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Sample records for androgen antagonists

  1. Classification and virtual screening of androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiazhong; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-05-24

    Computational tools, such as quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), are highly useful as screening support for prioritization of substances of very high concern (SVHC). From the practical point of view, QSAR models should be effective to pick out more active rather than inactive compounds, expressed as sensitivity in classification works. This research investigates the classification of a big data set of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs)-androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, mainly aiming to improve the external sensitivity and to screen for potential AR binders. The kNN, lazy IB1, and ADTree methods and the consensus approach were used to build different models, which improve the sensitivity on external chemicals from 57.1% (literature) to 76.4%. Additionally, the models' predictive abilities were further validated on a blind collected data set (sensitivity: 85.7%). Then the proposed classifiers were used: (i) to distinguish a set of AR binders into antagonists and agonists; (ii) to screen a combined estrogen receptor binder database to find out possible chemicals that can bind to both AR and ER; and (iii) to virtually screen our in-house environmental chemical database. The in silico screening results suggest: (i) that some compounds can affect the normal endocrine system through a complex mechanism binding both to ER and AR; (ii) new EDCs, which are nonER binders, but can in silico bind to AR, are recognized; and (iii) about 20% of compounds in a big data set of environmental chemicals are predicted as new AR antagonists. The priority should be given to them to experimentally test the binding activities with AR.

  2. Gene expression profiling of the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide and vinclozolin in zebrafish (Danio rerio) gonads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma, E-mail: dalma@stthomas.edu [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); University of St. Thomas, 2115 Summit Ave, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Wang Ronglin [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Ecological Exposure Research Division, 26W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Villeneuve, Daniel L. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); Bencic, David C.; Lazorchak, Jim [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Ecological Exposure Research Division, 26W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Ankley, Gerald T. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States)

    2011-01-25

    The studies presented in this manuscript focus on characterization of transcriptomic responses to anti-androgens in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Research on the effects of anti-androgens in fish has been characterized by a heavy reliance on apical endpoints, and molecular mechanisms of action (MOA) of anti-androgens remain poorly elucidated. In the present study, we examined effects of a short term exposure (24-96 h) to the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide (FLU) and vinclozolin (VZ) on gene expression in gonads of sexually mature zebrafish, using commercially available zebrafish oligonucleotide microarrays (4 x 44 K platform). We found that VZ and FLU potentially impact reproductive processes via multiple pathways related to steroidogenesis, spermatogenesis, and fertilization. Observed changes in gene expression often were shared by VZ and FLU, as demonstrated by overlap in differentially-expressed genes and enrichment of several common key pathways including: (1) integrin and actin signaling, (2) nuclear receptor 5A1 signaling, (3) fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling, (4) polyamine synthesis, and (5) androgen synthesis. This information should prove useful to elucidating specific mechanisms of reproductive effects of anti-androgens in fish, as well as developing biomarkers for this important class of endocrine-active chemicals.

  3. Similarities and Distinctions in Actions of Surface-Directed and Classic Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Ho Suh

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR surface-directed antagonist MJC13 inhibits AR function and proliferation of prostate cancer (PC cells. These effects are related to arrest of an AR/chaperone complex in the cytoplasm. Here, we compared MJC13 and classic AR antagonists such as flutamide and bicalutamide. Microarray analysis and confirmatory qRT-PCR reveals that MJC13 and flutamide inhibit dihydrotestosterone (DHT-dependent genes in LNCaP PC cells. Both compounds are equally effective on a genome wide basis and as effective as second generation AR antagonists (MDV3100, ARN-509 at selected genes. MJC13 inhibits AR binding to the prostate specific antigen (PSA promoter more strongly than flutamide, consistent with different mechanisms of action. Examination of efficacy of MJC13 in conditions that reflect aspects castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC reveals that it inhibits flutamide activation of an AR mutant (ART877A that emerges during flutamide withdrawal syndrome, but displays greatly restricted gene-specific activity in 22Rv1 cells that express a constitutively active truncated AR and is inactive against glucocorticoid receptor (GR, which can co-opt androgen-dependent signaling networks in CRPC. Importantly, MJC13 inhibits AR interactions with SRC2 and β-catenin in the nucleus and, unlike flutamide, strongly inhibits amplification of AR activity obtained with transfected SRC2 and β-catenin. MJC13 also inhibits DHT and β-catenin-enhanced cell division in LNCaP cells. Thus, a surface-directed antagonist can block AR activity in some conditions in which a classic antagonist fails and may display utility in particular forms of CRPC.

  4. A Combined Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Research of Quinolinone Derivatives as Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Bai, Fang; Cao, Hong; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Antiandrogens bicalutamide, flutamide and enzalutamide etc. have been used in clinical trials to treat prostate cancer by binding to and antagonizing androgen receptor (AR). Although initially effective, the drug resistance problem will emerge eventually, which results in a high medical need for novel AR antagonist exploitation. Here in this work, to facilitate the rational design of novel AR antagonists, we studied the structure-activity relationships of a series of 2-quinolinone derivatives and investigated the structural requirements for their antiandrogenic activities. Different modeling methods, including 2D MLR, 3D CoMFA and CoMSIA, were implemented to evolve QSAR models. All these models, thoroughly validated, demonstrated satisfactory results especially for the good predictive abilities. The contour maps from 3D CoMFA and CoMSIA models provide visualized explanation of key structural characteristics relevant to the antiandrogenic activities, which is summarized to a position-specific conclusion at the end. The obtained results from this research are practically useful for rational design and screening of promising chemicals with high antiandrogenic activities.

  5. 20-Aminosteroids as a novel class of selective and complete androgen receptor antagonists and inhibitors of prostate cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fousteris, Manolis A; Schubert, Undine; Roell, Daniela; Roediger, Julia; Bailis, Nikolaos; Nikolaropoulos, Sotiris S; Baniahmad, Aria; Giannis, Athanassios

    2010-10-01

    Here, the synthesis and the evaluation of novel 20-aminosteroids on androgen receptor (AR) activity is reported. Compounds 11 and 18 of the series inhibit both the wild type and the T877A mutant AR-mediated transactivation indicating AR antagonistic function. Interestingly, minor structural changes such as stereoisomers of the amino lactame moiety exhibit preferences for antagonism among wild type and mutant AR. Other tested nuclear receptors are only weakly or not affected. In line with this, the prostate cancer cell growth of androgen-dependent but not of cancer cells lacking expression of the AR is inhibited. Further, the expression of the prostate specific antigen used as a diagnostic marker is also repressed. Finally steroid 18 enhances cellular senescence that might explain in part the growth inhibition mediated by this derivative. Steroids 11 and 18 are the first steroids that act as complete AR antagonists and exhibit AR specificity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Combined Ligand/Structure-Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Steroidal Androgen Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, targeting the androgen receptor (AR, are the main endocrine therapies for prostate cancer (PCa. But as drug resistance to antiandrogens emerges in advanced PCa, there presents a high medical need for exploitation of novel AR antagonists. In this work, the relationships between the molecular structures and antiandrogenic activities of a series of 7α-substituted dihydrotestosterone derivatives were investigated. The proposed MLR model obtained high predictive ability. The thoroughly validated QSAR model was used to virtually screen new dihydrotestosterones derivatives taken from PubChem, resulting in the finding of novel compounds CID_70128824, CID_70127147, and CID_70126881, whose in silico bioactivities are much higher than the published best one, even higher than bicalutamide. In addition, molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD simulations, and MM/GBSA have been employed to analyze and compare the binding modes between the novel compounds and AR. Through the analysis of the binding free energy and residue energy decomposition, we concluded that the newly discovered chemicals can in silico bind to AR with similar position and mechanism to the reported active compound and the van der Waals interaction is the main driving force during the binding process.

  7. Combined Ligand/Structure-Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Steroidal Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Han, Rui; Zhang, Huimin; Liu, Hongli; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2017-01-01

    The antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, targeting the androgen receptor (AR), are the main endocrine therapies for prostate cancer (PCa). But as drug resistance to antiandrogens emerges in advanced PCa, there presents a high medical need for exploitation of novel AR antagonists. In this work, the relationships between the molecular structures and antiandrogenic activities of a series of 7 α -substituted dihydrotestosterone derivatives were investigated. The proposed MLR model obtained high predictive ability. The thoroughly validated QSAR model was used to virtually screen new dihydrotestosterones derivatives taken from PubChem, resulting in the finding of novel compounds CID_70128824, CID_70127147, and CID_70126881, whose in silico bioactivities are much higher than the published best one, even higher than bicalutamide. In addition, molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and MM/GBSA have been employed to analyze and compare the binding modes between the novel compounds and AR. Through the analysis of the binding free energy and residue energy decomposition, we concluded that the newly discovered chemicals can in silico bind to AR with similar position and mechanism to the reported active compound and the van der Waals interaction is the main driving force during the binding process.

  8. Developmental Programming: Prenatal and Postnatal Androgen Antagonist and Insulin Sensitizer Interventions Prevent Advancement of Puberty and Improve LH Surge Dynamics in Prenatal Testosterone-Treated Sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Veiga-Lopez, Almudena; Herkimer, Carol; Abi Salloum, Bachir; Moeller, Jacob; Beckett, Evan; Sreedharan, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal T excess induces maternal hyperinsulinemia, early puberty, and reproductive/metabolic defects in the female similar to those seen in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. This study addressed the organizational/activational role of androgens and insulin in programming pubertal advancement and periovulatory LH surge defects. Treatment groups included the following: 1) control; 2) prenatal T; 3) prenatal T plus prenatal androgen antagonist, flutamide; 4) prenatal T plus prenatal insuli...

  9. Developmental Programming: Prenatal and Postnatal Androgen Antagonist and Insulin Sensitizer Interventions Prevent Advancement of Puberty and Improve LH Surge Dynamics in Prenatal Testosterone-Treated Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Veiga-Lopez, Almudena; Herkimer, Carol; Abi Salloum, Bachir; Moeller, Jacob; Beckett, Evan; Sreedharan, Rohit

    2015-07-01

    Prenatal T excess induces maternal hyperinsulinemia, early puberty, and reproductive/metabolic defects in the female similar to those seen in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. This study addressed the organizational/activational role of androgens and insulin in programming pubertal advancement and periovulatory LH surge defects. Treatment groups included the following: 1) control; 2) prenatal T; 3) prenatal T plus prenatal androgen antagonist, flutamide; 4) prenatal T plus prenatal insulin sensitizer, rosiglitazone; 5) prenatal T and postnatal flutamide; 6) prenatal T and postnatal rosiglitazone; and 7) prenatal T and postnatal metformin. Prenatal treatments spanned 30-90 days of gestation and postnatal treatments began at approximately 8 weeks of age and continued throughout. Blood samples were taken twice weekly, beginning at approximately 12 weeks of age to time puberty. Two-hour samples after the synchronization with prostaglandin F2α were taken for 120 hours to characterize LH surge dynamics at 7 and 19 months of age. Prenatal T females entered puberty earlier than controls, and all interventions prevented this advancement. Prenatal T reduced the percentage of animals having LH surge, and females that presented LH surge exhibited delayed timing and dampened amplitude of the LH surge. Prenatal androgen antagonist, but not other interventions, restored LH surges without normalizing the timing of the surge. Normalization of pubertal timing with prenatal/postnatal androgen antagonist and insulin sensitizer interventions suggests that pubertal advancement is programmed by androgenic actions of T involving insulin as a mediary. Restoration of LH surges by cotreatment with androgen antagonist supports androgenic programming at the organizational level.

  10. Small Molecule Antagonists of the Nuclear Androgen Receptor for the Treatment of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James K; Skoda, Erin M; Zhou, Jianhua; Parrinello, Erica; Wang, Dan; O'Malley, Katherine; Eyer, Benjamin R; Kazancioglu, Mustafa; Eisermann, Kurtis; Johnston, Paul A; Nelson, Joel B; Wang, Zhou; Wipf, Peter

    2016-08-11

    After a high-throughput screening campaign identified thioether 1 as an antagonist of the nuclear androgen receptor, a zone model was developed for structure-activity relationship (SAR) purposes and analogues were synthesized and evaluated in a cell-based luciferase assay. A novel thioether isostere, cyclopropane (1S,2R)-27, showed the desired increased potency and structural properties (stereospecific SAR response, absence of a readily oxidized sulfur atom, low molecular weight, reduced number of flexible bonds and polar surface area, and drug-likeness score) in the prostate-specific antigen luciferase assay in C4-2-PSA-rl cells to qualify as a new lead structure for prostate cancer drug development.

  11. Qualitative and quantitative simulation of androgen receptor antagonists: A case study of polybrominated diphenyl ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yang; Shi, Wei; Xia, Pu; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yu, Hongxia

    2017-12-15

    Recently, great attention has been paid to the identification and prediction of the androgen disrupting potencies of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). However, few existing models can discriminate active and inactive compounds, which make the quantitative prediction process including the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) technique unreliable. In this study, different grouping methods were investigated and compared for qualitative identification, including molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations (MD). The results showed that qualitative identification based on MD, which is lab-independent, accurate and closer to the real transcriptional activation process, could separate 90.5% of active and inactive chemicals and was preferred. The 3D-QSAR models built as the quantitative simulation method showed r 2 and q 2 values of 0.513 and 0.980, respectively. Together, a novel workflow combining qualitative identification and quantitative simulations was generated with processes including activeness discrimination and activity prediction. This workflow, for analyzing the antagonism of androgen receptor (AR) of PBDEs is not only allowing researchers to reduce their intense laboratory experiments but also assisting them in inspecting and adjusting their laboratory systems and results. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Androgen priming using aromatase inhibitor and hCG during early-follicular-phase GnRH antagonist down-regulation in modified antagonist protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løssl, Kristine; Andersen, A N; Loft, A

    2006-01-01

    Temporary exposure of follicles to increased levels of androgens may enhance their sensitivity to FSH. The aim of this study was to increase the intraovarian androgen level using aromatase inhibitors and hCG before controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) and to test this concept clinically.......Temporary exposure of follicles to increased levels of androgens may enhance their sensitivity to FSH. The aim of this study was to increase the intraovarian androgen level using aromatase inhibitors and hCG before controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) and to test this concept clinically....

  13. Androgen priming using aromatase inhibitor and hCG during early-follicular-phase GnRH antagonist down-regulation in modified antagonist protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løssl, Kristine; Andersen, A N; Loft, A

    2006-01-01

    Temporary exposure of follicles to increased levels of androgens may enhance their sensitivity to FSH. The aim of this study was to increase the intraovarian androgen level using aromatase inhibitors and hCG before controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) and to test this concept clinically....

  14. The Three Dimensional Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (3D-QSAR and Docking Studies of Curcumin Derivatives as Androgen Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor antagonists have been proved to be effective anti-prostate cancer agents. 3D-QSAR and Molecular docking methods were performed on curcumin derivatives as androgen receptor antagonists. The bioactive conformation was explored by docking the potent compound 29 into the binding site of AR. The constructed Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA and Comparative Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA models produced statistically significant results with the cross-validated correlation coefficients q2 of 0.658 and 0.567, non-cross-validated correlation coefficients r2 of 0.988 and 0.978, and predicted correction coefficients r2pred of 0.715 and 0.793, respectively. These results ensure the CoMFA and CoMSIA models as a tool to guide the design of novel potent AR antagonists. A set of 30 new analogs were proposed by utilizing the results revealed in the present study, and were predicted with potential activities in the developed models.

  15. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists versus standard androgen suppression therapy for advanced prostate cancer A systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunath, Frank; Borgmann, Hendrik; Blümle, Anette; Keck, Bastian; Wullich, Bernd; Schmucker, Christine; Sikic, Danijel; Roelle, Catharina; Schmidt, Stefanie; Wahba, Amr; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2015-11-13

    To evaluate efficacy and safety of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists compared to standard androgen suppression therapy for advanced prostate cancer. The international review team included methodologists of the German Cochrane Centre and clinical experts. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Web of Science, EMBASE, trial registries and conference books for randomised controlled trials (RCT) for effectiveness data analysis, and randomised or non-randomised controlled studies (non-RCT) for safety data analysis (March 2015). Two authors independently screened identified articles, extracted data, evaluated risk of bias and rated quality of evidence according to GRADE. 13 studies (10 RCTs, 3 non-RCTs) were included. No study reported cancer-specific survival or clinical progression. There were no differences in overall mortality (RR 1.35, 95% CI 0.63 to 2.93), treatment failure (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.17) or prostate-specific antigen progression (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.64 to 1.06). While there was no difference in quality of life related to urinary symptoms, improved quality of life regarding prostate symptoms, measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), with the use of GnRH antagonists compared with the use of standard androgen suppression therapy (mean score difference -0.40, 95% CI -0.94 to 0.14, and -1.84, 95% CI -3.00 to -0.69, respectively) was found. Quality of evidence for all assessed outcomes was rated low according to GRADE. The risk for injection-site events was increased, but cardiovascular events may occur less often by using GnRH antagonist. Available evidence is hampered by risk of bias, selective reporting and limited follow-up. There is currently insufficient evidence to make firm conclusive statements on the efficacy of GnRH antagonist compared to standard androgen suppression therapy for advanced prostate cancer. There is need for further high-quality research on GnRH antagonists with long-term follow-up. CRD42012002751

  16. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists versus standard androgen suppression therapy for advanced prostate cancer A systematic review with meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunath, Frank; Borgmann, Hendrik; Blümle, Anette; Keck, Bastian; Wullich, Bernd; Schmucker, Christine; Sikic, Danijel; Roelle, Catharina; Schmidt, Stefanie; Wahba, Amr; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate efficacy and safety of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists compared to standard androgen suppression therapy for advanced prostate cancer. Setting The international review team included methodologists of the German Cochrane Centre and clinical experts. Participants We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Web of Science, EMBASE, trial registries and conference books for randomised controlled trials (RCT) for effectiveness data analysis, and randomised or non-randomised controlled studies (non-RCT) for safety data analysis (March 2015). Two authors independently screened identified articles, extracted data, evaluated risk of bias and rated quality of evidence according to GRADE. Results 13 studies (10 RCTs, 3 non-RCTs) were included. No study reported cancer-specific survival or clinical progression. There were no differences in overall mortality (RR 1.35, 95% CI 0.63 to 2.93), treatment failure (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.17) or prostate-specific antigen progression (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.64 to 1.06). While there was no difference in quality of life related to urinary symptoms, improved quality of life regarding prostate symptoms, measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), with the use of GnRH antagonists compared with the use of standard androgen suppression therapy (mean score difference −0.40, 95% CI −0.94 to 0.14, and −1.84, 95% CI −3.00 to −0.69, respectively) was found. Quality of evidence for all assessed outcomes was rated low according to GRADE. The risk for injection-site events was increased, but cardiovascular events may occur less often by using GnRH antagonist. Available evidence is hampered by risk of bias, selective reporting and limited follow-up. Conclusions There is currently insufficient evidence to make firm conclusive statements on the efficacy of GnRH antagonist compared to standard androgen suppression therapy for advanced prostate cancer. There is need for further high-quality research on

  17. Determination of benzimidazole- and bicyclic hydantoin-derived selective androgen receptor antagonists and agonists in human urine using LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Kohler, Maxie; Thomas, Andreas; Maurer, Joachim; Schlörer, Nils; Kamber, Matthias; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2008-05-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) represent a novel class of drugs with tissue-specific agonistic and antagonistic properties, which are prohibited in sports from January 2008 according to the World Anti-Doping Agency. Preventive approaches to restrict the use of SARMs include early implementation of target analytes into doping control screening assays. Five model SARMs were synthesized, four of which are analogs to prostate-specific androgen receptor antagonists with a 5,6-dichloro-benzimidazole nucleus. The fifth SARM is a muscle-tissue specific agonist with a bicyclic hydantoin structure (BMS-564929). Dissociation pathways after negative electrospray ionization were studied using an LTQ-Orbitrap mass analyzer, and diagnostic product ions and common fragmentation patterns were employed to establish a screening procedure that target the intact SARMs as well as putative metabolic products. Sample preparation based on solid-phase extraction and subsequent LC-MS/MS measurement allowed for detection limits of 1-20 ng/mL, intra- and interday precisions of between 2.4 and 13.2% and between 6.5 and 24.2%, respectively. Recoveries varied from 89 to 106%, and tests for ion suppression or enhancement effects were negative for all analytes. [figure: see text

  18. Widely used pharmaceuticals present in the environment revealed as in vitro antagonists for human estrogen and androgen receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ezechiáš, Martin; Janochová, Jana; Filipová, Alena; Křesinová, Zdena; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 152, JUNE (2016), s. 284-291 ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020218; GA ČR GA13-28283S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Endocrine disruptor * Anti-estrogenic * Anti-androgenic Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.208, year: 2016

  19. The suitability of concentration addition for predicting the effects of multi-component mixtures of up to 17 anti-androgens with varied structural features in an in vitro AR antagonist assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermler, Sibylle; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.kortenkamp@brunel.ac.uk

    2011-12-15

    The risks associated with human exposures to chemicals capable of antagonising the effects of endogenous androgens have attracted considerable recent interest. Exposure is typically to large numbers of chemicals with androgen receptor (AR) antagonist activity, yet there is limited evidence of the combined effects of multi-component mixtures of these chemicals. A few in vitro studies with mixtures of up to six AR antagonists suggest that the concept of concentration addition (CA) provides good approximations of experimentally observed mixture effects, but studies with larger numbers of anti-androgens, and with more varied structural features, are missing. Here we show that the mixture effects of up to 17 AR antagonists, comprising compounds as diverse as UV-filter substances, parabens, perfluorinated compounds, bisphenol-A, benzo({alpha})pyrene, synthetic musks, antioxidants and polybrominated biphenyls, can be predicted well on the basis of the anti-androgenicity of the single components using the concept of CA. We tested these mixtures in an in vitro AR-dependent luciferase reporter gene assay, based on MDA-kb2 cells. The effects of further mixtures, composed of four and six anti-androgens, could be predicted accurately by CA. However, there was a shortfall from expected additivity with a ten-component mixture at two different mixture ratios, but attempts to attribute these deviations to differential expression of hormone-metabolising CYP isoforms did not produce conclusive results. CA provides good approximations of in vitro mixture effects of anti-androgens with varying structural features. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Humans are exposed to a large number of androgen receptor antagonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is limited evidence of the combined effects of anti-androgenic chemicals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modelled the predictability of combined effects of up to 17 anti-androgens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested the

  20. Toxic Identification and Evaluation of Androgen Receptor Antagonistic Activities in Acid-Treated Liver Extracts of High-Trophic Level Wild Animals from Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misaki, Kentaro; Suzuki, Go; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Takahashi, Shin; Someya, Masayuki; Takigami, Hidetaka; Tajima, Yuko; Yamada, Tadasu K; Amano, Masao; Isobe, Tomohiko; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2015-10-06

    Sulfuric acid-treated liver extracts of representative high-trophic level Japanese animals were analyzed by toxic identification and evaluation (TIE) with chemically activated luciferase expression (CALUX) and chemical analysis to elucidate androgen receptor (AR) antagonistic activities and potential contributions of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The activities were detected in striped dolphins (n = 5), Stejneger's beaked whales (n = 6), golden eagle (n = 1), and Steller's sea eagle (n = 1) with CALUX-flutamide equivalents (FluEQs) as follow: 38 (20-52), 47 (21-96), 5.0, and 80 μg FluEQ/g-lipid, respectively. The AR antagonism was detected in limited number of specimens at lower levels for finless porpoise, raccoon dog, and common cormorant. Theoretical activities (Theo-FluEQs) were calculated using the concentration of OCPs and PCBs and their IC25-based relative potency (REP) values. These total contribution to CALUX-FluEQ was 126%, 84%, 53%, 55%, and 44% for striped dolphin, Steller's sea eagle, Stejneger's beaked whale, finless porpoise, and golden eagle, respectively, and the main contributor was p,p'-DDE. However, most of the activities for raccoon dog (7.6%) and common cormorant (17%) could not be explained by OCPs and PCBs. This suggests other unknown compounds could function as AR antagonists in these terrestrial species.

  1. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 3-oxo-4-oxa-5α-androst-17β-amide derivatives as dual 5α-reductase inhibitors and androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Kejing; Sun, Jie; Wang, Chong; Wang, Ying; You, Qidong; Xiao, Hong; Xiang, Hua

    2017-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of death in men. Recently, some researches have showed that 5α-reductase inhibitors were beneficial in PCa treatment as well. In this study, a series of novel 3-oxo-4-oxa-5α-androst-17β-amide derivatives have been designed and synthesized in a more simple and convenient method. Most of the synthesized compounds displayed good 5α-reductase inhibitory activities and androgen receptor binding affinities. Their anti-proliferation activities in PC-3 and LNCaP cell lines were also evaluated and the results indicated that most of the synthesized compounds exhibited potent anti-proliferative activities. It is obvious that the androgen-dependent cell line LNCaP was much more sensitive than the androgen-independent cell line PC-3. Among all the synthesized compounds, 11d and 11k displayed the best inhibition activity with 4-fold more sensitive toward LNCaP than PC-3, which was consistent with their high affinities observed in AR binding assay. Molecular modeling studies suggested that 11k could bind to AR in a manner similar to the binding of dihydrotestosterone to AR. Compared to the finasteride, 11k showed a longer plasma half-life (4h) and a better bioavailability. Overall, based on biological activities data, compound 11d and 11k can be identified as potential dual 5α-reductase inhibitors and AR antagonists which might be of therapeutic importance for prostate cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bile acids and their oxo derivatives: Potential inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase I and II, androgen receptor antagonists and CYP3A4 substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifunović, Jovana; Borčić, Vladan; Mikov, Momir

    2017-05-01

    Some biological properties of bile acids and their oxo derivatives have not been sufficiently investigated, although the interest in bile acids as signaling molecules is rising. The aim of this work was to evaluate physico-chemical parametar b (slope) that represents the lipophilicity of the examined molecules and to investigate interactions of bile acids with carbonic anhydrase I, II, androgen receptor and CYP450s. Thirteen candidates were investigated using normal-phase thin-layer chromatography in two solvent systems. Retention parameters were used in further quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis and docking studies to predict interactions and binding affinities of examined molecules with enzymes and receptors. Prediction of activity on androgen receptor showed that compounds 3α-hydroxy-12-oxo-5β-cholanoic and 3α-hydroxy-7-oxo-5β-cholanoic acid have stronger antiandrogen activity than natural bile acids. The inhibitory potential for carbonic anhydrase I and II was tested and it was concluded that molecules 3α-hydroxy-12-oxo-5β-cholanoic, 3α-hydroxy-7-oxo-5β-cholanoic, 3,7,12-trioxo-5β-cholanoic acid and hyodeoxycholic acid show the best results. Substrate behavior for CYP3A4 was confirmed for all investigated compounds. Oxo derivatives of bile acids show stronger interactions with enzymes and receptors as classical bile acids and lower membranolytic activity compared with them. These significant observations could be valuable in consideration of oxo derivatives as building blocks in medicinal chemistry. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL ANDROGENS AND ANTIANDROGENS: AN EXPANDING CHEMICAL UNIVERSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Within the last ten years, awareness has grown about environmental chemicals that display antiandrogenic or androgenic activity. While studies in the early 1990s focused on pesticides that acted as androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, it soon became evident that this was not the ...

  4. Masking effect of anti-androgens on androgenic activity in European river sediment unveiled by effect-directed analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, J.M.; Hamers, T.; Thomas, K.; van der Linden, S.C.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Lamoree, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    This study shows that the androgen receptor agonistic potency is clearly concealed by the effects of androgen receptor antagonists in a total sediment extract, demonstrating that toxicity screening of total extracts is not enough to evaluate the full in vitro endocrine disrupting potential of a

  5. PTTG1, A novel androgen responsive gene is required for androgen-induced prostate cancer cell growth and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zheng [Department of Urology, First Hospital, Peking University & Institute of Urology, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China); Jin, Bo [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Jin, Yaqiong [Biobank for Clinical Data and Samples in Pediatric, Beijing Pediatric Research Institute, Beijing Children' s Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100045 (China); Huang, Shengquan; Niu, Xiaohua [Department of Urology, First Hospital, Peking University & Institute of Urology, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China); Mao, Zebin [The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Health Science Center, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Xin, Dianqi, E-mail: xin-dianqi@163.com [Department of Urology, First Hospital, Peking University & Institute of Urology, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China)

    2017-01-01

    Androgens (AR) play an important role in initiation and progression of prostate cancer. It has been shown that AR exert their effects mainly through the androgen-activated AR which binds to androgen response elements (AREs) in the regulatory regions of target genes to regulate the transcription of androgen-responsive genes, thus, identification of AR downstream target gene is critical to understand androgen function in prostate cancer. In this study, our results showed that androgen treatment of LNCaP cells induced PTTG1 expression, which was blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist, Casodex. Bioinformatics analysis and experiments using PTTG1 promoter deletion mutants showed that the PTTG1 promoter contains a putative androgen response element (ARE), which localizes in the −851 to −836 region of the promoter. Androgen activated androgen receptor (AR) binding to this ARE was confirmed by Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Furthermore, Knockdown of PTTG1 expression using short hairpin RNA significantly reduced androgen-induced LNCaP cell growth and invasion. In addition, we showed PTTG1 is highly expressed in metastasis prostate cancer tissue. These results suggest that PTTG1 is a novel downstream target gene of androgen receptor and take part in prostate cancer proliferation and metastasis. - Highlights: • Androgen treatment of LNCaP cells induced PTTG1 expression. • Knockdown of PTTG1 expression significantly reduced androgen-induced LNCaP cell growth and invasion. • PTTG1 is highly expressed in metastasis prostate cancer tissue. • PTTG1 is a novel downstream target gene of androgen receptor.

  6. Androgen insensitivity syndrome: gonadal androgen receptor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulam, C.B.; Graham, M.L.; Spelsberg, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    To determine whether abnormalities of the androgen receptor previously observed in skin fibroblasts from patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome also occur in the gonads of affected individuals, androgen receptor activity in the gonads of a patient with testicular feminization syndrome was investigated. Using conditions for optimal recovery of androgen receptor from human testes established by previous studies, we detected the presence of a high-affinity (dissociation constant . 3.2 X 10(-10) mol/L), low-capacity (4.2 X 10(-12) mol/mg DNA), androgen-binding protein when tritium-labeled R1881 was incubated at 4 degrees C with nuclear extracts from the gonads of control patients or from a patient with testicular feminization syndrome but not when incubated at 37 degrees C. Thus this patient has an androgen receptor with a temperature lability similar to that of receptors from normal persons

  7. Interlaboratory comparison of four in vitro assays for assessing androgenic and antiandrogenic activity of environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Körner, Wolfgang; Vinggaard, Anne; Terouanne, B.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated and compared four in vitro assays to detect androgen agonists and antagonists in an international interlaboratory study. Laboratory 1 used a cell proliferation assay (assay 1) with human mammary carcinoma cells stably transfected with human androgen receptor. The other laboratories u...

  8. Comparison of the Hershberger assay and androgen receptor binding assay of twelve chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Kanji; Sawaki, Masakuni; Noda, Shoji; Muroi, Takako; Takakura, Saori; Mitoma, Hideo; Sakamoto, Satoko; Nakai, Makoto; Yakabe, Yoshikuni

    2004-02-15

    We performed the Hershberger assay of 12 chemicals based on the OECD draft protocol. The chemicals tested by the Hershberger assay were phthalic acid di-n-hexyl ester, phthalic acid di-n-amyl ester, phthalic acid di-n-propyl ester, diethylstilbestrol, 17beta-estradiol, tamoxifen, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane, cyproterone acetate, 6alpha-methyl-17alpha-hydroxy-progesterone, atrazine, and spironolactone. Phthalic acid di-n-hexyl ester, phthalic acid di-n-amyl ester, and phthalic acid di-n-propyl ester are phthalates; diethylstilbestrol and 17beta-estradiol are estrogenic chemicals; tamoxifen is partial estrogen receptor antagonist with mainly estrogenic properties; 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone is an androgen derivatives; dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane is a reference androgen antagonistic chemical; cyproterone acetate, 6alpha-methyl-17alpha-hydroxy-progesterone, and spironolactone have an androgenic steroid structure and are known as androgen antagonistic chemicals; and atrazine is a reference endocrine disruptor. We also subjected these chemicals to the receptor binding assay for androgen. A clear androgen agonistic effect was detected in 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, and an androgen antagonistic effect was observed in five chemicals: cyproterone acetate, spironolactone, 6alpha-methyl-17alpha-hydroxy-progesterone, phthalic acid di-n-amyl ester, and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane. By contrast, diethylstilbestrol, 17beta-estradiol, tamoxifen, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane, cyproterone acetate, 6alpha-methyl-17alpha-hydroxy-progesterone, and spironolactone were positive in the receptor binding assay for androgen. Three estrogenic chemicals, diethylstilbestrol, 17beta-estradiol, and tamoxifen, were negative in the Hershberger assay with receptor binding affinity. On the other hand, the Hershberger assays of three phthalates were performed at the same dosages, and the results showed androgen antagonistic affinity only

  9. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); G. Romalo (G.); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); E. Mulder (Eppo); L. Pinsky (L.); H.U. Schweikert (H.); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of

  10. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkmann, A. O.; Kuiper, G. G.; Ris-Stalpers, C.; van Rooij, H. C.; Romalo, G.; Trifiro, M.; Mulder, E.; Pinsky, L.; Schweikert, H. U.; Trapman, J.

    1991-01-01

    The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of the genomic organization of the

  11. Androgen receptor phosphorylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractMany physiological processes in organisms are regulated by a relatively small number of steroid honnones. Androgens are the so-called male sex steroid hormones which control growth, differentiation and functions of male reproductive and accessory sex tissues. Androgens are mainly

  12. Molecular basis of androgen insensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkmann, A.; Jenster, G.; Ris-Stalpers, C.; van der Korput, H.; Brüggenwirth, H.; Boehmer, A.; Trapman, J.

    1996-01-01

    Male sexual differentiation and development proceed under direct control of androgens. Androgen action is mediated by the intracellular androgen receptor, which belongs to the superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors. In the X-linked androgen insensitivity syndrome, defects in the

  13. Ovarian overproduction of androgens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ovarian or adrenal tumor. Outlook (Prognosis) Treatment success depends on the cause of excess androgen production. ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  14. Androgens and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, L P

    2009-12-01

    The cessation of ovarian sex steroidigenesis, either as result as surgical extirpation, certain medical therapies or the gradual cessation of ovarian function, leads to menopause with all its associated physiological, physical and lifestyle changes. The changing hormonal milieu of menopause is most commonly associated with declining levels of estrogens. However, ovarian senescence also results in declining levels of androgens. Indeed, it is the loss of physiological levels of estrogens and androgens that result in the varied signs and symptoms of menopause including vasomotor symptoms, bone mineral density loss, reduced interest in sex, alterations in mood and energy and hair loss, among others. This paper will provide a review of the role of androgens in the menopause and assess the potential of androgen therapies in the management of the menopause.

  15. QSAR models for anti-androgenic effect - a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gunde Egeskov; Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev; Wedebye, Eva Bay

    2011-01-01

    Three modelling systems (MultiCase (R), LeadScope (R) and MDL (R) QSAR) were used for construction of androgenic receptor antagonist models. There were 923-942 chemicals in the training sets. The models were cross-validated (leave-groups-out) with concordances of 77-81%, specificity of 78......-91% and sensitivity of 51-76%. The specificity was highest in the MultiCase (R) model and the sensitivity was highest in the MDL (R) QSAR model. A complementary use of the models may be a valuable tool when optimizing the prediction of chemicals for androgenic receptor antagonism. When evaluating the fitness...

  16. Therapeutic androgen receptor ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, George F.; Sui, Zhihua

    2003-01-01

    In the past several years, the concept of tissue-selective nuclear receptor ligands has emerged. This concept has come to fruition with estrogens, with the successful marketing of drugs such as raloxifene. The discovery of raloxifene and other selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) has raised the possibility of generating selective compounds for other pathways, including androgens (that is, selective androgen receptor modulators, or SARMs). PMID:16604181

  17. Comparative safety evaluation of selective androgen receptor modulators and anabolic androgenic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seul Min; Lee, Byung-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) have been in use for decades for the treatment of short stature, severe burns, HIV wasting syndrome, osteoporosis, and anemia. However, their lack of selective effects on certain symptoms and unfavorable pharmacokinetic properties has limited their long-term usage in clinics. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have some advantages over AASs; they are highly specific for androgen receptors, are orally available, and, most importantly, act as strong receptor agonists in skeletal muscle and bone, and as weak agonists or antagonists in androgen-responsive tissues such as the prostate and sebaceous glands. The exact molecular mechanism, however, has not been fully elucidated. This article includes a toxicological review of major AASs, and a comparative safety analysis of major AASs and SARMs in clinical trials to evaluate the therapeutic potential of SARMs. Based on the robust tissue selectivity of SARMs over AASs, they are worth considering as a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of various muscle-wasting diseases.

  18. Hedgehog/Gli supports androgen signaling in androgen deprived and androgen independent prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shtutman Michael

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC develops as a consequence of hormone therapies used to deplete androgens in advanced prostate cancer patients. CRPC cells are able to grow in a low androgen environment and this is associated with anomalous activity of their endogenous androgen receptor (AR despite the low systemic androgen levels in the patients. Therefore, the reactivated tumor cell androgen signaling pathway is thought to provide a target for control of CRPC. Previously, we reported that Hedgehog (Hh signaling was conditionally activated by androgen deprivation in androgen sensitive prostate cancer cells and here we studied the potential for cross-talk between Hh and androgen signaling activities in androgen deprived and androgen independent (AI prostate cancer cells. Results Treatment of a variety of androgen-deprived or AI prostate cancer cells with the Hh inhibitor, cyclopamine, resulted in dose-dependent modulation of the expression of genes that are regulated by androgen. The effect of cyclopamine on endogenous androgen-regulated gene expression in androgen deprived and AI prostate cancer cells was consistent with the suppressive effects of cyclopamine on the expression of a reporter gene (luciferase from two different androgen-dependent promoters. Similarly, reduction of smoothened (Smo expression with siRNA co-suppressed expression of androgen-inducible KLK2 and KLK3 in androgen deprived cells without affecting the expression of androgen receptor (AR mRNA or protein. Cyclopamine also prevented the outgrowth of AI cells from androgen growth-dependent parental LNCaP cells and suppressed the growth of an overt AI-LNCaP variant whereas supplemental androgen (R1881 restored growth to the AI cells in the presence of cyclopamine. Conversely, overexpression of Gli1 or Gli2 in LNCaP cells enhanced AR-specific gene expression in the absence of androgen. Overexpressed Gli1/Gli2 also enabled parental LNCaP cells to

  19. GABAB antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Hansen, J J; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1994-01-01

    chromatographic techniques. The absolute stereochemistry of (-)-(R)-phaclofen was established by X-ray crystallographic analysis. (-)-(R)-Phaclofen was shown to inhibit the binding of [3H]-(R)-baclofen to GABAB receptor sites on rat cerebellar membranes (IC50 = 76 +/- 13 microM), whereas (+)-(S......)-baclofen and the antagonist (-)-(R)-phaclofen suggests that these ligands interact with the GABAB receptor sites in a similar manner. Thus, it may be concluded that the different pharmacological effects of these compounds essentially result from the different spatial and proteolytic properties of their acid groups....

  20. Concept and viability of androgen annihilation for advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, James L

    2014-09-01

    There remains no standard of care for patients with a rising prostate-specific antigen level after radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy but who have no radiographic metastases, even though this is the second largest group of patients with prostate cancer (CaP) in the United States. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) may cure some men with advanced CaP based on single-institution series and a randomized clinical trial of immediate versus delayed ADT for men found to have pelvic lymph node metastasis at the time of radical prostatectomy. ADT may be more effective when initiated for minimal disease burden, which can be detected using PSA after radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy, and if more complete disruption of the androgen axis using newer agents decreases the chance that androgen-sensitive cells survive to adapt to a low-androgen environment. Androgens may be "annihilated" simultaneously using a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist or agonist to inhibit testicular production of testosterone, a P45017A1 (CYP17A1) inhibitor to diminish metabolism of testosterone via the adrenal pathway and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) via the backdoor pathway, a 5α-reductase (SRD5A) inhibitor to diminish testosterone reduction to DHT and backdoor metabolism of progesterone substrates to DHT, and a newer antiandrogen to compete better with DHT for the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain. Early initiation of androgen annihilation for induction as part of planned intermittent ADT should be safe, may reduce tumor burden below a threshold that allows eradication by the immune system, and may cure many men who have failed definitive local therapy. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  1. Androgen secreting adrenocortical tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolthers, O D; Cameron, F J; Scheimberg, I; Honour, J W; Hindmarsh, P C; Savage, M O; Stanhope, R G; Brook, C G

    1999-01-01

    Androgen secreting adrenocortical tumours are rare in children and the determination of their malignant potential can be difficult. To assess the presentation, histology, and clinical behaviour of these tumours. Two tertiary referral centres. Retrospective analysis of children diagnosed with an androgen secreting adrenocortical tumour between 1976 and 1996. Twenty three girls and seven boys aged 0-14 years. Pubic hair was observed in all children, clitoromegaly or growth of the phallus in 23 children, acceleration of linear growth in 22 children, and advanced bone age (> 1.5 years) in 18 children. Hypersecretion of androgens was detected by assessment of serum androgen concentrations alone in four patients and by 24 hour urine steroid excretion profiles in 22 patients. All 16 tumours measuring 10 cm were malignant. Histological slides were available for reassessment in 25 children. Although mitoses and necrosis were more characteristic of tumours with malignant behaviour, no exclusive histological features of malignancy were seen. Histological criteria for malignancy are not reliable, whereas tumour size is important in assessing malignant potential.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allow cells to respond to androgens, which are hormones (such as testosterone ) that direct male sexual development. Androgens and androgen receptors also have other important functions in both males and females, such as regulating ...

  3. Metabolic syndrome in androgenic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Hima; Upadya, Gatha M

    2016-01-01

    Androgenic alopecia has been associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease in various studies. The relationship between androgenic alopecia and metabolic syndrome, a known risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, is still poorly understood. To study the association between metabolic syndrome and early-onset androgenic alopecia. A hospital-based analytical cross-sectional study was done on men in the age group of 18-55 years. Eighty five clinically diagnosed cases with early-onset (alopecia of Norwood grade III or above, and 85 controls without androgenic alopecia were included. Data collected included anthropometric measurements, arterial blood pressure and history of chronic diseases. Fasting blood and lipid profile were determined. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed as per the new International Diabetes Federation criteria. Chi-square and Student's t-test were used for statistical analysis using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17.00. Metabolic syndrome was seen in 19 (22.4%) patients with androgenic alopecia and 8 (9.4%) controls (P = 0.021). Abdominal obesity, hypertension and lowered high-density lipoprotein were significantly higher in patients with androgenic alopecia versus their respective controls. The limitations of our study include small sample size in subgroups and the lack of evidence of a temporal relationship between metabolic syndrome and androgenic alopecia. A higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome is seen in men with early-onset androgenic alopecia. Early screening for metabolic syndrome and its components is beneficial in patients with early-onset androgenic alopecia.

  4. Effects of currently used pesticides in assays for estrogenicity, androgenicity, and aromatase activity in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Vinggaard, Anne; Rasmussen, Thomas Høj

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-four pesticides were tested for interactions with the estrogen receptor (ER) and the androgen receptor (AR) in transactivation assays. Estrogen-like effects on MCF-7 cell proliferation and effects on CYP19 aromatase activity in human placental microsomes were also investigated. Pesticides...... to their frequent use in Danish greenhouses. In addition, the metabolite mercaptodimethur sulfoxide, the herbicide tribenuron-methyl, and the organochlorine dieldrin, were included. Several of the pesticides, dieldrin, endosulfan, methiocarb, and fenarimol, acted both as estrogen agonists and androgen antagonists....... Prochloraz reacted as both an estrogen and an androgen antagonist. Furthermore, fenarimol and prochloraz were potent aromatase inhibitors while endosulfan was a weak inhibitor. Hence, these three pesticides possess at least three different ways to potentially disturb sex hormone actions. In addition...

  5. Effect of highly bioaccumulated polychlorinated biphenyl congeners on estrogen and androgen receptor activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld-Jørgensen, E.C.; Andersen, H. R.; Rasmussen, T.H.

    2001-01-01

    -tk-CAT) analysis the three congeners exhibited a significantly estrogen receptor-ligand mediated decrease of the chloramphenicol transferase activity in both control and 10 nM 17 beta -estradiol induced MCF-7 cells. In addition, PCB # 138 elicited a dose-dependent antagonistic effect on androgen receptor activity...

  6. Selective androgen receptor modulator activity of a steroidal antiandrogen TSAA-291 and its cofactor recruitment profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikichi, Yukiko; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kusaka, Masami; Hara, Takahito

    2015-10-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) specifically bind to the androgen receptor and exert agonistic or antagonistic effects on target organs. In this study, we investigated the SARM activity of TSAA-291, previously known as a steroidal antiandrogen, in mice because TSAA-291 was found to possess partial androgen receptor agonist activity in reporter assays. In addition, to clarify the mechanism underlying its tissue selectivity, we performed comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis of androgen receptor using TSAA-291 and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), an endogenous androgen. The androgen receptor agonistic activity of TSAA-291 was more obvious in reporter assays using skeletal muscle cells than in those using prostate cells. In castrated mice, TSAA-291 increased the weight of the levator ani muscle without increasing the weight of the prostate and seminal vesicle. Comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis via mammalian two-hybrid methods revealed that among a total of 112 cofactors, 12 cofactors including the protein inhibitor of activated STAT 1 (PIAS1) were differently recruited to androgen receptor in the presence of TSAA-291 and DHT. Prostate displayed higher PIAS1 expression than skeletal muscle. Forced expression of the PIAS1 augmented the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor, and silencing of PIAS1 by siRNAs suppressed the secretion of prostate-specific antigen, an androgen responsive marker. Our results demonstrate that TSAA-291 has SARM activity and suggest that TSAA-291 may induce different conformational changes of the androgen receptor and recruitment profiles of cofactors such as PIAS1, compared with DHT, to exert tissue-specific activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Androgens and androgen receptor action in skin and hair follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruti, Julieta María; Leirós, Gustavo José; Balañá, María Eugenia

    2018-04-15

    Beyond sexual functions, androgens exert their action in skin physiology and pathophysiology. Skin cells are able to synthesize most active androgens from gonadal or adrenal precursors and the enzymes involved in skin steroidogenesis are implicated both in normal or pathological processes. Even when the role of androgens and androgen receptor (AR) in skin pathologies has been studied for decades, their molecular mechanisms in skin disorders remain largely unknown. Here, we analyze recent studies of androgens and AR roles in several skin-related disorders, focusing in the current understanding of their molecular mechanisms in androgenetic alopecia (AGA). We review the molecular pathophysiology of type 2 5α-reductase, AR coactivators, the paracrine factors deregulated in dermal papillae (such as TGF-β, IGF 1, WNTs and DKK-1) and the crosstalk between AR and Wnt signaling in order to shed some light on new promising treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. ANDROGEN LEVELS IN PREECLAMPSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Valadan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality during pregnancy. Several independent investigators have demonstrated the association of androgens with hypertension. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether maternal levels of sex hormones, especially testosterone, are higher in patients with preeclampsia than in matched normotensive control subjects. Serum levels of testosterone, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S and estradiol were measured in 60 subjects in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy with documented preeclampsia (including 30 cases of mild and 30 cases of severe preeclampsia and 60 healthy normotensive women with similar maternal and gestational ages and body mass index (BMI and neonatal sex. All subjects were primigravid with singleton pregnancies. Cases of polycystic ovary (PCO, diabetes, chronic hypertension and chronic systemic diseases such as lupus and patients using steroid hormones and anti-hypertensive drugs were excluded. Levels of testosterone, DHEA-S and estradiol were not higher in primigravid women with preeclampsia than in normotensive women with similar gestational and maternal ages, BMI and neonatal sex. There were no significant differences in sex hormones measured between groups of mild and severe preeclampsia and normotensive women. There were also no significant differences in sex hormone levels according to neonatal sex. These findings are against the hypothesis of mediating or amplifying role of high androgen levels in pathophysiology of preeclampsia.

  9. A novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 exerts anti-androgenic activity in the prostate cancer xenograft R-3327G and anabolic activity on skeletal muscle mass & function in castrated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisamore, Michael J; Gentile, Michael A; Dillon, Gregory Michael; Baran, Matthew; Gambone, Carlo; Riley, Sean; Schmidt, Azriel; Flores, Osvaldo; Wilkinson, Hilary; Alves, Stephen E

    2016-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor super family of transcription factors. Androgens play an essential role in the development, growth, and maintenance of male sex organs, as well as the musculoskeletal and central nervous systems. Yet with advancing age, androgens can drive the onset of prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in males within the United States. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) by pharmacologic and/or surgical castration induces apoptosis of prostate cells and subsequent shrinkage of the prostate and prostate tumors. However, ADT is associated with significant musculoskeletal and behavioral adverse effects. The unique pharmacological activity of selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 recently has been reported as an AR antagonist with 5α-reductase inhibitor function. The molecule inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in AR positive, androgen dependent prostate cancer cells. Importantly, MK-4541 inhibited androgen-dependent prostate growth in male rats yet maintained lean body mass and bone formation following ovariectomy in female rats. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of SARM MK-4541 in the androgen-dependent Dunning R3327-G prostate carcinoma xenograft mouse model as well as on skeletal muscle mass and function, and AR-regulated behavior in mice. MK-4541 significantly inhibited the growth of R3327-G prostate tumors, exhibited anti-androgen effects on the seminal vesicles, reduced plasma testosterone concentrations in intact males, and inhibited Ki67 expression. MK-4541 treated xenografts appeared similar to xenografts in castrated mice. Importantly, we demonstrate that MK-4541 exhibited anabolic activity in androgen deficient conditions, increasing lean body mass and muscle function in adult castrated mice. Moreover, MK-4541 treatment restored general activity levels in castrated mice. Thus, MK-4541 exhibits an optimum profile as an adjuvant therapy to ADT

  10. ANDROGEN REPLACEMENT THERAPY IN POSTMENOPAUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Meden Vrtovec

    2008-12-01

    Scientific studies and clinical experiences have not provided until now the answers to thequestion: »Whom to treat, when, why and for how long should androgens be used for HRTin postmenopausal women?«

  11. Combined exposure to anti-androgens causes markedly increased frequencies of hypospadias in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Scholze, M.; Petersen, Marta Axelstad

    2008-01-01

    of several anti-androgenic chemicals. In a mixture (MIX) study with three androgen receptor antagonists, vinclozolin, flutamide and procymidone, rats were gavaged during gestation and lactation with several doses of a MIX of the three chemicals or the chemicals alone. External malformations of the male...... reproductive organs were assessed on PND 47 using a score from 0 to 3 (normal to marked) for hypospadias. Markedly increased frequencies were observed after exposure to a MIX of the three chemicals compared to administration of the three chemicals alone. Anogenital distance at PND 1, nipple retention at PND 13...

  12. CLONING, EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR AND ISOLATION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA FROM THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone mimics or antagonists, including those recommended for use in the EPA's Tier 1 screening battery, typically use mammalian estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR) such as rat or human. Although we know that the amino acid s...

  13. Hot flushes in prostatic cancer patients during androgen-deprivation therapy with monthly dose of degarelix or leuprolide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Karup, C; van der Meulen, E

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the onset, incidence and frequency/intensity of hot flushes during androgen-deprivation therapy with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist (GnRH) blocker versus an agonist using data from a randomized Phase 3 clinical trial. In total, 610 prostate cancer...

  14. The estrogenic and androgenic potential of pyrethroids in vitro. Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saillenfait, Anne-Marie; Ndiaye, Dieynaba; Sabaté, Jean-Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic pyrethroids are used worldwide as insecticides. Their metabolites are regularly detected in the urine of adults and children from the general population. There is increasing concern that they may induce sex-hormone disrupting effects. The present work reviews available published information on the (anti)estrogenic and (anti)androgenic activity of pyrethroids in in vitro screening tests. In recent years, a large number of pyrethroids have been evaluated using various common testing methods. In tests using recombinant yeast or mammalian cells, the pyrethroids were found to be essentially negative or weakly estrogenic. More inconsistent results were found regarding their estrogenic action in proliferation tests. Conflicting findings were also reported across studies and/or assays which evaluated their anti-estrogenic or anti-androgenic potential. Some studies have suggested that certain pyrethroids may have potential antagonist activity. However, no strong interaction with the estrogenic or androgenic pathway was reported. The present review confirms the interest in performing a screening battery and in adopting an integrative approach for identifying the potential of different compounds from a chemical family to interfere with the endocrine system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Androgens and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Carolyn A; McLachlan, Robert I

    2010-06-01

    As testosterone levels are frequently reduced in obesity, an understanding of the relationship between serum testosterone and adiposity is necessary in the clinical evaluation of these men, in particular when considering testosterone therapy. Population and interventional data suggest a bi-directional relationship exists between testosterone and obesity in men, with lower total testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) (and to a lesser extent free testosterone) levels than their nonobese peers; obesity having an impact at least as important as ageing. Abnormalities in the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis are seen with increasing obesity. Weight loss in massive obesity increases testosterone levels but its role in mild-moderate obesity is unclear. Testosterone supplementation reduces total body fat in hypogonadal and ageing men although the effects on regional fat distribution are less well described. Favourable changes in total body fat and regional fat distribution suggest a potential role for testosterone in obesity. However, lifestyle advice to achieve sustained weight loss should be the mainstay of management. Obese men with confirmed androgen deficiency can be offered treatment, whereas in those with low-normal testosterone levels more research is needed.

  16. Male patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmann, Philip; Christiansen, Peter; Johannsen, Trine Holm

    2012-01-01

    To describe the natural history of phenotype, growth and gonadal function in patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome.......To describe the natural history of phenotype, growth and gonadal function in patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome....

  17. Androgens and the ageing male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2002-01-01

    Hypogonadal men share a variety of signs and symptoms such as decreased muscle mass, osteopoenia, increased fat mass, fatigue, decreased libido and cognitive dysfunctions. Controlled trials have demonstrated favourable effects of androgen substitution therapy on these signs and symptoms in men...... with severe primary or secondary hypogonadism. Thus, androgen substitution therapy is warranted in men with true hypogonadism at all ages. Symptoms experienced by otherwise healthy ageing males are non-specific and vague, although some may be similar to symptoms of hypogonadism. Therefore, the term...

  18. Multivalent Peptidomimetic Conjugates as Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Function in Therapy-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Therapy-Resistant Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Kent Kirshenbaum, PhD 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER...releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists that prevent testicular androgen synthesis or AR antagonists, such as bicalutamide (Casodex), which block AR...Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kent Kirshenbaum CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: New York University New York, NY 10012 REPORT DATE: October

  19. Multivalent Peptidomimetic Conjugates as Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Function in Therapy Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Receptor Function in Therapy-Resistant Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0590 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Kendall W. Nettles... prevent testicular androgen synthesis or AR antagonists, such as bicalutamide (Casodex), which block AR transcriptional activity (3). Although...Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Kendall W. Nettles CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Scripps Research Institute, The Jupiter, FL 33458 REPORT DATE

  20. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Escape Mechanism from Androgen Ablation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-31

    except that no salmon sperm DNA was used as blocking reagent. The immunoprecipitated DNA and un- enriched input DNA were treated with RNase A and purified...A, Wang Y, Suzuki K, Mirosevich J, et al. (2005) Foxa1 and Foxa2 interact with the androgen receptor to regulate prostate and epididymal genes

  1. Androgens and the ageing male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2002-01-01

    not have an andropause. As large placebo-controlled studies of androgen treatment in elderly males are lacking, proper risk assessment of adverse effects such as prostate cancer following testosterone treatment in elderly males is completely lacking. In the future, testosterone therapy may prove beneficial...

  2. Androgenic switch in barley microspores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Faria Maraschin, Simone

    2005-01-01

    Barley androgenesis represents an attractive system to study stress-induced cell differentiation and is a valuable tool for efficient plant breeding. The switch from the pollen developmental pathway towards an androgenic route involves several well-described morphological changes. However, little is

  3. Effect of small molecules modulating androgen receptor (SARMs in human prostate cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tesei

    Full Text Available The management of hormone-refractory prostate cancer represents a major challenge in the therapy of this tumor, and identification of novel androgen receptor antagonists is needed to render treatment more effective. We analyzed the activity of two novel androgen receptor antagonists, (S-11 and (R-9, in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of hormone-sensitive or castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. In vitro experiments were performed on LNCaP, LNCaP-AR, LNCaP-Rbic and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by SRB and BrdU uptake, AR transactivation by luciferase reporter assay and PSA levels by Real Time RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Cell cycle progression-related markers were evaluated by western blot. In vivo experiments were performed on SCID mice xenografted with cells with different sensitivity to hormonal treatment. In hormone-sensitive LNCaP and LNCaP-AR cells, the latter expressing high androgen receptor levels, (R-9 and (S-11 exhibited a higher cytotoxic effect compared to that of the reference compound ((R-bicalutamide, also in the presence of the synthetic androgen R1881. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect produced by (R-9 was higher than that of (S-11 in the two hormone-resistant LNCaP-AR and VCaP cells. A significant reduction in PSA levels was observed after exposure to both molecules. Moreover, (S-11 and (R-9 inhibited DNA synthesis by blocking the androgen-induced increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. In vivo studies on the toxicological profile of (R-9 did not reveal the presence of adverse events. Furthermore, (R-9 inhibited tumor growth in various in vivo models, especially LNCaP-Rbic xenografts, representative of recurrent disease. Our in vitro results highlight the antitumor activity of the two novel molecules (R-9 and (S-11, making them a potentially attractive option for the treatment of CRPC.

  4. Effect of small molecules modulating androgen receptor (SARMs) in human prostate cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesei, Anna; Leonetti, Carlo; Di Donato, Marzia; Gabucci, Elisa; Porru, Manuela; Varchi, Greta; Guerrini, Andrea; Amadori, Dino; Arienti, Chiara; Pignatta, Sara; Paganelli, Giulia; Caraglia, Michele; Castoria, Gabriella; Zoli, Wainer

    2013-01-01

    The management of hormone-refractory prostate cancer represents a major challenge in the therapy of this tumor, and identification of novel androgen receptor antagonists is needed to render treatment more effective. We analyzed the activity of two novel androgen receptor antagonists, (S)-11 and (R)-9, in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of hormone-sensitive or castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In vitro experiments were performed on LNCaP, LNCaP-AR, LNCaP-Rbic and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by SRB and BrdU uptake, AR transactivation by luciferase reporter assay and PSA levels by Real Time RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Cell cycle progression-related markers were evaluated by western blot. In vivo experiments were performed on SCID mice xenografted with cells with different sensitivity to hormonal treatment. In hormone-sensitive LNCaP and LNCaP-AR cells, the latter expressing high androgen receptor levels, (R)-9 and (S)-11 exhibited a higher cytotoxic effect compared to that of the reference compound ((R)-bicalutamide), also in the presence of the synthetic androgen R1881. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect produced by (R)-9 was higher than that of (S)-11 in the two hormone-resistant LNCaP-AR and VCaP cells. A significant reduction in PSA levels was observed after exposure to both molecules. Moreover, (S)-11 and (R)-9 inhibited DNA synthesis by blocking the androgen-induced increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. In vivo studies on the toxicological profile of (R)-9 did not reveal the presence of adverse events. Furthermore, (R)-9 inhibited tumor growth in various in vivo models, especially LNCaP-Rbic xenografts, representative of recurrent disease. Our in vitro results highlight the antitumor activity of the two novel molecules (R)-9 and (S)-11, making them a potentially attractive option for the treatment of CRPC.

