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Sample records for anemia hemolytic congenital

  1. Genetic diagnosis for congenital hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohga, Shouichi

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hemolytic anemia is a group of monogenic diseases presenting with anemia due to increased destruction of circulating erythrocytes. The etiology of inherited anemia accounts for germline mutations of the responsible genes coding for the structural components of erythrocytes and extra-erythrocytes. The erythrocyte abnormalities are classified into three major disorders of red cell membrane defects, hemoglobinopathies, and red cell enzymopathies. The extra-erythrocyte abnormalities, typified by consumption coagulopathy and intravascular hemolysis, include Upshaw-Schulman syndrome and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. The clinical manifestations of congenital hemolytic anemia are anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis and splenomegaly, while the onset mode and severity are both variable. Genetic overlapping of red cell membrane protein disorders, and distinct frequency and mutation spectra differing among races make it difficult to understand this disease entity. On the other hand, genetic modifiers for the phenotype of β-globin diseases provide useful information for selecting the optimal treatment and for long-term management. Recently, next generation sequencing techniques have enabled us to determine the novel causative genes in patients with undiagnosed hemolytic anemias. We herein review the concept and strategy for genetic diagnosis of inherited hemolytic anemias.

  2. Hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  3. Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worsen your condition or lead to complications. Hemolytic Anemia and Children Parents of children who have hemolytic anemia usually ... members, friends, and your child's classmates about hemolytic anemia. You also may want to tell your child's teachers or other caregivers about the condition. Let ...

  4. Clinical Outcomes of Splenectomy in Children: Report of the Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Henry E; Englum, Brian R; Rothman, Jennifer; Leonard, Sarah; Reiter, Audra; Thornburg, Courtney; Brindle, Mary; Wright, Nicola; Heeney, Matthew M; Smithers, Charles; Brown, Rebeccah L; Kalfa, Theodosia; Langer, Jacob C; Cada, Michaela; Oldham, Keith T; Scott, J Paul; St. Peter, Shawn; Sharma, Mukta; Davidoff, Andrew M.; Nottage, Kerri; Bernabe, Kathryn; Wilson, David B; Dutta, Sanjeev; Glader, Bertil; Crary, Shelley E; Dassinger, Melvin S; Dunbar, Levette; Islam, Saleem; Kumar, Manjusha; Rescorla, Fred; Bruch, Steve; Campbell, Andrew; Austin, Mary; Sidonio, Robert; Blakely, Martin L

    2014-01-01

    The outcomes of children with congenital hemolytic anemia (CHA) undergoing total splenectomy (TS) or partial splenectomy (PS) remain unclear. In this study, we collected data from 100 children with CHA who underwent TS or PS from 2005–2013 at 16 sites in the Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) consortium using a patient registry. We analyzed demographics and baseline clinical status, operative details, and outcomes at 4, 24, and 52 weeks after surgery. Results were summarized as hematologic outcomes, short-term adverse events (AEs) (≤ 30 days after surgery), and long-term AEs (31–365 days after surgery). For children with hereditary spherocytosis, after surgery there was an increase in hemoglobin (baseline 10.1 ± 1.8 gm/dl, 52 week 12.8 ± 1.6 gm/dl; mean ± SD), decrease in reticulocyte and bilirubin as well as control of symptoms. Children with sickle cell disease had control of clinical symptoms after surgery, but had no change in hematologic parameters. There was an 11% rate of short-term AEs and 11% rate of long-term AEs. As we accumulate more subjects and longer follow-up, use of a patient registry should enhance our capacity for clinical trials and engage all stakeholders in the decision-making process. PMID:25382665

  5. Hematologic outcomes after total splenectomy and partial splenectomy for congenital hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englum, Brian R; Rothman, Jennifer; Leonard, Sarah; Reiter, Audra; Thornburg, Courtney; Brindle, Mary; Wright, Nicola; Heeney, Matthew M; Jason Smithers, C; Brown, Rebeccah L; Kalfa, Theodosia; Langer, Jacob C; Cada, Michaela; Oldham, Keith T; Scott, J Paul; St Peter, Shawn D; Sharma, Mukta; Davidoff, Andrew M; Nottage, Kerri; Bernabe, Kathryn; Wilson, David B; Dutta, Sanjeev; Glader, Bertil; Crary, Shelley E; Dassinger, Melvin S; Dunbar, Levette; Islam, Saleem; Kumar, Manjusha; Rescorla, Fred; Bruch, Steve; Campbell, Andrew; Austin, Mary; Sidonio, Robert; Blakely, Martin L; Rice, Henry E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the hematologic response to total splenectomy (TS) or partial splenectomy (PS) in children with hereditary spherocytosis (HS) or sickle cell disease (SCD). The Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) consortium registry collected hematologic outcomes of children with CHA undergoing TS or PS to 1 year after surgery. Using random effects mixed modeling, we evaluated the association of operative type with change in hemoglobin, reticulocyte counts, and bilirubin. We also compared laparoscopic to open splenectomy. The analysis included 130 children, with 62.3% (n=81) undergoing TS. For children with HS, all hematologic measures improved after TS, including a 4.1g/dl increase in hemoglobin. Hematologic parameters also improved after PS, although the response was less robust (hemoglobin increase 2.4 g/dl, p<0.001). For children with SCD, there was no change in hemoglobin. Laparoscopy was not associated with differences in hematologic outcomes compared to open. TS and laparoscopy were associated with shorter length of stay. Children with HS have an excellent hematologic response after TS or PS, although the hematologic response is more robust following TS. Children with SCD have smaller changes in their hematologic parameters. These data offer guidance to families and clinicians considering TS or PS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... Drugs that can cause this type of hemolytic anemia include: Cephalosporins (a class of antibiotics), most common ...

  7. Post Blood Transfusion Hypertensive Encephalopathy in a Child with Congenital Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiman Arshpreet

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children having hemolytic anemias who have received multiple blood transfusions exhibit a rare complication of development of hypertension and seizures following transfusion, which may or may not be associated with intracranial hemorrhage. Case description: A 9-year-old boy presented with history of progressive paleness of body and weakness for the 30 days. There was a history of blood transfusion one week ago and multiple transfusions for one year of age. Examination revealed tachycardia, tachypnea, severe pallor and splenohepatomegaly. Blood work revealed a hemoglobin level of 4.0 grams with peripheral smear findings suggestive of hemolytic anemia. After blood transfusion, child complained of difficulty in breathing, vomiting and visual loss, followed by convulsions. Blood pressure was 180/110 mmHg. Seizure was controlled with intravenous midazolam and hypertension with furosemide and labetalol. CT brain was normal. As hypertension got under control, child gradually gained consciousness. Conclusion: A less intensive transfusion regimen among such patients along with prompt management of hypertension can prevent this potentially fatal syndrome.

  8. Hemolytic anemias during pregnancy and the reproductive years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mintz, U.; Moohr, J.W.; Ultmann, J.E.

    1977-11-01

    Anemia is a common phenomenon in women during the reproductive years. In pregnancy, it is associated with an increased incidence of maternal-fetal morbidity and mortality. The approach to the investigation of anemic women suspected of having hemolytic anemia of either congenital or acquired etiology is the subject of this article. Various conditions in the pregnant women can have hematologic consequences for the newborn infant; these conditions include sensitization to fetal blood cells, infections, drug ingestion and the possession of genes for hereditary hemolytic disorders, which may be transmitted to the fetus. Because several forms of hemolytic anemias are hereditary or are caused by an altered gene, genetic consultation is important.

  9. Immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) or removal of the spleen (splenectomy) may be considered. You may receive treatment to ... need special treatment. In most people, steroids or splenectomy can totally or partially control anemia.

  10. The challenge of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia

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    Hassanain Hani Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA is a Coomb's-negative hemolytic anemia characterized by red cell fragmentation (schistocytes. Thrombotic microangiopathy anemia, including thrombotic thrombocytopenia and hemolytic-uremic syndrome, malignant hypertension, preeclampsia are among the most common causes. We present a case of MAHA presenting with thrombocytopenia initially diagnosed as MAHA secondary to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and received five sessions plasmapheresis without improvement but with worsening of anemia and thrombocytopenia. On further inquiry, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency was identified, and the patient showed dramatic recovery after the trial of B12 and folate.

  11. Recommendations regarding splenectomy in hereditary hemolytic anemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Barcellini, Wilma; Corcione, Francesco; Garçon, Loïc; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pignata, Claudio; Graziadei, Giovanna; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Rees, David C.; de Montalembert, Mariane; Rivella, Stefano; Gambale, Antonella; Russo, Roberta; Ribeiro, Leticia; Vives-Corrons, Jules; Martinez, Patricia Aguilar; Kattamis, Antonis; Gulbis, Beatrice; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Roberts, Irene; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders with a variety of causes, including red cell membrane defects, red blood cell enzyme disorders, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, thalassemia syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. As damaged red blood cells passing through the red pulp of the spleen are removed by splenic macrophages, splenectomy is one possible therapeutic approach to the management of severely affected patients. However, except for hereditary spherocytosis for which the effectiveness of splenectomy has been well documented, the efficacy of splenectomy in other anemias within this group has yet to be determined and there are concerns regarding short- and long-term infectious and thrombotic complications. In light of the priorities identified by the European Hematology Association Roadmap we generated specific recommendations for each disorder, except thalassemia syndromes for which there are other, recent guidelines. Our recommendations are intended to enable clinicians to achieve better informed decisions on disease management by splenectomy, on the type of splenectomy and the possible consequences. As no randomized clinical trials, case control or cohort studies regarding splenectomy in these disorders were found in the literature, recommendations for each disease were based on expert opinion and were subsequently critically revised and modified by the Splenectomy in Rare Anemias Study Group, which includes hematologists caring for both adults and children. PMID:28550188

  12. Retinal phlebitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Fiona L M; Tajunisah, Iqbal

    2009-01-01

    To describe a case of retinal phlebitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Observational case report. A 44-year-old Indian man diagnosed with autoimmune hemolytic anemia presented with a 1-week history of blurred vision in both eyes. Fundus biomicroscopy revealed bilateral peripheral retinal venous sheathing and cellophane maculopathy. Fundus fluorescent angiogram showed bilateral late leakage from the peripheral venous arcades and submacular fluid accumulation. The retinal phlebitis resolved following a blood transfusion and administration of systemic steroids. Retinopathy associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia is not well known. This is thought to be the first documentation of retinal phlebitis occurring in this condition.

  13. Positive predictive value of diagnosis coding for hemolytic anemias in the Danish National Patient Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dennis Lund; Overgaard, Ulrik Malthe; Pedersen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    . Patients with mechanical reason for hemolysis such as an artificial heart valve, and patients with vitamin-B12 or folic acid deficiency were excluded. RESULTS: We identified 412 eligible patients: 249 with a congenital hemolytic anemia diagnosis and 163 with acquired hemolytic anemia diagnosis. In all...

  14. Thrombotic Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia without Evidence of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şinasi Özsoylu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In a recent issue of this journal Dr. Oymak and her colleagues presented a clinically and genetically well-studied 5-year-old boy who was seen with severe microangiopathic hemolytic anemia without laboratory findings of renal involvement despite complement factor H gene mutations [1]. Because of Yeneral’s extensive review [2] on atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS published recently in the Turkish Journal of Hematology, I brought it to readers’ attention that more recently some authors do not use ‘aHUS’, which was historically used to distinguish heterogeneous uncharacterized syndromes from Shiga toxin-related HUS, since the term lacks both specificity and suggested causes [3]. Though in our patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura renal involvement was documented at the beginning but not in the last two recurrences, neither serum nor urinary findings indicated kidney involvement [4]. Although the discussions of Dr. Oymak et al. are well taken, the term ‘microangiopathic hemolytic anemia’ is covering the syndrome to a large extent as suggested by George and Nester

  15. Two new glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase variants associated with congenital nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia found in Japan: GD(-) Tokushima and GD(-) Tokyo.

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    Miwa, S; Ono, J; Nakashima, K; Abe, S; Kageoka, T

    1976-01-01

    Two new variants of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency associated with chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia were discovered in Japan. Gd(-) Tokushima was found in a 17-years-old male whose erythrocytes contained 4.4% of normal enzyme activity. Partially purified enzyme revealed a main band of normal electrophoretic mobility with additional two minor bands of different mobility; normal Km G6P, and Km NADP five-to sixfold higher than normal; normal utilization of 2-deoxy-G6P, galactose-6P, and deamino-NADP; marked thermal instability; a normal pH curve; and normal Ki NADPH. The hemolytic anemia was moderate to severe. Gd(-) Tokyo was characterized from a 15-year-old male who had chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia of mild degree. The erythrocytes contained 3% of normal enzyme activity, and partially purified enzyme revealed slow electrophoretic mobility (90% of normal for both a tris-hydrochloride buffer system and a tris-EDTA-borate buffer system, and 70% of normal for a phosphate buffer system); normal Km G6P and Km NADP; normal utilization of 2-deoxy-G6P, galactose-6P, and deamino-NADP; greatly increased thermal instability; a normal pH curve; and normal Ki NADPH. These two variants are clearly different from hitherto described G6PD variants, including the Japanese variants Gd(-) Heian and Gd(-) Kyoto. The mothers of both Gd(-) Tokushima and Gd(-) Tokoyo were found to be heterozygote by an ascorbate-cyanide test.

  16. Thyroid storm and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

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    Moore, Joseph A; Gliga, Louise; Nagalla, Srikanth

    2017-08-01

    Graves' disease is often associated with other autoimmune disorders, including rare associations with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We describe a unique presentation of thyroid storm and warm AIHA diagnosed concurrently in a young female with hyperthyroidism. The patient presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and altered mental status. Laboratory studies revealed hemoglobin 3.9g/dL, platelets 171×10 9 L -1 , haptoglobin storm and warm AIHA. She was started on glucocorticoids to treat both warm AIHA and thyroid storm, as well as antithyroid medications, propranolol and folic acid. Due to profound anemia and hemodynamic instability, the patient was transfused two units of uncrossmatched packed red blood cells slowly and tolerated this well. She was discharged on methimazole as well as a prolonged prednisone taper, and achieved complete resolution of the thyrotoxicosis and anemia at one month. Hyperthyroidism can affect all three blood cell lineages of the hematopoietic system. Anemia can be seen in 10-20% of patients with thyrotoxicosis. Several autoimmune processes can lead to anemia in Graves' disease, including pernicious anemia, celiac disease, and warm AIHA. This case illustrates a rarely described presentation of a patient with Graves' disease presenting with concurrent thyroid storm and warm AIHA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. SEVERE IMMUNE HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA AFTER LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

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    A. I. Sushkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical case of successful treatment of severe immune hemolytic anemia after liver transplantation is represen- ted in this article. The cause of complication was so-called passenger lymphocyte syndrome (a type of graft- versus-host disease. Two plasmapheresis sessions and Ig (0.5 g/kg in combination with increased maintenance immunosuppression with a short course of oral methylprednisolone in a total dose of 150 mg during 12 days were effective. The patient was discharged from hospital 34 days after transplantation in a satisfactory condition with a stable hemoglobin level. 

  18. Hemolytic anemia caused by kinking of dacron grafts implanted in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hemolytic anemia caused by a kinked Dacron graft is a rare complication after repair of acute aortic dissection. We present a case of hemolytic anemia due to kinking of previously implanted Dacron graft for ascending aorta dissection treated by surgery and replaced with new Dacron. Case Details: We report a ...

  19. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: transfusion challenges and solutions

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    Barros MM

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melca M O Barros, Dante M Langhi Jr, José O Bordin Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is defined as the increased destruction of red blood cells (RBCs in the presence of anti-RBC autoantibodies and/or complement. Classification of AIHA is based on the optimal auto-RBC antibody reactivity temperatures and includes warm, cold-reactive, mixed AIHA, and drug-induced AIHA subtypes. AIHA is a rare disease, and recommendations for transfusion are based mainly on results from retrospective data and relatively small cohort studies, including heterogeneous patient samples or single case reports. In this article, we will review the challenges and solutions to safely transfuse AIHA patients. We will reflect on the indication for transfusion in AIHA and the difficulty in the accomplishment of immunohematological procedures for the selection of the safest and most compatible RBC units. Keywords: hemolytic anemia, RBC autoantibodies, autoimmunity, hemolysis, direct ­antiglobulin test

  20. [Treatment and results of therapy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

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    Tasić, J; Macukanović, L; Pavlović, M; Koraćević, S; Govedarević, N; Kitić, Lj; Tijanić, I; Bakić, M

    1994-01-01

    Basic principles in the therapy of idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody were glucocorticoides and splenectomy. Immunosupresive drugs, plasmaferesis and intravenous high doses gamma globulin therapy are also useful. In secundary autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody we treated basic illness. During the period of 1990-1992 we treated 21 patients with primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 6 patients with secondary /4 CLL and 2 Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma/. Complete remission we found as a normalisation of reticulocites and hemoglobin level respectively. Complete remission by corticoides we got in 14/21 patients, partial response in 2/21 respectively. Complete response by splenectomy we got in 2/3 splenoctomized patients (idiopathic type). For successful treatment secondary hemolytic anemias we treated primary diseases (CLL and malignant lymphoma) and we got in 4/6 patients complete remission. Our results were standard in both type of autoimmune hemolytic anaemias induced by warm antibody.

  1. Hemolytic Anemia after Aortic Valve Replacement: a Case Report

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    Feridoun Sabzi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare and an underestimated complication after aortic valve replacement (AVR.The mechanism responsible for hemolysis most commonly involves a regurgitated flow or jet that related to paravalvar leak or turbulence of subvalvar stenosis. It appears to be independent of its severity as assessed by echocardiography. We present a case of a 24-year-old man with a history of AVR in 10 year ago that developed severe hemolytic anemia due to a mild subvalvar stenosis caused by pannus formation and mild hypertrophic septum. After exclusion of other causes of hemolytic anemia and the lack of clinical and laboratory improvement, the patient underwent redo valve surgery with pannus and subvalvar hypertrophic septum resection. Anemia and heart failure symptoms gradually resolved after surgery

  2. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside

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    R K Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT still remains the diagnostic hallmark of AIHA. The sensitive gel technology has enabled the immunohematologist not only to diagnose serologically such patients, but also to characterize red cell bound autoantibodies with regard to their class, subclass and titer in a rapid and simplified way. Detailed characterization of autoantibodies is important, as there is a relationship between in vivo hemolysis and strength of DAT; red cell bound multiple immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin G subclass and titer. Transfusing AIHA patient is a challenge to the immunohematologist as it is encountered with difficulties in ABO grouping and cross matching requiring specialized serological tests such as alloadsorption or autoadsorption. At times, it may be almost impossible to find a fully matched unit to transfuse these patients. However, transfusion should not be withheld in a critically ill patient even in the absence of compatible blood. The "best match" or "least incompatible units" can be transfused to such patients under close supervision without any serious side-effects. All blood banks should have the facilities to perform the necessary investigations required to issue "best match" packed red blood cells in AIHA. Specialized techniques such as elution and adsorption, which at times are helpful in enhancing blood safety in AIHA should be established in all transfusion services.

  3. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic hemolytic anemias: Pathophysiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haw, Alexandra; Palevsky, Harold I

    2018-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hemoglobinopathies and chronic hemolytic anemias. These hematological diseases include - but are not limited to - sickle cell disease (SCD), thalassemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hematuria, and hereditary spherocytosis. Although most studies have been based on the use of echocardiography as a screening tool for pulmonary hypertension as opposed to the gold standard of right heart catheterization for definitive diagnosis, the association between chronic hemolytic anemia and pulmonary hypertension is evident. Studies have shown that patients with SCD and a tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV) ≥ 2.5 m/sec are at increased risk of pulmonary hypertension and are at increased mortality risk. Additional markers of risk of pulmonary hypertension and increased mortality include a pro-BNP >160 pg/mL combined with a 6-min walk distance of pulmonary hypertension in chronic hemolytic anemias. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pulmonary aspergillosis and central nervous system hemorrhage as complications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with corticosteroids.

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    Cleri, Dennis J; Moser, Robert L; Villota, Francisco J; Wang, Yue; Husain, Syed A; Nadeem, Shahzinah; Anjari, Tarek; Sajed, Mohammad

    2003-06-01

    Warm, active antibody adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia is the most common form of hemolytic anemia not related to drug therapy. Mortality in adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia is related to the inability to successfully treat patients' underlying disease, or the infectious complications of splenectomy and prolonged steroid therapy. Predisposing factors for invasive aspergillosis are neutropenia and steroid therapy. We present a fatal case of aspergillosis complicating a nonneutropenic case of warm active antibody adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with prolonged steroid therapy.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions CDA Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia ( CDA ) is an inherited blood disorder that affects ...

  6. Severe late anemia of hemolytic disease of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Simon; James, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    Late anemia is a well-recognized complication of Rhesus hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). The incidence of Rhesus HDN is declining, with a tendency for more severely affected pregnancies to be managed in specialist centres. Consequently, many paediatric departments may see relatively few affected infants with comparatively mild disease, and the risk of late anemia in such cases may not always be appreciated. Two cases of infants born with evidence of Rhesus isoimmunization noted at birth and encountering no immediate problems other than mild hyperbilirubinemia are described. After an uneventful early neonatal course, both infants were discharged without follow-up and presented in the second to third weeks of life with severe, life-threatening anemia, leading to neurological sequelae in one case. The importance of close surveillance, including hemoglobin measurements, in all infants with Rhesus hemolytic disease, irrespective of initial severity, is reiterated. PMID:20212966

  7. Pure red cell aplasia following autoimmune hemolytic anemia: An enigma

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    M Saha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 6-month history of anemia. The laboratory findings revealed hemolytic anemia and direct antiglobulin test was positive. With a diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, prednisolone was started but was ineffective after 1 month of therapy. A bone marrow trephine biopsy revealed pure red cell aplasia (PRCA showing severe erythroid hypoplasia. The case was considered PRCA following AIHA. This combination without clear underlying disease is rare. Human parvovirus B19 infection was not detected in the marrow aspirate during reticulocytopenia. The patient received azathioprine, and PRCA improved but significant hemolysis was once again documented with a high reticulocyte count. The short time interval between AIHA and PRCA phase suggested an increased possibility of the evolution of a single disease.

  8. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia as a Complication of Nivolumab Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Amruth R; Kennedy, Devin; Mosharraf, Hossain; Doll, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Recently, immunotherapeutic drugs, including PD-1 inhibitors (nivolumab, pembrolizumab), PD-L1 inhibitors (atezolizumab, avelumab), and CTLA4 inhibitors (ipiliumumab), have emerged as important additions to the armamentarium against certain malignancies and have been incorporated into therapeutic protocols for first-, second-, or third-line agents for these metastatic cancers. Immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab is currently FDA approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic malignant melanoma [Redman et al.: BMC Med 2016;14: 20], metastatic non-small cell lung cancer [Guibert and Mazières: Expert Opin Biol Ther 2015;15: 1789-1797], metastatic renal cell cancer [Farolfi et al.: Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 2016;12: 1089-1096], and relapsed or refractory classic Hodgkin's lymphoma [Villasboas and Ansell: Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2016;16: 5-12]. Given the current and increasing indications for these drugs, it is essential for all physicians to become well versed with their common adverse effects and to be observant for other less documented clinical conditions that could be unmasked with the use of such medications. A definite association between autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab has not been clearly documented, although a few cases have been reported recently [Kong et al.: Melanoma Res 2016;26: 202-204; Schwab et al.: Case Rep Oncol 2016;9: 373-378; Tardy et al.: Hematol Oncol 2016, DOI: 10.1002/hon.2338]. We report a case of fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia refractory to steroids in a patient treated with nivolumab for metastatic lung cancer, and reflect on the other reported cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after the use of nivolumab.

  9. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia as a Complication of Nivolumab Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amruth R. Palla

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, immunotherapeutic drugs, including PD-1 inhibitors (nivolumab, pembrolizumab, PD-L1 inhibitors (atezolizumab, avelumab, and CTLA4 inhibitors (ipiliumumab, have emerged as important additions to the armamentarium against certain malignancies and have been incorporated into therapeutic protocols for first-, second-, or third-line agents for these metastatic cancers. Immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab is currently FDA approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic malignant melanoma [Redman et al.: BMC Med 2016;14: 20], metastatic non-small cell lung cancer [Guibert and Mazières: Expert Opin Biol Ther 2015;15: 1789–1797], metastatic renal cell cancer [Farolfi et al.: Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 2016;12: 1089–1096], and relapsed or refractory classic Hodgkin’s lymphoma [Villasboas and Ansell: Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2016;16: 5–12]. Given the current and increasing indications for these drugs, it is essential for all physicians to become well versed with their common adverse effects and to be observant for other less documented clinical conditions that could be unmasked with the use of such medications. A definite association between autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab has not been clearly documented, although a few cases have been reported recently [Kong et al.: Melanoma Res 2016;26: 202–204; Schwab et al.: Case Rep Oncol 2016;9: 373–378; Tardy et al.: Hematol Oncol 2016, DOI: 10.1002/hon.2338]. We report a case of fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia refractory to steroids in a patient treated with nivolumab for metastatic lung cancer, and reflect on the other reported cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after the use of nivolumab.

  10. Rasburicase-induced Hemolytic Anemia in an Adolescent With Unknown Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akande, Manzilat; Audino, Anthony N; Tobias, Joseph D

    2017-01-01

    Rasburicase, used in the prevention and treatment of tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), may cause hemolytic anemia and methemoglobinemia in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Although routine screening for G6PD deficiency has been recommended, given the turnaround time for test results and the urgency to treat TLS, such screening may not be feasible. We report a case of rasburicase-induced hemolytic anemia without methemoglobinemia in an adolescent with T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma, TLS, and previously unrecognized G6PD deficiency. Previous reports of hemolytic anemia with rasburicase are reviewed, mechanisms discussed, and preventative strategies presented.

  11. Lung papillary adenocarcinoma complicated with paraneoplastic autoimmune hemolytic anemia: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Limin; Wang, Huaquan; Qu, Wen; Fang, Fang; Dong, Qi-e; Shao, Zonghong

    2014-01-01

    A middle-aged woman presented at our facility and was diagnosed after surgery with lung papillary adenocarcinoma. Seven years earlier, she had suffered from autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), which was refractory. Following lung surgery, the AIHA was cured.

  12. Abordagem ambulatorial do nutricionista em anemia hemolítica Nutritional ambulatory approach in hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Vieira

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Descreve a atuação do nutricionista em ambulatório de Hematologia Pediátrica em um hospital escola e relata as condutas dietéticas necessárias na abordagem de crianças com anemia hemolítica com e sem sobrecarga de ferro, e também as atitudes mais freqüentes dos familiares em relação à alimentação desses pacientes.The Authors describe the performance of the Dietitian in a Pediatric Hematology Ambulatory. They emphasize the necessary dietetic procedures for adequate management of children with hemolytic anemia, with and without iron overload. Furthermore, they approach the family's attitude towards the patient's nutrition.

  13. Alloimmunization in autoimmune hemolytic anemia patient: The differential adsorption approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi C Dara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients of β-thalassemia major are dependent on regular blood transfusions for their entire lifetime. Development of antibodies against red blood cell (RBC antigen which may be alloantibody or autoantibody, several times as a result of frequent red cell component transfusions, further complicates the subsequent transfusion therapy. Among the autoantibodies, warm-reactive autoantibodies are commoner and interfere in the pretransfusion testing. These RBC autoantibodies present in patient's serum potentially react with all the cells of antibody identification panel giving “pan-reactive” picture and making alloantibody identification complex. In this report, we present our approach in a thalassemia patient who presented with warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia, low hemoglobin of 5.8 g/dl, and three significant alloantibodies (anti-D, anti-S, and anti-Jk b which were masked by pan-reactive warm autoantibody(s. Differential adsorption was used to unmask underlying alloantibodies. We suggest that differential adsorption procedure is an effective and efficient method for autoantibody adsorption, detection, and identification of masked alloantibody(s, especially in patients with low hemoglobin and history of recent blood transfusion.

  14. A Rare Association of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia with Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Agrawal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An 80-year-old male presented with dyspnea on exertion for at least two months. He also complained of progressive dysphagia and weight loss of 35 pounds over the last eight months. Initial blood tests showed hemoglobin of 6.1 g/dl, reticulocytes count of 19.7%, total bilirubin of 3.2 mg/dl, lactate dehydrogenase of 600 U/L, and haptoglobin of less than 8 mg/dl, and direct Coombs test was positive for warm immunoglobulin G. The impression was autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA. The evaluation of dysphagia with esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a single irregular 4 cm malignant appearing ulcerated mass at the incisura angularis of the stomach. The mass was confirmed as adenocarcinoma on biopsy. Diagnostic laparoscopy was positive for malignant cells and he was diagnosed with stage IV adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Other extensive workup to determine the etiology of AIHA was negative (described in detail below. Surgery was deferred primarily due to metastasis of cancer. Initially, hemoglobin was stabilized by intravenous methylprednisolone, high dose immunoglobulins, and packed red blood cell transfusions. After a few weeks, hemoglobin started trending down again. The patient was weaned off steroids and paradoxically IgG-mediated autohemolysis was controlled with the initiation of palliative chemotherapy. Our case highlights a rare occurrence of AIHA in association with gastric adenocarcinoma.

  15. Hemolytic anemia following high dose intravenous immunoglobulin in patients with chronic neurological disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, Lars Høj; Christiansen, I; Harbo, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    High dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established treatment for various neuromuscular disorders. Recently, cases of hemolytic anemia following IVIG have been observed. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of anemia and hemolysis after IVIG and its relationship...

  16. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Sonani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA, a very infrequent condition which represents a group of disorders in which presence of autoantibodies directed against self-antigens leads to shortened red cell survival. Till date, a very few cases of AIHA in Malaria patients are reported worldwide but still AIHA should be considered a relatively rare cause of anemia in malaria. A 20 year male presented with intermittent fever since seven days and yellowish discoloration of urine and sclera since 5 days. He was transfused three units of blood at a private clinic before one month. On examination, pallor, icterus and spelnomegaly were present. Hemoglobin (Hb was 3.2 gm% and peripheral smear revealed ring forms of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. Serum LDH and Serum billirubin (Indirect and Direct were high. This patient′s blood group was B +ve with positive autocontrol. Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT, antibody screening and antibody identification were pan-positive with reaction strength of +4 against each cell. Direct Antiglobulin Test was +4 positive anti IgG and negative with anti C3. He was treated with Artesunate and methylprednisone. Least incompatible, saline washed O Neg and B neg red cells were transfused on the 2 nd day of starting treatment. Hb was raised to 6.1 gm% on 4 th day. Patient was discharged on 9th day with Hb 7.0 gm% with oral tapering dose of steroids. In the above case, patient was suffering from high grade malarial parasitemia with co-existing autoimmune RBC destruction by IgG auto-antibodies which led to sudden drop in Hb and rise in serum LDH and indirect billirubin. Least incompatible packed red cells along with antimalarials and steroids led to clinical improvement. So far, one case report each from India, Korea, Canada and Germany and one case series report of three cases from India have been reported. Under-reporting or rarity of this phenomenon may be accountable for this.

  17. Leukemoid reaction, a rare manifestation of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a case of small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salagre, Kaustubh D; Sahay, Ravindra Nath; Patil, Anuja; Pati, Anuja; Joshi, Amita; Shukla, Akash

    2013-10-01

    A 48 year old lady presented with jaundice and exertional breathlesness. Her laboratory reports showed anaemia, reticulocytosis, leucocytosis, elevated Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase levels, hyperbillirubinemia and positive direct Coomb's test. After ruling out all the other causes of autoimmunity and hemolytic anemia, she was diagnosed as leukemoid reaction due to autoimmune hemolytic anemia with primary sclerosing cholangitis. Patient showed immediate improvement after corticosteroids.

  18. Alpha-Methyldopa-Induced Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy

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    Charalampos Grigoriadis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-methyldopa has been demonstrated to be safe for use during pregnancy and is now used to treat gestational hypertension. In pregnancy, alpha-methyldopa-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia does not have typical features and the severity of symptoms ranges from mild fatigue to dyspnea, respiratory failure, and death if left untreated. A case of alpha-methyldopa-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a 36-year-old gravida 2, para 1 woman at 37+6 weeks of gestation is reported herein along with the differential diagnostic procedure and the potential risks to the mother and the fetus.

  19. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, as part of Evans' syndrome, caused by cold reactive IgG autoantibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, AS; Muis, N; DeGraaf, SSN

    1996-01-01

    We describe a boy with Evans' syndrome, consisting of immune thrombocytopenic purpura at age 2 and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) at age 4. AIHA was caused by cold Ige autoantibodies. This is unusual because AIHA is generally associated with either warm IgG antibodies or cold IgM antibodies.

  20. [The immunometaboic effects of benfotiamine and riboxine on hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uteshev, B S; Lazareva, G A; Prokopenko, L G

    2002-01-01

    Single (80 mg/kg) or multiply repeated (30 mg/kg) intramuscular injections of phenylhydrazine decrease the functional activity of mononuclear blood cells and the reduces immunological reactivity of the organism. Benfotiamine and riboxin decrease the extent of changes in the immunological response to a single administration of phenylhydrazine but do not significantly influence the immunological functions impaired by repeated injections of the hemolytic toxin.

  1. Parvovirus B19-triggered acute hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia in a child with Evans syndrome

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    ELPIS MANTADAKIS

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human parvovirus B19 (HPV-B19 is the etiologic agent of erythema infectiosum, of transient aplastic crises in individuals with underlying chronic hemolytic disorders, and of chronic pure red cell aplasia in immunocompromised individuals. Case report. We describe a 14-year-old girl with long-standing Evans syndrome, who presented with severe anemia, reticulocytopenia and thromocytopenia. A bone marrow aspirate revealed severe erythroid hypoplasia along with presence of giant pronormoblasts, while serological studies and real-time PCR of whole blood were positive for acute parvovirus B19 infection. The patient was initially managed with corticosteroids, but both cytopenias resolved only after administration of intravenous gamma globulin 0.8g/kg. Conclusion: Acute parvovirus B19 infection should be suspected in patients with immunologic diseases, who present with reticulocytopenic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. In this setting, intravenous gamma globulin is effective for both cytopenias.

  2. A thermolabile aldolase A mutant causes fever-induced recurrent rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia.

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    Asmaa Mamoune

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease.

  3. Parvovirus B19-triggered Acute Hemolytic Anemia and Thrombocytopenia in a Child with Evans Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikidou, Panagiota; Grapsa, Anastassia; Bezirgiannidou, Zoe; Chatzimichael, Athanassios; Mantadakis, Elpis

    2018-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (HPV-B19) is the etiologic agent of erythema infectiosum, of transient aplastic crises in individuals with underlying chronic hemolytic disorders, and of chronic pure red cell aplasia in immunocompromised individuals. We describe a 14-year-old girl with long-standing Evans syndrome, who presented with severe anemia, reticulocytopenia and thrombocytopenia. A bone marrow aspirate revealed severe erythroid hypoplasia along with the presence of giant pronormoblasts, while serological studies and real-time PCR of whole blood were positive for acute parvovirus B19 infection. The patient was initially managed with corticosteroids, but both cytopenias resolved only after administration of intravenous gamma globulin 0.8g/kg. Acute parvovirus B19 infection should be suspected in patients with immunologic diseases, who present reticulocytopenic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. In this setting, intravenous gamma globulin is effective for both cytopenias.

  4. Report of a case with Hodgkin's lymphoma, tuberculosis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    OpenAIRE

    TUĞCU, Deniz; KEBUDİ, Rejin; ZÜLFİKAR, Bülent; AYAN, İnci; GÖRGÜN, Ömer; AĞAN, Mehmet; SOMER, Alper; AKINCI, Ferhan

    2007-01-01

    Tuberculosis has been described in association with malignancies including Hodgkin's disease (HD). In this article, a patient with diagnoses of H D, tuberculosis and hemolytic anemia is reported. Both tuberculosis and HD may present with similar symptoms and signs, and one of the diagnoses may be overlooked. The physicians should be aware of the simultaneous occurrence of both of these diseases when they are faced with initial therapeutic failure, during care of H D and tuberculosis patients.

