mechanisms of action. The possible application of TFPI and other inhibitors of TF as potential anticancer agents is described, and information regarding potential antitumor properties of TFPI-2 (which has structural similarities to TFPI) is also included.

  16. S2 from equine infectious anemia virus is an infectivity factor which counteracts the retroviral inhibitors SERINC5 and SERINC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chande, Ajit; Cuccurullo, Emilia Cristiana; Rosa, Annachiara; Ziglio, Serena; Carpenter, Susan; Pizzato, Massimo

    2016-11-15

    The lentivirus equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) encodes the small protein S2, a pathogenic determinant that is important for virus replication and disease progression in horses. No molecular function had been linked to this accessory protein. We report that S2 can replace the activity of Negative factor (Nef) in HIV-1 infectivity, being required to antagonize the inhibitory activity of Serine incorporator (SERINC) proteins on Nef-defective HIV-1. Like Nef, S2 excludes SERINC5 from virus particles and requires an ExxxLL motif predicted to recruit the clathrin adaptor, Adaptor protein 2 (AP2). Accordingly, functional endocytic machinery is essential for S2-mediated infectivity enhancement, and S2-mediated enhancement is impaired by inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In addition to retargeting SERINC5 to a late endosomal compartment, S2 promotes host factor degradation. Emphasizing the similarity with Nef, we show that S2 is myristoylated, and, as is compatible with a crucial role in posttranslational modification, its N-terminal glycine is required for anti-SERINC5 activity. EIAV-derived vectors devoid of S2 are less susceptible than HIV-1 to the inhibitory effect of both human and equine SERINC5. We then identified the envelope glycoprotein of EIAV as a determinant that also modulates retroviral susceptibility to SERINC5, indicating that EIAV has a bimodal ability to counteract the host factor. S2 shares no sequence homology with other retroviral factors known to counteract SERINC5. Like the primate lentivirus Nef and the gammaretrovirus glycoGag, the accessory protein from EIAV is an example of a retroviral virulence determinant that independently evolved SERINC5-antagonizing activity. SERINC5 therefore plays a critical role in the interaction of the host with diverse retrovirus pathogens.

  17. Transcriptome analysis of ankylosing spondylitis patients before and after TNF-α inhibitor therapy reveals the pathways affected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X B; Ellis, J J; Pennisi, D J; Song, X; Batra, J; Hollis, K; Bradbury, L A; Li, Z; Kenna, T J; Brown, M A

    2017-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitors are highly effective in suppressing inflammation in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients, and operate by suppression of TFN-α and downstream immunological pathways. To determine the mechanisms of action of TNF-α inhibitors in AS patients, we used transcriptomic and bioinformatic approaches on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from AS patients pre and post treatment. We found 656 differentially expressed genes, including the genome-wide significant AS-associated genes, IL6R, NOTCH1, IL10, CXCR2 and TNFRSF1A. A distinctive gene expression profile was found between male and female patients, mainly because of sex chromosome-linked genes and interleukin 17 receptor C, potentially accounting for the differences in clinical manifestation and treatment response between the genders. In addition to immune and inflammation regulatory pathways, like intestinal immune network for IgA production, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, Ras signaling pathway, allograft rejection and hematopoietic cell lineage, KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway analyses revealed that infection-associated pathways (influenza A and toxoplasmosis) and metabolism-associated pathways were involved in response to TNF-α inhibitor treatment, providing insight into the mechanism of TNF-α inhibitors.

  18. Genetic/metabolic effect of iron metabolism and rare anemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Camaschella

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in iron metabolism have allowed a novel classification of iron disorders and to identify previously unknown diseases. These disorders include genetic iron overload (hemochromatosis and inherited iron-related anemias, in some cases accompanied by iron overload. Rare inherited anemias may affect the hepcidin pathway, iron absorption, transport, utilization and recycling. Among the genetic iron-related anemias the most common form is likely the iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA, due to mutations of the hepcidin inhibitor TMPRSS6 encoding the serine protease matriptase-2. IRIDA is characterized by hepcidin up-regulation, decrease iron absorption and macrophage recycling and by microcytic- hypochromic anemia, unresponsive to oral iron. High serum hepcidin levels may suggest the diagnosis, which requires demonstrating the causal TMPRSS6 mutations by gene sequencing. Other rare microcytic hypochromic anemias associated with defects of iron transport-uptake are the rare hypotransferrinemia, and DMT1 and STEAP3 mutations. The degree of anemia is variable and accompanied by secondary iron overload even in the absence of blood transfusions. This is due to the iron-deficient or expanded erythropoiesis that inhibits hepcidin transcription, increases iron absorption, through the erythroid regulator, as in untransfused beta-thalassemia. Sideroblastic anemias are due to decreased mitochondrial iron utilization for heme or sulfur cluster synthesis. Their diagnosis requires demonstrating ringed sideroblasts by Perl’s staining of the bone marrow smears. The commonest X-linked form is due to deltaamino- levulinic-synthase-2-acid (ALAS2 mutations. The recessive, more severe form, affects SLC25A38, which encodes a potential mitochondrial importer of glycine, an amino acid essential for ALA synthesis and thus results in heme deficiency. Two disorders affect iron/sulfur cluster biogenesis: deficiency of the ATP-binding cassette B7 (ABCB7 causes X

  19. An Ixodes ricinus Tick Salivary Lectin Pathway Inhibitor Protects Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato from Human Complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemakers, Alex; Coumou, Jeroen; Schuijt, Tim J; Oei, Anneke; Nijhof, Ard M; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom; Bins, Adriaan D; Hovius, Joppe W R

    2016-04-01

    We previously identified tick salivary lectin pathway inhibitor (TSLPI) in Ixodes scapularis, a vector for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) in North America. TSLPI is a salivary protein facilitating B. burgdorferi s.s. transmission and acquisition by inhibiting the host lectin complement pathway through interference with mannose binding lectin (MBL) activity. Since Ixodes ricinus is the predominant vector for Lyme borreliosis in Europe and transmits several complement sensitive B. burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) strains, we aimed to identify, describe, and characterize the I. ricinus ortholog of TSLPI. We performed (q)PCRs on I. ricinus salivary gland cDNA to identify a TSLPI ortholog. Next, we generated recombinant (r)TSLPI in a Drosophila expression system and examined inhibition of the MBL complement pathway and complement-mediated killing of B. burgdorferi s.l. in vitro. We identified a TSLPI ortholog in I. ricinus salivary glands with 93% homology at the RNA and 89% at the protein level compared to I. scapularis TSLPI, which was upregulated during tick feeding. In silico analysis revealed that TSLPI appears to be part of a larger family of Ixodes salivary proteins among which I. persulcatus basic tail salivary proteins and I. scapularis TSLPI and Salp14. I. ricinus rTSLPI inhibited the MBL complement pathway and protected B. burgdorferi s.s. and Borrelia garinii from complement-mediated killing. We have identified a TSLPI ortholog, which protects B. burgdorferi s.l. from complement-mediated killing in I. ricinus, the major vector for tick-borne diseases in Europe.

  20. Synchronization dynamics of chemically coupled cells with activator–inhibitor pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guemkam Ghomsi, P. [Complex Systems and Theoretical Biology Group, Laboratory of Research on Advanced Materials and Nonlinear Science (LaRAMaNS), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Buea, P.O. Box 63, Buea (Cameroon); Laboratoire de Mécanique, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaoundé I, P.O. Box 812, Yaoundé (Cameroon); Moukam Kakmeni, F.M., E-mail: moukam.kakmeni@ubuea.cm [Complex Systems and Theoretical Biology Group, Laboratory of Research on Advanced Materials and Nonlinear Science (LaRAMaNS), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Buea, P.O. Box 63, Buea (Cameroon); Kofane, T.C.; Tchawoua, C. [Laboratoire de Mécanique, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaoundé I, P.O. Box 812, Yaoundé (Cameroon)

    2014-08-01

    Systems of interacting cells containing an activator–inhibitor pathway, regulating naturally in their inner parts their end-product concentrations through a sequence of biochemical reactions with feedback-loops: an end-product inhibition of the first substrate, and an autocatalytic activation of the end-product through an allosteric enzyme-mediated reaction are investigated. The individual cells are considered to be identical and are described by nonlinear differential equations recently proposed following the concerted transition model. The chemical and electrical coupling types, realized by exchange of metabolites across concentration of the cells are used in order to analyze the onset of phase and complete synchronization in the biochemical system. It is found that depending on the coupling nature and the range of coupling strength, cells enter into different synchronization regimes going from low-quality to high-quality synchronization. The synchronization manifold's stability is analyzed. The results are supported by numerical simulations using indicators such as the conditional Lyapunov exponents and the rate of change of the Lyapunov function. The results indicate that the system cannot completely synchronize under the single action of the chemical coupling. The combined effect of both chemical and electrical couplings is found to be of capital importance in the onset of complete synchronization and high quality synchronization. - Highlights: • We investigate the dynamics and synchronization of cells with activator–inhibitor pathways. • A complete study of fixed points' stability and bifurcations of the system is done. • It is found that chemically coupled cells only display phase synchronization. • Electrical coupling is important for complete synchronization in the coupled cells. • High quality synchronization is observed in the coupled cells.

  1. Therapeutic effect of a novel Wnt pathway inhibitor on cardiac regeneration after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dezhong; Fu, Wenbin; Li, Liangpeng; Xia, Xuewei; Liao, Qiao; Yue, Rongchuan; Chen, Hongmei; Chen, Xiongwen; An, Songzhu; Zeng, Chunyu; Wang, Wei Eric

    2017-12-15

    After myocardial infarction (MI), the heart is difficult to repair because of great loss of cardiomyoctyes and lack of cardiac regeneration. Novel drug candidates that aim at reducing pathological remodeling and stimulating cardiac regeneration are highly desirable. In the present study, we identified if and how a novel porcupine inhibitor CGX1321 influenced MI and cardiac regeneration. Permanent ligation of left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery was performed in mice to induce MI injury. Cardiac function was measured by echocardiography, infarct size was examined by TTC staining. Fibrosis was evaluated with Masson's trichrome staining and vimentin staining. As a result, CGX1321 administration blocked the secretion of Wnt proteins, and inhibited both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling pathways. CGX1321 improved cardiac function, reduced myocardial infarct size, and fibrosis of post-MI hearts. CGX1321 significantly increased newly formed cardiomyocytes in infarct border zone of post-MI hearts, evidenced by the increased EdU + cardiomyocytes. Meanwhile, CGX1321 increased Ki67 + and phosphohistone H3 (PH3 + ) cardiomyocytes in culture, indicating enhanced cardiomyocyte proliferation. The mRNA microarray showed that CGX1321 up-regulated cell cycle regulating genes such as Ccnb1 and Ccne1 CGX1321 did not alter YAP protein phosphorylation and nuclear translocation in cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, porcupine inhibitor CGX1321 reduces MI injury by limiting fibrosis and promoting regeneration. It promotes cardiomyocyte proliferation by stimulating cell cycle regulating genes with a Hippo/YAP-independent pathway. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. Sepsis-Induced Coagulation in the Baboon Lung Is Associated with Decreased Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haiwang; Ivanciu, Lacramioara; Popescu, Narcis; Peer, Glenn; Hack, Erik; Lupu, Cristina; Taylor, Fletcher B.; Lupu, Florea

    2007-01-01

    Increased tissue factor (TF)-dependent procoagulant activity in sepsis may be partly due to decreased expression or function of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). To test this hypothesis, baboons were infused with live Escherichia coli and sacrificed after 2, 8, or 24 hours. Confocal and electron microscopy revealed increased leukocyte infiltration and fibrin deposition in the intravascular and interstitial compartments. Large amounts of TF were detected by immunostaining in leukocytes and platelet-rich microthrombi. TF induction was documented by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and coagulation assays. Lung-associated TFPI antigen and mRNA decreased during sepsis, and TFPI activity diminished abruptly at 2 hours. Blocking antibodies against TFPI increased fibrin deposition in septic baboon lungs, suggesting that TF-dependent coagulation might be aggravated by reduced endothelial TFPI. Decreased TFPI activity coincided with the release of tissue plasminogen activator and the peak of plasmin generation, suggesting that TFPI could undergo proteolytic inactivation by plasmin. Enhanced plasmin produced in septic baboons by infusion of blocking antibodies against plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 led to decreased lung-associated TFPI and unforeseen massive fibrin deposition. We conclude that activation of TF-driven coagulation not adequately countered by TFPI may underlie the widespread thrombotic complications of sepsis. PMID:17640967

  3. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Bryan Sears, R.; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with a photoinitiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)—a multikinase inhibitor—encapsulated inside. Near-infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release while reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities.

  4. Advanced basal cell carcinoma, the hedgehog pathway, and treatment options – role of smoothened inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecher, Leslie A; Sharfman, William H

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer and its incidence is rising worldwide. Ultraviolet radiation exposure, including tanning bed use, as well as host factors play a role in its development. The majority of cases are treated and cured with local therapies including surgery. Yet, the health care costs of diagnosis and treatment of BCCs in the US is substantial. In the United States, the cost of nonmelanoma skin cancer care in the Medicare population is estimated to be US$426 million per year. While rare, locally advanced BCCs that can no longer be controlled with surgery and/or radiation, and metastatic BCCs do occur and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Vismodegib (GDC-0449), a smoothened inhibitor targeted at the hedgehog pathway, is the first US Food and Drug Association (FDA)-approved agent in the treatment of locally advanced, unresectable, and metastatic BCCs. This class of agents appears to be changing the survival rates in advanced BCC patients, but appropriate patient selection and monitoring are important. Multidisciplinary assessments are essential for the optimal care and management of these patients. For some patients with locally advanced BCC, treatment with a hedgehog inhibitor may eliminate the need for an excessively disfiguring or morbid surgery. PMID:26604681

  5. Pernicious Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helps your body absorb vitamin B12. Have an autoimmune disorder that involves the endocrine glands, such as Addison's ... Research suggests a link may exist between these autoimmune disorders and pernicious anemia that's caused by an autoimmune ...

  6. [Hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchscherer, A; Chemnitz, J

    2015-09-01

    Hemolytic anemia can be caused by various hereditary or acquired diseases. Classification is usually based on corpuscular or extracorpuscular defects. Beside the anemia, laboratory testing indicates increased lactate dehydrogenase, unconjugated bilirubin and reticulocytes as well as reduced or absent plasma haptoglobin. Knowledge of further diagnostic procedures (e.g., Coombs test, schistocytes, hemoglobin electrophoresis or flow cytometric analysis) leads in many cases to an underlying disease with differentiated therapeutic options. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is often associated with diseases as HIV, connective tissue disease, lymphomas or malignant tumors and the hemolytic process is preexisting in many cases. Thrombotic microvascular diseases (e.g., thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura or hemolytic-uremic syndrome) are further important causes of hemolytic anemia which need immediate diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Peptide inhibitor of complement C1 (PIC1, a novel suppressor of classical pathway activation: mechanistic studies and clinical potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A Sharp

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The classical pathway of complement plays multiple physiological roles including modulating immunological effectors initiated by adaptive immune responses as well as an essential homeostatic role in the clearance of damaged self-antigens. However, dysregulated classical pathway activation is associated with antibody-initiated, inflammatory diseases processes like cold agglutinin disease (CAD, acute intravascular hemolytic transfusion reaction (AIHTR and acute/hyperacute transplantation rejection. To date, only one putative classical pathway inhibitor, C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH, is currently commercially available and its only approved indication is for replacement treatment in hereditary angioedema (HAE, which is predominantly a kinin pathway disease. Given the variety of disease conditions in which the classical pathway is implicated, development of therapeutics that specifically inhibit complement initiation represents a major unmet medical need. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement. In vitro studies have demonstrated that these Peptide Inhibitors of Complement C1 (PIC1 bind to the collagen-like region of the initiator molecule of the classical pathway, C1q. PIC1 binding to C1q blocks activation of the associated serine proteases (C1s-C1r-C1r-C1s and subsequent downstream complement activation. Rational design optimization of PIC1 has resulted in the generation of a highly potent derivative of fifteen amino acids. PIC1 inhibits classical pathway mediated complement activation in ABO incompatibility in vitro as well as inhibiting classical pathway activation in vivo in rats. This review will focus on the pre-clinical development of PIC1 and discuss its potential as a therapeutic in antibody-mediated classical pathway disease, specifically AIHTR.

  8. Chemical, computational and functional insights into the chemical stability of the Hedgehog pathway inhibitor GANT61.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcaterra, Andrea; Iovine, Valentina; Botta, Bruno; Quaglio, Deborah; D'Acquarica, Ilaria; Ciogli, Alessia; Iazzetti, Antonia; Alfonsi, Romina; Lospinoso Severini, Ludovica; Infante, Paola; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Mori, Mattia; Ghirga, Francesca

    2018-12-01

    This work aims at elucidating the mechanism and kinetics of hydrolysis of GANT61, the first and most-widely used inhibitor of the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway that targets Glioma-associated oncogene homologue (Gli) proteins, and at confirming the chemical nature of its bioactive form. GANT61 is poorly stable under physiological conditions and rapidly hydrolyses into an aldehyde species (GANT61-A), which is devoid of the biological activity against Hh signalling, and a diamine derivative (GANT61-D), which has shown inhibition of Gli-mediated transcription. Here, we combined chemical synthesis, NMR spectroscopy, analytical studies, molecular modelling and functional cell assays to characterise the GANT61 hydrolysis pathway. Our results show that GANT61-D is the bioactive form of GANT61 in NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells and SuFu -/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts, and clarify the structural requirements for GANT61-D binding to Gli1. This study paves the way to the design of GANT61 derivatives with improved potency and chemical stability.

  9. Recurrent chromosome 22 deletions in osteoblastoma affect inhibitors of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Karolin H; Nilsson, Jenny; Arbajian, Elsa; Vult von Steyern, Fredrik; Brosjö, Otte; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Szuhai, Karoly; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W

    2013-01-01

    Osteoblastoma is a bone forming tumor with histological features highly similar to osteoid osteoma; the discrimination between the tumor types is based on size and growth pattern. The vast majority of osteoblastomas are benign but there is a group of so-called aggressive osteoblastomas that can be diagnostically challenging at the histopathological level. The genetic aberrations required for osteoblastoma development are not known and no genetic difference between conventional and aggressive osteoblastoma has been reported. In order to identify recurrent genomic aberrations of importance for tumor development we applied cytogenetic and/or SNP array analyses on nine conventional and two aggressive osteoblastomas. The conventional osteoblastomas showed few or no acquired genetic aberrations while the aggressive tumors displayed heavily rearranged genomes. In one of the aggressive osteoblastomas, three neighboring regions in chromosome band 22q12 were homozygously deleted. Hemizygous deletions of these regions were found in two additional cases, one aggressive and one conventional. In total, 10 genes were recurrently and homozygously lost in osteoblastoma. Four of them are functionally involved in regulating osteogenesis and/or tumorigenesis. MN1 and NF2 have previously been implicated in the development of leukemia and solid tumors, and ZNRF3 and KREMEN1 are inhibitors of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway. In line with deletions of the latter two genes, high beta-catenin protein expression has previously been reported in osteoblastoma and aberrations affecting the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway have been found in other bone lesions, including osteoma and osteosarcoma.

  10. Recurrent Chromosome 22 Deletions in Osteoblastoma Affect Inhibitors of the Wnt/Beta-Catenin Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Karolin H.; Nilsson, Jenny; Arbajian, Elsa; Vult von Steyern, Fredrik; Brosjö, Otte; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Szuhai, Karoly; Hogendoorn, Pancras C. W.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoblastoma is a bone forming tumor with histological features highly similar to osteoid osteoma; the discrimination between the tumor types is based on size and growth pattern. The vast majority of osteoblastomas are benign but there is a group of so-called aggressive osteoblastomas that can be diagnostically challenging at the histopathological level. The genetic aberrations required for osteoblastoma development are not known and no genetic difference between conventional and aggressive osteoblastoma has been reported. In order to identify recurrent genomic aberrations of importance for tumor development we applied cytogenetic and/or SNP array analyses on nine conventional and two aggressive osteoblastomas. The conventional osteoblastomas showed few or no acquired genetic aberrations while the aggressive tumors displayed heavily rearranged genomes. In one of the aggressive osteoblastomas, three neighboring regions in chromosome band 22q12 were homozygously deleted. Hemizygous deletions of these regions were found in two additional cases, one aggressive and one conventional. In total, 10 genes were recurrently and homozygously lost in osteoblastoma. Four of them are functionally involved in regulating osteogenesis and/or tumorigenesis. MN1 and NF2 have previously been implicated in the development of leukemia and solid tumors, and ZNRF3 and KREMEN1 are inhibitors of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway. In line with deletions of the latter two genes, high beta-catenin protein expression has previously been reported in osteoblastoma and aberrations affecting the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway have been found in other bone lesions, including osteoma and osteosarcoma. PMID:24236197

  11. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer can interfere with the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack ... vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia called pernicious anemia. Vitamin C deficiency anemia risk factors include: Smoking. Smoking ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless ...

  13. What Is Fanconi Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Your Body FA is one of many types of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to a condition ... disorder. Anemia The most common symptom of all types of anemia is fatigue (tiredness). Fatigue occurs because your body ...

  14. About Anemia (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español About Anemia KidsHealth / For Kids / About Anemia What's in this ... to every cell in your body. What Is Anemia? Anemia happens when a person doesn't have ...

  15. Recombinant human tissue factor pathway inhibitor exerts anticoagulant, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects in murine pneumococcal pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, F. E.; Brands, X.; Schultz, M. J.; Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Roelofs, J. J. T. H.; van 't Veer, C.; van der Poll, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia and a major cause of sepsis. Recombinant human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (rh-TFPI) attenuates sepsis-induced coagulation and has been evaluated in clinical trials involving patients

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to a condition ... symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common ...

  17. Phase I study of the Hedgehog pathway inhibitor IPI-926 in adult patients with solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimeno, Antonio; Weiss, Glen J; Miller, Wilson H; Gettinger, Scott; Eigl, Bernard J C; Chang, Anne Lynne S; Dunbar, Joi; Devens, Shannon; Faia, Kerrie; Skliris, Georgios; Kutok, Jeff; Lewis, Karl D; Tibes, Raoul; Sharfman, William H; Ross, Robert W; Rudin, Charles M

    2013-05-15

    To conduct a first-in-human phase I study to determine the dose-limiting toxicities (DLT), characterize the pharmacokinetic profile, and document the antitumor activity of IPI-926, a new chemical entity that inhibits the Hedgehog pathway (HhP). Patients with solid tumors refractory to standard therapy were given IPI-926 once daily (QD) by mouth in 28-day cycles. The starting dose was 20 mg, and an accelerated titration schedule was used until standard 3 + 3 dose-escalation cohorts were implemented. Pharmacokinetics were evaluated on day -7 and day 22 of cycle 1. Ninety-four patients (32F, 62M; ages, 39-87) received doses ranging from 20 to 210 mg QD. Dose levels up to and including 160 mg administered QD were well tolerated. Toxicities consisted of reversible elevations in aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and bilirubin, fatigue, nausea, alopecia, and muscle spasms. IPI-926 was not associated with hematologic toxicity. IPI-926 pharmacokinetics were characterized by a slow absorption (T(max) = 2-8 hours) and a terminal half-life (t(1/2)) between 20 and 40 hours, supporting QD dosing. Of those HhP inhibitor-naïve patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) who received more than one dose of IPI-926 and had a follow-up clinical or Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) assessment, nearly a third (8 of 28 patients) showed a response to IPI-926 at doses ≥130 mg. IPI-926 was well tolerated up to 160 mg QD within 28-day cycles, which was established as the recommended phase II dose and schedule for this agent. Single-agent activity of IPI-926 was observed in HhP inhibitor-naïve patients with BCC. ©2013 AACR

  18. Advanced basal cell carcinoma, the hedgehog pathway, and treatment options – role of smoothened inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fecher LA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Leslie A Fecher,1,3 William H Sharfman2 1Department of Internal Medicine and Dermatology, Indiana University Health Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD, USA, 3Department of Internal Medicine and Dermatology, University of Michigan, MI, USA Abstract: Cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common human cancer and its incidence is rising worldwide. Ultraviolet radiation exposure, including tanning bed use, as well as host factors play a role in its development. The majority of cases are treated and cured with local therapies including surgery. Yet, the health care costs of diagnosis and treatment of BCCs in the US is substantial. In the United States, the cost of nonmelanoma skin cancer care in the Medicare population is estimated to be US$426 million per year. While rare, locally advanced BCCs that can no longer be controlled with surgery and/or radiation, and metastatic BCCs do occur and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Vismodegib (GDC-0449, a smoothened inhibitor targeted at the hedgehog pathway, is the first US Food and Drug Association (FDA-approved agent in the treatment of locally advanced, unresectable, and metastatic BCCs. This class of agents appears to be changing the survival rates in advanced BCC patients, but appropriate patient selection and monitoring are important. Multidisciplinary assessments are essential for the optimal care and management of these patients. For some patients with locally advanced BCC, treatment with a hedgehog inhibitor may eliminate the need for an excessively disfiguring or morbid surgery. Keywords: basal cell carcinoma, hedgehog, smoothened, vismodegib, Gorlin, basal cell nevus syndrome

  19. Recurrent chromosome 22 deletions in osteoblastoma affect inhibitors of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolin H Nord

    Full Text Available Osteoblastoma is a bone forming tumor with histological features highly similar to osteoid osteoma; the discrimination between the tumor types is based on size and growth pattern. The vast majority of osteoblastomas are benign but there is a group of so-called aggressive osteoblastomas that can be diagnostically challenging at the histopathological level. The genetic aberrations required for osteoblastoma development are not known and no genetic difference between conventional and aggressive osteoblastoma has been reported. In order to identify recurrent genomic aberrations of importance for tumor development we applied cytogenetic and/or SNP array analyses on nine conventional and two aggressive osteoblastomas. The conventional osteoblastomas showed few or no acquired genetic aberrations while the aggressive tumors displayed heavily rearranged genomes. In one of the aggressive osteoblastomas, three neighboring regions in chromosome band 22q12 were homozygously deleted. Hemizygous deletions of these regions were found in two additional cases, one aggressive and one conventional. In total, 10 genes were recurrently and homozygously lost in osteoblastoma. Four of them are functionally involved in regulating osteogenesis and/or tumorigenesis. MN1 and NF2 have previously been implicated in the development of leukemia and solid tumors, and ZNRF3 and KREMEN1 are inhibitors of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway. In line with deletions of the latter two genes, high beta-catenin protein expression has previously been reported in osteoblastoma and aberrations affecting the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway have been found in other bone lesions, including osteoma and osteosarcoma.

  20. Sideroblastic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Bhandari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sideroblastic anemias are a heterogenous group of disorders that have as a common feature with the presence of ringed sideroblasts in the marrow. We present a case of young female, nursing student who presented with increasing palpitation, fatigue and exertional shortness of breath for the last one year. She had a low hemoglobin and high serum iron. Anemia with iron overload prompted us to do bone marrow study and there were 19% ringed sideroblasts and iron overload fulfilling the diagnosis of sideroblastic anemia. We searched for secondary causes of ringed sideroblast but could not find any culprit. Her cytogenetics report was normal and genetic analysis was not done due to financial reason. Since the diagnosis 3 months back, patient is on pyridoxine, folic acid, deferasirox and still needs regular blood transfusion suggesting that she may be pyridoxine refractory and may develop iron overload.

  1. A comparative analysis of inhibitors of the glycolysis pathway in breast and ovarian cancer cell line models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xintaropoulou, Chrysi; Ward, Carol; Wise, Alan; Marston, Hugh; Turnbull, Arran; Langdon, Simon P

    2015-09-22

    Many cancer cells rely on aerobic glycolysis for energy production and targeting of this pathway is a potential strategy to inhibit cancer cell growth. In this study, inhibition of five glycolysis pathway molecules (GLUT1, HKII, PFKFB3, PDHK1 and LDH) using 9 inhibitors (Phloretin, Quercetin, STF31, WZB117, 3PO, 3-bromopyruvate, Dichloroacetate, Oxamic acid, NHI-1) was investigated in panels of breast and ovarian cancer cell line models. All compounds tested blocked glycolysis as indicated by increased extracellular glucose and decreased lactate production and also increased apoptosis. Sensitivity to several inhibitors correlated with the proliferation rate of the cell lines. Seven compounds had IC50 values that were associated with each other consistent with a shared mechanism of action. A synergistic interaction was revealed between STF31 and Oxamic acid when combined with the antidiabetic drug metformin. Sensitivity to glycolysis inhibition was also examined under a range of O2 levels (21% O2, 7% O2, 2% O2 and 0.5% O2) and greater resistance to the inhibitors was found at low oxygen conditions (7% O2, 2% O2 and 0.5% O2) relative to 21% O2 conditions. These results indicate growth of breast and ovarian cancer cell lines is dependent on all the targets examined in the glycolytic pathway with increased sensitivity to the inhibitors under normoxic conditions.

