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Sample records for androgen antagonists

  1. Preliminary investigations into triazole derived androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altimari, Jarrad M; Niranjan, Birunthi; Risbridger, Gail P; Schweiker, Stephanie S; Lohning, Anna E; Henderson, Luke C

    2014-05-01

    A range of 1,4-substituted-1,2,3-N-phenyltriazoles were synthesized and evaluated as non-steroidal androgen receptor (AR) antagonists. The motivation for this study was to replace the N-phenyl amide portion of small molecule antiandrogens with a 1,2,3-triazole and determine effects, if any, on biological activity. The synthetic methodology presented herein is robust, high yielding and extremely rapid. Using this methodology a series of 17 N-aryl triazoles were synthesized from commercially available starting materials in less than 3h. After preliminary biological screening at 20 and 40 μM, the most promising three compounds were found to display IC50 values of 40-50 μM against androgen dependent (LNCaP) cells and serve as a starting point for further structure-activity investigations. All compounds in this work were the focus of an in silico study to dock the compounds into the human androgen receptor ligand binding domain (hARLBD) and compare their predicted binding affinity with known antiandrogens. A comparison of receptor-ligand interactions for the wild type and T877A mutant AR revealed two novel polar interactions. One with Q738 of the wild type site and the second with the mutated A877 residue.

  2. Classification and virtual screening of androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiazhong; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-05-24

    Computational tools, such as quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), are highly useful as screening support for prioritization of substances of very high concern (SVHC). From the practical point of view, QSAR models should be effective to pick out more active rather than inactive compounds, expressed as sensitivity in classification works. This research investigates the classification of a big data set of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs)-androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, mainly aiming to improve the external sensitivity and to screen for potential AR binders. The kNN, lazy IB1, and ADTree methods and the consensus approach were used to build different models, which improve the sensitivity on external chemicals from 57.1% (literature) to 76.4%. Additionally, the models' predictive abilities were further validated on a blind collected data set (sensitivity: 85.7%). Then the proposed classifiers were used: (i) to distinguish a set of AR binders into antagonists and agonists; (ii) to screen a combined estrogen receptor binder database to find out possible chemicals that can bind to both AR and ER; and (iii) to virtually screen our in-house environmental chemical database. The in silico screening results suggest: (i) that some compounds can affect the normal endocrine system through a complex mechanism binding both to ER and AR; (ii) new EDCs, which are nonER binders, but can in silico bind to AR, are recognized; and (iii) about 20% of compounds in a big data set of environmental chemicals are predicted as new AR antagonists. The priority should be given to them to experimentally test the binding activities with AR.

  3. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of 4-phenylpyrrole derivatives as novel androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Nobuyuki; Hitaka, Takenori; Yamada, Masami; Hara, Takahito; Miyazaki, Junichi; Santou, Takashi; Kusaka, Masami; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Furuya, Shuichi; Tasaka, Akihiro; Hamamura, Kazumasa; Ito, Mitsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A series of 4-phenylpyrrole derivatives D were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their potential as novel orally available androgen receptor antagonists therapeutically effective against castration-resistant prostate cancers. 4-Phenylpyrrole compound 1 exhibited androgen receptor (AR) antagonistic activity against T877A and W741C mutant-type ARs as well as wild-type AR. An arylmethyl group incorporated into compound 1 contributed to enhancement of antagonistic activity. Compound 4n, 1-{[6-chloro-5-(hydroxymethyl)pyridin-3-yl]methyl}-4-(4-cyanophenyl)-2,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-3-carbonitrile exhibited inhibitory effects on tumor cell growth against the bicalutamide-resistant LNCaP-cxD2 cell line as well as the androgen receptor-dependent JDCaP cell line in a mouse xenograft model. These results demonstrate that this series of pyrrole compounds are novel androgen receptor antagonists with efficacy against prostate cancer cells, including castration-resistant prostate cancers such as bicalutamide-resistant prostate cancer.

  4. The discovery of novel human androgen receptor antagonist chemotypes using a combined pharmacophore screening procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, Arnout; Helsen, Christine; Zhang, Kam Y J; Claessens, Frank

    2013-04-01

    Unraveling the mechanisms involved in castration- and therapy-resistant prostate cancer has led to a renewed interest in androgen receptor (AR)-targeted therapeutics. Anti-androgens that block the activity of the AR therefore remain a valid therapeutic option. However, they must be more effective than, or display a distinct mechanism of action or binding mode from those of bicalutamide and hydroxyflutamide, which are currently in clinical use. For that reason, the second-generation anti-androgen MDV3100 was developed. MDV3100, however, shares its 4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl group with bicalutamide and hydroxyflutamide required for binding to the AR. In this work, we used a combined strategy to find new antagonist structures distinct from the 4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl group to avoid cross-resistance for these compounds and to find structures without agonist activity on mutant ARs (AR W741C and AR T877A). We found two novel chemotypes with AR-antagonistic activity (IC(50): 3-6 μM) by virtual screening and confirmed their biological activity in an androgen-responsive reporter assay. The design of our computational approach was validated by the observation of strongly decreased or absence of agonistic activity on the two mutant ARs. Further structural derivatization to optimize the potency of these compounds can render these chemotypes into very promising, alternative AR antagonists for prostate cancer therapy.

  5. Gene expression profiling of the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide and vinclozolin in zebrafish (Danio rerio) gonads

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    Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma, E-mail: dalma@stthomas.edu [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); University of St. Thomas, 2115 Summit Ave, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Wang Ronglin [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Ecological Exposure Research Division, 26W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Villeneuve, Daniel L. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); Bencic, David C.; Lazorchak, Jim [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Ecological Exposure Research Division, 26W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Ankley, Gerald T. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States)

    2011-01-25

    The studies presented in this manuscript focus on characterization of transcriptomic responses to anti-androgens in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Research on the effects of anti-androgens in fish has been characterized by a heavy reliance on apical endpoints, and molecular mechanisms of action (MOA) of anti-androgens remain poorly elucidated. In the present study, we examined effects of a short term exposure (24-96 h) to the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide (FLU) and vinclozolin (VZ) on gene expression in gonads of sexually mature zebrafish, using commercially available zebrafish oligonucleotide microarrays (4 x 44 K platform). We found that VZ and FLU potentially impact reproductive processes via multiple pathways related to steroidogenesis, spermatogenesis, and fertilization. Observed changes in gene expression often were shared by VZ and FLU, as demonstrated by overlap in differentially-expressed genes and enrichment of several common key pathways including: (1) integrin and actin signaling, (2) nuclear receptor 5A1 signaling, (3) fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling, (4) polyamine synthesis, and (5) androgen synthesis. This information should prove useful to elucidating specific mechanisms of reproductive effects of anti-androgens in fish, as well as developing biomarkers for this important class of endocrine-active chemicals.

  6. Similarities and Distinctions in Actions of Surface-Directed and Classic Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

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    Ji Ho Suh

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR surface-directed antagonist MJC13 inhibits AR function and proliferation of prostate cancer (PC cells. These effects are related to arrest of an AR/chaperone complex in the cytoplasm. Here, we compared MJC13 and classic AR antagonists such as flutamide and bicalutamide. Microarray analysis and confirmatory qRT-PCR reveals that MJC13 and flutamide inhibit dihydrotestosterone (DHT-dependent genes in LNCaP PC cells. Both compounds are equally effective on a genome wide basis and as effective as second generation AR antagonists (MDV3100, ARN-509 at selected genes. MJC13 inhibits AR binding to the prostate specific antigen (PSA promoter more strongly than flutamide, consistent with different mechanisms of action. Examination of efficacy of MJC13 in conditions that reflect aspects castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC reveals that it inhibits flutamide activation of an AR mutant (ART877A that emerges during flutamide withdrawal syndrome, but displays greatly restricted gene-specific activity in 22Rv1 cells that express a constitutively active truncated AR and is inactive against glucocorticoid receptor (GR, which can co-opt androgen-dependent signaling networks in CRPC. Importantly, MJC13 inhibits AR interactions with SRC2 and β-catenin in the nucleus and, unlike flutamide, strongly inhibits amplification of AR activity obtained with transfected SRC2 and β-catenin. MJC13 also inhibits DHT and β-catenin-enhanced cell division in LNCaP cells. Thus, a surface-directed antagonist can block AR activity in some conditions in which a classic antagonist fails and may display utility in particular forms of CRPC.

  7. Similarities and Distinctions in Actions of Surface-Directed and Classic Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Ji Ho; Chattopadhyay, Arundhati; Sieglaff, Douglas H; Storer Samaniego, Cheryl; Cox, Marc B; Webb, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) surface-directed antagonist MJC13 inhibits AR function and proliferation of prostate cancer (PC) cells. These effects are related to arrest of an AR/chaperone complex in the cytoplasm. Here, we compared MJC13 and classic AR antagonists such as flutamide and bicalutamide. Microarray analysis and confirmatory qRT-PCR reveals that MJC13 and flutamide inhibit dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-dependent genes in LNCaP PC cells. Both compounds are equally effective on a genome wide basis and as effective as second generation AR antagonists (MDV3100, ARN-509) at selected genes. MJC13 inhibits AR binding to the prostate specific antigen (PSA) promoter more strongly than flutamide, consistent with different mechanisms of action. Examination of efficacy of MJC13 in conditions that reflect aspects castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) reveals that it inhibits flutamide activation of an AR mutant (ART877A) that emerges during flutamide withdrawal syndrome, but displays greatly restricted gene-specific activity in 22Rv1 cells that express a constitutively active truncated AR and is inactive against glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which can co-opt androgen-dependent signaling networks in CRPC. Importantly, MJC13 inhibits AR interactions with SRC2 and β-catenin in the nucleus and, unlike flutamide, strongly inhibits amplification of AR activity obtained with transfected SRC2 and β-catenin. MJC13 also inhibits DHT and β-catenin-enhanced cell division in LNCaP cells. Thus, a surface-directed antagonist can block AR activity in some conditions in which a classic antagonist fails and may display utility in particular forms of CRPC.

  8. Antarlides: A New Type of Androgen Receptor (AR) Antagonist that Overcomes Resistance to AR-Targeted Therapy.

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    Saito, Shun; Fujimaki, Takahiro; Panbangred, Watanalai; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Imoto, Masaya

    2016-02-18

    Prostate cancer is treated with androgen receptor (AR) antagonists but most patients experience disease progression after long-term treatment with these compounds. Therefore, new AR antagonists are required for patient follow-up treatment. In the course of screening for a new AR antagonist, we isolated the novel compounds antarlides A-E (1-5) from Streptomyces sp. BB47. Antarlides are mutually isomeric with respect to the double bond and have a 22-membered-ring macrocyclic structure. The full stereostructure of 1 was established by chemical modifications, including methanolysis, the Trost method, acetonide formation, and the PGME method. 1-5 inhibited the binding of androgen to ARs in vitro. In addition, 2 inhibited the transcriptional activity of not only wild-type AR but also mutant ARs, which are seen in patients with acquired resistance to clinically used AR antagonists. Therefore, antarlides are a potent new generation of AR antagonists that overcome resistance.

  9. A Combined Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Research of Quinolinone Derivatives as Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Bai, Fang; Cao, Hong; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Antiandrogens bicalutamide, flutamide and enzalutamide etc. have been used in clinical trials to treat prostate cancer by binding to and antagonizing androgen receptor (AR). Although initially effective, the drug resistance problem will emerge eventually, which results in a high medical need for novel AR antagonist exploitation. Here in this work, to facilitate the rational design of novel AR antagonists, we studied the structure-activity relationships of a series of 2-quinolinone derivatives and investigated the structural requirements for their antiandrogenic activities. Different modeling methods, including 2D MLR, 3D CoMFA and CoMSIA, were implemented to evolve QSAR models. All these models, thoroughly validated, demonstrated satisfactory results especially for the good predictive abilities. The contour maps from 3D CoMFA and CoMSIA models provide visualized explanation of key structural characteristics relevant to the antiandrogenic activities, which is summarized to a position-specific conclusion at the end. The obtained results from this research are practically useful for rational design and screening of promising chemicals with high antiandrogenic activities.

  10. Sexual differentiation of oxytocin stress responsiveness: effect of neonatal androgenization, castration and a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist.

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    Carter, D A; Saridaki, E; Lightman, S L

    1988-04-01

    The plasma OT increment following stress in rats is sexually dimorphic, females exhibiting greater responses than males. We have investigated the role of neonatal androgen secretion in determining the sex-typical level of response. Castration of male pups either surgically or functionally (GnRH antagonist treatment) within either 2 h or 5 days of birth did not elevate the OT responses of adult males. In contrast, androgenization of female pups (testosterone, 1.25 mg/pup) within 5 days of birth markedly reduced the OT stress responses of adults to a level insignificantly different to males. The results show that neonatal androgens can exert organizational effects on OT regulatory mechanisms. Since neonatal castration was ineffective it would appear that a prenatal defeminization or masculinization event determines OT stress responsiveness in males.

  11. Combined Ligand/Structure-Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Steroidal Androgen Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, targeting the androgen receptor (AR, are the main endocrine therapies for prostate cancer (PCa. But as drug resistance to antiandrogens emerges in advanced PCa, there presents a high medical need for exploitation of novel AR antagonists. In this work, the relationships between the molecular structures and antiandrogenic activities of a series of 7α-substituted dihydrotestosterone derivatives were investigated. The proposed MLR model obtained high predictive ability. The thoroughly validated QSAR model was used to virtually screen new dihydrotestosterones derivatives taken from PubChem, resulting in the finding of novel compounds CID_70128824, CID_70127147, and CID_70126881, whose in silico bioactivities are much higher than the published best one, even higher than bicalutamide. In addition, molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD simulations, and MM/GBSA have been employed to analyze and compare the binding modes between the novel compounds and AR. Through the analysis of the binding free energy and residue energy decomposition, we concluded that the newly discovered chemicals can in silico bind to AR with similar position and mechanism to the reported active compound and the van der Waals interaction is the main driving force during the binding process.

  12. Developmental Programming: Prenatal and Postnatal Androgen Antagonist and Insulin Sensitizer Interventions Prevent Advancement of Puberty and Improve LH Surge Dynamics in Prenatal Testosterone-Treated Sheep.

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    Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Veiga-Lopez, Almudena; Herkimer, Carol; Abi Salloum, Bachir; Moeller, Jacob; Beckett, Evan; Sreedharan, Rohit

    2015-07-01

    Prenatal T excess induces maternal hyperinsulinemia, early puberty, and reproductive/metabolic defects in the female similar to those seen in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. This study addressed the organizational/activational role of androgens and insulin in programming pubertal advancement and periovulatory LH surge defects. Treatment groups included the following: 1) control; 2) prenatal T; 3) prenatal T plus prenatal androgen antagonist, flutamide; 4) prenatal T plus prenatal insulin sensitizer, rosiglitazone; 5) prenatal T and postnatal flutamide; 6) prenatal T and postnatal rosiglitazone; and 7) prenatal T and postnatal metformin. Prenatal treatments spanned 30-90 days of gestation and postnatal treatments began at approximately 8 weeks of age and continued throughout. Blood samples were taken twice weekly, beginning at approximately 12 weeks of age to time puberty. Two-hour samples after the synchronization with prostaglandin F2α were taken for 120 hours to characterize LH surge dynamics at 7 and 19 months of age. Prenatal T females entered puberty earlier than controls, and all interventions prevented this advancement. Prenatal T reduced the percentage of animals having LH surge, and females that presented LH surge exhibited delayed timing and dampened amplitude of the LH surge. Prenatal androgen antagonist, but not other interventions, restored LH surges without normalizing the timing of the surge. Normalization of pubertal timing with prenatal/postnatal androgen antagonist and insulin sensitizer interventions suggests that pubertal advancement is programmed by androgenic actions of T involving insulin as a mediary. Restoration of LH surges by cotreatment with androgen antagonist supports androgenic programming at the organizational level.

  13. A new highly specific and robust yeast androgen bioassay for the detection of agonists and antagonists.

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    Bovee, Toine F H; Helsdingen, Richard J R; Hamers, Astrid R M; van Duursen, Majorie B M; Nielen, Michel W F; Hoogenboom, Ron L A P

    2007-11-01

    Public concern about the presence of natural and anthropogenic compounds which affect human health by modulating normal endocrine functions is continuously growing. Fast and simple high-throughput screening methods for the detection of hormone activities are thus indispensable. During the last two decades, a panel of different in vitro assays has been developed, mainly for compounds with an estrogenic mode of action. Here we describe the development of an androgen transcription activation assay that is easy to use in routine screening. Recombinant yeast cells were constructed that express the human androgen receptor and yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP), the latter in response to androgens. Compared with other reporters, the yEGFP reporter protein is very convenient because it is directly measurable in intact living cells, i.e., cell wall disruption and the addition of a substrate are not needed. When yeast was exposed to 17beta-testosterone, the concentration where half-maximal activation is reached (EC(50)) was 50 nM. The relative androgenic potencies, defined as the ratio between the EC(50) of 17beta-testosterone and the EC(50) of the compound, of 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, methyltrienolone, and 17beta-boldenone are 2.3, 1.4, and 0.15 respectively. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that this new yeast androgen bioassay is fast, sensitive, and very specific and also suited to detect compounds that have an antiandrogenic mode of action.

  14. A new highly specific and robust yeast androgen bioassay for the detection of agonists and antagonists

    OpenAIRE

    Bovee, T. F. H.; Helsdingen, J.R.; Hamers, A.R.M.; Duursen, van, M.; Nielen, M. W. F.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Public concern about the presence of natural and anthropogenic compounds which affect human health by modulating normal endocrine functions is continuously growing. Fast and simple high-throughput screening methods for the detection of hormone activities are thus indispensable. During the last two decades, a panel of different in vitro assays has been developed, mainly for compounds with an estrogenic mode of action. Here we describe the development of an androgen transcription activation ass...

  15. Androgen Receptor Antagonists and Anti-Prostate Cancer Activities of Some Newly Synthesized Substituted Fused Pyrazolo-, Triazolo- and Thiazolo-Pyrimidine Derivatives

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    Saleh A. Bahashwan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of substituted pyrazole, triazole and thiazole derivatives (2–13 were synthesized from 1-(naphtho[1,2-d]thiazol-2-ylhydrazine as starting material and evaluated as androgen receptor antagonists and anti-prostate cancer agents. The newly synthesized compounds showed potent androgen receptor antagonists and anti-prostate cancer activities with low toxicity (lethal dose 50 (LD50 comparable to Bicalutamide as reference drug. The structures of newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and MS spectral data and elemental analysis. The detailed synthesis, spectroscopic data, LD50 values and pharmacological activities of the synthesized compounds are reported.

  16. Androgen priming using aromatase inhibitor and hCG during early-follicular-phase GnRH antagonist down-regulation in modified antagonist protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løssl, Kristine; Andersen, A N; Loft, A;

    2006-01-01

    Temporary exposure of follicles to increased levels of androgens may enhance their sensitivity to FSH. The aim of this study was to increase the intraovarian androgen level using aromatase inhibitors and hCG before controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) and to test this concept clinically.......Temporary exposure of follicles to increased levels of androgens may enhance their sensitivity to FSH. The aim of this study was to increase the intraovarian androgen level using aromatase inhibitors and hCG before controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) and to test this concept clinically....

  17. Androgen priming using aromatase inhibitor and hCG during early-follicular-phase GnRH antagonist down-regulation in modified antagonist protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løssl, Kristine; Andersen, A N; Loft, A;

    2006-01-01

    Temporary exposure of follicles to increased levels of androgens may enhance their sensitivity to FSH. The aim of this study was to increase the intraovarian androgen level using aromatase inhibitors and hCG before controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) and to test this concept clinically....

  18. The Three Dimensional Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (3D-QSAR and Docking Studies of Curcumin Derivatives as Androgen Receptor Antagonists

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    Jing Yang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor antagonists have been proved to be effective anti-prostate cancer agents. 3D-QSAR and Molecular docking methods were performed on curcumin derivatives as androgen receptor antagonists. The bioactive conformation was explored by docking the potent compound 29 into the binding site of AR. The constructed Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA and Comparative Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA models produced statistically significant results with the cross-validated correlation coefficients q2 of 0.658 and 0.567, non-cross-validated correlation coefficients r2 of 0.988 and 0.978, and predicted correction coefficients r2pred of 0.715 and 0.793, respectively. These results ensure the CoMFA and CoMSIA models as a tool to guide the design of novel potent AR antagonists. A set of 30 new analogs were proposed by utilizing the results revealed in the present study, and were predicted with potential activities in the developed models.

  19. The suitability of concentration addition for predicting the effects of multi-component mixtures of up to 17 anti-androgens with varied structural features in an in vitro AR antagonist assay

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    Ermler, Sibylle; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.kortenkamp@brunel.ac.uk

    2011-12-15

    The risks associated with human exposures to chemicals capable of antagonising the effects of endogenous androgens have attracted considerable recent interest. Exposure is typically to large numbers of chemicals with androgen receptor (AR) antagonist activity, yet there is limited evidence of the combined effects of multi-component mixtures of these chemicals. A few in vitro studies with mixtures of up to six AR antagonists suggest that the concept of concentration addition (CA) provides good approximations of experimentally observed mixture effects, but studies with larger numbers of anti-androgens, and with more varied structural features, are missing. Here we show that the mixture effects of up to 17 AR antagonists, comprising compounds as diverse as UV-filter substances, parabens, perfluorinated compounds, bisphenol-A, benzo({alpha})pyrene, synthetic musks, antioxidants and polybrominated biphenyls, can be predicted well on the basis of the anti-androgenicity of the single components using the concept of CA. We tested these mixtures in an in vitro AR-dependent luciferase reporter gene assay, based on MDA-kb2 cells. The effects of further mixtures, composed of four and six anti-androgens, could be predicted accurately by CA. However, there was a shortfall from expected additivity with a ten-component mixture at two different mixture ratios, but attempts to attribute these deviations to differential expression of hormone-metabolising CYP isoforms did not produce conclusive results. CA provides good approximations of in vitro mixture effects of anti-androgens with varying structural features. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Humans are exposed to a large number of androgen receptor antagonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is limited evidence of the combined effects of anti-androgenic chemicals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modelled the predictability of combined effects of up to 17 anti-androgens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested the

  20. Molecular mechanism of R-bicalutamide switching from androgen receptor antagonist to agonist induced by amino acid mutations using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculation

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    Liu, Hongli; Han, Rui; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Zheng, Lifang

    2016-12-01

    R-bicalutamide, a first generation antiandrogen, was used to treat prostate cancer for decades. Although it is very effective at the beginning, resistance appears after 2-3 years of treatment. Mutation of androgen receptor (AR) is considered a main reason for drug resistance. It is reported that AR W741C, W741L, W741C_T877A, T877A, F876L, F876L_T877A and L701H mutations can convert R-bicalutamide from AR antagonist to agonist, but the switching mechanisms are not clear. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) calculations were performed to analyze the interaction mechanisms between R-bicalutamide and wild type/mutant ARs. The results indicate that helix H12, which lies on the top of AR LBD like a cover, plays a vital role in R-bicalutamide binding. When interacting with AR, the B-ring of R-bicalutamide pushes H12 aside, distorting the coactivator binding site (AF2) resulting in the inactivation of transcription. Several residue mutations appear to enlarge the distance between the B-ring of R-bicalutamide and H12, reducing steric clash, which is conducive to a closed H12 conformation, leading to the formation of the coactivator binding site AF2 and increased transcription. Hydrogen bond and per-residue free energy decomposition analyses are also investigated to explore the interacting mechanisms, and M895 is found to be a key residue in the antagonist mechanism. The obtained molecular mechanisms will aid rational screening and design of novel AR antagonists, even to mutant AR.

  1. In vivo biodistribution of an androgen receptor avid PET imaging agent 7-{alpha}-fluoro-17 {alpha}-methyl-5-{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone ([{sup 18}F]FMDHT) in rats pretreated with cetrorelix, a GnRH antagonist

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    Garg, Sudha; Doke, Aniruddha; Black, Kimberly W.; Garg, Pradeep K. [Wake Forest University Health Sciences, PET Center, Department of Radiological Sciences, Winston Salem, NC (United States)

    2008-02-15

    For this study, we have assessed the in vivo distribution and androgen receptor (AR) seeking properties of an F-18-labeled androgen [{sup 18}F]FMDHT in rats castrated with a GnRH antagonist. The radiochemical synthesis of [{sup 18}F]FMDHT was performed using a previously published method. The radiochemical synthesis provided the desired product in good radiochemical yields and radiochemical purity. In vivo biodistribution studies were performed in chemically castrated rats. The animals were castrated using cetrorelix, a GnRH antagonist. To assess the specificity of [{sup 18}F]FMDHT towards ARs, a separate group of animals was pretreated with a large dose of androgen before the [{sup 18}F]FMDHT injection. The in vivo biodistribution results show selective uptake of [{sup 18}F]FMDHT in the prostate that ranged from 0.46 + 0.10 %ID/g at 1 h to 0.59 + 0.16 %ID/g at 3 h with prostate to muscle ratio ranging from 8.06 + 2.46 at 1 h to 18.81 + 4.90 at 3 h. These in vivo distribution studies document a high selectivity and specificity of [{sup 18}F]FMDHT towards AR rich tissues and suggests that [{sup 18}F]FMDHT may be a useful in vivo PET imaging ligand. (orig.)

  2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a fluorine-18-labeled nonsteroidal androgen receptor antagonist, N-(3-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-4-nitronaphthyl)-cis-5-norbornene-endo-2,3-dicarboxylic imide

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    Parent, Ephraim E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Dence, Carmen S. [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Sharp, Terry L. [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Welch, Michael J. [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Katzenellenbogen, John A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)]. E-mail: jkatzene@uiuc.edu

    2006-07-15

    Introduction: Androgen receptor (AR), which is overexpressed in most prostate cancers, is the target of androgen ablation and antiandrogen therapies: it is also the target for the receptor-mediated imaging of AR-positive prostate cancer using radiolabeled ligands. Previous AR imaging agents were based on a steroidal core labeled with fluorine. To develop a novel class of nonsteroidal imaging agents, with binding and pharmacological characteristics that are more similar to those of clinically used AR antagonists, we synthesized N-(3-fluoro-4-nitronaphthyl)-cis-5-norbornene-endo-2,3-dicarboxylic imide (3-F-NNDI), an analog of recently reported AR antagonist ligands. Methods: 3-F-NNDI was synthesized in six steps starting with 1-nitronaphthalene, with fluorine incorporation as the final step. The labeling of 3-F-NNDI with fluorine-18 was achieved through a novel, extremely mild, S{sub N}Ar displacement reaction of an o-nitro-activated arene trimethylammonium salt, and 3-[{sup 18}F]F-NNDI was prepared in high specific activity. Results and Discussion: 3-F-NNDI was found to have an AR-binding affinity similar to that of its parent compound. In vitro assays demonstrated high stability of the labeled compound under physiological conditions in buffer and in the blood. Androgen target tissue uptake in diethylstilbestrol-pretreated male rats, however, was minimal, probably because of extensive metabolic defluorination the radiolabeled ligand. Conclusions: This study is part of our first look at a novel class of nonsteroidal AR antagonists as positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents that are alternatives to steroidal AR agonist-based imaging agents. Although 3-[{sup 18}F]F-NNDI has significant affinity for AR, it showed limited promise as a PET imaging agent because of its poor target tissue distribution properties.

  3. Androgen resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Ieuan A; Deeb, Asma

    2006-12-01

    Androgen resistance causes the androgen insensitivity syndrome in its variant forms and is a paradigm of clinical syndromes associated with hormone resistance. In its complete form, the syndrome causes XY sex reversal and a female phenotype. Partial resistance to androgens is a common cause of ambiguous genitalia of the newborn, but a similar phenotype may result from several other conditions, including defects in testis determination and androgen biosynthesis. The biological actions of androgens are mediated by a single intracellular androgen receptor encoded by a gene on the long arm of the X chromosome. Mutations in this gene result in varying degrees of androgen receptor dysfunction and phenotypes that often show poor concordance with the genotype. Functional characterization and three-dimensional modelling of novel mutant receptors has been informative in understanding the mechanism of androgen action. Management issues in syndromes of androgen insensitivity include decisions on sex assignment, timing of gonadectomy in relation to tumour risk, and genetic and psychological counselling.

  4. Selective androgen receptor modulators: in pursuit of tissue-selective androgens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omwancha, Josephat; Brown, Terry R

    2006-10-01

    The androgen receptor mediates the androgenic and anabolic activity of the endogenous steroids testosterone and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Current knowledge of the androgen receptor protein structure, and the molecular mechanisms surrounding the binding properties and activities of agonists and antagonists has led to the design and development of novel nonsteroidal ligands with selected tissue-specific androgen receptor agonist and antagonist activities. The activity of these compounds, termed selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs), is directed toward the maintenance or enhancement of anabolic effects on bone and muscle with minimal androgenic effects on prostate growth. SARMs are of potential therapeutic value in the treatment of male hypogonadism, osteoporosis, frailty and muscle wasting, burn injury and would healing, anemia, mood and depression, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

  5. Reinforcing aspects of androgens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ruth I

    2004-11-15

    Are androgens reinforcing? Androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, often with negative long-term health consequences. As a result, in 1991, testosterone was declared a controlled substance. Recently, Brower [K.J. Brower, Anabolic steroid abuse and dependence. Curr. Psychiatry Rep. 4 (2002) 377-387.] proposed a two-stage model of AAS dependence. Users initiate steroid use for their anabolic effects on muscle growth. With continued exposure, dependence on the psychoactive effects of AAS develops. However, it is difficult in humans to separate direct psychoactive effects of AAS from the user's psychological dependence on the anabolic effects of AAS. Thus, studies in laboratory animals are useful to explore androgen reinforcement. Testosterone induces a conditioned place preference in rats and mice, and is voluntarily consumed through oral, intravenous, and intracerebroventricular self-administration in hamsters. Active, gonad-intact male and female hamsters will deliver 1 microg/microl testosterone into the lateral ventricles. Indeed, some individuals self-administer testosterone intracerebroventricularly to the point of death. Male rats develop a conditioned place preference to testosterone injections into the nucleus accumbens, an effect blocked by dopamine receptor antagonists. These data suggest that androgen reinforcement is mediated by the brain. Moreover, testosterone appears to act through the mesolimbic dopamine system, a common substrate for drugs of abuse. Nonetheless, androgen reinforcement is not comparable to that of cocaine or heroin. Instead, testosterone resembles other mild reinforcers, such as caffeine, nicotine, or benzodiazepines. The potential for androgen addiction remains to be determined.

  6. Systems Pharmacology Modeling of Prostate‐Specific Antigen in Patients With Prostate Cancer Treated With an Androgen Receptor Antagonist and Down‐Regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, HB; Young, J; Clack, G; Dickinson, PA

    2016-01-01

    First‐in‐human (FIH) studies with AZD3514, a selective androgen receptor (AR) down‐regulator, showed decreases of >30% in the prostate‐specific antigen (PSA) in some patients. A modeling approach was adopted to understand these observations and define the optimum clinical use hypothesis for AZD3514 for clinical testing. Initial empirical modeling showed that only baseline PSA correlated significantly with this biological response, whereas drug concentration did not. To identify the mechanistic cause of this observation, a mechanism‐based model was first developed, which described the effects of AZD3514 on AR protein and PSA mRNA levels in LNCaP cells with and without dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Second, the mechanism‐based model was linked to a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model; PSA effects of clinical doses were subsequently simulated under different clinical conditions. This model was used to adjust the design of the ongoing clinical FIH study and direct the backup program. PMID:27299938

  7. Androgen receptor modulators: a marriage of chemistry and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Iain J

    2013-06-01

    Androgenic steroids are important for male development in utero and secondary sexual characteristics at puberty. In addition, androgens play a role in non-reproductive tissues, such as bone and muscle in both sexes. The actions of the androgens testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are mediated by a single receptor protein, the androgen receptor. Over the last 60-70 years there has been considerable research interest in the development of inhibitors of androgen receptor for the management of diseases such as prostate cancer. However, more recently, there is also a growing appreciation of the need for selective androgen modulators that would demonstrate tissue-selective agonist or antagonist activity. The chemistry and biology of selective agonists, antagonists and selective androgen receptor modulators will be discussed in this review.

  8. Selective androgen receptor modulators as improved androgen therapy for advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coss, Christopher C; Jones, Amanda; Dalton, James T

    2014-11-01

    Androgens were at one time a therapeutic mainstay in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. Despite comparable efficacy, SERMs and aromatase inhibitors eventually became the therapies of choice due to in part to preferred side-effect profiles. Molecular characterization of breast tumors has revealed an abundance of androgen receptor expression but the choice of an appropriate androgen receptor ligand (agonist or antagonist) has been confounded by multiple conflicting reports concerning the role of the receptor in the disease. Modern clinical efforts have almost exclusively utilized antagonists. However, the recent clinical development of selective androgen receptor modulators with greatly improved side-effect profiles has renewed interest in androgen agonist therapy for advanced breast cancer.

  9. Treatment of androgenic disorders in women: acne, hirsutism, and alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, G P; Bergfeld, W F

    1990-01-01

    Androgen excess disorders--acne, alopecia, and hirsutism--can be treated effectively with endocrine therapy such as androgen receptor blockers or antagonists, or with androgen suppression. Spironolactone, estrogen, and dexamethasone are considered the most effective approaches to treatment. Whatever the modality, careful planning is key to success, with recognition that response rates vary from patient to patient. A treatment regimen generally continues for at least 2 years.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL ANDROGENS AND ANTIANDROGENS: AN EXPANDING CHEMICAL UNIVERSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Within the last ten years, awareness has grown about environmental chemicals that display antiandrogenic or androgenic activity. While studies in the early 1990s focused on pesticides that acted as androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, it soon became evident that this was not the ...

  11. Unexpected binding orientation of bulky-B-ring anti-androgens and implications for future drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Charles B; Jones, Amanda; Bohl, Casey E; Dalton, James T; Miller, Duane D

    2011-06-01

    Several new androgen receptor antagonists were synthesized and found to have varying activities across typically anti-androgen resistant mutants (Thr877 → Ala and Trp741 → Leu) and markedly improved potency over previously reported pan-antagonists. X-ray crystallography of a new anti-androgen in an androgen receptor mutant (Thr877 → Ala) shows that the receptor can accommodate the added bulk presented by phenyl to naphthyl substitution, casting doubt on previous reports of predicted binding orientation and the causes of antagonism in bulky-B-ring antagonists.

  12. Up-regulation of Bcl-2 is required for the progression of prostate cancer cells from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent growth stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuting Lin; Junichi Fukuchi; Richard A Hiipakka; John M Kokontis; Jialing Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Bcl-2 is an anti-apoptotic oncoprotein and its protein levels are inversely correlated with prognosis in many cancers.However, the role of Bcl-2 in the progression of prostate cancer is not clear. Here we report that Bcl-2 is required for the progression of LNCaP prostate cancer cells from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent growth stage. The mRNA and protein levels of Bcl-2 are significantly increased in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells, shRNA-mediated gene silencing of Bcl-2 in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells promotes UV-induced apoptosis and suppresses the growth of prostate tumors in vivo. Growing androgen-dependent cells under androgen-deprivation conditions results in formation of androgen-independent colonies; and the transition from androgen-dependent to androgen-independent growth is blocked by ectopic expression of the Bcl-2 antagonist Bax or Bcl-2 shRNA. Thus, our results demonstrate that Bcl-2 is not only critical for the survival of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells, but is also required for the progression of prostate cancer cells from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent growth stage.

  13. Ovarian overproduction of androgens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001165.htm Ovarian overproduction of androgens To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ovarian overproduction of androgens is a condition in which the ...

  14. Androgen receptor mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.W. Jenster (Guido); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); J.A.G.M. van der Korput (J. A G M); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); A.L.M. Boehmer (Annemie); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractMale sexual differentiation and development proceed under direct control of androgens. Androgen action is mediated by the intracellular androgen receptor, which belongs to the superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors. At least three pathological situations are associated wit

  15. Androgens and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderschueren, Dirk; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Boonen, Steven; Lindberg, Marie K; Bouillon, Roger; Ohlsson, Claes

    2004-06-01

    Loss of estrogens or androgens increases the rate of bone remodeling by removing restraining effects on osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis, and also causes a focal imbalance between resorption and formation by prolonging the lifespan of osteoclasts and shortening the lifespan of osteoblasts. Conversely, androgens, as well as estrogens, maintain cancellous bone mass and integrity, regardless of age or sex. Although androgens, via the androgen receptor (AR), and estrogens, via the estrogen receptors (ERs), can exert these effects, their relative contribution remains uncertain. Recent studies suggest that androgen action on cancellous bone depends on (local) aromatization of androgens into estrogens. However, at least in rodents, androgen action on cancellous bone can be directly mediated via AR activation, even in the absence of ERs. Androgens also increase cortical bone size via stimulation of both longitudinal and radial growth. First, androgens, like estrogens, have a biphasic effect on endochondral bone formation: at the start of puberty, sex steroids stimulate endochondral bone formation, whereas they induce epiphyseal closure at the end of puberty. Androgen action on the growth plate is, however, clearly mediated via aromatization in estrogens and interaction with ERalpha. Androgens increase radial growth, whereas estrogens decrease periosteal bone formation. This effect of androgens may be important because bone strength in males seems to be determined by relatively higher periosteal bone formation and, therefore, greater bone dimensions, relative to muscle mass at older age. Experiments in mice again suggest that both the AR and ERalpha pathways are involved in androgen action on radial bone growth. ERbeta may mediate growth-limiting effects of estrogens in the female but does not seem to be involved in the regulation of bone size in males. In conclusion, androgens may protect men against osteoporosis via maintenance of cancellous bone mass and

  16. INTERACTION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES AND RELATED COMPOUNDS WITH THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of several environmental chemicals capable of binding to the androgen receptor (AR) and interfering with its normal function has heightened concern for adverse effects across a broad spectrum of environmental chemicals. We previously demonstrated AR antagonist act...

  17. Androgens and the skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, M K; Vandenput, L; Movèrare Skrtic, S; Vanderschueren, D; Boonen, S; Bouillon, R; Ohlsson, C

    2005-03-01

    Loss of estrogens or androgens causes bone loss by increasing the rate of bone remodeling, and also causes an imbalance between resorption and formation by prolonging the lifespan of osteoclasts and shortening the lifespan of osteoblasts. Conversely, treatment with androgens, as well as estrogens, maintains cancellous bone mass and integrity, regardless of age or sex. Both androgens, via the androgen receptor (AR), and estrogens, via the estrogen receptors (ERs) can exert these effects, but the relative contribution of these 2 pathways remains uncertain. Androgens, like estrogens, stimulate endochondral bone formation at the start of puberty, whereas they induce epiphyseal closure at the end of puberty, thus, they have a biphasic effect. Androgen action on the growth plate is, however, clearly mediated via aromatization into estrogens and interaction with ER alpha. Androgens increase, while estrogens decrease radial growth. This differential effect of the sex steroids may be important because bone strength in males seems to be determined by higher periosteal bone formation and, therefore, greater bone dimensions. Experiments in mice suggest that both the AR and ER alpha pathways are involved in androgen action on radial bone growth. ER beta may mediate growth-limiting effects of estrogens in the female but does not seem to be involved in the regulation of bone size in males. In conclusion, androgens may protect men against osteoporosis via maintenance of cancellous bone mass and expansion of cortical bone. This androgen action on bone is mediated by the AR and ER alpha.

  18. Androgens and women's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, G P

    1998-01-01

    Androgenic disorders are those conditions in women characterized by excessive androgen action. They are the most common endocrinopathy of women, affecting from 10% to 20%. Signs are: persistent acne, hirsutism and androgenic alopecia, which is the female equivalent of male pattern baldness. A subgroup, those traditionally labeled as having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), additionally have anovulation, as well as menstrual abnormalities and, often, obesity. Although women with androgenic disorders usually present themselves for help with the skin or menstrual changes, there are other important implications regarding their health. Women with PCOS have varying degrees of insulin resistance, and an increased incidence of Type II diabetes mellitus, as well as unfavorable lipid patterns. The presence of these risk factors is suggested by upper segment obesity, darkening of the skin, and the other skin changes that make up acanthosis nigricans. Diagnosis involves measurement of circulating androgens (of which free testosterone is most important), together with prolactin and FSH when menstrual dysfunction is present. Many women with androgenic skin changes have normal serum androgen levels, suggesting increased end organ sensitivity to androgens. Others have hyperandrogenism (of ovarian or adrenal origin). Treatment is usually successful in controlling acne, reducing hirsutism and stabilizing, or partially reversing, androgenic alopecia. Pharmacological approaches involve suppressing androgen levels, for example, the use of an appropriate oral contraceptive, or antagonizing androgen action with several medications that have this activity. Unfortunately, most women with androgenic disorders are frustrated in their efforts to obtain medical help. Understanding androgenic disorders will enable the physician to significantly help the majority of women with these conditions.

  19. Antiandrogens prevent stable DNA-binding of the androgen receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Farla; R. Hersmus (Remko); J. Trapman (Jan); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe androgen receptor (AR) is essential for development of the male gender and in the growth of the majority of prostate cancers. Agonists as well as most antagonists induce translocation of the receptor to the nucleus, whereas only agonists can activate AR function. An

  20. Androgens and the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrakakis, Constantine; Bondy, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    Androgens have important physiological effects in women while at the same time they may be implicated in breast cancer pathologies. However, data on the effects of androgens on mammary epithelial proliferation and/or breast cancer incidence are not in full agreement. We performed a literature review evaluating current clinical, genetic and epidemiological data regarding the role of androgens in mammary growth and neoplasia. Epidemiological studies appear to have significant methodological limitations and thus provide inconclusive results. The study of molecular defects involving androgenic pathways in breast cancer is still in its infancy. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies suggest that androgens inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth while conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens. Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Suppression of androgens using conventional estrogen treatment may thus enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation.

  1. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); G. Romalo (G.); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); E. Mulder (Eppo); L. Pinsky (L.); H.U. Schweikert (H.); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of t

  2. In Silico and In Vitro Investigation of the Piperine's Male Contraceptive Effect: Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies in Androgen-Binding Protein and Androgen Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinta, Gopichand; Ramya Chandar Charles, Mariasoosai; Klopčič, Ivana; Sollner Dolenc, Marija; Periyasamy, Latha; Selvaraj Coumar, Mohane

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanism of action of traditional medicines is an important step towards developing marketable drugs from them. Piperine, an active constituent present in the Piper species, is used extensively in Ayurvedic medicines (practiced on the Indian subcontinent). Among others, piperine is known to possess a male contraceptive effect; however, the molecular mechanism of action for this effect is not very clear. In this regard, detailed docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies of piperine with the androgen-binding protein and androgen receptors were carried out. Androgen receptors control male sexual behavior and fertility, while the androgen-binding protein binds testosterone and maintains its concentration at optimal levels to stimulate spermatogenesis in the testis. It was found that piperine docks to the androgen-binding protein, similar to dihydrotestosterone, and to androgen receptors, similar to cyproterone acetate (antagonist). Also, the piperine-androgen-binding protein and piperine-androgen receptors interactions were found to be stable throughout 30 ns of molecular dynamics simulation. Further, two independent simulations for 10 ns each also confirmed the stability of these interactions. Detailed analysis of the piperine-androgen-binding protein interactions shows that piperine interacts with Ser42 of the androgen-binding protein and could block the binding with its natural ligands dihydrotestosterone/testosterone. Moreover, piperine interacts with Thr577 of the androgen receptors in a manner similar to the antagonist cyproterone acetate. Based on the in silico results, piperine was tested in the MDA-kb2 cell line using the luciferase reporter gene assay and was found to antagonize the effect of dihydrotestosterone at nanomolar concentrations. Further detailed biochemical experiments could help to develop piperine as an effective male contraceptive agent in the future.

  3. GABAB antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Hansen, J J; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1994-01-01

    Phaclofen, which is the phosphonic acid analogue of the GABAB agonist (RS)-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-aminobutyric acid (baclofen), is a GABAB antagonist. As part of our studies on the structural requirements for activation and blockade of GABAB receptors, we have resolved phaclofen using chiral chroma...

  4. A competitive inhibitor that reduces recruitment of androgen receptor to androgen-responsive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Shapiro, David J

    2012-07-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has a critical role in the growth and progression of androgen-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancers. To identify novel inhibitors of AR transactivation that block growth of prostate cancer cells, a luciferase-based high-throughput screen of ~160,000 small molecules was performed in cells stably expressing AR and a prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-luciferase reporter. CPIC (1-(3-(2-chlorophenoxy) propyl)-1H-indole-3-carbonitrile) was identified as a small molecule that blocks AR transactivation to a greater extent than other steroid receptors. CPIC inhibited AR-mediated proliferation of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell lines, with minimal toxicity in AR-negative cell lines. CPIC treatment also reduced the anchorage-independent growth of LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells. CPIC functioned as a pure antagonist by inhibiting the expression of AR-regulated genes in LAPC-4 cells that express wild-type AR and exhibited weak agonist activity in LNCaP cells that express the mutant AR-T877A. CPIC treatment did not reduce AR levels or alter its nuclear localization. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the site of action of CPIC. CPIC inhibited recruitment of androgen-bound AR to the PSA promoter and enhancer sites to a greater extent than bicalutamide. CPIC is a new therapeutic inhibitor that targets AR-mediated gene activation with potential to arrest the growth of prostate cancer.

  5. A physiological role for androgen actions in the absence of androgen receptor DNA binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Tammy P S; Clarke, Michele V; Ghasem-Zadeh, Ali; Lee, Nicole K L; Davey, Rachel A; MacLean, Helen E

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that androgens have physiological actions via non-DNA binding-dependent androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathways in males, using our genetically modified mice that express a mutant AR with deletion of the 2nd zinc finger of the DNA binding domain (AR(ΔZF2)) that cannot bind DNA. In cultured genital skin fibroblasts, the mutant AR(ΔZF2) has normal ligand binding ability, phosphorylates ERK-1/2 in response to 1 min DHT treatment (blocked by the AR antagonist bicalutamide), but has reduced androgen-dependent nuclear localization compared to wildtype (WT). AR(ΔZF2) males have normal baseline ERK-1/2 phosphorylation, with a 1.5-fold increase in Akt phosphorylation in AR(ΔZF2) muscle vs WT. To identify physiological actions of non-DNA binding-dependent AR signaling, AR(ΔZF2) males were treated for 6 weeks with dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Cortical bone growth was suppressed by DHT in AR(ΔZF2) mice (6% decrease in periosteal and 7% decrease in medullary circumference vs untreated AR(ΔZF2) males). In conclusion, these data suggest that non-DNA binding dependent AR actions suppress cortical bone growth, which may provide a mechanism to fine-tune the response to androgens in bone.

  6. Update on androgenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorneycroft, I H

    1999-02-01

    The development of a new generation of progestins deemed less androgenic than their earlier counterparts has led to a number of misconceptions regarding their possible benefits in combination oral contraceptives. All combination oral contraceptives are beneficial for treating such androgenic conditions as acne and hirsutism. The only expressed androgenic effect of some first- and second-generation combined oral contraceptives are changes in plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels. However, the overall effect of today's low-dose oral contraceptives is largely lipid neutral, and human and monkey studies have shown that oral contraceptive use is associated with reduced, not increased, atherosclerosis rates. Myocardial infarction rates are not increased among oral contraceptive users, except among those who are heavy smokers.

  7. Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sindhu Sharma, Kuldeep Singh, Sanjay Dhar*,Yudhvir Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) present at several differentiation from genetic defects to endorgan resistance thereby producing gender dilema dispelled by sex hormones signature.It is quite traumaticfor the patients and family of the affected baby. Extreme sensitivity and awareness on the part of thecaring doctor is necessary for early diagnosis of case of AIS &for successful outcome.

  8. Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindhu Sharma, Kuldeep Singh, Sanjay Dhar*,Yudhvir Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS present at several differentiation from genetic defects to endorgan resistance thereby producing gender dilema dispelled by sex hormones signature.It is quite traumaticfor the patients and family of the affected baby. Extreme sensitivity and awareness on the part of thecaring doctor is necessary for early diagnosis of case of AIS &for successful outcome.

  9. Androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001180.htm Androgen insensitivity syndrome To use the ... a condition in which the opening of the urethra is on the underside of the penis, instead of ... they can develop cancer, just like any undescended testicle. Estrogen replacement is ...

  10. Antiandrogens act as selective androgen receptor modulators at the proteome level in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Greg N; Gamble, Simon C; Hough, Michael A; Begum, Shajna; Dart, D Alwyn; Odontiadis, Michael; Powell, Sue M; Fioretti, Flavia M; Bryan, Rosie A; Waxman, Jonathan; Wait, Robin; Bevan, Charlotte L

    2015-05-01

    Current therapies for prostate cancer include antiandrogens, inhibitory ligands of the androgen receptor, which repress androgen-stimulated growth. These include the selective androgen receptor modulators cyproterone acetate and hydroxyflutamide and the complete antagonist bicalutamide. Their activity is partly dictated by the presence of androgen receptor mutations, which are commonly detected in patients who relapse while receiving antiandrogens, i.e. in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. To characterize the early proteomic response to these antiandrogens we used the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line, which harbors the androgen receptor mutation most commonly detected in castrate-resistant tumors (T877A), analyzing alterations in the proteome, and comparing these to the effect of these therapeutics upon androgen receptor activity and cell proliferation. The majority are regulated post-transcriptionally, possibly via nongenomic androgen receptor signaling. Differences detected between the exposure groups demonstrate subtle changes in the biological response to each specific ligand, suggesting a spectrum of agonistic and antagonistic effects dependent on the ligand used. Analysis of the crystal structures of the AR in the presence of cyproterone acetate, hydroxyflutamide, and DHT identified important differences in the orientation of key residues located in the AF-2 and BF-3 protein interaction surfaces. This further implies that although there is commonality in the growth responses between androgens and those antiandrogens that stimulate growth in the presence of a mutation, there may also be influential differences in the growth pathways stimulated by the different ligands. This therefore has implications for prostate cancer treatment because tumors may respond differently dependent upon which mutation is present and which ligand is activating growth, also for the design of selective androgen receptor modulators, which aim to elicit differential proteomic

  11. One and the same androgen for all? towards designer androgens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LouisJGGooren; NhuThanhNguyen

    1999-01-01

    The introduction of designer oestrogens as a treatment medality in hormone replacement in women has invited to consider the concept of compounds with selective androgenic effects for male honnone replacement therapy. The full spectrum of the actions of testosterone may not be necessary of even undesired for certain indications for testosterone treatment, To define for what indications certain androgenic properties are desired and undesired more insight in basic androgen (patho)physiology is required. There is convincing evidence that aromatization of androgenic compounds to nestrogens might be an advantage for maintenance of bone mass and it might also mitigate negative effects of androgens on bichemical parameters of cardiovascular risks: the potentially negative effects of oestmgens on prostate pathology in ageing men needs further elucidation. While the role of dihydro-testosterone (DHT) for the male sexual differentiation and for pubertal sexual maturation is evident, its role in mature and ageing males seems less significant or may even be harmful. It is, however, of note that a negative effect of DHT on prostate pathophysiolog~ is certainly not proven.For male contraception a progestational agent with strong androgenic properties might be an asset. For most of the androgenic actions the critical levels of androgens are not well established. The latter is relevant since the large amount of androgen molecules required for its biological actions (as compared to oestrogens) is an impediment in androgen replacement medalities. There may be room for more biopotent androgens since delivery of large amounts of androgen molecules to the circulation poses problems fur treatment modalities. ( Asian J Andro11999 Jun; 1:21 -28)

  12. Mechanisms of action of androgen receptor agonists and antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Veldscholte (Jos)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the studies described in the next chapters was, first, to prove that the AR in LNCaP cells is abnormal with respect to ligand binding characteristics, and to find an explanation for this defect. Second, it was investigated whether this aberration could account for the growth s

  13. Metabolic syndrome, androgens, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulana, Mohadetheh; Lima, Roberta; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2011-04-01

    Obesity is one of the constellation of factors that make up the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in men and women is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In men, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with reductions in testosterone levels. In women, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with increases in androgen levels. In men, reductions in androgen levels are associated with inflammation, and androgen supplements reduce inflammation. In women, increases in androgens are associated with increases in inflammatory cytokines, and reducing androgens reduces inflammation. This review discusses the possibility that the effects of androgens on metabolic syndrome and its sequelae may differ between males and females.

  14. ANDROGEN INSENSITIVITY SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Kanan; Sonali

    2014-01-01

    The condition is inherited as X - linked recessive gene 1 . The underlying pathology is the inability of end organs to respond to androgens. These cases are phenotypically and psychologically female with adequate breast development , normal external genitalia , a vagina with variable depth , absent /sparse pubic hair and axillary hair. The exact incidence in India is not known but the reported incidence is 1 in 2 , 000 to 1 in 62 ,400 worldwi...

  15. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tančić-Gajić Milina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS belongs to disorders of sex development, resulting from complete or partial resistance to the biological actions of androgens in persons who are genetically males (XY with normally developed testes and age-appropriate for males of serum testosterone concentration. Case Outline. A 21-year-old female patient was admitted at our Clinic further evaluation and treatment of testicular feminization syndrome, which was diagnosed at the age of 16 years. The patient had never menstruated. On physical examination, her external genitalia and breast development appeared as completely normal feminine structures but pubic and axillary hair was absent. Cytogenetic analysis showed a 46 XY karyotype. The values of sex hormones were as in adult males. The multisliced computed tomography (MSCT showed structures on both sides of the pelvic region, suggestive of testes. Bilateral orchiectomy was performed. Hormone replacement therapy was prescribed after gonadectomy. Vaginal dilatation was advised to avoid dyspareunia. Conclusion. The diagnosis of complete androgen insensitivity is based on clinical findigs, hormonal analysis karyotype, visualization methods and genetic analysis. Bilateral gonadectomy is generally recommended in early adulthood to avoid the risk of testicular malignancy. Vaginal length may be short requiring dilatation in an effort to avoid dyspareunia. Vaginal surgery is rarely indicated for the creation of a functional vagina. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175067

  16. Selective androgen receptor modulator activity of a steroidal antiandrogen TSAA-291 and its cofactor recruitment profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikichi, Yukiko; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kusaka, Masami; Hara, Takahito

    2015-10-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) specifically bind to the androgen receptor and exert agonistic or antagonistic effects on target organs. In this study, we investigated the SARM activity of TSAA-291, previously known as a steroidal antiandrogen, in mice because TSAA-291 was found to possess partial androgen receptor agonist activity in reporter assays. In addition, to clarify the mechanism underlying its tissue selectivity, we performed comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis of androgen receptor using TSAA-291 and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), an endogenous androgen. The androgen receptor agonistic activity of TSAA-291 was more obvious in reporter assays using skeletal muscle cells than in those using prostate cells. In castrated mice, TSAA-291 increased the weight of the levator ani muscle without increasing the weight of the prostate and seminal vesicle. Comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis via mammalian two-hybrid methods revealed that among a total of 112 cofactors, 12 cofactors including the protein inhibitor of activated STAT 1 (PIAS1) were differently recruited to androgen receptor in the presence of TSAA-291 and DHT. Prostate displayed higher PIAS1 expression than skeletal muscle. Forced expression of the PIAS1 augmented the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor, and silencing of PIAS1 by siRNAs suppressed the secretion of prostate-specific antigen, an androgen responsive marker. Our results demonstrate that TSAA-291 has SARM activity and suggest that TSAA-291 may induce different conformational changes of the androgen receptor and recruitment profiles of cofactors such as PIAS1, compared with DHT, to exert tissue-specific activity.

  17. EPI-001, A Compound Active against Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer, Targets Transactivation Unit 5 of the Androgen Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mol, Eva; Fenwick, R Bryn; Phang, Christopher T W; Buzón, Victor; Szulc, Elzbieta; de la Fuente, Alex; Escobedo, Albert; García, Jesús; Bertoncini, Carlos W; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva; McEwan, Iain J; Riera, Antoni; Salvatella, Xavier

    2016-09-16

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer is the lethal condition suffered by prostate cancer patients that become refractory to androgen deprivation therapy. EPI-001 is a recently identified compound active against this condition that modulates the activity of the androgen receptor, a nuclear receptor that is essential for disease progression. The mechanism by which this compound exerts its inhibitory activity is however not yet fully understood. Here we show, by using high resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, that EPI-001 selectively interacts with a partially folded region of the transactivation domain of the androgen receptor, known as transactivation unit 5, that is key for the ability of prostate cells to proliferate in the absence of androgens, a distinctive feature of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Our results can contribute to the development of more potent and less toxic novel androgen receptor antagonists for treating this disease.

  18. Antiandrogen flutamide protects male mice from androgen-dependent toxicity in three models of spinal bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renier, Kayla J; Troxell-Smith, Sandra M; Johansen, Jamie A; Katsuno, Masahisa; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Chua, Jason P; Sun Kim, Hong; Lieberman, Andrew P; Breedlove, S Marc; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2014-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a late-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disease linked to a polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the androgen receptor (AR). Men affected by SBMA show marked muscle weakness and atrophy, typically emerging midlife. Given the androgen-dependent nature of this disease, one might expect AR antagonists to have therapeutic value for treating SBMA. However, current work from animal models suggests otherwise, raising questions about whether polyQ-expanded AR exerts androgen-dependent toxicity through mechanisms distinct from normal AR function. In this study, we asked whether the nonsteroidal AR antagonist flutamide, delivered via a time-release pellet, could reverse or prevent androgen-dependent AR toxicity in three different mouse models of SBMA: the AR97Q transgenic (Tg) model, a knock-in (KI) model, and a myogenic Tg model. We find that flutamide protects mice from androgen-dependent AR toxicity in all three SBMA models, preventing or reversing motor dysfunction in the Tg models and significantly extending the life span in KI males. Given that flutamide effectively protects against androgen-dependent disease in three different mouse models of SBMA, our data are proof of principle that AR antagonists have therapeutic potential for treating SBMA in humans and support the notion that toxicity caused by polyQ-expanded AR uses at least some of the same mechanisms as normal AR before diverging to produce disease and muscle atrophy.

  19. Protein phosphatase 1 suppresses androgen receptor ubiquitylation and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaming; Han, Weiwei; Gulla, Sarah; Simon, Nicholas I; Gao, Yanfei; Cai, Changmeng; Yang, Hongmei; Zhang, Xiaoping; Liu, Jihong; Balk, Steven P; Chen, Shaoyong

    2016-01-12

    The phosphoprotein phosphatases are emerging as important androgen receptor (AR) regulators in prostate cancer (PCa). We reported previously that the protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit (PP1α) can enhance AR activity by dephosphorylating a site in the AR hinge region (Ser650) and thereby decrease AR nuclear export. In this study we show that PP1α increases the expression of wildtype as well as an S650A mutant AR, indicating that it is acting through one or more additional mechanisms. We next show that PP1α binds primarily to the AR ligand binding domain and decreases its ubiquitylation and degradation. Moreover, we find that the PP1α inhibitor tautomycin increases phosphorylation of AR ubiquitin ligases including SKP2 and MDM2 at sites that enhance their activity, providing a mechanism by which PP1α may suppress AR degradation. Significantly, the tautomycin mediated decrease in AR expression was most pronounced at low androgen levels or in the presence of the AR antagonist enzalutamide. Consistent with this finding, the sensitivity of LNCaP and C4-2 PCa cells to tautomycin, as assessed by PSA synthesis and proliferation, was enhanced at low androgen levels or by treatment with enzalutamide. Together these results indicate that PP1α may contribute to stabilizing AR protein after androgen deprivation therapies, and that targeting PP1α or the AR-PP1α interaction may be effective in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

  20. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Claire [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Lafosse, Jean-Michel [CHU Toulouse, Hopital Rangueil, Service d' orthopedie et Traumatologie, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Malavaud, Bernard [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France); CHU Toulouse, Hopital Rangueil, Service d' Urologie et de Transplantation Renale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Cuvillier, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.cuvillier@ipbs.fr [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France)

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  1. ANDROGEN LEVELS IN PREECLAMPSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Valadan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality during pregnancy. Several independent investigators have demonstrated the association of androgens with hypertension. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether maternal levels of sex hormones, especially testosterone, are higher in patients with preeclampsia than in matched normotensive control subjects. Serum levels of testosterone, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S and estradiol were measured in 60 subjects in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy with documented preeclampsia (including 30 cases of mild and 30 cases of severe preeclampsia and 60 healthy normotensive women with similar maternal and gestational ages and body mass index (BMI and neonatal sex. All subjects were primigravid with singleton pregnancies. Cases of polycystic ovary (PCO, diabetes, chronic hypertension and chronic systemic diseases such as lupus and patients using steroid hormones and anti-hypertensive drugs were excluded. Levels of testosterone, DHEA-S and estradiol were not higher in primigravid women with preeclampsia than in normotensive women with similar gestational and maternal ages, BMI and neonatal sex. There were no significant differences in sex hormones measured between groups of mild and severe preeclampsia and normotensive women. There were also no significant differences in sex hormone levels according to neonatal sex. These findings are against the hypothesis of mediating or amplifying role of high androgen levels in pathophysiology of preeclampsia.