  5. Pharmacological characterization of an imidazolopyrazole as novel selective androgen receptor modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuqing; Allan, George F; Tannenbaum, Pamela; Sbriscia, Tifanie; Linton, Olivia; Lai, Muh-Tsann; Haynes-Johnson, Donna; Bhattacharjee, Sheela; Lundeen, Scott G; Sui, Zhihua

    2013-03-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are androgens with tissue-selective activity. SARMs that have anabolic activity on muscle while having minimal stimulatory activity on prostate are classified as SARM agonists. They can be used to prevent the loss of lean body mass that is associated with cancer, immunodeficiency, renal disease and aging. They may also have anabolic activity on bone; thus, unlike estrogens, they may reverse the loss of bone strength associated with aging or hypogonadism. Our in-house effort on SARM program discovers a nonsteroidal androgen receptor ligand with a unique imidazolopyrazole moiety in its structure. In vitro, this compound is a weak androgen receptor binder and a weak androgen agonist. Despite this, in orchidectomized mature rats it is an effective SARM agonist, with an ED(50) on levator ani muscle of 3.3mg/kg and an ED(50) on ventral prostate of >30mg/kg. It has its maximal effect on muscle at the dose of 10mg/kg. In addition, this compound has mixed agonistic and antagonistic activities on prostate, reducing the weight of that tissue in intact rats by 22% at 10mg/kg. The compound does not have significant effect on gonadotropin levels or testosterone levels in both orchidectomized and intact male rats. It does not have notable progestin, estrogen or glucocorticoid agonistic or antagonistic activity in rats. In a female sexual behavior model, it improves the sexual desire of ovariectomized female rats for sexually mature intact males over nonsexually ovariectomized females. Overall, the imidazolopyrazole is a potent prostate-sparing candidate for development as a SARM agonist with an appropriate pharmacological profile for clinical benefit in muscle-wasting conditions and female sexual function disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Expanding the therapeutic use of androgens via selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs)

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a novel class of androgen receptor (AR) ligands that might change the future of androgen therapy dramatically. With improved pharmacokinetic characteristics and tissue-selective pharmacological activities, SARMs are expected to greatly extend the clinical applications of androgens to osteoporosis, muscle wasting, male contraception and diseases of the prostate. Mechanistic studies with currently available SARMs will help to define the contrib...

  7. Differential Mechanisms of Androgen Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    two infertile Finnish men. Fertility and Sterility , 79, Supple3, 2003. Miyake H, Hara I, Eto H.2005 Clinical outcome of maximum androgen blockade...identified in two infertile men (Lund et al 2003). It can be postulated that Q58L could change the conformation of the polyglutamide tract thereby...and PC3- LNCAP AR (C) tumour xenografts. 3 million cells in sterile PBS (1:1 ratio with Matrigel) were implanted s.c. into the flank of SCID mice

  8. Androgen-Dependent Regulation of Human MUC1 Mucin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Mitchell

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available MUC1 mucin is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen, progesterone, and glucocorticoids. Our objective was to determine whether androgen receptor. (20AR activation regulates expression of MUC1. The following breast and prostatic cell lines were phenotyped and grouped according to AR and MUC1protein expression: 1 AR+MUCi + [DAR17+19. (20AR transfectants of DU-145, ZR-75-1, MDA-MB-453, and T47D]; 2 AR-MUCi+ [DZeoi. (20AR- vector control, DU-145, BT20, MDA-MB231, and MCF7]; 3 AIR +MUCi -. (20LNCaP and LNCaP-r. Cell proliferation was determined using the MTT assay in the presence of synthetic androgen R1881, 0.1 pM to 1 µM. Cell surface MUC1expression was determined by flow cytometry in the presence or absence of oestradiol, medroxy progesterone acetate or R1881, with and without 4 hydroxy-flutamide. (204-OH, a nonsteroidal AR antagonist. The functional significance of MUC1expression was investigated with a cell-cell aggregation assay. Only AR+ MUC1 + cell lines showed a significant increase in MUC1expression with AR activation. (20P. (20range =.01 to .0001, reversed in the presence of 4-OHF. Cell proliferation was unaffected. Increased expression of MUC1was associated with a significant. (20P. (20range =.002 to .001 reduction in cell-cell adhesion. To our knowledge, this is the first description of androgen-dependent regulation of MUC1mucin. This is also functionally associated with decreased cell-cell adhesion, a recognised feature of progressive malignancy. These findings have important implications for physiological and pathological processes.

  9. PROCHLORAZ INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AT DOSAGE LEVELS BELOW THOSE THAT AFFECT ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT ORGAN WEIGHTS OR THE ONSET OF MALE RAT PUBERTY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that has several endocrine modes of action. In vitro, PCZ inhibits steroidogenesis and acts as an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist. We hypothesized that pubertal exposure to prochloraz would delay preputial separation and growth of an...

  10. CLONING AND IN VITRO EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR AND ISOLATION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR α FROM THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone mimics or antagonists typically use mammalian (rat, human) estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR). Although we know that the amino acid sequences of steroid receptors in nonmammalian vertebrates are not identical to the ma...

  11. Androgen and estrogen receptor mediated mechanisms of testosterone action in male rat pelvic autonomic ganglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves-Tyson, T.D.; Arshi, M.S.; Handelsman, D. J.; Cheng, Y.; Keast, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Although male reproductive function is primarily androgen dependent, many studies suggest that estrogens have direct actions on the male reproductive organs. Pelvic autonomic neurons provide the motor control of the internal reproductive organs and the penis and various properties of these neurons are affected by endogenous androgens. However, the possible role of estrogens at this site has not been examined. Here we have investigated the significance of estrogens produced by aromatisation of testosterone in the physiological actions of androgens on adult male rat pelvic ganglion neurons. RT-PCR studies showed that aromatase and both estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are expressed in these ganglia. Western blotting also showed that aromatase is expressed in male pelvic ganglia. Using immunohistochemical visualisation, ERα was predominantly expressed by nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-positive parasympathetic pelvic ganglion neurons. In vivo studies showed that the decrease in pelvic ganglion soma size caused by gonadectomy could be prevented by administration of testosterone (T) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT), but not 17β-estradiol (E2), showing that this maintenance action of testosterone is mediated entirely by androgenic mechanisms. However, in vitro studies of cultured pelvic ganglion neurons revealed that T, DHT and E each stimulated the growth of longer and more complex neurites in both noradrenergic and cholinergic NOS-expressing neurons. The effects of T were attenuated by either androgen or estrogen receptor antagonists, or by inhibition of aromatase. Together these studies demonstrate that estrogens are likely to be synthesised in the male pelvic ganglia, produced from testosterone by local aromatase. The effects of androgens on axonal growth are likely to be at least partly mediated by estrogenic mechanisms, which may be important for understanding disease-, aging- and injury-induced plasticity in this part of the nervous system. PMID:17629410

  12. Androgen and estrogen receptor-mediated mechanisms of testosterone action in male rat pelvic autonomic ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves-Tyson, T D; Arshi, M S; Handelsman, D J; Cheng, Y; Keast, J R

    2007-08-10

    Although male reproductive function is primarily androgen dependent, many studies suggest that estrogens have direct actions on the male reproductive organs. Pelvic autonomic neurons provide the motor control of the internal reproductive organs and the penis and various properties of these neurons are affected by endogenous androgens. However, the possible role of estrogens at this site has not been examined. Here we have investigated the significance of estrogens produced by aromatization of testosterone (T) in the physiological actions of androgens on adult male rat pelvic ganglion neurons. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies showed that aromatase and both estrogen receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta) are expressed in these ganglia. Western blotting also showed that aromatase is expressed in male pelvic ganglia. Using immunohistochemical visualization, ERalpha was predominantly expressed by nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-positive parasympathetic pelvic ganglion neurons. In vivo studies showed that the decrease in pelvic ganglion soma size caused by gonadectomy could be prevented by administration of T or dihydrotestosterone (DHT), but not 17beta-estradiol (E2), showing that this maintenance action of testosterone is mediated entirely by androgenic mechanisms. However, in vitro studies of cultured pelvic ganglion neurons revealed that T, DHT and E each stimulated the growth of longer and more complex neurites in both noradrenergic and cholinergic NOS-expressing neurons. The effects of T were attenuated by either androgen or estrogen receptor antagonists, or by inhibition of aromatase. Together these studies demonstrate that estrogens are likely to be synthesized in the male pelvic ganglia, produced from T by local aromatase. The effects of androgens on axonal growth are likely to be at least partly mediated by estrogenic mechanisms, which may be important for understanding disease-, aging- and injury-induced plasticity in this part of the

  13. New insights into the androgen biotransformation in prostate cancer: A regulatory network among androgen, androgen receptors and UGTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xuan; Liu, Mingyao; Wang, Xin

    2016-04-01

    Androgen, as one kind of steroid hormones, is pivotal in the hormone-sensitive cancer, such as prostate cancer (PCa). The synthesis, elimination, and bioavailability of androgen in prostate cells have been proved to be a main cause of the carcinogenesis, maintenance and deterioration of PCa. This review illustrates the outlines of androgen biotransformation, and further discusses the different enzymes, especially UDP-glucuronyltransferases (UGTs) embedded in both benign and malignant prostate cells, which catalyze the reactions. Although many inhibitors of the enzymes responsible for the synthesis of androgens have been developed into drugs to fight against PCa, the elimination procedures metabolized by the UGTs are less emphasized. Thus the regulatory network among androgen, androgen receptors (AR) and UGTs is carefully reviewed in this article, indicating the determinant effects of UGTs on prostatic androgens and the regulation of AR. Finally, the hypothesis is also put forward that the regulators of UGTs may be developed to accelerate the androgen elimination and benefit PCa therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Anti-androgenic effects of S-40542, a novel non-steroidal selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejishima, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Noriko; Suzuki, Mika; Furuya, Kazuyuki; Nagata, Naoya; Yamada, Shizuo

    2012-10-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) would provide alternative therapeutic agent for androgen-related diseases. We identified a tetrahydroquinoline (THQ) derivative, 1-(8-nitro-3a, 4, 5, 9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinolin-4-yl) ethane-1, 2-diol (S-40542) as a novel SARM antagonist. Affinity for nuclear receptors of S-40542 was evaluated in receptor-binding studies. Androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity of S-40542 was investigated by luciferase reporter assay in DU145AR cells. Normal and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) model rats were repeatedly treated with S-40542 and flutamide. The tissue weights of prostate and levator ani muscle as well as blood levels of testosterone and luteinizing hormone were measured. S-40542 bound to the AR with high affinity. S-40542 at relatively high concentrations increased the transcriptional activity. This agent also showed a concentration-dependent AR antagonistic action in the presence of 1 nM 5α-dihydrotestosterone. Repeated treatment with S-40542 and flutamide decreased dose-dependently the weights of the prostate to a similar extent. In contrast, the tissue weight-reducing effect by S-40542 treatment on the levator ani muscle was much weaker than that of flutamide. S-40542 had little effect on the blood level of testosterone and luteinizing hormone, whereas flutamide increased the level of both hormones. Furthermore, S-40542 decreased dose-dependently prostate weight of BPH rats. The current results indicate that S-40542 possesses the prostate-selective SARM activity, suggestive of clinical benefit against benign prostate hyperplasia. THQ compounds may be useful for the research of mode of action of SARMs and for the development of safe SARM antagonists. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Analytical methodology for the profiling and characterization of androgen receptor active compounds in human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiveri, Paolo; Horwood, Julia; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Arrebola, Juan P; Olea, Nicolas; Hill, Elizabeth M

    2014-08-01

    The exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals during foetal development has been proposed to cause reproductive dysfunctions in the neonate or later life. In order to support such studies, an analytical method was developed to profile the receptor mediated (anti)androgenic activities present in extracts of placenta samples. Placenta samples from women giving birth to healthy male neonates were extracted and fractionated by HPLC. Fractions containing androgen receptor (AR) activity were detected using an in vitro yeast-based human androgen receptor transcription screen. GC-MS analyses of receptor active fractions resulted in detection of chemical contaminants including antimicrobial and cosmetic compounds which exhibited AR antagonist activity in the yeast screen, and endogenously derived steroids which contributed to both the agonist and antagonistic activity in the samples. The bioassay-directed fractionation methodology developed in this study revealed the potential to identify mixtures of chemical contaminants that should be investigated for potential effects on the reproductive system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Critical role of androgen receptor in the postnatal period in male sexual behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shunji; Ohoya, Miku; Takanami, Keiko; Matsuda, Ken Ichi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2015-11-16

    Gonadal hormones have a developmental role in organization of the nervous system that regulates sexually dimorphic behavior. It is well known that androgen secreted from testes in the perinatal period is converted to estrogen by aromatase in rodent brain, and that estrogen and its receptor play a pivotal role in masculinization of brain structure and function. Treatment with flutamide, an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, during the perinatal period inhibits development of malespecific brain structure and function, suggesting that androgen signaling via AR also influences brain masculinization. In this study, we investigated which stage during the postnatal period is critical for androgen signaling in brain masculinization. The postnatal period was designated as postnatal days (PD) 0-22, and divided into stages I (PD 0-7), II (PD 8-14), and III (PD 15-22). Newborn male rats were given flutamide subcutaneously in each stage. After adulthood, the effects of postnatal flutamide treatment on brain masculinization were evaluated byanalysis of male sexual behavior. Continuous inhibition of AR throughout stages I and II caused a robust reduction of the intromission ratio and ejaculation frequency compared with other groups. AR inhibition in stage I, II, or III did not cause any change. AR inhibition had no effect onmount behavior. These results show that stage-specific AR activation in the first two postnatal weeks may contribute to brain masculinization mediating male sexual behavior in adulthood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of androgen receptor functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Steketee (Karine)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe androgens testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) are steroid hormones, which are necessary for development and maintenance of the functions of the male sex organs, including the prostate. Androgens also play an important role in benign abnormalities of the prostate and in the

  18. Androgens, body fat Distribution and Adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerradi, Mouna; Dereumetz, Julie; Boulet, Marie-Michèle; Tchernof, André

    2014-12-01

    Androgens are regulators of important adipocyte functions such as adipogenesis, lipid storage, and lipolysis. Through depot-specific impact on the cells of each fat compartment, androgens could modulate body fat distribution patterns in humans. Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone have been shown to inhibit the differentiation of preadipocytes to lipid-storing adipocytes in several models including primary cultures of human adipocytes from both men and women. Androgen effects have also been observed on some markers of lipid metabolism such as LPL activity, fatty acid uptake, and lipolysis. Possible depot-specific and sex-specific effects have been observed in some but not all models. Transformation of androgen precursors to active androgens or their inactivation by enzymes that are expressed and functional in adipose tissue may contribute to modulate the local availability of active hormones. These phenomena, along with putative depot-specific interactions with glucocorticoids may contribute to human body fat distribution patterns.

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Katsuji; Miyawaki, Toshio; Hitaka, Takenori; Imai, Yumi N; Hara, Takahito; Miyazaki, Junichi; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kusaka, Masami; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Tasaka, Akihiro; Shiraishi, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-05-15

    To develop effective drugs for hypogonadism, sarcopenia, and cachexia, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that exhibit not only anabolic effects on organs such as muscles and the central nervous system (CNS) but also neutral or antagonistic effects on the prostate. Based on the information obtained from a docking model with androgen receptor (AR), we modified a hit compound A identified through high-throughput screening. Among the prepared compounds, 1-(4-cyano-1-naphthyl)-2,3-disubstituted pyrrolidine derivatives 17h, 17m, and 17j had highly potent AR agonistic activities in vitro and good tissue selectivity in vivo. These derivatives increased the weight of the levator ani muscle without influencing the prostate and seminal vesicle. In addition, these compounds induced sexual behavior in castrated rats, indicating that the compounds could also act as agonists on the CNS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Androgens are not major down-regulators of androgen receptor levels during growth of the immature rat penis .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, R; Lin, M C; Sadeghi, F; Swerdloff, R S; Rajfer, J; Gonzalez-Cadavid, N F

    1996-03-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalent hypothesis that androgens are responsible for the organ-specific down-regulation of penile androgen receptors (ARs) and decline of penile growth in the rat during sexual maturation. Sexually immature male rats (21 days old) were castrated and treated for 3 days ("short-term"), with high doses of: (a) testosterone and the alpha-reductase inhibitor finasteride (T/F); (b) dihydrotestosterone (DHT); or (c) finasteride alone (F). Intact and castrate controls received vehicle only. PolyA + RNA was analysed by Northern blot hybridization and ARs were estimated in the penis and ventral prostates by (3-H)R-1881 binding in the cytosol. Short-term castration, with or without F, increased penile AR mRNA, whereas high doses of T/F and DHT reduced it considerably. Although penile cytosol AR concentration in the control castrates, with or without F, paralleled the AR mRNA rise, treatment with androgens left cytosol AR content per organ and AR concentration above those of the intact rat penis despite the drop in AR mRNA. A "long-term" treatment (10 days) on 19-day-old rats with either medium or high doses of T/F and DHT also failed to down-regulate penile cytosol ARs below the intact controls. Western blot analysis of penile cytosol AR levels confirmed these results. Block of pituitary FSH and LH release by a GnRH antagonist in castrates receiving T/F or DHT at high doses did not modify the response. In the case of intact rats, high doses of T/F or DHT actually increased penile cytosol AR content. No difference was observed between T/F and DHT effects. In contrast to what occurs during sexual maturation, the prostate ARs and growth rate responded to all treatments in a similar way to what was observed in the penis. Our results suggest that increases in serum T or DHT are not major factors in the physiological down-regulation of ARs and androgen-dependent growth in the rat corpora cavernosa.

  1. 1,4-Substituted Triazoles as Nonsteroidal Anti-Androgens for Prostate Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Claudia; Pepe, Antonella; Kim, Yeong Sang; Lee, Sunmin; Guerrini, Andrea; Parenti, Marco Daniele; Tesei, Anna; Zamagni, Alice; Cortesi, Michela; Zaffaroni, Nadia; De Cesare, Michelandrea; Beretta, Giovanni Luca; Trepel, Jane B; Malhotra, Sanjay V; Varchi, Greta

    2017-04-13

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in men, and the androgen receptor (AR) represents the primary target for PC treatment, even though the disease frequently progresses toward androgen-independent forms. Most of the commercially available nonsteroidal antiandrogens show a common scaffold consisting of two aromatic rings connected by a linear or a cyclic spacer. By taking advantage of a facile, one-pot click chemistry reaction, we report herein the preparation of a small library of novel 1,4-substituted triazoles with AR antagonistic activity. Biological and theoretical evaluation demonstrated that the introduction of the triazole core in the scaffold of nonsteroidal antiandrogens allowed the development of small molecules with improved overall AR-antagonist activity. In fact, compound 14d displayed promising in vitro antitumor activity toward three different prostate cancer cell lines and was able to induce 60% tumor growth inhibition of the CW22Rv1 in vivo xenograft model. These results represent a step toward the development of novel and improved AR antagonists.

  2. Androgen receptor expression in human ovarian and uterine tissue of long term androgen-treated transsexual women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Chadha; T.D. Pache; F.J. Huikeshoven (Frans); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen receptor (AR) modulation in human uteri and ovaries of long term androgen-treated transsexual female patients was investigated. Androgen receptor expression was evaluated immunohistochemically in the ovaries of 11 and the endometria and myometria of six androgen-treated

  3. Structural characteristics of anabolic androgenic steroids contributing to binding to the androgen receptor and to their anabolic and androgenic activities. Applied modifications in the steroidal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkaki, A G; Angelis, Y S; Koupparis, M; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, A; Kokotos, G; Georgakopoulos, C

    2009-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone introduced for therapeutic purposes providing enhanced anabolic potency with reduced androgenic effects. Androgens mediate their action through their binding to the androgen receptor (AR) which is mainly expressed in androgen target tissues, such as the prostate, skeletal muscle, liver and central nervous system. This paper reviews some of the wide spectrum of testosterone and synthetic AAS structure modifications related to the intended enhancement in anabolic activity. The structural features of steroids necessary for effective binding to the AR and those which contribute to the stipulation of the androgenic and anabolic activities are also presented.

  4. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2003-01-01

    .... Intermittent androgen ablation therapy may slow down the development of androgen refractory tumors because intermittent recovery of androgens can induce differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells...

  5. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2005-01-01

    .... Intermittent androgen ablation therapy may slow down the development of androgen refractory tumors because intermittent recovery of androgens can induce differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells...

  6. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2006-01-01

    .... Intermittent androgen ablation therapy (IAAT) may slow down the development of androgen refractory tumors because intermittent recovery of androgens can induce differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells...

  7. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2004-01-01

    .... Intermittent androgen ablation therapy may slow down the development of androgen refractory tumors because intermittent recovery of androgens can induce differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells...

  8. Androgens in pregnancy: roles in parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makieva, Sofia; Saunders, Philippa T K; Norman, Jane E

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the physiology of pregnancy enables effective management of pregnancy complications that could otherwise be life threatening for both mother and fetus. A functional uterus (i) retains the fetus in utero during pregnancy without initiating stretch-induced contractions and (ii) is able to dilate the cervix and contract the myometrium at term to deliver the fetus. The onset of labour is associated with successful cervical remodelling and contraction of myometrium, arising from concomitant activation of uterine immune and endocrine systems. A large body of evidence suggests that actions of local steroid hormones may drive changes occurring in the uterine microenvironment at term. Although there have been a number of studies considering the potential role(s) played by progesterone and estrogen at the time of parturition, the bio-availability and effects of androgens during pregnancy have received less scrutiny. The aim of this review is to highlight potential roles of androgens in the biology of pregnancy and parturition. A review of published literature was performed to address (i) androgen concentrations, including biosynthesis and clearance, in maternal and fetal compartments throughout gestation, (ii) associations of androgen concentrations with adverse pregnancy outcomes, (iii) the role of androgens in the physiology of cervical remodelling and finally (iv) the role of androgens in the physiology of myometrial function including any impact on contractility. Some, but not all, androgens increase throughout gestation in maternal circulation. The effects of this increase are not fully understood; however, evidence suggests that increased androgens might regulate key processes during pregnancy and parturition. For example, androgens are believed to be critical for cervical remodelling at term, in particular cervical ripening, via regulation of cervical collagen fibril organization. Additionally, a number of studies highlight potential roles for androgens

  9. Androgen effects on women's gendered behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udry, J R; Morris, N M; Kovenock, J

    1995-07-01

    Test of the applicability of the hormonal theory of sex-dimorphic behaviour to adult women is achieved in this study by assembling measures of prenatal and adult androgen exposure, and a broad measure of gendered behaviour on a sample of white women aged 27-30. Androgen exposure in the second (and no other) trimester of fetal life, combined with and in interaction with adult androgens, masculineses women's behaviour and explains a substantial proportion of the within-sex variance in women's adult gendered behaviour.

  10. Expanding the therapeutic use of androgens via selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T

    2007-03-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a novel class of androgen receptor (AR) ligands that might change the future of androgen therapy dramatically. With improved pharmacokinetic characteristics and tissue-selective pharmacological activities, SARMs are expected to greatly extend the clinical applications of androgens to osteoporosis, muscle wasting, male contraception and diseases of the prostate. Mechanistic studies with currently available SARMs will help to define the contributions of differential tissue distribution, tissue-specific expression of 5alpha-reductase, ligand-specific regulation of gene expression and AR interactions with tissue-specific coactivators to their observed tissue selectivity, and lead to even greater expansion of selective anabolic therapies.

  11. ANABOLIC ANDROGENIC STEROIDS AND DEPENDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IHSAN SARI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Anabolic androgenic steroids are used for sportive, cosmetic, therapeutic and occupational reasons and there are many side effects reported (George, 2005; Nieminen et al., 1996; O'Sullivan et al., 2000. Prevalence of anabolic steroids’ use also indicates the importance of this topic. Moreover, it is now known that use of anabolic steroids could lead to dependence which could be psychological or/and physiological (Copeland et al., 2000. It isimportant to know about all aspects of anabolic steroids including dependence. Therefore, this study has attempted to give an insight into use of anabolic steroids and dependence. The discussion will focus on prevalence, reasons, and side effects of use and physiological and psychological dependence

  12. ABUSE OF ANABOLIC ANDROGENIC STEROIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Yavari

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the International Olympic Committee, the abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASS is found in over 50% of positive doping tests. AASS abuse is not restricted to the organized sports andwidespread use. It remains as an unsolved public-health problem.Lower black market price, easier access to AASS, bodybuilding clubs and internet advertising are factors of this increasingly misuse. There is not real data about the prevalence of AASS abuse in various populations or countries, because most of athletes or students, due to their prohibition or ethical aspects do not admit to AASS abuse. Often they are aware of the risks of their choice and yet, are eager to put themselves at risk without deeper consideration. The abusers use them to improve their physical fitness and appearance.Present article has been collected to elucidate the risks and adverse effects of AASS and explanation of mechanisms of these events.

  13. Adrenal Androgens and the Menopausal Transition

    OpenAIRE

    Lasley, B. L.; Crawford, S.; McConnell, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    The concept that adrenal androgen production gradually declines with age has changed following the analysis of the longitudinal data collected in the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN). It is now recognized that four adrenal androgens (3-beta hydroxy-5-androsten-17-one or dehydroepiandrosterone--DHEA, its sulfate, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate--DHEAS; androst-4-ene, 3,17-dione or androstenedione; and androst-5-ene-3-beta, 17-beta diol, also known as androstenediol or Adiol) ris...

  14. Androgen deprivation treatment of sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Frederick W; Taller, Inna; Tucker, Douglas E; Berlin, Fred S

    2011-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are underutilized in patients seeking diminution of problematic sexual drives. This chapter reviews the literature on surgical castration of sex offenders, anti-androgen use and the rationale for providing androgen deprivation therapy, rather than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or more conservative interventions, for patients with paraphilias and excessive sexual drive. Discussions of informed consent, side effects, contraindications and case examples are provided. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Androgen dependent development of a modified anal fin, gonopodium, as a model to understand the mechanism of secondary sexual character expression in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Yukiko; Katoh, Hironori; Yamada, Gen

    2004-09-24

    Male external genitalia show structural variations among species. Androgenic hormones are essential for the morphological specification of male type copulatory organs, while little is known about the developmental mechanisms of such secondary sexual characters. Western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis may offer a clue to the sexual differentiation researches, because they show a prominent masculine sexual character for appendage development, anal fin to gonopodium (GP) transition, and its formation could be induced in early juvenile fry by exogenously supplied androgens. We show that GP development is promoted by androgen dependent augmentation of sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression. Two AR cDNAs were cloned and identified as ARalpha and ARbeta from western mosquitofish. Both ARs were predominantly expressed in the distal region of outgrowing anal fin rays. Exposure of fry to androgen caused anal fin outgrowth concomitant with the Shh induction in the distal anal fin ray epithelium. When AR signaling was inhibited by its antagonist flutamide in fry, the initial induction of the Shh was suppressed accompanying retarded anal fin outgrowth. Similar suppression of anal fin outgrowth was induced by treatment with cyclopamine, an inhibitor of Shh signaling. These observations indicate that androgen dependent Shh expression is required for anal fin outgrowth leading to the formation of a genital appendage, the GP in teleost fishes. Androgen-induced GP formation may provide insights into the expression mechanism regulating the specification of sexual features in vertebrates.

  16. Screening of bisphenol A, triclosan and paraben analogues as modulators of the glucocorticoid and androgen receptor activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolšek, Katra; Gobec, Martina; Mlinarič Raščan, Irena; Sollner Dolenc, Marija

    2015-02-01

    A homeostasis of the glucocorticoid and androgen endocrine system is essential to human health. Their disturbance can lead to various diseases, for example cardiovascular, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, infertility, cancer. Fifteen widely used industrial chemicals that disrupt endocrine activity were selected for evaluation of potential (anti)glucocorticoid and (anti)androgenic activities. The human breast carcinoma MDA-kb2 cell line was utilized for reporter gene assays, since it expresses both the androgen and the glucocorticoid-responsive reporter. Two new antiandrogens, 4,4'-sulfonylbis(2-methylphenol) (dBPS) and 4,4'-thiodiphenol (THIO), and two new antiglucocorticoids, bisphenol Z and its analog bis[4-(2-hydroxyethoxy)phenyl] sulfone (BHEPS) were identified. Moreover, four new glucocorticoid agonists (methyl paraben, ethyl paraben, propyl paraben and bisphenol F) were found. To elucidate the structure-activity relationship of bisphenols, we performed molecular docking experiments with androgen and glucocorticoid receptor. These docking experiments had shown that bulky structures such as BHEPS and bisphenol Z act as antiglucocorticoid, because they are positioned toward helix H12 in the antagonist conformation and could therefore be responsible for H12 conformational change and the switch between agonistic and antagonistic conformation of receptor. On the other hand smaller structures cannot interact with H12. The results of in vitro screening of fifteen industrial chemicals as modulators of the glucocorticoid and androgen receptor activities demand additional in vivo testing of these chemicals for formulating any relevant hazard identification to human health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Androgen Bioassay for the Detection of Nonlabeled Androgenic Compounds in Nutritional Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Elliot R; McGrath, Kristine C Y; Li, XiaoHong; Heather, Alison K

    2018-01-01

    Both athletes and the general population use nutritional supplements. Athletes often turn to supplements hoping that consuming the supplement will help them be more competitive and healthy, while the general population hopes to improve body image or vitality. While many supplements contain ingredients that may have useful properties, there are supplements that are contaminated with compounds that are banned for use in sport or have been deliberately adulterated to fortify a supplement with an ingredient that will produce the advertised effect. In the present study, we have used yeast cell and mammalian cell androgen bioassays to characterize the androgenic bioactivity of 112 sports supplements available from the Australian market, either over the counter or via the Internet. All 112 products did not declare an androgen on the label as an included ingredient. Our findings show that six out of 112 supplements had strong androgenic bioactivity in the yeast cell bioassay, indicating products spiked or contaminated with androgens. The mammalian cell bioassay confirmed the strong androgenic bioactivity of five out of six positive supplements. Supplement 6 was metabolized to weaker androgenic bioactivity in the mammalian cells. Further to this, Supplement 6 was positive in a yeast cell progestin bioassay. Together, these findings highlight that nutritional supplements, taken without medical supervision, could expose or predispose users to the adverse consequences of androgen abuse. The findings reinforce the need to increase awareness of the dangers of nutritional supplements and highlight the challenges that clinicians face in the fast-growing market of nutritional supplements.

  18. Obesity and androgens: facts and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Renato

    2006-05-01

    This review discusses androgen status in male and female obesity, according to their specific phenotype, and the main mechanisms responsible. Published data in the literature of the last 20 years represented the basis of most of the data and concepts incorporated in the review. Obesity is associated with profound alterations in androgen secretion, transport, metabolism, and action, according to a dichotomous behavior depending on sex. Obese men are characterized by a progressive decrease of testosterone levels with increasing body weight, whereas obese women, particularly those with the abdominal phenotype, tend to develop a condition of functional hyperandrogenism. Reduced sex hormone-binding globulin synthesis and circulating blood levels represent the sole common mechanism which is responsible in both sexes. Among other still partially undefined factors, mechanisms potentially responsible for the sex dichotomy in androgen levels involve specific alterations of gonadotropin secretion, estrogens, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, leptin, androgen receptors, specific steroidogenic enzymes in the peripheral tissues, and, possibly, ghrelin. In both sexes, androgens play an important role in determining the sex-dependent pattern of body fat distribution. Moreover there are theoretical possibilities that low testosterone in men and high free testosterone fraction in women may play a role in the development of the metabolic syndrome. This is exemplified by the well defined association between obesity and other features of the metabolic syndrome in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and in hypogonadal men. The effects of androgen and antiandrogens in obese men and women also represent arguments in favor of this association. Given the fundamental role of sex hormones in the regulation of body composition, fuel homeostasis, and reproduction in humans, more emphasis should be placed on the potential role of androgen dysregulation in the pathophysiology of different

  19. Mixture effects at very low doses with combinations of anti-androgenic pesticides, antioxidants, industrial pollutant and chemicals used in personal care products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, Frances; Ermler, Sibylle; Kugathas, Subramaniam [Institute for the Environment, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Rosivatz, Erika [Institute of Chemical Biology, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Scholze, Martin [Institute for the Environment, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Kortenkamp, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.kortenkamp@brunel.ac.uk [Institute for the Environment, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    Many xenobiotics have been identified as in vitro androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, but information about their ability to produce combined effects at low concentrations is missing. Such data can reveal whether joint effects at the receptor are induced at low levels and may support the prioritisation of in vivo evaluations and provide orientations for the grouping of anti-androgens in cumulative risk assessment. Combinations of 30 AR antagonists from a wide range of sources and exposure routes (pesticides, antioxidants, parabens, UV-filters, synthetic musks, bisphenol-A, benzo(a)pyrene, perfluorooctane sulfonate and pentabromodiphenyl ether) were tested using a reporter gene assay (MDA-kb2). Chemicals were combined at three mixture ratios, equivalent to single components' effect concentrations that inhibit the action of dihydrotesterone by 1%, 10% or 20%. Concentration addition (CA) and independent action were used to calculate additivity expectations. We observed complete suppression of dihydrotestosterone effects when chemicals were combined at individual concentrations eliciting 1%, 10% or 20% AR antagonistic effect. Due to the large number of mixture components, the combined AR antagonistic effects occurred at very low concentrations of individual mixture components. CA slightly underestimated the combined effects at all mixture ratios. In conclusion, large numbers of AR antagonists from a wide variety of sources and exposure routes have the ability of acting together at the receptor to produce joint effects at very low concentrations. Significant mixture effects are observed when chemicals are combined at concentrations that individually do not induce observable AR antagonistic effects. Cumulative risk assessment for AR antagonists should apply grouping criteria based on effects where data are available, rather than on criteria of chemical similarity. - Highlights: • Mixtures of AR antagonists at low individual concentrations cause complete inhibition

  20. Prenatal testosterone exposure induces hypertension in adult females via androgen receptor-dependent protein kinase Cδ-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesson, Chellakkan S; Chinnathambi, Vijayakumar; Hankins, Gary D; Yallampalli, Chandra; Sathishkumar, Kunju

    2015-03-01

    Prenatal exposure to excess testosterone induces hyperandrogenism in adult females and predisposes them to hypertension. We tested whether androgens induce hypertension through transcriptional regulation and signaling of protein kinase C (PKC) in the mesenteric arteries. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with vehicle or testosterone propionate (0.5 mg/kg per day from gestation days 15 to 19, SC) and their 6-month-old adult female offspring were examined. Plasma testosterone levels (0.84±0.04 versus 0.42±0.09 ng/mL) and blood pressures (111.6±1.3 versus 104.5±2.4 mm Hg) were significantly higher in prenatal testosterone-exposed rats compared with controls. This was accompanied with enhanced expression of PKCδ mRNA (1.5-fold) and protein (1.7-fold) in the mesenteric arteries of prenatal testosterone-exposed rats. In addition, mesenteric artery contractile responses to PKC activator, phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate, was significantly greater in prenatal testosterone-exposed rats. Treatment with androgen receptor antagonist flutamide (10 mg/kg, SC, BID for 10 days) significantly attenuated hypertension, PKCδ expression, and the exaggerated vasoconstriction in prenatal testosterone-exposed rats. In vitro exposure of testosterone to cultured mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells dose dependently upregulated PKCδ expression. Analysis of PKCδ gene revealed a putative androgen responsive element in the promoter upstream to the transcription start site and an enhancer element in intron-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that androgen receptors bind to these elements in response to testosterone stimulation. Furthermore, luciferase reporter assays showed that the enhancer element is highly responsive to androgens and treatment with flutamide reverses reporter activity. Our studies identified a novel androgen-mediated mechanism for the control of PKCδ expression via transcriptional regulation that controls vasoconstriction and blood pressure. © 2014

  1. Inhibition of androgen receptor by decoy molecules delays progression to castration-recurrent prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Kyung Myung

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR is a member of the steroid receptor family and a therapeutic target for all stages of prostate cancer. AR is activated by ligand binding within its C-terminus ligand-binding domain (LBD. Here we show that overexpression of the AR NTD to generate decoy molecules inhibited both the growth and progression of prostate cancer in castrated hosts. Specifically, it was shown that lentivirus delivery of decoys delayed hormonal progression in castrated hosts as indicated by increased doubling time of tumor volume, prolonged time to achieve pre-castrate levels of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA and PSA nadir. These clinical parameters are indicative of delayed hormonal progression and improved therapeutic response and prognosis. Decoys reduced the expression of androgen-regulated genes that correlated with reduced in situ interaction of the AR with androgen response elements. Decoys did not reduce levels of AR protein or prevent nuclear localization of the AR. Nor did decoys interact directly with the AR. Thus decoys did not inhibit AR transactivation by a dominant negative mechanism. This work provides evidence that the AR NTD plays an important role in the hormonal progression of prostate cancer and supports the development of AR antagonists that target the AR NTD.

  2. Naloxone : actions of an antagonist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, Eveline Louise Arianna van

    2009-01-01

    The opioid antagonist naloxone has a special place in pharmacology – it has no intrinsic action of its own, but it is able to save lives in the case of life threatening side-effects caused by other drugs. Naloxone is an antagonist for all opioid receptors, but most specifically for the μ-opioid

  3. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, Andrea; Iaquinto, Gaetano; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  4. Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 95; Issue 4. Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome in sex-reversed XY female patients. BALACHANDRAN SARANYA GUNASEKARAN BHAVANI BRINDHA ARUMUGAM MEENA JAYASHANKAR ...

  5. Salbutamol exhibits androgenic activity in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bueren, André O; Ma, Risheng; Schlumpf, Margret; Lichtensteiger, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Background Salbutamol has been shown to mediate anabolic effects after intravenous administration. However, the mechanism responsible for the anabolic actions of salbutamol remains unknown. Aim To investigate the potential mechanism by which salbutamol mediates anabolic effects in vitro. Methods The potential androgenic activity of salbutamol was investigated in vitro by the A‐Screen assay that measures androgen‐dependent inhibition of proliferation of the androgen receptor (AR)‐positive human mammary carcinoma cell line, MCF7‐AR1. Results The assay was validated with three known androgens; methyltrienolone (R1881), 5α‐dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and danazol. IC50 values of R1881, DHT and danazol, 4.41×10–11, 4.44×10−11 and 1.08×10−8 M, respectively, were in the ranges known from earlier studies. Our results demonstrate that salbutamol exhibits androgenic activity, with an IC50 value of 8.93×10−6 M. Anti‐estrogenic or cytotoxic effects, which might have interfered with the assay, were excluded by additional experiments on wild‐type MCF7 and MCF7‐AR1 cells, respectively. Conclusion These data indicate that salbutamol exerts anabolic effects through androgen receptor agonistic activity in vitro. PMID:17510230

  6. Discovery AND Therapeutic Promise OF Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiyun; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Androgens are essential for male development and the maintenance of male secondary characteristics, such as bone mass, muscle mass, body composition, and spermatogenesis. The main disadvantages of steroidal androgens are their undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. The recent discovery of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) provides a promising alternative for testosterone replacement therapies with advantages including oral bioavailability, flexibility of structural modification, androgen receptor specificity, tissue selectivity, and the lack of steroid-related side effects. PMID:15994457

  7. Low androgen induced penile maldevelopment involves altered gene expression of biomarkers of smooth muscle differentiation and a key enzyme regulating cavernous smooth muscle cell tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumu, Lilian A; Braden, Tim D; Vail, Krystal; Simon, Liz; Goyal, Hari Om

    2014-07-01

    We determined the effects of low androgens in the neonatal period on biomarkers of smooth muscle cell differentiation, Myh11 and Acta2, and on Pde5A expression in the penis. One-day-old pups were treated daily with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist antide with or without dihydrotestosterone for 1 to 6 days. Tissues were collected at age day 7 and at adulthood at age 120 days. Penes were examined by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Testes were assayed for the intratesticular testosterone and steroidogenic enzymes Cyp17α1 and StAR. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist exposure suppressed the neonatal testicular testosterone surge 70% to 80%. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed 80% to 90% reductions in Cyp17α1 and StAR protein, and 40% to 60% reductions in Myh11 and ACTA2 as a result of gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist compared to controls. Dihydrotestosterone co-administration mitigated these decreases. Western blot confirmed the Myh11 decrease at the protein level. Immunohistochemistry of Acta2 confirmed cavernous smooth muscle cell loss at the tissue level. Also, gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist exposure decreased Pde5a expression and dihydrotestosterone co-administration mitigated the decrease. Comparison of data between 2 parts of the penis body (corpora cavernosa and corpus spongiosum) showed that antagonist induced decreases in Myh11, Acta2 and Pde5a expression occurred only in the corpora cavernosa, implying that the latter is the target site of low androgen action. As evidenced by gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist induced suppression of the neonatal testosterone surge and reduced steroidogenesis, low androgens in the neonatal period altered gene expression of biomarkers of smooth muscle cell differentiation. This led to loss of cavernous smooth muscle cells and consequently to penile maldevelopment. Copyright

  8. Enhanced Androgen Signaling With Androgen Receptor Overexpression in the Osteoblast Lineage Controls Skeletal Turnover, Matrix Quality and Bone Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wiren, Kristine M; Jepsen, Karl

    2006-01-01

    .... We genetically engineered transgenic mice in which androgen receptor (AR) overexpression is skeletally targeted in two separate models to better understand the role of androgen signaling directly in bone...

  9. Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gene mutations associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome in sex-reversed XY female patients. J. Genet. ... signal and a C-terminal. Keywords. androgen insensitivity syndrome; androgen receptor; truncation mutation; N-terminal domain; XY sex reversal. .... and an increased risk of gonadal tumour. Mutations in SRY.

  10. Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome Presenting with Gynecomastia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Won Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gynecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast caused by the proliferation of glandular breast tissue. Determining the various causes of gynecomastia such as physiological causes, drugs, systemic diseases, and endocrine disorders is important. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS is a rare endocrine disorder presenting with gynecomastia and is a disorder of male sexual differentiation caused by mutations within the androgen receptor gene. All individuals with AIS have the 46 XY karyotype, although AIS phenotypes can be classified as mild, partial or complete and can differ among both males and females including ambiguous genitalia or infertility in males. We experienced a case of partial AIS presenting with gynecomastia and identified the androgen receptor gene mutation.

  11. Comparing the androgenic and estrogenic properties of progestins used in contraception and hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw-du Toit, Renate; Perkins, Meghan S.; Hapgood, Janet P.; Africander, Donita

    2017-01-01

    Progestins used in endocrine therapies bind to multiple steroid receptors and are associated with several side-effects. It is thus important to understand the relationship between steroid receptor cross-reactivity and the side-effect profile of progestins. In cell lines that express negligible levels of steroid receptors, we report for the first time the binding affinities, potencies and efficacies of selected progestins from different generations determined in parallel. We show that the progestins bind to the androgen receptor (AR) with similar affinities to each other and progesterone, while none bind estrogen receptor (ER)-β, and only norethisterone acetate, levonorgestrel and gestodene bind ERα. Comparative dose-response analysis revealed that progestins from the first three generations display similar androgenic activity to the natural androgen dihydrotestosterone for transactivation, while norethisterone acetate, levonorgestrel and gestodene are ERα agonists. We show for the first time that the anti-androgenic properties of progesterone and drospirenone are similar to the well-known AR antagonist hydroxyflutamide, while nomegestrol acetate is more potent and nestorone less potent than both hydroxyflutamide and progesterone. Moreover, we are the first to report that the older progestins, unlike progesterone and the fourth generation progestins, are efficacious ERα agonists for transrepression, while the selected progestins from the second and third generation are efficacious AR agonists for transrepression. Considering the progestin potencies and their reported free serum concentrations relative to dihydrotestosterone and estradiol, our results suggest that the progestins are likely to exert AR-, but not ERα- or ERβ-mediated effects in vivo. PMID:28711501

  12. Bioactive Androgens and Glucuronidated Androgen Metabolites are Associated with Subcutaneous and Ectopic Skeletal Muscle Adiposity among Older Black Men

    OpenAIRE

    Miljkovic, Iva; Cauley, Jane A; Dressen, Amy S; Gordon, Christopher L; Goodpaster, Bret H; Kuller, Lewis H; Bunker, Clareann H; Patrick, Alan L; Wheeler, Victor W; Orwoll, Eric S; Zmuda, Joseph M

    2011-01-01

    Aging is associated with declining serum levels of androgenic hormones and with increased skeletal muscle fat infiltration, an emerging risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Androgens regulate fat mass and glucose homeostasis, but the effect of androgenic hormones on skeletal muscle fat infiltration is largely unknown. Thus, the aim of the current study was to examine the association of serum androgens and their precursors and metabolites with skeletal muscle fat infiltration and T...

  13. Pharmacodynamics of selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Donghua; Gao, Wenqing; Kearbey, Jeffrey D; Xu, Huiping; Chung, Kiwon; He, Yali; Marhefka, Craig A; Veverka, Karen A; Miller, Duane D; Dalton, James T

    2003-03-01

    The present study aimed to identify selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) with in vivo pharmacological activity. We examined the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological activity of four chiral, nonsteroidal SARMs synthesized in our laboratories. In the in vitro assays, these compounds demonstrated moderate to high androgen receptor (AR) binding affinity, with K(i) values ranging from 4 to 37 nM, and three of the compounds efficaciously stimulated AR-mediated reporter gene expression. The compounds were then administered subcutaneously to castrated rats to appraise their in vivo pharmacological activity. Androgenic activity was evaluated by the ability of these compounds to maintain the weights of prostate and seminal vesicle, whereas levator ani muscle weight was used as a measure of anabolic activity. The maximal response (E(max)) and dose for half-maximal effect (ED(50)) were determined for each compound and compared with that observed for testosterone propionate (TP). Compounds S-1 and S-4 demonstrated in vivo androgenic and anabolic activity, whereas compounds S-2 and S-3 did not. The activities of S-1 and S-4 were tissue-selective in that both compounds stimulated the anabolic organs more than the androgenic organs. These two compounds were less potent and efficacious than TP in androgenic activity, but their anabolic activity was similar to or greater than that of TP. Neither S-1 nor S-4 caused significant luteinizing hormone or follicle stimulating hormone suppression at doses near the ED(50) value. Thus, compounds S-1 and S-4 were identified as SARMs with potent and tissue-selective in vivo pharmacological activity, and represent the first members of a new class of SARMs with selective anabolic effects.

  14. Adrenal androgens and the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasley, Bill L; Crawford, Sybil; McConnell, Daniel S

    2011-09-01

    The concept that adrenal androgen production gradually declines with age has changed after analysis of longitudinal data from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN). It is now recognized that 4 adrenal androgens rise during the menopausal transition in most women. Ethnic and individual differences in sex steroids are more apparent in circulating adrenal steroids than in either estradiol or cyclic ovarian steroid hormone profiles, particularly during the early and late perimenopause. Thus, adrenal steroid production may play a larger role in the occurrence of symptoms and the potential for healthier aging than previously recognized.

  15. Regulation of expression of Na+,K+-ATPase in androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Blok (Leen); G.T.G. Chang; M. Steenbeek-Slotboom (M.); W.M. van Weerden (Wytske); H.G. Swarts; J.J.H.H.M. de Pont (J. J H H M); G.J. van Steenbrugge (Gert Jan); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe β1-subunit of Na+,K+-ATPase was isolated and identified as an androgen down-regulated gene. Expression was observed at high levels in androgen-independent as compared to androgen-dependent (responsive) human prostate cancer cell lines and xenografts when grown in the presence of

  16. Mathematical Models of Androgen Resistance in Prostate Cancer Patients under Intermittent Androgen Suppression Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Baez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Predicting the timing of a castrate resistant prostate cancer is critical to lowering medical costs and improving the quality of life of advanced prostate cancer patients. We formulate, compare and analyze two mathematical models that aim to forecast future levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA. We accomplish these tasks by employing clinical data of locally advanced prostate cancer patients undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. While these models are simplifications of a previously published model, they fit data with similar accuracy and improve forecasting results. Both models describe the progression of androgen resistance. Although Model 1 is simpler than the more realistic Model 2, it can fit clinical data to a greater precision. However, we found that Model 2 can forecast future PSA levels more accurately. These findings suggest that including more realistic mechanisms of androgen dynamics in a two population model may help androgen resistance timing prediction.

  17. Studies on antagonistic marine streptomycetes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, D.; Nair, S.

    Sixty nine strains of Streptomyces sp. isolated from the sediments of Andaman and Nicobar islands (Bay of Bengal) were screened for their antagonistic property against a number of test cultures (Vibrio sp., Klebsiella sp., Escherichia coli, Shigella...

  18. Antioxidants Abrogate Alpha-Tocopherylquinone-Mediated Down-Regulation of the Androgen Receptor in Androgen-Responsive Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M Fajardo

    Full Text Available Tocopherylquinone (TQ, the oxidation product of alpha-tocopherol (AT, is a bioactive molecule with distinct properties from AT. In this study, AT and TQ are investigated for their comparative effects on growth and androgenic activity in prostate cancer cells. TQ potently inhibited the growth of androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines (e.g., LAPC4 and LNCaP cells, whereas the growth of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells (e.g., DU145 cells was not affected by TQ. Due to the growth inhibitory effects induced by TQ on androgen-responsive cells, the anti-androgenic properties of TQ were examined. TQ inhibited the androgen-induced activation of an androgen-responsive reporter and inhibited the release of prostate specific antigen from LNCaP cells. TQ pretreatment was also found to inhibit AR activation as measured using the Multifunctional Androgen Receptor Screening assay. Furthermore, TQ decreased androgen-responsive gene expression, including TM4SF1, KLK2, and PSA over 5-fold, whereas AT did not affect the expression of androgen-responsive genes. Of importance, the antiandrogenic effects of TQ on prostate cancer cells were found to result from androgen receptor protein down-regulation produced by TQ that was not observed with AT treatment. Moreover, none of the androgenic endpoints assessed were affected by AT. The down-regulation of androgen receptor protein by TQ was abrogated by co-treatment with antioxidants. Overall, the biological actions of TQ were found to be distinct from AT, where TQ was found to be a potent inhibitor of cell growth and androgenic activity in androgen-responsive prostate cancer cells.

  19. Transfection of Sertoli cells with androgen receptor alters gene expression without androgen stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietz, D; Markmann, M; Lang, D; Konrad, L; Geyer, J; Kliesch, S; Chakraborty, T; Hossain, H; Bergmann, M

    2015-12-29

    Androgens play an important role for the development of male fertility and gained interest as growth and survival factors for certain types of cancer. Androgens act via the androgen receptor (AR/Ar), which is involved in various cell biological processes such as sex differentiation. To study the functional mechanisms of androgen action, cell culture systems and AR-transfected cell lines are needed. Transfection of AR into cell lines and subsequent gene expression analysis after androgen treatment is well established to investigate the molecular biology of target cells. However, it remains unclear how the transfection with AR itself can modulate the gene expression even without androgen stimulation. Therefore, we transfected Ar-deficient rat Sertoli cells 93RS2 by electroporation using a full length human AR. Transfection success was confirmed by Western Blotting, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. AR transfection-related gene expression alterations were detected with microarray-based genome-wide expression profiling of transfected and non-transfected 93RS2 cells without androgen stimulation. Microarray analysis revealed 672 differentially regulated genes with 200 up- and 472 down-regulated genes. These genes could be assigned to four major biological categories (development, hormone response, immune response and metabolism). Microarray results were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis for 22 candidate genes. We conclude from our data, that the transfection of Ar-deficient Sertoli cells with AR has a measurable effect on gene expression even without androgen stimulation and cause Sertoli cell damage. Studies using AR-transfected cells, subsequently stimulated, should consider alterations in AR-dependent gene expression as off-target effects of the AR transfection itself.

  20. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator, YK11, Up-Regulates Osteoblastic Proliferation and Differentiation in MC3T3-E1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsu, Tomofumi; Kusakabe, Taichi; Kato, Keisuke; Inouye, Yoshio; Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Kanno, Yuichiro

    2018-01-01

    Androgens are key regulators that play a critical role in the male reproductive system and have anabolic effects on bone mineral density and skeletal muscle mass. We have previously reported that YK11 is a novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) and induces myogenic differentiation and selective gene regulation. In this study, we show that treatment of YK11 and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) accelerated cell proliferation and mineralization in MC3T3-E1 mouse osteoblast cells. Further, YK11-treated cells increased osteoblast specific differentiation markers, such as osteoprotegerin and osteocalcin, compared to untreated cells. These observations were attenuated by androgen receptor (AR) antagonist treatment. To clarify the effect of YK11, we investigated rapid non-genomic signaling by AR. The phosphorylated Akt protein level was increased by YK11 and DHT treatment, suggesting that YK11 activates Akt-signaling via non-genomic signaling of AR. Because it is known Akt-signaling is a key regulator of androgen-mediated osteoblast differentiation, YK11 has osteogenic activity as well as androgen.

  1. Nonsteroidal mycotoxin alternariol is a full androgen agonist in the yeast reporter androgen bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypuła-Trębas, Sylwia; Minta, Maria; Radko, Lidia; Jedziniak, Piotr; Posyniak, Andrzej

    2017-10-01

    Alternariol (AOH) is a toxic metabolite of phytopathogenic fungi of the Alternaria spp. and important contaminant of agricultural commodities. According to the recent studies, AOH has a potential to modulate the endocrine system of humans and animals. In the view of these reports, our study addressed the effects of AOH on human estrogen receptor (hERα) and androgen receptor (hAR) signaling with the use of the yeast estrogen and androgen reporter bioassays. Our results show that, apart from a weak estrogenic response, AOH induces full androgenic response of the bioassay with the EC50 of 269.4μM. The androgenic potency of AOH relative to testosterone (T) is 0.046%. Moreover, in the presence of T, AOH at 5μM acts as a weak antiandrogen, whereas at higher concentrations AOH sum up with the androgenic activity of T in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting additive effect. To our knowledge it is the first report of the androgenic potency of natural, nonsteroidal substance and may have the impact on the direction of the further studies. Further research is warranted to clarify the role of AOH in disruption of AR signaling in humans and animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Androgen receptor signaling is required for androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cell proliferation and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day Wanda V

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgens and androgen receptors (AR regulate normal prostate development and growth. They also are involved in pathological development of prostatic diseases, including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate cancer (PCa. Antiandrogen therapy for PCa, in conjunction with chemical or surgical castration, offers initial positive responses and leads to massive prostate cell death. However, cancer cells later appear as androgen-independent PCa. To investigate the role of AR in prostate cell proliferation and survival, we introduced a vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA. This siRNA targeted 5'-untranslated region of AR mRNA for extended suppression of AR expression in androgen-sensitive human prostate LNCaP cells. Results The siRNA design successfully suppressed endogenous AR expression, as revealed by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining in LNCaP cells. LNCaP cells did not proliferate in the absence of AR and underwent apoptosis, based on elevated phospho-Histone H2B expression and higher number of apoptotic body as compared to control cells. Conclusion We demonstrated that AR is vital for prostate cell proliferation and survival in this androgen-sensitive prostate cell line. These results further strengthen the hypothesis that AR can be a therapeutic target for treating androgen-sensitive stages of PCa. Unlike antiandorgens, however, siRNA targeting AR provides a direct inactivation of AR function through the suppression of AR protein expression.

  3. Novel Small Molecule Antagonists of the Interaction of the Androgen Receptor and Transcriptional Co-regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    achieved (assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis ). For ~107 LNCaP nuclei, 6μg of anti-AR antibody (PG- 21, Upstate) was used for immunoprecipitation...Guy. Manuscript accepted in JBS (see pdf file attached) Abstract: Standardized, automated ligand binding assays facilitate evaluation of endocrine...chromatography (silica gel ; SP1/4 Biotage), preparative and semi-preparative HPLC (Waters Systems), preparative TLC, distillation, recrystallization NMR (1D

  4. Three siblings with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A diagnosis of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome was made, based on this clinical picture and laboratory findings. Two of her younger siblings were subsequently also diagnosed with this condition. She underwent an orchidectomy and is currently on female hormone replacement therapy. At the time of writing up ...

  5. Sexual behavior reduces hypothalamic androgen receptor immunoreactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Guasti, Alonso; Swaab, Dick; Rodríguez-Manzo, Gabriela

    2003-01-01

    Male sexual behavior is regulated by limbic areas like the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN), the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST), the nucleus accumbens (nAcc) and the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN). Neurons in these brain areas are rich in androgen receptors (AR) and express

  6. Therapeutic Use of Androgens in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in men, the same is not true for women. Media stories about how testosterone increases libido (sexual desire) ... medications, do have lower androgen levels than healthy women. In addition, despite claims in the popular media that getting testosterone levels checked is “a small ...

  7. Leverpatologi associeret med anaboliske-androgene steroider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Katrine; Søe, Martin Jensen; Gluud, C N

    1994-01-01

    This review regards the liver damaging side-effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS). It seems that AAS can cause development of peliosis hepatis, subcellular changes of hepatocytes, hepatocellular hyperplasia and hepatocellular adenomas. On the other hand, it has not been convincingly proved...

  8. The relationship between follicular fluid androgen concentrations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common cause of oligoanovulation, infertility, and hyperandrogenism in women and characterized by abnormal folliculogenesis. The androgen receptoe ( AR) is present in the ovary in almost all stages of folliculogenesis and has been suggested to play a proliferative role for ...