  2. Tissue Factor and Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor in the Wound-Healing Process After Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ślusarz, Robert; Głowacka, Mariola; Biercewicz, Monika; Barczykowska, Ewa; Haor, Beata; Rość, Danuta; Gadomska, Grażyna

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the concentrations of tissue factor (TF) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) in the blood of patients with a postoperative wound after neurosurgery. Participants included 20 adult patients who underwent neurosurgery because of degenerative spine changes. The concentration of TF and TFPI in the patients' blood serum was measured 3 times: before surgery, during the first 24 hr after surgery, and between the 5th and 7th days after surgery. The control group comprised 20 healthy volunteers similar to the patient group with respect to gender and age. A statistically significant difference was observed between TF concentration at all three measurement time points in the research group and TF concentration in the control group (p = .018, p = .010, p = .001). A statistically significant difference was found between TFPI concentration at the second time point in the research group and TFPI concentration in the control group (p = .041). No statistically significant within-subject difference was found between TF concentrations before and after surgery. A statistically significant within-subject difference was found between TFPI concentrations within 24 hr after surgery and 5-7 days after surgery (p = .004). High perioperative concentrations of TF indicate not only the presence of thrombophilia but also the importance of TF in the wound-healing process. Perioperative changes in TFPI concentrations are related to its compensatory influence on hemostasis in thrombophilic conditions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Factor VII activating protease (FSAP) promotes the proteolysis and inhibition of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanse, Sandip M.; Declerck, Paul J.; Ruf, Wolfram; Broze, George; Etscheid, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Factor VII activating protease (FSAP) activates FVII as well as pro-urokinase and inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-BB, thus regulating haemostasis- and remodeling-associated processes in the vasculature. A genetic variant of FSAP (Marburg I polymorphism) results in low enzymatic activity and is associated with an enhanced risk for carotid stenosis and stroke. We postulate that there are additional substrates for FSAP that will help to explain its role in vascular biology and have searched for such a substrate. Results and Methods Using screening procedures to determine the influence of FSAP on various haemostasis-related processes on endothelial cells we discovered that FSAP inhibited tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), a major anti-coagulant secreted by these cells. Proteolytic degradation of TFPI by FSAP could also be demonstrated by Western blotting and the exact cleavage sites were determined by N-terminal sequencing. The Marburg I variant of FSAP had a diminished ability to inhibit TFPI. A monoclonal antibody to FSAP, that specifically inhibited FSAP binding to TFPI, reversed the inhibitory effect of FSAP on TFPI. Conclusions The identification of TFPI as a sensitive substrate for FSAP increases our understanding of its role in regulating haemostasis and proliferative remodeling events in the vasculature. PMID:22116096

  4. Phytochemicals as multi-target inhibitors of the inflammatory pathway- A modeling and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Nisha S; Ramanan, Meera; Paragi-Vedanthi, Padmapriya; Doble, Mukesh

    2017-03-11

    The arachidonic acid pathway consists of several enzymes and targeting them is favored for developing anti-inflammatory drugs. However, till date the current drugs are generally active against a single target, leading to undesirable side-effects. Phytochemicals are known to inhibit multiple targets simultaneously and hence, an attempt is made here to investigate their suitability. A pharmacophore based study is performed with three sets of reported phytochemicals namely, dual 5-LOX/mPGES1, alkaloids and FLAP inhibitors. The analysis indicated that phenylpropanoids (including ferulic acid) and benzoic acids derivatives, and berberine mapped onto these pharmacophores with three hydrophobic centroids and an acceptor feature. 2,4,5-trimethoxy (7) and 3,4-dimethoxy cinnamic acids (8) mapped onto all the three pharmacophores. Experimental studies indicated that berberine inhibited 5-LOX (100 μM) and PGE 2 (50 μM) production by 72.2 and 72.0% and ferulic acid by 74.3 and 54.4% respectively. This approach offers a promising theoretical combined with experimental strategy for designing novel molecules against inflammatory enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pernicious anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a type of vitamin B12 anemia. The body needs vitamin B12 to make red blood cells. You get ... shots in the beginning. Some people may also need to take vitamin B12 supplements by mouth. A certain type of ...

  7. Genetic/metabolic effect of iron metabolism and rare anemias

    OpenAIRE

    Clara Camaschella

    2013-01-01

    Advances in iron metabolism have allowed a novel classification of iron disorders and to identify previously unknown diseases. These disorders include genetic iron overload (hemochromatosis) and inherited iron-related anemias, in some cases accompanied by iron overload. Rare inherited anemias may affect the hepcidin pathway, iron absorption, transport, utilization and recycling. Among the genetic iron-related anemias the most common form is likely the iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (I...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  11. Anemia in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Umran Kucukgoz Gulec; Fatma Tuncay Ozgunen; Ismail Cuneyt Evruke; Suleyman Cansun Demir

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most frequent form of anemia in pregnant women. Folic acid, vitamin B12 deficiency, and hemoglobinopathies are other causes of anemia in pregnancy. Finding the underlying cause are crucial to the management of the anemia. Anemia is defined as hemoglobin of

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  13. Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the therapeutic efficacy of the histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 in human tumor xenograft models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Toshiaki; Ozaki, Kei-ichi; Fujio, Kohsuke; Kajikawa, Shu-hei; Uesato, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Kazushi; Tanimura, Susumu; Koji, Takehiko; Kohno, Michiaki

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the anticancer efficacy of HDAC inhibitors. •MEK inhibitors sensitize human tumor xenografts to HDAC inhibitor cytotoxicity. •Such the enhanced efficacy is achieved by a transient blockade of the ERK pathway. •This drug combination provides a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer patients. -- Abstract: The ERK pathway is up-regulated in various human cancers and represents a prime target for mechanism-based approaches to cancer treatment. Specific blockade of the ERK pathway alone induces mostly cytostatic rather than pro-apoptotic effects, however, resulting in a limited therapeutic efficacy of the ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors. We previously showed that MEK inhibitors markedly enhance the ability of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors to induce apoptosis in tumor cells with constitutive ERK pathway activation in vitro. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of such drug combinations, we administered the MEK inhibitor PD184352 or AZD6244 together with the HDAC inhibitor MS-275 in nude mice harboring HT-29 or H1650 xenografts. Co-administration of the MEK inhibitor markedly sensitized the human xenografts to MS-275 cytotoxicity. A dose of MS-275 that alone showed only moderate cytotoxicity thus suppressed the growth of tumor xenografts almost completely as well as induced a marked reduction in tumor cellularity when administered with PD184352 or AZD6244. The combination of the two types of inhibitor also induced marked oxidative stress, which appeared to result in DNA damage and massive cell death, specifically in the tumor xenografts. The enhanced therapeutic efficacy of the drug combination was achieved by a relatively transient blockade of the ERK pathway. Administration of both MEK and HDAC inhibitors represents a promising chemotherapeutic strategy with improved safety for cancer patients

  14. APLASTIC ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Dharma Laksmi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Aplastic Anemia describes a disorder of the clinical syndrome is marked by a deficiency of red blood cells, neutrophils, monocytes and platelets in the absence of other forms of bone marrow damage. Aplastic anemia is classified as a rare disease in developed countries the incidence of 3-6 cases / 1 million inhabitants / year. The exact cause of someone suffering from aplastic anemia also can not be established with certainty, but there are several sources of potential risk factors. Prognosis or course of the disease varies widely aplastic anemia, but without treatment generally gives a poor prognosis /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  15. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [ ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor may recommend that you ... Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to a condition in which ... to grow and develop. The iron that full-term infants have stored in their bodies is used ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  2. Toxic hemolytic anemias.

    OpenAIRE

    ZEMANOVÁ, Vendula

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with toxic hemolytic anemias which are often unheeded. There are described laboratory signs of hemolytic anemias, their dividing into the various groups and it focuses mainly to toxic and drug-related hemolytic anemias and their causations.

  3. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  4. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  5. Living with Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Fanconi Anemia Heart Failure Other ...

  6. What Is Aplastic Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Fanconi Anemia Heart Failure Other ...

  7. What Causes Aplastic Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Fanconi Anemia Heart Failure Other ...

  8. Plasticity in the Oxidative Folding Pathway of the High Affinity Nerita Versicolor Carboxypeptidase Inhibitor (NvCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esperante, Sebastián A; Covaleda, Giovanni; Trejo, Sebastián A; Bronsoms, Sílvia; Aviles, Francesc X; Ventura, Salvador

    2017-07-14

    Nerita Versicolor carboxypeptidase inhibitor (NvCI) is the strongest inhibitor reported so far for the M14A subfamily of carboxypeptidases. It comprises 53 residues and a protein fold composed of a two-stranded antiparallel β sheet connected by three loops and stabilized by three disulfide bridges. Here we report the oxidative folding and reductive unfolding pathways of NvCI. Much debate has gone on whether protein conformational folding guides disulfide bond formation or instead they are disulfide bonds that favour the arrangement of local or global structural elements. We show here that for NvCI both possibilities apply. Under physiological conditions, this protein folds trough a funnelled pathway involving a network of kinetically connected native-like intermediates, all sharing the disulfide bond connecting the two β-strands. In contrast, under denaturing conditions, the folding of NvCI is under thermodynamic control and follows a "trial and error" mechanism, in which an initial quasi-stochastic population of intermediates rearrange their disulfide bonds to attain the stable native topology. Despite their striking mechanistic differences, the efficiency of both folding routes is similar. The present study illustrates thus a surprising plasticity in the folding of this extremely stable small disulfide-rich inhibitor and provides the basis for its redesign for biomedical applications.

  9. Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin attenuates the cytotoxicity of sunitinib in cardiomyocytes via inhibition of the autophagy pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Takayuki; Uesugi, Mai; Takase, Kazuma; Miyamoto, Norimasa; Sawada, Kohei

    2017-08-15

    Sunitinib malate (sunitinib) is an orally available, multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor with antitumor and antiangiogenic activities. Although sunitinib is effective for the treatment of patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor, advanced renal cell carcinoma, or pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, adverse cardiac events associated with sunitinib administration have been reported. Here, we examined the effect of geldanamycin, an inhibitor of heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, on sunitinib-induced cytotoxicity in cardiomyocytes. First, we found that treatment with geldanamycin or other Hsp90 inhibitors (tanespimycin, ganetespib, or BIIB021) significantly attenuated sunitinib-induced cytotoxicity in rat H9c2 cardiomyocytes, suggesting a drug-class effect of Hsp90 inhibitors. We then examined the mechanisms underlying sunitinib-induced cytotoxicity and found that sunitinib induced autophagy in H9c2 cells and that pretreatment with geldanamycin inhibited the induction of autophagy by promoting degradation of the autophagy-related proteins Atg7, Beclin-1, and ULK1. Pharmacological assessment with autophagy inhibitors confirmed that geldanamycin attenuated the cytotoxicity of sunitinib by interfering with autophagy. In addition, we found that the molecular chaperone Hsp70, which is induced by geldanamycin, was not involved in the attenuation of sunitinib-induced cytotoxicity. Finally, to provide more clinically relevant data, we confirmed that geldanamycin attenuated sunitinib-induced cytotoxicity in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. Together, these data suggest that geldanamycin attenuates sunitinib-induced cytotoxicity in cardiomyocytes by inhibiting the autophagy pathway. Thus, the further investigation of combination or sequential treatment with an Hsp90 inhibitor and sunitinib is warranted as a potential strategy of attenuating the cardiotoxicity associated with sunitinib administration in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  10. Identification of angular naphthopyrones from the Philippine echinoderm Comanthus species as inhibitors of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovolou, Yvonni; Ebada, Sherif Saeed; Wätjen, Wim; Proksch, Peter

    2011-04-25

    The redox-sensitive nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) signaling pathway is an important cellular pathway often misregulated in various cancer cells. Therefore, blockade of NF-κB signaling in cancer cells presents a promising strategy and enormous effort has been invested to identify potent and specific inhibitors. The aim of this study was the identification of new compounds derived from marine organisms that act as NF-κB inhibitors and to identify their mechanism of action. In the present work a bioassay-guided investigation of a Philippine specimen of the marine echinoderm Comanthus sp. yielded ten compounds evenly divided into anthraquinones and naphthopyrones. From these compounds only two naphthopyrones, comaparvin and 6-methoxycomaparvin exhibited noteworthy inhibitory activity against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) induced NF-κB activation in rat hepatoma cells and human breast cancer cells. Comaparvin at concentrations between 50μM and 100μM reduces chymotrypsin-like proteasomal activity, blocks nuclear translocation of NF-κB and effectively inhibits TNF-α induced IκB phosphorylation suggesting a role of this compound in targeting IκB kinase (IKK). Furthermore, comaparvin sensitized cancer cells to apoptotic effects mediated by the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. These results correlate with downregulation of TNF-α induced expression of protective NF-κB target genes like MnSOD, XIAP or A20. In conclusion we identified the naphthopyrone comaparvin isolated from the marine echinoderm Comanthus sp. as a new inhibitor of the NF-κB signaling pathway acting by targeting both proteasome function and IκB phosphorylation likely by direct inhibitory effect on IKKβ activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español What Is ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  12. Anemia of chronic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000565.htm Anemia of chronic disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... body tissues. There are many types of anemia. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is anemia that is found in people ...

  13. Activation of mPTP-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis pathway by a novel pan HDAC inhibitor resminostat in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Meili [Department of Infectious Disease, Linyi People’s Hospital, Linyi (China); Shi, Wenhong [Department of Radiotherapy, Linyi Tumor Hospital, Linyi (China); Li, Zhengling [Department of Nursing, Tengzhou Central People’s Hospital, Tengzhou (China); Liu, Haiyan, E-mail: liuhaiyanlinyi5@sina.com [Department of Nursing, Linyi People’s Hospital, No. 27 Jiefang Road, Linyi 276000, Shandong (China)

    2016-09-02

    Over-expression and aberrant activation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) are often associated with poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we evaluated the potential anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell activity by resminostat, a novel pan HDAC inhibitor (HDACi). We demonstrated that resminostat induced potent cytotoxic and anti-proliferative activity against established HCC cell lines (HepG2, HepB3, SMMC-7721) and patient-derived primary HCC cells. Further, resminostat treatment in HCC cells activated mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP)-dependent apoptosis pathway, which was evidenced by physical association of cyclophilin-D and adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT-1), mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome C release and caspase-9 activation. Intriguingly, the mPTP blockers (sanglifehrin A and cyclosporine A), shRNA knockdown of cyclophilin-D or the caspase-9 inhibitor dramatically attenuated resminostat-induced HCC cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity. Reversely, HCC cells with exogenous cyclophilin-D over-expression were hyper-sensitive to resminostat. Intriguingly, a low concentration of resminostat remarkably potentiated sorafenib-induced mitochondrial apoptosis pathway activation, leading to a profound cytotoxicity in HCC cells. The results of this preclinical study indicate that resminostat (or plus sorafenib) could be further investigated as a valuable anti-HCC strategy. - Highlights: • Resminostat inhibits human HCC cell survival and proliferation. • Resminostat activates mPTP-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis pathway in HCC cells. • Resminostat potentiates sorafenib-induced mitochondrial apoptosis pathway activation. • mPTP or caspase-9 inhibition attenuates apoptosis by resminostat or plus sorafenib.

  14. Impact of the Smoothened inhibitor, IPI-926, on smoothened ciliary localization and Hedgehog pathway activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Marisa O; Campbell, Veronica T; Harari, Joseph A; Tibbitts, Thomas T; Proctor, Jennifer L; Whitebread, Nigel; Conley, James M; White, Kerry F; Kutok, Jeffery L; Read, Margaret A; McGovern, Karen; Faia, Kerrie L

    2014-01-01

    A requisite step for canonical Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activation by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand is accumulation of Smoothened (Smo) to the primary cilium (PC). Activation of the Hh pathway has been implicated in a broad range of cancers, and several Smo antagonists are being assessed clinically, one of which is approved for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma. Recent reports demonstrate that various Smo antagonists differentially impact Smo localization to the PC while still exerting inhibitory activity. In contrast to other synthetic small molecule Smo antagonists, the natural product cyclopamine binds to and promotes ciliary accumulation of Smo and "primes" cells for Hh pathway hyper-responsiveness after compound withdrawal. We compared the properties of IPI-926, a semi-synthetic cyclopamine analog, to cyclopamine with regard to potency, ciliary Smo accumulation, and Hh pathway activity after compound withdrawal. Like cyclopamine, IPI-926 promoted accumulation of Smo to the PC. However, in contrast to cyclopamine, IPI-926 treatment did not prime cells for hyper-responsiveness to Shh stimulation after compound withdrawal, but instead demonstrated continuous inhibition of signaling. By comparing the levels of drug-induced ciliary Smo accumulation with the degree of Hh pathway activity after compound withdrawal, we propose that a critical threshold of ciliary Smo is necessary for "priming" activity to occur. This "priming" appears achievable with cyclopamine, but not IPI-926, and is cell-line dependent. Additionally, IPI-926 activity was evaluated in a murine tumor xenograft model and a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship was examined to assess for in vivo evidence of Hh pathway hyper-responsiveness. Plasma concentrations of IPI-926 correlated with the degree and duration of Hh pathway suppression, and pathway activity did not exceed baseline levels out to 96 hours post dose. The overall findings suggest that IPI-926 possesses unique biophysical

  15. Discovery and characterization of a potent Wnt and hedgehog signaling pathways dual inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haikuo; Chen, Qin; Zhu, Fang; Zheng, Jiyue; Li, Jiajun; Zhang, Hongjian; Chen, Shuaishuai; Xing, Haimei; Luo, Lusong; Zheng, Long Tai; He, Sudan; Zhang, Xiaohu

    2018-04-10

    Embryonic stem cell pathways such as hedgehog and Wnt pathways are central to the tumorigenic properties of cancer stem cells (CSC). Since CSCs are characterized by their ability to self-renew, form differentiated progeny, and develop resistance to anticancer therapies, targeting the Wnt and hedgehog signaling pathways has been an important strategy for cancer treatment. Although molecules targeting either Wnt or hedgehog are common, to the best of our knowledge, those targeting both pathways have not been documented. Here we report a small molecule (compound 1) that inhibits both Wnt (IC 50  = 0.5 nM) and hedgehog (IC 50  = 71 nM) pathways based on reporter gene assays. We further identified that the molecular target of 1 for Wnt pathway inhibition was porcupine (a member of the membrane-bound O-acyltransferase family of proteins), a post-translational modification node in Wnt signaling; while the target of 1 mitigating hedgehog pathway was Smoothened, a key G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) mediating hedgehog signal transduction. Preliminary analysis of structure-activity-relationship identified key functional elements for hedgehog/Wnt inhibition. In in vivo studies, compound 1 demonstrated good oral exposure and bioavailability while eliciting no overt toxicity in mice. An important consideration in cancer treatment is the potential therapeutic escape through compensatory activation of an interconnected pathway when only one signaling pathway is inhibited. Toward this end, compound 1 may not only lead to the development of new therapeutics for Wnt and hedgehog related cancers, but may also help to develop potential cancer treatment which needs to target Wnt and hedgehog signaling simultaneously. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Bowman-Birk inhibitor affects pathways associated with energy metabolism in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) is toxic when fed to certain insects, including the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Dietary BBI has been demonstrated to slow growth and increase insect mortality by inhibiting the digestive enzymes trypsin and chymotrypsin, resulting in a reduced supply of amino acid...

  17. The Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Pathway, Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain Protein Inhibitors, and Their Roles in Bone Repair and Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs are oxygen-dependent transcriptional activators that play crucial roles in angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, energy metabolism, and cell fate decisions. The group of enzymes that can catalyse the hydroxylation reaction of HIF-1 is prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs. PHD inhibitors (PHIs activate the HIF pathway by preventing degradation of HIF-α via inhibiting PHDs. Osteogenesis and angiogenesis are tightly coupled during bone repair and regeneration. Numerous studies suggest that HIFs and their target gene, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, are critical regulators of angiogenic-osteogenic coupling. In this brief perspective, we review current studies about the HIF pathway and its role in bone repair and regeneration, as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. Additionally, we briefly discuss the therapeutic manipulation of HIFs and VEGF in bone repair and bone tumours. This review will expand our knowledge of biology of HIFs, PHDs, PHD inhibitors, and bone regeneration, and it may also aid the design of novel therapies for accelerating bone repair and regeneration or inhibiting bone tumours.

  18. Concurrent epigenetic silencing of wnt/β-catenin pathway inhibitor genes in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskalev, Evgeny A; Pötz, Oliver; Joos, Thomas O; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Luckert, Katrin; Vorobjev, Ivan A; Mastitsky, Sergey E; Gladkikh, Aleena A; Stephan, Achim; Schrenk, Marita; Kaplanov, Kamil D; Kalashnikova, Olga B

    2012-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signalling is aberrantly activated in primary B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). Epigenetic silencing of pathway inhibitor genes may be a mechanism for its activation. In this study, we investigated systematically and quantitatively the methylation status of 12 Wnt/β-catenin pathway inhibitor genes – CDH1, DACT1, DKK1, DKK2, DKK3, DKK4, SFRP1, SFRP2, SFRP3, SFRP4, SFRP5 and WIF1 – in the cell lines EHEB and MEC-1 as well as patient samples. Quantification of DNA methylation was performed by means of bisulphite pyrosequencing and confirmed by bisulphite Sanger sequencing. Gene expression was analysed by qPCR using GAPDH as internal control. E-cadherin and β-catenin protein quantification was carried out by microsphere-based immunoassays. Methylation differences observed between the patient and control groups were tested using generalised least squares models. For 10 genes, a higher methylation level was observed in tumour material. Only DKK4 exhibited similarly high methylation levels in both tumour and normal specimens, while DACT1 was always essentially unmethylated. However, also for these inhibitors, treatment of cells with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2´-deoxycytidine resulted in an induction of their expression, as shown by quantitative PCR, suggesting an indirect epigenetic control of activity. While the degree of demethylation and its transcriptional consequences differed between the genes, there was an overall high correlation of demethylation and increased activity. Protein expression studies revealed that no constitutive Wnt/β-catenin signalling occurred in the cell lines, which is in discrepancy with results from primary CLL. However, treatment with 5-aza-2´-deoxycytidine caused accumulation of β-catenin. Simultaneously, E-cadherin expression was strongly induced, leading to the formation of a complex with β-catenin and thus demonstrating its epigenetically regulated inhibition effect. The results suggest an

  19. Hedgehog pathway inhibition in chondrosarcoma using the smoothened inhibitor IPI-926 directly inhibits sarcoma cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Veronica T; Nadesan, Puviindran; Ali, S Amanda; Wang, Chang Ye Yale; Whetstone, Heather; Poon, Raymond; Wei, Qingxia; Keilty, John; Proctor, Jennifer; Wang, Lauren W; Apte, Suneel S; McGovern, Karen; Alman, Benjamin A; Wunder, Jay S

    2014-05-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) pathway inhibition in cancer has been evaluated in both the ligand-independent and ligand-dependent settings, where Hh signaling occurs either directly within the cancer cells or within the nonmalignant cells of the tumor microenvironment. Chondrosarcoma is a malignant tumor of cartilage in which there is ligand-dependent activation of Hh signaling. IPI-926 is a potent, orally delivered small molecule that inhibits Hh pathway signaling by binding to Smoothened (SMO). Here, the impact of Hh pathway inhibition on primary chondrosarcoma xenografts was assessed. Mice bearing primary human chondrosarcoma xenografts were treated with IPI-926. The expression levels of known Hh pathway genes, in both the tumor and stroma, and endpoint tumor volumes were measured. Gene expression profiling of tumors from IPI-926-treated mice was conducted to identify potential novel Hh target genes. Hh target genes were studied to determine their contribution to the chondrosarcoma neoplastic phenotype. IPI-926 administration results in downmodulation of the Hh pathway in primary chondrosarcoma xenografts, as demonstrated by evaluation of the Hh target genes GLI1 and PTCH1, as well as inhibition of tumor growth. Chondrosarcomas exhibited autocrine and paracrine Hh signaling, and both were affected by IPI-926. Decreased tumor growth is accompanied by histopathologic changes, including calcification and loss of tumor cells. Gene profiling studies identified genes differentially expressed in chondrosarcomas following IPI-926 treatment, one of which, ADAMTSL1, regulates chondrosarcoma cell proliferation. These studies provide further insight into the role of the Hh pathway in chondrosarcoma and provide a scientific rationale for targeting the Hh pathway in chondrosarcoma.

  20. Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP proteins in pediatric leukemia: Molecular pathways and novel approaches to therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone eFulda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP proteins are a family of proteins with antiapoptotic functions that contribute to the evasion of apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death. IAP proteins are expressed at high levels in a variety of human cancers including childhood acute leukemia. This elevated expression has been associated with unfavorable prognosis and poor outcome. Therefore, IAP proteins are currently exploited as therapeutic targets for cancer drug discovery. Consequently, small-molecule inhibitors or antisense oligonucleotides directed against IAP proteins have been developed over the last years. Indeed, IAP antagonists proved to exhibit in vitro and in vivo antitumor activities against childhood pediatric leukemia in several preclinical studies. Thus, targeting IAP proteins represents a promising molecular targeted strategy to overcome apoptosis resistance in childhood leukemia which warrants further exploitation.

  1. Inborn anemias in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an α-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes

  2. [Anemias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnevsky, A V; Esaulenko, I E; Ovsyannikov, E S; Zhusina, Yu G

    2016-01-01

    According to different studies, anemia occurs in 8--33% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The paper describes the most important various causes of anemia in COPD, such as systemic inflammation and endocrine disorders, the use of some medications (theophylline, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), frequent COPD exacerbations, and long-term oxygen therapy. Lower hemoglobin levels in COPD patients are accompanied by increased shortness of breath, reduced exercise tolerance, and lower quality of life. Furthermore, some investigations have shown that anemia is an independent predictor of death in patients with COPD. In spite of the fact that anemia may be successfully in these patients, the evidence suggesting the importance of its impact on the prognosis of COPD is limited.

  3. Next-generation mTOR inhibitors in clinical oncology: how pathway complexity informs therapeutic strategy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wander, Seth A

    2011-04-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a PI3K-related kinase that regulates cell growth, proliferation, and survival via mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2. The mTOR pathway is often aberrantly activated in cancers. While hypoxia, nutrient deprivation, and DNA damage restrain mTORC1 activity, multiple genetic events constitutively activate mTOR in cancers. Here we provide a brief overview of the signaling pathways up- and downstream of mTORC1 and -2, and discuss the insights into therapeutic anticancer targets - both those that have been tried in the clinic with limited success and those currently under clinical development - that knowledge of these pathways gives us.

  4. Novel bioassay for the discovery of inhibitors of the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP and terpenoid pathways leading to carotenoid biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Corniani

    Full Text Available The 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP pathway leads to the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate in plastids. It is a major branch point providing precursors for the synthesis of carotenoids, tocopherols, plastoquinone and the phytyl chain of chlorophylls, as well as the hormones abscisic acid and gibberellins. Consequently, disruption of this pathway is harmful to plants. We developed an in vivo bioassay that can measure the carbon flow through the carotenoid pathway. Leaf cuttings are incubated in the presence of a phytoene desaturase inhibitor to induce phytoene accumulation. Any compound reducing the level of phytoene accumulation is likely to interfere with either one of the steps in the MEP pathway or the synthesis of geranylgeranyl diphosphate. This concept was tested with known inhibitors of steps of the MEP pathway. The specificity of this in vivo bioassay was also verified by testing representative herbicides known to target processes outside of the MEP and carotenoid pathways. This assay enables the rapid screen of new inhibitors of enzymes preceding the synthesis of phytoene, though there are some limitations related to the non-specific effect of some inhibitors on this assay.

  5. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Induces the Expression of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor-1 (TFPI-1 in Human Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chinetti-Gbaguidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue factor (TF is the initiator of the blood coagulation cascade after interaction with the activated factor VII (FVIIa. Moreover, the TF/FVIIa complex also activates intracellular signalling pathways leading to the production of inflammatory cytokines. The TF/FVIIa complex is inhibited by the tissue factor pathway inhibitor-1 (TFPI-1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is a transcription factor that, together with PPARα and PPARβ/δ, controls macrophage functions. However, whether PPARγ activation modulates the expression of TFP1-1 in human macrophages is not known. Here we report that PPARγ activation increases the expression of TFPI-1 in human macrophages in vitro as well as in vivo in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The induction of TFPI-1 expression by PPARγ ligands, an effect shared by the activation of PPARα and PPARβ/δ, occurs also in proinflammatory M1 and in anti-inflammatory M2 polarized macrophages. As a functional consequence, treatment with PPARγ ligands significantly reduces the inflammatory response induced by FVIIa, as measured by variations in the IL-8, MMP-2, and MCP-1 expression. These data identify a novel role for PPARγ in the control of TF the pathway.

  6. Primary hyperparathyroidism and anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falko, J M; Guy, J T; Smith, R E; Mazzaferri, E L

    1976-08-01

    The frequency of anemia associated with primary hyperparathyroidism is uncertain. When anemia does occur, its mechanisms are obscure. Two patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and moderate normochromic, normocytic, reticulocytopenic anemia were studied in detail. Both had results of ferrokinetic studies that were consistent with the anemia of chronic disease; one had low serum iron concentrations and reduced normoblastic iron incorporation. Anemia in both patients resolved after parathyroidectomy. Clinical records of 100 nonuremic patients with primary hyperparathyroidism were reviewed and three other anemic patients were found. The cause of anemia in two of these individuals was bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal system, and the third had folate deficiency attributable to chronic alchoholism.

  7. Increasing the radiosensitivity of tumours in an hypoxic environment using inhibitors of the pentose phosphate pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahasrabudhe, M.B.; Bhonsle, S.R.; Krishnamurti, K.; Tilak, B.D.