  5. Diagnostic and therapeutic considerations in idiopathic hypereosinophilia with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia

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    Sweidan AJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexander J Sweidan,1,2 Adam K Brys,3 David D Sohn,1,2 Milan R Sheth4 1University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, St Mary Medical Center, Long Beach, CA, USA; 3School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 4Long Beach Memorial Hospital, Long Beach, CA, USA Abstract: Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES encompasses numerous diverse conditions resulting in peripheral hypereosinophilia that cannot be explained by hypersensitivity, infection, or atopy and that is not associated with known systemic diseases with specific organ involvement. HES is often attributed to neoplastic or reactive causes, such as chronic eosinophilic leukemia, although a majority of cases remains unexplained and are considered idiopathic. Here, we review the current diagnosis and management of HES and present a unique case of profound hypereosinophilia associated with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia requiring intensive management. This case clearly illustrates the limitations of current knowledge with respect to hypereosinophilia syndrome as well as the challenges associated with its classification and management. Keywords: hypereosinophilia, eosinophils, myeloproliferative disorder, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia, leukemia

  6. Hematologic outcomes after total splenectomy and partial splenectomy for congenital hemolytic anemia☆☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englum, Brian R.; Rothman, Jennifer; Leonard, Sarah; Reiter, Audra; Thornburg, Courtney; Brindle, Mary; Wright, Nicola; Heeney, Matthew M.; Smithers, C. Jason; Brown, Rebeccah L.; Kalfa, Theodosia; Langer, Jacob C.; Cada, Michaela; Oldham, Keith T.; Scott, J. Paul; St Peter, Shawn D; Sharma, Mukta; Davidoff, Andrew M.; Nottage, Kerri; Bernabe, Kathryn; Wilson, David B.; Dutta, Sanjeev; Glader, Bertil; Crary, Shelley E.; Dassinger, Melvin S.; Dunbar, Levette; Islam, Saleem; Kumar, Manjusha; Rescorla, Fred; Bruch, Steve; Campbell, Andrew; Austin, Mary; Sidonio, Robert; Blakely, Martin L.; Rice, Henry E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to define the hematologic response to total splenectomy (TS) or partial splenectomy (PS) in children with hereditary spherocytosis (HS) or sickle cell disease (SCD). Methods The Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) consortium registry collected hematologic outcomes of children with CHA undergoing TS or PS to 1 year after surgery. Using random effects mixed modeling, we evaluated the association of operative type with change in hemoglobin, reticulocyte counts, and bilirubin. We also compared laparoscopic to open splenectomy. Results The analysis included 130 children, with 62.3% (n = 81) undergoing TS. For children with HS, all hematologic measures improved after TS, including a 4.1 g/dl increase in hemoglobin. Hematologic parameters also improved after PS, although the response was less robust (hemoglobin increase 2.4 g/dl, p < 0.001). For children with SCD, there was no change in hemoglobin. Laparoscopy was not associated with differences in hematologic outcomes compared to open. TS and laparoscopy were associated with shorter length of stay. Conclusion Children with HS have an excellent hematologic response after TS or PS, although the hematologic response is more robust following TS. Children with SCD have smaller changes in their hematologic parameters. These data offer guidance to families and clinicians considering TS or PS. PMID:26613837

  7. Hemolytic anemia after ingestion of the natural hair dye Lawsonia inermis (henna) in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardes, Daniel J; Ross, Linda A; Markovich, Jessica E

    2013-01-01

    To describe the clinical presentation and case management of a dog that developed hemolytic anemia and evidence of renal tubular dysfunction after ingestion of a natural hair dye containing Lawsonia inermis (henna). To review cases of henna toxicity reported in the human literature. An 8-year-old female spayed Border Collie was presented 5 days after ingestion of a box of natural hair dye. The dog was showing signs of lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and weakness. A serum biochemistry profile, complete blood count, and urinalysis demonstrated evidence of renal tubular dysfunction and a regenerative anemia without spherocytosis. The dog was treated with a transfusion of packed RBCs and IV fluids, resulting in significant clinical improvement. Repeat diagnostics showed resolution of the anemia and no lasting evidence of tubular dysfunction. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case in the veterinary literature of toxicity following ingestion of Lawsonia inermis (henna). Henna ingestion was associated with the development of hemolytic anemia and acute kidney injury. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2013.

  8. Hypophosphatemia and hemolytic anemia associated with diabetes mellitus and hepatic lipidosis in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, L G; Hardy, R M; Weiss, D J; Bartges, J W

    1993-01-01

    Hypophosphatemia associated with hemolytic anemia was diagnosed in five cats with diabetes mellitus and in one cat with idiopathic hepatic lipidosis. The hematocrit began decreasing within 24 to 48 hours after documented hypophosphatemia in each case. The anemia resolved in all five surviving cats. Because of the temporal relationship and lack of other detectable causes, hemolytic anemia was presumed to be caused by hypophosphatemia. There were increased Heinz bodies in three of six hypophosphatemic cats during episodes of hemolysis. Intravenous potassium phosphate administration corrected the hypophosphatemia in four of five cats. The effective dosages of intravenous phosphate ranged from 0.011 to 0.017 mmol of phosphate/kg/h for 6 to 12 hours. Hypocalcemia (5.4 to 8.7 mg/dL) occurred in four of five cats treated with intravenous phosphate; however, only one cat developed clinical signs attributable to hypocalcemia. Based on this retrospective study, we recommend monitoring serum phosphorus concentration every 6 to 12 hours in cats likely to become hypophosphatemic. Treatment of hypophosphatemia in cats is warranted because of the apparent increased susceptibility of cats to hypophosphatemia-induced hemolysis. Cats with severe hypophosphatemia (< or = 1.5 mg/dL) should be given oral or parenteral phosphate if contraindications do not exist.

  9. Hemolytic anemia in two patients with glioblastoma multiforme: A possible interaction between vorinostat and dapsone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jennifer A; Petty, William J; Harmon, Michele; Peacock, James E; Valente, Kari; Owen, John; Pirmohamed, Munir; Lesser, Glenn J

    2015-06-01

    Patients undergoing treatment for glioblastoma multiforme are routinely placed on prophylactic treatment for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia because of significant therapy-induced lymphopenia. In patients with sulfa allergies, dapsone prophylaxis is often used due to its efficacy, long half-life, cost effectiveness, and general safety at low doses. However, dapsone may uncommonly induce a hemolytic anemia, particularly in patients deficient of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. This hemolysis is thought to be a result of oxidative stress on red blood cells induced by dapsone metabolites which produce reactive oxygen species that disrupt the red blood cell membrane and promote splenic sequestration. A single case report of dapsone-induced hemolytic anemia in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme has been reported. We present two patients with glioblastoma multiforme who developed severe hemolytic anemia shortly after initiating therapy with vorinostat, a pan-active histone deacetylase inhibitor, while on prophylactic dapsone. There are several potential mechanisms by which histone deacetylase inhibition may alter dapsone metabolism including changes in hepatic acetylation or N-glucuronidation leading to an increase in the bioavailability of dapsone's hematotoxic metabolites. In addition, vorinostat may lead to increased hemolysis through inhibition of heat shock protein-90, a chaperone protein that maintains the integrity of the red blood cell membrane cytoskeleton. The potential interaction between dapsone and vorinostat may have important clinical implications as more than 10 clinical trials evaluating drug combinations with vorinostat in patients with malignant glioma are either ongoing or planned in North America. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Zinc-induced hemolytic anemia caused by ingestion of pennies by a pup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latimer, K.S.; Jain, A.V.; Inglesby, H.B.; Clarkson, W.D.; Johnson, G.B.

    1989-01-01

    A 4-month-old Pomeranian pup was examined because of anorexia, salivation, and persistent vomiting. Initial laboratory testing revealed marked hemolytic anemia with spherocytosis. Survey abdominal radiography revealed 4 metal objects which, when removed by gastrotomy, were identified as pennies. Of 4 pennies, 3 were minted since 1983 and were heavily pitted over the surface and rim. Partially digested pennies were composed of a copper-plated high zinc concentration alloy. Further laboratory testing indicated a marked increase in serum zinc concentration in the pup (28.8 mg/L), confirming metal toxicosis. Serum zinc concentrations decreased during recovery

  11. Maternal anti-M induced hemolytic disease of newborn followed by prolonged anemia in newborn twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Satyam; Doda, Veena; Maria, Arti; Kotwal, Urvershi; Goyal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Allo-anti-M often has an immunoglobulin G (IgG) component but is rarely clinically significant. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn along with prolonged anemia in newborn twins that persisted for up to 70 days postbirth. The aim was to diagnose and successfully manage hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) due to maternal alloimmunization. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT), antigen typing, irregular antibody screening and identification were done by polyspecific antihuman globulin cards and standard tube method. At presentation, the newborn twins (T1, T2) had HDN with resultant low reticulocyte count and prolonged anemia, which continued for up to 70 days of life. Blood group of the twins and the mother was O RhD positive. DAT of the both newborns at birth was negative. Anti-M was detected in mothers as well as newborns. Type of antibody in mother was IgG and IgM type whereas in twins it was IgG type only. M antigen negative blood was transfused thrice to twin-1 and twice to twin-2. Recurring reduction of the hematocrit along with low reticulocyte count and normal other cell line indicated a pure red cell aplastic state. Anti-M is capable of causing HDN as well as prolonged anemia (red cell aplasia) due to its ability to destroy the erythroid precursor cells. Newborns with anemia should be evaluated for all the possible causes to establish a diagnosis and its efficient management. Mother should be closely monitored for future pregnancies as well.

  12. Maternal anti-M induced hemolytic disease of newborn followed by prolonged anemia in newborn twins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyam Arora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allo-anti-M often has an immunoglobulin G (IgG component but is rarely clinically significant. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn along with prolonged anemia in newborn twins that persisted for up to 70 days postbirth. The aim was to diagnose and successfully manage hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN due to maternal alloimmunization. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT, antigen typing, irregular antibody screening and identification were done by polyspecific antihuman globulin cards and standard tube method. At presentation, the newborn twins (T1, T2 had HDN with resultant low reticulocyte count and prolonged anemia, which continued for up to 70 days of life. Blood group of the twins and the mother was O RhD positive. DAT of the both newborns at birth was negative. Anti-M was detected in mothers as well as newborns. Type of antibody in mother was IgG and IgM type whereas in twins it was IgG type only. M antigen negative blood was transfused thrice to twin-1 and twice to twin-2. Recurring reduction of the hematocrit along with low reticulocyte count and normal other cell line indicated a pure red cell aplastic state. Anti-M is capable of causing HDN as well as prolonged anemia (red cell aplasia due to its ability to destroy the erythroid precursor cells. Newborns with anemia should be evaluated for all the possible causes to establish a diagnosis and its efficient management. Mother should be closely monitored for future pregnancies as well.

  13. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the lung with initial presentation of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Chun Huang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucoepidermoid carcinoma is a rare entity of lung malignancy that is subclassified into high-grade or low-grade types according to its histological features. High-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma is a more aggressive form of malignancy, with a tendency towards lymph node involvement and distant metastasis. Cancer-related microangiopathic hemolytic anemia as a less common situation of paraneoplastic syndrome may be encountered with metastatic malignancy, but has not been reported previously in mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the lung. Herein, we report a 78-year-old male patient who presented with hemoptysis for one day. Laboratory tests showed microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. A chest X-ray demonstrated consolidation in the left lung field. Chest computed tomography revealed a mass in the left upper lobe, and a subsequent bronchoscopic biopsy was performed. The histopathological results indicated a high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. The patient refused systemic chemotherapy, and palliative radiation therapy only was conducted for local disease control. The patient has performed well for 12 months to date since diagnosis of the tumor.

  14. Observação de anemia hemolítica auto-imune em artrite reumatóide Observation of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in rheumatoid arthritis

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    Ricardo A. S. Souza

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Artrite reumatóide é uma doença difusa do tecido conjuntivo que se caracteriza pelo acometimento articular e sistêmico. Disfunções hematológicas como anemia ocorrem em até 65% dos pacientes, sendo a anemia das doenças crônicas a forma mais comum. A anemia hemolítica auto-imune pode estar associada à difusa do tecido conjuntivo, sendo classicamente associada ao lúpus eritematoso sistêmico e fazendo parte dos seus critérios de classificação. A presença de anemia hemolítica auto-imune em artrite reumatóide é relatada raramente na literatura e os mecanismos etiopatogênicos para o seu desenvolvimento ainda não estão esclarecidos. Descrevemos um caso de artrite reumatóide no adulto e outro de artrite reumatóide juvenil que desenvolveram anemia hemolítica auto-imune e discutimos os prováveis mecanismos etiopatogênicos envolvidos.Rheumatoid arthritis is a connective tissue disease characterized by articular and systemic involvement. Hematological abnormalities such as anemia may occur in up to 65% of the patients, with chronic disease anemia being the commonest form. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia can be associated with different connective tissue diseases, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus and it is part of its classification criteria. On the other hand, the presence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in rheumatoid arthritis has rarely been described in the literature and the pathogenic mechanisms for its development remain unclear. We describe here a case of rheumatoid arthritis and another of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis that developed to autoimmune hemolytic anemia and present the probable etiopathogenic mechanisms.

  15. Incompatible blood transfusion: Challenging yet lifesaving in the management of acute severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudipta Sekhar Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is characterized by the production of autoantibodies directed against red cell antigens. Most patients of AIHA arrive in the emergency or out-patient department (OPD with severe anemia requiring urgent blood transfusion. Here we share our experience of managing these patients with incompatible blood transfusions and suggest the minimal test required to assure patient safety. Materials and Methods: A total of 14 patients admitted with severe anemia, diagnosed with AIHA and requiring blood transfusion urgently were included in the study. A series of immunohematological investigations were performed to confirm the diagnosis and issue "best match" packed red blood cells (PRBC to these patients. Results: A total of 167 PRBC units were crossmatched for 14 patients of which 46 units (28% were found to be best match ones and 26 (56.5% of these units were transfused. A mean turn around time of 222 min was observed in issuing the ′best match′ blood. Severe hemolysis was observed in all patients with a median hemoglobin increment of 0.88 g/dl after each unit PRBC transfusion. Conclusion: Decision to transfuse in AIHA should be based on the clinical condition of the patient. No critical patient should be denied blood transfusion due to serological incompatibility. Minimum investigations such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT, antibody screening and autocontrol should be performed to ensure transfusion safety in patients. All transfusion services should be capable of issuing "best match" PRBCs in AIHA.

  16. Incompatible blood transfusion: Challenging yet lifesaving in the management of acute severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudipta Sekhar; Zaman, Rafiq Uz; Safi, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is characterized by the production of autoantibodies directed against red cell antigens. Most patients of AIHA arrive in the emergency or out-patient department (OPD) with severe anemia requiring urgent blood transfusion. Here we share our experience of managing these patients with incompatible blood transfusions and suggest the minimal test required to assure patient safety. A total of 14 patients admitted with severe anemia, diagnosed with AIHA and requiring blood transfusion urgently were included in the study. A series of immunohematological investigations were performed to confirm the diagnosis and issue best match packed red blood cells (PRBC) to these patients. A total of 167 PRBC units were crossmatched for 14 patients of which 46 units (28%) were found to be best match ones and 26 (56.5%) of these units were transfused. A mean turn around time of 222 min was observed in issuing the "best match" blood. Severe hemolysis was observed in all patients with a median hemoglobin increment of 0.88 g/dl after each unit PRBC transfusion. Decision to transfuse in AIHA should be based on the clinical condition of the patient. No critical patient should be denied blood transfusion due to serological incompatibility. Minimum investigations such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT), antibody screening and autocontrol should be performed to ensure transfusion safety in patients. All transfusion services should be capable of issuing "best match" PRBCs in AIHA.

  17. Adrenal failure followed by status epilepticus and hemolytic anemia in primary antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bures Vladimir

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a 14 year old boy who presented with the symptoms abdominal pain, fever and proteinuria. A hematoma in the region of the right pararenal space was diagnosed. Prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged, lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies were positive and serum cortisol was normal. Ten days after admission the boy suddenly suffered generalized seizures due to low serum sodium. As well, the patient developed hemolytic anemia, acute elevated liver enzymes, hematuria and increased proteinuria. At this time a second hemorrhage of the left adrenal gland was documented. Adrenal function tests revealed adrenal insufficiency. We suspected microthromboses in the adrenals and secondary bleeding and treated the boy with hydrocortisone, fludrocortisone and phenprocoumon. Conclusion Adrenal failure is a rare complication of APS in children with only five cases reported to date. As shown in our patient, this syndrome can manifest in a diverse set of simultaneously occurring symptoms.

  18. Anti-M Antibody Induced Prolonged Anemia Following Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Due to Erythropoietic Suppression in 2 Siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Atsushi; Ohto, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Negishi, Yutaka; Tsuiki, Hideki; Arakawa, Takeshi; Yagi, Yoshihito; Uchimura, Daisuke; Miyazaki, Toru; Ohashi, Wataru; Takamoto, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) arising from MNSs incompatibility is rare, with few reports of prolonged anemia and reticulocytopenia following HDN. We report the younger of 2 male siblings, both of whom had anti-M-induced HDN and anemia persisting for over a month. Peripheral reticulocytes remained inappropriately low for the degree of anemia, and they needed multiple red cell transfusions. Viral infections were ruled out. Corticosteroids were given for suspected pure red cell aplasia. Anemia and reticulocytopenia subsequently improved. Colony-forming unit erythroid assay revealed erythropoietic suppression of M antigen-positive erythroid precursor cells cultured with maternal or infant sera containing anti-M. In conclusion, maternal anti-M caused HDN and prolonged anemia by erythropoietic suppression in 2 siblings.

  19. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia.

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    J Pedro Fernández-Murray

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia.

  20. Megadose Methylprednisolone (MDMP Treatment in a Patient with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA Resistant to Conventional Corticosteroid Administration: A Case Report

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    Şinasi Özsoylu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A female in the Netherlands with severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA was treated with conventional corticosteroid (2 mg/kg/d in divided doses and blood transfusions for 18 months without improvement. The presented patient responded to megadose methylprednisolone (MDMP 30 mg/kg/d for 3 d, followed by 20 mg/kg for 4 d, and subsequently 10, 5, 2, and 1 mg/kg/d each for 1 week.

  1. Life-threatening autoimmune hemolytic anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: successful seletive splenic artery embolization

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    matteo molica

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Selective splenic artery embolization (SSAE is a nonsurgical intervention characterized by the transcatheter occlusion of the splenic artery and/or its branch vessels using metallic coils or other embolic devices. It has been applied for the management of splenic trauma, hypersplenism with portal hypertension, hereditary spherocytosis, thalassemia and splenic hemangioma. We hereby describe a case of a patient affected by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP and warm auto-immune hemolytic anemia (AIHA both resistant to immunosuppressive and biological therapies, not eligible for a surgical intervention because of her critical conditions. She underwent SSAE and achieved a hematologic complete response within a few days without complications. SSAE is a minimally invasive procedure to date not considered a standard option in the management of AIHA and ITP. However, following the progressive improvement of the techniques, its indications have been extended, with a reduction in morbidity and mortality compared to splenectomy in patients with critical clinical conditions. SSAE was a lifesaving therapeutic approach for our patient and it may represent a real alternative for the treatment of resistant AIHA and ITP patients not eligible for splenectomy.

  2. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis-Related Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Three Case Reports and Review of the Literature

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    Yu Tian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The association between primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is uncommon; only fourteen such case reports have been described. In this report, three patients who developed AIHA on the basis of PBC underwent successful therapy with corticosteroids and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA. Patient 3 was more complicated, suffering from PBC, Evans syndrome, Sjögren syndrome and Klinefelter syndrome simultaneously. This has not previously been reported in the world literature. Review of all fifteen cases showed that there is a prominent occurrence sequence that AIHA might take place on the basis of PBC. With sufficient doses of corticosteroids or immunosuppressant therapy, besides hemolysis under effective control, liver function also improved. According to the criteria of secondary AIHA, we may call them PBC-related AIHA. Thus, patients with PBC with serum bilirubin levels rising suddenly should undergo screening for associated hemolysis. Recommended treatment for PBC-related AIHA includes sufficient doses of corticosteroids to control the hemolysis in the acute phase, and immunosuppressant or adequate dose of UDCA to maintain therapy. These case reports have been increasing in recent years, so further reserch is needed to illustrate the incidence and natural courses of these two organ-specific autoimmune diseases.

  3. Characterization of autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemia following treatment with interferon alfa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencomo Hernandez, Antonio; Gutierrez Diaz, Adys; Avila Cabrera, Onel; Rodriguez, Luis Ramon

    2012-01-01

    We studied 13 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by interferon alfa. They underwent tests for immune protein detection and characterization of IgG subclasses in RBCs by direct antiglobulin test (PAD) and the microplate technique. Also they were applied ELISA test for quantifying immunoglobulins in the red blood cells. It was detected the presence of IgG and C3 in 53.84 % of cases, IgG alone in 23.07 % and in 15.38 % were identified IgG and IgA autoantibodies. In 11 patients the presence of IgG1 was showed and also in one case the subclass IgG3 autoantibodies was identified. The ELISA detected antibodies at concentrations of 183 IgG molecules per erythrocyte in a patient with negative PAD. In high-grade hemolysis patients, it was found a concentration of autoantibodies between 1 500 and 3 180 molecules of IgG per erythrocyte, while in low-grade hemolysis patients it behaved between 183 and 1 000 molecules. There was a negative correlation between Hb and plasma haptoglobin values with the number of IgG molecules per erythrocyte and a positive correlation between the latter with the reticulocyte count

  4. [Recombinant erythropoietin as treatment for hyporegenerative anemia following hemolytic disease of the newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Hugo; Bacciedoni, Viviana; García, Cecilia; Schvartzman, Gabriel; Vain, Néstor

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the study is to report results of erythropoietin treatment for late hyporegenerative anemia in the hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Reports previously published concern only a few cases, with controversial results. Case series report concerning 50 neonates with HDN due to Rh, ABO or KpA antigens, aged more than 7 days. Erythropoietin treatment started when hematocrit dropped to levels requiring transfusion, with an inappropriate reticulocyte response (Reticulocyte Production Index <1). At start of treatment mean age was 24.3 +/- 12.0 days (range 8-65 days), hematocrit 24.1 +/- 2.8% (range 18-30%), and Reticulocyte Production Index 0.34 +/- 0.25 (range 0.05-0.98). Hematocrit and Reticulocyte Production Index showed significant increases after 7 and 14 days of treatment (p <0.001). No difference was observed either between infants with Rh-HDN and ABO-HDN or between Rh-HDN patients with or without intrauterine transfusions. Seven infants (14%) required one packed RBC transfusion during erythropoietin therapy, 2 of them within 72 hours from starting treatment. The percentage of transfused infants showed no difference either between ABO-HDN and Rh-HDN or between Rh-HDN with and without intrauterine transfusions. Moderate, short-lasting neutropenia, not associated to infections, was observed in 11 patients. No other adverse effect was observed. The administration of erythropoietin appears to be a safe and useful therapy. Its efficacy should be confirmed by randomized studies.

  5. Hemolytic anemia repressed hepcidin level without hepatocyte iron overload: lesson from Günther disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millot, Sarah; Delaby, Constance; Moulouel, Boualem; Lefebvre, Thibaud; Pilard, Nathalie; Ducrot, Nicolas; Ged, Cécile; Lettéron, Philippe; de Franceschi, Lucia; Deybach, Jean Charles; Beaumont, Carole; Gouya, Laurent; De Verneuil, Hubert; Lyoumi, Saïd; Puy, Hervé; Karim, Zoubida

    2017-02-01

    Hemolysis occurring in hematologic diseases is often associated with an iron loading anemia. This iron overload is the result of a massive outflow of hemoglobin into the bloodstream, but the mechanism of hemoglobin handling has not been fully elucidated. Here, in a congenital erythropoietic porphyria mouse model, we evaluate the impact of hemolysis and regenerative anemia on hepcidin synthesis and iron metabolism. Hemolysis was confirmed by a complete drop in haptoglobin, hemopexin and increased plasma lactate dehydrogenase, an increased red blood cell distribution width and osmotic fragility, a reduced half-life of red blood cells, and increased expression of heme oxygenase 1. The erythropoiesis-induced Fam132b was increased, hepcidin mRNA repressed, and transepithelial iron transport in isolated duodenal loops increased. Iron was mostly accumulated in liver and spleen macrophages but transferrin saturation remained within the normal range. The expression levels of hemoglobin-haptoglobin receptor CD163 and hemopexin receptor CD91 were drastically reduced in both liver and spleen, resulting in heme- and hemoglobin-derived iron elimination in urine. In the kidney, the megalin/cubilin endocytic complex, heme oxygenase 1 and the iron exporter ferroportin were induced, which is reminiscent of significant renal handling of hemoglobin-derived iron. Our results highlight ironbound hemoglobin urinary clearance mechanism and strongly suggest that, in addition to the sequestration of iron in macrophages, kidney may play a major role in protecting hepatocytes from iron overload in chronic hemolysis. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  6. Severe iron overload and hyporegenerative anemia in a case with rhesus hemolytic disease: therapeutic approach to rare complications

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    Fatih Demircioğlu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A 33 weeks’ gestation, a baby with rhesus hemolytic disease (RHD, who had received intrauterine transfusions twice, developed cholestatic hepatic disease and late hyporegenerative anemia. Her serum ferritin and bilirubin levels increased to 8842 ng/ml and 17.9 mg/dl, respectively. Liver biopsy showed cholestasis and severe iron overload. Treatment with recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO decreased the transfusion need, and intravenous deferoxamine resulted in a marked decreased in serum ferritin levels and normalization of liver function. In patients who have undergone intrauterine transfusions due to RHD, hyperferritinemia and late hyporegenerative anemia should be kept in mind. Chelation therapy in cases with symptomatic hyperferritinemia and rHuEPO treatment in cases with severe hyporegenerative anemia should be considered.

  7. Management of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children and adolescents: A single center experience

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    Nazan Sarper

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present and discuss the treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA. Materials and Methods: The medical records of all patients (n=19 diagnosed in a tertiary hematology center between 1999 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed.Results: Median age at diagnosis of AIHA was 5 years (range: 4 months-17 years. In all, 13 patients had primary (idiopathic AIHA, whereas 2 had primary Evans Syndrome (ES, 2 had autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS+ES, and 1 had Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS+AIHA. Among the 13 primary idiopathic AIHA patients, 9 recovered following a 4-8-week course of prednisolone treatment without relapses, whereas 3 patients required a longer course of prednisolone. One AIHA patient that was very resistant to prednisolone recovered after cyclosporine A was added to the treatment. All patients with primary idiopathic AIHA were in remission for a median of 3 years (range: 4 months-10 years at the time this manuscript was written. Among the patients with primary ES, 2 had relapses similar to the ALPS patients. Splenectomy was performed in 1 primary ES patient, who at the time this report was written was also in remission. One ALPS patient required the addition of mycophenolate mofetil due to prednisolone resistance. The WAS patient was treatment resistant and died due to septicemia.Conclusions: Primary AIHA in pediatric patients generally has an acute onset and good response to corticosteroids. Primary or secondary ES has a chronic or relapsing course, and treatment may require other immunosuppressive agents in addition to corticosteroids. Complications of splenectomy must not be underestimated in patients with underlying immunodeficiency. AIHA often causes considerable morbidity and mortality in WAS.

  8. Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction presenting as a painful crisis in a patient with sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabron, A; Moreira, G; Bordin, J O

    1999-01-07

    Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) are frequently transfused with red blood cells (RBC). Recently we reported that the calculated risk of RBC alloimmunization per transfussed unit in Brazilian patients with SCA is 1.15%. We describe a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) presenting as a painful crisis in a patient with SCA. A 35-year-old Brazilian female with homozygous SCA was admitted for a program of partial exchange transfusion prior to cholecystectomy. Her blood group was O RhD positive and no atypical RBC alloantibody was detected using the indirect antiglobulin technique. Pre-transfusional hemoglobin (Hb) was 8.7 g/dL and isovolumic partial exchange transfusion was performed using 4 units of ABO compatible packed RBC. Five days after the last transfusion she developed generalized joint pain and fever of 39 degrees C. Her Hb level dropped from 12.0 g/dL to 9.3 g/dL and the unconjugated bilirrubin level rose to 27 mmol/L. She was jaundiced and had hemoglobinuria. Hemoglobin electrophoresis showed 48.7% HbS, 46.6% HbA1, 2.7% HbA2, and 2.0% HbF. The patient's extended RBC phenotype was CDe, K-k+, Kp(a-b+), Fy(a-b-), M+N+s+, Le(a+b-), Di(a-). An RBC alloantibody with specificity to the Rh system (anti-c, titer 1:16.384) was identified by the indirect antiglobulin test. The Rh phenotype of the RBC used in the last packed RBC transfusion was CcDEe. The patient was discharged, asymptomatic, 7 days after admission.

  9. Parvovirus B19 infection presenting with severe erythroid aplastic crisis during pregnancy in a woman with autoimmune hemolytic anemia and alpha-thalassemia trait: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Ching; Chen, Chin-Shan; Wang, Wei-Yao; Ma, Jui-Shan; Shu, Hwei-Fan; Fan, Frank S

    2015-03-12

    Parvovirus B19 virus commonly causes subclinical infection, but it can prove fatal to the fetus during pregnancy and cause severe anemia in an adult with hemolytic diseases. We present the case of a woman with autoimmune hemolytic anemia who was diagnosed with parvovirus B19-induced transient aplastic crisis during her second trimester of pregnancy and faced the high risk of both fetal and maternal complications related to this specific viral infection. To the best of our knowledge, the experience of successful intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for B19 virus infection during pregnancy, as in our case, is limited. A 28-year-old and 20-week pregnant Chinese woman with genetically confirmed alpha-thalassemia trait was diagnosed with cold antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia and suffered from transient aplastic crisis caused by B19 virus infection. She received intravenous immunoglobulin treatment to reduce the risk of hydrops fetalis. Her peripheral blood reticulocyte percentage recovered, but anemia persisted, so she underwent several courses of high dose intravenous dexamethasone for controlling her underlying hemolytic problem. Finally, her hemoglobin levels remained stable with no need of erythrocyte transfusion, and a healthy baby boy was naturally delivered. Parvovirus B19 virus infection should be considered when a sudden exacerbation of anemia occurs in a patient with hemolytic disease, and the possible fetal complications caused by maternal B19 virus infection during pregnancy should not be ignored. Close monitoring and adequate management can keep both mother and fetus safe.

  10. B-lymphocyte reconstitution after repeated rituximab treatment in a child with steroid-dependent autoimmune hemolytic anemia

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    Annelieke A.A. van der Linde

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the detailed long-term reconstitution of B-lymphocyte subpopulations, immunoglobulins, and specific antibody production after two courses of rituximab in a young, previously healthy girl with steroid-dependent autoimmune hemolytic anemia. B-lymphocyte subpopulations were surprisingly normal directly after reconstitution. However, there was a slower reconstitution after the second rituximab course, especially of non-switched and switched memory B-lymphocytes, and a temporary decline in IgM below age-matched reference values.

  11. Hemolysis of the red cell : Towards improved understanding of hereditary hemolytic anemia and new diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisjes, Henk Rick

    2018-01-01

    The condition in which in the oxygen-carrying capacity of RBCs or their number is insufficient to meet physiological needs is characterized as anemia. Anemia is an underestimated burden of disease and despite that the vast majority of anemia is caused by iron deficiency, a substantial number of

  12. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension associated with hemolytic anemia

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    Sarfraz Saleemi

    2014-01-01

    Because of a unique pathophysiology, pulmonary hypertension associated with hemolytic disorders was moved from WHO group I to group V PH diseases. Treatment strategies are also unique and include blood transfusion, iron chelation, hydroxyurea, and oxygen therapy. The role of PH-specific agents has not been established.

  13. Late complications following total-body irradiation and bone marrow rescue in mice: predominance of glomerular nephropathy and hemolytic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Down, J.D.; Berman, A.J.; Mauch, P.; Warhol, M.

    1990-01-01

    Late mortality and pathology were assessed in various mouse strains following total-body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation. Long-term survival data revealed both radiation dose- and strain-dependent onset of mortality between 1 and 2 years post-treatment. Renal damage appeared to have contributed to the late mortality in most treatment groups as shown by glomerular lesions, elevated blood urea nitrogen and an accompanying fall in hematocrit. Hemolysis was deduced to be the major cause of anemia, as concluded from results of 51 Cr-labeled erythrocyte survival. No decrease in erythropoiesis was evident as seen from spleen and bone marrow 59 Fe uptake. These findings are together consistent with the manifestation of a hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) with kidney glomeruli representing the principal sites of injury responsible for both renal dysfunction and microangiopathic hemolysis. (author)

  14. Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia Following Three Different Species of Hump-Nosed Pit Viper (Genus: Hypnale) Envenoming in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namal Rathnayaka, Rathnayaka Mudiyanselage M K; Ranathunga, Anusha Nishanthi; Kularatne, Senanayake A M; Rajapakse, Jayanthe; Ranasinghe, Shirani; Jayathunga, Radha

    2018-03-01

    There are 3 species of hump-nosed pit vipers in Sri Lanka: Hypnale hypnale, Hypnale zara, and Hypnale nepa. The latter 2 are endemic to the country. Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) is a known complication of hump-nosed pit viper bites. It was previously documented as a complication of general viper bites and not species specific. We report a series of 3 patients who developed MAHA after being bitten by each species of hump-nosed pit viper. The first patient was bitten by H hypnale and developed a severe form of MAHA associated with acute kidney injury and thrombocytopenia falling into the category of thrombotic microangiopathy. The other 2 developed MAHA that resolved without any complications. Copyright © 2017 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Refractory IgG Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Treated with Eculizumab: A Novel Application of Anticomplement Therapy

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    Kim Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA is the most common form of AIHA, with corticosteroids in first-line treatment resulting in a 60–80% response rate. Atypical wAIHA and IgG plus complement mediated disease have a higher treatment failure rate and higher recurrence rate. We report a case of severe wAIHA secondary to Waldenström macroglobulinemia with life threatening intravascular hemolysis refractory to prednisone, rituximab, splenectomy, and plasmapheresis. A four-week treatment of eculizumab in this heavily pretreated patient resulted in a sustained increase in hemoglobin and transfusion independence, suggesting a role for complement inhibition in refractory wAIHA.

  16. IgG4-Related Disease Combined with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Steroid-Responsive Transient Hypercalcemia

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    Sho Hasegawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 67-year-old man with elevated serum immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4 levels, systemic lymphadenopathy infiltrated by IgG4-positive plasma cells, and Coombs-positive autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA showed marked hypercalcemia. Although the intact parathyroid hormone (PTH level was elevated, 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy and thyroid ultrasonography revealed no evidence of primary hyperparathyroidism. Liver biopsy showed marked infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells, which confirmed the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD. Corticosteroid therapy was initiated, and subsequently, intact PTH and serum calcium levels gradually normalized. Transient hypercalcemia in a patient with AIHA may therefore be associated with IgG4-RD.

  17. Late complications following total-body irradiation and bone marrow rescue in mice: predominance of glomerular nephropathy and hemolytic anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Down, J.D.; Berman, A.J.; Mauch, P. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA)); Warhol, M. (Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (USA). Dept. of Pathology); Yeap, B. (Dana Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Late mortality and pathology were assessed in various mouse strains following total-body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation. Long-term survival data revealed both radiation dose- and strain-dependent onset of mortality between 1 and 2 years post-treatment. Renal damage appeared to have contributed to the late mortality in most treatment groups as shown by glomerular lesions, elevated blood urea nitrogen and an accompanying fall in hematocrit. Hemolysis was deduced to be the major cause of anemia, as concluded from results of {sup 51}Cr-labeled erythrocyte survival. No decrease in erythropoiesis was evident as seen from spleen and bone marrow {sup 59}Fe uptake. These findings are together consistent with the manifestation of a hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) with kidney glomeruli representing the principal sites of injury responsible for both renal dysfunction and microangiopathic hemolysis. (author).