  9. Development of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Coss, Christopher C; Dalton, James T

    2017-06-15

    The Androgen Receptor (AR), a member of the steroid hormone receptor family, plays important roles in the physiology and pathology of diverse tissues. AR ligands, which include circulating testosterone and locally synthesized dihydrotestosterone, bind to and activate the AR to elicit their effects. Ubiquitous expression of the AR, metabolism and cross reactivity with other receptors limit broad therapeutic utilization of steroidal androgens. However, the discovery of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) and other tissue-selective nuclear hormone receptor modulators that activate their cognate receptors in a tissue-selective manner provides an opportunity to promote the beneficial effects of androgens and other hormones in target tissues with greatly reduced unwanted side-effects. In the last two decades, significant resources have been dedicated to the discovery and biological characterization of SARMs in an effort to harness the untapped potential of the AR. SARMs have been proposed as treatments of choice for various diseases, including muscle-wasting, breast cancer, and osteoporosis. This review provides insight into the evolution of SARMs from proof-of-concept agents to the cusp of therapeutic use in less than two decades, while covering contemporary views of their mechanisms of action and therapeutic benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Deciphering the selective androgen receptor modulators paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuqing; Sui, Zhihua

    2013-02-01

    The development and potential clinical use of tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have advanced tremendously over the past few years. A key aspect of SARMs is the ability to clearly differentiate between the anabolic and androgenic activities. SARMs provide therapeutic opportunities in a variety of diseases, including muscle wasting associated with burns, cancer, end-stage renal disease, osteoporosis, frailty and hypogonadism. The aim of the present paper is to summarize the current standing of research and development of SARMs and plausible molecular mechanisms underlying the potential for selective modulation of androgen receptor (AR) by different ligands. This paper also provides an update on SARM discovery paradigms for preclinical evaluations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical investigations and initial clinical trials, but long-term safety, tolerability and efficacy studies in patients are still necessary. Preclinically, improving knowledge of tissue selectivity at the molecular level, developing AR selectivity transcription profile, exploring in vitro/in vivo correlation, along with expanding selectivity evaluation among more androgen responsive tissues would accelerate the discovery of a new generation of more selective and safer clinical candidates, minimize false leads and hasten development of effective approaches for an expanded range of clinical conditions.

  11. Androgen regulation of prostate cancer: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, G; Baldi, E; Maggi, M

    2011-03-01

    Androgens play an essential role in the development and differentiation of the prostate gland; their contribution to pathological conditions, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer (PC), remains unclear. We reviewed relationships between androgens and the prostate both in physiological and pathological conditions. A systematic search of published evidence was performed using Medline (1969 to September 2010). Androgen-dependency of prostate growth is evident only in the hypogonadal condition, but not in the eugonadal state (the "saturation hypothesis"). There is unequivocal evidence that reducing androgen signaling to the hypogonadal range can reduce PC growth and patient symptoms. At physiological testosterone concentration there is no link between androgen levels and PC risk. In addition, different strategies of androgen deprivation (ADT) for advanced PC are only palliative and rarely cure patients. Preliminary evidence indicates that a low androgen milieu is associated with tumor aggressiveness. Transition to androgen-independence is complex and involves both selection and outgrowth of preexisting androgen resistant clones, as well as adaptative upregulation of genes that help the cancer cells to survive and grow after ADT. Because androgens are essential for the regulation of fat distribution, insulin sensitivity, and lipid and bone metabolism, recent publications have highlighted the concept that ADT may also be involved with an increase in overall, as well as cardiovascular, morbidity and mortality. While ADT still represents a cornerstone for the palliative therapy of a small fraction of aggressive PC, a "misuse and/or abuse" of ADT should be avoided.

  12. Specific modulation of nongenomic androgen signaling in the ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Stacy N; Jamnongjit, Michelle; Gill, Arvind; Lutz, Lindsey B; Hammes, Stephen R

    2005-01-01

    Maturation, or meiotic progression, of amphibian oocytes is one of the few physiologically relevant steroid-mediated processes that occurs in the complete absence of transcription from beginning to end. As such, frog oocyte maturation has served as a useful model of nongenomic steroid signaling for many years. Earlier work in Xenopus laevis demonstrated that, although several steroids promoted oocyte maturation in vitro, androgens were the most abundant and potent steroids detected in the serum and ovaries of ovulating frogs. Thus, androgens were likely the primary physiologic regulators of Xenopus oocyte maturation, mediating their actions at least in part via classical androgen receptors expressed in oocytes. The importance of androgens for Xenopus oocyte maturation and ovulation has now been confirmed, as inhibition of androgen production in vivo by blocking CYP17 activity reduced hCG-triggered oocyte maturation and delayed ovulation in female frogs. Taking advantage of the absolute transcription-independence of this androgen-mediated response, selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have been characterized that specifically promote genomic versus nongenomic androgen responses. These include androstenediol and estren, which preferentially promote nongenomic signals, as well as R1881 and 19-nortestosterone, which preferentially promote genomic signaling. Interestingly, the SARMs androstenediol and R1881 signal similarly in mouse oocytes, demonstrating the conserved nature of androgen-mediated maturation in vertebrates. These results suggest that SARMs may serve as useful tools for specifically regulating nongenomic androgen signaling both in vitro and in vivo.

  13. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  14. Androgen levels in women with various forms of ovarian dysfunction : Associations with cardiometabolic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, N. M P; Jaspers, L.; Koster, M. P H; Broekmans, F. J M; De Rijke, Y. B.; Franco, O. H.; Laven, J. S E; Kavousi, M.; Fauser, B. C J M

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are differences in androgen levels among women with various forms of ovarian dysfunction associated with cardiometabolic abnormalities? SUMMARY ANSWER Androgen levels differed substantially between women with and without ovarian dysfunction, and increased androgen levels were

  15. Effects of androgenic-anabolic steroids in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartgens, Fred; Kuipers, Harm

    2004-01-01

    . Generally, AAS seem to induce increments of aggression and hostility. Mood disturbances (e.g. depression, [hypo-]mania, psychotic features) are likely to be dose and drug dependent. AAS dependence or withdrawal effects (such as depression) seem to occur only in a small number of AAS users. Dissatisfaction with the body and low self-esteem may lead to the so-called 'reverse anorexia syndrome' that predisposes to the start of AAS use. Many other adverse effects have been associated with AAS misuse, including disturbance of endocrine and immune function, alterations of sebaceous system and skin, changes of haemostatic system and urogenital tract. One has to keep in mind that the scientific data may underestimate the actual untoward effects because of the relatively low doses administered in those studies, since they do not approximate doses used by illicit steroid users. The mechanism of action of AAS may differ between compounds because of variations in the steroid molecule and affinity to androgen receptors. Several pathways of action have been recognised. The enzyme 5-alpha-reductase seems to play an important role by converting AAS into dihydrotestosterone (androstanolone) that acts in the cell nucleus of target organs, such as male accessory glands, skin and prostate. Other mechanisms comprises mediation by the enzyme aromatase that converts AAS in female sex hormones (estradiol and estrone), antagonistic action to estrogens and a competitive antagonism to the glucocorticoid receptors. Furthermore, AAS stimulate erythropoietin synthesis and red cell production as well as bone formation but counteract bone breakdown. The effects on the cardiovascular system are proposed to be mediated by the occurrence of AAS-induced atherosclerosis (due to unfavourable influence on serum lipids and lipoproteins), thrombosis, vasospasm or direct injury to vessel walls, or may be ascribed to a combination of the different mechanisms. AAS-induced increment of muscle tissue can be attributed

  16. Androgen deprivation therapy-associated vasomotor symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Jason M; Kohli, Manish; Loprinzi, Charles L

    2012-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is widely used as standard therapy in the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. While efficacious, ADT is associated with multiple side effects, including decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, diabetes, loss of muscle tone and altered body composition, osteoporosis, lipid changes, memory loss, gynecomastia and hot flashes. The breadth of literature for the treatment of hot flashes is much smaller in men than that in women. While hor...

  17. Recurrent angioedema associated with hypogonadism or anti-androgen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, W J; Lehner, R; Späth, P J

    1989-10-01

    Two male patients with hypogonadism and four female patients who received an anti-androgen as contraceptive (cyproteronacetate) and who had recurrent angioedema are described. In one male patient, augmentation of the plasma androgen level resulted in disappearance of symptoms. In the four female patients, recurrent angioedema and urticaria developed after initiation of the anti-androgen treatment. Cessation of cyproteronacetate and a change to another contraceptive resulted in complete resolution of the previously frequent angioedematous attacks. The women are still symptom free after more than 60 patient's months. These cases suggest that an androgen deficit due to either hypogonadism or to anti-androgen treatment may be another cause of angioedema. One of the two male patients was untreated and presented with 40% normal value of C1-INH. Androgen therapy normalized C1-INH concentration in this male patient. Functional C1-INH in the same patient, studied before and after the beginning of androgen therapy, clearly increased when assessed by inhibition of amidolytic activity of C1-esterase. The other male patient with hypogonadism had already been under androgen treatment for 4 years and had C1-INH levels in the normal range. In the female patients, complement profiles were normal before and after cessation of anti-androgen contraception; however, the C1-INH plasma levels were higher after cessation of anti-androgen anticonception. These results indicate an effect of androgen deficit on the level of C1-INH in circulating plasma but do not prove a role of C1-INH in angioedema associated with diminished androgen plasma levels.

  18. Prostate cancer: molecular biology of early progression to androgen independence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadar, M D; Hussain, M; Bruchovsky, N

    1999-12-01

    To improve the therapy for prostate cancer, it will be necessary to address the problems of progression to androgen independence and the process of metastatic spread of tumour. The complexity of the latter condition is likely to mitigate against the immediate development of relevant therapeutic approaches. However, the basis of androgen independence appears to be a problem of simpler dimensions and more amenable to treatment with current therapeutic technology. Since early tumour progression can be detected by an incomplete prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to androgen withdrawal therapy, a study of the molecular biology of PSA gene regulation may well provide insight into new methods for preventing or delaying this problem. Mounting evidence suggests that ligand-independent activation of the androgen receptor may be one underlying mechanism of androgen independence. In the absence of androgen, a compensatory increase in the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) enhances the ability of the androgen receptor to bind to the response elements regulating PSA gene expression. The activation of the androgen receptor through up-regulation of the PKA signal transduction pathway involves the amino-terminus of the androgen receptor, the function of which may be altered either by modifications such as phosphorylation, or through interactions with co-regulators or other proteins. Of therapeutic interest is the fact that this effect can be counteracted experimentally by the anti-androgen, bicalutamide, and clinically by several other similar agents. We speculate that the inhibition of PKA-activated androgen receptor might also be accomplished by decoy molecules that can bind to the relevant activated site on the amino-terminus or competitively interact with proteins recruited by the PKA pathway that are responsible for activating the receptor in the absence of androgen. Such molecules might include small mimetic substances or agents that can gain access to the

  19. Aberrant splicing of androgen receptor mRNA results in synthesis of a nonfunctional receptor protein in a patient with androgen insensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Kuiper, G. G.; Faber, P. W.; Schweikert, H. U.; van Rooij, H. C.; Zegers, N. D.; Hodgins, M. B.; Degenhart, H. J.; Trapman, J.; Brinkmann, A. O.

    1990-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity is a disorder in which the correct androgen response in an androgen target cell is impaired. The clinical symptoms of this X chromosome-linked syndrome are presumed to be caused by mutations in the androgen receptor gene. We report a G----T mutation in the splice donor site of

  20. Pathological changes in anabolic androgenic steroid users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusetti, Monia; Licata, Manuela; Silingardi, Enrico; Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Palmiere, Cristian

    2015-07-01

    Several classes of recreational and prescription drugs have additional effects on the heart and vasculature, which may significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality in chronic users. The study presented herein focuses on pathological changes involving the heart possibly due to anabolic androgenic steroid use. The role these hormones may play in their occurrence of sudden cardiac death is also investigated. 98 medico-legal cases including 6 anabolic androgenic steroid users were retrospectively reviewed. Autopsies, histology, immunohistochemistry, biochemistry and toxicology were performed in all cases. Pathological changes consisted of various degrees of interstitial and perivascular fibrosis as well as fibroadipous metaplasia and perineural fibrosis within the myocardium of the left ventricle. Within the limits of the small number of investigated cases, our results appear to confirm former observations on this topic and suggest anabolic androgenic steroid's potential causative role in the pathogenesis of sudden cardiac deaths in chronic users. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  1. Androgen therapy in women, beyond libido.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S R

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize the literature regarding the potential role of testosterone therapy for women. The author conducted a search of the literature using Medline (Ovid, 1946-present) and PubMed (1966-2013) for English-language studies that included the following search terms: 'testosterone' or 'androgen' combined with 'women', 'therapy' or 'treatment'. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials have consistently shown that transdermal testosterone therapy improves sexual desire, arousal, orgasm frequency and satisfaction in premenopausal and postmenopausal women presenting with sexual desire/arousal problems. No adverse metabolic effects have been observed in these studies. In postmenopausal women, testosterone therapy has also been associated with favorable effects on body composition, bone, cardiovascular function and cognitive performance. Although androgens have many varied roles, the focus of testosterone therapy for women has been on improving sexual desire. Not only do testosterone effects on sexuality extend beyond libido, but testosterone has other key physiological actions. Issues that urgently need to be addressed include approval of a testosterone formulation that delivers a female dose such that physicians refrain from prescribing compounded testosterone or modifying doses of testosterone formulated for men and regulation of prescription of compounded androgens for women.

  2. Modulators of androgen and estrogen receptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Bart L; Khosla, Sundeep

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on significant recent findings regarding modulators of androgen and estrogen receptor activity. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) interact with androgen receptors (ARs), and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) interact with estrogen receptors (ERs), with variable tissue selectivity. SERMs, which interact with both ERб and ERв in a tissue-specific manner to produce diverse outcomes in multiple tissues, continue to generate significant interest for clinical application. Development of SARMs for clinical application has been slower to date because of potential adverse effects, but these diverse compounds continue to be investigated for use in disorders in which modulation of the AR is important. SARMs have been investigated mostly at the basic and preclinical level to date, with few human clinical trials published. These compounds have been evaluated mostly for application in different stages of prostate cancer to date, but they hold promise for multiple other applications. Publication of the large STAR and RUTH clinical trials demonstrated that the SERMs tamoxifen and raloxifene have interesting similarities and differences in tissues that contain ERs. Lasofoxifene, bazedoxifene, and arzoxifene are newer SERMs that have been demonstrated in clinical trials to more potently increase bone mineral density and lower serum cholesterol values than tamoxifen or raloxifene. Both SARMs and SERMs hold great promise for therapeutic use in multiple disorders in which tissue-specific effects are mediated by their respective receptors.

  3. The Role of (BETA)-Catenin in Androgen Receptor Signaling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhowmick, Neil A

    2006-01-01

    .... Our preliminary data seem indicate stromally derived paracrine Wnt family members activate theepithelial frizzled receptor to enable prostate epithelial survival in an androgen deficient environment...

  4. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation...

  5. ANTAGONISTIC POTENTIAL OF FLUORESCENT Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth performance of Lycopersicon esculentum in Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani infested soil. Biochemical characteristics of fluorescent Pseudomonas showed that all ten isolates were positive ...

  6. Effect of organochlorine pesticides on human androgen receptor activation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, Geraldine; Terouanne, Beatrice; Mauvais, Pascale; Michel, Serge; Rahmani, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Many persistent organochlorine pesticides (OCs) have been implicated in adverse effects, that is, reproductive and developmental effects, in man and in wildlife alike. It has been hypothesized that these so-called xeno-hormones could be responsible for the increased incidence in various male sexual differentiation disorders such as hypospadias, cryptorchidism, low sperm counts and quality. In this report, OCs, called endocrine disrupters, were tested for their interaction with the androgen receptor. The stable prostatic cell line PALM, which contains a human androgen receptor (hAR) expression vector and the reporter MMTV-luciferase, was used to characterize the response of hAR to OC and was compared with synthetic androgen compound R1881. We found that all the OC pesticides tested were able to shift the agonist [ 3 H]-R1881 from its binding site to the AR in competitive binding assays. In addition, these compounds antagonize - in a dose-dependent manner - the AR-mediated transcription by synthetic AR ligand R1881. None of the pesticides reacted as agonists. These results demonstrate that OC endocrine activities in vivo probably result from direct and specific binding to the AR ligand-binding domain. Although the antagonistic potential of OC pesticides is lower than that of hydroxyflutamide, they are capable of disrupting the male hormone signaling pathway. Because these chemicals are extremely persistent and tend to bioaccumulate, these results support the hypothesis that the recent increase in the incidence of male sexual disorders could be due to long exposure to ubiquitous OC pesticides found in the environment

  7. Feed-forward inhibition of androgen receptor activity by glucocorticoid action in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartig, Sean M; He, Bin; Newberg, Justin Y; Ochsner, Scott A; Loose, David S; Lanz, Rainer B; McKenna, Neil J; Buehrer, Benjamin M; McGuire, Sean E; Marcelli, Marco; Mancini, Michael A

    2012-09-21

    We compared transcriptomes of terminally differentiated mouse 3T3-L1 and human adipocytes to identify cell-specific differences. Gene expression and high content analysis (HCA) data identified the androgen receptor (AR) as both expressed and functional, exclusively during early human adipocyte differentiation. The AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) inhibited human adipocyte maturation by downregulation of adipocyte marker genes, but not in 3T3-L1. It is interesting that AR induction corresponded with dexamethasone activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR); however, when exposed to the differentiation cocktail required for adipocyte maturation, AR adopted an antagonist conformation and was transcriptionally repressed. To further explore effectors within the cocktail, we applied an image-based support vector machine (SVM) classification scheme to show that adipocyte differentiation components inhibit AR action. The results demonstrate human adipocyte differentiation, via GR activation, upregulates AR but also inhibits AR transcriptional activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prenatal androgen receptor activation determines adult alcohol and water drinking in a sex-specific way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Sabine E; Zoicas, Iulia; Reichel, Martin; Mühle, Christiane; Büttner, Christian; Ekici, Arif B; Eulenburg, Volker; Lenz, Bernd; Kornhuber, Johannes; Müller, Christian P

    2017-08-04

    Alcohol use disorders are major psychiatric disorders. Correlational studies in humans suggested organizational hormonal effects during embryonic development as a risk factor for adult alcohol dependence. Permanent changes can be induced by the activity of sex hormones, like testosterone. Here, we demonstrate a relationship between prenatal androgen receptor (AR)-activation and adult alcohol as well as water drinking in mice in a sex-dependent fashion. Prenatal AR inhibition using the antagonist flutamide decreased adult male alcohol consumption. In contrast, prenatal AR activation by dihydrotestosterone (DHT) led to an increase in adult alcohol consumption in females. These effects were different in adult water drinking, flutamide increased water consumption in females and DHT increased water consumption in males. Prenatal flutamide reduced locomotion and anxiety in adult males but was ineffective in females. We found that prenatal AR activation controls adult levels of monoaminergic modulatory transmitters in the brain and blood hormone levels in a sex-specific way. RNA-Seq analysis confirmed a prenatal AR mediated control of adult expression of alcohol drinking-related genes like Bdnf and Per2. These findings demonstrate that prenatal androgen activity is a risk factor for the establishment of alcohol consumption in adults by its organizational effects. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Testosterone increases renal anti-aging klotho gene expression via the androgen receptor-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Che; Huang, Shih-Ming; Lin, Shih-Hua; Ka, Shuk-Man; Chen, Ann; Shih, Meng-Fu; Hsu, Yu-Juei

    2014-12-01

    Gender is known to be associated with longevity and oestrogen administration induced longevity-associated gene expression is one of the potential mechanisms underlying the benefits of oestrogen on lifespan, whereas the role of testosterone in the regulation of longevity-associated gene expressions remains largely unclear. The klotho gene, predominantly expressed in the kidney, has recently been discovered to be an aging suppressor gene. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory effects of testosterone on renal klotho gene expression in vivo and in vitro. In testosterone-administered mouse kidney and NRK-52E cells, increased klotho expression was accompanied by the up-regulation of the nuclear androgen receptor (AR). Overexpression of AR enhanced the expression of klotho mRNA and protein. Conversely, testosterone-induced klotho expression was attenuated in the presence of flutamide, an AR antagonist. A reporter assay and a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated that AR directly binds to the klotho promoter via androgen response elements (AREs) which reconfirmed its importance for AR binding via the element mutation. In summary, our study demonstrates that testosterone up-regulates anti-aging klotho together with AR expression in the kidney in vivo and in vitro by recruiting AR on to the AREs of the klotho promoter.

  10. IκBα mediates prostate cancer cell death induced by combinatorial targeting of the androgen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, Sarah Louise; Centenera, Margaret Mary; Tilley, Wayne Desmond; Selth, Luke Ashton; Butler, Lisa Maree

    2016-01-01

    Combining different clinical agents to target multiple pathways in prostate cancer cells, including androgen receptor (AR) signaling, is potentially an effective strategy to improve outcomes for men with metastatic disease. We have previously demonstrated that sub-effective concentrations of an AR antagonist, bicalutamide, and the histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, act synergistically when combined to cause death of AR-dependent prostate cancer cells. In this study, expression profiling of human prostate cancer cells treated with bicalutamide or vorinostat, alone or in combination, was employed to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying this synergistic action. Cell viability assays and quantitative real time PCR were used to validate identified candidate genes. A substantial proportion of the genes modulated by the combination of bicalutamide and vorinostat were androgen regulated. Independent pathway analysis identified further pathways and genes, most notably NFKBIA (encoding IκBα, an inhibitor of NF-κB and p53 signaling), as targets of this combinatorial treatment. Depletion of IκBα by siRNA knockdown enhanced apoptosis of prostate cancer cells, while ectopic overexpression of IκBα markedly suppressed cell death induced by the combination of bicalutamide and vorinostat. These findings implicate IκBα as a key mediator of the apoptotic action of this combinatorial AR targeting strategy and a promising new therapeutic target for prostate cancer. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2188-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  11. The PPARγ ligand ciglitazone regulates androgen receptor activation differently in androgen-dependent versus androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, Patrice E.; Lyles, Besstina E.; Stewart, LaMonica V.

    2010-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) regulates growth and progression of androgen-dependent as well as androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists have been reported to reduce AR activation in androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells. To determine whether PPARγ ligands are equally effective at inhibiting AR activity in androgen-independent prostate cancer, we examined the effect of the PPARγ ligands ciglitazone and rosiglitazone on C4-2 cells, an androgen- independent derivative of the LNCaP cell line. Luciferase-based reporter assays and Western blot analysis demonstrated that PPARγ ligand reduced dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced increases in AR activity in LNCaP cells. However, in C4-2 cells, these compounds increased DHT-induced AR driven luciferase activity. In addition, ciglitazone did not significantly alter DHT-mediated increases in prostate specific antigen (PSA) protein or mRNA levels within C4-2 cells. siRNA-based experiments demonstrated that the ciglitazone-induced regulation of AR activity observed in C4-2 cells was dependent on the presence of PPARγ. Furthermore, overexpression of the AR corepressor cyclin D1 inhibited the ability of ciglitazone to induce AR luciferase activity in C4-2 cells. Thus, our data suggest that both PPARγ and cyclin D1 levels influence the ability of ciglitazone to differentially regulate AR signaling in androgen-independent C4-2 prostate cancer cells.

  12. Additive effects of dietary glycotoxins and androgen excess on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AGE immunoreactivity was higher on the renal tubules of the androgenized animals fed with HA diet, when compared with the animals fed with LA diet, but did not significantly differ among the two groups. Conclusions: The above mentioned data suggest that dietary glycotoxins, in combination with increased androgen ...

  13. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  14. New selective estrogen and androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Bart L; Khosla, Sundeep

    2009-07-01

    The present review focuses on the most significant recent findings regarding selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). SERMs, which interact with estrogen receptor-alpha and estrogen receptor-beta in multiple tissues, continue to generate clinical interest in potential applications in as many disorders as the tissues in which the two known receptors are found. SARMs have been demonstrated to have fewer clinical applications to date, but continue to be investigated for use in multiple disorders in which androgen receptor modulation is likely to be important. Both types of compounds hold great promise for therapeutic use in multiple hormonal disorders involving tissue-specific effects mediated by estrogen or androgen receptors. Although SERMs have been available for clinical use for 50 years, recent investigation has focused on large randomized clinical trials for newer indications of older agents or smaller clinical trials of newer agents with improved clinical activity and reduced side effects in specific tissues. In particular, the large, prospective, randomized, controlled, multiyear Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene and Raloxifene Use in the Heart clinical trials have recently shown interesting similarities and differences between tamoxifen and raloxifene in estrogen-responsive tissues. Lasofoxifene and arzoxifene are two newer SERMs that have recently been demonstrated to improve bone mineral density and lower serum cholesterol values compared with older SERMs in smaller clinical trials. SARMs are a newer category of drug still being investigated mostly at the basic and preclinical level, with fewer clinical trials available for review. SARMs are currently being investigated mostly for use in prostate cancer at different stages but hold promise for multiple other applications. Recent clinical trials indicate that SERMs are useful in treatment of disorders of bone and mineral metabolism and breast cancer

  15. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha And Human Androgen Receptor: Comparisons in the COS Whole Cell Binding Assay Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray, Jr. and Vickie S. WilsonU.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle...

  16. Functional analysis of a novel androgen receptor mutation, Q902K, in an individual with partial androgen insensitivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Umar (Arzu); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); N.M. Van (Mai); M. van Leeuwen (Marije); M.M.P.J. Verbiest (Michael); W.J. Kleijer (Wim); D. Dooijes (Dennis); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is caused by defects in the androgen receptor (AR) that render the AR partially or completely inactive. As a result, embryonic sex differentiation is impaired. Here, we describe a novel mutation in the AR found in a patient with

  17. The long-term outcome of boys with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome and a mutation in the androgen receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas-Herald, A.; S. Bertelloni (Silvano); A. Juul (Anders); J. Bryce (Jillian); Jiang, J.; M. Rodie (Martina); R. Sinnott (Richard); Boroujerdi, M.; Lindhardt Johansen, M.; O. Hiort (Olaf); P-M. Holterhus (Paul-Martin); M.L. Cools (Martine); Guaragna-Filho, G.; Guerra-Junior, G.; N. Weintrob (Naomi); S.E. Hannema (Sabine); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); T. Guran (Tulay); F. Darendeliler (Feyza); A. Nordenström (Anna); I.A. Hughes (Ieuan A.); Acerini, C.; Tadokoro-Cuccaro, R.; S.F. Ahmed (Faisal)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In boys with suspected partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS), systematic evidence that supports the long-term prognostic value of identifying a mutation in the androgen receptor gene (AR) is lacking. Objective: To assess the clinical characteristics and long-term

  18. Androgens and estrogens in skeletal sexual dimorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Michaël; Antonio, Leen; Sinnesael, Mieke; Dubois, Vanessa; Gielen, Evelien; Classens, Frank; Vanderschueren, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Bone is an endocrine tissue expressing androgen and estrogen receptors as well as steroid metabolizing enzymes. The bioactivity of circulating sex steroids is modulated by sex hormone-binding globulin and local conversion in bone tissue, for example, from testosterone (T) to estradiol (E2) by aromatase, or to dihydrotestosterone by 5α-reductase enzymes. Our understanding of the structural basis for gender differences in bone strength has advanced considerably over recent years due to increasing use of (high resolution) peripheral computed tomography. These microarchitectural insights form the basis to understand sex steroid influences on male peak bone mass and turnover in cortical vs trabecular bone. Recent studies using Cre/LoxP technology have further refined our mechanistic insights from global knockout mice into the direct contributions of sex steroids and their respective nuclear receptors in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes, and other cells to male osteoporosis. At the same time, these studies have reinforced the notion that androgen and estrogen deficiency have both direct and pleiotropic effects via interaction with, for example, insulin-like growth factor 1, inflammation, oxidative stress, central nervous system control of bone metabolism, adaptation to mechanical loading, etc., This review will summarize recent advances on these issues in the field of sex steroid actions in male bone homeostasis. PMID:24385015

  19. Androgenic alopecia; the risk–benefit ratio of Finasteride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Rowland

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Finasteride is currently approved and largely used as a therapeutic option for androgenetic alopecia. Apparently a safe drug and effective at the onset, several concerns appeared over time regarding the frequency and magnitude of finasteride adverse effects, which in some cases seem to be even irreversible. This paper presents administration of finasteride in androgenic alopecia from two distinct perspectives. On one hand, androgenic alopecia is a condition that affects especially the self-image and esteem, aspects that are subjective, namely changeable and thus relative. On the other hand, this condition presents a multifactorial etiology, androgens being only in part involved. In addition, androgens have their own physiological roles within the body, so that any androgenic suppression should be carefully advised. Yet, adverse effects induced by Finasteride are only in part documented and treatable. Finally, alternative therapeutic approaches (like topical finasteride become available, so that the oral administration of Finasteride for androgenic alopecia should be in our opinion reevaluated. As a conclusion, a very detailed and informed discussion should take place with such patients accepting to start a therapy with finasteride for androgenic alopecia.

  20. New insights into androgen treatment of erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Gooren

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Erectile response in mammals is centrally and peripherally regulated by androgens. Severe hypogonadism in men usually results in loss of libido and potency which can be restored by androgen administration. The original insights into the mechanisms of action of androgens on sexual function indicated that androgens particularly exert effects on libido and that sleep-related erections were androgen-sensitive but erections in response to erotic stimuli were relatively androgen-independent. There are a number of recent developments which shed new light on testosterone treatment of erectile dysfunction in aging men. There is growing insight that testosterone has profound effects on tissues of the penis involved in the mechanism of erection and that testosterone deficiency impairs the anatomical and physiological/biochemical substrate of erectile capacity, reversible upon androgen treatment. Several studies have indicated that the administration of PDE-5-inhibitors is not always sufficient to restore erectile potency in men and that administration of testosterone improves the therapeutical response to PDE-5-inhibitors considerably. There is increasing insight not to view erectile dysfunction (ED as a single entity but as part of the aging process. Circulating levels of testosterone are closely related to manifestations of other etiological factors in ED, such as atherosclerotic disease and diabetes mellitus. The latter are correlated with lower-than-normal testosterone levels.

  1. Smac mimetics as IAP antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulda, Simone

    2015-03-01

    As the Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins are expressed at high levels in human cancers, they represent promising targets for therapeutic intervention. Small-molecule inhibitors of IAP proteins mimicking the endogenous IAP antagonist Smac, called Smac mimetics, neutralize IAP proteins and thereby promote the induction of cell death. Smac mimetics have been shown in preclinical models of human cancer to directly trigger cancer cell death or to sensitize for cancer cell death induced by a variety of cytotoxic stimuli. Smac mimetics are currently undergoing clinical evaluation in phase I/II trials, demonstrating that therapeutic targeting of IAP proteins has reached the clinical stage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Androgenic Regulation of Male Sexual Behavior and Physiology in the Syrian Hamster (Mesocricetus Auratus)

    OpenAIRE

    Piekarski, David John

    2012-01-01

    The androgen testosterone (T) and its metabolite, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), are released from the gonads and act in the brain and periphery to control many male-typical traits, including male sexual behavior (MSB). The classical model of androgenic action asserts that T, or DHT binds to a single species of intracellular androgen receptor (AR), that acts as a transcription factor to induce transactivation of androgen-regulated genes. Accordingly, androgens may take hours or days to assert t...

  3. Blood androgen levels in male baboons throughout the year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taranov, A.G.; Goncharov, N.P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a study of possible dependence of the androgen level in male baboons on the time of year. Plasma was obtained by centrifugation of the blood at 3000 rpm and the following androgens were determined by radioimmunoassay, using chromatographic separation of the steroids on columns with celite: testosterone, 5s-dihydrotestosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone. Plasma steriod concentrations were calculated and the results were subjected to statistical analysis by Students test. Seasonal change in the concentration of steroids in the animals' blood plasma were discovered. The results of androgen assay throughout the year and determination of their mean annual concentrations are shown

  4. ANABOLIC ANDROGENIC STEROIDS AND ADVERSE EVENTS OF THEIR APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Đukanović

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Anabolic androgenic steroids are synthetic compounds originating from testosterone. Their main effects are the control of development and expression of male secondary sexual characteristics, which are known as androgenic effects, and encourage muscle growth or anabolic effects. Anabolic androgenic steroids are most commonly used illegal substances. Besides these physiological effects, which are achieved using therapeutic doses of these preparations, higher doses than recommended, especially over the longer term, may be associated with the emergence of numerous adverse events. Adverse events may be registered in almost all organs and organ systems, but usually include changes in the reproductive system, skin, liver and cardiovascular system.

  5. Androgenic anabolic steroids also impair right ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasikcioglu, Erdem; Oflaz, Huseyin; Umman, Berrin; Bugra, Zehra

    2009-05-01

    Chronic anabolic steroid use suppresses left ventricular functions. However, there is no information regarding the chronic effects of anabolic steroids on right ventricular function which also plays a key role in global cardiac function. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of androgenic anabolic steroids usage among athletes on remodeling the right part of the heart. Androgenic-anabolic steroids-using bodybuilders had smaller diastolic velocities of both ventricles than drug-free bodybuilders and sedentary counterparts. This study shows that androgenic anabolic steroids-using bodybuilders exhibited depressed diastolic functions of both ventricles.

  6. [Bone and Men's Health. Bone selective androgen receptor modulators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Kazuyuki

    2010-02-01

    Androgen, one of the sex steroid hormones shows various biological activities on the corresponding various tissues. Many efforts to produce novel drug materials maintaining a desired biological activity with an adequate tissue selectivity, which is so-called selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) , are being performed. As one of such efforts, studies on SARMs against bone tissues which possess a significant potential to stimulate a bone formation with reducing undesirable androgenic virilizing activities are in progress all over the world. This review focuses on the research and development activities of such SARMs and discuses their usefulness for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  7. Synthetic peptide antagonists of glucagon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unson, C.G.; Andreu, D.; Gurzenda, E.M.; Merrifield, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Several glucagon analogs were synthesized in an effort to find derivatives that would bind with high affinity to the glucagon receptor of rat liver membranes but would not activate membrane-bound adenylate cyclase and, therefore, would serve as antagonists of the hormone. Measurements on a series of glucagon/secretin hybrids indicated that replacement of Asp 9 in glucagon by Glu 9 , found in secretin, was the important sequence difference in the N terminus of the two hormones. Further deletion of His 1 and introduction of a C-terminal amide resulted in des-His 1 -[Glu 9 ]glucagon amide, which had a 40% binding affinity relative to that of native glucagon but caused no detectable adenylate cyclase activation in the rat liver membrane. This antagonist completely inhibited the effect of a concentration of glucagon that alone gave a full agonist response. It had an inhibition index of 12. The pA 2 was 7.2. An attempt was made to relate conformation with receptor binding. The peptides were synthesized by solid-phase methods and purified to homogeneity by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography on C 18 -silica columns

  8. Multiple roles for UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)2B15 and UGT2B17 enzymes in androgen metabolism and prostate cancer evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier-Landry, Louis; Bélanger, Alain; Barbier, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    In the prostate, approximately 50% of androgens are from adrenal steroids, mainly dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), its sulfate and androstenedione. These compounds are converted first into testosterone, and then into the active hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT). After having activated the androgen receptor (AR), DHT is reduced into androstane-3α-DIOL (3α-DIOL) and androsterone (ADT), which are subsequently converted into 2 inactive and easily excretable metabolites: 3α-DIOL-17glucuronide (3α-DIOL-17G) and ADT-3glucuronide (ADT-3G). The formation of these last derivatives through the glucuronidation reaction involves 2 UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes, namely UGT2B15 and UGT2B17. The present review article aims at providing a comprehensive view of the physiological and pharmacological importance of these 2 enzymes for the control of androgen homeostasis. We will resume: (i) how UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 contribute to androgen elimination; (ii) how their glucuronidation capacity influences the androgen signaling pathway in prostate cells; (iii) how they contribute to the anti-proliferative properties of AR antagonists in prostate cancer cells; and (iv) how AR and its spliced variants regulate the UGT2B15 and/or UGT2B17 genes expression. Finally, whether the unexploited AR-UGT axis could serve as a prognostic maker or a pharmacological target for novel therapeutics in the treatment of prostate cancer is also discussed. This article is part of a special issue entitled 'Essential role of DHEA'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Bailey

    Full Text Available Testosterone (T and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR, cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22. All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact.

  10. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact.

  11. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete’s urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as ‘T-equivalent’ concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact. PMID:26998755

  12. Anabolic androgenic steroid-induced hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Peter; Llewellyn, William; Van Mol, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) have been abused for decades by both professional and amateur athletes in order to improve physical performance or muscle mass. AAS abuse can cause adverse effects, among which are hepatotoxic effects. These effects include cholestatic icterus and possibly peliosis hepatis and hepatocellular carcinoma or adenoma. In particular, 17α-alkylated AAS appear to be hepatotoxic, whereas nonalkylated AAS appear not to be. The 17α-alkyl substitution retards hepatic metabolism of the AAS rendering it orally bioavailable. The mechanism responsible for the hepatotoxicity induced by 17α-alkylated AAS remains poorly understood. However, oxidative stress has been repeatedly shown to be associated with it. In this manuscript we present a hypothesis which describes a potential mechanism responsible for AAS-induced hepatotoxicity, based on several observations from the literature which suggest oxidative stress being a causal factor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Control measures for anabolic androgenic steroid medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Mourelle, Raquel; Carracedo-Martínez, Eduardo; Ces Gens, Eugenio; Cadórniga Valiño, Luis; Álvaro Esteban, Pilar; Pose Reino, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) can cause serious adverse effects when used without a therapeutic purpose. This article aims to show that the AAS are susceptible to being sold on the black market. We also aim to describe how certain limitations on the health inspection services of the Galician health service to pursue these illegal actions prompted a regulatory initiative demanding that additional actions be granted to community pharmacies when dispensing AAS. Four pharmacy inspections detected the diversion of a total of 3118 packages of AAS, which led to the opening of four disciplinary proceedings. In two of these, specialized police forces were called in as there was sufficient evidence of possible diversion to gymnasiums, resulting in a police operation called Operation Fitness. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. ROR-γ drives androgen receptor expression and represents a therapeutic target in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjian; Zou, June X; Xue, Xiaoqian; Cai, Demin; Zhang, Yan; Duan, Zhijian; Xiang, Qiuping; Yang, Joy C; Louie, Maggie C; Borowsky, Alexander D; Gao, Allen C; Evans, Christopher P; Lam, Kit S; Xu, Jianzhen; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Evans, Ronald M; Xu, Yong; Chen, Hong-Wu

    2016-05-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is overexpressed and hyperactivated in human castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, the determinants of AR overexpression in CRPC are poorly defined. Here we show that retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γ (ROR-γ) is overexpressed and amplified in metastatic CRPC tumors, and that ROR-γ drives AR expression in the tumors. ROR-γ recruits nuclear receptor coactivator 1 and 3 (NCOA1 and NCOA3, also known as SRC-1 and SRC-3) to an AR-ROR response element (RORE) to stimulate AR gene transcription. ROR-γ antagonists suppress the expression of both AR and its variant AR-V7 in prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines and tumors. ROR-γ antagonists also markedly diminish genome-wide AR binding, H3K27ac abundance and expression of the AR target gene network. Finally, ROR-γ antagonists suppressed tumor growth in multiple AR-expressing, but not AR-negative, xenograft PCa models, and they effectively sensitized CRPC tumors to enzalutamide, without overt toxicity, in mice. Taken together, these results establish ROR-γ as a key player in CRPC by acting upstream of AR and as a potential therapeutic target for advanced PCa.

  15. Effects of Androgen Ablation on Anti-Tumor Immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kast, W

    2003-01-01

    ... prostate. Castration of mice stimulates B and T lymphopoiesis, thymic and bone marrow hyperplasia. The induction of apoptotic cell death following androgen ablation is accompanied by an inflammatory infiltrate comprised predominantly of activated T cells...

  16. Multiple arterial thromboses associated with anabolic androgenic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Neil Arthur; Abbas, Jonathan Raihan; Simms, Malcolm Harold

    2014-03-01

    The use of supraphysiological doses of anabolic androgenic steroids can have serious side effects. This article reports the case of a young man who suffered potentially life-threatening arterial thromboses following the use of these drugs.

  17. Androgen Receptor Splice Variants and Resistance to Taxane Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    report. Inventions, patent applications, and/or licenses Nothing to report. Others Nothing to report. 7. Participants & Other... Brand LJ et al: Androgen receptor splice variants mediate enzalutamide resistance in castration-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Cancer Res

  18. Regulation of Androgen Responses in Prostate Cancer by BAG-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reed, John

    2001-01-01

    .... However, nearly all tumors eventually relapse as hormone-refractory disease. A need therefore exists for better understanding of the mechanisms that allow prostate cancer cells to grow in an androgen - independent manner...

  19. Regulation of Androgen Responses in Prostate Cancer by BAG-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reed, John

    1999-01-01

    .... However, nearly all tumors eventually relapse as hormone- refractory disease. A need therefore exists for better understanding of the mechanisms that allow prostate cancer cells to grow in an androgen - independent manner...

  20. Performance of the Androgen Deficiency in Aging Male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    failure, chronic liver disease, chronic renal failure, tuberculosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and malignancy. Relevant socio- demographic and diabetes-related information were documented. Clinical evaluation of androgen deficiency. Participants completed the original ...

  1. Male osteoporosis and androgenic therapy: from testosterone to SARMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilotti, Antonio; Falchetti, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    As in the women, male osteoporosis represents an important social problem, amplified by the increasing life expectance.Differently from women, 50% of male osteoporosis is secondary to treatments and/or diseases that make mandatory their search through an accurate clinical investigations in every newly diagnosed osteoporotic men. Male osteoporosis is frequently underdiagnosed and consequently undertreated, and too often it is revealed only after the occurrence of a fragility fracture. Androgens may prevent the loss of cancellous bone and stimulate periosteal cortical bone apposition. The anabolic effect of testosterone on both bone and muscle, is limited by the high incidence of androgenic side effects. Hypogonadism is the only situation where the benefits of the use of testosterone formulations exceed the side effects. Selective androgen receptor modulators can dissociate androgenic and anabolic effect on different tissues with various strategies. Many compounds have been studied with positive results in vivo and in clinical trials.

  2. Vocal cues to male androgen levels in giant pandas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Benjamin D; Keating, Jennifer L; Kersey, David; Rengui, Li; Huang, Yan; Swaisgood, Ronald R

    2011-02-23

    Little is known about the potential of non-human mammal vocalizations to signal information on the hormonal status of the caller. In the current study, we used endocrine data and acoustic analyses to determine whether male giant panda bleats provide reliable information about the caller's current androgen levels. Our results revealed significant relationships between acoustic features of male giant panda bleats and the caller's faecal androgen metabolite concentrations. To our knowledge, this constitutes the first demonstration that the acoustic structure of a non-human mammal call has the potential to yield information about the caller's current androgen levels. We go on to discuss the anatomical basis for our findings and the potential functional relevance of signalling information on male androgen levels in giant panda sexual communication.

  3. Molecular analysis of the androgen-receptor gene in a family with receptor-positive partial androgen insensitivity: an unusual type of intronic mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); A.L.M. Boehmer (Annemie); S. Ramnarain; M.C. Verleun-Mooijman; D.P.E. Satijn (David); J. Trapman (Jan); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn the coding part and the intron-exon boundaries of the androgen-receptor gene of a patient with partial androgen insensitivity, no mutation was found. The androgen receptor of this patient displayed normal ligand-binding parameters and migrated as a

  4. Impact of Early Postnatal Androgen Exposure on Voice Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisa, Leila; Leonel, Maria L.; Gonçalves, Maria I. R.; Pletsch, Francisco; Sade, Elis R.; Custódio, Gislaine; Zagonel, Ivete P. S.; Longui, Carlos A.; Figueiredo, Bonald C.

    2012-01-01

    Background The impact of early postnatal androgen exposure on female laryngeal tissue may depend on certain characteristics of this exposure. We assessed the impact of the dose, duration, and timing of early androgen exposure on the vocal development of female subjects who had been treated for adrenocortical tumor (ACT) in childhood. Methods The long-term effects of androgen exposure on the fundamental vocal frequency (F0), vocal pitch, and final height and the presence of virilizing signs were examined in 9 adult (age, 18.4 to 33.5 years) and 10 adolescent (13.6 to 17.8 years) female ACT patients. We also compared the current values with values obtained 0.9 years to 7.4 years after these subjects had undergone ACT surgery, a period during which they had shown normal androgen levels. Results Of the 19 subjects, 17 (89%) had been diagnosed with ACT before 4 years of age, 1 (5%) at 8.16 years, and 1 (5%) at 10.75 years. Androgen exposure (2 to 30 months) was sufficiently strong to cause pubic hair growth in all subjects and clitoromegaly in 74% (14/19) of the subjects, but did not reduce their height from the target value. Although androgen exposure induced a remarkable reduction in F0 (132 Hz) and moderate pitch virilization in 1 subject and partial F0 virilization, resulting in F0 of 165 and 169 Hz, in 2 subjects, the majority had normal F0 ranging from 189 to 245 Hz. Conclusions Female laryngeal tissue is less sensitive to androgen exposure between birth and adrenarche than during other periods. Differential larynx sensitivity to androgen exposure in childhood and F0 irreversibility in adulthood are age-, concentration-, duration-, and timing-dependent events that may also be affected by exposure to inhibitory or stimulatory hormones. Further studies are required to better characterize each of these factors. PMID:23284635

  5. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Iaquinto, G; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World today. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World today. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  6. Androgen receptor and histone lysine demethylases in ovine placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellane R Cleys

    Full Text Available Sex steroid hormones regulate developmental programming in many tissues, including programming gene expression during prenatal development. While estradiol is known to regulate placentation, little is known about the role of testosterone and androgen signaling in placental development despite the fact that testosterone rises in maternal circulation during pregnancy and in placenta-induced pregnancy disorders. We investigated the role of testosterone in placental gene expression, and focused on androgen receptor (AR. Prenatal androgenization decreased global DNA methylation in gestational day 90 placentomes, and increased placental expression of AR as well as genes involved in epigenetic regulation, angiogenesis, and growth. As AR complexes with histone lysine demethylases (KDMs to regulate AR target genes in human cancers, we also investigated if the same mechanism is present in the ovine placenta. AR co-immunoprecipitated with KDM1A and KDM4D in sheep placentomes, and AR-KDM1A complexes were recruited to a half-site for androgen response element (ARE in the promoter region of VEGFA. Androgenized ewes also had increased cotyledonary VEGFA. Finally, in human first trimester placental samples KDM1A and KDM4D immunolocalized to the syncytiotrophoblast, with nuclear KDM1A and KDM4D immunostaining also present in the villous stroma. In conclusion, placental androgen signaling, possibly through AR-KDM complex recruitment to AREs, regulates placental VEGFA expression. AR and KDMs are also present in first trimester human placenta. Androgens appear to be an important regulator of trophoblast differentiation and placental development, and aberrant androgen signaling may contribute to the development of placental disorders.

  7. Aberrant AR Signaling as a Function of Declining Androgen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Ser 133) obtained from the American Type Culture Collection located within a transcriptionally critical region called G\\’lanassas, VA, USA) and grown...p300 and its activation via the PIKA pathway. cells toward androgen independence with respect to Western blot data indicated that CREB phosphorylation...presence of obtained from the American Type Culture Collection (Manassas, V.A) and dihydrotestosterone after androgen receptor knock-down. We C4-2B

  8. Nonsteroidal Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators Enhance Female Sexual Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Amanda; Hwang, Dong Jin; Duke, Charles B.; He, Yali; Siddam, Anjaiah; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2010-01-01

    Women experience a decline in estrogen and androgen levels after natural or surgically induced menopause, effects that are associated with a loss of sexual desire and bone mineral density. Studies in our laboratories have shown the beneficial effects of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) in the treatment of osteoporosis and muscle wasting in animal models. A series of S-3-(phenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-cyano-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-propionamide analogs was synthesized to eval...

  9. Selective androgen receptor modulators in preclinical and clinical development

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Mohler, Michael L.; Bohl, Casey E.; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2008-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the function of several organs including primary and accessory sexual organs, skeletal muscle, and bone, making it a desirable therapeutic target. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) bind to the AR and demonstrate osteo- and myo-anabolic activity; however, unlike testosterone and other anabolic steroids, these nonsteroidal agents produce less of a growth effect on prostate and other secondary sexual organs. SARMs provide therapeutic o...

  10. Estrogens and Androgens in Skeletal Physiology and Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Maria; Laurent, Michaël R.; Dubois, Vanessa; Claessens, Frank; O'Brien, Charles A.; Bouillon, Roger; Vanderschueren, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens and androgens influence the growth and maintenance of the mammalian skeleton and are responsible for its sexual dimorphism. Estrogen deficiency at menopause or loss of both estrogens and androgens in elderly men contribute to the development of osteoporosis, one of the most common and impactful metabolic diseases of old age. In the last 20 years, basic and clinical research advances, genetic insights from humans and rodents, and newer imaging technologies have changed considerably the landscape of our understanding of bone biology as well as the relationship between sex steroids and the physiology and pathophysiology of bone metabolism. Together with the appreciation of the side effects of estrogen-related therapies on breast cancer and cardiovascular diseases, these advances have also drastically altered the treatment of osteoporosis. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of action of estrogens and androgens on bone, their influences on skeletal homeostasis during growth and adulthood, the pathogenetic mechanisms of the adverse effects of their deficiency on the female and male skeleton, as well as the role of natural and synthetic estrogenic or androgenic compounds in the pharmacotherapy of osteoporosis. We highlight latest advances on the crosstalk between hormonal and mechanical signals, the relevance of the antioxidant properties of estrogens and androgens, the difference of their cellular targets in different bone envelopes, the role of estrogen deficiency in male osteoporosis, and the contribution of estrogen or androgen deficiency to the monomorphic effects of aging on skeletal involution. PMID:27807202

  11. Anabolic-androgenic steroid increases running endurance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zyl, C G; Noakes, T D; Lambert, M I

    1995-10-01

    The study was designed to determine whether treatment with an anabolic-androgenic steroid enhances running performance in rats by increasing their freely chosen training distance. Forty male Long-Evans rats were randomly divided into either a sedentary control group or an exercising group caged in specially designed running wheels in which the rats were able to run spontaneously. After 4 wk, both groups were further subdivided into two groups receiving either 0.5-mg Durabolin (nandrolone phenylpropionate) (im) or 0.5-mg saline, every second day. After 8 wk, running distance was similar in both exercising groups. Rats receiving the anabolic-androgenic steroid ran 41% longer during the test of submaximal running endurance compared to the trained rats receiving saline (P sedentary rats receiving the anabolic-androgenic steroid. After 4 wk of training, the maximal sprinting speed increased by 29% in trained rats. There was no further increase in maximal sprinting speed after an additional 4 wk of training and treatment with either anabolic-androgenic steroid or saline treatment. Therefore, rats that train spontaneously while being treated with an anabolic-androgenic steroid had increased submaximal running endurance compared with trained rats treated with saline, despite the similar voluntary training distance and skeletal muscle oxidative capacity between the two groups. The mechanism by which treatment with an anabolic-androgenic steroid, combined with training, enhances submaximal running performance could not be identified and needs to be addressed in future studies.

  12. Female adipocyte androgen synthesis and the effects of insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cadagan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders characterized by insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia, and its presence can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease significantly. The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased circulating androgen levels in women, which may originate from the ovaries and adrenal glands. Adipocytes are also able to synthesise steroid hormones, and this output has been hypothesised to increase with elevated insulin plasma concentrations. However, the contribution of the adipocytes to the circulating androgen levels in women with metabolic syndrome is limited and the effects of insulin are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of steroid precursors and synthetic enzymes in human adipocyte biopsies as markers of possible adipocyte androgen synthesis. We examined pre and mature adipocytes taken from tissue biopsies of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue of participating women from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, of the Royal Derby Hospital. The results showed the potential for localised adipocyte androgen synthesis through the presence of the androgen precursor progesterone, as well as the steroid-converting enzyme 17α-hydroxylase. Furthermore, we found the controlled secretion of androstenedione in vitro and that insulin treatment caused levels to increase. Continued examination of a localised source of androgen production is therefore of clinical relevance due to its influence on adipocyte metabolism, its negative impact on female steroidogenic homeostasis, and the possible aggravation this may have when associated to obesity and obesity related metabolic abnormalities such as hyperinsulinaemia.

  13. Enhanced evaluation of selective androgen receptor modulators in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto-Duessel, M; He, M; Adamson, T W; Jones, J O

    2013-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a class of drugs that control the activity of the androgen receptor (AR), which mediates the response to androgens, in a tissue-selective fashion. They are specifically designed to reduce the possible complications that result from the systemic inhibition or activation of AR in patients with diseases that involve androgen signalling. However, there are no ideal in vivo models for evaluating candidate SARMs. Therefore, we created a panel of androgen-responsive genes in clinically relevant AR expressing tissues including prostate, skin, bone, fat, muscle, brain and kidney. We used select genes from this panel to compare transcriptional changes in response to the full agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and the SARM bolandiol at 16 h and 6 weeks. We identified several genes in each tissue whose expression at each of these time points correlates with the known tissue-specific effects of these compounds. For example, in the prostate we found four genes whose expression was much lower in animals treated with bolandiol compared with animals treated with DHT for 6 weeks, which correlated well with differences in prostate weight. We demonstrate that adding molecular measurements (androgen-regulated gene expression) to the traditional physiological measurements (tissue weights, etc.) makes the evaluation of potential SARMs more accurate, thorough and perhaps more rapid by allowing measurement of selectivity after only 16 h of drug treatment. © 2012 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  14. Hormone Treatment and Muscle Anabolism during Aging: Androgens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, E. Lichar; Durham, William J.; Urban, Randall J.; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda

    2010-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual decline in circulating testosterone concentrations and decreased musculature in men. While testosterone administration is often considered when symptoms of hypogonadism are presented, the long-term effects of androgen use on muscle physiology are not yet fully understood. The definition of hypogonadism in men remains obscure but is generally indicated by total testosterone concentrations less than a threshold value of 300-500 ng/dL. Androgen replacement therapy is generally safe in men and women with low endogenous testosterone concentrations. The development of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may provide additional options in treatment of hypogonadism while lowering the potential of side effects often associated with long-term androgen use. Androgen administration, either alone or in combination with other treatments, can be successful in improving muscle mass by increasing protein anabolism and reducing protein catabolism in men and women. Further research is necessary to optimize the anabolic and anticatabolic properties of androgens for treatment and prevention of muscle loss in men and women. PMID:20452103

  15. Further Evaluation of Androgen Therapy In Aplastic Anemia: With Special Reference to Correlation Between Response to Androgen and EEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whang, Kee Suk

    1967-01-01

    Patients with aplastic anemia were treated with a combination of depo-testosterone cyclopentylpropionate (Upjohn) and dexamethasone. In 7 of 15 patients treated, there was response in which either a significant increase in hemoglobin concentration, a prolonged interval or a cessation of blood transfusion requirement developed during androgen therapy. Younger patients with cellular marrow appeared to be better responding to androgen. EEI (Effective Erythropoietic Index) formulated by Gardner and Nathan (1966) which was a helpful measurement as to whether patients with myelofibrosis would response to androgen, was evaluated in patients with aplastic anemia. It was concluded that EEI as well as ferrokinetics indices (Plasma- 59 Fe-disappearance rate, RBC 59 Fe net incorporation) did not significantly correlate with the degree of response to androgen in aplastic anemia.

  16. New antagonist agents of neuropeptide y receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Aldana

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In the CNS, NPY has been implicated in obesity and feeding, endocrine function and metabolism. Potent and selective rNPY antagonists will be able to probe the merits of this approach for the treatment of obesity. We report the synthesis and preliminary evaluation of some hydrazide derivatives as antagonists of rNPY.

  17. Prenatal androgen excess enhances stimulation of the GNRH pulse in pubertal female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaonan; Yuan, Chun; Zhao, Nannan; Cui, Yugui; Liu, Jiayin

    2014-07-01

    In adolescent girls with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), neuroendocrine derangements manifest after the onset of puberty, characterized by rapid LH pulse frequency. The early mechanism underlying the pubertal regulation of the GNRH/LH pulsatile release in adolescents with PCOS remains uncertain. To determine the effects of prenatal androgen exposure on the activation of GNRH neurons and generation of LH pulse at puberty, we administrated 5α-dihydrotestosterone to pregnant rats and observed serum LH levels and expression of hypothalamic genes in female offspring from postnatal 4 to 8 weeks. The 6-week-old prenatally androgenized (PNA) female rats exhibited an increase in LH pulse frequency. The hypothalamic expression of neurokinin B (Nkb (Tac2)) and Lepr mRNA levels in PNA rats increased remarkably before puberty and remained high during puberty, whereas elevated Kiss1 mRNA levels were detected only after the onset of puberty. Exogenous kisspeptin, NK3R agonist, and leptin triggered tonic stimulation of GNRH neurons and increased LH secretion in 6-week-old PNA rats. Leptin upregulated Kiss1 mRNA levels in the hypothalamus of pubertal PNA rats; however, pretreatment with a kisspeptin antagonist failed to suppress the elevated serum LH stimulated by leptin, indicating that the stimulatory effects of leptin may be conveyed indirectly to GNRH neurons via other neural components within the GNRH neuronal network, rather than through the kisspeptin-GPR54 pathway. These findings validate the hypotheses that NKB and leptin play an essential role in the activation of GNRH neurons and initiation of increased LH pulse frequency in PNA female rats at puberty and that kisspeptin may coordinate their stimulatory effects on LH release. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  18. Treatment of Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Dependence: Emerging Evidence and Its Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanayama, Gen; Brower, Kirk J.; Wood, Ruth I.; Hudson, James I.; Pope, Harrison G.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, few users of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) seek substance-abuse treatment. But this picture may soon change substantially, because illicit AAS use did not become widespread until the 1980s, and consequently the older members of this AAS-using population—those who initiated AAS as youths in the 1980s—are only now reaching middle age. Members of this group, especially those who have developed AAS dependence, may therefore be entering the age of risk for cardiac and psychoneuroendocrine complications sufficient to motivate them for substance-abuse treatment. We suggest that this treatment should address at least three etiologic mechanisms by which AAS dependence might develop. First, individuals with body-image disorders such as “muscle dysmorphia” may become dependent on AAS for their anabolic effects; these body-image disorders may respond to psychological therapies or pharmacologic treatments. Second, AAS suppress the male hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis via their androgenic effects, potentially causing hypogonadism during AAS withdrawal. Men experiencing prolonged dysphoric effects or frank major depression from hypogonadism may desire to resume AAS, thus contributing to AAS dependence. AAS-induced hypogonadism may require treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin or clomiphene to reactivate neuroendocrine function, and may necessitate antidepressant treatments in cases of depression inadequately responsive to endocrine therapies alone. Third, human and animal evidence indicates that AAS also possess hedonic effects, which likely promote dependence via mechanisms shared with classical addictive drugs, especially opioids. Indeed, the opioid antagonist naltrexone blocks AAS dependence in animals. By inference, pharmacological and psychosocial treatments for human opioid dependence might also benefit AAS-dependent individuals. PMID:20188494

  19. Treatment of anabolic-androgenic steroid dependence: Emerging evidence and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanayama, Gen; Brower, Kirk J; Wood, Ruth I; Hudson, James I; Pope, Harrison G

    2010-06-01

    Currently, few users of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) seek substance abuse treatment. But this picture may soon change substantially, because illicit AAS use did not become widespread until the 1980s, and consequently the older members of this AAS-using population - those who initiated AAS as youths in the 1980s - are only now reaching middle age. Members of this group, especially those who have developed AAS dependence, may therefore be entering the age of risk for cardiac and psychoneuroendocrine complications sufficient to motivate them for substance abuse treatment. We suggest that this treatment should address at least three etiologic mechanisms by which AAS dependence might develop. First, individuals with body image disorders such as "muscle dysmorphia" may become dependent on AAS for their anabolic effects; these body image disorders may respond to psychological therapies or pharmacological treatments. Second, AAS suppress the male hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis via their androgenic effects, potentially causing hypogonadism during AAS withdrawal. Men experiencing prolonged dysphoric effects or frank major depression from hypogonadism may desire to resume AAS, thus contributing to AAS dependence. AAS-induced hypogonadism may require treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin or clomiphene to reactivate neuroendocrine function, and may necessitate antidepressant treatments in cases of depression inadequately responsive to endocrine therapies alone. Third, human and animal evidence indicates that AAS also possess hedonic effects, which likely promote dependence via mechanisms shared with classical addictive drugs, especially opioids. Indeed, the opioid antagonist naltrexone blocks AAS dependence in animals. By inference, pharmacological and psychosocial treatments for human opioid dependence might also benefit AAS-dependent individuals. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Long-term Effects Of Perinatal Androgenization On Reproductive Parameters Of Male Rat Offspring Androgenization And Male Rat Reproduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, M T; Perobelli, J E; Sanabria, M; Anselmo-Franci, J A; Kempinas, W De Grava

    2015-01-01

    It is known that during sex differentiation, fetal androgens are critical determinants of the male phenotype. Although testosterone is necessary for normal development of male sexual behavior, perinatal androgen treatment can result in disruption of normal male sexual reproduction. Pregnant Wistar rats were administered either corn oil (vehicle) or testosterone propionate at 0.2 mg/kg from gestational day 12 until the end of lactation and the reproductive function of male off spring was evalu...

