WorldWideScience

Sample records for andean cordillera central

  1. Exhumation of the Cordillera de Domeyko: Implications for Andean retroarc evolution between the Late Cretaceous and the Oligocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez, S.; Carrapa, B.; DeCelles, P. G.

    2017-12-01

    In Cordilleran-type orogens, exhumation of the thrust belt records the kinematic history of the orogenic system. In the Central Andes, the widest and thickest part of this orogen, several authors have documented the exhumation of the thrust belt in the modern forearc (Chile) and retroarc region (Bolivia and Argentina) showing an overall eastward propagation of deformation since the late Eocene. However, the exhumation of earlier Andean retroarc tectonic events remains poorly documented. In the forearc, the Cordillera de Domeyko and Salar de Atacama basin exhibit multiple pieces of evidence for earlier Andean orogenesis. The goal of this study is to document the thermal record of Late Cretaceous to Eocene retroarc deformation. To this end, this study investigates the cooling history of the easternmost basement uplift of the Cordillera de Domeyko. We couple this record with detrital thermochronology from cobbles in the Late Cretaceous to Miocene sedimentary units from the Salar de Atacama basin which records the unroofing history of this uplift. We employed a multi-dating approach combining apatite fission track (AFT) and apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He (AHe) thermochronology to constrain the timing and amount of exhumation in the early Andean retroarc region. Our results show episodic cooling ca. 90-80, 65-60 and 45-40 Ma. This new data provides a thermochronologic record of Late Cretaceous and Paleocene deformation in the retroarc region as well as of the widely recognized Eocene deformation event. The cooling signal is interpreted to reflect exhumation controlled by uplift and erosion in the retroarc region. These exhumation events reflect episodes of internal deformation, crustal thickening, and roughly similar amounts of local erosion. Exhumation in this region decreased by the late Oligocene; by this time the orogenic front was established to the east, in the Eastern Cordillera.

  2. Fission track thermochronology of Neogene plutons in the Principal Andean Cordillera of central Chile (33-35°S: Implications for tectonic evolution and porphyry Cu-Mo mineralization Termocronología mediante trazas de fision de plutones neógenos en la Cordillera Principal Andina de Chile central (33-35°S: Implicancias para la evolución tectónica y mineralización de pórfidos de Cu-Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Maksaev

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Apatite fission track data for Miocene plutons of the western slope of the Principal Andean Cordillera in central Chile (33-35°S define a distinct episode of enhanced crustal cooling through the temperature range of the apatite partial annealing zone (~125-60°C from about 6 to 3 Ma. This cooling episode is compatible with accelerated exhumation of the plutons at the time of Pliocene compressive tectonism, and mass wasting on the western slope of the Principal Andean Cordillera in central Chile. The timing coincides with the southward migration of the subducting Juan Fernández Ridge and the development of progressive subduction flattening northward of 33°S. It also corresponds to the time of active magmatic-hydrothermal processes and rapid unroofing of the world class Río Blanco-Los Bronces and El Teniente porphyry Cu-Mo deposits. Zircon fission track ages coincide with previous 40Ar/39Ar dates of the intrusions, and with some of the apatite fission track ages, being coherent with igneous-linked, rapid cooling following magmatic intrusion. The thermochronologic data are consistent with a maximum of about 8 km for Neogene exhumation of the plutons.Los datos de trazas de fision en apatita de plutones miocenos del flanco oeste de la Cordillera Principal de Chile central (33-35°S definen un episodio distintivo de enfriamiento acelerado a través del rango de temperatura de la zona de acortamiento parcial de trazas en apatita (~125-60°C entre los 6 a 3 Ma. Este episodio de enfriamiento es compatible con exhumación rápida de los plutones al tiempo del tectonismo compresivo plioceno y remociones en masa en el flanco oeste de la Cordillera Principal en Chile central. El período de tiempo coincide con la migración hacia el sur de la subducción de la Dorsal de Juan Fernández y con el desarrollo de un aplanamiento progresivo de la subducción hacia el norte de los 33°S. También corresponde al tiempo de actividad magmático-hidrotermal y r

  3. Andean deformation and rift inversion, eastern edge of Cordillera Oriental (Guateque Medina area), Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branquet, Y.; Cheilletz, A.; Cobbold, P. R.; Baby, P.; Laumonier, B.; Giuliani, G.