  18. Ceftriaxone-induced immune hemolytic anemia as a life-threatening complication of antibiotic treatment of 'chronic Lyme disease'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wilde, Maarten; Speeckaert, Marijn; Callens, Rutger; Van Biesen, Wim

    2017-04-01

    'Chronic Lyme disease' is a controversial condition. As any hard evidence is lacking that unresolved systemic symptoms, following an appropriately diagnosed and treated Lyme disease, are related to a chronic infection with the tick-borne spirochaetes of the Borrelia genus, the term 'chronic Lyme disease' should be avoided and replaced by the term 'post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome.' The improper prescription of prolonged antibiotic treatments for these patients can have an impact on the community antimicrobial resistance and on the consumption of health care resources. Moreover, these treatments can be accompanied by severe complications. In this case report, we describe a life-threatening ceftriaxone-induced immune hemolytic anemia with an acute kidney injury (RIFLE-stadium F) due to a pigment-induced nephropathy in a 76-year-old woman, who was diagnosed with a so-called 'chronic Lyme disease.'

  19. Severe acute hepatitis and cold agglutinin-related hemolytic anemia secondary to prime infection with Epstein-Barr virus

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    Guillermo Ontanilla-Clavijo

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus, a member of the Herpesviridae family, is responsible for the infectious mononucleosis clinical syndrome, which mainly includes the pharyngitis, fever, and lymphadenopathy triad after incubation for 30-50 days. The liver is involved in 80-90% of patients in a self-limiting transient manner, with jaundice being much more uncommon (5%. From a hematological standpoint it may manifest aplastic anemia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia. We report a case of infectious mononucleosis that included severe acute hepatitis and was associated with severe hemolytic anemia secondary to cold agglutinins. After exclusion of other etiologies, and given the clinical suspicion of the above association, which was later confirmed by lab tests, empiric therapy was initiated with antiviral agents (aciclovir + valganciclovir and corticoids, which resulted in a progressive clinical improvement until complete remission. Therefore, we believe that this case report will reinforce the clinical evidence in support of the above combined therapy for serious infectious mononucleosis as a step prior to liver transplantation.

  20. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn with late-onset anemia due to anti-M: a case report and review of the Japanese literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Ohto, Hitoshi; Nollet, Kenneth E; Kawabata, Kinuyo; Saito, Shunnichi; Yagi, Yoshihito; Negishi, Yutaka; Ishida, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) attributed to M/N-incompatibility varies from asymptomatic to lethally hydropic. Case reports are rare, and the clinical significance of anti-M is not completely understood. A challenging case of HDFN due to anti-M prompted an investigation of the Japanese literature, in order to characterize the clinical spectrum of M/N-incompatibility pregnancies in Japan and report results to English-language readers. Japanese reports of HDFN attributed to M/N incompatibility were compiled. Abstracted data include maternal antibody titers at delivery, fetal direct antiglobulin test, hemoglobin, total bilirubin, reticulocyte count at birth, and therapeutic interventions. We investigated characteristics of HDFN due to M/N-incompatible pregnancies in Japan after encountering a case of severe HDFN along with late-onset anemia in an infant born to a woman carrying IgG anti-M with a titer of 1. In total, thirty-three babies with HDFN due to anti-M and one due to anti-N have been reported in Japan since 1975. The median maternal antibody titer was 64 at delivery and was 16 or less in 10 of 34 women (29%). Five of 34 babies (15%) were stillborn or died as neonates. Twenty-one of 29 survivors (72%) had severe hemolytic anemia and/or hydrops fetalis. The reticulocyte count of neonates with anemia stayed below the reference interval. Sixteen (55%) developed late-onset anemia and 14 (48%) were transfused with M-negative RBCs. Significant positive correlation (P hemolytic anemia and/or hydrops fetalis. Low reticulocyte count in neonates with late-onset anemia is consistent with suppressed erythropoiesis due to anti-M. © 2013.

  1. A teenager presents with fulminant hepatic failure and acute hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Somnath; Sonny, Abraham; Rahman, Nadeem

    2015-03-01

    A teenager was admitted to an outside hospital ED following an episode of melena. He had been complaining of intermittent abdominal pain, nausea, malaise, and easy fatigability for 2 months, with significant worsening of symptoms 2 weeks prior to this episode. He had no significant medical, surgical, or family history. On presentation at the outside ED, he was found to be profoundly icteric and encephalopathic. Initial laboratories suggested anemia, acute kidney injury, and acute liver failure, leading to a presumptive diagnosis of acute fulminant liver failure necessitating transfer to our institution.

  2. Effects of therapeutic plasma exchange on serum immunoglobulin concentrations in a dog with refractory immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scagnelli, Alyssa M; Walton, Stuart A; Liu, Chin-Chi; Acierno, Mark J

    2018-05-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 9-year-old 8.3-kg (18.3-lb) neutered male Miniature Schnauzer was referred for diagnosis and treatment of a sudden onset of lethargy, anorexia, vomiting, and pallor. CLINICAL FINDINGS On physical examination, the dog was lethargic with pale mucous membranes and a capillary refill time ≥ 2 seconds. Skin and sclera were mildly icteric. Signs of pain were elicited during abdominal palpation, and an enlarged spleen was noted. Results of agglutination testing and cytologic findings were consistent with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA). No contributing factors for development of IMHA were identified. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Initial treatment included management with immunosuppressant medications. Three packed RBC transfusions were administered, but clinical signs continued to progress. Therefore, therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) was performed 5 and 9 days after admission. Following each TPE procedure, the dog had an appreciable clinical improvement and decrease in RBC autoagglutination, and the Hct stabilized. Serum IgG and IgM concentrations were measured during and after both TPE procedures. Despite anticoagulative treatment, the dog developed a thrombus in the splenic vein, necessitating a splenectomy. CLINICAL RELEVANCE The decrease and rebound in serum IgG and IgM concentrations following TPE provided evidence that TPE may have the same immunomodulatory effects in dogs as have been proposed to occur in people. Further, findings suggested that TPE may be a useful alternative in dogs with refractory IMHA when traditional treatments fail.

  3. A case of red-cell adenosine deaminase overproduction associated with hereditary hemolytic anemia found in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, S; Fujii, H; Matsumoto, N; Nakatsuji, T; Oda, S; Asano, H; Asano, S

    1978-01-01

    A case of red cell adenosine deaminase (ADA) overproduction associated with hereditary hemolytic anemia is reported here. This appears to be the second report. Proband is a 38-year-old Japanese male who had hemoglobin, 15.8 g/100 ml; reticulocyte count, 4.5%; serum indirect bilirubin, 4.9 mg/100 ml; 51Cr-labeled red cell half-life, 12 days; red cells showed moderate stomatocytosis. His red cell ADA activity showed 40-fold increase while that of the mother showed 4-fold increase. The mother was hematologically normal. The father had a normal enzyme activity. The proband and the mother showed slightly high serum uric acid levels. The proband's red cell showed: ATP, 628 nmoles/ml (normal, 1,010--1,550); adenine nucleotide pool, 46% of the normal mean; 2,3-diphosphoglycerate content, 3,782 nmoles/ml (normal 4,170--5,300); increased oxygen affinity of hemoglobin, P50 of intact erythrocytes being 21.8 mmHg (normal, 24.1--26.1). Red cell glycolytic intermediates in the proband were low in general, and the rate of lactate production was low. Kinetic studies using crude hemolysate revealed a normal Km for adenosine, normal electrophoretic mobility but slightly abnormal pH curve and slightly low utilization of 2-deoxyadenosine. The ADA activity of lymphocytes was nearly normal.

  4. Resolution of alloimmunization and refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a multi-transfused beta-thalassemia major patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Philip

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta-thalassemia is one of the most prevalent autosomal disorders, which affect more than 400,000 newborn per year worldwide. In India, the carrier rate of beta-thalassemia varies from 3-17%. The overall rate of alloimmunization in thalassemia patients has been reported to be 5-30% in the world, which is mostly contributed by the alloimmunization to minor blood group antigen. Among Asians, the incidence of red cell alloimmunization is 22%. The recommended treatment for beta-thalassemia major is regular blood transfusion every 3 to 4 weeks. The development of anti-red cell antibodies (alloantibodies and/or autoantibodies can significantly complicate transfusion therapy. Alloantibodies are commonly associated with red cell hemolysis. Red cell autoantibodies appear less frequently, but they can result in clinical hemolysis called autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, and in difficulty in cross-matching blood. Patients with autoantibodies may have a higher transfusion rate and often require immunosuppressive drugs or alternative treatments including intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg and rituximab (anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody.

  5. Investigating the Antioxidant Properties of Royal Jelly and Vitamin C on Enzymes, Histomorphometric and Liver Cells Apoptosis in Mice Suffering Hemolytic Anemia

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    Hojat Anbara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Hemolytic anemia induced by phenylhydrazine (PHZ as a hemolytic composition can change the function and structure of liver. Therefore, the present study attempts to evaluate the protective effects of vitamin C and royal jelly co-administration against the oxidative damages and liver apoptosis induced by hemolytic anemia in adult mice. Materials & Methods: 32 adult male mice were divided equally and randomly into four groups. The first group received normal saline with a dose of 0.1 ml, IP. The second group received a dose of vitamin C (250 kg/mg, IP along with 100 kg/mg dose of royal jelly administered orally. The third group was administered with 6 mg/100 gr, IP phenylhydrazine in 48 hour intervals. Finally, the fourth group received vitamin C and royal jelly in the doses similar to the first three groups along with phenylhydrazine with the same doses of previous groups. After 35 days, the serum and testis samples were taken and were used for serum analysis and histochemical and histomorphometric studies. Results: Phenylhydrazine increased the level of serum concentration of aspartate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminase, malondialdehyde and lactate dehydrogenase and decreased the superoxide dismutase along with the total antioxidant capacity and serum albumin. Moreover, phenylhydrazine increased the apoptosis, the number of kupffer cells and the diameter of hepatocytes. Prescribing the royal jelly with vitamin C improved the changes of abovementioned parameters significantly. Conclusion: Royal jelly with vitamin C is an antioxidant with the potential properties in preventing the oxidative damages and apoptosis induced by phenylhydrazine-induced hemolytic anemia in mouse liver.

  6. A case of recurrent autoimmune hemolytic anemia during remission associated with acute pure red cell aplasia and hemophagocytic syndrome due to human parvovirus B19 infection successfully treated by steroid pulse therapy with a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Shimada, Asami; Imai, Hidenori; Wakabayashi, Mutsumi; Sugimoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Noriko; Sawada, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Norio; Noguchi, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 47-year-old man diagnosed as having autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in April 2011. He also had a congenital chromosomal abnormality, a balanced translocation. Treatment with prednisolone (PSL) 60 mg/day resulted in resolution of the AIHA, and the treatment was completed in November 2011. While the patient no longer had anemia, the direct and indirect Coombs tests remained positive. In May 2013, he developed recurrent AIHA associated with acute pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) caused by human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19) infection. Tests for anti-erythropoietin and anti-erythropoietin receptor antibodies were positive. Steroid pulse therapy resulted in resolution of the AIHA, PRCA, as well as HPS. The serum test for anti-erythropoietin antibodies also became negative after the treatment. However, although the serum was positive for anti-HPV B19 IgG antibodies, the patient continued to have a low CD4 lymphocyte count (CD4, B19 infection (HPV B19 DNA remained positive), suggesting the risk of recurrence and bone marrow failure.

  7. Men with Sickle Cell Anemia and Priapism Exhibit Increased Hemolytic Rate, Decreased Red Blood Cell Deformability and Increased Red Blood Cell Aggregate Strength.

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    Kizzy-Clara Cita

    Full Text Available To investigate the association between priapism in men with sickle cell anemia (SCA and hemorheological and hemolytical parameters.Fifty-eight men with SCA (median age: 38 years were included; 28 who had experienced priapism at least once during their life (priapism group and 30 who never experienced this complication (control group. Twenty-two patients were treated with hydroxycarbamide, 11 in each group. All patients were at steady state at the time of inclusion. Hematological and biochemical parameters were obtained through routine procedures. The Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer was used to measure red blood cell (RBC deformability at 30 Pa (ektacytometry and RBC aggregation properties (laser backscatter versus time. Blood viscosity was measured at a shear rate of 225 s-1 using a cone/plate viscometer. A principal component analysis was performed on 4 hemolytic markers (i.e., lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT, total bilirubin (BIL levels and reticulocyte (RET percentage to calculate a hemolytic index.Compared to the control group, patients with priapism exhibited higher ASAT (p = 0.01, LDH (p = 0.03, RET (p = 0.03 levels and hemolytic indices (p = 0.02. Higher RBC aggregates strength (p = 0.01 and lower RBC deformability (p = 0.005 were observed in patients with priapism compared to controls. After removing the hydroxycarbamide-treated patients, RBC deformability (p = 0.01 and RBC aggregate strength (p = 0.03 were still different between the two groups, and patients with priapism exhibited significantly higher hemolytic indices (p = 0.01 than controls.Our results confirm that priapism in SCA is associated with higher hemolytic rates and show for the first time that this complication is also associated with higher RBC aggregate strength and lower RBC deformability.

  8. Congenital sideroblastic anemia due to mutations in the mitochondrial HSP70 homologue HSPA9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Ciesielski, Szymon J.; Schmidt, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    The congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs) are relatively uncommon diseases characterized by defects in mitochondrial heme synthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that mutations in HSPA9, a mitochondrial HSP70 homolog located in the chromosome 5q...

  9. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hemolytic Anemia Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases Iron Deficiency Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Vitamin Deficiency Anemia (See ... Hemolytic Anemia Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases Iron Deficiency Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Vitamin Deficiency Anemia NOTE: ...

  10. Prolonged extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome in a child affected by rituximab-resistant autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a case report

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    Beretta Chiara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children younger than 2 years of age is usually characterized by a severe course, with a mortality rate of approximately 10%. The prolonged immunosuppression following specific treatment may be associated with a high risk of developing severe infections. Recently, the use of monoclonal antibodies (rituximab has allowed sustained remissions to be obtained in the majority of pediatric patients with refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Case presentation We describe the case of an 8-month-old Caucasian girl affected by a severe form of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which required continuous steroid treatment for 16 months. Thereafter, she received 4 weekly doses of rituximab (375 mg/m2/dose associated with steroid therapy, which was then tapered over the subsequent 2 weeks. One month after the last dose of rrituximab, she presented with recurrence of severe hemolysis and received two more doses of rrituximab. The patient remained in clinical remission for 7 months, before presenting with a further relapse. An alternative heavy immunosuppressive therapy was administered combining cyclophosphamide 10 mg/kg/day for 10 days with methylprednisolone 40 mg/kg/day for 5 days, which was then tapered down over 3 weeks. While still on steroid therapy, the patient developed an interstitial pneumonia with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, which required immediate admission to the intensive care unit where extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy was administered continuously for 37 days. At 16-month follow-up, the patient is alive and in good clinical condition, with no organ dysfunction, free from any immunosuppressive treatment and with a normal Hb level. Conclusions This case shows that aggressive combined immunosuppressive therapy may lead to a sustained complete remission in children with refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia. However, the severe life-threatening complication presented by our

  11. Coinfection of hepatitis A virus genotype IA and IIIA complicated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia, prolonged cholestasis, and false-positive immunoglobulin M anti-hepatitis E virus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Sup; Jeong, Sook Hyang; Jang, Je Hyuck; Myung, Hyung Joon; Kim, Jin Wook; Bang, Soo Mee; Song, Sang Hoon; Kim, Haeryoung; Yun, Hae Sun

    2011-12-01

    A 37-year-old male presented with fever and jaundice was diagnosed as hepatitis A complicated with progressive cholestasis and severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia. He was treated with high-dose prednisolone (1.5 mg/kg), and eventually recovered. His initial serum contained genotype IA hepatitis A virus (HAV), which was subsequently replaced by genotype IIIA HAV. Moreover, at the time of development of hemolytic anemia, he became positive for immunoglobulin M (IgM) anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV). We detected HAV antigens in the liver biopsy specimen, while we detected neither HEV antigen in the liver nor HEV RNA in his serum. This is the first report of hepatitis A coinfected with two different genotypes manifesting with autoimmune hemolytic anemia, prolonged cholestasis, and false-positive IgM anti-HEV.

  12. MRI evaluation of cranial bone marrow signal intensity and thickness in chronic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, Tulin; Agildere, A. Muhtesem; Oguzkurt, Levent; Barutcu, Ozlem; Kizilkilic, Osman; Kocak, Rikkat; Alp Niron, Emin

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim is to assess the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings for cranial bone marrow (CBM) signal intensity and thickness in patients with chronic anemia and compared these with findings in healthy subjects. We also investigated the relationships between CBM changes and age, type of anemia (hemolytic versus non-hemolytic), and severity of anemia. Methods: We quantitatively evaluated CBM signal intensity and thickness on images from 40 patients with chronic anemia (20 with congenital hemolytic anemia (HA) and 20 with acquired anemia) and compared these to findings in 28 healthy subjects. The intensity of CBM relative to scalp, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and muscle intensity was also investigated in patients and subjects in the control group. The sensitivity and specificity of CBM hypointense to GM and CBM hypointense to WM as markers of anemia were evaluated. Relationships between age and CBM thickness/intensity, and between anemia severity (hemoglobin (Hb) level) and CBM thickness/intensity were evaluated. Results: Cranial bone marrow signal intensity was lower in the chronic anemia patients than in the controls (P 0.05 for both). There were no correlations between age and CBM intensity or thickness, or between anemia severity and CBM intensity or thickness. Conclusion: Patients with chronic anemia exhibit lower CBM signal intensity on MRI than healthy subjects. Patients with hemolytic anemia have thicker CBM than patients with non-hemolytic anemia or healthy individuals. Decreased CBM intensity may indicate that the patient has anemia, and increased CBM thickness may specifically point to hemolytic anemia. These MRI findings may signal the need for further evaluation for the clinician

  13. A dominant mutation in the gene encoding the erythroid transcription factor KLF1 causes a congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnaud, Lionel; Saison, Carole; Helias, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are inherited red blood cell disorders whose hallmarks are ineffective erythropoiesis, hemolysis, and morphological abnormalities of erythroblasts in bone marrow. We have identified a missense mutation in KLF1 of patients with a hitherto unclassified...

  14. Anemia hemolítica causada por Indigofera suffruticosa (Leg. Papilionoideae em bovinos Hemolytic anemia caused by Indigofera suffruticosa (Leg. Papilionoideae in cattle

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    José Diomedes Barbosa Neto

    2001-03-01

    animals had hemoglobinuria, which was transitory, inspite continuation of the administration of the plant. Two animals had no further manifestations, a third animal showed only slight other manifestations, and the other three had additional symptoms of moderate intensity. These were apathy, whitish visible mucous membranes, rough hair coat, anorexia, descrease in frequency and intensity of the ruminal movements, tachycardia, positive venous pulse and dispnoea. Before the occurrence of the hemolytic crisis the urine had a bluish-green colour. None of the experimental animals died, but one was euthanized whilst showing hemoglobinuria. Post-mortem findings were anemia, the bladder containing wine-red urine, swollen dark-brown kidneys, liver on the outside and on the cut-surface bluish and with perceptible lobular design. The main histological changes were found in liver and kidney. In the liver there was coagulative necrosis and cloudy swelling and/or cytoplasmatic microvacuolization of the hepatocytes; in the kidney there was severe nephrosis, associated with large amounts of filtrate and/or hemoglobine in the Bowman spaces, in the tubules and also in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells.

  15. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based multiplex enzyme assay for six enzymes associated with hereditary hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul Min; Lee, Kyunghoon; Jun, Sun-Hee; Song, Sang Hoon; Song, Junghan

    2017-08-15

    Deficiencies in erythrocyte metabolic enzymes are associated with hereditary hemolytic anemia. Here, we report the development of a novel multiplex enzyme assay for six major enzymes, namely glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase, hexokinase, triosephosphate isomerase, and adenosine deaminase, deficiencies in which are implicated in erythrocyte enzymopathies. To overcome the drawbacks of traditional spectrophotometric enzyme assays, the present assay was based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The products of the six enzymes were directly measured by using ion pairing UPLC-MS/MS, and the precision, linearity, ion suppression, optimal sample amounts, and incubation times were evaluated. Eighty-three normal individuals and 13 patients with suspected enzymopathy were analyzed. The UPLC running time was within 5min. No ion suppression was observed at the retention time for the products or internal standards. We selected an optimal dilution factor and incubation time for each enzyme system. The intra- and inter-assay imprecision values (CVs) were 2.5-12.1% and 2.9-14.3%, respectively. The linearity of each system was good, with R 2 values >0.97. Patient samples showed consistently lower enzyme activities than those from normal individuals. The present ion paring UPLC-MS/MS assay enables facile and reproducible multiplex evaluation of the activity of enzymes implicated in enzymopathy-associated hemolytic anemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor may recommend that you ... Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [ ...

  18. Imaging Diagnosis of Neonatal Anemia: Report of Two Unusual Etiologies

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    Shabnam Bhandari Grover

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia in neonatal period is rare, with the common causes being Rh and ABO blood group incompatibility, hemorrhagic disease of newborn, congenital hemolytic anemia, hemoglobinopathies, and TORCH (toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes virus infections. Congenital leukemia and infantile osteopetrosis (OP are among the rare causes of neonatal anemia. A review of the literature shows approximately 200 reported cases of congenital leukemia. Articles describing the imaging features of congenital leukemia are still rarer. Infantile OP, another rare disorder with a reported incidence of 1 in 250,000 has characteristic imaging features, which are diagnostic of the disease. We report a case each, of two rare diseases: Congenital leukemia and infantile osteopetrosis. Additionally, our report highlights the radiological and imaging features of congenital leukemia and infantile OP and their crucial role in arriving at an early diagnosis.

  19. Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia in 57-year-old woman with Borderline Serous Tumor of the Ovary:Real-Time Management of Common Pathways of Hemostatic Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Joan Morris

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 57-year-old woman who underwent surgery for the removal of an ovarian mass but subsequently experienced microangioathic hemolytic anemia post-operatively, associated with fevers, renal insufficiency, hypertension, and hemolysis. While her clinical situations was initially suspicious for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP, further sorting of clinical information led to other explanations of these findings, including a systemic inflammatory response. Multiple triggers of the coagulation system which can lead to a common pathway of hemostatic failure were considered, and specific criteria seen in disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, TTP, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT, catastrophic antiphospholipid anitbody syndrom (APS, all of which can seem to overlap when a physician is faced with distinguishing the diagnosis clinically. We propose a chronologic and strategic approach for the clinician to consider when approaching this diagnostic dilemma.

  20. A Coincidental Discovery of a New Stable Variant (Hb Hachioji or HBB: c.187C>T) in a Patient with Chronic Hemolytic Anemia of Unexplained Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mella, Ferania; Yamashiro, Yasuhiro; Adhiyanto, Chris; Tanaka, Tatehiko; Nitta, Takenori; Amao, Yuki; Kimoto, Masafumi

    2018-01-01

    We report a new hemoglobin (Hb) variant, Hb Hachioji (HBB: c.187C>T), which was detected in a 32-year-old male with hemolytic anemia. The proband had undergone splenectomy in his childhood after being diagnosed with hereditary spherocytosis (HS) with no clinical improvement. A recent study showed that Heinz bodies were frequently observed in his red cells, however, no abnormal band was separated by isoelectric focusing (IEF), and the isopropanol (instability) test was negative. Direct sequencing revealed that the proband was a heterozygous carrier of a novel mutation (GCT>GTT) at codon 62 of the β-globin gene, leading to an alanine to valine substitution. This variant was named Hb Hachioji. Characterization at the mRNA level by cDNA sequencing detected β Hachioji mRNA, as well as β A mRNA. Subsequently, study of the proband's family indicated that his father was a carrier of this Hb variant, although unexpectedly, the father was asymptomatic and clinically healthy. Oxygen affinity measurement of total Hb showed no alteration in the P 50 and oxygen equilibrium curve. The presence of Hb Hachioji was confirmed by mass spectrometry (MS). Hb Hachioji comprised approximately 50.0% of the total Hb and was a stable variant. The phenotypic discrepancy between these two carriers suggests that Hb Hachioji may not be associated with the hemolytic involvement in the proband. P4.2Nippon, which is the primary cause of most cases of Japanese HS, was absent in the proband's parents. The coexistence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency was ruled out. Thus, the cause of hemolytic involvement in this patient remains unclear.

  1. Use of Laser Assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer (LoRRca MaxSis in the Diagnosis of RBC Membrane Disorders, Enzyme Defects, and Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemias: A Monocentric Study on 202 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zaninoni

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hemolytic anemias are a group of heterogeneous diseases mainly due to abnormalities of red cell (RBC membrane and metabolism. The more common RBC membrane disorders, classified on the basis of blood smear morphology, are hereditary spherocytosis (HS, elliptocytosis, and hereditary stomatocytoses (HSt. Among RBC enzymopathies, the most frequent is pyruvate kinase (PK deficiency, followed by glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, pyrimidine 5′ nucleotidase P5′N, and other rare enzymes defects. Because of the rarity and heterogeneity of these diseases, diagnosis may be often challenging despite the availability of a variety of laboratory tests. The ektacytometer laser-assisted optical rotational cell analyser (LoRRca MaxSis, able to assess the RBC deformability in osmotic gradient conditions (Osmoscan analysis, is a useful diagnostic tool for RBC membrane disorders and in particular for the identification of hereditary stomatocytosis. Few data are so far available in other hemolytic anemias. We evaluated the diagnostic power of LoRRca MaxSis in a large series of 140 patients affected by RBC membrane disorders, 37 by enzymopathies, and 16 by congenital diserythropoietic anemia type II. Moreover, nine patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH were also investigated. All the hereditary spherocytoses, regardless the biochemical defect, showed altered Osmoscan curves, with a decreased Elongation Index (EI max and right shifted Omin; hereditary elliptocytosis (HE displayed a trapezoidal curve and decreased EImax. Dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (DHSt caused by PIEZO1 mutations was characterized by left-shifted curve, whereas KCNN4 mutations were associated with a normal curve. Congenital diserythropoietic anemia type II and RBC enzymopathies had Osmoscan curve within the normal range except for glucosephosphate isomerase (GPI deficient cases who displayed an enlarged curve associated with significantly increased Ohyper, offering a

  2. Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis in Association with Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia: A Case Report

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    Marcus A. Carden

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-year-old girl with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA acutely developed fever, tachypnea, and increased oxygen requirement. Chest X-ray revealed bilateral interstitial infiltrates and mild cardiomegaly. Blood cultures grew no infectious agents, while pulmonary specimens grew cytomegalovirus (CMV. Treatment with intravenous ganciclovir was initiated but without response. Final cytologic preparations of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid revealed eosinophilic amorphous material consistent with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP. CDA and PAP are extremely rare disorders in pediatrics. PAP should be considered in patients with hematological disorders who present with acute interstitial pneumonia, after infectious causes are ruled out.

  3. Graves’ Disease Causing Pancytopenia and Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia at Different Time Intervals: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

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    Peyman Naji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves’ disease (GD is associated with various hematologic abnormalities but pancytopenia and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA are reported very rarely. Herein, we report a patient with GD who had both of these rare complications at different time intervals, along with a review of the related literature. The patient was a 70-year-old man who, during a hospitalization, was also noted to have pancytopenia and elevated thyroid hormone levels. Complete hematologic workup was unremarkable and his pancytopenia was attributed to hyperthyroidism. He was started on methimazole but unfortunately did not return for followup and stopped methimazole after a few weeks. A year later, he presented with fatigue and weight loss. Labs showed hyperthyroidism and isolated anemia (hemoglobin 7 g/dL. He had positive direct Coombs test and elevated reticulocyte index. He was diagnosed with AIHA and started on glucocorticoids. GD was confirmed with elevated levels of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins and thyroid uptake and scan. He was treated with methimazole and radioactive iodine ablation. His hemoglobin improved to 10.7 g/dL at discharge without blood transfusion. Graves’ disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hematologic abnormalities. These abnormalities in the setting of GD generally respond well to antithyroid treatment.

  4. Successful management of transfusion-dependent congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type 1b with interferon alfa-2a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Møller, Michael Boe; Greisen, Pernille Wied

    2018-01-01

    The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are a group of rare inherited blood disorders characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis as the principal cause of anemia. We present a child with CDA 1b-the rarest and least well-described type-due to a mutation in the C15orf41 gene. The patient...... presented with severe in utero and neonatal manifestations, typical peripheral limb anomalies as well as rarely reported cardiac manifestations, visual impairment, short stature, and hip dysplasia. Anemia was complicated by iron overload and pronounced extra medullary erythropoiesis leading to skull...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic female carriers who have heavy menstrual ... Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease ...

  6. Anemia in the Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview of Horseshoe Kidney Additional Content Medical News Anemia in the Newborn By Andrew W. Walter, MS ... for the Professional Version Blood Problems in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn ...

  7. Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia in 57-year-old woman with Borderline Serous Tumor of the Ovary:Real-Time Management of Common Pathways of Hemostatic Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Joan Morris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    We present a case of a 57-year-old woman who underwent surgery for the removal of an ovarian mass but subsequently experienced microangioathic hemolytic anemia post-operatively, associated with fevers, renal insufficiency, hypertension, and hemolysis. While her clinical situations was initially suspicious for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP, further sorting of clinical information led to other explanations of these findings, including a systemic inflammatory response. Multiple triggers of the coagulation system which can lead to a common pathway of hemostatic failure were considered, and specific criteria seen in disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, TTP, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT, catastrophic antiphospholipid anitbody syndrom (APS, all of which can seem to overlap when a physician is faced with distinguishing the diagnosis clinically. We propose a chronologic and strategic approach for the clinician to consider when approaching this diagnostic dilemma.

  8. Prevention of hypoxic fetal complications in pregnant women with congenital heart disease and anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iu. Davydova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is — to develop a strategy of prevention of hypoxic fetal abnormalities in pregnant women with congenital heart disease, heart failure and iron deficiency anemia. Materials and methods. The study included 86 pregnant women with CHD and NYHA II–III. 68 women in the third trimester of pregnancy is diagnosed anemia (group I, 18 pregnant women with CHD, NYHA II–III without anemia (II group, the control group consisted of 24 pregnant women without cardiac disease, with physiological pregnancy. All pregnant with information registration consent studied the concentration of ferritin, hemoglobin level, morphological study of the placenta. All pregnant women were assigned to iron supplements, oral iron (III hydroxide polymaltose complex (Maltofer when hemoglobin levels above 95 g/l and the expected delivery date more than 40 days of starting treatment. When the hemoglobin level below 95 g/l of intravenously administered iron (III hydroxide sucrose complex (Venofer followed by transfer to oral iron (III. Results. In groups of pregnant I and II did not have perinatal losses, births in gestation less than 28 weeks, with a score Apgar at birth of less than 4 points. Pregnant women with cyanotic heart defects and the need for early delivery in less than 37 weeks are not included in the study. Also, there is a correlation between the degree of severity of anemia in women with CHD with HF and prematurity, and the presence of IUGR child birth asphyxia able to varying degrees (respectively, r=0.8, r=0.75 and r=0.85. Conclusions. Formation of fetoplacental unit in women with CHD on a background of heart failure occurs with complications associated with the presence of tissue hypoxia, as well as the possible impact on the process of oxidative stress. The development of iron deficiency anemia in this group is an additional risk factor for placental dysfunction, which is confirmed by morphometric and morphological studies of placentas

  9. Hemolytic crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003270.htm Hemolytic crisis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hemolytic crisis occurs when large numbers of red blood cells ...

  10. [Guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of secondary iron overload in patients with congenital anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cario, H; Grosse, R; Janssen, G; Jarisch, A; Meerpohl, J; Strauss, G

    2010-11-01

    In Germany and Central Europe, congenital disorders leading to secondary hemochromatosis are rare. The majority of these patients are treated in peripheral medical institutions. As a consequence, the experience of each institution in the treatment of secondary hemochromatosis in patients with congenital anemia is limited. Recent developments concerning new chelating agents, their combination for intensified chelation and new possibilities to diagnose and monitor iron overload have important consequences for the management of patients with secondary hemochromatosis and increase its complexity enormously. Therefore, the development of a guideline for rational and efficient diagnostics and treatment was necessary. The new guideline was developed within a formal consensus process and finally approved by a consensus conference with participants from both the pediatric and adult German hematology societies (GPOH and DGHO). Apart from general information and recommendations, the guideline contains 9 consensus statements on diagnostics (iron status, siderotic complications, chelator side-effects), the start of chelation, indications for intensified chelation, iron elimination in specific disorders, and iron elimination after stem cell transplantation. Here, these consensus statements are presented and discussed in detail. For the complete text of the guideline, please visit the AWMF homepage at http://www.leitlinien.net . © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child might have anemia. They will do a physical exam and review your health history and symptoms. To diagnose anemia, your doctor ... and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food ...

  12. Efficacy of D- red blood cell transfusion and rituximab therapy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia with anti-D and panreactive autoantibodies arising after hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Keiji; Ohto, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Saito, Shunichi; Kawabata, Kinuyo; Ogawa, Kazuei; Nollet, Kenneth E; Ikeda, Kazuhiko

    2018-04-17

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is caused by autoantibodies to red blood cells (RBCs), which can be panreactive and/or specific to Rh/other blood group antigens. We report a severe case of AIHA after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) due to autoanti-D triggered by reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. A combined strategy of D- RBC transfusion and administration of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) resolved the hemolysis. A 33-year-old male underwent allogeneic BMT from an ABO-identical and HLA-matched unrelated male donor. Five months later, while having mild chronic graft-versus-host disease, he manifested AIHA, with a hemoglobin (Hb) level of 5.1 g/dL on AIHA Day 2 (Posttransplant Day 156) and was refractory to D+ RBCs, with a Hb level of 2.4 g/dL on AIHA Day 6. Anti-D-like autoantibodies (titer 1280, subclass immunoglobulin G 1 , monocyte monolayer assay 28.7%) and panreactive (titer 40) were identified. Changing the RBC transfusion strategy to D- increased his Hb level to 6.7 g/dL on Day 10. Administration of anti-CD20 MoAb mitigated EBV-related B-cell proliferation and reduced anti-D autoantibody titer to 320 by Day 16 with normalized Hb concentration after 6 months. In severe AIHA, when standard treatment and regular RBC transfusions are ineffective, transfusion of RBCs lacking the target antigen(s) of autoantibodies and administration of anti-CD20 MoAb should be considered. © 2018 AABB.

  13. Identification of Stages of Erythroid Differentiation in Bone Marrow and Erythrocyte Subpopulations in Blood Circulation that Are Preferentially Lost in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreoshi Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Repeated weekly injections of rat erythrocytes produced autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA in C57BL/6 mice after 5-6 weeks. Using the double in vivo biotinylation (DIB technique, recently developed in our laboratory, turnover of erythrocyte cohorts of different age groups during AIHA was monitored. Results indicate a significant decline in the proportion of reticulocytes, young and intermediate age groups of erythrocytes, but a significant increase in the proportion of old erythrocytes in blood circulation. Binding of the autoantibody was relatively higher to the young erythrocytes and higher levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS were also seen in these cells. Erythropoietic activity in the bone marrows and the spleen of AIHA induced mice was examined by monitoring the relative proportion of erythroid cells at various stages of differentiation in these organs. Cells at different stages of differentiation were enumerated flow cytometrically by double staining with anti-Ter119 and anti-transferrin receptor (CD71 monoclonal antibodies. Erythroid cells in bone marrow declined significantly in AIHA induced mice, erythroblast C being most affected (50% decline. Erythroblast C also recorded high intracellular ROS level along with increased levels of membrane-bound autoantibody. No such decline was observed in spleen. A model of AIHA has been proposed indicating that binding of autoantibodies may not be a sufficient condition for destruction of erythroid cells in bone marrow and in blood circulation. Last stage of erythropoietic differentiation in bone marrow and early stages of erythrocytes in blood circulation are specifically susceptible to removal in AIHA.

  14. Anticardiolipin antibodies in D+ hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, D.M.W.M. te; Alfen-van der Velden, J. van; Onland, W.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Monnens, L.A.H.

    2002-01-01

    The diarrhea-associated form of the hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS) is characterized by a triad of symptoms, namely thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. Histopathological studies of patients with D+ HUS show microthrombi in arterioles and glomeruli of the kidney. Recently,

  15. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a hemoglobin value of less than 13.5 gm/dl in a man or less than 12.0 gm/dl in a woman. Normal values for children ... types of anemia cannot be prevented, eating healthy foods can help you avoid both iron-and vitamin- ...