    1977-01-01

    Rapidly growing tumours contain few blood vessels in the tumour mass. Cells in such tumours obtain nutrients and oxygen from the periphery by diffusion, resulting in a diminishing oxygen and nutrient gradient from the periphery to centre of the tumour mass. In normal tissues, oxygen is utilized via a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle; in tumour cells oxygen is utilized via a hexose monophosphate (HMP) pathway and through the TCA cycle at a 30% reduced level. Interference with the HMP pathway selectively inhibits the utilization of oxygen by tumour cells, thus increasing the availability of oxygen to hypoxic cells situated deeper in the tumour mass. This effect has been exploited for increasing the radiosensitivity of tumour cells situated in an hypoxic environment. The influence of sixteen potential antimetabolites on the HMP pathway has been studied. Of these, six compounds, namely, (1) 2-carboxy 5-hydroxymethyl thiophene, (2) the sodium salt of 2:5 dicarbethoxy 3:4 dihydroxy thiophene, (3) the dihydrazide of 2:5 dicarboxy thiophene, (4) the dihydrazide of 3:4 dimethoxy 2:5 dicarboxy thiophene, (5) trithiocyanuric acid, and (6) cyanuric trithioglycollic acid showed an inhibiting effect on the HMP pathway without any influence on the TCA cycle. Influence of administration of compounds (1), (2) and (4) prior to radiation on the growth of transplanted fibrosarcomas in mice has been studied and is reported here. These three compounds showed marked potentiation of radiosensitivity of tumours. (author)

  8. Kinase pathway dependence in primary human leukemias determined by rapid inhibitor screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Tyner (Jeffrey); W.F. Yang (Wayne); A. Bankhead III (Armand); G. Fan (Guang); L.B. Fletcher (Luke); J. Bryant (Jade); J.M. Glover (Jason); B.H. Chang (Bill); S.E. Spurgeon (Stephen); W.H. Fleming (William); T. Kovacsovics; J. Gotlib (Jason); S.T. Oh (Stephen); M.W.N. Deininger (Michael W.); C.M. Zwaan (Christian Michel); M.L. den Boer (Monique); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); T. O'Hare (Thomas); B.J. Druker (Brian); M.M. Loriaux (Marc)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractKinases are dysregulated in most cancers, but the frequency of specific kinase mutations is low, indicating a complex etiology in kinase dysregulation. Here, we report a strategy to rapidly identify functionally important kinase targets, irrespective of the etiology of kinase pathway

  9. Effects of different progestin regimens in hormone replacement therapy on blood coagulation factor VII and tissue factor pathway inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, E-M; Skouby, S O.; Andersen, L F

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces cardiovascular risk, but an early increased risk was reported in women with coronary heart disease. In such women the arterial intima can express tissue factor, and changes in coagulation factor VII (factor VII) and tissue factor...... pathway inhibitor (TFPI) may be deleterious. METHODS: We measured factor VII clotting activity, activated factor VII, and concentrations of factor VII and TFPI during 12 months in healthy post-menopausal women randomized to: (i). cyclic oral estrogen/progestin (n = 25); (ii). long-cycle oral estrogen...... after progestin intake. The integrated response, AUC, for TFPI was significantly lower in the HRT groups compared with the reference group. CONCLUSION: The observed changes may increase the early thrombotic risk associated with HRT use. Udgivelsesdato: 2002-Dec...

  10. Effects of cattle slurry and nitrification inhibitor application on spatial soil O2 dynamics and N2O production pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Quan Van; Wu, Di; Kong, Xianwang

    2017-01-01

    Application of cattle slurry to grassland soil has environmental impacts such as ammonia volatilization and greenhouse gas emissions. The extent, however, depends on application method and soil conditions through their effects on infiltration and oxygen (O2) availability during subsequent...... decomposition. Here, we applied O2 planar optode and N2O isotopomer techniques to investigate the linkage between soil O2 dynamics and N2O production pathways in soils treated with cattle slurry (treatment CS) and tested the effect of the nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethyl pyrazole phosphate, DMPP (treatment...... produced during incubation. Over 18 days, the application of DMPP substantially mitigated N2O emissions by 60% compared to untreated CS in the investigated system which in terms of aeration status corresponded to wet or compacted grassland soil. Using this novel combination of O2 planar optode imaging...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for iron-deficiency anemia, especially if they have: A history of iron-deficiency anemia Heavy blood loss during ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of blood ... iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition because they need twice ...

  13. Anemia in the Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Version Blood Problems in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Polycythemia in the Newborn (See ... faster. Blood Problems in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Polycythemia in the Newborn NOTE: ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you lose iron. ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... and is recruiting by invitation only. View more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the first prenatal visit. For pregnant women, medical care during pregnancy usually includes screening for anemia. Also, ... while checking for other problems. Specialists Involved Primary care doctors often diagnose and treat iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment ... ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... items, such as ice, dirt, paint, or starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or ... Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all ... growth and development, and behavioral problems. Signs and Symptoms of Iron Deficiency Signs and symptoms of iron ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... can lead to several conditions: irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias , a heart murmur , an enlarged heart, or even ... More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... drawings also can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, ... more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat the ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic female carriers who have heavy menstrual ... Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1.54MB] Cardiovascular Health Study Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for the condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia ... periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and ... of the mouth, an enlarged spleen, and frequent infections. People who have iron-deficiency anemia may have ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have iron-deficiency anemia, you'll have a high level of transferrin that has no iron. Other ... may include dietary changes and supplements, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require a blood ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and paler than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency ... if you have iron-deficiency anemia or another type of anemia. You may be diagnosed with iron- ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and ... Internal bleeding (bleeding inside the body) also may lead to iron-deficiency anemia. This type of blood ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs and ... much of the transferrin in your blood isn't carrying iron. If you have iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, your ... and children talk about their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... specialists also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs ... information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, your ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... effects on brain health, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends testing all infants for anemia at 1 ... heart murmur , an enlarged heart, or even heart failure . In infants and young children, signs of anemia ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ... Treatment may need to be done in a hospital. The goals of treating iron-deficiency anemia are ...

  20. Anemia in the Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview of Biliary Atresia Additional Content Medical News Anemia in the Newborn By Andrew W. Walter, MS ... for the Professional Version Blood Problems in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ... iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you may get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is ...

  3. The Anemias of Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  5. Sickle cell anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    ŘÍHOVÁ, Tereza

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is about the disease called sickle cell anemia, or drepanocytosis. In this thesis is described the history of the disease, pathophysiology, laboratory features, various clinical features, diferencial diagnosis, quality of life in sickle cell anemia and therapy.

  6. Sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  7. Side Effects: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia is a side effect of cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and radiation therapy. It can make women and men feel fatigued, dizzy, and short of breath. Learn how to manage fatigue caused by anemia during cancer treatment.

  8. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as ice, dirt, paint, or starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated ... Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your ...

  10. Development of inhibitors of the 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway enzymes as potential anti-infective agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, Tiziana; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2014-12-11

    Important pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agents of tuberculosis and malaria, respectively, and plants, utilize the 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP, 5) pathway for the biosynthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate (1) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (2), the universal precursors of isoprenoids, while humans exclusively utilize the alternative mevalonate pathway for the synthesis of 1 and 2. This distinct distribution, together with the fact that the MEP pathway is essential in numerous organisms, makes the enzymes of the MEP pathway attractive drug targets for the development of anti-infective agents and herbicides. Herein, we review the inhibitors reported over the past 2 years, in the context of the most important older developments and with a particular focus on the results obtained against enzymes of pathogenic organisms. We will also discuss new discoveries in terms of structural and mechanistic features, which can help to guide a rational development of inhibitors.

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI resources Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease ( ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart- ... infections Motor or cognitive development delays in ... with chronic conditions, iron-deficiency anemia can make their condition worse or result ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a ... Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Anemia (MedlinePlus) "Dietary ...

  17. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  19. Anemia: Progress in molecular mechanisms and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review recent insights into how red blood cells (RBCs) are produced, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various forms of anemia, and novel therapies derived from these findings. It is likely that these new insights, mainly arising from basic scientific studies, will contribute immensely to understanding frequently debilitating forms of anemia and the ability to treat affected patients. Major worldwide diseases that may stand to benefit from the new advances include the hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease), rare genetic disorders of red blood cell production, and anemias associated with chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and cancer. Promising new treatment approaches include drugs that target recently defined pathways in red blood cell production, iron metabolism, and fetal globin gene expression, as well as gene therapies using improved viral vectors and newly developed genome editing technologies. PMID:25742458

  20. Anemia: progress in molecular mechanisms and therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Vijay G; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2015-03-01

    Anemia is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review recent insights into how red blood cells (RBCs) are produced, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various forms of anemia, and novel therapies derived from these findings. It is likely that these new insights, mainly arising from basic scientific studies, will contribute immensely to both the understanding of frequently debilitating forms of anemia and the ability to treat affected patients. Major worldwide diseases that are likely to benefit from new advances include the hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease); rare genetic disorders of RBC production; and anemias associated with chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and cancer. Promising new approaches to treatment include drugs that target recently defined pathways in RBC production, iron metabolism, and fetal globin-family gene expression, as well as gene therapies that use improved viral vectors and newly developed genome editing technologies.

  1. Platelet-Derived Short-Chain Polyphosphates Enhance the Inactivation of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor by Activated Coagulation Factor XI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Puy

    Full Text Available Factor (F XI supports both normal human hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. Activated FXI (FXIa promotes thrombin generation by enzymatic activation of FXI, FIX, FX, and FV, and inactivation of alpha tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPIα, in vitro. Some of these reactions are now known to be enhanced by short-chain polyphosphates (SCP derived from activated platelets. These SCPs act as a cofactor for the activation of FXI and FV by thrombin and FXIa, respectively. Since SCPs have been shown to inhibit the anticoagulant function of TFPIα, we herein investigated whether SCPs could serve as cofactors for the proteolytic inactivation of TFPIα by FXIa, further promoting the efficiency of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation to generate thrombin.Purified soluble SCP was prepared by size-fractionation of sodium polyphosphate. TFPIα proteolysis was analyzed by western blot. TFPIα activity was measured as inhibition of FX activation and activity in coagulation and chromogenic assays. SCPs significantly accelerated the rate of inactivation of TFPIα by FXIa in both purified systems and in recalcified plasma. Moreover, platelet-derived SCP accelerated the rate of inactivation of platelet-derived TFPIα by FXIa. TFPIα activity was not affected by SCP in recalcified FXI-depleted plasma.Our data suggest that SCP is a cofactor for TFPIα inactivation by FXIa, thus, expanding the range of hemostatic FXIa substrates that may be affected by the cofactor functions of platelet-derived SCP.

  2. The effector AWR5 from the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is an inhibitor of the TOR signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Crina; Li, Liang; Gil, Sergio; Tatjer, Laura; Hashii, Keisuke; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Coll, Núria S; Ariño, Joaquín; Valls, Marc

    2016-06-03

    Bacterial pathogens possess complex type III effector (T3E) repertoires that are translocated inside the host cells to cause disease. However, only a minor proportion of these effectors have been assigned a function. Here, we show that the T3E AWR5 from the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is an inhibitor of TOR, a central regulator in eukaryotes that controls the switch between cell growth and stress responses in response to nutrient availability. Heterologous expression of AWR5 in yeast caused growth inhibition and autophagy induction coupled to massive transcriptomic changes, unmistakably reminiscent of TOR inhibition by rapamycin or nitrogen starvation. Detailed genetic analysis of these phenotypes in yeast, including suppression of AWR5-induced toxicity by mutation of CDC55 and TPD3, encoding regulatory subunits of the PP2A phosphatase, indicated that AWR5 might exert its function by directly or indirectly inhibiting the TOR pathway upstream PP2A. We present evidence in planta that this T3E caused a decrease in TOR-regulated plant nitrate reductase activity and also that normal levels of TOR and the Cdc55 homologues in plants are required for R. solanacearum virulence. Our results suggest that the TOR pathway is a bona fide T3E target and further prove that yeast is a useful platform for T3E function characterisation.

  3. Activity of mevalonate pathway inhibitors against breast and ovarian cancers in the ATP-based tumour chemosensitivity assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Louise A; Kurbacher, Christian M; Glaysher, Sharon; Fernando, Augusta; Reichelt, Ralf; Dexel, Susanne; Reinhold, Uwe; Cree, Ian A

    2009-01-01

    Previous data suggest that lipophilic statins such as fluvastatin and N-bisphosphonates such as zoledronic acid, both inhibitors of the mevalonate metabolic pathway, have anti-cancer effects in vitro and in patients. We have examined the effect of fluvastatin alone and in combination with zoledronic acid in the ATP-based tumour chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA) for effects on breast and ovarian cancer tumour-derived cells. Both zoledronic acid and fluvastatin showed activity in the ATP-TCA against breast and ovarian cancer, though fluvastatin alone was less active, particularly against breast cancer. The combination of zoledronic acid and fluvastatin was more active than either single agent in the ATP-TCA with some synergy against breast and ovarian cancer tumour-derived cells. Sequential drug experiments showed that pre-treatment of ovarian tumour cells with fluvastatin resulted in decreased sensitivity to zoledronic acid. Addition of mevalonate pathway components with zoledronic acid with or without fluvastatin showed little effect, while mevalonate did reduced inhibition due to fluvastatin. These data suggest that the combination of zoledronic acid and fluvastatin may have activity against breast and ovarian cancer based on direct anti-cancer cell effects. A clinical trial to test this is in preparation

  4. Inhibition of multiple pathogenic pathways by histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA in a corneal alkali-burn injury model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyu; Zhou, Qinbo; Hanus, Jakub; Anderson, Chastain; Zhang, Hongmei; Dellinger, Michael; Brekken, Rolf; Wang, Shusheng

    2013-01-01

    Neovascularization (NV) in the cornea is a major cause of vision impairment and corneal blindness. Hemangiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis induced by inflammation underlie the pathogenesis of corneal NV. The current mainstay treatment, corticosteroid, treats the inflammation associated with corneal NV, but is not satisfactory due to such side effects as cataract and the increase in intraocular pressure. It is imperative to develop a novel therapy that specifically targets the hemangiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and inflammation pathways underlying corneal NV. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been in clinical trials for cancer and other diseases. In particular, HDACi suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, vorinostat, Zolinza) has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The functional mechanism of SAHA in cancer and especially in corneal NV remains unclear. Here, we show that topical application of SAHA inhibits neovascularization in an alkali-burn corneal injury model. Mechanistically, SAHA inhibits corneal NV by repressing hemangiogenesis, inflammation pathways and previously overlooked lymphangiogenesis. Topical SAHA is well tolerated on the ocular surface. In addition, the potency of SAHA in corneal NV appears to be comparable to the current steroid therapy. SAHA may possess promising therapeutic potential in alkali-burn corneal injury and other inflammatory neovascularization disorders. PMID:23186311

  5. In vitro resistance selection with doravirine (MK-1439), a novel nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor with distinct mutation development pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Meizhen; Wang, Deping; Grobler, Jay A; Hazuda, Daria J; Miller, Michael D; Lai, Ming-Tain

    2015-01-01

    Doravirine (DOR, formerly known as MK-1439) is a human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1) nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) that is currently in phase 2b clinical trials. In vitro resistance selection of subtype B virus (MT4-green fluorescent protein [GFP] cells), as well as subtype A and C viruses (MT4-GFP/CCR5 cells) was conducted with DOR, rilpivirine (RPV), and efavirine (EFV) under low-multiplicity-of-infection conditions in a 96-well format. Resistance selection was performed with escalating concentrations of the NNRTIs ranging from the 95% effective concentration (1 × EC(95)) to 1,000 × EC(95) in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum. In the resistance selection of subtype B virus with DOR, a V106A mutant virus led to two mutation pathways, followed by the emergence separately of either F227L or L234I. In the resistance selection of subtype A and C viruses, similar mutation development pathways were detected, in which a V106A or V106M mutant was also the starting virus in the pathways. Mutations that are commonly associated with RPV and EFV in clinical settings were also identified in subtype B viruses such as the E138K and K103N mutants, respectively, in this in vitro resistance selection study. The susceptibility of subtype B mutant viruses selected by DOR, RPV, and EFV to NNRTIs was evaluated. Results suggest that mutant viruses selected by DOR are susceptible to RPV and EFV and mutants selected by RPV and EFV are susceptible to DOR. When the replication capacity of the V106A mutant was compared with that of the wild-type (WT) virus, the mutant virus was 4-fold less fit than the WT virus. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Impact of dialysis technique on renal anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichi, Vincenzo; Scatena, Alessia; Paoletti, Sabrina; Migliori, Massimiliano

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a significant complication in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a major cause of death in dialysis patients. Clinical studies have shown that anemia is associated with reduced survival in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis. Furthermore, an association between anemia and adverse cardiovascular outcomes has also been observed in patients with earlier stages of CKD not yet requiring dialysis. Although this fact still remains controversial, high-efficiency on-line hemodiafiltration (HDF) has been shown to improve anemia and to reduce the need for erythropoietin-stimulating agents in hemodialysis (HD) patients. This positive effect has been attributed to the fact that the convective methods might remove some protein-bound erythropoietic inhibitor substances. Moreover, in HD patients, renal anemia is linked to the inflammatory state of uremic syndrome. It is also worth nothing that the improvement in anemia is associated with a reduced inflammatory state in patients undergoing on-line HDF. Here, we have reviewed the current knowledge of the effect of dialysis technique on renal anemia. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Characterization of the sulfate uptake and assimilation pathway from Xanthomonas citri - targets for bacterial growth inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tambascia, C.; Balan, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Microorganisms require sulfur for growth and obtain it either for inorganic sulfate or organosulfur compounds. ATP-Binding Cassete (SulT family) or major facilitator superfamily-type (SulP) transporters are responsible for the sulfate transport into the cell. In Xanthomonas citri, the phytopathogenic bacterium that causes the canker citrus disease, there are no reports related to the importance of these transporters during in vitro or in vivo infection. We identified in X. citri genome all the genes that belong to the well-characterized cys regulon from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, which includes three ABC transporters and all the enzymes necessary for sulfate oxide reduction to sulfide and cysteine. Once these genes have been shown to be extremely important for bacteria growth and development in different environments, we chose the sbpcysWUA and cysDNCHIJG operons, which encodes the ABC inorganic sulfate ABC transporter and all the enzymes necessary for conversion of sulfate in cysteine, respectively. As a step for crystallization trials and resolution of their tridimensional structures, the referred genes were amplified and cloned into the cloning vector pGEM T-easy. In addition, using bioinformatics tools and molecular modeling we characterized all the protein functions as well as built tridimensional models of their structure for determination of the active sites. The importance of each protein is discussed aiming the discovery of a good target for development of inhibitors that could block the bacterium growth. (author)

  8. Characterization of the sulfate uptake and assimilation pathway from Xanthomonas citri - targets for bacterial growth inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tambascia, C.; Balan, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Microorganisms require sulfur for growth and obtain it either for inorganic sulfate or organosulfur compounds. ATP-Binding Cassete (SulT family) or major facilitator superfamily-type (SulP) transporters are responsible for the sulfate transport into the cell. In Xanthomonas citri, the phytopathogenic bacterium that causes the canker citrus disease, there are no reports related to the importance of these transporters during in vitro or in vivo infection. We identified in X. citri genome all the genes that belong to the well-characterized cys regulon from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, which includes three ABC transporters and all the enzymes necessary for sulfate oxide reduction to sulfide and cysteine. Once these genes have been shown to be extremely important for bacteria growth and development in different environments, we chose the sbpcysWUA and cysDNCHIJG operons, which encodes the ABC inorganic sulfate ABC transporter and all the enzymes necessary for conversion of sulfate in cysteine, respectively. As a step for crystallization trials and resolution of their tridimensional structures, the referred genes were amplified and cloned into the cloning vector pGEM T-easy. In addition, using bioinformatics tools and molecular modeling we characterized all the protein functions as well as built tridimensional models of their structure for determination of the active sites. The importance of each protein is discussed aiming the discovery of a good target for development of inhibitors that could block the bacterium growth. (author)

  9. The Levels of the Lectin Pathway Serine Protease MASP-1 and Its Complex Formation with C1 Inhibitor Are Linked to the Severity of Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Cecilie Bo; Csuka, Dorottya; Munthe-Fog, Lea

    2015-01-01

    C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) is known to form complexes with the lectin complement pathway serine proteases MASP-1 and MASP-2. Deficiency of C1-INH is associated with hereditary angioedema (HAE), an autosomal inherited disease characterized by swelling attacks caused by elevated levels of bradykinin. MASP...

  10. Genetically engineered fusion of MAP-1 and factor H domains 1-5 generates a potent dual upstream inhibitor of both the lectin and alternative complement pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordmaj, Mie Anemone; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Hein, Estrid

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of the complement cascade has emerged as an option for treatment of a range of diseases. Mannose-binding lectin/ficolin/collectin-associated protein (MAP-1) is a pattern recognition molecule (PRM)-associated inhibitor of the lectin pathway. The central regulator of the alternative path...

  11. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor in endothelial cells colocalizes with glycolipid microdomains/caveolae: Regulatory mechanism(s) of the anticoagulant properties of the endothelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupu, C.; Goodwin, C.A.; Westmuckett, A.D.; Emeis, J.J.; Scully, M.F.; Kakkar, V.V.; Lupu, F.

    1997-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), the main downregulator of the procoagulant activity of tissue factor·factor VIIa complex, locates in human endothelial cells (EC) in culture as well-defined clusters uniformly distributed both on the cell surface and intracellularly. We here demonstrate by

  12. Enhanced cerebrovascular expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 via the MEK/ERK pathway during cerebral ischemia in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maddahi, Aida; Chen, Qingwen; Edvinsson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    microscopy revealed enhanced expression of MMP-9, TIMP-1, and phosphorylated ERK1/2 in the smooth muscle cells of the ischemic MCA and associated intracerebral microvessels. The specific MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126, given intraperitoneal zero or 6 hours after the ischemic event, reduced the infarct volume......, are transcriptionally regulated via the MEK/ERK pathway....

  13. Therapeutic complement inhibition in complement-mediated hemolytic anemias: Past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risitano, Antonio M; Marotta, Serena

    2016-06-01

    The introduction in the clinic of anti-complement agents represented a major achievement which gave to physicians a novel etiologic treatment for different human diseases. Indeed, the first anti-complement agent eculizumab has changed the treatment paradigm of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), dramatically impacting its severe clinical course. In addition, eculizumab is the first agent approved for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS), a life-threatening inherited thrombotic microangiopathy. Nevertheless, such remarkable milestone in medicine has brought to the fore additional challenges for the scientific community. Indeed, the list of complement-mediated anemias is not limited to PNH and aHUS, and other human diseases can be considered for anti-complement treatment. They include other thrombotic microangiopathies, as well as some antibody-mediated hemolytic anemias. Furthermore, more than ten years of experience with eculizumab led to a better understanding of the individual steps of the complement cascade involved in the pathophysiology of different human diseases. Based on this, new unmet clinical needs are emerging; a number of different strategies are currently under development to improve current anti-complement treatment, trying to address these specific clinical needs. They include: (i) alternative anti-C5 agents, which may improve the heaviness of eculizumab treatment; (ii) broad-spectrum anti-C3 agents, which may improve the efficacy of anti-C5 treatment by intercepting the complement cascade upstream (i.e., preventing C3-mediated extravascular hemolysis in PNH); (iii) targeted inhibitors of selective complement activating pathways, which may prevent early pathogenic events of specific human diseases (e.g., anti-classical pathway for antibody-mediated anemias, or anti-alternative pathway for PNH and aHUS). Here we briefly summarize the status of art of current and future complement inhibition for different complement-mediated anemias

  14. [Iron dysregulation and anemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Katsuya

    2015-10-01

    Most iron in the body is utilized as a component of hemoglobin that delivers oxygen to the entire body. Under normal conditions, the iron balance is tightly regulated. However, iron dysregulation does occasionally occur; total iron content reductions cause iron deficiency anemia and overexpression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin disturbs iron utilization resulting in anemia of chronic disease. Conversely, the presence of anemia may ultimately lead to iron overload; for example, thalassemia, a common hereditary anemia worldwide, often requires transfusion, but long-term transfusions cause iron accumulation that leads to organ damage and other poor outcomes. On the other hand, there is a possibility that iron overload itself can cause anemia; iron chelation therapy for the post-transfusion iron overload observed in myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia improves dependency on transfusions in some cases. These observations reflect the extremely close relationship between anemias and iron metabolism.

  15. Novel acetylcholinesterase inhibitors from Zijuan tea and biosynthetic pathway of caffeoylated catechin in tea plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Fu, Xi-Wen; Dai, Xin-Long; Hua, Fang; Chu, Gang-Xiu; Chu, Ming-Jie; Hu, Feng-Lin; Ling, Tie-Jun; Gao, Li-Ping; Xie, Zhong-Wen; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Bao, Guan-Hu

    2017-12-15

    Zijuan tea is a special cultivar of Yunnan broad-leaf tea (Camellia sinensis var. assamica) with purple buds, leaves, and stems. Phytochemical study on this tea led to the discovery of three hydroxycinnamoylated catechins (HCCs) (1-3), seven other catechins (4-10), three proanthocyanidins (11-13), five flavones and flavone glycosides (14-18), two alkaloids (19, 20), one steroid (21), and one phenylpropanoid glycoside (22). The isolation and structural elucidation of the caffeoylated catechin (1) by means of spectroscopic techniques were described. We also provide the first evidence that 1 is synthesized via a two-step pathway in tea plant. The three HCCs (1-3) were investigated on their bioactivity through molecular modeling simulation and biochemical experiments. Our results show that they bind acetylcholinesterase (AChE) tightly and have strong AChE inhibitory activity with IC 50 value at 2.49, 11.41, 62.26μM, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor prevents airway obstruction, respiratory failure and death due to sulfur mustard analog inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancourt, Raymond C.; Veress, Livia A.; Ahmad, Aftab; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Rioux, Jacqueline S.; Garlick, Rhonda B.; White, Carl W.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes airway injury, with enhanced vascular permeability, coagulation, and airway obstruction. The objective of this study was to determine whether recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) could inhibit this pathogenic sequence. Methods Rats were exposed to the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) via nose-only aerosol inhalation. One hour later, TFPI (1.5 mg/kg) in vehicle, or vehicle alone, were instilled into the trachea. Arterial O2 saturation was monitored using pulse oximetry. Twelve hours after exposure, animals were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma analyzed for prothrombin, thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels, and fluid fibrinolytic capacity. Lung steady-state PAI-1 mRNA was measured by RT-PCR analysis. Airway-capillary leak was estimated by BALF protein and IgM, and by pleural fluid measurement. In additional animals, airway cast formation was assessed by microdissection and immunohistochemical detection of airway fibrin. Results Airway obstruction in the form of fibrin-containing casts were evident in central conducting airways of rats receiving CEES. TFPI decreased cast formation, and limited severe hypoxemia. Findings of reduced prothrombin consumption, and lower TAT complexes in BALF, demonstrated that TFPI acted to limit thrombin activation in airways. TFPI, however, did not appreciably affect CEES-induced airway protein leak, PAI-1 mRNA induction, or inhibition of the fibrinolytic activity present in airway surface liquid. Conclusions Intratracheal administration of TFPI limits airway obstruction, improves gas exchange, and prevents mortality in rats with sulfur mustard-analog-induced acute lung injury. PMID:23727623

  17. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor prevents airway obstruction, respiratory failure and death due to sulfur mustard analog inhalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rancourt, Raymond C., E-mail: raymond.rancourt@ucdenver.edu; Veress, Livia A., E-mail: livia.veress@ucdenver.edu; Ahmad, Aftab, E-mail: aftab.ahmad@ucdenver.edu; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B., E-mail: tara.hendry-hofer@ucdenver.edu; Rioux, Jacqueline S., E-mail: jacqueline.rioux@ucdenver.edu; Garlick, Rhonda B., E-mail: rhonda.garlick@ucdenver.edu; White, Carl W., E-mail: carl.w.white@ucdenver.edu

    2013-10-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes airway injury, with enhanced vascular permeability, coagulation, and airway obstruction. The objective of this study was to determine whether recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) could inhibit this pathogenic sequence. Methods: Rats were exposed to the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) via nose-only aerosol inhalation. One hour later, TFPI (1.5 mg/kg) in vehicle, or vehicle alone, was instilled into the trachea. Arterial O{sub 2} saturation was monitored using pulse oximetry. Twelve hours after exposure, animals were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma were analyzed for prothrombin, thrombin–antithrombin complex (TAT), active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels, and fluid fibrinolytic capacity. Lung steady-state PAI-1 mRNA was measured by RT-PCR analysis. Airway-capillary leak was estimated by BALF protein and IgM, and by pleural fluid measurement. In additional animals, airway cast formation was assessed by microdissection and immunohistochemical detection of airway fibrin. Results: Airway obstruction in the form of fibrin-containing casts was evident in central conducting airways of rats receiving CEES. TFPI decreased cast formation, and limited severe hypoxemia. Findings of reduced prothrombin consumption, and lower TAT complexes in BALF, demonstrated that TFPI acted to limit thrombin activation in airways. TFPI, however, did not appreciably affect CEES-induced airway protein leak, PAI-1 mRNA induction, or inhibition of the fibrinolytic activity present in airway surface liquid. Conclusions: Intratracheal administration of TFPI limits airway obstruction, improves gas exchange, and prevents mortality in rats with sulfur mustard-analog-induced acute lung injury. - Highlights: • TFPI administration to rats after mustard inhalation reduces airway cast formation. • Inhibition of thrombin activation is the likely mechanism for limiting casts. • Rats given TFPI

  18. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor prevents airway obstruction, respiratory failure and death due to sulfur mustard analog inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rancourt, Raymond C.; Veress, Livia A.; Ahmad, Aftab; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Rioux, Jacqueline S.; Garlick, Rhonda B.; White, Carl W.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes airway injury, with enhanced vascular permeability, coagulation, and airway obstruction. The objective of this study was to determine whether recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) could inhibit this pathogenic sequence. Methods: Rats were exposed to the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) via nose-only aerosol inhalation. One hour later, TFPI (1.5 mg/kg) in vehicle, or vehicle alone, was instilled into the trachea. Arterial O 2 saturation was monitored using pulse oximetry. Twelve hours after exposure, animals were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma were analyzed for prothrombin, thrombin–antithrombin complex (TAT), active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels, and fluid fibrinolytic capacity. Lung steady-state PAI-1 mRNA was measured by RT-PCR analysis. Airway-capillary leak was estimated by BALF protein and IgM, and by pleural fluid measurement. In additional animals, airway cast formation was assessed by microdissection and immunohistochemical detection of airway fibrin. Results: Airway obstruction in the form of fibrin-containing casts was evident in central conducting airways of rats receiving CEES. TFPI decreased cast formation, and limited severe hypoxemia. Findings of reduced prothrombin consumption, and lower TAT complexes in BALF, demonstrated that TFPI acted to limit thrombin activation in airways. TFPI, however, did not appreciably affect CEES-induced airway protein leak, PAI-1 mRNA induction, or inhibition of the fibrinolytic activity present in airway surface liquid. Conclusions: Intratracheal administration of TFPI limits airway obstruction, improves gas exchange, and prevents mortality in rats with sulfur mustard-analog-induced acute lung injury. - Highlights: • TFPI administration to rats after mustard inhalation reduces airway cast formation. • Inhibition of thrombin activation is the likely mechanism for limiting casts. • Rats given TFPI had

  19. Angiomotin stabilization by tankyrase inhibitors antagonizes constitutive TEAD-dependent transcription and proliferation of human tumor cells with Hippo pathway core component mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troilo, Albino; Benson, Erica K; Esposito, Davide; Garibsingh, Rachel-Ann A; Reddy, E Premkumar; Mungamuri, Sathish Kumar; Aaronson, Stuart A

    2016-05-17

    The evolutionarily conserved Hippo inhibitory pathway plays critical roles in tissue homeostasis and organ size control, while mutations affecting certain core components contribute to tumorigenesis. Here we demonstrate that proliferation of Hippo pathway mutant human tumor cells exhibiting high constitutive TEAD transcriptional activity was markedly inhibited by dominant negative TEAD4, which did not inhibit the growth of Hippo wild-type cells with low levels of regulatable TEAD-mediated transcription. The tankyrase inhibitor, XAV939, identified in a screen for inhibitors of TEAD transcriptional activity, phenocopied these effects independently of its other known functions by stabilizing angiomotin and sequestering YAP in the cytosol. We also identified one intrinsically XAV939 resistant Hippo mutant tumor line exhibiting lower and less durable angiomotin stabilization. Thus, angiomotin stabilization provides a new mechanism for targeting tumors with mutations in Hippo pathway core components as well as a biomarker for sensitivity to such therapy.