  2. Androgen and prostatic stroma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-JieNIU; Teng-XiangMA; IuZHANG; YongXU; Rui-FaHAN; GuangSUN

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effect of androgen on the proliferation,differentiation and regression of canine prostatic stromal cells in vivo and human stromal cells in vitro.Methods:Twenty-two dogs,including 15 normal prostate doge and 7 prostatic hyperplasia dogs,had their serum concentration of testosterone and estrodiol determined by radioimmunoassay before and after castration.The expression of androgen receptor(AR)and estrogen receptor(ER)in the prostate were analysed by immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative RT-PCR before and after castration.Light microscopy,transmission electron microscopy and TUNEL assay were carried out successively before and after castration to evaluate the prostatic histomorphology.In vitro serum-free cell cultures from human prostatic stroma were established and exposed to dihydrotestosterone(DHT).The proliferation of the cell culture was detected by MTT assay.The expression of TGFβ bFGF,AR,and smooth muscle cell(SMC) specific proteins (myosin and/or smoothelin)were detected using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR.The differentiation from fibroblasts to smooth muscle cells was deduced by measuring the expression of SMC specific proteins.Results:Before castration,the serum concentrations of testosterone and estrodiol were not statistically different between normal and hyperplasia groups.Following castration,the serum concentration of testerone decreased rapidly in 2 days,and the concentration of estrodiol had no significant change compared with the pre-castration data.In the prostate,AR was presented in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the AR mRNA level was higher in hyperplasia than in normal prostate tissues(P<0.05).While ER predominantly existed in the prostate stromal cells and the ER mRNA had no difference between the hyperplasia and the normal group.Within the early phase of castration(

  3. Castration induces up-regulation of intratumoral androgen biosynthesis and androgen receptor expression in an orthotopic VCaP human prostate cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuuttila, Matias; Yatkin, Emrah; Kallio, Jenny; Savolainen, Saija; Laajala, Teemu D; Aittokallio, Tero; Oksala, Riikka; Häkkinen, Merja; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Auriola, Seppo; Poutanen, Matti; Mäkelä, Sari

    2014-08-01

    Androgens are key factors involved in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and PCa growth can be suppressed by androgen deprivation therapy. In a considerable proportion of men receiving androgen deprivation therapy, however, PCa progresses to castration-resistant PCa (CRPC), making the development of efficient therapies challenging. We used an orthotopic VCaP human PCa xenograft model to study cellular and molecular changes in tumors after androgen deprivation therapy (castration). Tumor growth was monitored through weekly serum prostate-specific antigen measurements, and mice with recurrent tumors after castration were randomized to treatment groups. Serum prostate-specific antigen concentrations showed significant correlation with tumor volume. Castration-resistant tumors retained concentrations of intratumoral androgen (androstenedione, testosterone, and 5α-dihydrotestosterone) at levels similar to tumors growing in intact hosts. Accordingly, castration induced up-regulation of enzymes involved in androgen synthesis (CYP17A1, AKR1C3, and HSD17B6), as well as expression of full-length androgen receptor (AR) and AR splice variants (AR-V1 and AR-V7). Furthermore, AR target gene expression was maintained in castration-resistant xenografts. The AR antagonists enzalutamide (MDV3100) and ARN-509 suppressed PSA production of castration-resistant tumors, confirming the androgen dependency of these tumors. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that our VCaP xenograft model exhibits the key characteristics of clinical CRPC and thus provides a valuable tool for identifying druggable targets and for testing therapeutic strategies targeting AR signaling in CRPC.

  4. Inhibition of the Akt, cyclooxygenase-2, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 pathways in combination with androgen deprivation therapy: potential therapeutic approaches for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Altuwaijri, Saleh; Cai, Yi; Messing, Edward M; Chang, Chawnshang

    2005-09-01

    Prostate cancer cells are generally dependent on androgen stimulation mediated by the androgen receptor (AR) for growth and survival, and, therefore, hormonal manipulation, such as castration and/or the use of AR antagonists, results in a regression of the cancer. However, this treatment very rarely leads to the "cure" of advanced disease, and cancers eventually become androgen-independent. A number of genes/pathways have been reported to be activated in prostate cancer, most of which are possibly associated with disease progression. In this article, among them, we focus on Akt (also known as protein kinase B), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, whose activities or expressions have been found to be regulated by androgens/AR. Previous studies by us and others, with androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell lines, have demonstrated that androgen deprivation results in activation/overexpression of Akt, COX-2, and MMP-9 in cells. This suggests that androgen deprivation in clinical settings activates the Akt, COX-2, and MMP-9 pathways in prostate cancer, which may increase cell growth and in turn promote the transition to the androgen-independent state. We hypothesize that androgen deprivation, in combination with inhibition of the Akt, COX-2, and MMP-9 pathways, delays the androgen-independent transition and has more beneficial effects than hormonal therapy alone.

  5. A novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 exerts anti-androgenic activity in the prostate cancer xenograft R-3327G and anabolic activity on skeletal muscle mass & function in castrated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisamore, Michael J; Gentile, Michael A; Dillon, Gregory Michael; Baran, Matthew; Gambone, Carlo; Riley, Sean; Schmidt, Azriel; Flores, Osvaldo; Wilkinson, Hilary; Alves, Stephen E

    2016-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor super family of transcription factors. Androgens play an essential role in the development, growth, and maintenance of male sex organs, as well as the musculoskeletal and central nervous systems. Yet with advancing age, androgens can drive the onset of prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in males within the United States. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) by pharmacologic and/or surgical castration induces apoptosis of prostate cells and subsequent shrinkage of the prostate and prostate tumors. However, ADT is associated with significant musculoskeletal and behavioral adverse effects. The unique pharmacological activity of selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 recently has been reported as an AR antagonist with 5α-reductase inhibitor function. The molecule inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in AR positive, androgen dependent prostate cancer cells. Importantly, MK-4541 inhibited androgen-dependent prostate growth in male rats yet maintained lean body mass and bone formation following ovariectomy in female rats. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of SARM MK-4541 in the androgen-dependent Dunning R3327-G prostate carcinoma xenograft mouse model as well as on skeletal muscle mass and function, and AR-regulated behavior in mice. MK-4541 significantly inhibited the growth of R3327-G prostate tumors, exhibited anti-androgen effects on the seminal vesicles, reduced plasma testosterone concentrations in intact males, and inhibited Ki67 expression. MK-4541 treated xenografts appeared similar to xenografts in castrated mice. Importantly, we demonstrate that MK-4541 exhibited anabolic activity in androgen deficient conditions, increasing lean body mass and muscle function in adult castrated mice. Moreover, MK-4541 treatment restored general activity levels in castrated mice. Thus, MK-4541 exhibits an optimum profile as an adjuvant therapy to ADT

  6. In vivo modulation of androgen receptor by androgens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V·L·Kumar; V·Kumar

    2002-01-01

    Aim:To study the effect of androgen and antiandrogen on the level of androgen receptor(AR)mRNA.Methods:The totalRNA was extracted from the prostate and analyzed by slot blot analysis,The blots were hybrid-ized with ARcDNA probe and 1Aprobe(internal control)and autoradionraphy was performed.The intensity of signal was measured with a densitometer and the ratio of AR RNAand1ARNAwas calculated.Results:Androgenic deprivation produced by castration decreased the weight of the prostate and increased the levels of ARmRNA.Treatment of the castrated rats with testostrone increased the weight of prostate and decreased the levels of ARmRNA.Treatment of normal rats with flutamide decreased the weight of the gland and increased the levels of AR mRNA.Conclusion:Androgens produce proliferative effect on the prostate and negatively regulate the AR transcription.

  7. QSAR models for anti-androgenic effect - a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gunde Egeskov; Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev; Wedebye, Eva Bay;

    2011-01-01

    of the model for a particular application, balance of training sets, domain definition, and cut-offs for prediction interpretation should also be taken into account. Different descriptors in the modelling systems are illustrated with hydroxyflutamide and dexamethasone as examples (a non-steroid and a steroid......Three modelling systems (MultiCase (R), LeadScope (R) and MDL (R) QSAR) were used for construction of androgenic receptor antagonist models. There were 923-942 chemicals in the training sets. The models were cross-validated (leave-groups-out) with concordances of 77-81%, specificity of 78...

  8. Up-Regulation of Hepatic Alpha-2-HS-Glycoprotein Transcription by Testosterone via Androgen Receptor Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Voelkl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Fetuin-A (alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, AHSG, a liver borne plasma protein, contributes to the prevention of soft tissue calcification, modulates inflammation, reduces insulin sensitivity and fosters weight gain following high fat diet or ageing. In polycystic ovary syndrome, fetuin-A levels correlate with free androgen levels, an observation pointing to androgen sensitivity of fetuin-A expression. The present study thus explored whether the expression of hepatic fetuin-A is modified by testosterone. Methods: HepG2 cells were treated with testosterone and androgen receptor antagonist flutamide, and were silenced with androgen receptor siRNA. To test the in vivo relevance, male mice were subjected to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT for 7 weeks. AHSG mRNA levels were determined by quantitative RT-PCR and fetuin-A protein abundance by Western blotting. Results: In HepG2 cells, AHSG mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein abundance were both up-regulated following testosterone treatment. The human alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein gene harbors putative androgen receptor response elements in the proximal 5 kb promoter sequence relative to TSS. The effect of testosterone on AHSG mRNA levels was abrogated by silencing of the androgen receptor in HepG2 cells. Moreover, treatment of HepG2 cells with the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide in presence of endogenous ligands in the medium significantly down-regulated AHSG mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein abundance. In addition, ADT of male mice was followed by a significant decrease of hepatic Ahsg mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein levels. Conclusions: Testosterone participates in the regulation of hepatic fetuin-A expression, an effect mediated, at least partially, by androgen receptor activation.

  9. Design and synthesis of an array of selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Ryan P; Blanc, Jean-Baptiste E; Stewart, Eugene L; Brown, Peter J; Caivano, Matilde; Gray, David W; Hoekstra, William J; Willson, Timothy M; Han, Bajin; Turnbull, Philip

    2007-01-01

    We describe the design, using shape comparison and fast docking computer algorithms, and rapid parallel synthesis of a 1300 member array based on GSK7721, a 4-aminobenzonitrile androgen receptor (AR) antagonist identified by focused screening of the GSK compound collection. The array yielded 352 submicromolar and 17 subnanomolar AR agonists as measured by a cell-based reporter gene functional assay. The rapid synthesis of a large number of active compounds provided valuable information in the optimization of AR modulators, which may be useful in treating androgen deficiency in aging males.

  10. Synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and characterization of novel nonsteroidal and selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlienger, Nathalie; Lund, Birgitte W; Pawlas, Jan; Badalassi, Fabrizio; Bertozzi, Fabio; Lewinsky, Rasmus; Fejzic, Alma; Thygesen, Mikkel B; Tabatabaei, Ali; Bradley, Stefania Risso; Gardell, Luis R; Piu, Fabrice; Olsson, Roger

    2009-11-26

    Herein we describe the discovery of ACP-105 (1), a novel and potent nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) with partial agonist activity relative to the natural androgen testosterone. Compound 1 was developed from a series of compounds found in a HTS screen using the receptor selection and amplification technology (R-SAT). In vivo, 1 improved anabolic parameters in a 2-week chronic study in castrated male rats. In addition to compound 1, a number of potent antiandrogens were discovered from the same series of compounds whereof one compound, 13, had antagonist activity at the AR T877A mutant involved in prostate cancer.

  11. Inhibition of the Androgen Receptor by Antiandrogens in Spinobulbar Muscle Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniahmad, Aria

    2016-03-01

    Spinal-bulbar muscle atrophy (SBMA) or also named Kennedy's Disease is caused by a polyglutamine expansion (PolyQ) of the coding region of the androgen receptor (AR). The AR is a ligand-controlled transcription factor and member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. The central characteristics of the SBMA pathogenicity are muscle weakness, the loss of motoneurons and the occurrence of AR-containing protein aggregates that are observed in spinal cord motoneurons and skeletal muscles induced by the AR-PolyQ expansion in the presence of androgens. The PolyQ triggers a misfolding in the AR-PolyQ and leads to protein aggregation in spinal cord motoneurons and muscle cells. The AR-PolyQ toxicity is activated by the AR ligand testosterone and dihydrotestosterone that activate the receptor and triggers nuclear toxicity by inducing AR nuclear translocation. In line with this, androgen treatment of SBMA patients worsened the SBMA symptoms. SBMA has been modeled in AR-overexpressing and AR-PolyQ-knock-in animals, but precisely how the PolyQ expansion leads to neurodegeneration is unclear. The androgen-induced toxicity and androgen-dependent nuclear accumulation of AR-PolyQ protein seems to be central to the pathogenesis. Therefore, the inhibition of the androgen-activated AR-PolyQ might be a therapeutic option. Here the use of AR antagonists for treatment option of SBMA will be reviewed and discussed.

  12. Role of androgen receptor in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HiroyoshiSuzuki; HaruoIto

    1999-01-01

    The growth of prostate cancer is sensitive to androgen, and hormonal therapy has been used for treatment of ad-vanced cancer. About 80 % of prostate cancers initially respond to hormonal therapy, howcrver, more than half of the re-sponders gradtmlly become resistant to this therapy. Changes in tumors from an androgen-responsive to an androgen-unre-sponsive state have been widely discussed. Since androgen action is mediated by androgen receptor (AR), abnonnalitiesof AR is believed to play an important role of the loss of androgen responsiveness in prostate cancer. "Ilais article focusedon the role of AR in the progression of prostate cancer.

  13. Abiraterone acetate: oral androgen biosynthesis inhibitor for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg JE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Yasser Rehman1, Jonathan E Rosenberg21Division of Hospital Medicine, UMass Memorial Healthcare, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the US and Europe. The treatment of advanced-stage prostate cancer has been androgen deprivation. Medical castration leads to decreased production of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone by the testes, but adrenal glands and even prostate cancer tissue continue to produce androgens, which eventually leads to continued prostate cancer growth despite castrate level of androgens. This stage is known as castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, which continues to be a challenge to treat. Addition of androgen antagonists to hormonal deprivation has been successful in lowering the prostate-specific antigen levels further, but has not actually translated into life-prolonging options. The results of several contemporary studies have continued to demonstrate activation of the androgen receptor as being the key factor in the continued growth of prostate cancer. Blockade of androgen production by nongonadal sources has led to clinical benefit in this setting. One such agent is abiraterone acetate, which significantly reduces androgen production by blocking the enzyme, cytochrome P450 17 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP17. This has provided physicians with another treatment option for patients with CRPC. The landscape for prostate cancer treatment has changed with the approval of cabazitaxel, sipuleucel-T and abiraterone. Here we provide an overview of abiraterone acetate, its mechanism of action, and its potential place for therapy in CRPC.Keywords: CRPC, abiraterone, CYP17, inhibitors, androgens, castration resistant prostate cancer

  14. Hot flushes in prostatic cancer patients during androgen-deprivation therapy with monthly dose of degarelix or leuprolide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Karup, C; van der Meulen, E;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the onset, incidence and frequency/intensity of hot flushes during androgen-deprivation therapy with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist (GnRH) blocker versus an agonist using data from a randomized Phase 3 clinical trial. In total, 610 prostate cancer...

  15. CLONING, EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR AND ISOLATION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA FROM THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone mimics or antagonists, including those recommended for use in the EPA's Tier 1 screening battery, typically use mammalian estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR) such as rat or human. Although we know that the amino acid s...

  16. ANDROGEN INSENSITIVITY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The condition is inherited as X - linked recessive gene 1 . The underlying pathology is the inability of end organs to respond to androgens. These cases are phenotypically and psychologically female with adequate breast development , normal external genitalia , a vagina with variable depth , absent /sparse pubic hair and axillary hair. The exact incidence in India is not known but the reported incidence is 1 in 2 , 000 to 1 in 62 ,400 worldwide . These patients have male karyotyping (XY wi th negative sex chromatin with undescended gonads. These cases are rarely diagnosed before puberty. Though rare , these are extremely distressing to the concerned individuals requiring expert handling. Management should include psychological counseling not only to determine the sexual mentation but also to help those individuals to cope with their problems. The chance of malignancy developing in the gonad with Y chromosome are about 20%.Surgical removal of the gonad is mandatory but can be delayed till 18 ye ars to permit breast development and epiphyseal closure. The aim of presenting this case is to develop awareness regarding this rare syndrome X - linked genetic disorder which runs in families

  17. Hypochlorite Oxidation of Select Androgenic Steroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steroid hormones are vital for regulation of various biological functions including sexual development. Elevated concentrations of natural and synthetic androgenic steroids have been shown to adversely affect normal development in indigenous aqueous species. Androgens and their s...

  18. Androgen receptor-dependent transactivation of growth arrest-specific gene 6 mediates inhibitory effects of testosterone on vascular calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Bo-Kyung; Akishita, Masahiro; Iijima, Katsuya; Ogawa, Sumito; Maemura, Koji; Yu, Jing; Takeyama, Kenichi; Kato, Shigeaki; Eto, Masato; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi

    2010-03-05

    Recent epidemiological studies have found that androgen deficiency is associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease in men. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying the cardioprotective effects of androgens. Here we show the inhibitory effects of testosterone on vascular calcification and a critical role of androgen receptor (AR)-dependent transactivation of growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6), a key regulator of inorganic phosphate (P(i))-induced calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Testosterone and nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone inhibited P(i)-induced calcification of human aortic VSMC in a concentration-dependent manner. Androgen inhibited P(i)-induced VSMC apoptosis, an essential process for VSMC calcification. The effects on VSMC calcification were mediated by restoration of P(i)-induced down-regulation of Gas6 expression and a subsequent reduction of Akt phosphorylation. These effects of androgen were blocked by an AR antagonist, flutamide, but not by an estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780. We then explored the mechanistic role of the AR in Gas6 expression and found an abundant expression of AR predominantly in the nucleus of VSMC and two consensus ARE sequences in the Gas6 promoter region. Dihydrotestosterone stimulated Gas6 promoter activity, and this effect was abrogated by flutamide and by AR siRNA. Site-specific mutation revealed that the proximal ARE was essential for androgen-dependent transactivation of Gas6. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated ligand-dependent binding of the AR to the proximal ARE of Gas6. These results indicate that AR signaling directly regulates Gas6 transcription, which leads to inhibition of vascular calcification, and provides a mechanistic insight into the cardioprotective action of androgens.

  19. BAY 1024767 blocks androgen receptor mutants found in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Tatsuo; Lejeune, Pascale; Köhr, Silke; Neuhaus, Roland; Faus, Hortensia; Gelato, Kathy A; Busemann, Matthias; Cleve, Arwed; Lücking, Ulrich; von Nussbaum, Franz; Brands, Michael; Mumberg, Dominik; Jung, Klaus; Stephan, Carsten; Haendler, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations arise in patients developing resistance to hormone deprivation therapies. Here we describe BAY 1024767, a thiohydantoin derivative with strong antagonistic activity against nine AR variants with mutations located in the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD), and against wild-type AR. Antagonism was maintained, though reduced, at increased androgen levels. Anti-tumor efficacy was evidenced in vivo in the KuCaP-1 prostate cancer model which bears the W741C bicalutamide resistance mutation and in the syngeneic prostate cancer rat model Dunning R3327-G. The prevalence of six selected AR mutations was determined in plasma DNA originating from 100 resistant patients and found to be at least 12%. Altogether the results show BAY 1024767 to be a strong antagonist for several AR mutants linked to therapy resistance, which opens the door for next-generation compounds that can benefit patients based on their mutation profile.

  20. Growth inhibiting effects of terazosin on androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许克新; 王向红; 凌明达; 王云川

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, terazosin on the androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines PC-3 and DU145.Methods Two androgen independent cell lines, PC-3 and DU145, were used to determine cell viability, colony-forming ability, as well as cell cycle distribution, after exposure to terazosin. Western blot analysis was used to determine the expression of p21WAF1 and p27KIP1.Results This study shows that terazosin inhibits not only prostate cancer cell growth but also its colony forming ability, both of which are main targets of clinical treatment. In addition, terazosin is shown to inhibit cell growth through G1 phase cell cycle arrest and the up-regulation of p27KIP1.Conclusion This study provides evidence that the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist terazosin may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of advanced hormone refractory prostate cancer.

  1. Differences in Hypercholesterolemia and Atherogenesis Induced by Common Androgen Deprivation Therapies in Male Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian Bo; Mortensen, Martin Bødtker; Koechling, Wolfgang;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of prostate cancer often involves androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor agonists, GnRH receptor antagonists, or orchiectomy. ADT may increase the rate of cardiovascular disease events, but recent clinical studies suggested...... allocated to orchiectomy and/or monthly injections with the GnRH receptor agonist leuprolide or the GnRH receptor antagonist degarelix. Atherosclerosis was quantified at 26 weeks of age in the aortic arch by en face examination and in the aortic root by histology. In intact Apoe-deficient mice, all types...... associated with GnRH agonist-based ADT....

  2. Laparoscopic gonedectomy in a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    G Bhaskararao; Himabindu, Y; Samir Ranjan Nayak; M Sriharibabu

    2014-01-01

    Complete Androgen insensitivity syndrome is a disorder of hormone resistance characterized by a female phenotype in an individual with an XY karyotype. The pathogenesis of CAIS involves a defective androgen receptor gene located on X-chromosome at Xq11-12and end organ insensitivity to androgens, although androgen concentrations are appropriate for the age of the patient. There are three major types of androgen insensitivity syndrome: Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, minimal androgen ...

  3. Estren promotes androgen phenotypes in primary lymphoid organs and submandibular glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustafsson Jan-Åke

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogens and androgens have extensive effects on the immune system, for example they suppress both T and B lymphopoiesis in thymus and bone marrow. Submandibular glands are sexually dimorphic in rodents, resulting in larger granular convoluted tubules in males compared to females. The aim of the present experiments was to investigate the estrogenic and androgenic effects of 4-estren-3α,17β-diol (estren on thymus, bone marrow and submandibular glands, and compare the effects to those of 17β-estradiol (E2 and 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT, respectively. Estrogen receptors (ERs were blocked by treatment of mice with the ER-antagonist ICI 182,780; also, knock-out mice lacking one or both ERs were used. Results As expected, the presence of functional ERs was mandatory for all the effects of E2. Similar to DHT-treatment, estren-treatment resulted in decreased thymus weight, as well as decreased frequency of bone marrow B cells. Treatment with estren or DHT also resulted in a shift in submandibular glands towards an androgen phenotype. All the effects of estren and DHT were independent of ERs. Conclusion Our study is the first to show that estren has similar effects as the androgen DHT on lymphopoiesis in thymus and bone marrow, and on submandibular glands, and that these effects are independent of estrogen receptors. This supports the hypothesis of estren being able to signal through the androgen receptor.

  4. Antagonizing effects of membrane-acting androgens on the eicosanoid receptor OXER1 in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyvianaki, Konstantina; Gebhart, Veronika; Peroulis, Nikolaos; Panagiotopoulou, Christina; Kiagiadaki, Fotini; Pediaditakis, Iosif; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Moustou, Eleni; Tzardi, Maria; Notas, George; Castanas, Elias; Kampa, Marilena

    2017-03-14

    Accumulating evidence during the last decades revealed that androgen can exert membrane initiated actions that involve signaling via specific kinases and the modulation of significant cellular processes, important for prostate cancer cell growth and metastasis. Results of the present work clearly show that androgens can specifically act at the membrane level via the GPCR oxoeicosanoid receptor 1 (OXER1) in prostate cancer cells. In fact, OXER1 expression parallels that of membrane androgen binding in prostate cancer cell lines and tumor specimens, while in silico docking simulation of OXER1 showed that testosterone could bind to OXER1 within the same grove as 5-OxoETE, the natural ligand of OXER1. Interestingly, testosterone antagonizes the effects of 5-oxoETE on specific signaling pathways and rapid effects such as actin cytoskeleton reorganization that ultimately can modulate cell migration and metastasis. These findings verify that membrane-acting androgens exert specific effects through an antagonistic interaction with OXER1. Additionally, this interaction between androgen and OXER1, which is an arachidonic acid metabolite receptor expressed in prostate cancer, provides a novel link between steroid and lipid actions and renders OXER1 as new player in the disease. These findings should be taken into account in the design of novel therapeutic approaches in prostate cancer.

  5. Antagonizing effects of membrane-acting androgens on the eicosanoid receptor OXER1 in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyvianaki, Konstantina; Gebhart, Veronika; Peroulis, Nikolaos; Panagiotopoulou, Christina; Kiagiadaki, Fotini; Pediaditakis, Iosif; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Moustou, Eleni; Tzardi, Maria; Notas, George; Castanas, Elias; Kampa, Marilena

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence during the last decades revealed that androgen can exert membrane initiated actions that involve signaling via specific kinases and the modulation of significant cellular processes, important for prostate cancer cell growth and metastasis. Results of the present work clearly show that androgens can specifically act at the membrane level via the GPCR oxoeicosanoid receptor 1 (OXER1) in prostate cancer cells. In fact, OXER1 expression parallels that of membrane androgen binding in prostate cancer cell lines and tumor specimens, while in silico docking simulation of OXER1 showed that testosterone could bind to OXER1 within the same grove as 5-OxoETE, the natural ligand of OXER1. Interestingly, testosterone antagonizes the effects of 5-oxoETE on specific signaling pathways and rapid effects such as actin cytoskeleton reorganization that ultimately can modulate cell migration and metastasis. These findings verify that membrane-acting androgens exert specific effects through an antagonistic interaction with OXER1. Additionally, this interaction between androgen and OXER1, which is an arachidonic acid metabolite receptor expressed in prostate cancer, provides a novel link between steroid and lipid actions and renders OXER1 as new player in the disease. These findings should be taken into account in the design of novel therapeutic approaches in prostate cancer. PMID:28290516

  6. Screening of bisphenol A, triclosan and paraben analogues as modulators of the glucocorticoid and androgen receptor activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolšek, Katra; Gobec, Martina; Mlinarič Raščan, Irena; Sollner Dolenc, Marija

    2015-02-01

    A homeostasis of the glucocorticoid and androgen endocrine system is essential to human health. Their disturbance can lead to various diseases, for example cardiovascular, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, infertility, cancer. Fifteen widely used industrial chemicals that disrupt endocrine activity were selected for evaluation of potential (anti)glucocorticoid and (anti)androgenic activities. The human breast carcinoma MDA-kb2 cell line was utilized for reporter gene assays, since it expresses both the androgen and the glucocorticoid-responsive reporter. Two new antiandrogens, 4,4'-sulfonylbis(2-methylphenol) (dBPS) and 4,4'-thiodiphenol (THIO), and two new antiglucocorticoids, bisphenol Z and its analog bis[4-(2-hydroxyethoxy)phenyl] sulfone (BHEPS) were identified. Moreover, four new glucocorticoid agonists (methyl paraben, ethyl paraben, propyl paraben and bisphenol F) were found. To elucidate the structure-activity relationship of bisphenols, we performed molecular docking experiments with androgen and glucocorticoid receptor. These docking experiments had shown that bulky structures such as BHEPS and bisphenol Z act as antiglucocorticoid, because they are positioned toward helix H12 in the antagonist conformation and could therefore be responsible for H12 conformational change and the switch between agonistic and antagonistic conformation of receptor. On the other hand smaller structures cannot interact with H12. The results of in vitro screening of fifteen industrial chemicals as modulators of the glucocorticoid and androgen receptor activities demand additional in vivo testing of these chemicals for formulating any relevant hazard identification to human health.

  7. Laparoscopic gonedectomy in a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskararao, G; Himabindu, Y; Nayak, Samir Rajan; Sriharibabu, M

    2014-07-01

    Complete Androgen insensitivity syndrome is a disorder of hormone resistance characterized by a female phenotype in an individual with an XY karyotype. The pathogenesis of CAIS involves a defective androgen receptor gene located on X-chromosome at Xq11-12and end organ insensitivity to androgens, although androgen concentrations are appropriate for the age of the patient. There are three major types of androgen insensitivity syndrome: Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, minimal androgen insensitivity syndrome, and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome. Management of androgen insensitivity syndrome includes multidisciplinary approach and involves gonedectomy to avoid gonadal tumors in later life. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and psychological support are required in long-term basis.

  8. Androgen excess: Investigations and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizneva, Daria; Gavrilova-Jordan, Larisa; Walker, Walidah; Azziz, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    Androgen excess (AE) is a key feature of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and results in, or contributes to, the clinical phenotype of these patients. Although AE will contribute to the ovulatory and menstrual dysfunction of these patients, the most recognizable sign of AE includes hirsutism, acne, and androgenic alopecia or female pattern hair loss (FPHL). Evaluation includes not only scoring facial and body terminal hair growth using the modified Ferriman-Gallwey method but also recording and possibly scoring acne and alopecia. Moreover, assessment of biochemical hyperandrogenism is necessary, particularly in patients with unclear or absent hirsutism, and will include assessing total and free testosterone (T), and possibly dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) and androstenedione, although these latter contribute limitedly to the diagnosis. Assessment of T requires use of the highest quality assays available, generally radioimmunoassays with extraction and chromatography or mass spectrometry preceded by liquid or gas chromatography. Management of clinical hyperandrogenism involves primarily either androgen suppression, with a hormonal combination contraceptive, or androgen blockade, as with an androgen receptor blocker or a 5α-reductase inhibitor, or a combination of the two. Medical treatment should be combined with cosmetic treatment including topical eflornithine hydrochloride and short-term (shaving, chemical depilation, plucking, threading, waxing, and bleaching) and long-term (electrolysis, laser therapy, and intense pulse light therapy) cosmetic treatments. Generally, acne responds to therapy relatively rapidly, whereas hirsutism is slower to respond, with improvements observed as early as 3 months, but routinely only after 6 or 8 months of therapy. Finally, FPHL is the slowest to respond to therapy, if it will at all, and it may take 12 to 18 months of therapy for an observable response.

  9. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Escape Mechanisms from Androgen Ablation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    of CAG repeats in the Machado-Joseph disease , spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and androgen receptor genes. Hum. Mol. Genet. 4, 1585-1590. Rundlett, S . E... diseases such as Huntington disease and spinal and bulbar muscular atro- phy, which is commonly called Kennedy’s disease . This finding has been attributed...STATEMENT: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and

  10. Estrogen Receptor Agonists and Antagonists in the Yeast Estrogen Bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Si; Bovee, Toine F H

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based bioassays can be used to predict the eventual biological activity of a substance on a living organism. In vitro reporter gene bioassays are based on recombinant vertebrate cell lines or yeast strains and especially the latter are easy-to-handle, cheap, and fast. Moreover, yeast cells do not express estrogen, androgen, progesterone or glucocorticoid receptors, and are thus powerful tools in the development of specific reporter gene systems that are devoid of crosstalk from other hormone pathways. This chapter describes our experience with an in-house developed RIKILT yeast estrogen bioassay for testing estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists, focusing on the applicability of the latter.

  11. Effect of small molecules modulating androgen receptor (SARMs in human prostate cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tesei

    Full Text Available The management of hormone-refractory prostate cancer represents a major challenge in the therapy of this tumor, and identification of novel androgen receptor antagonists is needed to render treatment more effective. We analyzed the activity of two novel androgen receptor antagonists, (S-11 and (R-9, in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of hormone-sensitive or castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. In vitro experiments were performed on LNCaP, LNCaP-AR, LNCaP-Rbic and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by SRB and BrdU uptake, AR transactivation by luciferase reporter assay and PSA levels by Real Time RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Cell cycle progression-related markers were evaluated by western blot. In vivo experiments were performed on SCID mice xenografted with cells with different sensitivity to hormonal treatment. In hormone-sensitive LNCaP and LNCaP-AR cells, the latter expressing high androgen receptor levels, (R-9 and (S-11 exhibited a higher cytotoxic effect compared to that of the reference compound ((R-bicalutamide, also in the presence of the synthetic androgen R1881. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect produced by (R-9 was higher than that of (S-11 in the two hormone-resistant LNCaP-AR and VCaP cells. A significant reduction in PSA levels was observed after exposure to both molecules. Moreover, (S-11 and (R-9 inhibited DNA synthesis by blocking the androgen-induced increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. In vivo studies on the toxicological profile of (R-9 did not reveal the presence of adverse events. Furthermore, (R-9 inhibited tumor growth in various in vivo models, especially LNCaP-Rbic xenografts, representative of recurrent disease. Our in vitro results highlight the antitumor activity of the two novel molecules (R-9 and (S-11, making them a potentially attractive option for the treatment of CRPC.

  12. Pharmacological characterization of an imidazolopyrazole as novel selective androgen receptor modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuqing; Allan, George F; Tannenbaum, Pamela; Sbriscia, Tifanie; Linton, Olivia; Lai, Muh-Tsann; Haynes-Johnson, Donna; Bhattacharjee, Sheela; Lundeen, Scott G; Sui, Zhihua

    2013-03-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are androgens with tissue-selective activity. SARMs that have anabolic activity on muscle while having minimal stimulatory activity on prostate are classified as SARM agonists. They can be used to prevent the loss of lean body mass that is associated with cancer, immunodeficiency, renal disease and aging. They may also have anabolic activity on bone; thus, unlike estrogens, they may reverse the loss of bone strength associated with aging or hypogonadism. Our in-house effort on SARM program discovers a nonsteroidal androgen receptor ligand with a unique imidazolopyrazole moiety in its structure. In vitro, this compound is a weak androgen receptor binder and a weak androgen agonist. Despite this, in orchidectomized mature rats it is an effective SARM agonist, with an ED(50) on levator ani muscle of 3.3mg/kg and an ED(50) on ventral prostate of >30mg/kg. It has its maximal effect on muscle at the dose of 10mg/kg. In addition, this compound has mixed agonistic and antagonistic activities on prostate, reducing the weight of that tissue in intact rats by 22% at 10mg/kg. The compound does not have significant effect on gonadotropin levels or testosterone levels in both orchidectomized and intact male rats. It does not have notable progestin, estrogen or glucocorticoid agonistic or antagonistic activity in rats. In a female sexual behavior model, it improves the sexual desire of ovariectomized female rats for sexually mature intact males over nonsexually ovariectomized females. Overall, the imidazolopyrazole is a potent prostate-sparing candidate for development as a SARM agonist with an appropriate pharmacological profile for clinical benefit in muscle-wasting conditions and female sexual function disorders.

  13. Genotype versus phenotype in families with androgen insensitivity syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boehmer, ALM; Bruggenwirth, H; Van Assendelft, C; Otten, BJ; Verleun-Mooijman, MCT; Niermeijer, MF; Brunner, HG; Rouwe, CW; Waelkens, JJ; Oostdijk, W; Kleijer, WJ; Van der Kwast, TH; De Vroede, MA; Drop, SLS

    2001-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome encompasses a wide range of phenotypes, which are caused by numerous different mutations in the AR gene. Detailed information on the genotype/ phenotype relationship in androgen insensitivity syndrome is important for sex assignment, treatment of androgen insensitivit

  14. Reptides and Proteins Interacting with the Androgen Receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. van de Wijngaart (Dennis)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAndrogens are important sex steroid hormones. The androgens testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) are essential for normal male sexual differentiation and for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues, including the prostate. Androgens mediate their effects by bin

  15. Synthetic Androgens as Designer Supplements

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Jan Felix; Parr, Maria Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are some of the most common performance enhancing drugs (PED) among society. Despite the broad spectrum of adverse effects and legal consequences, AAS are illicitly marketed and distributed in many countries. To circumvent existing laws, the chemical structure of AAS is modified and these designer steroids are sold as nutritional supplements mainly over the Internet. Several side effects are linked with AAS abuse. Only little is known about the pharmacologic...

  16. Androgens and the ageing male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2002-01-01

    Hypogonadal men share a variety of signs and symptoms such as decreased muscle mass, osteopoenia, increased fat mass, fatigue, decreased libido and cognitive dysfunctions. Controlled trials have demonstrated favourable effects of androgen substitution therapy on these signs and symptoms in men wi...... in some elderly males with low-normal testosterone levels. However, at this point in time, widespread use of testosterone in an elderly male population outside controlled clinical trials seems inappropriate....

  17. Identification of androgen-responsive genes that are alternatively regulated in androgen-dependent and androgen-independent rat prostate tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfundt, R.; Smit, F.P.; Jansen, Corine; Aalders, T.W.; Straatman, H.M.P.M.; Vliet, W. van der; Isaacs, J.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Schalken, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of androgen-dependent prostate tumors progress toward incurable, androgen-independent tumors. The identification of androgen-responsive genes, which are still actively transcribed in the tumors of patients who have undergone androgen ablation, may shed light on the molecular mechan

  18. CLONING AND IN VITRO EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR AND ISOLATION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR α FROM THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone mimics or antagonists typically use mammalian (rat, human) estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR). Although we know that the amino acid sequences of steroid receptors in nonmammalian vertebrates are not identical to the ma...

  19. Structure of the homodimeric androgen receptor ligand-binding domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Marta; Prekovic, Stefan; Gallastegui, Nerea; Helsen, Christine; Abella, Montserrat; Zielinska, Karolina; Gay, Marina; Vilaseca, Marta; Taulès, Marta; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; van Royen, Martin E.; Claessens, Frank; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva

    2017-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a crucial role in normal physiology, development and metabolism as well as in the aetiology and treatment of diverse pathologies such as androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS), male infertility and prostate cancer (PCa). Here we show that dimerization of AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is induced by receptor agonists but not by antagonists. The 2.15-Å crystal structure of homodimeric, agonist- and coactivator peptide-bound AR-LBD unveils a 1,000-Å2 large dimerization surface, which harbours over 40 previously unexplained AIS- and PCa-associated point mutations. An AIS mutation in the self-association interface (P767A) disrupts dimer formation in vivo, and has a detrimental effect on the transactivating properties of full-length AR, despite retained hormone-binding capacity. The conservation of essential residues suggests that the unveiled dimerization mechanism might be shared by other nuclear receptors. Our work defines AR-LBD homodimerization as an essential step in the proper functioning of this important transcription factor. PMID:28165461

  20. Estrogen and androgen regulate actin-remodeling and endocytosis-related genes during rat spermiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anita; Dumasia, Kushaan; Gaonkar, Reshma; Sonawane, Shobha; Kadam, Leena; Balasinor, N H

    2015-03-15

    Spermiation, the sperm release process, is imperative to male fertility and reproduction. Morphologically, it is characterized by removal of atypical adherens junctions called ectoplasmic specializations, and formation of transient endocytic devices called tubulobulbar complexes requiring cytoskeleton remodeling and recruitment of proteins needed for endocytosis. Earlier, estrogen administration to adult male rats was seen to cause spermiation failure due to disruption of tubulobulbar complexes. This was accompanied by reduction in intratesticular testosterone levels and increase in intratesticular estrogen along with deregulation of genes involved in cytoskeleton remodeling (Arpc1b, Evl and Capg) and endocytosis (Picalm, Eea1 and Stx5a). In the present study, we aim to understand the role of estrogen and androgen in regulating these genes independently using seminiferous tubule culture system treated with estrogen, androgen or agonists and antagonists of estrogen receptors. We find that transcripts of Arpc1b, Evl and Picalm are responsive to estrogen while those of Picalm, Eea1 and Stx5a are responsive to androgen. We also find that the estrogen regulation of Arpc1b and Evl is mediated through estrogen receptor β and that of Picalm occurs through estrogen receptors α and β. Localization of these proteins at or in the vicinity of tubulobulbar complexes reveals that ARPC1B, EVL, PICALM, EEA1 and STX5A seem to be involved in spermiation. Thus, estrogen and androgen regulate specific genes in seminiferous tubules that could play a role in spermiation.

  1. Critical role of androgen receptor in the postnatal period in male sexual behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shunji; Ohoya, Miku; Takanami, Keiko; Matsuda, Ken Ichi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2015-11-16

    Gonadal hormones have a developmental role in organization of the nervous system that regulates sexually dimorphic behavior. It is well known that androgen secreted from testes in the perinatal period is converted to estrogen by aromatase in rodent brain, and that estrogen and its receptor play a pivotal role in masculinization of brain structure and function. Treatment with flutamide, an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, during the perinatal period inhibits development of malespecific brain structure and function, suggesting that androgen signaling via AR also influences brain masculinization. In this study, we investigated which stage during the postnatal period is critical for androgen signaling in brain masculinization. The postnatal period was designated as postnatal days (PD) 0-22, and divided into stages I (PD 0-7), II (PD 8-14), and III (PD 15-22). Newborn male rats were given flutamide subcutaneously in each stage. After adulthood, the effects of postnatal flutamide treatment on brain masculinization were evaluated byanalysis of male sexual behavior. Continuous inhibition of AR throughout stages I and II caused a robust reduction of the intromission ratio and ejaculation frequency compared with other groups. AR inhibition in stage I, II, or III did not cause any change. AR inhibition had no effect onmount behavior. These results show that stage-specific AR activation in the first two postnatal weeks may contribute to brain masculinization mediating male sexual behavior in adulthood.

  2. [Androgen-deprivation therapy in prostate cancer: clinical evidence and future perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, F; Calarco, A; Totaro, A; Sacco, E; Volpe, A; Racioppi, M; D'Addessi, A; Bassi, P F

    2010-01-01

    Androgens are involved in the development and progression of prostate cancer even if the mechanism is not well-recognized. For this reason androgen-deprivation therapy remains a milestone for the treatment of patients with advanced and metastatic disease and, in the last years, in conjunction with radiotherapy and surgery in locally advanced tumors. Alternative options, such as intermittent deprivation suppression, seem to be promising in terms of clinical benefits and toxicity profile. However, current therapies present side effects, such as testosterone surge with consequent clinical flare-up, metabolic syndrome and hormone-resistance, which develops after a variable number of years. Novel therapies such as LH-RH antagonists and prolonged depot LH-RH analogues have been developed in order to avoid clinical flare-up and testosterone microsurges. Novel androgen synthesis inhibitors, such as abiraterone acetate and MDV3100, have been recently discovered and tested as promising hormonal second-line agents in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Finally, long-term side effects from androgen deprivation, such as osteoporosis, sarcopenic obesity and cardiovascular morbidity should be carefully monitored and properly treated.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of androgen and antiandrogen action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.W. Kuil (Cor)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe steroid hormones testosterone and 5a-dihydrotestosterone (androgens) control the development, differentiation and function of male reproductive and accessory sex tissues, such as seminal vesicle, epididymis and prostate. Changes in cell properties induced by androgens require the pre

  4. Molecular mechanisms of androgen receptor functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Steketee (Karine)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe androgens testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) are steroid hormones, which are necessary for development and maintenance of the functions of the male sex organs, including the prostate. Androgens also play an important role in benign abnormalities of the prostate and in the

  5. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  6. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E; Wang, Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents.

  7. In Vitro Androgen Bioassays as a Detection Method for Designer Androgens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison K. Heather

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Androgens are the class of sex steroids responsible for male sexual characteristics, including increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass. Illicit use of androgen doping can be an attractive option for those looking to enhance sporting performance and/or physical appearance. The use of in vitro bioassays to detect androgens, especially designer or proandrogens, is becoming increasingly important in combating androgen doping associated with nutritional supplements. The nutritional sports supplement market has grown rapidly throughout the past decade. Many of these supplements contain androgens, designer androgens or proandrogens. Many designer or proandrogens cannot be detected by the standard highly-sensitive screening methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry because their chemical structure is unknown. However, in vitro androgen bioassays can detect designer and proandrogens as these assays are not reliant on knowing the chemical structure but instead are based on androgen receptor activation. For these reasons, it may be advantageous to use routine androgen bioassay screening of nutraceutical samples to help curb the increasing problem of androgen doping.

  8. The transcriptional programme of the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Alastair D; Massie, Charlie E; Neal, David E

    2014-03-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is essential for normal prostate and prostate cancer cell growth. AR transcriptional activity is almost always maintained even in hormone relapsed prostate cancer (HRPC) in the absence of normal levels of circulating testosterone. Current molecular techniques, such as chromatin-immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), have permitted identification of direct AR-binding sites in cell lines and human tissue with a distinct coordinate network evident in HRPC. The effectiveness of novel agents, such as abiraterone acetate (suppresses adrenal androgens) or enzalutamide (MDV3100, potent AR antagonist), in treating advanced prostate cancer underlines the on-going critical role of the AR throughout all stages of the disease. Persistent AR activity in advanced disease regulates cell cycle activity, steroid biosynthesis and anabolic metabolism in conjunction with regulatory co-factors, such as the E2F family, c-Myc and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) transcription factors. Further treatment approaches must target these other factors.

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Katsuji; Miyawaki, Toshio; Hitaka, Takenori; Imai, Yumi N; Hara, Takahito; Miyazaki, Junichi; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kusaka, Masami; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Tasaka, Akihiro; Shiraishi, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-05-15

    To develop effective drugs for hypogonadism, sarcopenia, and cachexia, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that exhibit not only anabolic effects on organs such as muscles and the central nervous system (CNS) but also neutral or antagonistic effects on the prostate. Based on the information obtained from a docking model with androgen receptor (AR), we modified a hit compound A identified through high-throughput screening. Among the prepared compounds, 1-(4-cyano-1-naphthyl)-2,3-disubstituted pyrrolidine derivatives 17h, 17m, and 17j had highly potent AR agonistic activities in vitro and good tissue selectivity in vivo. These derivatives increased the weight of the levator ani muscle without influencing the prostate and seminal vesicle. In addition, these compounds induced sexual behavior in castrated rats, indicating that the compounds could also act as agonists on the CNS.

  10. Androgen receptor expression in human ovarian and uterine tissue of long term androgen-treated transsexual women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Chadha; T.D. Pache; F.J. Huikeshoven (Frans); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen receptor (AR) modulation in human uteri and ovaries of long term androgen-treated transsexual female patients was investigated. Androgen receptor expression was evaluated immunohistochemically in the ovaries of 11 and the endometria and myometria of six androgen-treated transsex

  11. Androgen and bone mass in men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AnnieW.C.Kung

    2003-01-01

    Androgens have multiple actions on the skeleton throughout life. Androgens promote skeletal growth and accumulation of minerals during puberty and adolescence and stimulate osteoblast but suppress osteoclast function,activity and lifespan through complex mechanisms. Also androgens increase periosteal bone apposition, resulting in larger bone size and thicker cortical bone in men. There is convincing evidence to show that aromatization to estrogens was an important pathway for mediating the action of testosterone on bone physiology. Estrogen is probably the dominant sex steroid regulating bone resorption in men, but both testosterone and estrogen are important in maintaining bone formation. ( Asian J Androl 2003 Jun; 5: 148-154)

  12. Androgen-responsive gene database: integrated knowledge on androgen-responsive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mei; Ma, Yunsheng; Chen, Congcong; Fu, Xuping; Yang, Shu; Li, Xia; Yu, Guohua; Mao, Yumin; Xie, Yi; Li, Yao

    2009-11-01

    Androgen signaling plays an important role in many biological processes. Androgen Responsive Gene Database (ARGDB) is devoted to providing integrated knowledge on androgen-controlled genes. Gene records were collected on the basis of PubMed literature collections. More than 6000 abstracts and 950 original publications were manually screened, leading to 1785 human genes, 993 mouse genes, and 583 rat genes finally included in the database. All the collected genes were experimentally proved to be regulated by androgen at the expression level or to contain androgen-responsive regions. For each gene important details of the androgen regulation experiments were collected from references, such as expression change, androgen-responsive sequence, response time, tissue/cell type, experimental method, ligand identity, and androgen amount, which will facilitate further evaluation by researchers. Furthermore, the database was integrated with multiple annotation resources, including National Center for Biotechnology Information, Gene Ontology, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway, to reveal the biological characteristics and significance of androgen-regulated genes. The ARGDB web site is mainly composed of the Browse, Search, Element Scan, and Submission modules. It is user friendly and freely accessible at http://argdb.fudan.edu.cn. Preliminary analysis of the collected data was performed. Many disease pathways, such as prostate carcinogenesis, were found to be enriched in androgen-regulated genes. The discovered androgen-response motifs were similar to those in previous reports. The analysis results are displayed in the web site. In conclusion, ARGDB provides a unified gateway to storage, retrieval, and update of information on androgen-regulated genes.

  13. Expanding the therapeutic use of androgens via selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T

    2007-03-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a novel class of androgen receptor (AR) ligands that might change the future of androgen therapy dramatically. With improved pharmacokinetic characteristics and tissue-selective pharmacological activities, SARMs are expected to greatly extend the clinical applications of androgens to osteoporosis, muscle wasting, male contraception and diseases of the prostate. Mechanistic studies with currently available SARMs will help to define the contributions of differential tissue distribution, tissue-specific expression of 5alpha-reductase, ligand-specific regulation of gene expression and AR interactions with tissue-specific coactivators to their observed tissue selectivity, and lead to even greater expansion of selective anabolic therapies.

  14. Novel Nor-Homo- and Spiro-Oxetan- Steroids Target the Human Androgen Receptor and Act as Antiandrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Marie; Rabe, Sebastian; Hessenkemper, Wiebke; Roell, Daniela; Bartsch, Sophie; Kraft, Florian; Abraham, Tsion E; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; van Royen, Martin E; Giannis, Athanassios; Baniahmad, Aria

    2014-06-01

    The prostate adenocarcinoma is the cancer with the highest incidence for men in Western countries. Targeting the androgen receptor (AR) by antagonists is used as hormone therapy for prostate cancer (PCa), however, eventually therapy resistance occurs in most patients. In most of these cancer the AR signaling is active and thus AR remains an important drug target. Since many years we are characterizing novel chemical structural platforms to provide a broader possibility for compounds that bind to and act as AR antagonists. Here, we describe the chemical synthesis of a battery of novel steroidal derivatives as nor-homo-, spiro-oxolan- and spiro-oxetan- steroids. They modulate the transcriptional activity of the human AR. As AR antagonists, the spiro-oxetan- steroid derivatives seem to be the most potent steroid derivatives. They inhibit the transcriptional activity of both wild-type AR as well as the AR mutant T877A. In line with this, these compounds bind to the human AR and inhibit the proliferation of the human androgen-dependent growing PCa cell line LNCaP. Interestingly, the castration-resistant AR expressing human PC3-AR cells are also growth inhibited. On mechanistic level, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assays with living cells indicate that the androgen-induced N/C terminal interaction of the AR is inhibited by the investigated compounds. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) assays in living cells suggest a higher mobility of the AR in the cell nuclei in the presence of spiro-oxetan- steroidal antagonists. Together, these findings suggest that spiro-oxetan- steroids are very useful as a chemical platform for novel AR antagonists.

  15. ABUSE OF ANABOLIC ANDROGENIC STEROIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Yavari

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the International Olympic Committee, the abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASS is found in over 50% of positive doping tests. AASS abuse is not restricted to the organized sports andwidespread use. It remains as an unsolved public-health problem.Lower black market price, easier access to AASS, bodybuilding clubs and internet advertising are factors of this increasingly misuse. There is not real data about the prevalence of AASS abuse in various populations or countries, because most of athletes or students, due to their prohibition or ethical aspects do not admit to AASS abuse. Often they are aware of the risks of their choice and yet, are eager to put themselves at risk without deeper consideration. The abusers use them to improve their physical fitness and appearance.Present article has been collected to elucidate the risks and adverse effects of AASS and explanation of mechanisms of these events.

  16. Synthetic androgens as designer supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jan Felix; Parr, Maria Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are some of the most common performance enhancing drugs (PED) among society. Despite the broad spectrum of adverse effects and legal consequences, AAS are illicitly marketed and distributed in many countries. To circumvent existing laws, the chemical structure of AAS is modified and these designer steroids are sold as nutritional supplements mainly over the Internet. Several side effects are linked with AAS abuse. Only little is known about the pharmacological effects and metabolism of unapproved steroids due to the absence of clinical studies. The large number of designer steroid findings in dietary supplements and the detection of new compounds combined with legal loopholes for their distribution in many countries show that stricter regulations and better information policy are needed.

  17. ANABOLIC ANDROGENIC STEROIDS AND DEPENDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IHSAN SARI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Anabolic androgenic steroids are used for sportive, cosmetic, therapeutic and occupational reasons and there are many side effects reported (George, 2005; Nieminen et al., 1996; O'Sullivan et al., 2000. Prevalence of anabolic steroids’ use also indicates the importance of this topic. Moreover, it is now known that use of anabolic steroids could lead to dependence which could be psychological or/and physiological (Copeland et al., 2000. It isimportant to know about all aspects of anabolic steroids including dependence. Therefore, this study has attempted to give an insight into use of anabolic steroids and dependence. The discussion will focus on prevalence, reasons, and side effects of use and physiological and psychological dependence

  18. Acne vulgaris related to androgens - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khondker, L; Khan, S I

    2014-01-01

    Sebum production is stimulated by androgens and is the key in the development of acne vulgaris. Several investigators have looked for direct relationships between serum androgen levels, sebum secretion rate and the presence of acne. The presence of acne in prepubertal girls and sebum production in both sexes correlate with serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels. Although increased serum androgen levels correlate with the presence of severe nodular acne in men and women, these levels are often within the normal range in mild to moderate acne. This raises the question of whether there is an increased local production of androgens within the sebaceous gland of patients with acne vulgaris that leads to increased sebum secretion.

  19. Androgen receptor roles in spermatogenesis and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Laura; Smith, Lee B

    2015-08-01

    Androgens such as testosterone are steroid hormones essential for normal male reproductive development and function. Mutations of androgen receptors (AR) are often found in patients with disorders of male reproductive development, and milder mutations may be responsible for some cases of male infertility. Androgens exert their action through AR and its signalling in the testis is essential for spermatogenesis. AR is not expressed in the developing germ cell lineage so is thought to exert its effects through testicular Sertoli and peri-tubular myoid (PTM) cells. AR signalling in spermatogenesis has been investigated in rodent models where testosterone levels are chemically supressed or models with transgenic disruption of AR. These models have pinpointed the steps of spermatogenesis that require AR signalling, specifically maintenance of spermatogonial numbers, blood-testis barrier integrity, completion of meiosis, adhesion of spermatids and spermiation, together these studies detail the essential nature of androgens in the promotion of male fertility.

  20. Laparoscopic gonedectomy in a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Bhaskararao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complete Androgen insensitivity syndrome is a disorder of hormone resistance characterized by a female phenotype in an individual with an XY karyotype. The pathogenesis of CAIS involves a defective androgen receptor gene located on X-chromosome at Xq11-12and end organ insensitivity to androgens, although androgen concentrations are appropriate for the age of the patient. There are three major types of androgen insensitivity syndrome: Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, minimal androgen insensitivity syndrome, and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome. Management of androgen insensitivity syndrome includes multidisciplinary approach and involves gonedectomy to avoid gonadal tumors in later life. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT and psychological support are required in long-term basis.

  1. Androgen deficiency and metabolic syndrome in men

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Ashley G; Zhao, Fujun; Lee, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a growing health concern worldwide. Initially a point of interest in cardiovascular events, the cluster of HTN, obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance known as MetS has become associated with a variety of other disease processes, including androgen deficiency and late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). Men with MetS are at a higher risk of developing androgen deficiency, and routine screening of testosterone (T) is advised in this population. The pathophysiology of ...

  2. Relationships between androgens, serotonin gene expression and innervation in male macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, C L; Coleman, K; Phu, K; Reddy, A P; Phu, A

    2014-08-22

    Androgen administration to castrated individuals was purported to decrease activity in the serotonin system. However, we found that androgen administration to castrated male macaques increased fenfluramine-induced serotonin release as reflected by increased prolactin secretion. In this study, we sought to define the effects of androgens and aromatase inhibition on serotonin-related gene expression in the dorsal raphe, as well as serotonergic innervation of the LC. Male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) were castrated for 5-7 months and then treated for 3 months with (1) placebo, (2) testosterone (T), (3) dihydrotestosterone (DHT; non-aromatizable androgen) and ATD (steroidal aromatase inhibitor), or (4) Flutamide (FLUT; androgen antagonist) and ATD (n=5/group). This study reports the expression of serotonin-related genes: tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2), serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and the serotonin 1A autoreceptor (5HT1A) using digoxigenin-ISH and image analysis. To examine the production of serotonin and the serotonergic innervation of a target area underlying arousal and vigilance, we measured the serotonin axon density entering the LC with ICC and image analysis. TPH2 and SERT expression were significantly elevated in T- and DHT + ATD-treated groups over placebo- and FLUT + ATD-treated groups in the dorsal raphe (p expression between the groups. There was a significant decrease in the pixel area of serotonin axons and in the number of varicosities in the LC across the treatment groups with T > placebo > DHT + ATD = FLUT + ATD treatments. Comparatively, T- and DHT + ATD-treated groups had elevated TPH2 and SERT gene expression, but the DHT + ATD group had markedly suppressed serotonin axon density relative to the T-treated group. Further comparison with previously published data indicated that TPH2 and SERT expression reflected yawning and basal prolactin secretion. The serotonin axon density in the LC agreed with the area under the fenfluramine

  3. Tetrahydroindolizinone NK1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jianming; Lu, Huagang; Morriello, Gregori J; Carlson, Emma J; Wheeldon, Alan; Chicchi, Gary G; Kurtz, Marc M; Tsao, Kwei-Lan C; Zheng, Song; Tong, Xinchun; Mills, Sander G; DeVita, Robert J

    2010-04-01

    A new class of potent NK(1) receptor antagonists with a tetrahydroindolizinone core has been identified. This series of compounds demonstrated improved functional activities as compared to previously identified 5,5-fused pyrrolidine lead structures. SAR at the 7-position of the tetrahydroindolizinone core is discussed in detail. A number of compounds displayed high NK(1) receptor occupancy at both 1 h and 24 h in a gerbil foot tapping model. Compound 40 has high NK(1) binding affinity, good selectivity for other NK receptors and promising in vivo properties. It also has clean P(450) inhibition and hPXR induction profiles.

  4. Clinical markers of androgenicity in acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan-Dare, R A; Hughes, B R; Cunliffe, W J

    1988-12-01

    Androgenic stimulation of sebaceous glands is necessary for development of acne. If hyperandrogenaemia were a major determinant of acne in women, the frequency of other clinical markers of androgenicity should increase with acne severity. To investigate this, 268 female subjects (aged 12-44 years) were studied. Subjects were divided into groups on the basis of acne severity: physiological, moderate, and severe. With exclusion of women taking oral contraceptives or anti-androgen therapy, subjects in each group were similar with respect to age at menarche and incidence of menstrual irregularity of amenorrhoea. Reports of excessive body hair, and clinical hirsutes on examination were few and there were no significant differences between acne severity groups. No correlation was observed between acne and hirsutes grades in all subjects (rank correlation coefficient = 0.096). Mild male pattern androgenic alopecia occurred in similar proportions of subjects in the three groups. Female pattern androgenic alopecia was observed in only two subjects. We have shown no correlation between acne severity and clinical markers of androgenicity in women. This suggests that in most cases factors other than hyperandrogenaemia are necessary for the development of acne.

  5. Androgen receptor expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors in a large series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Clinical and pathologic data were reviewed in 427 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and the expression of such hormone receptors was investigated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray technique. All tumors were negative for estrogen receptor expression. Progesterone and androgen receptors expression was observed in 5.4% and 17.6% of tumors, respectively. We found the higher average age at diagnosis, the lower frequency of tumors located in the small intestine, and the higher frequency of extragastrointestinal tumors to be statistically significant in the group of tumors with androgen receptor expression in contrast to the group showing no androgen receptor expression. There was no statistic difference between such groups regarding sex, tumor size, mitotic count, cell morphology, and risk of aggressive behavior. Considering that the expression of androgen receptors in gastrointestinal stromal tumors is not negligible, further studies are encouraged to establish the role of androgen deprivation therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

  6. Molecular cell biology of androgen receptor signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Nigel C; Gardiner, Robert A; Hooper, John D; Johnson, David W; Gobe, Glenda C

    2010-06-01

    The classical action of androgen receptor (AR) is to regulate gene transcriptional processes via AR nuclear translocation, response element binding and recruitment of, or crosstalk with, transcription factors. AR also utilises non-classical, non-genomic mechanisms of signal transduction. These precede gene transcription or protein synthesis, and involve steroid-induced modulation of cytoplasmic or cell membrane-bound regulatory proteins. Despite many decades of investigation, the role of AR in gene regulation of cells and tissues remains only partially characterised. AR exerts most of its effects in sex hormone-dependent tissues of the body, but the receptor is also expressed in many tissues not previously thought to be androgen sensitive. Thus it is likely that a complex, more over-arching, role for AR exists. Each AR domain co-ordinates a multitude of individual and vital roles via a diverse array of interacting partner molecules that are necessary for cellular and tissue development and maintenance. Aberrant AR activity, promoted by mutations or binding partner misregulation, can present as many clinical manifestations including androgen insensitivity syndrome and prostate cancer. In the case of malignant prostate cancer, treatment generally revolves around androgen deprivation therapies designed to interfere with AR action and the androgen signalling axis. Androgen therapies for prostate cancer often fail, highlighting a real need for increased research into AR function.

  7. Cardiovascular physiology of androgens and androgen testosterone therapy in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Shanhong; Komesaroff, Paul A; Sudhir, Krishnankutty

    2009-03-01

    Women before menopause are at relatively lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with age-matched men and after menopause this gender advantage disappears. Androgen has been known to be an independent factor contributing to the higher male susceptibility to CVD, through adverse effects on lipids, blood pressure, and glucose metabolism. High androgen levels also contribute to CVD development in women with polycystic ovary syndrome as well as androgen abusing athletes and body builders. On the other hand, decline in androgen levels, as a result of ageing in men, is associated with hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Postmenopausal women, particularly those with oophorectomy are generally in low levels of sex hormones and androgen insufficiency is independently associated with the higher incidence of atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. Androgen testosterone therapy (ATT) has been commonly used to improve well-being and libido in aging men with low androgen levels. The therapy has been demonstrated also to effectively reduce atherogenesis in these people. The use of ATT in postmenopausal women has increased in recent years and to date, however, the cardiovascular benefits of such therapy in these women remain uncertain. This review focuses on research regarding the impact of endogenous androgens and ATT on the cardiovascular physiology and CVD development in postmenopausal women.

  8. 抗雄激素疗法治疗痤疮的进展%Anti-androgen treatment of acne vulgaris: an update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晔; 项蕾红

    2012-01-01

    雄激素在痤疮发生过程中起着重要的作用,对于抗生素和维A酸类药物反应不佳的女性患者而言,无论其血雄激素水平是否正常,联合使用抗雄激素疗法可能是一种理想的选择,但具体机制尚不明确.抗雄激素疗法的药物可分为以下4类:雄激素受体拮抗剂、肾上腺源性雄激素阻断剂、卵巢源性雄激素阻断剂、酶抑制剂.外用抗雄激素制剂可能成为新的研究方向.概述抗雄激素治疗痤疮的机制、治疗方法以及新的研究进展.%Androgen plays an essential role in the pathophysiology of acne.The combination with antiandrogen agents may be an ideal option for the treatment of female patients with acne who poorly respond to antibiotics and tretinoins regardless of their blood level of androgens,although the exact therapeutic mechanism has not been well understood up to now.Anti-androgen agents can be classified into 4 groups,i.e.,androgen receptor antagonists,adrenal gland-derived inhibitors on androgen production,ovary-derived inhibitors on androgen production,and enzyme inhibitors.Topical anti-androgen agents may become a hot spot in future research on the treatment of acne.This paper presents the advances in therapeutic mechanisms and modalities of anti-androgen treatment of acne.