  16. Púrpura trombocitopênica e anemia hemolítica auto-imune em pacientes internados com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico juvenil Trombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia in hospitalized patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochebed Kyoung Kim

    2007-02-01

    esplenectomia. CONCLUSÕES: o CHE isolado foi uma manifestação grave em pacientes internados com LESJ, habitualmente associado a uma doença ativa e sistêmica.OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the hematological involvement (HI in hospitalized patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE. METHODS: from 1994 to 2005, 195 admissions occurred in 77 JSLE patients (American College of Rheumatology criteria and were followed by the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of the Instituto da Criança - University of São Paulo. These admissions were evaluated according to the presence of HI at onset or during the evolution of the disease: autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AHA or thrombocytopenic purpura. All patients performed at least two complete blood counts. AHA was defined by a fall in hemoglobin levels (beyond 2 g/dl, reticulocytosis, increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and indirect bilirubin levels, and a positive Coombs test. The hematologic manifestations associated with infection, neoplasia and aplastic anemia were excluded. RESULTS: HI occurred in 14 patients (18.9%, with 15 admissions. Among these patients, 11 were female, 7 had trombocytopenic purpura, 5 AHA and 2 Evans syndrome. HI as onset and single manifestation of JSLE was observed in three patients. All the patients with trombocytopenic purpura presented cutaneous bleeding (petechia and/or ecchymosis. All had disease activity and simultaneously presented other manifestations of JSLE, particularly nephritis and vasculitis. Initially, all patients received pulsetherapy with methylprednisolone and prednisone later. In three patients the treatment aimed predominantly the control of hematologic manifestations, with intravenous gammaglobulin. The most used immunossupressive therapies were intravenous cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine and azathioprine. One patient died of central nervous system bleeding. No patient needed splenectomy. CONCLUSIONS: isolated HI was a severe manifestation in hospitalized patients with JSLE, generally

  17. Anemia hemolítica auto-imune e outras manifestações imunes da leucemia linfocítica crônica Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and other autoimmune diseases related to chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José O. Bordin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A leucemia linfocítica crônica (LLC é freqüentemente associada a manifestações auto-imunes principalmente relacionadas às células do sistema hematopoético causando anemia hemolítica auto-imune (AHAI, púrpura trombocitopênica imune (PTI, aplasia pura de série vermelha (APSV, e neutropenia imune. A LLC é diagnosticada em até 15% dos pacientes com AHAI, e em cerca de 50% dos pacientes com AHAI secundária a doença maligna. A PTI ocorre em 2%, e a APSV em 1% dos pacientes com LLC. Prednisona é o tratamento inicial de escolha para a citopenia imune associada à LLC. Para cerca de 60% dos pacientes que apresentam recidiva da manifestação auto-imune tem sido utilizada esplenectomia, imunoglobulina endovenosa, ou ciclosporina. Embora as evidências sobre fisiopatologia sejam limitadas, os mecanismos fisiopatológicos da auto-imunidade na LLC estão relacionados à atividade dos linfócitos B leucêmicos que atuam como células apresentadoras de antígeno aberrantes, e são eficientes em processar e apresentar proteínas da membrana de hemácias e de plaquetas às células TH auto-reativas. Linfócitos TH específicos para certos auto-antígenos podem escapar de mecanismos de controle de auto-tolerância, e, se ativados, podem causar doença auto-imune. O diagnóstico de AHAI contra-indica o uso de fludarabina em pacientes com LLC, pois esse análogo da purina tem sido associado ao desenvolvimento de AHAI grave e fatal, com risco consideravelmente mais alto para pacientes mais imunossuprimidos devido a vários tratamentos anteriores.Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is frequently associated with autoimmune diseases directed against hematopoietic cells, including autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP, pure red cell aplasia (PRCA, and immune neutropenia. CLL represents the diagnosis in up to 15% of the patients with AIHA, and in 50% of the patients with AIHA secondary to malignancy. ITP occurs in 2% and

  18. Recurrent atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome after renal transplantation: treatment with eculizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B. Latzke

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is a rare entity. It is characterized by a thrombotic microangiopathy (nonimmune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure, with a typical histopathology of thickening of capillary and arteriolar walls and an obstructive thrombosis of the vascular lumen. The syndrome is produced by a genetic or acquired deregulation of the alternative pathway of the complement system, with high rates of end stage renal disease, post-transplant recurrence, and high mortality. Mutations associated with factor H, factor B and complement C3 show the worst prognosis. Even though plasma therapy is occasionally useful, eculizumab is effective both for treatment and prevention of post-transplant recurrence. We describe here an adult case of congenital aHUS (C3 mutation under preventive treatment with eculizumab after renal transplantation, with neither disease recurrence nor drug-related adverse events after a 36-months follow-up.

  19. Influence of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia on flow velocities in the portal vein and caudal vena cava measured by use of pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel Policelli; Koenigshof, Amy M; Smith, Daniel J; Strom, Phillip R; Nelson, Nathan C

    2018-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare blood flow velocities of the portal vein (PV) and caudal vena cava (CVC) measured by use of pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography in clinically normal dogs and dogs with primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA). ANIMALS 11 client-owned dogs admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital for management of primary IMHA and 21 staff- or student-owned clinically normal dogs. PROCEDURES Flow velocities in the PV and CVC at the porta hepatis were evaluated in conscious unsedated dogs with concurrent ECG monitoring; evaluations were performed before dogs with IMHA received heparin or blood transfusions. Three measurements of peak velocity at end expiration were obtained for each vessel, and the mean was calculated. Results were compared between IMHA and control groups. RESULTS Mean ± SD blood flow velocity in the CVC differed between control (63.0 ± 18.6 cm/s) and IMHA (104 ± 36.9 cm/s) groups. Variance in dogs with IMHA was significantly greater than that for the clinically normal dogs. No significant difference in blood flow velocity in the PV was detected between IMHA and control dogs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Higher blood flow velocities were detected by use of pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography in the CVC of dogs with naturally occurring IMHA and may be used to predict anemia in patients suspected of having IMHA.

  20. Reação transfusional hiper-hemolítica em pacientes portadores de anemia falciforme: relato de dois casos Hyper-hemolytic transfusional reaction in sickle cell patients: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia C.S. Naufel

    2002-12-01

    increased frequency of transfusions to which these patients are submitted, knowledge of the main risks and an adequate diagnosis of the complications caused by transfusional therapy are of fundamental importance. An atypical form of transfusional reaction, denominated hyperhemolytic transfusional reaction was recently described in sickle cell anemia patients after the transfusion of apparently compatible hemacias. In this case, previous conditions can exacerbate the hemolytic condition and put the life of the patient at risk. The pathophysiological conditions of this disease are not yet understood well and the treatment consists of suspending transfusions, corticoid therapy and / or administration of immunoglobulin. The aim of this work is o present two case reports of hyperhemolytic transfusional reaction in sickle cell anemia patients.

  1. Inborn anemias in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an α-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes

  2. Genetics Home Reference: atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney Diseases: Kidney Failure: Choosing a Treatment That's Right for You Educational Resources (6 links) Disease InfoSearch: Hemolytic uremic syndrome, atypical MalaCards: genetic atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome Merck Manual Consumer Version: Overview of Anemia Merck Manual Consumer Version: ...

  3. Development of Hemolytic Anemia in a Nivolumab-Treated Patient with Refractory Metastatic Squamous Cell Skin Cancer and Chronic Lymphatic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.S. Schwab

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Management of patients with metastatic squamous cell skin cancer, refractory to initial therapy with standard chemotherapy and radiation protocols, remains difficult with poor overall prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Recently, promising response rates with nivolumab, a programmed death receptor-1-blocking antibody, in squamous cancer of the head and neck have been demonstrated. Considering the similar histological patterns of squamous cell cancer of the skin and squamous cell cancer of the head and neck, we assumed that nivolumab could also be effective in our patients with refractory metastatic squamous cell cancer of the skin. So far, there have been no clinical data on the therapeutic efficacy of nivolumab in squamous cell skin cancer. We here present a case of a patient with metastatic squamous cell skin cancer refractory to previous therapies, who showed a good response to nivolumab over a period of 5 months, but developed a serious hemolytic crisis under nivolumab treatment after eight applications.

  4. Evaluation of stem cell reserve using serial bone marrow transplantation and competitive repopulation in a murine model of chronic hemolytic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggio-Price, L.; Wolf, N.S.; Priestley, G.V.; Pietrzyk, M.E.; Bernstein, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    Serial transplantation and competitive repopulation were used to evaluate any loss of self-replicative capacity of bone marrow stem cells in a mouse model with increased and persistent hemopoietic demands. Congenic marrows from old control and from young and old mice with hereditary spherocytic anemia (sphha/sphha) were serially transplanted at 35-day intervals into normal irradiated recipients. Old anemic marrow failed or reverted to recipient karyotype at a mean of 3.5 transplants, and young anemic marrow reverted at a mean of 4.0 transplants, whereas controls did so at a mean of 5.0 transplants. In a competitive assay in which a mixture of anemic and control marrow was transplanted, the anemic marrow persisted to 10 months following transplantation; anemic marrow repopulation was greater if anemic marrow sex matched with the host. It is possible that lifelong stress of severe anemia decreases stem cell reserve in the anemic sphha/sphha mouse marrow. However, marginal differences in serial transplantation number and the maintenance of anemic marrow in a competition assay would suggest that marrow stem cells, under prolonged stress, are capable of exhibiting good repopulating and self-replicating abilities

  5. Protective Effects of Royal Jelly and Vitamin C against Experimental Hemolytic Anemia on Sex Hormones and Histochemical Testicle Tissue Histochemistry of Adult Mice

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    H Anbara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Phenylhydrazine (PHZ is a well-known hemolytic compound inducing intoxication in erythrocytes. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the protective effects of royal jelly and vitamin C against phenylhydrazine-induced damages in mouse testicles. Methods: In this study, 64 adult male mice were randomly and equally assigned to eight groups. The first group received normal saline (0.1ml intraperitoneally. The second group received PHZ (6 mg/100 gr intraperitoneally in 48-hour intervals. The third group received vitamin C (250 mg/kg/day intraperitoneally perday a long with PHZ. The fourth group received royal jelly (100 mg/kg/day through gavage. The fifth group received PHZ along with vitamin C and royal jelly in similar doses to the previous groups. The sixth group received only vitamin C, the seventh group recieved only royal jelly, and finally the eighth group received similar doses of vitamin C and royal jelly. After 35 days, serum and tissue samples were taken and used for histochemical (Mallory-Azan, Alkaline phosphatase, Oil red-O and PAS, and serum analyses (Testosterone, LH, FSH. Results: The study results revealed the histochemical changes in testicular tissue of the phenylhydrazine group, in which vitamin C and royal jelly partly improved the changes. Furthermore, serum analyses demonstrated a significant decrease in testosterone, FSH and LH levels, which this decrease was diminished by royal jelly and vitamin C. Conclusions: Royal jelly and vitamin C seem to have the potential to decrease serum and tissue damages induced by phenylhydrazine via restraining free radicals.

  6. Effects of Methanol Seed Extract of Aframomum melegueta (Alligator Pepper on Wistar Rats with 2,4-Dinitrophenylhydrazine-induced Hemolytic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damilola A. Omoboyowa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of parasitic infections such as malaria, which leads to decrease in hematological indices, the major cause of anemia, constitutes a serious health challenge in many developing countries such as Nigeria. This study investigated the effect of methanol seed extract of Aframomum melegueta on selected hematological indices of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH-induced anemic rats model. The toxicity study and qualitative phytochemical screening of the extract were carried out using standard procedure. Twenty Wistar rats were grouped into five of four rats each (n = 4. Group I: Normal control; Group II: Negative control; Group III: administered 20 ml/kg b.w. of Astifer (Standard drug; Group IV and V were administered 200 and 400 mg/kg b.w. of the extract, respectively. The animals of Groups II to V were induced with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (20 mg/kg b.w. once daily for seven consecutive days; their blood samples were collected by ocular puncture into heparinized capillary tubes for hematological analysis and animals with packed cell volume (PCV ≥ 30% reduction were considered anemic for the study. The result of the qualitative phytochemical analysis showed that the methanol extract tested positive to alkaloids, carbohydrate, saponins, flavonoids, steroids, terpenoids, and anthraquinones. Acute toxicity and lethality studies on methanol extract showed an oral LD50 equal or less than 5000 mg/kg b.w. in mice. The rats administered 20 ml/kg b.w. of Astifer showed significant (P 0.05 decrease in hemoglobin count, RBC, platelet, neutrophils and lymphocyte count compared with the normal control animals. The rats administered 400 mg/kg b.w. of A. melegueta showed significant (P 0.05 lower PCV, RBC, WBC count, and lymphocyte count compared with anemic rats administered with 0.3 ml of normal saline. It can be concluded that Aframomum melegueta seed has beneficial immunological and hematological properties in Wistar rats and possessed

  7. Effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid on erythropoiesis: A preclinical in vitro characterization for the treatment of congenital sideroblastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Tohru; Okamoto, Koji; Niikuni, Ryoyu; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Ichinohasama, Ryo; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru; Harigae, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Treatment with ALA induces erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. • Transportation of ALA into erythroid cells occurs predominantly via SLC36A1. • ALA restores defects in ALAS2 in human iPS cell-derived erythroblasts. • ALA may represent a novel therapeutic option for CSA caused by ALAS2 mutations. - Abstract: Congenital sideroblastic anemia (CSA) is a hereditary disorder characterized by microcytic anemia and bone marrow sideroblasts. The most common form of CSA is attributed to mutations in the X-linked gene 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2). ALAS2 is a mitochondrial enzyme, which utilizes glycine and succinyl-CoA to form 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a crucial precursor in heme synthesis. Therefore, ALA supplementation could be an effective therapeutic strategy to restore heme synthesis in CSA caused by ALAS2 defects. In a preclinical study, we examined the effects of ALA in human erythroid cells, including K562 cells and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived erythroid progenitor (HiDEP) cells. ALA treatment resulted in significant dose-dependent accumulation of heme in the K562 cell line. Concomitantly, the treatment substantially induced erythroid differentiation as assessed using benzidine staining. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis confirmed significant upregulation of heme-regulated genes, such as the globin genes [hemoglobin alpha (HBA) and hemoglobin gamma (HBG)] and the heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) gene, in K562 cells. Next, to investigate the mechanism by which ALA is transported into erythroid cells, quantitative RT-PCR analysis was performed on previously identified ALA transporters, including solute carrier family 15 (oligopeptide transporter), member (SLC15A) 1, SLC15A2, solute carrier family 36 (proton/amino acid symporter), member (SLC36A1), and solute carrier family 6 (neurotransmitter transporter), member 13 (SLC6A13). Our analysis revealed that SLC36A1 was abundantly

  8. Effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid on erythropoiesis: A preclinical in vitro characterization for the treatment of congenital sideroblastic anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Tohru [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Department of Molecular Hematology/Oncology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Okamoto, Koji; Niikuni, Ryoyu [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Takahashi, Kiwamu [SBI Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Ishizawa, Kenichi [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Clinical Research, Innovation and Education Center, Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai (Japan); Ichinohasama, Ryo [Department of Hematopathology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Nakamura, Yukio [Cell Engineering Division, RIKEN BioResource Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru [SBI Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Harigae, Hideo, E-mail: harigae@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Department of Molecular Hematology/Oncology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Treatment with ALA induces erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. • Transportation of ALA into erythroid cells occurs predominantly via SLC36A1. • ALA restores defects in ALAS2 in human iPS cell-derived erythroblasts. • ALA may represent a novel therapeutic option for CSA caused by ALAS2 mutations. - Abstract: Congenital sideroblastic anemia (CSA) is a hereditary disorder characterized by microcytic anemia and bone marrow sideroblasts. The most common form of CSA is attributed to mutations in the X-linked gene 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2). ALAS2 is a mitochondrial enzyme, which utilizes glycine and succinyl-CoA to form 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a crucial precursor in heme synthesis. Therefore, ALA supplementation could be an effective therapeutic strategy to restore heme synthesis in CSA caused by ALAS2 defects. In a preclinical study, we examined the effects of ALA in human erythroid cells, including K562 cells and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived erythroid progenitor (HiDEP) cells. ALA treatment resulted in significant dose-dependent accumulation of heme in the K562 cell line. Concomitantly, the treatment substantially induced erythroid differentiation as assessed using benzidine staining. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis confirmed significant upregulation of heme-regulated genes, such as the globin genes [hemoglobin alpha (HBA) and hemoglobin gamma (HBG)] and the heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) gene, in K562 cells. Next, to investigate the mechanism by which ALA is transported into erythroid cells, quantitative RT-PCR analysis was performed on previously identified ALA transporters, including solute carrier family 15 (oligopeptide transporter), member (SLC15A) 1, SLC15A2, solute carrier family 36 (proton/amino acid symporter), member (SLC36A1), and solute carrier family 6 (neurotransmitter transporter), member 13 (SLC6A13). Our analysis revealed that SLC36A1 was abundantly

  9. Diagnóstico laboratorial da anemia hemolítica auto-imune: características do teste manual direto do PolybreneÒ Laboratory diagnosis of auto-immune hemolytic anemia: characteristics of the manual direct test of PolybreneTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.W. Braga

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available O teste manual direto do PolybreneÒ (TDP e o teste de Coombs direto (TCD foram utilizados para a detecção de IgG na superfície de hemácias de pacientes com diagnóstico clínico e laboratorial de anemia hemolítica auto-imune (AHAI. OBJETIVO: Comparar a sensibilidade e especificidade do TPD e do TCD no diagnóstico da AHAI. MÉTODO: Foram estudados 18 pacientes com diagnóstico clínico-laboratorial de AHAI. Como indivíduos controles, foram testados 20 doadores de sangue assintomáticos e 20 pacientes com anemia falciforme. RESULTADOS: O TCD foi positivo em 14 pacientes e negativo em quatro indivíduos, enquanto o TDP foi positivo em 17 pacientes e negativo em um indivíduo que apresentava TCD positivo devido a fixação de complemento (C3d nas hemácias. Todos os eluatos positivos realizados com a técnica de diclorometano revelaram anticorpos quentes com especificidade "anti-Rh". A sensibilidade do TDP (94% para detectar fixação de IgG in vivo foi significantemente maior (pThe direct manual PolybreneTM test (DPT and the direct antiglobulin tests (DAT were employed to detect antibody sensitizing red blood cell (RCB in patients with clinical and laboratorial findings of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA. PURPOSE: To compare the sensitivity and specificity of DPT and DAT in the diagnosis of AIHA. METHODS: Eighteen consecutive patients with diagnosis of AIHA were evaluated. The control group consisted of 20 normal volunteers blood donors and 20 patients with sickle cell anemia. All patients and controls were submitted to DPT and DAT. All DAT positive samples were further tested using monospecific reagents ( anti-IgG heavy chain and anti-C3d. Positive samples for either DPT or DAT were evaluated by eluate technique using. The dichloromethane (DCM. RESULTS: The DAT was positive in 14 patients and negative in 4 subjects, while the DPT was positive in 17 patients and negative in 1 individual who had a positive DAT owing to complement (C3d. All

  10. Congenital aplastic anemia caused by mutations in the SBDS gene: A rare presentation of Shwachman-Diamond syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Taco W.; Nannenberg, Eline; Alders, Marielle; Bredius, Robbert; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2004-01-01

    Clinical Findings. Aplastic anemia was diagnosed at birth for a first child from healthy nonconsanguineous parents. The girl had hypoglycemia, which normalized within 2 months. Cow milk allergy was suspected initially, because of skin lesions and diarrhea, followed by severe growth retardation.

  11. Pernicious anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... malabsorption); Anemia - intrinsic factor; Anemia - IF; Anemia - atrophic gastritis ... of pernicious anemia include: Weakened stomach lining (atrophic gastritis) An autoimmune condition in which the body's immune ...

  12. Hemolytic uremic syndrome after bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Ayako; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Tanikawa, Shu [Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1998-06-01

    One hundred and thirteen patients who underwent autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) were investigated for the subsequent development of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). HUS developed in seven patients (four males and three females, five acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), one acute myelogenous leukemia, one non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma) between 36-196 days after BMT. Four patients were recipients of autologous BMT and three were those of allogeneic BMT. Six patients were preconditioned with the regimens including fractionated total body irradiation (TBI). ALL and preconditioning regimen with TBI were suspected to be the risk factors for the development of HUS. Cyclosporin A (CSP) administration was discontinued in three patients who had been given CSP for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. Predonisolone was given to the three patients and plasma exchange was performed in one patient. Both hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia were resolved in virtually all patients, while creatinine elevation has persisted along with hypertension in one patient. (author)

  13. Inborn anemias in mice. Progress report to accompany twenty-first renewal proposal, 1 May 1975--30 April 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, E.S.; Bernstein, S.E.

    1976-05-15

    Progress is reported on studies on hereditary anemias of mice. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, four hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, and the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, each of which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse.

  14. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, Kalindi; D'Andrea, Alan; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis of proliferating cells. To date, 13 complementation groups of Fanconi anemia were identified. Five of these genes have been deleted or mutated in the mouse, as well as a sixth key regulatory gene, to create mouse models of Fanconi anemia. This review summarizes the phenotype of each of the Fanconi anemia mouse models and highlights how genetic and interventional studies using the strains have yielded novel insight into therapeutic strategies for Fanconi anemia and into how the Fanconi anemia pathway protects against genomic instability.

  15. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Kalindi; D' Andrea, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Niedernhofer, Laura J., E-mail: niedernhoferl@upmc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Cancer Institute, 5117 Centre Avenue, Hillman Cancer Center, Research Pavilion 2.6, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-1863 (United States)

    2009-07-31

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis of proliferating cells. To date, 13 complementation groups of Fanconi anemia were identified. Five of these genes have been deleted or mutated in the mouse, as well as a sixth key regulatory gene, to create mouse models of Fanconi anemia. This review summarizes the phenotype of each of the Fanconi anemia mouse models and highlights how genetic and interventional studies using the strains have yielded novel insight into therapeutic strategies for Fanconi anemia and into how the Fanconi anemia pathway protects against genomic instability.

  16. Multidisciplinary approach to anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Ghiațău

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We present the case of a 65 years- old woman who was admitted with a severe macrocytic anemia Hb= 5.7g/dl and diffuse bone pain. Biologically she has moderate thrombocytopenia 35 000/µl, a hepatic cytolysis and cholestatic syndrome. Material and method: The patient was extensively evaluated before presentation for a mild iron - deficiency anemia for which she underwent endoscopic examination of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract- normal. The bone marrow aspiration on admission revealed a marked hyperplasia of the erythroblastic line with ~50% basophilic erythroblasts suggesting a regenerative erythroid hyperplasia. These changes along with the marked reticulocytosis on the peripheral blood smear oriented us towards a hemolytic anemia; Folic acid, vitamin B12, autoimmune tests and hemolytic tests were all normal. We continued the investigations with a thoraco-abdominopelvic computed tomography which identified diffuse demineralization, vertebral compactation and pelvic stress fractures. The breast examination revealed a right breast nodule, but the breast ultrasonography pleaded for benignity. Lacking a clear definitive diagnosis we decided to perform a bone marrow biopsy. Results: The osteo- medullary biopsy pointed towards a medullar invasion from a lobular mammary carcinoma; In these circumstances we performed an ultrasound guided biopsy of the right mammary lump thus histologically confirming a tumoral invasion of the bone marrow with subsequent anemia. The patient started chemotherapy in the Oncology ward. Conclusion: The particularity of this case consists in the pattern of anemia, which initially seemed iron deficient and afterwards macrocytic – apparently hemolytic and was actually due to the tumoral medullar invasion and also the nonspecific ultrasonographic appearance of the breast tumor.

  17. Tissue Factor and Thrombin in Sickle Cell Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Chantrathammachart, Pichika; Pawlinski, Rafal

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited hematologic disorder associated with hemolytic and vaso-occlusive complications. An activation of coagulation is also a prominent feature of sickle cell anemia. Growing evidence indicates that coagulation may contribute to the inflammation and vascular injury in sickle cell anemia. This review focuses on tissue factor expression and its contribution to the activation of coagulation, thrombosis and vascular inflammation in sickle cell anemia.

  18. Hemolytic disease of the newborn- anti c antibody induced hemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murki, Srinivas; Kandraju, Hemasree; Devi, Surekha A

    2012-02-01

    Hemolytic disease in the newborn, as a cause of early jaundice, is not uncommon. This is mostly due to Rh (D), ABO incompatibility and rarely due to other minor blood group incompatibility. The authors report two cases of Rh anti c isoimmunization presenting as significant early neonatal jaundice within the 20 h of life. Both the babies were treated with intensive phototherapy. One baby underwent exchange transfusion and the other required packed cell transfusion for anemia.

  19. Severe hemolytic disease of the newborn from anti-e.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, R M; Dotzler, S A; Winter, L W; Kerecman, J D

    2008-03-01

    Maternal antibody-mediated fetal red blood cell destruction secondary to non-D Rhesus (Rh) antibodies is a significant cause of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Here, we report a rare case of severe HDN associated with maternal antibody to Rh e. In addition to severe anemia, the infant developed thrombocytopenia, conjugated hyperbilirubinemia and cholelithiasis. Resolution of the infant's cholelithiasis occurred following treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid.

  20. A case of asymptomatic pancytopenia with clinical features of hemolysis as a presentation of pernicious anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswara K. Kollipara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pernicious anemia is an autoimmune disease with a variety of clinical presentations. We describe a case of pernicious anemia presenting with pancytopenia with hemolytic features. Further workup revealed very low vitamin B12 levels and elevated methylmalonic acid. It is important for a general internist to identify pernicious anemia as one of the cause of pancytopenia and hemolytic anemia to avoid extensive workup. Pernicious anemia can present strictly with hematological abnormalities without neurological problems or vice versa as in our case.

  1. Hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Öktem

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is a severe disease with microangiopathic anemia, thrombocytopenia and leading cause of acute renal failure in children. Several etiological factors causing to HUS have been identified, like infections, genetic mutations, drugs, systemic diseases. In this review, we present the new classification of the disease, detailed information about pathogenesis, diagnostic methods and therapeutic approaches.

  2. Thiamine– Responsive Megaloblastic Anemia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Motavaselian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thiamine Responsive megaloblastic anemia in DIDMOA (Wolfram syndrome has an autosomal- recessive mode of inheritance . Megaloblastic anemia and sideroblastic anemia is accompanied by diabetes insipidus (DI, diabetes mellitus (DM ,optic atrophy (OA and deafness (D. Neutropenia and thrombocytopenia are also present. We report a 7 month old girl with congenital macrocytic anemia; a rare clinical feature of Wolfram,s syndrome with increased plasma levels of blood glucose, both of which dramatically responded to administration of thiamine in large doses . The patient also had neurosensorial deafness, but no improvement was observed in the deafness. We presented the case because thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia is a rare clinical presentation of Wolfram syndrome and after institution of treatment with thiamine, the anemia and hyperglycemia returned to normal.

  3. Aplastic crisis due to human parvovirus B19 infection in hereditary hemolytic anaemia Crise aplástica devido à infecção por parvovirus humano B19 em anemia hemolítica hereditária

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. N. Cubel

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available Specific anti-B19 IgM was demonstrated in sera from three children showing transient aplastic crisis. A two years-old boy living in Rio de Janeiro suffering from sickle-cell anaemia showed the crisis during August, 1990. Two siblings living in Santa Maria, RS, developed aplastic crisis during May, 1991, when they were also diagnosed for hereditary spherocytosis. For a third child from this same family, who first developed aplastic crisis no IgM anti-B19 was detected in her sera.IgM específica anti-B19 foi demonstrada nos soros de três crianças apresentando aplasia transitória de medula. Um menino de dois anos de idade vivendo no Rio de Janeiro e sendo portador de anemia falciforme, apresentou a crise durante Agosto de 1990. Dois irmãos vivendo em Santa Maria - RS, desenvolveram crise de aplasia em Maio de 1991, quando foram também diagnosticados como portadores de microesferocitose. IgM anti-B19 não foi detectada no soro de uma terceira criança, desta mesma família, a qual primeiramente apresentou crise de aplasia.

  4. Anti-Mur as the most likely cause of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtary, Sara; Gikas, Anastasia; Glader, Bertil; Andrews, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Although rare in the United States, anti-Mur is relatively common in Southeast Asia and has been reported to have clinical significance in Chinese and Taiwanese populations. The infant was full term and the second child of a Chinese mother and Vietnamese father, presenting with jaundice. He was clinically diagnosed with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia. The direct antiglobulin test indicated that the infant's red blood cells were coated only with anti-IgG. Anti-Mur was identified in the maternal serum and the neonate's plasma. The father was found to be positive for the Mur antigen. The cause of the infant's hemolytic anemia was determined to be most likely anti-Mur. Since anti-Mur is implicated in causing hemolytic disease of the newborn, it is important to recognize this antibody more commonly found in Asian patients in the United States as the Mur+ phenotype has a higher prevalence in this population. © 2016 AABB.

  5. A novel ubiquitin ligase is deficient in Fanconi anemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meetei, AR; Winter, de J.P.; Medhurst, A.L. dr.; Wallisch, M; Waisfisz, Q.; Vrugt, van der H.J.; Oostra, A.B.; Yan, Z; Ling, C; Bishop, CE; Hoatlin, M.E.; Joenje, H.

    2003-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a recessively inherited disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. Cells from individuals with Fanconi anemia are highly sensitive to DNA-crosslinking drugs, such as mitomycin C (MMC). Fanconi anemia proteins function in a DNA damage

  6. Unexpected Anemia and Reticulocytopenia in an Adolescent With Sickle Cell Anemia Receiving Chronic Transfusion Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blauel, Emily R; Grossmann, Lily T; Vissa, Madhav; Miller, Scott T

    2015-10-01

    In a patient with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion, exacerbation of anemia with reticulocytopenia must prompt consideration of a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with hyperhemolysis, as further transfusion may worsen this condition; definitive diagnosis is sometimes difficult. Anemia evolving during parvovirus B19-induced erythroid hypoplasia (transient aplastic crisis) should be attenuated in chronic transfusion patients due to superior survival of transfused over endogenous red blood cells. A 16-year-old with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion of modified intensity (goal to maintain hemoglobin S<50%) who developed symptomatic anemia with reticulocytopenia was later shown to have had transient aplastic crisis.

  7. Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... blood cells. There are different types, including Fanconi anemia. Causes include Toxic substances, such as pesticides, arsenic, ...

  8. Fanconi anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... possibly given through a vein) to treat infections Blood transfusions to treat symptoms due to low blood counts ... have regular check-ups to screen for cancer. Alternative Names Fanconi's anemia; Anemia - Fanconi's Images Formed elements of blood References Bagby GC. Aplastic anemia and related bone ...

  9. Hemolytic potential of hydrodynamic cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, S D; Bartlett, R H; Ceccio, S L

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the hemolytic potentials of discrete bubble cavitation and attached cavitation. To generate controlled cavitation events, a venturigeometry hydrodynamic device, called a Cavitation Susceptibility Meter (CSM), was constructed. A comparison between the hemolytic potential of discrete bubble cavitation and attached cavitation was investigated with a single-pass flow apparatus and a recirculating flow apparatus, both utilizing the CSM. An analytical model, based on spherical bubble dynamics, was developed for predicting the hemolysis caused by discrete bubble cavitation. Experimentally, discrete bubble cavitation did not correlate with a measurable increase in plasma-free hemoglobin (PFHb), as predicted by the analytical model. However, attached cavitation did result in significant PFHb generation. The rate of PFHb generation scaled inversely with the Cavitation number at a constant flow rate, suggesting that the size of the attached cavity was the dominant hemolytic factor.

  10. Fanconi Anemia — Case Report of Rare Aplastic Anemia at Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deaconu Alina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fanconi anemia is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by congenital abnormalities, defective haematopoiesis, and a high risk of developing acute myeloid leukaemia, myelodysplastic syndrome and cancers. FA was first described in 1927 by the Swiss pediatrician Guido Fanconi. The diagnosis is based on morphological abnormalities, hematologic abnormalities (pancytopenia, macrocytic anemia and progressive bone marrow failure and genetic tests (cariograma.

  11. Beta-hemolytic Streptococcal Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Bacteremia with beta-hemolytic Streptococci groups A, B, C and G has a mortality rate of approximately 20%. In this study we analyzed the association of various patient risk factors with mortality. Records from 241 patients with beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia were reviewed with particular...... attention to which predisposing factors were predictors of death. A logistic regression model found age, burns, immunosuppressive treatment and iatrogenic procedures prior to the infection to be significant predictors of death, with odds ratios of 1.7 (per decade), 19.7, 3.6 and 6.8, respectively...

  12. Assesment, treatment and prevention of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Nickavar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is a heterogeneous group of hemolytic disorders. Different terminologies have been described in HUS, which are as follows: (1 D+ HUS: Presentation with a preceding diarrhea; (2 typical HUS: D+ HUS with a single and self-limited episode; (3 atypical HUS (aHUS: Indicated those with complement dysregulation; (4 recurrent HUS: Recurrent episodes of thrombocytopenia and/or microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA after improvement of hematologic abnormalities; and (5 familial HUS: Necessary to distinct synchronous outbreaks of D+ HUS in family members and asynchronous disease with an inherited risk factor. aHUS is one of the potential causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD in children. It has a high recurrence after renal transplantation in some genetic forms. Therefore, recognition of the responsible mechanism and proper prophylactic treatment are recommended to prevent or delay the occurrence of ESRD and prolong the length of survival of the transplanted kidney. A computerized search of MEDLINE and other databases was carried out to find the latest results in pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of aHUS.

  13. Neonatal management and outcome in alloimmune hemolytic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, Isabelle M C; Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne E H J; van der Bom, Johanna G; van Klink, Jeanine M M; Oepkes, Dick; Lopriore, Enrico

    2017-07-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) occurs when fetal and neonatal erythroid cells are destroyed by maternal erythrocyte alloantibodies, it leads to anemia and hydrops in the fetus, and hyperbilirubinemia and kernicterus in the newborn. Postnatal care consists of intensive phototherapy and exchange transfusions to treat severe hyperbilirubinemia and top-up transfusions to treat early and late anemia. Other postnatal complications have been reported such as thrombocytopenia, iron overload and cholestasis requiring specific management. Areas covered: This review focusses on the current neonatal management and outcome of hemolytic disease and discusses postnatal treatment options as well as literature on long-term neurodevelopmental outcome. Expert commentary: Despite major advances in neonatal management, multiple issues have to be addressed to optimize postnatal management and completely eradicate kernicterus. Except for strict adherence to guidelines, improvement could be achieved by clarifying the epidemiology and pathophysiology of HDFN. Several pharmacotherapeutic agents should be further researched as alternative treatment options in hyperbilirubinemia, including immunoglobulins, albumin, phenobarbital, metalloporphyrins, zinc, clofibrate and prebiotics. Larger trials are warranted to evaluate EPO, folate and vitamin E in neonates. Long-term follow-up studies are needed in HDFN, especially on thrombocytopenia, iron overload and cholestasis.

  14. Intravenous immunoglobulin in ABO and Rh hemolytic diseases of newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseri, Fatemeh; Mamouri, Gholam A; Babaei, Homa

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate whether the use of intravenous immunoglobulin in newborn infants with isoimmune hemolytic jaundice due to Rh and ABO incompatibility is an effective treatment in reducing the need for exchange transfusion. This study included all direct Coombs' test positive Rh and ABO isoimmunized babies, who admitted in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Ghaem Hospital of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran, from October 2003 to October 2004. Significant hyperbilirubinemia was defined as rising by >or=0.5 mg/dl per hour. Babies were randomly assigned to received phototherapy with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) 0.5 g/kg over 4 hours, every 12 hours for 3 doses (study group) or phototherapy alone (control group). Exchange transfusion was performed in any group if serum bilirubin exceeded >or=20mg/dl or rose by >or=1mg/dl/h. A total of 34 babies were eligible for this study (17 babies in each group). The number of exchange transfusion, duration of phototherapy and hospitalization days, were significant shorter in the study group versus control group. When we analyzed the outcome results in ABO and Rh hemolytic disease separately, the efficacy of IVIg was significantly better in Rh versus ABO isoimmunization. Late anemia was more common in the IVIg group 11.8% versus 0%, p=0.48. Adverse effects were not observed during IVIg administration. Administration of IVIg to newborns with significant hyperbilirubinemia due to Rh hemolytic disease reduced the need for exchange transfusion but in ABO hemolytic disease there was no significant difference between IVIg and double surface blue light phototherapy.