    2002-09-01

    In the Guateque-Medina area, Paleozoic basement and Mesozoic rift basins have been uplifted and exhumed during the Andean orogeny (12 Ma to present). Surface exposures and subsurface data constrain the deformation style and the rift geometry. We have mapped a regional transect and restored a cross section. We have also reconciled existing stratigraphic data, from cordillera, foothills and foreland basin, and have added new data of our own. In Early Cretaceous shales, there is evidence for fault-controlled sedimentation. A brecciated evaporitic layer, which is locally emerald bearing, has acted as a regional detachment. The underlying basement, composed of Paleozoic sediments, crops out as the Quetame Massif. It was uplifted during the Andean orogeny on a series of high-angle reverse faults. The main SE-verging Tesalia fault has resulted from Andean reactivation of an Early Cretaceous normal fault, which bounded a half-rift. A series of NW-verging back-thrusts may have resulted from Andean reactivation of Paleozoic faults. Between the back-thrusts and the Tesalia fault is a basement pop-up. It may be part of a flower structure, because components of right-lateral slip have been identified. These are attributed to eastward subduction of the Nazca plate beneath South America. In general, the style and timing of Andean deformation in the Guateque-Medina area are compatible with the plate tectonic setting of the northern Andes.

  4. Central Andean crustal structure from receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jamie; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George; Wagner, Lara; Minaya, Estela; Tavera, Hernado

    2016-07-01

    The Central Andean Plateau (15°-27°S) is a high plateau in excess of 3 km elevation, associated with thickened crust along the western edge of the South America plate, in the convergent margin between the subducting Nazca plate and the Brazilian craton. We have calculated receiver functions using seismic data from a recent portable deployment of broadband seismometers in the Bolivian orocline (12°-21°S) region and combined them with waveforms from 38 other stations in the region to investigate crustal thickness and crust and mantle structures. Results from the receiver functions provide a more detailed map of crustal thickness than previously existed, and highlight mid-crustal features that match well with prior studies. The active volcanic arc and Altiplano have thick crust with Moho depths increasing from the central Altiplano (65 km) to the northern Altiplano (75 km). The Eastern Cordillera shows large along strike variations in crustal thickness. Along a densely sampled SW-NE profile through the Bolivian orocline there is a small region of thin crust beneath the high peaks of the Cordillera Real where the average elevations are near 4 km, and the Moho depth varies from 55 to 60 km, implying the crust is undercompensated by 5 km. In comparison, a broader region of high elevations in the Eastern Cordillera to the southeast near 20°S has a deeper Moho at 65-70 km and appears close to isostatic equilibrium at the Moho. Assuming the modern-day pattern of high precipitation on the flanks of the Andean plateau has existed since the late Miocene, we suggest that climate induced exhumation can explain some of the variations in present day crustal structure across the Bolivian orocline. We also suggest that south of the orocline at 20°S, the thicker and isostatically compensated crust is due to the absence of erosional exhumation and the occurrence of lithospheric delamination.

  5. Incadendron : a new genus of Euphorbiaceae tribe Hippomaneae from the sub-Andean cordilleras of Ecuador and Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J. Wurdack

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Incadendron esseri K.Wurdack & Farfan, gen. & sp. nov., from the wet sub-Andean cordilleras of Ecuador (Cordillera del Cóndor and Peru (Cusco, Oxapampa is described and illustrated. This recently discovered large canopy tree with a narrow elevational range presents an unusual combination of rare morphological characters in Hippomaneae including mucilage-secreting sheathing stipules, conduplicate ptyxis, and large, woody fruits. The broader significance of these characters in Hippomaneae is discussed. The morphology and anatomy of Incadendron were investigated, highlighting its fruit similarities with Guiana Shield endemic Senefelderopsis, and the systematics value of ptyxis variation, which remains poorly studied for the family.