  9. Development of androgen- and estrogen-responsive bioassays, members of a panel of human cell line-based highly selective steroid-responsive bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneveld, Edwin; Jansen, Hendrina J; Riteco, Jacoba A C; Brouwer, Abraham; van der Burg, Bart

    2005-01-01

    We have established highly sensitive and specific androgen and estrogen reporter cell lines which we have named AR (androgen receptor) and ERalpha (estrogen receptor alpha) CALUX (Chemically Activated LUciferase eXpression), respectively. Both bioassays are member of a panel of CALUX reporter cell lines derived from the human U2-OS osteosarcoma cell line, all using highly selective reporter constructs based with a basal promoter element linked to multimerized response elements, allowing efficient and specific measurement of compounds interfering with androgen, estrogen, progesterone, and glucocorticoid receptors. The AR CALUX bioassay contains the human androgen receptor and a luciferase reporter construct containing three androgen-responsive elements coupled to a minimal TATA promoter. This cell line was characterized by its stable expression of AR protein, its highly selective response to low levels of different natural and synthetic androgens, and its insignificant response to other nuclear hormone receptor ligands such as estrogens, progestins, and glucocorticoids. The EC50 of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) was found to be 0.13 nM, consistent with the high affinity of this ligand to the human AR. Flutamide, cyproterone acetate, and the environmental contaminants vinclozolin, DDT, methoxychlor, its metabolite HPTE, and penta-BFR showed clear antagonistic activity in the AR CALUX bioassay, competitively inhibiting DHT-mediated transactivation. The established AR CALUX bioassay proved to excel in terms of easy cell line maintenance, high fold induction range (typical 30 times over solvent control), low minimal detection limit (3.6 pM), and high androgen selectivity. Potential applications such as testing the androgenic or estrogenic activity of pure chemicals and pharmaceuticals and complex mixtures (environmental, food, feed, and clinical) are discussed.

  10. Androgen-induced cell migration: role of androgen receptor/filamin A association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Castoria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Androgen receptor (AR controls male morphogenesis, gametogenesis and prostate growth as well as development of prostate cancer. These findings support a role for AR in cell migration and invasiveness. However, the molecular mechanism involved in AR-mediated cell migration still remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mouse embryo NIH3T3 fibroblasts and highly metastatic human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells harbor low levels of transcriptionally incompetent AR. We now report that, through extra nuclear action, AR triggers migration of both cell types upon stimulation with physiological concentrations of the androgen R1881. We analyzed the initial events leading to androgen-induced cell migration and observed that challenging NIH3T3 cells with 10 nM R1881 rapidly induces interaction of AR with filamin A (FlnA at cytoskeleton. AR/FlnA complex recruits integrin beta 1, thus activating its dependent cascade. Silencing of AR, FlnA and integrin beta 1 shows that this ternary complex controls focal adhesion kinase (FAK, paxillin and Rac, thereby driving cell migration. FAK-null fibroblasts migrate poorly and Rac inhibition by EHT impairs motility of androgen-treated NIH3T3 cells. Interestingly, FAK and Rac activation by androgens are independent of each other. Findings in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells strengthen the role of Rac in androgen signaling. The Rac inhibitor significantly impairs androgen-induced migration in these cells. A mutant AR, deleted of the sequence interacting with FlnA, fails to mediate FAK activation and paxillin tyrosine phosphorylation in androgen-stimulated cells, further reinforcing the role of AR/FlnA interaction in androgen-mediated motility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present report, for the first time, indicates that the extra nuclear AR/FlnA/integrin beta 1 complex is the key by which androgen activates signaling leading to cell migration. Assembly of this ternary complex may control organ development

  11. Methodology for profiling anti-androgen mixtures in river water using multiple passive samplers and bioassay-directed analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscio, Camilla; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Al-Salhi, Raghad; Ramsey, Michael H; Hill, Elizabeth M

    2014-06-15

    The identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals in surface waters is challenging as they comprise a variety of structures which are often present at nanomolar concentrations and are temporally highly variable. Hence, a holistic passive sampling approach can be an efficient technique to overcome these limitations. In this study, a combination of 4 different passive samplers used for sampling polar (POCIS Apharm and POCIS Bpesticide) and apolar compounds (LDPE low density polyethylene membranes, and silicone strips) were used to profile anti-androgenic activity present in river water contaminated by a wastewater effluent. Extracts of passive samplers were analysed using HPLC fractionation in combination with an in vitro androgen receptor antagonist screen (YAS). Anti-androgenic activity was detected in extracts from silicone strips and POCIS A/B at (mean ± SD) 1.1 ± 0.1 and 0.55 ± 0.06 mg flutamide standard equivalents/sampler respectively, but was not detected in LDPE sampler extracts. POCIS samplers revealed higher selectivity for more polar anti-androgenic HPLC fractions compared with silicone strips. Over 31 contaminants were identified which showed inhibition of YAS activity and were potential anti-androgens, and these included fungicides, germicides, flame retardants and pharmaceuticals. This study reveals that passive sampling, using a combination of POCIS A and silicone samplers, is a promising tool for screening complex mixture of anti-androgenic contaminants present in surface waters, with the potential to identify new and emerging structures with endocrine disrupting activity.

  12. Moving Beyond the Androgen Receptor (AR): Targeting AR-Interacting Proteins to Treat Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Christopher; Mitsiades, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Medical or surgical castration serves as the backbone of systemic therapy for advanced and metastatic prostate cancer, taking advantage of the importance of androgen signaling in this disease. Unfortunately, resistance to castration emerges almost universally. Despite the development and approval of new and more potent androgen synthesis inhibitors and androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, prostate cancers continue to develop resistance to these therapeutics, while often maintaining their dependence on the AR signaling axis. This highlights the need for innovative therapeutic approaches that aim to continue disrupting AR downstream signaling but are orthogonal to directly targeting the AR itself. In this review, we discuss the preclinical research that has been done, as well as clinical trials for prostate cancer, on inhibiting several important families of AR-interacting proteins, including chaperones (such as heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and FKBP52), pioneer factors (including forkhead box protein A1 (FOXA1) and GATA-2), and AR transcriptional coregulators such as the p160 steroid receptor coactivators (SRCs) SRC-1, SRC-2, SRC-3, as well as lysine deacetylases (KDACs) and lysine acetyltransferases (KATs). Researching the effect of-and developing new therapeutic agents that target-the AR signaling axis is critical to advancing our understanding of prostate cancer biology, to continue to improve treatments for prostate cancer and for overcoming castration resistance.

  13. Mixture effects at very low doses with combinations of anti-androgenic pesticides, antioxidants, industrial pollutant and chemicals used in personal care products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, Frances; Ermler, Sibylle; Kugathas, Subramaniam [Institute for the Environment, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Rosivatz, Erika [Institute of Chemical Biology, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Scholze, Martin [Institute for the Environment, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Kortenkamp, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.kortenkamp@brunel.ac.uk [Institute for the Environment, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    Many xenobiotics have been identified as in vitro androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, but information about their ability to produce combined effects at low concentrations is missing. Such data can reveal whether joint effects at the receptor are induced at low levels and may support the prioritisation of in vivo evaluations and provide orientations for the grouping of anti-androgens in cumulative risk assessment. Combinations of 30 AR antagonists from a wide range of sources and exposure routes (pesticides, antioxidants, parabens, UV-filters, synthetic musks, bisphenol-A, benzo(a)pyrene, perfluorooctane sulfonate and pentabromodiphenyl ether) were tested using a reporter gene assay (MDA-kb2). Chemicals were combined at three mixture ratios, equivalent to single components' effect concentrations that inhibit the action of dihydrotesterone by 1%, 10% or 20%. Concentration addition (CA) and independent action were used to calculate additivity expectations. We observed complete suppression of dihydrotestosterone effects when chemicals were combined at individual concentrations eliciting 1%, 10% or 20% AR antagonistic effect. Due to the large number of mixture components, the combined AR antagonistic effects occurred at very low concentrations of individual mixture components. CA slightly underestimated the combined effects at all mixture ratios. In conclusion, large numbers of AR antagonists from a wide variety of sources and exposure routes have the ability of acting together at the receptor to produce joint effects at very low concentrations. Significant mixture effects are observed when chemicals are combined at concentrations that individually do not induce observable AR antagonistic effects. Cumulative risk assessment for AR antagonists should apply grouping criteria based on effects where data are available, rather than on criteria of chemical similarity. - Highlights: • Mixtures of AR antagonists at low individual concentrations cause complete inhibition

  14. Androgen receptor drives cellular senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena Mirochnik

    Full Text Available The accepted androgen receptor (AR role is to promote proliferation and survival of prostate epithelium and thus prostate cancer progression. While growth-inhibitory, tumor-suppressive AR effects have also been documented, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we for the first time link AR anti-cancer action with cell senescence in vitro and in vivo. First, AR-driven senescence was p53-independent. Instead, AR induced p21, which subsequently reduced ΔN isoform of p63. Second, AR activation increased reactive oxygen species (ROS and thereby suppressed Rb phosphorylation. Both pathways were critical for senescence as was proven by p21 and Rb knock-down and by quenching ROS with N-Acetyl cysteine and p63 silencing also mimicked AR-induced senescence. The two pathways engaged in a cross-talk, likely via PML tumor suppressor, whose localization to senescence-associated chromatin foci was increased by AR activation. All these pathways contributed to growth arrest, which resolved in senescence due to concomitant lack of p53 and high mTOR activity. This is the first demonstration of senescence response caused by a nuclear hormone receptor.

  15. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, Andrea; Iaquinto, Gaetano; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  16. Androgen manipulation and vasopressin binding in the rat brain and peripheral organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xin; Phillips, P.; Oldfield, B.; Trinder, D.; Risvanis, J.; Stephenson, J.; Johnston, C. (Univ. of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia))

    1994-03-01

    It is now widely recognized that there is a sexual dimorphism in the development of arginine vasopressin (AVP) immunoreactivity in certain parts of the brain, and that changes in brain AVP immunoreactivity change with manipulation of androgen status. The aim of the present experiment was to determine specifically any AVP receptor changes in response to manipulation of androgen levels using a selective V[sub 1] antagonist radioligand. Following castration, plasma testosterone levels fell and AVP immunoreactivity was reduced in the lateral septum and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. With testosterone supplementation in castrated animals, the immunoreactivity in these regions was restored to a higher degree than in sham-operated animals. Central and peripheral V[sub 1] AVP receptor binding (as determined using the selective AVP V)[sub 1] antagonist radioligand [[sup 125]I](d(CH[sub 2])[sub 5],sarcosine[sup 7]) AVP was not changed in any of the brain regions studied or in liver or kidney membranes from the three groups. The study demonstrates that there is no change in brain AVP receptor binding despite changes in regional AVP immunoreactivity in the brain, and excludes any confounding interaction with changes in oxytocin receptors. 23 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. Androgen circle of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homburg, Roy

    2009-07-01

    Although the aetiology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is still not known and the search for causative genes is proving elusive, it is generally agreed that hyperandrogenism is at the heart of the syndrome. Here, it is proposed that excess androgens are the root cause of PCOS starting from their influence on the female fetus in programming gene expression, producing the characteristic signs and symptoms which are then exacerbated by a propagation of excess ovarian androgen production from multiple small follicles, anovulation and insulin resistance in the reproductive life-span, thus setting up a vicious perpetual circle of androgen excess. This opinion paper, rather than being a full-scale review, is intentionally biased in support of this hypothesis that androgen excess is the 'root of all evil' in PCOS; in the hope that its acceptance could lead to more direct treatment of the syndrome in all its facets rather than the symptomatic treatment of side effects of androgen excess that we are addressing today.

  18. Discovery and therapeutic promise of selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiyun; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T

    2005-06-01

    Androgens are essential for male development and the maintenance of male secondary characteristics, such as bone mass, muscle mass, body composition, and spermatogenesis. The main disadvantages of steroidal androgens are their undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. The recent discovery of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) provides a promising alternative for testosterone replacement therapies with advantages including oral bioavailability, flexibility of structural modification, androgen receptor specificity, tissue selectivity, and the lack of steroid-related side effects.

  19. Conazole fungicides inhibit Leydig cell testosterone secretion and androgen receptor activation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarke J.E. Roelofs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Conazole fungicides are widely used in agriculture despite their suspected endocrine disrupting properties. In this study, the potential (anti-androgenic effects of ten conazoles were assessed and mutually compared with existing data. Effects of cyproconazole (CYPRO, fluconazole (FLUC, flusilazole (FLUS, hexaconazole (HEXA, myconazole (MYC, penconazole (PEN, prochloraz (PRO, tebuconazole (TEBU, triadimefon (TRIA, and triticonazole (TRIT were examined using murine Leydig (MA-10 cells and human T47D-ARE cells stably transfected with an androgen responsive element and a firefly luciferase reporter gene. Six conazoles caused a decrease in basal testosterone (T secretion by MA-10 cells varying from 61% up to 12% compared to vehicle-treated control. T secretion was concentration-dependently inhibited after exposure of MA-10 cells to several concentrations of FLUS (IC50 = 12.4 μM or TEBU (IC50 = 2.4 μM in combination with LH. The expression of steroidogenic and cholesterol biosynthesis genes was not changed by conazole exposure. Also, there were no changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS formation that could explain the altered T secretion after exposure to conazoles. Nine conazoles decreased T-induced AR activation (IC50s ranging from 10.7 to 71.5 μM and effect potencies (REPs were calculated relative to the known AR antagonist flutamide (FLUT. FLUC had no effect on AR activation by T. FLUS was the most potent (REP = 3.61 and MYC the least potent (REP = 0.03 AR antagonist. All other conazoles had a comparable REP from 0.12 to 0.38. Our results show distinct in vitro anti-androgenic effects of several conazole fungicides arising from two mechanisms: inhibition of T secretion and AR antagonism, suggesting potential testicular toxic effects. These effects warrant further mechanistic investigation and clearly show the need for accurate exposure data in order to perform proper (human risk assessment of this class of compounds.

  20. Computational Investigation on the Allosteric Modulation of Androgen Receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Min-Rui; LI Jun-Qian

    2012-01-01

    Androgens have similar structures with different biological activities. To identify molecular determinants responsible for the activity difference, we have docked six steroidal androgens to the binding site or the surface of androgen receptor by using molecular docking with computational investigation. The energy was calculated respectively based on the QM (quantum mechanics) and MM (molecular mechanics) methods. The result shows that the allosteric modulation of androgen receptor plays an important role in the binding process between androgens and receptor. The open state receptor is less stable than the close state one, but the latter is more favorable for binding with androgens. It is worthy of note that when the androgen receptors binding or without binding with androgen are in close state, they are difficult to return to their open state. This phenomenon is an exception of the well known two-state model theory in which the two states are reversible. Whether the internal of close state androgen receptor has a combination of androgen or not, the androgen receptor surface can be combined with another androgen, and their surface binding energies could be very close. The result is consistent with the experimental observations, but this phenomenon of continuous combination from open state is also an exception of the two-state model theory.

  1. Transcriptional network of androgen receptor in prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2013-08-01

    The androgen receptor belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. It binds to the androgen responsive element and recruits coregulatory factors to modulate gene transcription. In addition, the androgen receptor interacts with other transcription factors, such as forkhead box A1, and other oncogenic signaling pathway molecules that bind deoxyribonucleic acid and regulate transcription. Androgen receptor signaling plays an important role in the development of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cells proliferate in an androgen-dependent manner, and androgen receptor blockade is effective in prostate cancer therapy. However, patients often progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer with elevated androgen receptor expression and hypersensitivity to androgen. Recently, comprehensive analysis tools, such as complementary DNA microarray, chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequence, have described the androgen-mediated diverse transcriptional program and gene networks in prostate cancer. Furthermore, functional and clinical studies have shown that some of the androgen receptor-regulated genes could be prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of prostate cancer, particularly castration-resistant prostate cancer. Thus, identifying androgen receptor downstream signaling events and investigating the regulation of androgen receptor activity is critical for understanding the mechanism of carcinogenesis and progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  2. High dose androgen therapy in male pseudohermaphroditism due to 5 alpha-reductase deficiency and disorders of the androgen receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Price, P; Wass, J. A.; Griffin, J E; Leshin, M; Savage, M O; Large, D. M.; Bu'Lock, D E; Anderson, D. C.; Wilson, J. D.; Besser, G M

    1984-01-01

    We describe the clinical and biochemical features of six men with male pseudohermaphroditism due to androgen resistance. Each of the subjects had male-gender behavior but incomplete virilization. The underlying defects in androgen metabolism were defined by studies of the 5 alpha-reductase enzyme and the androgen receptor in fibroblasts cultured from biopsies of genital skin. Four of the six have 5 alpha-reductase deficiency, and two have defects of the androgen receptor (the Reifenstein synd...

  3. Using Anabolic Androgenic Steroids in Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefa Lök

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available It is known that sportsmen especially youngers who engaged in athletism, weight lifting and body building sport have beenusing ‘‘Anabolic Androgenic Steroid’’ (AAS intensively for purpose of doping during world sport history. Used dopingsubstances to increase sport performance differ from sport branches. In some sport branches, it is used to diminish neuralstress while in other sport branches it is used to increase force, endurance and resistance against exhaustion. Today amongsportsmen using ergogenic substances to increase rivalry and physical performance for purpose of doping are increased. Inthis study using anabolic androgenic steroids in sports will be assessed.

  4. Antioxidants Abrogate Alpha-Tocopherylquinone-Mediated Down-Regulation of the Androgen Receptor in Androgen-Responsive Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M Fajardo

    Full Text Available Tocopherylquinone (TQ, the oxidation product of alpha-tocopherol (AT, is a bioactive molecule with distinct properties from AT. In this study, AT and TQ are investigated for their comparative effects on growth and androgenic activity in prostate cancer cells. TQ potently inhibited the growth of androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines (e.g., LAPC4 and LNCaP cells, whereas the growth of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells (e.g., DU145 cells was not affected by TQ. Due to the growth inhibitory effects induced by TQ on androgen-responsive cells, the anti-androgenic properties of TQ were examined. TQ inhibited the androgen-induced activation of an androgen-responsive reporter and inhibited the release of prostate specific antigen from LNCaP cells. TQ pretreatment was also found to inhibit AR activation as measured using the Multifunctional Androgen Receptor Screening assay. Furthermore, TQ decreased androgen-responsive gene expression, including TM4SF1, KLK2, and PSA over 5-fold, whereas AT did not affect the expression of androgen-responsive genes. Of importance, the antiandrogenic effects of TQ on prostate cancer cells were found to result from androgen receptor protein down-regulation produced by TQ that was not observed with AT treatment. Moreover, none of the androgenic endpoints assessed were affected by AT. The down-regulation of androgen receptor protein by TQ was abrogated by co-treatment with antioxidants. Overall, the biological actions of TQ were found to be distinct from AT, where TQ was found to be a potent inhibitor of cell growth and androgenic activity in androgen-responsive prostate cancer cells.

  5. Androgen inhibits the growth of carcinoma cell lines established from prostate cancer xenografts that escape androgen treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly-Pharaboz, Marie-Odile; Kalach, Jean-Jacques; Pharaboz, Julie; Chantepie, Jacqueline; Nicolas, Brigitte; Baille, Marie-Laurence; Ruffion, Alain; Benahmed, Mohamed; André, Jean

    2008-07-01

    Most prostate cancers escape endocrine therapy by diverse mechanisms. One of them might be growth repression by androgen. We reported that androgen represses the growth in culture of MOP cells (a sub-line of LNCaP cells) and that of MOP cell xenografts, although tumor growth becomes androgen-independent (AI). Here we explore whether AI tumors contain androgen-responsive cells. ME carcinoma cells were established from AI tumors. The responses to androgen were examined by cell counting, DAPI labeling, flow cytometry, PSA immunoassay and tumor size follow-up. Androgen receptors (AR) were analyzed by western blotting and DNA sequencing. The pattern of responses of these cells to androgen was compared to that of MOP cells and that of JAC cells established from LNCaP-like MOP cells. R1881, a synthetic androgen: (1) repressed the growth of all the six ME cell lines obtained, MOP and JAC cells, (2) augmented the secretion of PSA, (3) induced spectacular cell bubbling/fragmentation and (4) blocked the cell cycle and induced a modest increase of apoptosis. All the androgen-repressed cells expressed the same level of mutated AR as LNCaP cells. In nude mice, the growth of ME-2 cell xenografts displayed transient androgen repression similar to that of MOP cells. In culture neither fibroblasts nor extra-cellular matrix altered the effects of R1881 on cell proliferation. These results demonstrate that androgen-independent tumors contain androgen-responsive cells. The apparent discrepancy between the responses to androgen of tumors and those of carcinoma cells in culture suggests that microenvironmental factors contribute to the androgen responsiveness of tumor cells in vivo. These modifications, albeit unspecified, could be suitable targets for restoring the androgen responsiveness of AI tumors.

  6. Androgen-mediated regulation of skeletal muscle protein balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Michael L; Steiner, Jennifer L; Gordon, Bradley S

    2017-02-22

    Androgens significantly alter muscle mass in part by shifting protein balance in favor of net protein accretion. During various atrophic conditions, the clinical impact of decreased production or bioavailability of androgens (termed hypogonadism) is important as a loss of muscle mass is intimately linked with survival outcome. While androgen replacement therapy increases muscle mass in part by restoring protein balance, this is not a comprehensive treatment option due to potential side effects. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanisms by which androgens alter protein balance is needed for the development of androgen-independent therapies. While the data in humans suggest androgens alter protein balance (both synthesis and breakdown) in the fasted metabolic state, a predominant molecular mechanism(s) behind this observation is still lacking. This failure is likely due in part to inconsistent experimental design between studies including failure to control nutrient/feeding status, the method of altering androgens, and the model systems utilized.

  7. Androgen receptor signaling is required for androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cell proliferation and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day Wanda V

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgens and androgen receptors (AR regulate normal prostate development and growth. They also are involved in pathological development of prostatic diseases, including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate cancer (PCa. Antiandrogen therapy for PCa, in conjunction with chemical or surgical castration, offers initial positive responses and leads to massive prostate cell death. However, cancer cells later appear as androgen-independent PCa. To investigate the role of AR in prostate cell proliferation and survival, we introduced a vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA. This siRNA targeted 5'-untranslated region of AR mRNA for extended suppression of AR expression in androgen-sensitive human prostate LNCaP cells. Results The siRNA design successfully suppressed endogenous AR expression, as revealed by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining in LNCaP cells. LNCaP cells did not proliferate in the absence of AR and underwent apoptosis, based on elevated phospho-Histone H2B expression and higher number of apoptotic body as compared to control cells. Conclusion We demonstrated that AR is vital for prostate cell proliferation and survival in this androgen-sensitive prostate cell line. These results further strengthen the hypothesis that AR can be a therapeutic target for treating androgen-sensitive stages of PCa. Unlike antiandorgens, however, siRNA targeting AR provides a direct inactivation of AR function through the suppression of AR protein expression.

  8. A new highly specific and robust yeast androgen bioassay for the detection of agonist and antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovee, T.F.H.; Helsdingen, J.R.; Hamers, A.R.M.; Duursen, van M.; Nielen, M.W.F.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Public concern about the presence of natural and anthropogenic compounds which affect human health by modulating normal endocrine functions is continuously growing. Fast and simple high-throughput screening methods for the detection of hormone activities are thus indispensable. During the last two d

  9. Novel Small Molecule Antagonists of the Interaction of the Androgen Receptor and Transcriptional Co-regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    peritoneal injection, tail injection, oral gavage, retro-orbital blood sampling, isoflurane anesthesia, CO2 euthanasia , cardiac stick, organ harvesting...RESEARCH EXPERIENCE Post- Doctoral Research Associate Dec. 2005 - St Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, USA Advisor: Dr. R. K. Guy

  10. Epithelial ovarian cancer: testing the 'androgens hypothesis'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Catherine M; Green, Adèle C; Nagle, Christina M; Jordan, Susan J; Whiteman, David C; Bain, Christopher J; Webb, Penelope M

    2008-12-01

    In 1998, Risch proposed a hypothesis for the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer relating to the role of androgens in stimulating epithelial cell proliferation. Although this hypothesis has been widely discussed, direct evidence to support it is scant. To address this issue, we have conducted a detailed analysis of factors possibly associated with high circulating levels of androgens, including polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), hirsutism and acne (all clinically associated with hyperandrogenism) using the data collected in an Australia-wide, population-based case-control study. Cases aged 18-79 years with a new diagnosis of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (n=1276) or borderline malignant tumour (n=315) were identified through a network of clinics and cancer registries throughout Australia. Controls (n=1508) were selected from the National Electoral Roll. Women self-reported a history of PCOS, acne, hirsutism and also use of testosterone supplements or the androgenic medication Danazol. We found no evidence that a history of PCOS, acne or hirsutism was associated with ovarian cancer overall, or with specific subtypes, with the exception of serous borderline tumours that were positively associated with a history of PCOS (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.0-6.1). Women who had ever used testosterone supplements had an increased risk of ovarian cancer (OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.1-12.0); however, use of the androgenic medication Danazol did not increase risk (OR 1.0; 95% CI 0.4-2.9). Overall, our results do not support the hypothesis that androgen-related disorders increase the risk of ovarian cancer.

  11. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B Alex; Jetten, Anton M; Austin, Christopher P; Tice, Raymond R

    2013-05-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR.

  12. Novel mutations of androgen receptor: a possible mechanism of bicalutamide withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takahito; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi; Araki, Hideo; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Kusaka, Masami; Miyamoto, Masaomi

    2003-01-01

    Most prostate cancers (PCs) become resistant to combined androgen blockade therapy with surgical or medical castration and antiandrogens after several years. Some of these refractory PCs regress after discontinuation of antiandrogen administration [antiandrogen withdrawal syndrome (AWS)]. Although the molecular mechanisms of the AWS are not fully understood because of the lack of suitable experimental models, one hypothesis of the mechanism is mutation of androgen receptor (AR). However, bicalutamide, which has become the most prevalent pure antiandrogen, does not work as an agonist for any mutant AR detected thus far in PC. To elucidate the mechanisms of the AWS, we established and characterized novel LNCaP cell sublines, LNCaP-cxDs, which were generated in vitro by culturing androgen-dependent LNCaP-FGC human PC cells in androgen-depleted medium with bicalutamide to mimic the combined androgen blockade therapy. LNCaP-FGC cells did not grow at first, but they started to grow after 6-13 weeks of culture. Bicalutamide stimulated LNCaP-cxD cell growth and increased prostate-specific antigen secretion from LNCaP-cxD cells both in vitro and in vivo. Sequencing of AR transcripts revealed that the AR in LNCaP-cxD cells harbors a novel mutation in codon 741, TGG (tryptophan) to TGT (cysteine; W741C), or in codon 741, TGG to TTG (leucine; W741L), in the ligand-binding domain. Transactivation assays showed that bicalutamide worked as an agonist for both W741C and W741L mutant ARs. Importantly, another antiandrogen, hydroxyflutamide, worked as an antagonist for these mutant ARs. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time that within only 6-13 weeks of in vitro exposure to bicalutamide, LNCaP-FGC cells, whose growth had initially been suppressed, came to use bicalutamide as an AR agonist via W741 AR mutation to survive. Our data strongly support the hypothesis that AR mutation is one possible mechanism of the AWS and suggest that flutamide might be effective as a second

  13. Androgens and Androgen Derivatives: Science, Myths, and Theories: Explored From a Special Operations Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Melissa L; Deuster, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Androgen use outside of legitimate medical therapy is a perceived concern that is drawing attention across military and specifically Special Operations Forces (SOF) communities. For leadership and the medical community to properly address the issue and relate to those individuals who are using or considering use, it will be crucial to understand the scope of the problem. Limited data suggest that the prevalence of androgen use may be increasing, and inferences made from the scientific literature suggest that SOF may be a population of concern. While risks of androgen use are well known, there are little data specific to military performance that can be applied to a rigorous risk:benefit analysis, allowing myths and poorly supported theories to perpetuate within the community. Further efforts to define the potential benefits balanced against the short- and long-term risks should be undertaken. Providers within the SOF community should arm themselves with information to engage androgen users and leadership in meaningful discussion regarding androgen use.

  14. Study of Androgen and Androgen Receptor in Relation to Insulin Resistance in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    初永丽; 孙永玉; 邱红玉

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate the relationship between serum testosterone level and expression of androgen receptors in ovary in relation to insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Serum testosterone levels were determined by radioimmunoassay in 17 patients with PCOS and 20 cases as control group. The expression of androgen receptor in ovary was detected by immunohistochemistry method. The results showed that serum testosterone level [ (3. 1± 1.5) nmol/L] and insulin resistance index (0. 85±0. 49) in patients with PCOS were significantly higher than in control group (P<0. 05), and showed a positive relation (r=0. 65, P<0. 01). The expression levels of androgen receptor in ovary of patients with PCOS were significantly higher than that in control group (P<0.05). The optical density value was positively related with insulin resistance index (r=0.59,P<0. 01). It was concluded that androgen and androgen receptor could accelerate insulin resistance and the interaction of them might aggravate the pathophysiological change in PCOS.

  15. Androgen insensitivity syndrome: do trinucleotide repeats in androgen receptor gene have any role?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Singh Rajender; Nalini J. Gupta; Baidyanath Chakravarty; Lalji Singh; Kumarasamy Thangaraj

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of CAG and GGN repeats as genetic background affecting androgen insensitivity syn- drome (AIS) phenotype. Methods: We analyzed lengths of androgen receptor (AR)-CAG and GGN repeats in 69 AIS cases, along with 136 unrelated normal male individuals. The lengths of repeats were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by allelic genotyping to determine allele length. Results: Our study revealed significantly shorter mean lengths of CAG repeats in patients (mean 18.25 repeats, range 14-26 repeats) in comparison to the controls (mean 22.57 repeats, range 12-39 repeats) (two-tailed P < 0.0001). GGN repeats, however, did not differ significantly between patients (mean 21.48 repeats) and controls (mean 21.21 repeats) (two- tailed P = 0.474). Among patients' groups, the mean number of CAG repeats in partial androgen insensitivity cases (mean 15.83 repeats) was significantly less than in complete androgen insensitivity cases (mean 19.46 repeats) (two- tailed P < 0.0001). Conclusion: The findings suggest that shorter lengths of repeats in the AR gene might act as low penetrance genetic background in varying manifestation of androgen insensitivity. (Asian J Androl 2008 Jul; 10: 616-624)

  16. Androgen levels in women with various forms of ovarian dysfunction : Associations with cardiometabolic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, N. M P; Jaspers, L.; Koster, M. P H; Broekmans, F. J M; De Rijke, Y. B.; Franco, O. H.; Laven, J. S E; Kavousi, M.; Fauser, B. C J M

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are differences in androgen levels among women with various forms of ovarian dysfunction associated with cardiometabolic abnormalities? SUMMARY ANSWER Androgen levels differed substantially between women with and without ovarian dysfunction, and increased androgen levels were associat

  17. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  18. Androgen receptor gene polymorphism in zebra species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Ito

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor genes (AR have been found to have associations with reproductive development, behavioral traits, and disorders in humans. However, the influence of similar genetic effects on the behavior of other animals is scarce. We examined the loci AR glutamine repeat (ARQ in 44 Grevy's zebras, 23 plains zebras, and three mountain zebras, and compared them with those of domesticated horses. We observed polymorphism among zebra species and between zebra and horse. As androgens such as testosterone influence aggressiveness, AR polymorphism among equid species may be associated with differences in levels of aggression and tameness. Our findings indicate that it would be useful to conduct further studies focusing on the potential association between AR and personality traits, and to understand domestication of equid species.

  19. Androgen Receptor Roles in the Development of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

    OpenAIRE

    IZUMI, KOUJI; Mizokami, Atsushi; Lin, Wen-Jye; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is a major cause of lower urinary tract symptoms, with an increased volume of transitional zone and associated with increased stromal cells. It is known that androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays a key role in development of BPH, and that blockade of this signaling decreases BPH volume and can relieve lower urinary tract symptoms, but the mechanisms of androgen/AR signaling in BPH development remain unclear, and the effectiveness of current drugs fo...

  20. Effects of androgenic-anabolic steroids in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartgens, Fred; Kuipers, Harm

    2004-01-01

    . Generally, AAS seem to induce increments of aggression and hostility. Mood disturbances (e.g. depression, [hypo-]mania, psychotic features) are likely to be dose and drug dependent. AAS dependence or withdrawal effects (such as depression) seem to occur only in a small number of AAS users. Dissatisfaction with the body and low self-esteem may lead to the so-called 'reverse anorexia syndrome' that predisposes to the start of AAS use. Many other adverse effects have been associated with AAS misuse, including disturbance of endocrine and immune function, alterations of sebaceous system and skin, changes of haemostatic system and urogenital tract. One has to keep in mind that the scientific data may underestimate the actual untoward effects because of the relatively low doses administered in those studies, since they do not approximate doses used by illicit steroid users. The mechanism of action of AAS may differ between compounds because of variations in the steroid molecule and affinity to androgen receptors. Several pathways of action have been recognised. The enzyme 5-alpha-reductase seems to play an important role by converting AAS into dihydrotestosterone (androstanolone) that acts in the cell nucleus of target organs, such as male accessory glands, skin and prostate. Other mechanisms comprises mediation by the enzyme aromatase that converts AAS in female sex hormones (estradiol and estrone), antagonistic action to estrogens and a competitive antagonism to the glucocorticoid receptors. Furthermore, AAS stimulate erythropoietin synthesis and red cell production as well as bone formation but counteract bone breakdown. The effects on the cardiovascular system are proposed to be mediated by the occurrence of AAS-induced atherosclerosis (due to unfavourable influence on serum lipids and lipoproteins), thrombosis, vasospasm or direct injury to vessel walls, or may be ascribed to a combination of the different mechanisms. AAS-induced increment of muscle tissue can be attributed

  1. Consequences of use of anabolic androgenic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casavant, Marcel J; Blake, Kathleen; Griffith, Jill; Yates, Andrew; Copley, LaRae M

    2007-08-01

    Whether providing anticipatory guidance to the young adolescent patient, conducting a preparticipation examination on a young athlete, or treating a sick user of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs), the primary care physician must be familiar with the adverse consequences of the use of these compounds. This article reviews the endocrine, cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric, musculoskeletal, hematologic, hepatic, and miscellaneous effects of AASs, highlighting effects reported in children and adolescents, and relying on consequences in adults when pediatric data is unavailable.

  2. Hematological changes during androgen deprivation therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mathis Grossmann; Jeffrey D Zajac

    2012-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been associated with a plethora of adverse effects,consistent with the androgen dependency of multiple reproductive and somatic tissues.One such tissue is the hemopoietic system,and one of the most predictable consequences of ADT is the development of anemia.Although anemia caused by ADT is rarely severe,ADT is often given to frail,elderly men with increased susceptibility to anemia due to multiple other causes.ADT-associated anemia may contribute to fatigue and reduced quality of life (QoL) in such men,although this requires further study.While anemia is an independent risk factor of mortality in men with prostate cancer,it is not known whether treatment of ADT-associated anemia alters clinically important outcomes,or whether treatment affects mortality.Awareness of the phenomenon of ADT-induced anemia should avoid unnecessary work-up in mild cases of normocytic normochromic anemia.However,assessment and treatment of more severe anemia may be required.This should be determined on an individual basis.In contrast to the well-described actions of ADT on erythrepoiesis,its effect on other hemopoietic lineages has been less well elucidated.While preclinical studies have found roles for androgens in maturation and differentiated function of neutrophils,lymphocytes and platelets,the implications of these findings for men with prostate cancer receiving ADT require further studies.

  3. Androgens exert sexually dimorphic effects on angiogenesis: novel insight into the relationship between androgens and cardiovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katya B Rubinow; John K Amory; Stephanie T Page

    2011-01-01

    @@ The effects of androgen exposure on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in men remain poorly understood.Given the earlier incidence of CVD among men relative to women, androgens historically have been assumed to potentiate CVD in men.However,mounting clinical data challenge this assumption and increasingly implicate low levels of circulating testosterone as a risk factor for CVD and mortality.1,2 In their recenfly published report 'A sex-specific role for androgens in angiogenesis',3 Sieveking and colleagues make striking observations regarding the impact of androgens on angiogenesis and recovery from ischemic injury, important components of vascular repair which might provide a mechanism whereby androgens could exert protective cardiovascular effects.Moreover, these findings were sex-specific in both in vitro and in vivo model systems, suggesting a sexually dimorphic effect of androgens in modulating CVD.

  4. Androgen receptor serine 81 phosphorylation mediates chromatin binding and transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoyong; Gulla, Sarah; Cai, Changmeng; Balk, Steven P

    2012-03-01

    Our previous findings indicated that androgen receptor (AR) phosphorylation at serine 81 is stimulated by the mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). In this report, we extended our previous study and confirmed that Ser-81 phosphorylation increases during mitosis, coincident with CDK1 activation. We further showed blocking cell cycle at G(1) or S phase did not disrupt androgen-induced Ser-81 phosphorylation and AR-dependent transcription, consistent with a recent report that AR was phosphorylated at Ser-81 and activated by the transcriptional CDK9. To assess the function of Ser-81 phosphorylation in prostate cancer (PCa) cells expressing endogenous AR, we developed a ligand switch strategy using a ligand-binding domain mutation (W741C) that renders AR responsive to the antagonist bicalutamide. An S81A/W741C double mutant AR stably expressed in PCa cells failed to transactivate the endogenous AR-regulated PSA or TMPRSS2 genes. ChIP showed that the S81A mutation prevented ligand-induced AR recruitment to these genes, and cellular fractionation revealed that the S81A mutation globally abrogated chromatin binding. Conversely, the AR fraction rapidly recruited to chromatin after androgen stimulation was highly enriched for Ser-81 phosphorylation. Finally, inhibition of CDK1 and CDK9 decreased AR Ser-81 phosphorylation, chromatin binding, and transcriptional activity. These findings indicate that Ser-81 phosphorylation by CDK9 stabilizes AR chromatin binding for transcription and suggest that CDK1-mediated Ser-81 phosphorylation during mitosis provides a pool of Ser-81 phosphorylation AR that can be readily recruited to chromatin for gene reactivation and may enhance AR activity in PCa.

  5. Effects of androgens on insulin action in women: is androgen excess a component of female metabolic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbould, A

    2008-10-01

    Hyperinsulinemia as a consequence of insulin resistance causes hyperandrogenemia in women. The objective was to review evidence for the converse situation, i.e. whether androgens adversely influence insulin action. Androgen excess could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes, and in obese peripubertal girls. An Entrez-PubMed search was conducted to identify studies addressing the relationship of androgens with metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes in women. Studies reporting outcomes of androgen administration, interventions to reduce androgen effects in hyperandrogenemic women, and basic studies investigating androgen effects on insulin target tissues were reviewed. Multiple studies showed associations between serum testosterone and insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes risk in women, but their cross-sectional nature did not allow conclusions about causality. Androgen administration to healthy women was associated with development of insulin resistance. Intervention studies in women with hyperandrogenism were limited by small subject numbers and use of indirect methods for assessing insulin sensitivity. However, in three of the seven studies using euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps, reduction of androgen levels or blockade of androgen action improved insulin sensitivity. Testosterone administration to female rats caused skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Testosterone induced insulin resistance in adipocytes of women in vitro. In conclusion, the metabolic consequences of androgen excess in women have been under-researched. Studies of long-term interventions that lower androgen levels or block androgen effects in young women with hyperandrogenism are needed to determine whether these might protect against metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes in later life.

  6. A selective androgen receptor modulator enhances male-directed sexual preference, proceptive behavior, and lordosis behavior in sexually experienced, but not sexually naive, female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudwa, A E; López, F J; McGivern, R F; Handa, R J

    2010-06-01

    Androgens influence many aspects of reproductive behavior, including sexual preference of females for males. In oophorectomized women with sexual desire disorder, testosterone patches improve libido, but their use is limited because of adverse side effects. Selective androgen receptor modulators offer an improved safety profile for both sexes: enhancing libido and muscle and bone growth in a manner similar to steroidal androgens but with fewer adverse effects, such as hirsutism, acne, and prostate growth. The current study investigated the action of a novel selective androgen receptor modulator (LGD-3303 [9-chloro-2-ethyl-1-methyl-3-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-3H-pyrrolo-[3,2-f]quinolin-7(6H)-one]) on male-directed sexual preference, proceptivity, and lordosis behavior of female rats. LGD-3303 is a nonsteroidal, nonaromatizable, highly selective ligand for the androgen receptor and effectively crosses the blood-brain barrier. Gonadectomized female rats were treated with LGD-3303 (3-30 mg/kg) or vehicle by daily oral gavage. Results showed that LGD-3303 treatment enhanced sexual preference of females for males but only if females had previous sexual experience. This occurred after 1 or 7 d of treatment. In contrast, preference for males was inhibited by LGD-3303 treatments of sexually naive females. The LGD-3303 increase in male preference was blocked by pretreatment with the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide. LGD-3303 treatment increased lordosis and proceptivity behaviors in ovariectomized females primed with suboptimal doses of estradiol benzoate plus progesterone. These data support the concept that LGD-3303 can stimulate aspects of female sexual behavior and may serve as a potential therapeutic for women with sexual desire disorders.

  7. 5alpha-Reduced androgens block estradiol-BSA-stimulated release of oxytocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Jack D; Song, Yan; Englöf, Ila; Höfle, Simone; Key, Mary; Morris, Mariana

    2003-06-27

    In this study we test the postulate that estradiol conjugated to bovine serum albumin (E-BSA) acts via receptors for the steroid-binding protein sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) by attempting to block E-BSA-stimulated release of oxytocin with two antagonists of SHBG receptor actions: the 5alpha-reduced androgens dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 3alpha-diol. Simultaneous superfusion with either DHT or 3alpha-diol significantly blocked E-BSA-stimulated release of oxytocin. We also found that a wide range of free 17beta-estradiol was unable to stimulate oxytocin release, suggesting that E-BSA stimulates receptors other than those for free estradiol to release oxytocin, perhaps SHBG receptors.

  8. Synthesis of potential mescaline antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, F; Nieforth, K A

    1976-10-01

    1-[2-(3,4,5-Trimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-3-pyrroline, 2-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, N-n-propylmescaline, N-cyclopropylmethylmescaline, and N-allylmescaline were synthesized as potential mescaline antagonists. The ability of these compounds to antagonize mescaline-induced disruption of swim behavior is also given.

  9. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation......)-phenylethylamine salt of N-BOC-(R)-ATAA. Like ATAA, neither (R)- nor (S)-ATAA significantly affected (IC50 > 100 microM) the receptor binding of tritiated AMPA, kainic acid, or (RS)-3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid, the latter being a competitive NMDA antagonist. Electrophysiological experiments......, using the rat cortical wedge preparation, showed the NMDA antagonist effect as well as the AMPA antagonist effect of ATAA to reside exclusively in the (R)-enantiomer (Ki = 75 +/- 5 microM and 57 +/- 1 microM, respectively). Neither (R)- nor (S)-ATAA significantly reduced kainic acid-induced excitation...

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW LHRH ANTAGONISTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENGDun-Ren; XIAOShao-Bo

    1989-01-01

    An ideal antagonist of LHRH is one which can act on the pitutary to inhibit LHRH-stimulatod LH / FSH secretion by competitive occupying the LHRH receptor in the pitutary gland. Its action should be very specific, fast and highly effective, the durations

  11. Phytoestrogens selective for the estrogen receptor beta exert anti-androgenic effects in castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Paul; Wuttke, Wolfgang; Seidlová-Wuttke, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men of the Western world. A castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) eventually will arise when a local restricted prostate carcinoma was not cured duly by radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy. Although androgen ablation therapies are considered the gold standard for treatments of advanced prostate cancer there is no curative therapy available at present. In previous pre-clinical and clinical trials several phytoestrogens were investigated for their anticancer potential in various models for prostate cancer. Phytoestrogens feature tumour preventive characteristics and most probably are involved in the low incidence rate of hormone related cancers in Asian countries. Phytoestrogens such as isoflavones can have a marked impact on the most essential therapy target of CRPC i.e. the androgen receptor. Furthermore, functional analyses solidified the notion of such drugs as androgen antagonistic. Phytoestrogens commonly feature low toxicity combined with a potential of targeted therapy. Thus, these drugs qualify for conceivable implementation in prostate cancer patients under active surveillance. In addition, relapse prevention with these drugs after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy might be considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Phytoestrogens'.

  12. [Histologic study of stimulation of preputial glands in the mouse by androgens and inhibition by a detergent or zinc salts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marois, M; Rateau, J C; Elie, C

    1982-12-01

    Preputial glands are a kind of sebaceous glands ; they play a role in reproduction and sexual and social behavior by means of secreted pheromones. In this work, the authors compared the regression of these glands to that of seminal vesicles and investigated the stimulating potency of three androgens : testosterone, androstenedione, androsterone. These data demonstrate the sensitivity of preputial glands to all three androgens. Castration interrupted the secretory activity of the glandular cells of the acini. Four injections of 250 micrograms of testosterone, nine injections of 250 micrograms of androstenedione or androsterone to male mice castrated before puberty restored elaboration and holocrine secretion of sebum. The authors tested for a possible antagonistic action of two substances : a detergent, superinone (100 mg body weight) and zinc salts (10 mg body weight) associated to androgens. After treatment by superinone, histological analysis revealed glandular cell lysis. The action of zinc salts was less pronounced. Zinc acetate and sulfate seem to counter the elaboration of secretions without disrupting glandular structure. The mechanisms of action of their two substances are very probably different.

  13. The role of GH and IGF-I in mediating anabolic effects of testosterone on androgen-responsive muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Carlo; Bhasin, Shalender; Tangherlini, Frances; Barton, Elisabeth R; Ganno, Michelle; Zhang, Anqi; Shansky, Janet; Vandenburgh, Herman H; Travison, Thomas G; Jasuja, Ravi; Morris, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone (T) supplementation increases skeletal muscle mass, circulating GH, IGF-I, and im IGF-I expression, but the role of GH and IGF-I in mediating T's effects on the skeletal muscle remains poorly understood. Here, we show that T administration increased body weight and the mass of the androgen-dependent levator ani muscle in hypophysectomized as well as castrated plus hypophysectomized adult male rats. T stimulated the proliferation of primary human skeletal muscle cells (hSKMCs) in vitro, an effect blocked by transfecting hSKMCs with small interference RNA targeting human IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR). In differentiation conditions, T promoted the fusion of hSKMCs into larger myotubes, an effect attenuated by small interference RNA targeting human IGF-IR. Notably, MKR mice, which express a dominant negative form of the IGF-IR in skeletal muscle fibers, treated with a GnRH antagonist (acyline) to suppress endogenous T, responded to T administration by an attenuated increase in the levator ani muscle mass. In conclusion, circulating GH and IGF-I are not essential for mediating T's effects on an androgen-responsive skeletal muscle. IGF-I signaling plays an important role in mediating T's effects on skeletal muscle progenitor cell growth and differentiation in vitro. However, IGF-IR signaling in skeletal muscle fibers does not appear to be obligatory for mediating the anabolic effects of T on the mass of androgen-responsive skeletal muscles in mice.

  14. Testosterone increases renal anti-aging klotho gene expression via the androgen receptor-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Che; Huang, Shih-Ming; Lin, Shih-Hua; Ka, Shuk-Man; Chen, Ann; Shih, Meng-Fu; Hsu, Yu-Juei

    2014-12-01

    Gender is known to be associated with longevity and oestrogen administration induced longevity-associated gene expression is one of the potential mechanisms underlying the benefits of oestrogen on lifespan, whereas the role of testosterone in the regulation of longevity-associated gene expressions remains largely unclear. The klotho gene, predominantly expressed in the kidney, has recently been discovered to be an aging suppressor gene. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory effects of testosterone on renal klotho gene expression in vivo and in vitro. In testosterone-administered mouse kidney and NRK-52E cells, increased klotho expression was accompanied by the up-regulation of the nuclear androgen receptor (AR). Overexpression of AR enhanced the expression of klotho mRNA and protein. Conversely, testosterone-induced klotho expression was attenuated in the presence of flutamide, an AR antagonist. A reporter assay and a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated that AR directly binds to the klotho promoter via androgen response elements (AREs) which reconfirmed its importance for AR binding via the element mutation. In summary, our study demonstrates that testosterone up-regulates anti-aging klotho together with AR expression in the kidney in vivo and in vitro by recruiting AR on to the AREs of the klotho promoter.

  15. ATM Inhibition Potentiates Death of Androgen Receptor-inactivated Prostate Cancer Cells with Telomere Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vidyavathi; Wu, Min; Ciavattone, Nicholas; McKenty, Nathan; Menon, Mani; Barrack, Evelyn R; Reddy, G Prem-Veer; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2015-10-16

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a role in maintaining telomere stability in prostate cancer cells, as AR inactivation induces telomere dysfunction within 3 h. Since telomere dysfunction in other systems is known to activate ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) signaling pathways, we investigated the role of ATM-mediated DDR signaling in AR-inactivated prostate cancer cells. Indeed, the induction of telomere dysfunction in cells treated with AR-antagonists (Casodex or MDV3100) or AR-siRNA was associated with a dramatic increase in phosphorylation (activation) of ATM and its downstream effector Chk2 and the presenceof phosphorylated ATM at telomeres, indicating activation of DDR signaling at telomeres. Moreover, Casodex washout led to the reversal of telomere dysfunction, indicating repair of damaged telomeres. ATM inhibitor blocked ATM phosphorylation, induced PARP cleavage, abrogated cell cycle checkpoint activation and attenuated the formation of γH2AX foci at telomeres in AR-inactivated cells, suggesting that ATM inhibitor induces apoptosis in AR-inactivated cells by blocking the repair of damaged DNA at telomeres. Finally, colony formation assay revealed a dramatic decrease in the survival of cells co-treated with Casodex and ATM inhibitor as compared with those treated with either Casodex or ATM inhibitor alone. These observations indicate that inhibitors of DDR signaling pathways may offer a unique opportunity to enhance the potency of AR-targeted therapies for the treatment of androgen-sensitive as well as castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  16. The androgenic anabolic steroid tetrahydrogestrinone produces dioxin-like effects via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyo Youl; Kim, Sun-Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2012-10-01

    For a long time, athletes have used androgenic anabolic steroids (AASs) in an inappropriate and veiled manner with the aim of improving exercise performance or for cosmetic purposes. Abuse of AASs triggers adverse effects such as hepatocarcinogenesis, heart attacks, and aggressive behavior. However, AAS-induced toxicity is not completely understood at the molecular level. In the present study, we showed, by performing a dioxin response element (DRE)-luciferase reporter gene assay, that tetrahydrogestrinone (THG), a popular and potent androgen receptor agonist, has dioxin-like effects. In addition, we showed that THG increased cytochrome P-450 1A1 (CYP1A1) mRNA and protein levels, and enzyme activity. The gene encoding CYP1A1 is involved in phase 1 xenobiotic metabolism and a target gene of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Using the AhR antagonist CH-223191, we also examined whether the effects of THG on DRE activation depended on AhR. Our results suggest that synthetic anabolic steroids may have dioxin-like side effects that can disturb endocrine systems and may cause other side effects including cancer through AhR.

  17. Neonatal RU-486 (mifepristone) exposure increases androgen receptor immunoreactivity and sexual behavior in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes-Lorman, Robin; Auger, Anthony P; Auger, Catherine J

    2014-01-16

    Progesterone and progestin receptors (PRs) are known to play a role in the development of brain physiology and behavior in many different species. The distribution and regulation of PRs within the developing brain suggest that they likely contribute to the organization of the brain and behavior in a sex-specific manner. We examined the role of PR signaling during development on the organization of adult sexual behavior and androgen receptor (AR) expression in the brain. We administered the PR antagonist, RU-486, subcutaneously to male and female rats on postnatal days 1-7 (0=day of birth) and examined adult sexual behavior and AR-immunoreactivity (AR-ir) in the adult brain. A typical sex difference in lordosis quotient (LQ) was observed and neonatal RU-486 treatment did not alter this behavior. In contrast, neonatal RU-486 treatment increased adult male sexual behavior and AR-ir in several brain areas in males. These data indicate that a transient disruption in PR signaling during development can have lasting consequences on the male brain and may increase male sexual behavior in part by increasing AR expression, and therefore androgen sensitivity, in adulthood.

  18. Lead evaluation of tetrahydroquinolines as nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators for the treatment of osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Naoya; Furuya, Kazuyuki; Oguro, Nao; Nishiyama, Daisuke; Kawai, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Noriko; Ohyabu, Yuki; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Miyakawa, Motonori

    2014-01-01

    Tetrahydroquinoline (THQ) was deemed to be a suitable scaffold for our nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) concept. We adapted the strategy of switching the antagonist function of cyano-group-containing THQ (CN-THQ) to the agonist function and optimized CN-THQ as an orally available drug candidate with suitable pharmacological and ADME profiles. Based on binding mode analyses and synthetic accessibility, we designed and synthesized a compound that possesses a para-substituted aromatic ring attached through an amide linker. The long-tail THQ derivative 6-acetamido-N-(2-(8-cyano-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinolin-4-yl)-2-methylpropyl)nicotinamide (1 d), which bears a para-acetamide-substituted aromatic group, showed an appropriate in vitro biological profile, as expected. We considered that the large conformational change at Trp741 of the androgen receptor (AR) and the hydrogen bond between 1 d and helix 12 of the AR could maintain the structure of the AR in its agonist form; indeed, 1 d displays strong AR agonistic activity. Furthermore, 1 d showed an appropriate in vivo profile for use as an orally available SARM, displaying clear tissue selectivity, with a separation between its desirable osteoanabolic effect on femoral bone mineral density and its undesirable virilizing effects on the uterus and clitoral gland in a female osteoporosis model.

  19. Androgen regulation of the TMPRSS2 gene and the effect of a SNP in an androgen response element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinckemalie, Liesbeth; Spans, Lien; Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël; Helsen, Christine; Joniau, Steven; Claessens, Frank

    2013-12-01

    More than 50% of prostate cancers have undergone a genomic reorganization that juxtaposes the androgen-regulated promoter of TMPRSS2 and the protein coding parts of several ETS oncogenes. These gene fusions lead to prostate-specific and androgen-induced ETS expression and are associated with aggressive lesions, poor prognosis, and early-onset prostate cancer. In this study, we showed that an enhancer at 13 kb upstream of the TMPRSS2 transcription start site is crucial for the androgen regulation of the TMPRSS2 gene when tested in bacterial artificial chromosomal vectors. Within this enhancer, we identified the exact androgen receptor binding sequence. This newly identified androgen response element is situated next to two binding sites for the pioneer factor GATA2, which were identified by DNase I footprinting. Both the androgen response element and the GATA-2 binding sites are involved in the enhancer activity. Importantly, a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs8134378) within this androgen response element reduces binding and transactivation by the androgen receptor. The presence of this SNP might have implications on the expression and/or formation levels of TMPRSS2 fusions, because both have been shown to be influenced by androgens.

  20. Abiraterone and other novel androgen-directed strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer: a new era of hormonal therapies is born.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Michael T; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2012-08-01

    The number of life-prolonging therapies proven effective in the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has been limited until recently. In the past 2 years several such therapies have come to market. In 2010, the autologous immunotherapy sipuleucel-T and the next-generation taxane cabazitaxel were approved in this setting. However, abundant evidence has shown that CRPC growth continues to be driven through androgen-dependent signaling. Both of these drugs fail to take advantage of this targetable oncogenic pathway. Potent specific inhibitors of cytochrome P450-17 have been engineered with the aim of suppressing androgen synthesis beyond that seen with the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists/antagonists. Abiraterone acetate was developed by rational design based on a pregnenolone parent structure. Its approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was granted in 2011 based on phase III data demonstrating an overall survival advantage compared with placebo. More recently, other drugs that act along the androgen signaling pathway, such as orteronel (TAK-700), galeterone (TOK-001), enzalutamide (MDV3100) and ARN-509, have shown promise in clinical trials. Some of these are expected to gain FDA approval in the near future. Here, we review abiraterone and other novel androgen-directed therapeutic strategies for the management of advanced prostate cancer.

  1. In vitro translation of androgen receptor cRNA results in an activated androgen receptor protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); P.E. de Ruiter (Petra); J. Trapman (Jan); G.W. Jenster (Guido); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractTranslation of androgen receptor (AR) cRNA in a reticulocyte lysate and subsequent analysis of the translation products by SDS/PAGE showed a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 108 kDa. Scatchard-plot analysis revealed a single binding component with

  2. In the mood for sex : The value of androgens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apperloo, MJA; Van der Stege, JG; Hoek, A; Schultz, WCMW

    2003-01-01

    Androgen substitution is increasingly being employed to enhance sexual desire in women based on the assumption that low androgen levels cause low sexual desire, Sexual functioning in women is complex; therefore, decreased sexual interest can have various causes. An adequate female sexual biopsycboso

  3. [Wheat androgenic embryoids and calli: data of scanning electron microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglova, N N; Gorbunova, V Iu; Abramov, S N; Sel'dimirova, O A

    2001-01-01

    The surface of wheat androgenic embryoids and calli at different developmental stages was studied using SEM. The embryoids were already characterized by regular cell divisions at the early developmental stages, while the calli were represented by irregular cell conglomerates. This trend was preserved during further development of androgenic structures. SEM studies of the surface of so-called secondary embryoids confirmed these observations.

  4. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  5. Development of selective androgen receptor modulators and their therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Rodan, Gideon A; Schmidt, Azi

    2002-01-01

    Androgens control a broad range of physiological functions. The androgen receptor (AR), a steroid receptor that mediates the diverse biological actions of androgens, is a ligand inducible transcription factor. Abnormalities in the androgen signaling system result in many disturbances ranging from changes in gender determination and sexual development to psychiatric and emotional disorders. Androgen replacement therapy can improve many clinical conditions including hypogonadism and osteoporosis, but is limited by the lack of efficacious and safe therapeutic agents with easy delivery options. Recent progress in the area of gene regulation by steroid receptors and by selective receptor modulators provides an opportunity to examine if selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) could address some of the problems associated with current androgen therapy. Since the composition of the transcriptional initiation complex recruited by liganded AR determines the specificity of gene regulation, synthetic ligands aimed at initiating transcription of tissue and promoter specific genes offers hope for developing better androgen therapy. Establishment of assays that predict synthetic ligand activity is critical for SARM development. Advancement in high throughput compound screening and gene fingerprinting technologies, such as microarrays and proteomics, will facilitate and accelerate identification of effective SARMs.

  6. Disruption of androgen and estrogen receptor activity in prostate cancer by a novel dietary diterpene carnosol: implications for chemoprevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeremy J.; Syed, Deeba N.; Suh, Yewseok; Heren, Chenelle R.; Saleem, Mohammad; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Emerging data is suggesting that estrogens, in addition to androgens, may also be contributing to the development of prostate cancer (PCa). In view of this notion agents that target estrogens, in addition to androgens, may be a novel approach for PCa chemoprevention and treatment. Thus, the identification and development of non-toxic dietary agents capable of disrupting androgen receptor (AR) in addition to estrogen receptor (ER) could be extremely useful in the management of PCa. Through molecular modeling we found carnosol, a dietary diterpene fits within the ligand binding domain of both AR and ER-α. Using a TR-FRET assay we found that carnosol interacts with both AR and ER-α and additional experiments confirmed that it functions as a receptor antagonist with no agonist effects. LNCaP, 22Rv1, and MCF7 cells treated with carnosol (20–40 µM) showed decreased protein expression of AR and ER-α. Oral administration of carnosol at 30 mg/kg five days weekly for 28 days to 22Rv1 PCa xenografted mice suppressed tumor growth by 36% (p = 0.028) and was associated with a decrease in serum PSA by 26% (p=0.0042). These properties make carnosol unique to any known anti-androgen or anti-estrogen investigated so far for the simultaneous disruption of AR and ER-α. We suggest that carnosol may be developed or chemically modified through more rigorous structure activity relationship studies for a new class of investigational agents - a dual AR/ER modulator. PMID:20736335

  7. Synthesis of esters of androgens with unsaturated fatty acids for androgen requiring therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, F; Garofalo, A; Aloisi, A M; Lamponi, S; Magnani, A; Petroni, A

    2013-06-01

    Androgens' metabolism and activity are gaining a more and more important role in human physiology particularly referring to aging and to neurodegenerative diseases. Androgen treatment is often required for long-lasting disorders. In order to improve their duration and effects, androgens can be administered as esters of carboxylic acids. The novelty of our research is the use of esters of androgens with specific unsaturated fatty acids, in order to reduce possible side effects particularly related to chronic pathologies with altered lipid homeostasis such as X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and cardiovascular disorders. Thus the esters of the main androgenic substances testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and their metabolite 5α-androstan-3α,17β-diol were chemically obtained by coupling with different unsaturated fatty acids. To this aim, fatty acids with various degree of unsaturation and belonging to different series were selected. Specifically, oleic acid (18:1, n-9), linoleic acid (18:2, n-6), and the n-3 fatty acids, α-linolenic acid (18:3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6) were used obtaining corresponding esters with acceptable yields and good degree of purity. All the synthesized compounds were tested for their cytotoxic activities in mouse NIH3T3 and human astrocyte cell lines. The esters demonstrated good tolerability and no in vitro cytotoxic effect in both cell cultures. After these promising preliminary results, the esters will be suitable for in vivo studies in order to ascertain their pharmacokinetic characteristics and their biological effects.

  8. Androgens regulate Hedgehog signalling and proliferation in androgen-dependent prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirab, Nanor; Terry, Stéphane; Giton, Frank; Caradec, Josselin; Chimingqi, Mihelaiti; Moutereau, Stéphane; Vacherot, Francis; de la Taille, Alexandre; Kouyoumdjian, Jean-Claude; Loric, Sylvain

    2012-09-15

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is androgen sensitive in its development and progression to metastatic disease. Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activation is important in the initiation and growth of various carcinomas including PCa. We and others have observed aberrations of Hh pathway during the progression of PCa to the castration-resistant state. The involvement of androgen signalling in Hh pathway activation, however, remains largely elusive. Here we investigate the direct role of androgen signalling on Hh pathway. We examined the effect of Dihydrosterone (DHT), antiandrogen, bicalutamide, and Hh pathway inhibitor, KAAD-cyclopamine in four human prostate cell lines (two cancerous: LNCaP, VCaP, and two normal: PNT2 and PNT2-ARm which harbours a mutant version of androgen receptor (AR) that is commonly found in LNCaP). Cell proliferation as well as Hh pathway members (SHH, IHH, DHH, GLI, PTCH) mRNA expression levels were assessed. We showed that KAAD-cyclopamine decreased cell proliferation of DHT-stimulated LNCaP, VCaP and PNT2-ARm cells. SHH expression was found to be downregulated by DHT in all AR posititve cells. The negative effect of DHT on SHH expression was counteracted when cells were treated by bicalutamide. Importantly, KAAD-cyclopamine treatment seemed to inhibit AR activity. Moreover, bicalutamide as well as KAAD-cyclopamine treatments induced GLI and PTCH expression in VCaP and PNT2-ARm. Our results suggest that Hh pathway activity can be regulated by androgen signalling. Specifically, we show that the DHT-induced inhibition of Hh pathway is AR dependent. The mutual interaction between these two pathways might be important in the regulation of cell proliferation in PCa.