  15. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... online community Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  16. Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Anemia What's in this article? ... Deficiency Anemia in My Kids? Print What Is Anemia? Anemia is when the level of healthy red ...

  17. What Is Aplastic Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Anemia Aplastic Anemia Also known as What Is Aplastic anemia (a-PLAS-tik uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... heart, heart failure , infections, and bleeding. Severe aplastic anemia can even cause death. Overview Aplastic anemia is ...

  18. Severe Hemolytic Jaundice in a Neonate with a Novel COL4A1 Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomotaki, Seiichi; Mizumoto, Hiroshi; Hamabata, Takayuki; Kumakura, Akira; Shiota, Mitsutaka; Arai, Hiroshi; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Hata, Daisuke

    2016-12-01

    We report our experience with a preterm infant with severe hemolytic jaundice who required exchange transfusion just after birth. The patient was negative for alloimmune hemolysis as a result of maternal-fetal blood type incompatibility, and tests for inherited defects in erythrocyte metabolism, membrane function, and hemoglobin synthesis were normal. We also performed a bone marrow examination, but could not identify the cause of hemolysis. The patient had several other complications, including porencephaly, epilepsy, elevated serum levels of creatine kinase, and persistent microscopic hematuria. Later, we detected a genetic mutation in COL4A1, which was recently found to be associated with hemolytic anemia. We therefore believe that all of the patient's clinical features, including hemolytic anemia, were due to the mutation in COL4A1. Genetic testing for COL4A1 mutations is recommended in neonates who exhibit hemolytic disease of unknown etiology, especially when other complications compatible with COL4A1-related disorders are present. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiyyatu Sa′idu Usman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Maternal allo-antibody production is stimulated when fetal red blood cells are positive for an antigen absent on the mother′s red cells. The maternal IgG antibodies produced will pass through the placenta and attack fetal red cells carrying the corresponding antigen. Allo-immune hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E rarely occurs. Case summary: We report two cases of anti-E hemolytic diseases in neonates. One of the neonates had severe hemolysis presenting with severe anemia, thrombocytopenia, and conjugated hyperbilirubinemia, while the other had moderate anemia and unconjugated hyperbilrubinemia. Although both the neonates were treated by phototherapy and intravenous immunoglobulin, one of them received double volume exchange transfusion. Conclusion: There appeared to be an increase in the occurrence of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by Rh antibodies other than anti-D. In this case report, both patients presented with anemia and hyperbilirubinemia but were successfully treated, with a favorable outcome.

  20. Sequences responsible for the distinctive hemolytic potentials of Friend and Moloney murine leukemia viruses are dispersed but confined to the psi-gag-PR region.

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, J; Corbin, A; Pozo, F; Orsoni, S; Sitbon, M

    1993-01-01

    Friend and Moloney murine leukemia viruses (F- and M-MuLV) induce distinct diseases in hematopoietic tissues following inoculation of newborn mice of susceptible strains. F-MuLV induces erythroleukemia preceded by severe early hemolytic anemia; M-MuLV induces thymomas and only very mild hemolysis. The major viral determinant of severe early hemolytic anemia residues in the env gene, but sequences located outside this gene can modulate this effect. By means of genetic chimeras of F- and M-MuLV...

  1. Intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) therapy for significant hyperbilirubinemia in ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miqdad, A M; Abdelbasit, O B; Shaheed, M M; Seidahmed, M Z; Abomelha, A M; Arcala, O P

    2004-09-01

    Although intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) therapy has been reported in hyperbilirubinemia of Rh hemolytic disease, its use in ABO hemolytic disease has been reported in only a few studies. In our institute we have observed that almost 30% of babies with hyperbilirubinemia due to ABO hemolytic disease required exchange transfusion. To determine whether administration of IVIG to newborns with significant hyperbilirubinemia due to ABO hemolytic disease would reduce the need for exchange transfusion as a primary goal in these babies. This was a prospective study involving all newborns with significant hyperbilirubinemia due to direct Coombs-positive ABO hemolytic disease. All healthy term babies with ABO hemolytic disease with positive direct Coombs test in the period between 2000 and 2002 were identified. Significant hyperbilirubinemia was defined as hyperbilirubinemia requiring phototherapy and/or rising by 8.5 micromol/l per h (0.5 mg/dl per h) or more to require exchange transfusion. Babies were randomly assigned into two groups: group 1 (study group) received phototherapy plus IVIG (500 mg/kg); and group 2 (control group) received phototherapy alone. Exchange transfusion was carried out in any group if at any time the bilirubin level reached 340 micromol/l (20 mg/dl) or more, or rose by 8.5 micromol/l per h (0.5 mg/dl per h) in group 2. A total of 112 babies were enrolled over 2 years, 56 in each group. Exchange transfusion was carried out in four babies in the study group, while 16 babies in the control group required exchange. Late anemia was not of concern in either group. No adverse effects related to IVIG administration were recorded. Administration of IVIG to newborns with significant hyperbilirubinemia due to ABO hemolytic disease with positive direct Coomb's test reduces the need for exchange transfusion without producing immediate adverse effects.

  2. Inborn anemias in mice. Progress report, 1 August 1979-15 July 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1980-08-01

    Four macrocytic anemias, four hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia are under investigation in mice. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus the wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values; (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions; (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis; (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue; (e) functional tests of the stem cell component; (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli; and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  3. Use of recombinant erythropoietin for the management of severe hemolytic disease of the newborn of a K0 phenotype mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoura, Antonia; Korakaki, Eftychia; Hatzidaki, Eleftheria; Saitakis, Emmanuel; Maraka, Sofia; Papamastoraki, Isabella; Matalliotakis, Emmanuel; Foundouli, Kaliopi; Giannakopoulou, Christine

    2007-01-01

    Very few people do not express any Kell antigens on their red blood cells (K0 phenotype). They can be immunized by transfusion or pregnancy and develop antibodies against Kell system antigens. These maternal antibodies can cause severe hemolytic disease of the fetus/newborn, as a result of the suppression of erythropoiesis and hemolysis. Multiple intrauterine transfusions in the management of severe hemolytic disease have been shown to cause erythropoietic suppression as well. Recombinant erythropoietin has been successfully used in the management of late anemia of infants with Rh hemolytic disease and in 1 case of KEL1 (Kell)-associated hemolytic disease. The authors present the case of severe hemolytic disease of a newborn due to KEL5 (Ku) isoimmunization of his K0 phenotype mother. Regular intrauterine transfusions were performed to manage the severe fetal anemia (Hb 3 g/dL). A male infant was born at the 36th week of gestation having normal hemoglobin (15.8 g/dL) and developed only mild hyperbilirubinemia. On the 15th day of life, the infant's hematocrit had fallen to 27.3%, with low reticulocyte count and low erythropoietin level. The infant was managed successfully with recombinant erythropoietin.

  4. Use Massive Parallel Sequencing and Exome Capture Technology to Sequence the Exome of Fanconi Anemia Children and Their Patents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    Fanconi Anemia; Autosomal or Sex Linked Recessive Genetic Disease; Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis Failure, Multiple Congenital Abnormalities, and Susceptibility to Neoplastic Diseases.; Hematopoiesis Maintainance.

  5. Signaling Pathways in Pathogenesis of Diamond Blackfan Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0590 TITLE: SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN PATHOGENESIS OF DIAMOND BLACKFAN ANEMIA PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: KATHLEEN M...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0590 SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN PATHOGENESIS OF DIAMOND BLACKFAN ANEMIA 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES None 14. ABSTRACT: Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a disorder that results in pure red cell aplasia, congenital

  6. [Microalbuminuria in pediatric patients diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos C, María Paz; Del Salas, Paulina; Zambrano, Pedro O

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by the presence of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney failure. It is the leading cause of acute kidney failure in children under 3 years of age. A variable number of patients develop proteinuria, hypertension, and chronic renal failure. To evaluate the renal involvement in pediatric patients diagnosed with HUS using the microalbumin/creatinine ratio. Descriptive concurrent cohort study that analyzed the presence of microalbuminuria in patients diagnosed with HUS between January 2001 and March 2012, who evolved without hypertension and normal renal function (clearance greater than 90ml/min using Schwartz formula). Demographic factors (age, sex), clinical presentation at time of diagnosis, use of antibiotics prior to admission, and need for renal replacement therapy were evaluated. Of the 24 patients studied, 54% were male. The mean age at diagnosis was two years. Peritoneal dialysis was required in 45%, and 33% developed persistent microalbuminuria. Antiproteinuric treatment was introduce in 4 patients, with good response. The mean follow-up was 6 years (range 6 months to 11 years). The serum creatinine returned to normal in all patients during follow up. The percentage of persistent microalbuminuria found in patients with a previous diagnosis of HUS was similar in our group to that described in the literature. Antiproteinuric treatment could delay kidney damage, but further multicenter prospective studies are necessary. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  7. Advanced Prostate Cancer Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, consumption thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. HUS generally has a dismal prognosis, except when associated with gastroenteritis caused by verotoxin-producing bacteria. Cancer associated HUS is uncommon, and there are only scarce reports on prostate cancer presenting with HUS. Case Presentation. A 72-year-old man presented to the emergency department with oliguria, hematuria, and hematemesis. Clinical evaluation revealed acute renal failure, hemolysis, normal blood-clotting studies, and prostate-specific antigen value of 1000 ng/mL. The patient was started on hemodialysis, ultrafiltration with plasma exchange, and androgen blockade with bicalutamide and completely recovered from HUS. The authors review the 14 published cases on this association. Conclusion. The association of HUS and prostate cancer occurs more frequently in patients with high-grade, clinically advanced prostate cancer. When readily recognized and appropriately treated, HUS does not seem to worsen prognosis in prostate cancer patients.

  8. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: New Developments in Pathogenesis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Boyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome is defined by the characteristic triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. In children, most cases of HUS are caused by Shiga-toxin-producing bacteria, especially Escherichia coli O157:H7. Common vehicles of transmission include ground beef, unpasteurized milk, and municipal or swimming water. Shiga-toxin-associated HUS is a main cause of acute renal failure in young children. Management remains supportive as there is at present no specific therapy to ameliorate the prognosis. Immediate outcome is most often favourable but long-term renal sequelae are frequent due to nephron loss. Atypical HUS represents 5% of cases. In the past 15 years, mutations in complement regulators of the alternative pathway have been identified in almost 60% of cases, leading to excessive complement activation. The disease has a relapsing course and more than half of the patients either die or progress to end-stage renal failure. Recurrence after renal transplantation is frequent.

  9. Your Guide to Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inherited Causes l Folate or iron deficiency l Fanconi anemia from poor diet l Shwachman-Diamond l Demand ... cells, leading to aplastic anemia. These conditions include Fanconi anemia, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, Diamond- Blackfan anemia, ...

  10. About Anemia (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español About Anemia KidsHealth / For Kids / About Anemia What's in this ... to every cell in your body. What Is Anemia? Anemia happens when a person doesn't have ...

  11. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: managing the mother, fetus, and newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Meghan; Matthews, Dana C

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) affects 3/100 000 to 80/100 000 patients per year. It is due to maternal blood group antibodies that cause fetal red cell destruction and in some cases, marrow suppression. This process leads to fetal anemia, and in severe cases can progress to edema, ascites, heart failure, and death. Infants affected with HDFN can have hyperbilirubinemia in the acute phase and hyporegenerative anemia for weeks to months after birth. The diagnosis and management of pregnant women with HDFN is based on laboratory and radiographic monitoring. Fetuses with marked anemia may require intervention with intrauterine transfusion. HDFN due to RhD can be prevented by RhIg administration. Prevention for other causal blood group specificities is less studied. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  12. Anticardiolipin antibodies in classic pediatric hemolytic-uremic syndrome: a possible pathogenic role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiles, L G; Olavarría, F; Elgueta, M; Moya, P; Mezzano, S

    1998-01-01

    Anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies have been associated with thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia and an increased risk of thrombosis in different vascular locations, even in the absence of lupus. The classic hemolytic-uremic syndrome is a postinfectious acute renal failure characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and the presence of widespread glomerular thrombosis in the kidney, with pathogenic mechanisms that remain to be identified. In order to establish the frequency of aCL antibodies in this syndrome and to identify a possible role in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations, 17 patients were studied during the reactant phase of the disease looking for an association between the presence of aCL antibodies (isotypes IgG, IgA and IgM) and the main clinical variables of the syndrome. In 8 patients IgG aCL was present, 2 patients had IgM aCL, and 1 had IgA antibodies on the solid-phase ELISA aCL assays, but no association could be demonstrated with the clinical variables studied. Although it might correspond to an epiphenomenon related to the triggering intestinal infection, a pathogenic role cannot be discarded and additional studies should be performed.

  13. [Congenital malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium malariae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenz, W; Trop, M; Kollaritsch, H; Reinthaler, F

    2000-05-19

    Increasing tourism and growing numbers of immigrants from malaria-endemic countries are leading to a higher importation rate of rare tropical disorders in European countries. We describe, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of connatal malaria in Austria. The patient is the first child of a 24 year old mother who was born in Ghana and immigrated to Austria one and a half years before delivery. She did not stay in an endemic region during this period and did not show fever or any other signs of malaria. The boy was healthy for the first six weeks of his life. In the 8th week of life he was admitted to our hospital due to persistent fever of unknown origin. On physical examination he showed only mild splenomegaly. Routine laboratory testing revealed mild hemolytic anemia with a hemoglobin value of 8.3 g/l. In the blood smear Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium malariae were detected. Oral therapy with quinine hydrochloride was successful and blood smears became negative for Plasmodia within 6 days. This case shows that congenital malaria can occur in children of clinically healthy women who were born in malaria-endemic areas even one and a half year after they have immigrated to non-endemic regions.

  14. Inborn anemias in mice. Progress report, 1 May 1977--31 July 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1978-08-01

    Hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, four hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, and the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes. Considerable effort is devoted to perfection of hematologic, cell culture, and transplant methods to make these techniques useful in dealing with special problems associated with abnormal function.

  15. A case of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome as an early manifestation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Kyun Han

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is the most common cause of acute renal failure in children younger than 4 years and is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, acute renal failure, and thrombocytopenia. HUS associated with diarrheal prodrome is usually caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 or by Shigella dysenteriae, which generally has a better outcome. However, atypical cases show a tendency to relapse with a poorer prognosis. HUS has been reported to be associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in children. The characteristics and the mechanisms underlying this condition are largely unknown. In this study, we describe the case of an 11-year-old boy in whom the diagnosis of ALL was preceded by the diagnosis of atypical HUS. Thus, patients with atypical HUS should be diagnosed for the possibility of developing ALL.

  16. Successful Management of a Rare Cause of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome With Eculizumab in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alparslan, Caner; Yavaşcan, Önder; Kasap Demir, Belde; Atmiş, Bahriye; Karabay Bayazit, Aysun; Leblebisatan, Göksel; Öncel, Elif P; Alaygut, Demet; Mutlubaş, Fatma; Aksu, Nejat

    2018-03-23

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, acute renal failure, and thrombocytopenia. It very rarely coexists with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) emerging before, simultaneously, or after the diagnosis has been made, and management of the patient may be difficult. We present the case of a 7-year-old boy who was diagnosed with HUS and initially managed by hemodialysis (HD). Thereafter, HUS progressed, and neurological findings developed. The patient was treated with eculizumab, agressive blood pressure control, and antiepileptic drugs. At the fifth month of follow-up, the patient was diagnosed with acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia with fever, bone pain, hepatosplenomegaly, and pancytopenia. After initiation of ALL treatment, he had no episodes of HUS, despite cessation of eculizumab. In conclusion, eculizumab may be a treatment of choice to prevent further systemic damage in recurrent HUS episodes of patients with borderline changes in the bone marrow until ALL is constantly diagnosed.

  17. Hemolytic uremic syndrome and hypertensive crisis post dengue hemorrhagic fever: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervin Tri Hadianto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS clinically manifests as acute renal failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Acute renal failure with oliguria, hypertension, and proteinuria usually develops in affected patients.1,2 In children under 15 years of age, typical HUS occurs at a rate of 0.91 cases per 100,000 population.3 The initial onset of this disease usually happens in children below 3 years of age. Incidence is similar in boys and girls. Seasonal variation occurs, with HUS peaking in the summer and fall. In young children, spontaneous recovery is common. In adults, the probability of recovery is low when HUS is associated with severe hypertension.2

  18. Severe pneumococcal hemolytic uremic syndrome in an 8-month-old girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahar Gargah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure, represents one of the major causes of acute renal failure in infancy and childhood. The typical form occurring after an episode of diarrhea caused by Escherichia coli is the most frequent in children. Other microorganisms also may be responsible for HUS, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, which causes more severe forms of the disease. We report an 8-month-old girl who presented with pneumonia and subsequently developed HUS. Renal biopsy showed characteristic lesion of thrombotic microangiopathy and extensive cortical necrosis. She was managed with peritoneal dialysis but did not improve and developed severe sepsis due to staphylococcal peritonitis, resulting in the death of the patient. Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced HUS is uncommon, but results in severe disease in the young. There is a high risk of these patients developing end-stage kidney disease in the long term.

  19. Hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by a new deletion of the entire beta-globin cluster.

    OpenAIRE

    Pirastu, M; Kan, Y W; Lin, C C; Baine, R M; Holbrook, C T

    1983-01-01

    We describe a new type of gamma delta beta-thalassemia in four generations of a family of Scotch-Irish descent. The proposita presented with hemolytic disease of the newborn, which was characterized by a microcytic anemia. Initial restriction endonuclease analysis of the DNA showed no grossly abnormal patterns, but studies of polymorphic restriction sites and gene dosage revealed an extensive deletion that removed all the beta- and beta-like globin genes from the affected chromosome. In situ ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  3. APLASTIC ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Dharma Laksmi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Aplastic Anemia describes a disorder of the clinical syndrome is marked by a deficiency of red blood cells, neutrophils, monocytes and platelets in the absence of other forms of bone marrow damage. Aplastic anemia is classified as a rare disease in developed countries the incidence of 3-6 cases / 1 million inhabitants / year. The exact cause of someone suffering from aplastic anemia also can not be established with certainty, but there are several sources of potential risk factors. Prognosis or course of the disease varies widely aplastic anemia, but without treatment generally gives a poor prognosis /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  4. Sickle cell anemia and mitral valve replacement. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomfim, V; Ribeiro, A; Gouvea, F; Pereira, J; Björk, V

    1989-01-01

    An 8-year-old black boy with sickle cell disease and severe hemolytic anemia crisis (95% hemoglobin S) also had mitral incompetence due to rheumatic valve disease. A 27 mm monostrut Björk-Shiley valve prosthesis was implanted after partial exchange transfusions had reduced the hemoglobin S to less than 40%. High-flow normothermic perfusion was used during extracorporeal circulation, with care taken to avoid hypoxia and acidosis. Postoperative recovery was uneventful.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... detect signs of iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain ... your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... view the colon directly. What if my doctor thinks something else is causing my iron-deficiency anemia? ... deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  9. Severe Aplastic Anemia (SAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page Print this page My Cart Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a disease ... leukemia (ALL) Other diseases What is severe aplastic anemia (SAA)? SAA is a bone marrow disease. The ...

  10. What Is Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Anemia Anemia Also known as Iron-poor blood , Low blood , ... you or your child diagnosed with Diamond-Blackfan anemia? The registry is collecting information from people with ...

  11. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  12. Anemia and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advocacy Toolkit Home For Patients Blood Disorders Anemia Anemia and Pregnancy Your body goes through significant changes ... becoming anemic. back to top Is Pregnancy-Related Anemia Preventable? Good nutrition is the best way to ...

  13. Musculoskeletal manifestations in sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Ravikanth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia is an inherited hemoglobin disorder characterized by substitution of glutamic acid by valine at the sixth position of the beta globin chain. The sequence of events leads to pain crisis. Ischemia of the tissues resulting from decreased blood flow is believed to occur in pain crisis. Repeated or prolonged sickling causes red cell death in the form of hemolytic anemia. The majority of hospital admissions are due to painful crisis. These patients are at increased risk for both osteomyelitis and infarction of the long bones. Magnetic resonance imaging has been shown to be helpful in the diagnosis of early osteomyelitis and its differentiation from infarction in sickle cell disease patients with acute bone crisis. Others findings include dactylitis, medullary infarcts, diploic space widening, fish mouth vertebrae, and avascular necrosis. We present a case series on the various musculoskeletal manifestations of sickle cell disease.

  14. Shigella sonnei and hemolytic uremic syndrome: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Adams

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is a well-described process that is known to cause severe renal dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, and anemia. HUS is typically associated with toxins (shiga-like and shigella toxin found in strains of E. coli and Shigella spp [1–3]. We present a case of a 27 year-old man with jaundice, thrombocytopenia, and renal dysfunction who was found to have HUS in the setting of Shigella sonnei infection. Outside of developing countries, cases of HUS related to S. sonnei are largely unreported.

  15. Hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with Plasmodium vivax malaria successfully treated with plasma exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V S Keskar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS in an adult patient with Plasmodium vivax malaria. The patient presented with worsening anemia, persistent thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury. HUS was diagnosed based on the high serum lactate dehydrogenase, elevated reticulocyte count and presence of schistocytes on peripheral blood smear. Kidney biopsy showed features of thrombotic microangiopathy. Complete hematological remission was achieved after five sessions of therapeutic plasma exchange. Renal function partially recovered and stabilized at discharge. Vivax malaria, generally considered benign, may be rarely associated with HUS.

  16. A Newborn Case of “c” Subgroup Mismatch Presenting with Severe Hemolysis and Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi Yangın Ergon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemolysis and jaundice related to Rh incompatibility in the neonatal period has decreased substantially due to the widespread use of anti-D gammaglobulin in recent years. Nevertheless, the rate of subgroup mismatch in the etiology of hemolytic diseases of the newborn has increased significantly. In this article an 8-day-old newborn infant with “c” subgroup incompatibility and presenting with severe anemia, in whom hemolysis could be controlled with intravenous immunoglobulin infusion and subgroup appropriate blood transfusion, has been presented. Scientific studies have demonstrated that the hemolytic disease of patients who don’t have major blood group incompatibility but carry anti-C antibodies can be rather serious. Therefore, subgroup mismatch should always be kept in mind for newborns presenting with severe hemolytic anemia, and transfusion or if necessary exchange transfusion should be provided with subgroup matched blood products.

  17. Anemia as a risk factor for childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishnan K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This prospective-(cohort study was conducted to evaluate whether anemia is a risk factor for childhood asthma. Materials and Methods: Two hundred children in the age group of 2-18 years who attended the Outpatient Department with upper respiratory / lower respiratory tract infections were included in this study. One hundred children with anemia were taken as the study group and another 100, age - and sex-matched children without anemia were taken as the control.They were subjected to complete blood count (CBC C-reactive protein (CRP estimation, Mantoux test and chest X-ray. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs were performed on those above six years showing evidence of asthma. Peripheral smear, serum ferritin and serum iron-binding capacity were estimated for all anemic children. Results: Asthma was present in 74 (74% children in the study group and in 33 (33% children in the control group. Iron-deficiency anemia was present in 85 (85% anemia of chronic infection in 20 (20% and the other five (5% had hemolytic anemia. Anemia was found to be a risk factor for childhood asthma. Conclusion: Anemic children were 5.75 times more susceptible to asthmatic attacks when compared with nonanemic children.

  18. Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulier, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is the most frequent inherited cause of BM failure (BMF). Fifteen FANC genes have been identified to date, the most prevalent being FANCA, FANCC, FANCG, and FANCD2. In addition to classical presentations with progressive BMF during childhood and a positive chromosome breakage test in the blood, atypical clinical and/or biological situations can be seen in which a FA diagnosis has to be confirmed or eliminated. For this, a range of biological tools have been developed, including analysis of skin fibroblasts. FA patients experience a strong selective pressure in the BM that predisposes to clonal evolution and to the emergence in their teens or young adulthood of myelodysplasia syndrome (MDS) and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with a specific pattern of somatic chromosomal lesions. The cellular mechanisms underlying (1) the hematopoietic defect which leads to progressive BMF and (2) somatic clonal evolutions in this background, are still largely elusive. Elucidation of these mechanisms at the molecular and cellular levels should be useful to understand the physiopathology of the disease and to adapt the follow-up and treatment of FA patients. This may also ultimately benefit older, non-FA patients with aplastic anemia, MDS/AML for whom FA represents a model genetic condition.

  19. Polymicrogyria and Congenital Parvovirus B19 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant S. Schulert

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fetal parvovirus B19 infection causes anemia, hydrops, and pregnancy loss but is generally not considered teratogenic. Nevertheless, disturbances of neuronal migration have been described with congenital parvovirus infection. We evaluated a term infant with congenital parvovirus disease and polymicrogyria. We compared this case with four other reports of central nervous system disease after birth to parvovirus-infected mothers. After an extensive diagnostic evaluation, this infant was found to have congenital parvovirus disease with severe anemia and nonimmune hydrops as well as extensive polymicrogyria. Although rare, this report and literature review suggest that parvovirus B19 has the potential to disrupt normal neurodevelopment. We suggest that infants with severe congenital parvovirus infection have close developmental surveillance and if symptomatic undergo neuroimaging to assess for disorders of neuromigration.

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia, your doctor may order the following blood tests to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia: Complete blood count (CBC) to ... than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not ... iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain treatment-related complications ...

  2. Anemia (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anemia KidsHealth / For Teens / Anemia What's in this article? ... Enough Iron Print en español Anemia What Is Anemia? Lots of teens are tired. With all the ...

  3. Reticulocyte parameters in hemoglobinopathies and iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortellazzi Laura C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric reticulocyte analysis allows the evaluation of reticulocyte maturity. New reticulocyte parameters have been used in the diagnosis and management of anemias, in the bone marrow transplant setting and in the monitoring of iron replacement or erythropoiet in therapy. Reticulocyte numbers and maturation levels have been studied in different hemoglobinopathies and the results have been correlated with the degree of ineffective erythropoiesis. In order to verify differences in reticulocyte parameters in various types of anemias and to test the absolute number of immature reticulocytes as a possible discriminating factor among various types of anemias, reticulocyte counts were performed on 219 samples from patients with sickle cell anemia (SS (n= 62, hemoglobin S trait (n=9, Sbeta thalassemia (n=7, hemoglobin SC disease (n=11, beta thalassemia trait (n=33 and iron deficiency anemia (n= 47, and non-anemic individuals (n= 50. Mean fluorescence index (MFI was defined as representative of the degree of reticulocyte immaturity and it was evaluated as a percentage and in absolute values. Reticulocyte counts and MFI values were significantly higher in SS, Sbeta thalassemic and SC groups when compared to controls, but not different among the three anemia groups. Patients with hemoglobin S trait, iron deficiency anemia and beta thalassemia trait showed reticulocyte parameters similar to the non-anemic group. There was no difference between the b thalassemic trait and iron deficiency anemia in relation to any parameters. MFI in absolute numbers were significantly higher in anemias that develop with the hemolytic process, although this was not evident in MFI percentage values. Our results showed that the erythoid expansion in sickle cell diseases (SS, SC and Sb thalassemia leads to an enhanced immature reticulocyte release from bone marrow and that the phenomena is more evident by the MFI counting in absolute figures than in percentages. We

  4. [A case of severe hemolytic disease of the newborn due to anti-Dia antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Min; Im, Sun Ju; Park, Su Eun; Lee, Eun Yup; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2007-10-01

    Here we report a severe case of hemolytic anemia of the newborn with kernicterus caused by anti-Di(a) antibody. A full term male infant was transferred due to hyperbilirubinemia on the third day of life. Despite single phototherapy, the baby's total bilirubin had elevated to 30.1 mg/dL. After exchange transfusion, total bilirubin decreased to 11.45 mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the infant's red cells was positive. The maternal and infant's sera showed a negative reaction in routine antibody detection tests, but were positive in Di(a) panel cells. The frequency of the Di(a) antigen among the Korean population is estimated to be 6.4-14.5%. Anti-Di(a) antibody could cause a hemolytic reaction against transfusion or hemolytic disease of the newborn. We suggest the need for reagent red blood cell panels to include Di(a) antigen positive cells in antibody identification test for Korean.

  5. Dangerous drug interactions leading to hemolytic uremic syndrome following lung transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parissis Haralabos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report our experience of a rather uncommon drug interaction, resulting in hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Methods Two consecutive cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome were diagnosed in our service. In both patients the use of macrolides in patients taking Tacrolimus, resulted in high levels of Tacrolimus. Results The first patient was a 48 years old female with Bilateral emphysema. She underwent Single Sequential Lung Transplantation. She developed reperfusion injury requiring prolonged stay. Tacrolimus introduced (Day 51. The patient remained well up till 5 months later; Erythromycin commenced for chest infection. High Tacrolimus levels and a clinical diagnosis of HUS were made. She was treated with plasmapheresis successfully. The second case was a 57 years old female with Emphysema & A1 Antithrypsin deficiency. She underwent Right Single Lung Transplantation. A2 rejection with mild Obliterative Bronchiolitis diagnosed 1 year later and she switched to Tacrolimus. She was admitted to her local Hospital two and a half years later with right middle lobe consolidation. The patient commenced on amoxicillin and clarithromycin. Worsening renal indices, high Tacrolimus levels, hemolytic anemia & low Platelets were detected. HUS diagnosed & treated with plasmapheresis. Conclusions There are 21 cases of HUS following lung transplantation in the literature that may have been induced by high tacrolimus levels. Macrolides in patients taking Cyclosporin or Tacrolimus lead to high levels. Mechanism of action could be glomeruloconstrictor effect with reduced GFR increased production of Endothelin-1 and increased Platelet aggregation.

  6. Signaling Pathways in Pathogenesis of Diamond Blackfan Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Allergy and Infectious Diseases. This research was funded by NIH National Heart , Lung, and Blood Institute grant R01 HL097561, a St. Baldrick’s Foundation...with anemia, congenital malformations and cancer. p53 mediates many features of DBA, but the mechanism of p53 activation remains unclear. Another...frequently mutated RP in DBA (Boria et al., 2010; Draptchinskaia et al., 1999; Farrar et al., 2011). DBA is associated with anemia, malformations and

  7. SnapShot: Fanconi anemia and associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anderson T; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2015-01-15

    Fanconi anemia is a genetic disorder resulting from biallelic mutations in one of the 17 FANC genes. It is characterized by congenital abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and cancer predisposition. The underlying cause is genomic instability resulting from the deficiency in replication-dependent DNA interstrand crosslink repair pathway commonly referred to as the Fanconi anemia-BRCA pathway. This SnapShot presents the key factors involved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hemolytic disease in the newborn - history and prevention in the world and the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavy, Jiri

    2010-06-01

    Hemolytic disease in the newborn with its typical signs and poor prognosis has been known for centuries. Historically it can be divided into three pathological states which are fetal hydrops (hydrops fetus universalis), neonatal jaundice (icterus neonati gravis familiaris) and fetal anemia (anemia neonati). Almost 70 reports with quite accurate descriptions were found up to the end of 19th century. The patho physiological basis of the condition began to be studied at the beginning of the last century and the development of our knowledge is an example of the cooperation between pathologists, pediatricians, hematologists and later, obstetricians, immunologists and geneticists. Despite all the advances in this field it remains a serious disease up to this time. It is not managed successfully in all cases and despite successful immunological prophylaxis there are cases when we need to administer intrauterine transfusion based on the information received by dopplerometric measurement of arteria cerebri perfusion and fetal blood sampling. Review of lover cited literature. The history of the hemolytic disease in the newborn, its condition and approaches to it has not been recently compiled in the Czech Republic.

  9. A Case of Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn due to Dia Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethava, Ashif; Olivares, Esperanza; Shariatmadar, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Dia is a clinically significant red cell antibody known to cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. Here, we report on a case of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by Dia antibody. The mother had three prior pregnancies with no history of blood transfusion. She delivered a preterm 35-week-old female newborn by cesarean section. The neonate developed anemia and mild icterus on postnatal day five with hemoglobin of 9500 mg/dL and total bilirubin of 10 mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the neonate's red blood cells was positive. The maternal serum and an eluate from the infant RBCs were negative in routine antibody detection tests but were positive using commercially prepared Di(a+) red cells. The neonate was discharged home in stable condition following treatment with erythropoietin and phototherapy. When a newborn has a positive DAT in the absence of major blood group incompatibility or commonly detected RBC antibodies, an antibody to a low frequency antigen such as Dia must be considered. Further immunohematology tests are required to determine presence of the antibody and the clinician must be alerted to closely monitor the infant for signs of anemia and hemolysis. PMID:26682081

  10. A Case of Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn due to Di (a) Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethava, Ashif; Olivares, Esperanza; Shariatmadar, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Di(a) is a clinically significant red cell antibody known to cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. Here, we report on a case of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by Di(a) antibody. The mother had three prior pregnancies with no history of blood transfusion. She delivered a preterm 35-week-old female newborn by cesarean section. The neonate developed anemia and mild icterus on postnatal day five with hemoglobin of 9500 mg/dL and total bilirubin of 10 mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the neonate's red blood cells was positive. The maternal serum and an eluate from the infant RBCs were negative in routine antibody detection tests but were positive using commercially prepared Di(a+) red cells. The neonate was discharged home in stable condition following treatment with erythropoietin and phototherapy. When a newborn has a positive DAT in the absence of major blood group incompatibility or commonly detected RBC antibodies, an antibody to a low frequency antigen such as Di(a) must be considered. Further immunohematology tests are required to determine presence of the antibody and the clinician must be alerted to closely monitor the infant for signs of anemia and hemolysis.

  11. A Case of Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn due to Dia Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashif Jethava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-Dia is a clinically significant red cell antibody known to cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. Here, we report on a case of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by Dia antibody. The mother had three prior pregnancies with no history of blood transfusion. She delivered a preterm 35-week-old female newborn by cesarean section. The neonate developed anemia and mild icterus on postnatal day five with hemoglobin of 9500 mg/dL and total bilirubin of 10 mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the neonate’s red blood cells was positive. The maternal serum and an eluate from the infant RBCs were negative in routine antibody detection tests but were positive using commercially prepared Di(a+ red cells. The neonate was discharged home in stable condition following treatment with erythropoietin and phototherapy. When a newborn has a positive DAT in the absence of major blood group incompatibility or commonly detected RBC antibodies, an antibody to a low frequency antigen such as Dia must be considered. Further immunohematology tests are required to determine presence of the antibody and the clinician must be alerted to closely monitor the infant for signs of anemia and hemolysis.

  12. Hematological outcome in neonatal alloimmune hemolytic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rath, Mirjam Eva Aafke

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on several aspects related to the hematological outcome of infants with hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) due to red blood cell alloimmunization, including pathogenesis and management of the disease. The presence of leukocytopenie and thrombocytopenia support the

  13. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Congenital Hypothyroidism March 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... Resources MedlinePlus (NIH) Mayo Clinic What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  14. Diagnosis of Fanconi Anemia by Diepoxybutane Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Arleen D.

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous disorder characterized by congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure, and predisposition to cancer, particularly hematological malignancies and solid tumors of the head and neck. The main role of FA proteins is in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). FA results from pathogenic variants in at least 16 distinct genes, causing genomic instability. Although the highly variable phenotype makes accurate diagnosis on the basis of clinical manifestations difficult in some patients, diagnosis based on a profound sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents can be used to identify the pre-anemia patient as well as patients with aplastic anemia or leukemia who may or may not have the physical stigmata associated with the syndrome. Diepoxybutane (DEB) analysis is the preferred test for FA because other agents have higher rates of false-positive and false-negative results. PMID:25827349

  15. Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Squamous Cell Carcinomas From Fanconi Anemia Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zeeburg, Hester J. T.; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Wu, Thijs; Gluckman, Eliane; Soulier, Jean; Surralles, Jordi; Castella, Maria; van der Wal, Jacqueline E.; Wennerberg, Johan; Califano, Joseph; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Ebell, Wolfram; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Joenje, Hans; Leemans, C. Rene; Brakenhoff, Ruud H.

    2008-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a recessively inherited disease that is characterized by congenital abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and a predisposition to develop cancer, particularly squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in the head and neck and anogenital regions. Previous studies of Fanconi anemia SCCs, mainly

  16. Clinical and molecular characteristics of squamous cell carcinomas from Fanconi anemia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zeeburg, H.T.J.; Snijders, P.J.F.; Wu, T.; Gluckman, E.; Soulier, J.; Surralles, J.; Castella, M.; van der Wal, J.E.; Wennerberg, J.; Califano, J.; Velleuer, E.; Dietrich, R.; Ebell, W.; Bloemena, E.; Joenje, H.; Leemans, C.R.; Brakenhoff, R.H.