  1. S179D prolactin: antagonistic agony!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ameae M

    2007-09-30

    The aims of this review are three-fold: first, to collate what is known about the production and activities of phosphorylated prolactin (PRL), the latter largely, but not exclusively, as illustrated through the use of the molecular mimic, S179D PRL; second, to apply this and related knowledge to produce an updated model of prolactin-receptor interactions that may apply to other members of this cytokine super-family; and third, to promote a shift in the current paradigm for the development of clinically important growth antagonists. This third aim explains the title since, based on results with S179D PRL, it is proposed that agents which signal to antagonistic ends may be better therapeutics than pure antagonists-hence antagonistic agony. Since S179D PRL is not a pure antagonist, we have proposed the term selective prolactin receptor modulator (SPeRM) for this and like molecules.

  2. [Extracorporeal life support in calcium antagonist intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, M W; Grewal, S; Meeder, H J; van Thiel, R J; den Uil, C A

    2017-01-01

    Intoxication with calcium antagonists is associated with poor outcome. Even mild calcium antagonist overdose may be fatal. A 51-year-old woman and a 51-year-old man came to the Accident and Emergency Department in severe shock after they had taken a calcium antagonist overdose. After extensive medicinal therapy had failed, they both needed extracorporeal life support (ECLS) as a bridge to recovery. In severe calcium antagonist overdose, the combination of vasoplegia and cardiac failure leads to refractory shock. ECLS temporarily supports the circulation and maintains organ perfusion. In this way ECLS functions as a bridge to recovery and may possibly save lives. Timely consultation with and referral to an ECLS centre is recommended in patients with calcium antagonist overdose.

  3. P-glycoprotein increases the efflux of the androgen dihydrotestosterone and reduces androgen responsive gene activity in prostate tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoruk, Matthew N; Giménez-Bonafé, Pepita; Guns, Emma S; Mayer, Lawrence D; Nelson, Colleen C

    2004-04-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is commonly associated with multi-drug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells and the efflux of a broad spectrum of chemicals from the cell, including many chemotherapeutics and certain steroid hormones. The impact of P-gp and mechanisms involved in androgen transport and cellular accumulation within normal and malignant prostate cells remains unclear. Following incubation of LNCaP, PC-3, HeLa, and HeLa FLAG-androgen receptor (AR) cells with (3)H-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) alone and in combination with P-gp inhibitors, PSC-833 and verapamil, we examined the cellular accumulation and efflux of androgens, as well as gene transcriptional response. Our data reveal that the cellular transport and accumulation of DHT is dependent on the expression of functional AR and modulated by P-gp. P-gp over-expression by both transient transfection and aspirin treatment in LNCaP cells showed decreased intracellular DHT accumulation, further suggesting DHT efflux is P-gp regulated. Androgen responsiveness may be modulated by P-gp in prostate cancer cells. The biological consequences of increased P-gp expression are decreased androgen accumulation and a corresponding decrease in androgen-regulated transcriptional activity and PSA gene expression. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Androgen-Sensitized Apoptosis of HPr-1AR Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congcong Chen

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR signaling is crucial to the development and homeostasis of the prostate gland, and its dysregulation mediates common prostate pathologies. The mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells have been investigated in human and rodent adult prostate. However, the cellular stress response of human prostate epithelial cells is not well understood, though it is central to prostate health and pathology. Here, we report that androgen sensitizes HPr-1AR and RWPE-AR human prostate epithelial cells to cell stress agents and apoptotic cell death. Although 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT treatment alone did not induce cell death, co-treatment of HPr-1AR cells with DHT and an apoptosis inducer, such as staurosporine (STS, TNFt, or hydrogen peroxide, synergistically increased cell death in comparison to treatment with each apoptosis inducer by itself. We found that the synergy between DHT and apoptosis inducer led to activation of the intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is supported by robust cleavage activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Further, the dramatic depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential that we observed upon co-treatment with DHT and STS is consistent with increased mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP in the pro-apoptotic mechanism. Interestingly, the synergy between DHT and apoptosis inducer was abolished by AR antagonists and inhibitors of transcription and protein synthesis, suggesting that AR mediates pro-apoptotic synergy through transcriptional regulation of MOMP genes. Expression analysis revealed that pro-apoptotic genes (BCL2L11/BIM and AIFM2 were DHT-induced, whereas pro-survival genes (BCL2L1/BCL-XL and MCL1 were DHT-repressed. Hence, we propose that the net effect of these AR-mediated expression changes shifts the balance of BCL2-family proteins

  5. Opioid antagonists for alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösner, Susanne; Hackl-Herrwerth, Andrea; Leucht, Stefan; Vecchi, Simona; Srisurapanont, Manit; Soyka, Michael

    2010-12-08

    Alcohol dependence belongs to the globally leading health risk factors. Therapeutic success of psychosocial programs for relapse prevention is moderate and could be increased by an adjuvant treatment with the opioid antagonists naltrexone and nalmefene. To determine the effectiveness and tolerability of opioid antagonists in the treatment of alcohol dependence. We searched the Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group (CDAG) Specialized Register, PubMed, EMBASE and CINAHL in January 2010 and inquired manufacturers and researchers for unpublished trials. All double-blind randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which compare the effects of naltrexone or nalmefene with placebo or active control on drinking-related outcomes. Two authors independently extracted outcome data. Trial quality was assessed by one author and cross-checked by a second author. Based on a total of 50 RCTs with 7793 patients, naltrexone reduced the risk of heavy drinking to 83% of the risk in the placebo group RR 0.83 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.90) and decreased drinking days by about 4%, MD -3.89 (95% CI -5.75 to -2.04). Significant effects were also demonstrated for the secondary outcomes of the review including heavy drinking days, MD - 3.25 (95% CI -5.51 to -0.99), consumed amount of alcohol, MD - 10.83 (95% CI -19.69 to -1.97) and gamma-glutamyltransferase, MD - 10.37 (95% CI -18.99 to -1.75), while effects on return to any drinking, RR 0.96 (95 CI 0.92 to 1.00) missed statistical significance. Side effects of naltrexone were mainly gastrointestinal problems (e.g. nausea: RD 0.10; 95% CI 0.07 to 0.13) and sedative effects (e.g. daytime sleepiness: RD 0.09; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.14). Based on a limited study sample, effects of injectable naltrexone and nalmefene missed statistical significance. Effects of industry-sponsored studies, RR 0.90 (95% CI 0.78 to 1.05) did not significantly differ from those of non-profit funded trials, RR 0.84 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.91) and the linear regression test did not indicate publication

  6. Androgen receptor function links human sexual dimorphism to DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Ammerpohl

    Full Text Available Sex differences are well known to be determinants of development, health and disease. Epigenetic mechanisms are also known to differ between men and women through X-inactivation in females. We hypothesized that epigenetic sex differences may also result from sex hormone functions, in particular from long-lasting androgen programming. We aimed at investigating whether inactivation of the androgen receptor, the key regulator of normal male sex development, is associated with differences of the patterns of DNA methylation marks in genital tissues. To this end, we performed large scale array-based analysis of gene methylation profiles on genomic DNA from labioscrotal skin fibroblasts of 8 males and 26 individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS due to inactivating androgen receptor gene mutations. By this approach we identified differential methylation of 167 CpG loci representing 162 unique human genes. These were significantly enriched for androgen target genes and low CpG content promoter genes. Additional 75 genes showed a significant increase of heterogeneity of methylation in AIS compared to a high homogeneity in normal male controls. Our data show that normal and aberrant androgen receptor function is associated with distinct patterns of DNA-methylation marks in genital tissues. These findings support the concept that transcription factor binding to the DNA has an impact on the shape of the DNA methylome. These data which derived from a rare human model suggest that androgen programming of methylation marks contributes to sexual dimorphism in the human which might have considerable impact on the manifestation of sex-associated phenotypes and diseases.

  7. PXR antagonists and implication in drug metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Sridhar; Dou, Wei; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Adopted orphan nuclear receptor (NR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), plays a central role in the regulation of xeno- and endobiotic metabolism. Since the discovery of the functional role of PXR in 1998, there is evolving evidence for the role of PXR agonists in abrogating metabolic pathophysiology (e.g., cholestasis, hypercholesterolemia, and inflammation). However, more recently, it is clear that PXR is also an important mediator of adverse xeno- (e.g., enhances acetaminophen toxicity) and endobiotic (e.g., hepatic steatosis) metabolic phenotypes. Moreover, in cancer therapeutics, PXR activation can induce drug resistance, and there is growing evidence for tissue-specific enhancement of the malignant phenotype. Thus, in these instances, there may be a role for PXR antagonists. However, as opposed to the discovery efforts for PXR agonists, there are only a few antagonists described. The mode of action of these antagonists (e.g., sulforaphane) remains less clear. Our laboratory efforts have focused on this question. Since the original discovery of azoles analogs as PXR antagonists, we have preliminarily defined an important PXR antagonist pharmacophore and developed less-toxic PXR antagonists. In this review, we describe our published and unpublished findings on recent structure-function studies involving the azole chemical scaffold. Further work in the future is needed to fully define potent, more-selective PXR antagonists that may be useful in clinical application. PMID:23330542

  8. Comparison of antiandrogenic activities of vinclozolin and D,L-camphorquinone in androgen receptor gene transcription assay in vitro and mouse in utero exposure assay in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Michiya; Kodaira, Kazuhisa; Kenichi, Hino; Ishimoto, Yoichi; Tamura, Hiroto; Iguchi, Taisen

    2002-05-24

    A chemical substance used as a photoinitiator for light-cure resin compositions, D,L-camphorquinone (CQN) was found to be weakly antiandrogenic in vitro. It competitively antagonized dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced transcriptional activity on the yeast-based androgen receptor gene transcription assay (YAA). Antiandrogenic activity of CQN was shown at higher concentration than 10(-4) M while the well-known antiandrogen, vinclozolin (VCZ) showed the activity at concentrations of 10(-6) M and above in YAA. The antiandrogenic activity of CQN was reconfirmed in the human cell line-based androgen receptor gene transcription assay (HCAA). To determine whether CQN affect male reproductive development, CQN or VCZ was administered to pregnant mice daily from gestational days 10 to 18 by gavage. In utero exposure to VCZ at 100 mg/kg/day caused a significant decrease in anogenital distance (AGD) of F1 neonates and reduced spermatogenesis in F1 males at 42 days of age. In contrast, maternal doses (100 and 300 mg/kg/day) of CQN had no affect on these endpoints in F1 offspring. Further, VCZ or CQN had no adverse affect on F1 male fertility. From these observations, CQN is potentially antagonistic to androgen receptor (AR) in vitro, but is estimated to be less antiandrogenic in vivo when it is administered to pregnant mice by gavage. Furthermore, these findings are the first to demonstrate that VCZ exerts significant antiandrogenic effects on reproductive tract development during gestation in mice.

  9. Androgen receptor-mediated regulation of the anti-atherogenic enzyme CYP27A1 involves the JNK/c-jun pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlin, Maria; Pettersson, Hanna; Tang, Wanjin; Wikvall, Kjell

    2011-02-15

    CYP27A1, an enzyme with several important roles in cholesterol homeostasis and vitamin D₃ metabolism, has been ascribed anti-atherogenic properties. This study addresses an important problem regarding how this enzyme, involved in cholesterol metabolism in the liver and peripheral tissues, is regulated. Our results identify the human CYP27A1 gene as a new target for the JNK/c-jun pathway. Initial experiments showed that an inhibitor of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) downregulated basal CYP27A1 promoter activity whereas overexpression of JNK slightly enhanced promoter activity. Androgen receptor (AR)-mediated upregulation of mRNA levels and endogenous enzyme activity was recently reported. In the present study, the AR antagonist nilutamide blocked the androgen induction of CYP27A1. The present data revealed that inhibition of the JNK/c-jun pathway abolishes the AR-mediated effect on CYP27A1 transcription and enzyme activity, whereas overexpression of JNK markedly increased androgenic upregulation of CYP27A1. In conclusion, the current results indicate involvement of the JNK/c-jun pathway in AR-mediated upregulation of human CYP27A1. The link to JNK signaling is interesting since inflammatory processes may upregulate CYP27A1 to clear cholesterol from peripheral tissues. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Review of Androgenic Anabolic Steroid Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Borges; G. Eisele; C. Byrd

    2001-07-31

    An area that has been overlooked within personnel security evaluations is employee use of androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS). Current drug testing within the federal government does not include testing for anabolic steroids, and the difficulties to implement such testing protocols-not to mention the cost involved-make AAS testing highly improbable. The basis of this report is to bring to the forefront the damage that anabolic steroids can cause from both a physical and a psychological standpoint. Most individuals who use AASs do so to increase their muscle mass because they wish to gain some type of competitive edge during athletic competition or they wish to enhance their physical features for self-satisfaction and self-esteem (i.e., body building). Security officers are one group of men who often take high doses of anabolic steroids, according to the Second Report of the Senate Standing Committee (1990). The negative psychological characteristics for AAS use is extensive and includes prominent hostility, aggressiveness, irritability, euphoria, grandiose beliefs, hyperactivity, reckless behavior, increased sexual appetite, unpredictability, poor impulse control, mood fluctuations, and insomnia. The drug may invoke a sense of power and invincibility (Leckman and Scahill, 1990). Depressive symptoms, such as anhedonia, fatigue, impaired concentration, decreased libido, and even suicidality (Pope and Katz, 1992) have been noted with steroid withdrawal. It appears that long-term users of AAS experience similar characteristics as other substance abusers (i.e., craving, dependence, and withdrawal symptoms).

  11. Illicit Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanayama, Gen; Hudson, James I.; Pope, Harrison G.

    2009-01-01

    The anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are a family of hormones that includes testosterone and its derivatives. These substances have been used by elite athletes since the 1950s, but they did not become widespread drugs of abuse in the general population until the 1980s. Thus, knowledge of the medical and behavioral effects of illicit AAS use is still evolving. Surveys suggest that many millions of boys and men, primarily in Western countries, have abused AAS to enhance athletic performance or personal appearance. AAS use among girls and women is much less common. Taken in supraphysiologic doses, AAS show various long-term adverse medical effects, especially cardiovascular toxicity. Behavioral effects of AAS include hypomanic or manic symptoms, sometimes accompanied by aggression or violence, which usually occur while taking AAS, and depressive symptoms occurring during AAS withdrawal. However, these symptoms are idiosyncratic and afflict only a minority of illicit users; the mechanism of these idiosyncratic responses remains unclear. AAS users may also ingest a range of other illicit drugs, including both “body-image” drugs to enhance physical appearance or performance, and classical drugs of abuse. In particular, AAS users appear particularly prone to opioid use. There may well be a biological basis for this association, since both human and animal data suggest that AAS and opioids may share similar brain mechanisms. Finally, AAS may cause a dependence syndrome in a substantial minority of users. AAS dependence may pose a growing public health problem in future years, but remains little studied. PMID:19769977

  12. Mass spectrometry of selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2008-07-01

    Nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are an emerging class of drugs for treatment of various diseases including osteoporosis and muscle wasting as well as the correction of age-related functional decline such as muscle strength and power. Several SARMs, which have advanced to preclinical and clinical trials, are composed of diverse chemical structures including arylpropionamide-, bicyclic hydantoin-, quinoline-, and tetrahydroquinoline-derived nuclei. Since January 2008, SARMs have been categorized as anabolic agents and prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Suitable detection methods for these low-molecular weight drugs were based on mass spectrometric approaches, which necessitated the elucidation of dissociation pathways in order to characterize and identify the target analytes in doping control samples as well as potential metabolic products and synthetic analogs. Fragmentation patterns of representatives of each category of SARMs after electrospray ionization (ESI) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) as well as electron ionization (EI) are summarized. The complexity and structural heterogeneity of these drugs is a daunting challenge for detection methods. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Refinement of the androgen response element based on ChIP-Seq in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Qi, Jianfei; Filipp, Fabian V

    2016-09-14

    Sequence motifs are short, recurring patterns in DNA that can mediate sequence-specific binding for proteins such as transcription factors or DNA modifying enzymes. The androgen response element (ARE) is a palindromic, dihexameric motif present in promoters or enhancers of genes targeted by the androgen receptor (AR). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) we refined AR-binding and AREs at a genome-scale in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines. Model-based searches identified more than 120,000 ChIP-Seq motifs allowing for expansion and refinement of the ARE. We classified AREs according to their degeneracy and their transcriptional involvement. Additionally, we quantified ARE utilization in response to somatic copy number amplifications, AR splice-variants, and steroid treatment. Although imperfect AREs make up 99.9% of the motifs, the degree of degeneracy correlates negatively with validated transcriptional outcome. Weaker AREs, particularly ARE half sites, benefit from neighboring motifs or cooperating transcription factors in regulating gene expression. Taken together, ARE full sites generate a reliable transcriptional outcome in AR positive cells, despite their low genome-wide abundance. In contrast, the transcriptional influence of ARE half sites can be modulated by cooperating factors.

  14. Effects of Androgen Blockade on Cognitive Function and Quality of Life in Men with Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grigsby, James

    2004-01-01

    .... Our major hypothesis is the patients undergoing androgen deprivation therapy will experience impairments in those cognitive abilities reported in the research literature to be related to androgen levels (e.g...

  15. Effects of Androgen Blockade on Cognitive Function and Quality of Life in Men with Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grigaby, James

    2003-01-01

    .... Our major hypothesis is that patients undergoing androgen deprivation therapy will experience impairments in those cognitive abilities reported in the research literature to be related to androgen levels (e.g...

  16. Androgenic-anabolic activities of some new synthesized steroidal pyrane, pyridine and thiopyrimidine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Mohamed M; Amr, Abd El-Galil E; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Hussain, Azza A; Amer, Mohamed S

    2014-01-01

    In continuation of our previous work, fused steroidal derivatives with pyrane, pyridine, pyrimidine moieties were synthesized and evaluated as androgenic-anabolic agents. Some of the newly synthesized compounds are exhibited pronounced androgenic-anabolic activities.

  17. Additive effects of dietary glycotoxins and androgen excess on the kidney of a female rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiria Palimeri

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The above mentioned data suggest that dietary glycotoxins, in combination with increased androgen exposure, exert a more profound negative impact on the kidney of an androgenized female rat model that mimics the metabolic characteristics of polycystic ovary syndrome.

  18. Nutritional Effect on Androgen-Response Gene Expression and Prostate Tumor Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2001-01-01

    .... The dietary influence on ventral prostate weight does not seem to involve androgen action axis because dietary components did not influence the expression of several androgen-response genes, serum testosterone...

  19. Postmenopausal serum androgens, oestrogens and breast cancer risk: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaks, R.; Rinaldi, S.; Key, T.J.; Berrino, F.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Biessy, C.; Dossus, L.; Lukanova, A.; Bingham, S.; Khaw, K-T.; Allen, N.E.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.; Gils, C.H. van; Grobbee, D.E.; Boeing, H.; Lahmann, P.H.; Nagel, G.; Chang-Claude, J.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Fournier, A.; Thiébaut, A.; Gonzalez, C.A.; Quirós, J.R.; Tormo, M-J.; Ardanaz, E.; Amiano, P.; Krogh, V.; Palli, D.; Panico, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Trichopoulou, A.; Kalapothaki, V.; Trichopoulos, D.; Ferrari, P.; Norat, T.; Saracci, R.; Riboli, E.

    2005-01-01

    Considerable experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that elevated endogenous sex steroids — notably androgens and oestrogens — promote breast tumour development. In spite of this evidence, postmenopausal androgen replacement therapy with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) or testosterone has

  20. The clinical and molecular spectrum of androgen insensitivity syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiort, O.; Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Holterhus, P.M.; Nitsche, E.M.; Kruse, K. [Medical Univ. of Luebeck (Germany)

    1996-05-03

    Androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS) are due to end-organ resistance to androgenic steroids in males leading to defective virilization of the external genitalia. The phenotype encompasses a wide array of genital ambiguity and may range from completely female to undervirilized but unequivocally male with infertility. This disorder is caused by mutations of the androgen receptor and is an X-linked recessive trait. We have studied 47 patients with AIS and have characterized the underlying molecular abnormality in the androgen receptor gene. Twenty patients had complete AIS and twenty-seven had partial AIS. Of the latter, 11 were of predominantly female phenotypic appearance and gender was assigned accordingly, while 16 were raised as males. Within the group of complete AIS, two patients had gross deletions within the gene, one had a small deletion, and one had an insertion. In the other patients with complete AIS, as well as all individuals with partial AIS, single nucleotide substitutions within the coding region were detected, each leading to an amino acid alteration. Seven codons were involved in more than one mutation in different cases. In addition, in one patient with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, an elongation of a glutamine-repeat was characterized. We conclude that mutations in the androgen receptor gene may be present throughout the whole coding region. However, our study provides evidence that several mutational hot spots exist. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Endogenous androgens and carotid intimal-medial thickness in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernini, G P; Sgro', M; Moretti, A; Argenio, G F; Barlascini, C O; Cristofani, R; Salvetti, A

    1999-06-01

    The influence of endogenous androgens on atherosclerotic disease in women is unknown. In this study involving 101 pre- and post-menopausal females, we evaluated the relationship between serum androgen levels and both carotid artery intimal-medial thickness (IMT) and major cardiovascular risk factors. In addition to evaluation of blood pressure, body mass index, and waist-to-hip ratio, serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), androstenedione (A), total testosterone (TTS), free testosterone (FTS), insulin, cholesterol (total and high density lipoproteins), triglycerides, and glucose were measured. All women underwent carotid ultrasonography. Spearman correlation coefficients showed that serum DHEA-S and A levels were negatively related (P body mass index (P < 0.02). Stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that A and FTS showed an inverse association with IMT measures (P < 0.05-0.001). In conclusion, our data indicate that in women serum DHEA-S and androgens decline with age and that normal hormonal levels are not associated with major cardiovascular risk factors. They also show that higher DHEA-S and androgen concentrations are related to lower carotid wall thickness; for A this association is independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Our results suggest that, in the physiological range, DHEA-S and androgens in women are correlated with lower risk of carotid artery atherosclerosis.

  2. Androgenic anabolic steroid use among male adolescents in Falkenberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, S

    1995-01-01

    Recent reports show that androgenic anabolic steroids are used by many teenagers, not as a deliberate attempt to give them strength, better athletic performance, etc., but to improve their looks. The so-called macho cult among young boys tempts them into using androgenic anabolic steroids to give them bigger muscles and a more powerful appearance. This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of androgenic anabolic steroid use among teenagers in a small town and to create a platform for future work with the aim of decreasing the misuse of these drugs. In Falkenberg, a town in the county of Halland in the west of Sweden, the pupils at two high schools were investigated by means of an anonymous multiple-choice questionnaire. A total of 1383 students (688 males and 695 females) aged 14-19 years participated in the study, giving a participation rate of 96%. The number of answers completed was 99%. The use of androgenic anabolic steroids is a reality among male teenagers in Falkenberg, with 5.8% of them using the drugs. Among 15- to 16-year-old boys misuse of these drugs is as high as 10%, and of these 50% (5.0% of total) also inject ampoules of the drugs. This prevalence is alarming since the adverse effects of androgenic anabolic steroids are more serious in teenagers. Serious action must be taken to inform teenagers of the consequences of misusing drugs.

  3. Critical androgen-sensitive periods of rat penis and clitoris development

    OpenAIRE

    Welsh, Michelle; MacLeod, David J; Walker, Marion; Smith, Lee B; Sharpe, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    Androgen control of penis development/growth is unclear. In rats, androgen action in a foetal 'masculinisation programming window' (MPW; e15.5-e18.5)' predetermines penile length and hypospadias occurrence. This has implications for humans (e.g. micropenis). Our studies aimed to establish in rats when androgen action/administration affects development/growth of the penis and if deficits in MPW androgen action were rescuable postnatally. Thus, pregnant rats were treated with flutamide during t...

  4. Andrographolide Targets Androgen Receptor Pathway in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chengfei; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Tummala, Ramakumar; Chun, Jae Yeon; Lou, Wei; Zhu, Yezi; Sun, Meng; Evans, Christopher P.; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C.

    2011-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling not only plays a pivotal role in the development of androgen-dependent prostate cancer but is also important in the growth and survival of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The first line of treatment of androgen-dependent prostate cancer is the use of androgen deprivation therapy. However, most patients will eventually relapse due to development of CRPC. Thus, development of a strategy to target AR for treatment of CRPC is urgently needed. The auth...

  5. Multivalent Peptidomimetic Conjugates as Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Function in Therapy-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    hormones that play a critical role in stimulating prostate cancer growth . Androgens activate a protein called the androgen receptor (AR), which...variants, and evaluating if they block androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell growth . To understand how these molecule blocks AR function , we will...regulates genes involved in cell growth . Although powerful anti-androgen drugs can be administered to block AR action and have been used successfully to

  6. Exposure of neonatal rats to anti-androgens induces penile mal-developments and infertility comparable to those induced by oestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, L; Avery, L; Braden, T D; Williams, C S; Okumu, L A; Williams, J W; Goyal, H O

    2012-06-01

    We previously reported that oestrogen exposure in neonatal rats induced permanent infertility and malformed penis characterized by fat accumulation, which replaced most of the smooth muscle cells and cavernous spaces in the body of the penis, structures essential for erection. The objective of this study was to determine if reduced androgen production/action in the neonatal period, in the absence of exogenous oestrogen exposure, induces penile deformities similar to those caused by oestrogen. Male rats were treated from postnatal days 1-6 with GnRH antagonist antide (A, 10 mg/kg) or androgen receptor (AR) antagonist flutamide (F, 50 mg/kg) or F + A, with or without AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT, 20 mg/kg). For comparison, pups received diethylstilbestrol (DES, 0.1 mg/kg), with or without DHT. Tissues were collected at ages 7 and 12 days and at adulthood. Flutamide alone decreased penile length and weight significantly (p penis and were infertile. In addition, reductions in penile length and weight were higher than in rats treated with F or A alone. DHT co-administration mitigated penile deformities in the DES group, but did not in the F + A group. Testicular testosterone was reduced by 70-95% at 7 or 12 days of age in all treated groups, except in the F group, which had threefold higher testosterone than controls. Collectively, data unequivocally show that reduced androgen production/action in the neonatal period, in the absence of oestrogen exposure, induces permanent infertility and malformed penis similar to that caused by oestrogen. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Andrology © 2011 European Academy of Andrology.

  7. GABAA receptor partial agonists and antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krall, Jacob; Balle, Thomas; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    to the local temporal pattern of GABA impact, enabling phasic or tonic inhibition. Specific GABAAR antagonists are essential tools for physiological and pharmacological elucidation of the different type of GABAAR inhibition. However, distinct selectivity among the receptor subtypes (populations) has been shown...... antagonists and describes the development of potent antagonists from partial agonists originally derived from the potent GABAAR agonist muscimol. In this process, several heterocyclic aromatic systems have been used in combination with structural models in order to map the orthosteric binding site...... and to reveal structural details to be used for obtaining potency and subtype selectivity. The challenges connected to functional characterization of orthosteric GABAAR partial agonists and antagonists, especially with regard to GABAAR stoichiometry and alternative binding sites are discussed. GABAAR...

  8. Calcium antagonists for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, S. M.; Rinkel, G. J. E.; Feigin, V. L.; Algra, A.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary ischaemia is a frequent cause of poor outcome in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Its pathogenesis has been incompletely elucidated, but vasospasm probably is a contributing factor. Experimental studies have suggested that calcium antagonists can prevent or reverse

  9. Maternal yolk androgens stimulate territorial behaviour in black-headed gull chicks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Wendt; Dijkstra, Cor; Groothuis, Ton G. G.

    2009-01-01

    Avian eggs contain substantial amounts of maternal androgens. The concentrations of these yolk androgens are affected by the maternal environment, such as the level of social competition, parasite exposure or food conditions. Since yolk androgens have been shown to affect a wide array of offspring

  10. Androgens as double-edged swords: Induction and suppression of follicular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie-Xue; Zhang, Jun-Yu; Ke, Zhang-Hong; Wang, Fang-Fang; Barry, John A; Hardiman, Paul J; Qu, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Androgens, which are mediated via the androgen receptor (AR), play important roles in normal follicular development and female fertility. However, just like a double-edged sword, besides the positive effects of androgen on follicular development, abnormal androgen levels, especially as in hyperandrogenism, seriously suppress normal follicular development. A crucial balance exists between the importance of androgens in follicular development and their negative effects when in excess. As the first meiotic division and epigenetic reprogramming are two critical events in oogenesis, abnormal androgen levels or deficiency in androgen/AR signaling in the ovary may affect these vital events. Oocytes have a tendency to develop genomic instability, thus resulting in an increasing incidence of unpredictable adult diseases. Although many studies have explored the effects of androgens and AR on follicular development, the conclusions are controversial and there has been no thorough review of this topic. This review focuses on the roles of androgens in the physiological process of follicular development, summarizes new insights into the roles of androgens in the arrested development of follicles, and discusses the potential risk of adult diseases originating from abnormal follicular androgen levels or androgen receptor signals, which may determine areas for future studies.

  11. Antagonist wear by polished zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartkamp, Oliver; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Reich, Sven

    The aim of this in vivo study was to measure antagonist wear caused by polished monolithic posterior zirconia crowns over a 24-month period using the intraoral digital impression (IDI) technique. Thirteen zirconia crowns were placed in nine patients. The crowns and adjacent teeth were captured using an intraoral scanner (Lava C.O.S.). The corresponding antagonist teeth and the respective neighboring teeth were also scanned. Scanning was performed immediately after the restoration (baseline) as well as 12 and 24 months after crown placement. Geomagic Qualify software was used to superimpose the follow-up data sets onto the corresponding baseline data set, identify wear sites, and measure maximum vertical height loss in each individual wear site. Overall antagonist wear was then determined as the mean of wear rates measured in all of the individual antagonist units. In addition, wear rates in enamel and ceramic antagonists were analyzed as part of the scope of this study. The maximum mean wear with standard deviation (SD) in the overall sample with a total of nine patients, 13 antagonist units, and 98 evaluable wear sites was 86 ± 23 µm at 12 months, and 103 ± 39 µm at 24 months. The maximum mean wear in the enamel antagonist subgroup was 87 ± 41 µm at 12 months, and 115 ± 71 µm at 24 months; and in the ceramic antagonist subgroup 107 ± 22 µm at 12 months, and 120 ± 27 µm at 24 months. The wear rates determined in this study are comparable to those of existing studies. The IDI technique of wear analysis can be carried out in a practical manner and produces useful results.

  12. High androgen levels protect against hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Johanna; Dahlgren, Eva; Bryman, Inger; Berntorp, Kerstin; Trimpou, Penelope; Wilhelmsen, Lars; Landin-Wilhelmsen, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common disorder, appearing mainly in women although less frequently found in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The objective was to test the hypothesis that hyperandrogenism might protect against hypothyroidism. The data from three prospective follow-up studies (up to 21 years) and one register study were compared: women with PCOS (Rotterdam criteria), n = 25, women with Turner syndrome, n = 217, a random population sample of women, n = 315, and men, n = 95 (the WHO MONICA study). Findings were to be verified or rejected in all females, n = 553 716, from the same region. The proportion of hypothyroidism was calculated and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO) in serum were measured. Hypothyroidism at >50 years of age was found in 8% of women with PCOS, 4% in men (PCOS vs. men; ns), 43% of women with Turner syndrome, irrespective of karyotype (p Hypothyroidism increased with age in all groups except PCOS women and men. In the register study, hypothyroidism was less common in women with PCOS >25 years (5.5%) than in women without PCOS (6.8%) from the same region (p Hypothyroidism was less frequently seen in women with PCOS and in men compared with women in the general population and among women with Turner syndrome. This was not explained by altered autoimmunity or the Y-chromosome. Androgens seem to protect against hypothyroidism. © 2016 The Authors. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  13. The Relationship between Androgenic Alopecia and Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Rahmatpour Rokni

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC and Androgenic Alopecia (AGA i are both common diseases in elder men. It seems that androgen plays a crucial role in the growth and development of prostate cancer. Therefore, the current study intended to investigate the relationship between androgenic alopecia and prostate cancer. The present study is a case-control study conducted on 75 patients with prostate cancer (case group referring to Imam Khomeini Hospital in Sari, Iran. The case group was compared with the control group (75 healthy individuals. The intended questionnaire of the study included information such as the age, sex, duration of disease, stage of disease, level of PSA, time diagnosis and time of interview for all the participants. The results of interview and clinical examination along with the patient’s information all were filled in the questionnaire and were statistically analyzed by SPSS after data collection. The mean age of PC group and healthy group was respectively 69.08 ± 8.97 and 68 .45 ± 10.16 years. The average level of PSA was 10.86 ± 11.7 and 2.66 ± 2.7 ng/ml in PC and healthy group in turn. The average duration of cancer was 12.63 ± 9.19 months in PC group. Furthermore, about 6.7% of cancer patients were in stage I, 48% were stage II, 29.3% were in stage III and 16% were in stage IV of prostate cancer. Besides, the number of cancer patients who had both frontal and vertex alopecia (baldness altogether exceeded healthy individuals (P=0.002. According to the results of the present study, there was a significant relationship between prostate cancer and androgenic alopecia which might have been caused by the effect of androgens on both diseases. Consequently, androgenic alopecia can be considered as one of the risk factors associated with prostate cancer.

  14. The Central Effects of Androgenic-anabolic Steroid Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mędraś, Marek; Brona, Anna; Jóźków, Paweł

    2018-02-21

    : Millions of men use androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) to stimulate muscle growth and improve physical appearance. Although 1 out of 3 people who uses androgenic-anabolic steroids develops a steroid use disorder, the effects of the drugs on the central nervous system and the psyche are still not well understood. Although most addictive substances improve mood immediately after administration, AAS exert less pronounced euphoric effects. Instead, they are primarily taken for the delayed gratification of increased muscle mass. Withdrawal from AAS may lead to a range of somatic and psychiatric symptoms, and, in many cases, comprehensive treatment supervised by an endocrinologist and a psychiatrist is required.

  15. Influence of obesity and androgen deficiency on prostatic blood circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Study at 120 Diabetes Mellitus II type men the high frequency Obesity (71,7% and Androgen Deficiency (52,8—64,5% of the patients depending on a degree of the indemnification and them pathogenic authentic communications were shown. The blood level of total testosterone was represented by the critical factor of Prostatic arterial Blood Circulation. Obesity and Androgen Deficiency are seem as independent risk factors to development of ischemic prostatopathy, such as Prostatic blood circulation Disorders can develop earlier than other variants of the diabetic microangiophaty.

  16. Optimizing Ligand Efficiency of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handlon, Anthony L; Schaller, Lee T; Leesnitzer, Lisa M; Merrihew, Raymond V; Poole, Chuck; Ulrich, John C; Wilson, Joseph W; Cadilla, Rodolfo; Turnbull, Philip

    2016-01-14

    A series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) containing the 1-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol core have been optimized for androgen receptor (AR) potency and drug-like properties. We have taken advantage of the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) parameter as a guide to interpret the effect of structural changes on AR activity. Over the course of optimization efforts the LLE increased over 3 log units leading to a SARM 43 with nanomolar potency, good aqueous kinetic solubility (>700 μM), and high oral bioavailability in rats (83%).

  17. A Molecular Modeling Study of the Hydroxyflutamide Resistance Mechanism Induced by Androgen Receptor Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Li Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyflutamide (HF, an active metabolite of the first generation antiandrogen flutamide, was used in clinic to treat prostate cancer targeting androgen receptor (AR. However, a drug resistance problem appears after about one year’s treatment. AR T877A is the first mutation that was found to cause a resistance problem. Then W741C_T877A and F876L_T877A mutations were also reported to cause resistance to HF, while W741C and F876L single mutations cannot. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD simulations combined with the molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA method have been carried out to analyze the interaction mechanism between HF and wild-type (WT/mutant ARs. The obtained results indicate that AR helix 12 (H12 plays a pivotal role in the resistance of HF. It can affect the coactivator binding site at the activation function 2 domain (AF2, surrounded by H3, H4, and H12. When H12 closes to the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD like a lid, the coactivator binding site can be formed to promote transcription. However, once H12 is opened to expose LBD, the coactivator binding site will be distorted, leading to invalid transcription. Moreover, per-residue free energy decomposition analyses indicate that N705, T877, and M895 are vital residues in the agonist/antagonist mechanism of HF.

  18. Pharmacological Characterization of a Novel Bifunctional Aldo-Keto Reductase 1C3 Inhibitor and Androgen Receptor Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    metastatic form of the disease known as advanced prostate cancer (APC) or castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). APC develops as a result of...Engl J Med 2011, 364, 1995-2005. 8. O’Donnell, A.; Judson, I.; Dowsett, M.; Raynaud , F.; Dearnaley, D.; Mason, M.; Harland, S.; Robbins, A

  19. Coronary dilation with nitrocompounds and calcium antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, S; Rafflenbeul, W; Lichtlen, P R

    1990-01-01

    The vasodilatory effects of nitrocompounds and calcium antagonists on epicardial coronary arteries represent substantial antianginal mechanisms in the presence of coronary vasospasm or eccentric coronary stenoses. With high doses of nitrocompounds, angiographically normal coronary segments can be dilated by an average of approx. 30%, some coronary stenoses even by up to 100%, usually without severe reduction of blood pressure. With calcium antagonists, a similar extent of dilation of normal coronary arteries and eccentric stenoses can be obtained. Our own group demonstrated an average dilation of normal coronary arteries of about 20% after intravenous administration of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists; however, the average systolic blood pressure dropped below 100 mmHg after these compounds. Hence, although in isolated human coronary arteries high concentrations of calcium antagonists were shown to induce a considerably greater vasodilation than nitrocompounds, the early drop in blood pressure prohibits a higher dosage of calcium antagonists in vivo. In the presence of coronary artery disease, particularly when associated with coronary vasospasm, a combination of the two groups of compounds might be recommendable, since an addition of the effects of coronary vasomotor tone is likely. Furthermore, the antianginal effects of a reduction of preload and afterload are complementary.

  20. Androgen receptor expression as a prognostic and predictive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: It is clear that triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) tumors are heterogeneous group, but clinically important sub-sets have begun to emerge. We investigate the immunohistochemical expression of androgen receptor (AR) among those hormonal insensitive groups which have only the option of chemotherapy.

  1. Anti-androgenic activity of Xylopic acid in orchidectomerized rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To characterize anti-androgenic properties of xylopic acid (XA) and to elucidate the possible mech-anism of the antifertility activity of XA, XA was administered to orchidectomized rats following the Hershberger assay protocol. Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were orchidectomized or sham oper-ated at 42 days of age.

  2. Continuous vs. intermittent androgen deprivation therapy for metastatic prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenhuijsen, J.F.; Badhauser, D.; Schaaf, B.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Mulders, P.F.A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyze the predictive value of PSA for progression and the role of testosterone for quality of life (QOL) in patients with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for metastatic prostate cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: PSA and testosterone data were used from a phase III trial randomizing

  3. Prevalence and awareness of anabolic androgenic steroid use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To examine the prevalence and awareness of anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) use among male bodybuilders visiting gyms in Jazan region, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 500 male bodybuilders visiting gyms in the Jazan region of Saudi Arabia. Information on ...

  4. Procoagulant State in Current and Former Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abusers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Simon; Rasmussen, Jon J; Frandsen, Mikkel N

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) abusers are considered at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We hypothesized that current and former AAS abuse would induce a procoagulant shift in the haemostatic balance. METHODS:  Men 18 to 50 years of age were included...

  5. Psychological and Behavioral Effects of Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrke, Michael S.

    This review of the literature on the psychological and behavioral effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AS) first looks at aspects of the history and prevalence of AS use in competitive sports. Research suggests that one-quarter to one-half million adolescents in the United States have used, or are currently using AS. Some effects of androgens…

  6. Hypercholesterolemia in Male Power Lifters Using Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jonathan C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Measurement of serum cholesterol concentrations in male power lifters who used anabolic-androgenic steroids for eight weeks, three years, or eight years indicated that mean serum cholesterol levels increased with drug use, but decreased promptly to near pre-steroid levels after steroid use ended. (Author/CB)

  7. Synthetic anabolic agents: steroids and nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The central role of testosterone in the development of male characteristics, as well as its beneficial effects on physical performance and muscle growth, has led to the search for synthetic alternatives with improved pharmacological profiles. Hundreds of steroidal analogs have been prepared with a superior oral bioavailability, which should also possess reduced undesirable effects. However, only a few entered the pharmaceutical market due to severe toxicological incidences that were mainly attributed to the lack of tissue selectivity. Prominent representatives of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are for instance methyltestosterone, metandienone and stanozolol, which are discussed as model compounds with regard to general pharmacological aspects of synthetic AAS. Recently, nonsteroidal alternatives to AAS have been developed that selectively activate the androgen receptor in either muscle tissue or bones. These so-called selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are currently undergoing late clinical trials (IIb) and will be prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency from January 2008. Their entirely synthetic structures are barely related to steroids, but particular functional groups allow for the tissue-selective activation or inhibition of androgen receptors and, thus, the stimulation of muscle growth without the risk of severe undesirable effects commonly observed in steroid replacement therapies. Hence, these compounds possess a high potential for misuse in sports and will be the subject of future doping control assays.

  8. Plasma androgen concentrations in initial samples from spotted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-01-31

    Jan 31, 1990 ... 1991,26(1). Plasma androgen concentrations in initial samples from spotted hyaenas immobilized with Zoletil (CI-744) reflect hormonal status estimated by GnRH challenge and immobilization stress response. A.S. van Jaarsveld * and J.D. Skinner. Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria, Pretoria ...

  9. Changes in gene expression following androgen receptor blockade ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu urs

    Involution of the rat ventral prostate and concomitant modulation of gene expression post-castration is a well- documented phenomenon. While the rat castration model has been extensively used to study androgen regulation of gene expression in the ventral prostate, it is not clear whether all the gene expression changes ...

  10. Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BALACHANDRAN SARANYA

    male breast cancer (Wooster et al. 1992) and prostate cancer. (Tilley et al. 1996). The two most important androgens are testosterone and. 5α-dihydrotestosterone, whose actions ..... Among the steroid recep- tors, the AR records the highest density, witnessing more than 600 different mutations leading to AIS (Gottlieb et al.

  11. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesha Rana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (ARΔZF2 versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57 Kip2, Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all but p57 Kip2 was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  12. Androgenic potential and anther in vitro culture of Lagenaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Androgenic potential and anther in vitro culture of Lagenaria siceraria (Molina) Standl an edible-seed cucurbit. Kouakou Laurent Kouakou, Tra Serge Doubi, Tra Serge Koffi, Kouadio Ignace Kouassi, Tanoh Hilaire Kouakou, Jean-Pierre Baudoin, Irié Arsène Zoro Bi ...

  13. Arylisothiocyanato selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Dong Jin; Yang, Jun; Xu, Huiping; Rakov, Igor M; Mohler, Michael L; Dalton, James T; Miller, Duane D

    2006-10-01

    A new series of androgen receptor targeted agents (ARTA) was prepared and tested in androgen-dependent and -independent prostate cancer cell lines. These agents were bicalutamide analogs with isothiocyanato substituted B-rings. Also, the linker sulfone of R-bicalutamide was maintained or replaced with several alternative linkages including ether, amine, N-methylamine, thioether, and methylene (in this case the product was a racemic mixture) functional groups at the X-position. To expand the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of these arylisothiocyanato AR ligands, B-ring halogenated arylisothiocyanato ligands were also prepared and tested. The arylisothiocyanato AR ligands showed strong binding affinities to AR ranging from 0.6 to 54 nM. Among them, thioether and ether linkages demonstrated high binding affinities (0.6 and 4.6 nM, respectively) and selective cell growth inhibition (approximately 3- to 6-fold) for LNCaP, an androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell line, when compared to the androgen independent prostate cell lines (DU145, PC-3, and PPC-1) and a bladder cell line (TSU-Pr1). However, the ligands were inactive (IC50>100 mM) in a normal monkey kidney cell line (CV-1) that was used as the control for non-specific toxicity.

  14. Reduced fetal androgen exposure compromises Leydig cell function in adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerds, K.J.; Keijer, J.

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of normal fetal development can influence functioning of organs and cells in adulthood. Circumstantial evidence suggests that subtle reductions in fetal androgen production may be the cause of adult male reproductive disorders due to reduced testosterone production. The mechanisms through

  15. Androgenic function of the gonads in males with hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Dogadin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the levels of sex hormones in men with hyperthyroidism before and during treatment, and determining the feasibility of testosterone prescribing together with thyrostatic therapy, in men with androgen deficiency. The study involved 37 men with newly diagnosed diffuse toxic goiter and 16 healthy men, aged from 22 to 55 years. The testosterone (test. fractions (overall and free, SHBG, LH, FSH, estradiol and prolactin were determined. All hormones were measured before treatment and after 3, and then 6 months of thyrostatic ther apy. The overall test. level in men with hyperthyroidism was the same as in healthy subjects. Absolute and relative content of free test. fraction was significantly lower, but the SHBG level was higher than in healthy age relative men. The diagnostics of androgen deficiency syndrome was based on free test. determination. All patients with Diffuse toxic goiter the tiamazol (Merkazolil was appointed, while treatment with testosterone (Omnadren250 were offered to patients with low of free test. levels, but not all followed the recommendations. The groups were follow: patients without androgen deficiency ( n = 16, patients with androgen deficiency, taking only thyrostatic therapy ( n = 10, patients with androgen deficiency taken thyrostatic therapy simultaneously with testosterone therapy ( n = 11. The decreasing of free test. level was detected in 57% of examined men. In most cases (80% of that patients the 6 months thyrostatic therapy did not lead to free test. normalization. The free test. level concentration was nor mal only in 2 examined not receiving testosterone men (20% and in 9 (82%; χ 2 = 5.76; p = 0.017 among those who recieved both: thyrostatic and testosterone therapy. During treatment with Omnadren250 the relative content of free test. was significantly higher at 3 and 6 months of treatment. Using a questionnaire AMS confirmed the dynamics characteristics of androgen deficiency

  16. Leuprolide acetate-stimulated androgen response during female puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, María Isabel; Martinez-Aguayo, Alejandro; Cavada, Gabriel; Avila, Alejandra; Iñiguez, German; Mericq, Veronica

    2015-08-01

    A physiological increase in androgen levels occurs during adolescence. Measuring androgen concentrations is the best method to distinguish normal evolution processes from hyperandrogenic disorders. The increase in circulating androgens during puberty is inversely associated with insulin sensitivity in normal weight girls. To assess circulating levels of ovarian androgens and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) at baseline and after GnRH analogue (GnRH-a) stimulation in normal pubertal girls across different Tanner stages. We also studied the association between this response and insulin sensitivity. Prospective study of healthy girls (6-12 years) from the local community (n = 63). Tanner I (n = 23) subjects were assessed cross-sectionally, and Tanner II girls (n = 40) were evaluated every 6 months until they reached Tanner V. Early morning dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S), AMH, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), androstenedione, glucose and insulin levels were measured. A GnRH-a test (500 μg/m(2) ; sc) and oral glucose intolerance test (OGTT) were performed. Differences throughout puberty were evaluated. Basal and/or stimulated Testosterone DHEA-S and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP) were inversely associated with insulin sensitivity (WIBSI) from the beginning of puberty, whereas androstenedione was directly associated with gonadotrophins. AMH was inversely associated with basal and stimulated gonadotrophins and directly with insulin area under the curve (AUC) only in the early stages of puberty. 17OHP and testosterone responsiveness increased significantly during puberty in all subjects, whereas testosterone levels changed less consistently. This pattern of ovarian-steroidogenic response was most evident during mid- and late puberty. Moreover, during late puberty only, basal 17OHP, testosterone and DHEA-S were positively associated with gonadotrophins. In normal nonobese girls born appropriate for gestational age, androgen synthesis was associated with

  17. Influence of endogenous androgens on carotid wall in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernini, G P; Moretti, A; Sgró, M; Argenio, G F; Barlascini, C O; Cristofani, R; Salvetti, A

    2001-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of a direct association between normal androgen levels and reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in women. After menopause the influence of estrogens declines, whereas that of androgens increases. Therefore, we investigated the effects of androgens on atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women, by using carotid artery intimal-medial thickness as a marker of vascular damage. Blood pressure, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, androstenedione, total and free testosterone, estrone, insulin, lipid profile, and glucose were evaluated in 44 women in stable physiological menopause. All subjects underwent carotid ultrasound (Biosound 2000 II s.a. high-resolution unit). Spearman correlation coefficients indicated that serum androstenedione and free testosterone were negatively associated with several carotid intimal-medial thickness measures with correlation coefficients (r) ranging from 0.477 to 0.397 (p < 0.01-0.04). Moreover, age-adjusted androstenedione and free testosterone highest tertiles showed intimal-medial thickness values significantly (p < 0.03-0.05) lower than the other tertiles. There was a favorable association between hormones and the most important cardiovascular risk factors. This association, however, did not reach statistical significance. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that the inverse relationships between the hormones (androstenedione and free testosterone) and several intimal-medial thickness measures were maintained (F: 4.15-6.07, p < 0.05-0.02) after adjustment for major cardiovascular risk factors. Our data demonstrate that in postmenopausal women endogenous steroid precursors and androgens are inversely related to carotid intimal-medial thickness, an established marker of atherosclerosis. In addition, these hormones show favorable associations with cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, our study suggests that, after menopause, normal androgen levels may

  18. Serum androgen profile and physical performance in women Olympic athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Emma; Berglund, Bo; Labrie, Fernand; Carlström, Kjell; Ekström, Lena; Hirschberg, Angelica Lindén

    2017-09-01

    The role of endogenous androgens for body composition and physical performance in women athletes is still not elucidated. To examine the serum androgen profile in relation to body composition and physical performance in women Olympic athletes and to compare endocrine variables and body composition to controls. Cross-sectional study, conducted between 2011 and 2015 at the Women's Health Research Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm. Swedish women Olympic athletes (n=106) and age-matched and body mass index-matched sedentary controls (n=117) were included in the study. Blood sampling was performed in a rested, fasting state for the measurement of serum androgens and their metabolites by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Body composition was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (controls n=100, athletes n=65). The athletes performed standardised performance tests (n=59) (squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ). The athletes demonstrated significantly higher levels of the precursor androgens dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and 5-androstene-3β, 17β-diol (5-DIOL) and the metabolite etiocholanolone glucuronide (Etio-G), significantly lower levels of estrone (pathletes. DHEA and lean mass legs explained 66% of the variance in SJ, whereas lean mass explained 52% of the variance in CMJ. The present data suggest that endogenous androgens are associated with a more anabolic body composition and enhanced performance in women athletes. These results are of importance for the current discussion regarding hyperandrogenism in women athletes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators enhance female sexual motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amanda; Hwang, Dong Jin; Duke, Charles B; He, Yali; Siddam, Anjaiah; Miller, Duane D; Dalton, James T

    2010-08-01

    Women experience a decline in estrogen and androgen levels after natural or surgically induced menopause, effects that are associated with a loss of sexual desire and bone mineral density. Studies in our laboratories have shown the beneficial effects of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) in the treatment of osteoporosis and muscle wasting in animal models. A series of S-3-(phenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-cyano-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-propionamide analogs was synthesized to evaluate the effects of B-ring substitutions on in vitro and in vivo pharmacologic activity, especially female sexual motivation. The androgen receptor (AR) relative binding affinities ranged from 0.1 to 26.5% (relative to dihydrotestosterone) and demonstrated a range of agonist activity at 100 nM. In vivo pharmacologic activity was first assessed by using male rats. Structural modifications to the B-ring significantly affected the selectivity of the SARMs, demonstrating that single-atom substitutions can dramatically and unexpectedly influence activity in androgenic (i.e., prostate) and anabolic (i.e., muscle) tissues. (S)-N-(4-cyano-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-3-(3-fluoro,4-chlorophenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-propanamide (S-23) displayed full agonist activity in androgenic and anabolic tissues; however, the remaining SARMs were more prostate-sparing, selectively maintaining the size of the levator ani muscle in castrated rats. The partner-preference paradigm was used to evaluate the effects of SARMs on female sexual motivation. With the exception of two four-halo substituted analogs, the SARMs increased sexual motivation in ovariectomized rats, with potency and efficacy comparable with testosterone propionate. These results indicate that the AR is important in regulating female libido given the nonaromatizable nature of SARMs and it could be a superior alternative to steroidal testosterone preparations in the treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder.

  20. Characterization of estrogen and androgen activity of food contact materials by different in vitro bioassays (YES, YAS, ERα and AR CALUX and chromatographic analysis (GC-MS, HPLC-MS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Mertl

    Full Text Available Endocrine active substances (EAS show structural similarities to natural hormones and are suspected to affect the human endocrine system by inducing hormone dependent effects. Recent studies with in vitro tests suggest that EAS can leach from packaging into food and may therefore pose a risk to human health. Sample migrates from food contact materials were tested for estrogen and androgen agonists and antagonists with different commonly used in vitro tests. Additionally, chemical trace analysis by GC-MS and HPLC-MS was used to identify potential hormone active substances in sample migrates. A GC-MS method to screen migrates for 29 known or potential endocrine active substances was established and validated. Samples were migrated according to EC 10/2011, concentrated by solid phase extraction and tested with estrogen and androgen responsive reporter gene assays based on yeast cells (YES and YAS or human osteoblast cells (ERα and AR CALUX. A high level of agreement between the different bioassays could be observed by screening for estrogen agonists. Four out of 18 samples tested showed an estrogen activity in a similar range in both, YES and ERα CALUX. Two more samples tested positive in ERα CALUX due to the lower limits of detection in this assay. Androgen agonists could not be detected in any of the tested samples, neither with YAS nor with AR CALUX. When testing for antagonists, significant differences between yeast and human cell-based bioassays were noticed. Using YES and YAS many samples showed a strong antagonistic activity which was not observed using human cell-based CALUX assays. By GC-MS, some known or supposed EAS were identified in sample migrates that showed a biological activity in the in vitro tests. However, no firm conclusions about the sources of the observed hormone activity could be obtained from the chemical results.

  1. Inhibition of Androgen-Independent Growth of Prostate Cancer by siRNA- Mediated Androgen Receptor Gene Silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    mediated shift of Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing and antineoplastic agents. J Biol Chem 2002;277:49374–82. 39. Wright ME, Tsai MJ, Aebersold R. Androgen receptor...two orders of magnitude better than nanowire arrays, but these assays require extensive labeling and mul- tiple chemical and biochemical manipulations

  2. Development of an endogenous androgen receptor-mediated luciferase expression assay (AR-LUX) for interactive androgenic action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankvoort, B.M.G.

    2003-01-01

    The research described in this thesis was aimed at developing an in vitro cell-based reporter gene system applicable to the detection of the illegal use of androgenic growth promoters in cattle, and the presence of potential endocrine disrupters present in surface waters and interfering with

  3. ETA-receptor antagonists or allosteric modulators?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Mey, Jo G R; Compeer, Matthijs G; Lemkens, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    . In resistance arteries, the long-lasting contractile effects can only be partly and reversibly relaxed by low-molecular-weight ET(A) antagonists (ERAs). However, the neuropeptide calcitonin-gene-related peptide selectively terminates binding of ET1 to ET(A). We propose that ET1 binds polyvalently to ET......(A) and that ERAs and the physiological antagonist allosterically reduce ET(A) functions. Combining the two-state model and the two-domain model of GPCR function and considering receptor activation beyond agonist binding might lead to better anti-endothelinergic drugs. Future studies could lead to compounds...