  20. Rational combination of MEK inhibitor and the STAT3 pathway modulator for the therapy in K-Ras mutated pancreatic and colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chengguang; Xiao, Hui; Wu, Xiaojuan; Li, Chenglong; Liang, Guang; Yang, Shulin; Lin, Jiayuh

    2015-06-10

    K-Ras mutations are frequently detected in pancreatic and colon cancers, which are associated with the resistance to MEK inhibitors targeting the Ras pathway. Identifying the underlying mechanisms for the acquired resistance is essential for the future clinical development of MEK inhibitors. Here, we identified that Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) was significantly activated following the MEK inhibition using AZD6244, PD98059 and Trametinib in K-Ras mutant pancreatic and colon cancer cells. The STAT3 activation may be important for the MEK inhibitor resistance in these K-Ras mutant cancer cells. We have shown that dual inhibition of STAT3 and MEK using the STAT3 inhibitor LY5 and MEK inhibitor Trametinib exerts significant anti-tumor cell efficacy in K-Ras mutant pancreatic and colon cancer cells in vitro. In addition, Trametinib showed increased suppression on tumor growth in vivo in STAT3 knockdown pancreatic cancer cells compared with tumor growth of control cells without STAT3 knockdown. Taken together, our results suggest the induced STAT3 activation as a possible mechanism for the resistance to MEK inhibitor and demonstrate the potentials of a combination therapy using MEK and STAT3 inhibitors in pancreatic and colon cancers harboring K-Ras mutant proteins.

  1. Novel histone deacetylase inhibitor AR-42 exhibits antitumor activity in pancreatic cancer cells by affecting multiple biochemical pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jin Chen

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal types of cancer with a 5-year survival rate of ~5%. Histone deacetylases (HDACs participate in many cellular processes, including carcinogenesis, and pharmacological inhibition of HDACs has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy. In this study, we explored antitumor activity of the novel HDAC inhibitor AR-42 in pancreatic cancer.Human pancreatic cancer cell lines BxPC-3 and PANC-1 were used in this study. Real-time PCR, RT-PCR, and western blotting were employed to investigate expression of specific genes and proteins, respectively. Translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor was investigated by immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation. The number of apoptotic cells, cell cycle stages, and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation levels were determined by flow cytometry. Cell invasiveness was examined by the Matrigel invasion assay. Efficacy of AR-42 in vivo was evaluated by utilizing BxPC-3 xenograft mouse model.AR-42 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation by causing G2/M cell cycle arrest via regulating expression levels of genes and proteins involved in cell cycle. AR-42 also induced ROS generation and DNA damage, triggering apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells via both caspase-3-dependent and caspase-3-independent pathways. In addition, AR-42 increased expression levels of negative regulators of p53 (miR-125b, miR-30d, and miR33, which could contribute to lower expression level of mutant p53 in pancreatic cancer cells. Cell invasion assay showed that AR-42 reduced cancer cell aggressiveness and significantly diminished BxPC-3 xenograft tumor growth in vivo.AR-42, a novel HDAC inhibitor, inhibited pancreatic cancer cells by regulating p53 expression, inducing cell cycle arrest, particularly at the G2/M stage, and activating multiple apoptosis pathways. Additionally, AR-42 inhibited cell invasiveness and potently suppressed pancreatic cancer tumors in vivo. We conclude that by

  2. Effect of fractalkine, IP-10 and different signal pathway inhibitors on NK cells in the tumor microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-zhen WU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the inducing effects of chemokines [fractalkine (FKN, IP-10] and different signal pathway inhibitors on NK cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies for CD56 and DAP10 respectively on human breast carcinoma. Murine macrophages (RAW 264.7 and breast cancer cells (4T1 were co-cultivated at a 1:4 ratio to imitate the TME with NK cells (KY-1 set as the object. RT-PCR was used to determine the mRNA expressions of CD16, NKG2D and NK1.1, and the content of CD107a in the supernatants was determined by ELISA. 10ng/ml FKN and 10ng/ml IP-10 were added into the TME, NK1.1+CD16+KY-1 cells were counted with flow cytometry, migration and adhesion assays were used to assess the related function of KY-1 cells. 4T1 cells were incubated in 10nmol/L of rapamycin, 30μmol/L of LY294002, 500ng/μl of andrographolide and 2mmol/L of wortmannin, the 4T1 tumor supernatants (TSNs were harvested separately and used to incubate RAW 264.7 for 48h, then the expressions of Rae1α and H60a mRNA in 4T1, RAW 264.7 and their mixture were determined by RT-PCR. Results The related indicators of KY-1 cells such as NK1.1+ number, chemotaxis rate, and adhesion function decreased obviously in TME, and the above indices increased after the addition of FKN and IP-10, and some signal pathway inhibitors indirectly promoted NK cells' function in TME, and among them rapamycin was the most efficient one (P<0.05. Conclusion FKN and IP-10 may up-regulate the number and function of NK cells in TME, and rapamycin can promote NK cells' killing function by inducing high expression of NKG2DLs (Rae1, H60a on tumor cells. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.07.07

  3. Connecting Lignin-Degradation Pathway with Pre-Treatment Inhibitor Sensitivity of Cupriavidus necator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yang, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hunsinger, G. B. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pienkos, P. T. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Johnson, D. K. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-05-27

    In order to produce lignocellulosic biofuels economically, the complete release of monomers from the plant cell wall components, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, through pre-treatment and hydrolysis (both enzymatic and chemical), and the efficient utilization of these monomers as carbon sources, is crucial. In addition, the identification and development of robust microbial biofuel production strains that can tolerate the toxic compounds generated during pre-treatment and hydrolysis is also essential. In this work, Cupriavidus necator was selected due to its capabilities for utilizing lignin monomers and producing polyhydroxylbutyrate (PHB), a bioplastic as well as an advanced biofuel intermediate. We characterized the growth kinetics of C. necator in pre-treated corn stover slurry as well as individually in the pre-sence of 11 potentially toxic compounds in the saccharified slurry. We found that C. necator was sensitive to the saccharified slurry produced from dilute acid pre-treated corn stover. Five out of 11 compounds within the slurry were characterized as toxic to C. necator, namely ammonium acetate, furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid. Aldehydes (e.g., furfural and HMF) were more toxic than the acetate and the lignin degradation products benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid; furfural was identified as the most toxic compound. Although toxic to C. necator at high concentration, ammonium acetate, benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid could be utilized by C. necator with a stimulating effect on C. necator growth. Consequently, the lignin degradation pathway of C. necator was reconstructed based on genomic information and literature. The efficient conversion of intermediate catechol to downstream products of cis,cis-muconate or 2-hydroxymuconate-6-semialdehyde may help improve the robustness of C. necator to benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid as well as improve PHB productivity.

  4. 2,3-Diarylxanthones as Potential Inhibitors of Arachidonic Acid Metabolic Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Clementina M M; Ribeiro, Daniela; Silva, Artur M S; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2017-06-01

    In response to an inflammatory stimulus, arachidonic acid (AA), the main polyunsaturated fatty acid present in the phospholipid layer of cell membranes, is released and metabolized to a series of eicosanoids. These bioactive lipid mediators of inflammation arise physiologically through the action of the enzymes 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and cyclooxygenases (constitutive COX-1 and inducible COX-2). It is believed that dual inhibition of 5-LOX and COXs may have a higher beneficial impact in the treatment of inflammatory disorders rather than the inhibition of each enzyme. With this demand for new dual-acting anti-inflammatory agents, a range of 2,3-diarylxanthones were tested through their ability to interact in the AA metabolism. In vitro anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated through the inhibition of 5-LOX-catalyzed leukotriene B 4 (LTB 4 ) formation in human neutrophils and inhibition of COX-1- and COX-2-catalyzed prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) formation in human whole blood. The results showed that some of the studied arylxanthones were able to prevent LTB 4 production in human neutrophils, in a concentration-dependent manner. The xanthone with a 2-catechol was the most active one (IC 50  ∼ 9 μM). The more effective arylxanthones in preventing COX-1-catalyzed PGE 2 production presented IC 50 values from 1 to 7 μM, exhibiting a structural feature with at least one non-substituted aryl group. All the studied arylxanthones were ineffective to prevent the formation of PGE 2 catalyzed by COX-2, up to the maximum concentration of 100 μM. The ability of the tested 2,3-diarylxanthones to interact with both 5-LOX and COX-1 pathways constitutes an important step in the research of novel dual-acting anti-inflammatory drugs.

  5. Connecting lignin-degradation pathway with pretreatment inhibitor sensitivity of Cupriavidus necator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eWang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To produce lignocellulosic biofuels economically, the complete release of monomers from the plant cell wall components, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, through pretreatment and hydrolysis (both enzymatic and chemical, and the efficient utilization of these monomers as carbon sources, is crucial. In addition, the identification and development of robust microbial biofuel production strains that can tolerate the toxic compounds generated during pretreatment and hydrolysis is also essential. In this work, Cupriavidus necator was selected due to its capabilities for utilizing lignin monomers and producing polyhydroxylbutyrate (PHB, a bioplastic as well as an advanced biofuel intermediate. We characterized the growth kinetics of C. necator in pretreated corn stover slurry as well as individually in the presence of 11 potentially toxic compounds in the saccharified slurry. We found that C. necator was sensitive to the saccharified slurry produced from dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Five out of 11 compounds within the slurry were characterized as toxic to C. necator, namely ammonium acetate, furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF, benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid. Aldehydes (e.g., furfural and HMF were more toxic than the acetate and the lignin degradation products benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid; furfural was identified as the most toxic compound. Although toxic to C. necator at high concentration, ammonium acetate, benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid could be utilized by C. necator with a stimulating effect on C. necator growth. Consequently, the lignin degradation pathway of C. necator was reconstructed based on genomic information and literature. The efficient conversion of intermediate catechol to downstream products of cis,cis-muconate or 2-hydroxymuconate-6-semialdehyde may help improve the robustness of C. necator to benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid as well as improve PHB productivity.

  6. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... artérielle Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in ... as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  7. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors and Mithramycin A Impact a Similar Neuroprotective Pathway at a Crossroad between Cancer and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Basso

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Mithramycin A (MTM and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi are effective therapeutic agents for cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. MTM is a FDA approved aureolic acid-type antibiotic that binds to GC-rich DNA sequences and interferes with Sp1 transcription factor binding to its target sites (GC box. HDACi, on the other hand, modulate the activity of class I and II histone deacetylases. They mediate their protective function, in part, by regulating the acetylation status of histones or transcription factors, including Sp1, and in turn chromatin accessibility to the transcriptional machinery. Because these two classes of structurally and functionally diverse compounds mediate similar therapeutic functions, we investigated whether they act on redundant or synergistic pathways to protect neurons from oxidative death. Non-protective doses of each of the drugs do not synergize to create resistance to oxidative death suggesting that these distinct agents act via a similar pathway. Accordingly, we found that protection by MTM and HDACi is associated with diminished expression of the oncogene, Myc and enhanced expression of a tumor suppressor, p21waf1/cip1. We also find that neuroprotection by MTM or Myc knockdown is associated with downregulation of class I HDAC levels. Our results support a model in which the established antitumor drug MTM or canonical HDACi act via distinct mechanisms to converge on the downregulation of HDAC levels or activity respectively. These findings support the conclusion that an imbalance in histone acetylase and HDAC activity in favor of HDACs is key not only for oncogenic transformation, but also neurodegeneration.

  8. Targeting Tuberculosis and HIV Infection-Specific Regulatory T Cells with MEK/ERK Signaling Pathway Inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora V Lieske

    Full Text Available Human regulatory T cells (Tregs are essential in maintaining immunological tolerance and suppress effector T cells. Tregs are commonly up-regulated in chronic infectious diseases such as tuberculosis (TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and thereby hamper disease-specific immune responses and eradication of pathogens. The MEK/ERK signaling pathway is involved in regulation of the FoxP3 transcription factor, which directs a lineage-specific transcriptional program to define Tregs and control their suppressive function. Here, we aimed to target activation of disease-specific Tregs by inhibition of the MEK/ERK signaling pathway based on the hypothesis that this would improve anti-HIV and anti-TB immunity. Stimulation of T cells from untreated TB (n = 12 and HIV (n = 8 patients with disease-specific antigens in vitro in the presence of the MEK inhibitor (MEKI trametinib (GSK1120212 resulted in significant down-regulation of both FoxP3 levels (MFI and fractions of resting (CD45RA+FoxP3+ and activated (CD45RA-FoxP3++ Tregs. MEKI also reduced the levels of specific T effector cells expressing the pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 in both HIV and TB patients. In conclusion, MEKIs modulate disease antigen-specific Treg activation and may have potential application in new treatment strategies in chronic infectious diseases where reduction of Treg activity would be favorable. Whether MEKIs can be used in current HIV or TB therapy regimens needs to be further investigated.

  9. Iron deficiency anemia and megaloblastic anemia in obese patients

    OpenAIRE

    Arshad Mahmoud; Jaberian Sara; Pazouki Abdolreza; Riazi Sajedeh; Rangraz Maryam Aghababa; Mokhber Somayyeh

    2017-01-01

    Background. The association between obesity and different types of anemia remained uncertain. The present study aimed to assess the relation between obesity parameters and the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia and also megaloblastic anemia among Iranian population.

  10. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlotto, John; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    sensitization has met with limited success via the use of hyperbaric oxygen, electron-affinic radiosensitizers, and mitomycin. Improvements in tumor oxygenation via the use of carbogen and nicotinamide, RSR13, and tirapazamine have shown promising clinical results and are all currently being tested in Phase III trials. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines recommend transfusion or erythropoietin for symptomatic patients with a hemoglobin of 10-11 g/dl and state that erythropoietin should strongly be considered if hemoglobin falls to less than 10 g/dl. These recommendations were based on studies that revealed an improvement in the quality of life of cancer patients, but not patient survival with anemia correction. Phase III studies evaluating the correction of anemia via erythropoietin have shown mixed results with some studies reporting a decrease in patient survival despite an improvement in hemoglobin levels. Diverse functions of erythropoietin are reviewed, including its potential to inhibit apoptosis via the JAK2/STAT5/BCL-X pathway. Correction of anemia by the use of blood transfusions has also shown a decrement in patient survival, possibly through inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive pathways. Conclusions: Anemia is a prevalent condition associated with cancer and its therapies. Proper Phase III trials are necessary to find the best way to correct anemia for specific patients. Future studies of erythropoietin must evaluate the possible anti-apoptotic effects by directly assessing the tumor for erythropoietin receptors or the presence of the JAK2/STAT5/BCL-X pathway. Due to the ability of transfusions to cause immunosuppression, most probably through inflammatory pathways, it may be best to study the effects of transfusion with the prolonged use of anti-inflammatory medications

  11. Versican G1 domain enhances adenoviral-mediated transgene expression and can be modulated by inhibitors of the Janus kinase (JAK)/STAT and Src family kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinfenwa, Patricia Y; Bond, Wesley S; Ildefonso, Cristhian J; Hurwitz, Mary Y; Hurwitz, Richard L

    2017-09-01

    To examine the biochemical influences that may contribute to the success of gene therapy for ocular disorders, the role of versican, a vitreous component, in adenoviral-mediated transgene expression was examined. Versican is a large chondroitin sulfate-containing, hyaluronic acid-binding proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and in ocular vitreous body. Y79 retinoblastoma cells and CD44-negative SK-N-DZ neuroblastoma cells transduced with adenoviral vectors in the presence of versican respond with an activation of transgene expression. Proteolysis of versican generates a hyaluronan-binding G1 domain. The addition of recombinant versican G1 to SK-N-DZ cells results in a similar activation of transgene expression, and treatment with dasatinib, an inhibitor of Src family kinases, also mimics the effects of versican. Enhancement is accompanied by an increase in signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) phosphorylation and is abrogated by treatment with C188-9, a STAT3/5 inhibitor, or with ruxolitinib, a Janus kinase 1/2 (JAK1/2) inhibitor. These data implicate versican G1 in enhancing adenoviral vector transgene expression in a hyaluronic acid-CD44 independent manner that is down-regulated by inhibitors of the JAK/STAT pathway and enhanced by inhibitors of the Src kinase pathway. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. MET Expression in Primary and Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: Implications of Correlative Biomarker Assessment to MET Pathway Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Shuch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Inhibitors of the MET pathway hold promise in the treatment for metastatic kidney cancer. Assessment of predictive biomarkers may be necessary for appropriate patient selection. Understanding MET expression in metastases and the correlation to the primary site is important, as distant tissue is not always available. Methods and Results. MET immunofluorescence was performed using automated quantitative analysis and a tissue microarray containing matched nephrectomy and distant metastatic sites from 34 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Correlations between MET expressions in matched primary and metastatic sites and the extent of heterogeneity were calculated. The mean expression of MET was not significantly different between primary tumors when compared to metastases (P=0.1. MET expression weakly correlated between primary and matched metastatic sites (R=0.5 and a number of cases exhibited very high levels of discordance between these tumors. Heterogeneity within nephrectomy specimens compared to the paired metastatic tissues was not significantly different (P=0.39. Conclusions. We found that MET expression is not significantly different in primary tumors than metastatic sites and only weakly correlates between matched sites. Moderate concordance of MET expression and significant expression heterogeneity may be a barrier to the development of predictive biomarkers using MET targeting agents.

  13. Reversed hydroxamate-bearing thermolysin inhibitors mimic a high-energy intermediate along the enzyme-catalyzed proteolytic reaction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Dae; Kim, Dong H

    2003-10-06

    A series of inhibitors that bear a reversed hydroxamate moiety have been evaluated as transition state analogue inhibitors for thermolysin. A linear correlation is observed between the K(i) values of these inhibitors and the kinetic parameters (K(M)/k(cat)) of the parallel series of related substrates, satisfying the criterion stipulated for transition state analogue inhibitors by Bartlett and Marlowe. Furthermore, examination of the binding mode of a related reversed hydroxamate bearing thermolysin inhibitor, in comparison with a transition state postulated for the enzyme-catalyzed proteolytic reaction revealed that the inhibitors under study mimic the electronic as well as the geometric characteristics of the transition state. On the basis of these results it may be concluded that the hydroxamate-bearing zinc protease inhibitors are a new type of transition state analogue inhibitors.

  14. DMPD: Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16982211 Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. Wullaer...vg) (.html) (.csml) Show Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. PubmedID 16982211 Title Ubiq

  15. Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K/PTEN/Akt/mTOR Inhibitors: Rationale and Importance to Inhibiting These Pathways in Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, William H.; Steelman, Linda S.; Long, Jacquelyn M.; Kempf, Ruth C.; Abrams, Stephen L.; Franklin, Richard A.; Bäsecke, Jörg; Stivala, Franca; Donia, Marco; Fagone, Paolo; Malaponte, Graziella; Mazzarino, Maria C.; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Libra, Massimo; Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Mijatovic, Sanja; Montalto, Giuseppe; Cervello, Melchiorre; Laidler, Piotr; Milella, Michele; Tafuri, Agostino; Bonati, Antonio; Evangelisti, Camilla; Cocco, Lucio; Martelli, Alberto M.; McCubrey, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K/PTEN/Akt/mTOR cascades are often activated by genetic alterations in upstream signaling molecules such as receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK). Integral components of these pathways, Ras, B-Raf, PI3K, and PTEN are also activated/inactivated by mutations. These pathways have profound effects on proliferative, apoptotic and differentiation pathways. Dysregulation of these pathways can contribute to chemotherapeutic drug resistance, proliferation of cancer initiating cells (CICs) and premature aging. This review will evaluate more recently described potential uses of MEK, PI3K, Akt and mTOR inhibitors in the proliferation of malignant cells, suppression of CICs, cellular senescence and prevention of aging. Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/PTEN/Akt/mTOR pathways play key roles in the regulation of normal and malignant cell growth. Inhibitors targeting these pathways have many potential uses from suppression of cancer, proliferative diseases as well as aging. PMID:21411864

  16. Hereditary sideroblastic anemias: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara

    2009-10-01

    Inherited sideroblastic anemia comprises several rare anemias due to heterogeneous genetic lesions, all characterized by the presence of ringed sideroblasts in the bone marrow. This morphological aspect reflects abnormal mitochondrial iron utilization by the erythroid precursors. The most common X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA), due to mutations of the first enzyme of the heme synthetic pathway, delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2), has linked heme deficiency to mitochondrial iron accumulation. The identification of other genes, such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette B7 (ABCB7) and glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5), has strengthened the role of iron sulfur cluster biogenesis in sideroblast formation and revealed a complex interplay between pathways of mitochondrial iron utilization and cytosolic iron sensing by the iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs). As recently occurred with the discovery of the SLC25A38-related sideroblastic anemia, the identification of the genes responsible for as yet uncharacterized forms will provide further insights into mitochondrial iron metabolism of erythroid cells and the pathophysiology of sideroblastic anemia.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Fanconi anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Fanconi anemia Fanconi anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Fanconi anemia is a condition that affects many parts of ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  19. Congenital Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) destruction can be secondary to intrinsic disorders of the RBC or to extrinsic causes. In the congenital hemolytic anemias, intrinsic RBC enzyme, RBC membrane, and hemoglobin disorders result in hemolysis. The typical clinical presentation is a patient with pallor, anemia, jaundice, and often splenomegaly. The laboratory features include anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and reticulocytosis. For some congenital hemolytic anemias, splenectomy is curative. However, in other diseases, avoidance of drugs and toxins is the best therapy. Supportive care with transfusions are also mainstays of therapy. Chronic hemolysis often results in the formation of gallstones, and cholecystectomy is often indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Anemia in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umran Kucukgoz Gulec

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia (IDA is the most frequent form of anemia in pregnant women. Folic acid, vitamin B12 deficiency, and hemoglobinopathies are other causes of anemia in pregnancy. Finding the underlying cause are crucial to the management of the anemia. Anemia is defined as hemoglobin of <11 g/dl in the first and third trimester and <10.5 g/dl in second trimester. According to the literature, anemia, particularly severe anemia (Hb<7g/dl is associated with increased risk of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity, and long term adverse effects in the newborn. The association of hemoglobin levels to perinatal outcome has been shown to be U shaped with both high and low hemoglobin levels being associated adverse perinatal outcome such as low birth weight, increased stillbirths. Anemia in pregnancy is a major public health problem. Ideally a woman should have adequate iron stores when she conceives, in order meet to additional requirements of pregnancy. This review focuses on the occurrence, types, maternal and perinatal outcomes, prevention and treatment of anemia during pregnancy. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 300-316

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs ...

  2. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Fanconi Anemia Heart Failure Other ...

  3. How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Fanconi Anemia Heart Failure Other ...

  4. Discovery of 4,6-disubstituted pyrimidines as potent inhibitors of the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) stress pathway and CDK9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, Carl S; Chessum, Nicola E A; Lamont, Scott; Pike, Kurt G; Faulder, Paul; Demeritt, Julie; Kemmitt, Paul; Tucker, Julie; Zani, Lorenzo; Cheeseman, Matthew D; Isaac, Rosie; Goodwin, Louise; Boros, Joanna; Raynaud, Florence; Hayes, Angela; Henley, Alan T; de Billy, Emmanuel; Lynch, Christopher J; Sharp, Swee Y; Te Poele, Robert; Fee, Lisa O'; Foote, Kevin M; Green, Stephen; Workman, Paul; Jones, Keith

    2016-08-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a transcription factor that plays key roles in cancer, including providing a mechanism for cell survival under proteotoxic stress. Therefore, inhibition of the HSF1-stress pathway represents an exciting new opportunity in cancer treatment. We employed an unbiased phenotypic screen to discover inhibitors of the HSF1-stress pathway. Using this approach we identified an initial hit ( 1 ) based on a 4,6-pyrimidine scaffold (2.00 μM). Optimisation of cellular SAR led to an inhibitor with improved potency ( 25 , 15 nM) in the HSF1 phenotypic assay. The 4,6-pyrimidine 25 was also shown to have high potency against the CDK9 enzyme (3 nM).

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program now includes participants with anemia, which may help us understand how genes contribute to differences in disease severity and how patients respond to treatment. The ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over 65 years of age had low hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... when used properly, can help prevent iron-deficiency anemia in infants and young children. Talk with your child's doctor ... and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young children and women are the two ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... term but can't take iron supplements by mouth. This therapy also is given to people who need immediate treatment for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With If you have iron-deficiency anemia, get ongoing care to make sure your iron levels are improving. ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... ages of 14 and 50 years need more iron than boys and men of the same age. Women are at higher ... anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a strong urge to move the legs. This ... may be a sign of infection, a blood disorder, or another ... may be a clue as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, for ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough Iron Even if you have enough iron in your ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other conditions to prevent you from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried ... patterns. Increase your daily intake of iron-rich foods to help treat your iron-deficiency anemia. See Prevention strategies to learn about foods ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be a sign of infection, a blood disorder, or another condition. Finally, the CBC looks at mean corpuscular (kor-PUS-kyu-lar) volume (MCV). MCV is a measure of the average size of your red blood cells. The results may be a clue as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, for ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI resources Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron ... was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we fund research and development for domestic small businesses that have strong potential ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition ... for the fetus' growth. About half of all pregnant women develop iron-deficiency anemia. The condition can increase ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  3. Hematologic Disorders: Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltierra, David; Harper, Tiffany; Jones, Matthew Page; Nau, Konrad C

    2015-06-01

    Anemia occurs in up to 25% of the US population. Normal hemoglobin levels vary by race, sex, and age. Classification of anemia by mean corpuscular volume guides the differential diagnosis and evaluation. Iron studies, reticulocyte count, the red blood cell distribution width index, and blood test results are used to make the diagnosis. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common microcytic anemia and is managed with iron therapy. Parenteral iron is available when the oral route cannot be used. Patients who do not benefit from therapy should be evaluated for adherence, malabsorption, occult bleeding, systemic disease, or less common inherited disorders. A source of gastrointestinal bleeding is found in 60% to 70% of patients with iron deficiency anemia who are referred for endoscopy. Normocytic anemia has a broad differential, including nutritional deficiencies, blood loss, renal disease, malignancy (solid tumors or hematologic cancer), rheumatologic disorders, endocrine disorders, and other systemic diseases. Macrocytic anemias are seen with vitamin B12 and folate deficiency, alcohol use, thyroid disease, hydroxyurea, antiretroviral drugs, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloma. Oral vitamin B12 is underused, and can be as effective as intramuscular vitamin B12 in managing anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you ... get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is a safe, common procedure in which blood ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... issues. For more information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources ...

  6. Screening of FGF target genes in Xenopus by microarray: temporal dissection of the signalling pathway using a chemical inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyeyoung A; Hyodo-Miura, Junko; Kitayama, Atsushi; Terasaka, Chie; Nagamune, Teruyuki; Ueno, Naoto

    2004-08-01

    Microarray is a powerful tool for analysing gene expression patterns in genome-wide view and has greatly contributed to our understanding of spatiotemporal embryonic development at the molecular level. Members of FGF (fibroblast growth factor) family play important roles in embryogenesis, e.g. in organogenesis, proliferation, differentiation, cell migration, angiogenesis, and wound healing. To dissect spatiotemporally the versatile roles of FGF during embryogenesis, we profiled gene expression in Xenopus embryo explants treated with SU5402, a chemical inhibitor specific to FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1), by microarray. We identified 38 genes that were down-regulated and 5 that were up-regulated in response to SU5402 treatment from stage 10.5-11.5 and confirmed their FGF-dependent transcription with RT-PCR analysis and whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH). Among the 43 genes, we identified 26 as encoding novel proteins and investigated their spatial expression pattern by WISH. Genes whose expression patterns were similar to FGFR1 were further analysed to test whether any of them represented functional FGF target molecules. Here, we report two interesting genes: one is a component of the canonical Ras-MAPK pathway, similar to mammalian mig6 (mitogen-inducible gene 6) acting in muscle differentiation; the other, similar to GPCR4 (G-protein coupled receptor 4), is a promising candidate for a gastrulation movement regulator. These results demonstrate that our approach is a promising strategy for scanning the genes that are essential for the regulation of a diverse array of developmental processes.