    2008-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a recessively inherited disease that is characterized by congenital abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and a predisposition to develop cancer, particularly squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in the head and neck and anogenital regions. Previous studies of Fanconi anemia SCCs, mainly

  17. Blueberry muffin rash, hyperbilirubinemia, and hypoglycemia: a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-Kp(a).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbaugh, J E; Morgan, S; Beck, J C; Zantek, N; Kearney, S; Bendel, C M; Roberts, K D

    2011-05-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn occurs when maternal IgG antibodies cross the placenta and cause hemolysis of fetal red blood cells. Kp(a) is a low frequency red blood cell antigen that has rarely been implicated in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. The few reported cases attributed to anti-Kp(a) have typically had minimal clinical consequences. We report a critically ill neonate who presented with purpura, respiratory failure, severe liver dysfunction, hyperbilirubinemia, hypoglycemia and anemia. This case report broadens the spectrum of neonatal disease associated with anti-Kp(a), addresses the evaluation of hemolysis with liver failure in a neonate, and emphasizes the importance of screening for antibodies to low frequency red blood cell antigens in suspected hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn.

  18. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-Ge3: combined antibody-dependent hemolysis and erythroid precursor cell growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackall, Douglas P; Pesek, Gina D; Montgomery, Matthew M; Oza, Krishna K; Arndt, Patricia A; Garratty, George; Shahcheraghi, Ali; Denomme, Gregory A

    2008-10-01

    The Gerbich (Ge) antigens are a collection of high-incidence antigens carried on the red blood cell membrane glycoproteins, glycophorins C and D. Antibodies against these antigens are uncommon, and there have been only rare case reports of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-Ge. In this case report, we present a neonate with severe anemia and hyperbilirubinemia due to anti-Ge3. Routine and special laboratory studies undertaken in this case suggested two mechanisms for the patient's hemolysis and persistent anemia. Antibody-dependent hemolysis was associated with early-onset hyperbilirubinemia, anemia, and a mild reticulocytosis, and inhibition of erythroid progenitor cell growth was associated with late anemia and normal bilirubin and reticulocyte values. Though rare, anti-Ge3 can be a dangerous antibody in pregnancy. Affected neonates may require intensive initial therapy and close follow-up for at least several weeks after delivery.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1.54MB] Cardiovascular Health Study Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ... deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia if you have low iron or ferritin levels in your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... mg and women need 18 mg. After age 51, both men and women need 8 mg. Pregnant ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as celiac disease; inflammatory bowel diseases, ... iron-deficiency anemia , such as bleeding in the digestive or urinary tract or heavy menstrual bleeding, your ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, red blood ... both full-term and preterm infants. Look for Diagnosis will explain tests and procedures that your doctor ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, red blood ... physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam Your doctor may ask about ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, ... signs of iron-deficiency anemia include: Brittle nails ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  19. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  20. Sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  1. Side Effects: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia is a side effect of cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and radiation therapy. It can make women and men feel fatigued, dizzy, and short of breath. Learn how to manage fatigue caused by anemia during cancer treatment.

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  4. Sickle cell anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    ŘÍHOVÁ, Tereza

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is about the disease called sickle cell anemia, or drepanocytosis. In this thesis is described the history of the disease, pathophysiology, laboratory features, various clinical features, diferencial diagnosis, quality of life in sickle cell anemia and therapy.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the duodenum, the first part of ... treatments for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With After being diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia, it is important ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... address the cause of your iron deficiency, such as any underlying bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron- ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Topics section only, or the News and Resources section. NHLBI Entire Site NHLBI Entire Site Health ... español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer ... and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency anemia. Research for Your Health The NHLBI is part of the U.S. Department ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  13. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI resources Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease ( ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive ...

  15. An atypical case of Fanconi anemia in elderly sibs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwee, ML; vanderKleij, JM; vanEssen, AJ; Begeer, JH; Joenje, H; Arwert, F; tenKate, LP

    1997-01-01

    We describe a 56-year-old woman suspected of Fanconi anemia on the basis of the following clinical findings: microcephaly, short stature, congenital deafness, and the clinical findings in her deceased brother. Hematologic or other signs of malignancy were absent. The diagnosis was confirmed by

  16. C3 Glomerulopathy and Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Two Important Manifestations of Complement System Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravneet Bajwa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The advances in our understanding of the alternative pathway have emphasized that uncontrolled hyperactivity of this pathway causes 2 distinct disorders that adversely impact the kidney. In the so-called atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS, renal dysfunction occurs along with thrombocytopenia, anemia, and target organ injury to multiple organs, most commonly the kidney. On the other hand, in the so-termed C3 glomerulopathy, kidney involvement is not associated with thrombocytopenia, anemia, or other system involvement. In this report, we present 2 cases of alternative pathway dysfunction. The 60-year-old female patient had biopsy-proven C3 glomerulopathy, while the 32-year-old female patient was diagnosed with aHUS based on renal dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, anemia, and normal ADAMTS-13 level. The aHUS patient was successfully treated with the monoclonal antibody (eculizumab for complement blockade. The patient with C3 glomerulopathy did not receive the monoclonal antibody. In this patient, management focused on blood pressure and proteinuria control with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. This article focuses on the clinical differences, pathophysiology, and treatment of aHUS and C3 glomerulopathy.

  17. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease following exchange transfusion 96 newborn

    OpenAIRE

    Khatami S.F; Behjati SH.

    2007-01-01

    Background: ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease of the newborn is a common cause of clinical jaundice and causes two-thirds of the hemolytic disease in newborns. This study was undertaken to determine the frequency of ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease and its complications in newborns undergoing exchange transfusion.Methods: This prospective and descriptive study was performed in jaundiced newborn infants during a three-year period. Inclusion criteria were: maternal blood type O, newbor...

  18. Anesthesia for a patient with Fanconi anemia for developmental dislocation of the hip: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer Dogan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is a rare autosomal recessive inherited bone marrow failure syndrome with congenital and hematological abnormalities. Literature regarding the anesthetic management in these patients is limited. A management of a developmental dislocation of the hip was described in a patient with fanconi anemia. Because of the heterogeneous nature, a patient with fanconi anemia should be established thorough preoperative evaluation in order to diagnose on clinical features. In conclusion, we preferred caudal anesthesia in this patient with fanconi anemia without thrombocytopenia, because of avoiding from N2O, reducing amount of anesthetic, existing microcephaly, hypothyroidism and elevated liver enzymes, providing postoperative analgesia, and reducing amount of analgesic used postoperatively.

  19. Congenital tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2012-06-20

    Jun 20, 2012 ... Key words: Congenital tuberculo- sis, case report, miliary tuberculosis. Introduction. Congenital tuberculosis defines tuberculosis in infants of .... tary TB and otitis media, resulting in seizures, deafness, and death. It is therefore not surprising that the index case who presented at twelve weeks of age, had ...

  20. Congenital Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  1. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... artérielle Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in ... as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  2. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cysts Solitary Kidney Your Kidneys & How They Work Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ... function as well as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs ...

  3. Kell hemolytic disease of the fetus. Combination treatment with plasmapheresis and intrauterine blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhwani, S; Machado, P; Pecos, P; Coloma, M; Rebollo, S; Raya, J M

    2011-08-01

    We report the case of a 36-year old pregnant woman with a Kell alloimmunization (anti-K1), probably secondary to a previous blood transfusion, and a severe hemolytic disease of the fetus. Once the first fetal blood transfusion by cordocentesis was performed, we started treatment with repeated plasmapheresis to maintain anti-K1 titer below 1:32. With this scheme we did not need to perform a second intrauterine fetal blood transfusion and only mild anemia was found in the newborn. Taking into account that the rate of serious complications with plasmapheresis is lower than that related with intrauterine blood transfusion, this could be an alternative approach to repeated transfusions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: Laboratory characteristics, complement-amplifying conditions, renal biopsy, and genetic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A Hossain

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, consumptive thrombocytopenia, and widespread damage to multiple organs including the kidney. The syndrome has a high mortality necessitating the need for an early diagnosis to limit target organ damage. Because thrombotic microangiopathies present with similar clinical picture, accurate diagnosis of aHUS continues to pose a diagnostic challenge. This article focuses on the role of four distinct aspects of aHUS that assist clinicians in making an accurate diagnosis of aHUS. First, because of the lack of a single specific laboratory test for aHUS, other forms of thrombotic microangiopathies such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and Shiga toxin-associated HUS must be excluded to successfully establish the diagnosis of aHUS. Second, application of the knowledge of complement-amplifying conditions is critically important in making an accurate diagnosis. Third, when available, a renal biopsy can reveal changes consistent with thrombotic microangiopathy. Fourth, genetic mutations are increasingly clarifying the underlying complement dysfunction and gaining importance in the diagnosis and management of patients with aHUS. This review concentrates on the four aspects of aHUS and calls for heightened awareness in making an accurate diagnosis of aHUS.

  5. Familial Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Review of Its Genetic and Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengxiao Bu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is a rare renal disease (two per one million in the USA characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Both sporadic (80% of cases and familial (20% of cases forms are recognized. The study of familial aHUS has implicated genetic variation in multiple genes in the complement system in disease pathogenesis, helping to define the mechanism whereby complement dysregulation at the cell surface level leads to both sporadic and familial disease. This understanding has culminated in the use of Eculizumab as first-line therapy in disease treatment, significantly changing the care and prognosis of affected patients. However, even with this bright outlook, major challenges remain to understand the complexity of aHUS at the genetic level. It is possible that a more detailed picture of aHUS can be translated to an improved understanding of disease penetrance, which is highly variable, and response to therapy, both in the short and long terms.

  6. Acute Systolic Heart Failure Associated with Complement-Mediated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Vaughn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement-mediated hemolytic uremic syndrome (otherwise known as atypical HUS is a rare disorder of uncontrolled complement activation that may be associated with heart failure. We report the case of a 49-year-old female with no history of heart disease who presented with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Given her normal ADAMSTS13 activity, evidence of increased complement activation, and renal biopsy showing evidence of thrombotic microangiopathy, she was diagnosed with complement-mediated HUS. She subsequently developed acute hypoxemic respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary edema requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed evidence of a Takotsubo cardiomyopathy with an estimated left ventricular ejection fraction of 20%, though ischemic cardiomyopathy could not be ruled out. Treatment was initiated with eculizumab. After several failed attempts at extubation, she eventually underwent tracheotomy. She also required hemodialysis to improve her uremia and hypervolemia. After seven weeks of hospitalization and five doses of eculizumab, her renal function and respiratory status improved, and she was discharged in stable condition on room air and independent of hemodialysis. Our case illustrates a rare association between acute systolic heart failure and complement-mediated HUS and highlights the potential of eculizumab in stabilizing even the most critically-ill patients with complement-mediated disease.

  7. Eculizumab Therapy Leads to Rapid Resolution of Thrombocytopenia in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Mou Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eculizumab is highly effective in controlling complement activation in patients with the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS. However, the course of responses to the treatment is not well understood. We reviewed the responses to eculizumab therapy for aHUS. The results show that, in patients with aHUS, eculizumab therapy, when not accompanied with concurrent plasma exchange therapy, led to steady increase in the platelet count and improvement in extra-renal complications within 3 days. By day 7, the platelet count was normal in 15 of 17 cases. The resolution of hemolytic anemia and improvement in renal function were less predictable and were not apparent for weeks to months in two patients. The swift response in the platelet counts was only observed in one of five cases who received concurrent plasma exchange therapy and was not observed in a case of TMA due to gemcitabine/carboplatin. In summary, eculizumab leads to rapid increase in the platelet counts and resolution of extrarenal symptoms in patients with aHUS. Concurrent plasma exchange greatly impedes the response of aHUS to eculizumab therapy. Eculizumab is ineffective for gemcitabine/carboplatin associated TMA.

  8. A noninvasive method for the prediction of fetal hemolytic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Kravchenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to improve the diagnosis of fetal hemolytic disease.Subjects and methods. A study group consisted of 42 pregnant women whose newborn infants had varying degrees of hemolytic disease. The women were divided into 3 subgroups according to the severity of neonatal hemolytic disease: 1 pregnant women whose neonates were born with severe hemolytic disease (n = 14; 2 those who gave birth to babies with moderate hemolytic disease (n = 11; 3 those who delivered infants with mild hemolytic disease (n = 17. A comparison group included 42 pregnant women whose babies were born without signs of hemolytic disease. Curvesfor blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery were analyzed in a fetus of 25 to 39 weeks’ gestation.Results. The peak systolic blood flow velocity was observed in Subgroup 1; however, the indicator did not exceed 1.5 MoM even in severe fetal anemic syndrome. The fetal middle artery blood flow velocity rating scale was divided into 2 zones: 1 the boundary values of peak systolic blood flow velocity from the median to the obtained midscore; 2 the boundary values of peak systolic blood flow velocity of the obtained values of as high as 1.5 MoM.Conclusion. The value of peak systolic blood flow velocity being in Zone 2, or its dynamic changes by transiting to this zone can serve as a prognostic factor in the development of severe fetal hemolytic disease. 

  9. A Newborn Case of “c” Subgroup Mismatch Presenting with Severe Hemolysis and Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Ezgi Yangın Ergon; Senem Alkan Özdemir; Rüya Çolak; Kıymet Çelik; Özgür Olukman; Şebnem Çalkavur

    2017-01-01

    Hemolysis and jaundice related to Rh incompatibility in the neonatal period has decreased substantially due to the widespread use of anti-D gammaglobulin in recent years. Nevertheless, the rate of subgroup mismatch in the etiology of hemolytic diseases of the newborn has increased significantly. In this article an 8-day-old newborn infant with “c” subgroup incompatibility and presenting with severe anemia, in whom hemolysis could be controlled with intravenous immunoglobulin infusion and subg...

  10. Severe hemolytic disease of the newborn in a group B African-American infant delivered by a group O mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabik-Clary, Kathryn; Reddy, Vishnu V B; Benjamin, William H; Boctor, Fouad N

    2006-01-01

    Maternal-fetal ABO incompatibility is a common hematological problem affecting the newborn. In general, hemolysis is minimal and the clinical course is relatively benign, rarely causing the escalating levels of hyperbilirubinemia and significant anemia commonly associated with Rh hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). The incidence of HDN ranges from one in 150 births to 1:3000 births, depending on the degree of anemia and level of serum bilirubin. The etiology of ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn (ABO-HDN) is complex because anti-A and anti-B antibodies are composed mainly of IgM. Since only IgG antibodies cross the placenta, those pregnant women with high levels of IgG anti-A,B, anti-A, or anti-B with an ABO incompatible fetus will be the ones to give birth to an infant with ABO-HDN. We describe a case of a B/Rh positive term newborn born to an O/Rh negative African-American mother demonstrating aggressive hemolysis and a robust response of the bone marrow. This case was successfully managed with phototherapy and simple RBC transfusion without the need for exchange transfusion.

  11. Congenital rubella

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that usually closes shortly after birth remains open ( patent ductus arteriosus ) Narrowing of the large artery that ... prior to pregnancy can prevent congenital rubella. Pregnant women who have not had the vaccine should avoid ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... grams per deciliter (g/dl) for men and less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, ... blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 mmol/L. ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... loss and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. Common causes of blood loss that lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular use of medicines such as aspirin ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ... and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ... Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blocks the intestine from taking up iron. Other medical conditions Other medical conditions that may lead to iron-deficiency anemia ... daily amount of iron. If you have other medical conditions that cause iron-deficiency anemia , such as ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, ... or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ages 1 and 2, especially if they drink a lot ... Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, ... (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend heart-healthy eating and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount of iron. Read less Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials We lead or sponsor many studies related to iron-deficiency anemia. See if you ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron ... was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia. Return to Signs, Symptoms, and Complications to review signs and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency ... NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and ... Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or upset stomach. ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... over 65 years of age had low hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we fund research and development for domestic small businesses that have strong potential ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  13. Idiopathic combined, autoantibody-mediated ADAMTS-13/factor H deficiency in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome in a 17-year-old woman: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patschan Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome is a life-threatening condition with various etiopathogeneses. Without therapy approximately 90% of all patients die from the disease. Case presentation We report the case of a 17-year-old Caucasian woman with widespread hematomas and headache. Due to hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and schistocytosis, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome was suspected and plasma exchange therapy was initiated immediately. Since her thrombocyte level did not increase during the first week of therapy, plasma treatment had to be intensified to a twice-daily schedule. Further diagnostics showed markedly reduced activities of both ADAMTS-13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13 - also known as von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease and factor H. Test results for antibodies against both proteins were positive. While plasma exchange therapy was continued, rituximab was given once weekly for four consecutive weeks. After the last dose, thrombocytes and activities of ADAMTS-13 and factor H increased into the normal range. Our patient improved and was discharged from the hospital. Conclusions Since no clinical symptoms/laboratory findings indicated a malignant or specific autoimmune-mediated disorder, the diagnosis made was thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome due to idiopathic combined, autoantibody-mediated ADAMTS-13/factor H deficiency.

  14. Safety of Sofosbuvir and Ribavirin Combination Therapy in a Patient Who Developed Anemia due to Ribavirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Suii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon (IFN and ribavirin (RBV combination therapy was previously the standard of care for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 2 infection. But, it often induced hemolytic anemia. In 2014, sofosbuvir (SOF was approved for the treatment of chronic HCV genotype 2 in Japan. SOF/RBV therapy is more effective against genotype 2 than IFN/RBV therapy. We report a case of a 74-year-old woman with chronic HCV genotype 2b infection. She received five treatments including RBV and IFN therapy before SOF was approved and all of them were ineffective. Therapies that included RBV induced severe anemia and led to discontinuation of treatment. With pegylated IFN/RBV therapy, the maximum change in hemoglobin (Hb from baseline was −3.7 g/dL. However, SOF/RBV therapy was effective and she achieved sustained virologic response (SVR with a maximum change in Hb from baseline of only −1.2 g/dL. We also found reticulocyte count was very low during treatment in this case and speculate it was one of the reasons that she developed hemolytic anemia with RBV. In conclusion, SOF/RBV therapy is effective and allowed the patient to achieve SVR. An SOF/RBV regimen is safe and effective for patients who have or are at risk of anemia induced by RBV.

  15. Antimicrobial, hemolytic and thrombolytic activities of some new N ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Hemolytic and thrombolytic activities were determined by measuring absorbance before and after incubation of blood cells with test compound. Results: Compound 9d strongly inhibited Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli with zone of ...

  16. Hemolytic activity of Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo A De Carli

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available The hemolytic activity of live isolates and clones of Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus was investigated. The isolates were tested against human erythrocytes. No hemolytic activity was detected by the isolates of T. foetus. Whereas the isolates of T. vaginalis lysed erythrocytes from all human blood groups. No hemolysin released by the parasites could be detected. Our preliminary results suggest that hemolysis depend on the susceptibility of red cell membranes to destabilization and the intervention of cell surface receptors as a mechanism of the hemolytic activity. The mechanism could be subject to strain-species-genera specific variation of trichomonads. The hemolytic activity of T. vaginalis is not due to a hemolysin or to a product of its metabolism. Pretreatment of trichomonads with concanavalin A reduced levels of hemolysis by 40%.

  17. Imaginological characteristics of Fanconi anemia patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis González Mendoza

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA is an autosomal recessive disease characterizedby the presence of bone marrow failure and that generally isaccompanies by diverse congenital malformations and the presenceof myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukaemia. We reporta case of male patient to 6 years old, product of a normal pregnancy,on physical examination his presents microcephaly and four fingersin each hand with absence of the thumbs; the radiological imagesshow to the presence of radial aplasia and absence of the carporadialbones of the upper left limb. Diagnoses impression becomesof Fanconi anemia by laboratory tests. At the time of suspectingthe diagnoses of FA, is important to consider the different diseasesthat by their clinical characteristics and the different congenital malformations they accompany them consider differential diagnoses,and thus to be able to make a suitable therapeutic handling

  18. Congenital amusias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, B; Albouy, P; Caclin, A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the sophisticated music processing reported in the general population, individuals with congenital amusia show deficits in music perception and production. Congenital amusia occurs without brain damage, sensory or cognitive deficits, and has been suggested as a lifelong deficit with genetic origin. Even though recognized for a long time, this disorder has been systematically studied only relatively recently for its behavioral and neural correlates. The currently most investigated hypothesis about the underlying deficits concerns the pitch dimension, notably with impaired pitch discrimination and memory. Anatomic and functional investigations of pitch processing revealed that the amusic brain presents abnormalities in the auditory and inferior frontal cortices, associated with decreased connectivity between these structures. The deficit also impairs processing of pitch in speech material and processing of the time dimension in music for some of the amusic individuals, but does not seem to affect spatial processing. Some studies suggest at least partial dissociation in the disorder between perception and production. Recent studies revealed spared implicit pitch perception in congenital amusia, supporting the power of implicit cognition in the music domain. Current challenges consist in defining different subtypes of congenital amusia as well as developing rehabilitation programs for this "musical handicap." © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular pathogenesis and clinical management of Fanconi anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Younghoon; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder associated with a high frequency of hematological abnormalities and congenital anomalies. Based on multilateral efforts from basic scientists and clinicians, significant advances in our knowledge of FA have been made in recent years. Here we review the clinical features, the diagnostic criteria, and the current and future therapies of FA and describe the current understanding of the molecular basis of the disease. PMID:23114602

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... anemia or who have chronic conditions such as kidney disease or celiac disease may be more likely to ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia? Read more When there is inflammation, your liver makes more of a hormone called hepcidin. Hepcidin ... your abdomen to check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for gastrointestinal bleeding To see if gastrointestinal bleeding is causing your iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order the following procedures to guide treatment . Fecal ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) ... Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility Copyright and Usage No FEAR ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your blood, such as vitamin B12 or folic acid. Visit our Pernicious Anemia Health Topic to learn ... recommend options such as taking your supplements with food, lowering the dose, trying a different type of ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... our clinical trials . Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. ... are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who ...

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ... these usually go away within a day or two. Red blood cell transfusions. These may be used ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more. Read less Reminders Return to Causes to review how blood loss, not consuming the recommended amount ... iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... red blood cells, called hemolysis . Hemolysis, in this case, is caused by strong muscle contractions and the ... to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness ... If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Your ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may ... of other nutrients in your blood, such as vitamin B12 or folic acid. Visit our Pernicious Anemia ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your blood may be normal even if the total amount of iron in your body is low. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... counts, hemoglobin or hematocrit levels, or mean corpuscular volume (MCV) that would suggest anemia. Different tests help ... complete blood count measures hemoglobin and mean corpuscular volume (MCV). Hemoglobin of less than 13 grams per ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors that ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the ... of iron. The recommended daily amounts of iron will depend on your age, sex, and whether you ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as ... tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may ...

  5. Anemia of chronic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... systemic lupus erythematosus , rheumatoid arthritis , and ulcerative colitis Cancer , including lymphoma and Hodgkin disease Long-term infections, such as bacterial endocarditis, osteomyelitis (bone infection), HIV/AIDS , lung abscess, hepatitis B or hepatitis C Symptoms Anemia of ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as a TMRPSS6 gene mutation that causes a person’s body to make too much of a hormone ... anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic female ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People ... make it hard to find the energy to do normal activities. Headache Irregular heartbeat. This is a ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption ... deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend erythropoiesis stimulating agents (esa) . These medicines stimulate the bone marrow to ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may recommend erythropoiesis stimulating agents (esa) . These medicines stimulate the bone marrow to make more red blood ... NHLBI is funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming ... iron-deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and naproxen Certain rare genetic conditions such as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which causes bleeding in the bowels ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. Read ... to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors that increase your risk of ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... striking the ground, such as with marathon runners. Sex Girls and women between the ages of 14 ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron- ... factors , such as if you are following a vegetarian eating pattern, your doctor may recommend changes to ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding ... oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption of iron. If you are pregnant, talk to ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order a blood test called a complete blood count ( ... your risk factors , do a physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . View all trials from ClinicalTrials.gov . Visit Children and Clinical ... Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development ... iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood loss, consuming less than ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... improved health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood donors . NHLBI’s Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program , which began in ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough hemoglobin-carrying red blood cells, your heart has to work harder to move oxygen-rich blood through your ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... in our clinical trials . Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for ... Surgery, upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ... and where to find more information. Causes Your body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through research and ... blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors of future health problems in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as most of a newborn’s iron stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ... This makes it harder to stop bleeding and can increase the risk of iron-deficiency anemia from ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... of Intramural Research , which includes investigators in our Hematology Branch , performs research on anemia. We fund research. ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... whether your bone marrow is healthy and making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. Read less Reminders Return to Causes to review how blood loss, not consuming the recommended amount ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms. More severe iron-deficiency anemia may cause fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. ... in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating Dizziness Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the most common symptom. ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of ... anemia , such as bleeding in the digestive or urinary tract or heavy menstrual bleeding, your doctor will want ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to learn more about iron-deficiency anemia, our role in research and clinical trials to improve health, ... of Blood Diseases and Resources (DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ... to your doctor if you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, unhealthy environments, family ... 12 months, especially if they are fed only breast milk or are fed formula that is not fortified ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding ... of iron-deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic female carriers who have heavy menstrual periods, may be ... anemia. Endurance activities and athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance athletes ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ... heavy menstrual bleeding, your doctor will want to control these other conditions to prevent you from developing ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough hemoglobin-carrying ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... red blood cells, called hemolysis . Hemolysis, in this case, is caused by strong muscle contractions and the ... anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that NHLBI is ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk ... upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating Dizziness Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the ... Our support of SBIR/STTR programs is helping advance research in iron-deficiency anemia, in part by ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ... Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... family history and genetics , lifestyle habits, or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron ... Signs, Symptoms, and Complications Iron-deficiency anemia can range from mild to severe. People with mild or ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron to prepare for blood loss during delivery. Screening and Prevention Your doctor may screen you for ... and symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for ...

  1. Protective effect of ethyl pyruvate on mice sperm parameters in phenylhydrazine induced hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozafari, Ali Akbar; Shahrooz, Rasoul; Ahmadi, Abbas; Malekinjad, Hassan; Mardani, Karim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the protective effect of ethyl pyruvate (EP) on sperm quality parameters, testosterone level and malondialdehyde (MDA) in phenylhydrazine (PHZ) treated mice. For this purpose, 32 NMRI mice with the age range of 8 to 10 weeks, weight average 26.0 ± 2.0 g, were randomly divided into four equal groups. The control group (1) received normal saline (0. 1 mL per day) by intraperitoneal injection (IP). Group 2 (PHZ group) was treated with initial dose of PHZ (8 mg 100 g(-1), IP) followed by 6 mg 100 g(-1) , IP every 48 hr. Group 3, (Group PHZ+EP) received PHZ (according to the previous prescription) with EP (40 mg kg(-1), daily, IP). Ethyl pyruvate group (4) received only EP (40 mg kg(-1), daily, IP). Treatment period was 35 days. After euthanasia, sperms from caudal region of epididymis were collected and the total mean sperm count, sperm viability, motility and morphology were determined. Testis tissue MDA and serum testosterone levels of all experimental groups were also evaluated. A considerable reduction in mean percentage of number, natural morphology of sperm, sperm motility and viability and serum testosterone concentration besides DNA injury increment among mice treating with PHZ in comparison with control group were observed. However, in PHZ+EP group the above mentioned parameters were improved. This study showed that PHZ caused induction of toxicity on sperm parameters and reduction of testosterone as well as the increment of MDA level and EP as an antioxidant could reduce destructive effects of PHZ on sperm parameters, testosterone level and lipid peroxidation.

  2. Splenic myeloid metaplasia in warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA): a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguiano-Álvarez, Víctor Manuel; Hernández-Company, Alonso; Hamdan-Pérez, Nashla; Montante-M, Daniel; Zúñiga-Tamayo, Diego A; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Sergio; Pomerantz, Alan; Tuna-Aguilar, Elena J

    2018-03-01

    Splenic myeloid metaplasia (SMM) is a kind of extramedullary hematopoiesis, whereas its clinical significance in wAIHA remains unclear. The aim of this study is evaluating the frequency and clinical characteristics of SMM, compared with splenic-congestion (SC). We included patients with wAIHA treated in a Mexican tertiary hospital between January 1992 and December 2015. All patients received steroids as first-line treatment and splenectomy as second-line treatment. Among the thirty-six splenectomized patients, 15 (41.6%) and 21 (58.4%) were diagnosed as SMM and SC, respectively. No differences were found in clinical characteristics between two groups. SMM patients showed lower platelet count (147×10 9 /L vs. 240×10 9 /L, P =0.02) and higher presence of anti-dsDNA antibodies (40% vs. 4.7%, P =0.01) than SC patients. Although the complete response (CR) rate with first-line treatment was lower in SMM patients (13.3% vs. 47.6%; P =0.04), post-splenectomy median disease-free-survival (DFS) was longer (16.2 mo vs. 5.1 mo; P =0.19). Univariate/multivariate analysis showed that achieving CR during first-line treatment (OR 0.3, 95% CI: 0.03-0.94, P =0.03) and higher platelet count (OR 0.99, 95% CI: 0.98-0.99, P =0.03) were protective factors for SMM; and anti-dsDNA titer higher than 9.6 IU/dL was a risk factor for SMM (OR 2.76, 95% CI: 1.48-5.14, P SMM have different biological profiles with those without SMM. This study is the first trial evaluating the significance of histopathological spleen findings and their association with rheumatologic profile.

  3. Anesthesia for a patient with Fanconi anemia for developmental dislocation of the hip: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer Dogan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is a rare autosomal recessive inherited bone marrow failure syndrome with congenital and hematological abnormalities. Literature regarding the anesthetic management in these patients is limited. A management of a developmental dislocation of the hip was described in a patient with fanconi anemia. Because of the heterogeneous nature, a patient with fanconi anemia should be established thorough preoperative evaluation in order to diagnose on clinical features. In conclusion, we preferred caudal anesthesia in this patient with fanconi anemia without thrombocytopenia, because of avoiding from N2O, reducing amount of anesthetic, existing microcephaly, hypothyroidism and elevated liver enzymes, providing postoperative analgesia, and reducing amount of analgesic used postoperatively. Keywords: Fanconi anemia, Caudal anesthesia, Developmental dislocation of the hip

  4. Molecular defects identified by whole exome sequencing in a child with Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhaojing; Geng, Juan; Yao, Ru-En; Li, Caihua; Ying, Daming; Shen, Yongnian; Ying, Lei; Yu, Yongguo; Fu, Qihua

    2013-11-10

    Fanconi anemia is a rare genetic disease characterized by bone marrow failure, multiple congenital malformations, and an increased susceptibility to malignancy. At least 15 genes have been identified that are involved in the pathogenesis of Fanconi anemia. However, it is still a challenge to assign the complementation group and to characterize the molecular defects in patients with Fanconi anemia. In the current study, whole exome sequencing was used to identify the affected gene(s) in a boy with Fanconi anemia. A recurring, non-synonymous mutation was found (c.3971C>T, p.P1324L) as well as a novel frameshift mutation (c.989_995del, p.H330LfsX2) in FANCA gene. Our results indicate that whole exome sequencing may be useful in clinical settings for rapid identification of disease-causing mutations in rare genetic disorders such as Fanconi anemia. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Case of Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia, Hemorrhagic Anemia-Induced Fetal Hydrops, Maternal Mirror Syndrome, and Human Chorionic Gonadotropin–Induced Thyrotoxicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venu Jain

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT can be a cause of severe fetal thrombocytopenia, with the common presentation being intracranial hemorrhage in the fetus, usually in the third trimester. A very unusual case of fetal anemia progressed to hydrops. This was further complicated by maternal Mirror syndrome and human chorionic gonadotropin–induced thyrotoxicosis. Without knowledge of etiology, and possibly due to associated cardiac dysfunction, fetal transfusion resulted in fetal demise. Subsequent testing revealed FNAIT as the cause of severe hemorrhagic anemia. In cases with fetal anemia without presence of red blood cell antibodies, FNAIT must be ruled out as a cause prior to performing fetal transfusion. Fetal heart may adapt differently to acute hemorrhagic anemia compared with a more subacute hemolytic anemia.

  6. Intrauterine transfusion and non-invasive treatment options for hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn - review on current management and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiers, Carolien; van Kamp, Inge; Oepkes, Dick; Lopriore, Enrico

    2017-04-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) remains a serious pregnancy complication which can lead to severe fetal anemia, hydrops and perinatal death. Areas covered: This review focusses on the current prenatal management, treatment with intrauterine transfusion (IUT) and promising non-invasive treatment options for HDFN. Expert commentary: IUTs are the cornerstone in prenatal management of HDFN and have significantly improved perinatal outcome in the past decades. IUT is now a relatively safe procedure, however the risk of complications is still high when performed early in the second trimester. Non-invasive management using intravenous immunoglobulin may be a safe alternative and requires further investigation.

  7. A case of coombs-positive severe late anemia without hyperbilirubinemia, refractory to blood transfusion, improved with immunoglobulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Kushwah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhesus hemolytic disease of newborn is a well-known disease with early and late complications mainly manifesting as severe hyperbilirubinemia requiring prompt treatment such as exchange transfusion and immunoglobulins. We report a case of Coombs-positive severe late anemia without hyperbilirubinemia which presented with features such as sepsis and failure to gain weight. Baby was refractory to blood transfusion initially, but later on successfully improved with immunoglobulins.

  8. Clinical characteristics of hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to cobalamin C disorder in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi-Liang; Song, Wen-Qi; Peng, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Xiao-Rong; He, Le-Jian; Fu, Li-Bing

    2015-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the clinical characteristics of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) secondary to cobalamin C disorder (cbl-C disorder). We reviewed retrospectively the medical records of 3 children with HUS secondary to cbl-C disorder who had been treated between April 1, 2009 and October 31, 2013. The 3 patients with HUS secondary to cbl-C disorder presented with progressive hemolytic anemia, acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, poor feeding, and failure to thrive. Two of the 3 patients once had high blood pressure. The mutations of c.609G>A (p.W203X), c.217C>T (p.R73X) and c.365A>T (p.H122L) in the methylmalonic aciduria (cobalamin deficiency) cbl-C type, with homocystinuria gene were detected in the 3 patients. In these patients the levels of lactate dehydrogenase and homocysteine in serum were elevated and the level of methylmalonic acid (MMA) in urine was also elevated. After treatment with hydroxocobalamin, 2 patients were discharged with no obvious abnormal growth and neurological development and 1 patient died of multiple organ failure. The results of this study demonstrated that cbl-C disorder should be investigated in any child presenting with HUS. The high concentrations of homocysteine and MMA could be used for timely recognization of the disease. Once the high levels of plasma homocystein and/or plasma or urine MMA are detected, the treatment with parenteral hydroxocobalamin should be prescribed immediately. The early diagnosis and treatment would contribute to the good prognosis of the disease.

  9. Hemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn: Modern Practice and Future Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Delaney, Meghan

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) sensitization occurs in some women in response to exposure to paternally derived RBC antigens during pregnancy or to nonself antigens on transfused RBCs during their lifetime. Once sensitized, future pregnancies may be at risk for hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Although great strides have been made over the past few decades in terms of identifying blood group antigens and in predicting fetal anemia through the use of noninvasive monitoring, many questions remain in terms of understanding RBC alloimmunization risk factors, preventative therapies, and treatment strategies. At the present time, there is room for improvement in these areas in both developed and developing countries. Evidence-based, universal guidelines describing recommended RBC antigen matching transfusion strategies for girls or women, before pregnancy or during intrauterine transfusions, would be welcomed. A better understanding of the mechanism(s) of action of Rh immunoglobulin, first introduced more than half of a century ago and one of the most successful immunoprophylaxis therapies in existence today, would also be a large step forward. For example, answers to questions of the role(s) that fetal RBC clearance, antigen masking, antigen modulation, and immune suppression play in the effectiveness of Rh immunoglobulin may help to guide the development of novel preventative therapies during pregnancy for immunization to RhD and non-RhD antigens. Furthermore, a better understanding of the importance of anti-RhD or other alloantibody glycosylation patterns may be beneficial not only in developing such novel immunoprophylaxis therapies but also in predicting the clinical significance of existing maternal alloantibodies. One other area of need includes the development of therapies beyond intrauterine transfusions to mitigate the dangers of maternal alloantibodies to developing fetuses. We challenge physicians, scientists, and funding agencies to prioritize studies of

  10. Congenital Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estey, Chelsie M

    2016-03-01

    There are several types of hydrocephalus, which are characterized based on the location of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation. Physical features of animals with congenital hydrocephalus may include a dome-shaped skull, persistent fontanelle, and bilateral ventrolateral strabismus. Medical therapy involves decreasing the production of CSF. The most common surgical treatment is placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Postoperative complications may include infection, blockage, drainage abnormalities, and mechanical failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Congenital diplopodia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brower, Jason S.; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Costouros, John G.; Boakes, Jennette; Greenspan, Adam

    2003-01-01

    Diplopodia, or duplicated foot, is a rare congenital anomaly. It differs from polydactyly in that supernumerary metatarsal and tarsal bones are present as well as extra digits. Only a few cases of this anomaly have been reported in the literature to date. We present a newborn male without intrauterine teratogen exposure who was born with a duplicate foot of the left lower extremity and imperforate anus. (orig.)