  6. Within plate seismicity analysis in the segment between the high Cordillera and the Precordillera of northern Mendoza (Southern Central Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Olivar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Crustal seismicity in northwestern Mendoza Province in Argentina, corresponding to the transition zone between the Chilean-Pampean flat subduction zone (26.5–33.5°S and the Southern Central Andes normal subduction zone to the south, is studied in order to i identify its relationship with the mapped structure, ii determine deformational mechanisms and iii constrain the geometry of the fold and thrust belt in the lower crust. Through this, we aim to determine which are the structures that contribute to Andean construction, east of the Frontal Cordillera in Argentina and at the western Principal Cordillera in Chile. Data from a temporary local seismic network are reprocessed in order to achieve a precise location of hypocenters and, whenever possible, to build focal mechanisms. Results are interpreted and compared with previous seismic studies and structural models. Analyzed seismicity is grouped around the eastern front of Frontal Cordillera, with hypocenters mainly at depths of 25–40 km. Contrastingly, earthquakes in the Principal Cordillera to the west are located at the axial Andean sector and Chilean slope, with depths shallower than 15 km. Obtained focal mechanisms indicate mainly strike-slip displacements, left lateral at Frontal Cordillera and right lateral at Principal Cordillera. Based on these observations, new possible structural models are proposed, where seismogenic sources could be either associated with inherited basement structures from the Cuyania-Chilenia suture; or correspond to deep-blind thrusts linked with a deeper-than-previously-assumed decollement that could be shared between Frontal Cordillera and western Precordillera. This deeper decollement would coincide in turn with the one determined from receiver function analysis for the eastern Sierras Pampeanas in previous works, potentially implying a common decollement all through the fold and thrust belt configuration. Apart from this, a new interpretation of

  7. Water Resources and Groundwater in a Glaciated Andean Watershed (Cordillera Blanca, Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, J. M.; Gordon, R.; Baraer, M.; Lautz, L.; Mark, B. G.; Wigmore, O.; Chavez, D.; Aubry-Wake, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is estimated that almost 400 million people live in watersheds where glaciers provide at least 10% of the runoff, yet many questions remain regarding the impact of climate change and glacier recession on water resources derived from these high mountain watersheds. We present research from the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, an area with the highest density of glaciers in the tropics. While glacier meltwater buffers stream discharge throughout the range, groundwater is a major component of dry season runoff, contributing up to 50-70% of outflow in some tributaries. In order to predict future changes to water resources it is critical to understand how groundwater can offset future hydrologic stress by maintaining stream baseflow, including recharge mechanisms, subsurface pathways, storage, and net fluxes to rivers. We present a synthesis of results based on hydrologic modeling, drilling/piezometers, geophysics, and artificial and natural hydrologic tracers. Our findings show that 'pampas', low-relief mountain valleys, are critical for baseflow generation by storing groundwater on interannual timescales. Pampas have a total area of ~65 km2 and are comprised of unconsolidated glacial, talus, lacustrine and wetland (bofedales) deposits. The valleys commonly have buried talus aquifers that are overlain by low permeability, glaciolacustrine deposits. Glaciofluvial outwash deposits and small wetlands also act as unconfined aquifers. These groundwater systems appear to be primarily recharged by wet season precipitation, and at higher elevations also by glacial meltwater. Additionally a ubiquitous feature in the valleys are springs, often located at the base of talus deposits, which generate a large hydrologic flux within the hydrologic systems. While glaciers are the most visible and vulnerable component of the Andean waterscape, we argue that it is crucial to understand the complete mountain hydrologic cycle, including groundwater, in order to understand the ongoing

  8. Una nueva especie de Eleutherodactylus (Amphibia: Leptodactylidae) de la Cordillera Central de Colombia Una nueva especie de Eleutherodactylus (Amphibia: Leptodactylidae) de la Cordillera Central de Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Roa Trujillo Sonia H.; Ruíz Carranza Pedro M.