  7. [Hemolytic anemias in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, A; Zimmermann, R; Krause, S W

    2011-11-01

    The erythrocyte lifespan in haemolytic anemia is shortened while erythropoesis is increased. Important labaratory findings are increased reticulocytes, LDH, indirect bilirubin and a decreased haptoglobin level. The most important diagnostic tool for further work up of hemolytic anemia is the direct antiglobulin test (DAT, Coombs test) to differentiate autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) from other causes. Another important group are fragmentation syndroms (hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura). In these forms of haemolytic anemia fragmented red blood cells can be found in the blood smear together with thrombocytopenia. A severe problem in paroxysmal nocturnal hematuria is the incidence of thrombosis. The following review describes the most important forms of hemolytic anemia in the adult and the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Frequent Genetic Aberrations in the CDK4 Pathway in Acral Melanoma Indicate the Potential for CDK4/6 Inhibitors in Targeted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yan; Sheng, Xinan; Wu, Xiaowen; Yan, Junya; Ma, Meng; Yu, Jiayi; Si, Lu; Chi, Zhihong; Cui, Chuanliang; Dai, Jie; Li, Yiqian; Yu, Huan; Xu, Tianxiao; Tang, Huan; Tang, Bixia; Mao, Lili; Lian, Bin; Wang, Xuan; Yan, Xieqiao; Li, Siming; Guo, Jun

    2017-11-15

    Purpose: Effective therapies for the majority of metastatic acral melanoma patients have not been established. Thus, we investigated genetic aberrations of CDK4 pathway in acral melanoma and evaluated the efficacy of CDK4/6 inhibitors in targeted therapy of acral melanoma. Experimental Design: A total of 514 primary acral melanoma samples were examined for the copy number variations (CNV) of CDK4 pathway-related genes, including Cdk4, Ccnd1 , and P16 INK4a , by QuantiGenePlex DNA Assay. The sensitivity of established acral melanoma cell lines and patient-derived xenograft (PDX) containing typical CDK4 aberrations to CDK4/6 inhibitors was evaluated. Results: Among the 514 samples, 203 cases, 137 cases, and 310 cases, respectively, showed Cdk4 gain (39.5%), Ccnd1 gain (26.7%), and P16 INK4a loss (60.3%). The overall frequency of acral melanomas that contain at least one aberration in Cdk4, Ccnd1 , and P16 INK4a was 82.7%. The median overall survival time for acral melanoma patients with concurrent Cdk4 gain with P16 INK4a loss was significantly shorter than that for patients without such aberrations ( P = 0.005). The pan-CDK inhibitor AT7519 and selective CDK4/6 inhibitor PD0332991 could inhibit the cell viability of acral melanoma cells and the tumor growth of PDX with Cdk4 gain plus Ccnd1 gain, Cdk4 gain plus P16 INK4a loss, and Ccnd1 gain plus P16 INK4a loss. Conclusions: Genetic aberration of CDK4 pathway is a frequent event in acral melanoma. Acral melanoma cell lines and PDX containing CDK4 pathway aberrations are sensitive to CDK4/6 inhibitors. Our study provides evidence for the testing of CDK4/6 inhibitors in acral melanoma patients. Clin Cancer Res; 23(22); 6946-57. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Comparative evaluation of the efficacy of the cyclooxygenase pathway inhibitor and nitric oxide synthase inhibitor in the reduction of alveolar bone loss in ligature induced periodontitis in rats: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Jagadish

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alveolar bone loss is the most striking feature of periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a cyclooxygenase (COX pathway inhibitor and nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor in the reduction of alveolar bone loss in an experimental periodontal disease (EPD model. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 60 Wistar rats divided into three groups of 20 rats each and then subjected to a ligature placement around the left maxillary second molars. Group 1 rats were treated with COX inhibitor (diclofenac sodium 10 mg/kg/d, group 2 with NOS inhibitor (aminoguanidine hydrochloride 10 mg/kg/d and group 3 served as controls, receiving only saline, intraperitoneally 1h before EPD induction and daily until the sacrifice on the 11 th day. Leukogram was performed before ligation, at 6 h and at the first, seventh and 11 th days after EPD induction. After sacrifice, all the excised maxillae were subjected to morphometric and histometric analysis to measure the alveolar bone loss. Histopathological analysis was carried out to estimate cell influx, alveolar bone and cementum integrity. Results: Induction of experimental periodontitis in the rat model produced pronounced leucocytosis, which was significantly reduced by the administration of diclofenac sodium and aminoguanidine on the 11 th day. In morphometric and histometric examinations, both the test drugs significantly (P < 0.05 inhibited the alveolar bone loss as compared with the control group. Conclusion: Both COX inhibitor and NOS inhibitor are equally effective in inhibiting the inflammatory bone resorption in an experimental periodontitis model.

  10. Anemia in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Wendy W; Schrier, Stanley L

    2012-05-01

    There have been several large-scale epidemiologic studies, including the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III), which have described the prevalence and impact of anemia in the elderly. The information derived has been critically important. However, given the large number of patients surveyed, these reports necessarily relied substantially on the laboratory-based screening evaluations. There are now two recent reports describing the cause of anemia in elderly outpatients, and although the numbers are smaller than the large scale surveys, they constitute comprehensive hematologic evaluations with therapeutic interventions and clinical follow-up. The purpose of this review is to compare these different analyses. There are distinct differences and similarities in the two types of studies, which are derived from patients seen in hematology clinics. Despite comprehensive hematologic evaluation, the puzzling entity of unexplained anemia of the elderly is confirmed and found to account for 30-46% of patients. NHANES III classified iron-deficiency anemia with other nutritional anemias, a classification that might be correct in the developing third world, but in North America and Western Europe, iron deficiency is more often caused by blood loss and the cause must be sought and dealt with. The myelodysplastic syndromes are an important cause of anemia in the elderly, with a prevalence of at least 4%. Large-scale screening studies of anemia in the elderly are of great importance, and when complemented by comprehensive hematologic evaluations, provide a more accurate picture of the clinical situation.

  11. Targeting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 and Protein Kinase D1 Related Pathways by a Multiple Kinase Inhibitor in Angiogenesis and Inflammation Related Processes In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Attila; Gyulavári, Pál; Greff, Zoltán; Futosi, Krisztina; Németh, Tamás; Simon-Szabó, Laura; Kerekes, Krisztina; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Brauswetter, Diána; Kokas, Márton; Borbély, Gábor; Erdei, Anna; Mócsai, Attila; Kéri, György; Vántus, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and protein kinase D1 (PKD1) signaling axis plays a critical role in normal and pathological angiogenesis and inflammation related processes. Despite all efforts, the currently available therapeutic interventions are limited. Prior studies have also proved that a multiple target inhibitor can be more efficient compared to a single target one. Therefore, development of novel inflammatory pathway-specific inhibitors would be of great value. To test this possibility, we screened our molecular library using recombinant kinase assays and identified the previously described compound VCC251801 with strong inhibitory effect on both VEGFR2 and PKD1. We further analyzed the effect of VCC251801 in the endothelium-derived EA.hy926 cell line and in different inflammatory cell types. In EA.hy926 cells, VCC251801 potently inhibited the intracellular activation and signaling of VEGFR2 and PKD1 which inhibition eventually resulted in diminished cell proliferation. In this model, our compound was also an efficient inhibitor of in vitro angiogenesis by interfering with endothelial cell migration and tube formation processes. Our results from functional assays in inflammatory cellular models such as neutrophils and mast cells suggested an anti-inflammatory effect of VCC251801. The neutrophil study showed that VCC251801 specifically blocked the immobilized immune-complex and the adhesion dependent TNF-α -fibrinogen stimulated neutrophil activation. Furthermore, similar results were found in mast cell degranulation assay where VCC251801 caused significant reduction of mast cell response. In summary, we described a novel function of a multiple kinase inhibitor which strongly inhibits the VEGFR2-PKD1 signaling and might be a novel inhibitor of pathological inflammatory pathways. PMID:25874616

  12. Targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and protein kinase D1 related pathways by a multiple kinase inhibitor in angiogenesis and inflammation related processes in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Varga

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 and protein kinase D1 (PKD1 signaling axis plays a critical role in normal and pathological angiogenesis and inflammation related processes. Despite all efforts, the currently available therapeutic interventions are limited. Prior studies have also proved that a multiple target inhibitor can be more efficient compared to a single target one. Therefore, development of novel inflammatory pathway-specific inhibitors would be of great value. To test this possibility, we screened our molecular library using recombinant kinase assays and identified the previously described compound VCC251801 with strong inhibitory effect on both VEGFR2 and PKD1. We further analyzed the effect of VCC251801 in the endothelium-derived EA.hy926 cell line and in different inflammatory cell types. In EA.hy926 cells, VCC251801 potently inhibited the intracellular activation and signaling of VEGFR2 and PKD1 which inhibition eventually resulted in diminished cell proliferation. In this model, our compound was also an efficient inhibitor of in vitro angiogenesis by interfering with endothelial cell migration and tube formation processes. Our results from functional assays in inflammatory cellular models such as neutrophils and mast cells suggested an anti-inflammatory effect of VCC251801. The neutrophil study showed that VCC251801 specifically blocked the immobilized immune-complex and the adhesion dependent TNF-α -fibrinogen stimulated neutrophil activation. Furthermore, similar results were found in mast cell degranulation assay where VCC251801 caused significant reduction of mast cell response. In summary, we described a novel function of a multiple kinase inhibitor which strongly inhibits the VEGFR2-PKD1 signaling and might be a novel inhibitor of pathological inflammatory pathways.

  13. The role of complement activation in thrombosis and hemolytic anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, John; Terry, Hunter S; Kleinert, Dorothy; Laurence, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe complement activation in hemostatic and pathologic states of coagulation and in the acquired and congenital hemolytic anemias. We review published and emerging data on the involvement of the classic, alternative and lectin-based complement pathways in coagulation and the hemolytic anemias. The alternative pathway in particular is always "on," at low levels, and is particularly sensitive to hyper-activation in a variety of physiologic and pathologic states including infection, autoimmune disorders, thrombosis and pregnancy, requiring tight control predicated on a variety of soluble and membrane bound regulatory proteins. In acquired hemolytic anemias such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and cold agglutinin disease (CAD), the complement system directly induces red blood cell injury, resulting in intravascular and extravascular hemolysis. In congenital hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, the complement system may also contribute to thrombosis and vascular disease. Complement activation may also lead to a storage lesion in red blood cells prior to transfusion. Complement pathways are activated in hemolytic anemias and are closely linked with thrombosis. In acquired disorders such as PNH and possibly CAD, inhibition of the alternative complement pathway improves clinical outcomes and reduces thrombosis risk. Whether complement inhibition has a similar role in congenital hemolytic anemias apart from the atypical hemolytic-uremic (aHUS)-type thrombotic microangiopathies remains to be determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Heme oxygenase/carbon monoxide-biliverdin pathway may be involved in the antinociceptive activity of etoricoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grangeiro, Niedja M G; Aguiar, Jordana A; Chaves, Hellíada V; Silva, Antonio A R; Lima, Vilma; Benevides, Norma M B; Brito, Gerly A C; da Graça, José R V; Bezerra, Mirna M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the interaction between the heme oxygenase-1/ biliverdin/carbon monoxide (HO-1/BVD/CO) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) pathways in the writhing test. Mice were pretreated with 0.1, 1 or 10 mg/kg, ip etoricoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, or with one of the following HO-1/BVD/CO pathway modulators: 1, 3 or 9 mg/kg, sc ZnPP IX, a specific HO-1 inhibitor, 0.3, 1 or 3 mg/kg, sc hemin, a substrate of the HO-1/BVD/CO pathway; or 0.00025, 0.025 or 2.5 μmol/kg, sc DMDC, a CO donor. Mice pretreated with etoricoxib or one of the HO-1/BVD/CO pathway modulators received an injection of acetic acid (ip) after 30 and 60 min, respectively. Next, the number of writhes was quantified between 0 and 30 min after stimulus injection. In another series of experiments, ineffective doses of etoricoxib were co-administered with hemin or DMDC and an effective dose of etoricoxib with ZnPP IX, followed by an acetic acid injection. Four hours after the acetic acid injection, levels of bilirubin, which is a product of BVD conversion by the BVD reductase enzyme, in the peritoneal lavage were determined. Hemin or DMDC reduced (pZnPP IX potentiated (pZnPP IX. Pretreatment with ZnPP IX reduced bilirubin levels, but etoricoxib pretreatment significantly increased the bilirubin concentration in peritoneal exudates. The data obtained from these experiments showed that the HO-1/BVD/CO pathway was activated in the acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing model. The analgesic effect of etoricoxib was at least partially dependent on the participation of the HO-1/BVD/CO pathway.

  15. [Anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Hideki; Kojima, Seiji

    2008-03-01

    Anemia is one of the most common symptoms in children caused by numerous underlying diseases. In majority of patients, these diseases can be correctly diagnosed through physical examination, history taking, and routine laboratory tests. Bone marrow failure syndromes associated with several genetic diseases are rare causes of anemia in childhood. We reviewed the recent progress of molecular mechanisms in bone marrow failure syndromes, such as Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), and dyskeratosis congenita (DC), which are all predicted to involve defective ribosome synthesis. Delineation of the precise role of each gene product in ribosomal biogenesis and hematopoiesis may have both therapeutic and prognostic significance.

  16. ANEMIA OF CENTRAL ORIGIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kazusa; Young, Neal S.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoproliferative anemia results from the inability of bone marrow to produce adequate numbers of red blood cells. The list of conditions that cause hypoproliferative anemia is long, starting from common etiologies as iron deficiency to rarer diagnoses of constitutional bone marrow failure syndromes. There is no perfect diagnostic algorithm, and clinical data may not always clearly distinguish “normal” from “abnormal”, yet it is important for practicing clinicians to recognize each condition so that treatment can be initiated promptly. This review describes diagnostic approaches to hypoproliferative anemia, with particular emphasis on bone marrow failure syndromes. PMID:26404444

  17. Transcriptional Responses of Escherichia coli to a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of LolCDE, an Essential Component of the Lipoprotein Transport Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Christian; Dougherty, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Gram-negative bacteria, a dedicated machinery consisting of LolABCDE components targets lipoproteins to the outer membrane. We used a previously identified small-molecule inhibitor of the LolCDE complex of Escherichia coli to assess the global transcriptional consequences of interference with lipoprotein transport. Exposure of E. coli to the LolCDE inhibitor at concentrations leading to minimal and significant growth inhibition, followed by transcriptome sequencing, identified a small group of genes whose transcript levels were decreased and a larger group whose mRNA levels increased 10- to 100-fold compared to those of untreated cells. The majority of the genes whose mRNA concentrations were reduced were part of the flagellar assembly pathway, which contains an essential lipoprotein component. Most of the genes whose transcript levels were elevated encode proteins involved in selected cell stress pathways. Many of these genes are involved with envelope stress responses induced by the mislocalization of outer membrane lipoproteins. Although several of the genes whose RNAs were induced have previously been shown to be associated with the general perturbation of the cell envelope by antibiotics, a small subset was affected only by LolCDE inhibition. Findings from this work suggest that the efficiency of the Lol system function may be coupled to a specific monitoring system, which could be exploited in the development of reporter constructs suitable for use for screening for additional inhibitors of lipoprotein trafficking. IMPORTANCE Inhibition of the lipoprotein transport pathway leads to E. coli death and subsequent lysis. Early significant changes in the levels of RNA for a subset of genes identified to be associated with some periplasmic and envelope stress responses were observed. Together these findings suggest that disruption of this key pathway can have a severe impact on balanced outer membrane synthesis sufficient to affect viability. PMID

  18. Transcriptional Responses of Escherichia coli to a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of LolCDE, an Essential Component of the Lipoprotein Transport Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Christian; Dougherty, Thomas J; Lory, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, a dedicated machinery consisting of LolABCDE components targets lipoproteins to the outer membrane. We used a previously identified small-molecule inhibitor of the LolCDE complex of Escherichia coli to assess the global transcriptional consequences of interference with lipoprotein transport. Exposure of E. coli to the LolCDE inhibitor at concentrations leading to minimal and significant growth inhibition, followed by transcriptome sequencing, identified a small group of genes whose transcript levels were decreased and a larger group whose mRNA levels increased 10- to 100-fold compared to those of untreated cells. The majority of the genes whose mRNA concentrations were reduced were part of the flagellar assembly pathway, which contains an essential lipoprotein component. Most of the genes whose transcript levels were elevated encode proteins involved in selected cell stress pathways. Many of these genes are involved with envelope stress responses induced by the mislocalization of outer membrane lipoproteins. Although several of the genes whose RNAs were induced have previously been shown to be associated with the general perturbation of the cell envelope by antibiotics, a small subset was affected only by LolCDE inhibition. Findings from this work suggest that the efficiency of the Lol system function may be coupled to a specific monitoring system, which could be exploited in the development of reporter constructs suitable for use for screening for additional inhibitors of lipoprotein trafficking. Inhibition of the lipoprotein transport pathway leads to E. coli death and subsequent lysis. Early significant changes in the levels of RNA for a subset of genes identified to be associated with some periplasmic and envelope stress responses were observed. Together these findings suggest that disruption of this key pathway can have a severe impact on balanced outer membrane synthesis sufficient to affect viability. Copyright © 2016 Lorenz et al.

  19. Role of tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 in the expressions of matrix metallopro- teinases in keratocytes in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yuan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To elucidate the relation between tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2(TFPI-2expression and the expression of matrix metalloproteinases(MMPsin keratocytes. METHODS: Primary culture and subculture of rabbit keratocytes were established in vitro. Plasmid vector pBos-Cite-neo/TFPI-2 was transfected into keratocytes with Lipofectamine 2000. After being selected by G418, three groups of cells including TFPI-2 gene transfected cells K-TFPI-2, empty vector transfected cells K-V and non-transfected cells K-P were screened for TFPI-2 mRNA and protein by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis, respectively. The activity of MMPs in the three groups of cells was detected by substrate zymography and compared by ANOVA. RESULTS: Expression of mRNA and protein of TFPI-2 was more in the cells of K-TFPI-2 than in the other cells of K-P and K-V with a significant difference(mRNA:0.79±0.02 vs 0.51±0.03 and 0.48±0.02, P=0.000 and P=0.000; Protein:24.5±0.8 vs 15.5±0.5 and 14.9±0.9,P=0.000 and P=0.000. Compared with the two groups of K-P and K-V, the cells of K-TFPI-2 had a significant decreased activity of MMP1(12.3±0.7 vs 16.7±1.2 and 15.9±0.7, P=0.001 and P=0.003and MMP2(15.4±1.3 vs 18.2±1.1 and 17.8±1.1, P=0.027 and P=0.046. CONCLUSION: It is suggested that the expression of TFPI-2 may strongly inhibit the activity of MMPs in keratocytes in vitro, which provides an experimental basis for curing CNV with gene therapy.

  20. Blockade of the MEK/ERK pathway with a raf inhibitor prevents activation of pro-inflammatory mediators in cerebral arteries and reduction in cerebral blood flow after subarachnoid hemorrhage in a rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maddahi, Aida; Ansar, Saema; Chen, Qingwen

    2011-01-01

    /ERK (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway upstream with a specific raf inhibitor would prevent SAH-induced activation of the cerebrovascular inflammatory response. The raf inhibitor SB-386023-b was injected intracisternally in our rat model at 0, 6, or 12 hours after the SAH. After 48...

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  14. Equine Infectious Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hoopes, Karl H.

    2017-01-01

    This fact sheet gives information on equine infectious anemia, a blood-borne infectious viral disease of horses, donkeys, and mules. It describes transmission, clinical disease, diagnosis and control.

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  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... about their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless ... Get Email Alerts Receive automatic alerts about NHLBI related news and highlights from across the Institute. Learn ...

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  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... can cause complications and may be life-threatening. Signs and Symptoms Common signs of iron-deficiency anemia ... abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and have a plan Tell ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through research and ... blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors of future health problems in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... eating lead in paint or soil, or drinking water that contains lead. Teens Teens are at risk ... the first prenatal visit. For pregnant women, medical care during pregnancy usually includes screening for anemia. Also, ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... to iron-deficiency anemia. We are interested in studying in more detail how iron levels are regulated ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... GI tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Are you curious about how ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more information about diet and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young ... who should be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur if ... months. Tell your doctor if you have any new symptoms or if your symptoms get worse. Participate ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for ... be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women of childbearing ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia if they're underweight or have chronic (ongoing) illnesses. Teenage girls who ... other dark green leafy vegetables Prune juice The Nutrition Facts labels on packaged foods will show how ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... treat iron-deficiency anemia. These doctors include pediatricians, family doctors, gynecologists/obstetricians, and internal medicine specialists. A hematologist (a blood disease specialist), a gastroenterologist (a digestive system specialist), and ...

  1. Anemia (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual ... immune system can destroy red blood cells. Why Teens Get Anemia Because teens go through rapid growth ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... When signs and symptoms do occur, they can range from mild to severe. Many of the signs ... hematocrit is a sign of anemia. The normal range of these levels varies in certain racial and ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... of vitamin C are vegetables and fruits, especially citrus fruits. Citrus fruits include oranges, grapefruits, tangerines, and similar fruits. ... their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People ... make it hard to find the energy to do normal activities. Headache Irregular heartbeat. This is a ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... stomach also can interfere with iron absorption. Risk Factors Infants and Young Children Infants and young children ... blood loss during their monthly periods Other risk factors for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... bleeding in the GI tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Anemia (MedlinePlus) "Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Iron" (Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health) Building 31 31 Center ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... All News NHLBI News NHLBI in the Press Research Features All Events Past Events Upcoming Events About ... NHLBI Entire Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the likelihood of bleeding in the GI tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Are you ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... anemia or who have chronic conditions such as kidney disease or celiac disease may be more likely to ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors that ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs and ... Reticulocytes are young, immature red blood cells. Over time, reticulocytes become mature red blood cells that carry ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to prevent you from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried ... tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur ... leafy green vegetables like turnip greens and spinach. Treatment To Stop Bleeding If blood loss is causing ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... vegetables. During some stages of life, such as pregnancy and childhood, it may be hard to get ... prenatal visit. For pregnant women, medical care during pregnancy usually includes screening for anemia. Also, your doctor ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  19. Immune hemolytic anemia

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    ... intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) or removal of the spleen (splenectomy) may be considered. You may receive treatment to ... need special treatment. In most people, steroids or splenectomy can totally or partially control anemia.

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as ice, dirt, paint, or starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ...

  4. XIV Conferencia : Anemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Paredes Manrique

    1958-05-01

    Full Text Available La anemia es la disminución por debajo de lo normal de la Hb. o del número de globulos rojos o del hematocrito, pero es difícil encontrar un cuadro clínico que corresponda a la realidad de la anemia en el cual no estén descendidos los tres elementos.

  5. Anemia carencial y SIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Ruiz

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Determinar el tipo mas frecuente de anemia en pacientes con SIDA y el grado de severidad de la anemia. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se estudió 100 pacientes, entre 18 y 60 años, infectados por virus de inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH en estadio SIDA, de Lima Metropolitana y el Callao, desde enero a diciembre 2001. Se realizó hemograma, mielograma, dosaje sérico de hierro, saturación de transferrina, ferritina, folato y vitamina B12. Las muestras fueron procesadas en el Departamento de Patología Clínica del Hospital Nacional Dos de Mayo. RESULTADOS: De los 100 pacientes, 60% presentaron anemia severa, 30% moderada y 10% leve. La tipificación del cuadro anémico fue carencial en 70% y por enfermedad crónica en 30%. En el caso de anemia carencial, 25% fue ferropénica, 30% carencial mixta (ferropénica y megaloblástica y 15% megaloblástica. De los casos con componente megaloblástico, 30 pacientes tuvieron deficiencia de folatos y 15 carencia de vitamina B12. CONCLUSIONES: La anemia prevalente fue la del tipo carencial. El grado de anemia predominante fue el severo.

  6. Multiple TPR motifs characterize the Fanconi anemia FANCG protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, E.; Vrugt, van der H.J.; Vries, de Y.; Winter, de J.P.; Arwert, F.; Joenje, H.

    2004-01-01

    The genome protection pathway that is defective in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) is controlled by at least eight genes, including BRCA2. A key step in the pathway involves the monoubiquitylation of FANCD2, which critically depends on a multi-subunit nuclear 'core complex' of at least six FANC

  7. A preclinical orthotopic model for glioblastoma recapitulates key features of human tumors and demonstrates sensitivity to a combination of MEK and PI3K pathway inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaa El Meskini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current therapies for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the highest grade malignant brain tumor, are mostly ineffective, and better preclinical model systems are needed to increase the successful translation of drug discovery efforts into the clinic. Previous work describes a genetically engineered mouse (GEM model that contains perturbations in the most frequently dysregulated networks in GBM (driven by RB, KRAS and/or PI3K signaling and PTEN that induce development of Grade IV astrocytoma with properties of the human disease. Here, we developed and characterized an orthotopic mouse model derived from the GEM that retains the features of the GEM model in an immunocompetent background; however, this model is also tractable and efficient for preclinical evaluation of candidate therapeutic regimens. Orthotopic brain tumors are highly proliferative, invasive and vascular, and express histology markers characteristic of human GBM. Primary tumor cells were examined for sensitivity to chemotherapeutics and targeted drugs. PI3K and MAPK pathway inhibitors, when used as single agents, inhibited cell proliferation but did not result in significant apoptosis. However, in combination, these inhibitors resulted in a substantial increase in cell death. Moreover, these findings translated into the in vivo orthotopic model: PI3K or MAPK inhibitor treatment regimens resulted in incomplete pathway suppression and feedback loops, whereas dual treatment delayed tumor growth through increased apoptosis and decreased tumor cell proliferation. Analysis of downstream pathway components revealed a cooperative effect on target downregulation. These concordant results, together with the morphologic similarities to the human GBM disease characteristics of the model, validate it as a new platform for the evaluation of GBM treatment.

  8. An Inducible TGF-β2-TGFβR Pathway Modulates the Sensitivity of HNSCC Cells to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Targeting Dominant Receptor Tyrosine Kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K Kleczko

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is overexpressed in approximately 90% of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC, and molecularly targeted therapy against the EGFR with the monoclonal antibody cetuximab modestly increases overall survival in head and neck cancer patients. We hypothesize that co-signaling through additional pathways limits the efficacy of cetuximab and EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs in the clinical treatment of HNSCC. Analysis of gene expression changes in HNSCC cell lines treated 4 days with TKIs targeting EGFR and/or fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs identified transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGF-β2 induction in the three cell lines tested. Measurement of TGF-β2 mRNA validated this observation and extended it to additional cell lines. Moreover, TGF-β2 mRNA was increased in primary patient HNSCC xenografts treated for 4 weeks with cetuximab, demonstrating in vivo relevance of these findings. Functional genomics analyses with shRNA libraries identified TGF-β2 and TGF-β receptors (TGFβRs as synthetic lethal genes in the context of TKI treatment. Further, direct RNAi-mediated silencing of TGF-β2 inhibited cell growth, both alone and in combination with TKIs. Also, a pharmacological TGFβRI inhibitor similarly inhibited basal growth and enhanced TKI efficacy. In summary, the studies support a TGF-β2-TGFβR pathway as a TKI-inducible growth pathway in HNSCC that limits efficacy of EGFR-specific inhibitors.

  9. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor AUDA decreases bleomycin-induced pulmonary toxicity in mice by inhibiting the p38/Smad3 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xin-Wei; Jia, Yong-Liang; Ge, Ling-Tian; Jiang, Bo; Jiang, Jun-Xia; Shen, Jian; Jin, Ya-Chao; Guan, Yan; Sun, Yun; Xie, Qiang-Min

    2017-08-15

    Bleomycin (BLM) has potent tumor cell-killing properties that have given it an important place in cancer chemotherapy, but pulmonary toxicity is its major adverse effect. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors have been reported to have protective effects in fibrosis models, but the effects of AUDA, an sEH inhibitor of BLM-induced pulmonary toxicity and fibrosis, remain to be researched. In this study, we assessed the effects of AUDA on the BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a mouse model, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β 1 -induced epithelial proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in vitro by monitoring changes in pulmonary function, inflammatory response, fibrotic remodeling, and signaling pathways. AUDA was administered by intragastric administration (i.g) daily for three weeks, starting at seven days after intratracheal instillation of BLM. All examinations were performed 24h after the last i.g. In vivo, AUDA significantly improved BLM-induced decline in lung function and body weight, and inhibited inflammatory cell accumulation and the mRNA and protein expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, TGF-β 1 , and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) in lung tissue. Moreover, AUDA attenuated BLM-induced deposition of collagen fibers, destruction of alveolar structures, and pulmonary parenchyma. Additionally, AUDA regulated the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and E-cadherin by inhibiting the Smad3/p38 signaling pathway. In vitro, AUDA significantly inhibited TGF-β 1 -induced epithelial cells and fibroblast proliferation, reduced sEH expression and α-SMA expression, and increased epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) levels and E-cadherin expression in epithelial cells. These effects were blocked by AUDA by downregulating the Smad3 and p38 signaling pathways. Taken together, these data indicate that treatment with sEH inhibitors may improve BLM-induced pulmonary toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 signaling pathway clear prion-infected cells from PrPSc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Elin K; Luhr, Katarina M; Ibáñez, Carlos; Kristensson, Krister

    2005-09-14

    Prions represent a unique class of infectious agents in which the normal cellular prion protein (PrPC) is converted to an abnormal isoform (PrPSc), which accumulates in the brain and constitutes the major, if not the only, component of the infectious particle. Factors that still remain to be identified may facilitate the conversion of PrPC to PrPSc. In the present study, we first demonstrated that a growth factor of the neurotrophin family, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), stimulates the formation of PrPSc in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-secreting neuronal cell line (GT1-1 cells) infected with the Rocky Mountain Laboratory (RML) strain of scrapie as determined by Western blot analysis. We then observed that the prion-infected cells can be cleared from PrPSc by treatment with three inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) [1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(o-aminophenylmercapto)butadiene and 2-(2-amino-3-methyoxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one, as well as alpha-[amino[(4-aminophenyl)thio]methylene]-2-(trifluoromethyl) benzeneacetonitrile, which passes the blood-brain barrier], a component of one of the intracellular signaling pathways activated by BDNF. The MEK1/2 inhibitors were also efficient in clearing PrPSc from prion-infected GT1-1 cells stimulated to accumulate high levels of PrPSc by enhanced serum concentrations in the medium or by the use of a serum-free neuron-specific neurobasal medium. PrPSc did not reappear in the cultures within 5 weeks after completion of treatment. We conclude that inhibitors of the MEK1/2 pathway can efficiently and probably irreversibly clear PrP(Sc) from prion-infected cells. The MEK pathway may therefore be a suitable target for therapeutic intervention in prion diseases.