  9. Identification of putative steroid receptor antagonists in bottled water: combining bioassays and high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wagner

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs are man-made compounds interfering with hormone signaling and thereby adversely affecting human health. Recent reports provide evidence for the presence of EDCs in commercially available bottled water, including steroid receptor agonists and antagonists. However, since these findings are based on biological data the causative chemicals remain unidentified and, therefore, inaccessible for toxicological evaluation. Thus, the aim of this study is to assess the antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic activity of bottled water and to identify the causative steroid receptor antagonists. We evaluated the antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic activity of 18 bottled water products in reporter gene assays for human estrogen receptor alpha and androgen receptor. Using nontarget high-resolution mass spectrometry (LTQ-Orbitrap Velos, we acquired corresponding analytical data. We combined the biological and chemical information to determine the exact mass of the tentative steroid receptor antagonist. Further MS(n experiments elucidated the molecule's structure and enabled its identification. We detected significant antiestrogenicity in 13 of 18 products. 16 samples were antiandrogenic inhibiting the androgen receptor by up to 90%. Nontarget chemical analysis revealed that out of 24520 candidates present in bottled water one was consistently correlated with the antagonistic activity. By combining experimental and in silico MS(n data we identified this compound as di(2-ethylhexyl fumarate (DEHF. We confirmed the identity and biological activity of DEHF and additional isomers of dioctyl fumarate and maleate using authentic standards. Since DEHF is antiestrogenic but not antiandrogenic we conclude that additional, yet unidentified EDCs must contribute to the antagonistic effect of bottled water. Applying a novel approach to combine biological and chemical analysis this is the first study to identify so far unknown EDCs in bottled water

  10. Identification of Putative Steroid Receptor Antagonists in Bottled Water: Combining Bioassays and High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Martin; Schlüsener, Michael P.; Ternes, Thomas A.; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are man-made compounds interfering with hormone signaling and thereby adversely affecting human health. Recent reports provide evidence for the presence of EDCs in commercially available bottled water, including steroid receptor agonists and antagonists. However, since these findings are based on biological data the causative chemicals remain unidentified and, therefore, inaccessible for toxicological evaluation. Thus, the aim of this study is to assess the antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic activity of bottled water and to identify the causative steroid receptor antagonists. We evaluated the antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic activity of 18 bottled water products in reporter gene assays for human estrogen receptor alpha and androgen receptor. Using nontarget high-resolution mass spectrometry (LTQ-Orbitrap Velos), we acquired corresponding analytical data. We combined the biological and chemical information to determine the exact mass of the tentative steroid receptor antagonist. Further MSn experiments elucidated the molecule’s structure and enabled its identification. We detected significant antiestrogenicity in 13 of 18 products. 16 samples were antiandrogenic inhibiting the androgen receptor by up to 90%. Nontarget chemical analysis revealed that out of 24520 candidates present in bottled water one was consistently correlated with the antagonistic activity. By combining experimental and in silico MSn data we identified this compound as di(2-ethylhexyl) fumarate (DEHF). We confirmed the identity and biological activity of DEHF and additional isomers of dioctyl fumarate and maleate using authentic standards. Since DEHF is antiestrogenic but not antiandrogenic we conclude that additional, yet unidentified EDCs must contribute to the antagonistic effect of bottled water. Applying a novel approach to combine biological and chemical analysis this is the first study to identify so far unknown EDCs in bottled water. Notably

  11. Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N...

  12. Visualising androgen receptor activity in male and female mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Alwyn Dart

    Full Text Available Androgens, required for normal development and fertility of males and females, have vital roles in the reproductive tract, brain, cardiovascular system, smooth muscle and bone. Androgens function via the androgen receptor (AR, a ligand-dependent transcription factor. To assay and localise AR activity in vivo we generated the transgenic "ARE-Luc" mouse, expressing a luciferase reporter gene under the control of activated endogenous AR. In vivo imaging of androgen-mediated luciferase activity revealed several strongly expressing tissues in the male mouse as expected and also in certain female tissues. In males the testes, prostate, seminal vesicles and bone marrow all showed high AR activity. In females, strong activity was seen in the ovaries, uterus, omentum tissue and mammary glands. In both sexes AR expression and activity was also found in salivary glands, the eye (and associated glands, adipose tissue, spleen and, notably, regions of the brain. Luciferase protein expression was found in the same cell layers as androgen receptor expression. Additionally, mouse AR expression and activity correlated well with AR expression in human tissues. The anti-androgen bicalutamide reduced luciferase signal in all tissues. Our model demonstrates that androgens can act in these tissues directly via AR, rather than exclusively via androgen aromatisation to estrogens and activation of the estrogen receptor. Additionally, it visually demonstrates the fundamental importance of AR signalling outside the normal role in the reproductive organs. This model represents an important tool for physiological and developmental analysis of androgen signalling, and for characterization of known and novel androgenic or antiandrogenic compounds.

  13. Ligand-dependent inhibition of beta-catenin/TCF signaling by androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesire, Dennis R; Isaacs, William B

    2002-12-01

    Beta-catenin signaling may contribute to prostate cancer (CaP) progression. Although beta-catenin is known to upregulate T cell factor (TCF) target gene expression in CaP cells, recent evidence demonstrates its capacity to enhance ligand-dependent androgen receptor (AR) function. Thus, we wished to further understand the interaction between these two pathways. We find in both CaP cells (CWR22-Rv1, LAPC-4, DU145) and non-CaP cells (HEK-293, TSU, SW480, HCT-116) that beta-catenin/TCF-related transcription (CRT), as measured by activation of a synthetic promoter and that of cyclin D1, is inhibited by androgen treatment. This inhibition is AR-dependent, as it only occurs in cells expressing AR endogenously or transiently, and is abrogated by AR antagonists. Additional analyses convey that the ligand-dependent nature of CRT suppression depends on transactivation-competent AR in the nucleus, but not on indirect effects stemming from AR target gene expression. Given the recent work identifying an AR/beta-catenin interaction, and from our finding that liganded AR does not prompt gross changes in the constitutive nuclear localization of TCF4 or mutant beta-catenin, we hypothesized that transcription factor (i.e. AR and TCF) competition for beta-catenin recruitment may explain, in part, androgen-induced suppression of CRT. To address this idea, we expressed an AR mutant lacking its DNA-binding domain (DBD). This receptor could not orchestrate ligand-dependent CRT repression, thereby providing support for those recent data implicating the AR DBD/LBD as necessary for beta-catenin interaction. Further supporting this hypothesis, TCF/LEF over-expression counteracts androgen-induced suppression of CRT, and requires beta-catenin binding activity to do so. Interestingly, TCF4 over-expression potently antagonizes AR function; however, this inhibition may occur independently of beta-catenin/TCF4 interaction. These results from TCF4 over-expression analyses, taken together, provide

  14. Deoxyribonucleic acid-binding ability of androgen receptors in whole cells: implications for the actions of androgens and antiandrogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.W. Kuil (Cor); E. Mulder (Eppo)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn whole cells, the effects of several androgens and antiandrogens on the in the induction of DNA binding for the human wild-type androgen receptor (AR) and a mutant receptor ARL (LNCaP mutation; codon 868, Thr to Ala) were examined and related to the transc

  15. Functional analysis of a novel androgen receptor mutation, Q902K, in an individual with partial androgen insensitivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Umar (Arzu); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); N.M. Van (Mai); M. van Leeuwen (Marije); M.M.P.J. Verbiest (Michael); W.J. Kleijer (Wim); D. Dooijes (Dennis); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is caused by defects in the androgen receptor (AR) that render the AR partially or completely inactive. As a result, embryonic sex differentiation is impaired. Here, we describe a novel mutation in the AR found in a patient with par

  16. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha And Human Androgen Receptor: Comparisons in the COS Whole Cell Binding Assay Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray, Jr. and Vickie S. WilsonU.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle...

  17. Androgen deprivation causes truncation of the C-terminal region of androgen receptor in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Naoki; Inoue, Kaoru; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Inui, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) acts as a ligand-dependent transcription factor, whereas mutant AR lacking the C-terminal ligand-binding domain functions in a ligand-independent manner. In the present study we report that the C-terminal truncated AR, which we named AR-NH1 (the N-terminal fragment of AR cleaved in the neighborhood of helix 1 of the ligand-binding domain), is produced in LNCaP prostatic carcinoma cells. The AR-NH1 of ~90 kDa was observed in an androgen-independent LNCaP subline and was further accumulated by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. MG132 treatment caused the accumulation of AR-NH1 even in parent LNCaP cells. AR-NH1 was produced in the absence of ligand or in the presence of the AR antagonist bicalutamide, whereas AR agonists suppressed its production. AR-NH1 was detected with different AR antibodies recognizing amino acid residues 1-20 and 300-316 and was also generated from exogenous AR. Both siRNA-mediated AR knockdown and treatment with a serine protease inhibitor (4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride) reduced AR-NH1 levels. According to the predicted cleavage site (between amino acid residues 660-685) and its nuclear localization, it is assumed that AR-NH1 functions as a constitutively active transcription factor. These data suggest that AR-NH1 is produced under hormone therapy and contributes to the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer due to its ligand-independent transcriptional activity.

  18. L712V mutation in the androgen receptor gene causes complete androgen insensitivity syndrome due to severe loss of androgen function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajender, Singh; Gupta, Nalini J; Chakrabarty, Baidyanath; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2013-12-11

    Inability to respond to the circulating androgens is named as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene are the most common cause of AIS. A cause and effect relationship between some of these mutations and the AIS phenotype has been proven by in vitro studies. Several other mutations have been identified, but need to be functionally validated for pathogenicity. Screening of the AR mutations upon presumptive diagnosis of AIS is recommended. We analyzed a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) for mutations in the AR gene. Sequencing of the entire coding region revealed C>G mutation (CTT-GTT) at codon 712 (position according to the NCBI database) in exon 4 of the gene, resulting in replacement of leucine with valine in the ligand-binding domain of the AR protein. No incidence of this mutation was observed in 230 normal male individuals analyzed for comparison. In vitro androgen binding and transactivation assays using mutant clone showed approximately 71% loss of ligand binding and about 76% loss of transactivation function. We conclude that CAIS in this individual was due to L712V substitution in the androgen receptor protein.

  19. Androgens and estrogens in skeletal sexual dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Michaël; Antonio, Leen; Sinnesael, Mieke; Dubois, Vanessa; Gielen, Evelien; Classens, Frank; Vanderschueren, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Bone is an endocrine tissue expressing androgen and estrogen receptors as well as steroid metabolizing enzymes. The bioactivity of circulating sex steroids is modulated by sex hormone-binding globulin and local conversion in bone tissue, for example, from testosterone (T) to estradiol (E2) by aromatase, or to dihydrotestosterone by 5α-reductase enzymes. Our understanding of the structural basis for gender differences in bone strength has advanced considerably over recent years due to increasing use of (high resolution) peripheral computed tomography. These microarchitectural insights form the basis to understand sex steroid influences on male peak bone mass and turnover in cortical vs trabecular bone. Recent studies using Cre/LoxP technology have further refi ned our mechanistic insights from global knockout mice into the direct contributions of sex steroids and their respective nuclear receptors in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes, and other cells to male osteoporosis. At the same time, these studies have reinforced the notion that androgen and estrogen defi ciency have both direct and pleiotropic effects via interaction with, for example, insulin-like growth factor 1, inflammation, oxidative stress, central nervous system control of bone metabolism, adaptation to mechanical loading, etc., This review will summarize recent advances on these issues in the fi eld of sex steroid actions in male bone homeostasis.

  20. Androgens and estrogens in skeletal sexual dimorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Laurent

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bone is an endocrine tissue expressing androgen and estrogen receptors as well as steroid metabolizing enzymes. The bioactivity of circulating sex steroids is modulated by sex hormone-binding globulin and local conversion in bone tissue, for example, from testosterone (T to estradiol (E2 by aromatase, or to dihydrotestosterone by 5α-reductase enzymes. Our understanding of the structural basis for gender differences in bone strength has advanced considerably over recent years due to increasing use of (high resolution peripheral computed tomography. These microarchitectural insights form the basis to understand sex steroid influences on male peak bone mass and turnover in cortical vs trabecular bone. Recent studies using Cre/LoxP technology have further refi ned our mechanistic insights from global knockout mice into the direct contributions of sex steroids and their respective nuclear receptors in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes, and other cells to male osteoporosis. At the same time, these studies have reinforced the notion that androgen and estrogen defi ciency have both direct and pleiotropic effects via interaction with, for example, insulin-like growth factor 1, inflammation, oxidative stress, central nervous system control of bone metabolism, adaptation to mechanical loading, etc., This review will summarize recent advances on these issues in the fi eld of sex steroid actions in male bone homeostasis.

  1. Beyond androgen deprivation: ancillary integrative strategies for targeting the androgen receptor addiction of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F; Hejazi, Jalal; Rastmanesh, Reza

    2014-09-01

    The large majority of clinical prostate cancers remain dependent on androgen receptor (AR) activity for proliferation even as they lose their responsiveness to androgen deprivation or antagonism. AR activity can be maintained in these circumstances by increased AR synthesis--often reflecting increased NF-κB activation; upregulation of signaling pathways that promote AR activity in the absence of androgens; and by emergence of AR mutations or splice variants lacking the ligand-binding domain, which render the AR constitutively active. Drugs targeting the N-terminal transactivating domain of the AR, some of which are now in preclinical development, can be expected to inhibit the activity not only of unmutated ARs but also of the mutant forms and splice variants selected for by androgen deprivation. Concurrent measures that suppress AR synthesis or boost AR turnover could be expected to complement the efficacy of such drugs. A number of nutraceuticals that show efficacy in prostate cancer xenograft models--including polyphenols from pomegranate, grape seed, and green tea, the crucifera metabolite diindolylmethane, and the hormone melatonin--have the potential to suppress AR synthesis via downregulation of NF-κB activity; clinical doses of salicylate may have analogous efficacy. The proteasomal turnover of the AR is abetted by diets with a high ratio of long-chain omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids, which are beneficial in prostate cancer xenograft models; berberine and sulforaphane, by inhibiting AR's interaction with its chaperone Hsp90, likewise promote AR proteasomal degradation and retard growth of human prostate cancer in nude mice. Hinge region acetylation of the AR is required for optimal transactivational activity, and low micromolar concentrations of the catechin epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) can inhibit such acetylation--possibly explaining the ability of EGCG administration to suppress androgenic activity and cell proliferation in prostate cancer

  2. Complex modulation of androgen responsive gene expression by methoxyacetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Kerri A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal androgen signaling is critical for testicular development and spermatogenesis. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA, the primary active metabolite of the industrial chemical ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, disrupts spermatogenesis and causes testicular atrophy. Transcriptional trans-activation studies have indicated that MAA can enhance androgen receptor activity, however, whether MAA actually impacts the expression of androgen-responsive genes in vivo, and which genes might be affected is not known. Methods A mouse TM3 Leydig cell line that stably expresses androgen receptor (TM3-AR was prepared and analyzed by transcriptional profiling to identify target gene interactions between MAA and testosterone on a global scale. Results MAA is shown to have widespread effects on androgen-responsive genes, affecting processes ranging from apoptosis to ion transport, cell adhesion, phosphorylation and transcription, with MAA able to enhance, as well as antagonize, androgenic responses. Moreover, testosterone is shown to exert both positive and negative effects on MAA gene responses. Motif analysis indicated that binding sites for FOX, HOX, LEF/TCF, STAT5 and MEF2 family transcription factors are among the most highly enriched in genes regulated by testosterone and MAA. Notably, 65 FOXO targets were repressed by testosterone or showed repression enhanced by MAA with testosterone; these include 16 genes associated with developmental processes, six of which are Hox genes. Conclusions These findings highlight the complex interactions between testosterone and MAA, and provide insight into the effects of MAA exposure on androgen-dependent processes in a Leydig cell model.

  3. Selective androgen receptor modulators for frailty and osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Edward J; Moore, William J; Freedman, Leonard P; Nagpal, Sunil

    2007-10-01

    Androgens play an important role not only in male sexual differentiation, puberty, sexual behavior and spermatogenesis, but also in the maintenance of bone architecture and muscle mass and strength. For decades, steroidal androgens have been used by hypogonadal and aging men as hormone replacement therapy, and abused by prominent athletes as anabolic agents for enhancing physical performance. The use of steroidal androgens is associated with hepatotoxicity, potential for prostate stimulation, virilizing actions and other side effects resulting from their cross-reactivity to related steroid receptors. Therefore, to utilize the therapeutic potential of the androgen receptor for the treatment of indications such as osteoporosis and frailty, several pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies are developing non-steroidal tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that retain the beneficial properties of natural androgens and exhibit better therapeutic indices. This article reviews the mechanism of androgen action, novel non-steroidal ligands under development and future directions of SARM research for the discovery of novel modulators for frailty and osteoporosis.

  4. Aberrant splicing of androgenic receptor mRNA results in synthesis of a nonfunctional receptor protein in a patient with androgen insensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Kuiper, G.G.J.M.; Faber, P.W.; van Rooij, H.C.J.; Degenhart, H.J.; Trapman, J.; Brinkmann, A.O. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Schweikert, H.U. (Univ. of Bonn (Germany)); Zegers, N.D. (Medical Biological Laboratory-Organization for Applied Scientific Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Hodgins, M.B. (Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1990-10-01

    Androgen insensitivity is a disorder in which the correct androgen response in an androgen target cell is impaired. The clinical symtpoms of this X chromosome-linked syndrome are presumed to be caused by mutations in the androgen receptor gene. The authors report a G {r arrow} T mutation in the splice donor site of intron 4 of the androgen receptor gene of a 46, XY subject lacking detectable androgen binding to the receptor and with the complete form of androgen insensitivity. This point mutation completely abolishes normal RNA splicing at the exon 4/intron 4 boundary and results in the activation of a cryptic splice donor site in exon 4, which leads to the deletion of 123 nucleotides from the mRNA. Translation of the mutant mRNA results in an androgen receptor protein {approx}5 kDa smaller than the wild type. This mutated androgen receptor protein was unable to bind androgens and unable to activate transcription of an androgen-regulated reporter gene construct. This mutation in the human androgen receptor gene demonstrates the importance of an intact steroid-binding domain for proper androgen receptor functioning in vivo.

  5. Androgens regulate gene expression in avian skeletal muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Fuxjager

    Full Text Available Circulating androgens in adult reproductively active male vertebrates influence a diversity of organ systems and thus are considered costly. Recently, we obtained evidence that androgen receptors (AR are expressed in several skeletal muscles of three passeriform birds, the golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus, zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata, and ochre-bellied flycatcher (Mionectes oleagieus. Because skeletal muscles that control wing movement make up the bulk of a bird's body mass, evidence for widespread effects of androgen action on these muscles would greatly expand the functional impact of androgens beyond their well-characterized effects on relatively discrete targets throughout the avian body. To investigate this issue, we use quantitative PCR (qPCR to determine if androgens alter gene mRNA expression patterns in wing musculature of wild golden-collared manakins and captive zebra finches. In manakins, the androgen testosterone (T up-regulated expression of parvalbumin (PV and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I, two genes whose products enhance cellular Ca(2+ cycling and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle fibers. In T-treated zebra finches, the anti-androgen flutamide blunted PV and IGF-I expression. These results suggest that certain transcriptional effects of androgen action via AR are conserved in passerine skeletal muscle tissue. When we examined wing muscles of manakins, zebra finches and ochre-bellied flycatchers, we found that expression of PV and IGF-I varied across species and in a manner consistent with a function for AR-dependent gene regulation. Together, these findings imply that androgens have the potential to act on avian muscle in a way that may enhance the physicality required for successful reproduction.

  6. Regulation of androgen action during establishment of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Douglas A; Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Saunders, Philippa T K

    2016-07-01

    During the establishment of pregnancy, the ovarian-derived hormones progesterone and oestradiol regulate remodelling of the endometrium to promote an environment that is able to support and maintain a successful pregnancy. Decidualisation is characterised by differentiation of endometrial stromal cells that secrete growth factors and cytokines that regulate vascular remodelling and immune cell influx. This differentiation process is critical for reproduction, and inadequate decidualisation is implicated in the aetiology of pregnancy disorders such as foetal growth restriction and preeclampsia. In contrast to progesterone and oestradiol, the role of androgens in regulating endometrial function is poorly understood. Androgen receptors are expressed in the endometrium, and androgens are reported to regulate both the transcriptome and the secretome of endometrial stromal cells. In androgen-target tissues, circulating precursors are activated to mediate local effects, and recent studies report that steroid concentrations detected in endometrial tissue are distinct to those detected in the peripheral circulation. New evidence suggests that decidualisation results in dynamic changes in the expression of androgen biosynthetic enzymes, highlighting a role for pre-receptor regulation of androgen action during the establishment of pregnancy. These results suggest that such enzymes could be future therapeutic targets for the treatment of infertility associated with endometrial dysfunction. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that androgens play a beneficial role in regulating the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Future studies should be focussed on investigating the safety and efficacy of androgen supplementation with the potential for utilisation of novel therapeutics, such as selective androgen receptor modulators, to improve reproductive outcomes in women.

  7. Muscarinic Receptor Agonists and Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Kelly

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive review of pharmacological and medical aspects of the muscarinic class of acetylcholine agonists and antagonists is presented. The therapeutic benefits of achieving receptor subtype selectivity are outlined and applications in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease are discussed. A selection of chemical routes are described, which illustrate contemporary methodology for the synthesis of chiral medicinal compounds (asymmetric synthesis, chiral pool, enzymes. Routes to bicyclic intrannular amines and intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions are highlighted.

  8. Androgens and breast cancer in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2011-09-01

    Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies support the notion that androgens inhibit mammary proliferation and, thus, may protect from breast cancer. On the other hand, administration of conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens and may, thus, enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk, but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation.

  9. A simplified method for extracting androgens from avian egg yolks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, C.P.; Bauman, J.E.; Hahn, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    Female birds deposit significant amounts of steroid hormones into the yolks of their eggs. Studies have demonstrated that these hormones, particularly androgens, affect nestling growth and development. In order to measure androgen concentrations in avian egg yolks, most authors follow the extraction methods outlined by Schwabl (1993. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 90:11446-11450). We describe a simplified method for extracting androgens from avian egg yolks. Our method, which has been validated through recovery and linearity experiments, consists of a single ethanol precipitation that produces substantially higher recoveries than those reported by Schwabl.

  10. [Anabolic androgenic steroids in amateur sports in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerdeman, Jorn; de Hon, Olivier; Levi, Marcel; de Ronde, W Pim

    2010-01-01

    In the Netherlands an estimated 20,000 people use anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS). The use of AAS is particularly common in regular visitors to gyms and fitness centres. AAS are usually synthetic derivatives of testosterone with both an anabolic and an androgenic effect. AAS have many side effects like liver damage (oral use) or infections (intramuscular use), which can be explained partly by the androgenic effect and partly by the manner of use. Many of these side effects are only reported in case studies and have not been systematically investigated.

  11. [Bone and Men's Health. Bone selective androgen receptor modulators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Kazuyuki

    2010-02-01

    Androgen, one of the sex steroid hormones shows various biological activities on the corresponding various tissues. Many efforts to produce novel drug materials maintaining a desired biological activity with an adequate tissue selectivity, which is so-called selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) , are being performed. As one of such efforts, studies on SARMs against bone tissues which possess a significant potential to stimulate a bone formation with reducing undesirable androgenic virilizing activities are in progress all over the world. This review focuses on the research and development activities of such SARMs and discuses their usefulness for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  12. S578N mutation of the androgen receptor in an adolescent with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yuan; WANG De-fen; LI Xiao-ying; YANG Jun; WANG Wei

    2010-01-01

    @@ Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) was first described by the American gynecologist Morris in 1953 and was initially described in 82 patients.1 The syndrome was designated "testicular feminization syndrome" , because the testes produce hormones with estrogen-like actions.1 Clinical AIS manifestations include the appearance of normal female external genitalia without internal female genital organs. Other clinical manifestations include undescended testes, normal female breast development, and scant axillary and pubic hair. AIS is the most common condition that cancause male undermasculinisation.

  13. A satellite cell-specific knockout of the androgen receptor reveals myostatin as a direct androgen target in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Sinnesael, Mieke; Cielen, Nele; Helsen, Christine; Clinckemalie, Liesbeth; Spans, Lien; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Deldicque, Louise; Hespel, Peter; Carmeliet, Geert; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Androgens have well-established anabolic actions on skeletal muscle, although the direct effects of the androgen receptor (AR) in muscle remain unclear. We generated satellite cell-specific AR-knockout (satARKO) mice in which the AR is selectively ablated in satellite cells, the muscle precursor cells. Total-limb maximal grip strength is decreased by 7% in satARKO mice, with soleus muscles containing ∼10% more type I fibers and 10% less type IIa fibers than the corresponding control littermates. The weight of the perineal levator ani muscle is markedly reduced (-52%). Thus, muscle AR is involved in fiber-type distribution and force production of the limb muscles, while it is a major determinant of the perineal muscle mass. Surprisingly, myostatin (Mstn), a strong inhibitor of skeletal muscle growth, is one of the most androgen-responsive genes (6-fold reduction in satARKO) through direct transcription activation by the AR. Consequently, muscle hypertrophy in response to androgens is augmented in Mstn-knockout mice. Our finding that androgens induce Mstn signaling to restrain their own anabolic actions has implications for the treatment of muscle wasting disorders.-Dubois, V., Laurent, M. R., Sinnesael, M., Cielen, N., Helsen, C., Clinckemalie, L., Spans, L., Gayan-Ramirez, G., Deldicque, L., Hespel, P., Carmeliet, G., Vanderschueren, D., and Claessens, F. A satellite cell-specific knockout of the androgen receptor reveals myostatin as a direct androgen target in skeletal muscle.

  14. Identification and characterization of the minimal androgen-regulated kidney-specific kidney androgen-regulated protein gene promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The kidney androgen-regulated protein (Kap) gene is tissue specific and regulated by androgen in mouse kidney proximal tubule cells (PTCs). In the present study, we aimed to identify the minimal PTC-specific androgen-regulated Kap promoter and analyze its androgen response elements (AREs).Adeletion series of the Kap1542 promoter/luciferase constructs were assayed in opossum kidney (OK) PTCs in the presence or absence of 15 nM dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Kap 1542 and Kap637 had low activity and no androgen induction; Kap224 had a basal activity that was 4- to 5-fold higher than that of Kap 1542, but was only sfightly induced by DHT. Kap 147 had a basal activity that was 2- to 3-fold higher than that of Kap 1542 and was induced by DHT 4- to 6-fold. Kap77 abol-ished basal promoter activity but was still induced by DHT. Results showed that, in vitro, Kap147 was a minimal androgen-regulated promoter. Transient transfection in different cells demonstrated that Kap147 specifically initi-ated reporter gene expression in PTCs. Sequence analysis revealed two potential AREs located at positions -124 and -39 of Kap147. Mutational assays showed that only the ARE at -124 was involved in androgen response in OK cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay also verified -124 ARE bound specifically to androgen receptor. In conclusion, we defined the minimal Kap 147 promoter that may be a good model for the study of kidney PTC-specific expression and molecular mechanisms that lead to an androgen-specific responsiveness in vivo.

  15. Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1) is regulated by androgens and enhances androgen-dependent prostate development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Kimberly P; Mehta, Vatsal; Branam, Amanda M; Abler, Lisa L; Buresh-Stiemke, Rita A; Joshi, Pinak S; Schmitz, Christopher T; Marker, Paul C; Vezina, Chad M

    2012-12-01

    Fetal prostate development from urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium requires androgen receptor (AR) activation in UGS mesenchyme (UGM). Despite growing awareness of sexually dimorphic gene expression in the UGS, we are still limited in our knowledge of androgen-responsive genes in UGM that initiate prostate ductal development. We found that WNT inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1) mRNA is more abundant in male vs. female mouse UGM in which its expression temporally and spatially overlaps androgen-responsive steroid 5α-reductase 2 (Srd5a2). Wif1 mRNA is also present in prostatic buds during their elongation and branching morphogenesis. Androgens are necessary and sufficient for Wif1 expression in mouse UGS explant mesenchyme, and testicular androgens remain necessary for normal Wif1 expression in adult mouse prostate stroma. WIF1 contributes functionally to prostatic bud formation. In the presence of androgens, exogenous WIF1 protein increases prostatic bud number and UGS basal epithelial cell proliferation without noticeably altering the pattern of WNT/β-catenin-responsive Axin2 or lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1 (Lef1) mRNA. Wif1 mutant male UGSs exhibit increased (Sfrp)2 and (Sfrp)3 expression and form the same number of prostatic buds as the wild-type control males. Collectively our results reveal Wif1 as one of the few known androgen-responsive genes in the fetal mouse UGM and support the hypothesis that androgen-dependent Wif1 expression is linked to the mechanism of androgen-induced prostatic bud formation.

  16. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact.

  17. Activation of two mutant androgen receptors from human prostatic carcinoma by adrenal androgens and metabolic derivatives of testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culig, Z; Stober, J; Gast, A; Peterziel, H; Hobisch, A; Radmayr, C; Hittmair, A; Bartsch, G; Cato, A C; Klocker, H

    1996-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a central regulatory role in prostatic carcinoma and is a target of androgen ablation therapy. Recent detection of mutant receptors in tumor specimens suggest a contribution of AR alterations to progression towards androgen independence. In a specimen derived from metastatic prostate cancer we have reported a point mutation in the AR gene that leads to a single amino acid exchange in the ligand binding domain of the receptor. Another amino acid exchange resulting from a point mutation was also identified 15 amino acids away from our mutation. This mutation was detected in the AR gene isolated from an organ-confined prostatic tumor. Here we report the functional characterization of the two mutant receptors in the presence of adrenal androgens and testosterone metabolites. These studies were performed by cotransfecting androgen-responsive reporter genes and either the wild-type or mutant AR expression vectors into receptor negative DU-145 and CV-1 cells. The indicator genes used consisted of the promoter of the androgen-inducible prostate-specific antigen gene or the C' Delta9 enhancer fragment from the promoter of the mouse sex-limited protein driving the expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene. Cotransfection-transactivation assays revealed that the adrenal androgen androstenedione and two products of testosterone metabolism, androsterone and androstandiol, induced reporter gene activity more efficiently in the presence of the mutant receptors than in the presence of the wild-type receptor. No difference between wild-type and mutant receptors was observed in the presence of the metabolite androstandione. The interaction of receptor-hormone complexes with target DNA was studied in vitro by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Dihydrotestosterone and the synthetic androgen mibolerone induced a faster migrating complex with all receptors, whereas the androgen metabolite androstandione induced this

  18. Anabolic androgenic steroid-induced hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Peter; Llewellyn, William; Van Mol, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) have been abused for decades by both professional and amateur athletes in order to improve physical performance or muscle mass. AAS abuse can cause adverse effects, among which are hepatotoxic effects. These effects include cholestatic icterus and possibly peliosis hepatis and hepatocellular carcinoma or adenoma. In particular, 17α-alkylated AAS appear to be hepatotoxic, whereas nonalkylated AAS appear not to be. The 17α-alkyl substitution retards hepatic metabolism of the AAS rendering it orally bioavailable. The mechanism responsible for the hepatotoxicity induced by 17α-alkylated AAS remains poorly understood. However, oxidative stress has been repeatedly shown to be associated with it. In this manuscript we present a hypothesis which describes a potential mechanism responsible for AAS-induced hepatotoxicity, based on several observations from the literature which suggest oxidative stress being a causal factor.

  19. Androgen deprivation therapy-associated vasomotor symptoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jason M Jones; Manish Kohli; Charles L Loprinzi

    2012-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is widely used as standard therapy in the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer.While efficacious,ADT is associated with multiple side effects,including decreased libido,erectile dysfunction,diabetes,loss of muscle tone and altered body composition,osteoporosis,lipid changes,memory loss,gynecomastia and hot flashes.The breadth of literature for the treatment of hot flashes is much smaller in men than that in women.While hormonal therapy of hot flashes has been shown to be effective,multiple non-hormonal medications and treatment methods have also been developed.This article reviews current options for the treatment of hot flashes in patients taking ADT.

  20. Androgenic alopecia in women: an Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Srivastava, Govind; Aggarwal, Ashok K; Midha, Reshmi

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to investigate androgenic alopecia (AA) utilizing clinical and investigative procedures to establish the pattern of AA in the Indian subcontinent. A total of 35 consecutive women presenting with AA were included. After obtaining informed consent, a detailed history/examination, hair pull test, trichogram, and a scalp biopsy were performed in patients. AA classification was attempted across Ludwig and Norwood guidelines. Of 35 women, 16 had grade I, 10 had grade II, and 1 had grade III Ludwig classification. In addition, 6 other women had Christmas tree baldness: 1 each of fronto-parietal and male pattern baldness. Several investigations including hormonal profile were inconclusive; however, hair pull test and trichogram may be helpful in understanding the sequence in AA in women. AA has infrequently been reported, particularly India and in Asia in general.

  1. A PRACTICAL APPROACH TO THE DETECTION OF ANDROGEN RECEPTOR GENE-MUTATIONS AND PEDIGREE ANALYSIS IN FAMILIES WITH X-LINKED ANDROGEN INSENSITIVITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RISSTALPERS, C; HOOGENBOEZEM, T; SLEDDENS, HFBM; VERLEUNMOOIJMAN, MCT; DEGENHART, HJ; DROP, SLS; HALLEY, DJJ; Oosterwijk, Jan; HODGINS, MB; TRAPMAN, J; BRINKMANN, AO

    1994-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked disorder in which defects in the androgen receptor gene have prevented the normal development of both internal and external male structures in 46,XY individuals. This survey reports the analysis of 11 AIS subjects. The androgen receptor gene of th

  2. Male osteoporosis and androgenic therapy: from testosterone to SARMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilotti, Antonio; Falchetti, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    As in the women, male osteoporosis represents an important social problem, amplified by the increasing life expectance.Differently from women, 50% of male osteoporosis is secondary to treatments and/or diseases that make mandatory their search through an accurate clinical investigations in every newly diagnosed osteoporotic men. Male osteoporosis is frequently underdiagnosed and consequently undertreated, and too often it is revealed only after the occurrence of a fragility fracture. Androgens may prevent the loss of cancellous bone and stimulate periosteal cortical bone apposition. The anabolic effect of testosterone on both bone and muscle, is limited by the high incidence of androgenic side effects. Hypogonadism is the only situation where the benefits of the use of testosterone formulations exceed the side effects. Selective androgen receptor modulators can dissociate androgenic and anabolic effect on different tissues with various strategies. Many compounds have been studied with positive results in vivo and in clinical trials.

  3. Multiple arterial thromboses associated with anabolic androgenic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Neil Arthur; Abbas, Jonathan Raihan; Simms, Malcolm Harold

    2014-03-01

    The use of supraphysiological doses of anabolic androgenic steroids can have serious side effects. This article reports the case of a young man who suffered potentially life-threatening arterial thromboses following the use of these drugs.

  4. Identification and characterisation of an androgen receptor from zebrafish Danio rerio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Andersen, Ole; Bjerregaard, Poul

    2007-01-01

    Androgens play key roles in vertebrate sex differentiation, gonadal differentiation and sexual behaviour. The action of androgens is primarily mediated through androgen receptors (ARs). The present study describes the isolation, sequencing and initial characterisation of an androgen receptor from...... to determine Kd for the zfARd12. The characterisation of this zfAR provides a new perspective for understanding the mechanisms underlying androgen actions in a model vertebrate species commonly used for studies investigating potential endocrine disrupters.......Androgens play key roles in vertebrate sex differentiation, gonadal differentiation and sexual behaviour. The action of androgens is primarily mediated through androgen receptors (ARs). The present study describes the isolation, sequencing and initial characterisation of an androgen receptor from...

  5. Androgen receptor and histone lysine demethylases in ovine placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellane R Cleys

    Full Text Available Sex steroid hormones regulate developmental programming in many tissues, including programming gene expression during prenatal development. While estradiol is known to regulate placentation, little is known about the role of testosterone and androgen signaling in placental development despite the fact that testosterone rises in maternal circulation during pregnancy and in placenta-induced pregnancy disorders. We investigated the role of testosterone in placental gene expression, and focused on androgen receptor (AR. Prenatal androgenization decreased global DNA methylation in gestational day 90 placentomes, and increased placental expression of AR as well as genes involved in epigenetic regulation, angiogenesis, and growth. As AR complexes with histone lysine demethylases (KDMs to regulate AR target genes in human cancers, we also investigated if the same mechanism is present in the ovine placenta. AR co-immunoprecipitated with KDM1A and KDM4D in sheep placentomes, and AR-KDM1A complexes were recruited to a half-site for androgen response element (ARE in the promoter region of VEGFA. Androgenized ewes also had increased cotyledonary VEGFA. Finally, in human first trimester placental samples KDM1A and KDM4D immunolocalized to the syncytiotrophoblast, with nuclear KDM1A and KDM4D immunostaining also present in the villous stroma. In conclusion, placental androgen signaling, possibly through AR-KDM complex recruitment to AREs, regulates placental VEGFA expression. AR and KDMs are also present in first trimester human placenta. Androgens appear to be an important regulator of trophoblast differentiation and placental development, and aberrant androgen signaling may contribute to the development of placental disorders.

  6. Impact of early postnatal androgen exposure on voice development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Grisa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of early postnatal androgen exposure on female laryngeal tissue may depend on certain characteristics of this exposure. We assessed the impact of the dose, duration, and timing of early androgen exposure on the vocal development of female subjects who had been treated for adrenocortical tumor (ACT in childhood. METHODS: The long-term effects of androgen exposure on the fundamental vocal frequency (F0, vocal pitch, and final height and the presence of virilizing signs were examined in 9 adult (age, 18.4 to 33.5 years and 10 adolescent (13.6 to 17.8 years female ACT patients. We also compared the current values with values obtained 0.9 years to 7.4 years after these subjects had undergone ACT surgery, a period during which they had shown normal androgen levels. RESULTS: Of the 19 subjects, 17 (89% had been diagnosed with ACT before 4 years of age, 1 (5% at 8.16 years, and 1 (5% at 10.75 years. Androgen exposure (2 to 30 months was sufficiently strong to cause pubic hair growth in all subjects and clitoromegaly in 74% (14/19 of the subjects, but did not reduce their height from the target value. Although androgen exposure induced a remarkable reduction in F0 (132 Hz and moderate pitch virilization in 1 subject and partial F0 virilization, resulting in F0 of 165 and 169 Hz, in 2 subjects, the majority had normal F0 ranging from 189 to 245 Hz. CONCLUSIONS: Female laryngeal tissue is less sensitive to androgen exposure between birth and adrenarche than during other periods. Differential larynx sensitivity to androgen exposure in childhood and F0 irreversibility in adulthood are age-, concentration-, duration-, and timing-dependent events that may also be affected by exposure to inhibitory or stimulatory hormones. Further studies are required to better characterize each of these factors.

  7. Alternative splicing of the androgen receptor in polycystic ovary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fangfang; Pan, Jiexue; Liu, Ye; Meng, Qing; Lv, Pingping; Qu, Fan; Ding, Guo-Lian; Klausen, Christian; Leung, Peter C. K.; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Yao, Weimiao; Zhou, Cai-Yun; Shi, Biwei; ZHANG, JUNYU; Sheng, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Excess androgens and abnormal follicle development, largely due to ovarian granulosa cell (GC) dysfunction, characterize polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common endocrinopathy of women predisposing to infertility. Thus, it is important to understand GC dysfunction. The androgen receptor (AR) is widely believed to be an essential regulator of GC biology. High expression of AR in GCs is primarily considered to associate with PCOS. However, we show that AR alternative splice variants in GCs d...

  8. Major enzymes controlling the androgenic pressure in the developing lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Yves; Provost, Pierre R

    2013-09-01

    A sex difference is observed in the incidence and morbidity of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) of the neonate and in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The involvement of androgens is well evidenced in RDS and it is suspected in BPD. Interestingly, the developing lung is not an inert tissue just exposed to circulating androgens, but is rather an active androgen metabolizing tissue, expressing enzymes involved in both androgen synthesis and inactivation. The present review focuses on the major enzymes involved in androgen metabolism within the developing lung. Testosterone synthesis and inactivation by AKR1C3/Akr1c6 (human/mouse 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) type 5) and HSD17B2 (17β-HSD type 2), respectively, play an important role in the developing lung. Akr1c14 (3α-HSD) shows a strong increase in expression according to developmental time. The canalicular stage of lung development corresponding to the surge of surfactant lipid synthesis, which is linked to RDS, as well as saccularization/alveolarization, which are linked to BPD, are covered by this review for the mouse and human species. The androgen metabolizing enzymes expressed within the developing lung can become potential pharmaceutical targets in the objective of accelerating lung maturation by specific treatments. The classic deleterious effects of androgens on lung maturation and the surge of surfactant synthesis in males are well known. Conversely, androgens also have positive impacts on the development of both male and female lungs. Steroidogenic enzymes are key regulators of these positive effects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'CSR 2013'.

  9. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR)-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (ARΔZF2 ) versus w...

  10. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Iaquinto, G; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World today. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World today. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  11. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M H Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2-3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein.

  12. Female adipocyte androgen synthesis and the effects of insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cadagan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders characterized by insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia, and its presence can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease significantly. The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased circulating androgen levels in women, which may originate from the ovaries and adrenal glands. Adipocytes are also able to synthesise steroid hormones, and this output has been hypothesised to increase with elevated insulin plasma concentrations. However, the contribution of the adipocytes to the circulating androgen levels in women with metabolic syndrome is limited and the effects of insulin are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of steroid precursors and synthetic enzymes in human adipocyte biopsies as markers of possible adipocyte androgen synthesis. We examined pre and mature adipocytes taken from tissue biopsies of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue of participating women from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, of the Royal Derby Hospital. The results showed the potential for localised adipocyte androgen synthesis through the presence of the androgen precursor progesterone, as well as the steroid-converting enzyme 17α-hydroxylase. Furthermore, we found the controlled secretion of androstenedione in vitro and that insulin treatment caused levels to increase. Continued examination of a localised source of androgen production is therefore of clinical relevance due to its influence on adipocyte metabolism, its negative impact on female steroidogenic homeostasis, and the possible aggravation this may have when associated to obesity and obesity related metabolic abnormalities such as hyperinsulinaemia.

  13. Enhanced evaluation of selective androgen receptor modulators in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto-Duessel, M; He, M; Adamson, T W; Jones, J O

    2013-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a class of drugs that control the activity of the androgen receptor (AR), which mediates the response to androgens, in a tissue-selective fashion. They are specifically designed to reduce the possible complications that result from the systemic inhibition or activation of AR in patients with diseases that involve androgen signalling. However, there are no ideal in vivo models for evaluating candidate SARMs. Therefore, we created a panel of androgen-responsive genes in clinically relevant AR expressing tissues including prostate, skin, bone, fat, muscle, brain and kidney. We used select genes from this panel to compare transcriptional changes in response to the full agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and the SARM bolandiol at 16 h and 6 weeks. We identified several genes in each tissue whose expression at each of these time points correlates with the known tissue-specific effects of these compounds. For example, in the prostate we found four genes whose expression was much lower in animals treated with bolandiol compared with animals treated with DHT for 6 weeks, which correlated well with differences in prostate weight. We demonstrate that adding molecular measurements (androgen-regulated gene expression) to the traditional physiological measurements (tissue weights, etc.) makes the evaluation of potential SARMs more accurate, thorough and perhaps more rapid by allowing measurement of selectivity after only 16 h of drug treatment.

  14. Androgen deprivation of the PC-310 [correction of prohormone convertase-310] human prostate cancer model system induces neuroendocrine differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Jongsma (Johan); M.H. Oomen; M.A. Noordzij (Marinus); W.M. van Weerden (Wytske); G.J. Martens; Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); F.H. Schröder (Fritz); G.J. van Steenbrugge (Gert Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractNeuroendocrine (NE) cells are androgen-independent cells and secrete growth-modulating neuropeptides via a regulated secretory pathway (RSP). We studied NE differentiation after androgen withdrawal in the androgen-dependent prostate cancer xenograft PC-310.

  15. Discovery of ODM-201, a new-generation androgen receptor inhibitor targeting resistance mechanisms to androgen signaling-directed prostate cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Anu-Maarit; Riikonen, Reetta; Oksala, Riikka; Ravanti, Laura; Aho, Eija; Wohlfahrt, Gerd; Nykänen, Pirjo S; Törmäkangas, Olli P; Palvimo, Jorma J; Kallio, Pekka J

    2015-07-03

    Activation of androgen receptor (AR) is crucial for prostate cancer growth. Remarkably, also castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is dependent on functional AR, and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the addiction. Known causes of CRPC include gene amplification and overexpression as well as point mutations of AR. We report here the pharmacological profile of ODM-201, a novel AR inhibitor that showed significant antitumor activity and a favorable safety profile in phase 1/2 studies in men with CRPC. ODM-201 is a full and high-affinity AR antagonist that, similar to second-generation antiandrogens enzalutamide and ARN-509, inhibits testosterone-induced nuclear translocation of AR. Importantly, ODM-201 also blocks the activity of the tested mutant ARs arising in response to antiandrogen therapies, including the F876L mutation that confers resistance to enzalutamide and ARN-509. In addition, ODM-201 reduces the growth of AR-overexpressing VCaP prostate cancer cells both in vitro and in a castration-resistant VCaP xenograft model. In contrast to other antiandrogens, ODM-201 shows negligible brain penetrance and does not increase serum testosterone levels in mice. In conclusion, ODM-201 is a potent AR inhibitor that overcomes resistance to AR-targeted therapies by antagonizing both overexpressed and mutated ARs. ODM-201 is currently in a phase 3 trial in CRPC.

  16. Piperine, a Bioactive Component of Pepper Spice Exerts Therapeutic Effects on Androgen Dependent and Androgen Independent Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common solid malignancy in men, with 32,000 deaths annually. Piperine, a major alkaloid constituent of black pepper, has previously been reported to have anti-cancer activity in variety of cancer cell lines. The effect of piperine against prostate cancer is not currently known. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the anti-tumor mechanisms of piperine on androgen dependent and androgen independent prostate cancer cells. Here, we show that piperine inhibited th...

  17. Dual-color bioluminescent bioreporter for forensic analysis: evidence of androgenic and anti-androgenic activity of illicit drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevenini, Luca; Michelini, Elisa; D'Elia, Marcello; Guardigli, Massimo; Roda, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Bioassays represent promising complementary techniques to conventional analytical approaches used in doping analysis to detect illicit drugs like anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS). The fact that all AAS share a common mechanism of action via the human androgen receptor (hAR) enables the use of bioassays, relying on the activation of hAR as antidoping screening tools. Previously, we developed a dual-color bioreporter based on yeast cells engineered to express hAR and androgen response elements driving the expression of the bioluminescent (BL) reporter protein Photinus pyralis luciferase. A second reporter protein, the red-emitting luciferase PpyRE8, was introduced in the bioreporter as internal viability control. Here, we report the first forensic application of a straightforward, accurate, and cost-effective bioassay, relying on spectral resolution of the two BL signals, in 96-microwell format. The bioreporter responds to dihydrotestosterone as reference androgen in a concentration-dependent manner from 0.08 to 1,000 nM with intra- and inter-assay variation coefficients of 11.4 % and 13.1 %, respectively. We also demonstrated the suitability of this dual-color bioreporter to assess (anti)-androgenic activity of pure AAS, mixtures of AAS, and other illicit drugs provided by the Scientific Police. Significant anti-androgenic activity was observed in samples labeled as marijuana and hashish, containing Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol as major constituent.

  18. New antagonist agents of neuropeptide y receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Aldana

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In the CNS, NPY has been implicated in obesity and feeding, endocrine function and metabolism. Potent and selective rNPY antagonists will be able to probe the merits of this approach for the treatment of obesity. We report the synthesis and preliminary evaluation of some hydrazide derivatives as antagonists of rNPY.

  19. Androgen-Sensitized Apoptosis of HPr-1AR Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congcong Chen

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR signaling is crucial to the development and homeostasis of the prostate gland, and its dysregulation mediates common prostate pathologies. The mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells have been investigated in human and rodent adult prostate. However, the cellular stress response of human prostate epithelial cells is not well understood, though it is central to prostate health and pathology. Here, we report that androgen sensitizes HPr-1AR and RWPE-AR human prostate epithelial cells to cell stress agents and apoptotic cell death. Although 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT treatment alone did not induce cell death, co-treatment of HPr-1AR cells with DHT and an apoptosis inducer, such as staurosporine (STS, TNFt, or hydrogen peroxide, synergistically increased cell death in comparison to treatment with each apoptosis inducer by itself. We found that the synergy between DHT and apoptosis inducer led to activation of the intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is supported by robust cleavage activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Further, the dramatic depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential that we observed upon co-treatment with DHT and STS is consistent with increased mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP in the pro-apoptotic mechanism. Interestingly, the synergy between DHT and apoptosis inducer was abolished by AR antagonists and inhibitors of transcription and protein synthesis, suggesting that AR mediates pro-apoptotic synergy through transcriptional regulation of MOMP genes. Expression analysis revealed that pro-apoptotic genes (BCL2L11/BIM and AIFM2 were DHT-induced, whereas pro-survival genes (BCL2L1/BCL-XL and MCL1 were DHT-repressed. Hence, we propose that the net effect of these AR-mediated expression changes shifts the balance of BCL2-family proteins

  20. Chemical Suppression of the Reactivated Androgen Signaling Pathway in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    of cyclopamine on androgen signaling in LNCaP cells. (A) Real time qPCR was used to measure relative expression of KLK3, KLK2, PGC or SHH mRNA in...response to Shh signaling . Science 1998, 280:1603-1607. 20. Chen JK, Taipale J, Cooper MK, Beachy PA: Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling by direct...body, although all can simi- larly engage with receptor to initiate the signaling process. Shh is synthesized as a propolypeptide that is processed

  1. Androgen receptor function links human sexual dimorphism to DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Ammerpohl

    Full Text Available Sex differences are well known to be determinants of development, health and disease. Epigenetic mechanisms are also known to differ between men and women through X-inactivation in females. We hypothesized that epigenetic sex differences may also result from sex hormone functions, in particular from long-lasting androgen programming. We aimed at investigating whether inactivation of the androgen receptor, the key regulator of normal male sex development, is associated with differences of the patterns of DNA methylation marks in genital tissues. To this end, we performed large scale array-based analysis of gene methylation profiles on genomic DNA from labioscrotal skin fibroblasts of 8 males and 26 individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS due to inactivating androgen receptor gene mutations. By this approach we identified differential methylation of 167 CpG loci representing 162 unique human genes. These were significantly enriched for androgen target genes and low CpG content promoter genes. Additional 75 genes showed a significant increase of heterogeneity of methylation in AIS compared to a high homogeneity in normal male controls. Our data show that normal and aberrant androgen receptor function is associated with distinct patterns of DNA-methylation marks in genital tissues. These findings support the concept that transcription factor binding to the DNA has an impact on the shape of the DNA methylome. These data which derived from a rare human model suggest that androgen programming of methylation marks contributes to sexual dimorphism in the human which might have considerable impact on the manifestation of sex-associated phenotypes and diseases.

  2. Expression of Androgen Receptor in Meningiomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the expression of androgen receptor (AR) in meningiomas and its relation to tumor proliferative potential, we examined the expression of AR and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) by avidine-biotin complex immunohistochemistry in 39 cases of meningiomas. Of the 39 cases of meningiomas, 20(51 %) showed positive AR immunoreactivity. The AR expression positivity rates were 31 % (6/19) in benign meningiomas, 58 % (7/12) in atypical meningiomas, 87.5 % (7/8) in malignant meningiomas, respectively. In addition to the tumor cells, cells of microvascular endothelial proliferation were frequently AR positive. Malignant meningiomas had a significantly higher percentage of AR positive cells compared with atypical and benign meningiomas (P<0.05). The mean proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index (PCNA LI) was significantly higher in the malignant meningiomas when compared with atypical meningiomas (P<0.05) and benign meningiomas (P<0.05). AR positive meningiomas had higher PCNA LI than AR negative meningiomas (P<0.05). The expression of AR in tumor tissues was significantly related with PCNA LI. These data indicated that AR in the meningiomas was correlated with histological grade and AR might participate in the growth of these tumors and tumor angiogenesis. The measurement of AR in these tumors may indirectly represent tumor growth potential.

  3. Anabolic-androgenic steroids and the adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogol, A D; Yesalis, C E

    1992-03-01

    This article has reviewed some of the hormonal and behavioral maturation that occurs during adolescence, which are characterized by remarkable physical changes and behavioral vulnerability. Risk taking of many varieties is common and drugs (including anabolic-androgenic steroids) form a part of the prevailing culture in many places. These steroids probably are not severe health hazards when taken intermittently and in low to moderate doses. The 17-alkylated derivatives are clearly the more likely to cause hepatotoxicity. Thus, the scare tactics formerly used (severe constitutional side effects) are doomed to failure. The tenuous link between these drugs and objective behavioral and addictive effects must be strengthened before health strategies based on this issue can be validated. Clearly, the lack of scientific information has impeded, if not precluded, the formulation of an effective health education strategy. The most potent deterrent to the use of steroid drugs by athletes must be the moral issue of fair play and maintaining a "level playing field." We strongly support directed research in these areas and hope that the credibility of the scientific community can be regained after its faulted "stop steroid use" campaigns based on the lack of steroid efficacy in bringing about desired results or on their dire consequences have been replaced with credible evidence to refute their use on these and other grounds.

  4. Effect of androgen deprivation on penile ultrastructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou-JunSHEN; Xie-LaiZHOU; Ying-LiLU; Zhao-DianCHEN

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the ultrastructural changes of penile corpus cavernosum and tunica albuginea in rats treated with castration or finasteride.Methods:Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats of nine weeks old were randomly divided into three groups with 6 rats each,Group A served as the control,Group B was castrated and Group C,treated with finasteride,Four weeks later,rats were anesthetized and blood samples obtained for the determination of serum testosterone(T)and dihydrotestosterone(DHT) levels;penile tissues were taken for scanning electron microscopy.Results:The T,free T and DHT levels in Group B and the DHT level in Group C were significantly lower than those in Group A(P0.05).Elastic fibers in the tunica albuginea of Group A were very rich and arranged regularly and undulatedly,but in Group B,most of the elastic fibers were replaced by collagenous fibers.In Group C,the tunica albuginea was mainly composed of thick and irregular-arranged collagenous fibers.In Group A,there were abundant smooth muscle fibers in the trabeculae of corpus cavernosum,but they were much less in Group C and scarce or even disappeared in Group B.In Groups B and C,the diminished/disappeared smooth muscle fibers were replaced by irregularly arranged collagenous fibers.Conclusion:In rats,androgen is essential for maintaining the normal structure of penile tunica albuginea and corpus carvenosum.

  5. Review of Androgenic Anabolic Steroid Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Borges; G. Eisele; C. Byrd

    2001-07-31

    An area that has been overlooked within personnel security evaluations is employee use of androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS). Current drug testing within the federal government does not include testing for anabolic steroids, and the difficulties to implement such testing protocols-not to mention the cost involved-make AAS testing highly improbable. The basis of this report is to bring to the forefront the damage that anabolic steroids can cause from both a physical and a psychological standpoint. Most individuals who use AASs do so to increase their muscle mass because they wish to gain some type of competitive edge during athletic competition or they wish to enhance their physical features for self-satisfaction and self-esteem (i.e., body building). Security officers are one group of men who often take high doses of anabolic steroids, according to the Second Report of the Senate Standing Committee (1990). The negative psychological characteristics for AAS use is extensive and includes prominent hostility, aggressiveness, irritability, euphoria, grandiose beliefs, hyperactivity, reckless behavior, increased sexual appetite, unpredictability, poor impulse control, mood fluctuations, and insomnia. The drug may invoke a sense of power and invincibility (Leckman and Scahill, 1990). Depressive symptoms, such as anhedonia, fatigue, impaired concentration, decreased libido, and even suicidality (Pope and Katz, 1992) have been noted with steroid withdrawal. It appears that long-term users of AAS experience similar characteristics as other substance abusers (i.e., craving, dependence, and withdrawal symptoms).

  6. Postmenopausal serum androgens, oestrogens and breast cancer risk: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaks, R.; Rinaldi, S.; Key, T.J.; Berrino, F.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Biessy, C.; Dossus, L.; Lukanova, A.; Bingham, S.; Khaw, K-T.; Allen, N.E.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.; Gils, C.H. van; Grobbee, D.E.; Boeing, H.; Lahmann, P.H.; Nagel, G.; Chang-Claude, J.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Fournier, A.; Thiébaut, A.; Gonzalez, C.A.; Quirós, J.R.; Tormo, M-J.; Ardanaz, E.; Amiano, P.; Krogh, V.; Palli, D.; Panico, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Trichopoulou, A.; Kalapothaki, V.; Trichopoulos, D.; Ferrari, P.; Norat, T.; Saracci, R.; Riboli, E.

    2005-01-01

    Considerable experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that elevated endogenous sex steroids — notably androgens and oestrogens — promote breast tumour development. In spite of this evidence, postmenopausal androgen replacement therapy with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) or testosterone has

  7. Postmenopausal serum androgens, oestrogens and breast cancer risk : the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaks, R; Rinaldi, S; Key, TJ; Berrino, F; Peeters, PHM; Biessy, C; Dossus, L; Lukanova, A; Binghan, S; Khaw, KTG; Allen, NE; Bueno-De-Mesquita, HB; van Gils, CH; Grobbee, D; Boeing, H; Lahmann, PH; Nagel, G; Chang-Claude, J; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Fournier, A; Thiebaut, A; Gonzalez, CA; Quiros, [No Value; Tormo, MJ; Ardanaz, E; Amiano, P; Krogh, [No Value; Palli, D; Panico, S; Tumino, R; Vineis, P; Trichopoulou, A; Kalapothaki, [No Value; Trichopoulos, D; Ferrari, P; Norat, T; Saracci, R; Riboli, E

    2005-01-01

    Considerable experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that elevated endogenous sex steroids - notably androgens and oestrogens - promote breast tumour development. In spite of this evidence, postmenopausal androgen replacement therapy with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) or testosterone has

  8. Manipulation of male attractiveness induces rapid changes in avian maternal yolk androgen deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, Sjouke A.; Komdeur, Jan; Vedder, Oscar; Engelhardt, Nikolaus von; Korsten, Peter; Groothuis, Ton G.G.

    2009-01-01

    Avian eggs contain maternal androgens that may adjust offspring development to environmental conditions. We review evidence and functional explanations for the relationship between androgen concentrations in avian eggs and male attractiveness. Experimental studies in captive birds show generally pos

  9. Androgens and skeletal muscle: cellular and molecular action mechanisms underlying the anabolic actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2012-05-01

    Androgens increase both the size and strength of skeletal muscle via diverse mechanisms. The aim of this review is to discuss the different cellular targets of androgens in skeletal muscle as well as the respective androgen actions in these cells leading to changes in proliferation, myogenic differentiation, and protein metabolism. Androgens bind and activate a specific nuclear receptor which will directly affect the transcription of target genes. These genes encode muscle-specific transcription factors, enzymes, structural proteins, as well as microRNAs. In addition, anabolic action of androgens is partly established through crosstalk with other signaling molecules such as Akt, myostatin, IGF-I, and Notch. Finally, androgens may also exert non-genomic effects in muscle by increasing Ca(2+) uptake and modulating kinase activities. In conclusion, the anabolic effect of androgens on skeletal muscle is not only explained by activation of the myocyte androgen receptor but is also the combined result of many genomic and non-genomic actions.

  10. Design, Synthesis, and Preclinical Characterization of the Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator (SARM) RAD140.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Chris P; Shomali, Maysoun; Lyttle, C Richard; O'Dea, Louis St L; Herendeen, Hillary; Gallacher, Kyla; Paquin, Dottie; Compton, Dennis R; Sahoo, Bishwabhusan; Kerrigan, Sean A; Burge, Matthew S; Nickels, Michael; Green, Jennifer L; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Tchesnokov, Alexei; Hattersley, Gary

    2011-02-10

    This report describes the discovery of RAD140, a potent, orally bioavailable, nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM). The characterization of RAD140 in several preclinical models of anabolic androgen action is also described.

  11. Refinement of the androgen response element based on ChIP-Seq in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Qi, Jianfei; Filipp, Fabian V

    2016-09-14

    Sequence motifs are short, recurring patterns in DNA that can mediate sequence-specific binding for proteins such as transcription factors or DNA modifying enzymes. The androgen response element (ARE) is a palindromic, dihexameric motif present in promoters or enhancers of genes targeted by the androgen receptor (AR). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) we refined AR-binding and AREs at a genome-scale in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines. Model-based searches identified more than 120,000 ChIP-Seq motifs allowing for expansion and refinement of the ARE. We classified AREs according to their degeneracy and their transcriptional involvement. Additionally, we quantified ARE utilization in response to somatic copy number amplifications, AR splice-variants, and steroid treatment. Although imperfect AREs make up 99.9% of the motifs, the degree of degeneracy correlates negatively with validated transcriptional outcome. Weaker AREs, particularly ARE half sites, benefit from neighboring motifs or cooperating transcription factors in regulating gene expression. Taken together, ARE full sites generate a reliable transcriptional outcome in AR positive cells, despite their low genome-wide abundance. In contrast, the transcriptional influence of ARE half sites can be modulated by cooperating factors.

  12. 4-Nitro-3-phenylphenol has both androgenic and anti-androgenic-like effects in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trisomboon, Jiratthiya; Li, ChunMei; Suzuki, Akira; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of endocrine disruption of 4-nitro-3-phenylphenol (PNMPP) on immature male Wistar-Imamichi rats, the rat pituitary was exposed to PNMPP (10(-5)-10(-9) M) for 24 h with or without gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in experiment I. In addition, the Leydig cells (10(-5)-10(-9) M) were exposed to PNMPP for 24 h with or without human chronic gonadotropin (hCG) in experiment II. Our results showed that the PNMPP at 10(-5)-10(-7) M suppressed follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) productions from GnRH-stimulated pituitary cells. At the same time, PNMPP 10(-5)-10(-7) M induced an increase in testosterone production from the Leydig cells treated with or without hCG. Based on our results, it can be concluded that that PNMPP might have both androgen agonist action by decreasing FSH and LH production in the pituitary and anti-androgenic action by increasing testosterone production in the Leydig cell.