  12. [Fanconi Anemia, Complementation Group D1 Caused by Biallelic Mutations of BRCA2 Gene--Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchmajerová, A; Švojgr, K; Novotná, D; Macháčková, E; Sumerauer, D; Smíšek, P; Kodet, R; Kynčl, M; Křepelová, A; Foretová, L

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, clinically and genetically heterogeneous, characterized by typical clinical features, such as short stature, microcephaly, skeletal abnormalities, abnormal skin pigmentations, developmental delay and congenital heart, kidney anomalies etc. Pancytopenia leading to bone marrow failure occurs in the first decade. Patients with Fanconi anemia have a high risk of hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. The diagnosis of Fanconi anemia is based on cytogenetic testing for increased rates of spontaneous chromosomal breakage and increased sensitivity to diepoxybutane or mitomycin C. Fanconi anemia is a heterogeneous disorder, at least 15 complementation groups are described, and 15 genes in which mutations are responsible for all of the 15 Fanconi anemia complementation groups have been identified. Unlike other Fanconi anemia complementation groups, for complementation group D1 (FANCD1), the bone marrow failure is not a typical feature, but early-onset leukemia and specific solid tumors, most often medulloblastoma and Wilms tumor, are typical for this complementation group.

  13. Congenital toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, François; Wallon, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Congenital toxoplasmosis results from the transplacental transmission of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii after a maternal infection acquired in pregnancy. Prevalence of congenital infection ranges from 0.1 to 0.3 per 1000 live births. The maternal-fetal transmission rate increases with gestational age at maternal seroconversion, from less than 15% at 13 weeks of gestation to over 70% at 36 weeks. Conversely, the later the maternal infection, the lower the risk of symptomatic congenital infection (infections acquired during the third trimester are most often asymptomatic at birth). Prenatal diagnosis is currently performed by PCR analysis in amniotic fluid. Antenatal management and treatment vary considerably among countries. In some European countries, maternal infections are detected through serological screening allowing a prompt treatment with spiramycin, which is expected to reduce the risk of vertical transmission. If PCR analysis in amniotic fluid is positive or if maternal infection was acquired in the third trimester of pregnancy, a combination with pyrimethamine and sulphonamide is given until delivery. Benefits of antenatal treatments remain controversial. Infected newborns are prescribed pyrimethamine and sulphonamide for 12 months. Despite antenatal and postnatal treatment, chorioretinitis can occur at any age (prevalence>20% at 10 years of age): long-term ophthalmological follow-up remains necessary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cancer-related anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rzaeq, Hikmat N.

    2004-01-01

    Anemia is the most common hematological abnormality in cancer patients is often under-recognized and undertreated. The pathogenesis of cancer anemia is complex and most of time multifactorial; involving factors related to the tumor itself or its therapy. While anemia can be present in a wide range of symptoms, involing almost every organ, it is beleived that it contributes much to cancer-related-fatigue, one of the most common symptoms in cancer patients. In addition there is increasing evidence to suggest that anemia is an independent factor adversely affecting tumor reponse and patient survival. While blood transfusion was the only option to treat cancer related anemia, the use of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) is becomig the new standard of care, more so with the recent studies demonstrating the feasibility of a sigle weekly injection .Things are even getting better with the recent approval of a new form of rHuEPO; Darbepoetin an analogue with a 3-fold longer half-life. In addition to its effects in raising homoglobin, several well controlled studies demonstrated decrease in transfusion requirementsand better qualify of life assessed objectively using standard assesments scales. (author)

  15. Severe anemia in Malawian children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calis, Job C. J.; Phiri, Kamija S.; Faragher, E. Brian; Brabin, Bernard J.; Bates, Imelda; Cuevas, Luis E.; de Haan, Rob J.; Phiri, Ajib I.; Malange, Pelani; Khoka, Mirriam; Hulshof, Paul J. M.; van Lieshout, Lisette; Beld, Marcel G. H. M.; teo, Yik Y.; Rockett, Kirk A.; Richardson, Anna; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Boele van Hensbroek, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. Methods We conducted a case-control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration, <5.0 g per deciliter) and

  16. Severe anemia in Malawian children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calis, Job Cj; Phiri, Kamija S.; Faragher, E. Brian; Brabin, Bernard J.; Bates, Imelda; Cuevas, Luis E.; de Haan, Rob J.; Phiri, Ajib I.; Malange, Pelani; Khoka, Mirriam; Hulshof, Paul Jm; van Lieshout, Lisette; Beld, Marcel Ghm; teo, Yik Y.; Rockett, Kirk A.; Richardson, Anna; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; van Hensbroek, Michaël Boele

    2016-01-01

    Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. We conducted a case-control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration, <5.0 g per deciliter) and 757 preschool

  17. Severe Anemia in Malawian Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calis, J.C.J.; Kamija, S.P.; Faragher, E.B.; Brabin, B.J.; Bates, I.; Cuevas, L.E.; Haan, de R.J.; Phiri, A.I.; Malange, P.; Khoka, M.; Hulshof, P.J.M.; Lieshout, L.; Beld, M.G.H.M.; Teo, Y.Y.; Rockett, K.A.; Richardson, A.; Kwiatkowski, D.P.; Molyneux, M.E.; Hensbroek, van M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. Methods We conducted a case¿control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration,

  18. Anemia in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsson, Andreas; Andersson, Charlotte; Andell, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    predictor of mortality, with the highest mortality observed for macrocytic anemia, which was less prevalent than microcytic and normocytic anemia. Dietary intake of iron and vitamin B12 were significantly lower and use of antithrombotic medications was significantly higher in subjects with anemia. The World...

  19. [Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, A; Meier, H P; Straub, R; Gerber, V

    2009-04-01

    Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is a reportable, eradicable epizootic disease caused by the equine lentivirus of the retrovirus family which affects equids only and occurs worldwide. The virus is transmitted by blood, mainly by sanguivorous insects. The main symptoms of the disease are pyrexia, apathy, loss of body condition and weight, anemia, edema and petechia. However, infected horses can also be inapparent carriers without any overt signs. The disease is diagnosed by serological tests like the Coggins test and ELISA tests. Presently, Switzerland is offi cially free from EIA. However, Switzerland is permanently at risk of introducing the virus as cases of EIA have recently been reported in different European countries.

  20. Quiescent complement in nonhuman primates during E coli Shiga toxin-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic microangiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Benjamin C; Mayer, Chad L; Leibowitz, Caitlin S; Stearns-Kurosawa, D J; Kurosawa, Shinichiro

    2013-08-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) produce ribosome-inactivating Shiga toxins (Stx1, Stx2) responsible for development of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and acute kidney injury (AKI). Some patients show complement activation during EHEC infection, raising the possibility of therapeutic targeting of complement for relief. Our juvenile nonhuman primate (Papio baboons) models of endotoxin-free Stx challenge exhibit full spectrum HUS, including thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and AKI with glomerular thrombotic microangiopathy. There were no significant increases in soluble terminal complement complex (C5b-9) levels after challenge with lethal Stx1 (n = 6) or Stx2 (n = 5) in plasma samples from T0 to euthanasia at 49.5 to 128 hours post-challenge. d-dimer and cell injury markers (HMGB1, histones) confirmed coagulopathy and cell injury. Thus, complement activation is not required for the development of thrombotic microangiopathy and HUS induced by EHEC Shiga toxins in these preclinical models, and benefits or risks of complement inhibition should be studied further for this infection.

  1. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn owing to anti-U, successfully treated with repeated intrauterine transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strindberg, Johanna; Lundahl, Joachim; Ajne, Gunilla

    2013-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) owing to anti-U has rarely been reported. U is part of the MNS system.M and N glycoproteins are located on glycophorin A (GPA); Sand s antigens are on glycophorin B (GPB). Individuals who lack GPB are S- and s- and also lack U. The U- phenotype occurs almost exclusively in the African population and has a very low frequency (0.25%). Anti-U is of immunoglobulin G class and can cause hemolytic transfusion reaction and HDFN. In this report we present the use of a noninvasive method to detect anemia in the fetus and the subsequent use of intrauterine transfusion(IUT) with blood of a very rare phenotype. For the first time, we used deglycerolized and 3-week-old red blood cell units for IUT without signs of adverse reactions and with the expected effect on the hemoglobin value. We conclude that this transfusion strategy could be applied safely.

  2. Congenital syphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Kyung Soo; Hur, Don

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, marked increase in incidence of congenital syphilis has occurred throughout the world due to changes in social norms and development of penicillin-resistant strains. Early diagnosis plays an important role in congenital syphilis as the clinical manifestations may simulate many other conditions in the paediatric age group. The authors analyzed 52 cases of congenital syphilis admitted to the department of paediatrics, Chosun University Hospital, clinically and radiologically. Among them, 18 cases were born in this hospital and 34 cases were admitted from OPD, during the period of 8 years from January, 1975 to December, 1982. The results obtained were as follows; 1. In 28 of 34 cases (82%), the first clinical manifestations were below the age of 3 months. 2. Among the 52 cases, a male predominance was observed with a male to female ratio of 2 : 1. 3. The serologic test (VDRL) of the 52 studied cases showed reactive response in 49 cases (94%), and that of syphilitic mothers except 6 cases, reactive in all studied cases. 4. The major manifestations of the 52 cases were bone tenderness (12%) and swelling of the joints (7%) in skeletal system, hepatosplenomegaly (79%) and skin lesions (73%) in extraskeletal one. 5. The radiological skeletal changes were detected in 45 of 52 cases (87%), and the commonest findings were detected in 45 of 52 cases (87%), and the commonest findings were metaphysitis (83%) and periostitis (81%). The most characteristic type of metaphysitis were transverse trophic line (74%) and zone of rarefaction (65%). 6. The commonest bones to be affected were growing metaphyses of the long bones, particulary about the wrist and the knee. The order of frequency were radius (80%), uina (80%), tibia (77%), femur (69%) and humerus (40%)

  3. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease following exchange transfusion 96 newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatami S.F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease of the newborn is a common cause of clinical jaundice and causes two-thirds of the hemolytic disease in newborns. This study was undertaken to determine the frequency of ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease and its complications in newborns undergoing exchange transfusion.Methods: This prospective and descriptive study was performed in jaundiced newborn infants during a three-year period. Inclusion criteria were: maternal blood type O, newborn blood type A or B, rising indirect hyperbilirubinemia in the first two days of life, positive immunohematologic test for newborns and exchange transfusion. Exclusion criteria were: incomplete information, other accompanying diseases that induce hyperbilirubinemia. All newborn infants received phototherapy before and after exchange transfusion. We did not use intravenous immunoglobulin, hemoxygenase inhibitor drugs and blood products before exchange transfusion.Results: Double-volume exchange transfusion via umbilical cord catheter was performed in 96 patients, 19 (20% of whom suffered from ABO incompatibility. Of these 19 newborns, two-thirds (13 were preterm infants. The minimum level of serum bilirubin was 10 mg/dl and the maximum serum bilirubin level was 35 mg/dl. In six patients (32% serum bilirubin levels were >25mg/dl. The most common blood group was type A for newborns. Immunohematologic tests were positive in 84% of the mothers. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease was the fourth and second most common reasons for blood exchange transfusion in preterm and term infants, respectively. Laboratory complications were more common than clinical complications. The etiology of 48% of the alloimmunization and 42% of the hemolytic disease in these newborns was ABO incompatibility.Conclusions: Mothers with blood group O and newborns with blood group A or B with positive immunohematologic tests in first hours of life are at high risk for hemolytic disease

  4. [The importance of antenatal immunoprophylaxis for prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcević, Mirta; Mataija, Marina; Sović, Dragica; Dodig, Javorka; Matijević, Ratko; Kukuruzović, Monika

    2011-03-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) is a consequence of maternal alloimmunization against fetal red blood cell antigens. Alloimmunization against D antigen from Rhesus (Rh) blood group system is particularly important because of its strong immunogenicity. During the last few decades, the introduction of RhD prophylaxis by postpartum administration of anti-D immunoglobulin to RhD negative women, now improved with antenatal prophylaxis, has led to a dramatic decrease in perinatal mortality and morbidity from HDFN. However, severe cases have not disappeared, mostly due to prophylaxis failure. In our case, inappropriate prenatal care during the first pregnancy in an RhD negative mother resulted in primary immunization. In the next pregnancy with an RhD positive child, the mother's secondary immune response was extremely strong and led to early development of severe fetal anemia. The fetus survived thanks to the treatment with intrauterine transfusions (IUT), but they caused suppression of erythropoiesis, which lasted for months after birth. The long lasting, late anemia was treated with repeated postnatal red cell transfusions and recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). Despite the severity of HDFN in our case, the short-term outcome is good. The boy has normal growth until now, but due to the possibility of an adverse long-term neurodevelopmental outcome, this case requires continuous follow up. It also reminds of the fact that RhD alloimmunization remains an actual problem in daily routine. Antenatal prophylaxis is a crucial step in quality care of those who are at a risk of HDFN.

  5. Association of ITPA polymorphisms rs6051702/rs1127354 instead of rs7270101/rs1127354 as predictor of ribavirin-associated anemia in chronic hepatitis C treated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Avolio, Antonio; De Nicolò, Amedeo; Cusato, Jessica; Ciancio, Alessia; Boglione, Lucio; Strona, Silvia; Cariti, Giuseppe; Troshina, Giulia; Caviglia, Gian Paolo; Smedile, Antonina; Rizzetto, Mario; Di Perri, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    Functional variants rs7270101 and rs1127354 of inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) were recently found to protect against ribavirin (RBV)-induced hemolytic anemia. However, no definitive data are yet available on the role of no functional rs6051702 polymorphism. Since a simultaneous evaluation of the three ITPA SNPs for hemolytic anemia has not yet been investigated, we aimed to understand the contribution of each SNPs and its potential clinical use to predict anemia in HCV treated patients. A retrospective analysis included 379 HCV treated patients. The ITPA variants rs6051702, rs7270101 and rs1127354 were genotyped and tested for association with achieving anemia at week 4. We also investigated, using multivariate logistic regression, the impact of each single and paired associated polymorphism on anemia onset. All SNPs were associated with Hb decrease. The carrier of at least one variant allele in the functional ITPA SNPs was associated with a lower decrement of Hb, as compared to patients without a variant allele. In multivariate logistic regression analyses the carrier of a variant allele in the rs6051702/rs1127354 association (OR=0.11, p=1.75×10(-5)) and Hb at baseline (OR=1.51, p=1.21×10(-4)) were independently associated with protection against clinically significant anemia at week 4. All ITPA polymorphisms considered were shown to be significantly associated with anemia onset. A multivariate regression model based on ITPA genetic polymorphisms was developed for predicting the risk of anemia. Considering the characterization of pre-therapy anemia predictors, rs6051702 SNP in association to rs1127354 is more informative in order to avoid this relevant adverse event. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ribavirin-induced anemia in hepatitis C virus patients undergoing combination therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeja M Krishnan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The current standard of care for hepatitis C virus (HCV infection - combination therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin - elicits sustained responses in only ∼50% of the patients treated. No alternatives exist for patients who do not respond to combination therapy. Addition of ribavirin substantially improves response rates to interferon and lowers relapse rates following the cessation of therapy, suggesting that increasing ribavirin exposure may further improve treatment response. A key limitation, however, is the toxic side-effect of ribavirin, hemolytic anemia, which often necessitates a reduction of ribavirin dosage and compromises treatment response. Maximizing treatment response thus requires striking a balance between the antiviral and hemolytic activities of ribavirin. Current models of viral kinetics describe the enhancement of treatment response due to ribavirin. Ribavirin-induced anemia, however, remains poorly understood and precludes rational optimization of combination therapy. Here, we develop a new mathematical model of the population dynamics of erythrocytes that quantitatively describes ribavirin-induced anemia in HCV patients. Based on the assumption that ribavirin accumulation decreases erythrocyte lifespan in a dose-dependent manner, model predictions capture several independent experimental observations of the accumulation of ribavirin in erythrocytes and the resulting decline of hemoglobin in HCV patients undergoing combination therapy, estimate the reduced erythrocyte lifespan during therapy, and describe inter-patient variations in the severity of ribavirin-induced anemia. Further, model predictions estimate the threshold ribavirin exposure beyond which anemia becomes intolerable and suggest guidelines for the usage of growth hormones, such as erythropoietin, that stimulate erythrocyte production and avert the reduction of ribavirin dosage, thereby improving treatment response. Our model thus facilitates, in

  7. Twin pregnancy complicated by severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-g and anti-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevett, Thomas N; Moise, Kenneth J

    2005-11-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-G antibodies is rare, and in most previously reported cases, leads to a mild anemia. The RhG antigen is usually found in association with both RhD and RhC. We report a case of a twin pregnancy affected by both anti-G and anti-C alloantibodies leading to severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn requiring multiple intrauterine transfusions and prolonged postnatal therapy. A patient with a prolonged history of previously affected pregnancies due to anti-D and anti-C was subsequently found to be affected with anti-G instead. She required aggressive therapy during her pregnancy, initially with intravenous immune globulin and plasmapheresis until umbilical blood sampling and intrauterine transfusions were feasible. Although hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-G antibodies is rare and usually mild, these pregnancies should be followed up closely and in utero therapy should be offered if necessary.

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) ... We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... This is sometimes used to deliver iron through a blood vessel to increase iron levels in the blood. One benefit of IV iron ... over 65 years of age had low hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... infection. A history of gastrointestinal surgery, such as weight-loss surgery—especially gastric bypass—or gastrectomy. Certain rare ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and ... of Health [NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or even heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, ... Upper endoscopy to look for bleeding in the esophagus, stomach, and the first part of the ... blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program now includes participants with anemia, which ...

  18. Anemia - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... XYZ List of All Topics All Anemia - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated on 30 April 2018

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... supplements. Iron supplements can change how certain medicines work. Your doctor may suggest check-ups to make sure your ... To prevent complications from iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may ... during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  20. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... raise your risk for this type of anemia: Alcoholism Eating overcooked food Poor diet (often seen in the poor, the older people, and people who do not eat fresh fruits or vegetables) Pregnancy Folic acid is needed to help a baby ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Services’ National Institutes of Health (NIH)—the Nation’s biomedical research agency that makes important scientific discoveries to improve ... efforts for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that ... This could help develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough hemoglobin-carrying red blood cells, your heart has to work harder to move oxygen-rich blood through your ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  4. Anemia and School Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia may ... as a TMRPSS6 gene mutation that causes a person’s body to make too much of a hormone ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... 2, especially if they drink a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have ... our Pernicious Anemia Health Topic to learn more. Bone marrow tests help your doctor see whether your ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to advancing science and translating discoveries into clinical practice to promote the prevention and treatment of heart, ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin ... resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and save lives. We are committed to advancing science and translating discoveries into clinical practice to promote the prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through ...

  12. Twin anemia polycythemia sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaghekke, Femke

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we describe that Twin Anemia Polycythemia Sequence (TAPS) is a form of chronic feto-fetal transfusion in monochorionic (identical) twins based on a small amount of blood transfusion through very small anastomoses. For the antenatal diagnosis of TAPS, Middle Cerebral Artery – Peak

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron ... anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the body. When your heart has to work harder, this can lead to several conditions: irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias , a heart murmur , an ... chronic conditions, iron-deficiency anemia can make their condition worse or result in treatments not working as well. Look for Diagnosis will discuss any ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  17. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program now includes ... Studies (REDS) program Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI ...

  19. Study of chronic hemolytic anaemia patients in Rio de Janeiro: prevalence of anti-human parvovirus B19 IgG antibodies and the developement aplastic crises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANT'ANNA Anadayr L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of anti-human parvovirus B19 IgG antibodies was determined in sera from 165 chronic hemolytic anemia patients, receiving medical care at Instituto Estadual de Hematologia (IEHE, Rio de Janeiro, during the year of 1994. This sample represents around 10% of the chronic hemolytic anemia patients attending at IEHE. Most of these patients (140 have sickle cell disease. Anti-B19 IgG antibodies were detected in 32.1% of patients. No statistically significant difference (p > 0.05 was seen between IgG antibody prevalence in male (27.8% and female (35.5% patients. Anti-B19 IgG antibodies were more frequent in older (37.6% than younger (28.2% than 20 years old patients, although this difference had no statistical significance (p > 0.05. Anti-B19 IgG antibody prevalence showed that 67.9% of patients enrolled in the study were susceptible to B19 acute infection. With the aim to detect acute B19 infection, patients follow up continued until February 1996. During this period four patients presented transient aplastic crisis due to human parvovirus B19 as confirmed by the detection of specific IgM antibodies. All four patients were younger than 20 years old, and 3 were younger than 10 years old. Three of them were sickle cell disease patients. Three of the four acute B19 infection occurred during 1994 springtime.

  20. Unusual causes of abdominal pain: sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shahid; Shahid, Rabia K; Russo, Linda A

    2005-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia and vaso-occlusive painful crises. The vascular occlusion in sickle cell disease is a complex process and accounts for the majority of the clinical manifestation of the disease. Abdominal pain is an important component of vaso-occlusive painful crises. It often represents a substantial diagnostic challenge in this population of patients. These episodes are often attributed to micro-vessel occlusion and infarcts of mesentery and abdominal viscera. Abdominal pain due to sickle cell vaso-occlusive crisis is often indistinguishable from an acute intra-abdominal disease process such as acute cholecystitis, acute pancreatitis, hepatic infarction, ischemic colitis and acute appendicitis. In the majority of cases, however, no specific cause is identified and spontaneous resolution occurs. This chapter will focus on etiologies, pathophysiology and management of abdominal pain in patients with sickle cell disease.

  1. Parvovirus B19 infection in Tunisian patients with sickle-cell anemia and acute erythroblastopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zili Mohamed

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human parvovirus B19 is the etiologic agent of erythema infectiosum in children. It is also associated with other clinical manifestations in different target groups. Patients with chronic hemolytic anemia are at high risk of developing acute erythroblastopenia following infection by the virus. They usually become highly viremic and pose an increased risk of virus transmission. Close monitoring of such high risk groups is required for epidemiologic surveillance and disease prevention activities. Here we report a molecular epidemiological study on B19 virus infection in Tunisian patients with chronic hemolytic anemia. Methods This study was conducted on 92 young chronic hemolytic anemia patients who attended the same ward at the National Bone Marrow Transplantation Center of Tunis and 46 controls from a different hospital. Screening for IgM and IgG anti-B19 antibodies was performed using commercially available enzyme immunoassays and B19 DNA was detected by nested PCR in the overlapping VP1/VP2 region. DNA was sequenced using dideoxy-terminator cycle sequencing technology. Results Anti-parvovirus B19 IgG antibodies were detected in 26 of 46 sickle-cell anemia patients, 18 of 46 β-thalassemia and 7 of 46 controls. Anti-parvovirus B19 IgM antibodies were detected only in 4 of the sickle-cell anemia patients: two siblings and two unrelated who presented with acute erythroblastopenia at the time of blood collection for this study and had no history of past transfusion. B19 DNA was detected only in sera of these four patients and the corresponding 288 bp nested DNA amplicons were sequenced. The sequences obtained were all identical and phylogenetic analysis showed that they belonged to a new B19 virus strain of Genotype1. Conclusion A new parvovirus B19 strain of genotype1 was detected in four Tunisian patients with sickle-cell anemia. Virus transmission appeared to be nosocomial and resulted in acute erythroblastopenia in the four

  2. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn in the molecular era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Ross M

    2016-02-01

    Maternal-fetal red cell antigen incompatibility can lead to alloimmunization, maternal immunoglobulin transplacental transfer, and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). The use of routine antenatal anti-D prophylaxis (RAADP) has sharply decreased the incidence of and mortality from HDFN due to RhD allosensitization. The ability to identify pregnancies/fetuses at risk of HDFN has significantly improved due to paternal molecular RHD zygosity testing, and non-invasive fetal molecular diagnostics for detecting putative antigen(s) (notably RhD) in fetuses utilizing cff-DNA in maternal plasma. Fetal RHD genotyping using cff-DNA has become increasingly accurate for fetal RHD detection, prompting some countries to implement targeted RAADP through mass screening programs of RhD-negative pregnant women. Along with middle cerebral artery Doppler ultrasonography for predicting fetal anemia, non-invasive fetal molecular diagnostics have greatly decreased the need for invasive diagnostic procedures in pregnancies at risk for severe HDFN. This review highlights these molecular advancements in HDFN-related prenatal diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Case report: Severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-C+G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernman, Riina; Stefanovic, Vedran; Korhonen, Anu; Haimila, Katri; Sareneva, Inna; Sulin, Kati; Kuosmanen, Malla; Sainio, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Anti-G is commonly present with anti-D and/or anti-C and can confuse serological investigations. in general, anti-G is not considered a likely cause of severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), but it is important to differentiate it from anti-D in women who should be administered anti-D immunoglobulin prophylaxis. We report one woman with three pregnancies severely affected by anti-C+G requiring intrauterine treatment and a review of the literature. In our case, the identification of the correct antibody was delayed because the differentiation of anti-C+G and anti-D+C was not considered important during pregnancy since the father was D-. In addition, anti-C+G and anti-G titer levels were not found to be reliable as is generally considered in Rh immunization. Severe HDFN occurred at a maternal anti-C+G antibody titer of S and anti-G titer of 1 in comparison with the critical titer level of 16 or more in our laboratory. close collaboration between the immunohematology laboratory and the obstetric unit is essential. In previously affected families, early assessment for fetal anemia is required even when titers are low.

  4. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-Lan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Sarah; Squires, Jerry E

    2014-05-01

    Antibodies to the high-incidence red blood cell (RBC) antigen Lan (Langereis) are typically immunoglobulin G and have been shown to fix complement and cause hemolysis of Lan antigen-positive RBCs. Only three cases of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) have been reported involving anti-Lan and all have been characterized as "mild." A 26-year-old Hispanic female presented in her fifth pregnancy for routine obstetric care. Due to progressively rising anti-Lan titers, middle cerebral artery (MCA) Dopplers were performed. At 32 weeks of gestation, the antibody titer had reached 128; the MCA Doppler indicated that fetal anemia was severe. An intrauterine transfusion with Lan antigen-negative RBCs was performed and a viable infant was delivered 25 days later. Three cases of HDFN associated with anti-Lan have been previously reported. While these cases have been associated with somewhat variable serologic findings, none have resulted in fetal demise or severe symptomatology requiring pre- or postnatal intervention other than routine phototherapy. The current report, however, suggests that in some instances anti-Lan can result in a more severe form of HDFN requiring more aggressive prenatal therapy. In spite of previous case reports suggesting that anti-Lan is associated with relatively mild HDFN, this case suggests that in some instances, this antibody can cause severe HDFN requiring prenatal intervention. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  5. Immunoglobulin for alloimmune hemolytic disease in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiers, Carolien; Scheffer-Rath, Mirjam Ea; Lopriore, Enrico; de Haas, Masja; Liley, Helen G

    2018-03-18

    Exchange transfusion and phototherapy have traditionally been used to treat jaundice and avoid the associated neurological complications. Because of the risks and burdens of exchange transfusion, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) has been suggested as an alternative therapy for alloimmune hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) to reduce the need for exchange transfusion. To assess the effect and complications of IVIg in newborn infants with alloimmune HDN on the need for and number of exchange transfusions. We performed electronic searches of CENTRAL, PubMed, Embase (Ovid), Web of Science, CINAHL (EBSCOhost), Academic Search Premier, and the trial registers ClinicalTrials.gov and controlled-trials.com in May 2017. We also searched reference lists of included and excluded trials and relevant reviews for further relevant studies. We considered all randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of IVIg in the treatment of alloimmune HDN. Trials must have used predefined criteria for the use of IVIg and exchange transfusion therapy to be included. We used the standard methods of Cochrane and its Neonatal Review Group. We assessed studies for inclusion and two review authors independently assessed quality and extracted data. We discussed any differences of opinion to reach consensus. We contacted investigators for additional or missing information. We calculated risk ratio (RR), risk difference (RD) and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) for categorical outcomes. We calculated mean difference (MD) for continuous variables. We used GRADE criteria to assess the risk of bias for major outcomes and to summarize the level of evidence. Nine studies with 658 infants fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Term and preterm infants with Rh or ABO (or both) incompatibility were included. The use of exchange transfusion decreased significantly in the immunoglobulin treated group (typical RR 0.35, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.49; typical RD -0.22, 95% CI -0.27 to

  6. Evaluation of Neonatal Hemolytic Jaundice: Clinical and Laboratory Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anet Papazovska Cherepnalkovski

    2015-12-01

    CONCLUSIONS: The laboratory profile in ABO/Rh isoimmunisation cases depicts hemolytic mechanism of jaundice. These cases carry a significant risk for early and severe hyperbilirubinemia and are eligible for neurodevelopmental follow-up. Hematological parameters and blood grouping are simple diagnostic methods that assist the etiological diagnosis of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

  7. Atypical relapse of hemolytic uremic syndrome after transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olie, Karolien H.; Florquin, Sandrine; Groothoff, Jaap W.; Verlaak, René; Strain, Lisa; Goodship, Timothy H. J.; Weening, Jan J.; Davin, Jean-Claude

    2004-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) frequently leads to end-stage renal failure and can relapse after transplantation. A 12-year-old girl presenting with familial atypical HUS with a factor H mutation was successfully transplanted 6 years after a first transplant that had failed because of

  8. Congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Victoria J; Stewart, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    For most people, music, like language, is acquired effortlessly in early life. But a few percent of the population have lifelong difficulties in the perception and production of music. In this chapter we discuss psycho-acoustic and behavioral studies that have attempted to delineate the nature of the auditory perceptual deficits in this group and consider whether these difficulties extend outside the musical domain. Finally, we review structural imaging studies in this group which point to subtle anomalies in temporal and frontal areas. We suggest that amusia can be considered a disorder of neural development, which has relatively specific consequences at the behavioral level. Studies of congenital amusia provide a unique window on the neurocognitive architecture of music processing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Severe form of hemolytic-uremic syndrome with multiple organ failure in a child: a case report [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/24q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dino Mijatovic

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS is a leading cause of acute renal failure in infants and young children. It is traditionally defined as a triad of acute renal failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia that occur within a week after prodromal hemorrhagic enterocolitis. Severe cases can also be presented by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, toxic megacolon with ileus, pancreatitis, central nervous system (CNS disorders and multiple organ failure (MOF. Case presentation: A previously healthy 4-year old Caucasian girl developed acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia following a short episode of abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. In the next week of, what initially appeared as typical HUS, she developed MOF, including ileus, pancreatitis, hepatitis, coma and ARDS, accompanied by hemodynamic instability and extreme leukocytosis. Nonetheless, the girl made a complete recovery after one month of the disease. She was successfully treated in the intensive care unit and significant improvement was noticed after plasmapheresis and continuous veno-venous hemodialysis. Conclusions: Early start of plasmapheresis and meticulous supportive treatment in the intensive care unit, including renal placement therapy, may be the therapy of choice in severe cases of HUS presented by MOF. Monitoring of prognostic factors is important for early performance of appropriate diagnostic and therapeutical interventions.

  10. [Severe hemolytic disease of the newborn as a result of late and undiagnosed alloimmunization--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdowska-Szymczak, Agnieszka; Czaplińska, Natalia; Borek-Dziecioł, Beata; Kociszewska-Najman, Bozena; Bartkowiak, Robert; Wielgoś, Mirosław

    2014-03-01

    We report a case of a hemolytic disease in a newborn from the first pregnancy due to anti-D antibodies. The maternal blood group was A Rhesus negative. She had an antibody screening test twice during the pregnancy (in the second trimester) and it was negative. The pregnancy was uneventful, without any invasive procedures and bleeding. The infant was born at 39 weeks of gestation in good overall condition. After the delivery the blood group of the neonate was indicated - A Rhesus positive, BOC positive. Anti-D antibodies were detected in maternal blood. Neonatal blood tests revealed severe anemia (hemoglobin level: 6.0g/dl, hematocrit: 22.2%, erythrocytes: 2.01T/L). During the first day of neonatal life, the newborn received two transfusions of red blood cells. Bilirubin level and rate of rise were not recommendation enough for exchange transfusion. The newborn was treated with continuous phototherapy since the delivery The perinatal period was complicated with intrauterine infection and respiratory failure. Hematopoietic vitamins and iron supplementation was initiated in the second week of neonatal life due to persistent anemia. The child remained under medical care of a hematologic clinic and received human recombinant erythropoietin treatment.

  11. In vitro assessment of recombinant, mutant immunoglobulin G anti-D devoid of hemolytic activity for treatment of ongoing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Leif K; Green, Trine H; Sandlie, Inger

    2008-01-01

    A specific treatment for ongoing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) due to anti-D would be very attractive. One approach could be administration to the mother of nonhemolytic anti-D, which by crossing the placenta can block the binding of hemolytic maternal anti-D.......A specific treatment for ongoing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) due to anti-D would be very attractive. One approach could be administration to the mother of nonhemolytic anti-D, which by crossing the placenta can block the binding of hemolytic maternal anti-D....

  12. [Anemia in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerevoet, M; Sattar, L; Bron, D; Gulbis, B; Pepersack, T

    2014-09-01

    Anaemia is a problem that affects almost 10% over 65 years and 20% over 85 years. There is no physiological anaemia in the elderly. Any anaemia expresses the existence of a pathological process, regardless of its severity. Anaemia in the elderly is always associated with a poor prognosis that is in terms of mortality, morbidity and risk of fragility. The diagnostic approach to anemia in the elderly is the same as in younger individual. There are many causes of anaemia; anaemia balance is a complex diagnostic process. Most anaemias are due to a deficiency, chronic inflammation or comorbidity. However, in the elderly, the etiology of anaemia is often multifactorial. In a number of cases remain unexplained anaemia. In a number of cases, anemia remain unexplained. Treatment of anaemia is the treatment of the cause, but specific therapeutic aspects to the elderly should be considered, as among other martial substitution or use of erythropoietin (EPO).

  13. Hyperemic peripheral red marrow in a patient with sickle cell anemia demonstrated on Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiden, R.A.; Locko, R.C.; Stent, T.R.

    1991-01-01

    A 25-year-old gravid woman, homozygous for sickle cell anemia, with a history of recent deep venous thrombosis, was examined using Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography for recurrent thrombosis. Although negative for thrombus, the study presented an unusual incidental finding: the patient's peripheral bone marrow was hyperemic in a distribution consistent with peripheral red bone marrow expansion. Such a pattern has not been documented before using this technique. This report supports other literature that has demonstrated hyperemia of peripheral red bone marrow in other hemolytic anemias. This finding may ultimately define an additional role of scintigraphy in assessing the pathophysiologic status of the sickle cell patient

  14. Radiological features in congenital erythropoietic porphyria (Gunther's disease). Report of three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, M.; Legmann, P.; Le Cloirec, A.; Deybach, J.C.; Nordmann, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Gunther's disease or congenital erythropoietic porphyria is a rare and severe disorder comprising cutaneous and haemolytic symptoms. Photocutaneous lesions are responsible for scleroderma-like calcifications and deformities of the extremities visible on X-rays. Hemolytic manifestations lead to diffuse major osteopenia. Soft tissue calcifications of the fingers can be seen even in young patients. One case reported here is the first illustration of intracranial calcifications located on dura-mater and calvarium.