    1991-01-01

    A new species of Eleutherodactylus, unistrigatus Group from the Cordillera Central in central Colombia is named. Additional characters of cranial morphology for defining the unistrigatus Group are given. Se nomina y describe una nueva especie de Eleutherodactylus del Grupo unistrigatus de la región central de la Cordillera Central de Colombia. Se presenta una descripción detallada de los caracteres craneales como un aporte para la definición de este Grupo.

  9. Tectonomagmatic Associations on the Central Andean Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, S. L.; Viramonte, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Neogene evolution of the Central Andes is characterized by a strong association between plate convergence, mountain building and plateau formation, and magmatism. Plateau uplift by crustal shortening and thickening in the lower crust is broadly coincident with large scale silicic magmatism defined by the Neogene Central Andean ignimbrite province. Of particular interest here are the spatiotemporal correlations between silicic magmatism and tectonic evolution of the Altiplano-Puna plateau. Although magmatism is driven by the subduction-related flux from mantle to crust, the shift to "crustal" magmatism as indicated by elevated crustal isotopic indices after ~10Ma suggests a link between crustal thickening, plateau formation and silicic magmatism. In particular, elevated geotherms associated with crustal thickening and enhanced mantle flux associated with lithospheric delamination may have played a role in thermally preparing the Central Andean crust for enhanced silicic magma production during the extensive Neogene ignimbrite flare-up. Emplacement of these magmas in the upper crust throughout the Neogene may have fuelled a period of significant interaction between magmatism and tectonism on the plateau. With particular reference to the 21° to 24°S segment of the Central Andes, spatial and structural coincidence of calderas of the Altiplano Puna Volcanic Complex with the NW-SE striking Calama-Olacapata-El Toro fault zone suggests significant tectonomagmatic interaction. Location of calderas suggest that these regional faults focused magma intrusion and storage, while spatially and temporally correlated eruption pulses connote a tectonic control. Indeed, current thermomechanical models of magma chamber development and eruption triggering promote a role for external triggering of "perched" upper crustal magma chambers. This might have been achieved by melt-enhanced deformation, or alternatively, significant uplift (~1km) associated with the development of large

  10. Market access and community size influence pastoral management of native and exotic livestock species : a case study in communities of the Cordillera Real in Bolivia's high Andean wetlands

    OpenAIRE

    Struelens, Quentin; Pomar, K. G.; Herrera, S. L.; Huanca, G. N.; Dangles, Olivier; Rebaudo, François

    2017-01-01

    Grazing areas management is of utmost importance in the Andean region. In the valleys of the Bolivian Cordillera Real near La Paz, pastoralism constitutes the traditional way for people to insure food security and economical sustainability. In these harsh mountains, unique and productive wetlands sustained by glacial water streams are of utmost importance for feeding cattle herds during the dry season. After the colonization by the Spanish, a shift in livestock species has been observed, with...

  11. Andean Ores, Bronze Artifacts, and Lead Isotopes: Constraints on Metal Sources in Their Geological Context

    OpenAIRE

    Macfarlane, Andrew W.; Lechtman, Heather Nan

    2014-01-01

    With a focus on bronze production in the south-central Andes during the Middle Horizon, this study reports the first archaeological use of lead isotope analysis to investigate metallic ores and metal artifacts in the Andean zone of South America. Because the vast majority of metal deposits in the Andean cordillera formed in a convergent plate boundary setting, lead isotope compositions of most Andean ore sources are not unique. Lead isotope ratios of central and south-central Andean ores defi...