  13. Two cases of androgen insensitivity due to somatic mosaicism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie J. Nokoff

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the androgen receptor (AR. The incidence of AIS is estimated to be 1 in 99,000. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS is characterized by a 46,XY karyotype with external genitalia that appear typically female and results from mutations that render the androgen receptor non-functional. Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS results from partial loss of function mutations in AR. Rarely, PAIS results from somatic mosaicism for an AR mutation and not from a hypomorphic variant. We present two cases of PAIS due to somatic mosaicism, one caused by a novel nonsense mutation and one caused by a missense mutation previously reported in CAIS. Two patients with atypical genitalia presented to our multidisciplinary clinic for disorders of sex development and sequencing of AR was performed as part of the diagnostic evaluation. In case one, AR sequencing revealed mosaicism for a nonsense mutation, c.1331T > A; p.Leu444Ter. This mutation has not previously been reported, but is presumed to be pathogenic. In case two, AR sequencing revealed a mosaic missense mutation, c.2279 C > A; p.Ser760Tyr, which has previously been reported in CAIS but not in PAIS. Similar phenotypes may result from AR mutations that are present in a mosaic state with full loss of function or hypomorphic mutations that partially impair the function of the protein in either all tissues or in a mosaic state.

  14. Androgenic anabolic steroid use among male adolescents in Falkenberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, S

    1995-01-01

    Recent reports show that androgenic anabolic steroids are used by many teenagers, not as a deliberate attempt to give them strength, better athletic performance, etc., but to improve their looks. The so-called macho cult among young boys tempts them into using androgenic anabolic steroids to give them bigger muscles and a more powerful appearance. This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of androgenic anabolic steroid use among teenagers in a small town and to create a platform for future work with the aim of decreasing the misuse of these drugs. In Falkenberg, a town in the county of Halland in the west of Sweden, the pupils at two high schools were investigated by means of an anonymous multiple-choice questionnaire. A total of 1383 students (688 males and 695 females) aged 14-19 years participated in the study, giving a participation rate of 96%. The number of answers completed was 99%. The use of androgenic anabolic steroids is a reality among male teenagers in Falkenberg, with 5.8% of them using the drugs. Among 15- to 16-year-old boys misuse of these drugs is as high as 10%, and of these 50% (5.0% of total) also inject ampoules of the drugs. This prevalence is alarming since the adverse effects of androgenic anabolic steroids are more serious in teenagers. Serious action must be taken to inform teenagers of the consequences of misusing drugs.

  15. Identification of Comamonas testosteroni as an androgen degrader in sewage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Lung; Wang, Chia-Hsiang; Yang, Fu-Chun; Ismail, Wael; Wang, Po-Hsiang; Shih, Chao-Jen; Wu, Yu-Ching; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported the masculinization of freshwater wildlife exposed to androgens in polluted rivers. Microbial degradation is a crucial mechanism for eliminating steroid hormones from contaminated ecosystems. The aerobic degradation of testosterone was observed in various bacterial isolates. However, the ecophysiological relevance of androgen-degrading microorganisms in the environment is unclear. Here, we investigated the biochemical mechanisms and corresponding microorganisms of androgen degradation in aerobic sewage. Sewage samples collected from the Dihua Sewage Treatment Plant (Taipei, Taiwan) were aerobically incubated with testosterone (1 mM). Androgen metabolite analysis revealed that bacteria adopt the 9, 10-seco pathway to degrade testosterone. A metagenomic analysis indicated the apparent enrichment of Comamonas spp. (mainly C. testosteroni) and Pseudomonas spp. in sewage incubated with testosterone. We used the degenerate primers derived from the meta-cleavage dioxygenase gene (tesB) of various proteobacteria to track this essential catabolic gene in the sewage. The amplified sequences showed the highest similarity (87–96%) to tesB of C. testosteroni. Using quantitative PCR, we detected a remarkable increase of the 16S rRNA and catabolic genes of C. testosteroni in the testosterone-treated sewage. Together, our data suggest that C. testosteroni, the model microorganism for aerobic testosterone degradation, plays a role in androgen biodegradation in aerobic sewage. PMID:27734937

  16. Stromal Androgen Receptor Roles in the Development of Normal Prostate, Benign Prostate Hyperplasia, and Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Simeng; Chang, Hong-Chiang; Tian, Jing; Shang, Zhiqun; Niu, Yuanjie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-01-01

    The prostate is an androgen-sensitive organ that needs proper androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signals for normal development. The progression of prostate diseases, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa), also needs proper androgen/AR signals. Tissue recombination studies report that stromal, but not epithelial, AR plays more critical roles via the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions to influence the early process of prostate development. However, in BPH and PCa,...

  17. Uncarboxylated Osteocalcin and Gprc6a Axis Produce Intratumoral Androgens in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    state in the progression of prostate cancer . Recently, tumor cells have been shown to activate androgen receptor signaling via multiple pathways ...Gprc6a axis is functional in VCaP prostate cancer cells. This pathway can induce intra turmoral androgen synthesis through overexpression of...androgen biosynthetic enzyme expression. Together this pathway promotes prostate cancer bone metastasis and drive androgen receptor mediated bone tumor

  18. Antagonists of the kappa opioid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Mariangela; Guerrero, Miguel; Rosen, Hugh; Roberts, Edward

    2014-05-01

    The research community has increasingly focused on the development of OPRK antagonists as pharmacotherapies for the treatment of depression, anxiety, addictive disorders and other psychiatric conditions produced or exacerbated by stress. Short-acting OPRK antagonists have been recently developed as a potential improvement over long-acting prototypic ligands including nor-BNI and JDTic. Remarkably the short-acting LY2456302 is undergoing phase II clinical trials for the augmentation of the antidepressant therapy in treatment-resistant depression. This Letter reviews relevant chemical and pharmacological advances in the identification and development of OPRK antagonists.

  19. Antagonistic formation motion of cooperative agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢婉婷; 代明香; 薛方正

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a new formation motion problem of a class of first-order multi-agent systems with antagonis-tic interactions. A distributed formation control algorithm is proposed for each agent to realize the antagonistic formation motion. A sufficient condition is derived to ensure that all agents make an antagonistic formation motion in a distributed manner. It is shown that all agents can be spontaneously divided into several groups, and agents in the same group collab-orate while agents in different groups compete. Finally, a numerical simulation is included to demonstrate our theoretical results.

  20. Evaluation and characterization of anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities in soil samples along the Second Songhua River, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Wang, Yafei; Kong, Dongdong; Wang, Jinsheng; Teng, Yanguo; Li, Na

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, re-combined estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) gene yeast assays combined with a novel approach based on Monte Carlo simulation were used for evaluation and characterization of soil samples collected from Jilin along the Second Songhua River to assess their antagonist/agonist properties for ER and AR. The results showed that estrogenic activity only occurred in the soil samples collected in the agriculture area, but most soil samples showed anti-estrogenic activities, and the bioassay-derived 4-hydroxytamoxifen equivalents ranged from N.D. to 23.51 μg/g. Hydrophilic substance fractions were determined as potential contributors associated with anti-estrogenic activity in these soil samples. Moreover, none of the soil samples exhibited AR agonistic potency, whereas 54% of the soil samples exhibited AR antagonistic potency. The flutamide equivalents varied between N.D. and 178.05 μg/g. Based on Monte Carlo simulation-related mass balance analysis, the AR antagonistic activities were significantly correlated with the media polar and polar fractions. All of these results support that this novel calculation method can be adopted effectively to quantify and characterize the ER/AR agonists and antagonists of the soil samples, and these data could help provide useful information for future management and remediation efforts.

  1. Proteomic analysis of androgen-regulated protein expression in a mouse fetal vas deferens cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Umar (Arzu); T.M. Luider (Theo); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractDuring sex differentiation, androgens are essential for development of the male genital tract. The Wolffian duct is an androgen-sensitive target tissue that develops into the epididymis, vas deferens, and seminal vesicle. The present study aimed to identify androgen-reg

  2. Identification of an AR mutation-negative class of androgen insensitivity by determining endogenous AR activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornig, N.C.; Ukat, M.; H.U. Schweikert (H.); O. Hiort (Olaf); Werner, R.; S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); M.L. Cools (Martine); I.A. Hughes (Ieuan A.); L. Audí (Laura); S.F. Ahmed (S. Faisal); Demiri, J.; Rodens, P.; Worch, L.; Wehner, G.; Kulle, A.E.; Dunstheimer, D.; Müller-Roßberg, E.; T. Reinehr (Thomas); Hadidi, A.T.; Eckstein, A.K.; Van Der Horst, C.; Seif, C.; R. Siebert (Reiner); O. Ammerpohl (Ole); P-M. Holterhus (Paul-Martin)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractContext: Only approximately 85%of patients with a clinical diagnosis complete androgen insensitivity syndrome and less than 30%with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome can be explained by inactivating mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Objective: The objective of the study

  3. Inhibitory effects of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone on growth and invasiveness of PC3 human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Moreno, Laura; Arenas, M Isabel; Schally, Andrew V; Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Zarka, Elías; González-Santander, Marta; Carmena, María J; Vacas, Eva; Prieto, Juan C; Bajo, Ana M

    2013-02-15

    New approaches are needed to the therapy of advanced prostate cancer. This study determined the effect of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonists, JMR-132 and JV-1-38 on growth of PC3 tumors as well as on angiogenesis and metastasis through the evaluation of various factors that contribute largely to the progression of prostate cancer. Human PC3 androgen-independent prostate cancer cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. The treatment with JMR-132 (10 μg/day) or JV-1-38 (20 μg/day) lasted 41 days. We also evaluated the effects of JMR-132 and JV-1-38 on proliferation, cell adhesion and migration in PC-3 cells in vitro. Several techniques (Western blot, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, ELISA and zymography) were used to evaluate the expression levels of GHRH receptors and its splice variants, GHRH, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2 and -9, β-catenin and E-cadherin. GHRH antagonists suppressed the proliferation of PC-3 cells in vitro and significantly inhibited growth of PC3 tumors. After treatment with these analogues, we found an increase in expression of GHRH receptor accompanied by a decrease of GHRH levels, a reduction in both VEGF and HIF-1α expression and in active forms of MMP-2 and MMP-9, a significant increase in levels of membrane-associated β-catenin and a significant decline in E-cadherin. These results support that the blockade of GHRH receptors can modulate elements involved in angiogenesis and metastasis. Consequently, GHRH antagonists could be considered as suitable candidates for therapeutic trials in the management of androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  4. In silico and biological analysis of anti-androgen activity of the brominated flame retardants ATE, BATE and DPTE in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Ajay; Asnake, Solomon; Kharlyngdoh, Joubert Banjop; Modig, Carina; Olsson, Per-Erik

    2015-05-25

    The brominated flame retardants (BFRs) 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromoethyl)cyclohexane (TBECH or DBE-DCBH) and allyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (ATE or TBP-AE) are alternative BFRs that have been introduced to replace banned BFRs. TBECH is a potential endocrine disrupter in human, chicken and zebrafish and in a recent study we showed that ATE, along with the structurally similar BFR 2,3-dibromopropyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE or TBP-DBPE) and its metabolite 2-bromoallyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (BATE or TBP-BAE) are potential endocrine and neuronal disrupters in human. In this study we analyzed ATE, BATE and DPTE for zebrafish androgen receptor (zAR) modulating properties. In silico analysis with two softwares, Molecular Operating Environment (MOE) and Internal Coordinate Mechanics (ICM), showed that ATE, BATE and DPTE bind to zAR. In vitro AR activation assay revealed that these three BFRs down-regulate 11-ketotestosterone (KT) mediated zAR activation. Exposure to 10 μM DPTE resulted in reduced hatching success and like TBECH, BATE and DPTE at 10 μM also had teratogenic properties with 20% and 50% back-bone curvature respectively. Gene transcription analysis in zebrafish embryos as well as in juveniles showed down-regulation of the androgen receptor and androgen response genes, which further support that these BFRs are androgen antagonists and potential endocrine disrupting compounds. Genes involved in steroidogenesis were also down-regulated by these BFRs. In view of this, the impact of these BFRs on humans and wildlife needs further analysis.

  5. Prevalent flucocorticoid and androgen activity in US water sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavreva, Diana A.; George, Anuja A.; Klausmeyer, Paul; Varticovski, Lyuba; Sack, Daniel; Voss, Ty C.; Schiltz, R. Louis; Blazer, Vicki; Iwanowiczl, Luke R.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2012-01-01

    Contamination of the environment with endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is a major health concern. The presence of estrogenic compounds in water and their deleterious effect are well documented. However, detection and monitoring of other classes of EDCs is limited. Here we utilize a high-throughput live cell assay based on sub-cellular relocalization of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid and androgen receptors (GFP-GR and GFP-AR), in combination with gene transcription analysis, to screen for glucocorticoid and androgen activity in water samples. We report previously unrecognized glucocorticoid activity in 27%, and androgen activity in 35% of tested water sources from 14 states in the US. Steroids of both classes impact body development, metabolism, and interfere with reproductive, endocrine, and immune systems. This prevalent contamination could negatively affect wildlife and human populations.

  6. CH5137291, an androgen receptor nuclear translocation-inhibiting compound, inhibits the growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikura, Nobuyuki; Kawata, Hiromitsu; Nishimoto, Ayako; Nakamura, Ryo; Tsunenari, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Miho; Tachibana, Kazutaka; Shiraishi, Takuya; Yoshino, Hitoshi; Honma, Akie; Emura, Takashi; Ohta, Masateru; Nakagawa, Toshito; Houjo, Takao; Corey, Eva; Vessella, Robert L; Aoki, Yuko; Sato, Haruhiko

    2015-04-01

    Resistance of prostate cancer to castration is currently an unavoidable problem. The major mechanisms underlying such resistance are androgen receptor (AR) overexpression, androgen-independent activation of AR, and AR mutation. To address this problem, we developed an AR pure antagonist, CH5137291, with AR nuclear translocation-inhibiting activity, and compared its activity and characteristics with that of bicalutamide. Cell lines corresponding to the mechanisms of castration resistance were used: LNCaP-BC2 having AR overexpression and LNCaP-CS10 having androgen-independent AR activation. VCaP and LNCaP were used as hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cells. In vitro functional assay clearly showed that CH5137291 inhibited the nuclear translocation of wild-type ARs as well as W741C- and T877A-mutant ARs. In addition, it acted as a pure antagonist on the transcriptional activity of these types of ARs. In contrast, bicalutamide did not inhibit the nuclear translocation of these ARs, and showed a partial/full agonistic effect on the transcriptional activity. CH5137291 inhibited cell growth more strongly than bicalutamide in VCaP and LNCaP cells as well as in LNCaP-BC2 and LNCaP-CS10 cells in vitro. In xenograft models, CH5137291 strongly inhibited the tumor growth of LNCaP, LNCaP-BC2, and LNCaP-CS10, whereas bicalutamide showed a weaker effect in LNCaP and almost no effect in LNCaP-BC2 and LNCaP-CS10 xenografts. Levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in plasma correlated well with the antitumor effect of both agents. CH5137291 inhibited the growth of LNCaP tumors that had become resistant to bicalutamide treatment. A docking model suggested that CH5137291 intensively collided with the M895 residue of helix 12, and therefore strongly inhibited the folding of helix 12, a cause of AR agonist activity, in wild-type and W741C-mutant ARs. In cynomolgus monkeys, the serum concentration of CH5137291 increased dose-dependently and PSA level decreased 80% at 100 mg/kg. CH

  7. Contributions by the CAG-repeat Polymorphism of the Androgen Receptor Gene and Circulating Androgens to Muscle Size. Odense Androgen Study - A Population-based Study of 20-29 Year-old Danish Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian;

    2007-01-01

    Context: The number of CAG-repeats within the CAG-repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene is inversely correlated with the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor. Objective: To study the effect of the CAG-repeat number and circulating androgens on muscle size, to examine......-repeat number correlated inversely with thigh and axial muscle area and with lower and upper extremity lean body mass. Except for upper extremity lean body mass, these findings remained significant in multivariate analyses controlling for circulating androgens, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake...

  8. Detection of androgen receptor in human prostatic adenoma by autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demura, Takayoshi; Sakashita, Shigeo; Takamura, Takao; Kuroda, Kazuhide (Asahikawa Medical Coll., Hokkaido (Japan))

    1982-09-01

    We developed a new amplified method to detect the localization of androgen receptors within the human prostatic tissue specimens. The tissue sections were treated with 50 ..mu..l of 100 nM tritiated dihydrotestosterone (/sup 3/H-DHT). The binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to receptors was demonstrated as silver grains on the stained tissue sections. The binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the prostatic tissue was inhibited by additional non-radioactive DHT remarkably and by testosterone partially, but not affected by additional progesterone and 17..beta..-estradiol. No binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the bladder tissue was found. These results showed that the binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the prostatic tissue was a specific reaction of /sup 3/H-DHT and androgen receptor. Androgen receptors were seen in the nuclei and the cytoplasmas of glandular epithelial cells of prostate. However, stromal cells contained less abundant androgen receptors. The method reported here has several advantages in detecting the androgen receptor of the prostatic tissue in comparison with the radioreceptor assay and other histochemical methods. 1) The needle biopsied specimens are big enough to examine. 2) Morphological observations are also possible on the same specimen because the specimens are stained with hematoxylin simultaneously. Therefore, we can know the relative ratio of androgen receptor positive cells and negative cells. 3) Binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the receptor with this method may be more specific than other histochemical methods, since binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the receptor was inhibited by 200-fold excess of non-radioactive DHT. 4) Treatment of scintillator, fluorographic technique shortens the exposure periods. The exposure periods are approximately six to twelve times shorter than that of the conventional autoradiography.

  9. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  10. [Use and abuse of androgens and anabolic steroids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alén, M

    1993-01-01

    At therapeutic dosages, androgen and anabolic steroids enhance neither muscle strength nor competitive performance. Endogenous androgen secretion is inhibited, and the net effect is negligible. The dosages taken by athletes and body-builders are 10-50 fold greater than the therapeutic dosages, and give rise to hyperandrogenic conditions. Although this improves endurance, strength and muscle development, at the same time a manifest hormone disturbance is developed with a variety of consequences. Abusers, who as a rule inject illicit preparations themselves, are also at risk of hepatitis and HIV.

  11. Influence of obesity and androgen deficiency on prostatic blood circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Study at 120 Diabetes Mellitus II type men the high frequency Obesity (71,7% and Androgen Deficiency (52,8—64,5% of the patients depending on a degree of the indemnification and them pathogenic authentic communications were shown. The blood level of total testosterone was represented by the critical factor of Prostatic arterial Blood Circulation. Obesity and Androgen Deficiency are seem as independent risk factors to development of ischemic prostatopathy, such as Prostatic blood circulation Disorders can develop earlier than other variants of the diabetic microangiophaty.

  12. Optimizing Ligand Efficiency of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handlon, Anthony L; Schaller, Lee T; Leesnitzer, Lisa M; Merrihew, Raymond V; Poole, Chuck; Ulrich, John C; Wilson, Joseph W; Cadilla, Rodolfo; Turnbull, Philip

    2016-01-14

    A series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) containing the 1-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol core have been optimized for androgen receptor (AR) potency and drug-like properties. We have taken advantage of the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) parameter as a guide to interpret the effect of structural changes on AR activity. Over the course of optimization efforts the LLE increased over 3 log units leading to a SARM 43 with nanomolar potency, good aqueous kinetic solubility (>700 μM), and high oral bioavailability in rats (83%).

  13. Catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II suppress the androgen receptor signaling and prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haolong; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-08-21

    Although the new generation of androgen receptor (AR) antagonists like enzalutamide (ENZ) prolong survival of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), AR-driven tumors eventually recur indicating that additional therapies are required to fully block AR function. Since DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II) was demonstrated to be essential for AR to initiate gene transcription, this study tested whether catalytic inhibitors of Topo II can block AR signaling and suppress ENZ-resistant CRPC growth. Using multiple prostate cancer cell lines, we showed that catalytic Topo II inhibitors, ICRF187 and ICRF193 inhibited transcription activities of the wild-type AR, mutant ARs (F876L and W741C) and the AR-V7 splice variant. ICRF187 and ICRF193 decreased AR recruitment to target promoters and reduced AR nuclear localization. Both ICRF187 and ICRF193 also inhibited cell proliferation and delayed cell cycling at the G2/M phase. ICRF187 inhibited tumor growth of castration-resistant LNCaP and 22RV1 xenografts as well as ENZ-resistant MR49F xenografts. We conclude that catalytic Topo II inhibitors can block AR signaling and inhibit tumor growth of CRPC xenografts, identifying a potential co-targeting approach using these inhibitors in combination with AR pathway inhibitors in CRPC.

  14. The structural basis of androgen receptor activation: Intramolecular and intermolecular amino–carboxy interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaufele, Fred; Carbonell, Xavier; Guerbadot, Martin; Borngraeber, Sabine; Chapman, Mark S.; Ma, Aye Aye K.; Miner, Jeffrey N.; Diamond, Marc I.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors important in human physiology and disease. In certain NRs, including the androgen receptor (AR), ligand binding to the carboxy-terminal domain (LBD) regulates transcriptional activation functions in the LBD and amino-terminal domain (NTD). The basis for NTD–LBD communication is unknown but may involve NTD–LBD interactions either within a single receptor or between different members of an AR dimer. Here, measurement of FRET between fluorophores attached to the NTD and LBD of the AR established that agonist binding initiated an intramolecular NTD–LBD interaction in the nucleus and cytoplasm. This intramolecular folding was followed by AR self-association, which occurred preferentially in the nucleus. Rapid, ligand-induced intramolecular folding and delayed association also were observed for estrogen receptor-α but not for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ2. An antagonist ligand, hydroxyflutamide, blocked the NTD–LBD association within AR. NTD–LBD association also closely correlated with the transcriptional activation by heterologous ligands of AR mutants isolated from hormone-refractory prostate tumors. Intramolecular folding, but not AR–AR affinity, was disrupted by mutation of an α-helical (23FQNLF27) motif in the AR NTD previously described to interact with the AR LBD in vitro. This work establishes an intramolecular NTD–LBD conformational change as an initial component of ligand-regulated NR function. PMID:15994236

  15. Dehydroepiandrosterone substitution in female adrenal failure: no impact on endothelial function and cardiovascular parameters despite normalization of androgen status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Jens Juel; Andersen, Niels Holmark; Sørensen, Keld E;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Female adrenal insufficiency implicates reduced production of the adrenal androgen precursor dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and low androgen levels. Oral DHEA restores androgen deficit but the clinical implications and safety of substitution therapy is uncertain. A putative DHEA receptor...... androgen levels using 6 months of DHEA replacement in this pilot study did not affect cardiovascular parameters and endothelial function in female adrenal insufficiency...

  16. Dominant-negative androgen receptor inhibition of intracrine androgen-dependent growth of castration-recurrent prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Titus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer (CaP is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. Androgen deprivation therapy is initially effective in CaP treatment, but CaP recurs despite castrate levels of circulating androgen. Continued expression of the androgen receptor (AR and its ligands has been linked to castration-recurrent CaP growth. PRINCIPAL FINDING: In this report, the ligand-dependent dominant-negative ARΔ142-337 (ARΔTR was expressed in castration-recurrent CWR-R1 cell and tumor models to elucidate the role of AR signaling. Expression of ARΔTR decreased CWR-R1 tumor growth in the presence and absence of exogenous testosterone (T and improved survival in the presence of exogenous T. There was evidence for negative selection of ARΔTR transgene in T-treated mice. Mass spectrometry revealed castration-recurrent CaP dihydrotestosterone (DHT levels sufficient to activate AR and ARΔTR. In the absence of exogenous testosterone, CWR-R1-ARΔTR and control cells exhibited altered androgen profiles that implicated epithelial CaP cells as a source of intratumoral AR ligands. CONCLUSION: The study provides in vivo evidence that activation of AR signaling by intratumoral AR ligands is required for castration-recurrent CaP growth and that epithelial CaP cells produce sufficient active androgens for CaP recurrence during androgen deprivation therapy. Targeting intracrine T and DHT synthesis should provide a mechanism to inhibit AR and growth of castration-recurrent CaP.

  17. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome due to a new frameshift deletion in exon 4 of the androgen receptor gene: Functional analysis of the mutant receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Lobaccaro, J.M.; Lumbroso, S.; Poujol, Nicolas; Georget, V.; Brinkmann, Albert; Malpuech, Georges; Sultan, C.

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the androgen receptor gene in a large kindred with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome and negative receptor-binding activity, single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and sequencing identified a 13 base pair deletion within exon 4. This was responsible for a predictive frameshift in the open reading frame and introduction of a premature stop codon at position 783 instead of 919. The deletion was reproduced in androgen receptor wildtype cDNA and tran...

  18. Promoter-dependent activity on androgen receptor N-terminal domain mutations in androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadokoro-Cuccaro, Rieko; Davies, John; Mongan, Nigel P; Bunch, Trevor; Brown, Rosalind S; Audi, Laura; Watt, Kate; McEwan, Iain J; Hughes, Ieuan A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations are associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Missense mutations identified in the AR-N-terminal domain (AR-NTD) are rare, and clinical phenotypes are typically mild. We investigated 7 missense mutations and 2 insertion/deletions located in the AR-NTD. This study aimed to elucidate the pathogenic role of AR-NTD mutants in AIS and to use this knowledge to further define AR-NTD function. AR-NTD mutations (Q120E, A159T, G216R, N235K, G248V, L272F, and P380R) were introduced into AR-expression plasmids. Stably expressing cell lines were established for del57L and ins58L. Transactivation was measured using luciferase reporter constructs under the control of GRE and Pem promoters. Intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and partial proteolysis studies were performed for mutations which showed reduced activities by using a purified AR-AF1 protein. Pem-luciferase reporter activation was reduced for A159T, N235K, and G248V but not the GRE-luciferase reporter. Protein structure analysis detected no significant change in the AR-AF1 region for these mutations. Reduced cellular expression and transactivation activity were observed for ins58L. The mutations Q120E, G216R, L272F, P380R, and del57L showed small or no detectable changes in function. Thus, clinical and experimental analyses have identified novel AR-signalling defects associated with mutations in the structurally disordered AR-NTD domain in patients with AIS.

  19. New considerations for ADT in advanced prostate cancer and the emerging role of GnRH antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, N D; Abrahamsson, P-A; Anderson, J; Crawford, E D; Lange, P

    2013-03-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is first-line treatment for metastatic prostate cancer (PCa). Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists are the most commonly used ADT but have several theoretical physiologic disadvantages (e.g. initial testosterone surge, potential microsurges upon repeat administration). Testosterone surge delays the intended serologic endpoint of testosterone suppression and may exacerbate clinical symptoms. GnRH antagonists were developed with a view toward overcoming these potential adverse physiologic events. This review evaluates GnRH agonists and antagonists, assessing the potential future role of antagonists in PCa and strategies to minimize ADT adverse events (AEs). Evidence was identified via PubMed search (by GnRH agent and other ADT-related terms), from review article bibliographies, and authors' therapy area knowledge, with articles included by author consensus. Degarelix shows similar efficacy to a GnRH agonist in achieving and maintaining castration, with faster onset and without testosterone surge/microsurges. Phase III data showed that, in the first treatment year, degarelix displayed a lower risk of PSA failure or death (composite endpoint), lower levels of the bone marker serum alkaline phosphatase (in baseline metastatic disease), and fewer musculoskeletal AEs than the agonist leuprolide. Also, crossing over from leuprolide to degarelix after 1 year reduced the risk of PSA failure or death. ADT displays an AE spectrum which can impact quality of life as well as causing significant morbidities. Strategies to improve ADT tolerability have become increasingly important including: a holistic management approach, improved diet and exercise, more specific monitoring to detect and prevent testosterone depletion toxicities, and intermittent ADT allowing hormonal recovery between treatment periods. Clinical studies suggest possible benefits of GnRH antagonists over agonists based on different mechanisms of action. Gn

  20. Pharmacological Characterization of a Novel Bifunctional Aldo-Keto Reductase 1C3 Inhibitor and Androgen Receptor Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    efficacious therapy for APC. References 1. Altekruse SF , K. C., Krapcho M, Neyman N, Aminou R, Waldron W, Ruhl J, Howlader N...cancer. Br J Cancer 2004, 90, 2317- 2325. 9. Reid, A. H.; Attard, G.; Danila, D. C.; Oommen, N. B.; Olmos, D.; Fong , P. C.; Molife, L. R.; Hunt, J

  1. Subtle structural changes in tetrahydroquinolines, a new class of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators, induce different functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Naoya; Kawai, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Isao

    2012-08-27

    Tetrahydroquinolines (THQs), a new class of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor (AR) modulators, have two indispensable functional groups, that is, a hydroxyl group for AR binding and a nitro group for agonistic activity. Interestingly, switching the nitro to a cyano group, the compound acts as an antagonist. To understand this phenomenon, molecular dynamics simulations were applied for dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and representative THQs complexes with AR. Upon ligand binding, the hydroxyl group formed a tight hydrogen-bond (H-bond) with Asn705 on Helix 3 (H3). The immobilization of Asn705 on H3 is helpful in the formation of tight H-bonds with Asp890 on loop 11-12, and this immobilization consequently leads to a stabilization of H12. The difference in the DHT carbonyl isosteres affected the presence or absence of the H-bonds between the hydroxyl group of THQ and Thr877 and the distortion of H12, which is caused by the methyl group of THQ. Thus, the binding, agonist, and antagonist functions were controlled by subtle structural changes in THQ.

  2. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of androgen receptor gene mutations in patients with androgen insensitivity syndromes: Application for diagnosis, genetic counseling, and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiort, O. (Medizinische Universitaet zu Luebeck (Germany) Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)); Huang, Q. (Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA (United States)); Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Kruse, K. (Medizinische Universitaet zu Luebeck (Germany)); Sadeghi-Nejad, A.; Wolfe, H.J. (Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)); Yandell, D.W. (Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA (United States))(Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States) Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Recent studies indicate that mutations in the androgen receptor gene are associated with androgen insensitivity syndromes, a heterogeneous group of related disorders involving defective sexual differentiation in karyotypic males. In this report, the authors address the possibility of rapid mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene for initial diagnosis, genetic counseling, and molecular subclassification of affected patients and their families. DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of six patients from five families with various degrees of androgen insensitivity was studied. Exons 2 to 8 of the androgen receptor gene were analyzed using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Female family members were also studied to identify heterozygote carriers. Point mutations in the AR gene were identified in all six patients, and all mutations caused amino acid substitutions. One patient with incomplete androgen insensitivity was a mosaic for the mutation. Four of the five mothers, as well as a young sister of one patient, were carriers of the mutation present in the affected child. The data show that new mutations may occur in the androgen receptor gene leading to sporadic androgen insensitivity syndrome. Molecular genetic characterization of the variant allele can serve as a primary tool for diagnosis and subsequent therapy, and can provide a basis for distinguishing heterozygous carriers in familial androgen resistance. The identification of carriers is of substantial clinical importance for genetic counseling. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Vocal area-related expression of the androgen receptor in the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Eiji; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2008-05-01

    The androgen receptor is a steroid hormone receptor widely expressed in the vocal control nuclei in songbirds. Here, we analysed androgen receptor expression in the brains of juvenile and adult budgerigars. With a species-specific probe for budgerigar androgen receptor mRNA, we found that the androgen receptor was expressed in the vocal areas, such as the central nucleus of the lateral nidopallium, the anterior arcopallium, the oval nucleus of the mesopallium, the oval nucleus of the anterior nidopallium and the tracheosyringeal hypoglossal nucleus. With the present data, together with previous reports, it turned out that the androgen receptor expression in telencephalic vocal control areas is similar amongst three groups of vocal learners--songbirds, hummingbirds and parrots, suggesting the possibility that the androgen receptor might play a role in vocal development and that the molecular mechanism regulating the androgen receptor expression in the vocal areas might be important in the evolution of vocal learning.

  4. MMTV-PyMT and Derived Met-1 Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells as Models for Studying the Role of the Androgen Receptor in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Jessica L; Butterfield, Kiel T; Spoelstra, Nicole S; Norris, John D; Josan, Jatinder S; Pollock, Julie A; McDonnell, Donald P; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Richer, Jennifer K

    2017-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has a faster rate of metastasis compared to other breast cancer subtypes, and no effective targeted therapies are currently FDA-approved. Recent data indicate that the androgen receptor (AR) promotes tumor survival and may serve as a potential therapeutic target in TNBC. Studies of AR in disease progression and the systemic effects of anti-androgens have been hindered by the lack of an AR-positive (AR+) immunocompetent preclinical model. In this study, we identified the transgenic MMTV-PyMT (mouse mammary tumor virus-polyoma middle tumor-antigen) mouse mammary gland carcinoma model of breast cancer and Met-1 cells derived from this model as tools to study the role of AR in breast cancer progression. AR protein expression was examined in late-stage primary tumors and lung metastases from MMTV-PyMT mice as well as in Met-1 cells by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Sensitivity of Met-1 cells to the AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and anti-androgen therapy was examined using cell viability, migration/invasion, and anchorage-independent growth assays. Late-stage primary tumors and lung metastases from MMTV-PyMT mice and Met-1 cells expressed abundant nuclear AR protein, while negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors. Met-1 sensitivity to DHT and AR antagonists demonstrated a reliance on AR for survival, and AR antagonists inhibited invasion and anchorage-independent growth. These data suggest that the MMTV-PyMT model and Met-1 cells may serve as valuable tools for mechanistic studies of the role of AR in disease progression and how anti-androgens affect the tumor microenvironment.

  5. Androgen receptor roles in the development of benign prostate hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kouji; Mizokami, Atsushi; Lin, Wen-Jye; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-06-01

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is a major cause of lower urinary tract symptoms, with an increased volume of transitional zone and associated with increased stromal cells. It is known that androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays a key role in development of BPH, and that blockade of this signaling decreases BPH volume and can relieve lower urinary tract symptoms, but the mechanisms of androgen/AR signaling in BPH development remain unclear, and the effectiveness of current drugs for treating BPH is still limited. The detailed mechanisms of androgen/AR signaling need to be clarified, and new therapies are needed for better treatment of BPH patients. This review focuses on roles of AR in epithelial and stromal cells in BPH development. In epithelial cells, AR may contribute to BPH development via epithelial cell-stromal cell interaction with alterations of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, leading to proliferation of stromal cells. Data from several mouse models with selective knockout of AR in stromal smooth-muscle cells and/or fibroblasts indicate that the AR in stromal cells can also promote BPH development. In prostatic inflammation, AR roles in infiltrating macrophages and epithelial and stromal cells have been linked to BPH development, which has led to discovery of new therapeutic targets. For example, targeting AR with the novel AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9 offers a potential therapeutic approach against BPH development.

  6. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesha Rana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (ARΔZF2 versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57 Kip2, Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all but p57 Kip2 was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  7. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kesha Rana; Nicole KL Lee; Jeffrey D Zajac; Helen E MacLean

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor(AR)‑regulated genes ininvitroandinvivomodels. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factormyogenin was signiifcantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone‑treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity(ARΔZF2) versus wildtype mice, demonstrating thatmyogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligaseFbxo32 was repressed by 12h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, andc‑Myc expression was decreased in testosterone‑treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7, p57Kip2, Igf2 andcalcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all butp57Kip2was also decreased in testosterone‑treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase‑mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  8. Environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons affect androgen receptor activation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hnida, Christina; Larsen, John Christian

    2000-01-01

    Nine structurally different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were tested for their ability to either agonize or antagonize the human androgen receptor (hAR) in a sensitive reporter gene assay based on CHO cells transiently cotransfected with a hAR vector and an MMTV-LUC vector. Benz...

  9. Posttranslational modification of the androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steen, Travis; Tindall, Donald J; Huang, Haojie

    2013-07-16

    The androgen receptor (AR) is important in the development of the prostate by regulating transcription, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis. AR undergoes posttranslational modifications that alter its transcription activity, translocation to the nucleus and stability. The posttranslational modifications that regulate these events are of utmost importance to understand the functional role of AR and its activity. The majority of these modifications occur in the activation function-1 (AF1) region of the AR, which contains the transcriptional activation unit 1 (TAU1) and 5 (TAU5). Identification of the modifications that occur to these regions may increase our understanding of AR activation in prostate cancer and the role of AR in the progression from androgen-dependent to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Most of the posttranslational modifications identified to date have been determined using the full-length AR in androgen dependent cells. Further investigations into the role of posttranslational modifications in androgen-independent activation of full-length AR and constitutively active splicing variants are warranted, findings from which may provide new therapeutic options for CRPC.

  10. The androgen receptor in hormone-refractory prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Lei Mao; Zhi-Qi Zhu; Charlie Degui Chen

    2009-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer is responsive to hormone therapy that interferes with androgen receptor (AR) signalling.However,the effect is short-lived,as nearly all tumours progress to a hormone-refractory (HR) state,a lethal stage of the disease.Intuitively,the AR should not be involved because hormone therapy that blocks or reduces AR activity is not effective in treating HR turnouts.However,there is still a consensus that AR plays an essential role in HR prostate cancer (HRPC) because AR signalling is still functional in HR tumours.AR signalling can be activated in HR turnouts through several mechanisms.First,activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways can sensitize the AR to castrate levels of androgens.Also,mutations in the AR can change AR ligand specificity,thereby allowing it to be activated by non-steroids or anti-androgens.Finally,overexpression of the wild-type AR sensitizes itself to low concentrations of androgens.Therefore,drugs targeting AR signalling could still be effective in treating HRPC.

  11. Premature adrenarche: novel lessons from early onset androgen excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idkowiak, Jan; Lavery, Gareth G; Dhir, Vivek; Barrett, Timothy G; Stewart, Paul M; Krone, Nils; Arlt, Wiebke

    2011-08-01

    Adrenarche reflects the maturation of the adrenal zona reticularis resulting in increased secretion of the adrenal androgen precursor DHEA and its sulphate ester DHEAS. Premature adrenarche (PA) is defined by increased levels of DHEA and DHEAS before the age of 8 years in girls and 9 years in boys and the concurrent presence of signs of androgen action including adult-type body odour, oily skin and hair and pubic hair growth. PA is distinct from precocious puberty, which manifests with the development of secondary sexual characteristics including testicular growth and breast development. Idiopathic PA (IPA) has long been considered an extreme of normal variation, but emerging evidence links IPA to an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome (MS) and thus ultimately cardiovascular morbidity. Areas of controversy include the question whether IPA in girls is associated with a higher rate of progression to the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and whether low birth weight increases the risk of developing IPA. The recent discoveries of two novel monogenic causes of early onset androgen excess, apparent cortisone reductase deficiency and apparent DHEA sulphotransferase deficiency, support the notion that PA may represent a forerunner condition for PCOS. Future research including carefully designed longitudinal studies is required to address the apparent link between early onset androgen excess and the development of insulin resistance and the MS.

  12. Androgenic Regulation of White Adipose Tissue-Prostate Cancer Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    oncogenes; inactivation of tumor suppression genes; and interaction between cancer cells and tumor-associated stroma and tumor- associated macrophages ...into inflamed tissue and dif- ferentiate into macrophages , which coordinate inflammatory re- sponses by producing chemokines and clearing debris by...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-1-0275 TITLE: Androgenic Regulation of White Adipose Tissue-Prostate Cancer Interactions PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

  13. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Kesha; Lee, Nicole K L; Zajac, Jeffrey D; MacLean, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR)-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (AR(ΔZF2)) versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR(∆ZF2) muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57(Kip2), Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR(∆ZF2) muscle, and the expression of all but p57(Kip2) was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  14. Psychological and Behavioral Effects of Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrke, Michael S.

    This review of the literature on the psychological and behavioral effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AS) first looks at aspects of the history and prevalence of AS use in competitive sports. Research suggests that one-quarter to one-half million adolescents in the United States have used, or are currently using AS. Some effects of androgens…

  15. Synthetic anabolic agents: steroids and nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The central role of testosterone in the development of male characteristics, as well as its beneficial effects on physical performance and muscle growth, has led to the search for synthetic alternatives with improved pharmacological profiles. Hundreds of steroidal analogs have been prepared with a superior oral bioavailability, which should also possess reduced undesirable effects. However, only a few entered the pharmaceutical market due to severe toxicological incidences that were mainly attributed to the lack of tissue selectivity. Prominent representatives of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are for instance methyltestosterone, metandienone and stanozolol, which are discussed as model compounds with regard to general pharmacological aspects of synthetic AAS. Recently, nonsteroidal alternatives to AAS have been developed that selectively activate the androgen receptor in either muscle tissue or bones. These so-called selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are currently undergoing late clinical trials (IIb) and will be prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency from January 2008. Their entirely synthetic structures are barely related to steroids, but particular functional groups allow for the tissue-selective activation or inhibition of androgen receptors and, thus, the stimulation of muscle growth without the risk of severe undesirable effects commonly observed in steroid replacement therapies. Hence, these compounds possess a high potential for misuse in sports and will be the subject of future doping control assays.

  16. Identification of Androgen Receptor-Specific Enhancer RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    AND SUBTITLE Identification of Androgen Receptor-Specific Enhancer RNAs 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0120 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT ...interesting eRNAs and their sequences are shown below. AR-eRNA-#1 ( 117 bp

  17. Androgen deprivation modulates the inflammatory response induced by irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Paul-Yang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine whether radiation (RT-induced inflammatory responses and organ damage might be modulated by androgen deprivation therapies. Methods The mRNA and tissue sections obtained from the lungs, intestines and livers of irradiated mice with or without androgen deprivation were analyzed by real-time PCR and histological analysis. Activation of NF-kappa B was examined by measuring nuclear protein levels in the intestine and lung 24 h after irradiation. We also examined the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, TGF-β1 and p-AKT to elucidate the related pathway responsible to irradiation (RT -induced fibrosis. Results We found androgen deprivation by castration significantly augmented RT-induced inflammation, associated with the increase NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression. However, administration of flutamide had no obvious effect on the radiation-induced inflammation response in the lung and intestine. These different responses were probably due to the increase of RT-induced NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression by castration or lupron treatment. In addition, our data suggest that TGF-β1 and the induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway may contribute to RT-induced fibrosis. Conclusion When irradiation was given to patients with total androgen deprivation, the augmenting effects on the RT-induced inflammation and fibrosis should take into consideration for complications associated with radiotherapy.

  18. The Biological and Clinical Significance of Androgen Receptor Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    3. Guo Z, Yang X, Sun F et al: A novel androgen receptor splice variant is up-regulated during prostate cancer progression and promotes andro ...prognostic of bio- chemical recurrence in multiple cohorts. Br J Cancer 201 0; 102: 570, 23. Haffner MC, Aryee MJ, Toubaji A et al : Andro - gen

  19. Oral contraceptives as anti-androgenic treatment of acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, André; Poulin, Yves

    2002-07-01

    Although acne is seldom associated with high serum levels of androgens, it has been shown that female acne patients have definite increases in ovarian and adrenal androgen levels when compared to appropriate controls. As shown in several pilot and in multiple open and comparative studies, oral contraceptives (OCs) are effective in causing a significant regression of mild to moderate acne. These results have been confirmed by multicentre randomized trials where low-dose OCs did not cause side effects different from those of the placebo-controlled group. The beneficial effect of OCs is related to a decrease in ovarian and adrenal androgen precursors; to an increase in sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), which limits free testosterone; and to a decrease in 3a-androstenediol glucuronide conjugate, the catabolite of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) formed in peripheral tissues. The estrogen-progestin combination containing cyproterone acetate (CPA) is particularly effective in treating acne, since this progestin also has a direct peripheral anti-androgenic action in blocking the androgen receptor. Only two open studies and one randomized study on small numbers of patients have reported some efficacy of spironolactone used alone or in combination with an OC in the treatment of acne. The new non-steroidal anti-androgens flutamide and finasteride are being evaluated for the treatment of hirsutism. Oral antibiotics are prescribed to patients with inflammatory lesions, where they are effective in decreasing the activity of microbes, the activity of microbial enzymes, and leukocyte chemotaxis. Concomitant intake of an OC and an antibiotic usually prescribed for acne does not impair the contraceptive efficacy of the OC. A second effective contraceptive method should be used whenever there would be decreased absorption or efficacy of the OC (digestive problems, breakthrough bleeding), lack of compliance and use of a type or dose of antibiotic different from that usually prescribed

  20. Nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators enhance female sexual motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amanda; Hwang, Dong Jin; Duke, Charles B; He, Yali; Siddam, Anjaiah; Miller, Duane D; Dalton, James T

    2010-08-01

    Women experience a decline in estrogen and androgen levels after natural or surgically induced menopause, effects that are associated with a loss of sexual desire and bone mineral density. Studies in our laboratories have shown the beneficial effects of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) in the treatment of osteoporosis and muscle wasting in animal models. A series of S-3-(phenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-cyano-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-propionamide analogs was synthesized to evaluate the effects of B-ring substitutions on in vitro and in vivo pharmacologic activity, especially female sexual motivation. The androgen receptor (AR) relative binding affinities ranged from 0.1 to 26.5% (relative to dihydrotestosterone) and demonstrated a range of agonist activity at 100 nM. In vivo pharmacologic activity was first assessed by using male rats. Structural modifications to the B-ring significantly affected the selectivity of the SARMs, demonstrating that single-atom substitutions can dramatically and unexpectedly influence activity in androgenic (i.e., prostate) and anabolic (i.e., muscle) tissues. (S)-N-(4-cyano-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-3-(3-fluoro,4-chlorophenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-propanamide (S-23) displayed full agonist activity in androgenic and anabolic tissues; however, the remaining SARMs were more prostate-sparing, selectively maintaining the size of the levator ani muscle in castrated rats. The partner-preference paradigm was used to evaluate the effects of SARMs on female sexual motivation. With the exception of two four-halo substituted analogs, the SARMs increased sexual motivation in ovariectomized rats, with potency and efficacy comparable with testosterone propionate. These results indicate that the AR is important in regulating female libido given the nonaromatizable nature of SARMs and it could be a superior alternative to steroidal testosterone preparations in the treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder.

  1. Characterization of estrogen and androgen activity of food contact materials by different in vitro bioassays (YES, YAS, ERα and AR CALUX) and chromatographic analysis (GC-MS, HPLC-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertl, Johannes; Kirchnawy, Christian; Osorio, Veronica; Grininger, Angelika; Richter, Alexander; Bergmair, Johannes; Pyerin, Michael; Washüttl, Michael; Tacker, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine active substances (EAS) show structural similarities to natural hormones and are suspected to affect the human endocrine system by inducing hormone dependent effects. Recent studies with in vitro tests suggest that EAS can leach from packaging into food and may therefore pose a risk to human health. Sample migrates from food contact materials were tested for estrogen and androgen agonists and antagonists with different commonly used in vitro tests. Additionally, chemical trace analysis by GC-MS and HPLC-MS was used to identify potential hormone active substances in sample migrates. A GC-MS method to screen migrates for 29 known or potential endocrine active substances was established and validated. Samples were migrated according to EC 10/2011, concentrated by solid phase extraction and tested with estrogen and androgen responsive reporter gene assays based on yeast cells (YES and YAS) or human osteoblast cells (ERα and AR CALUX). A high level of agreement between the different bioassays could be observed by screening for estrogen agonists. Four out of 18 samples tested showed an estrogen activity in a similar range in both, YES and ERα CALUX. Two more samples tested positive in ERα CALUX due to the lower limits of detection in this assay. Androgen agonists could not be detected in any of the tested samples, neither with YAS nor with AR CALUX. When testing for antagonists, significant differences between yeast and human cell-based bioassays were noticed. Using YES and YAS many samples showed a strong antagonistic activity which was not observed using human cell-based CALUX assays. By GC-MS, some known or supposed EAS were identified in sample migrates that showed a biological activity in the in vitro tests. However, no firm conclusions about the sources of the observed hormone activity could be obtained from the chemical results.

  2. Androgen receptor roles in insulin resistance and obesity in males: the linkage of androgen-deprivation therapy to metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, I-Chen; Lin, Hung-Yun; Sparks, Janet D; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed malignancies in men. Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) is the first-line treatment and fundamental management for men with advanced PCa to suppress functions of androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling. ADT is effective at improving cancer symptoms and prolonging survival. However, epidemiological and clinical studies support the notion that testosterone deficiency in men leads to the development of metabolic syndrome that increases cardiovascular disease risk. The underlying mechanisms by which androgen/AR signaling regulates metabolic homeostasis in men are complex, and in this review, we discuss molecular mechanisms mediated by AR signaling that link ADT to metabolic syndrome. Results derived from various AR knockout mouse models reveal tissue-specific AR signaling that is involved in regulation of metabolism. These data suggest that steps be taken early to manage metabolic complications associated with PCa patients receiving ADT, which could be accomplished using tissue-selective modulation of AR signaling and by treatment with insulin-sensitizing agents.

  3. Development of an endogenous androgen receptor-mediated luciferase expression assay (AR-LUX) for interactive androgenic action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankvoort, B.M.G.

    2003-01-01

    The research described in this thesis was aimed at developing an in vitro cell-based reporter gene system applicable to the detection of the illegal use of androgenic growth promoters in cattle, and the presence of potential endocrine disrupters present in surface waters and interfering with androge

  4. Elucidation of the mechanism of suppressed steroidogenesis during androgen deprivation therapy of prostate cancer patients using a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, H; Katano, T; Nishida, K; Kinoshita, H; Matsuda, T; Ito, S

    2016-09-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard medical approach to the management of prostate cancer. Patients switched from a GnRH antagonist to a GnRH agonist, did not experience a testosterone surge in spite of the occurrence of luteinizing hormone (LH) surge in our protocol of clinical study. To clarify this observation, male mice pre-treated with two different doses of the GnRH antagonist degarelix for 28 days were further administered the GnRH agonist leuprolide or chorionic gonadotropin, and testosterone production of the mice was studied. Serum LH and testosterone levels, the size of Leydig cells, and expression level of steroidogenesis-related genes in the testis were analyzed. Treatment of mice with a high dose of degarelix (0.1 μg/mouse; HDG), but not a low dose (0.05 μg/mouse; LDG), for 28 days reproduced declined steroidogenesis observed in prostate cancer patients during ADT switched from a GnRH antagonist to a GnRH agonist. The size of the Leydig cells in the HDG mice was not significantly different from that in naive mice. Although expression levels of StAR, P450scc, and 17β HSD increased significantly in the LDH testis, those in the HDG testis did not change. Treatment of mice with a high dose of degarelix for 28 days reproduced the decline in steroidogenesis observed in prostate cancer patients during ADT. In this animal model, we demonstrated that initial ADT may inhibit the ability of Leydig cells to produce testosterone by suppressing the expression of genes involved in steroidogenesis, such as StAR, P450scc, and 17βHSD.

  5. Auxin-Oxylipin Crosstalk: Relationship of Antagonists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maik Hoffmann; Mathias Hentrich; Stephan Pollmann

    2011-01-01

    Phytohormones regulate a wide array of developmental processes throughout the life cycle of plants. Herein, the various plant hormones may interact additively, synergistically, or antagonistically. By their cooperation they create a delicate regulatory network whose net output largely depends on the action of specific phytohormone combinations rather than on the independent activities of separate hormones. While most classical studies of plant hormonal control have focused mainly on the action of single hormones or on the synergistic interaction of hormones in regulating various developmental processes, recent work is beginning to shed light on the crosstalk of nominally antagonistic plant hormones, such as gibberellins and auxins with oxylipins or abscisic acid. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of how two of the first sight antagonistic plant hormones, i.e. auxins and oxylipins,interact in controlling plant responses and development.

  6. Androgens Regulate T47D Cells Motility and Invasion through Actin Cytoskeleton Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montt-Guevara, Maria Magdalena; Shortrede, Jorge Eduardo; Giretti, Maria Silvia; Giannini, Andrea; Mannella, Paolo; Russo, Eleonora; Genazzani, Alessandro David; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between androgens and breast cancer is controversial. Androgens have complex effects on breast cancer progression and metastasis. Moreover, androgen receptor (AR) is expressed in approximately 70 to 90% of invasive breast carcinomas, which has prognostic relevance in basal-like cancers and in triple-negative breast cancers. Recent studies have associated the actin-binding proteins of the ezrin–radixin–moesin (ERM) family with metastasis in endocrine-sensitive cancers. We studied on T47D breast cancer cells whether androgens with different characteristics, such as testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) may regulate breast cancer cell motility and invasion through the control of actin remodeling. We demonstrate that androgens promote migration and invasion in T47D via Moesin activation. We show that T and DHEA exert their actions via the AR and estrogen receptor (ER), while the non-aromatizable androgen – DHT – only recruits AR. We further report that androgen induced significant changes in actin organization with pseudopodia along with membrane ruffles formation, and this process is mediated by Moesin. Our work identifies novel mechanisms of action of androgens on breast cancer cells. Through the modulation of Moesin, androgens alter the architecture of cytoskeleton in T47D breast cancer cell and promote cell migration and invasion. These results could help to understand the biological actions of androgens on breast cancer and, eventually, to develop new strategies for breast cancer treatment. PMID:27746764

  7. ANDROGENS REGULATE T47D CELLS MOTILITY AND INVASION THROUGH ACTIN CYTOSKELETON REMODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Magdalena Montt-Guevara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between androgens and breast cancer is controversial. Androgens have complex effects on breast cancer progression and metastasis. Moreover, androgens receptor (AR is expressed in approximately 70% to 90% of invasive breast carcinomas, which has prognostic relevance in basal-like cancers and in triple negative breast cancers. Recent studies have associated the actin-binding proteins of the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM family with metastasis in endocrine-sensitive cancers. We studied on T47D breast cancer cells whether androgens with different characteristics, such as testosterone (T, dihydrotestosterone (DHT and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA may regulate breast cancer cell motility and invasion through the control of actin remodelling. We demonstrate that androgens promote migration and invasion in T47D via Moesin activation. We show that T and DHEA exert their actions via the AR and estrogen receptor (ER, while the non aromatizable androgen – DHT only recruits AR. We further report that androgen induced significant changes in actin organization with pseudopodia along with membrane ruffles formation, and this process is mediated by Moesin. Our work identifies novel mechanisms of action of androgens on breast cancer cells. Through the modulation of Moesin, androgens alter the architecture of cytoskeleton in T47D breast cancer cell and promote cell migration and invasion. These results could help to understand the biological actions of androgens on breast cancer, and eventually to develop new strategies for treatment of breast cancer.

  8. Identification of an anabolic selective androgen receptor modulator that actively induces death of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Azriel; Meissner, Robert S; Gentile, Michael A; Chisamore, Michael J; Opas, Evan E; Scafonas, Angela; Cusick, Tara E; Gambone, Carlo; Pennypacker, Brenda; Hodor, Paul; Perkins, James J; Bai, Chang; Ferraro, Damien; Bettoun, David J; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Alves, Stephen E; Flores, Osvaldo; Ray, William J

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) initially responds to inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but inevitably progresses to hormone ablation-resistant disease. Much effort is focused on optimizing this androgen deprivation strategy by improving hormone depletion and AR antagonism. However we found that bicalutamide, a clinically used antiandrogen, actually resembles a selective AR modulator (SARM), as it partially regulates 24% of endogenously 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-responsive genes in AR(+) MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. These data suggested that passive blocking of all AR functions is not required for PCa therapy. Hence, we adopted an active strategy that calls for the development of novel SARMs, which induce a unique gene expression profile that is intolerable to PCa cells. Therefore, we screened 3000 SARMs for the ability to arrest the androgen-independent growth of AR(+) 22Rv1 and LNCaP PCa cells but not AR(-) PC3 or DU145 cells. We identified only one such compound; the 4-aza-steroid, MK-4541, a potent and selective SARM. MK-4541 induces caspase-3 activity and cell death in both androgen-independent, AR(+) PCa cell lines but spares AR(-) cells or AR(+) non-PCa cells. This activity correlates with its promoter context- and cell-type dependent transcriptional effects. In rats, MK-4541 inhibits the trophic effects of DHT on the prostate, but not the levator ani muscle, and triggers an anabolic response in the periosteal compartment of bone. Therefore, MK-4541 has the potential to effectively manage prostatic hypertrophic diseases owing to its antitumor SARM-like mechanism, while simultaneously maintaining the anabolic benefits of natural androgens.

  9. Androgen deficiency in the aging male and chronic prostatitis: clinical and diagnostic comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spirin Р.V.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to study probability, period of development and characteristics of a clinical course of chronic prostatitis against the background of androgen deficiency in the aging male. Materials and methods: The Aging Male Symptoms (AMS rating scale has been applied for androgen deficiency evaluation and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS — for chronic prostatitis evaluation. 57 men with chronic prostatitis in combination with androgen deficiency in the aging male have been examined. Results: It has been concluded that the development of chronic prostatitis against the background of androgen deficiency in the aging male occurs in a shorter time period and about 1.5 times more frequently compared to androgen deficiency in the aging male at the background of chronic prostatitis. The analysis of time periods between the onset of chronic prostatitis symptoms against the background of androgen deficiency in the aging male and androgen deficiency in the aging male symptoms against the background of chronic prostatitis showed that androgen deficiency in the aging male symptoms have been revealed 1-2 years earlier than the onset of chronic prostatitis. The development of androgen deficiency in the aging male against the background of chronic prostatitis has showed a backward tendency. Signs of chronic prostatitis have been more frequently occurred in a period of four-five years earlier the androgen deficiency in the aging male development. Conclusion: The risk of development of chronic prostatitis against the background of androgen deficiency in the aging male during the next two years is actually four times higher in comparison with the development of androgen deficiency in the aging male against the background of chronic prostatitis. According to the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, patients with chronic prostatitis in combination with androgen deficiency in the aging male showed higher degree of severity than

  10. Glycogen synthesis correlates with androgen-dependent growth arrest in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorin Frederic A

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen withdrawal in normal prostate or androgen-dependent prostate cancer is associated with the downregulation of several glycolytic enzymes and with reduced glucose uptake. Although glycogen metabolism is known to regulate the intracellular glucose level its involvement in androgen response has not been studied. Methods We investigated the effects of androgen on glycogen phosphorylase (GP, glycogen synthase (GS and on glycogen accumulation in the androgen-receptor (AR reconstituted PC3 cell line containing either an empty vector (PC3-AR-V or vector with HPV-E7 (PC3-AR-E7 and the LNCaP cell line. Results Androgen addition in PC3 cells expressing the AR mimics androgen ablation in androgen-dependent prostate cells. Incubation of PC3-AR-V or PC3-AR-E7 cells with the androgen R1881 induced G1 cell cycle arrest within 24 hours and resulted in a gradual cell number reduction over 5 days thereafter, which was accompanied by a 2 to 5 fold increase in glycogen content. 24 hours after androgen-treatment the level of Glucose-6-P (G-6-P had increased threefold and after 48 hours the GS and GP activities increased twofold. Under this condition inhibition of glycogenolysis with the selective GP inhibitor CP-91149 enhanced the increase in glycogen content and further reduced the cell number. The androgen-dependent LNCaP cells that endogenously express AR responded to androgen withdrawal with growth arrest and increased glycogen content. CP-91149 further increased glycogen content and caused a reduction of cell number. Conclusion Increased glycogenesis is part of the androgen receptor-mediated cellular response and blockage of glycogenolysis by the GP inhibitor CP-91149 further increased glycogenesis. The combined use of a GP inhibitor with hormone therapy may increase the efficacy of hormone treatment by decreasing the survival of prostate cancer cells and thereby reducing the chance of cancer recurrence.

  11. The comparison of the aging male symptoms (AMS) scale and androgen deficiency in the aging male (ADAM) questionnaire to detect androgen deficiency in middle-aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueh, Kuang-Shun; Huang, Shu-Pin; Lee, Yung-Chin; Wang, Chii-Jye; Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Li, Wei-Ming; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Tsai, Yueh-Fong; Tsai, Chia-Chun; Juan, Hsu-Cheng; Huang, Chun-Hsiung; Liu, Chia-Chu

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of androgen deficiency in men increases with aging. Two common instruments, the Aging Male Symptoms (AMS) scale and the Androgen Deficiency in the Aging Male (ADAM) questionnaire, are often used to screen for androgen deficiency in clinical practice. The aim of this study is to compare the capability of the AMS scale and the ADAM questionnaire to detect androgen deficiency in middle-aged Taiwanese men. In April 2008, a free health screening was conducted by Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital. All participants completed a health questionnaire and had blood samples drawn between 8:00 am and noon. Serum total testosterone (TT), albumin, and sex hormone-binding globulin levels were measured. The level of free testosterone (FT) was calculated. Clinical symptoms associated with androgen deficiency were screened by using the AMS scale and ADAM questionnaire. Androgen deficiency was defined as TT AMS scale were 57.4% and 48.1%, compared with 66.7% and 25.6% for the ADAM questionnaire. In a sample of middle-aged Taiwanese men, neither the AMS scale nor the ADAM questionnaire had sufficient sensitivity and specificity to detect androgen deficiency. In addition to using those 2 screening instruments, a thorough physical and biochemical workup should still be conducted in patients at risk or suspected of androgen deficiency.

  12. Development of an androgen reporter gene assay (AR-LUX) utilizing a human cell line with an endogenously regulated androgen receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankvoort, B.M.G.; Groene, E.M. de; Meeteren-Kreikamp, A.P. van; Witkamp, R.F.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the work described in this report is to develop and characterize a cell-based androgen reporter assay. For this purpose, the androgen receptor (AR) expressing human breast cancer cell line T47D was stably transfected with a luciferase gene under transcriptional control of the PB-ARE-2 and

  13. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome due to a new frameshift deletion in exon 4 of the androgen receptor gene: Functional analysis of the mutant receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Lobaccaro; S. Lumbroso; N. Poujol (Nicolas); V. Georget; A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G. Malpuech (Georges); C. Sultan

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the androgen receptor gene in a large kindred with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome and negative receptor-binding activity, single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and sequencing identified a 13 base pair deletion within exon 4. This was responsible for

  14. The brominated flame retardants TBP-AE and TBP-DBPE antagonize the chicken androgen receptor and act as potential endocrine disrupters in chicken LMH cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnake, Solomon; Pradhan, Ajay; Kharlyngdoh, Joubert Banjop; Modig, Carina; Olsson, Per-Erik

    2015-12-01

    Increased exposure of birds to endocrine disrupting compounds has resulted in developmental and reproductive dysfunctions. We have recently identified the flame retardants, allyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-AE), 2-3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-DBPE) and the TBP-DBPE metabolite 2-bromoallyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-BAE) as antagonists to both the human androgen receptor (AR) and the zebrafish AR. In the present study, we aimed at determining whether these compounds also interact with the chicken AR. In silico modeling studies showed that TBP-AE, TBP-BAE and TBP-DBPE were able to dock into to the chicken AR ligand-binding pocket. In vitro transfection assays revealed that all three brominated compounds acted as chicken AR antagonists, inhibiting testosterone induced AR activation. In addition, qRT-PCR studies confirmed that they act as AR antagonists and demonstrated that they also alter gene expression patterns of apoptotic, anti-apoptotic, drug metabolizing and amino acid transporter genes. These studies, using chicken LMH cells, suggest that TBP-AE, TBP-BAE and TBP-DBPE are potential endocrine disrupters in chicken.