  4. Association of androgen metabolism gene polymorphisms with prostate cancer risk and androgen concentrations: Results from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Douglas K; Chau, Cindy H; Till, Cathee; Goodman, Phyllis J; Leach, Robin J; Johnson-Pais, Teresa L; Hsing, Ann W; Hoque, Ashraful; Parnes, Howard L; Schenk, Jeannette M; Tangen, Catherine M; Thompson, Ian M; Reichardt, Juergen K V; Figg, William D

    2016-08-01

    Prostate cancer is highly influenced by androgens and genes. The authors investigated whether genetic polymorphisms along the androgen biosynthesis and metabolism pathways are associated with androgen concentrations or with the risk of prostate cancer or high-grade disease from finasteride treatment. A nested case-control study from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial using data from men who had biopsy-proven prostate cancer (cases) and a group of biopsy-negative, frequency-matched controls was conducted to investigate the association of 51 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 12 genes of the androgen pathway with overall (total), low-grade, and high-grade prostate cancer incidence and serum hormone concentrations. There were significant associations of genetic polymorphisms in steroid 5α-reductase 1 (SRD5A1) (reference SNPs: rs3736316, rs3822430, rs1560149, rs248797, and rs472402) and SRD5A2 (rs2300700) with the risk of high-grade prostate cancer in the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial; 2 SNPs were significantly associated with an increased risk (SRD5A1 rs472402 [odds ratio, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-2.75; Ptrend = .03] and SRD5A2 rs2300700 [odds ratio, 1.94; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-3.18; Ptrend = .01]). Eleven SNPs in SRD5A1, SRD5A2, cytochrome P450 family 1, subfamily B, polypeptide 1 (CYP1B1), and CYP3A4 were associated with modifying the mean concentrations of serum androgen and sex hormone-binding globulin; and 2 SNPs (SRD5A1 rs824811 and CYP1B1 rs10012; Ptrend cancer risk. Germline genetic variations of androgen-related pathway genes are associated with serum androgen concentrations and the risk of prostate cancer. Further studies to examine the functional consequence of novel causal variants are warranted. Cancer 2016;122:2332-2340. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  5. Identification of an anabolic selective androgen receptor modulator that actively induces death of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Azriel; Meissner, Robert S; Gentile, Michael A; Chisamore, Michael J; Opas, Evan E; Scafonas, Angela; Cusick, Tara E; Gambone, Carlo; Pennypacker, Brenda; Hodor, Paul; Perkins, James J; Bai, Chang; Ferraro, Damien; Bettoun, David J; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Alves, Stephen E; Flores, Osvaldo; Ray, William J

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) initially responds to inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but inevitably progresses to hormone ablation-resistant disease. Much effort is focused on optimizing this androgen deprivation strategy by improving hormone depletion and AR antagonism. However we found that bicalutamide, a clinically used antiandrogen, actually resembles a selective AR modulator (SARM), as it partially regulates 24% of endogenously 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-responsive genes in AR(+) MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. These data suggested that passive blocking of all AR functions is not required for PCa therapy. Hence, we adopted an active strategy that calls for the development of novel SARMs, which induce a unique gene expression profile that is intolerable to PCa cells. Therefore, we screened 3000 SARMs for the ability to arrest the androgen-independent growth of AR(+) 22Rv1 and LNCaP PCa cells but not AR(-) PC3 or DU145 cells. We identified only one such compound; the 4-aza-steroid, MK-4541, a potent and selective SARM. MK-4541 induces caspase-3 activity and cell death in both androgen-independent, AR(+) PCa cell lines but spares AR(-) cells or AR(+) non-PCa cells. This activity correlates with its promoter context- and cell-type dependent transcriptional effects. In rats, MK-4541 inhibits the trophic effects of DHT on the prostate, but not the levator ani muscle, and triggers an anabolic response in the periosteal compartment of bone. Therefore, MK-4541 has the potential to effectively manage prostatic hypertrophic diseases owing to its antitumor SARM-like mechanism, while simultaneously maintaining the anabolic benefits of natural androgens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. ANDROGENS REGULATE T47D CELLS MOTILITY AND INVASION THROUGH ACTIN CYTOSKELETON REMODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Magdalena Montt-Guevara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between androgens and breast cancer is controversial. Androgens have complex effects on breast cancer progression and metastasis. Moreover, androgens receptor (AR is expressed in approximately 70% to 90% of invasive breast carcinomas, which has prognostic relevance in basal-like cancers and in triple negative breast cancers. Recent studies have associated the actin-binding proteins of the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM family with metastasis in endocrine-sensitive cancers. We studied on T47D breast cancer cells whether androgens with different characteristics, such as testosterone (T, dihydrotestosterone (DHT and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA may regulate breast cancer cell motility and invasion through the control of actin remodelling. We demonstrate that androgens promote migration and invasion in T47D via Moesin activation. We show that T and DHEA exert their actions via the AR and estrogen receptor (ER, while the non aromatizable androgen – DHT only recruits AR. We further report that androgen induced significant changes in actin organization with pseudopodia along with membrane ruffles formation, and this process is mediated by Moesin. Our work identifies novel mechanisms of action of androgens on breast cancer cells. Through the modulation of Moesin, androgens alter the architecture of cytoskeleton in T47D breast cancer cell and promote cell migration and invasion. These results could help to understand the biological actions of androgens on breast cancer, and eventually to develop new strategies for treatment of breast cancer.

  7. Androgens Regulate T47D Cells Motility and Invasion through Actin Cytoskeleton Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montt-Guevara, Maria Magdalena; Shortrede, Jorge Eduardo; Giretti, Maria Silvia; Giannini, Andrea; Mannella, Paolo; Russo, Eleonora; Genazzani, Alessandro David; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between androgens and breast cancer is controversial. Androgens have complex effects on breast cancer progression and metastasis. Moreover, androgen receptor (AR) is expressed in approximately 70 to 90% of invasive breast carcinomas, which has prognostic relevance in basal-like cancers and in triple-negative breast cancers. Recent studies have associated the actin-binding proteins of the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family with metastasis in endocrine-sensitive cancers. We studied on T47D breast cancer cells whether androgens with different characteristics, such as testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) may regulate breast cancer cell motility and invasion through the control of actin remodeling. We demonstrate that androgens promote migration and invasion in T47D via Moesin activation. We show that T and DHEA exert their actions via the AR and estrogen receptor (ER), while the non-aromatizable androgen - DHT - only recruits AR. We further report that androgen induced significant changes in actin organization with pseudopodia along with membrane ruffles formation, and this process is mediated by Moesin. Our work identifies novel mechanisms of action of androgens on breast cancer cells. Through the modulation of Moesin, androgens alter the architecture of cytoskeleton in T47D breast cancer cell and promote cell migration and invasion. These results could help to understand the biological actions of androgens on breast cancer and, eventually, to develop new strategies for breast cancer treatment.

  8. Supplementation with Pfaffia glomerata (Sprengel) Pedersen does not affect androgenic-anabolic parameters in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ney Felipe; Martino-Andrade, Anderson Joel; Dos Santos Lourenço, Ana Carolina; Muller, Juliane Centeno; Spercoski, Katherinne Maria; Nihi, Fabiola; Miguel, Marilis Dallarmi; de Oliveira, Vinícius Bednarczuk; Dalsenter, Paulo Roberto; Morais, Rosana Nogueira

    2015-02-23

    Paffia spp (Amaranthacea) has a widespread use of in Brazil as a possible hormonal supplement and a substitute of Panax ginseng, although information on its reproductive effects is missing. To evaluated possible anabolic-androgenic or anti-androgenic effects of Pfaffia glomerata (PG) extract using intact eight-months-old male rats and pre-pubertal castrated rats. Three different dose levels of PG (8.5, 30 and 85 mg/kg/day) were administered to eight-months-old rats for 28 days or to castrated males for 7 days (Hershberger assay). In the experiment with intact animals, 24h fecal samples were collected for quantification of fecal metabolites of androgens throughout treatment. At the end of the treatment period, animals were euthanized for evaluation of serum testosterone, reproductive organ weights, number of spermatids per testis, diameter of seminiferous tubules and cross-sectional area of soleus muscle fibers. In the Hershberber assay, androgenic or anti-androgenic effects were evaluated by the weights of androgen-dependent tissues: ventral prostate, seminal vesicle, glans penis and levator ani muscle/bulbocavernosus muscle. No effects were observed in the concentrations of fecal metabolites of androgens monitored during the treatment of intact eight-months-old rats. Moreover, at the end of treatment, no changes were seen in any of the investigated parameters. In the Hershberger assay, the PG extract did not induce androgenic or anti-androgenic effects at the dose levels tested. Significant effects were only observed in animals treated with testosterone and testosterone plus flutamide, which were used as positive controls for androgenicity and anti-androgenicity, respectively. At the dose levels tested, PG extract does not induce anabolic-androgenic or anti-androgenic effects in rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. CRTH2 antagonists in asthma: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh D

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dave Singh, Arjun Ravi, Thomas Southworth Division of Infection, Immunity and Respiratory Medicine, The Medicines Evaluation Unit, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK Abstract: Chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells (CRTH2 binds to prostaglandin D2. CRTH2 is expressed on various cell types including eosinophils, mast cells, and basophils. CRTH2 and prostaglandin D2 are involved in allergic inflammation and eosinophil activation. Orally administered CRTH2 antagonists are in clinical development for the treatment of asthma. The biology and clinical trial data indicate that CRTH2 antagonists should be targeted toward eosinophilic asthma. This article reviews the clinical evidence for CRTH2 involvement in asthma pathophysiology and clinical trials of CRTH2 antagonists in asthma. CRTH2 antagonists could provide a practical alternative to biological treatments for patients with severe asthma. Future perspectives for this class of drug are considered, including the selection of the subgroup of patients most likely to show a meaningful treatment response. Keywords: CRTH2, clinical trial, eosinophilic asthma, prostaglandin D2

  10. Carbon adaptation influence the antagonistic ability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influences of carbon adaptation on antagonistic activities of three Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains V4, V7 and V10 against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis were determined in this study. Results from this study showed that the P. aeruginosa strains and their adapted strains significantly inhibited the growth of mycelium ...

  11. Calcium antagonists for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkel, G. J. E.; Feigin, V. L.; Algra, A.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary ischaemia is a frequent cause of poor outcome in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Its pathogenesis has not been elucidated yet, but may be related to vasospasm. Experimental studies have indicated that calcium antagonists can prevent or reverse vasospasm and have

  12. Antagonistic properties of microogranisms associated with cassava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antagonistic properties of indigenous microflora from cassava starch, flour and grated cassava were investigated using the conventional streak, novel ring and well diffusion methods. Antagonism was measured by zone of inhibition between the fungal plug and bacterial streak/ring. Bacillus species were more effective ...

  13. Alopecia induced by tumour necrosis factor-alpha antagonists: description of 52 cases and disproportionality analysis in a nationwide pharmacovigilance database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béné, Johana; Moulis, Guillaume; Auffret, Marine; Lefevre, Guillaume; Coquerelle, Pascal; Coupe, Patrick; Péré, Patrice; Gautier, Sophie

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this research was to describe the cases of TNF-α antagonist-related alopecia reported in the French Pharmacovigilance Database (FPVD) and to investigate the association between exposure to TNF-α antagonists and occurrence of alopecia. All spontaneous reports of TNF-α antagonist-related alopecia recorded in the FPVD between January 2000 and April 2012 were colligated and described. We conducted disproportionality analyses (case/non-case method) to assess the link between the occurrence of alopecia and exposure to TNF-α antagonists. Cases were all reports of alopecia and non-cases were all other reports recorded during the study period. Exposure to TNF-α antagonists was sought in cases and in non-cases. Reporting odds ratios (RORs) were calculated to assess the association. Docetaxel was used as positive control and acetaminophen as negative control. We performed sensitivity analyses excluding cases of androgenic alopecia and those occurring in psoriatic patients. Among 282 590 spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) collated in the FPVD, 1068 cases (alopecia reports) were identified. Of these cases, 52 (4.9%) occurred during exposure to TNF-α antagonists (18 involved infliximab, 17 adalimumab, 15 etanercept and 2 certolizumab). Exposure to TNF-α antagonists was more frequent among alopecia reports than among other ADR reports for all TNF-α antagonists pooled (ROR 3.0, 95% CI 2.3, 4.0) as well as for each antagonist separately, with similar values. Sensitivity analyses yielded similar results. The RORs were 29.9 (95% CI 25.3, 35.5) with docetaxel and 0.3 (95% CI 0.2, 0.4) with acetaminophen. The present study confirms a strong link between TNF-α antagonist exposure (class effect) and the occurrence of alopecia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Antagonist-Elicited Cannabis Withdrawal in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, David A.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M.; Darwin, William D.; Kelly, Deanna L.; McMahon, Robert P.; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40–120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0–8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses. PMID:21869692

  15. Antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; McMahon, Robert P; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40-120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0-8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses.

  16. Combining elements from two antagonists of formyl peptide receptor 2 generates more potent peptidomimetic antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Holdfeldt, Andre; Nielsen, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Structural optimization of a peptidomimetic antagonist of formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) was explored by an approach involving combination of elements from the two most potent FPR2 antagonists described: a Rhodamine B-conjugated 10-residue gelsonin-derived peptide (i.e., PBP10, Rh......B-QRLFQVKGRR-OH) and the palmitoylated α-peptide/β-peptoid hybrid Pam-(Lys-βNspe)6-NH2. This generated an array of hybrid compounds from which a new subclass of receptor-selective antagonists was identified. The most potent representatives displayed activity in the low nanomolar range. The resulting stable and potent FPR2-selective...... antagonists (i.e., RhB-(Lys-βNphe)n-NH2; n = 4–6) are expected to become valuable tools in further elucidation of the physiological role of FPR2 in health and disease....

  17. Similarities and differences between calcium antagonists: pharmacological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.; Pfaffendorf, M.

    1993-01-01

    Characteristics of three different calcium antagonist groups: Most important calcium antagonists used to treat cardiovascular disease belong to one of three main groups, phenylalkylamines, dihydropyridines and benzothiazepines. The best known drug in each group is verapamil, nifedipine and

  18. Protective effects of calcium antagonists in different organs and tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of calcium antagonists in ischemic disorders of various tissues is attributed to vasodilator and antivasoconstrictor activities. A direct, energy-conserving, antiischemic effect of certain calcium antagonists has been claimed repeatedly by basic scientists. The clinical

  19. Androgen receptor functional analyses by high throughput imaging: determination of ligand, cell cycle, and mutation-specific effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam T Szafran

    Full Text Available Understanding how androgen receptor (AR function is modulated by exposure to steroids, growth factors or small molecules can have important mechanistic implications for AR-related disease therapies (e.g., prostate cancer, androgen insensitivity syndrome, AIS, and in the analysis of environmental endocrine disruptors.We report the development of a high throughput (HT image-based assay that quantifies AR subcellular and subnuclear distribution, and transcriptional reporter gene activity on a cell-by-cell basis. Furthermore, simultaneous analysis of DNA content allowed determination of cell cycle position and permitted the analysis of cell cycle dependent changes in AR function in unsynchronized cell populations. Assay quality for EC50 coefficients of variation were 5-24%, with Z' values reaching 0.91. This was achieved by the selective analysis of cells expressing physiological levels of AR, important because minor over-expression resulted in elevated nuclear speckling and decreased transcriptional reporter gene activity. A small screen of AR-binding ligands, including known agonists, antagonists, and endocrine disruptors, demonstrated that nuclear translocation and nuclear "speckling" were linked with transcriptional output, and specific ligands were noted to differentially affect measurements for wild type versus mutant AR, suggesting differing mechanisms of action. HT imaging of patient-derived AIS mutations demonstrated a proof-of-principle personalized medicine approach to rapidly identify ligands capable of restoring multiple AR functions.HT imaging-based multiplex screening will provide a rapid, systems-level analysis of compounds/RNAi that may differentially affect wild type AR or clinically relevant AR mutations.

  20. Optimised deconjugation of androgenic steroid conjugates in bovine urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikael; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Andersen, Jens Hinge

    2017-01-01

    and glucuronidase resulting in free steroids in the extract. It is well known that some sulphates are not deconjugated using aryl sulphatase; instead, for example, solvolysis can be used for deconjugation of these aliphatic sulphates. The effectiveness of solvolysis on androgenic steroid sulphates was tested...... with selected aliphatic steroid sulphates (boldenone sulphate, nortestosteron sulphate and testosterone sulphate), and the method was validated for analysis of androgenic steroids in bovine urine using free steroids, steroid sulphates and steroid glucuronides as standards. Glucuronidase and sulphuric acid......After administration of steroids to animals the steroids are partially metabolised in the liver and kidney to phase 2 metabolites, i.e., glucuronic acid or sulphate conjugates. During analysis these conjugated metabolites are normally deconjugated enzymatically with aryl sulphatase...

  1. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-02-05

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic-clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully.

  2. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome with paratesticular leiomyoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hoon; Oh, Hyung Woo; Lee, Mi Ja; Lim, Dong Hoon [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is a rare, X-linked recessive disorder. Patients with AIS may develop primary amenorrhea due to androgen receptor resistance, resulting in a normal female phenotype and male (XY) karyotype. We report a case of a 30-year-old woman who was diagnosed with complete AIS. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral inguinal cryptorchidism and no ovaries and uterus. After gonadectomy, the inguinal mass was confirmed as testicular atrophy with hamartomatous proliferation of Leydig cells and paratesticular leiomyoma. Although these tumors have been reported in association with AIS, this is the first case of paratesticular leiomyoma with hamartomatous proliferation of Leydig cells in atrophic testes being reported in Korea.

  3. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome with paratesticular leiomyoma: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Hoon; Oh, Hyung Woo; Lee, Mi Ja; Lim, Dong Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is a rare, X-linked recessive disorder. Patients with AIS may develop primary amenorrhea due to androgen receptor resistance, resulting in a normal female phenotype and male (XY) karyotype. We report a case of a 30-year-old woman who was diagnosed with complete AIS. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral inguinal cryptorchidism and no ovaries and uterus. After gonadectomy, the inguinal mass was confirmed as testicular atrophy with hamartomatous proliferation of Leydig cells and paratesticular leiomyoma. Although these tumors have been reported in association with AIS, this is the first case of paratesticular leiomyoma with hamartomatous proliferation of Leydig cells in atrophic testes being reported in Korea

  4. Selective androgen receptor modulators in preclinical and clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Mohler, Michael L; Bohl, Casey E; Miller, Duane D; Dalton, James T

    2008-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the function of several organs including primary and accessory sexual organs, skeletal muscle, and bone, making it a desirable therapeutic target. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) bind to the AR and demonstrate osteo- and myo-anabolic activity; however, unlike testosterone and other anabolic steroids, these nonsteroidal agents produce less of a growth effect on prostate and other secondary sexual organs. SARMs provide therapeutic opportunities in a variety of diseases, including muscle wasting associated with burns, cancer, or end-stage renal disease, osteoporosis, frailty, and hypogonadism. This review summarizes the current standing of research and development of SARMs, crystallography of AR with SARMs, plausible mechanisms for their action and the potential therapeutic indications for this emerging class of drugs.

  5. Evaluation of androgenic activity of Mucuna pruriens in male rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanolic extract of Mucuna pruriens seed was tested for their possible androgenic activity in Wister male albino rats. The methanolic extract of M. pruriens plant was gavaged separately into 2 group of rat at similar doses of 1000 mg/kg b.wt and 1500 mg/kg b.wt for 30 days. At the end of the treatment, the animals were ...

  6. Androgen Receptor Mutations and Polymorphisms in African American Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Koochekpour, Shahriar; Buckles, Erick; Shourideh, Mojgan; Hu, SiYi; Chandra, Dhyan; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Attwood, Kristopher

    2014-01-01

    The Androgen receptor (AR) plays a central role in the normal development of the prostate gland, in prostate carcinogenesis, and in the progression of prostate cancer (PCa) to advanced metastatic disease. African American (AA) men with PCa present with higher tumor volume, more advanced tumor stage, and higher Gleason score. This could be in part related to the AR expression or activity in the prostate tissue of AA men, or to unique mutations or polymorphisms of the AR. In Caucasian Americans...

  7. Androgen effect on body composition and fat metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, M D

    2000-01-01

    Recognizing the adverse metabolic effects of predominantly visceral body fat distribution associated with low testosterone levels, researchers have investigated the effects of androgen treatment on body fat distribution in men. This presentation reviews the results of research on acute and longer-term effects of treatment with testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. Methods for investigating these results, including measurement of lipoprotein lipase activity and of radiolabeled fat uptake and turnover, are described and discussed.

  8. Androgen receptor overexpression in prostate cancer in type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Zoltán Lutz

    2018-02-01

    Conclusions: We report elevated androgen receptor signaling and activity presumably due to altered insulin/IGF-1 receptors and decreased levels of protective estrogen receptor ligands in prostate cancer in men with diabetes. Our results reveal new insights why these patients have a worse prognosis. These findings provide the basis for future clinical trials to investigate treatment response in patients with prostate cancer and diabetes.

  9. Isolated micropenis reveals partial androgen insensitivity syndrome confirmed by molecular analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bhangoo, Amrit; Paris, Francoise; Philibert, Pascal; Audran, Francoise; Ten, Svetlana; Sultan, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) is the milder variant of androgen receptor (AR) defects. The subtle effects of AR mutations present in a patient with micropenis, peno-scrotal hypospadias, infertility, clitoromegaly and posterior labial fusion. We studied the association of isolated micropenis with the genetic defects resulting in androgen resistance, that is, AR gene defects and 5-α reductase type 2 (SRD5A2) deficiency. We describe two cases of isolated micropenis: one in a 14-...

  10. Hematopoietic androgen receptor deficiency promotes visceral fat deposition in male mice without impairing glucose homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Rubinow, K. B.; Wang, S.; den Hartigh, L. J.; Subramanian, S.; Morton, G. J.; Buaas, F. W.; Lamont, D.; Gray, N.; Braun, R. E.; Page, S. T.

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deficiency in men increases body fat, but the mechanisms by which testosterone suppresses fat deposition have not been elucidated fully. Adipose tissue macrophages express the androgen receptor (AR) and regulate adipose tissue remodeling. Thus, testosterone signaling in macrophages could alter the paracrine function of these cells and thereby contribute to the metabolic effects of androgens in men. A metabolic phenotyping study was performed to determine whether the loss of AR signal...

  11. Improvement in scalp hair growth in androgen-deficient women treated with testosterone: a questionnaire study

    OpenAIRE

    Glaser, RL; Dimitrakakis, C; Messenger, AG

    2012-01-01

    Background Androgens are thought to have an adverse effect on female scalp hair growth. However, our clinical experience of androgen replacement therapy in women with androgen deficiency, in which hair loss was seldom reported, led us to question this concept. Objectives To evaluate the effect of subcutaneous testosterone therapy on scalp hair growth in female patients. Methods A total of 285 women, treated for a minimum of 1 year with subcutaneous testosterone implants for symptoms of androg...

  12. Telomerase as an Androgen Receptor-Regulated Target in Selenium Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    androgens through de novo steroidogenesis (41–43). Xeno - graft studies have shown that knocking down AR expres- sion by shRNA could delay the progression...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-08-1-0291 TITLE: Telomerase as an Androgen Receptor...March 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Telomerase as an Androgen Receptor-Regulated Target in Selenium Chemoprevention of Prostate

  13. Biological aspects of the potential interaction between androgen suppression and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zietman, Anthony L.

    1996-01-01

    It is a basic axiom of radiotherapy that the radiation dose required for tumor eradication increases with increasing tumor volume. These Patterns of Care Studies and prospective studies using rebiopsy have shown that this holds true for prostate cancer as well. Despite our best endeavors with conventional dose, there remains a substantial element of local failure following radiotherapy, and this is T-stage related. Unlikely many other solid tumors, a convenient method of volume reduction exists for prostate carcinoma. Approximately 90% demonstrate shrinkage following androgen suppression, an effect that is more pronounced at the primary site than metastatic sites. Transrectal ultrasound studies have shown a median of 40% prostatic tumor volume reduction after 3-4 months of androgen suppression. With more protracted androgen suppression the shrinkage progresses and a small minority of patients may actually have a complete response determined pathologically. Animal models demonstrate clearly that the TCD 50 of androgen dependent tumors may be decreased by prior androgen depression. This effect is most pronounced if radiation is deferred until the time of maximal tumor regression. The advantage is lost if the tumor is allowed to regrow in an androgen independent fashion to its original volume. It is not clear whether this benefit of neoadjuvant androgen suppression results solely from volume shrinkage. The potential for synergy exists as both radiation and androgen suppression have an element of apoptosis as a common pathway of cell death. Although apoptosis is certainly the major cause of cell death from androgen suppression its' contribution to radiation cell kill in prostatic adenocarcinomas is yet to be evaluated. If the two effects are additive and not synergistic, then sequence should be unimportant. Animal models, however, demonstrate that the TCD 50 of androgen dependent tumors is not significantly reduced by adjuvant androgen suppression. Human data is still

  14. Taxifolin suppresses rat and human testicular androgen biosynthetic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Fei; Tian, Erpo; Wang, Li; Li, Xiaoheng; Zhu, Qiqi; Wang, Yiyan; Zhong, Ying; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2018-03-01

    Taxifolin is a flavonoid. It has been used as a chemopreventive agent and supplement. It may have some beneficial effects to treat prostate cancer by suppressing androgen production in Leydig cells. The objective of the present study was to study the effects of taxifolin on androgen production of rat Leydig cells isolated from immature testis and some rat and human testosterone biosynthetic enzyme activities. Rat Leydig cells were incubated with 100μM taxifolin without (basal) or with 10ng/ml luteinizing hormone (LH), 10mM 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8BR), and steroid enzyme substrates (20μM): 22R-hydroxychloesterol, pregnenolone, progesterone, and androstenedione. The medium concentrations of 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol (DIOL) and testosterone were measured. Taxifolin significantly suppressed basal, LH-stimulated, 8BR-stimulated, pregnenolone-mediated, and progesterone-mediated androgen production by Leydig cells. Further study demonstrated that taxifolin inhibited rat 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase with IC 50 values of 14.55±0.013 and 16.75±0.011μM, respectively. Taxifolin also inhibited these two enzyme activities in human testis with IC 50 value of about 100μM. Taxifolin was a competitive inhibitor for these two enzymes when steroid substrates were used. In conclusion, taxifolin may have benefits for the treatment of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Androgen Receptor Genotype in Humans and Susceptibility to Endocrine Disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg Giwercman, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Although animal studies have raised concern that the influence of endocrine-disrupting compounds would obstruct the development of the male reproductive system, in general, exposure levels far above those found in humans have been needed to induce reproductive toxicity in animal models. Human data are inconclusive and have evoked the question whether endocrine-disrupting compounds can have any impact on hormonal function and thus health consequences when natural hormones are present. Indeed, many contaminants with hormone-like activity are much less potent than endogenous hormones themselves: 17β-oestradiol was, for instance, estimated to be 17,000 times more potent than o,p'-DDT. However, humans are exposed to a multitude of agents, and when present in sufficient number and concentration, they might in principle act collected on the actions of endogenous hormones. Whether such effects will be physiologically relevant is still not known. Nevertheless, in the worst-case scenario, there are no threshold levels below which there are no effects at all, and one target molecule is the androgen receptor. This mini review focuses on the androgen receptor gene, its link with classical endocrine disruptors and smoking, and how common genetic variants in the androgen receptor gene may influence physiological outcomes. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Spatial memory performance in androgen insensitive male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bryan A; Watson, Neil V

    2005-06-02

    Masculinization of the developing rodent brain critically depends on the process of aromatization of circulating testosterone (T) to its estrogenic metabolite 17beta-estradiol, which subsequently interacts with estrogen receptors to permanently masculinize the brain. However, it remains unclear what role other androgenic mechanisms may play in the process of masculinization. A novel way of examining this is through the study of male rats that express the tfm mutation of the androgen receptor (AR) gene; such males are fully androgen insensitive and manifest a female phenotype due to a failure of AR-mediated masculinization of peripheral structures. Because tfm-affected males develop secretory testes and have near-normal T titers during development, aromatization would be expected to proceed normally, and brain mechanisms may be developmentally masculinized despite the feminized periphery. We compared tfm-affected males (X(tfm)Y) with normal males and females in the Morris Water Maze, a task in which males typically perform better than females. Performance of tfm-affected males was intermediate between that of normal males and females. While an overall male superiority was found in the task, the X(tfm)Y group reached male-typical escape latencies faster than females. Furthermore, in the X(tfm)Y group, the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus was significantly larger than in females. These results support the suggestion that that AR mediated mechanisms contribute to the masculinization of spatial behaviours and hippocampal morphology, and this may be independent of estrogenic processes.

  17. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-04-30

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a K(d) value of 2.6 µM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases.

  18. Prenatal androgen exposure and children's aggressive behavior and activity level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Debra; Pasterski, Vickie; Neufeld, Sharon; Glover, Vivette; O'Connor, Thomas G; Hindmarsh, Peter C; Hughes, Ieuan A; Acerini, Carlo L; Hines, Melissa

    2017-11-01

    Some human behaviors, including aggression and activity level, differ on average for males and females. Here we report findings from two studies investigating possible relations between prenatal androgen and children's aggression and activity level. For study 1, aggression and activity level scores for 43 girls and 38 boys, aged 4 to 11years, with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH, a genetic condition causing increased adrenal androgen production beginning prenatally) were compared to those of similarly-aged, unaffected relatives (41 girls, 31 boys). Girls with CAH scored higher on aggression than unaffected girls, d=0.69, and unaffected boys scored higher on activity level than unaffected girls, d=0.50. No other group differences were significant. For study 2, the relationship of amniotic fluid testosterone to aggression and activity level was investigated in typically-developing children (48 girls, 44 boys), aged 3 to 5years. Boys scored higher than girls on aggression, d=0.41, and activity level, d=0.50. However, amniotic fluid testosterone was not a significant predictor of aggression or activity level for either sex. The results of the two studies provide some support for an influence of prenatal androgen exposure on children's aggressive behavior, but not activity level. The within-sex variation in amniotic fluid testosterone may not be sufficient to allow reliable assessment of relations to aggression or activity level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Steroid Androgen Exposure during Development Has No Effect on Reproductive Physiology of Biomphalaria glabrata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satwant Kaur

    Full Text Available Gastropod mollusks have been proposed as alternative models for male reproductive toxicity testing, due to similarities in their reproductive anatomy compared to mammals, together with evidence that endocrine disrupting chemicals can cause effects in some mollusks analogous to those seen in mammals. To test this hypothesis, we used the freshwater pulmonate snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, for which various genetic tools and a draft genome have recently become available, to investigate the effects of two steroid androgens on the development of mollusk secondary sexual organs. Here we present the results of exposures to two potent androgens, the vertebrate steroid; 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT and the pharmaceutical anabolic steroid; 17α-methyltestosterone (MT, under continuous flow-through conditions throughout embryonic development and up to sexual maturity. Secondary sexual gland morphology, histopathology and differential gene expression analysis were used to determine whether steroid androgens stimulated or inhibited organ development. No significant differences between tissues from control and exposed snails were identified, suggesting that these androgens elicited no biologically detectable response normally associated with exposure to androgens in vertebrate model systems. Identifying no effect of androgens in this mollusk is significant, not only in the context of the suitability of mollusks as alternative model organisms for testing vertebrate androgen receptor agonists but also, if applicable to other similar mollusks, in terms of the likely impacts of androgens and anti-androgenic pollutants present in the aquatic environment.

  20. Therapeutic potential of the SARMs: revisiting the androgen receptor for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Scott; Narayanan, Ramesh; Dalton, James T

    2006-04-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMS) bind to the androgen receptor and demonstrate anabolic activity in a variety of tissues; however, unlike testosterone and other anabolic steroids, these nonsteroidal agents are able to induce bone and muscle growth, as well as shrinking the prostate. The potential of SARMS is to maximise the positive attributes of steroidal androgens as well as minimising negative effects, thus providing therapeutic opportunities in a variety of diseases, including muscle wasting associated with burns, cancer, end-stage renal disease, osteoporosis, frailty and hypogonadism. This review summarises androgen physiology, the current status of the R&D of SARMS and potential therapeutic indications for this emerging class of drugs.

  1. A precisely substituted benzopyran targets androgen refractory prostate cancer cells through selective modulation of estrogen receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Jain, Ashish; Singh, Vishal [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Sarswat, Amit [Division of Medicinal & Process Chemistry, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Maikhuri, Jagdamba P. [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Sharma, Vishnu L. [Division of Medicinal & Process Chemistry, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Gupta, Gopal, E-mail: g_gupta@cdri.res.in [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India)

    2015-03-15

    Dietary consumption of phytoestrogens like genistein has been linked with lower incidence of prostate cancer. The estradiol-like benzopyran core of genistein confers estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) selectivity that imparts weak anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells. DL-2-[4-(2-piperidinoethoxy)phenyl]-3-phenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (BP), a SERM designed with benzopyran core, targeted androgen independent prostate cancer (PC-3) cells 14-times more potently than genistein, ~ 25% more efficiently than tamoxifen and 6.5-times more actively than ICI-182780, without forfeiting significant specificity in comparison to genistein. BP increased apoptosis (annexin-V and TUNEL labeling), arrested cell cycle, and significantly increased caspase-3 activity along with mRNA expressions of estrogen receptor (ER)-β and FasL (qPCR) in PC-3 cells. In classical ERE-luc reporter assay BP behaved as a potent ER-α antagonist and ER-β agonist. Accordingly, it decreased expression of ER-α target PS2 (P < 0.01) and increased expression of ER-β target TNF-α (P < 0.05) genes in PC-3. ER-β deficient PC-3 (siRNA-transfected) was resistant to apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions of SERMs, including stimulation of FasL expression by BP. BP significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt and ERK-1/2, JNK and p38 in PC-3 (immunoblotting), and thus adopted a multi-pathway mechanism to exert a more potent anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells than natural and synthetic SERMs. Its precise ER-subtype specific activity presents a unique lead structure for further optimization. - Highlights: • BP with benzopyran core of genistein was identified for ER-β selective action. • BP was 14-times more potent than genistien in targeting prostate cancer cells. • It behaved as a potent ER-β agonist and ER-α antagonist in gene reporter assays. • BP's anti-proliferative action was inhibited significantly in ER-β deficient cells. • BP — a unique lead

  2. Selling androgenic anabolic steroids by the pound: identification and analysis of popular websites on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordaro, F G; Lombardo, S; Cosentino, M

    2011-12-01

    Internet websites offering androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) were identified and available products were examined. Keywords for the website search were: "anabolic steroids," "anabolic steroids buy," "anabolic steroid purchase." The first 10 websites offering AAS in the first 10 pages of results were considered. At least two AAS-containing products per website were selected. Thirty AAS-selling websites were identified, mainly located in the United States (46.7%) and Europe (30%). Most websites sold other anabolic/ergogenic products (clenbuterol, 76.7%; GH/IGF, 60.0%; thyroid hormones, 46.7%; erythropoietin, 30.0%; insulin, 20.0%) or products for AAS-related adverse effects (mainly: estrogen antagonists, 63.3%; products for erectile dysfunction, 56.7%; 5α-reductase inhibitors, 33.3%; anti-acne products, 33.3%). AAS were sold as medicines (69.6%) or as dietary supplements (30.4%). AAS in medicines were mainly: nandronole (20.4%), methandrostenolone (18.4%), and testosterone (12.2%). Dietary supplements contained mainly DHEA and included several fake compounds. Manufacturers were declared for 97.9% of medicines and 66.7% of dietary supplements; however, several manufacturers were not found on the Internet. Described benefits were usually few adverse effects and no estrogenicity. Toxicity was seldom reported and presented as mild. Recommended doses were two-fourfold higher than current medical recommendations. In conclusion, misleading information and deceiving practices were common findings on AAS-selling websites, indicating their deleterious potential for public health. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Differentially expressed androgen-regulated genes in androgen-sensitive tissues reveal potential biomarkers of early prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Dogus Murat; Allioli, Nathalie; Decaussin, Myriam; de Bernard, Simon; Ruffion, Alain; Samarut, Jacques; Vlaeminck-Guillem, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    Several data favor androgen receptor implication in prostate cancer initiation through the induction of several gene activation programs. The aim of the study is to identify potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) among androgen-regulated genes (ARG) and to evaluate comparative expression of these genes in normal prostate and normal prostate-related androgen-sensitive tissues that do not (or rarely) give rise to cancer. ARG were selected in non-neoplastic adult human prostatic epithelial RWPE-1 cells stably expressing an exogenous human androgen receptor, using RNA-microarrays and validation by qRT-PCR. Expression of 48 preselected genes was quantified in tissue samples (seminal vesicles, prostate transitional zones and prostate cancers, benign prostatic hypertrophy obtained from surgical specimens) using TaqMan® low-density arrays. The diagnostic performances of these potential biomarkers were compared to that of genes known to be associated with PCa (i.e. PCA3 and DLX1). By crossing expression studies in 26 matched PCa and normal prostate transitional zone samples, and 35 matched seminal vesicle and PCa samples, 14 genes were identified. Similarly, 9 genes were overexpressed in 15 benign prostatic hypertrophy samples, as compared to PCa samples. Overall, we selected 8 genes of interest to evaluate their diagnostic performances in comparison with that of PCA3 and DLX1. Among them, 3 genes: CRYAB, KCNMA1 and SDPR, were overexpressed in all 3 reference non-cancerous tissues. The areas under ROC curves of these genes reached those of PCA3 (0.91) and DLX1 (0.94). We identified ARG with reduced expression in PCa and with significant diagnostic values for discriminating between cancerous and non-cancerous prostatic tissues, similar that of PCA3. Given their expression pattern, they could be considered as potentially protective against prostate cancer. Moreover, they could be complementary to known genes overexpressed in PCa and included along

  4. Enhanced Androgen Signaling with Androgen Receptor Overexpression in the Osteoblast Lineage Controls Skeletal Turnover, Matrix Quality and Bone Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    or arrest [55], and possibly in wasting diseases associated with androgen deficiency and reduced bone mass, such as HIV [56]. Anabolic steroids...controlled trial of nandrolone decanoate in HIV - infected men with mild to moderate weight loss with recombinant human growth hormone as active reference...alkaline phosphatase subclones of SaOS2 cells [121], and human osteoblastic cells [109]. However, there are also reports, in a variety of model systems

  5. Loss and recovery of androgen receptor protein expression in the adult rat testis following androgen withdrawal by ethane dimethanesulfonate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boycho Nikolov

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Androgens are especially important for the maintenance of spermatogenesis in adulthood and the experimental withdrawal of testosterone (T production by ethane dimenthanesulfonate (EDS is a valuable tool for studying androgen-dependent events of spermatogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the specific changes in immunoexpression of androgen receptor (AR in the testis in relation to degeneration and regeneration of Leydig cell (LC population and seminiferous epithelium. Immunohistochemistry for AR and 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD as well as TUNEL assay for apoptosis were performed on testicular sections of control and EDS-treated rats. Serum LH and T levels were measured by RIA. Our results revealed a total loss of AR immunoexpression from the nuclei of Sertoli (SCs, LCs and peritubular cells during the first week after EDS administration and that coincided with severe drop in T levels. Two weeks after EDS administration, the AR expression was recovered in these cells but normal stage-specificity in SCs was replaced by uniform intensity of AR immunostaining at all the stages of the spermatogenic cycle. The stage-specific pattern of androgen expression in SCs with a maximum at stages VII-VIII appeared 5 weeks after treatment. LC immunoreactivity for 3beta-HSD at different time points after EDS administration correlated with values of T concentration. The maximal germ cell apoptosis on day 7 was followed by total loss of elongated spermatids 2 weeks after EDS treatment. Regeneration of seminiferous epithelium 3 weeks after EDS administration and onwards occurred in tandem with the development of new LC population indicated by the appearance of 3beta-HSD-positive cells and gradual increase in T production. The specific changes in AR after EDS including their loss and recovery in Sertoli cells paralleled with degenerative and regenerative events in Leydig and germ cell populations, confirming close functional

  6. Antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Kölliker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In species across taxa, offspring have means to influence parental investment (PI. PI thus evolves as an interacting phenotype and indirect genetic effects may strongly affect the co-evolutionary dynamics of offspring and parental behaviors. Evolutionary theory focused on explaining how exaggerated offspring solicitation can be understood as resolution of parent-offspring conflict, but the evolutionary origin and diversification of different forms of family interactions remains unclear.In contrast to previous theory that largely uses a static approach to predict how "offspring individuals" and "parental individuals" should interact given conflict over PI, we present a dynamic theoretical framework of antagonistic selection on the PI individuals obtain/take as offspring and the PI they provide as parents to maximize individual lifetime reproductive success; we analyze a deterministic and a stochastic version of this dynamic framework. We show that a zone for equivalent co-adaptation outcomes exists in which stable levels of PI can evolve and be maintained despite fast strategy transitions and ongoing co-evolutionary dynamics. Under antagonistic co-adaptation, cost-free solicitation can evolve as an adaptation to emerging preferences in parents.We show that antagonistic selection across the offspring and parental life-stage of individuals favors co-adapted offspring and parental behavior within a zone of equivalent outcomes. This antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation does not require solicitation to be costly, allows for rapid divergence and evolutionary novelty and potentially explains the origin and diversification of the observed provisioning forms in family life.

  7. Antagonist potential of Trichoderma indigenous isolates for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... Full Length Research Paper. Antagonist potential of Trichoderma indigenous isolates for biological control of Phytophthora palmivora the causative agent of black pod disease on cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) in Côte d'Ivoire. J. Mpika1,4*, I. B. Kébé1, A. E. Issali2, F.K. N'Guessan1, S. Druzhinina3, ...

  8. ARA24/Ran enhances the androgen-dependent NH2- and COOH-terminal interaction of the androgen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Naoki; Ohmori, Yuji; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Higashimura, Yasuki; Okamoto, Kazuki; Isohashi, Fumihide; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Inui, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) acts as an androgen-dependent transcription factor controlling the development of prostate tissue. Upon binding to androgen, AR undergoes a dynamic structural change leading to interaction between the NH 2 - and COOH-terminal regions of AR (N-C interaction). ARA24/Ran, which is a small GTPase, functions as an AR coactivator. Here, we report that ARA24/Ran enhances the N-C interaction of AR. The constitutively GTP- or GDP-bound form of ARA24/Ran repressed the AR N-C interaction. ARA24/Ran did not enhance the transcriptional activities of AR mutants that disrupt the N-C interaction. ARA24/Ran formed an endogenous protein complex with nuclear AR, but not cytoplasmic AR. Unlike SRC-1 with the positive activity for AR N-C interaction, ARA24/Ran did not enhance the transcriptional activity of the COOH-terminal domain-deleted AR mutant that is constitutively localized in the nucleus. These data demonstrate that ARA24/Ran increases AR transactivation by enhancing the AR N-C interaction in the nucleus

  9. Medicinal Chemistry of Competitive Kainate Receptor Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) receptors belong to the group of ionotropic glutamate receptors and are expressed throughout in the central nervous system (CNS). The KA receptors have been shown to be involved in neurophysiological functions such as mossy fiber long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity and are thus potential therapeutic targets in CNS diseases such as schizophrenia, major depression, neuropathic pain and epilepsy. Extensive effort has been made to develop subtype-selective KA receptor antagonists in order to elucidate the physiological function of each of the five subunits known (GluK1−5). However, to date only selective antagonists for the GluK1 subunit have been discovered, which underlines the strong need for continued research in this area. The present review describes the structure−activity relationship and pharmacological profile for 10 chemically distinct classes of KA receptor antagonists comprising, in all, 45 compounds. To the medicinal chemist this information will serve as reference guidance as well as an inspiration for future effort in this field. PMID:22778857

  10. The sexually antagonistic genes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Innocenti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available When selective pressures differ between males and females, the genes experiencing these conflicting evolutionary forces are said to be sexually antagonistic. Although the phenotypic effect of these genes has been documented in both wild and laboratory populations, their identity, number, and location remains unknown. Here, by combining data on sex-specific fitness and genome-wide transcript abundance in a quantitative genetic framework, we identified a group of candidate genes experiencing sexually antagonistic selection in the adult, which correspond to 8% of Drosophila melanogaster genes. As predicted, the X chromosome is enriched for these genes, but surprisingly they represent only a small proportion of the total number of sex-biased transcripts, indicating that the latter is a poor predictor of sexual antagonism. Furthermore, the majority of genes whose expression profiles showed a significant relationship with either male or female adult fitness are also sexually antagonistic. These results provide a first insight into the genetic basis of intralocus sexual conflict and indicate that genetic variation for fitness is dominated and maintained by sexual antagonism, potentially neutralizing any indirect genetic benefits of sexual selection.

  11. Pharmacological analysis of calcium antagonist receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    This work focuses on two aspects of the action of calcium antagonist drugs, namely, the interaction of drugs with receptors for verapamil-like calcium antagonists, and the interactions of drugs with voltage-sensitive calcium fluxes in rat brain synaptosomes. From binding studies I have found that the ligand of choice for labeling the verapamil receptor is (-)[ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil. This drug labels potently, reversibly and stereoselectively two receptors in membranes prepared from rat brain and rabbit skeletal muscle tissues. In equilibrium studies dihydropyridine calcium antagonists interact in a non-competitive fashion, while many non-DHPs are apparently competitive. In-depth kinetic studies in skeletal muscle membranes indicate that the two receptors are linked in a negative heterotropic fashion, and that low-affinity binding of (-) [ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil may be to the diltiazem receptor. However, these studies were not able to distinguish between the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to spatially separate, allosterically coupled receptors, and the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to a subsite of the verapamil receptor

  12. NMDA Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Ates-Alagoz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a psychiatric disorder that affects millions of people worldwide. Individuals battling this disorder commonly experience high rates of relapse, persistent residual symptoms, functional impairment, and diminished well-being. Medications have important utility in stabilizing moods and daily functions of many individuals. However, only one third of patients had considerable improvement with a standard antidepressant after 2 months and all patients had to deal with numerous side effects. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptor family has received special attention because of its critical role in psychiatric disorders. Direct targeting of the NMDA receptor could result in more rapid antidepressant effects. Antidepressant-like effects of NMDA receptor antagonists have been demonstrated in different animal models. MK-801 (a use-dependent channel blocker, and CGP 37849 (an NMDA receptor antagonist have shown antidepressant properties in preclinical studies, either alone or combined with traditional antidepressants. A recent development is use of ketamine clinically for refractory depression. The purpose of this review is to examine and analyze current literature on the role of NMDA receptor antagonists for treatment of depression and whether this is a feasible route in drug discovery.

  13. Contributions by the CAG-repeat Polymorphism of the Androgen Receptor Gene and Circulating Androgens to Muscle Size. Odense Androgen Study - A Population-based Study of 20-29 Year-old Danish Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    -29 years, who matched the background population as regards body mass index, chronic disease, medication, physical activity, smoking, and sociodemographic parameters. Genotyping was performed in 767 men, whole body DXA in 783 men, and MRI in 406 consecutively included men. Main Outcome Measures: Six......-repeat number correlated inversely with thigh and axial muscle area and with lower and upper extremity lean body mass. Except for upper extremity lean body mass, these findings remained significant in multivariate analyses controlling for circulating androgens, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake......Context: The number of CAG-repeats within the CAG-repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene is inversely correlated with the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor. Objective: To study the effect of the CAG-repeat number and circulating androgens on muscle size, to examine...

  14. Bone stroma-derived cells change coregulators recruitment to androgen receptor and decrease cell proliferation in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villagran, Marcelo A.; Gutierrez-Castro, Francisco A.; Pantoja, Diego F.; Alarcon, Jose C.; Fariña, Macarena A.; Amigo, Romina F.; Muñoz-Godoy, Natalia A. [Molecular Endocrinology and Oncology Laboratory, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Pinilla, Mabel G. [Department of Medical Specialties, School of Medicine, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Peña, Eduardo A.; Gonzalez-Chavarria, Ivan; Toledo, Jorge R.; Rivas, Coralia I.; Vera, Juan C. [Department of Physiopathology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); McNerney, Eileen M. [Molecular Endocrinology and Oncology Laboratory, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Onate, Sergio A., E-mail: sergio.onate@udec.cl [Molecular Endocrinology and Oncology Laboratory, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Department of Medical Specialties, School of Medicine, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Department of Urology, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-11-27

    Prostate cancer (CaP) bone metastasis is an early event that remains inactive until later-stage progression. Reduced levels of circulating androgens, due to andropause or androgen deprivation therapies, alter androgen receptor (AR) coactivator expression. Coactivators shift the balance towards enhanced AR-mediated gene transcription that promotes progression to androgen-resistance. Disruptions in coregulators may represent a molecular switch that reactivates latent bone metastasis. Changes in AR-mediated transcription in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-resistant C4-2 cells were analyzed for AR coregulator recruitment in co-culture with Saos-2 and THP-1. The Saos-2 cell line derived from human osteosarcoma and THP-1 cell line representing human monocytes were used to display osteoblast and osteoclast activity. Increased AR activity in androgen-resistant C4-2 was due to increased AR expression and SRC1/TIF2 recruitment and decreased SMRT/NCoR expression. AR activity in both cell types was decreased over 90% when co-cultured with Saos-2 or THP-1 due to dissociation of AR from the SRC1/TIF2 and SMRT/NCoR coregulators complex, in a ligand-dependent and cell-type specific manner. In the absence of androgens, Saos-2 decreased while THP-1 increased proliferation of LNCaP cells. In contrast, both Saos-2 and THP-1 decreased proliferation of C4-2 in absence and presence of androgens. Global changes in gene expression from both CaP cell lines identified potential cell cycle and androgen regulated genes as mechanisms for changes in cell proliferation and AR-mediated transactivation in the context of bone marrow stroma cells. - Highlights: • Decreased corepressor expression change AR in androgen-resistance prostate cancer. • Bone stroma-derived cells change AR coregulator recruitment in prostate cancer. • Bone stroma cells change cell proliferation in androgen-resistant cancer cells. • Global gene expression in CaP cells is modified by bone stroma cells in co

  15. Bone stroma-derived cells change coregulators recruitment to androgen receptor and decrease cell proliferation in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagran, Marcelo A.; Gutierrez-Castro, Francisco A.; Pantoja, Diego F.; Alarcon, Jose C.; Fariña, Macarena A.; Amigo, Romina F.; Muñoz-Godoy, Natalia A.; Pinilla, Mabel G.; Peña, Eduardo A.; Gonzalez-Chavarria, Ivan; Toledo, Jorge R.; Rivas, Coralia I.; Vera, Juan C.; McNerney, Eileen M.; Onate, Sergio A.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) bone metastasis is an early event that remains inactive until later-stage progression. Reduced levels of circulating androgens, due to andropause or androgen deprivation therapies, alter androgen receptor (AR) coactivator expression. Coactivators shift the balance towards enhanced AR-mediated gene transcription that promotes progression to androgen-resistance. Disruptions in coregulators may represent a molecular switch that reactivates latent bone metastasis. Changes in AR-mediated transcription in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-resistant C4-2 cells were analyzed for AR coregulator recruitment in co-culture with Saos-2 and THP-1. The Saos-2 cell line derived from human osteosarcoma and THP-1 cell line representing human monocytes were used to display osteoblast and osteoclast activity. Increased AR activity in androgen-resistant C4-2 was due to increased AR expression and SRC1/TIF2 recruitment and decreased SMRT/NCoR expression. AR activity in both cell types was decreased over 90% when co-cultured with Saos-2 or THP-1 due to dissociation of AR from the SRC1/TIF2 and SMRT/NCoR coregulators complex, in a ligand-dependent and cell-type specific manner. In the absence of androgens, Saos-2 decreased while THP-1 increased proliferation of LNCaP cells. In contrast, both Saos-2 and THP-1 decreased proliferation of C4-2 in absence and presence of androgens. Global changes in gene expression from both CaP cell lines identified potential cell cycle and androgen regulated genes as mechanisms for changes in cell proliferation and AR-mediated transactivation in the context of bone marrow stroma cells. - Highlights: • Decreased corepressor expression change AR in androgen-resistance prostate cancer. • Bone stroma-derived cells change AR coregulator recruitment in prostate cancer. • Bone stroma cells change cell proliferation in androgen-resistant cancer cells. • Global gene expression in CaP cells is modified by bone stroma cells in co

  16. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  17. Human Adrenal Androgens: Regulation of Biosynthesis and Role in Estrogen-Responsive Breast Cancer in a Mouse Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hornsby, Peter

    1997-01-01

    .... An androgen-dependent human breast cancer model was established in the scid mouse. To provide zona reticularis function, essential for adrenal androgen biosynthesis, in human adrenal organoids in the mouse, two approaches are being taken...

  18. [Effect of the estrogen antagonist tamoxifen in the treatment of advanced mastocarcinoma (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szepesi, T; Kärcher, K H

    1977-12-01

    Today the endocrin therapy of the advanced mastocarcinoma is in common use. Besides the already known therapy by estrogens, androgens, gestagens, and steroids, Tamoxifen, and estrogen antagonist, is a very promising therapeutic drug. In the presented study, Tamoxifen was submitted to a critical clinical control during a period of one year from 1st October 1975 until 1st October 1976. After a three months' treatment, a rate of 41% of objective remissions could be obtained. The criteria of success were estimated according to the scheme of Karnofsky. The average remission time is 5,5 months. By a determination of the estrogen receptors it would be possible to realize a therapeutic selection and to achieve a higher remission rate. The authors made an interesting observation, i.e. a probably immuno-stimulating effect which, however, still has to be submitted to further examinations. The side effects are described in detail and the indications are established. Its is astonishing that the subjective ameliorations, i.e. cessation of pains in case of generalized formation of metastases in the bones are much more frequent than the objective remissions. We came to the conclusion that the treatment by Tamoxifen is a valuable alternative in the therapy of the mastocarcinoma, above all in the postmenopausal period if the disease is advanced and incurable.

  19. Calcium regulation of androgen receptor expression in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Blok (Leen); J.E. Perry; J.K. Lindzey; D.J. Tindall; Y. Gong (Yuewen)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractElevation of intracellular calcium levels in the presence of normal androgen levels has been implicated in apoptotic prostate cell death. Since the androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the regulation of growth and differentiation of the prostate, it was of

  20. Anabolic androgenic steroids, an easily forgotten cause of polycythaemia and cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, M S Y; Vilcassim, S; Fedele, P; Grigoriadis, G

    2016-04-01

    Excessive anabolic androgenic steroids (both exogenous and endogenous) are known causes of polycythaemia and ischaemic cardiovascular events. Despite this, they are commonly forgotten in the workup of patients. We report a case of exogenous anabolic androgenic steroid-induced polycythaemia and stroke and explore possible pitfalls for clinicians. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  1. Defining the Construct of Synthetic Androgen Intoxication: An Application of General Brain Arousal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Hildebrandt

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic androgens (i. e., anabolic-androgenic steroids are the primary component to the majority of problematic appearance and performance enhancing drug (APED use. Despite evidence that these substances are associated with increased risk for aggression, violence, body image disturbances, and polypharmacy and can develop a pattern of chronic use consistent with drug dependence, there are no formal definitions of androgen intoxication. Consequently, the purpose of this paper is to establish a testable theory of androgen intoxication. We present evidence and theorize that synthetic androgen intoxication can be defined by a pattern of poor self-regulation characterized by increased propensity for a range of behaviors (e.g., aggression, sex, drug seeking, exercise, etc. via androgen mediated effects on general brain arousal. This theory posits that androgens reduce threshold for emotional reactivity, motor response, and alertness to sensory stimuli and disrupt inhibitory control over the behaviors associated with synthetic androgen use. These changes result from alteration to basic neurocircuitry that amplifies limbic activation and reduces top-down cortical control. The implications for this definition are to inform APED specific hypotheses about the behavioral and psychological effects of APED use and provide a basis for establishing clinical, legal, and public health guidelines to address the use and misuse of these substances.

  2. Penguin chicks benefit from elevated yolk androgen levels under sibling competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud Poisbleau

    Full Text Available Crested penguins (genus Eudyptes have a peculiar hatching pattern, with the first-laid egg (A-egg hatching after the second-laid egg (B-egg and chicks from A-eggs typically having a much lower survival probability. Maternal yolk androgens have been suggested to contribute to the competitive superiority of the B-chick in southern rockhopper penguins Eudyptes chrysocome, given their important role in mediating sibling competition in other species. We therefore increased the yolk androgen levels in freshly-laid eggs and examined the consequences for sibling competition--via effects on embryonic developmental times, chick growth and early survival. We placed one androgen-treated egg and one control egg into each foster nest, matching them for mass, laying date and laying order. The androgen treatment did not significantly affect embryonic developmental times or chick measurements at hatching. However, elevated yolk androgen levels benefitted chick growth in interaction with the number of siblings in a brood. Chicks from androgen-treated eggs had faster growth in the presence of a sibling than chicks from control eggs. Under these circumstances they also had a higher survival probability. Thus maternal androgens appear to reinforce the observed hatching pattern, facilitating brood reduction. This contrasts to most previous studies in other species where yolk androgens have been shown to compensate for the negative consequences of delayed hatching within the brood hierarchy.

  3. Ligand-specific allosteric regulation of coactivator functions of androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sung Hee; Ohgi, Kenneth A.; Nelson, Charles A.; Welsbie, Derek; Chen, Charlie; Sawyers, Charles L.; Rose, David W.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    The androgen receptor not only mediates prostate development but also serves as a key regulator of primary prostatic cancer growth. Although initially responsive to selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs), which cause recruitment of the nuclear receptor–corepressor (N-CoR) complex, resistance invariably occurs, perhaps in response to inflammatory signals. Here we report that dismissal of nuclear receptor–corepressor complexes by specific signals or androgen receptor overexpression results in recruitment of many of the cohorts of coactivator complexes that permits SARMs and natural ligands to function as agonists. SARM-bound androgen receptors appear to exhibit failure to recruit specific components of the coactivators generally bound by liganded nuclear receptors, including cAMP response element-binding protein (CBP)/p300 or coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) to the SARM-bound androgen receptor, although still causing transcriptional activation of androgen receptor target genes. SARM-bound androgen receptors use distinct LXXLL (L, leucine; X, any amino acid) helices in the p160 nuclear receptor interaction domains that may impose selective allosteric effects, providing a component of the molecular basis of differential responses to different classes of ligands by androgen receptor. PMID:16492776

  4. Why do winners keep winning? Androgen mediation of winner but not loser effects in cichlid fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rui F.; Silva, Ana; Canário, Adelino V.M.

    2009-01-01

    Animal conflicts are influenced by social experience such that a previous winning experience increases the probability of winning the next agonistic interaction, whereas a previous losing experience has the opposite effect. Since androgens respond to social interactions, increasing in winners and decreasing in losers, we hypothesized that socially induced transient changes in androgen levels could be a causal mediator of winner/loser effects. To test this hypothesis, we staged fights between dyads of size-matched males of the Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). After the first contest, winners were treated with the anti-androgen cyproterone acetate and losers were supplemented with 11-ketotestosterone. Two hours after the end of the first fight, two contests were staged simultaneously between the winner of the first fight and a naive male and between the loser of first fight and another naive male. The majority (88%) of control winners also won the second interaction, whereas the majority of control losers (87%) lost their second fight, thus confirming the presence of winner/loser effects in this species. As predicted, the success of anti-androgen-treated winners in the second fight decreased significantly to chance levels (44%), but the success of androgenized losers (19%) did not show a significant increase. In summary, the treatment with anti-androgen blocks the winner effect, whereas androgen administration fails to reverse the loser effect, suggesting an involvement of androgens on the winner but not on the loser effect. PMID:19324741

  5. Androgenic alopecia is not useful as an indicator of men at high risk of prostate cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Vermeulen, S.; Heijer, M. den; Oort, I.M. van; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Androgens are assumed to play a central role in the pathophysiology of both prostate cancer (PC) and androgenic alopecia (AA). A correlation between the two phenotypes may be relevant for identification of men at high risk of PC. We evaluated the association between AA at different ages

  6. Combination decongestion therapy in hospitalized heart failure: loop diuretics, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Mentz, Robert J; Greene, Stephen J; Senni, Michele; Sato, Naoki; Nodari, Savina; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Congestion is the most common reason for admissions and readmissions for heart failure (HF). The vast majority of hospitalized HF patients appear to respond readily to loop diuretics, but available data suggest that a significant proportion are being discharged with persistent evidence of congestion. Although novel therapies targeting congestion should continue to be developed, currently available agents may be utilized more optimally to facilitate complete decongestion. The combination of loop diuretics, natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists represents a regimen of currently available therapies that affects early and persistent decongestion, while limiting the associated risks of electrolyte disturbances, hemodynamic fluctuations, renal dysfunction and mortality.