  12. Late Cretaceous to Cenozoic deformation and exhumation of the Chilean Frontal Cordillera (28°-29°S), Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Fernando; Parra, Mauricio; Arriagada, César; Mora, Andrés; Bascuñan, Sebastián; Peña, Matías

    2017-11-01

    The Frontal Cordillera in northern Chile is located over the flat-slab subduction segment of the Central Andes. This tectonic province is characterized by a thick-skinned structural style showing evidence of tectonic inversion and basement-involved compressive structures. Field data, U-Pb geochronological and apatite fission track data were used to unravel partially the tectonic history of the area. Previous U-Pb ages of synorogenic deposits exposed on the flanks of basement-core anticlines indicate that Andean deformation started probably during Late Cretaceous with the tectonic inversion of Triassic and Jurassic half-grabens. New U-Pb ages of the synorogenic Quebrada Seca Formation suggest that this deformation continued during Paleocene (66-60 Ma) with the reverse faulting of pre-rift basement blocks. The analysis of new apatite fission-track data shows that a rapid and coeval cooling related to exhumation of the pre-rift basement blocks occurred during Eocene times. This exhumation event is interpreted for first time in the Chilean Frontal Cordillera and it could have occurred simultaneously with the propagation of basement-involved structures. The age of this exhumation event coincides with the Incaic orogenic phase, which is interpreted as the most important to the Central Andes in terms of shortening, uplift and exhumation.

  13. Contribution to the Geology of the Central and Western Cordillera of Colombia in the sector between Ibagué and Cali

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelson, H.W.

    1957-01-01

    Het Westelijk gedeelte van de Republiek Columbia (Zuid Amerika) wordt ingenomen door de Cordilleras de los Andes, welke in genoemde republiek uit drie hoofdketens bestaat, t. w. de West Cordillera, de Centrale Cordillera en de Oost Cordillera. Een studie werd gemaakt van een centraal gelegen Strook

  14. Una nueva especie de eleutherodactylus (amphibia: leptodactylidae) de la cordillera central de colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Roa Trujillo, Sonia H.; Ruíz Carranza, Pedro M.

    2012-01-01

    Se nomina y describe una nueva especie de Eleutherodactylus del Grupo unistrigatus de la región central de la Cordillera Central de Colombia. Se presenta una descripción detallada de los caracteres craneales como un aporte para la definición de este Grupo.

  15. Population Declines of Mountain Coqui (Eleutherodactylus portoricensis) in the Cordillera Central of Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Brittany S.; Ríos-Franceschi, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The Mountain Coqui (Eleutherodactylus portoricensis) is a frog endemic to montane rainforests in the Cordillera Central and Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. Classified as endangered by the IUCN Red List and as vulnerable by the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources of Puerto Rico, this species has undergone considerable decline in the Luquillo Mountains. To evaluate the population status of E. portoricensis across its entire range, we conducted ~87 hours of surveys at 18 historical localities and 25 additional localities that we considered suitable for this species. We generated occupancy models to estimate the probability of occurrence at surveyed sites and to identify geographic and climatic factors affecting site occupancy. We also constructed a suitability map to visualize population status in relation to the presence of land cover at elevations where the species has been documented, and determined the dates when populations were last detected at historical localities. Eleutherodactylus portoricensis was detected at 14 of 43 localities, including 10 of 18 historical localities, but it was not detected at any localities west of Aibonito (western Cordillera Central). Occupancy models estimated the probability of occurrence for localities in the western Cordillera Central as zero. Site occupancy was positively associated with montane cloud forest, and negatively associated with the western Cordillera Central, maximum temperature, and precipitation seasonality. The suitability map suggests that declines have occurred despite the presence of suitable habitat. We suggest upgrading the extinction risk of E. portoricensis and potentially developing a captive breeding program for this species. PMID:25685250