  15. The alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist terazosin induces prostate cancer cell death through a p53 and Rb independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kexin; Wang, Xianghong; Ling, Patrick M T; Tsao, S W; Wong, Y C

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Treatment failure in prostate cancer is usually due to the development of androgen independence and resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs at an advanced stage. Recently, it was reported that the alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist terazosin was able to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth and indicated that it may have an implication in the treatment of prostate cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms involved in terazosin-induced prostate cancer cell death using two androgen-independent cell lines, PC-3 and DU145. Our results showed that terazosin inhibited not only prostate cancer cell growth but also colony forming ability, which is the main target of chemotherapy. We also found that the sensitivity of these cells to terazosin was not affected by the presence of either functional p53 or Rb, suggesting that the terazosin-induced cell death was independent of p53 and Rb. However, the terazosin-induced cell death was associated with G1 phase cell cycle arrest and up-regulation of p27KIP1. In addition, up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 was also observed indicating that these two apoptotic regulators may play important roles in terazosin-mediated cell death pathway. Our results provide evidence for the first time that terazosin may have a therapeutic potential in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

  16. Genetic factors influencing pyrimidine-antagonist chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maring, JG; Groen, HJM; Wachters, FM; Uges, DRA; de Vries, EGE

    2005-01-01

    Pyrimidine antagonists, for example, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cytarabine (ara-C) and gemcitabine (dFdC), are widely used in chemotherapy regimes for colorectal, breast, head and neck, non-small-cell lung cancer, pancreatic cancer and leukaemias. Extensive metabolism is a prerequisite for conversion of

  17. Why are mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists cardioprotective?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Chai (Wenxia); A.H.J. Danser (Jan)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractTwo clinical trials, the Randomized ALdosterone Evaluation Study (RALES) and the EPlerenone HEart failure and SUrvival Study (EPHESUS), have recently shown that mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists reduce mortality in patients with heart failure on top of ACE inhibition. This effe

  18. The use of digit ratios as markers for perinatal androgen action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIntyre Matthew H

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since the ratio of the second-to-fourth finger length was first proposed as a marker for prenatal androgen action in 1998, over 100 studies have been published that have either further tested the association between the digit ratio and prenatal androgens, or employed digit ratios as a marker to investigate the association between prenatal androgens and a variety of outcomes, including behavior, fertility, and disease risks. Despite the clear demand for an adult marker of prenatal androgen action and increased use of digit ratios as such a marker, its validity remains controversial. This review (1 evaluates current evidence for the relationship between digit ratios and prenatal androgens (using experimentation with animal models, amniotic testosterone, and congenital adrenal hyperplasia case-control studies, (2 describes opportunities for future validation tests, and (3 compares the potential advantages and disadvantages of digit ratio measures with more established methods for studying the effects of prenatal androgens.

  19. Androgen receptor functional analyses by high throughput imaging: determination of ligand, cell cycle, and mutation-specific effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam T Szafran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding how androgen receptor (AR function is modulated by exposure to steroids, growth factors or small molecules can have important mechanistic implications for AR-related disease therapies (e.g., prostate cancer, androgen insensitivity syndrome, AIS, and in the analysis of environmental endocrine disruptors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the development of a high throughput (HT image-based assay that quantifies AR subcellular and subnuclear distribution, and transcriptional reporter gene activity on a cell-by-cell basis. Furthermore, simultaneous analysis of DNA content allowed determination of cell cycle position and permitted the analysis of cell cycle dependent changes in AR function in unsynchronized cell populations. Assay quality for EC50 coefficients of variation were 5-24%, with Z' values reaching 0.91. This was achieved by the selective analysis of cells expressing physiological levels of AR, important because minor over-expression resulted in elevated nuclear speckling and decreased transcriptional reporter gene activity. A small screen of AR-binding ligands, including known agonists, antagonists, and endocrine disruptors, demonstrated that nuclear translocation and nuclear "speckling" were linked with transcriptional output, and specific ligands were noted to differentially affect measurements for wild type versus mutant AR, suggesting differing mechanisms of action. HT imaging of patient-derived AIS mutations demonstrated a proof-of-principle personalized medicine approach to rapidly identify ligands capable of restoring multiple AR functions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HT imaging-based multiplex screening will provide a rapid, systems-level analysis of compounds/RNAi that may differentially affect wild type AR or clinically relevant AR mutations.

  20. Update of the androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1999-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 309 to 374 during the past year. We have expanded the database by adding information on AR-interacting proteins; and we have improved the database by identifying those mutation entries that have been updated. Mutations of unknown significance have now been reported in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the AR gene, and in individuals who are somatic mosaics constitutionally. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms, including silent mutations, have been discovered in normal individuals and in individuals with male infertility. A mutation hotspot associated with prostatic cancer has been identified in exon 5. The database is available on the internet (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  1. Optimised deconjugation of androgenic steroid conjugates in bovine urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mikael; Frandsen, Henrik L; Andersen, Jens H

    2017-04-01

    After administration of steroids to animals the steroids are partially metabolised in the liver and kidney to phase 2 metabolites, i.e., glucuronic acid or sulphate conjugates. During analysis these conjugated metabolites are normally deconjugated enzymatically with aryl sulphatase and glucuronidase resulting in free steroids in the extract. It is well known that some sulphates are not deconjugated using aryl sulphatase; instead, for example, solvolysis can be used for deconjugation of these aliphatic sulphates. The effectiveness of solvolysis on androgenic steroid sulphates was tested with selected aliphatic steroid sulphates (boldenone sulphate, nortestosteron sulphate and testosterone sulphate), and the method was validated for analysis of androgenic steroids in bovine urine using free steroids, steroid sulphates and steroid glucuronides as standards. Glucuronidase and sulphuric acid in ethyl acetate were used for deconjugation and the extract was purified by solid-phase extraction. The final extract was evaporated to dryness, re-dissolved and analysed by LC-MS/MS.

  2. Impact of androgen deprivation therapy on sexual function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Clarisse R Mazzola; John P Mulhall

    2012-01-01

    Many patients with prostate cancer for whom androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is indicated are young and desire to remain sexually active.In such patients,the side effects of androgen therapy on sexual function can be a source of serious reduction in overall quality of life.Providing the appropriate treatment options in this patient population is therefore essential.Nevertheless,treating such patients is challenging and an understanding of the underlying mechanisms of sexual physiology and pathophysiology is crucial to optimal patient care.In this paper,we reviewed what was known regarding the effects of ADT on sexual function in animal models and we also provided a detailed review on the effects of ADT on sexual health in humans and its treatment.

  3. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-02-05

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic-clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully.

  4. Threat perception and familiarity moderate the androgen response to competition in women

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Social interactions elicit androgen responses whose function has been posited to be the adjustment of androgen-dependent behaviors to social context. The activation of this androgen response is known to be mediated and moderated by psychological factors. In this study we tested the hypothesis that the testosterone (T) changes after a competition are not simply related to its outcome, but rather to the way the subject evaluates the event. In particular we tested two evaluative dimensions of a ...

  5. Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: A Rare Case of Disorder of Sex Development

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonsa Pizzo; Antonio Simone Laganà; Irene Borrielli; Nella Dugo

    2013-01-01

    Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS) could be considered as a disease that causes resistance to androgens actions, influencing both the morphogenesis and differentiation of the body structures, and systems in which this hormone exerts its effects. It depends on an X-linked mutations in the Androgen Receptor (AR) gene that express a variety of phenotypes ranging from male infertility to completely normal female external genitalia. The clinical phenotypes of AIS could vary and be classified in...

  6. Improvement in scalp hair growth in androgen-deficient women treated with testosterone: a questionnaire study

    OpenAIRE

    Glaser, RL; Dimitrakakis, C.; Messenger, AG

    2012-01-01

    Background Androgens are thought to have an adverse effect on female scalp hair growth. However, our clinical experience of androgen replacement therapy in women with androgen deficiency, in which hair loss was seldom reported, led us to question this concept. Objectives To evaluate the effect of subcutaneous testosterone therapy on scalp hair growth in female patients. Methods A total of 285 women, treated for a minimum of 1 year with subcutaneous testosterone implants for symptoms of androg...

  7. Echocardiographic Findings in Power Athletes Abusing Anabolic Androgenic Steroids

    OpenAIRE

    Hajimoradi, Behzad; Kazerani, Hashem

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) abuse for improving physical appearance and performance in body builders is common and has been considered responsible for serious cardiovascular effects. Due to disagreement about cardiovascular side effects of these drugs in published articles, this case control study was designed to evaluate the echocardiographic findings in body builder athletes who are current and chronic abusers of these drugs. Methods Body builder athletes with continuous prac...

  8. Aberrant AR Signaling as a Function of Declining Androgen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    CAG are associated with diseases such as Huntington disease and spinal and bulbar muscular atro- phy, which is commonly called Kennedy’s disease . This...Sequence variation and size ranges of CAG repeats in the Machado-Joseph disease , spinocerebellar ataxia type I and androgen receptor genes. Hutm. Mot...Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be

  9. ANABOLIC-ANDROGENIC STEROID DEPENDENCE? INSIGHTS FROM ANIMALS AND HUMANS

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Ruth I.

    2008-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, with negative health consequences. As a result, in 1991 testosterone and related AAS were declared controlled substances. However, the relative abuse and dependence liability of AAS have not been fully characterized. In humans, it is difficult to separate the direct psychoactive effects of AAS from reinforcement due to their systemic anabolic effects. Howev...

  10. Muscle Dysfunction in Androgen Deprivation: Role of Ryanodine Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE Muscle Dysfunction in Androgen Deprivation: Role of Ryanodine Receptor 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1...required for muscle contraction . RyR1 is a homotetrameric macromolecular protein complex that includes four RyR1 monomers (565kDa each), the RyR1... muscle physiology experiments). Under a microscope, the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle is cut with micro dissection scissors at the distal insertion

  11. Anti-androgens in treatment of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, M; Ramadan, A; Abdel Monem, A

    1985-10-01

    Seventy-five women suffering from acne vulgaris classified into three groups according to the grade of the disease. Anti-androgenic tablets cyproterone acetate (CPA), were given in three cycles. The total number of patients whose condition improved was 52% after the first cycle, 55% after the second cycle, and 81.3% after the third cycle. No serious side effects were encountered. CPA is a suitable therapeutic modility for AV in women who use contraceptives.

  12. Androgenic Hormone Profile of Adult Women with Acne

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, Marisa Gonzaga da; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso; Machado Filho, Carlos D'apparecida Santos

    2013-01-01

    Acne in adult women is a hard-to-manage frequent disease with many relapse cases. It mostly interferes with quality of life and causes major social and metabolic losses for patients. This is a transversal retrospective study and the aim was to standardize the research on circulating androgenic hormone levels and to detect hyperandrogenic states early, showing the frequency and the pattern of the altered hormones, useful resources to correctly evaluate each patient. in this study 835 women abo...

  13. Targeting Androgen Receptor Aberrations in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Adam; Welti, Jonathan; Blagg, Julian; de Bono, Johann S

    2016-09-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) splice variants (SV) have been implicated in the development of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and resistance to AR targeting therapies, including abiraterone and enzalutamide. Agents targeting AR-SV are urgently needed to test this hypothesis and further improve the outcome of patients suffering from this lethal disease. Clin Cancer Res; 22(17); 4280-2. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Yang et al., p. 4466.

  14. EFFECT OF ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST AND ENDOTHELIN RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST ON NITROGLYCERIN TOLERANCE IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether angiotensin II receptor antagonist and endothelin receptor antagonist can improve the nitroglycerin (Nit) tolerance in vivo. Methods. Twenty-four rats were divided into 4 groups (n=6,each): Control group, Nitroglycerin (Nit) group, Nit+ bosentan group and Nit+ losartan group. Nitroglycerin tolerance was induced by 2-day treatment of nitroglycerin patch (0.05 mg/h). AngiotensinⅡ receptor antagonist losartan ( 10 mg· kg- 1· d- 1 ) and endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan ( 100 mg· kg- 1· d- 1 ) were given by gavage for 2 days respectively. Results. The least hypotensive response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was observed in Nit group . The effective percentages of hypotensive response to SNP were increased in both Nit+ losartan group and Nit+ bosentan group compared with Nit group [(31.95± 4.45 ) % vs (21.00± 3.69 ) % , P Conclusion. Endothelin receptor antagonist and angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist could prevent against the Nit tolerance .

  15. Male gender identity in complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    T'Sjoen, Guy; De Cuypere, Griet; Monstrey, Stan; Hoebeke, Piet; Freedman, F Kenneth; Appari, Mahesh; Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Van Borsel, John; Cools, Martine

    2011-06-01

    Women and girls with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) invariably have a female typical core gender identity. In this case report, we describe the first case of male gender identity in a CAIS individual raised female leading to complete sex reassignment involving both androgen treatment and phalloplasty. CAIS was diagnosed at age 17, based on an unambiguously female phenotype, a 46,XY karyotype, and a 2660delT androgen receptor (AR) gene mutation, leading to a premature stop in codon 807. Bilateral gonadectomy was performed but a short period of estrogen treatment induced a negative emotional reaction and treatment was stopped. Since the age of 3, childhood-onset cross gender behavior had been noticed. After a period of psychotherapy, persisting male gender identity was confirmed. There was no psychiatric co-morbidity and there was an excellent real life experience. Testosterone substitution was started, however without inducing any of the desired secondary male characteristics. A subcutaneous mastectomy was performed and the patient received phalloplasty by left forearm free flap and scrotoplasty. Testosterone treatment was continued, without inducing virilization, and bone density remained normal. The patient qualifies as female-to-male transsexual and was treated according to the Standards of Care by the World Professional Association for Transgender Health with good outcome. However, we do not believe that female sex of rearing as a standard procedure should be questioned in CAIS. Our case challenges the role of a functional AR pathway in the development of male gender identity.

  16. Local oestrogenic/androgenic balance in the cerebral vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, D N; Duckles, S P; Gonzales, R J

    2011-09-01

    Reproductive effects of sex steroids are well-known; however it is increasingly apparent that these hormones have important actions on non-reproductive tissues such as the vasculature. The latter effects can be relevant throughout the lifespan, not just limited to reproductive years, and are not necessarily restricted to one gender or the other. Our work has established that cerebral blood vessels are a non-reproductive target tissue for sex steroids. We have found that oestrogen and androgens alter vascular tone, endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in cerebral vessels. Often the actions of oestrogen and androgens oppose each other. Moreover, it is clear that cerebral vessels are directly targeted by sex steroids, as they express specific receptors for these hormones. Interestingly, cerebral blood vessels also express enzymes that metabolize sex steroids. These findings suggest that local synthesis of 17ß-estradiol and dihydrotestosterone can occur within the vessel wall. One of the enzymes present, aromatase, converts testosterone to 17ß-estradiol, which would alter the local balance of androgenic and oestrogenic influences. Thus cerebral vessels are affected by circulating sex hormones as well as locally synthesized sex steroids. The presence of vascular endocrine effector mechanisms has important implications for male-female differences in cerebrovascular function and disease. Moreover, the cerebral circulation is a target for gonadal hormones as well as anabolic steroids and therapeutic drugs used to manipulate sex steroid actions. The long-term consequences of these influences are yet to be determined.

  17. Clinical, ultrasound and hormonal markers of androgenicity in acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, S; Cunliffe, W J; Keczkes, K; Early, A S; McGarrigle, H H; Katz, M; Reese, R A

    1995-08-01

    Androgenic stimulation of sebaceous glands is an important factor in the development of acne. We examined 36 females (aged 14-34 years), selected because none had received oral contraceptives, anti-androgen therapy, or systemic antibiotics during the previous year, or isotretinoin therapy, prior to their participation in the study. Subjects were divided into groups on the basis of acne severity, as follows: physiological, mild and moderate. Only two patients had polycystic ovaries on ultrasound examination. Seven patients had irregular menses; none had evidence of hirsutism. We found that the severity of acne, based on the acne grade, was highly correlated with the inflammatory lesion count, and less correlated with the sebum excretion rate. Either acne grade or inflammatory lesion count could be related to some of the five androgenic hormone determinants; free testosterone (TESTOS), delta 4 androstenedione (DELTA 4), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), dehydroepiandrostenedione sulphate (DHEAS) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Multiple linear regression analysis determined the best model for predicting ACNE scores as involving DELTA 4 and DHEAS (positive effects), and SHBG (negative effect), P < 0.005, R2 = 0.36). In none of the patients were the levels of DHEAS or SHBG outside the normal range. The findings in the two patients with polycystic ovaries did not differ significantly from those in the remainder of the patients.

  18. Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: Management Considerations from Infancy to Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min-Jye; Vu, Bach-Mai K; Axelrad, Marni; Dietrich, Jennifer E; Gargollo, Patricio; Gunn, Sheila; Macias, Charles G; McCullough, Laurence B; Roth, David R; Sutton, V Reid; Karaviti, Lefkothea P

    2015-06-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an undervirilization syndrome in individuals with 46, XY karyotype. The undervirilization can be complete feminization or incomplete virilization with grades of ambiguity. AIS is caused by mutations in the androgen receptor, resulting in resistance to the physiologic activities of androgens. Differing degrees of resistance lead to three phenotypes: a complete form with female-appearing external genitalia, a partial form with a wide range of virilization, and a mild form with only minor undervirilization. AIS presents different challenges depending on whether resistance is complete or partial. Challenges include sex assignment, which impacts other medical decisions such as gonadectomy, hormonal replacement, and other surgical interventions. This review describes medical, psychosocial, and ethical concerns for each stage of development in complete and partial AIS, from the neonatal period to adulthood. These aspects of care should be addressed within an ethical framework by a multidisciplinary team, with the patients and families being the stakeholders in the decision-making process. We use the GRADE system when appropriate to appraise the existing evidence and provide recommendations and guidelines for management of AIS and appropriate transition of patients from pediatric to adult care.

  19. Discovery of diarylhydantoins as new selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nique, François; Hebbe, Séverine; Peixoto, Christophe; Annoot, Denis; Lefrançois, Jean-Michel; Duval, Eric; Michoux, Laurence; Triballeau, Nicolas; Lemoullec, Jean-Michel; Mollat, Patrick; Thauvin, Maxime; Prangé, Thierry; Minet, Dominique; Clément-Lacroix, Philippe; Robin-Jagerschmidt, Catherine; Fleury, Damien; Guédin, Denis; Deprez, Pierre

    2012-10-11

    A novel selective androgen receptor modulator scaffold has been discovered through structural modifications of hydantoin antiandrogens. Several 4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-N-arylhydantoins displayed partial agonism with nanomolar in vitro potency in transactivation experiments using androgen receptor (AR) transfected cells. In a standard castrated male rat model, several compounds showed good anabolic activity on levator ani muscle, dissociated from the androgenic activity on ventral prostate, after oral dosing at 30 mg/kg. (+)-4-[3,4-Dimethyl-2,5-dioxo-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)imidazolidin-1-yl]-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile ((+)-11b) displayed anabolic potency with a strong dissociation between levator ani muscle and ventral prostate (A(50) = 0.5 mg/kg vs 70 mg/kg). The binding modes of two compounds, including (+)-11b, within the AR ligand-binding domain have been studied by cocrystallization experiments using a coactivator-like peptide. Both compounds bound to the same site, and the overall structures of the AR were very similar.

  20. Recent developments in antiandrogens and selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haendler, Bernard; Cleve, Arwed

    2012-04-16

    The androgens testosterone and dihydrotestosterone play an essential role in the development and maintenance of primary and secondary male characteristics. Androgens bind to a specific androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor which controls the expression of a large number of downstream target genes. The AR is an essential player in early and late prostate cancer, and may also be involved in some forms of breast cancer. It also represents a drug target for the treatment of hypogonadism. Recent studies furthermore indicate that targeting the AR in pathologies such as frailty syndrome, cachexia or polycystic ovary syndrome may have clinical benefit. Numerous AR ligands with very different pharmacological properties have been identified in the last 40 years and helped to treat several of these diseases. However, progress still needs to be made in order to find compounds with an improved profile with regard to efficacy, differentiation and side-effects. This will only be achieved through a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in normal and aberrant AR signaling.

  1. Direct interaction between AR and PAK6 in androgen-stimulated PAK6 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Busby, Jennifer; John, Ciny; Wei, Jianning; Yuan, Xin; Lu, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    A p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) was previously identified to be an androgen receptor (AR) interacting protein through a yeast two-hybrid screening. We used hormone responsive prostate cancer LAPC4 and LNCap cell lines as models to study the signaling events associated with androgen stimulation and PAK6. An androgen-stimulated PAK6 kinase activation was observed in LAPC4 cells expressing endogenous PAK6 and in LNCap cells ectopically expressing a wild type PAK6. This activation was likely mediated through a direct interaction between AR and PAK6 since siRNA knock-down of AR in LAPC4 cells downregulated androgen-stimulated PAK6 activation. In addition, LNCap cells expressing a non-AR-interacting PAK6 mutant exhibited dampened androgen-stimulated kinase activation. As a consequence of androgen-stimulated activation, PAK6 was phosphorylated at multiple serine/threonine residues including the AR-interacting domain of PAK6. Furthermore, androgen-stimulation promoted prostate cancer cell motility and invasion were demonstrated in LNCap cells ectopically expressing PAK6-WT. In contrast, LNCap expressing non-AR-interacting mutant PAK6 did not respond to androgen stimulation with increased cell motility and invasion. Our results demonstrate that androgen-stimulated PAK6 activation is mediated through a direct interaction between AR and PAK6 and PAK6 activation promotes prostate cancer cells motility and invasion.

  2. Direct interaction between AR and PAK6 in androgen-stimulated PAK6 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Liu

    Full Text Available A p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6 was previously identified to be an androgen receptor (AR interacting protein through a yeast two-hybrid screening. We used hormone responsive prostate cancer LAPC4 and LNCap cell lines as models to study the signaling events associated with androgen stimulation and PAK6. An androgen-stimulated PAK6 kinase activation was observed in LAPC4 cells expressing endogenous PAK6 and in LNCap cells ectopically expressing a wild type PAK6. This activation was likely mediated through a direct interaction between AR and PAK6 since siRNA knock-down of AR in LAPC4 cells downregulated androgen-stimulated PAK6 activation. In addition, LNCap cells expressing a non-AR-interacting PAK6 mutant exhibited dampened androgen-stimulated kinase activation. As a consequence of androgen-stimulated activation, PAK6 was phosphorylated at multiple serine/threonine residues including the AR-interacting domain of PAK6. Furthermore, androgen-stimulation promoted prostate cancer cell motility and invasion were demonstrated in LNCap cells ectopically expressing PAK6-WT. In contrast, LNCap expressing non-AR-interacting mutant PAK6 did not respond to androgen stimulation with increased cell motility and invasion. Our results demonstrate that androgen-stimulated PAK6 activation is mediated through a direct interaction between AR and PAK6 and PAK6 activation promotes prostate cancer cells motility and invasion.

  3. Androgens in women are essentially made from DHEA in each peripheral tissue according to intracrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrie, Fernand; Martel, Céline; Bélanger, Alain; Pelletier, Georges

    2017-04-01

    The objective is to review how the cell-specific amounts of intracellular androgens are all made in women from circulating dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in each peripheral tissue, independently from the rest of the body. Following 500 million years of evolution, approximately three dozen cell-specific intracrine enzymes have been engineered in human peripheral tissues whereby the inactive sex steroid precursor DHEA mainly of adrenal origin is transformed into the appropriate minute intracellular amounts of androgens. These intracellular androgens are inactivated in the same cells, with no biologically significant release of active androgens in the circulation. The best estimate is that approximately 50% as much androgens are synthesized in women, compared to men of the same age. The problem with DHEA, however, the exclusive source of androgens in women of all ages, is that DHEA secretion has already decreased by an average of 60% at time of menopause and continues to decrease thereafter. The human-specific and highly sophisticated mechanisms of intracrinology permit each cell to control androgen availability according to its own needs independently from the remaining of the body. Such a mechanism is completely different from classical endocrinology well understood in men where testosterone of testicular origin is transported through the blood and has indiscriminate access to the androgen receptor (AR) in all AR-containing cells of the body. In men, both the endocrine and intracrine mechanisms are in operation while, in women, only the intracrine mechanisms responsible for intracellular formation from DHEA provide androgens.

  4. Steroid Androgen Exposure during Development Has No Effect on Reproductive Physiology of Biomphalaria glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Satwant; Baynes, Alice; Lockyer, Anne E; Routledge, Edwin J; Jones, Catherine S; Noble, Leslie R; Jobling, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Gastropod mollusks have been proposed as alternative models for male reproductive toxicity testing, due to similarities in their reproductive anatomy compared to mammals, together with evidence that endocrine disrupting chemicals can cause effects in some mollusks analogous to those seen in mammals. To test this hypothesis, we used the freshwater pulmonate snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, for which various genetic tools and a draft genome have recently become available, to investigate the effects of two steroid androgens on the development of mollusk secondary sexual organs. Here we present the results of exposures to two potent androgens, the vertebrate steroid; 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and the pharmaceutical anabolic steroid; 17α-methyltestosterone (MT), under continuous flow-through conditions throughout embryonic development and up to sexual maturity. Secondary sexual gland morphology, histopathology and differential gene expression analysis were used to determine whether steroid androgens stimulated or inhibited organ development. No significant differences between tissues from control and exposed snails were identified, suggesting that these androgens elicited no biologically detectable response normally associated with exposure to androgens in vertebrate model systems. Identifying no effect of androgens in this mollusk is significant, not only in the context of the suitability of mollusks as alternative model organisms for testing vertebrate androgen receptor agonists but also, if applicable to other similar mollusks, in terms of the likely impacts of androgens and anti-androgenic pollutants present in the aquatic environment.

  5. Steroid Androgen Exposure during Development Has No Effect on Reproductive Physiology of Biomphalaria glabrata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satwant Kaur

    Full Text Available Gastropod mollusks have been proposed as alternative models for male reproductive toxicity testing, due to similarities in their reproductive anatomy compared to mammals, together with evidence that endocrine disrupting chemicals can cause effects in some mollusks analogous to those seen in mammals. To test this hypothesis, we used the freshwater pulmonate snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, for which various genetic tools and a draft genome have recently become available, to investigate the effects of two steroid androgens on the development of mollusk secondary sexual organs. Here we present the results of exposures to two potent androgens, the vertebrate steroid; 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT and the pharmaceutical anabolic steroid; 17α-methyltestosterone (MT, under continuous flow-through conditions throughout embryonic development and up to sexual maturity. Secondary sexual gland morphology, histopathology and differential gene expression analysis were used to determine whether steroid androgens stimulated or inhibited organ development. No significant differences between tissues from control and exposed snails were identified, suggesting that these androgens elicited no biologically detectable response normally associated with exposure to androgens in vertebrate model systems. Identifying no effect of androgens in this mollusk is significant, not only in the context of the suitability of mollusks as alternative model organisms for testing vertebrate androgen receptor agonists but also, if applicable to other similar mollusks, in terms of the likely impacts of androgens and anti-androgenic pollutants present in the aquatic environment.

  6. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome or testicular feminization: review of literature based on a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souhail, Regragui; Amine, Slaoui; Nadia, Abounouh; Tarik, Karmouni; Khalid, El Khader; Abdellatif, Koutani; Ahmed, Ibn Attya

    2016-01-01

    Testicular feminization, or the androgen insensitivity syndrome, is a rare disease. Because of various abnormalities of the X chromosome, a male, genetically XY, has some physical characteristics of a woman or a full female phenotype. Indeed the androgen insensitivity syndrome occurs because of a resistance to the actions of the androgen hormones, which in turn switches the development towards the aspect of a woman. We report a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome in a 30 years old woman who presented primary amenorrhea. We aim to improve our knowledge of this illness from the data that provides us this study, and a review of the literature.

  7. Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: A Rare Case of Disorder of Sex Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonsa Pizzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS could be considered as a disease that causes resistance to androgens actions, influencing both the morphogenesis and differentiation of the body structures, and systems in which this hormone exerts its effects. It depends on an X-linked mutations in the Androgen Receptor (AR gene that express a variety of phenotypes ranging from male infertility to completely normal female external genitalia. The clinical phenotypes of AIS could vary and be classified into three categories, as complete (CAIS, partial (PAIS, and mild (MAIS forms, according to the severity of androgen resistance. We will describe a case of CAIS in a 16-year-old patient.

  8. Steroid Androgen Exposure during Development Has No Effect on Reproductive Physiology of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockyer, Anne E.; Routledge, Edwin J.; Jones, Catherine S.; Noble, Leslie R.; Jobling, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Gastropod mollusks have been proposed as alternative models for male reproductive toxicity testing, due to similarities in their reproductive anatomy compared to mammals, together with evidence that endocrine disrupting chemicals can cause effects in some mollusks analogous to those seen in mammals. To test this hypothesis, we used the freshwater pulmonate snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, for which various genetic tools and a draft genome have recently become available, to investigate the effects of two steroid androgens on the development of mollusk secondary sexual organs. Here we present the results of exposures to two potent androgens, the vertebrate steroid; 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and the pharmaceutical anabolic steroid; 17α-methyltestosterone (MT), under continuous flow-through conditions throughout embryonic development and up to sexual maturity. Secondary sexual gland morphology, histopathology and differential gene expression analysis were used to determine whether steroid androgens stimulated or inhibited organ development. No significant differences between tissues from control and exposed snails were identified, suggesting that these androgens elicited no biologically detectable response normally associated with exposure to androgens in vertebrate model systems. Identifying no effect of androgens in this mollusk is significant, not only in the context of the suitability of mollusks as alternative model organisms for testing vertebrate androgen receptor agonists but also, if applicable to other similar mollusks, in terms of the likely impacts of androgens and anti-androgenic pollutants present in the aquatic environment. PMID:27448327

  9. Mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptor antagonists in animal models of anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, SM; KorteBouws, GAH; Koob, GF; DeKloet, ER; Bohus, B

    1996-01-01

    The behavioral effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of a specific mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist [RU28318 (10-50 ng/2 mu l)], a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist [RU38486 (1-50 ng/2 mu l)], or both antagonists (50 ng/2 mu l), were studied in two different animal

  10. High affinity retinoic acid receptor antagonists: analogs of AGN 193109.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A T; Wang, L; Gillett, S J; Chandraratna, R A

    1999-02-22

    A series of high affinity retinoic acid receptor (RAR) antagonists were prepared based upon the known antagonist AGN 193109 (2). Introduction of various phenyl groups revealed a preference for substitution at the para-position relative to the meta-site. Antagonists with the highest affinities for the RARs possessed hydrophobic groups, however, the presence of polar functionality was also well tolerated.

  11. Novel benzimidazole-based MCH R1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Andrew J; Al-Barazanji, Kamal A; Barvian, Kevin K; Bishop, Michael J; Britt, Christy S; Cooper, Joel P; Goetz, Aaron S; Grizzle, Mary K; Hertzog, Donald L; Ignar, Diane M; Morgan, Ronda O; Peckham, Gregory E; Speake, Jason D; Swain, Will R

    2006-10-01

    The identification of an MCH R1 antagonist screening hit led to the optimization of a class of benzimidazole-based MCH R1 antagonists. Structure-activity relationships and efforts to optimize pharmacokinetic properties are detailed along with the demonstration of the effectiveness of an MCH R1 antagonist in an animal model of obesity.

  12. A precisely substituted benzopyran targets androgen refractory prostate cancer cells through selective modulation of estrogen receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Jain, Ashish; Singh, Vishal [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Sarswat, Amit [Division of Medicinal & Process Chemistry, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Maikhuri, Jagdamba P. [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Sharma, Vishnu L. [Division of Medicinal & Process Chemistry, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Gupta, Gopal, E-mail: g_gupta@cdri.res.in [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India)

    2015-03-15

    Dietary consumption of phytoestrogens like genistein has been linked with lower incidence of prostate cancer. The estradiol-like benzopyran core of genistein confers estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) selectivity that imparts weak anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells. DL-2-[4-(2-piperidinoethoxy)phenyl]-3-phenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (BP), a SERM designed with benzopyran core, targeted androgen independent prostate cancer (PC-3) cells 14-times more potently than genistein, ~ 25% more efficiently than tamoxifen and 6.5-times more actively than ICI-182780, without forfeiting significant specificity in comparison to genistein. BP increased apoptosis (annexin-V and TUNEL labeling), arrested cell cycle, and significantly increased caspase-3 activity along with mRNA expressions of estrogen receptor (ER)-β and FasL (qPCR) in PC-3 cells. In classical ERE-luc reporter assay BP behaved as a potent ER-α antagonist and ER-β agonist. Accordingly, it decreased expression of ER-α target PS2 (P < 0.01) and increased expression of ER-β target TNF-α (P < 0.05) genes in PC-3. ER-β deficient PC-3 (siRNA-transfected) was resistant to apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions of SERMs, including stimulation of FasL expression by BP. BP significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt and ERK-1/2, JNK and p38 in PC-3 (immunoblotting), and thus adopted a multi-pathway mechanism to exert a more potent anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells than natural and synthetic SERMs. Its precise ER-subtype specific activity presents a unique lead structure for further optimization. - Highlights: • BP with benzopyran core of genistein was identified for ER-β selective action. • BP was 14-times more potent than genistien in targeting prostate cancer cells. • It behaved as a potent ER-β agonist and ER-α antagonist in gene reporter assays. • BP's anti-proliferative action was inhibited significantly in ER-β deficient cells. • BP — a unique lead

  13. Antiproliferative Effect of Androgen Receptor Inhibition in Mesenchymal Stem-Like Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiyu Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Androgen receptor (AR, a steroid hormone receptor, has recently emerged as prognostic and treatment-predictive marker in breast cancer. Previous studies have shown that AR is widely expressed in up to one-third of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC. However, the role of AR in TNBC is still not fully understood, especially in mesenchymal stem-like (MSL TNBC cells. Methods: MSL TNBC MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T breast cancer cells were exposed to various concentration of agonist 5-α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT or nonsteroidal antagonist bicalutamide or untreated. The effects of AR on cell viability and apoptosis were determined by MTT assay, cell counting, flow cytometry analysis and protein expression of p53, p73, p21 and Cyclin D1 were analyzed by western blotting. The bindings of AR to p73 and p21 promoter were detected by ChIP assay. MDA-MB-231 cells were transplanted into nude mice and the tumor growth curves were determined and expression of AR, p73 and p21 were detected by Immunohistochemistry (IHC staining after treatment of DHT or bicalutamide. Results: We demonstrate that AR agonist DHT induces MSL TNBC breast cancer cells proliferation and inhibits apoptosis in vitro. Similarly, activated AR significantly increases viability of MDA-MB-231 xenografts in vivo. On the contrary, AR antagonist, bicalutamide, causes apoptosis and exerts inhibitory effects on the growth of breast cancer. Moreover, DHT-dependent activation of AR involves regulation in the cell cycle related genes, including p73, p21 and Cyclin D1. Further investigations indicate the modulation of AR on p73 and p21 mediated by direct binding of AR to their promoters, and DHT could make these binding more effectively. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates the tumorigenesis role of AR and the inhibitory effect of bicalutamide in AR-positive MSL TNBC both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that AR inhibition could be a potential therapeutic approach for AR-positive TNBC

  14. Selling androgenic anabolic steroids by the pound: identification and analysis of popular websites on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordaro, F G; Lombardo, S; Cosentino, M

    2011-12-01

    Internet websites offering androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) were identified and available products were examined. Keywords for the website search were: "anabolic steroids," "anabolic steroids buy," "anabolic steroid purchase." The first 10 websites offering AAS in the first 10 pages of results were considered. At least two AAS-containing products per website were selected. Thirty AAS-selling websites were identified, mainly located in the United States (46.7%) and Europe (30%). Most websites sold other anabolic/ergogenic products (clenbuterol, 76.7%; GH/IGF, 60.0%; thyroid hormones, 46.7%; erythropoietin, 30.0%; insulin, 20.0%) or products for AAS-related adverse effects (mainly: estrogen antagonists, 63.3%; products for erectile dysfunction, 56.7%; 5α-reductase inhibitors, 33.3%; anti-acne products, 33.3%). AAS were sold as medicines (69.6%) or as dietary supplements (30.4%). AAS in medicines were mainly: nandronole (20.4%), methandrostenolone (18.4%), and testosterone (12.2%). Dietary supplements contained mainly DHEA and included several fake compounds. Manufacturers were declared for 97.9% of medicines and 66.7% of dietary supplements; however, several manufacturers were not found on the Internet. Described benefits were usually few adverse effects and no estrogenicity. Toxicity was seldom reported and presented as mild. Recommended doses were two-fourfold higher than current medical recommendations. In conclusion, misleading information and deceiving practices were common findings on AAS-selling websites, indicating their deleterious potential for public health.

  15. A precisely substituted benzopyran targets androgen refractory prostate cancer cells through selective modulation of estrogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Jain, Ashish; Singh, Vishal; Sarswat, Amit; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Sharma, Vishnu L; Gupta, Gopal

    2015-03-15

    Dietary consumption of phytoestrogens like genistein has been linked with lower incidence of prostate cancer. The estradiol-like benzopyran core of genistein confers estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) selectivity that imparts weak anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells. DL-2-[4-(2-piperidinoethoxy)phenyl]-3-phenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (BP), a SERM designed with benzopyran core, targeted androgen independent prostate cancer (PC-3) cells 14-times more potently than genistein, ~25% more efficiently than tamoxifen and 6.5-times more actively than ICI-182780, without forfeiting significant specificity in comparison to genistein. BP increased apoptosis (annexin-V and TUNEL labeling), arrested cell cycle, and significantly increased caspase-3 activity along with mRNA expressions of estrogen receptor (ER)-β and FasL (qPCR) in PC-3 cells. In classical ERE-luc reporter assay BP behaved as a potent ER-α antagonist and ER-β agonist. Accordingly, it decreased expression of ER-α target PS2 (P<0.01) and increased expression of ER-β target TNF-α (P<0.05) genes in PC-3. ER-β deficient PC-3 (siRNA-transfected) was resistant to apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions of SERMs, including stimulation of FasL expression by BP. BP significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt and ERK-1/2, JNK and p38 in PC-3 (immunoblotting), and thus adopted a multi-pathway mechanism to exert a more potent anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells than natural and synthetic SERMs. Its precise ER-subtype specific activity presents a unique lead structure for further optimization.

  16. Inhibition of Androgen-Independent Growth of Prostate Cancer by siRNA- Mediated Androgen Receptor Gene Silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA Introduction Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed after skin cancers and the... cancer cell growth: androgen regulation of CDK2, CDK4 , and CKI p16 genes. Cancer Res. 1997; 57:4511-4516. 109. Gregory CW, Hamil KG, Kim D, Hall SH...the most diagnosed non- skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer -related death [2]. Currently, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the most

  17. Synthesis and in vitro characterization of ionone-based compounds as dual inhibitors of the androgen receptor and NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiguo; Zhou, Jinming; Geng, Guoyan; Lin, Rongtuan; Wu, Jian Hui

    2014-04-01

    Current therapeutic strategy for advanced prostate cancer is to suppress the androgen receptor (AR) signaling. However, lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) arises due to AR reactivation via multiple mechanisms, including mutations in the AR and cross-talk with other pathways such as NF-κB. We have previously identified two ionone-based antiandrogens (SC97 and SC245), which are full antagonists of the wild type and the clinically-relevant T877A, W741C and H874Y mutated ARs. Here, we discovered SC97 and SC245 also inhibit NF-κB. By synthesizing a series of derivatives of these two compounds, we have discovered a novel compound 3b that potently inhibits both AR and NF-κB signalling, including the AR F876L mutant. Compound 3b showed low micromolar antiproliferative activites in C4-2B and 22Rv1 cells, which express mutated ARs and are androgen-independent, as well as DU-145 and PC-3 cells, which exhibit constitutively activated NF-κB signalling. Our studies indicate 3b is effective against the CRPC cells.

  18. The effects of serotonin, dopamine, gonadotropin-releasing hormones, and corazonin, on the androgenic gland of the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siangcham, Tanapan; Tinikul, Yotsawan; Poljaroen, Jaruwan; Sroyraya, Morakot; Changklungmoa, Narin; Phoungpetchara, Ittipon; Kankuan, Wilairat; Sumpownon, Chanudporn; Wanichanon, Chaitip; Hanna, Peter J; Sobhon, Prasert

    2013-11-01

    Neurotransmitters and neurohormones are agents that control gonad maturation in decapod crustaceans. Of these, serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) are neurotransmitters with known antagonist roles in female reproduction, whilst gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRHs) and corazonin (Crz) are neurohormones that exercise both positive and negative controls in some invertebrates. However, the effects of these agents on the androgenic gland (AG), which controls testicular maturation and male sex development in decapods, via insulin-like androgenic gland hormone (IAG), are unknown. Therefore, we set out to assay the effects of 5-HT, DA, l-GnRH-III, oct-GnRH and Crz, on the AG of small male Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr), using histological studies, a BrdU proliferative cell assay, immunofluorescence of Mr-IAG, and ELISA of Mr-IAG. The results showed stimulatory effects by 5-HT and l-GnRH-III through significant increases in AG size, proliferation of AG cells, and Mr-IAG production (Prosenbergii, as they induce increases in AG and testicular size, IAG production, and spermatogenesis. The mechanisms by which these occur are part of our on-going research.

  19. Studies on Androgen Receptor mRNA expression in Pancreas, Hypothalamus and Ovary of Androgen Sterilized Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li WANG; Jing-wen HOU; Li-min LU; Jin YU; Sui-qi GUI

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the androgen receptor (AR) mRNA expression in pancreas,hypothalamus and ovary of androgen sterilized rats (ASR)Methods ASR model was established by subcutaneous injection of testosterone propionate to SD female rats at the age of 9 days. Around the age of 106 days (proestrus),all rats were killed, serum △ 4-andronestedione (△ 4-A), total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), insulin (Ins) and C-peptide (C-P)were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Total RNA in pancreas, hypothalamus and ovary were extracted and the amount of AR mRNA was quantitatedly analyzed by RT-PCR with single base mutant template as inner standard. Results Serum concentrations of△ 4-A, TT, FT, Ins and C-P in ASR model rats were significantly higher than those in control group (P<0. 05, P<0. 01). The expression of AR mRNA in pancreas, hypothalamus and ovary increased significantly (P<0. 05,P<0. 01) of model rats as compared with control group. Conclusion The elevated serum androgen levels in ASR model could enhance the expression of AR mRNA levels in pancreas, hypothalamus and ovary, which further induce hyperinsulinemia and anovulation.

  20. Functional characterisation of a natural androgen receptor missense mutation (N771H) causing human androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, J; Cai, L-Q; Hong, Y; Zhu, Y-S

    2012-05-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked disorder due to mutations of androgen receptor (AR) gene. Various AR mutations have been identified, and the characterisation of these mutations greatly facilitates our understanding of AR structure-function. In this study, we have analysed an AR missense mutation (N771H) identified in patients with AIS. Functional analysis of the mutant AR was performed by in vitro mutagenesis-cotransfection assays. Compared to the wild-type AR, the dose-response curve of dihydrotestosterone-induced transactivation activity in the mutant AR was greatly shifted to the right and significantly decreased. However, the maximal efficacy of transactivation activity in the mutant AR was similar to that of the wild type. Receptor binding assay indicated that the mutant AR had an approximately 2.5-fold lower binding affinity to dihydrotestosterone compared to the wild type. Western blot analysis showed that the size and the expression level of mutant AR in transfected cells were comparable to the wild type. These data underscore the importance of asparagine at amino acid position 771 of human AR in normal ligand binding and normal receptor function, and a mutation at this position results in androgen insensitivity in affected subjects.

  1. [Cutaneous adverse effects of TNFalpha antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failla, V; Sabatiello, M; Lebas, E; de Schaetzen, V; Dezfoulian, B; Nikkels, A F

    2012-01-01

    The TNFalpha antagonists, including adalimumab, etanercept and infliximab, represent a class of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs. Although cutaneous adverse effects are uncommon, they are varied. There is no particular risk profile to develop cutaneous adverse effects. The principal acute side effects are injection site reactions and pruritus. The major long term cutaneous side effects are infectious and inflammatory conditions. Neoplastic skin diseases are exceptional. The association with other immunosuppressive agents can increase the risk of developing cutaneous adverse effects. Some adverse effects, such as lupus erythematosus, require immediate withdrawal of the biological treatment, while in other cases temporary withdrawal is sufficient. The majority of the other cutaneous adverse effects can be dealt without interrupting biologic treatment. Preclinical and clinical investigations revealed that the new biologics, aiming IL12/23, IL23 and IL17, present a similar profile of cutaneous adverse effects, although inflammatory skin reactions may be less often encountered compared to TNFalpha antagonists.

  2. Aminopyrimidine derivatives as adenosine antagonists / Janke Kleynhans

    OpenAIRE

    Kleynhans, Janke

    2013-01-01

    Aims of this project - The aim of this study was to design and synthesise novel 2-aminopyrimidine derivatives as potential adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonists. Background and rationale - Parkinson’s disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder (after Alzheimer’s disease) and is characterised by the selective death of the dopaminergic neurons of the nigro-striatal pathway. Distinctive motor symptoms include bradykinesia, muscle rigidity and tremor, while non-m...

  3. The Justification of Antagonistic Response to Wrongdoing

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, David Michael

    2012-01-01

    There is a strong Western tradition of opposing angry, hostile, or antagonistic reactions to wrongdoing. In the twentieth century, leaders like Mahatma Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. counseled responding to wrongdoing with forgiveness and love rather than anger, hate, or vindictiveness.This ideal has taken on an exalted status in Western culture. Gandhi and King are widely regarded as moral saints. And yet sometimes antagonism seems deeply appropriate. Consider a very serious wrong: s...

  4. Antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Kölliker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In species across taxa, offspring have means to influence parental investment (PI. PI thus evolves as an interacting phenotype and indirect genetic effects may strongly affect the co-evolutionary dynamics of offspring and parental behaviors. Evolutionary theory focused on explaining how exaggerated offspring solicitation can be understood as resolution of parent-offspring conflict, but the evolutionary origin and diversification of different forms of family interactions remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In contrast to previous theory that largely uses a static approach to predict how "offspring individuals" and "parental individuals" should interact given conflict over PI, we present a dynamic theoretical framework of antagonistic selection on the PI individuals obtain/take as offspring and the PI they provide as parents to maximize individual lifetime reproductive success; we analyze a deterministic and a stochastic version of this dynamic framework. We show that a zone for equivalent co-adaptation outcomes exists in which stable levels of PI can evolve and be maintained despite fast strategy transitions and ongoing co-evolutionary dynamics. Under antagonistic co-adaptation, cost-free solicitation can evolve as an adaptation to emerging preferences in parents. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that antagonistic selection across the offspring and parental life-stage of individuals favors co-adapted offspring and parental behavior within a zone of equivalent outcomes. This antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation does not require solicitation to be costly, allows for rapid divergence and evolutionary novelty and potentially explains the origin and diversification of the observed provisioning forms in family life.

  5. Androgen suppresses the proliferation of androgen receptor-positive castration-resistant prostate cancer cells via inhibition of Cdk2, CyclinA, and Skp2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Kokontis

    Full Text Available The majority of prostate cancer (PCa patient receiving androgen ablation therapy eventually develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. We previously reported that androgen treatment suppresses Skp2 and c-Myc through androgen receptor (AR and induced G1 cell cycle arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, a late stage CRPC cell line model. However, the mechanism of androgenic regulation of Skp2 in CRPC cells was not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the androgenic regulation of Skp2 in two AR-positive CRPC cell line models, the LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR Cells. The former one is an early stage androgen-independent LNCaP cells, while the later one is PC-3 cells re-expressing either wild type AR or mutant LNCaP AR. Proliferation of LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR cells is not dependent on but is suppressed by androgen. We observed in this study that androgen treatment reduced protein expression of Cdk2, Cdk7, Cyclin A, cyclin H, Skp2, c-Myc, and E2F-1; lessened phosphorylation of Thr14, Tyr15, and Thr160 on Cdk2; decreased activity of Cdk2; induced protein level of p27(Kip1; and caused G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1 cells and PC-3AR cells. Overexpression of Skp2 protein in LNCaP 104-R1 or PC-3AR cells partially blocked accumulation of p27(Kip1 and increased Cdk2 activity under androgen treatment, which partially blocked the androgenic suppressive effects on proliferation and cell cycle. Analyzing on-line gene array data of 214 normal and PCa samples indicated that gene expression of Skp2, Cdk2, and cyclin A positively correlates to each other, while Cdk7 negatively correlates to these genes. These observations suggested that androgen suppresses the proliferation of CRPC cells partially through inhibition of Cyclin A, Cdk2, and Skp2.

  6. Androgen suppresses the proliferation of androgen receptor-positive castration-resistant prostate cancer cells via inhibition of Cdk2, CyclinA, and Skp2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokontis, John M; Lin, Hui-Ping; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yu; Fukuchi, Junichi; Hiipakka, Richard A; Chung, Chi-Jung; Chan, Tzu-Min; Liao, Shutsung; Chang, Chung-Ho; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2014-01-01

    The majority of prostate cancer (PCa) patient receiving androgen ablation therapy eventually develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We previously reported that androgen treatment suppresses Skp2 and c-Myc through androgen receptor (AR) and induced G1 cell cycle arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, a late stage CRPC cell line model. However, the mechanism of androgenic regulation of Skp2 in CRPC cells was not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the androgenic regulation of Skp2 in two AR-positive CRPC cell line models, the LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR Cells. The former one is an early stage androgen-independent LNCaP cells, while the later one is PC-3 cells re-expressing either wild type AR or mutant LNCaP AR. Proliferation of LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR cells is not dependent on but is suppressed by androgen. We observed in this study that androgen treatment reduced protein expression of Cdk2, Cdk7, Cyclin A, cyclin H, Skp2, c-Myc, and E2F-1; lessened phosphorylation of Thr14, Tyr15, and Thr160 on Cdk2; decreased activity of Cdk2; induced protein level of p27(Kip1); and caused G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1 cells and PC-3AR cells. Overexpression of Skp2 protein in LNCaP 104-R1 or PC-3AR cells partially blocked accumulation of p27(Kip1) and increased Cdk2 activity under androgen treatment, which partially blocked the androgenic suppressive effects on proliferation and cell cycle. Analyzing on-line gene array data of 214 normal and PCa samples indicated that gene expression of Skp2, Cdk2, and cyclin A positively correlates to each other, while Cdk7 negatively correlates to these genes. These observations suggested that androgen suppresses the proliferation of CRPC cells partially through inhibition of Cyclin A, Cdk2, and Skp2.

  7. Piperine, a Bioactive Component of Pepper Spice Exerts Therapeutic Effects on Androgen Dependent and Androgen Independent Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash Samykutty

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common solid malignancy in men, with 32,000 deaths annually. Piperine, a major alkaloid constituent of black pepper, has previously been reported to have anti-cancer activity in variety of cancer cell lines. The effect of piperine against prostate cancer is not currently known. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the anti-tumor mechanisms of piperine on androgen dependent and androgen independent prostate cancer cells. Here, we show that piperine inhibited the proliferation of LNCaP, PC-3, 22RV1 and DU-145 prostate cancer cells in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, Annexin-V staining demonstrated that piperine treatment induced apoptosis in hormone dependent prostate cancer cells (LNCaP. Using global caspase activation assay, we show that piperine-induced apoptosis resulted in caspase activation in LNCaP and PC-3 cells. Further studies revealed that piperine treatment resulted in the activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of PARP-1 proteins in LNCaP, PC-3 and DU-145 prostate cancer cells. Piperine treatment also disrupted androgen receptor (AR expression in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Our evaluations further show that there is a significant reduction of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA levels following piperine treatment in LNCaP cells. NF-kB and STAT-3 transcription factors have previously been shown to play a role in angiogenesis and invasion of prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, treatment of LNCaP, PC-3 and DU-145 prostate cancer cells with piperine resulted in reduced expression of phosphorylated STAT-3 and Nuclear factor-κB (NF-kB transcription factors. These results correlated with the results of Boyden chamber assay, wherein piperine treatment reduced the cell migration of LNCaP and PC-3 cells. Finally, we show that piperine treatment significantly reduced the androgen dependent and androgen independent tumor growth in nude mice model xenotransplanted with prostate cancer cells. Taken together, these

  8. Androgen Receptor (AR) Promotes Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Development via Modulating Inflammatory IL1α and TGFβ1 Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Luo, Jie; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Wang, Ronghao; Pang, Haiyan; Chang, Eugene; Yan, Chen; Sparks, Janet; Lee, Soo Ok; Cho, Joshua; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-01-01

    Gender difference is a risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurism formation yet the reason for male predominance remains unclear. Androgen and the androgen receptor influence the male gender difference, indicating that androgen receptor signaling may affect abdominal aortic aneurism development. Using angiotensin II induced abdominal aortic aneurism in apolipoprotein E null mouse models (82.4% abdominal aortic aneurism incidence), we found that mice lacking androgen receptor failed to develop ...

  9. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  10. Effects of low testosterone levels and of adrenal androgens on growth of prostate tumor models in nude mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. van Weerden (Wytske); G.J. van Steenbrugge (Gert Jan); A. van Kreuningen (A.); E.P.C.M. Moerings (Ellis); F.H. de Jong (Frank); F.H. Schröder (Fritz)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Two transplantable, androgen dependent prostate tumor models of human origin, PC-82 and PC-EW, were used to study the effect of low androgen levels and adrenal androgens on prostate tumor cell proliferation. Tumor load of the PC-82 and PC-EW tumors could be maintained cons

  11. Molecular Targeting of Prostate Cancer During Androgen Ablation: Inhibition of CHES1/FOXN3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Introduction R esults B ackground and O bjectives: D efining the m echanism s underlying prostate cancer (C aP ) survival during androgen w ithdraw al...as a therapeutic target for increasing the efficacy of both androgen ablation and chem otherapy. Future D irections "  D efine the exact position

  12. Why do winners keep winning? Androgen mediation of winner but not loser effects in cichlid fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rui F.; Silva, Ana; Canário, Adelino V.M.

    2009-01-01

    Animal conflicts are influenced by social experience such that a previous winning experience increases the probability of winning the next agonistic interaction, whereas a previous losing experience has the opposite effect. Since androgens respond to social interactions, increasing in winners and decreasing in losers, we hypothesized that socially induced transient changes in androgen levels could be a causal mediator of winner/loser effects. To test this hypothesis, we staged fights between dyads of size-matched males of the Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). After the first contest, winners were treated with the anti-androgen cyproterone acetate and losers were supplemented with 11-ketotestosterone. Two hours after the end of the first fight, two contests were staged simultaneously between the winner of the first fight and a naive male and between the loser of first fight and another naive male. The majority (88%) of control winners also won the second interaction, whereas the majority of control losers (87%) lost their second fight, thus confirming the presence of winner/loser effects in this species. As predicted, the success of anti-androgen-treated winners in the second fight decreased significantly to chance levels (44%), but the success of androgenized losers (19%) did not show a significant increase. In summary, the treatment with anti-androgen blocks the winner effect, whereas androgen administration fails to reverse the loser effect, suggesting an involvement of androgens on the winner but not on the loser effect. PMID:19324741

  13. Humanized Androgen Receptor Mice: A Genetic Model for Differential Response to Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    address at the International Conference on Hormonal Steroids and Hormones & Cancer, Edinburgh, Scotland , 09/22/2010; Genetic Variation of the Androgen...Ferrell, R.E., Roth , S.M., 2005. Androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism is associated with fat-free mass in men. J. Appl. Physiol. 98, 132–137. Wu, C.T

  14. Androgenic alopecia is not useful as an indicator of men at high risk of prostate cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Vermeulen, S.; Heijer, M. den; Oort, I.M. van; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Androgens are assumed to play a central role in the pathophysiology of both prostate cancer (PC) and androgenic alopecia (AA). A correlation between the two phenotypes may be relevant for identification of men at high risk of PC. We evaluated the association between AA at different ages

  15. A place of androgen deficiency in a clinical portrait of the modern urological patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In article on the basis of literary given both own clinical supervision and researches applied aspects of androgen deficiency in urological practice are considered. True androgen deficiency’ frequency in man’s population remains precisely not established as decrease in testosterone synthesis is connected not only with the age, but also varieties of other factors, including features of geography of area of residing, presence or absence of other hormonal and metabolic disorders, accompanying somatic comorbidity etc. Results of the newest foreign epidemiological researches of androgen deficiency prevalence worldwide, and also results of the first Russian pilot epidemiological research of androgen deficiency at men prevalence in practice of urologists and doctors of adjacent specialities (Yaroslavl Study, 2013 present in the article. Intime pathogenetic communication of androgen deficiency both the most widespread uroandrological and somatic diseases at men is shown. On the basis of own clinical experience optimum algorithms of complex diagnostics of androgen deficiency at urological patients are offered and also the necessity of inclusion of testosterone preparations for pharmacotherapy of the majority of male urinogenital diseases is shown. The review of indications, contra-indications, estimations of risk factors and preparations for androgen replacement therapy is spent. Features of transdermal forms of testosterone preparations (Аndrogel are described and the clinical analysis of their present and perspective application within the limits of modern androgen replacement therapy is carried out.

  16. A place of androgen deficiency in a clinical portrait of the modern urological patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In article on the basis of literary given both own clinical supervision and researches applied aspects of androgen deficiency in urological practice are considered. True androgen deficiency’ frequency in man’s population remains precisely not established as decrease in testosterone synthesis is connected not only with the age, but also varieties of other factors, including features of geography of area of residing, presence or absence of other hormonal and metabolic disorders, accompanying somatic comorbidity etc. Results of the newest foreign epidemiological researches of androgen deficiency prevalence worldwide, and also results of the first Russian pilot epidemiological research of androgen deficiency at men prevalence in practice of urologists and doctors of adjacent specialities (Yaroslavl Study, 2013 present in the article. Intime pathogenetic communication of androgen deficiency both the most widespread uroandrological and somatic diseases at men is shown. On the basis of own clinical experience optimum algorithms of complex diagnostics of androgen deficiency at urological patients are offered and also the necessity of inclusion of testosterone preparations for pharmacotherapy of the majority of male urinogenital diseases is shown. The review of indications, contra-indications, estimations of risk factors and preparations for androgen replacement therapy is spent. Features of transdermal forms of testosterone preparations (Аndrogel are described and the clinical analysis of their present and perspective application within the limits of modern androgen replacement therapy is carried out.

  17. Penguin chicks benefit from elevated yolk androgen levels under sibling competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud Poisbleau

    Full Text Available Crested penguins (genus Eudyptes have a peculiar hatching pattern, with the first-laid egg (A-egg hatching after the second-laid egg (B-egg and chicks from A-eggs typically having a much lower survival probability. Maternal yolk androgens have been suggested to contribute to the competitive superiority of the B-chick in southern rockhopper penguins Eudyptes chrysocome, given their important role in mediating sibling competition in other species. We therefore increased the yolk androgen levels in freshly-laid eggs and examined the consequences for sibling competition--via effects on embryonic developmental times, chick growth and early survival. We placed one androgen-treated egg and one control egg into each foster nest, matching them for mass, laying date and laying order. The androgen treatment did not significantly affect embryonic developmental times or chick measurements at hatching. However, elevated yolk androgen levels benefitted chick growth in interaction with the number of siblings in a brood. Chicks from androgen-treated eggs had faster growth in the presence of a sibling than chicks from control eggs. Under these circumstances they also had a higher survival probability. Thus maternal androgens appear to reinforce the observed hatching pattern, facilitating brood reduction. This contrasts to most previous studies in other species where yolk androgens have been shown to compensate for the negative consequences of delayed hatching within the brood hierarchy.

  18. The postmenopausal ovary as an androgen-producing gland; hypothesis on the etiology of endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, VHWM; Sluijmer, AV; Heineman, MJ

    2002-01-01

    Postmenopausal estrogens originate from the peripheral conversion of androgens, which are produced by the adrenal glands and the ovaries. Estrogens are considered to contribute to the neoplastic development of endometrium. Hyperplasia of ovarian stroma is associated with an increased androgen produc

  19. A new highly androgen specific yeast biosensor, enabling optimisation of (Q)SAR model approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovee, T.F.H.; Lommerse, J.P.M.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Fernandes, E.A.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2008-01-01

    Recently we constructed recombinant yeast cells that express the human androgen receptor (hAR) and yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP), the latter in response to androgens. When exposed to 17ß-testosterone, the concentration where half-maximal activation is reached (EC50) was 50 nM. Rel

  20. [Myoanabolic steroids and selective androgen receptor modulators: mechanism of action and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Miklós

    2009-11-01

    Interest in anabolic steroids has been renewed in the last decade with the discovery of tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators exhibiting high myotropic and small androgenic activity. An explanation put forward by us in 1982 for the mechanism of the preferential myotropic effect of nandrolone (19-nortestosterone) exploits the fundamental difference between the 5alpha-reductase concentrations in skeletal muscle and androgenic target tissue. In androgenic tissue, testosterone is converted to the more potent 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone whereas nandrolone is converted to a less potent derivative. As 5alpha-reduction is negligible in skeletal muscle, this explains why nandrolone shows a greater myotropic to androgenic ratio when compared with testosterone. Anabolic steroids that do not undergo 5alpha-reduction exert myotropic-androgenic dissociation because their effect in androgenic tissues is not amplified by 5alpha-reduction. Tissue selectivity by receptor modulators may be achieved by inducing specific conformational changes of the androgen receptor that affect its interaction with transcriptional coregulators. Anabolic activity is mediated by the stimulation of ribosomal RNA synthesis therefore regulation of this synthesis by anabolic steroids would deserve detailed studies.