  7. Investigation of orexin-2 selective receptor antagonists: Structural modifications resulting in dual orexin receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skudlarek, Jason W; DiMarco, Christina N; Babaoglu, Kerim; Roecker, Anthony J; Bruno, Joseph G; Pausch, Mark A; O'Brien, Julie A; Cabalu, Tamara D; Stevens, Joanne; Brunner, Joseph; Tannenbaum, Pamela L; Wuelfing, W Peter; Garson, Susan L; Fox, Steven V; Savitz, Alan T; Harrell, Charles M; Gotter, Anthony L; Winrow, Christopher J; Renger, John J; Kuduk, Scott D; Coleman, Paul J

    2017-03-15

    In an ongoing effort to explore the use of orexin receptor antagonists for the treatment of insomnia, dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs) were structurally modified, resulting in compounds selective for the OX 2 R subtype and culminating in the discovery of 23, a highly potent, OX 2 R-selective molecule that exhibited a promising in vivo profile. Further structural modification led to an unexpected restoration of OX 1 R antagonism. Herein, these changes are discussed and a rationale for selectivity based on computational modeling is proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Continuing Development of Alternative High-Throughput Screens to Determine Endocrine Disruption, Focusing on Androgen Receptor, Steroidogenesis, and Thyroid Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    The focus of this meeting is the SAP's review and comment on the Agency's proposed high-throughput computational model of androgen receptor pathway activity as an alternative to the current Tier 1 androgen receptor assay (OCSPP 890.1150: Androgen Receptor Binding Rat Prostate Cyt...

  9. Reduction of periodontal pathogens adhesion by antagonistic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoogmoed, C G; Geertsema-Doornbusch, G I; Teughels, W; Quirynen, M; Busscher, H J; Van der Mei, H C

    2008-02-01

    Periodontitis results from a shift in the subgingival microflora into a more pathogenic direction with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans considered as periodontopathogens. In many cases, treatment procures only a temporary shift towards a less pathogenic microflora. An alternative treatment could be the deliberate colonization of pockets with antagonistic microorganisms to control the adhesion of periodontopathogens. The aim of this study was to identify bacterial strains that reduce adhesion of periodontopathogens to surfaces. Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus crista, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus mitis, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Haemophilus parainfluenzae were evaluated as potential antagonists against P. gingivalis ATCC 33277, P. intermedia ATCC 49046, and A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 43718 as periodontopathogens. Adhesion of periodontopathogens to the bottom plate of a parallel plate flow chamber was studied in the absence (control) and the presence of pre-adhering antagonistic strains up to a surface coverage of 5%. The largest reduction caused by antagonistic strains was observed for P. gingivalis. All antagonistic strains except S. crista ATCC 49999 inhibited the adhesion of P. gingivalis by at least 1.6 cells per adhering antagonist, with the largest significant reduction observed for A. naeslundii ATCC 51655 (3.8 cells per adhering antagonist). Adhering antagonists had a minimal effect on the adhesion of A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 43718. Intermediate but significant reductions were perceived for P. intermedia, most notably caused by S. mitis BMS. The adhesion of P. gingivalis was inhibited best by antagonistic strains, while S. mitis BMS appeared to be the most successful antagonist.

  10. Prenatal androgen excess programs metabolic derangements in pubertal female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaonan; Dai, Xiaonan; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Nannan; Cui, Yugui; Liu, Jiayin

    2013-04-01

    Owing to the heterogeneity in the clinical symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the early pathophysiological mechanisms of PCOS remain unclear. Clinical, experimental, and genetic evidence supports an interaction between genetic susceptibility and the influence of maternal environment in the pathogenesis of PCOS. To determine whether prenatal androgen exposure induced PCOS-related metabolic derangements during pubertal development, we administrated 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in pregnant rats and observed their female offspring from postnatal 4 to 8 weeks. The prenatally androgenized (PNA) rats exhibited more numerous total follicles, cystic follicles, and atretic follicles than the controls. Fasting glucose, insulin, leptin levels, and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance were elevated in the PNA rats at the age of 5-8 weeks. Following intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests, glucose and insulin levels did not differ between two groups; however, the PNA rats showed significantly higher 30- and 60-min glucose levels than the controls after insulin stimulation during 5-8 weeks. In addition, prenatal DHT treatment significantly decreased insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of AKT in the skeletal muscles of 6-week-old PNA rats. The abundance of IR substrate 1 (IRS1) and IRS2 was decreased in the skeletal muscles and liver after stimulation with insulin in the PNA group, whereas phosphorylation of insulin-signaling proteins was unaltered in the adipose tissue. These findings validate the contribution of prenatal androgen excess to metabolic derangements in pubertal female rats, and the impaired insulin signaling through IRS and AKT may result in the peripheral insulin resistance during pubertal development.

  11. Androgenic alopecia and dutasteride in hair mesotherapy: A short review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela B Busanello

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Androgenic alopecia (AGA is the most common cause of patterned hair loss in predisposed men and women. AGA is a multifactorial and polygenetic condition, affecting up to 80% of men and 40-50% of women during life. AGA is characterized by a gradual reduction of the anagen and increase in telagen phase, leading to a progressive follicle miniaturization. As a consequence, terminal hairs are converted into vellus hairs decreasing hair density. The pathophysiology of AGA is heterogeneous and highly complex. A diverse combination of genetical factors, endocrine abnormalities, circulating androgens, drugs, diet and microinflammation in hair follicles of each individual are related to this condition. However, it is well known that androgens are the major modulators of male AGA but their specific action on female AGA is still under debate. Circulating testosterone is converted by 5a-reductase in 5a-dihydrotestosterone (DHT in the periphery, a decrease of anagen phase occur, anticipating catagen phase in a complex process involving apoptosis as probably microinflammation. In AGA treatment, mesotherapy is being used with 5a-reductase inhibitors, especially dutasteride, injected directly on scalp. Thus, this updated review summarized the injectable use of dutasteride based on data available on PubMed until March 2017. Dutasteride, a second-generation inhibitor of 5a-reductase is more potent than finasteride due to the capability of inhibit types 1 and 2 of the enzyme. The efficacy and safety of hair mesotherapy with dutasteride were reported by distinct groups and the best results were achieved when this compound was used in combination with other substances, increasing hair growth. This result could be explained by the multifactorial pathophysiology of AGA, involving hair follicle sensitivity to DHT and microinflammation. Therefore, a multi-therapeutic approach seems to be more effective in AGA management. In conclusion, more studies are needed to

  12. Androgen status in healthy premenopausal women with loss of libido.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyunt, A; Stephen, G; Gibbin, J; Durgan, L; Fielding, A M; Wheeler, M; Price, D E

    2005-01-01

    Androgen deficiency may contribute to female sexual dysfunction and loss of libido. The role of the active metabolite of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), in these conditions is uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine the role of androgens and DHT in the etiology of loss of libido in healthy women. We studied 29 premenopausal women with reduced libido (subjects) and 12 healthy females (controls). They were aged 18 to 45 years and in a stable heterosexual relationship. At 9 a.m. we took venous blood in the follicular phase for serum estradiol, total testosterone, and DHT, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and SHBG levels. Subjects were interviewed by a psychosexual counsellor. Using the modified Wilson's sexual fantasy questionnaire (Baumgartner, Scalora, & Huss, 2002) and sexual satisfaction by Golombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS Rust & Golombok, 1985, 1986) we assessed sexual drive. The total testosterone and DHT levels (mean +/- SD) were respectively 0.97 +/- 0.38 mmol/L and 0.76 +/- 0.37 nmol/L in subjects and 0.97 +/- 0.41 mmol/L and 0.77 +/- 0.15 nmol/L in controls. The SHBG and DHEAS were respectively 65 +/- 42 mmol/L and 3.76 +/- 1.0 umol/L in subjects and 65 +/- 29 mmol/L and 3.67 +/- 2.6 in controls. The scores of the Wilson questionnaire and GRISS were respectively 21 +/- 14.1 and 5 +/- 2.1 in subjects and 35 +/- 14.8 & 2 +/- 1.2 in controls. Subjects were more likely than controls to have low income (48% versus 8%, p libido in otherwise healthy women may be related to relationship problem, depression, psychosocial factors, and sexual dysfunction in the partner but do not appear to be related to androgen status.

  13. The androgen receptor as an emerging target in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanda T

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tatsuo Kanda, Osamu Yokosuka Department of Gastroenterology and Nephrology, Chiba University, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the male-dominant liver diseases with poor prognosis, although treatments for HCC have been progressing in the past decades. Androgen receptor (AR is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Previous studies reported that AR was expressed in human HCC and non-HCC tissues. AR is activated both ligand-dependently and ligand-independently. The latter is associated with a mitogen-activated protein kinase–, v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1–, or signal-transducer and activator of transcription–signaling pathway, which has been implicated in the development of HCC. It has been reported that more than 200 RNA expression levels are altered by androgen treatment. In the liver, androgen-responsive genes are cytochrome P450s, transforming growth factor , vascular endothelial growth factor, and glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa, which are also associated with human hepatocarcinogenesis. Recent studies also revealed that AR plays a role in cell migration and metastasis. It is possible that cross-talk among AR-signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and innate immune response is important for human hepatocarcinogenesis and HCC development. This review shows that AR could play a potential role in human HCC and represent one of the important target molecules for the treatment of HCC. Keywords: vascular endothelial growth factor, angiogenesis, glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa, hepatocarcinogenesis, molecular targets 

  14. Platelet-Rich Plasma in Androgenic Alopecia: Indications, Technique, and Potential Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferneini, Elie M; Beauvais, Daniel; Castiglione, Concetta; Ferneini, Moniek V

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injected into the scalp for the management of androgenic alopecia. A literature review was performed to evaluate the benefits of PRP in androgenic alopecia. Hair restoration has been increasing. PRP's main components of platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor have the potential to stimulate hard and soft tissue wound healing. In general, PRP showed a benefit on patients with androgenic alopecia, including increased hair density and quality. Currently, different PRP preparations are being used with no standard technique. This review found beneficial effects of PRP on androgenic alopecia. However, more rigorous study designs, including larger samples, quantitative measurements of effect, and longer follow-up periods, are needed to solidify the utility of PRP for treating patients with androgenic alopecia. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Is there a correlation between androgens and sexual desire in women?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wåhlin-Jacobsen, Sarah; Pedersen, Anette Tønnes; Kristensen, Ellids

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: For women, the correlation between circulating androgens and sexual desire is inconclusive. Substitution with androgens at physiological levels improves sexual function in women who experience decreased sexual desire and androgen deficiency from surgical menopause, pituitary disease...... between serum levels of androgens and sexual desire in women and whether the level of ADT-G is better correlated than the level of circulating androgens with sexual desire. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study including 560 healthy women aged 19-65 years divided into three age groups. Correlations...... were considered to be statistically significant at PSexual desire was determined as the total score of the sexual desire domain of the Female Sexual Function Index. Total testosterone (TT), calculated free testosterone (FT), androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate...

  16. Ekspresi Gen CYP19 Aromatase, Estrogen, Androgen pada penderita Periodontitis Agresif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahlia Herawati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Kepadatan tulang tubuh ditentukan oleh gen CYP19 aromatase, hormon estrogen dan androgen. Pada periodontitis agresif terjadi perkembangan cepat kerusakan tulang alveolar, dan kerusakan tulang alveoler tersebut tidak diimbangioleh regenerasi tulang. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menunjukkan ekspresi gen CYP19 aromatase, estrogen, androgen pada penderita periodontitis agresif agar dapat untuk menjadi pertimbangan pada saat melakukan perawatan periodontal. Metode penelitian, pemeriksaan ekspresi gen aromatse CYP19 berasal dari spesimen tulang alveolar menggunakan imunohistokimia, pengukuran hormon estrogen dan androgen dari serum menggunakan Vidas: Elfa. Hasil penelitian ekspresi gene CYP19 aromatase pada periodontitis agresif menunjukkan gambaran lebih rendah densitasnya dibandingkan pada nonperiodontitis. Estrogen dan androgen pad aperiodontitis agresif ada kecenderungan lebih rendah dibandingkan pada nonperiodontitis. Kesimpulan regenerasi tulang alveoler pad a periodontitis agresif terhambat karena sedikitnya gen CYP19 aromatase dan hormon estrogen dan androgen yang berperan pada pembentukan tulang alveoler kurang memadai.

  17. Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a Family of Warmblood Horses Caused by a 25-bp Deletion of the DNA-Binding Domain of the Androgen Receptor Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eastman Welsford, G.; Munk, Rikke; Villagómez, Daniel A.F.

    2017-01-01

    Testicular feminization, an earlier term coined for describing a syndrome resulting from failure of masculinization of target organs by androgen secretions during embryo development, has been well documented not only in humans but also in the domestic horse. The pathology, actually referred...... pedigree segregating AIS, where the molecular analyses of the androgen receptor gene in the family provided evidences that a 25-bp deletion of the DNA-binding domain is causative of this equine syndrome....

  18. In human granulosa cells from small antral follicles, androgen receptor mRNA and androgen levels in follicular fluid correlate with FSH receptor mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. E.; Rasmussen, I. A.; Kristensen, Stine Gry

    2011-01-01

    RNA analysis (24 women). Expression of Androgen Receptor (AR) mRNA levels in granulosa cells, and of androstenedione and testosterone in FF, were correlated to the expression of FSH receptor (FSHR), LH receptor (LHR), CYP19 and anti-Müllerian Hormone-receptor2 (AMHR2) mRNA in the granulosa cells and to the FF....... This suggests that follicular sensitivity towards FSH stimulation may be augmented by stimulation of androgens via the AR....

  19. Lepidium meyenii (Maca) does not exert direct androgenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, P; Simonini, F; Iriti, M; Rossoni, M; Faoro, F; Poletti, A; Visioli, F

    2006-04-06

    Maca is the edible root of the Peruvian plant Lepidum meyenii, traditionally employed for its purported aphrodisiac and fertility-enhancing properties. This study aimed at testing the hypothesis that Maca contains testosterone-like compounds, able to bind the human androgen receptor and promote transcription pathways regulated by steroid hormone signaling. Maca extracts (obtained with different solvents: methanol, ethanol, hexane and chloroform) are not able to regulate GRE (glucocorticoid response element) activation. Further experiments are needed to assess which compound, of the several Maca's components, is responsible of the observed in vivo effects.

  20. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald William L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The androgen receptor (AR plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa. However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant and LNCaP (androgen-dependent PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT, Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD, Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2, Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1 – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are

  1. Environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons affect androgen receptor activation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hnida, Christina; Larsen, John Christian

    2000-01-01

    Nine structurally different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were tested for their ability to either agonize or antagonize the human androgen receptor (hAR) in a sensitive reporter gene assay based on CHO cells transiently cotransfected with a hAR vector and an MMTV-LUC vector. Benz......, determined in the presence of increasing concentrations of R1881. No cytotoxic effects of the tested compounds were observed as determined either by metabolic reduction using AlamarBlue (up to 20 mu M) or determined in cells transfected with a constitutively active hAR (up to 10 mu M). The well-known ability...

  2. Intratumoral androgen metabolism and actions in invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Tomomi; McNamara, Keely May; Miki, Yasuhiro; Takagi, Mayu; Rai, Yoshiaki; Ohi, Yasuyo; Sagara, Yasuaki; Tamaki, Kentaro; Hirakawa, Hisashi; Ishida, Takanori; Suzuki, Takashi; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Sasano, Hironobu

    2014-11-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) accounts for approximately 10% of all breast carcinomas and is characterized by higher levels of androgen receptor (AR) compared to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Despite this potentially androgen-responsive environment, the combined importance of AR and androgen metabolism in non-neoplastic lobules and lobular carcinoma remains unknown. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the status of pivotal androgen-producing enzymes 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 5 (17βHSD5) and 5α-reductase type 1 (5αRed1) in 178 cases of ILC and surrounding histologically non-neoplastic lobular tissue using immunohistochemistry. Androgen receptor prevalence was higher but androgenic enzymes lower in ILC than non-neoplastic lobules. In ILC cases the status of 5αRed1 and 17βHSD5 was inversely correlated with tumor size (P = 0.0053) and nuclear grade (P = 0.0290), and significantly associated with better overall survival of the patients (P = 0.0059). Based on these findings, we hypothesized that androgen signaling could act as a tumor suppressor. As previous studies suggested that androgens might partially act by increasing levels of the estrogen inactivating enzyme 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (17βHSD2) in IDC tissues, this was reasonably considered a potential mechanism of androgen actions. Significantly positive correlation was detected between the status of androgenic enzymes and 17βHSD2 (P Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  3. Effects of co-administration of estrogen and androgen on induction of sex reversal in the medaka Oryzias latipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hirokuni; Iwamatsu, Takashi; Shibata, Yasushi; Ishihara, Michio; Kobayashi, Yasuhisa

    2011-05-01

    To investigate how estrogen and androgen affect each other in inducing sex reversal in the medaka, O. Iatipes, 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-methyldihydrotestosterone (MDHT) were co-administered by a convenient method for hormonal treatment, in which freshly fertilized eggs were immersed for 24 h in saline containing either or both of the two sex steroids in different concentrations and/or ratios. The minimal concentrations of E2 and MDHT sufficient to induce the maximal rate of sex reversal from male to female and from female to male were 500 ng/ml and 2.5 ng/ml, respectively, both of which were referred to as the most efficacious dose (MED), and each equivalent for the inducing potency in sex reversal. E2 and MDHT, when simultaneously administered at MED, greatly suppressed each other to induce each corresponding sex reversal. Thus, the present experimental results indicate that E2 and DMHT are antagonists that induce corresponding sex reversal, and suggest that genotypic sex in the medaka might be modified through an unknown factor of common affinity to both sex steroids, by which the pathway of differentiation of either sex could be switched at the early stages of development far before gonadal sex differentiation.

  4. Comparative study on transcriptional activity of 17 parabens mediated by estrogen receptor α and β and androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoko; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Uramaru, Naoto; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2013-07-01

    The structure-activity relationships of parabens which are widely used as preservatives for transcriptional activities mediated by human estrogen receptor α (hERα), hERβ and androgen receptor (hAR) were investigated. Fourteen of 17 parabens exhibited hERα and/or hERβ agonistic activity at concentrations of ≤ 1 × 10(-5)M, whereas none of the 17 parabens showed AR agonistic or antagonistic activity. Among 12 parabens with linear alkyl chains ranging in length from C₁ to C₁₂, heptylparaben (C₇) and pentylparaben (C₅) showed the most potent ERα and ERβ agonistic activity in the order of 10(-7)M and 10(-8)M, respectively, and the activities decreased in a stepwise manner as the alkyl chain was shortened to C₁ or lengthened to C₁₂. Most parabens showing estrogenic activity exhibited ERβ-agonistic activity at lower concentrations than those inducing ERα-agonistic activity. The estrogenic activity of butylparaben was markedly decreased by incubation with rat liver microsomes, and the decrease of activity was blocked by a carboxylesterase inhibitor. These results indicate that parabens are selective agonists for ERβ over ERα; their interactions with ERα/β are dependent on the size and bulkiness of the alkyl groups; and they are metabolized by carboxylesterases, leading to attenuation of their estrogenic activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of the molecular networks in androgen dependent and independent prostate cancer revealed fragile and robust subsystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Tasseff

    Full Text Available Androgen ablation therapy is currently the primary treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. Unfortunately, in nearly all cases, androgen ablation fails to permanently arrest cancer progression. As androgens like testosterone are withdrawn, prostate cancer cells lose their androgen sensitivity and begin to proliferate without hormone growth factors. In this study, we constructed and analyzed a mathematical model of the integration between hormone growth factor signaling, androgen receptor activation, and the expression of cyclin D and Prostate-Specific Antigen in human LNCaP prostate adenocarcinoma cells. The objective of the study was to investigate which signaling systems were important in the loss of androgen dependence. The model was formulated as a set of ordinary differential equations which described 212 species and 384 interactions, including both the mRNA and protein levels for key species. An ensemble approach was chosen to constrain model parameters and to estimate the impact of parametric uncertainty on model predictions. Model parameters were identified using 14 steady-state and dynamic LNCaP data sets taken from literature sources. Alterations in the rate of Prostatic Acid Phosphatase expression was sufficient to capture varying levels of androgen dependence. Analysis of the model provided insight into the importance of network components as a function of androgen dependence. The importance of androgen receptor availability and the MAPK/Akt signaling axes was independent of androgen status. Interestingly, androgen receptor availability was important even in androgen-independent LNCaP cells. Translation became progressively more important in androgen-independent LNCaP cells. Further analysis suggested a positive synergy between the MAPK and Akt signaling axes and the translation of key proliferative markers like cyclin D in androgen-independent cells. Taken together, the results support the targeting of both the Akt and MAPK

  6. Diphenyl Purine Derivatives as Peripherally Selective Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulp, Alan; Bortoff, Katherine; Zhang, Yanan; Seltzman, Herbert; Mathews, James; Snyder, Rodney; Fennell, Tim; Maitra, Rangan

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonists are potentially useful for the treatment of several diseases. However, clinical development of several CB1 antagonists was halted due to central nervous system (CNS)-related side effects including depression and suicidal ideation in some users. Recently, studies have indicated that selective regulation of CB1 receptors in the periphery is a viable strategy for treating several important disorders. Past efforts to develop peripherally selective antagonists of CB1 have largely targeted rimonabant, an inverse agonist of CB1. Reported here are our efforts toward developing a peripherally selective CB1 antagonist based on the otenabant scaffold. Even though otenabant penetrates the CNS, it is unique among CB1 antagonists that have been clinically tested because it has properties that are normally associated with peripherally selective compounds. Our efforts have resulted in an orally absorbed compound that is a potent and selective CB1 antagonist with limited penetration into the CNS. PMID:23098108

  7. Differentially expressed androgen-regulated genes in androgen-sensitive tissues reveal potential biomarkers of early prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogus Murat Altintas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several data favor androgen receptor implication in prostate cancer initiation through the induction of several gene activation programs. The aim of the study is to identify potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa among androgen-regulated genes (ARG and to evaluate comparative expression of these genes in normal prostate and normal prostate-related androgen-sensitive tissues that do not (or rarely give rise to cancer. METHODS: ARG were selected in non-neoplastic adult human prostatic epithelial RWPE-1 cells stably expressing an exogenous human androgen receptor, using RNA-microarrays and validation by qRT-PCR. Expression of 48 preselected genes was quantified in tissue samples (seminal vesicles, prostate transitional zones and prostate cancers, benign prostatic hypertrophy obtained from surgical specimens using TaqMan® low-density arrays. The diagnostic performances of these potential biomarkers were compared to that of genes known to be associated with PCa (i.e. PCA3 and DLX1. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: By crossing expression studies in 26 matched PCa and normal prostate transitional zone samples, and 35 matched seminal vesicle and PCa samples, 14 genes were identified. Similarly, 9 genes were overexpressed in 15 benign prostatic hypertrophy samples, as compared to PCa samples. Overall, we selected 8 genes of interest to evaluate their diagnostic performances in comparison with that of PCA3 and DLX1. Among them, 3 genes: CRYAB, KCNMA1 and SDPR, were overexpressed in all 3 reference non-cancerous tissues. The areas under ROC curves of these genes reached those of PCA3 (0.91 and DLX1 (0.94. CONCLUSIONS: We identified ARG with reduced expression in PCa and with significant diagnostic values for discriminating between cancerous and non-cancerous prostatic tissues, similar that of PCA3. Given their expression pattern, they could be considered as potentially protective against prostate cancer. Moreover, they could

  8. Hypocretin antagonists in insomnia treatment and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Chad; Cao, Michelle; Guilleminault, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Hypocretin neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep through stabilization of sleep promoting GABAergic and wake promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. Hypocretin also influences other physiologic processes such as metabolism, appetite, learning and memory, reward and addiction, and ventilatory drive. The discovery of hypocretin and its effect upon the sleep-wake cycle has led to the development of a new class of pharmacologic agents that antagonize the physiologic effects of hypocretin (i.e. hypocretin antagonists). Further investigation of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side-effect profile of currently available hypnotics (e.g. impaired cognition, confusional arousals, and motor balance difficulties). However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle while also influencing non-sleep physiologic processes may create an entirely different but equally concerning side-effect profile such as transient loss of muscle tone (i.e. cataplexy) and a dampened respiratory drive. In this review, we will discuss the discovery of hypocretin and its receptors, hypocretin and the sleep-wake cycle, hypocretin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia, and other implicated functions of the hypocretin system.

  9. Sexually antagonistic selection in human male homosexuality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Camperio Ciani

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness, accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait.

  10. Sexually Antagonistic Selection in Human Male Homosexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Cermelli, Paolo; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling ‘Darwinian paradox’. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness), accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait. PMID:18560521

  11. Sphingosine kinase-1 is central to androgen-regulated prostate cancer growth and survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Dayon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1 is an oncogenic lipid kinase notably involved in response to anticancer therapies in prostate cancer. Androgens regulate prostate cancer cell proliferation, and androgen deprivation therapy is the standard of care in the management of patients with advanced disease. Here, we explored the role of SphK1 in the regulation of androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell growth and survival. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Short-term androgen removal induced a rapid and transient SphK1 inhibition associated with a reduced cell growth in vitro and in vivo, an event that was not observed in the hormono-insensitive PC-3 cells. Supporting the critical role of SphK1 inhibition in the rapid effect of androgen depletion, its overexpression could impair the cell growth decrease. Similarly, the addition of dihydrotestosterone (DHT to androgen-deprived LNCaP cells re-established cell proliferation, through an androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt dependent stimulation of SphK1, and inhibition of SphK1 could markedly impede the effects of DHT. Conversely, long-term removal of androgen support in LNCaP and C4-2B cells resulted in a progressive increase in SphK1 expression and activity throughout the progression to androgen-independence state, which was characterized by the acquisition of a neuroendocrine (NE-like cell phenotype. Importantly, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway--by negatively impacting SphK1 activity--could prevent NE differentiation in both cell models, an event that could be mimicked by SphK1 inhibitors. Fascinatingly, the reversability of the NE phenotype by exposure to normal medium was linked with a pronounced inhibition of SphK1 activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report the first evidence that androgen deprivation induces a differential effect on SphK1 activity in hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cell models. These results also suggest that SphK1 activation upon chronic androgen deprivation may serve as a

  12. Targeting Androgen Receptor in Treating HER2 Positive Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Licai; Du, Zhuanyun; Xiong, Xusheng; Ma, Hua; Zhu, Zhenfeng; Gao, Hongwei; Cao, Jiawei; Li, Tong; Li, Hongzhi; Yang, Kaiyan; Chen, Guorong; Richer, Jennifer K; Gu, Haihua

    2017-11-06

    Androgen receptor (AR) is widely expressed in different subtypes of breast cancer (BC). However, it is unclear how AR functions in HER2 positive (+) BC. Knockdown of AR with shRNAs and a new generation anti-androgen drug, Enzalutamide, were used to explore the involvement of AR on the growth of HER2 + BC cells (HCC1954 and SKBR3). AR shRNA or Enzalutamide inhibited the growth of SKBR3 cells at a similar extend compared to trastuzumab, an approved HER2 targeted drug. Combining Enzalutamide with trastuzumab further decreased the growth of HCC1954 and SKBR3 cells compared with single agent alone in vitro. Biochemical analysis revealed that inhibiting AR resulted in decreased HER2 phosphorylation and activation of Erk and Akt, without affecting the HER2 and HER3 expression. The in vivo efficacy of Enzalutamide was further tested using the HCC1954 xenograft model. Enzalutamide impaired the growth of HCC1954 tumor at a level comparable to that by trastuzumab. Enzalutamide decreased Ki67 staining and increased activated caspase3 staining compared with vehicle control in HCC1954 tumors. Our results indicate AR plays an important role in promoting the growth of HER2 + BC by cross-talking with the HER2 signaling. AR drug may be used as an alternative second line therapy for treating HER2 + BC.

  13. Oestrogen-androgen crosstalk in the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srilatha, B; Adaikan, P G

    2003-12-01

    Ageing in man is associated with a decline in testosterone following changes in the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis. This may offset the physiologic equilibrium between oestrogen and androgen and at some point when the ratio of free testosterone to oestradiol reaches a critical level, the oestrogenic gonadotropin suppressive effect predominates with decreased release of FSH and LH. Adding to this endocrinal complexity is the continued peripheral conversion to oestradiol through aromatisation. Although the androgen deficiency is not the sole cause for impotence in the elderly, there is a gradual decrease in nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) and spontaneous morning erections with ageing. Despite the age related increase in oestrogen levels, the information on the pathophysiological role of the "female hormone" in erectile dysfunction has been scanty. Together with our identification of oestrogen receptors within the penile cavernosum, we have delineated dysfunctional changes on male erection mediated by oestradiol. These findings parallel the recent concerns over environmental oestrogens on fertility declines in young men. Oestrogenic activity is also present in plants and thereby in human diet. These phytoestrogens are structurally and functionally similar to oestradiol and more potent than the environmental oestrogenic chemicals such as organochlorine and phenolic compounds. Thus in the light of growing concerns of possible compromising effects on sexuality by endogenous and environmental oestrogens, we are faced with the scientific need to delineate their role on the mechanism of male erectile pathway in health and disease for clinical correlates and prognostics.

  14. Cumulative effects of anti-androgenic chemical mixtures and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kembra L. Howdeshell and L. Earl Gray, Jr.Toxicological studies of defined chemical mixtures assist human health risk assessment by characterizing the joint action of chemicals. This presentation will review the effects of anti-androgenic chemical mixtures on reproductive tract development in rats with a special focus on the reproductive toxicant phthalates. Observed mixture data are compared to mathematical mixture model predictions to determine how the individual chemicals in a mixture interact (e.g., response addition – probabilities of response for each individual chemical are added; dose-addition – the doses of each individual chemical at a given mixture dose are combined together based on the relative potency of the individual chemicals). Phthalate mixtures are observed to act in a dose-additive manner based on the relative potency of the individual phthalates to suppress fetal testosterone production. Similar dose-additive effects have been reported for mixtures of phthalates with anti-androgenic pesticides of differing mechanisms. Data from these phthalate experiments in rats can be used in conjunction with human biomonitoring data to determine individual hazard ratios. Furthermore, data from the toxicological studies can inform the analysis of human biomonitoring data on the association of detected chemicals and their metabolites with measured health outcomes. Data from phthalate experiments in rats can be used in conjunction with human biomonit

  15. Brain connectivity aberrations in anabolic-androgenic steroid users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlye, Lars T; Kaufmann, Tobias; Alnæs, Dag; Hullstein, Ingunn R; Bjørnebekk, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Sustained anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) use has adverse behavioral consequences, including aggression, violence and impulsivity. Candidate mechanisms include disruptions of brain networks with high concentrations of androgen receptors and critically involved in emotional and cognitive regulation. Here, we tested the effects of AAS on resting-state functional brain connectivity in the largest sample of AAS-users to date. We collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from 151 males engaged in heavy resistance strength training. 50 users tested positive for AAS based on the testosterone to epitestosterone (T/E) ratio and doping substances in urine. 16 previous users and 59 controls tested negative. We estimated brain network nodes and their time-series using ICA and dual regression and defined connectivity matrices as the between-node partial correlations. In line with the emotional and behavioral consequences of AAS, current users exhibited reduced functional connectivity between key nodes involved in emotional and cognitive regulation, in particular reduced connectivity between the amygdala and default-mode network (DMN) and between the dorsal attention network (DAN) and a frontal node encompassing the superior and inferior frontal gyri (SFG/IFG) and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), with further reductions as a function of dependency, lifetime exposure, and cycle state (on/off).

  16. Effects of anabolic-androgens on brain reward function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhillaj, Emanuela; Morgese, Maria G.; Tucci, Paolo; Bove, Maria; Schiavone, Stefania; Trabace, Luigia

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are mainly prescribed to treat several diseases caused by testosterone deficiency. However, athletes try to promote muscle growth by manipulating testosterone levels or assuming androgen anabolic steroids (AAS). These substances were originally synthesized to obtain anabolic effects greater than testosterone. Although AAS are rarely prescribed compared to testosterone, their off-label utilization is very wide. Furthermore, combinations of different steroids and doses generally higher than those used in therapy are common. Symptoms of the chronic use of supra-therapeutic doses of AAS include anxiety, depression, aggression, paranoia, distractibility, confusion, amnesia. Interestingly, some studies have shown that AAS elicited electroencephalographic changes similar to those observed with amphetamine abuse. The frequency of side effects is higher among AAS abusers, with psychiatric complications such as labile mood, lack of impulse control and high violence. On the other hand, AAS addiction studies are complex because data collection is very difficult due to the subjects' reticence and can be biased by many variables, including physical exercise, that alter the reward system. Moreover, it has been reported that AAS may imbalance neurotransmitter systems involved in the reward process, leading to increased sensitivity toward opioid narcotics and central stimulants. The goal of this article is to review the literature on steroid abuse and changes to the reward system in preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26379484

  17. Brain connectivity aberrations in anabolic-androgenic steroid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars T. Westlye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustained anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS use has adverse behavioral consequences, including aggression, violence and impulsivity. Candidate mechanisms include disruptions of brain networks with high concentrations of androgen receptors and critically involved in emotional and cognitive regulation. Here, we tested the effects of AAS on resting-state functional brain connectivity in the largest sample of AAS-users to date. We collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data from 151 males engaged in heavy resistance strength training. 50 users tested positive for AAS based on the testosterone to epitestosterone (T/E ratio and doping substances in urine. 16 previous users and 59 controls tested negative. We estimated brain network nodes and their time-series using ICA and dual regression and defined connectivity matrices as the between-node partial correlations. In line with the emotional and behavioral consequences of AAS, current users exhibited reduced functional connectivity between key nodes involved in emotional and cognitive regulation, in particular reduced connectivity between the amygdala and default-mode network (DMN and between the dorsal attention network (DAN and a frontal node encompassing the superior and inferior frontal gyri (SFG/IFG and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, with further reductions as a function of dependency, lifetime exposure, and cycle state (on/off.

  18. Sarcopenia and androgens: A link between pathology and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eBasualto-Alarcón

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, is becoming more prevalent as the lifespan continues to increase in most populations. As sarcopenia is highly disabling, being associated with increased risk of dependence, falls, fractures, weakness, disability, and death, development of approaches to its prevention and treatment are required. Androgens are the main physiologic anabolic steroid hormones and normal testosterone levels are necessary for a range of developmental and biological processes, including maintenance of muscle mass. Testosterone concentrations decline as age increase, suggesting that low plasma testosterone levels can cause or accelerate muscle- and age-related diseases, as sarcopenia. Currently, there is increasing interest on the anabolic properties of testosterone for therapeutic use in muscle diseases including sarcopenia. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this muscle syndrome and its relationship with plasma level of androgens are not completely understood. This review discusses the recent findings regarding sarcopenia, the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of this disease and the treatment approaches that have been developed based on testosterone deficiency and their implications.

  19. Effects of anabolic-androgens on brain reward function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela eMhillaj

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Androgens are mainly prescribed to treat several diseases caused by testosterone deficiency. However, athletes try to promote muscle growth by manipulating testosterone levels or assuming the so called androgen anabolic steroids (AAS. These substances were originally synthesized to obtain anabolic effects greater than testosterone. Although AAS are rarely prescribed compared to testosterone, the off-label utilization is very wide. Furthermore, combination of different steroids, and doses largely higher than those used in therapy are common. Symptoms of the chronic use of supra-therapeutic doses of AAS include anxiety, depression, aggression, paranoia, distractibility, confusion, amnesia. Interestingly, some studies have shown that AAS elicited electroencephalographic changes similar to those observed with amphetamine abuse. Among the AAS abusers, the frequency of side effects is higher, with psychiatric complications such as labile mood, lack of impulse control and high violence. On the other hand, AAS addiction studies are complex because the collection of data is very difficult due to reticent subjects and can be biased by many variables, including physical exercise, that alter the reward system. Moreover, it has been reported that AAS may imbalance neurotransmitter systems involved in reward process, leading to an increased sensitivity toward opioid narcotics and central stimulants. The aim of this review is to discuss what is present in literature in regard to steroid abuse and alteration of reward system in preclinical and clinical studies.

  20. Histological characterization of peppermint shrimp ( Lysmata wurdemanni) androgenic gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Dong; Lin, Tingting

    2017-12-01

    The androgenic gland (AG) is an important endocrine gland for male reproductive function in crustaceans. In the present study, we investigated the histological characteristics of the androgenic gland of peppermint shrimp, Lysmata wurdemanni. The peppermint shrimp matures as male first, then some individuals may become euhermaphrodite after several moltings (transitional phase). Euhermaphrodite-phase shrimp acts as male at intermolts. However, it can be fertilized as a female immediately after molting. Considering the male reproductive function acts in its lifespan except for at larval stages, and female reproductive system starts to develop at transitional phase, we hypothesized that AG activity might be reduced to allow and promote vitellogenesis onset in early transitional phase and the following euhermaphrodite phase. So AG cell structure might be different in three phases in L. wurdemanni. The results showed that AG exists in the male in transitional and euhermaphrodite phases. The gland cell clusters surrounding the ejaculatory ducts locate at the roots of the fifth pereopods. The nucleus diameters are similar in the three phases while the nucleus- to-cell ratio is the lowest in euhermaphrodite phase. Our results indicated that for the individuals that will become euhermaphrodite, the cellular structure of AG changes since transitional phase. Male reproductive function which is still available in euhermaphrodite-phase shrimp should be due to the existence of the gland.

  1. Are androgen steroids acting as pheromones in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pause, Bettina M

    2004-10-30

    In animals, chemosensory communication is successfully used to transmit behaviourally relevant information, e.g. information about sexual status, danger and social organisation. In many instances pheromones might have evolved from hormone-like substances. Consequently, a large number of studies have been carried out in humans, in order to investigate possible pheromonal properties of androgen steroids. Besides discussing the production and perception of androgen steroids, it will primarily be questioned whether their perception can alter mood and behaviour in humans. Therefore, a study has been carried out to investigate whether local preferences can be altered through androstenone exposure. It is shown that heterosexual women and homosexual men prefer seats sprayed with androstenone. However, as this effect is positively correlated with the sensitivity to androstenone, the effect might be due to a general olfactory attraction of low androstenone concentrations. In regard to the conflicting results of studies on putative human pheromones, it will finally be discussed whether the perceptual context and the individual learning history of the perceiver contribute significantly to a successful communication of pheromonal information.

  2. Position stand on androgen and human growth hormone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jay R; Kraemer, William J; Bhasin, Shalender; Storer, Thomas; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Haff, G Gregory; Willoughby, Darryn S; Rogol, Alan D

    2009-08-01

    Hoffman, JR, Kraemer, WJ, Bhasin, S, Storer, T, Ratamess, NA, Haff, GG, Willoughby, DS, and Rogol, AD. Position stand on Androgen and human growth hormone use. J Strength Cond Res 23(5): S1-S59, 2009-Perceived yet often misunderstood demands of a sport, overt benefits of anabolic drugs, and the inability to be offered any effective alternatives has fueled anabolic drug abuse despite any consequences. Motivational interactions with many situational demands including the desire for improved body image, sport performance, physical function, and body size influence and fuel such negative decisions. Positive countermeasures to deter the abuse of anabolic drugs are complex and yet unclear. Furthermore, anabolic drugs work and the optimized training and nutritional programs needed to cut into the magnitude of improvement mediated by drug abuse require more work, dedication, and preparation on the part of both athletes and coaches alike. Few shortcuts are available to the athlete who desires to train naturally. Historically, the NSCA has placed an emphasis on education to help athletes, coaches, and strength and conditioning professionals become more knowledgeable, highly skilled, and technically trained in their approach to exercise program design and implementation. Optimizing nutritional strategies are a vital interface to help cope with exercise and sport demands (). In addition, research-based supplements will also have to be acknowledged as a strategic set of tools (e.g., protein supplements before and after resistance exercise workout) that can be used in conjunction with optimized nutrition to allow more effective adaptation and recovery from exercise. Resistance exercise is the most effective anabolic form of exercise, and over the past 20 years, the research base for resistance exercise has just started to develop to a significant volume of work to help in the decision-making process in program design (). The interface with nutritional strategies has been less

  3. Sarcopenia and Androgens: A Link between Pathology and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basualto-Alarcón, Carla; Varela, Diego; Duran, Javier; Maass, Rodrigo; Estrada, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, is becoming more prevalent as the lifespan continues to increase in most populations. As sarcopenia is highly disabling, being associated with increased risk of dependence, falls, fractures, weakness, disability, and death, development of approaches to its prevention and treatment are required. Androgens are the main physiologic anabolic steroid hormones and normal testosterone levels are necessary for a range of developmental and biological processes, including maintenance of muscle mass. Testosterone concentrations decline as age increase, suggesting that low plasma testosterone levels can cause or accelerate muscle- and age-related diseases, as sarcopenia. Currently, there is increasing interest on the anabolic properties of testosterone for therapeutic use in muscle diseases including sarcopenia. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this muscle syndrome and its relationship with plasma level of androgens are not completely understood. This review discusses the recent findings regarding sarcopenia, the intrinsic, and extrinsic mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of this disease and the treatment approaches that have been developed based on testosterone deficiency and their implications. PMID:25566189

  4. Cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govindan, M.V.; Burelle, M.; Cantin, C.; Kabrie, C.; Labrie, F.; Lachance, Y.; Leblanc, G.; Lefebvre, C.; Patel, P.; Simard, J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss how in order to define the functional domains of the human androgen receptor, complementary DNA (cDNA) clones encoding the human androgen receptor (hAR) have been isolated from a human testis λgtll cDNA library using synthetic oligonnucleotide probes, homologous to segments of the human glucocorticoid, estradiol and progesterone receptors. The cDNA clones corresponding to the human glucocorticoid, estradiol and progesterone receptors were eliminated after cross-hybridization with their respective cDNA probes and/or after restriction mapping of the cDNA clones. The remaining cDNA clones were classified into different groups after analysis by restriction digestion and cross-hybridization. Two of the largest cDNA clones from each group were inserted into an expression vector in both orientations. The linearized plasmids were used as templates in in vitro transcription with T7 RNA polymerase. Subsequent in vitro translation of the purified transcripts in rabbit reticulocyte lysate followed by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) permitted the characterization of the encoded polyeptides. The expressed proteins larger than 30,000 Da were analyzed for their ability to bind tritium-labelled dihydrotestosterone ([ 3 H] DHT) with high affinity and specificity

  5. Update of the androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1999-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 309 to 374 during the past year. We have expanded the database by adding information on AR-interacting proteins; and we have improved the database by identifying those mutation entries that have been updated. Mutations of unknown significance have now been reported in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the AR gene, and in individuals who are somatic mosaics constitutionally. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms, including silent mutations, have been discovered in normal individuals and in individuals with male infertility. A mutation hotspot associated with prostatic cancer has been identified in exon 5. The database is available on the internet (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca). Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  7. Androgen deprivation therapy (castration therapy) and pedophilia: What's new.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvani, Mauro; Mondaini, Nicola; Zucchi, Alessandro

    2015-09-30

    Andrology is a constantly evolving discipline, embracing social problems like pedophilia and its pharmacological treatment. With regard to chemical castration, the andrologist may perform an important role as part of a team of specialists. At present, no knowledge is available regarding hormonal, chromosomal or genetic alterations involved in pedophilia. International legislation primarily aims to defend childhood, but does not provide for compulsory treatment. We reviewed international literature that, at present, only comprises a few reports on research concerning androgen deprivation. Most of these refer to the use of leuprolide acetate, rather than medroxyprogesterone and cyproterone acetate, which present a larger number of side effects. Current opinions on chemical castration for pedophilia are discordant. Some surveys confirm that therapy reduces sexual thoughts and fantasies, especially in recidivism. On the other hand, some authors report that chemical castration does not modify the pedophile's personality. In our opinion, once existing legislation has changed, andrologists could play a significant role in the selection of patients to receive androgen deprivation therapy, due in part to their knowledge about its action and side effects.

  8. Conventional and novel stem cell based therapies for androgenic alopecia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talavera-Adame D

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dodanim Talavera-Adame,1 Daniella Newman,2 Nathan Newman1 1American Advanced Medical Corp. (Private Practice, Beverly Hills, CA, 2Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA, USA Abstract: The prevalence of androgenic alopecia (AGA increases with age and it affects both men and women. Patients diagnosed with AGA may experience decreased quality of life, depression, and feel self-conscious. There are a variety of therapeutic options ranging from prescription drugs to non-prescription medications. Currently, AGA involves an annual global market revenue of US$4 billion and a growth rate of 1.8%, indicating a growing consumer market. Although natural and synthetic ingredients can promote hair growth and, therefore, be useful to treat AGA, some of them have important adverse effects and unknown mechanisms of action that limit their use and benefits. Biologic factors that include signaling from stem cells, dermal papilla cells, and platelet-rich plasma are some of the current therapeutic agents being studied for hair restoration with milder side effects. However, most of the mechanisms exerted by these factors in hair restoration are still being researched. In this review, we analyze the therapeutic agents that have been used for AGA and emphasize the potential of new therapies based on advances in stem cell technologies and regenerative medicine. Keywords: stem cells, stem cell therapies, hair follicle, dermal papilla, androgenic alopecia, laser, hair regeneration

  9. Improving selective androgen receptor modulator discovery and preclinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jeremy Orion

    2009-09-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) represent a new class of pharmaceuticals that may find wide clinical use. However, selectivity is not understood at the molecular level, which has made the discovery and preclinical evaluation of SARMs difficult. We review the current state of SARM discovery and preclinical evaluation, as well as our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling AR selectivity. We then discuss how increasing our molecular knowledge of AR selectivity will help create better discovery and evaluation methods and lead to a wider array of safer SARMs. The SARM field has advanced rapidly, but without a solid foundation of molecular knowledge to inform discovery and preclinical evaluation methods. The field has also taken a narrow view of selectivity, disregarding many androgen-responsive tissues, which could lead to unforeseen and detrimental side effects with chronic administration of SARMs. An investment in basic research could accelerate the discovery of a new generation of more selective and safer SARMs that could be used to treat an expanded range of clinical conditions.

  10. Selective androgen receptor modulators as function promoting therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Shalender; Jasuja, Ravi

    2009-05-01

    The past decade has witnessed an unprecedented discovery effort to develop selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that improve physical function and bone health without adversely affecting the prostate and cardiovascular outcomes. This review describes the historical evolution, the rationale for SARM development, and the mechanisms of testosterone action and SARM selectivity. Although steroidal SARMs have been around since the 1940s, a number of nonsteroidal SARMs that do not serve as substrates for CYP19 aromatase or 5alpha-reductase, act as full agonists in muscle and bone and as partial agonists in prostate are in development. The differing interactions of steroidal and nonsteroidal compounds with androgen receptor (AR) contribute to their unique pharmacologic actions. Ligand binding induces specific conformational changes in the ligand-binding domain, which could modulate surface topology and protein-protein interactions between AR and coregulators, resulting in tissue-specific gene regulation. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of SARMs to increase muscle and bone mass in preclinical rodent models with varying degree of prostate sparing. Phase I trials of SARMs in humans have reported modest increments in fat-free mass. SARMs hold promise as a new class of function promoting anabolic therapies for a number of clinical indications, including functional limitations associated with aging and chronic disease, frailty, cancer cachexia, and osteoporosis.

  11. Variation in the resumption of cycling and conception by fecal androgen and estradiol levels in female Northern Muriquis (Brachyteles hypoxanthus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strier, Karen B; Ziegler, Toni E

    2005-09-01

    We measured fecal androgen (T+DHT) and estradiol (E2) levels in female northern muriquis (Brachyteles hypoxanthus) at the Estação Biológica de Caratinga/RPPN Feliciano Miguel Abdala, Minas Gerais, Brazil, to evaluate the hormonal bases underlying individual variation in the resumption of cycling and conception. We found that androgen levels were significantly lower in females than in males, and that there were no consistent patterns in female androgen levels across precycling or cycling conditions. Females that resumed cycling earlier in the study (weeks 4-8) had higher precycling E2 levels and correspondingly lower precycling androgen/E2 ratios than females that resumed cycling later (weeks 12-16). There were no differences in female precycling androgen levels, but cycling females that conceived during or immediately after the study period had lower androgen levels and threefold higher E2 peaks than the one cycling female that failed to conceive. These results suggest that minimum E2 thresholds are necessary for both the resumption of ovarian cycling and conception. Individual variation in these components of fertility may be regulated by differences in E2 levels, which affect androgen/E2 ratios, rather than by androgen levels per se. Further research into the relative concentrations of T vs. DHT will be necessary to fully evaluate whether androgens affect cycling and conception in this species.

  12. Androgen effects on skeletal muscle: implications for the development and management of frailty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew DL O'Connell

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Androgens have potent anabolic effects on skeletal muscle and decline with age in parallel to losses in muscle mass and strength. This loss of muscle mass and function, known as sarcopenia, is the central event in development of frailty, the vulnerable health status that presages adverse outcomes and rapid functional decline in older adults. The potential role of falling androgen levels in the development of frailty and their utility as function promoting therapies in older men has therefore attracted considerable attention. This review summarizes current concepts and definitions in muscle ageing, sarcopenia and frailty, and evaluates recent developments in the study of androgens and frailty. Current evidence from observational and interventional studies strongly supports an effect of androgens on muscle mass in ageing men, but effects on muscle strength and particularly physical function have been less clear. Androgen treatment has been generally well-tolerated in studies of older men, but concerns remain over higher dose treatments and use in populations with high cardiovascular risk. The first trials of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs suggest similar effects on muscle mass and function to traditional androgen therapies in older adults. Important future directions include the use of these agents in combination with exercise training to promote functional ability across different populations of older adults, as well as more focus on the relationships between concurrent changes in hormone levels, body composition and physical function in observational studies.

  13. Androgen effects on skeletal muscle: implications for the development and management of frailty

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connell, Matthew DL; Wu, Frederick CW

    2014-01-01

    Androgens have potent anabolic effects on skeletal muscle and decline with age in parallel to losses in muscle mass and strength. This loss of muscle mass and function, known as sarcopenia, is the central event in development of frailty, the vulnerable health status that presages adverse outcomes and rapid functional decline in older adults. The potential role of falling androgen levels in the development of frailty and their utility as function promoting therapies in older men has therefore attracted considerable attention. This review summarizes current concepts and definitions in muscle ageing, sarcopenia and frailty, and evaluates recent developments in the study of androgens and frailty. Current evidence from observational and interventional studies strongly supports an effect of androgens on muscle mass in ageing men, but effects on muscle strength and particularly physical function have been less clear. Androgen treatment has been generally well–tolerated in studies of older men, but concerns remain over higher dose treatments and use in populations with high cardiovascular risk. The first trials of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) suggest similar effects on muscle mass and function to traditional androgen therapies in older adults. Important future directions include the use of these agents in combination with exercise training to promote functional ability across different populations of older adults, as well as more focus on the relationships between concurrent changes in hormone levels, body composition and physical function in observational studies. PMID:24457838

  14. Androgenic effect of honeybee drone milk in castrated rats: roles of methyl palmitate and methyl oleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seres, A B; Ducza, E; Báthori, M; Hunyadi, A; Béni, Z; Dékány, M; Hajagos-Tóth, J; Verli, J; Gáspár, Róbert

    2014-04-28

    Numerous honeybee (Apis mellifera) products have been used in traditional medicine to treat infertility and to increase vitality in both men and women. Drone milk (DM) is a relatively little-known honeybee product with a putative sexual hormone effect. The oestrogenic effect of a fraction of DM has recently been reported in rats. However, no information is available on the androgenic effects of DM. The purpose of the present study was to determine the androgen-like effect of DM in male rats and to identify effective compounds. A modified Hershberger assay was used to investigate the androgenic effect of crude DM, and the plasma level of testosterone was measured. The prostatic mRNA and protein expression of Spot14-like androgen-inducible protein (SLAP) were also examined with real-time PCR and Western blot techniques. GC-MS and NMR spectroscopic investigations were performed to identify the active components gained by bioactivity-guided fractionation. The crude DM increased the relative weights of the androgen-dependent organs and the plasma testosterone level in castrated rats and these actions were flutamide-sensitive. DM increased the tissue mRNA and protein level of SLAP, providing further evidence of its androgen-like character. After bioactivity-guided fractionation, two fatty acid esters, methyl palmitate (MP) and methyl oleate (MO), were identified as active compounds. MP alone showed an androgenic effect, whereas MO increased the weight of androgen-sensitive tissues and the plasma testosterone level only in combination. The experimental data of DM and its active compounds (MO and MP) show androgenic activity confirming the traditional usage of DM. DM or MP or/and MO treatments may project a natural mode for the therapy of male infertility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Androgen regulated genes in human prostate xenografts in mice: relation to BPH and prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold D Love

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate carcinoma (CaP are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1 highly expressed in prostate, 2 had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3 encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues.

  16. Impact of Androgen and Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products on Female Rat Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Palioura

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Advanced glycation end products (AGEs have been related to a wide range of liver disorders including hyperandrogenic states such as the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the potential impact of dietary glycotoxins exposure and androgen excess on hepatic histology and biochemistry in an androgenized female rat model. Methods: The study population consisted of 80 female Wistar rats, divided in 3 groups, a group of prepubertal (Group A, n=30 and adult rats (Group B, n=20 that were androgenized via subcutaneous implantation of dihydrotestosterone-containing pellets as well as a group of adult non-androgenized rodents (Group C, n=30. All groups were randomly assigned either to a high-AGE or low-AGE diet for 3 months. Results: Rats fed with a high-AGE diet exhibited significantly elevated levels of gamma-glutamyl transferase (γGT (p≤0.0002 and indices of AGE immunostaining in liver tissue (pper se constitutes an aggravating factor as demonstrated by the elevated γGT levels in adult androgenized animals compared to non-androgenized, independent of diet content (p=0.0002 and by the elevated AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels in low-AGE subgroups (adult androgenized vs. non-androgenized, p=0.0002 followed by increased immunohistochemical AGE deposition in hepatocytes of the latter categories (p=0.0007. Conclusion: The present study suggests that androgens and glycotoxins may contribute synergistically to distort hepatic physiology and function as observed in hyperandrogenic conditions.

  17. The Attractiveness of Opposites: Agonists and Antagonists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Tony

    2015-02-02

    ABSTRACT Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, of which constipation is the most common aspect, is a major limiting factor in the use of opioids for pain management. The availability of an oral, long-acting formulation of oxycodone and naloxone represents a highly significant development in pain management. The combination of an opioid analgesic with an opioid antagonist offers reliable pain control with a significant reduction in the burden of opioid-induced constipation. This report is adapted from paineurope 2014; Issue 3, ©Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd, and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, LTD and is distributed free of charge to healthcare professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be accessed via the website: http:\\/\\/www.paineurope.com at which European health professionals can register online to receive copies of the quarterly publication.

  18. Antiallergic effects of H1-receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroody, F M; Naclerio, R M

    2000-01-01

    The primary mechanism of antihistamine action in the treatment of allergic diseases is believed to be competitive antagonism of histamine binding to cellular receptors (specifically, the H1-receptors), which are present on nerve endings, smooth muscles, and glandular cells. This notion is supported by the fact that structurally unrelated drugs antagonize the H1-receptor and provide clinical benefit. However, H1-receptor antagonism may not be their sole mechanism of action in treating allergic rhinitis. On the basis of in vitro and animal experiments, drugs classified as H1-receptor antagonists have long been recognized to have additional pharmacological properties. Most first-generation H1-antihistamines have anticholinergic, sedative, local anaesthetic, and anti-5-HT effects, which might favourably affect the symptoms of the allergic response but also contribute to side-effects. These additional properties are not uniformly distributed among drugs classified as H1-receptor antagonists. Azatadine, for example, inhibits in vitro IgE-mediated histamine and leukotriene (LT) release from mast cells and basophils. In human challenge models, terfenadine, azatadine, and loratadine reduce IgE-mediated histamine release. Cetirizine reduces eosinophilic infiltration at the site of antigen challenge in the skin, but not the nose. In a nasal antigen challenge model, cetirizine pretreatment did not affect the levels of histamine and prostaglandin D2 recovered in postchallenge lavages, whereas the levels of albumin, N-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME) esterase activity, and LTs were reduced. Terfenadine, cetirizine, and loratadine blocked allergen-induced hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. In view of the complexity of the pathophysiology of allergy, a number of H1 antagonists with additional properties are currently under development for allergic diseases. Mizolastine, a new H1-receptor antagonist, has been shown to have additional actions that should help reduce the

  19. Calcium antagonists and the diabetic hypertensive patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Rossing, P

    1993-01-01

    reduces albuminuria, delays the progression of nephropathy, and postpones renal insufficiency in diabetic nephropathy. Calcium antagonists and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors induce an acute increase in the glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and renal sodium excretion......Roughly 40% of all diabetic patients, whether insulin dependent or not, develop persistent albuminuria (over 300 mg/24 hr), a decrease in the glomerular filtration rate, and elevated blood pressure, ie, diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy is the single most important cause of end stage renal...... disease in the Western world, and accounts for over a quarter of all end stage renal disease. It also is a major cause of the increased morbidity and mortality seen in diabetic patients; for example, the cost of end stage renal care in the United States currently exceeds +1.8 billion per year for diabetic...

  20. Assay method for organic calcium antagonist drugs and a kit for such an assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, S. H.; Gould, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A method for measuring the level of organic calcium antagonist drug in a body fluid comprises preparing a mixture of a radioactive calcium antagonist drug, a body fluid containing a calcium antagonist drug and a calcium antagonist receptor material, measuring the radioactivity of the radioactive calcium antagonist drug bound to said calcium antagonist receptor material and deriving the concentration of the calcium antagonist drug in the body fluid from a standard curve indicating the concentration of calcium antagonist drug versus inhibition of binding of said radioactive calcium antagonist drug to said receptor sites caused by the calcium antagonist drug in said body fluid. A kit for measuring the level of an organic calcium drug comprises a receptacle containing a radioactive calcium antagonist drug, a calcium antagonist receptor material and a standard amount of a nonradioactive calcium antagonist drug

  1. Androgen-like activities in blood cleared for endogenous steroid hormones across European and Inuit populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Tanja; Hjelmborg, Philip Sebastian; Goralczyk, Katarzyna

    of the present study was to compare the actual level of androgen-like activity in serum fractions containing the lipophilic POPs but free of endogenous hormones between different European and Inuit populations for finally to evaluate whether the xeno-androgenic activity is correlated to bio-accumulated POPs...... and /or lifestyle.To obtain the serum fraction containing the actual mixture of bio-accumulated POPs SPE-HPLC extraction was performed. The effect of the serum extract on the function of the androgen receptor (AR) trans-activity was determined using the Chinese Hamster Ovary cells CHO-K1, which were...