  11. Involvement of HDAC1 and the PI3K/PKC signaling pathways in NF-κB activation by the HDAC inhibitor apicidin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Kee; Seo, Dong-Wan; Kang, Dong-Won; Lee, Hoi Young; Han, Jeung-Whan; Kim, Su-Nam

    2006-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are appreciated as one of promising anticancer drugs, but they exert differential responses depending on the cell type. We recently reported the critical role of NF-κB as a modulator in determining cell fate for apoptosis in response to an HDAC inhibitor. In this study, we investigate a possible signaling pathway required for NF-κB activation in response to the HDAC inhibitor apicidin. Treatment of HeLa cells with apicidin leads to an increase in transcriptional activity of NF-κB and the expression of its target genes, IL-8 and TNF-α. TNF-α expression by apicidin is induced at earlier time points than NF-κB activation or IL-8 expression. In addition, our data show that the early expression of TNF-α does not lead to activation of NF-κB, because disruption of TNF-α activity by a neutralizing antibody does not affect nuclear translocation of NF-κB, IκBα degradation or reporter gene activation by apicidin. However, this activation of NF-κB requires the PI3K and PKC signaling pathways, but not ERK or JNK. Furthermore, apicidin activation of NF-κB seems to result from HDAC1 inhibition, as evidenced by the observation that overexpression of HDAC1, but not HDAC2, 3 or 4, dramatically inhibits NF-κB reporter gene activity. Collectively, our results suggest that activation of NF-κB signaling by apicidin requires both the PI3K/PKC signaling pathways and HDAC1, and functions as a critical modulator in determining the cellular effect of apicidin

  12. Comparison between endothelial and tumor cells in the response to verteporfin-photodynamic therapy and a PI3K pathway inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fateye, Babasola; Wan, Aaron; Yang, Xue; Myers, Kenneth; Chen, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established cancer treatment. Molecular-targeted agents targeting phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is showing great promise as anticancer drugs. This study compared SVEC mouse endothelial and PC-3 human prostate tumor cells in the response to verteporfin-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) and a pan-PI3K pathway inhibitor LY294002. Verteporfin cellular uptake and intracellular localization was determined by spectrofluorometry and confocal fluorescence microscopy, respectively, in the SVEC and PC-3 cells. Cytotoxicity induced by LY294002 and verteporfin-PDT was assessed by the MTS assay. Effects of treatments on cell survival and death signaling were examined by Western blot analysis. PC-3 cells had a higher cellular uptake of verteporfin than SVEC cells at 15min after incubation with verteporfin. Verteporfin was mainly localized in mitochondria in both SVEC and PC-3 cells. Verteporfin-PDT alone as well as PDT in combination with LY294002 induced more apoptosis and caused more reduction in cell viability in SVEC cells than in PC-3 cells. PC-3 cells exhibited a higher level of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins than SVEC cells. SVEC cells were more responsive to verteporfin-PDT and PI3K pathway inhibitor LY294002 than PC-3 cells. Such differences in response were likely due to differences in Bcl-2 family protein level. These results support tumor vascular targeting by verteporfin-PDT and its therapeutic enhancement by PI3K pathway inhibition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cancer-related anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rzaeq, Hikmat N.

    2004-01-01

    Anemia is the most common hematological abnormality in cancer patients is often under-recognized and undertreated. The pathogenesis of cancer anemia is complex and most of time multifactorial; involving factors related to the tumor itself or its therapy. While anemia can be present in a wide range of symptoms, involing almost every organ, it is beleived that it contributes much to cancer-related-fatigue, one of the most common symptoms in cancer patients. In addition there is increasing evidence to suggest that anemia is an independent factor adversely affecting tumor reponse and patient survival. While blood transfusion was the only option to treat cancer related anemia, the use of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) is becomig the new standard of care, more so with the recent studies demonstrating the feasibility of a sigle weekly injection .Things are even getting better with the recent approval of a new form of rHuEPO; Darbepoetin an analogue with a 3-fold longer half-life. In addition to its effects in raising homoglobin, several well controlled studies demonstrated decrease in transfusion requirementsand better qualify of life assessed objectively using standard assesments scales. (author)

  14. Derivation and evaluation of putative adverse outcome pathways for the effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors on reproductive processes in female fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition is of concern in fish because COX inhibitors (e.g., ibuprofen) are ubiquitous in aquatic systems/fish tissues, and can disrupt synthesis of prostaglandins that modulate a variety of essential biological functions including reproduction. High conten...

  15. Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In Treatment at NIH "The Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation is helping patients like me cope with bone marrow failure disease." Diseases Aplastic Anemia Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH) Related Diseases Treatments ...

  16. Evaluation of Macrocytic Anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Ralph; Dwyre, Denis M

    2015-10-01

    Macrocytic anemia, defined as a mean cell volume (MCV) ≥100 fL in adults, has a narrow differential diagnosis that requires evaluation of the peripheral blood smear as well as additional laboratory testing taken in conjunction with clinical information that includes patient history and physical examination findings. This review is an update on the approach to a patient with macrocytic anemia with attention paid to the differentiation of megaloblastic and non-megaloblastic macrocytic anemias. Critical to the determination of the diagnosis is the judicious use of laboratory testing and the evaluation of those findings in conjunction with the patient medical, surgical, and medication history. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Activating the Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway for the Treatment of Melanoma--Application of LY2090314, a Novel Selective Inhibitor of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Atkinson

    Full Text Available It has previously been observed that a loss of β-catenin expression occurs with melanoma progression and that nuclear β-catenin levels are inversely proportional to cellular proliferation, suggesting that activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway may provide benefit for melanoma patients. In order to further probe this concept we tested LY2090314, a potent and selective small-molecule inhibitor with activity against GSK3α and GSK3β isoforms. In a panel of melanoma cell lines, nM concentrations of LY2090314 stimulated TCF/LEF TOPFlash reporter activity, stabilized β-catenin and elevated the expression of Axin2, a Wnt responsive gene and marker of pathway activation. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that melanoma cell lines are very sensitive to LY2090314 in vitro (IC50 ~10 nM after 72hr of treatment in contrast to other solid tumor cell lines (IC50 >10 uM as evidenced by caspase activation and PARP cleavage. Cell lines harboring mutant B-RAF or N-RAS were equally sensitive to LY2090314 as were those with acquired resistance to the BRAF inhibitor Vemurafenib. shRNA studies demonstrated that β-catenin stabilization is required for apoptosis following treatment with the GSK3 inhibitor since the sensitivity of melanoma cell lines to LY290314 could be overcome by β-catenin knockdown. We further demonstrate that in vivo, LY2090314 elevates Axin2 gene expression after a single dose and produces tumor growth delay in A375 melanoma xenografts with repeat dosing. The activity of LY2090314 in preclinical models suggests that the role of Wnt activators for the treatment of melanoma should be further explored.

  18. Prevotella intermedia stimulates tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 expression via multiple signaling pathways in human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Su-Min; He, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Ming; Shu, Lei

    2011-06-01

    Prevotella intermedia is an important periodontal pathogen that induces various inflammatory and immune responses. In this study, we investigated the effects of P. intermedia on the plasminogen system in human periodontal ligament (hPDL) cells and explored the signaling pathways involved. Using semi-quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and quantitative real-time RT-qPCR, we demonstrated that P. intermedia challenge increased tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-2 expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, but exerted no influence on urokinase-type plasminogen activator and PAI-1mRNA expression in hPDL cells. Prevotella intermedia stimulation also enhanced tPA protein secretion as confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot results revealed that P. intermedia treatment increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase (p38). ERK, JNK and protein kinase C inhibitors significantly attenuated the P. intermedia-induced tPA and PAI-2 expression. Furthermore, p38 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors markedly decreased PAI-2 expression, whereas they showed no or little inhibition on tPA expression. In contrast, inhibition of protein kinase A greatly enhanced the upregulatory effect of P. intermedia on tPA and PAI-2 expression. Our results suggest that P. intermedia may contribute to periodontal tissue destruction by upregulating tPA and PAI-2 expression in hPDL cells via multiple signaling pathways. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Severe anemia in Malawian children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calis, Job Cj; Phiri, Kamija S.; Faragher, E. Brian; Brabin, Bernard J.; Bates, Imelda; Cuevas, Luis E.; de Haan, Rob J.; Phiri, Ajib I.; Malange, Pelani; Khoka, Mirriam; Hulshof, Paul Jm; van Lieshout, Lisette; Beld, Marcel Ghm; teo, Yik Y.; Rockett, Kirk A.; Richardson, Anna; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; van Hensbroek, Michaël Boele

    2016-01-01

    Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. We conducted a case-control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration, <5.0 g per deciliter) and 757 preschool

  20. Nutritional anemias and the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Ralph

    2008-10-01

    Nutritional anemias are important because they are easily reversed and because their underlying causes, most often unrelated to dietary intake, require individualized assessment. Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) usually results from iron losses accompanying chronic bleeding, including loss to intestinal parasites, or from gastric disorders or malabsorption in the elderly. Cobalamin-deficiency anemia, the only nutritional anemia with predilection for the elderly, nearly always stems from failure of intrinsic factor (IF)-related absorption. Folate-deficiency anemia, the only nutritional anemia usually caused by poor intake, has nearly disappeared in countries that fortify food with folic acid. Copper-deficiency anemia, which usually results from malabsorptive disorders or from medical or nutritional interventions that provide inadequate copper or excess zinc, is uncommon but increasingly recognized. The prevalences of nutritional anemias, which are not always distinguished from non-anemic deficiency, are uncertain. The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) provides an essential diagnostic tool leading to judicious matching of relevant biochemical changes with relevant anemia. Nutritional anemias usually feature abnormal MCV, whereas the predominant anemias in the aged, especially the anemias of chronic disease/chronic inflammation (ACD/ACI), of renal failure, and of unknown causes, are typically normocytic.

  1. Effects of inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and downstream pathways of receptor tyrosine kinases involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin or mitogen-activated protein kinase in canine hemangiosarcoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Mami; Hoshino, Yuki; Izumi, Yusuke; Sakai, Hiroki; Takagi, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is a progressive malignant neoplasm with no current effective treatment. Previous studies showed that receptor tyrosine kinases and molecules within their downstream pathways involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR) or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were overexpressed in canine, human, and murine tumors, including HSA. The present study investigated the effects of inhibitors of these pathways in canine splenic and hepatic HSA cell lines using assays of cell viability and apoptosis. Inhibitors of the MAPK pathway did not affect canine HSA cell viability. However, cell viability was significantly reduced by exposure to inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and the PI3K/Akt/m-TOR pathway; these inhibitors also induced apoptosis in these cell lines. These results suggest that these inhibitors reduce the proliferation of canine HSA cells by inducing apoptosis. Further study of these inhibitors, using xenograft mouse models of canine HSA, are warranted to explore their potential for clinical application.

  2. [Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, A; Meier, H P; Straub, R; Gerber, V

    2009-04-01

    Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is a reportable, eradicable epizootic disease caused by the equine lentivirus of the retrovirus family which affects equids only and occurs worldwide. The virus is transmitted by blood, mainly by sanguivorous insects. The main symptoms of the disease are pyrexia, apathy, loss of body condition and weight, anemia, edema and petechia. However, infected horses can also be inapparent carriers without any overt signs. The disease is diagnosed by serological tests like the Coggins test and ELISA tests. Presently, Switzerland is offi cially free from EIA. However, Switzerland is permanently at risk of introducing the virus as cases of EIA have recently been reported in different European countries.

  3. Small molecule R1498 as a well-tolerated and orally active kinase inhibitor for hepatocellular carcinoma and gastric cancer treatment via targeting angiogenesis and mitosis pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Wu, Xihan; Zhang, Meifang; Zhu, Liangcheng; Zhao, Rong; Xu, Danqing; Lin, Zhaohu; Liang, Chungen; Chen, Taiping; Chen, Li; Ren, Yi; Zhang, Joe; Qin, Ning; Zhang, Xiongwen

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinases play important roles in tumor development and progression. Lots of kinase inhibitors have entered into market and show promising clinical benefits. Here we report the discovery of a novel small molecule, well-tolerated, orally active kinase inhibitor, R1498, majorly targeting both angiogenic and mitotic pathways for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and gastric cancer (GC). A series of biochemical and cell-based assays indicated that the target kinase cluster of R1498 included Aurora kinases and VEGFR2 et al. R1498 showed moderate in vitro growth inhibition on a panel of tumor cells with IC50 of micromole range. The in vivo anti-tumor efficacy of R1498 was evaluated on a panel of GC and HCC xenografts in a parallel comparison with another multikinase inhibitor sorafenib. R1498 demonstrated superior efficacy and toxicity profile over sorafenib in all test models with >80% tumor growth inhibition and tumor regression in some xenogratfts. The therapeutic potential of R1498 was also highlighted by its efficacy on three human GC primary tumor derived xenograft models with 10-30% tumor regression rate. R1498 was shown to actively inhibit the Aurora A activity in vivo, and decrease the vascularization in tumors. Furthermore, R1498 presented good in vivo exposure and therapeutic window in the pharmacokinetic and dose range finding studies. Theses evidences indicate that R1498 is a potent, well-tolerated, orally active multitarget kinase inhibitor with a unique antiangiogenic and antiproliferative profile, and provide strong confidence for further development for HCC and GC therapy.

  4. Anti-neuroinflammatory efficacy of the aldose reductase inhibitor FMHM via phospholipase C/protein kinase C-dependent NF-κB and MAPK pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Ke-Wu [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Li, Jun [Modern Research Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029 (China); Dong, Xin; Wang, Ying-Hong; Ma, Zhi-Zhong; Jiang, Yong; Jin, Hong-Wei [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Tu, Peng-Fei, E-mail: pengfeitu@vip.163.com [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Modern Research Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Aldose reductase (AR) has a key role in several inflammatory diseases: diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, AR inhibition seems to be a useful strategy for anti-inflammation therapy. In the central nervous system (CNS), microglial over-activation is considered to be a central event in neuroinflammation. However, the effects of AR inhibition in CNS inflammation and its underlying mechanism of action remain unknown. In the present study, we found that FMHM (a naturally derived AR inhibitor from the roots of Polygala tricornis Gagnep.) showed potent anti-neuroinflammatory effects in vivo and in vitro by inhibiting microglial activation and expression of inflammatory mediators. Mechanistic studies showed that FMHM suppressed the activity of AR-dependent phospholipase C/protein kinase C signaling, which further resulted in downstream inactivation of the IκB kinase/IκB/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inflammatory pathway. Therefore, AR inhibition-dependent NF-κB inactivation negatively regulated the transcription and expression of various inflammatory genes. AR inhibition by FMHM exerted neuroprotective effects in lipopolysaccharide-induced neuron–microglia co-cultures. These findings suggested that AR is a potential target for neuroinflammation inhibition and that FMHM could be an effective agent for treating or preventing neuroinflammatory diseases. - Highlights: • FMHM is a natural-derived aldose reductase (AR) inhibitor. • FMHM inhibits various neuroinflammatory mediator productions in vitro and in vivo. • FMHM inhibits neuroinflammation via aldose reductase/PLC/PKC-dependent NF-κB pathway. • FMHM inhibits neuroinflammation via aldose reductase/PLC/PKC-dependent MAPK pathway. • FMHM protects neurons against inflammatory injury in microglia-neuron co-cultures.

  5. Anti-neuroinflammatory efficacy of the aldose reductase inhibitor FMHM via phospholipase C/protein kinase C-dependent NF-κB and MAPK pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldose reductase (AR) has a key role in several inflammatory diseases: diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, AR inhibition seems to be a useful strategy for anti-inflammation therapy. In the central nervous system (CNS), microglial over-activation is considered to be a central event in neuroinflammation. However, the effects of AR inhibition in CNS inflammation and its underlying mechanism of action remain unknown. In the present study, we found that FMHM (a naturally derived AR inhibitor from the roots of Polygala tricornis Gagnep.) showed potent anti-neuroinflammatory effects in vivo and in vitro by inhibiting microglial activation and expression of inflammatory mediators. Mechanistic studies showed that FMHM suppressed the activity of AR-dependent phospholipase C/protein kinase C signaling, which further resulted in downstream inactivation of the IκB kinase/IκB/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inflammatory pathway. Therefore, AR inhibition-dependent NF-κB inactivation negatively regulated the transcription and expression of various inflammatory genes. AR inhibition by FMHM exerted neuroprotective effects in lipopolysaccharide-induced neuron–microglia co-cultures. These findings suggested that AR is a potential target for neuroinflammation inhibition and that FMHM could be an effective agent for treating or preventing neuroinflammatory diseases. - Highlights: • FMHM is a natural-derived aldose reductase (AR) inhibitor. • FMHM inhibits various neuroinflammatory mediator productions in vitro and in vivo. • FMHM inhibits neuroinflammation via aldose reductase/PLC/PKC-dependent NF-κB pathway. • FMHM inhibits neuroinflammation via aldose reductase/PLC/PKC-dependent MAPK pathway. • FMHM protects neurons against inflammatory injury in microglia-neuron co-cultures

  6. Synthesis of an Endogenous Steroidal Na Pump Inhibitor Marinobufagenin, Implicated in Human Cardiovascular Diseases, Is Initiated by CYP27A1 via Bile Acid Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, Olga V; Zernetkina, Valentina I; Shilova, Victoria Y; Grigorova, Yulia N; Juhasz, Ondrej; Wei, Wen; Marshall, Courtney A; Lakatta, Edward G; Bagrov, Alexei Y

    2015-10-01

    The bioactive steroid, marinobufagenin, is an endogenous Na/K-ATPase bufadienolide inhibitor that is synthesized by adrenocortical and placental cells. Marinobufagenin binding to Na/K-ATPase initiates profibrotic cell signaling, and heightened marinobufagenin levels are implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, preeclampsia, and chronic kidney disease. Steroids are derived from cholesterol through the traditional steroidogenesis pathway initiated by enzyme CYP11A1, and via the acidic bile acid pathway, which is controlled by enzyme CYP27A1. The mechanism of marinobufagenin biosynthesis in mammals, however, remains unknown. Here, we show that post-transcriptional silencing of the CYP27A1 gene in human trophoblast and rat adrenocortical cells reduced the expression of CYP27A1 mRNA by 70%, reduced total bile acids 2-fold, and marinobufagenin levels by 67% when compared with nontreated cells or cells transfected with nontargeting siRNA. In contrast, silencing of the CYP11A1 gene did not affect marinobufagenin production in either cell culture, but suppressed production of progesterone 2-fold in human trophoblast cells and of corticosterone by 90% in rat adrenocortical cells when compared with cells transfected with nontargeting siRNA. In vivo, in a high-salt administration experiment, male and female Dahl salt-sensitive rats became hypertensive after 4 weeks on a high-NaCl diet, their plasma marinobufagenin levels doubled, and adrenocortical CYP27A1 mRNA and protein increased 1.6-fold and 2.0-fold. Therefore, the endogenous steroidal Na/K-ATPase inhibitor, marinobufagenin, is synthesized in mammalian placenta and adrenal cortex from cholesterol through the novel acidic bile acid pathway. These findings will help to understand the role of marinobufagenin in highly prevalent human cardiovascular diseases. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Functional analyses of ATM, ATR and Fanconi anemia proteins in lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beumer, Jan H.; Fu, Katherine Y.; Anyang, Bean N.; Siegfried, Jill M.; Bakkenist, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    ATM and ATR are kinases implicated in a myriad of DNA-damage responses. ATM kinase inhibition radiosensitizes cells and selectively kills cells with Fanconi anemia (FA) gene mutations. ATR kinase inhibition sensitizes cells to agents that induce replication stress and selectively kills cells with ATM and TP53 mutations. ATM mutations and FANCF promoter-methylation are reported in lung carcinomas. We undertook functional analyses of ATM, ATR, Chk1 and FA proteins in lung cancer cell lines. We included Calu6 that is reported to be FANCL-deficient. In addition, the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) database was interrogated for alterations in: 1) ATM, MRE11A, RAD50 and NBN; 2) ATR, ATRIP and TOPBP1; and 3) 15 FA genes. No defects in ATM, ATR or Chk1 kinase activation, or FANCD2 monoubiquitination were identified in the lung cancer cell lines examined, including Calu6, and major alterations in these pathways were not identified in the TCGA database. Cell lines were radiosensitized by ATM kinase inhibitor KU60019, but no cell killing by ATM kinase inhibitor alone was observed. While no synergy between gemcitabine or carboplatin and ATR kinase inhibitor ETP-46464 was observed, synergy between gemcitabine and Chk1 kinase inhibitor UCN-01 was observed in 54 T, 201 T and H460, and synergy between carboplatin and Chk1 kinase inhibitor was identified in 201 T and 239 T. No interactions between ATM, ATR and FA activation were observed by either ATM or ATR kinase inhibition in the lung cancer cell lines. Analyses of ATM serine 1981 and Chk1 serine 345 phosphorylation, and FANCD2 monoubiquitination revealed that ATM and ATR kinase activation and FA pathway signaling are intact in the lung cancer cell lines examined. As such, these posttranslational modifications may have utility as biomarkers for the integrity of DNA damage signaling pathways in lung cancer. Different sensitization profiles between gemcitabine and carboplatin and ATR kinase inhibitor ETP-46464 and Chk1 kinase inhibitor

  8. SphK1 inhibitor SKI II inhibits the proliferation of human hepatoma HepG2 cells via the Wnt5A/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Zhang, Cai-Xia; Ma, Yan; He, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jia-Ping; Shao, Rong-Guang

    2016-04-15

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) promotes cell growth, proliferation and survival. Sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1), which converts sphingosine to S1P, is a key promoter in cancer. We previously found that the SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI II), suppresses the cell growth and induces apoptosis in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. However, the precise regulatory mechanism and signaling pathway on SKI II inhibiting tumor growth remains unknown. The expressions of β-catenin and related molecules of Wnt/β-catenin signal were detected by western blot in HepG2 cells. And the mRNA expression of β-catenin was detected by RT-PCR. The Wnt5A gene was silenced by siRNA. The colony formation was determined by staining with crystal violet. And the cell growth was examined by SRB assay and BrdU assay. We found that SKI II decreased the expression of β-catenin and the downstream molecules of β-catenin signal pathway and promotes the β-catenin degradation. In addition, SKI II induced the expression of Wnt5A, and then triggered β-catenin degradation. Furthermore, silencing Wnt5A decreased the anti-tumor effects of SKI II through recovering the expressions of β-catenin and downstream molecules of β-catenin signal pathway. SKI II-induced downregulation of HepG2 cell proliferation was associated with Wnt signaling pathway through Wnt5A-mediated β-catenin degradation. Our study revealed that a novel signal pathway was involved in SKI II-inhibited cell proliferation in human hepatoma cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence and association of post-renal transplant anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Elsayed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In some renal allograft recipients, anemia persists or develops following transplantation. Anemia is associated with pre-operative blood loss and allograft dysfunction, including delayed graft function, acute rejection and chronic allograft dysfunction. To study the prevalence and association of post-renal transplant anemia, we studied 200 renal transplant recipients; 131 (65.5% patients were males and 69 (34.5% patients were females, and age ranged from 17 to 67 years, with a mean of 37.7 ± 10.8 years. All patients were receiving cyclosporine, prednisolone and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF. Complete blood count was done at two times: three and six months post-renal transplant. There were 74% anemic patients three months after renal transplantation and 45% anemic patients six months after renal transplantation. High creatinine value, female gender, delayed graft function, episodes of acute rejection, perioperative blood loss and infections were the only significant independent risk factors for prevalence of anemia post-renal transplant. In our study, we did not find an association between MMF and cyclosporine nor angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs or angiotensin receptors blocker (ARBs with anemia. This study demonstrates that anemia is a common complication during the first six months after kidney transplantation, with several risk factors precipitating this complication.

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia if they're underweight or have chronic (ongoing) illnesses. Teenage girls who have heavy periods ... because blood is lost during dialysis. Also, the kidneys are no longer able to make ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... woman's risk for a premature or low-birth-weight baby. Adults Who Have Internal Bleeding Adults who have internal bleeding, such as intestinal bleeding, can develop iron-deficiency anemia due to blood loss. Certain conditions, such as colon cancer and bleeding ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Follow a high-fiber diet. Large amounts of fiber can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron-rich foods may help you prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Taking ...

  13. Anemia and School Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Frequent blood tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia ... iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a lower than normal number of red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste ... Anemia also can occur if your red blood cells don't contain enough hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow- ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin ... resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  19. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Howard A; Weitz, Ilene C

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an acquired autoimmune disorder resulting in the production of antibodies directed against red blood cell antigens causing shortened erythrocyte survival. The disorders can present as a primary disorder (idiopathic) or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, malignancies, or infections. Treatment involves immune modulation with corticosteroids and other agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research ... Is Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ways that NHLBI continues to translate ... Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that NHLBI is funding on iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z ... usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... infection. A history of gastrointestinal surgery, such as weight-loss surgery—especially gastric bypass—or gastrectomy. Certain rare ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or advise you to eat more iron-rich foods. This not only will help you avoid iron-deficiency anemia, but also may lower your risk of having a low-birth-weight baby. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications The signs and ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may ask whether you might be pregnant. Physical Exam Your doctor will do a physical exam to look for signs of iron-deficiency anemia. ... liver and spleen Do a pelvic and rectal exam to check for internal bleeding Diagnostic Tests and ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron added). If you don't eat these foods regularly, or if you don't take an iron supplement, you're more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... where there is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... body. People with severe iron-deficiency anemia or who have chronic conditions such as kidney disease or celiac disease may be more likely to ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... levels of red blood cells, hemoglobin, and iron. Dietary Changes and Supplements Iron You may need iron supplements to build ... Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Anemia (MedlinePlus) "Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Iron" (Office of Dietary Supplements, National ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... preventing, diagnosing, and treating heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor about delayed clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and low-birth-weight babies (weighing less than 5.5 pounds) are at even greater risk for iron- ... loss during their monthly periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron ... anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other ... poorly because of money, social, health, or other problems. Follow a very low-fat diet over a ...

  1. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  2. Multidisciplinary approach to anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Ghiațău

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We present the case of a 65 years- old woman who was admitted with a severe macrocytic anemia Hb= 5.7g/dl and diffuse bone pain. Biologically she has moderate thrombocytopenia 35 000/µl, a hepatic cytolysis and cholestatic syndrome. Material and method: The patient was extensively evaluated before presentation for a mild iron - deficiency anemia for which she underwent endoscopic examination of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract- normal. The bone marrow aspiration on admission revealed a marked hyperplasia of the erythroblastic line with ~50% basophilic erythroblasts suggesting a regenerative erythroid hyperplasia. These changes along with the marked reticulocytosis on the peripheral blood smear oriented us towards a hemolytic anemia; Folic acid, vitamin B12, autoimmune tests and hemolytic tests were all normal. We continued the investigations with a thoraco-abdominopelvic computed tomography which identified diffuse demineralization, vertebral compactation and pelvic stress fractures. The breast examination revealed a right breast nodule, but the breast ultrasonography pleaded for benignity. Lacking a clear definitive diagnosis we decided to perform a bone marrow biopsy. Results: The osteo- medullary biopsy pointed towards a medullar invasion from a lobular mammary carcinoma; In these circumstances we performed an ultrasound guided biopsy of the right mammary lump thus histologically confirming a tumoral invasion of the bone marrow with subsequent anemia. The patient started chemotherapy in the Oncology ward. Conclusion: The particularity of this case consists in the pattern of anemia, which initially seemed iron deficient and afterwards macrocytic – apparently hemolytic and was actually due to the tumoral medullar invasion and also the nonspecific ultrasonographic appearance of the breast tumor.

  3. [INHIBITORS OF MAP-KINASE PATHWAY U0126 AND PD98059 DIFFERENTLY AFFECT ORGANIZATION OF TUBULIN CYTOSKELETON AFTER STIMULATION OF EGF RECEPTOR ENDOCYTOSIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlobina, M V; Steblyanko, Yu Yu; Shklyaeva, M A; Kharchenko, V V; Salova, A V; Kornilova, E S

    2015-01-01

    phospho-ERK2 could be detected after 60 min of endocytosis. In both cases, MAP-kinase activation dynamics was significantly different from the control. Our results suggest involvement of EGF-stimulated MAP-kinase pathway in cytoskeleton regulation. At the same time, they demonstrate that the two studied and widely used inhibitors are not equivalent with respect to not only the effect on MAP-kinase activity but also to such interdependent processes such as changes in cytoskeleton organization and signaling receptor' endocytosis.