  1. Impact of circulating cholesterol levels on growth and intratumoral androgen concentration of prostate tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe A Mostaghel

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the second most common cancer in men. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT leads to tumor involution and reduction of tumor burden. However, tumors eventually reemerge that have overcome the absence of gonadal androgens, termed castration resistant PCa (CRPC. Theories underlying the development of CRPC include androgen receptor (AR mutation allowing for promiscuous activation by non-androgens, AR amplification and overexpression leading to hypersensitivity to low androgen levels, and/or tumoral uptake and conversion of adrenally derived androgens. More recently it has been proposed that prostate tumor cells synthesize their own androgens through de novo steroidogenesis, which involves the step-wise synthesis of androgens from cholesterol. Using the in vivo LNCaP PCa xenograft model, previous data from our group demonstrated that a hypercholesterolemia diet potentiates prostatic tumor growth via induction of angiogenesis. Using this same model we now demonstrate that circulating cholesterol levels are significantly associated with tumor size (R = 0.3957, p = 0.0049 and intratumoral levels of testosterone (R = 0.41, p = 0.0023 in LNCaP tumors grown in hormonally intact mice. We demonstrate tumoral expression of cholesterol uptake genes as well as the spectrum of steroidogenic enzymes necessary for androgen biosynthesis from cholesterol. Moreover, we show that circulating cholesterol levels are directly correlated with tumoral expression of CYP17A, the critical enzyme required for de novo synthesis of androgens from cholesterol (R = 0.4073, p = 0.025 Since hypercholesterolemia does not raise circulating androgen levels and the adrenal gland of the mouse synthesizes minimal androgens, this study provides evidence that hypercholesterolemia increases intratumoral de novo steroidogenesis. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that cholesterol-fueled intratumoral androgen synthesis may accelerate the

  2. Preliminary report: effect of adrenal androgen and estrogen on bone maturation and bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisaka, O; Hoshi, M; Kanazawa, S; Numata, M; Nakajima, D; Kanno, S; Negishi, M; Nishikura, K; Nitta, A; Imataka, M; Kuribayashi, T; Kano, K

    2001-04-01

    To clarify the independent physiological roles of adrenal androgen and estrogen on bone growth, we compared the lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) in prepubertal girls with virilizing congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) (n = 17) and girls with central precocious puberty (CPP) (n = 18). When BMD was analyzed according to chronologic age, no significant differences were found between CPP and CAH patients. However, when adjusted to bone age, BMD was statistically higher in CAH than in CPP subjects. This finding suggests that adrenal androgen, as well as estrogen, plays an important role in increasing BMD. Adrenal androgen may act on bone not only as androgen, but as estrogen after having been metabolized into an aromatized bone-active compound in peripheral tissues, such as bone and fat. Therefore, adrenal androgen may have a more important role in increasing BMD than previously realized.

  3. Testicular steroidogenesis is locally regulated by androgen via suppression of Nur77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chin-Hee; Gong, Eun-Yeung; Park, Ji soo; Lee, Keesook

    2012-06-01

    Steroidogenesis in the testis is regulated by a negative feedback mechanism through the hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis. Recent studies suggest that besides this long-loop regulation, testicular steroidogenesis is also locally regulated by androgen. However, the molecular mechanism behind this additional regulatory pathway has been poorly addressed. In the present study, we demonstrate that liganded androgen receptor (AR) suppresses the transcriptional activity of Nur77 on steroidogenic enzyme gene promoters, affecting testicular steroidogenesis. AR physically interacts and colocalizes with Nur77 in the nucleus in the presence of androgen. AR inhibits Nur77 transactivation by competing mainly with coactivators such as SRC-1 for Nur77 binding. These results suggest that androgen, through binding to AR, directly acts as a signal inhibiting the expression of steroidogenic enzyme genes in Leydig cells, eventually resulting in decreased testicular steroidogenesis. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that androgen acts locally to regulate testicular steroidogenesis, and may provide its action mechanism.

  4. Role of 5α-reductase inhibitors in androgen-stimulated skin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouni, Faris; Zeitouni, Nathalie; Mohler, James

    2013-02-01

    5α-reductase (5α-R) isozymes are ubiquitously expressed in human tissues. This enzyme family is composed of 3 members that perform several important biologic functions. 5α-R isozymes play an important role in benign prostate hyperplasia, prostate cancer, and androgen-stimulated skin disorders, which include androgenic alopecia, acne, and hirsutism. Discovery of 5α-R type 2 deficiency in 1974 sparked interest in development of pharmaceutical agents to inhibit 5α-R isozymes, and 2 such inhibitors are currently available for clinical use: finasteride and dutasteride. 5α-R inhibitors are US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Only finasteride is FDA-approved for treatment of male androgenic alopecia. This article reviews the pathophysiology of androgen-stimulated skin disorders and the key clinical trials using 5α-R inhibitors in the treatment of androgen-stimulated skin disorders.

  5. Ekspresi Gen CYP19 Aromatase, Estrogen, Androgen pada penderita Periodontitis Agresif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahlia Herawati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Kepadatan tulang tubuh ditentukan oleh gen CYP19 aromatase, hormon estrogen dan androgen. Pada periodontitis agresif terjadi perkembangan cepat kerusakan tulang alveolar, dan kerusakan tulang alveoler tersebut tidak diimbangioleh regenerasi tulang. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menunjukkan ekspresi gen CYP19 aromatase, estrogen, androgen pada penderita periodontitis agresif agar dapat untuk menjadi pertimbangan pada saat melakukan perawatan periodontal. Metode penelitian, pemeriksaan ekspresi gen aromatse CYP19 berasal dari spesimen tulang alveolar menggunakan imunohistokimia, pengukuran hormon estrogen dan androgen dari serum menggunakan Vidas: Elfa. Hasil penelitian ekspresi gene CYP19 aromatase pada periodontitis agresif menunjukkan gambaran lebih rendah densitasnya dibandingkan pada nonperiodontitis. Estrogen dan androgen pad aperiodontitis agresif ada kecenderungan lebih rendah dibandingkan pada nonperiodontitis. Kesimpulan regenerasi tulang alveoler pad a periodontitis agresif terhambat karena sedikitnya gen CYP19 aromatase dan hormon estrogen dan androgen yang berperan pada pembentukan tulang alveoler kurang memadai.

  6. EFFECT OF ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST AND ENDOTHELIN RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST ON NITROGLYCERIN TOLERANCE IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建梅; 陈永红; 王晓红; 唐朝枢

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether angiotensin II receptor antagonist and endothelin receptor antagonist can improve the nitroglycerin (Nit) tolerance in vivo. Methods. Twenty-four rats were divided into 4 groups (n =6, each): Control group, Nitroglycerin (Nit) group, Nit + bosentan group and Nit + losartan group. Nitroglycerin tolerance was induced by 2-day treatment ofnitroglycerin patch (0. 05mg/h). Angiotensin I1 receptor antagonist losartan (10mg ·kg-1·d-1) and endothe-lin receptor antagonist bosentan ( 100 mg·kg-1· d-1 ) were given by gavage for 2 days respectively. Results. The least hypotensive response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was observed in Nit group. The effec-tive percentages of hypotensive response to SNP were increased in both Nit + losartan group and Nit + bosentangroup compared with Nit group [(31.95±4.45) % vs (21.00±3.69) %, P <0.01and (33. 18±6. 16)% vs (21.00±3.69 ) %, P < 0. 01 , respectivelyl. The maximal vessel relaxation induced by SNP was thesame in 4 different groups but the highest EC50 (concentration which produces 50% of the maximal response toSNP) was found in tolerant group[ (34 ±10) nmol/L, P < 0. 01 ]. The ET-1 amounts in plasma and vasculartissue were markedly increased by 54% and 60% in Nit group compared with those in control group( P<0. 01). The ET-1 amounts in plasma and vascular tissue were decreased by 30% and 37% in Nit + losartangroup compared with those in Nit group ( P < 0.01 ). Conclusion. Endothelin receptor antagonist and angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist could prevent against the Nit tolerance.

  7. Prenatal androgen excess programs metabolic derangements in pubertal female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaonan; Dai, Xiaonan; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Nannan; Cui, Yugui; Liu, Jiayin

    2013-04-01

    Owing to the heterogeneity in the clinical symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the early pathophysiological mechanisms of PCOS remain unclear. Clinical, experimental, and genetic evidence supports an interaction between genetic susceptibility and the influence of maternal environment in the pathogenesis of PCOS. To determine whether prenatal androgen exposure induced PCOS-related metabolic derangements during pubertal development, we administrated 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in pregnant rats and observed their female offspring from postnatal 4 to 8 weeks. The prenatally androgenized (PNA) rats exhibited more numerous total follicles, cystic follicles, and atretic follicles than the controls. Fasting glucose, insulin, leptin levels, and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance were elevated in the PNA rats at the age of 5-8 weeks. Following intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests, glucose and insulin levels did not differ between two groups; however, the PNA rats showed significantly higher 30- and 60-min glucose levels than the controls after insulin stimulation during 5-8 weeks. In addition, prenatal DHT treatment significantly decreased insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of AKT in the skeletal muscles of 6-week-old PNA rats. The abundance of IR substrate 1 (IRS1) and IRS2 was decreased in the skeletal muscles and liver after stimulation with insulin in the PNA group, whereas phosphorylation of insulin-signaling proteins was unaltered in the adipose tissue. These findings validate the contribution of prenatal androgen excess to metabolic derangements in pubertal female rats, and the impaired insulin signaling through IRS and AKT may result in the peripheral insulin resistance during pubertal development.

  8. Revisiting hyper- and hypo-androgenism by tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Flaminia; Gambineri, Alessandra; Mezzullo, Marco; Vicennati, Valentina; Pelusi, Carla; Pasquali, Renato; Pagotto, Uberto

    2013-06-01

    Modern endocrinology is living a critical age of transition as far as laboratory testing and biochemical diagnosis are concerned. Novel liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assays for steroid measurement in biological fluids have abundantly demonstrated their analytical superiority over immunometric platforms that until now have dominated the world of steroid hormones determination in clinical laboratories. One of the most useful applications of LC-MS/MS is in the hypogonadism and hyperandrogenism field: LC-MS/MS has proved particularly suitable for the detection of low levels of testosterone typical of women and children, and in general more reliable in accurately determining hypogonadal male levels. This technique also offers increased informative power by allowing multi-analytical profiles that give a more comprehensive picture of the overall hormonal asset. Several LC-MS/MS methods for testosterone have been published in the last decade, some of them included other androgen or more comprehensive steroid profiles. LC-MS/MS offers the concrete possibility of achieving a definitive standardization of testosterone measurements and the generation of widely accepted reference intervals, that will set the basis for a consensus on the diagnostic value of biochemical testing. The present review is aimed at summarizing technological advancements in androgen measurements in serum and saliva. We also provide a picture of the state of advancement of standardization of testosterone assays, of the redefinition of androgen reference intervals by novel assays and of studies using LC-MS/MS for the characterization and diagnosis of female hyperandrogenism and male hypogonadism.

  9. Calpain-Dependent Proteolysis of the Androgen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    fetal bovine serum, 2 mmol/L L-glutamine, 100 units/mL penicillin , and 100 Ag/mL streptomycin (Invitrogen) at 37jC and 5% CO2. Western immunoblot...mutations Mutation of the AR gene to either a hypersensitive receptor or a receptor with expanded ligand specificity would confer androgen...PC3, DU145 and R1 cells were propagated in RPMI 1640 supplemented with 5% fetal bovine serum, 2 mmol/L L- glutamine, 100 units/mL penicillin , and

  10. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald William L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The androgen receptor (AR plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa. However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant and LNCaP (androgen-dependent PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT, Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD, Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2, Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1 – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are

  11. Sequencing the transcriptional network of androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chng, Kern Rei; Cheung, Edwin

    2013-11-01

    The progression of prostate cancer is largely dependent on the activity of the androgen receptor (AR), which in turn, correlates with the net output of the AR transcriptional regulatory network. A detailed and thorough understanding of the AR transcriptional regulatory network is therefore critical in the strategic manipulation of AR activity for the targeted eradication of prostate cancer cells. In this mini-review, we highlight some of the novel and unexpected mechanistic and functional insights of the AR transcriptional network derived from recent targeted sequencing (ChIP-Seq) studies of AR and its coregulatory factors in prostate cancer cells.

  12. Identification of testosterone-/androgen receptor-regulated genes in mouse Sertoli cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao-Xia Zhang; Xiao-Yan Zhang; Zhen-Ming Zhang; Wei Lu; Ling Liu; Gang Li; Zhi-Ming Cai; Yao-Ting Gui; Chawnshang Chang

    2012-01-01

    Androgen and androgen receptor (AR) play important roles in male spermatogenesis and fertility,yet detailed androgenlAR signals in Sertoli cells remain unclear.To identify AR target genes in Sertoli cells,we analyzed the gene expression profiles of testis between mice lacking AR in Sertoli cells (S-AR-/y) and their littermate wild-type (WT) mice.Digital gene expression analysis identified 2276 genes downregulated and 2865 genes upregulated in the S-AR-/y mice testis compared to WT ones.To further nail down the difference within Sertoli cells,we first constructed Sertoli cell line TM4 with stably transfected AR (named as TM4/AR) and found androgens failed to transactivate AR in Sertoli TM4 and TM4/AR cells.Interestingly,additional transient transfection of AR-cDNA resulted in significant androgen responsiveness with TM4/AR cells showing 10 times more androgen sensitivity than TM4 cells.In the condition where maximal androgen response was demonstrated,we then analyzed gene expression and found the expression levels of 2313 genes were changed more than twofold by transient transfection of AR-cDNA in the presence of testosterone.Among these genes,603 androgen-/ AR-regulated genes,including 164 upregulated and 439 downregulated,were found in both S-AR-/y mice testis and TM4/AR cells.Using informatics analysis,the gene ontology was applied to analyze these androgen-/AR-regulated genes to predict the potential roles of androgen/AR in the process of spermatogenesis.Together,using gene analysis in both S-AR-/y mice testis and TM4/AR cells may help us to better understand the androgen/AR signals in Sertoli cells and their influences in spermatogenesis.

  13. Crosstalk between androgen and pro-inflammatory signaling remodels androgen receptor and NF-κB cistrome to reprogram the prostate cancer cell transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Marjo; Niskanen, Einari A.; Kaikkonen, Minna U.; Palvimo, Jorma J.

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory processes and androgen signaling are critical for the growth of prostate cancer (PC), the most common cancer among males in Western countries. To understand the importance of potential interplay between pro-inflammatory and androgen signaling for gene regulation, we have interrogated the crosstalk between androgen receptor (AR) and NF-κB, a key transcriptional mediator of inflammatory responses, by utilizing genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and global run-on sequencing in PC cells. Co-stimulation of LNCaP cells with androgen and pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα invoked a transcriptome which was very distinct from that induced by either stimulation alone. The altered transcriptome that included gene programs linked to cell migration and invasiveness was orchestrated by significant remodeling of NF-κB and AR cistrome and enhancer landscape. Although androgen multiplied the NF-κB cistrome and TNFα restrained the AR cistrome, there was no general reciprocal tethering of the AR to the NF-κB on chromatin. Instead, redistribution of FOXA1, PIAS1 and PIAS2 contributed to the exposure of latent NF-κB chromatin-binding sites and masking of AR chromatin-binding sites. Taken together, concomitant androgen and pro-inflammatory signaling significantly remodels especially the NF-κB cistrome, reprogramming the PC cell transcriptome in fashion that may contribute to the progression of PC. PMID:27672034

  14. Analysis of the molecular networks in androgen dependent and independent prostate cancer revealed fragile and robust subsystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Tasseff

    Full Text Available Androgen ablation therapy is currently the primary treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. Unfortunately, in nearly all cases, androgen ablation fails to permanently arrest cancer progression. As androgens like testosterone are withdrawn, prostate cancer cells lose their androgen sensitivity and begin to proliferate without hormone growth factors. In this study, we constructed and analyzed a mathematical model of the integration between hormone growth factor signaling, androgen receptor activation, and the expression of cyclin D and Prostate-Specific Antigen in human LNCaP prostate adenocarcinoma cells. The objective of the study was to investigate which signaling systems were important in the loss of androgen dependence. The model was formulated as a set of ordinary differential equations which described 212 species and 384 interactions, including both the mRNA and protein levels for key species. An ensemble approach was chosen to constrain model parameters and to estimate the impact of parametric uncertainty on model predictions. Model parameters were identified using 14 steady-state and dynamic LNCaP data sets taken from literature sources. Alterations in the rate of Prostatic Acid Phosphatase expression was sufficient to capture varying levels of androgen dependence. Analysis of the model provided insight into the importance of network components as a function of androgen dependence. The importance of androgen receptor availability and the MAPK/Akt signaling axes was independent of androgen status. Interestingly, androgen receptor availability was important even in androgen-independent LNCaP cells. Translation became progressively more important in androgen-independent LNCaP cells. Further analysis suggested a positive synergy between the MAPK and Akt signaling axes and the translation of key proliferative markers like cyclin D in androgen-independent cells. Taken together, the results support the targeting of both the Akt and MAPK

  15. The Effect of F877L and T878A Mutations on Androgen Receptor Response to Enzalutamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prekovic, Stefan; van Royen, Martin E; Voet, Arnout R D; Geverts, Bart; Houtman, Rene; Melchers, Diana; Zhang, Kam Y J; Van den Broeck, Thomas; Smeets, Elien; Spans, Lien; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Joniau, Steven; Claessens, Frank; Helsen, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Treatment-induced mutations in the ligand-binding domain of the androgen receptor (AR) are known to change antagonists into agonists. Recently, the F877L mutation has been described to convert enzalutamide into an agonist. This mutation was seen to co-occur in the endogenous AR allele of LNCaP cells, next to the T878A mutation. Here, we studied the effects of enzalutamide on the F877L and T878A mutants, as well as the double-mutant AR (F877L/T878A). Molecular modeling revealed favorable structural changes in the double-mutant AR that lead to a decrease in steric clashes for enzalutamide. Ligand-binding assays confirmed that the F877L mutation leads to an increase in relative binding affinity for enzalutamide, but only the combination with the T878A mutation resulted in a strong agonistic activity. This correlated with changes in coregulator recruitment and chromatin interactions. Our data show that enzalutamide is only a very weak partial agonist of the AR F877L, and a strong partial agonist of the double-mutant AR. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1702-12. ©2016 AACR.

  16. Comparative study on transcriptional activity of 17 parabens mediated by estrogen receptor α and β and androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoko; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Uramaru, Naoto; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2013-07-01

    The structure-activity relationships of parabens which are widely used as preservatives for transcriptional activities mediated by human estrogen receptor α (hERα), hERβ and androgen receptor (hAR) were investigated. Fourteen of 17 parabens exhibited hERα and/or hERβ agonistic activity at concentrations of ≤ 1 × 10(-5)M, whereas none of the 17 parabens showed AR agonistic or antagonistic activity. Among 12 parabens with linear alkyl chains ranging in length from C₁ to C₁₂, heptylparaben (C₇) and pentylparaben (C₅) showed the most potent ERα and ERβ agonistic activity in the order of 10(-7)M and 10(-8)M, respectively, and the activities decreased in a stepwise manner as the alkyl chain was shortened to C₁ or lengthened to C₁₂. Most parabens showing estrogenic activity exhibited ERβ-agonistic activity at lower concentrations than those inducing ERα-agonistic activity. The estrogenic activity of butylparaben was markedly decreased by incubation with rat liver microsomes, and the decrease of activity was blocked by a carboxylesterase inhibitor. These results indicate that parabens are selective agonists for ERβ over ERα; their interactions with ERα/β are dependent on the size and bulkiness of the alkyl groups; and they are metabolized by carboxylesterases, leading to attenuation of their estrogenic activity.

  17. GABAA receptor partial agonists and antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krall, Jacob; Balle, Thomas; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    A high degree of structural heterogeneity of the GABAA receptors (GABAARs) has been revealed and is reflected in multiple receptor subtypes. The subunit composition of GABAAR subtypes is believed to determine their localization relative to the synapses and adapt their functional properties...... to the local temporal pattern of GABA impact, enabling phasic or tonic inhibition. Specific GABAAR antagonists are essential tools for physiological and pharmacological elucidation of the different type of GABAAR inhibition. However, distinct selectivity among the receptor subtypes (populations) has been shown...

  18. Effect of MK-906, a specific 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, on serum androgens and androgen conjugates in normal men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittmaster, R S; Stoner, E; Thompson, D L; Nance, D; Lasseter, K C

    1989-01-01

    To determine the hormonal effects of MK-906, an orally active 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, on serum androgens and androgen conjugates, 12 healthy men were given 10, 20, 50, and 100 mg MK-906 2 weeks apart in randomized order in a 4-period crossover design. Serum testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), androstanediol glucuronide, and androsterone glucuronide were measured before and 24 hours after each dose. The effect of MK-906 on glucuronyl transferase activity, the enzyme responsible for androstanediol glucuronide and androsterone glucuronide formation, was assessed in vitro using rat prostate tissue. Serum T levels were unchanged after all doses. Serum DHT, androstanediol glucuronide, and androsterone glucuronide were suppressed by 70, 40, and 56%, respectively, after the 10-mg dose, and by 82, 52, and 66% after the 100-mg dose (P less than 0.02 for the comparison between the 10 and 100-mg doses for all three steroids), respectively. Baseline serum T and DHT levels were strongly correlated (R = 0.89, P = 0.0002), as were androstanediol glucuronide and androsterone glucuronide levels (R = 0.78, P = 0.003), but there was no correlation between DHT levels and the levels of either conjugated steroid. MK-906 had no effect on glucuronyl transferase activity in vitro. It was concluded that single doses of MK-906 suppress both conjugated and unconjugated 5 alpha-reduced androgens. While all three steroids appeared to be good markers of systemic 5 alpha-reductase inhibition, further research will be needed to determine which steroid best reflects tissue DHT levels in patients receiving these inhibitors.

  19. Effect of androgen suppression compared with androgen receptor blockade on arterial stiffness in men with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockery, Frances; Bulpitt, Christopher J; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Vernon, Clare; Rajkumar, Chakravarthi

    2009-01-01

    Endogenous testosterone and estradiol are thought to be cardio-protective in men. We wanted to determine the effects of 2 different anti-androgen therapies on arterial stiffness as one suppresses (goserelin--a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analog) while the other increases (bicalutamide--an androgen receptor blocker) both testosterone and estradiol. We conducted a randomized trial on 43 men (mean age, 71.2 +/- 6.2 years) with localized prostate cancer. They received either goserelin or bicalutamide for 24 weeks. Carotid-femoral (C-F) and carotid-radial (C-R) pulse wave velocities (PWVs) were measured. Twenty age- and disease-matched men with prostate cancer on no active treatment were studied in a similar manner. After 12 weeks of goserelin, radial artery PWV increased significantly from baseline and a nonsignificant increase was observed in femoral PWV (change from baseline radial: +1.4 m/s, P = .002, femoral: +0.9 m/s, P = .127) Both PWV measures increased significantly with bicalutamide (change from baseline radial: +0.8, femoral: +0.9 m/s, P change from baseline radial: +1.7, femoral: +1.3 m/s, P change from baseline radial: +0.4, femoral: +0.4 m/s, P not significant [NS]); however, comparison of changes between the 2 drugs were not significantly different at either 12 or 24 weeks (P >or= .967 at 12 weeks and P >or= .07 at 24 weeks). The untreated men studied in parallel showed no changes at 12 or 24 weeks in either PWV measure. Anti-androgen treatment in men might increase large artery stiffness, an adverse cardiovascular risk factor; however, the effect was not maintained with testosterone receptor blockade, in the longer term, but tended to be sustained with suppression therapy. This could relate to the different sex hormone effects of the 2 therapies.

  20. Clinical evaluation of women presenting with low libido and determination of whether androgen therapy might be appropriate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Mary-Anne; Burger, Henry

    2006-04-01

    The assessment of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is often challenging in the clinical setting. Although androgen deficiency is regarded as a major cause for FSD, the causes of this condition are multifactorial. Women presenting with FSD require thorough clinical evaluation to determine the cause of FSD. Androgen therapy should be used in women only when clinical and biochemical parameters indicate that FSD stems from androgen deficiency. This review outlines the various causes of FSD, clinical and biochemical investigations required to diagnose androgen deficiency, and options for treatment of the woman found to have androgen deficiency as a cause of FSD.

  1. Differentially expressed androgen-regulated genes in androgen-sensitive tissues reveal potential biomarkers of early prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogus Murat Altintas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several data favor androgen receptor implication in prostate cancer initiation through the induction of several gene activation programs. The aim of the study is to identify potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa among androgen-regulated genes (ARG and to evaluate comparative expression of these genes in normal prostate and normal prostate-related androgen-sensitive tissues that do not (or rarely give rise to cancer. METHODS: ARG were selected in non-neoplastic adult human prostatic epithelial RWPE-1 cells stably expressing an exogenous human androgen receptor, using RNA-microarrays and validation by qRT-PCR. Expression of 48 preselected genes was quantified in tissue samples (seminal vesicles, prostate transitional zones and prostate cancers, benign prostatic hypertrophy obtained from surgical specimens using TaqMan® low-density arrays. The diagnostic performances of these potential biomarkers were compared to that of genes known to be associated with PCa (i.e. PCA3 and DLX1. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: By crossing expression studies in 26 matched PCa and normal prostate transitional zone samples, and 35 matched seminal vesicle and PCa samples, 14 genes were identified. Similarly, 9 genes were overexpressed in 15 benign prostatic hypertrophy samples, as compared to PCa samples. Overall, we selected 8 genes of interest to evaluate their diagnostic performances in comparison with that of PCA3 and DLX1. Among them, 3 genes: CRYAB, KCNMA1 and SDPR, were overexpressed in all 3 reference non-cancerous tissues. The areas under ROC curves of these genes reached those of PCA3 (0.91 and DLX1 (0.94. CONCLUSIONS: We identified ARG with reduced expression in PCa and with significant diagnostic values for discriminating between cancerous and non-cancerous prostatic tissues, similar that of PCA3. Given their expression pattern, they could be considered as potentially protective against prostate cancer. Moreover, they could

  2. Antioxidant effects of calcium antagonists in rat brain homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, K; Ina, Y; Nagashima, K; Ohmori, K; Ohno, T

    2000-06-01

    We studied the antioxidant activities of calcium antagonists against autoxidation in rat brain homogenates. The homogenates were incubated for 30 min at 37 degrees C with or without a calcium antagonist and subsequently assayed for lipid peroxide content. Percent inhibition of the lipid peroxidation was used as an index of the antioxidant effect. Dihydropyridine calcium antagonists exhibited concentration-dependent (3-300 micromol/l) inhibitory effects against lipid peroxidation. The relative order of antioxidant potency and associated IC50 values (micromol/l) of the calcium antagonists for inhibition of the lipid peroxidation were as follows: nifedipine (51.5)>barnidipine (58.6)>benidipine (71.2)>nicardipine (129.3)>amlodipine (135.5)>nilvadipine (167.3)>nitrendipine (252.1)> diltiazem (>300)=verapamil (>300). These results suggest that some dihydropyridine calcium antagonists show antioxidant properties. The antioxidant effects of the calcium antagonists may contribute to their pharmacological actions.

  3. Effects of anabolic-androgens on brain reward function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela eMhillaj

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Androgens are mainly prescribed to treat several diseases caused by testosterone deficiency. However, athletes try to promote muscle growth by manipulating testosterone levels or assuming the so called androgen anabolic steroids (AAS. These substances were originally synthesized to obtain anabolic effects greater than testosterone. Although AAS are rarely prescribed compared to testosterone, the off-label utilization is very wide. Furthermore, combination of different steroids, and doses largely higher than those used in therapy are common. Symptoms of the chronic use of supra-therapeutic doses of AAS include anxiety, depression, aggression, paranoia, distractibility, confusion, amnesia. Interestingly, some studies have shown that AAS elicited electroencephalographic changes similar to those observed with amphetamine abuse. Among the AAS abusers, the frequency of side effects is higher, with psychiatric complications such as labile mood, lack of impulse control and high violence. On the other hand, AAS addiction studies are complex because the collection of data is very difficult due to reticent subjects and can be biased by many variables, including physical exercise, that alter the reward system. Moreover, it has been reported that AAS may imbalance neurotransmitter systems involved in reward process, leading to an increased sensitivity toward opioid narcotics and central stimulants. The aim of this review is to discuss what is present in literature in regard to steroid abuse and alteration of reward system in preclinical and clinical studies.

  4. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  5. Brain connectivity aberrations in anabolic-androgenic steroid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars T. Westlye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustained anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS use has adverse behavioral consequences, including aggression, violence and impulsivity. Candidate mechanisms include disruptions of brain networks with high concentrations of androgen receptors and critically involved in emotional and cognitive regulation. Here, we tested the effects of AAS on resting-state functional brain connectivity in the largest sample of AAS-users to date. We collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data from 151 males engaged in heavy resistance strength training. 50 users tested positive for AAS based on the testosterone to epitestosterone (T/E ratio and doping substances in urine. 16 previous users and 59 controls tested negative. We estimated brain network nodes and their time-series using ICA and dual regression and defined connectivity matrices as the between-node partial correlations. In line with the emotional and behavioral consequences of AAS, current users exhibited reduced functional connectivity between key nodes involved in emotional and cognitive regulation, in particular reduced connectivity between the amygdala and default-mode network (DMN and between the dorsal attention network (DAN and a frontal node encompassing the superior and inferior frontal gyri (SFG/IFG and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, with further reductions as a function of dependency, lifetime exposure, and cycle state (on/off.

  6. Position stand on androgen and human growth hormone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jay R; Kraemer, William J; Bhasin, Shalender; Storer, Thomas; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Haff, G Gregory; Willoughby, Darryn S; Rogol, Alan D

    2009-08-01

    Hoffman, JR, Kraemer, WJ, Bhasin, S, Storer, T, Ratamess, NA, Haff, GG, Willoughby, DS, and Rogol, AD. Position stand on Androgen and human growth hormone use. J Strength Cond Res 23(5): S1-S59, 2009-Perceived yet often misunderstood demands of a sport, overt benefits of anabolic drugs, and the inability to be offered any effective alternatives has fueled anabolic drug abuse despite any consequences. Motivational interactions with many situational demands including the desire for improved body image, sport performance, physical function, and body size influence and fuel such negative decisions. Positive countermeasures to deter the abuse of anabolic drugs are complex and yet unclear. Furthermore, anabolic drugs work and the optimized training and nutritional programs needed to cut into the magnitude of improvement mediated by drug abuse require more work, dedication, and preparation on the part of both athletes and coaches alike. Few shortcuts are available to the athlete who desires to train naturally. Historically, the NSCA has placed an emphasis on education to help athletes, coaches, and strength and conditioning professionals become more knowledgeable, highly skilled, and technically trained in their approach to exercise program design and implementation. Optimizing nutritional strategies are a vital interface to help cope with exercise and sport demands (). In addition, research-based supplements will also have to be acknowledged as a strategic set of tools (e.g., protein supplements before and after resistance exercise workout) that can be used in conjunction with optimized nutrition to allow more effective adaptation and recovery from exercise. Resistance exercise is the most effective anabolic form of exercise, and over the past 20 years, the research base for resistance exercise has just started to develop to a significant volume of work to help in the decision-making process in program design (). The interface with nutritional strategies has been less

  7. Brain connectivity aberrations in anabolic-androgenic steroid users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlye, Lars T; Kaufmann, Tobias; Alnæs, Dag; Hullstein, Ingunn R; Bjørnebekk, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Sustained anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) use has adverse behavioral consequences, including aggression, violence and impulsivity. Candidate mechanisms include disruptions of brain networks with high concentrations of androgen receptors and critically involved in emotional and cognitive regulation. Here, we tested the effects of AAS on resting-state functional brain connectivity in the largest sample of AAS-users to date. We collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from 151 males engaged in heavy resistance strength training. 50 users tested positive for AAS based on the testosterone to epitestosterone (T/E) ratio and doping substances in urine. 16 previous users and 59 controls tested negative. We estimated brain network nodes and their time-series using ICA and dual regression and defined connectivity matrices as the between-node partial correlations. In line with the emotional and behavioral consequences of AAS, current users exhibited reduced functional connectivity between key nodes involved in emotional and cognitive regulation, in particular reduced connectivity between the amygdala and default-mode network (DMN) and between the dorsal attention network (DAN) and a frontal node encompassing the superior and inferior frontal gyri (SFG/IFG) and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), with further reductions as a function of dependency, lifetime exposure, and cycle state (on/off).

  8. Androgenic hormone profile of adult women with acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Marisa Gonzaga; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso; Machado, Carlos D Aparecida S

    2013-01-01

    Acne in adult women is a hard-to-manage frequent disease with many relapse cases. It mostly interferes with quality of life and causes major social and metabolic losses for patients. This is a transversal retrospective study and the aim was to standardize the research on circulating androgenic hormone levels and to detect hyperandrogenic states early, showing the frequency and the pattern of the altered hormones, useful resources to correctly evaluate each patient. In this study 835 women above 15 years of age, with acne or aggravation cases, were analyzed. The aim was to verify the percentage of androgen examinations with levels above normal. The levels of the hormones dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydrotestosterone, androstenedione and total testosterone were measured in all patients. The evaluation of the hormone profile showed that 54.56% of the patients had hyperandrogenism, and the levels of DHEA were most frequently elevated. Therefore, in the face of the importance of hyperandrogenism in the pathogenesis of acne, standardizing the research of the hormone profile is paramount for the treatment and control of relapses in case of a surge of acne breakouts during a woman's adult life.

  9. Oestrogen-androgen crosstalk in the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BSrilatha; PGAdaikan

    2003-01-01

    Ageing in man is associated with a decline in testosterone following changes in the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis. This may offset the physiologic equilibrium between oestrogen and androgen and at some point when the ratio of free testosterone to oestradiol reaches a critical level, the oestrogenic gonadotropin suppressive effect predominates with decreased release of FSH and LH. Adding to this endocrinal complexity is the continued peripheral conversion to oestradiol through aromatisation. Although the androgen deficiency is not the sole cause for impotence in the elderly, there is a gradual decrease in nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) and spontaneous morning erections with ageing. Despite the age related increase in oestrogen levels, the information on the pathophysiological role of the "female hormone" in erectile dysfunction has been scanty. Together with our identification of oestrogen receptors within the penile cavernosum, we have delineated dysfunctional changes on male erection mediated by oestradiol.These findings parallel the recent concerns over environmental oestrogens on fertility declines in young men. Oestrogenic activity is also present in plants and thereby in human diet. These phytoestrogens are structurally and functionally similar to oestradiol and more potent than the environmental oestrogenic chemicals such as organochlorine and phenolic compounds. Thus in the light of growing concerns of possible compromising effects on sexuality by endogenous and environmental oestrogens, we are faced with the scientific need to delineate their role on the mechanism of male erectile pathway in health and disease for clinical correlates and prognostics.

  10. Cardiovascular risk factors and events in women with androgen excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macut, D; Antić, I B; Bjekić-Macut, J

    2015-03-01

    Androgen excess (AE) was approximated to be present in 7% of the adult population of women. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most prevalent among them, followed by idiopathic hirsutism (IH), congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), hyperandrogenic insulin-resistant acanthosis nigricans (HAIRAN) syndrome, and androgen-secreting neoplasms (ASNs). Increased cardiovascular risk was implicated in women with AE. Serum testosterone independently increases risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and correlates even with indices of subclinical atherosclerosis in various populations of postmenopausal women. Hyperandrogenism in PCOS is closely related to the aggravation of abdominal obesity, and together with insulin resistance forming the metabolic core for the development of CVD. However, phenotypic variability of PCOS generates significant influence on the cardiometabolic risks. Numerous risk factors in PCOS lead to 5-7 times higher risk for CVD and over 2-fold higher risk for coronary heart disease and stroke. However, issue on the cardiometabolic risk in postmenopausal women with hyperandrogenic history is still challenging. There is a significant overlapping in the CVD characteristics of women with PCOS and variants of CAH. Relevant clinical data on the prevalence and cardiometabolic risk and events in women with IH, HAIRAN syndrome or ASNs are scarce. The effects of various oral contraceptives (OCs) and antiandrogenic compounds on metabolic profile are varying, and could be related to the selected populations and different therapy regiments mainly conducted in women with PCOS. It is assumed relation of OCs containing antiandrogenic progestins to the increased risk of cardiovascular and thromboembolic events.

  11. Are androgen steroids acting as pheromones in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pause, Bettina M

    2004-10-30

    In animals, chemosensory communication is successfully used to transmit behaviourally relevant information, e.g. information about sexual status, danger and social organisation. In many instances pheromones might have evolved from hormone-like substances. Consequently, a large number of studies have been carried out in humans, in order to investigate possible pheromonal properties of androgen steroids. Besides discussing the production and perception of androgen steroids, it will primarily be questioned whether their perception can alter mood and behaviour in humans. Therefore, a study has been carried out to investigate whether local preferences can be altered through androstenone exposure. It is shown that heterosexual women and homosexual men prefer seats sprayed with androstenone. However, as this effect is positively correlated with the sensitivity to androstenone, the effect might be due to a general olfactory attraction of low androstenone concentrations. In regard to the conflicting results of studies on putative human pheromones, it will finally be discussed whether the perceptual context and the individual learning history of the perceiver contribute significantly to a successful communication of pheromonal information.

  12. Sarcopenia and androgens: A link between pathology and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eBasualto-Alarcón

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, is becoming more prevalent as the lifespan continues to increase in most populations. As sarcopenia is highly disabling, being associated with increased risk of dependence, falls, fractures, weakness, disability, and death, development of approaches to its prevention and treatment are required. Androgens are the main physiologic anabolic steroid hormones and normal testosterone levels are necessary for a range of developmental and biological processes, including maintenance of muscle mass. Testosterone concentrations decline as age increase, suggesting that low plasma testosterone levels can cause or accelerate muscle- and age-related diseases, as sarcopenia. Currently, there is increasing interest on the anabolic properties of testosterone for therapeutic use in muscle diseases including sarcopenia. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this muscle syndrome and its relationship with plasma level of androgens are not completely understood. This review discusses the recent findings regarding sarcopenia, the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of this disease and the treatment approaches that have been developed based on testosterone deficiency and their implications.

  13. Sexually antagonistic selection in human male homosexuality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Camperio Ciani

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness, accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait.

  14. Sexually antagonistic selection in human male homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Cermelli, Paolo; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2008-06-18

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness), accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait.

  15. Activins and activin antagonists in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alev Deli; Emanuel Kreidl; Stefan Santifaller; Barbara Trotter; Katja Seir; Walter Berger; Rolf Schulte-Hermann; Chantal Rodgarkia-Dara; Michael Grusch

    2008-01-01

    In many parts of the world hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is among the leading causes of cancer-related mortality but the underlying molecular pathology is still insufficiently understood. There is increasing evidence that activins, which are members of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily of growth and differentiation factors, could play important roles in liver carcinogenesis. Activins are disulphide-linked homo-or heterodimers formed from four different β subunits termed βA, βB, βC, and βE, respectively. Activin A, the dimer of two βA subunits, is critically involved in the regulation of cell growth, apoptosis, and tissue architecture in the liver, while the hepatic function of other activins is largely unexplored so far. Negative regulators of activin signals include antagonists in the extracellular space like the binding proteins follistatin and FLRG, and at the cell membrane antagonistic co-receptors like Cripto or BAMBI. Additionally, in the intracellular space inhibitory Smads can modulate and control activin activity. Accumulating data suggest that deregulation of activin signals contributes to pathologic conditions such as chronic inflammation, fibrosis and development of cancer. The current article reviews the alterations in components of the activin signaling pathway that have been observed in HCC and discusses their potential significance for liver tumorigenesis.

  16. ETA-receptor antagonists or allosteric modulators?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Mey, Jo G R; Compeer, Matthijs G; Lemkens, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    The paracrine signaling peptide endothelin-1 (ET1) is involved in cardiovascular diseases, cancer and chronic pain. It acts on class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) but displays atypical pharmacology. It binds tightly to ET receptor type A (ET(A)) and causes long-lasting effects. In resista......The paracrine signaling peptide endothelin-1 (ET1) is involved in cardiovascular diseases, cancer and chronic pain. It acts on class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) but displays atypical pharmacology. It binds tightly to ET receptor type A (ET(A)) and causes long-lasting effects....... In resistance arteries, the long-lasting contractile effects can only be partly and reversibly relaxed by low-molecular-weight ET(A) antagonists (ERAs). However, the neuropeptide calcitonin-gene-related peptide selectively terminates binding of ET1 to ET(A). We propose that ET1 binds polyvalently to ET(A......) and that ERAs and the physiological antagonist allosterically reduce ET(A) functions. Combining the two-state model and the two-domain model of GPCR function and considering receptor activation beyond agonist binding might lead to better anti-endothelinergic drugs. Future studies could lead to compounds...

  17. Zebrafish phenotypic screen identifies novel Notch antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velaithan, Vithya; Okuda, Kazuhide Shaun; Ng, Mei Fong; Samat, Norazwana; Leong, Sze Wei; Faudzi, Siti Munirah Mohd; Abas, Faridah; Shaari, Khozirah; Cheong, Sok Ching; Tan, Pei Jean; Patel, Vyomesh

    2017-04-01

    Zebrafish represents a powerful in vivo model for phenotype-based drug discovery to identify clinically relevant small molecules. By utilizing this model, we evaluated natural product derived compounds that could potentially modulate Notch signaling that is important in both zebrafish embryogenesis and pathogenic in human cancers. A total of 234 compounds were screened using zebrafish embryos and 3 were identified to be conferring phenotypic alterations similar to embryos treated with known Notch inhibitors. Subsequent secondary screens using HEK293T cells overexpressing truncated Notch1 (HEK293TΔE) identified 2 compounds, EDD3 and 3H4MB, to be potential Notch antagonists. Both compounds reduced protein expression of NOTCH1, Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and hairy and enhancer of split-1 (HES1) in HEK293TΔE and downregulated Notch target genes. Importantly, EDD3 treatment of human oral cancer cell lines demonstrated reduction of Notch target proteins and genes. EDD3 also inhibited proliferation and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest of ORL-150 cells through inducing p27(KIP1). Our data demonstrates the utility of the zebrafish phenotypic screen and identifying EDD3 as a promising Notch antagonist for further development as a novel therapeutic agent.

  18. Evaluation of H2 receptor antagonists in chronic idiopathic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minocha Y

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available H1-antagonist (hydroxyzine hydrochloride in dosage of 10 mg-25 mg thrice a day failed to elicit satisfactory response in 60 out of 170 patients of chronic idiopathic urticaria. Additional administration of H2-antagonist (cimetidine in dosage of 200 mg four times a day, in patients not responding earlier to H1-antagonist alones exhibited moderate to good improvement of various parameters of urticaria in approximately 85% patients

  19. Role of non-genomic androgen signalling in suppressing proliferation of fibroblasts and fibrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoria, G; Giovannelli, P; Di Donato, M; Ciociola, A; Hayashi, R; Bernal, F; Appella, E; Auricchio, F; Migliaccio, A

    2014-12-04

    The functions of androgen receptor (AR) in stromal cells are still debated in spite of the demonstrated importance of these cells in organ development and diseases. Here, we show that physiological androgen concentration (10 nM R1881 or DHT) fails to induce DNA synthesis, while it consistently stimulates cell migration in mesenchymal and transformed mesenchymal cells. Ten nanomolar R1881 triggers p27 Ser10 phosphorylation and its stabilization in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Activation of Rac and its downstream effector DYRK 1B is responsible for p27 Ser10 phosphorylation and cell quiescence. Ten nanomolar androgen also inhibits transformation induced by oncogenic Ras in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Overexpression of an AR mutant unable to interact with filamin A, use of a small peptide displacing AR/filamin A interaction, and filamin A knockdown indicate that the androgen-triggered AR/filamin A complex regulates the pathway leading to p27 Ser10 phosphorylation and cell cycle arrest. As the AR/filamin A complex is also responsible for migration stimulated by 10 nM androgen, our report shows that the androgen-triggered AR/filamin A complex controls, through Rac 1, the decision of cells to halt cell cycle and migration. This study reveals a new and unexpected role of androgen/AR signalling in coordinating stromal cell functions.

  20. Aberrant E2F activation by polyglutamine expansion of androgen receptor in SBMA neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Eriko; Zhao, Yue; Ito, Saya; Sawatsubashi, Shun; Murata, Takuya; Furutani, Takashi; Shirode, Yuko; Yamagata, Kaoru; Tanabe, Masahiko; Kimura, Shuhei; Ueda, Takashi; Fujiyama, Sally; Lim, Jinseon; Matsukawa, Hiroyuki; Kouzmenko, Alexander P; Aigaki, Toshiro; Tabata, Tetsuya; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Kato, Shigeaki

    2009-03-10

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat (polyQ) expansion within the human androgen receptor (AR). Unlike other neurodegenerative diseases caused by abnormal polyQ expansion, the onset of SBMA depends on androgen binding to mutant human polyQ-AR proteins. This is also observed in Drosophila eyes ectopically expressing the polyQ-AR mutants. We have genetically screened mediators of androgen-induced neurodegeneration caused by polyQ-AR mutants in Drosophila eyes. We identified Rbf (Retinoblastoma-family protein), the Drosophila homologue of human Rb (Retinoblastoma protein), as a neuroprotective factor. Androgen-dependent association of Rbf or Rb with AR was remarkably potentiated by aberrant polyQ expansion. Such potentiated Rb association appeared to attenuate recruitment of histone deacetyltransferase 1 (HDAC1), a corepressor of E2F function. Either overexpression of Rbf or E2F deficiency in fly eyes reduced the neurotoxicity of the polyQ-AR mutants. Induction of E2F function by polyQ-AR-bound androgen was suppressed by Rb in human neuroblastoma cells. We conclude that abnormal expansion of polyQ may potentiate innate androgen-dependent association of AR with Rb. This appears to lead to androgen-dependent onset of SBMA through aberrant E2F transactivation caused by suppressed histone deacetylation.

  1. Effects of androgen and leptin on behavioral and cellular responses in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yi; Shao, Ruijin; Weijdegård, Birgitta; Wang, Tienpei; Johansson, Julia; Sun, Shan; Wang, Wei; Egecioglu, Emil; Billig, Håkan; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet

    2011-09-01

    The causes of anxiety and depression in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) remain elusive. To identify steps linking androgen signaling to the regulation of affective symptoms in vivo, we compared behavioral responses in female rats continuously exposed to DHT from puberty (a model of DHT-induced PCOS) and in rats exposed to DHT for 1week. Continuous and 1week of DHT exposure resulted in a general decrease in locomotor activity and time spent on the open arms in the elevated plus maze, indicating anxiety-like behavior. Rats with DHT-induced PCOS have increases in adiposity and circulating leptin levels accompanied by leptin resistance. One week of DHT exposure decreased androgen receptor (AR) expression in the hypothalamus and leptin synthesis and function in adipocytes; it also inhibited signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and attenuated leptin activity by increasing levels of soluble leptin receptor, a leptin-binding protein, in the hypothalamus. This may affect the androgen-induced anxiety-related behavior in female rats. In conclusion, our results highlight the central role of androgens in behavioral function in female rats and suggest that androgens directly regulate the AR by decreasing its hypothalamic expression. Androgens also increase leptin synthesis in adipocytes, which drives central leptin signaling, and may regulate anxiety-related behaviors. Elucidating mechanisms by which androgens modulate female anxiety-like behavior may uncover useful approaches for treating women with PCOS who have symptoms of anxiety.

  2. Androgen excess fetal programming of female reproduction: a developmental aetiology for polycystic ovary syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, D H; Barnett, D K; Bruns, C M; Dumesic, D A

    2005-01-01

    The aetiology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) remains unknown. This familial syndrome is prevalent among reproductive-aged women and its inheritance indicates a dominant regulatory gene with incomplete penetrance. However, promising candidate genes have proven unreliable as markers for the PCOS phenotype. This lack of genetic linkage may represent both extreme heterogeneity of PCOS and difficulty in establishing a universally accepted PCOS diagnosis. Nevertheless, hyperandrogenism is one of the most consistently expressed PCOS traits. Animal models that mimic fetal androgen excess may thus provide unique insight into the origins of the PCOS syndrome. Many female mammals exposed to androgen excess in utero or during early post-natal life typically show masculinized and defeminized behaviour, ovulatory dysfunction and virilized genitalia, although behavioural and ovulatory dysfunction can coexist without virilized genitalia based upon the timing of androgen excess. One animal model shows particular relevance to PCOS: the prenatally androgenized female rhesus monkey. Females exposed to androgen excess early in gestation exhibit hyperandrogenism, oligomenorrhoea and enlarged, polyfollicular ovaries, in addition to LH hypersecretion, impaired embryo development, insulin resistance accompanying abdominal obesity, impaired insulin response to glucose and hyperlipidaemia. Female monkeys exposed to androgen excess late in gestation mimic these programmed changes, except for LH and insulin secretion defects. In utero androgen excess may thus variably perturb multiple organ system programming and thereby provide a single, fetal origin for a heterogeneous adult syndrome.

  3. Photoperiod and testosterone regulate androgen receptor immunostaining in the Siberian hamster brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittman, Eric L; Ehrlich, David A; Ogdahl, Justyne L; Jetton, Amy E

    2003-09-01

    Day length regulates the effects of gonadal steroids on gonadotropin secretion and behavior in seasonal breeders. To determine whether this influence of photoperiod results from changes in androgen receptor expression in Siberian hamster brain regions that regulate neuroendocrine function, androgen receptor immunostaining was examined in castrated animals given either no androgen replacement or one of three doses of testosterone (T) resulting in physiological serum concentrations. Half of the animals were housed under inhibitory photoperiod conditions, and immunostaining was quantified 11 days later. Measurement of serum gonadotropin and prolactin concentrations confirmed that androgen exerted graded effects on pituitary function but that the animals were killed before photoperiodic influences had fully developed. T significantly increased the numbers of androgen receptor-immunoreactive cells in every brain region examined. Photoperiod exerted no significant influence on androgen receptor-immunoreactive cell number in the arcuate nucleus, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), medial preoptic nucleus, or in medial amygdala. An interaction between T and photoperiod was observed in the BNST and in the rostral and middle portions of the arcuate nucleus. Although increasing concentrations of T resulted in more intense cellular immunostaining in the BNST and arcuate, this effect was not influenced by day length. These results indicate that relatively short-duration (11 days) exposure to inhibitory photoperiod triggers localized and regionally specific changes in androgen receptor expression.

  4. Androgen responsiveness of the new human endometrial cancer cell line MFE-296.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenberg, R; Beck, S; Filmer, A; Hushmand Nia, A; Kunzmann, R; Koch, M; Slater, E P; Schulz, K D

    1994-04-01

    MFE-296 endometrial cancer cells express androgen receptors in vitro. These cells, which are tumorigenic in nude mice, are derived from a moderately differentiated human endometrial adenocarcinoma. They express vimentin and the cytokeratins 7, 8, 18, and 19. Karyotyping revealed near-tetraploidy for most of the cells. No marker chromosomes were observed. DNA analyses confirmed the genetic identity of the cell line and the patient from whom the cell line was derived. Proliferation of MFE-296 cells was inhibited by the progestin R5020 and the androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The inhibition of proliferation by DHT was antagonized by the antiandrogen Casodex, demonstrating the involvement of the androgen receptor. Androgen binding was determined at 22,000 binding sites per cell using a whole-cell assay (KD = 0.05 nM) and 30 fmol/mg protein with the dextran charcoal method; 7 fmol/mg protein of progesterone receptors were found, whereas estrogen receptors were below 5 fmol/mg protein. The androgen receptor was functionally intact, as demonstrated by transfection experiments with a reporter-gene construct, containing an androgen-responsive element. In MFE-296 cells the content of the androgen receptor was up-regulated by its own ligand.

  5. Androgen effects on skeletal muscle: implications for the development and management of frailty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew DL O'Connell

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Androgens have potent anabolic effects on skeletal muscle and decline with age in parallel to losses in muscle mass and strength. This loss of muscle mass and function, known as sarcopenia, is the central event in development of frailty, the vulnerable health status that presages adverse outcomes and rapid functional decline in older adults. The potential role of falling androgen levels in the development of frailty and their utility as function promoting therapies in older men has therefore attracted considerable attention. This review summarizes current concepts and definitions in muscle ageing, sarcopenia and frailty, and evaluates recent developments in the study of androgens and frailty. Current evidence from observational and interventional studies strongly supports an effect of androgens on muscle mass in ageing men, but effects on muscle strength and particularly physical function have been less clear. Androgen treatment has been generally well-tolerated in studies of older men, but concerns remain over higher dose treatments and use in populations with high cardiovascular risk. The first trials of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs suggest similar effects on muscle mass and function to traditional androgen therapies in older adults. Important future directions include the use of these agents in combination with exercise training to promote functional ability across different populations of older adults, as well as more focus on the relationships between concurrent changes in hormone levels, body composition and physical function in observational studies.

  6. Androgen effects on skeletal muscle: implications for the development and management of frailty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Matthew D L; Wu, Frederick C W

    2014-01-01

    Androgens have potent anabolic effects on skeletal muscle and decline with age in parallel to losses in muscle mass and strength. This loss of muscle mass and function, known as sarcopenia, is the central event in development of frailty, the vulnerable health status that presages adverse outcomes and rapid functional decline in older adults. The potential role of falling androgen levels in the development of frailty and their utility as function promoting therapies in older men has therefore attracted considerable attention. This review summarizes current concepts and definitions in muscle ageing, sarcopenia and frailty, and evaluates recent developments in the study of androgens and frailty. Current evidence from observational and interventional studies strongly supports an effect of androgens on muscle mass in ageing men, but effects on muscle strength and particularly physical function have been less clear. Androgen treatment has been generally well-tolerated in studies of older men, but concerns remain over higher dose treatments and use in populations with high cardiovascular risk. The first trials of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) suggest similar effects on muscle mass and function to traditional androgen therapies in older adults. Important future directions include the use of these agents in combination with exercise training to promote functional ability across different populations of older adults, as well as more focus on the relationships between concurrent changes in hormone levels, body composition and physical function in observational studies.

  7. Androgen regulated genes in human prostate xenografts in mice: relation to BPH and prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold D Love

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate carcinoma (CaP are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1 highly expressed in prostate, 2 had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3 encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues.

  8. Androgen regulated genes in human prostate xenografts in mice: relation to BPH and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Harold D; Booton, S Erin; Boone, Braden E; Breyer, Joan P; Koyama, Tatsuki; Revelo, Monica P; Shappell, Scott B; Smith, Jeffrey R; Hayward, Simon W

    2009-12-21

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma (CaP) are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ) human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1) highly expressed in prostate, 2) had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3) encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues.

  9. Loss of exogenous androgen dependence by prostate tumor cells is associated with elevated glucuronidation potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Brenna M.; Howell, Michelle E.; Wei, Qin; Ma, Linlin; Romsdahl, Trevor; Loughman, Eileen G.; Markham, Jonathan E.; Seravalli, Javier; Barycki, Joseph J.; Simpson, Melanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate epithelial cells control the potency and availability of androgen hormones in part by inactivation and elimination. UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronate, an essential precursor for androgen inactivation by the prostate glucuronidation enzymes UGT2B15 and UGT2B17. UGDH expression is androgen stimulated, which increases the production of UDP-glucuronate, and fuels UGT-catalyzed glucuronidation. In this study, we compared the glucuronidation potential and its impact on androgen-mediated gene expression in an isogenic LNCaP model for androgen dependent versus castration resistant prostate cancer. Despite significantly lower androgen-glucuronide output, LNCaP 81 castration resistant tumor cells expressed higher levels of UGDH, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17. However, the magnitude of androgen-activated UGDH and PSA expression, as well as the AR-dependent repression of UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, was blunted several-fold in these cells. Consistent with these results, the ligand-activated binding of AR to the PSA promoter and subsequent transcriptional activation were also significantly reduced in castration resistant cells. Analysis of the UDP-sugar pools and flux through pathways downstream of UDP-glucuronate production revealed that these glucuronidation precursor metabolites were channeled through proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan biosynthetic pathways, leading to increased surface expression of Notch 1. Knockdown of UGDH diminished Notch1 and increased glucuronide output. Overall, these results support a model in which the aberrant partitioning of UDP-glucuronate and other UDP-sugars into alternative pathways during androgen deprivation contributes to the loss of prostate tumor cell androgen sensitivity by promoting altered cell surface proteoglycan expression. PMID:27307252

  10. Development of an androgen reporter gene assay (AR-LUX) utilizing a human cell line with an endogenously regulated androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankvoort, B M; de Groene, E M; van Meeteren-Kreikamp, A P; Witkamp, R F; Rodenburg, R J; Aarts, J M

    2001-11-01

    The aim of the work described in this report is to develop and characterize a cell-based androgen reporter assay. For this purpose, the androgen receptor (AR) expressing human breast cancer cell line T47D was stably transfected with a luciferase gene under transcriptional control of the PB-ARE-2 androgen response element. The application of this cell line in an endogenous Androgen Receptor-mediated LUciferase eXpression assay (AR-LUX) was validated. An EC50 value of 86 pM was determined for the standard androgen R1881 with a detection limit of 46 pM. Other androgens like dihydrotestosterone, 17beta-trenbolone, and bolasterone also induced luciferase expression, while anti-androgens suppressed these responses. As expected, AR-mediated responses were also elicited by high concentrations of the steroids progesterone, 17beta-estradiol, d-aldosterone, and dexamethasone, with observed EC50 values 10 to 350,000 times higher than that for R1881. A unique feature of the AR-LUX assay is that effects on modulation of active endogenous AR-levels are reliably reflected in the luciferase induction response, as exemplified by vitamin D, all-trans-retinoic acid, epigallocatechin gallate, and forskolin. This feature is especially useful when assessing complex mixtures, e.g., environmental samples or natural compound libraries. From these data it is concluded that the AR-LUX assay is a reliable in vitro test system for the detection and quantification of AR-mediated biological effects. The 96-well plate format makes the assay particularly suitable for high-throughput screening.

  11. Untersuchungen zur normalen und pathologischen Steuerung der Nebennierenrinden-Androgene im Kindesalter

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Die Reifung der Zona reticularis der Nebennieren-Rinden (NNR) und ihrer Androgen-Sekretion vor der Pubertät unterscheidet sich bei Menschen und höheren Primaten von der NNR-Reifung anderer Species, z.B. der Nager. Die Sekretion der NNR-Androgene leitet die Pubertätsentwicklung ein. Die NNR-Androgene erlangen medizinische Bedeutung dadurch, dass sie bei Frauen zu Hirsutismus und Fertilitätsstörungen führen können. Neben diesen Symptomen stellen sie einen Risikofaktor für die Entwicklung eines ...

  12. Characteristics and outcome of patients with heart failure due to anabolic-androgenic steroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Eva Bjerre; Thune, Jens Jakob; Gustafsson, Finn

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to analyse the outcome of patients with advanced heart failure due to abuse of anabolic-androgenic steroids. DESIGN: A retrospective chart review of patients admitted or referred for advanced heart failure, due to anabolic-androgenic steroid abuse...... with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers. The remaining 3 patients required implantation of a LV assist device (LVAD) and were listed for heart transplantation. No recovery of LV function in the patients treated with assist device was seen. CONCLUSION: Anabolic-androgenic steroid...

  13. Mutually-Antagonistic Interactions in Baseball Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Saavedra, Serguei; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A; Mucha, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit interesting structural changes over time. We also find that these networks exhibit a significant network structure that is sensitive to baseball's rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions. We find that a player's position in the network does not correlate with his success in the random walker ranking but instead has a substantial effect on its sensitivity to changes in his own aggregate performance.

  14. Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2010-03-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

  15. Antagonists of IAP proteins as cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynek, Jasmin N; Vucic, Domagoj

    2013-05-28

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins play pivotal roles in cellular survival by blocking apoptosis, modulating signal transduction, and affecting cellular proliferation. Through their interactions with inducers and effectors of apoptosis IAP proteins can effectively suppress apoptosis triggered by diverse stimuli including death receptor signaling, irradiation, chemotherapeutic agents, or growth factor withdrawal. Evasion of apoptosis, in part due to the action of IAP proteins, enhances resistance of cancer cells to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and contributes to tumor progression. Additionally, IAP genes are known to be subject to amplification, mutation, and chromosomal translocation in human malignancies and autoimmune diseases. In this review we will discuss the role of IAP proteins in cancer and the development of antagonists targeting IAP proteins for cancer treatment.

  16. The Attractiveness of Opposites: Agonists and Antagonists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Tony

    2015-02-02

    ABSTRACT Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, of which constipation is the most common aspect, is a major limiting factor in the use of opioids for pain management. The availability of an oral, long-acting formulation of oxycodone and naloxone represents a highly significant development in pain management. The combination of an opioid analgesic with an opioid antagonist offers reliable pain control with a significant reduction in the burden of opioid-induced constipation. This report is adapted from paineurope 2014; Issue 3, ©Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd, and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, LTD and is distributed free of charge to healthcare professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be accessed via the website: http:\\/\\/www.paineurope.com at which European health professionals can register online to receive copies of the quarterly publication.