  15. [Anemia: guidelines comparison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The development of recombinant human erythropoietin and its introduction into the market in the late 1980s has significantly improved the quality of life of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and reduced the need for blood transfusions. Starting from a cautious target, a progressive increase in the recommended hemoglobin levels has been observed over the years, in parallel with an increase in the obtained levels. This trend has gone together with the publication of findings of observational studies showing a relationship between the increase in hemoglobin levels and a reduction in the mortality risk, with the conduction of clinical trials testing the effects of complete anemia correction, and with the compilation of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients by scientific societies and organizations. In the last two years, evidence of a possible increase in the mortality risk in those patients who were randomized to high hemoglobin levels has resulted in a decrease in the upper limit of the recommended Hb target to be obtained with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESA), and consequently in a narrowing of the target range. Comparison of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients is an interesting starting point to discuss single recommendations, strengthen their importance, or suggest new topics of research to fill up important gaps in knowledge.

  16. Fanconi anemia and the cell cycle: new perspectives on aneuploidy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a complex heterogenic disorder of genomic instability, bone marrow failure, cancer predisposition, and congenital malformations. The FA signaling network orchestrates the DNA damage recognition and repair in interphase as well as proper execution of mitosis. Loss of FA signaling causes chromosome instability by weakening the spindle assembly checkpoint, disrupting centrosome maintenance, disturbing resolution of ultrafine anaphase bridges, and dysregulating cytokinesis. Thus, the FA genes function as guardians of genome stability throughout the cell cycle. This review discusses recent advances in diagnosis and clinical management of Fanconi anemia and presents the new insights into the origins of genomic instability in FA. These new discoveries may facilitate the development of rational therapeutic strategies for FA and for FA-deficient malignancies in the general population. PMID:24765528

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Diamond-Blackfan anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of the bone marrow . The ...

  18. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe January 2014 Print this issue Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells En español Send ... Disease When Blood Cells Bend Wise Choices Preventing Anemia To prevent or treat iron-deficiency anemia: Eat ...

  19. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Donate Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia Because you have aplastic anemia , everyday events can ... bleeding, such as contact sports. Pregnancy and Aplastic Anemia Pregnancy is possible for women who have been ...

  20. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1971-09-15

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T{sub 50} Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  1. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho

    1971-01-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T 50 Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  2. [Congenital hypothyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla Peón, María Fernanda

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is a cause of preventable mental retardation; therefore, timely diagnosis and treatment by the primary care physician is very important. CH screening must be performed between the second and fifth days of life with capillary blood done with a heel prick and must be confirmed by measurement of thyroid hormones in venous blood. The most common cause of CH is thyroid dysgenesis, which may be identified by a thyroid scan carried out before initiating treatment. Treatment should be with levothyroxine (10-15μg/kg/day) and should not be delayed or suspended during the first 3 years of life due to the deleterious effect on neurodevelopment in case of low thyroid hormones during this time. Preterm or sick infants or those with Down syndrome require special consideration. This article provides diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms for CH. Copyright © 2015 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Fanconi anemia: a disorder defective in the DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitao, Hiroyuki; Takata, Minoru

    2011-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer predisposition disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, congenital developmental defects, chromosomal abnormalities, and cellular hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) agents. So far mutations in 14 FANC genes were identified in FA or FA-like patients. These gene products constitute a common ubiquitin-phosphorylation network called the "FA pathway" and cooperate with other proteins involved in DNA repair and cell cycle control to repair ICL lesions and to maintain genome stability. In this review, we summarize recent exciting discoveries that have expanded our view of the molecular mechanisms operating in DNA repair and DNA damage signaling.

  4. Evaluation of anticonvulsant, antimicrobial and hemolytic activity of Aitchisonia rosea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Rasool

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anticonvulsant, antimicrobial and hemolytic effect of Aitchisonia rosea. The anticonvulsant effect was studied at doses 400 and 800 mg/kg against pentylenetetrazole, strychnine and picrotoxin-induced seizures in albino mice. The antimicrobial assay was conducted by disc diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration. Hemolytic effect was analyzed by reported method. Phenolic compounds present in the n-butanol fraction of the plant were estimated by HPLC. The plant showed maximum response against drug-induced convulsions and provided protection to animals at both doses. It also showed maximum zone of inhibition and highly significant MIC against all bacterial and fungal strains. The plant protected the RBCs from hemolysis. The highest amount of phenolics found was caffeic acid (7.5 ± 0.04.

  5. Anti-M causing delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alperin, J.B.; Riglin, H.; Branch, D.R.; Gallagher, M.T.; Petz, L.D.

    1983-01-01

    A 52-year-old gravida 1, para 1 woman with M- red cells experienced a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction and exhibited an anti-M antibody following the infusion of four units of M+ red cells. Measurements of erythrocyte survival using 51 Cr-labeled donor M+ and M- red cells and in vitro studies of monocyte-macrophage phagocytosis of sensitized reagent red cells implicate anti-M in the pathogenesis of hemolysis

  6. Management of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in children

    OpenAIRE

    Grisaru, Silviu

    2014-01-01

    Silviu GrisaruUniversity of Calgary, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Acute renal failure associated with a fulminant, life-threatening systemic disease is rare in previously healthy young children; however, when it occurs, the most common cause is hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). In most cases (90%), this abrupt and devastating illness is a result of ingestion of food or drink contaminated with pathogens that produce very potent toxins. Currently, there ...

  7. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that cause reduced platelet function. Most of the time, people with these disorders have ...

  8. Congenital Heart Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart defects. Important Notice The Congenital Heart Information Network website is temporarily out of service. Please join ... and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright © ...

  9. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Fraser CD, Kane LC. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM Jr, ... Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern ...

  10. Serratamolide is a hemolytic factor produced by Serratia marcescens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Q Shanks

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens is a common contaminant of contact lens cases and lenses. Hemolytic factors of S. marcescens contribute to the virulence of this opportunistic bacterial pathogen. We took advantage of an observed hyper-hemolytic phenotype of crp mutants to investigate mechanisms of hemolysis. A genetic screen revealed that swrW is necessary for the hyper-hemolysis phenotype of crp mutants. The swrW gene is required for biosynthesis of the biosurfactant serratamolide, previously shown to be a broad-spectrum antibiotic and to contribute to swarming motility. Multicopy expression of swrW or mutation of the hexS transcription factor gene, a known inhibitor of swrW expression, led to an increase in hemolysis. Surfactant zones and expression from an swrW-transcriptional reporter were elevated in a crp mutant compared to the wild type. Purified serratamolide was hemolytic to sheep and murine red blood cells and cytotoxic to human airway and corneal limbal epithelial cells in vitro. The swrW gene was found in the majority of contact lens isolates tested. Genetic and biochemical analysis implicate the biosurfactant serratamolide as a hemolysin. This novel hemolysin may contribute to irritation and infections associated with contact lens use.

  11. Aplastic anemia due to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Kunio; Saito, Akira

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between radiation exposure and aplastic anemia, clarified previously, is discussed. When persons such as radiological technicians receive whole-body irradiation in rather large doses, it is possible that aplastic anemia will result later on. However, this is difficult to determine because the irradiated region is limited despite large doses of radiation. (Bell, E.)

  12. Correction of anemia in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analía Cánepa

    2015-11-01

    Se observó que en el 50% de las pacientes estudiadas no se logró corregir la anemia. Concluimos que existe una dificultad en la corrección de la anemia y una necesidad de realizar futuros estudios que permitan conocer las causas de este problema e implementar acciones en base a ellas.

  13. Phenotypic variability in patients with Fanconi anemia and biallelic FANCF mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryon, Rebecca; Zierhut, Heather; MacMillan, Margaret L; Wagner, John E

    2017-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a heterogeneous genetic disorder that is characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, congenital anomalies, and markedly increased risk for malignancies. Mutations in the FANCF (FA-F) gene represent approximately 2% of affected patients. Currently, information on the phenotypic findings of patients with Fanconi anemia from biallelic mutations in FANCF is limited. Here, we report three patients who illustrate the clinical variability within the FA-F group. This analysis suggests a more severe phenotype for those with the common c.484_485delCT mutation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Congenital Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woong Hee; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shick; Shin, Hyeong Cheol [Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Intrahepatic portosystemic shunts are an anomalous connection between the portal vein and hepatic vein/IVC, which may be either congenital or acquired secondary to liver cirrhosis or portal hypertension. Cases of congenital intrahepatic shunts are usually encountered in children and may spontaneously resolve. We report 5 cases of congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunts in neonates and an adult

  15. Aplastic anemia: clinico haematological features, treatment and outcome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wali, R.; Fadoo, Z.; Naqvi, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the clinico haematological features, treatment and outcome of children diagnosed with aplastic anemia at a single institution. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January 1999 till December 2008. Methodology: Medical records of children aged less than 15 years of age diagnosed with aplastic anemia were reviewed. Clinico haematological features, treatment and its response to therapy and outcome were recorded. Results were described in percentages. Results: Ninety patients were diagnosed to have aplastic anemia (AA); 65 were male during the study period. Age ranged from 1 to 15 years. Fever in 65 patients (72.2%), pallor in 53 (58.8%), skin bleeding in 49 (54.4%) and epistaxis in 31(34.4%) were the most common and frequent presenting features. Congenital (Fanconi's) anemia was found in 15 (16.6%) and acquired idiopathic in 75 (83.4%) of patients. Very severe aplastic anemia (VSAA) was seen in 29 (32.2%), 26 (28.9%) had severe AA and 17 (18.9%) had moderate AA. Eight patients (8.9%) underwent haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), 12 (13.3%) received immunosuppressive therapy (IST) and 70 patients (77.7%) received other and supportive therapy. Five (62.5%) patients showed complete response to HSCT and 3 (37.5%) failed to engraft. IST showed complete response in 3 (25%), partial response in 5 (41.6%) and no response in 4 (33.3%). Twenty two patients (24.4%) expired either due to infection in 16 (72.7%, fungal in 6, bacterial in 10) and intracranial haemorrhage in 6 (27.3%) cases. Conclusion: Majority of cases with AA were acquired and idiopathic in etiology. VSAA and SAA were frequent. Response to HSCT and IST was sub-optimal. (author)

  16. Síndrome hemolítico-urêmica esporádica pós-parto Sporadic postpartum hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza M. Moreira

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Anemia hemolítica microangiopática associado à trombocitopenia participa de um grupo de doenças que freqüentemente apresentam suas características clínicas muito semelhantes, sendo difícil distingui-las. A síndrome hemolítico-urêmica é dividida em duas apresentações: a forma não esporádica, que acomete comumente crianças após infecção bacteriana causando diarréia sanguinolenta, possui bom prognóstico; e a forma esporádica, que acomete adultos, sendo bem descritos casos em mulheres pósparto, é a forma sistêmica de trombocitopenia microangiopática de pior prognóstico com alta morbidade e mortalidade, cuja falência renal é o distúrbio predominante. Relatamos um caso de síndrome hemolítico-urêmica pós-parto em paciente previamente sadia, que apresentou quadro de insuficiência renal, anemia hemolítica e trombocitopenia. Instituída a terapêutica de suporte adequada e precocemente, a paciente evoluiu satisfatoriamente com normalização dos níveis pressóricos e recuperação da função renal.Microangiopathic hemolytic associated with thrombocytopenia is part of a disease group that frequently show likeness and that's why become difficult to separate them. There are two types of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS; the non sporadic type and the epidemic or "typical" type that is common on childreen that is associated with diarrhea and infection caused by verotoxinaproducing E. coli with a good prognostic; and the sporadic postpartum period. It is the systemic type of mocroangiophatic thrombocytopenia of poor prognostic with high morbidity and mortality which renal failure is the main disturb. We reported a case of HUS occuring in postpartum previously healthy, that showed abrupt renal failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. After proper therapy the patient developed a normal blood pressure and recovery renal function.

  17. Absence of hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn despite maternal high-titer IgG anti-Ku.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakaiya, R M; Whaley, A; Howard-Menk, C; Rami, J; Papari, M; Campbell-Lee, S; Malecki, Z

    2010-01-01

    Anti-Ku seen in K(o) (Kell-null) individuals has previously been shown to cause severe hemolytic transfusion reactions. Maternal anti-Ku can cause none or moderate to severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). In two of four previously described HDFN cases, intrauterine transfusions were required because of severe anemia. We report a case in which maternal anti-Ku did not cause HDFN. Standard serologic methods were used for RBC antibody screening and identification, adsorption and elution of RBC antibodies, and antigen typing. A gravida 3, para 3 (G3P3) woman was first evaluated in 2006 and was found to have an IgG RBC antibody that reacted against all panel RBCs in the anti-human globulin phase. A panel of RBCs treated with DTT did not react with the antibody. The antibody failed to react with one example of K(o) RBCs. The patient’s RBCs typed negative for the following Kell blood group antigens: KEL1, KEL2, KEL3, KEL4, KEL6, KEL7, KEL11, KEL13, and KEL18. These results established the presence of anti-Ku in maternal serum. The newborn was group A, D+ and required phototherapy for hyperbilirubinemia, but did not require transfusion. The woman was seen again in January 2010 during the third trimester (G4P3). At this time, anti-Ku titer was 256. She delivered a healthy group O, D+ baby boy at 37 weeks' gestation. Cord RBCs were 4+ for IgG by DAT. An eluate reacted with all RBCs tested, but did not react when tested against a panel of DTT-treated RBCs. K(o) phenotype is rare to begin with, and the maternal anti-Ku formation may require more than one pregnancy. Therefore, cases that can be evaluated for anti-Ku–related HDFN are rare. Our case contributes to serologic and clinical aspects of such rare cases.

  18. Risk factors for development of hemolytic uremic syndrome in a cohort of adult patients with STEC 0104:H4 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zoufaly

    Full Text Available The outbreak of Shiga toxin producing E.coli O104:H4 in northern Germany in 2011 was one of the largest worldwide and involved mainly adults. Post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS occurred in 22% of STEC positive patients. This study's aim was to assess risk factors for HUS in STEC-infected patients and to develop a score from routine hospital parameters to estimate patient risks for developing HUS. In a cohort analysis, adult patients with STEC infection were included in five participating hospitals in northern Germany between May and July 2011. Clinical data were obtained from questionnaires and medical records, laboratory data were extracted from hospitals' electronic data systems. HUS was defined as thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia and acute renal dysfunction. Random forests and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify risk factors for HUS and develop a score using the estimated coefficients as weights. Among 259 adults with STEC infection, vomiting (OR 3.48,95%CI 1.88-6.53, visible blood in stools (OR 3.91,95%CI1.20-16.01, age above 75 years (OR 3.27, 95%CI 1.12-9.70 and elevated leukocyte counts (OR 1.20, 95%CI 1.10-1.31, per 1000 cells/mm(3 were identified as independent risk factors for HUS. A score using these variables has an area under the ROC curve of 0.74 (95%CI 0.68-0.80. Vomiting, visible blood in stools, higher leukocyte counts, and higher age indicate increased risk for developing HUS. A score using these variables might help to identify high risk patients who potentially benefit from aggressive pre-emptive treatment to prevent or mitigate the devastating consequences of HUS.

  19. Disturbance of cerebral neuronal migration following congenital parvovirus B19 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pistorius, Lourens Rasmus; Smal, Jaime; de Haan, Timo Robert; Page-Christiaens, Godelieve C. M. L.; Verboon-Maciolek, Malgorzata; Oepkes, Dick; de Vries, Linda S.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the clinical course of an infant who presented with severe fetal anemia and fetal hydrops following congenital parvovirus B19 infection before 16 gestational weeks. The fetus was treated by cordocentesis and intrauterine transfusion at 18 weeks. The infant demonstrated mild unilateral

  20. Fatal hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn associated with anti-Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrard, Thierry; Pham, Bach-Nga; Arnaud, Lionel; Fleutiaux, Sophie; Brossard, Yves; Guerin, Bénédicte; Desmoulins, Isabelle; Rouger, Philippe; Le Pennec, Pierre-Yves

    2008-09-01

    Jr(a) is a high-prevalence red cell (RBC) antigen. The clinical significance of anti-Jr(a) is controversial. When hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) occurred, most reported cases were clinically mild. We report the first case of fatal HDFN due to anti-Jr(a). A 28-year-old Caucasian woman with transfusion history was monitored at the 29th week of pregnancy (G4P1). An ultrasound scan showed fetal cardiomegaly and hepatomegaly. An antibody directed against a high-prevalence antigen was detected, but without conclusive identification. An emergency cesarean section was performed at the 36th week. The newborn was hydropic and showed severe anemia. Death occurred 30 hours after birth. Serologic methods were performed to investigate the mother's RBCs and serum. An in vitro functional cellular assay and semiquantitative measurement of anti-Jr(a) were used to determine the clinical significance of the antibody. Anti-Jr(a) was identified in the serum and Jr(a-) phenotype was confirmed. The anti-Jr(a) titer was 1024, with predominant immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 and minor IgG4 subclasses. The functional cellular assay was consistent with an antibody unlikely to cause HDFN. Semiquantitative measurement of anti-Jr(a) showed a reactivity equivalent to a 25 IU per mL (5 microg/mL) concentration of anti-D, a value associated with a significant risk of HDFN. This is the first documented case of fatal HDFN due to anti-Jr(a). Therefore, we recommend close monitoring of pregnant women with a high-titer anti-Jr(a), especially those with an incompatible transfusion history and/or multiple pregnancies. This case report provides new arguments about the clinical significance of anti-Jr(a) in the transfusion setting.

  1. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome post Kidney Transplantation: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami eAlasfar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is a rare disorder characterized by over-activation and dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway. Its estimated prevalence is 1-2 per million. The disease is characterized by thrombotic microangiopathy, which causes anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. aHUS has more severe course compared to typical (Infection-induced HUS and is frequently characterized by relapses that leads to end stage renal disease (ESRD. For a long time, kidney transplantation for these patients was contraindicated because of high rate of recurrence and subsequent renal graft loss. The post-kidney transplantation recurrence rate largely depends on the pathogenetic mechanisms involved. However, over the past several years, advancements in the understanding and therapeutics of aHUS have allowed successful kidney transplantation in these patients. Eculizumab, which is a complement C5 antibody that inhibits complement factor 5a (C5a and subsequent formation of the membrane attack complex, has been used in prevention and treatment of post-transplant aHUS recurrence. In this paper, we present two new cases of aHUS patients who underwent successful kidney transplantation in our center with the use of prophylactic and maintenance eculizumab therapy that have not been published before. The purpose of reporting these two cases is to emphasize the importance of using eculizumab as a prophylactic therapy to prevent aHUS recurrence post transplant in high-risk patients. We will also review the current understanding of the genetics of aHUS, the pathogenesis of its recurrence after kidney transplantation, and strategies for prevention and treatment of post-transplant aHUS recurrence.

  2. Metformin Therapy for Fanconis Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0300 TITLE: Metformin Therapy for Fanconis Anemia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Markus Grompe CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION... Anemia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0300 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Markus Grompe 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 This award pertains to the treatment of the inherited bone marrow failure syndrome Fanconi’s Anemia

  3. Neutropenia in infants with hemolytic disease of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Esther; Johnston, Donna L

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the incidence, outcome and risk factors of neutropenia in infants with hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). A retrospective chart review was performed on infants with HDN. Of 69 evaluable infants, 45% developed neutropenia. Only one infectious complication was recorded. In most instances the neutropenia resolved spontaneously, but in seven infants it persisted for a median of 397 days. Males were at higher risk for developing neutropenia, but severity of HDN, antibody specificity, or therapy were not significant risk factors. Neutropenia is a common feature of HDN, regardless of severity of disease, treatment received, or antibody specificity. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome triggered by varicella infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Condom

    2017-01-01

    The current case describes an aHUS associated to varicella infection as demonstrated by the simultaneous occurrence of the viral infection and aHUS manifestations. Apart from typical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome which is triggered by bacteria mostly Shiga toxin producing Echerichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae or Shigella, aHUS may be linked to viral infections such as HIV, EBV and enteroviruses, but very rarely by varicella. This case highlights a possible even rare complication of varicella infection a very common childhood disease. This complication could be avoided by to anti-VZV vaccination.

  5. THIAMINE–RESPONSIVE MEGALOBLASTIC ANEMIA, SENSORINEURAL DEAFNESS AND DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kadivar R. Moradian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract- The syndrome of diabetes mellitus, sensorineural deafness and megaloblastic anemia dose not result from thiamine deficiency. The previous reported patients had no sign of beriberi, had normal nutrition, and had no evidence of malabsorption. The features of this syndrome with apparent inheritance of autosomal recessive trait may define this puzzling syndrome as a true thiamine dependency state. The first Iranian patient was described by Vossough et al. in 1995. We found nine new cases with diagnostic criteria of thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia during eight years of our study. In two patients, presentation of diabetes and anemia was concomitant. All of them were deaf with sensorineural hearing loss which was detected in infancy up to two years of age. The presence of congenital valvular heart disease was eliminated by normal echocardiography, but cardiomyopathy was discovered in two. Nonspecific amino-aciduria was discovered in three but urinary screening tests for hereditary orotic aciduria were negative. Ox-Phos biochemistry of muscle mitochondria which demonstrates severe defect in complexes I, III, IV in diabetes mellitus associated with deafness, were done but was unremarkable in our patients. Urinary methylmalonic acid and methyl malonyl carnitine by GS/MS and TMS was done in our patients and showed abnormal results in six patients. Thiamine gene, SLC 19A2, was detected in four patients.

  6. Origin, functional role, and clinical impact of Fanconi anemia FANCA mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Castella, Maria; Pujol, Roser; Callén, Elsa; Trujillo, Juan P.; Casado, José A.; Gille, Hans; Lach, Francis P.; Auerbach, Arleen D.; Schindler, Detlev; Benítez, Javier; Porto, Beatriz; Ferro, Teresa; Muñoz, Arturo; Sevilla, Julián; Madero, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is characterized by congenital abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and cancer predisposition. To investigate the origin, functional role, and clinical impact of FANCA mutations, we determined a FANCA mutational spectrum with 130 pathogenic alleles. Some of these mutations were further characterized for their distribution in populations, mode of emergence, or functional consequences at cellular and clinical level. The world most frequent FANCA mutation is not the result of a mut...

  7. The Simple Chordate Ciona intestinalis Has a Reduced Complement of Genes Associated with Fanconi Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Stanley, Edward C.; Azzinaro, Paul A.; Vierra, David A.; Howlett, Niall G.; Irvine, Steven Q.

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a human genetic disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, and increased cancer risk. FA is associated with mutation in one of 24 genes. The protein products of these genes function cooperatively in the FA pathway to orchestrate the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links. Few model organisms exist for the study of FA. Seeking a model organism with a simpler version of the FA pathway, we searched the genome of the simple chordate Ciona intestinalis ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Fanconi anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fanconi anemia: at the crossroads of DNA repair. Biochemistry (Mosc). 2011 Jan;76(1):36-48. Review. ... not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about a ...

  9. Congenital orbital teratoma

    OpenAIRE

    Aiyub, Shereen; Chan, Weng Onn; Szetu, John; Sullivan, Laurence J; Pater, John; Cooper, Peter; Selva, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The p...

  10. Fanconi anemia: correlating central nervous system malformations and genetic complementation groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Tesch, Benjamin A; Gawande, Rakhee S; Zhang, Lei; MacMillan, Margaret L; Nascene, David R

    2017-06-01

    Congenital central nervous system abnormalities in children with Fanconi anemia are poorly characterized, especially with regard to specific genetic complementation groups. To characterize the impact of genetic complementation groups on central nervous system anatomy. Through chart review we identified 36 patients with Fanconi anemia with available brain MRIs at the University of Minnesota (average age, 11.3 years; range, 1-43 years; M:F=19:17), which we reviewed and compared to 19 age- and sex-matched controls (average age, 7.9 years; range, 2-18 years; M:F=9:10). Genotypic information was available for 27 patients (15 FA-A, 2 FA-C, 3 FA-G, and 7 FA-D1 [biallelic mutations in BRCA2 gene]). Of the 36 patients, 61% had at least one congenital central nervous system or skull base abnormality. These included hypoplastic clivus (n=12), hypoplastic adenohypophysis (n=11), platybasia (n=8), pontocerebellar hypoplasia (n=7), isolated pontine hypoplasia (n=4), isolated vermis hypoplasia (n=3), and ectopic neurohypophysis (n=6). Average pituitary volume was significantly less in patients with Fanconi anemia (PFanconi anemia patients (P=0.006), but the basal angle of those with FA-D1 was not significantly different from controls (P=0.239). Clivus length was less in the Fanconi anemia group (P=0.002), but significance was only observed in the FA-D1 subgroup (PFanconi anemia have higher incidences of ectopic neurohypophysis, adenohypophysis hypoplasia, platybasia and other midline central nervous system skull base posterior fossa abnormalities than age- and sex-matched controls. Patients with posterior fossa abnormalities, including pontocerebellar hypoplasia, are more likely to have biallelic BRCA2 mutations.

  11. Fanconi anemia: correlating central nervous system malformations and genetic complementation groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson-Tesch, Benjamin A.; Gawande, Rakhee S.; Nascene, David R.; Zhang, Lei; MacMillan, Margaret L.

    2017-01-01

    Congenital central nervous system abnormalities in children with Fanconi anemia are poorly characterized, especially with regard to specific genetic complementation groups. To characterize the impact of genetic complementation groups on central nervous system anatomy. Through chart review we identified 36 patients with Fanconi anemia with available brain MRIs at the University of Minnesota (average age, 11.3 years; range, 1-43 years; M:F=19:17), which we reviewed and compared to 19 age- and sex-matched controls (average age, 7.9 years; range, 2-18 years; M:F=9:10). Genotypic information was available for 27 patients (15 FA-A, 2 FA-C, 3 FA-G, and 7 FA-D1 [biallelic mutations in BRCA2 gene]). Of the 36 patients, 61% had at least one congenital central nervous system or skull base abnormality. These included hypoplastic clivus (n=12), hypoplastic adenohypophysis (n=11), platybasia (n=8), pontocerebellar hypoplasia (n=7), isolated pontine hypoplasia (n=4), isolated vermis hypoplasia (n=3), and ectopic neurohypophysis (n=6). Average pituitary volume was significantly less in patients with Fanconi anemia (P<0.0001) than in controls. Basal angle was significantly greater in Fanconi anemia patients (P=0.006), but the basal angle of those with FA-D1 was not significantly different from controls (P=0.239). Clivus length was less in the Fanconi anemia group (P=0.002), but significance was only observed in the FA-D1 subgroup (P<0.0001). Of the seven patients meeting criteria for pontocerebellar hypoplasia, six belonged to the FA-D1 group. Patients with Fanconi anemia have higher incidences of ectopic neurohypophysis, adenohypophysis hypoplasia, platybasia and other midline central nervous system skull base posterior fossa abnormalities than age- and sex-matched controls. Patients with posterior fossa abnormalities, including pontocerebellar hypoplasia, are more likely to have biallelic BRCA2 mutations. (orig.)

  12. Fanconi anemia: correlating central nervous system malformations and genetic complementation groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson-Tesch, Benjamin A. [University of Minnesota, Department of Radiology, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Gawande, Rakhee S.; Nascene, David R. [University of Minnesota, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Section, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Zhang, Lei [University of Minnesota, Biostatistical Design and Analysis Centre, Minneapolis, MN (United States); MacMillan, Margaret L. [University of Minnesota, Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, Department of Pediatrics, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Congenital central nervous system abnormalities in children with Fanconi anemia are poorly characterized, especially with regard to specific genetic complementation groups. To characterize the impact of genetic complementation groups on central nervous system anatomy. Through chart review we identified 36 patients with Fanconi anemia with available brain MRIs at the University of Minnesota (average age, 11.3 years; range, 1-43 years; M:F=19:17), which we reviewed and compared to 19 age- and sex-matched controls (average age, 7.9 years; range, 2-18 years; M:F=9:10). Genotypic information was available for 27 patients (15 FA-A, 2 FA-C, 3 FA-G, and 7 FA-D1 [biallelic mutations in BRCA2 gene]). Of the 36 patients, 61% had at least one congenital central nervous system or skull base abnormality. These included hypoplastic clivus (n=12), hypoplastic adenohypophysis (n=11), platybasia (n=8), pontocerebellar hypoplasia (n=7), isolated pontine hypoplasia (n=4), isolated vermis hypoplasia (n=3), and ectopic neurohypophysis (n=6). Average pituitary volume was significantly less in patients with Fanconi anemia (P<0.0001) than in controls. Basal angle was significantly greater in Fanconi anemia patients (P=0.006), but the basal angle of those with FA-D1 was not significantly different from controls (P=0.239). Clivus length was less in the Fanconi anemia group (P=0.002), but significance was only observed in the FA-D1 subgroup (P<0.0001). Of the seven patients meeting criteria for pontocerebellar hypoplasia, six belonged to the FA-D1 group. Patients with Fanconi anemia have higher incidences of ectopic neurohypophysis, adenohypophysis hypoplasia, platybasia and other midline central nervous system skull base posterior fossa abnormalities than age- and sex-matched controls. Patients with posterior fossa abnormalities, including pontocerebellar hypoplasia, are more likely to have biallelic BRCA2 mutations. (orig.)

  13. Cobalt-doped nanohydroxyapatite: synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial and hemolytic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tank, Kashmira P., E-mail: kashmira_physics@yahoo.co.in [Saurashtra University, Crystal Growth Laboratory, Physics Department (India); Chudasama, Kiran S.; Thaker, Vrinda S. [Saurashtra University, Bioscience Department (India); Joshi, Mihir J., E-mail: mshilp24@rediffmail.com [Saurashtra University, Crystal Growth Laboratory, Physics Department (India)

    2013-05-15

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}; HAP) is a major mineral component of the calcified tissues, and it has various applications in medicine and dentistry. In the present investigation, cobalt-doped hydroxyapatite (Co-HAP) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-mediated approach and characterized by different techniques. The EDAX was carried out to estimate the amount of doping in Co-HAP. The transmission electron microscopy result suggested the transformation of morphology from needle shaped to spherical type on increasing the doping concentration. The powder XRD study indicated the formation of a new phase of brushite for higher concentration of cobalt. The average particle size and strain were calculated using Williamson-Hall analysis. The average particle size was found to be 30-60 nm. The FTIR study confirmed the presence of various functional groups in the samples. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against four organisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shigella flexneri as Gram negative as well as Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus as Gram positive. The hemolytic test result suggested that all samples were non-hemolytic. The photoluminescence study was carried out to identify its possible applicability as a fluorescent probe.

  14. Cobalt-doped nanohydroxyapatite: synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial and hemolytic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tank, Kashmira P.; Chudasama, Kiran S.; Thaker, Vrinda S.; Joshi, Mihir J.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 ; HAP) is a major mineral component of the calcified tissues, and it has various applications in medicine and dentistry. In the present investigation, cobalt-doped hydroxyapatite (Co-HAP) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-mediated approach and characterized by different techniques. The EDAX was carried out to estimate the amount of doping in Co-HAP. The transmission electron microscopy result suggested the transformation of morphology from needle shaped to spherical type on increasing the doping concentration. The powder XRD study indicated the formation of a new phase of brushite for higher concentration of cobalt. The average particle size and strain were calculated using Williamson–Hall analysis. The average particle size was found to be 30–60 nm. The FTIR study confirmed the presence of various functional groups in the samples. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against four organisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shigella flexneri as Gram negative as well as Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus as Gram positive. The hemolytic test result suggested that all samples were non-hemolytic. The photoluminescence study was carried out to identify its possible applicability as a fluorescent probe.

  15. Management of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grisaru S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Silviu GrisaruUniversity of Calgary, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Acute renal failure associated with a fulminant, life-threatening systemic disease is rare in previously healthy young children; however, when it occurs, the most common cause is hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS. In most cases (90%, this abrupt and devastating illness is a result of ingestion of food or drink contaminated with pathogens that produce very potent toxins. Currently, there are no proven treatment options that can directly inactivate the toxin or effectively interfere with the cascade of destructive events triggered by the toxin once it gains access to the bloodstream and binds its receptor. However, HUS is self-limited, and effective supportive management during the acute phase is proven to be a life saver for children affected by HUS. A minority of childhood HUS cases, approximately 5%, are caused by various genetic mutations causing uncontrolled activation of the complement system. These children, who used to have a poor prognosis leading to end-stage renal disease, now have access to exciting new treatment options that can preserve kidney function and avoid disease recurrences. This review provides a summary of the current knowledge on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of childhood HUS, focusing on a practical approach to best management measures.Keywords: hemolytic, uremic, E.coli O157:H7, thrombotic, microangiopathy, complement system

  16. Hemolytic porcine intestinal Escherichia coli without virulence-associated genes typical of intestinal pathogenic E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierack, Peter; Weinreich, Joerg; Ewers, Christa; Tachu, Babila; Nicholson, Bryon; Barth, Stefanie

    2011-12-01

    Testing 1,666 fecal or intestinal samples from healthy and diarrheic pigs, we obtained hemolytic Escherichia coli isolates from 593 samples. Focusing on hemolytic E. coli isolates without virulence-associated genes (VAGs) typical for enteropathogens, we found that such isolates carried a broad variety of VAGs typical for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli.

  17. Cytomegalovirus Congenital Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Wahyutomo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus congenital infection is an infection caused by the the subfamily â Herpesviridae, during pregnancy. The incidence of infections among newborn infants is 1 %. One of the effects of congenitally acquired infection is the congenital cataract. A 6-year-old child complained to have a blurred vision diagnosed with cytomegalovirus congenital cataract. The diagnosis was confirmed by a positive serology testing for Ig M and Ig G CMV. The laboratory test using Giemsa staining to find inclusion bodies and a faster PCR could not be carried out (Sains Medika, 3(1:84-88.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Congenital hypothyroidism Congenital hypothyroidism Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Congenital hypothyroidism is a partial or complete loss of function ...

  19. Fanconi anemia proteins and endogenous stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang Qishen [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Research Foundation, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Andreassen, Paul R., E-mail: Paul.Andreassen@cchmc.org [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Research Foundation, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2009-07-31

    Each of the thirteen identified Fanconi anemia (FA) genes is required for resistance to DNA interstrand crosslinking agents, such as mitomycin C, cisplatin, and melphalan. While these agents are excellent tools for understanding the function of FA proteins in DNA repair, it is uncertain whether a defect in the removal of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) is the basis for the pathophysiology of FA. For example, DNA interstrand crosslinking agents induce other types of DNA damage, in addition to ICLs. Further, other DNA-damaging agents, such as ionizing or ultraviolet radiation, activate the FA pathway, leading to monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI. Also, FA patients display congenital abnormalities, hematologic deficiencies, and a predisposition to cancer in the absence of an environmental source of ICLs that is external to cells. Here we consider potential sources of endogenous DNA damage, or endogenous stresses, to which FA proteins may respond. These include ICLs formed by products of lipid peroxidation, and other forms of oxidative DNA damage. FA proteins may also potentially respond to telomere shortening or replication stress. Defining these endogenous sources of DNA damage or stresses is critical for understanding the pathogenesis of deficiencies for FA proteins. We propose that FA proteins are centrally involved in the response to replication stress, including replication stress arising from oxidative DNA damage.

  20. Fanconi anemia proteins and endogenous stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang Qishen; Andreassen, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    Each of the thirteen identified Fanconi anemia (FA) genes is required for resistance to DNA interstrand crosslinking agents, such as mitomycin C, cisplatin, and melphalan. While these agents are excellent tools for understanding the function of FA proteins in DNA repair, it is uncertain whether a defect in the removal of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) is the basis for the pathophysiology of FA. For example, DNA interstrand crosslinking agents induce other types of DNA damage, in addition to ICLs. Further, other DNA-damaging agents, such as ionizing or ultraviolet radiation, activate the FA pathway, leading to monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI. Also, FA patients display congenital abnormalities, hematologic deficiencies, and a predisposition to cancer in the absence of an environmental source of ICLs that is external to cells. Here we consider potential sources of endogenous DNA damage, or endogenous stresses, to which FA proteins may respond. These include ICLs formed by products of lipid peroxidation, and other forms of oxidative DNA damage. FA proteins may also potentially respond to telomere shortening or replication stress. Defining these endogenous sources of DNA damage or stresses is critical for understanding the pathogenesis of deficiencies for FA proteins. We propose that FA proteins are centrally involved in the response to replication stress, including replication stress arising from oxidative DNA damage.