  4. A Phase I Study of FOLFIRINOX Plus IPI-926, a Hedgehog Pathway Inhibitor, for Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Andrew H; LoConte, Noelle; Tempero, Margaret A; Walker, Evan J; Kate Kelley, R; Lewis, Stephanie; Chang, Wei-Chou; Kantoff, Emily; Vannier, Michael W; Catenacci, Daniel V; Venook, Alan P; Kindler, Hedy L

    2016-03-01

    In mouse models of pancreatic cancer, IPI-926, an oral Hedgehog inhibitor, increases chemotherapy delivery by depleting tumor-associated stroma. This multicenter phase Ib study evaluated IPI-926 in combination with FOLFIRINOX (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, oxaliplatin) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Patients were treated with once-daily IPI-926 plus FOLFIRINOX. A 3 + 3 dose escalation design was used, with cohort expansion at the maximum tolerated dose. A subset of patients underwent perfusion computed tomography to assess changes in tumor perfusion. The maximum tolerated dose was identified 1 dose level below standard FOLFIRINOX. Common treatment-related adverse events included liver function test abnormalities, neuropathy, nausea/vomiting, and diarrhea. Objective response rate was high (67%), and patients receiving IPI-926 maintenance showed further declines in CA19-9 levels even after FOLFIRINOX discontinuation. Treatment did not result in consistent increases in tumor perfusion. The study closed early when a separate phase II trial of IPI-926 plus gemcitabine indicated detrimental effects of this combination. This is the first study to demonstrate the feasibility of using FOLFIRINOX as the chemotherapeutic backbone in a clinical trial design. Although robust antitumor activity and acceptable safety were observed with the addition of IPI-926 to this regimen, future development of Hedgehog inhibitors in pancreatic cancer seems unlikely.

  5. Inhibitors of EGFR and PI3K/Akt/mtor pathways for the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro Palomares, E. M.

    2015-07-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and although new therapeutic approaches have been recently evaluated, improvement in overall patient survival is still poor. For this reason, new effective and selective clinical treatments are urgently needed. Genomic analysis allowing the identification of differences between normal and tumor cells provides new therapeutic options identifying novel targets or drugs that have shown efficacy in other tumor types. In this sense, EGFR amplification and/or overexpression are frequent events in HNSCC; in fact, the only targeted therapy approved to treat HNSCC is the anti-EFGR antibody Cetuximab. Based on cell line drug screening studies we identified Bosutinib (SKI-606), a Src/Abl inhibitor, as a candidate drug to treat HNSCC. Using a panel of HNSCC cell lines we found that the treatment with Bosutinib was able to reduce cell proliferation and to induce apoptosis at higher doses. We verified that the drug rapidly inhibited EGFR phosphorylation, and sensitivity to Bosutinib correlated with the activation of EGFR in tumor-derived cell lines. Moreover, Bosutinib showed a synergistic effect on cell viability with the PI3K? inhibitor BYL719 only in those cell lines with mutations in PIK3CA. These results suggest that Bosutinib could be a new effective drug in the treatment of HNSCC cancer, especially in tumors with high activity of EGFR, and its combination with BYL719 could especially benefit those patients bearing activating mutations of PIK3CA. (Author)

  6. Inhibition of canonical WNT signaling pathway by β-catenin/CBP inhibitor ICG-001 ameliorates liver fibrosis in vivo through suppression of stromal CXCL12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcora, Büsra Öztürk; Storm, Gert; Bansal, Ruchi

    2018-03-01

    Quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), in response to liver injury, undergo characteristic morphological transformation into proliferative, contractile and ECM-producing myofibroblasts. In this study, we investigated the implication of canonical Wnt signaling pathway in HSCs and liver fibrogenesis. Canonical Wnt signaling pathway activation and inhibition using β-catenin/CBP inhibitor ICG001 was examined in-vitro in TGFβ-activated 3T3, LX2, primary human HSCs, and in-vivo in CCl 4 -induced acute liver injury mouse model. Fibroblasts-conditioned medium studies were performed to assess the Wnt-regulated paracrine factors involved in crosstalk between HSCs-macrophages and HSCs-endothelial cells. Canonical Wnt signaling pathway components were significantly up-regulated in-vitro and in-vivo. In-vitro, ICG-001 significantly inhibited fibrotic parameters, 3D-collagen contractility and wound healing. Conditioned medium induced fibroblasts-mediated macrophage and endothelial cells activation was significantly inhibited by ICG-001. In-vivo, ICG-001 significantly attenuated collagen accumulation and HSC activation. Interestingly, ICG-001 drastically inhibited macrophage infiltration, intrahepatic inflammation and angiogenesis. We further analyzed the paracrine factors involved in Wnt-mediated effects and found CXCL12 was significantly suppressed both in-vitro and in-vivo following Wnt inhibition. Wnt-regulated CXCL12 secretion from activated HSCs potentiated macrophage infiltration and activation, and angiogenesis. Pharmacological inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling pathway via suppression of stromal CXCL12 suggests a potential therapeutic approach targeting activated HSCs in liver fibrosis. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Blockade of the MEK/ERK pathway with a raf inhibitor prevents activation of pro-inflammatory mediators in cerebral arteries and reduction in cerebral blood flow after subarachnoid hemorrhage in a rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maddahi, Aida; Ansar, Saema; Chen, Qingwen

    2011-01-01

    /ERK (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway upstream with a specific raf inhibitor would prevent SAH-induced activation of the cerebrovascular inflammatory response. The raf inhibitor SB-386023-b was injected intracisternally in our rat model at 0, 6, or 12 hours after the SAH. After 48...... normalized CBF and prevented SAH-induced upregulation of MMPs, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and pERK1/2 proteins. These results suggested that inhibition of MEK/ERK signal transduction by a specific raf inhibitor administered up to 6 hours after SAH normalized the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators...

  8. In vitro effects of heparin and tissue factor pathway inhibitor on factor VII assays. possible implications for measurements in vivo after heparin therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, E-M; Larsen, L F; Ostergaard, P

    2000-01-01

    The coagulant activity of blood coagulation factor VII (FVII:C) can be lowered by changes in lifestyle and by therapeutic intervention, e.g. heparin infusion. The question is, however, whether FVII:C determined ex vivo is a valid measure of the FVII activity in vivo. We measured plasma FVII......:C, activated FVII (FVIIa), FVII protein (FVII:Ag), tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), triglycerides, and free fatty acids (FFA) before and 15 min after infusion of a bolus of unfractionated heparin (50 IU/kg body weight) in 12 healthy subjects. Additionally, we conducted in vitro experiments...... to investigate the effect of unfractionated heparin and TFPI, which is released from the endothelium by heparin, on FVII:C, FVIIa, and FVII:Ag. Heparin infusion decreased triglycerides and increased FFA and TFPI. This was accompanied by significant reductions in FVIIa, FVII:C and FVII:Ag. In vitro, anti...

  9. Fanconi Anemia and Laron Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Cortazar, Inma; de Ita, Julieta Rodriguez; Aguirre, Gabriel Amador; Castorena-Torres, Fabiola; Ortiz-Urbina, Jesús; García-Magariño, Mariano; de la Garza, Rocío García; Diaz Olachea, Carlos; Elizondo Leal, Martha Irma

    2017-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a condition characterized by genetic instability and short stature, which is due to growth hormone (GH) deficiency in most cases. However, no apparent relationships have been identified between FA complementation group genes and GH. In this study, we thereby considered an association between FA and Laron syndrome (LS) (insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1] deficiency). A 21-year-old female Mexican patient with a genetic diagnosis of FA was referred to our research department for an evaluation of her short stature. Upon admission to our facility, her phenotype led to a suspicion of LS; accordingly, serum levels of IGF-1 and IGF binding protein 3 were analyzed and a GH stimulation test was performed. In addition, we used a next-generation sequencing approach for a molecular evaluation of FA disease-causing mutations and genes involved in the GH-IGF signaling pathway. Tests revealed low levels of IGF-1 and IGF binding protein 3 that remained within normal ranges, as well as a lack of response to GH stimulation. Sequencing confirmed a defect in the GH receptor signaling pathway. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to suggest an association between FA and LS. We propose that IGF-1 administration might improve some FA complications and functions based upon IGF-1 beneficial actions observed in animal, cell and indirect clinical models: erythropoiesis modulation, immune function improvement and metabolic regulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Estrogens, selective estrogen receptor modulators, and a selective estrogen receptor down-regulator inhibit endothelial production of tissue factor pathway inhibitor 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ree Anne

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hormone therapy, oral contraceptives, and tamoxifen increase the risk of thrombotic disease. These compounds also reduce plasma content of tissue factor pathway inhibitor-1 (TFPI, which is the physiological inhibitor of the tissue factor pathway of coagulation. The current aim was to study if estrogens and estrogen receptor (ER modulators may inhibit TFPI production in cultured endothelial cells and, if so, identify possible mechanisms involved. Methods Human endothelial cell cultures were treated with 17β-estradiol (E2, 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2, tamoxifen, raloxifene, or fulvestrant. Protein levels of TFPI in cell media and cell lysates were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and TFPI mRNA levels were assessed by quantitative PCR. Expression of ERα was analysed by immunostaining. Results All compounds (each in a concentration of 10 nM reduced TFPI in cell medium, by 34% (E2, 21% (EE2, 16% (tamoxifen, and 28% (raloxifene, respectively, with identical inhibitory effects on cellular TFPI levels. Expression of TFPI mRNA was principally unchanged. Treatment with fulvestrant, which was also associated with down-regulation of secreted TFPI (9% with 10 nM and 26% with 1000 nM, abolished the TFPI-inhibiting effect of raloxifene, but not of the other compounds. Notably, the combination of 1000 nM fulvestrant and 10 nM raloxifene increased TFPI secretion, and, conversely, 10 nM of either tamoxifen or raloxifene seemed to partly (tamoxifen or fully (raloxifene counteract the inhibitory effect of 1000 nM fulvestrant. The cells did not express the regular nuclear 66 kDa ERα, but instead a 45 kDa ERα, which was not regulated by estrogens or ER modulators. Conclusion E2, EE2, tamoxifen, raloxifene, and fulvestrant inhibited endothelial production of TFPI by a mechanism apparently independent of TFPI transcription.

  11. Multi-output model with Box-Jenkins operators of linear indices to predict multi-target inhibitors of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casañola-Martin, Gerardo M; Le-Thi-Thu, Huong; Pérez-Giménez, Facundo; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; Abad, Concepción; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2015-05-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) plays an important role in the degradation of cellular proteins and regulation of different cellular processes that include cell cycle control, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this sense, the disruption of proteasome activity leads to different pathological states linked to clinical disorders such as inflammation, neurodegeneration, and cancer. The use of UPP inhibitors is one of the proposed approaches to manage these alterations. On other hand, the ChEMBL database contains >5,000 experimental outcomes for >2,000 compounds tested as possible proteasome inhibitors using a large number of pharmacological assay protocols. All these assays report a large number of experimental parameters of biological activity like EC50, IC50 percent of inhibition, and many others that have been determined under many different conditions, targets, organisms, etc. Although this large amount of data offers new opportunities for the computational discovery of proteasome inhibitors, the complexity of these data represents a bottleneck for the development of predictive models. In this work, we used linear molecular indices calculated with the software TOMOCOMD-CARDD and Box-Jenkins moving average operators to develop a multi-output model that can predict outcomes for 20 experimental parameters in >450 assays carried out under different conditions. This generated multi-output model showed values of accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity above 70% for training and validation series. Finally, this model is considered multi-target and multi-scale, because it predicts the inhibition of the UPP for drugs against 22 molecular or cellular targets of different organisms contained in the ChEMBL database.

  12. Modulation of Plasma Metabolite Biomarkers of the MAPK Pathway with MEK Inhibitor RO4987655: Pharmacodynamic and Predictive Potential in Metastatic Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Joo Ern; Pal, Akos; Asad, Yasmin J; Henley, Alan T; Valenti, Melanie; Box, Gary; de Haven Brandon, Alexis; Revell, Victoria L; Skene, Debra J; Venturi, Miro; Rueger, Ruediger; Meresse, Valerie; Eccles, Suzanne A; de Bono, Johann S; Kaye, Stanley B; Workman, Paul; Banerji, Udai; Raynaud, Florence I

    2017-10-01

    MAPK pathway activation is frequently observed in human malignancies, including melanoma, and is associated with sensitivity to MEK inhibition and changes in cellular metabolism. Using quantitative mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, we identified in preclinical models 21 plasma metabolites including amino acids, propionylcarnitine, phosphatidylcholines, and sphingomyelins that were significantly altered in two B-RAF-mutant melanoma xenografts and that were reversed following a single dose of the potent and selective MEK inhibitor RO4987655. Treatment of non-tumor-bearing animals and mice bearing the PTEN-null U87MG human glioblastoma xenograft elicited plasma changes only in amino acids and propionylcarnitine. In patients with advanced melanoma treated with RO4987655, on-treatment changes of amino acids were observed in patients with disease progression and not in responders. In contrast, changes in phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins were observed in responders. Furthermore, pretreatment levels of seven lipids identified in the preclinical screen were statistically significantly able to predict objective responses to RO4987655. The RO4987655 treatment-related changes were greater than baseline physiological variability in nontreated individuals. This study provides evidence of a translational exo-metabolomic plasma readout predictive of clinical efficacy together with pharmacodynamic utility following treatment with a signal transduction inhibitor. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(10); 2315-23. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Multi-output Model with Box-Jenkins Operators of Quadratic Indices for Prediction of Malaria and Cancer Inhibitors Targeting Ubiquitin- Proteasome Pathway (UPP) Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casañola-Martin, Gerardo M; Le-Thi-Thu, Huong; Pérez-Giménez, Facundo; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; Abad, Concepción; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) is the primary degradation system of short-lived regulatory proteins. Cellular processes such as the cell cycle, signal transduction, gene expression, DNA repair and apoptosis are regulated by this UPP and dysfunctions in this system have important implications in the development of cancer, neurodegenerative, cardiac and other human pathologies. UPP seems also to be very important in the function of eukaryote cells of the human parasites like Plasmodium falciparum, the causal agent of the neglected disease Malaria. Hence, the UPP could be considered as an attractive target for the development of compounds with Anti-Malarial or Anti-cancer properties. Recent online databases like ChEMBL contains a larger quantity of information in terms of pharmacological assay protocols and compounds tested as UPP inhibitors under many different conditions. This large amount of data give new openings for the computer-aided identification of UPP inhibitors, but the intrinsic data diversity is an obstacle for the development of successful classifiers. To solve this problem here we used the Bob-Jenkins moving average operators and the atom-based quadratic molecular indices calculated with the software TOMOCOMD-CARDD (TC) to develop a quantitative model for the prediction of the multiple outputs in this complex dataset. Our multi-target model can predict results for drugs against 22 molecular or cellular targets of different organisms with accuracies above 70% in both training and validation sets.

  14. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K; Chaudhary, Sandeep C; Ballestas, Mary E; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-01-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [THE DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTIC POSSIBILITIES IN EVALUATION OF IRON-DEFICIENT CONDITION UNDER ANEMIAS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrikhina, G N; Blindar, V N; Matveeva, I I

    2016-03-01

    The article presents data concerning differential diagnostic possibilities of evaluation of genuine iron-deficient anemia and anemia of chronic diseases. The variety of mechanisms of development of anemia of chronic diseases is demonstrated, including effect of humoral inhibitors of erythropoiesis, disorder of iron metabolism at the expense of its redistribution into cells of macrophage system, suppression of erythropoiesis resulted in redistributed or functional iron deficiency. The data is presented concerning significance in diagnostic of anemia of chronic diseases of such factors as content of ferritin, dissolving receptors of transferrin and role of hepcidin protein in pathogenesis of anemia of chronic diseases. The analysis of scientific publications demonstrated that hepcidin is a negative regulator of iron metabolism. Under iron-deficient anemia its level in blood decreases that contribute to extensive absorption of iron in gastrointestinal tract. On the contrary, under anemia of chronic diseases its content drastically increases and results in blocking of iron transport everywhere, including internal epithelium, macrophages, placenta and other types of cells. The hyper-production of hepcidin during infection and inflammation is responsible for anemia of chronic diseases. The perspectives of development of pharmaceuticals decreasing level of hepcidin for treatment of anemia of chronic diseases is demonstrated.

  16. Selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor NS-398 attenuates myocardial fibrosis in mice after myocardial infarction via Snail signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Y-C; Shi, C-L; Zhou, M; Liu, Y; Zhang, G; Hou, S-A

    2017-12-01

    The role of NS-398 in Snail pathway of myocardial cells in mice after myocardial infarction and its effect on myocardial fibrosis were investigated in this study. C57BL/6 mice were selected to establish mouse models of myocardial infarction with permanent ligation of anterior descending branch and sham-operation models without ligation. After successful establishment of models, 30 mice were randomly divided into sham-operation group, myocardial infarction group and drug intervention group. The drug intervention group was treated with intraperitoneal injection of NS-398 (5 mg/kg) at 1 week after modeling for 3 weeks. The survival status of mice after operation was monitored, the cardiac function was detected via echocardiography, the collagen levels in heart tissue pathological sections were detected via Masson staining and Sirius red staining. Moreover, the expressions of Snail and type I collagen levels were detected via immunohistochemistry, and the Snail protein expression level and the activity and expression level of E-cadherin protein were detected via Western blotting. At 4 weeks after establishment of myocardial infarction model, the fibrosis reaction was obvious, and the cardiac function was decreased, accompanied with Snail activation. The administration of NS-398 for 3 weeks inhibited the Snail activity expression and significantly improved the fibrosis degree after infarction. However, it did not improve the cardiac function. Inhibiting Snail improved the fibrosis reaction after infarction, in which Snail/E-cadherin signaling pathway was involved. NS-398 improves the myocardial fibrosis in mice after myocardial infarction through inhibiting the Snail signaling pathway.

  17. [Anemia in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerevoet, M; Sattar, L; Bron, D; Gulbis, B; Pepersack, T

    2014-09-01

    Anaemia is a problem that affects almost 10% over 65 years and 20% over 85 years. There is no physiological anaemia in the elderly. Any anaemia expresses the existence of a pathological process, regardless of its severity. Anaemia in the elderly is always associated with a poor prognosis that is in terms of mortality, morbidity and risk of fragility. The diagnostic approach to anemia in the elderly is the same as in younger individual. There are many causes of anaemia; anaemia balance is a complex diagnostic process. Most anaemias are due to a deficiency, chronic inflammation or comorbidity. However, in the elderly, the etiology of anaemia is often multifactorial. In a number of cases remain unexplained anaemia. In a number of cases, anemia remain unexplained. Treatment of anaemia is the treatment of the cause, but specific therapeutic aspects to the elderly should be considered, as among other martial substitution or use of erythropoietin (EPO).

  18. Thiamine– Responsive Megaloblastic Anemia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Motavaselian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thiamine Responsive megaloblastic anemia in DIDMOA (Wolfram syndrome has an autosomal- recessive mode of inheritance . Megaloblastic anemia and sideroblastic anemia is accompanied by diabetes insipidus (DI, diabetes mellitus (DM ,optic atrophy (OA and deafness (D. Neutropenia and thrombocytopenia are also present. We report a 7 month old girl with congenital macrocytic anemia; a rare clinical feature of Wolfram,s syndrome with increased plasma levels of blood glucose, both of which dramatically responded to administration of thiamine in large doses . The patient also had neurosensorial deafness, but no improvement was observed in the deafness. We presented the case because thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia is a rare clinical presentation of Wolfram syndrome and after institution of treatment with thiamine, the anemia and hyperglycemia returned to normal.

  19. A furin inhibitor downregulates osteosarcoma cell migration by downregulating the expression levels of MT1-MMP via the Wnt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingshan; Li, Guojun; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Yang

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to explore the exact mechanism of the effect of a furin inhibitor on the migration and invasion of MG-63 and Saos-2 osteosarcoma cells. MG-63 and Saos-2 osteosarcoma cells were treated with regular culture medium in the presence or absence of 480 nM α1-antitrypsin Portland (α1-PDX). Wound-healing and Transwell assays were used for the detection of the effects of α1-PDX on MG-63 and Saos-2 osteosarcoma cell migration and invasion. Western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were performed to detect the expression levels of membrane type I matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), Wnt and β-catenin. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was used for detection of the levels of MT1-MMP gene transcription activity. The results showed that α1-PDX treatment significantly reduced the migration and invasion ability of the cells. Notably, the expression levels of MT1-MMP decreased evidently upon α1-PDX treatment, paralleled with reductions in the expression levels of Wnt and β-catenin. Further analysis of the transcriptional activity of MT1-MMP revealed that the α1-PDX-induced downregulation of the levels of MT1-MMP was mediated by the Wnt signaling pathway. These data suggest that α1-PDX plays a vital role in inhibiting MG-63 and Saos-2 osteosarcoma cell migration and invasion by downregulating the expression levels of MT1-MMP via the Wnt signaling pathway.

  20. Copper is a potent inhibitor of both the canonical and non-canonical NFκB pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth, Niall S; Hucks, Jr, George E; Kocab, Andrew J; McCollom, Annie L; Duckett, Colin S

    2014-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace element that plays key roles in many metabolic processes. Homeostatic regulation of intracellular copper is normally tightly controlled, but deregulated copper levels are found in numerous metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases, as well as in a range of neoplasms. There are conflicting reports regarding the exact role of copper in the regulation of NFκB-responsive genes, specifically whether copper leads to increased activation of the NFκB pathways, or downregulation. Here we show that increased intracellular levels of copper, using the ionophore clioquinol, leads to a potent inhibition of NFκB pathways, induced by multiple distinct stimuli. Addition of copper to cells inhibits ubiquitin-mediated degradation of IκBα by preventing its phoshorylation by the upstream IKK complex. Intriguingly, copper-dependent inhibition of NFκB can be reversed by the addition of the reducing agent, N-acetylcysteine (NAC). These results suggest that the oxidative properties of excess copper prevent NFκB activation by blocking IκBα destruction, and that NFκB activity should be assessed in diseases associated with copper excess. PMID:24552822

  1. miR-21 inhibitor suppresses cell proliferation and colony formation through regulating the PTEN/AKT pathway and improves paclitaxel sensitivity in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guohui; Cao, Dongmei; Meng, Lingzheng

    2017-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role and the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of microRNA-21 (miR-21) on the proliferation, apoptosis and colony formation of cervical cancer cells, and to examine the role of miR-21 in mediating the sensitivity of cervical cancer cells to paclitaxel (PTX). Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was employed to determine the level of miR‑21 in various cervical cancer and normal cervical cells. The results revealed that the expression levels of miR-21 in cervical cancer cells were markedly higher when compared with normal cervical cells. Subsequently, a miR‑21 inhibitor or negative control (NC) was transfected into cervical cancer cells. Cell viability, colony formation and apoptosis were then analyzed using an MTT assay, crystal violet and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining, respectively. The protein expression level of B-cell lymphoma‑2 (Bcl‑2), Bcl‑2‑associated X (Bax), programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4), survivin, c‑myc, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and phosphorylated (p)‑AKT were determined by western blot analysis. The sensitivity of cervical cancer cells to PTX (25, 50 and 100 µg/ml) was characterized using an MTT assay. The results demonstrated that the miR-21 inhibitor promoted apoptosis of cervical cancer cells and suppressed their proliferation and colony formation when compared with the NC. In addition, the expression levels of Bcl‑2, survivin, c‑myc and p‑AKT were significantly downregulated in cells transfected with the miR‑21 inhibitor, whilst the expression levels of Bax, PDCD4 and PTEN were significantly upregulated. Furthermore, the miR‑21 inhibitor significantly enhanced the inhibition efficacy of PTX at a range of concentrations in cervical cancer cells. It was concluded that inhibition of miR‑21 suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation through regulating the PTEN/AKT pathway, and improved PTX

  2. [Anemia: guidelines comparison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The development of recombinant human erythropoietin and its introduction into the market in the late 1980s has significantly improved the quality of life of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and reduced the need for blood transfusions. Starting from a cautious target, a progressive increase in the recommended hemoglobin levels has been observed over the years, in parallel with an increase in the obtained levels. This trend has gone together with the publication of findings of observational studies showing a relationship between the increase in hemoglobin levels and a reduction in the mortality risk, with the conduction of clinical trials testing the effects of complete anemia correction, and with the compilation of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients by scientific societies and organizations. In the last two years, evidence of a possible increase in the mortality risk in those patients who were randomized to high hemoglobin levels has resulted in a decrease in the upper limit of the recommended Hb target to be obtained with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESA), and consequently in a narrowing of the target range. Comparison of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients is an interesting starting point to discuss single recommendations, strengthen their importance, or suggest new topics of research to fill up important gaps in knowledge.

  3. Reduced Hsp70 and Glutamine in Pediatric Severe Malaria Anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempaiah, Prakasha; Dokladny, Karol; Karim, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Severe malarial anemia [SMA, hemoglobin (Hb) <5.0 g/dL] is a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality among children residing in Plasmodium falciparum transmission regions. Exploration of molecular pathways through global gene expression profiling revealed that SMA was characterized by dec...

  4. Anemia, Growth Failure and Hypothyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Chaytors, Richard Gordon; Higgins, Gerald

    1980-01-01

    A 12-year-old Caucasian female presented to her family physician with an old complaint of anemia and a new complaint of failure to grow. The anemia, first observed four years previously, had been diagnosed as iron deficiency, but had never satisfactorily responded to adequate iron therapy. Investigation of the failure to grow resulted in a diagnosis of hypothyroidism with related normochromic normocytic anemia.

  5. [Nutritional anemias in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serraj, Khalid; Federici, Laure; Kaltenbach, Georges; Andrès, Emmanuel

    2008-09-01

    Nutritional deficiencies cause one third of the cases of anemia in the elderly. The urgency of anemia management in elderly patients depends on tolerance and repercussions, rather than only on the hemoglobin level. Iron, vitamin B12 and folate are the most common deficiencies, and their levels should be tested. Chronic gastrointestinal bleeding is the principal cause of iron-deficiency anemia. Management is based on supplementation combined with effective etiological treatment.

  6. Synergistic effects of selective inhibitors targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway or NUP214-ABL1 fusion protein in human Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simioni, Carolina; Ultimo, Simona; Martelli, Alberto M; Zauli, Giorgio; Milani, Daniela; McCubrey, James A; Capitani, Silvano; Neri, Luca M

    2016-11-29

    Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) accounts for 25-30% of adult ALL and its incidence increases with age in adults >40 years old. Irrespective of age, the ABL1 fusion genes are markers of poor prognosis and amplification of the NUP214-ABL1 oncogene can be detected mainly in patients with T-ALL. T cell malignancies harboring the ABL1 fusion genes are sensitive to many cytotoxic agents, but up to date complete remissions have not been achieved. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway is often activated in leukemias and plays a crucial role in leukemogenesis.We analyzed the effects of three BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), alone and in combination with a panel of selective PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors, on three NUP214-ABL1 positive T-ALL cell lines that also displayed PI3K/Akt/mTOR activation. Cells were sensitive to anti BCR-ABL1 TKIs Imatinib, Nilotinib and GZD824, that specifically targeted the ABL1 fusion protein, but not the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis. Four drugs against the PI3K/Akt/mTOR cascade, GSK690693, NVP-BGT226, ZSTK474 and Torin-2, showed marked cytotoxic effects on T-leukemic cells, without affecting the NUP214-ABL1 kinase and related pathway. Dephosphorylation of pAkt and pS6 showed the cytotoxicity of these compounds. Either single or combined administration of drugs against the different targets displayed inhibition of cellular viability associated with a concentration-dependent induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and autophagy, having the combined treatments a significant synergistic cytotoxic effect. Co-targeting NUP214-ABL1 fusion gene and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway could represent a new and effective pharmacological strategy to improve the outcome in NUP214-ABL1 positive T-ALL.

  7. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is anemia of inflammation and chronic disease (AI/ACD)? Anemia of inflammation and chronic disease is a ... after iron-deficiency anemia. 1 Who gets AI/ACD? While AI/ACD can affect people at any ...

  8. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe January 2014 Print this issue Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells En español Send ... Disease When Blood Cells Bend Wise Choices Preventing Anemia To prevent or treat iron-deficiency anemia: Eat ...

  9. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Donate Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia Because you have aplastic anemia , everyday events can ... bleeding, such as contact sports. Pregnancy and Aplastic Anemia Pregnancy is possible for women who have been ...

  10. KRASness and PIK3CAness in patients with advanced colorectal cancer: outcome after treatment with early-phase trials with targeted pathway inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Garrido-Laguna

    Full Text Available To evaluate clinicopathologic and molecular features of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC and their outcomes in early-phase trials using pathway-targeting agents.We analyzed characteristics of 238 patients with mCRC referred to the phase 1 trials unit at MD Anderson Cancer Center. KRAS, PIK3CA and BRAF status were tested using PCR-based DNA sequencing.Fifty-one percent of patients harbored KRAS mutations; 15% had PIK3CA mutations. In the multivariate regression model for clinical characteristics KRAS mutations were associated with an increased incidence of lung and bone metastases and decreased incidence of adrenal metastases; PIK3CA mutations were marginally correlated with mucinous tumors (p = 0.05. In the univariate analysis, KRAS and PIK3CA mutations were strongly associated. Advanced Duke's stage (p<0.0001 and KRAS mutations (p = 0.01 were the only significant independent predictors of poor survival (Cox proportional hazards model. Patients with PIK3CA mutations had a trend toward shorter progression-free survival when treated with anti-EGFR therapies (p = 0.07. Eighteen of 78 assessable patients (23% treated with PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis inhibitors achieved stable disease [SD] ≥6 months or complete response/partial response (CR/PR, only one of whom were in the subgroup (N = 15 with PIK3CA mutations, perhaps because 10 of these 15 patients (67% had coexisting KRAS mutations. No SD ≥6 months/CR/PR was observed in the 10 patients treated with mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK pathway targeting drugs.KRAS and PIK3CA mutations frequently coexist in patients with colorectal cancer, and are associated with clinical characteristics and outcome. Overcoming resistance may require targeting both pathways.