  2. Caution for anabolic androgenic steroid use: a case report of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unai, Shinya; Miessau, Joseph; Karbowski, Pawel; Baram, Michael; Cavarocchi, Nicholas C; Hirose, Hitoshi

    2013-12-01

    We report a 42-year-old male amateur body builder and user of anabolic androgenic steroids, who developed ARDS, acute kidney injury, and refractory supraventricular tachycardia. He required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, continuous veno-venous hemodialysis, and catheter ablation. We believe that long-term anabolic androgenic steroid abuse predisposed the patient to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, from its immunomodulatory effects in an otherwise healthy patient. Anabolic androgenic steroid use should be part of the history taking process, since it may complicate diagnosis, disease progression, and prognosis.

  3. Characteristics and outcome of patients with heart failure due to anabolic-androgenic steroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Eva Bjerre; Thune, Jens Jakob; Gustafsson, Finn

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to analyse the outcome of patients with advanced heart failure due to abuse of anabolic-androgenic steroids. DESIGN: A retrospective chart review of patients admitted or referred for advanced heart failure, due to anabolic-androgenic steroid abuse...... with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers. The remaining 3 patients required implantation of a LV assist device (LVAD) and were listed for heart transplantation. No recovery of LV function in the patients treated with assist device was seen. CONCLUSION: Anabolic-androgenic steroid...

  4. Antagonistic activity of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvakumar Dharmaraj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To focus on the isolation and preliminary characterization of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria particularly Streptomyces species and also their antagonistic activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methods: The sponges were collected from Kovalam and Vizhinjam port of south-west coast of Kerala, India. Isolation of strains was carried out from sponge extracts using international Streptomyces project media. For preliminary identification of the strains, morphological (mycelial colouration, soluble pigments, melanoid pigmentation, spore morphology, nutritional uptake (carbon utilisation, amonoacids influence, sodium chloride tolerance, physiological (pH, temperature and chemotaxonomical characterization were done. Antimicrobial studies were also carried out for the selected strains. Results: With the help of the spicule structures, the collected marine sponges were identified as Callyspongia diffusa, Mycale mytilorum, Tedania anhelans and Dysidea fragilis. Nearly 94 strains were primarily isolated from these sponges and further they were sub-cultured using international Streptomyces project media. The strains exhibited different mycelial colouration (aerial and substrate, soluble and melanoid pigmentations. The strains possessed three types of sporophore morphology namely rectus flexibilis, spiral and retinaculiaperti. Among the 94 isolates, seven exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities with maximal zone of inhibition of 30 mm. The nutritional, physiological and chemotaxonomical characteristic study helped in the conventional identification of the seven strains and they all suggest that the strains to be grouped under the genus Streptomyces. Conclusions: The present study clearly helps in the preliminary identification of the isolates associated with marine sponges. Antagonistic activities prove the production of antimicrobial metabolites against the pathogens. Marine sponges associated Streptomyces are

  5. Local androgen inactivation in abdominal visceral adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Karine; Richard, Christian; Bélanger, Chantal; Dupont, Pierre; Daris, Marleen; Laberge, Philippe; Luu-The, Van; Tchernof, André

    2003-12-01

    We examined the expression and activity of two enzymes from the aldoketoreductase (AKR) family 1C, namely type 5 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-HSD-5, AKR1C3) and type 3 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3alpha-HSD-3, AKR1C2) in female sc and omental adipose tissue and in preadipocyte primary cultures. 17beta-HSD-5 preferentially synthesizes testosterone from the inactive adrenal precursor androstenedione, whereas 3alpha-HSD-3 inactivates dihydrotestosterone. mRNAs of both enzymes were detected in adipose tissue from the omental and sc compartments. Real-time PCR quantification indicated a 3-fold higher 3alpha-HSD-3 expression compared with 17beta-HSD-5, and the expression of both enzymes tended to be higher in the sc vs. the omental depot. Accordingly, dose-response and time-course experiments performed in preadipocyte primary cultures indicated that 3alpha-HSD activity was higher than 17beta-HSD activity (13-fold maximum velocity difference). We measured 3alpha-HSD activity in omental and sc adipose tissue samples of 32 women for whom body composition and body fat distribution were evaluated by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and CT, respectively. We found that androgen inactivation in omental adipose tissue through 3alpha-HSD activity was significantly higher in women with elevated vs. low visceral adipose tissue accumulation (1.7-fold difference; P < 0.05). Moreover, omental adipose tissue 3alpha-HSD activity was positively and significantly associated with CT-measured visceral adipose tissue (r = 0.43; P < 0.02) and omental adipocyte diameter (r = 0.42; P < 0.02). These results indicate that local androgen inactivation is a predominant reaction in female abdominal adipose tissue, with the greatest conversion rates observed in the presence of abdominal visceral obesity. Increased androgen inactivation in omental adipose tissue of abdominally obese women may impact locally on the regulation of adipocyte metabolism.

  6. Effect of a Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist on Neurocognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    Effectiveness Directorate, Biosciences and Protection Division, Warfighter Fatigue Countermeasures Branch. 35. Golden, C.J. (1978). Stroop Color and Word Test: A...0080 TITLE: Effect of a Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist on Neurocognitive Performance PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Thomas Neylan...31August2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effect of a Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist on Neurocognitive Performance 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH

  7. Using waste of Tofu production improved antagonistic activities of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mrs. Hoa

    2012-10-04

    Oct 4, 2012 ... screened for their antagonistic activity against 10 races of Xoo causing rice bacterial blight disease. Three actinomycete strains ... antagonistic activity of VN10-A-44 against the Xoo pathogen and to make use of tofu waste for large- ..... vitamins and some essential amino acids which are very important for ...

  8. Thrombin-receptor antagonist vorapaxar in acute coronary syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tricoci, Pierluigi; Huang, Zhen; Held, Claes

    2012-01-01

    Vorapaxar is a new oral protease-activated-receptor 1 (PAR-1) antagonist that inhibits thrombin-induced platelet activation.......Vorapaxar is a new oral protease-activated-receptor 1 (PAR-1) antagonist that inhibits thrombin-induced platelet activation....

  9. Evaluation of antagonistic fungi against charcoal rot of sunflower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro, sensitivity of Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid determined through inhibition zone technique to various antagonistic fungi viz., Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Trichoderma viride, Trichoderma harzianum and Penicillium capsulatum amended into PDA medium. All the antagonists reduced the colony ...

  10. Calcium antagonists for ischemic stroke: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, J.; Limburg, M.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stroke is a common disease, and many trials with calcium antagonists as possible neuroprotective agents have been conducted. The aim of this review is to determine whether calcium antagonists reduce the risk of death or dependency after acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: Acute

  11. Antagonistic and Bargaining Games in Optimal Marketing Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    Game theory approaches to find optimal marketing decisions are considered. Antagonistic games with and without complete information, and non-antagonistic games techniques are applied to paired comparison, ranking, or rating data for a firm and its competitors in the market. Mix strategy, equilibrium in bi-matrix games, bargaining models with…

  12. Androgen and taxol cause cell type-specific alterations of centrosome and DNA organization in androgen-responsive LNCaP and androgen-independent DU145 prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, H.; Ripple, M.; Balczon, R.; Weindruch, R.; Chakrabarti, A.; Taylor, M.; Hueser, C. N.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the effects of androgen and taxol on the androgen-responsive LNCaP and androgen-independent DU145 prostate cancer cell lines. Cells were treated for 48 and 72 h with 0.05-1 nM of the synthetic androgen R1881 and with 100 nM taxol. Treatment of LNCaP cells with 0.05 nM R1881 led to increased cell proliferation, whereas treatment with 1 nM R1881 resulted in inhibited cell division, DNA cycle arrest, and altered centrosome organization. After treatment with 1 nM R1881, chromatin became clustered, nuclear envelopes convoluted, and mitochondria accumulated around the nucleus. Immunofluorescence microscopy with antibodies to centrosomes showed altered centrosome structure. Although centrosomes were closely associated with the nucleus in untreated cells, they dispersed into the cytoplasm after treatment with 1 nM R1881. Microtubules were only faintly detected in 1 nM R1881-treated LNCaP cells. The effects of taxol included microtubule bundling and altered mitochondria morphology, but not DNA organization. As expected, the androgen-independent prostate cancer cell line DU145 was not affected by R1881. Treatment with taxol resulted in bundling of microtubules in both cell lines. Additional taxol effects were seen in DU145 cells with micronucleation of DNA, an indication of apoptosis. Simultaneous treatment with R1881 and taxol had no additional effects on LNCaP or DU145 cells. These results suggest that LNCaP and DU145 prostate cancer cells show differences not only in androgen responsiveness but in sensitivity to taxol as well. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Microarray analysis of androgen-regulated gene expression in testis: the use of the androgen-binding protein (ABP-transgenic mouse as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossman Gail

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spermatogenesis is an androgen-dependent process, yet the molecular mechanisms of androgens' actions in testis are poorly understood. Transgenic mice overexpressing rat androgen-binding protein (ABP in their testes have reduced levels of intratesticular androgens and, as a result, show a progressive impairment of spermatogenesis. We used this model to characterize changes in global gene expression in testis in response to reduced bioavailability of androgens. Methods Total RNA was extracted from testes of 30-day old transgenic and wild-type control mice, converted to cRNA, labeled with biotin, and hybridized to oligonucleotide microarrays. Microarray results were confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Three-hundred-eighty-one genes (3.05% of all transcripts represented on the chips were up-regulated and 198 genes (1.59% were down-regulated by at least a factor of 2 in the androgen-deficient animals compared to controls. Genes encoding membrane proteins, intracellular signaling molecules, enzymes, proteins participating in the immune response, and those involved in cytoskeleton organization were significantly overrepresented in the up-regulated group. Among the down-regulated transcripts, those coding for extracellular proteins were overrepresented most dramatically, followed by those related to proteolysis, cell adhesion, immune response, and growth factor, cytokine, and ion channel activities. Transcripts with the greatest potential impact on cellular activities included several transcription factors, intracellular signal transducers, secreted signaling molecules and enzymes, and various cell surface molecules. Major nodes in the up-regulated network were IL-6, AGT, MYC, and A2M, those in the down-regulated network were IL-2, -4, and -10, MAPK8, SOCS1, and CREB1. Conclusion Microarray analysis followed by gene ontology profiling and connectivity analysis identified several functional

  14. Interaction between Antagonist of Cannabinoid Receptor and Antagonist of Adrenergic Receptor on Anxiety in Male Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Komaki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anxiety is among the most common and treatable mental disorders. Adrenergic and cannabinoid systems have an important role in the neurobiology of anxiety. The elevated plus-maze (EPM has broadly been used to investigate anxiolytic and anxiogenic compounds. The present study investigated the effects of intraperitoneal (IP injection of cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist (AM251 in the presence of alpha-1 adrenergic antagonist (Prazosin on rat behavior in the EPM. Methods: In this study, the data were obtained from male Wistar rat, which weighing 200- 250 g. Animal behavior in EPM were videotaped and saved in computer for 10 min after IP injection of saline, AM251 (0.3 mg/kg, Prazosin (0.3 mg/kg and AM251 + Prazosin, subsequently scored for conventional indices of anxiety. During the test period, the number of open and closed arms entries, the percentage of entries into the open arms of the EPM, and the spent time in open and closed arms were recorded. Diazepam was considered as a positive control drug with anxiolytic effect (0.3, 0.6, 1.2 mg/kg. Results: Diazepam increased the number of open arm entries and the percentage of spent time on the open arms. IP injection of AM251 before EPM trial decreased open arms exploration and open arm entry. Whereas, Prazosin increased open arms exploration and open arm entry. This study showed that both substances in simultaneous injection have conflicting effects on the responses of each of these two compounds in a single injection. Discussion: Injection of CB1 receptor antagonist may have an anxiogenic profile in rat, whereas adrenergic antagonist has an anxiolytic effect. Further investigations are essential for better understanding of anxiolytic and anxiogenic properties and neurobiological mechanisms of action and probable interactions of the two systems.

  15. Androgen changes and flexible rutting behaviour in male giraffes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeber, Peter A; Duncan, Patrick; Fritz, Hervé; Ganswindt, André

    2013-10-23

    The social organization of giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) imposes a high-cost reproductive strategy on bulls, which adopt a 'roving male' tactic. Our observations on wild giraffes confirm that bulls indeed have unsynchronized rut-like periods, not unlike another tropical megaherbivore, the elephant, but on a much shorter timescale. We found profound changes in male sexual and social activities at the scale of about two weeks. This so far undescribed rutting behaviour is closely correlated with changes in androgen concentrations and appears to be driven by them. The short time scale of the changes in sexual and social activity may explain why dominance and reproductive status in male giraffe in the field seem to be unstable.

  16. When color fails: illicit blue tablets containing anabolic androgen steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favretto, Donata; Castagna, Franca; Maietti, Sergio; Boscolo-Berto, Rafael; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2013-09-01

    The necessity of specific, confirmatory tests in the identification of seized illicit products was highlighted by the analysis of eighteen heart shaped, blue tablets confiscated by Police at a street control in the North East of Italy. The tablets responded as amphetamines to a preliminary color test (Marquis); a subsequent, confirmatory assay by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the presence of two anabolic androgen steroids (AAS), methandienone and methyltestosterone, in concentration of 1.7 and 1.5mg respectively per tablet; no trace of amphetamine-like or nitrogen containing compounds was found. The observed orange coloration was due to the reaction of concentrated sulphuric acid, contained in the Marquis reagent, with the Δ(4) C-3 keto group of steroids. The two AAS, banned under the world antidoping code, are not considered as psychoactive drugs of abuse in most countries, although their trafficking may entangle severe public health concerns. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The metabolism of anabolic-androgenic steroids in the greyhound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Andrew R; Cawley, Adam T; Young, E Bruce; Kerwick, Carmel M; Cunnington, Karen; Stewart, Rhiannon T; Ambrus, Joseph I; Willis, Anthony C; McLeod, Malcolm D

    2013-04-01

    Effective control of the use of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) in animal sports is essential in order to ensure both animal welfare and integrity. In order to better police their use in Australian and New Zealand greyhound racing, thorough metabolic studies have been carried out on a range of registered human and veterinary AASs available in the region. Canine metabolic data are presented for the AASs boldenone, danazol, ethylestrenol, mesterolone, methandriol, nandrolone and norethandrolone. The principal Phase I metabolic processes observed were the reduction of A-ring unsaturations and/or 3-ketones with either 3α,5β- or 3β,5α-stereochemistry, the oxidation of secondary 17β-hydroxyl groups and 16α-hydroxylation. The Phase II β-glucuronylation of sterol metabolites was extensive. The presented data have enabled the effective analysis of AASs and their metabolites in competition greyhound urine samples.

  18. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersey, Robert D.; Elliot, Diane L.; Goldberg, Linn; Kanayama, Gen; Leone, James E.; Pavlovich, Mike; Pope, Harrison G.

    2012-01-01

    This NATA position statement was developed by the NATA Research & Education Foundation. Objective This manuscript summarizes the best available scholarly evidence related to anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) as a reference for health care professionals, including athletic trainers, educators, and interested others. Background Health care professionals associated with sports or exercise should understand and be prepared to educate others about AAS. These synthetic, testosterone-based derivatives are widely abused by athletes and nonathletes to gain athletic performance advantages, develop their physiques, and improve their body image. Although AAS can be ergogenic, their abuse may lead to numerous negative health effects. Recommendations Abusers of AAS often rely on questionable information sources. Sports medicine professionals can therefore serve an important role by providing accurate, reliable information. The recommendations provide health care professionals with a current and accurate synopsis of the AAS-related research. PMID:23068595

  19. Lxrα regulates the androgen response in prostate epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viennois, Emilie; Esposito, Teresa; Dufour, Julie; Pommier, Aurélien; Fabre, Stephane; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Guy, Laurent; Morel, Laurent; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc; Baron, Silvère

    2012-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a nonmalignant enlargement of the prostate that commonly occurs in older men. We show that liver X receptor (Lxr)-α knockout mice (lxrα(-/-)) develop ventral prostate hypertrophy, correlating with an overaccumulation of secreted proteins in prostatic ducts and an alteration of vesicular trafficking in epithelial cells. In the fluid of the lxrα(-/-) prostates, spermine binding protein is highly accumulated and shows a 3000-fold increase of its mRNA. This overexpression is mediated by androgen hypersensitivity in lxrα(-/-) mice, restricted to the ventral prostate. Generation of chimeric recombinant prostates demonstrates that Lxrα is involved in the establishment of the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in the mouse prostate. Altogether these results point out the crucial role of Lxrα in the homeostasis of the ventral prostate and suggest lxrα(-/-) mice may be a good model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  20. Metabolic sequelae associated with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Jason E; Smith, Matthew R

    2010-06-01

    To summarize the metabolic alterations associated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer and to evaluate the evidence linking ADT with an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. ADT by either bilateral orchiectomy or treatment with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists causes changes in body composition, alterations in lipid profiles, and decreased insulin sensitivity. The spectrum of metabolic changes during ADT is distinct from classically described metabolic syndrome. Population-based, linked cancer registry studies have consistently reported significant associations between ADT and greater risk for diabetes mellitus. Some but not all studies have reported a link between ADT and cardiovascular disease risk. Most studies have reported no increase in cardiovascular mortality following ADT. ADT appears causally associated with diabetes mellitus. ADT is also linked to cardiovascular morbidity, although there is less evidence that this relationship is causal.

  1. Pure Androgen-Secreting Adrenal Adenoma Associated with Resistant Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Rodríguez-Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure androgen-secreting adrenal adenoma is very rare, and its diagnosis remains a clinical challenge. Its association with resistant hypertension is uncommon and not well understood. We present an 18-year-old female with a 10-year history of hirsutism that was accidentally diagnosed with an adrenal mass during the evaluation of a hypertensive crisis. She had a long-standing history of hirsutism, clitorimegaly, deepening of the voice, and primary amenorrhea. She was phenotypically and socially a male. FSH, LH, prolactin, estradiol, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, and progesterone were normal. Total testosterone and DHEA-S were elevated. Cushing syndrome, primary aldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, and nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia were ruled out. She underwent adrenalectomy and pathology reported an adenoma. At 2-month followup, hirsutism and virilizing symptoms clearly improved and blood pressure normalized without antihypertensive medications, current literature of this unusual illness and it association with hypertension is presented and discussed.

  2. The long and winding road for selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, James T

    2017-10-01

    Numerous selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) with differing chemical structures and nearly ideal pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties have been developed that are well tolerated and selectively increase lean body mass in humans. However, definitive demonstration of the linkage between lean body mass and physical function in a relevant, large patient population has remained elusive for a SARM. The clinical endpoints serving as their basis of approval have shifted with time and clinical indication and are likely to continue to do so as the field matures with additional safety and efficacy data pertaining to the relationship between lean body mass and physical function, regulatory decisions with SARMs and other agents, and yet unexplored clinical indications. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  3. PCA3 noncoding RNA is involved in the control of prostate-cancer cell survival and modulates androgen receptor signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Luciana Bueno; Gimba, Etel Rodrigues Pereira; Palumbo, Antonio; Mello, Kivvi Duarte de; Sternberg, Cinthya; Caetano, Mauricio S; Oliveira, Felipe Leite de; Neves, Adriana Freitas; Nasciutti, Luiz Eurico; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    PCA3 is a non-coding RNA (ncRNA) that is highly expressed in prostate cancer (PCa) cells, but its functional role is unknown. To investigate its putative function in PCa biology, we used gene expression knockdown by small interference RNA, and also analyzed its involvement in androgen receptor (AR) signaling. LNCaP and PC3 cells were used as in vitro models for these functional assays, and three different siRNA sequences were specifically designed to target PCA3 exon 4. Transfected cells were analyzed by real-time qRT-PCR and cell growth, viability, and apoptosis assays. Associations between PCA3 and the androgen-receptor (AR) signaling pathway were investigated by treating LNCaP cells with 100 nM dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and with its antagonist (flutamide), and analyzing the expression of some AR-modulated genes (TMPRSS2, NDRG1, GREB1, PSA, AR, FGF8, CdK1, CdK2 and PMEPA1). PCA3 expression levels were investigated in different cell compartments by using differential centrifugation and qRT-PCR. LNCaP siPCA3-transfected cells significantly inhibited cell growth and viability, and increased the proportion of cells in the sub G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle and the percentage of pyknotic nuclei, compared to those transfected with scramble siRNA (siSCr)-transfected cells. DHT-treated LNCaP cells induced a significant upregulation of PCA3 expression, which was reversed by flutamide. In siPCA3/LNCaP-transfected cells, the expression of AR target genes was downregulated compared to siSCr-transfected cells. The siPCA3 transfection also counteracted DHT stimulatory effects on the AR signaling cascade, significantly downregulating expression of the AR target gene. Analysis of PCA3 expression in different cell compartments provided evidence that the main functional roles of PCA3 occur in the nuclei and microsomal cell fractions. Our findings suggest that the ncRNA PCA3 is involved in the control of PCa cell survival, in part through modulating AR signaling, which may raise new

  4. Androgens and hyperemesis gravidarum: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helseth, Ragnhild; Ravlo, Merethe; Carlsen, Sven M; Vanky, E Eszter

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is probably multifactorial, involving several hormones. Androgen concentrations are reported to correlate positively with emesis gravidarum. Hypothesizing a continuum between emesis gravidarum and HG, we investigated androgen concentrations in women with HG. In a case-control study, 32 women hospitalized for HG were compared with 29 control women scheduled for elective surgical abortion. Control women were matched for age, gestational length, body mass index (BMI) and parity. Patient characteristics and concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), androstenedione, testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), free testosterone index (FTI), androstanediol glucuronide (ADG), progesterone, TSH, free T3 and T4, beta-hCG, ferritin, insulin, estradiol and estriol were compared using Mann-Whitney tests and multivariate linear regression analyses. Women with HG had higher concentrations of ADG (8.49±4.19 vs. 6.19±1.77pmol/L; p=0.015), estradiol (2.39±1.36 vs. 1.60±9.30nmol/L; p=0.009) and ferritin (186±138 vs. 117±94pmol/L; p=0.040) compared with control women. Androstenedione (5.34±2.82 vs. 6.86±2.67; p=0.004) and insulin (63.7±35.0 vs. 75.3±25.8; p=0.050) concentrations were lower in women with HG. DHEAS, testosterone, FTI, SHBG, estriol, progesterone, beta-hCG, TSH, free T3 and free T4 concentrations did not differ between the groups. In multivariate regression analyses HG was associated with high concentrations of ADG (p=0.026) and low concentrations of androstenedione (p=0.018). Steroid hormone homeostasis may be altered in women with HG. HG may be associated with high ADG and low androstenedione concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Current position of 5HT3 antagonists and the additional value of NK1 antagonists; a new class of antiemetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. de Wit (Ronald)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe advent of the 5HT3 receptor antagonists (5HT3 antagonists) in the 1990s and the combination with dexamethasone has resulted in acute emesis protection in 70% of patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Despite complete protection in the acute phase, however, 40% of patients

  6. Androgen and Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baron, John

    1999-01-01

    This project will assess the association between the risk of breast cancer and polymorphisms of the androgen and vitamin D receptor among subjects in a recently- completed population-based case-control study in Sweden...

  7. Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibits Neuropeptide Mediated Growth of Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dai, Jie

    2000-01-01

    ...), a cell-surface peptidase which inactivates active peptides and reduces local concentrations of peptide available for receptor binding and signal transduction, in the growth inhibition of androgen-independent (Al) prostate cancer...

  8. Use of anabolic-androgenic steroids among body builders--frequency and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, M; Nilsson, A L; Katzman, P L; Janzon, L; Dymling, J F

    1990-06-01

    A total of 138 male body builders who regularly attended a gym participated anonymously in a study of the use of anabolic-androgenic steroids in relation to side-effects, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI; kg m-2), training frequency, social background, occupation, knowledge and attitudes to steroid use. Fifty-three of the 138 body builders had used anabolic-androgenic steroids for a median duration of 2 years. Steroid use was linked to a higher BMI and more frequent training. Seventy-five per cent (n = 18) of those attending body building for competition, and 24% (n = 11) of those attending to improve their sense of well-being, used anabolic-androgenic steroids. Of all body builders, 94% considered anabolic-androgenic steroids to be dangerous. Of the users, 81% experienced side-effects, but 74% still intended to continue steroid medication.

  9. Radiation therapy and androgen deprivation in the management of high risk prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Pra, Alan; Cury, Fabio L.; Souhami, Luis, E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.c [McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. of Oncology. Division of Radiation Oncology

    2011-03-15

    The combined use of radiation therapy (RT) and androgen deprivation for patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer is commonly accepted as the standard treatment among uro-oncologists. Preclinical studies have provided rationale for the use of this combination. Additionally, results of phase 3 studies using conventional doses of RT have supported the combined approach. Other phase 3 studies have also shown a benefit for using higher doses of RT; however, the role of androgen deprivation in this context is not clear. The optimal duration of the androgen deprivation, in both the neoadjuvant and adjuvant setting, is still under investigation. This article critically reviews the data on the use of RT combined with androgen deprivation for the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with emphasis on the results of phase 3 trials. (author)

  10. Prostate Cancer Metastases to Bone: Role of High Bone Turnover Induced by Androgen Deprivation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Padalecki, Susan

    2002-01-01

    .... Treatment with androgen deprivation therapy leads to an increase in bone turnover as indicated by the loss of bone mineral density and the increase in markers of bone turnover in patients on treatment...

  11. Insulin sensitivity in relation to fat distribution and plasma adipocytokines among abusers of anabolic androgenic steroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jon Jarløv; Schou, Morten; Selmer, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is prevalent among young men, but information regarding effects on insulin sensitivity and fat distribution is limited. The objective was to investigate insulin sensitivity in relation to fat distribution and adipocytokines among current...

  12. Nutritional Effect on Androgen-Response Gene Expression and Prostate Tumor Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2001-01-01

    ... (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and intraprostatic T and DHT in experimental animals. Thus, high fat diet is likely to modulate the ventral prostate weight via an androgen-independent mechanism...

  13. Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length Is Associated With Body Fat and Serum SHBG in Boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Annette; Hagen, Casper P; Sørensen, Kaspar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Longer androgen receptor gene CAG trinucleotide repeats, AR (CAG)n, have been associated with reduced sensitivity of the androgen receptor (AR) in vitro as well as in humans. Furthermore, short AR (CAG)n have been associated with premature adrenarche. Objective: The aim of the study...... was to evaluate associations between the AR (CAG)n polymorphism and development of pubic hair, levels of androgens, and body fat content in healthy boys. Methods: A longitudinal study of 78 healthy boys (age 6.2-12.4 years at inclusion) from the COPENHAGEN Puberty Study was conducted with clinical examinations...... accumulation and serum SHBG concentrations indicate that this genetic polymorphism may influence the androgen-dependent fine-tuning of metabolic and reproductive factors at a young age....

  14. MicroRNAs related to androgen metabolism and polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anja Elaine; Udesen, Pernille Bækgaard; Wissing, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a frequent endocrine disorder in women. PCOS is associated with altered features of androgen metabolism, increased insulin resistance and impaired fertility. Furthermore, PCOS, being a syndrome diagnosis, is heterogeneous and characterized by polycystic ovaries...

  15. Evolving perspectives of the role of novel agents in androgen-independent prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujith Kalmadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic androgen-independent prostate cancer presents an intriguing clinical challenge, with a subtle interaction between hormone-responsive and refractory tumor cell elements. The treatment of advanced prostate carcinoma, which had remained stagnant for several decades following the understanding of the link between androgenic stimulation and carcinogenesis, has now started to make steady headway with chemotherapy and targeted approaches. Metastatic prostate cancer is almost always treated with initial androgen deprivation, in various forms. However, despite such treatment androgen-independent prostate cancer cells eventually emerge and progress to threaten life. The therapeutic objectives for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer are to maintain the quality of life and prolong survival. The out-dated nihilistic dogma of deferring chemotherapy until the most advanced stages in advanced prostate cancer is now falling by the wayside with the development of newer effective, tolerable agents.

  16. Radiation therapy and androgen deprivation in the management of high risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Dal Pra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The combined use of radiation therapy (RT and androgen deprivation for patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer is commonly accepted as the standard treatment among uro-oncologists. Preclinical studies have provided rationale for the use of this combination. Additionally, results of phase 3 studies using conventional doses of RT have supported the combined approach. Other phase 3 studies have also shown a benefit for using higher doses of RT; however, the role of androgen deprivation in this context is not clear. The optimal duration of the androgen deprivation, in both the neoadjuvant and adjuvant setting, is still under investigation. This article critically reviews the data on the use of RT combined with androgen deprivation for the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with emphasis on the results of phase 3 trials.

  17. The effect of androgen on the retention of extinction memory after conditioned taste aversion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ema; Eda-Fujiwara, Hiroko; Satoh, Ryohei; Saito, Rika; Miyamoto, Takenori

    2013-05-01

    Conditioned taste aversion (CTA) induced by the application of a novel taste such as sodium saccharin (Sac) as the conditioned stimulus (CS) and a malaise-inducing agent as the unconditioned stimulus (US), results in acquisition of CTA memory to Sac. In contrast, CTA is extinguished by repeated presentations of the CS without the US, resulting in acquisition of the extinction memory. We examined the effects of androgenic hormones on acquisition and retention of extinction memory in mice. We gonadectomized sexually immature mice and continuously administered androgens to these animals. After sexual maturation, the mice underwent a conditioning period followed by an extinction period. Retrieval tests revealed that the androgen-treated group showed significantly greater retention of extinction memory than the non-treated group 5 weeks later, whereas such significant difference was not observed in acquisition of extinction memory. These results demonstrate the enhancing effect of androgens on retention of extinction memory.

  18. Androgen receptor and immune inflammation in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kouji; Li, Lei; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-01-01

    Both benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa) are frequent diseases in middle-aged to elderly men worldwide. While both diseases are linked to abnormal growth of the prostate, the epidemiological and pathological features of these two prostate diseases are different. BPH nodules typically arise from the transitional zone, and, in contrast, PCa arises from the peripheral zone. Androgen deprivation therapy alone may not be sufficient to cure these two prostatic diseases due to its undesirable side effects. The alteration of androgen receptor-mediated inflammatory signals from infiltrating immune cells and prostate stromal/epithelial cells may play key roles in those unwanted events. Herein, this review will focus on the roles of androgen/androgen receptor signals in the inflammation-induced progression of BPH and PCa. PMID:26594314

  19. Effects of combined exposure to anti-androgens on development and sexual dimorphic behaviour in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie

    the combined effects of anti-androgens and demonstrate that marked effects can occur at mixture doses below the NOAELs for the single chemicals. Since unhindered androgen action is essential for human male development in foetal life, these findings are highly relevant to human risk assessment. This must......Summary Background: Androgens are key regulators of male sexual differentiation during the in utero and early postnatal development. Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that counteract androgen action at some stage in these periods can permanently demasculinise male foetuses and lead...... to malformations of the reproductive tract. The incidence of hypospadias (where the opening of the urethra is on the underside of the penis) in young boys has increased over the last decades but it is still unclear whether human exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals may be responsible for this increase...

  20. Role of Imaging in the Diagnosis and Management of Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Nezzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome is an X-linked recessive androgen receptor disorder characterized by a female phenotype with an XY karyotype. Individuals affected by this syndrome have normal female external genitalia but agenesis of the Müllerian duct derivatives, that is, absence of the Fallopian tubes, uterus, cervix, and the proximal part of the vagina, with presence of endoabdominal, labial, or inguinal testes. The estimated prevalence is between 1 and 5 in 100,000 genetic males. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome can be diagnosed as a result of mismatch between the prenatal sex prediction and the phenotype at birth, can be detected by chance, or remain undetected until investigations for primary amenorrhea. Imaging can be important both to diagnose the pathology and to localize gonads prior to surgical treatment. In this paper, we present three cases of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome in adult women of 34, 22, and 38 years old.

  1. The Role of the Co-Chaperone, CHIP, in Androgen Independent Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hassen, Waleed A

    2008-01-01

    Expression of Chip, a Co-Chaperone Which Interacts with the Androgen Receptor, Results in Loss of AR Expression and Growth Inhibition of Prostate Cancer Cells Waleed Hassen, Xiaoyoung Zheng, Antonio...

  2. Seminal Plasma Proteins as Androgen Receptor Coregulators Promote Prostate Cancer Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    the presence of zinc was found to induce androgen-mediated PSA expression in AR-positive prostate cancer cells. Reportable Outcomes Ishiguro ...prostatectomy. Hum Pathol 43: 6 1991–2000, 2012. Appendix Ishiguro H, Izumi K, Zheng Y, Kashiwagi E, Kawahara T, Miyamoto H: Semenogelin I promotes...PROSTATE CANCER CELL GROWTH VIA FUNCTIONING AS AN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR COACTIVATOR AND PROTECTING AGAINST ZINC CYTOTOXICITY Hitoshi Ishiguro *, Baltimore

  3. Testosterone regulates keratin 33B expression in rat penis growth through androgen receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Yan-Min; Wu, Kai-Jie; Dang, Qiang; Shi, Qi; Gao, Yang; Guo, Peng; Xu, Shan; Wang, Xin-Yang; He, Da-Lin; Gong, Yong-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Androgen therapy is the mainstay of treatment for the hypogonadotropic hypogonadal micropenis because it obviously enhances penis growth in prepubescent microphallic patients. However, the molecular mechanisms of androgen treatment leading to penis growth are still largely unknown. To clarify this well-known phenomenon, we successfully generated a castrated male Sprague Dawley rat model at puberty followed by testosterone administration. Interestingly, compared with the control group, testost...

  4. Anogenital distance plasticity in adulthood: implications for its use as a biomarker of fetal androgen action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rod T; Mungall, Will; McKinnell, Chris; Sharpe, Richard M; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Milne, Laura; Smith, Lee B

    2015-01-01

    Androgen action during the fetal masculinization programming window (MPW) determines the maximum potential for growth of androgen-dependent organs (eg, seminal vesicles, prostate, penis, and perineum) and is reflected in anogenital distance (AGD). As such, determining AGD in postnatal life has potential as a lifelong easily accessible biomarker of overall androgen action during the MPW. However, whether the perineum remains androgen responsive in adulthood and thus responds plastically to perturbed androgen drive remains unexplored. To determine this, we treated adult male rats with either the antiandrogen flutamide or the estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) for 5 weeks, followed by a 4-week washout period of no treatment. We determined AGD and its correlate anogenital index (AGI) (AGD relative to body weight) at weekly intervals across this period and compared these with normal adult rats (male and female), castrated male rats, and appropriate vehicle controls. These data showed that, in addition to reducing circulating testosterone and seminal vesicle weight, castration significantly reduced AGD (by ∼17%), demonstrating that there is a degree of plasticity in AGD in adulthood. Flutamide treatment increased circulating testosterone yet also reduced seminal vesicle weight due to local antagonism of androgen receptor. Despite this suppression, surprisingly, flutamide treatment had no effect on AGD at any time point. In contrast, although DES treatment suppressed circulating testosterone and reduced seminal vesicle weight, it also induced a significant reduction in AGD (by ∼11%), which returned to normal 1 week after cessation of DES treatment. We conclude that AGD in adult rats exhibits a degree of plasticity, which may be mediated by modulation of local androgen/estrogen action. The implications of these findings regarding the use of AGD as a lifelong clinical biomarker of fetal androgen action are discussed.

  5. Androgen and estrogen receptor mediated mechanisms of testosterone action in male rat pelvic autonomic ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Purves-Tyson, T.D.; Arshi, M.S.; Handelsman, D. J.; Cheng, Y.; Keast, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Although male reproductive function is primarily androgen dependent, many studies suggest that estrogens have direct actions on the male reproductive organs. Pelvic autonomic neurons provide the motor control of the internal reproductive organs and the penis and various properties of these neurons are affected by endogenous androgens. However, the possible role of estrogens at this site has not been examined. Here we have investigated the significance of estrogens produced by aromatisation of...

  6. Cardiotoxic effects of cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroids in the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welder, A A; Melchert, R B

    1993-04-01

    Cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroid abuse have become major drug problems in the United States. Cocaine has been designated as "the drug of greatest national health concern" while as many as 1 million Americans have used or are currently using anabolic-androgenic steroids to promote athletic performance and/or improve physical appearance. Unfavorable cardiovascular events have been linked to both cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroid abuse in healthy, physically active individuals. Deaths of several United States athletes in 1986 focused attention on the life-threatening cardiovascular consequences of cocaine abuse. Reports of myocardial injury with anabolic-androgenic steroid abuse are anecdotal. Nevertheless, case reports have illustrated the alarming cardiotoxic potential of these steroids in athletes. Anabolic-androgenic steroids were correlated to myocardial infarction in weight lifters and cardiomyopathy in a former professional football player. From the total emergency room episodes where cocaine was mentioned in 1990, approximately 66% of these episodes occurred in young individuals 18-29 years of age. Over 500,000 of the individuals currently taking anabolic-androgenic steroids for nonmedical purposes are high-school children. Because cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroids are used improperly, more focus needs to be paid to the toxic mechanisms of their adverse effects. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss mechanisms whereby exercise and/or exercise training may alter the cardiovascular responses to these drugs. Furthermore, we would like to illustrate that contrary to the popular belief, acute and chronic abuse of cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroids have a negative impact on exercise performance.

  7. Synthetic lethality between androgen receptor signalling and the PARP pathway in prostate cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Asim, Mohammad; Tarish, Firas; Zecchini, Heather I; Sanjiv, Kumar; Gelali, Eleni; Massie, Charles Edward; Baridi, Ajoeb; Warren, Anne Y; Zhao, Wanfeng; Ogris, Christoph; McDuffus, Leigh-Anne; Mascalchi, Patrice; Shaw, Greg; Dev, Harveer; Wadhwa, Karan

    2017-01-01

    Emerging data demonstrate homologous recombination (HR) defects in castration resistant prostate cancers, rendering these tumours sensitive to PARP inhibition. Here, we demonstrate a direct requirement for the androgen receptor (AR) to maintain HR gene expression and HR activity in prostate cancer. We show that PARP-mediated repair pathways are upregulated in prostate cancer following androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Furthermore, upregulation of PARP activity is essential for the survival...

  8. Changes in rat testis morphology and androgen receptor expression around the age of puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Meseeh, Nabila A; El-Shaarawy, Ehab A A; AlDomairy, Ahmed F; Sehly, Reem A Abou

    2016-05-01

    Androgens are the keystone in fertility and intact sexual functions in males. It exerts its actions via androgen receptors extensively present in testicular cells, only its presence in germ cells is controversial. The alteration of androgen receptors in different testicular cells is usually accompanied by different sexual disorders. On the other hand, many sexual disorders are treated with androgens. Puberty, being the juncture of hormonal blossom, is an important stage to evaluate the evolution of testicular cells including androgen receptors. The aim of the work was to investigate the morphological and androgen receptor changes in different testicular cells during puberty in the rat testis using histological and immunohistochemical techniques. This study was carried out on 45 male albino rats (Sprague-Dawley). The rats were divided into three age groups; group I (prepubertal) 21 days old, group II (peripubertal) 35 days and group III (postpubertal) 90 days old. The rat testes were examined histologically and immuneohistochemically. Cells and androgen receptors were counted using Leica Qwin 500 image analyzer computer system. Data were analyzed using univariate ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc test. Histological examination of the different ages showed developmental changes of different testicular cells. Immunohistochemical examination revealed the presence of AR in spermatogenic cells in pubertal and postpubertal groups and partially in prepubertal group. AR was clearly expressed in both Sertoli and Leydig cells in the three groups. The maximum expression in Sertoli cells was at 90 days while that of Leydig cells was at the age of 35 days. Androgen receptors should not be excluded as an effective factor on germ cells through its direct action on AR, clearly expressed in spermatogenic cells and its surge at the age of puberty. Studies and treatments should respect the AR expected levels according to age in other testicular cells as well. Sertoli cells show a linear

  9. The Role of AKT in Androgen-Independent Progression of Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-01

    androgen ablation (2). However, there has been a growing appreciation that most patients treated by androgen ablation ultimately relapse to more aggressive...activation. (c) Bicistronic vector, iAkt,., containing M-FRB12 and F3-APH.Akt separated by the poliovirus IRES, functions more efficiently than iAkt...characterized IRES from poliovirus . Following specific antibodies against Akt S473 and T308 sites as electroporation of bicistronic vectors into Jurkat

  10. [Hormone replacement Up-to-date. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Current status and their future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Taiji; Kato, Ryuichi; Kobayashi, Koh

    2007-09-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) with tissue or organ-specificity are expected for their development. Indeed, they will be widely applied for patients with late onset of hypodonadism and those with prostate cancer who have hormone treatment-induced osteoporosis. SARMs having anabolic action on the bone or muscle but no or weak androgenic action on the prostate will be welcomed in the clinical setting.

  11. Androgen receptor mutations associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome: a high content analysis approach leading to personalized medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam T Szafran

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS is a rare disease associated with inactivating mutations of AR that disrupt male sexual differentiation, and cause a spectrum of phenotypic abnormalities having as a common denominator loss of reproductive viability. No established treatment exists for these conditions, however there are sporadic reports of patients (or recapitulated mutations in cell lines that respond to administration of supraphysiologic doses (or pulses of testosterone or synthetic ligands. Here, we utilize a novel high content analysis (HCA approach to study AR function at the single cell level in genital skin fibroblasts (GSF. We discuss in detail findings in GSF from three historical patients with AIS, which include identification of novel mechanisms of AR malfunction, and the potential ability to utilize HCA for personalized treatment of patients affected by this condition.

  12. Androgen and androgen metabolite levels in serum and urine of East African chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii): comparison of EIA and LC-MS analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preis, Anna; Mugisha, Lawrence; Hauser, Barbara; Weltring, Anja; Deschner, Tobias

    2011-12-01

    The primary male androgen testosterone (T) is often used as an endocrinological marker to investigate androgen-behaviour interactions in males. In chimpanzees and bonobos, studies investigating the relationship between T levels and dominance rank or aggressive behaviour have revealed contradictory results. The immunoassays used in these studies were originally developed for the measurement of steroids in serum. Their application to non-invasively collected samples, however, can lead to methodological problems due to cross-reacting metabolites, which might occur in urine or faeces but not in blood. The overall aim of this study, therefore, is to clarify whether a T enzyme immunoassay (EIA) is an applicable method to monitor testicular function in adult male chimpanzees. To estimate the impact of cross-reacting androgens on the used T EIA, we compared the results of an EIA measurement with a set of androgen metabolite levels measured by LC-MS. In urine from male chimpanzees, cross-reactivities appear to exist mainly with T and its exclusive metabolites, 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT) and 5α-androstanediol (androstanediol). Both urinary and serum T levels of male chimpanzees were significantly higher than female T levels when measured with the T EIA, indicating a reliable measurement of testicular androgens and their exclusive metabolites with the used EIA. In urine from female chimpanzees, the comparison between LC-MS and T EIA results indicated a higher impact of cross-reactions with adrenal androgen metabolites. Therefore, the investigation of urinary T levels in female chimpanzees with a T EIA seems to be problematic. Overall our results show that a T EIA can be a reliable method to monitor testicular function in male chimpanzee urine and that LC-MS is a valuable tool for the validation of immunoassays. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene is not a common determinant of male sexual orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macke, J.P.; Nathans, J.; King, V.L. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)); Hu, N.; Hu, S.; Hamer, D.; Bailey, M. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)); Brown, T. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1993-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that DNA sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene plays a causal role in the development of male sexual orientation, the authors have (1) measured the degree of concordance of androgen receptor alleles in 36 pairs of homosexual brothers, (2) compared the lengths of polyglutamine and polyglycine tracts in the amino-terminal domain of the androgen receptor in a sample of 197 homosexual males and 213 unselected subjects, and (3) screened the entire androgen receptor coding region for sequence variation by PCR and denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and/or single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis in 20 homosexual males with homosexual or bisexual brothers and one homosexual male with no homosexual brothers, and screened the amino-terminal domain of the receptor for sequence variation in an additional 44 homosexual males, 37 of whom had one or more first- or second-degree male relatives who were either homosexual or bisexual. These analyses show that (1) homosexual brothers are as likely to be discordant as concordant for androgen receptor alleles; (2) there are no large-scale differences between the distributions of polyglycine or polyglutamine tract lengths in the homosexual and control groups; and (3) coding region sequence variation is not commonly found within the androgen receptor gene of homosexual men. The DGGE screen identified two rare amino acid substitutions, ser[sup 205] -to-arg and glu[sup 793]-to-asp, the biological significance of which is unknown. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Spatiotemporal dynamics of androgen signaling underlie sexual differentiation and congenital malformations of the urethra and vagina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkins, Christine E; Enriquez, Ana B; Cohn, Martin J

    2016-11-22

    Disorders of sex development (DSDs) are congenital anomalies that affect sexual differentiation of genitourinary organs and secondary sex characters. A common cause of female genital virilization is congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), in which excess androgen production during development of 46XX females can result in vaginal atresia, masculinization of the urethra, a single urogenital sinus, and clitoral hypertrophy or ambiguous external genitalia. Development of the vagina depends on sexual differentiation of the urogenital sinus ridge, an epithelial thickening that forms where the sex ducts attach to the anterior urethra. In females, the sinus ridge descends posteriorly to allow the vaginal opening to form in the vulva, whereas in males and in females with CAH, androgens inhibit descent of the sinus ridge. The mechanisms that regulate development of the female urethra and vagina are largely unknown. Here we show that the timing and duration of, and the cell population targeted by, androgen signaling determine the position of vaginal attachment to the urethra. Manipulations of androgen signaling in utero reveal a temporal window of development when sinus ridge fate is determined. Cell type-specific genetic deletions of androgen receptor (Ar) identify a subpopulation of mesenchymal cells that regulate sinus ridge morphogenesis. These results reveal a common mechanism that coordinates development of the vagina and feminization of the urethra, which may account for development of a single urogenital sinus in females exposed to excessive androgen during a critical period of prenatal development.

  15. Spatiotemporal dynamics of androgen signaling underlie sexual differentiation and congenital malformations of the urethra and vagina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkins, Christine E.; Enriquez, Ana B.; Cohn, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSDs) are congenital anomalies that affect sexual differentiation of genitourinary organs and secondary sex characters. A common cause of female genital virilization is congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), in which excess androgen production during development of 46XX females can result in vaginal atresia, masculinization of the urethra, a single urogenital sinus, and clitoral hypertrophy or ambiguous external genitalia. Development of the vagina depends on sexual differentiation of the urogenital sinus ridge, an epithelial thickening that forms where the sex ducts attach to the anterior urethra. In females, the sinus ridge descends posteriorly to allow the vaginal opening to form in the vulva, whereas in males and in females with CAH, androgens inhibit descent of the sinus ridge. The mechanisms that regulate development of the female urethra and vagina are largely unknown. Here we show that the timing and duration of, and the cell population targeted by, androgen signaling determine the position of vaginal attachment to the urethra. Manipulations of androgen signaling in utero reveal a temporal window of development when sinus ridge fate is determined. Cell type-specific genetic deletions of androgen receptor (Ar) identify a subpopulation of mesenchymal cells that regulate sinus ridge morphogenesis. These results reveal a common mechanism that coordinates development of the vagina and feminization of the urethra, which may account for development of a single urogenital sinus in females exposed to excessive androgen during a critical period of prenatal development. PMID:27821748

  16. Non-neural androgen receptors affect sexual differentiation of brain and behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monks, D A; Swift-Gallant, A

    2018-02-01

    Although gonadal testosterone is the principal endocrine factor that promotes masculine traits in mammals, the development of a male phenotype requires local production of both androgenic and oestrogenic signals within target tissues. Much of our knowledge concerning androgenic components of testosterone signalling in sexual differentiation comes from studies of androgen receptor (Ar) loss of function mutants. Here, we review these studies of loss of Ar function and of AR overexpression either globally or selectively in the nervous system of mice. Global and neural mutations affect socio-sexual behaviour and the neuroanatomy of these mice in a sexually differentiated manner. Some masculine traits are affected by both global and neural mutation, indicative of neural mediation, whereas other masculine traits are affected only by global mutation, indicative of an obligatory non-neural androgen target. These results support a model in which multiple sites of androgen action coordinate to produce masculine phenotypes. Furthermore, AR overexpression does not always have a phenotype opposite to that of loss of Ar function mutants, indicative of a nonlinear relationship between androgen dose and masculine phenotype in some cases. Potential mechanisms of Ar gene function in non-neural targets in producing masculine phenotypes are discussed. © 2017 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  17. Selection for rapid embryo development correlates with embryo exposure to maternal androgens among passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabl, Hubert; Palacios, Maria G; Martin, Thomas E

    2007-08-01

    Greater offspring predation favors evolution of faster development among species. We hypothesized that greater offspring predation exerts selection on mothers to increase levels of anabolic androgens in egg yolks to achieve faster development. Here, we tested whether (1) concentrations of yolk androgens in passerine species were associated with offspring predation and (2) embryo and nestling development rates were associated with yolk androgen concentrations. We examined three androgens that increase in potency along the synthesis pathway: androstenedione (A(4)) to testosterone (T) to 5 alpha -dihydrotestosterone (5 alpha -DHT). Concentrations of none of these steroids were related to clutch size; only A(4) was allometrically related to egg volume. Species that experience greater predation showed higher yolk concentrations of T and 5 alpha -DHT. Higher concentrations of T and particularly 5 alpha -DHT were strongly correlated with faster development during the embryo period and less so during the nestling period. Development rates were most strongly correlated with 5 alpha -DHT, suggesting that potency increases along the androgen synthesis pathway and that effects are mediated by the androgen receptor pathway. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that selection for faster development by time-dependent offspring mortality may be achieved epigenetically by varying embryo exposure to maternal anabolic steroids.

  18. Selection for rapid embryo development correlates with embryo exposure to maternal androgens among passerine birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabl, H.; Palacios, M.G.; Martin, T.E.

    2007-01-01

    Greater offspring predation favors evolution of faster development among species. We hypothesized that greater offspring predation exerts selection on mothers to increase levels of anabolic androgens in egg yolks to achieve faster development. Here, we tested whether (1) concentrations of yolk androgens in passerine species were associated with offspring predation and (2) embryo and nestling development rates were associated with yolk androgen concentrations. We examined three androgens that increase in potency along the synthesis pathway: androstenedione (A4) to testosterone (T) to 5??- dihydrotestosterone (5??-DHT). Concentrations of none of these steroids were related to clutch size; only A4 was allometrically related to egg volume. Species that experience greater predation showed higher yolk concentrations of T and 5??-DHT. Higher concentrations of T and particularly 5??-DHT were strongly correlated with faster development during the embryo period and less so during the nestling period. Development rates were most strongly correlated with 5??-DHT, suggesting that potency increases along the androgen synthesis pathway and that effects are mediated by the androgen receptor pathway. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that selection for faster development by time-dependent offspring mortality may be achieved epigenetically by varying embryo exposure to maternal anabolic steroids. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  19. Genomic and non-genomic effects of androgens in the cardiovascular system: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Herald, Angela K; Alves-Lopes, Rheure; Montezano, Augusto C; Ahmed, S Faisal; Touyz, Rhian M

    2017-07-01

    The principle steroidal androgens are testosterone and its metabolite 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which is converted from testosterone by the enzyme 5α-reductase. Through the classic pathway with androgens crossing the plasma membrane and binding to the androgen receptor (AR) or via mechanisms independent of the ligand-dependent transactivation function of nuclear receptors, testosterone induces genomic and non-genomic effects respectively. AR is widely distributed in several tissues, including vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Androgens are essential for many developmental and physiological processes, especially in male reproductive tissues. It is now clear that androgens have multiple actions besides sex differentiation and sexual maturation and that many physiological systems are influenced by androgens, including regulation of cardiovascular function [nitric oxide (NO) release, Ca 2+ mobilization, vascular apoptosis, hypertrophy, calcification, senescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation]. This review focuses on evidence indicating that interplay between genomic and non-genomic actions of testosterone may influence cardiovascular function. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  20. On the proluminal movement of sup 3 H-androgens across the rat epididymal epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, T.T.; Jones, C.E.; Roddy, M.S. (Univ. of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville (USA))

    1989-07-01

    3H-Androgens in rat epididymal interstitium have previously been shown to move into the epididymal lumen against a concentration gradient. This is true especially in the caput epididymidis. The present investigation used the technique of in vivo epididymal perifusion and tubule micropuncture to demonstrate that the proluminal movement of 3H-androgens is subject to competitive inhibition (unlabeled testosterone in the perifusion fluid at 10 times and 100 times the concentration of 3H-testosterone significantly reduced proluminal movement of isotope) and is not energy-dependent (1 mM 2,4-dinitrophenol in perifusion fluid did not reduce the proluminal movement of isotope). Additionally, dry-mount autoradiography demonstrated high intraluminal concentrations of isotope relative to interstitial concentrations after caput tubule incubation in 3H-dihydrotestosterone (3H-DHT), and showed that the high intraluminal concentrations of isotope were not dependent on the presence of spermatozoa, i.e. proluminal movement of 3H-androgens was not due to binding to intraluminal spermatozoa. Isolation of caput epididymidal sperm on filters followed by 3H-DHT binding experiments also failed to demonstrate the presence of specific binding of this androgen to spermatozoa. Finally, it was confirmed that electrophoresed epididymal lumen fluid contains a single 3H-DHT binding peak that is at its highest concentration in the caput epididymal fluid. These data are consistent with the conclusion that intraluminal androgen-binding protein is an important factor in transepithelial androgen movement.

  1. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyatzis, Richard E.; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks – the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success. PMID:24624074

  2. Antagonistic Neural Networks Underlying Differentiated Leadership Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Eleftherios Boyatzis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950’s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task oriented and socio-emotional oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks -- the Task Positive Network (TPN and the Default Mode Network (DMN. Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success.

  3. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyatzis, Richard E; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks - the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success.

  4. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists: pharmacological opportunities, clinical experience, and translational prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janero, David R; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2009-03-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid (CB) (endocannabinoid) signaling system is involved in a variety of (patho)physiological processes, primarily by virtue of natural, arachidonic acid-derived lipids (endocannabinoids) that activate G protein-coupled CB1 and CB2 receptors. A hyperactive endocannabinoid system appears to contribute to the etiology of several disease states that constitute significant global threats to human health. Consequently, mounting interest surrounds the design and profiling of receptor-targeted CB antagonists as pharmacotherapeutics that attenuate endocannabinoid transmission for salutary gain. Experimental and clinical evidence supports the therapeutic potential of CB1 receptor antagonists to treat overweight/obesity, obesity-related cardiometabolic disorders, and substance abuse. Laboratory data suggest that CB2 receptor antagonists might be effective immunomodulatory and, perhaps, anti-inflammatory drugs. One CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, rimonabant, has emerged as the first-in-class drug approved outside the United States for weight control. Select follow-on agents (taranabant, otenabant, surinabant, rosonabant, SLV-319, AVE1625, V24343) have also been studied in the clinic. However, rimonabant's market withdrawal in the European Union and suspension of rimonabant's, taranabant's, and otenabant's ongoing development programs have highlighted some adverse clinical side effects (especially nausea and psychiatric disturbances) of CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists. Novel CB1 receptor ligands that are peripherally directed and/or exhibit neutral antagonism (the latter not affecting constitutive CB1 receptor signaling) may optimize the benefits of CB1 receptor antagonists while minimizing any risk. Indeed, CB1 receptor-neutral antagonists appear from preclinical data to offer efficacy comparable to or better than that of prototype CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists, with less propensity to induce nausea. Continued

  5. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad eKhanfar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®, the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  6. Possible site of action of CGRP antagonists in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Olesen, Jes

    2011-01-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists olcegepant and telcagepant are very potent drugs. Both are effective in migraine but in doses much higher than would be predicted from receptor binding and other in vitro results. This could perhaps suggest an effect of CGRP antagoni......The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists olcegepant and telcagepant are very potent drugs. Both are effective in migraine but in doses much higher than would be predicted from receptor binding and other in vitro results. This could perhaps suggest an effect of CGRP...... antagonists behind the blood-brain barrier (BBB), i.e. in the central nervous system (CNS)....

  7. Adolescent Anabolic/Androgenic Steroids: Aggression and Anxiety During Exposure Predict Behavioral Responding During Withdrawal in Syrian Hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus)

    OpenAIRE

    Ricci, Lesley A.; Morrison, Thomas R.; Melloni, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    In the U.S. and worldwide anabolic/androgenic steroid use remains high in the adolescent population. This is concerning given that anabolic/androgenic steroid use is associated with a higher incidence of aggressive behavior during exposure and anxiety during withdrawal. This study uses pubertal Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) to investigate the hypothesis that an inverse behavioral relationship exists between anabolic/androgenic steroid-induced aggression and anxiety across adolescent ...

  8. Alteration in sexually dimorphic testosterone biotransformation profiles as a biomarker of chemically induced androgen disruption in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, V S; McLachlan, J B; Falls, J G; LeBlanc, G A

    1999-01-01

    Assessment of the impact of environmental chemicals on androgen homeostasis in rodent models is confounded by high intraindividual and interindividual variability in circulating testosterone levels. Our goal was to evaluate changes in testosterone biotransformation processes as a measure of androgen homeostasis and as a biomarker of exposure to androgen-disrupting chemicals. Sex-specific differences in hepatic testosterone biotransformation enzyme activities were identified in CD-1 mice. Gona...

  9. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) Negatively Regulate Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Growth and Epithelial:Mesenchymal Stem Cell Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Ahn, Sunjoo; Cheney, Misty D.; Yepuru, Muralimohan; Miller, Duane D.; Steiner, Mitchell S.; Dalton, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The androgen receptor (AR) is the most highly expressed steroid receptor in breast cancer with 75–95% of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and 40–70% of ER-negative breast cancers expressing AR. Though historically breast cancers were treated with steroidal androgens, their use fell from favor because of their virilizing side effects and the emergence of tamoxifen. Nonsteroidal, tissue selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may provide a novel targeted approach to ...