  17. Androgen and taxol cause cell type-specific alterations of centrosome and DNA organization in androgen-responsive LNCaP and androgen-independent DU145 prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, H.; Ripple, M.; Balczon, R.; Weindruch, R.; Chakrabarti, A.; Taylor, M.; Hueser, C. N.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the effects of androgen and taxol on the androgen-responsive LNCaP and androgen-independent DU145 prostate cancer cell lines. Cells were treated for 48 and 72 h with 0.05-1 nM of the synthetic androgen R1881 and with 100 nM taxol. Treatment of LNCaP cells with 0.05 nM R1881 led to increased cell proliferation, whereas treatment with 1 nM R1881 resulted in inhibited cell division, DNA cycle arrest, and altered centrosome organization. After treatment with 1 nM R1881, chromatin became clustered, nuclear envelopes convoluted, and mitochondria accumulated around the nucleus. Immunofluorescence microscopy with antibodies to centrosomes showed altered centrosome structure. Although centrosomes were closely associated with the nucleus in untreated cells, they dispersed into the cytoplasm after treatment with 1 nM R1881. Microtubules were only faintly detected in 1 nM R1881-treated LNCaP cells. The effects of taxol included microtubule bundling and altered mitochondria morphology, but not DNA organization. As expected, the androgen-independent prostate cancer cell line DU145 was not affected by R1881. Treatment with taxol resulted in bundling of microtubules in both cell lines. Additional taxol effects were seen in DU145 cells with micronucleation of DNA, an indication of apoptosis. Simultaneous treatment with R1881 and taxol had no additional effects on LNCaP or DU145 cells. These results suggest that LNCaP and DU145 prostate cancer cells show differences not only in androgen responsiveness but in sensitivity to taxol as well. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Microarray analysis of androgen-regulated gene expression in testis: the use of the androgen-binding protein (ABP-transgenic mouse as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossman Gail

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spermatogenesis is an androgen-dependent process, yet the molecular mechanisms of androgens' actions in testis are poorly understood. Transgenic mice overexpressing rat androgen-binding protein (ABP in their testes have reduced levels of intratesticular androgens and, as a result, show a progressive impairment of spermatogenesis. We used this model to characterize changes in global gene expression in testis in response to reduced bioavailability of androgens. Methods Total RNA was extracted from testes of 30-day old transgenic and wild-type control mice, converted to cRNA, labeled with biotin, and hybridized to oligonucleotide microarrays. Microarray results were confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Three-hundred-eighty-one genes (3.05% of all transcripts represented on the chips were up-regulated and 198 genes (1.59% were down-regulated by at least a factor of 2 in the androgen-deficient animals compared to controls. Genes encoding membrane proteins, intracellular signaling molecules, enzymes, proteins participating in the immune response, and those involved in cytoskeleton organization were significantly overrepresented in the up-regulated group. Among the down-regulated transcripts, those coding for extracellular proteins were overrepresented most dramatically, followed by those related to proteolysis, cell adhesion, immune response, and growth factor, cytokine, and ion channel activities. Transcripts with the greatest potential impact on cellular activities included several transcription factors, intracellular signal transducers, secreted signaling molecules and enzymes, and various cell surface molecules. Major nodes in the up-regulated network were IL-6, AGT, MYC, and A2M, those in the down-regulated network were IL-2, -4, and -10, MAPK8, SOCS1, and CREB1. Conclusion Microarray analysis followed by gene ontology profiling and connectivity analysis identified several functional

  19. Antagonistic activity of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Selvakumar Dharmaraj; Dhevendaran Kandasamy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To focus on the isolation and preliminary characterization of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria particularly Streptomyces species and also their antagonistic activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methods: The sponges were collected from Kovalam and Vizhinjam port of south-west coast of Kerala, India. Isolation of strains was carried out from sponge extracts using international Streptomyces project media. For preliminary identification of the strains, morphological (mycelial colouration, soluble pigments, melanoid pigmentation, spore morphology), nutritional uptake (carbon utilisation, amonoacids influence, sodium chloride tolerance), physiological (pH, temperature) and chemotaxonomical characterization were done. Antimicrobial studies were also carried out for the selected strains. Results: With the help of the spicule structures, the collected marine sponges were identified as Callyspongia diffusa, Mycale mytilorum, Tedania anhelans and Dysidea fragilis. Nearly 94 strains were primarily isolated from these sponges and further they were sub-cultured using international Streptomyces project media. The strains exhibited different mycelial colouration (aerial and substrate), soluble and melanoid pigmentations. The strains possessed three types of sporophore morphology namely rectus flexibilis, spiral and retinaculiaperti. Among the 94 isolates, seven exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities with maximal zone of inhibition of 30 mm. The nutritional, physiological and chemotaxonomical characteristic study helped in the conventional identification of the seven strains and they all suggest that the strains to be grouped under the genus Streptomyces. Conclusions: The present study clearly helps in the preliminary identification of the isolates associated with marine sponges. Antagonistic activities prove the production of antimicrobial metabolites against the pathogens. Marine sponges associated Streptomyces are universally well

  20. PARTIAL AGONISTS, FULL AGONISTS, ANTAGONISTS - DILEMMAS OF DEFINITION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOYER, D; BODDEKE, HWGM

    1993-01-01

    The absence of selective antagonists makes receptor characterization difficult, and largely dependent on the use of agonists. However, there has been considerable debate as to whether certain drugs acting at G protein-coupled receptors are better described as agonists, partial agonists or antagonist

  1. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonists for assisted reproductive technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Inany, Hesham G.; Youssef, Mohamed A.; Ayeleke, Reuben Olugbenga; Brown, Julie; Lam, Wai Sun; Broekmans, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists can be used to prevent a luteinizing hormone (LH) surge during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) without the hypo-oestrogenic side-effects, flare-up, or long down-regulation period associated with agonists. The antagonists direct

  2. Antagonistic and Bargaining Games in Optimal Marketing Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    Game theory approaches to find optimal marketing decisions are considered. Antagonistic games with and without complete information, and non-antagonistic games techniques are applied to paired comparison, ranking, or rating data for a firm and its competitors in the market. Mix strategy, equilibrium in bi-matrix games, bargaining models with…

  3. Optimisation of GnRH antagonist use in ART

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdine, O.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the optimisation of controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF using exogenous FSH and GnRH antagonist co-treatment, by studying the timing of the initiation of GnRH antagonist co-medication and the role of ovarian reserve markers in optimising ovarian response and reproductive ou

  4. Time to raise awareness regarding complications of androgen deprivation therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shehzad Basaria

    2012-01-01

    No treatment is devoid of adverse effects,and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in men with prostate cancer (PCa) bears no exception.PCa is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy in men worldwide.In 2011,approximately 240 890 new cases of PCa were diagnosed in the United States and 33 720 men died because of the disease.1 In intermediate- and high-risk patients with locally advanced disease,ADT,when added to external bean radiation therapy,has shown improved survival,while in men with metastatic PCa,ADT improves quality of life (QoL).2-4 However,patients with localized cancer and those encountering biochemical recurrences after definitive therapy are also being started on ADT,even though survival advantage has not been conclusively demonstrated in these clinical settings.As a result,the use of ADT has significantly increased in the last 15 years.

  5. Optimised deconjugation of androgenic steroid conjugates in bovine urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikael; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Andersen, Jens Hinge

    2017-01-01

    After administration of steroids to animals the steroids are partially metabolised in the liver and kidney to phase 2 metabolites, i.e., glucuronic acid or sulphate conjugates. During analysis these conjugated metabolites are normally deconjugated enzymatically with aryl sulphatase and glucuronid......After administration of steroids to animals the steroids are partially metabolised in the liver and kidney to phase 2 metabolites, i.e., glucuronic acid or sulphate conjugates. During analysis these conjugated metabolites are normally deconjugated enzymatically with aryl sulphatase...... and glucuronidase resulting in free steroids in the extract. It is well known that some sulphates are not deconjugated using aryl sulphatase; instead, for example, solvolysis can be used for deconjugation of these aliphatic sulphates. The effectiveness of solvolysis on androgenic steroid sulphates was tested...... in ethyl acetate were used for deconjugation and the extract was purified by solid-phase extraction. The final extract was evaporated to dryness, re-dissolved and analysed by LC-MS/MS....

  6. Anabolic-androgenic steroid dependence? Insights from animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ruth I

    2008-10-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, with negative health consequences. As a result, in 1991 testosterone and related AAS were declared controlled substances. However, the relative abuse and dependence liability of AAS have not been fully characterized. In humans, it is difficult to separate the direct psychoactive effects of AAS from reinforcement due to their systemic anabolic effects. However, using conditioned place preference and self-administration, studies in animals have demonstrated that AAS are reinforcing in a context where athletic performance is irrelevant. Furthermore, AAS share brain sites of action and neurotransmitter systems in common with other drugs of abuse. In particular, recent evidence links AAS with opioids. In humans, AAS abuse is associated with prescription opioid use. In animals, AAS overdose produces symptoms resembling opioid overdose, and AAS modify the activity of the endogenous opioid system.

  7. Androgens and estrogens in postmenopausal insulin-treated diabetic women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H; Djursing, H; Hagen, C;

    1989-01-01

    Diabetic women may have an increased risk of developing endometrial carcinoma. Ovarian and adrenal activity seem to be factors in the genesis of this cancer. We have measured serum sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), free and bound fractions of estrogens and androgens, and gonadotropins in 20...... consecutive postmenopausal insulin-treated diabetic women and 16 normal postmenopausal women. The diabetics were nonketoacidotic, without nephropathy and without proliferative retinopathy. The groups were comparable regarding age and percent ideal body weight. The diabetic group had significantly increased...... levels were similar in the two groups, while serum PRL was significantly lower in the diabetic group (P less than 0.02). The hormonal changes in the diabetics were not related to control of the diabetes. We conclude that total estrogen levels are increased in postmenopausal women with insulin...

  8. Pure Androgen-Secreting Adrenal Adenoma Associated with Resistant Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Rodríguez-Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure androgen-secreting adrenal adenoma is very rare, and its diagnosis remains a clinical challenge. Its association with resistant hypertension is uncommon and not well understood. We present an 18-year-old female with a 10-year history of hirsutism that was accidentally diagnosed with an adrenal mass during the evaluation of a hypertensive crisis. She had a long-standing history of hirsutism, clitorimegaly, deepening of the voice, and primary amenorrhea. She was phenotypically and socially a male. FSH, LH, prolactin, estradiol, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, and progesterone were normal. Total testosterone and DHEA-S were elevated. Cushing syndrome, primary aldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, and nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia were ruled out. She underwent adrenalectomy and pathology reported an adenoma. At 2-month followup, hirsutism and virilizing symptoms clearly improved and blood pressure normalized without antihypertensive medications, current literature of this unusual illness and it association with hypertension is presented and discussed.

  9. The antiandrogenic effect of finasteride against a mutant androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Zhang, Haitao; Ip, Clement

    2011-05-15

    Finasteride is known to inhibit Type 2 5α-reductase and thus block the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The structural similarity of finasteride to DHT raises the possibility that finasteride may also interfere with the function of the androgen receptor (AR). Experiments were carried out to evaluate the antiandrogenic effect of finasteride in LNCaP, C4-2 and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Finasteride decreased DHT binding to AR, and DHT-stimulated AR activity and cell growth in LNCaP and C4-2 cells, but not in VCaP cells. LNCaP and C4-2 (derived from castration-resistant LNCaP) cells express the T877A mutant AR, while VCaP cells express the wild type AR. When PC-3 cells, which are AR-null, were transfected with either the wild type or the T877A mutant AR, only the mutant AR-expressing cells were sensitive to finasteride inhibition of DHT binding. Peroxiredoxin-1 (Prx1) is a novel endogenous facilitator of AR binding to DHT. In Prx1-rich LNCaP cells, the combination of Prx1 knockdown and finasteride was found to produce a greater inhibitory effect on AR activity and cell growth than either treatment alone. The observation suggests that cells with a low expression of Prx1 are likely to be more responsive to the antiandrogenic effect of finasteride. Additional studies showed that the efficacy of finasteride was comparable to that of bicalutamide (a widely used non-steroidal antiandrogen). The implication of the above findings is discussed in the context of developing strategies to improve the outcome of androgen deprivation therapy.

  10. Sensitivity as outcome measure of androgen replacement: the AMS scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinger Juergen C

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The capacity of the AMS scale as clinical utility and as outcome measure still needs validation. Methods An open post-marketing study was performed by office-based physicians in Germany in 2004. We analysed data of 1670 androgen-deficient males who were treated with testosterone gel. The AMS scale was applied prior to and after 3 months treatment. Results The improvement of complaints under treatment relative to the baseline score was 30.7% (total score, 27.3% (psychological domain, 30.5% (somatic domain, and 30.7% (sexual domain, respectively. Patients with little or no symptoms before therapy improved by 9%, those with mild complaints at entry by 24%, with moderate by 32%, and with severe symptoms by 39% – compared with the baseline score. We showed that the distribution of complaints of testosterone deficient men before therapy almost returned to norm values after 12 weeks of testosterone treatment. Age, BMI, and total testosterone level at baseline did not modify the positive effect of androgen therapy. We also demonstrated that the AMS results can predict the independent (physician's opinion about the individual treatment effect. Both, sensitivity (correct prediction of a positive assessment by the physician and specificity (correct prediction of a negative assessment by the physician were over 70%, if about 22% improvement of the AMS total score was used as cut-off point. Conclusion The AMS scale showed a convincing ability to measure treatment effects on quality of life across the full range of severity of complaints. Effect modification by other variables at baseline was not observed. In addition, results of the scale can predict the subjective clinical expert opinion on the treatment efficiency.

  11. Radiation therapy and androgen deprivation in the management of high risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Dal Pra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The combined use of radiation therapy (RT and androgen deprivation for patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer is commonly accepted as the standard treatment among uro-oncologists. Preclinical studies have provided rationale for the use of this combination. Additionally, results of phase 3 studies using conventional doses of RT have supported the combined approach. Other phase 3 studies have also shown a benefit for using higher doses of RT; however, the role of androgen deprivation in this context is not clear. The optimal duration of the androgen deprivation, in both the neoadjuvant and adjuvant setting, is still under investigation. This article critically reviews the data on the use of RT combined with androgen deprivation for the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with emphasis on the results of phase 3 trials.

  12. Role of Imaging in the Diagnosis and Management of Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Nezzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome is an X-linked recessive androgen receptor disorder characterized by a female phenotype with an XY karyotype. Individuals affected by this syndrome have normal female external genitalia but agenesis of the Müllerian duct derivatives, that is, absence of the Fallopian tubes, uterus, cervix, and the proximal part of the vagina, with presence of endoabdominal, labial, or inguinal testes. The estimated prevalence is between 1 and 5 in 100,000 genetic males. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome can be diagnosed as a result of mismatch between the prenatal sex prediction and the phenotype at birth, can be detected by chance, or remain undetected until investigations for primary amenorrhea. Imaging can be important both to diagnose the pathology and to localize gonads prior to surgical treatment. In this paper, we present three cases of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome in adult women of 34, 22, and 38 years old.

  13. Effects of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) on androgen bioactivity in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laurent, Michael R.; Helsen, Christine; Antonio, Leen; Schollaert, Dieter; Joniau, Steven; Vos, Michel J.; Decallonne, Brigitte; Hammond, Geoffrey L.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Biochemical assessments of androgen status (hyper- or hypoandrogenism) are usually based on serum testosterone concentrations. According to the free hormone hypothesis, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) determines free and bioavailable testosterone concentrations. Previous studies have suggested t

  14. Content of Androgen Receptor in Cultured Genital Skin Fibroblast From Different Ages of Chinese Normal Men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢建; 何立敏; 张金山; 杨震; 周云

    1995-01-01

    A ratpid, simple, reliable method is described for assaying androgen receptor (AR) in dispersed, whole, cultured human genital skin fibroblasts (GSF) with a synthetic androgen, 3H-methyltrienolone (3H-R1881). Receptors for androgen in GSF exhiblt high affinity (Kd=3.0±0.1 nmol/L), low binding capacity and androgen specificity. The content of AR in cultured GSF from 40 normal men varying in age from 1.5—60 years u:as also investigated by this assay. Scatchard analysis and slngle plot revealed the presence of 4.500-8500 binding sites per cell, mean number of AR in GSF of these men is 6288±1082 binding sites/cell. No significant difference was observed in the content of AR in different age groups. This result showed that the content of AR in these ceils did not change with age.

  15. LSD1 controls metastasis of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells through PXN and LPAR6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketscher, A; Jilg, C A; Willmann, D; Hummel, B; Imhof, A; Rüsseler, V; Hölz, S; Metzger, E; Müller, J M; Schüle, R

    2014-10-06

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) was shown to control gene expression and cell proliferation of androgen-dependent prostate cancer (PCa) cells, whereas the role of LSD1 in androgen-independent metastatic prostate cancer remains elusive. Here, we show that depletion of LSD1 leads to increased migration and invasion of androgen-independent PCa cells. Transcriptome and cistrome analyses reveal that LSD1 regulates expression of lysophosphatidic acid receptor 6 (LPAR6) and cytoskeletal genes including the focal adhesion adaptor protein paxillin (PXN). Enhanced LPAR6 signalling upon LSD1 depletion promotes migration with concomitant phosphorylation of PXN. In mice LPAR6 overexpression enhances, whereas knockdown of LPAR6 abolishes metastasis of androgen-independent PCa cells. Taken together, we uncover a novel mechanism of how LSD1 controls metastasis and identify LPAR6 as a promising therapeutic target to treat metastatic prostate cancer.

  16. MicroRNAs related to androgen metabolism and polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anja Elaine; Udesen, Pernille Bækgaard; Wissing, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a frequent endocrine disorder in women. PCOS is associated with altered features of androgen metabolism, increased insulin resistance and impaired fertility. Furthermore, PCOS, being a syndrome diagnosis, is heterogeneous and characterized by polycystic ovaries...

  17. Pathogenetic correlations androgen deficiency and uronephrological kidneys diseases at men (the literary review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of pathophysiological interactions of androgen deficiency, associated with it the metabolic disorders (components of a metabolic syndrome and the homeostasis disorders caused by uronephrological kidneys diseases at men based on the modern epidemiological, clinical and experimental investigations are considered in the literary review. There are described either androgen deficiency development mechanisms in kidneys pathology or mutual androgen deficiency influence an anatomic and functional condition of kidneys at men. The information about mechanisms and diagnostics and prognostic role of hyperprolactinaemia in kidneys diseases at men is presented, and also questions of a current state of a problem of expediency and carrying out possibility androgen re-placement therapies at this patients category are covered in the short form too. Kidneys diseases at men represent as the difficult interdisciplinary problem, therefore for the successful decision of modern questions of their early diagnostics, pathogenetic therapy and prevention unconditional interaction of various medical specialties is required.

  18. Pathogenetic correlations androgen deficiency and uronephrological kidneys diseases at men (the literary review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of pathophysiological interactions of androgen deficiency, associated with it the metabolic disorders (components of a metabolic syndrome and the homeostasis disorders caused by uronephrological kidneys diseases at men based on the modern epidemiological, clinical and experimental investigations are considered in the literary review. There are described either androgen deficiency development mechanisms in kidneys pathology or mutual androgen deficiency influence an anatomic and functional condition of kidneys at men. The information about mechanisms and diagnostics and prognostic role of hyperprolactinaemia in kidneys diseases at men is presented, and also questions of a current state of a problem of expediency and carrying out possibility androgen re-placement therapies at this patients category are covered in the short form too. Kidneys diseases at men represent as the difficult interdisciplinary problem, therefore for the successful decision of modern questions of their early diagnostics, pathogenetic therapy and prevention unconditional interaction of various medical specialties is required.

  19. Obstructing Androgen Receptor Activation in Prostate Cancer Cells Through Post-translational Modification by NEDD8

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Nonidet P - 40 ). Pre-cleared with 25 µl protein-A/G agarose beads, 700 µg lysate was subjected to immunoprecipitation with 20 µl anti-FLAG antibody...cell growth. REPORTABLE OUTCOMES: 1. Chang, K. H., Hsiao, P .-W. and Chen, J. D. Modulation of Androgen Receptor Activity by Reversible NEDD8...Hsiao, P .-W. and Chen, J. D. Modulation of Androgen Receptor Activity by Reversible NEDD8 Modification. (under revision) 1 Modulation of

  20. Beyond aggression: Androgen-receptor blockade modulates social interaction in wild meerkats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    delBarco-Trillo, Javier; Greene, Lydia K; Goncalves, Ines Braga; Fenkes, Miriam; Wisse, Jillian H; Drewe, Julian A; Manser, Marta B; Clutton-Brock, Tim; Drea, Christine M

    2016-02-01

    In male vertebrates, androgens are inextricably linked to reproduction, social dominance, and aggression, often at the cost of paternal investment or prosociality. Testosterone is invoked to explain rank-related reproductive differences, but its role within a status class, particularly among subordinates, is underappreciated. Recent evidence, especially for monogamous and cooperatively breeding species, suggests broader androgenic mediation of adult social interaction. We explored the actions of androgens in subordinate, male members of a cooperatively breeding species, the meerkat (Suricata suricatta). Although male meerkats show no rank-related testosterone differences, subordinate helpers rarely reproduce. We blocked androgen receptors, in the field, by treating subordinate males with the antiandrogen, flutamide. We monitored androgen concentrations (via baseline serum and time-sequential fecal sampling) and recorded behavior within their groups (via focal observation). Relative to controls, flutamide-treated animals initiated less and received more high-intensity aggression (biting, threatening, feeding competition), engaged in more prosocial behavior (social sniffing, grooming, huddling), and less frequently initiated play or assumed a 'dominant' role during play, revealing significant androgenic effects across a broad range of social behavior. By contrast, guarding or vigilance and measures of olfactory and vocal communication in subordinate males appeared unaffected by flutamide treatment. Thus, androgens in male meerkat helpers are aligned with the traditional trade-off between promoting reproductive and aggressive behavior at a cost to affiliation. Our findings, based on rare endocrine manipulation in wild mammals, show a more pervasive role for androgens in adult social behavior than is often recognized, with possible relevance for understanding tradeoffs in cooperative systems.

  1. Anabolic androgenic steroids reverse the beneficial effect of exercise on tendon biomechanics: An experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background\\ud The effect of anabolic androgenic steroids on tendons has not yet been fully elucidated. Aim of the present study was the evaluation of the impact of anabolic androgenic steroids on the biomechanical and histological characteristics of Achilles tendons.\\ud Methods\\ud Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomized into four groups with exercise and anabolic steroids (nandrolone decanoate) serving as variables. Protocol duration was 12 weeks. Following euthanasia, tendons’ biomechan...

  2. Cardiotoxic effects of cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroids in the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welder, A A; Melchert, R B

    1993-04-01

    Cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroid abuse have become major drug problems in the United States. Cocaine has been designated as "the drug of greatest national health concern" while as many as 1 million Americans have used or are currently using anabolic-androgenic steroids to promote athletic performance and/or improve physical appearance. Unfavorable cardiovascular events have been linked to both cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroid abuse in healthy, physically active individuals. Deaths of several United States athletes in 1986 focused attention on the life-threatening cardiovascular consequences of cocaine abuse. Reports of myocardial injury with anabolic-androgenic steroid abuse are anecdotal. Nevertheless, case reports have illustrated the alarming cardiotoxic potential of these steroids in athletes. Anabolic-androgenic steroids were correlated to myocardial infarction in weight lifters and cardiomyopathy in a former professional football player. From the total emergency room episodes where cocaine was mentioned in 1990, approximately 66% of these episodes occurred in young individuals 18-29 years of age. Over 500,000 of the individuals currently taking anabolic-androgenic steroids for nonmedical purposes are high-school children. Because cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroids are used improperly, more focus needs to be paid to the toxic mechanisms of their adverse effects. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss mechanisms whereby exercise and/or exercise training may alter the cardiovascular responses to these drugs. Furthermore, we would like to illustrate that contrary to the popular belief, acute and chronic abuse of cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroids have a negative impact on exercise performance.

  3. Successful treatment of metastatic androgen-independent prostate carcinoma in a transsexual patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorff, Tanya B; Shazer, Ronald L; Nepomuceno, Edward M; Tucker, Steven J

    2007-06-01

    The occurrence of prostate carcinoma in transsexual patients has rarely been reported. These cases present a unique challenge in that such patients are effectively receiving androgen deprivation therapy. By definition, their disease is androgen-independent prostate cancer, and the role of local therapy is undefined. We report on a male-to-female transsexual patient with metastatic prostate cancer treated successfully with combination chemotherapy after previous standard therapy failed.

  4. Isotope-Dilution Mass Spectrometry for Quantification of Urinary Active Androgens Separated by Gas Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Su Hyeon Lee; Man Ho Choi; Won-Yong Lee; Bong Chul Chung

    2010-01-01

    Cross reacting antibodies can cause an overestimation of the results of immunoassays. Therefore, alternative methodsare needed for the accurate quantification of steroids. Gas chromatography combined with isotope-dilution mass spectrometry(GC-IDMS) is developed to quantify urinary active androgens, testosterone, epitestosterone and dihydrotestosterone, which areclinically relevant androgens to both hair-loss and prostate diseases. The method devised involves enzymatic hydrolysis with β-glucur...

  5. Recent insights into androgen action on the anatomical and physiological substrate of penile erection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Louis J. G. Gooren; Farid Saad

    2006-01-01

    Erectile response is centrally and peripherally regulated by androgens. The original insights into the mechanisms of action of androgens were that androgens particularly exert effects on libido and that erections in response to erotic stimuli were relatively androgen-independent. It was shown that sexual functions in men required androgen levels at the low end of reference values of testosterone. So it seemed that testosterone was not useful treatment for men with erectile difficulties, particularly following the advent of the phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. However,approximately 50 % of those treated with PDE5 inhibitors discontinue their treatment. A number of recent developments shed new light on testosterone treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) in aging men. (1) A recent insight is that,in contrast to younger men, elderly men might require higher levels of testosterone for normal sexual functioning. (2)Several studies have indicated that PDE5 inhibitors are not always sufficient to restore erectile potency in men, and that testosterone improves the therapeutical response to PDE5 inhibitors considerably. (3) There is growing insight that testosterone has profound effects on tissues of the penis involved in the mechanism of erection and that testosterone deficiency impairs the anatomical and physiological substrate of erectile capacity, reversible upon androgen replacement. The synthesis of PDE5 is upregulated by androgens, and the arterial inflow into the penis is improved by giving androgen. The above invites a re-examination of the merits of giving testosterone to aging men with ED. The beneficial effects of PDE5 inhibitors may only be optimally expressed in a eugonadal environment.

  6. Developmental programming by androgen affects the circadian timing system in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereness, Amanda L; Murphy, Zachary C; Sellix, Michael T

    2015-04-01

    Circadian clocks play essential roles in the timing of events in the mammalian hypothalamo-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis. The molecular oscillator driving these rhythms has been localized to tissues of the HPO axis. It has been suggested that synchrony among these oscillators is a feature of normal reproductive function. The impact of fertility disorders on clock function and the role of the clock in the etiology of endocrine pathology remain unknown. Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a particularly devastating fertility disorder, affecting 5%-10% of women at childbearing age with features including a polycystic ovary, anovulation, and elevated serum androgen. Approximately 40% of these women have metabolic syndrome, marked by hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance. It has been suggested that developmental exposure to excess androgen contributes to the etiology of fertility disorders, including PCOS. To better define the role of the timing system in these disorders, we determined the effects of androgen-dependent developmental programming on clock gene expression in tissues of the metabolic and HPO axes. Female PERIOD2::luciferase (PER2::LUC) mice were exposed to androgen (dihydrotestosterone [DHT]) in utero (Days 16-18 of gestation) or for 9-10 wk (DHT pellet) beginning at weaning (pubertal androgen excess [PAE]). As expected, both groups of androgen-treated mice had disrupted estrous cycles. Analysis of PER2::LUC expression in tissue explants revealed that excess androgen produced circadian misalignment via tissue-dependent effects on phase distribution. In vitro treatment with DHT differentially affected the period of PER2::LUC expression in tissue explants and granulosa cells, indicating that androgen has direct and tissue-specific effects on clock gene expression that may account for the effects of developmental programming on the timing system.

  7. Selective androgen receptor modulators in drug discovery: medicinal chemistry and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadilla, Rodolfo; Turnbull, Philip

    2006-01-01

    Modulation of the androgen receptor has the potential to be an effective treatment for hypogonadism, andropause, and associated conditions such as sarcopenia, osteoporosis, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and sexual dysfunction. Side effects associated with classical anabolic steroid treatments have driven the quest for drugs that demonstrate improved therapeutic profiles. Novel, non-steroidal compounds that show tissue selective activity and improved pharmacokinetic properties have been developed. This review provides an overview of current advances in the development of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

  8. Novel selective androgen receptor modulators: SAR studies on 6-bisalkylamino-2-quinolinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oeveren, Arjan; Motamedi, Mehrnoush; Martinborough, Esther; Zhao, Shuo; Shen, Yixing; West, Sarah; Chang, William; Kallel, Adam; Marschke, Keith B; López, Francisco J; Negro-Vilar, Andrés; Zhi, Lin

    2007-03-15

    A series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) with a wide spectrum of receptor modulating activities was developed based on optimization of the 4-substituted 6-bisalkylamino-2-quinolinones (3). Significance of the trifluoromethyl group on the side chains and its interactions with amino acid residues within the androgen receptor (AR) ligand binding domain are discussed. A representative analog (9) was tested orally in a rodent model of hypogonadism and demonstrated desirable tissue selectivity.

  9. A large deletion/insertion-induced frameshift mutation of the androgen receptor gene in a family with a familial complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Peikuan; Ye, Yinghui; Wang, Yue; Lu, Lingping; Yong, Jing; Yu, Ping; Joseph, Kimani Kagunda; Jin, Fan; Qi, Ming

    2012-06-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked recessive genetic disorder with a normal 46, XY karyotype caused by abnormality of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. One Chinese family consisting of the proband and 5 other members with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) was investigated. Mutation analysis by DNA sequencing on all 8 exons and flanking intron regions of the AR gene revealed a unique large deletion/insertion mutation in the family. A 287 bp deletion and 77 bp insertion (c.933_1219delins77) mutation at codon 312 resulted in a frameshift which caused a premature stop (p.Phe312Aspfs*7) of polypeptide formation. The proband's mother and grandmother were heterozygous for the mutant allele. The proband's father, uncle and grandfather have the normal allele. From the pedigree constructed from mutational analysis of the family, it is revealed that the probably pathogenic mutation comes from the maternal side.

  10. Androgen receptor non-nuclear regulation of prostate cancer cell invasion mediated by Src and matriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarif, Jelani C; Lamb, Laura E; Schulz, Veronique V; Nollet, Eric A; Miranti, Cindy K

    2015-03-30

    Castration-resistant prostate cancers still depend on nuclear androgen receptor (AR) function despite their lack of dependence on exogenous androgen. Second generation anti-androgen therapies are more efficient at blocking nuclear AR; however resistant tumors still develop. Recent studies indicate Src is highly active in these resistant tumors. By manipulating AR activity in several different prostate cancer cell lines through RNAi, drug treatment, and the use of a nuclear-deficient AR mutant, we demonstrate that androgen acting on cytoplasmic AR rapidly stimulates Src tyrosine kinase via a non-genomic mechanism. Cytoplasmic AR, acting through Src enhances laminin integrin-dependent invasion. Active Matriptase, which cleaves laminin, is elevated within minutes after androgen stimulation, and is subsequently shed into the medium. Matriptase activation and shedding induced by cytoplasmic AR is dependent on Src. Concomitantly, CDCP1/gp140, a Matriptase and Src substrate that controls integrin-based migration, is activated. However, only inhibition of Matriptase, but not CDCP1, suppresses the AR/Src-dependent increase in invasion. Matriptase, present in conditioned medium from AR-stimulated cells, is sufficient to enhance invasion in the absence of androgen. Thus, invasion is stimulated by a rapid but sustained increase in Src activity, mediated non-genomically by cytoplasmic AR, leading to rapid activation and shedding of the laminin protease Matriptase.

  11. Contributions of androgen and estrogen to fetal programming of ovarian dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumesic Daniel A

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In female mammals, including humans, deviations from normal androgenic or estrogenic exposure during fetal development are detrimental to subsequent adult ovarian function. Androgen deficiency, without accompanying estrogen deficit, has little apparent impact on ovarian development. Fetal estrogen deficiency, on the other hand, results in impaired oocyte and follicle development, immature and abnormal adult ovaries, and excessive ovarian stimulation from endogenous gonadotropins ultimately generating hemorrhagic follicles. Complete estrogen deficiency lasting into adulthood results in partial ovarian masculinization. Fetal androgen excess, on the other hand, mediated either by direct androgen action or following androgen aromatization to estrogen, reprograms ovarian development and reproductive neuroendocrinology to mimic that found in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: enlarged, polyfollicular, hyperandrogenic, anovulatory ovaries with accompanying LH hypersecretion. Oocyte developmental competence is also compromised. Insulin is implicated in the mechanism of both anovulation and deficient oocyte development. Fetal estrogen excess induces somewhat similar disruption of adult ovarian function to fetal androgen excess. Understanding the quality of the fetal female sex steroid hormone environment is thus becoming increasingly important in improving our knowledge of mechanisms underlying a variety of female reproductive pathologies.

  12. Sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene is not a common determinant of male sexual orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macke, J.P.; Nathans, J.; King, V.L. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)); Hu, N.; Hu, S.; Hamer, D.; Bailey, M. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)); Brown, T. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1993-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that DNA sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene plays a causal role in the development of male sexual orientation, the authors have (1) measured the degree of concordance of androgen receptor alleles in 36 pairs of homosexual brothers, (2) compared the lengths of polyglutamine and polyglycine tracts in the amino-terminal domain of the androgen receptor in a sample of 197 homosexual males and 213 unselected subjects, and (3) screened the entire androgen receptor coding region for sequence variation by PCR and denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and/or single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis in 20 homosexual males with homosexual or bisexual brothers and one homosexual male with no homosexual brothers, and screened the amino-terminal domain of the receptor for sequence variation in an additional 44 homosexual males, 37 of whom had one or more first- or second-degree male relatives who were either homosexual or bisexual. These analyses show that (1) homosexual brothers are as likely to be discordant as concordant for androgen receptor alleles; (2) there are no large-scale differences between the distributions of polyglycine or polyglutamine tract lengths in the homosexual and control groups; and (3) coding region sequence variation is not commonly found within the androgen receptor gene of homosexual men. The DGGE screen identified two rare amino acid substitutions, ser[sup 205] -to-arg and glu[sup 793]-to-asp, the biological significance of which is unknown. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Development and Characterization of Uterine Glandular Epithelium Specific Androgen Receptor Knockout Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaesung Peter; Zheng, Yu; Skulte, Katherine A; Handelsman, David J; Simanainen, Ulla

    2015-11-01

    While estrogen action is the major driver of uterine development, androgens acting via the androgen receptor (AR) may also promote uterine growth as suggested by uterine phenotypes in global AR knockout (ARKO) female mice. Because AR is expressed in uterine endometrial glands, we generated (Cre/loxP) uterine gland epithelium-specific ARKO (ugeARKO) to determine the role of endometrial gland-specific androgen actions. However, AR in uterine gland epithelium may not be required for normal uterine development and function because ugeARKO females had normal uterine development and fertility. To determine if exogenous androgens acting via AR can fully support uterine growth in the absence of estrogens, the ARKO and ugeARKO females were ovariectomized and treated with supraphysiological doses of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone (nonaromatizable androgen). Both dihydrotestosterone and testosterone supported full uterine regrowth in wild-type females while ARKO females had no regrowth (comparable to ovariectomized only). These findings suggest that androgens acting via AR can promote full uterine regrowth in the absence of estrogens. The ugeARKO had 50% regrowth when compared to intact uterine glands, and histomorphologically, both the endometrial and myometrial areas were significantly (P glandular epithelial AR located in the endometrium may indirectly modify myometrial development. Additionally, to confirm Cre function in endometrial glands, we generated uge-specific PTEN knockout mouse model. The ugePTEN knockout females developed severe endometrial hyperplasia and therefore present a novel model for future research.

  14. Androgen receptor regulation of the seladin-1/DHCR24 gene: altered expression in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorsi, Lorella; Luciani, Paola; Nesi, Gabriella; Mannucci, Edoardo; Deledda, Cristiana; Dichiara, Francesca; Paglierani, Milena; Rosati, Fabiana; Masieri, Lorenzo; Serni, Sergio; Carini, Marco; Proietti-Pannunzi, Laura; Monti, Salvatore; Forti, Gianni; Danza, Giovanna; Serio, Mario; Peri, Alessandro

    2008-10-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) represents a major leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Elevated cholesterol levels, resulting from altered cholesterol metabolism, have been found in CaP cells. Seladin-1 (SELective Alzheimer Disease INdicator-1)/DHCR24 is a recently described gene involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrated the androgen regulation of seladin-1/DHCR24 expression, due to the presence of androgen responsive element sequences in its promoter region. In metastatic androgen receptor-negative CaP cells seladin-1/DHCR24 expression and cholesterol amount were reduced compared to androgen receptor-positive cells. In tumor samples from 61 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy the expression of seladin-1/DHCR24 was significantly higher with respect to normal tissues. In addition, in cancer tissues mRNA levels were positively related to T stage. In tumor specimens from 23 patients who received androgen ablation treatment for 3 months before surgery seladin-1/DHCR24 expression was significantly lower with respect to patients treated by surgery only. In conclusion, our study demonstrated for the first time the androgen regulation of the seladin-1/DHCR24 gene and the presence of a higher level of expression in CaP tissues, compared to the normal prostate. These findings, together with the results previously obtained in metastatic disease, suggest an involvement of this gene in CaP.

  15. MicroRNAs are mediators of androgen action in prostate and muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Narayanan

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR function is critical for the development of male reproductive organs, muscle, bone and other tissues. Functionally impaired AR results in androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS. The interaction between AR and microRNA (miR signaling pathways was examined to understand the role of miRs in AR function. Reduction of androgen levels in Sprague-Dawley rats by castration inhibited the expression of a large set of miRs in prostate and muscle, which was reversed by treatment of castrated rats with 3 mg/day dihydrotestosterone (DHT or selective androgen receptor modulators. Knockout of the miR processing enzyme, DICER, in LNCaP prostate cancer cells or tissue specifically in mice inhibited AR function leading to AIS. Since the only function of miRs is to bind to 3' UTR and inhibit translation of target genes, androgens might induce miRs to inhibit repressors of AR function. In concordance, knock-down of DICER in LNCaP cells and in tissues in mice induced the expression of corepressors, NCoR and SMRT. These studies demonstrate a feedback loop between miRs, corepressors and AR and the imperative role of miRs in AR function in non-cancerous androgen-responsive tissues.

  16. In human granulosa cells from small antral follicles, androgen receptor mRNA and androgen levels in follicular fluid correlate with FSH receptor mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. E.; Rasmussen, I. A.; Kristensen, Stine Gry;

    2011-01-01

    RNA analysis (24 women). Expression of Androgen Receptor (AR) mRNA levels in granulosa cells, and of androstenedione and testosterone in FF, were correlated to the expression of FSH receptor (FSHR), LH receptor (LHR), CYP19 and anti-Müllerian Hormone-receptor2 (AMHR2) mRNA in the granulosa cells and to the FF...... with the expression of AMHR2, but did not correlate with any of the hormones in the FF. These data demonstrate an intimate association between AR expression in immature granulosa cells, and the expression of FSHR in normal small human antral follicles and between the FF levels of androgen and FSHR expression...

  17. Corepressor effect on androgen receptor activity varies with the length of the CAG encoded polyglutamine repeat and is dependent on receptor/corepressor ratio in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Grant; Need, Eleanor F; Barrett, Jeffrey M; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Thompson, Vanessa C; Butler, Lisa M; Marshall, Villis R; Tilley, Wayne D; Coetzee, Gerhard A

    2011-08-01

    The response of prostate cells to androgens reflects a combination of androgen receptor (AR) transactivation and transrepression, but how these two processes differ mechanistically and influence prostate cancer risk and disease outcome remain elusive. Given recent interest in targeting AR transrepressive processes, a better understanding of AR/corepressor interaction and responses is warranted. Here, we used transactivation and interaction assays with wild-type and mutant ARs, and deletion AR fragments, to dissect the relationship between AR and the corepressor, silencing mediator for retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT). We additionally tested how these processes are influenced by AR agonist and antagonist ligands, as well as by variation in the polyglutamine tract in the AR amino terminal domain (NTD), which is encoded by a polymorphic CAG repeat in the gene. SMRT was recruited to the AR ligand binding domain by agonist ligand, and as determined by the effect of strategic mutations in activation function 2 (AF-2), requires a precise conformation of that domain. A distinct region of SMRT also mediated interaction with the AR-NTD via the transactivation unit 5 (TAU5; residues 315-538) region. The degree to which SMRT was able to repress AR increased from 17% to 56% as the AR polyglutamine repeat length was increased from 9 to 42 residues, but critically this effect could be abolished by increasing the SMRT:AR molar ratio. These data suggest that the extent to which the CAG encoded polyglutamine repeat influences AR activity represents a balance between corepressor and coactivator occupancy of the same ligand-dependent and independent AR interaction surfaces. Changes in the homeostatic relationship of AR to these molecules, including SMRT, may explain the variable penetrance of the CAG repeat and the loss of AR signaling flexibility in prostate cancer progression.

  18. Fine Tuning of a Type 1 Interferon Antagonist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Urin

    Full Text Available Type I interferons are multi-potent cytokines that serve as first line of defense against viruses and other pathogens, posses immunomudolatory functions and elicit a growth inhibitory response. In recent years it has been shown that interferons are also detrimental, for example in lupus, AIDS, tuberculosis and cognitive decline, highlighted the need to develop interferon antagonists. We have previously developed the antagonist IFN-1ant, with much reduced binding to the IFNAR1 receptor and enhanced binding to IFNAR2. Here, we further tune the IFN-1ant by producing three additional antagonists based on IFN-1ant but with altered activity profiles. We show that in all three cases the antiproliferative activity of interferons is blocked and the induction of gene transcription of immunomudolatory and antiproliferative associated genes are substantially decreased. Conversely, each of the new antagonists elicits a different degree of antiviral response, STAT phosphorylation and related gene induction. Two of the new antagonists promote decreased activity in relation to the original IFN-1ant, while one of them promotes increased activity. As we do not know the exact causes of the detrimental effects of IFNs, the four antagonists that were produced and analyzed provide the opportunity to investigate the extent of antagonistic and agonistic activity optimal for a given condition.

  19. Design, Syntheses and Bioactivities of Androgen Receptor Targeted Taxane Analogs, Simplified Fluorescently Labeled Discodermolide Analogs, and Conformationally Constrained Discodermolide Analogs

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer for men in America. The androgen receptor exerts transcriptional activity and plays an important role for the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. Androgen receptor ligands bind the androgen receptor and inhibit its transcriptional activity effectively. However, prostate cancer can progress to hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) to avoid this effect. Chemotherapies are currently the primary treatments for HRPC. Unfortunately, none of...

  20. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator RAD140 Is Neuroprotective in Cultured Neurons and Kainate-Lesioned Male Rats

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The decline in testosterone levels in men during normal aging increases risks of dysfunction and disease in androgen-responsive tissues, including brain. The use of testosterone therapy has the potential to increase the risks for developing prostate cancer and or accelerating its progression. To overcome this limitation, novel compounds termed “selective androgen receptor modulators” (SARMs) have been developed that lack significant androgen action in prostate but exert agonist effects in sel...

  1. Nalmefene: radioimmunoassay for a new opioid antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R; Hsiao, J; Taaffe, W; Hahn, E; Tuttle, R

    1984-11-01

    A specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) has been developed for the quantitation of a new opioid antagonist, nalmefene, in human plasma. The method employs a rabbit antiserum to an albumin conjugate of naltrexone-6-(O-carboxymethyl)oxime and [3H]naltrexone as the radioligand. Assay specificity was achieved by extraction of nalmefene from plasma at pH 9 into ether prior to RIA. The procedure has a limit of sensitivity of 0.2 ng/mL of nalmefene using a 0.5-mL sample of plasma for analysis. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation did not exceed 5.6 and 11%, respectively. The specificity of the RIA was established by demonstrating excellent agreement (r = 0.99) with a less sensitive and more time consuming HPLC procedure in the analysis of clinical plasma samples. The use of the RIA for the pharmacokinetic evaluation of nalmefene is illustrated with plasma concentration profiles of the drug in humans following intravenous and oral administration.

  2. Antagonistic Neural Networks Underlying Differentiated Leadership Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Eleftherios Boyatzis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950’s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task oriented and socio-emotional oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks -- the Task Positive Network (TPN and the Default Mode Network (DMN. Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success.

  3. In Search of the Molecular Mechanisms Mediating the Inhibitory Effect of the GnRH Antagonist Degarelix on Human Prostate Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Monica; Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B.; Patterson, Nathan H.; Chaurand, Pierre; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-01-01

    Degarelix is a gonadrotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor (GnRHR) antagonist used in patients with prostate cancer who need androgen deprivation therapy. GnRHRs have been found in extra-pituitary tissues, including prostate, which may be affected by the GnRH and GnRH analogues used in therapy. The direct effect of degarelix on human prostate cell growth was evaluated. Normal prostate myofibroblast WPMY-1 and epithelial WPE1-NA22 cells, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)-1 cells, androgen-independent PC-3 and androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells, as well as VCaP cells derived from a patient with castration-resistant prostate cancer were used. Discriminatory protein and lipid fingerprints of normal, hyperplastic, and cancer cells were generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). The investigated cell lines express GNRHR1 and GNRHR2 and their endogenous ligands. Degarelix treatment reduced cell viability in all prostate cell lines tested, with the exception of the PC-3 cells; this can be attributed to increased apoptosis, as indicated by increased caspase 3/7, 8 and 9 levels. WPE1-NA22, BPH-1, LNCaP, and VCaP cell viability was not affected by treatment with the GnRH agonists leuprolide and goserelin. Using MALDI MS, we detected changes in m/z signals that were robust enough to create a complete discriminatory profile induced by degarelix. Transcriptomic analysis of BPH-1 cells provided a global map of genes affected by degarelix and indicated that the biological processes affected were related to cell growth, G-coupled receptors, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, angiogenesis and cell adhesion. Taken together, these data demonstrate that (i) the GnRH antagonist degarelix exerts a direct effect on prostate cell growth through apoptosis; (ii) MALDI MS analysis provided a basis to fingerprint degarelix-treated prostate cells; and (iii) the clusters of genes affected by degarelix suggest that

  4. In search of the molecular mechanisms mediating the inhibitory effect of the GnRH antagonist degarelix on human prostate cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Sakai

    Full Text Available Degarelix is a gonadrotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH receptor (GnRHR antagonist used in patients with prostate cancer who need androgen deprivation therapy. GnRHRs have been found in extra-pituitary tissues, including prostate, which may be affected by the GnRH and GnRH analogues used in therapy. The direct effect of degarelix on human prostate cell growth was evaluated. Normal prostate myofibroblast WPMY-1 and epithelial WPE1-NA22 cells, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH-1 cells, androgen-independent PC-3 and androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells, as well as VCaP cells derived from a patient with castration-resistant prostate cancer were used. Discriminatory protein and lipid fingerprints of normal, hyperplastic, and cancer cells were generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI mass spectrometry (MS. The investigated cell lines express GNRHR1 and GNRHR2 and their endogenous ligands. Degarelix treatment reduced cell viability in all prostate cell lines tested, with the exception of the PC-3 cells; this can be attributed to increased apoptosis, as indicated by increased caspase 3/7, 8 and 9 levels. WPE1-NA22, BPH-1, LNCaP, and VCaP cell viability was not affected by treatment with the GnRH agonists leuprolide and goserelin. Using MALDI MS, we detected changes in m/z signals that were robust enough to create a complete discriminatory profile induced by degarelix. Transcriptomic analysis of BPH-1 cells provided a global map of genes affected by degarelix and indicated that the biological processes affected were related to cell growth, G-coupled receptors, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway, angiogenesis and cell adhesion. Taken together, these data demonstrate that (i the GnRH antagonist degarelix exerts a direct effect on prostate cell growth through apoptosis; (ii MALDI MS analysis provided a basis to fingerprint degarelix-treated prostate cells; and (iii the clusters of genes affected by degarelix

  5. A novel selective androgen receptor modulator, NEP28, is efficacious in muscle and brain without serious side effects on prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Kazumasa; Harada, Koichiro; Ichihara, Junji; Takata, Naoko; Takahashi, Yasuhiko; Saito, Koichi

    2013-11-15

    Age-related androgen depletion is known to be a risk factor for various diseases, such as osteoporosis and sarcopenia. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that age-related androgen depletion results in accumulation of β-amyloid protein and thereby acts as a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease. Supplemental androgen therapy has been shown to be efficacious in treating osteoporosis and sarcopenia. In addition, studies in animals have demonstrated that androgens can play a protective role against Alzheimer's disease. However, androgen therapy is not used routinely for these indications, because of side effects. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a new class of compounds. SARMs maintain the beneficial effects of androgens on bone and muscle while reducing unwanted side effects. NEP28 is a new SARM exhibiting high selectivity for androgen receptor. To investigate the pharmacological effects of NEP28, we compared the effects on muscle, prostate, and brain with mice that were androgen depleted by orchidectomy and then treated with either placebo, NEP28, dihydrotestosterone, or methyltestosterone. We demonstrated that NEP28 showed tissue-selective effect equivalent to or higher than existing SARMs. In addition, the administration of NEP28 increased the activity of neprilysin, a known Aβ-degrading enzyme. These results indicate that SARM is efficacious for the treatment of not only osteoporosis and sarcopenia, but also Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanfar, Mohammad A; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  7. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad eKhanfar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®, the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  8. Identification of a novel conformationally constrained glucagon receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Esther C Y; Tu, Meihua; Stevens, Benjamin D; Bian, Jianwei; Aspnes, Gary; Perreault, Christian; Sammons, Matthew F; Wright, Stephen W; Litchfield, John; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Sharma, Raman; Didiuk, Mary T; Ebner, David C; Filipski, Kevin J; Brown, Janice; Atkinson, Karen; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Guzman-Perez, Angel

    2014-02-01

    Identification of orally active, small molecule antagonists of the glucagon receptor represents a novel treatment paradigm for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present work discloses novel glucagon receptor antagonists, identified via conformational constraint of current existing literature antagonists. Optimization of lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE or LipE) culminated in enantiomers (+)-trans-26 and (-)-trans-27 which exhibit good physicochemical and in vitro drug metabolism profiles. In vivo, significant pharmacokinetic differences were noted with the two enantiomers, which were primarily driven through differences in clearance rates. Enantioselective oxidation by cytochrome P450 was ruled out as a causative factor for pharmacokinetic differences.

  9. New potential uroselective NO-donor alpha1-antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, Donatella; Tron, Gian Cesare; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto; Poggesi, Elena; Motta, Gianni; Leonardi, Amedeo

    2003-08-14

    A recent uroselective alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, REC15/2739, has been joined with nitrooxy and furoxan NO-donor moieties to give new NO-donor alpha(1)-antagonists. All the compounds studied proved to be potent and selective ligands of human cloned alpha(1a)-receptor subtype. Derivatives 6 and 7 were able to relax the prostatic portion of rat vas deferens contracted by (-)-noradrenaline because of both their alpha(1A)-antagonist and their NO-donor properties.

  10. Inactivation by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes: the end of androgen signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Sarah; Yueh, Mei-Fei; Tukey, Robert H; Giton, Frank; Fiet, Jean; Pelletier, Georges; Barbier, Olivier; Bélanger, Alain

    2008-04-01

    Conjugation by UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) is the major pathway of androgen metabolism and elimination in the human. High concentrations of glucuronide conjugates of androsterone (ADT) and androstane-3alpha,17beta-diol (3alpha-diol) are present in circulation and several studies over the last 30 years have concluded that the serum levels of these metabolites might reflect the androgen metabolism in several tissues, including the liver and androgen target tissues. Three UGT2B enzymes are responsible for the conjugation of DHT and its metabolites ADT and 3alpha-diol: UGT2B7, B15 and B17. UGT2B7 is expressed in the liver and skin whereas UGT2B15 and B17 were found in the liver, prostate and skin. Very specific antibodies against each UGT2B enzyme have been obtained and used for immunohistochemical studies in the human prostate. It was shown that UGT2B17 is expressed in basal cells whereas UGT2B15 is only localized in luminal cells, where it inactivates DHT. By using LNCaP cells, we have also demonstrated that the expression and activity of UGT2B15 and B17 are modulated by several endogenous prostate factors including androgen. Finally, to study the physiological role of UGT2B enzymes, transgenic mice bearing the human UGT2B15 gene were recently obtained. A decrease in reproductive tissue weight from transgenic animals compared to those from control animals was observed. In conclusion, the conjugation by UGT2B7, B15 and B17, which represents a non-reversible step in androgen metabolism, is an important means by which androgens are regulated locally. It is also postulated that UGT enzymes protect the tissue from deleteriously high concentrations of active androgen.

  11. Expression of novel genes linked to the androgen-induced, proliferative shutoff in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geck, P; Szelei, J; Jimenez, J; Lin, T M; Sonnenschein, C; Soto, A M

    1997-01-01

    Androgens control cell numbers in the prostate through three separate pathways: (a) inhibition of cell death, (b) induction of cell proliferation (Step-1) and (c) inhibition of cell proliferation (Step-2, proliferative shutoff). The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are incompletely understood. The human prostate carcinoma LNCaP variants express these pathways as follows: LNCaP-FGC express both steps, LNCaP-LNO expresses Step-2, LNCaP-TAC expresses Step-1, and LNCaP-TJA cells express neither step. These cells facilitated the search for mediators of the androgen-induced proliferative shutoff pathway. Androgen exposure for 24 h or longer induced an irreversible proliferative shutoff in LNCaP-FGC cells. The Wang and Brown approach for identifying differentially expressed mRNAs was used to search for mediators of Step-2. Ten unique inserts were identified and from those ten, three genes were further studied. The basal expression of these genes in shutoff-negative variants was not affected by androgen exposure. They were induced by androgens in shutoff-positive LNCaP variants and the androgen receptor-transfected, shutoff-positive, MCF7-AR1 cells. These genes were induced only in the range of androgen concentrations that elicited the shutoff response. Time course analysis showed that their induction precedes the commitment point by 12-18 h. In addition, they were expressed in the normal prostate during proliferative shutoff. These features suggest that the candidate genes have a role in the regulation cascade for proliferative shutoff.

  12. Androgen action in the masculinization programming window and development of male reproductive organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, D J; Sharpe, R M; Welsh, M; Fisken, M; Scott, H M; Hutchison, G R; Drake, A J; van den Driesche, S

    2010-04-01

    We have shown previously that deficient androgen action within a masculinization programming window (MPW; e15.5-e18.5 in rats) is important in the origin of male reproductive disorders and in programming male reproductive organ size, but that androgen action postnatally may be important to achieve this size. To further investigate importance of the MPW, we used two rat models, in which foetal androgen production or action was impaired during the MPW by exposing in utero to either di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) or to flutamide. Reduced anogenital distance (AGD) was used as a monitor of androgen production/action during the MPW. Offspring were evaluated in early puberty (Pnd25) to establish if reproductive organ size was altered. The testes, penis, ventral prostate (VP) and seminal vesicles (SV) were weighed and penis length measured. Both DBP and flutamide exposure in the MPW significantly reduced penis, VP and SV size along with AGD at Pnd25; AGD and organ size were highly correlated. In DBP-, but not flutamide-, exposed animals, testis weight was also reduced and correlated with AGD. Intratesticular testosterone was also measured in control and DBP-exposed males during (e17.5) or after (e21.5) the MPW and related to AGD at e21.5. To evaluate the importance of postnatal androgen action in reproductive organ growth, the effect of combinations of prenatal and postnatal maternal treatments on AGD and penis size at Pnd25 was evaluated. In prenatally DBP-exposed animals, further postnatal exposure to either DBP or flutamide significantly reduced AGD and penis size in comparison with prenatal DBP exposure alone. In comparison, rats exposed postnatally to testosterone propionate after prenatal vehicle-exposure showed considerable increase in these parameters vs. controls. In conclusion, we show that the size of all male reproductive organs is programmed by androgen exposure in the MPW, but that growth towards this size is dependent on androgen action postnatally.

  13. Single amino acid substitutions at 2 of 14 positions in an ultra-conserved region of the androgen receptor yield an androgen-binding domain that is reversibly thermolabile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliou, M.; Lumbroso, R.; Alvarado, C. [McGill Univ., Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The stereochemistry of the androgen receptor (AR) that is responsible for androgen-specific binding and for its contribution to the transregulatory attributes of an androgen-receptor complex are unknown. Our objective is to define structure-function relations of the human AR by correlating germline missense mutations at its X-linked locus with its resultant misbehavior. Subjects with Arg773Cys have complete androgen insensitivity. We and several other laboratories have reported that their genital skin fibroblasts (GSF) have negligible androgen-binding activity at 37{degrees}. We have found that Phe763Leu also causes CAI, but with approximately 10 fmol/mg protein androgen-binding activity at 37{degrees} (R-deficient). Within COS-1 cells transfected with each mutant AR cDNA, Phe763Leu and Arg773Cys androgen-binding activities are reversibly thermolabile, by a factor of 2, at 37{degrees} versus 22{degrees}, only in the presence of androgen; in the absence of androgen they are thermostable at 37{degrees}. We have discovered that (for a reason yet unknown) the GSF from a third family with Arg773Cys (and no other coding sequence mutation) have 20-40 mol/mg protein of androgen-binding activity at 37{degrees} when measured with 3-6 nFM androgen. This activity reversibly doubles at 22{degrees}. The reversible thermolability of an AR with Arg773Cys (and probably with Phe763Leu) is demonstrable within GSF. Ligand-dependence of this thermolability implies that ligand induces these mutant AR to undergo a deviant conformational change in, or near, a 14-aa region that shares 90% identity/similarity with its closest receptor relatives.

  14. Intra- and interspecific aggression do not modulate androgen levels in dusky gregories, yet male aggression is reduced by an androgen blocker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullioud, Philippe; Bshary, Redouan; Ros, Albert Frank Huascar

    2013-08-01

    Discussions about social behavior are generally limited to fitness effects of interactions occurring between conspecifics. However, many fitness relevant interactions take place between individuals belonging to different species. Our detailed knowledge about the role of hormones in intraspecific interactions provides a starting point to investigate how far interspecific interactions are governed by the same physiological mechanisms. Here, we carried out standardized resident-intruder (sRI) tests in the laboratory to investigate the relationship between androgens and both intra- and interspecific aggression in a year-round territorial coral reef fish, the dusky gregory, Stegastes nigricans. This damselfish species fiercely defend cultivated algal crops, used as a food source, against a broad array of species, mainly food competitors, and thus represent an ideal model system for comparisons of intra-and interspecific territorial aggression. In a first experiment, resident S. nigricans showed elevated territorial aggression against intra- and interspecific intruders, yet neither elicited a significant increase in androgen levels. However, in a second experiment where we treated residents with flutamide, an androgen receptor blocker, males but not females showed decreased aggression, both towards intra- and interspecific intruders. Thus androgens appear to affect aggression in a broader territorial context where species identity of the intruder appears to play no role. This supports the idea that the same hormonal mechanism may be relevant in intra- and interspecific interactions. We further propose that in such a case, where physiological mechanisms of behavioral responses are found to be context dependent, interspecific territorial aggression should be considered a social behavior.

  15. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by a novel splice donor site mutation and activation of a cryptic splice donor site in the androgen receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Joana B; Alvelos, Maria I; Bastos, Margarida; Carrilho, Francisco; Lemos, Manuel C

    2016-01-01

    The androgen insensitivity syndrome is an X-linked recessive genetic disorder characterized by resistance to the actions of androgens in an individual with a male karyotype. We evaluated a 34-year-old female with primary amenorrhea and a 46,XY karyotype, with normal secondary sex characteristics, absence of uterus and ovaries, intra-abdominal testis, and elevated testosterone levels. Sequence analysis of the androgen receptor (AR) gene revealed a novel splice donor site mutation in intron 4 (c.2173+2T>C). RT-PCR analysis showed that this mutation resulted in the activation of a cryptic splice donor site located in the second half of exon 4 and in the synthesis of a shorter mRNA transcript and an in-frame deletion of 41 amino acids. This novel mutation associated with a rare mechanism of abnormal splicing further expands the spectrum of mutations associated with the androgen insensitivity syndrome and may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in splicing defects.

  16. Androgen-androgen receptor system improves chronic inflammatory conditions by suppressing monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in adipocytes via transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morooka, Nobukatsu; Ueguri, Kei; Yee, Karen Kar Lye; Yanase, Toshihiko; Sato, Takashi

    2016-09-02

    Age-related decreases in sex hormones are closely related to chronic inflammation in obesity and metabolic diseases. Particularly, the molecular basis of androgen activity in regulating inflammation and controlling metabolism remains largely unknown. Obese adipocytes secrete monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a key chemokine that promotes the infiltration of monocytes/macrophages into adipose tissue, thereby leading to metabolic disorders. Here, we studied the role of androgen-androgen receptor (AR) action in regulating MCP-1 expression in adipose tissue. We observed the induction of Mcp-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes co-cultured with RAW264.7 macrophages. Additionally, Mcp-1 expression was upregulated by culturing in conditioned medium derived from inflammatory macrophages (M1-Mφ) containing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). We found that sex hormones downregulated TNF-α-induced Mcp-1 and interleukin (Il)-6 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, luciferase-reporter analysis indicated that MCP-1 promoter activity was predominantly suppressed by dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-AR interactions through functional canonical nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) sites, whereas non-canonical NF-κB site containing important flanking sequences exhibited minor contributions to DHT-AR transcriptional repression. These findings suggested that androgen-AR suppressed obesity-induced chronic inflammation in adipose tissue.

  17. The pharmacological properties of lipophilic calcium antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zwieten, P A

    1998-01-01

    Several types of calcium antagonists (CA) (verapamil, diltiazem, nifedipine and related drugs) may be used as antihypertensives. In practice, the dihydropyridines (nifedipine and related drugs) are the CA used most frequently as antihypertensives. Apart from the lowering of blood pressure CA may lead to other, theoretically beneficial, effects: regression of left ventricular and vascular hypertrophy, renal protection, weak natriuretic, weak antiplatelet, anti-ischaemic and antiatherogenic activity. Several new dihydropyridine CA have been introduced in recent years. The advantages of the newer compounds, such as amlodipine, felodipine, isradipine, lacidipine and lercanidipine, may include: vasoselectivity, hence little or no cardiodepressant activity; an improved kinetic profile, resulting in a slow onset and long duration of action, fewer side-effects such as reflex tachycardia and headache, owing to the slow onset of the antihypertensive action. For a few newer CA a predominant effect on specialized circulatory beds (renal, coronary and cerebral) has been claimed. The new CA, which are clearly lipophilic, deserve special attention. Owing to the lipophilic character of such compounds considerable concentration occurs in lipid-containing membrane depots. The CA thus concentrated are slowly released from these depots and, subsequently, reach their targets, the L-type calcium channels. This phenomenon explains both the slow onset and the long duration of action of these CA. Owing to the slow onset of action reflex tachycardia is virtually absent. The long duration of action allows satisfactory control of blood pressure in hypertensives by means of a single daily dose. A few lipophilic dihydropyridine CA are vasoselective. This property implies that at therapeutic, vasodilatory dosages no cardiodepressant activity occurs. Lercanidipine is a recently introduced example of a lipophilic and vasoselective dihydropyridine CA. It is an effective vasodilator

  18. A SELECTIVE ANTAGONIST OF MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTOR EPLERENONE IN CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Gegenava

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of aldosterone in pathophysiological processes is considered. The effects of the selective antagonist of mineralocorticoid receptor eplerenone are analyzed. The advantages of eplerenone compared with spironolactone are discussed.

  19. Structure-based drug design identifies novel LPA3 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fells, James I; Tsukahara, Ryoko; Liu, Jianxiong; Tigyi, Gabor; Parrill, Abby L

    2009-11-01

    Compound 5 ([5-(3-nitrophenoxy)-1,3-dioxo-1,3-dihydro-2-isoindol-2-yl]acetic acid) was identified as a weak selective LPA(3) antagonist (IC(50)=4504 nM) in a virtual screening effort to optimize a dual LPA(2 and 3) antagonist. Structure-based drug design techniques were used to prioritize similarity search matches of compound 5. This strategy rapidly identified 10 novel antagonists. The two most efficacious compounds identified inhibit activation of the LPA(3) receptor by 200 nM LPA with IC(50) values of 752 nM and 2992 nM. These compounds additionally define changes to our previously reported pharmacophore that will improve its ability to identify more potent and selective LPA(3) receptor antagonists. The results of the combined computational and experimental screening are reported.

  20. Secondary prevention with calcium antagonists after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J F

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the 3 calcium antagonists nifedipine, diltiazem, and verapamil have a comparable effect in the prevention of myocardial damage during ischaemia. Secondary prevention trials after acute myocardial infarction, which aimed at improving survival...