  11. Inhibitor of PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway Small Molecule Promotes Motor Neuron Differentiation of Human Endometrial Stem Cells Cultured on Electrospun Biocomposite Polycaprolactone/Collagen Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Hoveizi, Elham; Yazdankhah, Meysam; Ai, Jafar; Khakbiz, Mehrdad; Faghihi, Faezeh; Tajerian, Roksana; Bayat, Neda

    2017-05-01

    Small molecules as useful chemical tools can affect cell differentiation and even change cell fate. It is demonstrated that LY294002, a small molecule inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signal pathway, can inhibit proliferation and promote neuronal differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The purpose of this study was to investigate the differentiation effect of Ly294002 small molecule on the human endometrial stem cells (hEnSCs) into motor neuron-like cells on polycaprolactone (PCL)/collagen scaffolds. hEnSCs were cultured in a neurogenic inductive medium containing 1 μM LY294002 on the surface of PCL/collagen electrospun fibrous scaffolds. Cell attachment and viability of cells on scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazoyl-2-yl)2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The expression of neuron-specific markers was assayed by real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry analysis after 15 days post induction. Results showed that attachment and differentiation of hEnSCs into motor neuron-like cells on the scaffolds with Ly294002 small molecule were higher than that of the cells on tissue culture plates as control group. In conclusion, PCL/collagen electrospun scaffolds with Ly294002 have potential for being used in neural tissue engineering because of its bioactive and three-dimensional structure which enhances viability and differentiation of hEnSCs into neurons through inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Thus, manipulation of this pathway by small molecules can enhance neural differentiation.

  12. Studies on the mechanism of the anemia of renal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, J W; Foley, J E; Moriyama, Y; Ohno, Y; Modder, B; Lertora, J J

    1. The present studies have demonstrated that the titers of erythropoietin may be elevated to varying degrees in patients with anemia associated with end-stage renal disease. However, the increase in erythropoietin titers was apparently not sufficient to meet the increase in demand for new red blood cells created by their shortened life span and the inhibitors of heme synthesis and/or erythroid colony forming cells (CFU-E). 2. Inhibitors of heme synthesis were demonstrated in the plasma of some but not all patients with anemia associated with renal disease and in rabbits 72 hrs following bilateral nephrectomy. 3. CFU-E were both increased and decreased in the bone marrows of the chronic anemic uremic rabbits, when compared with that of sham operated controls, 14 and 21 days after 5/6th nephrectomy and depended on the rate of regeneration of the renal erythropoietic and excretory functions. CFU-E in marrows of 5/6th nephrectomy rabbits were decreased after 35 days. 4. An inhibitor of CFU-E was increased in the sera from chronic anemic uremic rabbits, when compared with that of the sham-operated controls, 35 days after 5/6th nephrectomy. 5. It is possible that in the anemia of uremia in addition to inadequate production of erythropoietin there is a defect in the differentiation of the CFU-E into the heme synthesizing erythroid series due to the presence of a specific inhibitor of CFU-E and/or heme synthesis.

  13. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho

    1971-01-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T 50 Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  15. Immune checkpoint inhibitor PD-1 pathway is down-regulated in synovium at various stages of rheumatoid arthritis disease progression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guo, Yanxia

    2018-01-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade with therapeutic anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen (CTLA)-4 (Ipilimumab) and anti-programmed death (PD)-1 (Nivolumab and Pembrolizumab) antibodies alone or in combination has shown remarkable efficacy in multiple cancer types, concomitant with immune-related adverse events, including arthralgia and inflammatory arthritis (IA) in some patients. Herein, using Nivolumab (anti-PD-1 antagonist)-responsive genes along with transcriptomics of synovial tissue from multiple stages of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease progression, we have interrogated the activity status of PD-1 pathway during RA development. We demonstrate that the expression of PD-1 was increased in early and established RA synovial tissue compared to normal and OA synovium, whereas that of its ligands, programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) and PD-L2, was increased at all the stages of RA disease progression, namely arthralgia, IA\\/undifferentiated arthritis, early RA and established RA. Further, we show that RA patients expressed PD-1 on a majority of synovial tissue infiltrating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Moreover, enrichment of Nivolumab gene signature was observed in IA and RA, indicating that the PD-1 pathway was downregulated during RA disease progression. Furthermore, serum soluble (s) PD-1 levels were increased in autoantibody positive early RA patients. Interestingly, most of the early RA synovium tissue sections showed negative PD-L1 staining by immunohistochemistry. Therefore, downregulation in PD-1 inhibitory signaling in RA could be attributed to increased serum sPD-1 and decreased synovial tissue PD-L1 levels. Taken together, these data suggest that agonistic PD1 antibody-based therapeutics may show efficacy in RA treatment and interception.

  16. Equine infectious anemia virus in China

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hua-Nan; Rao, Dan; Fu, Xian-Qiu; Hu, Ming-Ming; Dong, Jian-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia is an equine disease caused by equine infectious anemia virus, which was first reported in 1840. Equine infectious anemia virus research in China started in the 1960s, focusing on etiology, pathology, diagnosis, and immunology. Notably, in 1978 an attenuated vaccine was successfully developed for equine infectious anemia virus, effectively preventing equine infectious anemia virus in China. This article will review equine infectious anemia virus in China, including pa...

  17. [Diagnosis and treatment of hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamesaki, Toyomi

    2015-10-01

    Hemolytic anemia is defined as anemia due to a reduction of the RBC lifespan to less than the normal range of approximately 120 days. Patients with anemia and jaundice are often suspected to have hemolysis. Herein, different causes of hemolysis and the diagnostic algorithm are reviewed. Currently, there is no generic treatment for hemolytic anemia. Appropriate management of a patient with hemolytic anemia requires determination of the underlying cause. Treatments for the different causes of hemolytic anemia are also reviewed.

  18. AC-93253 iodide, a novel Src inhibitor, suppresses NSCLC progression by modulating multiple Src-related signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yi-Hua; Lin, Sih-Yin; Wu, Yu-Shan; Chen, Huei-Wen; Chen, Jeremy J W

    2017-11-13

    The tyrosine kinase Src is involved in the progression of many cancers. Moreover, inhibiting Src activity has been shown to obstruct several signaling pathways regulated by the EGFR. Thus, Src is a valuable target molecule in drug development. The purpose of this study was to identify compounds that directly or indirectly modulate Src to suppress lung cancer cell growth and motility and to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of these compounds. Human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines (PC9, PC9/gef, A549, and H1975) with different EGFR statuses were tested by cytotoxicity and proliferation assays after AC-93253 iodide treatment. Src and Src-related protein expression in AC-93253 iodide-treated PC9, PC9/gef, and A549 cells were assessed by western blotting. The effects of AC-93253 iodide on cancer cell colony formation, invasion, and migration were assessed in PC9 and PC9/gef cells. The synergistic effects of gefitinib and AC-93253 iodide were evaluated by combination index (CI)-isobologram analysis in gefitinib-resistant cell lines. The efficacy of AC-93253 iodide in vivo was determined using nude mice treated with either the compound or the vehicle. Among the compounds, AC-93253 iodide exhibited the most potent dose-independent inhibitory effects on the activity of Src as well as on that of the Src-related proteins EGFR, STAT3, and FAK. Furthermore, AC-93253 iodide significantly suppressed cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion, and migration in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. AC-93253 iodide sensitized tumor cells to gefitinib treatment regardless of whether the cells were gefitinib-sensitive (PC9) or resistant (H1975 and PC9/gef), indicating that it may exert synergistic effects when used in combination with established therapeutic agents. Our findings also suggested that the inhibitory effects of AC-93253 iodide on lung cancer progression may be attributable to its ability to modulate multiple proteins

  19. [HSP90 Inhibitor 17-AAG Inhibits Multiple Myeloma Cell Proliferation by Down-regulating Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kan-Kan; He, Zheng-Mei; Ding, Bang-He; Chen, Yue; Zhang, Li-Juan; Yu, Liang; Gao, Jian

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effect of HSP90 inhibitory 17-AAG on proliferation of multiple myeloma cells and its main mechanism. The multiple myeloma cells U266 were treated with 17-AAG of different concentrations (200, 400, 600 and 800 nmol/L) for 24, 48, and 72 hours respectively, then the proliferation rate, expression levels of β-catenin and C-MYC protein, as well as cell cycle of U266 cells were treated with 17-AAG and were detected by MTT method, Western blot and flow cytometry, respectively. The 17-AAG showed inhibitory effect on the proliferation of U266 cells in dose- and time-depetent manners (r = -0.518, P AAG displayed no inhibitory effect on proliferation of U266 cells (P > 0.05). The result of culturing U266 cells for 72 hours by 17-AAG of different concentrations showed that the more high of 17-AAG concentration, the more low level of β-catenin and C-MYC proteins (P AAG concentration, the more high of cell ratio in G1 phase (P AAG, the more long time of culture, the more high of cell ratio in G1 phase (P AAG can inhibit the proliferation of multiple myeloma cells, the down-regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and inhibition of HSP90 expression may be the main mechnisms of 17-AAG effect.

  20. Tissue factor-expressing tumor cells can bind to immobilized recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor under static and shear conditions in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara P Y Che

    Full Text Available Mammary tumors and malignant breast cancer cell lines over-express the coagulation factor, tissue factor (TF. High expression of TF is associated with a poor prognosis in breast cancer. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI, the endogenous inhibitor of TF, is constitutively expressed on the endothelium. We hypothesized that TF-expressing tumor cells can bind to immobilized recombinant TFPI, leading to arrest of the tumor cells under shear in vitro. We evaluated the adhesion of breast cancer cells to immobilized TFPI under static and shear conditions (0.35 - 1.3 dyn/cm2. We found that high-TF-expressing breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231 (with a TF density of 460,000/cell, but not low TF-expressing MCF-7 (with a TF density of 1,400/cell, adhered to recombinant TFPI, under static and shear conditions. Adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells to TFPI required activated factor VII (FVIIa, but not FX, and was inhibited by a factor VIIa-blocking anti-TF antibody. Under shear, adhesion to TFPI was dependent on the TFPI-coating concentration, FVIIa concentration and shear stress, with no observed adhesion at shear stresses greater than 1.0 dyn/cm2. This is the first study showing that TF-expressing tumor cells can be captured by immobilized TFPI, a ligand constitutively expressed on the endothelium, under low shear in vitro. Based on our results, we hypothesize that TFPI could be a novel ligand mediating the arrest of TF-expressing tumor cells in high TFPI-expressing vessels under conditions of low shear during metastasis.

  1. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Ballestas, Mary E. [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children' s of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Blvd., Suite 2114, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ► Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ► Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ► Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ► Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  2. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ► Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ► Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ► Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ► Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  3. Correction of anemia in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analía Cánepa

    2015-11-01

    Se observó que en el 50% de las pacientes estudiadas no se logró corregir la anemia. Concluimos que existe una dificultad en la corrección de la anemia y una necesidad de realizar futuros estudios que permitan conocer las causas de este problema e implementar acciones en base a ellas.

  4. Aplastic anemia due to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Kunio; Saito, Akira

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between radiation exposure and aplastic anemia, clarified previously, is discussed. When persons such as radiological technicians receive whole-body irradiation in rather large doses, it is possible that aplastic anemia will result later on. However, this is difficult to determine because the irradiated region is limited despite large doses of radiation. (Bell, E.)

  5. Targeting the MAPK Signaling Pathway in Cancer: Promising Preclinical Activity with the Novel Selective ERK1/2 Inhibitor BVD-523 (Ulixertinib).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germann, Ursula A; Furey, Brinley F; Markland, William; Hoover, Russell R; Aronov, Alex M; Roix, Jeffrey J; Hale, Michael; Boucher, Diane M; Sorrell, David A; Martinez-Botella, Gabriel; Fitzgibbon, Matthew; Shapiro, Paul; Wick, Michael J; Samadani, Ramin; Meshaw, Kathryn; Groover, Anna; DeCrescenzo, Gary; Namchuk, Mark; Emery, Caroline M; Saha, Saurabh; Welsch, Dean J

    2017-11-01

    Aberrant activation of signaling through the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK (MAPK) pathway is implicated in numerous cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target. Although BRAF and MEK-targeted combination therapy has demonstrated significant benefit beyond single-agent options, the majority of patients develop resistance and disease progression after approximately 12 months. Reactivation of ERK signaling is a common driver of resistance in this setting. Here we report the discovery of BVD-523 (ulixertinib), a novel, reversible, ATP-competitive ERK1/2 inhibitor with high potency and ERK1/2 selectivity. In vitro BVD-523 treatment resulted in reduced proliferation and enhanced caspase activity in sensitive cells. Interestingly, BVD-523 inhibited phosphorylation of target substrates despite increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2. In in vivo xenograft studies, BVD-523 showed dose-dependent growth inhibition and tumor regression. BVD-523 yielded synergistic antiproliferative effects in a BRAF V600E -mutant melanoma cell line xenograft model when used in combination with BRAF inhibition. Antitumor activity was also demonstrated in in vitro and in vivo models of acquired resistance to single-agent and combination BRAF/MEK-targeted therapy. On the basis of these promising results, these studies demonstrate BVD-523 holds promise as a treatment for ERK-dependent cancers, including those whose tumors have acquired resistance to other treatments targeting upstream nodes of the MAPK pathway. Assessment of BVD-523 in clinical trials is underway (NCT01781429, NCT02296242, and NCT02608229). Mol Cancer Ther; 16(11); 2351-63. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. GSK-3β inhibitor TWS119 attenuates rtPA-induced hemorrhagic transformation and activates the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway after acute ischemic stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Mingchang; Wang, Yuefei; Li, Qian; Deng, Gang; Wan, Jieru; Yang, Qingwu; Chen, Qianxue; Wang, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) is a devastating complication for patients with acute ischemic stroke who are treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). It is associated with high morbidity and mortality, but no effective treatments are currently available to reduce HT risk. Therefore, methods to prevent HT are urgently needed. In this study, we used TWS119, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), to evaluate the role of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in recombinant tPA (rtPA)-induced HT. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model of ischemic stroke and then were administered rtPA, rtPA combined with TWS119, or vehicle at 4 h. The animals were sacrificed 24 h after infarct induction. Rats treated with rtPA showed evident HT, had more severe neurologic deficit, brain edema, and blood-brain barrier breakdown, and had larger infarction volume than did the vehicle group. Rats treated with TWS119 had significantly improved outcomes compared with those of rats treated with rtPA alone. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that TWS119 increased the protein expression of β-catenin, claudin-3, and ZO-1 while suppressing the expression of GSK-3β. These results suggest that TWS119 reduces rtPA-induced HT and attenuates blood-brain barrier disruption, possibly through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. This study provides a potential therapeutic strategy to prevent tPA-induced HT after acute ischemic stroke.

  7. Retinoblastoma cells activate the AKT pathway and are vulnerable to the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chencheng; Freeman, Matthew J; Lu, Huarui; Wang, Xiaohong; Forster, Colleen L; Sarver, Aaron L; Hallstrom, Timothy C

    2017-06-13

    Retinoblastoma is a pediatric cancer of the retina most often caused by inactivation of the retinoblastoma (RB1) tumor suppressor gene. We previously showed that Rb1 loss cooperates with either co-activating the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway, or co-deleting Pten, to initiate retinoblastoma tumors in mice. The objectives of this study were to determine if the AKT pathway is activated in human retinoblastomas and the extent that anti-PI3K therapy induces apoptosis in retinoblastoma cells, alone or in combination with the DNA damaging drugs carboplatin and topotecan. Serial sections from human retinoblastoma tissue microarrays containing 27 tumors were stained with antibodies specific to p-AKT, Ki-67, forkhead box O1 (p-FOXO1), and ribosomal protein S6 (p-S6) using immunohistochemistry and each tumor sample scored for intensity. Human retinoblastoma tumors displayed significant correlation between p-AKT intensity with highly proliferative tumors (p = 0.008) that were also highly positive for p-FOXO1 (p = 0.002). Treatment with BEZ235, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, reduced phosphorylation levels of the AKT targets p-FOXO and p-S6 and effectively induced apoptosis the Y79 and Weri-1 human retinoblastoma cell lines and in vivo in our retinoblastoma mouse model. Long-term treatment with BEZ235 in vivo using our retinoblastoma-bearing mice induced apoptosis but did not significantly extend the lifespan of the mice. We then co-administered BEZ235 with topotecan and carboplatin chemotherapeutics in vivo, which more effectively induced apoptosis of retinoblastoma, but not normal retinal cells than either treatment alone. Our study has increased the variety of potentially effective targeted treatments that can be considered for human retinoblastoma.

  8. Targeting Hodgkin and Reed–Sternberg Cells with an Inhibitor of Heat-Shock Protein 90: Molecular Pathways of Response and Potential Mechanisms of Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Segges

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL cells overexpress heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90, an important intracellular signaling hub regulating cell survival, which is emerging as a promising therapeutic target. Here, we report the antitumor effect of celastrol, an anti-inflammatory compound and a recognized HSP90 inhibitor, in Hodgkin and Reed–Sternberg cell lines. Two disparate responses were recorded. In KM-H2 cells, celastrol inhibited cell proliferation, induced G0/G1 arrest, and triggered apoptosis through the activation of caspase-3/7. Conversely, L428 cells exhibited resistance to the compound. A proteomic screening identified a total of 262 differentially expressed proteins in sensitive KM-H2 cells and revealed that celastrol’s toxicity involved the suppression of the MAPK/ERK (extracellular signal regulated kinase/mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. The apoptotic effects were preceded by a decrease in RAS (proto-oncogene protein Ras, p-ERK1/2 (phospho-extracellular signal-regulated Kinase-1/2, and c-Fos (proto-oncogene protein c-Fos protein levels, as validated by immunoblot analysis. The L428 resistant cells exhibited a marked induction of HSP27 mRNA and protein after celastrol treatment. Our results provide the first evidence that celastrol has antitumor effects in cHL cells through the suppression of the MAPK/ERK pathway. Resistance to celastrol has rarely been described, and our results suggest that in cHL it may be mediated by the upregulation of HSP27. The antitumor properties of celastrol against cHL and whether the disparate responses observed in vitro have clinical correlates deserve further research.

  9. The Sodium-Glucose Co-Transporter 2 Inhibitor, Empagliflozin, Protects against Diabetic Cardiomyopathy by Inhibition of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to determine whether or not the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, empagliflozin (EMPA, can protect against diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM and to elucidate the related mechanism. Methods: Rats were divided into the following four groups: a non-diabetic group; diabetic cardiomyopathy rats without EMPA treatment; and diabetic cardiomyopathy rats with EMPA treatment (low- and high-dose EMPA. Hemodynamic measurements were performed to evaluate left ventricular systolic and diastolic function. The histopathology of the heart was examined with hematoxylin-eosin staining. Expression of glucose-regulated protein (GRP78, enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP, and caspase-12 was detected by Western blot, and the mRNA levels of XBP1, ATF4, and TRAF2 were analysed by real-time PCR. Results: EMPA significantly decreased the blood glucose level when compared with vehicle. EMPA strongly improved cardiac function based on hemodynamic and histopathologic analyses. Moreover, EMPA can significantly down-regulate the expression of GRP78, CHOP, and caspase-12 (P < 0.01. Additionally, the mRNA levels of XBP1, ATF4, and TRAF2 were markedly decreased by administration of EMPA (P < 0.01. Conclusion: EMPA protects against DCM by inactivating the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway.

  10. Feasibility and Safety of Local Treatment with Recombinant Human Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor in a Rat Model of Streptococcus pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florry E van den Boogaard

    Full Text Available Pulmonary coagulopathy is intrinsic to pulmonary injury including pneumonia. Anticoagulant strategies could benefit patients with pneumonia, but systemic administration of anticoagulant agents may lead to suboptimal local levels and may cause systemic hemorrhage. We hypothesized nebulization to provide a safer and more effective route for local administration of anticoagulants. Therefore, we aimed to examine feasibility and safety of nebulization of recombinant human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (rh-TFPI in a well-established rat model of Streptococcus (S. pneumoniae pneumonia. Thirty minutes before and every 6 hours after intratracheal instillation of S. pneumonia causing pneumonia, rats were subjected to local treatment with rh-TFPI or placebo, and sacrificed after 42 hours. Pneumonia was associated with local as well as systemic activation of coagulation. Nebulization of rh-TFPI resulted in high levels of rh-TFPI in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which was accompanied by an attenuation of pulmonary coagulation. Systemic rh-TFPI levels remained undetectable, and systemic TFPI activity and systemic coagulation were not affected. Histopathology revealed no bleeding in the lungs. We conclude that nebulization of rh-TFPI seems feasible and safe; local anticoagulant treatment with rh-TFPI attenuates pulmonary coagulation, while not affecting systemic coagulation in a rat model of S. pneumoniae pneumonia.

  11. Nebulized Recombinant Human Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor Attenuates Coagulation and Exerts Modest Anti-inflammatory Effects in Rat Models of Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; Hofstra, Jorrit J; Brands, Xanthe; Levi, Marcel M; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Zaat, Sebastiaan A J; Van't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom; Schultz, Marcus J

    2017-04-01

    Critically ill patients are at a constant risk of direct (e.g., by pneumonia) or indirect lung injury (e.g., by sepsis). Excessive alveolar fibrin deposition is a prominent feature of lung injury, undermining pulmonary integrity and function. We examined the effect of local administration of recombinant human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (rh-TFPI), a natural anticoagulant, in two well-established models of lung injury in rats. Rats received intratracheal instillation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, causing direct lung injury, or they received an intravenous injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), causing indirect lung injury. Rats were randomized to local treatment with rh-TFPI or placebo through repeated nebulization. Challenge with P. aeruginosa or LPS was associated with increased coagulation and decreased fibrinolysis in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma. Rh-TFPI levels in BALF increased after nebulization, whereas plasma rh-TFPI levels remained low and systemic TFPI activity was not affected. Nebulization of rh-TFPI attenuated pulmonary and systemic coagulation in both models, without affecting fibrinolysis. Nebulization of rh-TFPI modestly reduced the inflammatory response and bacterial growth of P. aeruginosa in the alveolar compartment. Local treatment with rh-TFPI does not alter systemic TFPI activity; however, it attenuates both pulmonary and systemic coagulopathy. Furthermore, nebulized rh-TFPI modestly reduces the pulmonary inflammatory response and allows increased bacterial clearance in rats with direct lung injury caused by P. aeruginosa.

  12. MicroRNA let-7 modulates the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection via control of A20, an inhibitor of the NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Sahu, Sanjaya Kumar; Kumar, Ranjeet; Subuddhi, Arijita; Maji, Ranjan Kumar; Jana, Kuladip; Gupta, Pushpa; Raffetseder, Johanna; Lerm, Maria; Ghosh, Zhumur; van Loo, Geert; Beyaert, Rudi; Gupta, Umesh D; Kundu, Manikuntala; Basu, Joyoti

    2015-03-11

    The outcome of the interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and a macrophage depends on the interplay between host defense and bacterial immune subversion mechanisms. MicroRNAs critically regulate several host defense mechanisms, but their role in the Mtb-macrophage interplay remains unclear. MicroRNA profiling of Mtb-infected macrophages revealed the downregulation of miR-let-7f in a manner dependent on the Mtb secreted effector ESAT-6. We establish that let-7f targets A20, a feedback inhibitor of the NF-κB pathway. Expression of let-7f decreases and A20 increases with progression of Mtb infection in mice. Mtb survival is attenuated in A20-deficient macrophages, and the production of TNF, IL-1β, and nitrite, which are mediators of immunity to Mtb, is correspondingly increased. Further, let-7f overexpression diminishes Mtb survival and augments the production of cytokines including TNF and IL-1β. These results uncover a role for let-7f and its target A20 in regulating immune responses to Mtb and controlling bacterial burden. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG plays an important role in JAK3/STAT5 signaling pathways in HTLV-1 infection cell line HUT-102].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q Q; Tan, H; Fu, Z P; Ma, Q; Song, J L

    2017-08-14

    Objective: To analyze whether heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) be involved in a permanently abnormal activated JAK/STAT signaling in ATL cells in vitro. Methods: The effect of 17-AAG on proliferation of ATL cell lines HUT-102 was assessed using CCK8 at different time points. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. The specific proteins HSP90, STAT5, p-STAT5 and JAK3 were detected by Western blotting. Results: Overexpression of HSP90 in HUT-102 cell lines was disclosed ( P AAG led to reduced cell proliferation, but there was no significant change in terms of cell proliferation when the concentration of 17-AAG between 2 000-8 000 nmol/L ( P >0.05) . 17-AAG induced cell apoptosis in different time-points and concentrations. 17-AAG don't affect the expression of JAK3 gene. Conclusion: This study indicated that JAK3 as HSP90 client protein was aberrantly activated in HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, leading to constitutive activation of p-STAT5 in JAK/STAT signal pathway, which demonstrated that HSP90-inhibitors 17-AAG inhibited the growth of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines by reducing cell proliferation and inducing cell apoptosis.

  14. Hedgehog pathway inhibitor in combination with radiation therapy for basal cell carcinomas of the head and neck. First clinical experience with vismodegib for locally advanced disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, Bjoern; Roedel, Claus; Balermpas, Panagiotis; Meissner, Markus; Ghanaati, Shahram; Burck, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Definitive radiotherapy and vismodegib, an oral inhibitor of the hedgehog pathway, are both established treatment options for locally advanced basal cell carcinomas (BCC). Both have shown good results in local tumor control; however, the effects concerning advanced tumors are often not of a lasting nature and to date no systematic data about the combination of the two modalities are available. We retrospectively analyzed four patients who received vismodegib and radiotherapy in combination. Radiation doses varied between 50.4 Gy and 66.0 Gy. Three patients had recurrent BCC. One patient had locoregional lymph node involvement. Vismodegib was taken once a day (150 mg) during the entire time of irradiation and beyond upon instructions of the attending dermatologist. In three cases a persistent complete response was observed, in one case the tumor remained stable for approximately 6 months until further tumor progression was documented. The combined therapy was well tolerated in all cases. No exceptional side effects pointing at a drug-radiation interaction were observed. The combination of vismodegib and radiation seems feasible and the initial results are promising. In our cohort, there was no increase in unexpected side effects. Further research is needed to evaluate the significance of this combined therapy. (orig.) [de

  15. Small molecule inhibitors uncover synthetic genetic interactions of human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1 with DNA damage response genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Ward

    Full Text Available Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1 is a structure selective endonuclease required for proficient DNA replication and the repair of DNA damage. Cellularly active inhibitors of this enzyme have previously been shown to induce a DNA damage response and, ultimately, cell death. High-throughput screens of human cancer cell-lines identify colorectal and gastric cell-lines with microsatellite instability (MSI as enriched for cellular sensitivity to N-hydroxyurea series inhibitors of FEN1, but not the PARP inhibitor olaparib or other inhibitors of the DNA damage response. This sensitivity is due to a synthetic lethal interaction between FEN1 and MRE11A, which is often mutated in MSI cancers through instabilities at a poly(T microsatellite repeat. Disruption of ATM is similarly synthetic lethal with FEN1 inhibition, suggesting that disruption of FEN1 function leads to the accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks. These are likely a result of the accumulation of aberrant replication forks, that accumulate as a consequence of a failure in Okazaki fragment maturation, as inhibition of FEN1 is toxic in cells disrupted for the Fanconi anemia pathway and post-replication repair. Furthermore, RAD51 foci accumulate as a consequence of FEN1 inhibition and the toxicity of FEN1 inhibitors increases in cells disrupted for the homologous recombination pathway, suggesting a role for homologous recombination in the resolution of damage induced by FEN1 inhibition. Finally, FEN1 appears to be required for the repair of damage induced by olaparib and cisplatin within the Fanconi anemia pathway, and may play a role in the repair of damage associated with its own disruption.

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Iron-Deficiency Anemia ... anemia, a common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the ...

  17. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACD is the second most common form of anemia, after iron-deficiency anemia. 1 1 Agarwal N, Prchal JT. Anemia of ... advances. Therefore, most people with kidney failure have anemia. Kidney ... develop iron deficiency due to blood loss during hemodialysis, a type ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding in the GI tract. ...

  19. Equine infectious anemia virus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua-Nan; Rao, Dan; Fu, Xian-Qiu; Hu, Ming-Ming; Dong, Jian-Guo

    2018-01-02

    Equine infectious anemia is an equine disease caused by equine infectious anemia virus, which was first reported in 1840. Equine infectious anemia virus research in China started in the 1960s, focusing on etiology, pathology, diagnosis, and immunology. Notably, in 1978 an attenuated vaccine was successfully developed for equine infectious anemia virus, effectively preventing equine infectious anemia virus in China. This article will review equine infectious anemia virus in China, including past and recent research, and commemorate scientists who have made great contributions to equine infectious anemia virus prevention.

  20. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia with renal neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Emily C; Parikh, Sahil P; Bhattacharyya, Nishith

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a type of hemolytic anemia characterized by autoantibodies directed against red blood cells shortening their survival. When autoimmune hemolytic anemia is secondary to a paraneoplastic process, severe anemia can occur leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. Here we discuss the literature and present the case of a child with autoimmune hemolytic anemia from a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a renal tumor.