  10. Cyproterone acetate enhances TRAIL-induced androgen-independent prostate cancer cell apoptosis via up-regulation of death receptor 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linjie; Wolff, Dennis W; Xie, Yan; Lin, Ming-Fong; Tu, Yaping

    2017-03-07

    Virtually all prostate cancer deaths occur due to obtaining the castration-resistant phenotype after prostate cancer cells escaped from apoptosis and/or growth suppression initially induced by androgen receptor blockade. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) was an attractive cancer therapeutic agent due to its minimal toxicity to normal cells and remarkable apoptotic activity in tumor cells. However, most localized cancers including prostate cancer are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, thereby creating a therapeutic challenge of inducing TRAIL sensitivity in cancer cells. Herein the effects of cyproterone acetate, an antiandrogen steroid, on the TRAIL-induced apoptosis of androgen receptor-negative prostate cancer cells are reported. Cell apoptosis was assessed by both annexin V/propidium iodide labeling and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage assays. Gene and protein expression changes were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot assays. The effect of cyproterone acetate on gene promoter activity was determined by luciferase reporter assay. Cyproterone acetate but not AR antagonist bicalutamide dramatically increased the susceptibility of androgen receptor-negative human prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis but no effects on immortalized human prostate stromal PS30 cells and human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells. Further investigation of the TRAIL-induced apoptosis pathway revealed that cyproterone acetate exerted its effect by selectively increasing death receptor 5 (DR5) mRNA and protein expression. Cyproterone acetate treatment also increased DR5 gene promoter activity, which could be abolished by mutation of a consensus binding domain of transcription factor CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) in the DR5 gene promoter. Cyproterone acetate increases CHOP expression in a concentration and time-dependent manner and endoplasmic reticulum stress reducer 4-phenylbutyrate could block

  11. Activation of estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) regulates the expression of N-cadherin, E-cadherin and β-catenin in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rafael de Souza; Lombardi, Ana Paola G; de Souza, Deborah Simão; Vicente, Carolina M; Porto, Catarina S

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of the activation of estrogen receptors on expression and localization of N-cadherin, E-cadherin and non-phosphorylated β-catenin in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells (PC-3 and DU-145) and in human post pubertal prostate epithelial cells (PNT1A). Expression of N-cadherin was detected in PNT1A and PC-3 cells, but not in DU-145 cells. E-cadherin was detected only in DU-145 cells and β-catenin was detected in all cells studied. N-cadherin and β-catenin were located preferentially in the cellular membrane of PNT1A cells and in the cytoplasm of PC-3 cells. E-cadherin and β-catenin were located preferentially in the cellular membrane of DU-145 cells. 17β-estradiol (E2) or the ERα-selective agonist PPT did not affect the content and localization of N-cadherin in PC-3 and PNT1A cells or E-cadherin in DU-145 cells. In PC-3 cells, ERβ-selective agonist DPN decreased the expression of N-cadherin. DPN-induced downregulation of N-cadherin was blocked by pretreatment with the ERβ-selective antagonist (PHTPP), indicating that ERβ1 is the upstream receptor regulating the expression of N-cadherin. In DU-145 cells, the activation of ERβ1 by DPN increased the expression of E-cadherin. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of ERβ1 is required to maintain an epithelial phenotype in PC-3 and DU-145 cells. The activation of ERβ1 also increased the expression of β-catenin in cytoplasm of PC-3 and in the cellular membrane of DU-145 cells. In conclusion, our results indicate differential expression and localization of N-cadherin, E-cadherin and β-catenin in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. The reduction of N-cadherin content by activation of ERβ, exclusively observed in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells (PC-3), may be related to the activation of signaling pathways, such as the release of β-catenin into the cytoplasm, translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus and

  12. Preparation and evaluation of a multimodal minoxidil microemulsion versus minoxidil alone in the treatment of androgenic alopecia of mixed etiology: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakr, Farouk M; Gado, Ali Mi; Mohammed, Haseebur R; Adam, Abdel Nasser Ismail

    2013-01-01

    The variable success of topical minoxidil in the treatment of androgenic alopecia has led to the hypothesis that other pathways could mediate this form of hair loss, including infection and/or microinflammation of the hair follicles. In this study, we prepared a multimodal microemulsion comprising minoxidil (a dihydrotestosterone antagonist), diclofenac (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent), and tea tree oil (an anti-infective agent). We investigated the stability and physicochemical properties of this formulation, and its therapeutic efficacy compared with a formulation containing minoxidil alone in the treatment of androgenic alopecia. We developed a multimodal oil/water (o/w) microemulsion, a formulation containing minoxidil alone, and another containing vehicle. A three-phase diagram was constructed to obtain the optimal concentrations of the selected oil, surfactant, and cosurfactant. Thirty-two men aged 18-30 years were randomized to apply 1 mL of microemulsion containing the multimodal formulation (formulation A, n = 11), minoxidil alone (formulation B, n = 11) or placebo (formulation C, n = 10) twice daily to the affected area for 32 weeks. Efficacy was evaluated by mean hair count, thickness, and weight on the targeted area of the scalp. Global photographs were taken, changes in the area of scalp coverage were assessed by patients and external investigators, and the benefits and safety of the study medications were evaluated. The physical stability of formula A was examined after a shelf storage period of 24 months. Formulation A achieved a significantly superior response than formulations B and C in terms of mean hair count (P minoxidil formulation significantly (P minoxidil alone and placebo formulations. These improvements were in agreement with the photographic assessments made by the investigators. Formula A was shown to be an o/w formulation with consistent pH, viscosity, specific gravity, and homogeneity, and was physically stable after 24 months

  13. Occurrence and in vitro bioactivity of estrogen, androgen, and glucocorticoid compounds in a nationwide screen of United States stream waters

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In vitro bioactivity concentrations and chemical concentrations of estrogens, androgens, and glucocorticoids from a nationwide screen of United States stream water...

  14. A novel selective androgen receptor modulator, NEP28, is efficacious in muscle and brain without serious side effects on prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Kazumasa; Harada, Koichiro; Ichihara, Junji; Takata, Naoko; Takahashi, Yasuhiko; Saito, Koichi

    2013-11-15

    Age-related androgen depletion is known to be a risk factor for various diseases, such as osteoporosis and sarcopenia. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that age-related androgen depletion results in accumulation of β-amyloid protein and thereby acts as a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease. Supplemental androgen therapy has been shown to be efficacious in treating osteoporosis and sarcopenia. In addition, studies in animals have demonstrated that androgens can play a protective role against Alzheimer's disease. However, androgen therapy is not used routinely for these indications, because of side effects. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a new class of compounds. SARMs maintain the beneficial effects of androgens on bone and muscle while reducing unwanted side effects. NEP28 is a new SARM exhibiting high selectivity for androgen receptor. To investigate the pharmacological effects of NEP28, we compared the effects on muscle, prostate, and brain with mice that were androgen depleted by orchidectomy and then treated with either placebo, NEP28, dihydrotestosterone, or methyltestosterone. We demonstrated that NEP28 showed tissue-selective effect equivalent to or higher than existing SARMs. In addition, the administration of NEP28 increased the activity of neprilysin, a known Aβ-degrading enzyme. These results indicate that SARM is efficacious for the treatment of not only osteoporosis and sarcopenia, but also Alzheimer's disease. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Androgenic anabolic steroid abuse and the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanberg, Paul; Atar, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has been linked to a variety of different cardiovascular side effects. In case reports, acute myocardial infarction is the most common event presented, but other adverse cardiovascular effects such as left ventricular hypertrophy, reduced left ventricular function, arterial thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and several cases of sudden cardiac death have also been reported. However, to date there are no prospective, randomized, interventional studies on the long-term cardiovascular effects of abuse of AAS. In this review we have studied the relevant literature regarding several risk factors for cardiovascular disease where the effects of AAS have been scrutinized:(1) Echocardiographic studies show that supraphysiologic doses of AAS lead to both morphologic and functional changes of the heart. These include a tendency to produce myocardial hypertrophy (Fig. 3), a possible increase of heart chamber diameters, unequivocal alterations of diastolic function and ventricular relaxation, and most likely a subclinically compromised left ventricular contractile function. (2) AAS induce a mild, but transient increase of blood pressure. However, the clinical significance of this effect remains modest. (3) Furthermore, AAS confer an enhanced pro-thrombotic state, most prominently through an activation of platelet aggregability. The concomitant effects on the humoral coagulation cascade are more complex and include activation of both pro-coagulatory and fibrinolytic pathways. (4) Users of AAS often demonstrate unfavorable measurements of vascular reactivity involving endothelial-dependent or endothelial-independent vasodilatation. A degree of reversibility seems to be consistent, though. (5) There is a comprehensive body of evidence documenting that AAS induce various alterations of lipid metabolism. The most prominent changes are concomitant elevations of LDL and decreases of HDL, effects that increase the risk of coronary artery disease

  16. Practical recommendations for calcium channel antagonist poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietjens, S J; de Lange, D W; Donker, D W; Meulenbelt, J

    2016-02-01

    Calcium channel antagonists (CCAs) are widely used for different cardiovascular disorders. At therapeutic doses, CCAs have a favourable side effect profile. However, in overdose, CCAs can cause serious complications, such as severe hypotension and bradycardia. Patients in whom a moderate to severe intoxication is anticipated should be observed in a monitored setting for at least 12 hours if an immediate-release formulation is ingested, and at least 24 hours when a sustained-release formulation (or amlodipine) is involved, even if the patient is asymptomatic. Initial treatment is aimed at gastrointestinal decontamination and general supportive care, i.e., fluid resuscitation and correction of metabolic acidosis and electrolyte disturbances. In moderate to severe CCA poisoning, a combined medical strategy might be indispensable, such as administration of vasopressors, intravenous calcium and hyperinsulinaemia/euglycaemia therapy. Especially hyperinsulinaemia/euglycaemia therapy is an important first-line treatment in CCA-overdosed patients in whom a large ingestion is suspected. High-dose insulin, in combination with glucose, seems to be most effective when used early in the intoxication phase, even when the patient shows hardly any haemodynamic instability. Intravenous lipid emulsion therapy should only be considered in patients with life-threatening cardiovascular toxicity, such as refractory shock, which is unresponsive to conventional therapies. When supportive and specific pharmacological measures fail to adequately reverse refractory conditions in CCA overdose, the use of extracorporeal life support should be considered. The efficacy of these pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions generally advocated in CCA poisoning needs further in-depth mechanistic foundation, in order to improve individualised treatment of CCA-overdosed patients.

  17. Characterization and design of antagonistic shape memory alloy actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georges, T; Brailovski, V; Terriault, P

    2012-01-01

    Antagonistic shape memory actuators use opposing shape memory alloy (SMA) elements to create devices capable of producing differential motion paths and two-way mechanical work in a very efficient manner. There is no requirement for additional bias elements to ‘re-arm’ the actuators and allow repetitive actuation. The work generation potential of antagonistic shape memory actuators is determined by specific SMA element characteristics and their assembly conditions. In this study, the selected SMA wires are assembled in antagonistic configuration and characterized using a dedicated test bench to evaluate their stress–strain characteristics as a function of the number of cycles. Using these functional characteristics, a so-called ‘working envelope’ is built to assist in the design of such an actuator. Finally, the test bench is used to simulate a real application of an antagonistic actuator (case study). (paper)

  18. A SELECTIVE ANTAGONIST OF MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTOR EPLERENONE IN CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Gegenava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of aldosterone in pathophysiological processes is considered. The effects of the selective antagonist of mineralocorticoid receptor eplerenone are analyzed. The advantages of eplerenone compared with spironolactone are discussed.

  19. Development of KGF Antagonist as a Breast Cancer Therapeutic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sugimoto, Yasuro

    2003-01-01

    .... We were able to show some potential intracellular KGFR target small molecules whereas extracellular target synthetic peptide antagonist was not able to do during this period We also added a new...

  20. Recent Development of Non-Peptide GnRH Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Ling Tukun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The decapeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone, also referred to as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone with the sequence (pGlu-His-Trp-Ser-Tyr-Gly-Leu-Arg-Pro-Gly-NH2 plays an important role in regulating the reproductive system. It stimulates differential release of the gonadotropins FSH and LH from pituitary tissue. To date, treatment of hormone-dependent diseases targeting the GnRH receptor, including peptide GnRH agonist and antagonists are now available on the market. The inherited issues associate with peptide agonists and antagonists have however, led to significant interest in developing orally active, small molecule, non-peptide antagonists. In this review, we will summarize all developed small molecule GnRH antagonists along with the most recent clinical data and therapeutic applications.

  1. Complications of TNF-α antagonists and iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    TNF-α is a central regulator of inflammation and its blockade downregulates other proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Subsequently, TNF-α antagonists are currently used in treatment regimens directed toward several inflammatory diseases. Despite a beneficia...

  2. Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15 1-0252 TITLE: Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...14 Jul 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Center for Substance Abuse Research Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University 3500 N, Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19140 AND ADDRESS(ES) 8

  3. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists as induction therapy after heart transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Christian H; Gustafsson, Finn; Gluud, Christian

    2008-01-01

    About half of the transplantation centers use induction therapy after heart transplantation. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists (IL-2Ras) are used increasingly for induction therapy. We conducted a systematic review of randomized trials assessing IL-2Ras.......About half of the transplantation centers use induction therapy after heart transplantation. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists (IL-2Ras) are used increasingly for induction therapy. We conducted a systematic review of randomized trials assessing IL-2Ras....

  4. Androgen action in the masculinization programming window and development of male reproductive organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, D J; Sharpe, R M; Welsh, M; Fisken, M; Scott, H M; Hutchison, G R; Drake, A J; van den Driesche, S

    2010-04-01

    We have shown previously that deficient androgen action within a masculinization programming window (MPW; e15.5-e18.5 in rats) is important in the origin of male reproductive disorders and in programming male reproductive organ size, but that androgen action postnatally may be important to achieve this size. To further investigate importance of the MPW, we used two rat models, in which foetal androgen production or action was impaired during the MPW by exposing in utero to either di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) or to flutamide. Reduced anogenital distance (AGD) was used as a monitor of androgen production/action during the MPW. Offspring were evaluated in early puberty (Pnd25) to establish if reproductive organ size was altered. The testes, penis, ventral prostate (VP) and seminal vesicles (SV) were weighed and penis length measured. Both DBP and flutamide exposure in the MPW significantly reduced penis, VP and SV size along with AGD at Pnd25; AGD and organ size were highly correlated. In DBP-, but not flutamide-, exposed animals, testis weight was also reduced and correlated with AGD. Intratesticular testosterone was also measured in control and DBP-exposed males during (e17.5) or after (e21.5) the MPW and related to AGD at e21.5. To evaluate the importance of postnatal androgen action in reproductive organ growth, the effect of combinations of prenatal and postnatal maternal treatments on AGD and penis size at Pnd25 was evaluated. In prenatally DBP-exposed animals, further postnatal exposure to either DBP or flutamide significantly reduced AGD and penis size in comparison with prenatal DBP exposure alone. In comparison, rats exposed postnatally to testosterone propionate after prenatal vehicle-exposure showed considerable increase in these parameters vs. controls. In conclusion, we show that the size of all male reproductive organs is programmed by androgen exposure in the MPW, but that growth towards this size is dependent on androgen action postnatally.

  5. Androgens in Women with Anorexia Nervosa and Normal-Weight Women with Hypothalamic Amenorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. K.; Lawson, E. A.; Mathur, V.; Wexler, T. L.; Meenaghan, E.; Misra, M.; Herzog, D. B.; Klibanski, A.

    2011-01-01

    Context Anorexia nervosa and normal-weight hypothalamic amenorrhea are characterized by hypogonadism and hypercortisolemia. However, it is not known whether these endocrine abnormalities result in reductions in adrenal and/or ovarian androgens or androgen precursors in such women, nor is it known whether relative androgen deficiency contributes to abnormalities in bone density and body composition in this population. Objective Our objective was to determine whether endogenous androgen and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels: 1) are reduced in women with anorexia nervosa and normal-weight hypothalamic amenorrhea, 2) are reduced further by oral contraceptives in women with anorexia nervosa, and 3) are predictors of weight, body composition, or bone density in such women. Design and Setting We conducted a cross-sectional study at a general clinical research center. Study Participants A total of 217 women were studied: 137 women with anorexia nervosa not receiving oral contraceptives, 32 women with anorexia nervosa receiving oral contraceptives, 21 normal-weight women with hypothalamic amenorrhea, and 27 healthy eumenorrheic controls. Main Outcome Measures Testosterone, free testosterone, DHEAS, bone density, fat-free mass, and fat mass were assessed. Results Endogenous total and free testosterone, but not DHEAS, were lower in women with anorexia nervosa than in controls. More marked reductions in both free testosterone and DHEAS were observed in women with anorexia nervosa receiving oral contraceptives. In contrast, normal-weight women with hypothalamic amenorrhea had normal androgen and DHEAS levels. Lower free testosterone, total testosterone, and DHEAS levels predicted lower bone density at most skeletal sites measured, and free testosterone was positively associated with fat-free mass. Conclusions Androgen levels are low, appear to be even further reduced by oral contraceptive use, and are predictors of bone density and fat-free mass in women with

  6. 17β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 Expression Is Induced by Androgen Signaling in Endometrial Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaki Hashimoto

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is one of the most common female pelvic cancers and has been considered an androgen-related malignancy. Several studies have demonstrated the anti-cell proliferative effect of androgen on endometrial cancer cells; however, the mechanisms of the anti-cancer effect of androgen remain largely unclear. 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (17β-HSD2, which catalyzes the conversion of E2 to E1, is known to be upregulated by androgen treatment in breast cancer cells. In this study, we therefore focused on the role of androgen on estrogen dependence in endometrial cancer. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT was found to induce 17β-HSD2 mRNA and protein expression in HEC-1B endometrial cancer cells. DHT could also inhibit cell proliferation of HEC-1B when induced by estradiol treatment. In 19 endometrioid endometrial adenocarcinoma (EEA tissues, intratumoral DHT concentration was measured by liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry and was found to be significantly correlated with 17β-HSD2 immunohistochemical status. We further examined the correlations between 17β-HSD2 immunoreactivity and clinicopathological parameters in 53 EEA tissues. 17β-HSD2 status was inversely associated with the histological grade, clinical stage, and cell proliferation marker Ki-67, and positively correlated with progesterone receptor expression. 17β-HSD2 status tended to be positively associated with androgen receptor status. In 53 EEA cases, the 17β-HSD2-positive group tended to have better prognosis than that for the negative group with respect to progression-free survival and endometrial cancer-specific survival. These findings suggest that androgen suppresses the estrogen dependence of endometrial cancer through the induction of 17β-HSD2 in endometrial cancer.

  7. Fecal androgen levels in common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus males living in captive family groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro D.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In captive common marmoset groups, the reproductive inhibition observed in subordinate female seems to be a result of olfactory, visual and behavioral cues from the dominant female. However, few studies have examined the relationship among adult males living in the same social group. These studies have shown that reproductive failure among peer males seems to be based on hormonal and behavioral mechanisms. New insights on sexual strategies in primates have been shown using fecal steroids, but so far no information is available for common marmoset males. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of light-dark cycle, age and reproductive condition on the profile of fecal androgens in males living in the same family group. Feces were collected from six fathers and six sons for androgen determination during the light phase of the 24-h cycle for eight days randomly distributed over a 4-week period. Androgen levels were determined by enzyme immunoassay technique. Adult sons showed higher androgen levels (166.97 ± 22.95 ng/g than fathers (80.69 ± 44.38 ng/g and juveniles (49.06 ± 23.15 ng/g; P 0.05 in fecal androgen profile was observed in adults or juveniles. No indication of androgen-mediated social competition between fathers and adult sons was demonstrable. These results provide basic information on fecal androgen profile useful to investigate the socioendocrinology of free-ranging common marmoset males and verify that, in contrast to daughters, the reproductive suppression of sons is not based on physiological inhibition of their gonads.

  8. The influence of androgens on hibernation phenology of free-living male arctic ground squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M M; Barnes, B M; O'Reilly, K M; Fenn, A M; Buck, C L

    2017-03-01

    Free-living ground squirrel species are sexually dimorphic in hibernation phenology. The underlying causes of these differences are not yet known. Androgens, testosterone (T) in particular, inhibit hibernation. To determine the influence of endogenous androgens on annual timing of hibernation we first measured circulating levels of T and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an adrenal androgen implicated in non-mating season aggression in other species, in free-living male arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii, AGS). We also manipulated endogenous androgen levels by surgical castration, and consequently compared body temperature records from intact (n=24) and castrated (n=9) males to elucidate the influence of endogenous androgens on annual body temperature cycles. The highest T levels (0.53±0.10ng/mL) were in reproductively mature male AGS in spring; whereas, both immature males in spring and all males in late summer had T levels an order of magnitude lower (0.07±0.01 and 0.06±0.00ng/mL, respectively). DHEA levels were higher in males during the late summer compared to reproductively mature males in spring (120.6±18.9 and 35.9±2.3pg/mL, respectively). Eliminating gonadal androgens via castration resulted in males delaying euthermy by extending heterothermy significantly in spring (Apr 22 ±2.9) than reproductive males (Mar 28 ±3.9) but did not change the timing of hibernation onset (castrate: Oct 12 ±1.0 vs. intact: Oct 3 ±3.1). We conclude that while androgens play a significant role in spring hibernation phenology of males, their role in fall hibernation onset is unclear. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a Family of Warmblood Horses Caused by a 25-bp Deletion of the DNA-Binding Domain of the Androgen Receptor Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eastman Welsford, G.; Munk, Rikke; Villagómez, Daniel A.F.

    2017-01-01

    Testicular feminization, an earlier term coined for describing a syndrome resulting from failure of masculinization of target organs by androgen secretions during embryo development, has been well documented not only in humans but also in the domestic horse. The pathology, actually referred...

  10. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-antagonists of natural origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Preeti; Singh, Ishwari Narayan; Mondal, Sambhu Charan; Singh, Lubhan; Garg, Vipin Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Presently herbal medicines are being used by about 80% of the world population for primary health care as they stood the test of time for their safety, efficacy, cultural acceptability and lesser side effects. The discovery of platelet activating factor antagonists (PAF antagonists) during these decades are going on with different framework, but the researchers led their efficiency in studying in vitro test models. Since it is assumed that PAF play a central role in etiology of many diseases in humans such as asthma, neuronal damage, migraine, cardiac diseases, inflammatory, headache etc. Present days instinctively occurring PAF antagonist exists as a specific grade of therapeutic agents for the humans against these and different diseases either laid hold of immunological or non-immunological types. Ginkgolide, cedrol and many other natural PAF antagonists such as andrographolide, α-bulnesene, cinchonine, piperine, kadsurenone, different Piper species' natural products and marine origin plants extracts or even crude drugs having PAF antagonist properties are being used currently against different inflammatory pathologies. This review is an attempt to summarize the data on PAF and action of natural PAF antagonists on it, which were evaluated by in vivo and in vitro assays. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Masculinization of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) by immersion in androgens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, W.L.; Fitzpatrick, M.S.; Lucero, M.; Contreras-Sanchez, W.M.; Schreck, C. B.

    1999-01-01

    The use of all-male populations increases the efficiency and feasibility of tilapia aquaculture. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of a short-term immersion procedure for masculinizing Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Two synthetic androgens were evaluated: 17α-methyldihydrotestosterone (MDHT) and 17α-methyltestosterone (MT). Exposure (3 h) on 10 and again on 13 days post-fertilization to MDHT at 500 μg/1 successfully masculinized fry in all experiments, resulting in 100, 94 and 83 ± 2% males in Experiments 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Immersions in MDHT or MT at 100 μg/1 resulted in significantly skewed sex ratios in Experiments 1 and 3 (MT resulted in 73 and 83 ± 3% males; and MDHT resulted in 72 and 91 ± 1% males) but not in Experiment 2. Immersion in MT at 500 μg/1 only caused masculinization in Experiment 3. Although further research and refinement is needed, immersion of Nile tilapia in MDHT may provide a practical alternative to the use of steroid-treated feed. Furthermore, when compared with current techniques for steroid-induced sex inversion of tilapia, short-term immersion reduces the period of time that workers are exposed to anabolic steroids.

  12. Androgen Receptor Expression in Thai Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suthat Chottanapund

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate prevalence and related factors of androgen receptor (AR expression in Thai breast cancer patients. A descriptive study was done in 95 patients, who were admitted to Charoenkrung Pracharak Hospital, Bangkok (2011–2013. Statistical relationships were examined between AR protein expression, tumor status, and patient characteristics. Compared with those from Western countries, ethnic Thai patients were younger at age of diagnosis and had a higher proliferative index (high Ki-67 expression, which indicates unfavorable prognosis. In addition, 91% of the Thai breast tumors that were positive for any of the following receptors, estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 also expressed the AR protein, while in triple negative breast tumors only 33% were AR positive. ER and PR expression was positively related with AR expression, while AR expression was inversely correlated to Ki-67 expression. AR status was strongly correlated with ER and PR status in Thai patients. There is an inverse relationship between Ki-67 and AR, which suggests that AR may be a prognostic factor for breast cancer.

  13. Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Dependence: An Emerging Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanayama, Gen; Brower, Kirk J.; Wood, Ruth I.; Hudson, James I.; Pope, Harrison G.

    2009-01-01

    Aims Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are widely used illicitly to gain muscle and lose body fat. Here we review the accumulating human and animal evidence showing that AAS may cause a distinct dependence syndrome, often associated with adverse psychiatric and medical effects. Method We present an illustrative case of AAS dependence, followed by a summary of the human and animal literature on this topic, based on publications known to us or obtained by searching the PubMed database. Results About 30% of AAS users appear to develop a dependence syndrome, characterized by chronic AAS use despite adverse effects on physical, psychosocial, or occupational functioning. AAS dependence shares many features with classical drug dependence. For example, hamsters will self-administer AAS, even to the point of death, and both humans and animals exhibit a well-documented AAS withdrawal syndrome, mediated by neuroendocrine and cortical neurotransmitter systems. AAS dependence may particularly involve opioidergic mechanisms. However, AAS differ from classical drugs in that they produce little immediate reward of acute intoxication, but instead a delayed effect of muscle gains. Thus standard diagnostic criteria for substance dependence, usually crafted for acutely intoxicating drugs, must be slightly adapted for cumulatively acting drugs such as AAS. Conclusions AAS dependence is a valid diagnostic entity, and likely a growing public health problem. AAS dependence may share brain mechanisms with other forms of substance dependence, especially opioid dependence. Future studies are needed to better characterize AAS dependence, identify risk factors for this syndrome, and develop treatment strategies. PMID:19922565

  14. Anabolic-androgenic steroid use and correlates in Norwegian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandvik, Morten Renslo; Bakken, Anders; Loland, Sigmund

    2018-04-10

    This paper surveys the prevalence and correlates of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) use among Norwegian adolescents, and examines the degree to which sports participation is a mediating or moderating factor to well-known correlations between AAS use and problem behaviour. The data come from the "Ungdata" study, a cross-national youth survey system offered to all municipalities in Norway (response rate: 74%, N = 77,572). The study demonstrates a lifetime prevalence of AAS use of 1.27% and a higher prevalence among boys (1.81%) than girls (0.76%). The analyses show that AAS use is clearly related to problem behaviour such as violence and other substance use. When controlling for problem behaviour, there are no correlations between AAS use and exercising in a sports club or on one's own, whilst there is a weak positive correlation between AAS use and exercising in a gym or engaging in other forms of physical exercise such as dancing or martial arts. These patterns are more or less the same for boys and for girls. We conclude that adolescent AAS use is a low-prevalence phenomenon that primarily takes place in smaller subgroups of individuals who engage in other forms of problem behaviour as well.

  15. Maintaining intimacy for prostate cancer patients on androgen deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassersug, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) causes erectile dysfunction and increases patients' emotionality while diminishing their sexual interest. ADT has been linked to erosion of spousal bonds; however, this is not an invariant outcome. Understanding the factors that lead to these various outcomes may help couples deal with ADT. A subset of couples report that they became closer as a result of the patients going on ADT. Recent data suggest that what helps couples most is preemptive awareness of ADT's side-effects and congruence in how patients and their partners understand and accept the psychosexual impact of ADT. Sex therapy for prostate cancer patients divides along gendered lines, with distinctly 'male' (recovery of erections) and 'female' (promoting sexual practices that are not erection dependent) approaches. Unfortunately, neither is very effective for couples when the patient is on ADT. Options beyond the standard gendered framework, such as use of an external penile prosthesis, may be worth offering to ADT patients trying to find a 'new normal' that is sexually rewarding for them. Intimacy is sharing something with someone that one shares with no one else. Exploring novel sexual practices can help couples stay intimate, even when the patient is on ADT.

  16. Renaturation of the androgen receptor after denaturation in SDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.P.; Young, C.Y.F.; Rowley, D.R.; Tindall, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Renaturation of the steroid binding activity of receptor proteins is a potentially useful tool for their purification and analysis. Cytosol was prepared from rat Dunning prostate tumor in buffer containing molybdate and then denatured by addition of SDS buffer and heating. Aliquots were precipitated in cold acetone and the resulting pellets were washed and solubilized with a small volume of solution containing a chaotropic agent such as 6M guanidine, 8M urea, or 5M sodium iodide. After a 20-minute incubation, samples were diluted 20-fold with buffer containing 4nM [ 3 H]dihydrotestosterone with or without excess unlabeled dihydrotestosterone. Diluted samples were incubated at 0 0 C for varying periods of time prior to assay of bound radioactivity using hydroxylapatite. A time-course of renaturation after exposure to guanidine showed a steady increase of specific binding activity during the first 7 hrs post-dilution that remained stable up to 22 hrs. Experiments with guanidine consistently demonstrated that 25-50% of binding activity was recoverable. Preliminary results using urea or sodium iodide were similar. Efforts to optimize recovery and to characterize the renatured androgen receptor are in progress

  17. Oestrogen and anti-androgen therapy for transgender women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangpricha, Vin; den Heijer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Transgender women experience lifelong gender dysphoria due to a gender assignment at birth that is incongruent with their gender identity. They often seek hormone therapy, with or without surgery, to improve their gender dysphoria and to better align their physical and psychological features with a more feminine gender role. Some of the desired physical changes from oestrogen and anti-androgen therapy include decreased body and facial hair, decreased muscle mass, breast growth, and redistribution of fat. Overall the risks of treatment are low, but include thromboembolism, the risk of which depends on the dose and route of oestrogen administration. Other associated conditions commonly seen in transgender women include increased risks of depression and osteoporosis. The risk of hormone-sensitive cancer seems to be low in transgender women, with no increased risk of breast cancer compared with women and no increase in prostate cancer when compared with men. The evidence base for the care of transgender women is limited by the paucity of high-quality research, and long-term longitudinal studies are needed to inform future guidelines. PMID:27916515

  18. Biochemistry and physiology of anabolic androgenic steroids doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, G; Franchini, M; Banfi, G

    2011-05-01

    Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AASs) are chemical and pharmacological derivatives of the male hormone testosterone which are widely used for increasing burst and sprinting activities in sports. Although AASs are thought to be transversal to the plurality of sports disciplines, they are principally misused by bodybuilders, weightlifters, shot, hammer, discus or javelin throwers, rugby and American football players as well as by swimmers and runners. AAS exert a kaleidoscope of effects on human biology, principally through the 5-α-reductase-mediated conversion into dihydrotestosterone, the aromatase-mediated conversion into female sex hormones, a competitive antagonism to the glucocorticoid receptors, the potential stimulation of erythropoietin secretion as well as psychoactive effects on the brain. The influence of AASs on physical performance is still undefined, since the large number of studies published so far have described discordant and often contradictory outcomes. Nevertheless, animal and human investigations support the hypothesis that the administration of AASs might increase lean body mass, muscle mass, and maximal voluntary strength especially in men, so that they would represent an appealing form of doping for increasing power capacity, sustaining intensive training periods and, last but not least, as a cosmetic muscle makeover. The aim of this article is to review the biochemistry, physiology and the ergogenic effects of AASs.

  19. Effects of anabolic androgenic steroids on chylomicron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Aleksandra T; Maranhão, Raul C; Alves, Maria-Janieire N N; Negrão, Carlos E; da Silva, Jeferson L; Vinagre, Carmen G C

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) on chylomicron metabolism. An artificial lipid emulsion labeled with radioactive cholesteryl ester (CE) and triglycerides (TG) mimicking chylomicrons was intravenously injected into individuals who regularly weight trained and made regular use of AAS (WT+AAS group), normolipidemic sedentary individuals (SDT group) and individuals who also regularly weight trained but did not use AAS (WT group). Fractional clearance rates (FCR) were determined by compartmental analysis for emulsion plasma decay curves. FCR-CE for the WT+AAS group was reduced (0.0073 ± 0.0079 min(-1), 0.0155 ± 0.0100 min(-1), 0.0149 ± 0.0160 min(-1), respectively; p<0.05), FCR-TG was similar for both the WT and SDT groups. HDL-C plasma concentrations were lower in the WT+AAS group when compared to the WT and SDT groups (22 ± 13; 41 ± 7; 38 ± 13 mg/dL, respectively; p<0.001). Hepatic triglyceride lipase activity was greater in the WT+AAS group when compared to the WT and SDT groups (7243 ± 1822; 3898 ± 1232; 2058 ± 749, respectively; p<0.001). However, no difference was observed for lipoprotein lipase activity. Data strongly suggest that AAS may reduce the removal from the plasma of chylomicron remnants, which are known atherogenic factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sudden or unnatural deaths involving anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darke, Shane; Torok, Michelle; Duflou, Johan

    2014-07-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) are frequently misused. To determine causes of death, characteristics, toxicology, and pathology of AAS positive cases, all cases (n = 24) presenting to the New South Wales Department of Forensic Medicine (1995-2012) were retrieved. All were male, and the mean age was 31.7 years. Deaths were mainly due to accidental drug toxicity (62.5%), then suicide (16.7%) and homicide (12.5%). Abnormal testosterone/epitestosterone ratios were reported in 62.5%, followed by metabolites of nandrolone (58.3%), stanozolol (33.3%), and methandienone (20.8%). In 23 of 24 cases, substances other than steroids were detected, most commonly psychostimulants (66.7%). In nearly half, testicular atrophy was noted, as was testicular fibrosis and arrested spermatogenesis. Left ventricular hypertrophy was noted in 30.4%, and moderate to severe narrowing of the coronary arteries in 26.1%. To summarize, the typical case was a male polydrug user aged in their thirties, with death due to drug toxicity. Extensive cardiovascular disease was particularly notable. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. Androgen receptor in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer: Beyond expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Debora; Cinausero, Marika; Iacono, Donatella; Pelizzari, Giacomo; Bonotto, Marta; Vitale, Maria Grazia; Gerratana, Lorenzo; Puglisi, Fabio

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, new therapeutic approaches have reshaped the overall strategy of breast cancer (BC) treatment and have markedly improved patient survival. This is, in part, due to novel therapies for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive BC. Unfortunately, many patients present de novo resistance to these therapies or develop an acquired resistance over time. Therefore, research is now focused on discovering new molecular targets to overcome these resistances. Interestingly, preclinical and clinical studies have shown a critical role for the cross-talk between androgen receptor (AR) and ER in luminal-like BC. AR is expressed in >60% of BC and in up to 90% of ERα-positive tumors. Multiple studies suggest that AR is associated with a favorable prognosis. However, AR overexpression and, in particular, the high AR:ER ratio, seem to be involved in resistance to hormonal treatment. In this setting, a group of BCs could benefit from AR-inhibitors; nevertheless, some ER-positive BC patients do not seem to benefit from this strategy. Therefore, it is crucial to identify biomarkers that would enable the selection of patients who might benefit from combination treatment with ER and AR inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Androgen receptor immunoreactivity in rat occipital cortex after callosotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Lepore

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Gonadal steroidogenesis can be influenced by direct neural links between the central nervous system and the gonads. It is known that androgen receptor (AR is expressed in many areas of the rat brain involved in neuroendocrine control of reproduction, such as the cerebral cortex. It has been recently shown that the occipital cortex exerts an inhibitory effect on testicular stereoidogenesis by a pituitary-independent neural mechanism. Moreover, the complete transection of the corpus callosum leads to an increase in testosterone (T secretion of hemigonadectomized rats. The present study was undertaken to analyze the possible corticocortical influences regulating male reproductive activities. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: 1 intact animals as control; 2 rats undergoing sham callosotomy; 3 posterior callosotomy; 4 gonadectomy and posterior callosotomy. Western blot analysis showed no remarkable variations in cortical AR expression in any of the groups except in group I where a significant decrease in AR levels was found. Similarly, both immunocytochemical study and cell count estimation showed a lower AR immunoreactivity in occipital cortex of callosotomized rats than in other groups. In addition, there was no difference in serum T and LH concentration between sham-callosotomized and callosotomized rats. In conclusion, our results show that posterior callosotomy led to a reduction in AR in the right occipital cortex suggesting a putative inhibiting effect of the contralateral cortical area.

  3. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) as Function Promoting Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Shalender; Jasuja, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The last decade has witnessed unprecedented discovery effort to develop selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that improve physical function and bone health without adversely affecting the prostate and cardiovascular outcomes. This review describes the historical evolution, the rationale for SARM development, and the mechanisms of testosterone action and SARM selectivity. Recent Findings While steroidal SARMs have been around since the 1940s, a number of nonsteroidal SARMs that do not serve as substrates for CYP19 aromatase or 5α-reductase, act as full agonists in muscle and bone and as partial agonists in prostate are in development. The differing interactions of steroidal and nonsteroidal compounds with AR contribute to their unique pharmacologic actions. Ligand binding induces specific conformational changes in the ligand binding domain, which could modulate surface topology and protein-protein interactions between AR and coregulators, resulting in tissue-specific gene regulation. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of SARMs to increase muscle and bone mass in preclinical rodent models with varying degree of prostate sparing. Phase I trials of SARMs in humans have reported modest increments in fat-free mass. Summary SARMs hold promise as a new class of function promoting anabolic therapies for a number of clinical indications, including functional limitations associated with aging and chronic disease, frailty, cancer cachexia, and osteoporosis. PMID:19357508

  4. alpha2-Adrenoceptor antagonists reverse the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist suppression of head-twitch behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, K; Mizowaki, M; Thongpraditchote, S; Murakami, Y; Watanabe, H

    1997-03-01

    The alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine, as well as 5-HT2 receptor antagonists, reportedly suppress 5-HT2 receptor-mediated head-twitch behavior. We investigated the effect of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists on the suppressive action of 5-HT2 receptor antagonists in mice pretreated with the noradrenaline toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or the 5-HT synthesis inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (p-CPA). In normal mice, idazoxan (0.08-0.2 mg/kg, IP) or yohimbine (0.2-2.0 mg/kg, IP), both alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists, had no effect on the head-twitch response caused by 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT; 16 mg/kg, IP), but idazoxan significantly enhanced the response at 0.5 mg/kg. On the other hand, these alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists, at doses that had no effect on the basal number of head-twitches (idazoxan 0.2 mg/kg and yohimbine 0.5 mg/kg), significantly attenuated not only the suppressive effect of clonidine (0.01 mg/kg, IP) on head-twitch response but also that of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ritanserin (0.03 mg/kg, IP). Moreover, idazoxan (0.2 mg/kg) also significantly reversed the inhibition by 0.01 mg/kg (IP) ketanserin, a selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist. Pretreatment with 6-OHDA plus nomifensine but not with p-CPA significantly attenuated the effect of idazoxan (0.2-0.5 mg/kg) on the ritanserin inhibition of the head-twitch response. Prazosin, an alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist, dose-dependently suppressed the response, and the effect of prazosin (1.25 mg/kg) was significantly attenuated by 0.5 mg/kg idazoxan. These results indicate that endogenous noradrenaline is involved in the apparent antagonistic interaction between selective alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists and 5-HT2 receptor antagonists in the head-twitch response, and suggest that noradrenaline stimulation of alpha1-adrenoceptors may be involved in this apparent antagonism.

  5. Androgen-androgen receptor system improves chronic inflammatory conditions by suppressing monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in adipocytes via transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morooka, Nobukatsu, E-mail: amorooka@gunma-u.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Ueguri, Kei [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Yee, Karen Kar Lye [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Human Resources Cultivation Center, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryushi, Gunma, 376-8515 (Japan); Yanase, Toshihiko [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes Mellitus, School of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka, 814-0180 (Japan); Sato, Takashi [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan)

    2016-09-02

    Age-related decreases in sex hormones are closely related to chronic inflammation in obesity and metabolic diseases. Particularly, the molecular basis of androgen activity in regulating inflammation and controlling metabolism remains largely unknown. Obese adipocytes secrete monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a key chemokine that promotes the infiltration of monocytes/macrophages into adipose tissue, thereby leading to metabolic disorders. Here, we studied the role of androgen-androgen receptor (AR) action in regulating MCP-1 expression in adipose tissue. We observed the induction of Mcp-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes co-cultured with RAW264.7 macrophages. Additionally, Mcp-1 expression was upregulated by culturing in conditioned medium derived from inflammatory macrophages (M1-Mφ) containing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). We found that sex hormones downregulated TNF-α-induced Mcp-1 and interleukin (Il)-6 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, luciferase-reporter analysis indicated that MCP-1 promoter activity was predominantly suppressed by dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-AR interactions through functional canonical nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) sites, whereas non-canonical NF-κB site containing important flanking sequences exhibited minor contributions to DHT-AR transcriptional repression. These findings suggested that androgen-AR suppressed obesity-induced chronic inflammation in adipose tissue. - Highlights: • DHT, non-aromatizable androgen suppresses Mcp-1 expression in adipocytes. • Mcp-1 transcription was negatively regulated by DHT-AR action. • DHT-AR selectively regulates Mcp-1 transcription through distinct NF-κB sites.

  6. Androgens upregulate Cdc25C protein by inhibiting its proteasomal and lysosomal degradation pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Chou

    Full Text Available Cdc25C is a cell cycle protein of the dual specificity phosphatase family essential for activating the cdk1/Cyclin B1 complex in cells entering into mitosis. Since altered cell cycle is a hallmark of human cancers, we investigated androgen regulation of Cdc25C protein in human prostate cancer (PCa cells, including androgen-sensitive (AS LNCaP C-33 cells and androgen-independent (AI LNCaP C-81 as well as PC-3 cells. In the regular culture condition containing fetal bovine serum (FBS, Cdc25C protein levels were similar in these PCa cells. In a steroid-reduced condition, Cdc25C protein was greatly decreased in AS C-33 cells but not AI C-81 or PC-3 cells. In androgen-treated C-33 cells, the Cdc25C protein level was greatly elevated, following a dose- and a time-dependent manner, correlating with increased cell proliferation. This androgen effect was blocked by Casodex, an androgen receptor blocker. Nevertheless, epidermal growth factor (EGF, a growth stimulator of PCa cells, could only increase Cdc25C protein level by about 1.5-fold. Altered expression of Cdc25C in C-33 cells and PC-3 cells by cDNA and/or shRNA transfection is associated with the corresponding changes of cell growth and Cyclin B1 protein level. Actinomycin D and cycloheximide could only partially block androgen-induced Cdc25C protein level. Treatments with both proteasomal and lysosomal inhibitors resulted in elevated Cdc25C protein levels. Immunoprecipitation revealed that androgens reduced the ubiquitination of Cdc25C proteins. These results show for the first time that Cdc25C protein plays a role in regulating PCa cell growth, and androgen treatments, but not EGF, greatly increase Cdc25C protein levels in AS PCa cells, which is in part by decreasing its degradation. These results can lead to advanced PCa therapy via up-regulating the degradation pathways of Cdc25C protein.

  7. Change to Either a Nonandrogenic or Androgenic Progestin-Containing Oral Contraceptive Preparation is Associated with Improved Sexual Function in Women with Oral Contraceptive-Associated Sexual Dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Susan R; Bitzer, Johannes; Giraldi, Annamaria

    2013-01-01

    It is a commonly held belief that combined oral contraceptive (COC) pills containing an androgenic progestin may be less likely to impair sexual function than COCs containing an anti-androgenic progestin....

  8. Examining a pathway for hormone mediated maternal effects - Yolk testosterone affects androgen receptor expression and endogenous testosterone production in young chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfannkuche, K. A.; Gahr, M.; Weites, I. M.; Riedstra, B.; Wolf, C.; Groothuis, T. G. G.

    2011-01-01

    In vertebrates maternal androgens can substantially influence developing offspring, inducing both short and long term changes in physiology and behavior, including androgen sensitive traits. However, how the effects of maternal hormones are mediated remains unknown. Two possible pathways are that

  9. Vitamin K antagonist use and mortality in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskamp, Pauline W M; Rookmaaker, Maarten B; Verhaar, Marianne C; Dekker, Friedo W; Ocak, Gurbey

    2018-01-01

    The risk-benefit ratio of vitamin K antagonists for different CHA2DS2-VASc scores in patients with end-stage renal disease treated with dialysis is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between vitamin K antagonist use and mortality for different CHA2DS2-VASc scores in a cohort of end-stage renal disease patients receiving dialysis treatment. We prospectively followed 1718 incident dialysis patients. Hazard ratios were calculated for all-cause and cause-specific (stroke, bleeding, cardiovascular and other) mortality associated with vitamin K antagonist use. Vitamin K antagonist use as compared with no vitamin K antagonist use was associated with a 1.2-fold [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.0-1.5] increased all-cause mortality risk, a 1.5-fold (95% CI 0.6-4.0) increased stroke mortality risk, a 1.3-fold (95% CI 0.4-4.2) increased bleeding mortality risk, a 1.2-fold (95% CI 0.9-1.8) increased cardiovascular mortality risk and a 1.2-fold (95% CI 0.8-1.6) increased other mortality risk after adjustment. Within patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score ≤1, vitamin K antagonist use was associated with a 2.8-fold (95% CI 1.0-7.8) increased all-cause mortality risk as compared with no vitamin K antagonist use, while vitamin K antagonist use within patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2 was not associated with an increased mortality risk after adjustment. Vitamin K antagonist use was not associated with a protective effect on mortality in the different CHA2DS2-VASc scores in dialysis patients. The lack of knowledge on the indication for vitamin K antagonist use could lead to confounding by indication. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  10. [Androgenic deficit and its treatment in stroke male patients with diabetes mellitus type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgunov, L Iu; Denisova, I A; Rozhkova, T I; Stakhovskaia, L V; Skvortsova, V I

    2011-01-01

    We have studied 154 men (mean age 61,4+/-4,1 years) with the first hemispheric ischemic stroke. Clinical and laboratory studies have revealed the androgenic deficit in 66,3%, with its frequency higher in patients with diabetes mellitus type II (50 and 26,3%, respectively). Forty-two men with diabetes mellitus type II and acquired androgenic deficit received replacing treatment with testosterone undecanoate in dose 1000 mg intramuscular. The treatment was started one week after the development of stroke, the next injections were given after 6 weeks and then every 12 weeks during 2 years. The control group included 30 males who did not receive androgens. After 2 years from the beginning of treatment, there were the decrease in clinical severity of androgenic deficit, the increase of total and free testosterone levels, and muscle power in the main group compared to the controls. Body mass index, glicated hemoglobin, cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoproteins have decreased as well. Secondary stroke has developed in 3 (7,1%) patients of the main group and in 5 (16,6%) controls; 12 (28,6%) patients returned to work in the main group compared to 2 (6,6%) in the control group. The treatment with androgens has a positive effect on risk factors of secondary ischemic stroke. It is an effective method for improvement of social adaptation of men survived after the stroke.

  11. Targeting the androgen receptor in triple-negative breast cancer: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina A

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Alain Mina,1 Rachel Yoder,2 Priyanka Sharma1 1Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Westwood, 2University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, KS, USA Abstract: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is an aggressive subtype associated with frequent recurrence and metastasis. Unlike hormone receptor-positive subtypes, treatment of TNBC is currently limited by the lack of clinically available targeted therapies. Androgen signaling is necessary for normal breast development, and its dysregulation has been implicated in breast tumorigenesis. In recent years, gene expression studies have identified a subset of TNBC that is enriched for androgen receptor (AR signaling. Interference with androgen signaling in TNBC is promising, and AR-inhibiting drugs have shown antitumorigenic activity in preclinical and proof of concept clinical studies. Recent advances in our understanding of androgenic signaling in TNBC, along with the identification of interacting pathways, are allowing development of the next generation of clinical trials with AR inhibitors. As novel AR-targeting agents are developed and evaluated in clinical trials, it is equally important to establish a robust set of biomarkers for identification of TNBC tumors that are most likely to respond to AR inhibition. Keywords: triple-negative breast cancer, androgen signaling, targeted therapy, biomarkers, prognosis 

  12. Mathematical modeling of continuous and intermittent androgen suppression for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voth, Alacia M; Alford, John G; Swim, Edward W

    2017-06-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent types of cancer among men. It is stimulated by the androgens, or male sexual hormones, which circulate in the blood and diffuse into the tissue where they stimulate the prostate tumor to grow. One of the most important treatments for advanced prostate cancer has become androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). In this paper we present three different models of ADT for prostate cancer: continuous androgen suppression (CAS), intermittent androgen suppression (IAS), and periodic androgen suppression. Currently, many patients in the U.S. receive CAS therapy of ADT, but many undergo a relapse after several years and experience adverse side effects while receiving treatment. Some clinical studies have introduced various IAS regimens in order to delay the time to relapse, and/or to reduce the economic costs and adverse side effects. We will compute and analyze parameter sensitivity analysis for CAS and IAS which may give insight to plan effective data collection in a future clinical trial. Moreover, a periodic model for IAS is used to develop an analytical formulation for relapse times which then provides information about the sensitivity of relapse to the parameters in our models.

  13. Effect of petroleum ether and ethanol fractions of seeds of Abrus precatorius on androgenic alopecia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukirti Upadhyay

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Seeds of Abrus precatorius L., Fabaceae, are commonly used as purgative, emetic, aphrodisiac and in nervous disorder in traditional and folk medicines. In present study petroleum ether and ethanolic extracts of A. precatorius seeds are evaluated for reversal of androgen (testosterone by i.m route induced alopecia in male albino wistar rats and compared to topical administration of standard antiandrogenic drug finasteride for 21 days. The results were reflected from visual observation and histological study of several skin sections via various parameters as anagen to telogen ratio and follicle density/mm area of skin surface. The animal of group 1 who were treated with only testosterone became alopecic on visual observation. Animals of Group 2, 3 and 4 who were treated with finasteride, petroleum ether and ethanolic extract of seed respectively topically along with testosterone (i.m did not developed alopecia. To investigate the mechanism of observed activity, in vitro experiments were performed. Inhibition of 5α-reductase activity by extracts and finasteride suggest that they reversed androgen induced alopecia by inhibiting conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (potent androgen responsible for androgenic alopecia. So it may be concluded that petroleum ether and ethanolic extract of A. precatorius seed posses anti androgenic alopecia activity due to inhibition of 5α-reductase enzyme.

  14. Effect of petroleum ether and ethanol fractions of seeds of Abrus precatorius on androgenic alopecia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukirti Upadhyay

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Seeds of Abrus precatorius L., Fabaceae, are commonly used as purgative, emetic, aphrodisiac and in nervous disorder in traditional and folk medicines. In present study petroleum ether and ethanolic extracts of A. precatorius seeds are evaluated for reversal of androgen (testosterone by i.m route induced alopecia in male albino wistar rats and compared to topical administration of standard antiandrogenic drug finasteride for 21 days. The results were reflected from visual observation and histological study of several skin sections via various parameters as anagen to telogen ratio and follicle density/mm area of skin surface. The animal of group 1 who were treated with only testosterone became alopecic on visual observation. Animals of Group 2, 3 and 4 who were treated with finasteride, petroleum ether and ethanolic extract of seed respectively topically along with testosterone (i.m did not developed alopecia. To investigate the mechanism of observed activity, in vitro experiments were performed. Inhibition of 5α-reductase activity by extracts and finasteride suggest that they reversed androgen induced alopecia by inhibiting conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (potent androgen responsible for androgenic alopecia. So it may be concluded that petroleum ether and ethanolic extract of A. precatorius seed posses anti androgenic alopecia activity due to inhibition of 5α-reductase enzyme.

  15. Identification of androgen receptors in normal human osteoblast-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colvard, D.S.; Eriksen, E.F.; Keeting, P.E.; Riggs, B.L.; Spelsberg, T.C.; Wilson, E.M.; Lubahn, D.B.; French, F.S.

    1989-01-01

    The sex steroids, androgens and estrogens, are major regulators of bone metabolism. However, whether these hormones act on bone cells through direct or indirect mechanisms has remained unclear. A nuclear binding assay recently used to demonstrate estrogen receptors in bone was used to identify specific nuclear binding of a tritiated synthetic androgen, [ 3 H]R1881 (methyltrienolone), in 21 of 25 (84%) human osteoblast-like cell strains and a concentration of bound steroid receptors of 821 ± 140 molecules per cell nucleus. Binding was saturable and steroid-specific. Androgen receptor gene expression in osteoblasts was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Relative concentrations of androgen and estrogen receptors were compared by measuring specific nuclear estrogen binding. Nuclear binding of [ 3 H]estradiol was observed in 27 of 30 (90%) cell strains; the concentration of bound estradiol receptor was 1537 ± 221 molecules per cell nucleus. The concentrations of nuclear binding sites were similar in males and females for both [ 3 H]R1881 and [ 3 H]estradiol. The authors conclude that both androgens and estrogens act directly on human bone cells through their respective receptor-mediated mechanisms

  16. Testosterone regulates keratin 33B expression in rat penis growth through androgen receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan-Min; Wu, Kai-Jie; Dang, Qiang; Shi, Qi; Gao, Yang; Guo, Peng; Xu, Shan; Wang, Xin-Yang; He, Da-Lin; Gong, Yong-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Androgen therapy is the mainstay of treatment for the hypogonadotropic hypogonadal micropenis because it obviously enhances penis growth in prepubescent microphallic patients. However, the molecular mechanisms of androgen treatment leading to penis growth are still largely unknown. To clarify this well-known phenomenon, we successfully generated a castrated male Sprague Dawley rat model at puberty followed by testosterone administration. Interestingly, compared with the control group, testosterone treatment stimulated a dose-dependent increase of penis weight, length, and width in castrated rats accompanied with a dramatic recovery of the pathological changes of the penis. Mechanistically, testosterone administration substantially increased the expression of androgen receptor (AR) protein. Increased AR protein in the penis could subsequently initiate transcription of its target genes, including keratin 33B (Krt33b). Importantly, we demonstrated that KRT33B is generally expressed in the rat penis and that most KRT33B expression is cytoplasmic. Furthermore, AR could directly modulate its expression by binding to a putative androgen response element sequence of the Krt33b promoter. Overall, this study reveals a novel mechanism facilitating penis growth after testosterone treatment in precastrated prepubescent animals, in which androgen enhances the expression of AR protein as well as its target genes, such as Krt33b.

  17. Andrographolide targets androgen receptor pathway in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengfei; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Tummala, Ramakumar; Chun, Jae Yeon; Lou, Wei; Zhu, Yezi; Sun, Meng; Evans, Christopher P; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C

    2011-02-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling not only plays a pivotal role in the development of androgen-dependent prostate cancer but is also important in the growth and survival of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The first line of treatment of androgen-dependent prostate cancer is the use of androgen deprivation therapy. However, most patients will eventually relapse due to development of CRPC. Thus, development of a strategy to target AR for treatment of CRPC is urgently needed. The authors have previously identified andrographolide as an inhibitor of interleukin-6, which can suppress tumor growth of prostate cancer cells by screening compounds from the Prestwick Natural compound library. In this study, they identified that andrographolide can inhibit AR expression and prostate cancer cell growth and induce apoptosis. Andrographolide is able to down-regulate AR expression at both mRNA and protein levels, prevents its nuclear translocation, and inhibits transactivation of its target genes. Andrographolide prevents the binding of Hsp90 to AR, resulting in proteasome-mediated AR degradation. Furthermore, andrographolide inhibits castration-resistant C4-2 cell growth by reducing AR expression and activity. Thus, andrographolide can be developed as a potential therapeutic agent for prostate cancer by inhibition of androgen receptor signaling.

  18. Testosterone regulates keratin 33B expression in rat penis growth through androgen receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Min Ma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Androgen therapy is the mainstay of treatment for the hypogonadotropic hypogonadal micropenis because it obviously enhances penis growth in prepubescent microphallic patients. However, the molecular mechanisms of androgen treatment leading to penis growth are still largely unknown. To clarify this well-known phenomenon, we successfully generated a castrated male Sprague Dawley rat model at puberty followed by testosterone administration. Interestingly, compared with the control group, testosterone treatment stimulated a dose-dependent increase of penis weight, length, and width in castrated rats accompanied with a dramatic recovery of the pathological changes of the penis. Mechanistically, testosterone administration substantially increased the expression of androgen receptor (AR protein. Increased AR protein in the penis could subsequently initiate transcription of its target genes, including keratin 33B (Krt33b. Importantly, we demonstrated that KRT33B is generally expressed in the rat penis and that most KRT33B expression is cytoplasmic. Furthermore, AR could directly modulate its expression by binding to a putative androgen response element sequence of the Krt33b promoter. Overall, this study reveals a novel mechanism facilitating penis growth after testosterone treatment in precastrated prepubescent animals, in which androgen enhances the expression of AR protein as well as its target genes, such as Krt33b.

  19. Prenatal androgen exposure alters girls' responses to information indicating gender-appropriate behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Melissa; Pasterski, Vickie; Spencer, Debra; Neufeld, Sharon; Patalay, Praveetha; Hindmarsh, Peter C; Hughes, Ieuan A; Acerini, Carlo L

    2016-02-19

    Individual variability in human gender-related behaviour is influenced by many factors, including androgen exposure prenatally, as well as self-socialization and socialization by others postnatally. Many studies have looked at these types of influences in isolation, but little is known about how they work together. Here, we report that girls exposed to high concentrations of androgens prenatally, because they have the genetic condition congenital adrenal hyperplasia, show changes in processes related to self-socialization of gender-related behaviour. Specifically, they are less responsive than other girls to information that particular objects are for girls and they show reduced imitation of female models choosing particular objects. These findings suggest that prenatal androgen exposure may influence subsequent gender-related behaviours, including object (toy) choices, in part by changing processes involved in the self-socialization of gendered behaviour, rather than only by inducing permanent changes in the brain during early development. In addition, the findings suggest that some of the behavioural effects of prenatal androgen exposure might be subject to alteration by postnatal socialization processes. The findings also suggest a previously unknown influence of early androgen exposure on later processes involved in self-socialization of gender-related behaviour, and thus expand understanding of the developmental systems regulating human gender development. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Androgens and estrogens in benign prostatic hyperplasia: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Tristan M.; Ricke, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common clinical problems in urology. While the precise molecular etiology remains unclear, sex steroids have been implicated in the development and maintenance of BPH. Sufficient data exists linking androgens and androgen receptor pathways to BPH and use of androgen reducing compounds, such as 5α-reductase inhibitors which block the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone, are a component of the standard of care for men with LUTS attributed to an enlarged prostate. However, BPH is a multifactorial disease and not all men respond well to currently available treatments, suggesting factors other than androgens are involved. Testosterone, the primary circulating androgen in men, can also be metabolized via CYP19/aromatase into the potent estrogen, estradiol-17β. The prostate is an estrogen target tissue and estrogens directly and indirectly affect growth and differentiation of prostate. The precise role of endogenous and exogenous estrogens in directly affecting prostate growth and differentiation in the context of BPH is an understudied area. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been shown to promote or inhibit prostate proliferation signifying potential roles in BPH. Recent research has demonstrated that estrogen receptor signaling pathways may be important in the development and maintenance of BPH and LUTS; however, new models are needed to genetically dissect estrogen regulated molecular mechanisms involved in BPH. More work is needed to identify estrogens and associated signaling pathways in BPH in order to target BPH with dietary and therapeutic SERMs. PMID:21620560