  16. Long-term monitoring of tropical alpine habitat change, Andean anurans, and chytrid fungus in the Cordillera Vilcanota, Peru: Results from a decade of study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seimon, Tracie A; Seimon, Anton; Yager, Karina; Reider, Kelsey; Delgado, Amanda; Sowell, Preston; Tupayachi, Alfredo; Konecky, Bronwen; McAloose, Denise; Halloy, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    The Cordillera Vilcanota in southern Peru is the second largest glacierized range in the tropics and home to one of the largest high-alpine lakes, Sibinacocha (4,860 m). Here, Telmatobius marmoratus (marbled water frog), Rhinella spinulosa (Andean toad), and Pleurodema marmoratum (marbled four-eyed frog) have expanded their range vertically within the past century to inhabit newly formed ponds created by ongoing deglaciation. These anuran populations, geographically among the highest (5,200-5,400 m) recorded globally, are being impacted by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis ( Bd ), and the disease it causes, chytridiomycosis. In this study, we report results from over a decade of monitoring these three anuran species, their habitat, and Bd infection status. Our observations reveal dynamic changes in habitat including ongoing rapid deglaciation (18.4 m/year widening of a corridor between retreating glaciers from 2005 to 2015), new pond formation, changes in vegetation in amphibian habitat, and widespread occurrence of Bd in amphibians in seven sites. Three of these sites have tested positive for Bd over a 9- to 12-year period. In addition, we observed a widespread reduction in T. marmoratus encounters in the Vilcanota in 2008, 2009, and 2012, while encounters increased in 2013 and 2015. Despite the rapid and dynamic changes in habitat under a warming climate, continued presence of Bd in the environment for over a decade, and a reduction in one of three anuran species, we document that these anurans continue to breed and survive in this high Andean environment. High variability in anuran encounters across sites and plasticity in these populations across habitats, sites, and years are all factors that could favor repopulation postdecline. Preserving the connectivity of wetlands in the Cordillera Vilcanota is therefore essential in ensuring that anurans continue to breed and adapt as climate change continues to reshape the environment.

  17. Market access and community size influence pastoral management of native and exotic livestock species: A case study in communities of the Cordillera Real in Bolivia's high Andean wetlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Struelens

    Full Text Available Grazing areas management is of utmost importance in the Andean region. In the valleys of the Bolivian Cordillera Real near La Paz, pastoralism constitutes the traditional way for people to insure food security and economical sustainability. In these harsh mountains, unique and productive wetlands sustained by glacial water streams are of utmost importance for feeding cattle herds during the dry season. After the colonization by the Spanish, a shift in livestock species has been observed, with the introduction of exotic species such as cows and sheep, resulting in a different impact on pastures compared to native camelid species-llamas and alpacas. Here we explored some of the social-economical and environmental drivers that motivate Bolivian pastoralists to prefer exotic over native livestock species, based on 36 household surveys in the Cordillera Real. We constructed a Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Model in order to assess the relationships between these drivers. Our results suggest that the access to market influenced pastoralists to reshape their herd composition, by increasing the number of sheep. They also suggest that community size increased daily grazing time in pastures, therefore intensifying the grazing pressure. At a broader scale, this study highlights the effects of some social-economical and environmental drivers on mountain herding systems.

  18. Market access and community size influence pastoral management of native and exotic livestock species: A case study in communities of the Cordillera Real in Bolivia's high Andean wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struelens, Quentin; Gonzales Pomar, Karina; Loza Herrera, Susi; Nina Huanca, Gaby; Dangles, Olivier; Rebaudo, François

    2017-01-01

    Grazing areas management is of utmost importance in the Andean region. In the valleys of the Bolivian Cordillera Real near La Paz, pastoralism constitutes the traditional way for people to insure food security and economical sustainability. In these harsh mountains, unique and productive wetlands sustained by glacial water streams are of utmost importance for feeding cattle herds during the dry season. After the colonization by the Spanish, a shift in livestock species has been observed, with the introduction of exotic species such as cows and sheep, resulting in a different impact on pastures compared to native camelid species-llamas and alpacas. Here we explored some of the social-economical and environmental drivers that motivate Bolivian pastoralists to prefer exotic over native livestock species, based on 36 household surveys in the Cordillera Real. We constructed a Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Model in order to assess the relationships between these drivers. Our results suggest that the access to market influenced pastoralists to reshape their herd composition, by increasing the number of sheep. They also suggest that community size increased daily grazing time in pastures, therefore intensifying the grazing pressure. At a broader scale, this study highlights the effects of some social-economical and environmental drivers on mountain herding systems.

  19. The role of collisional tectonics in the metallogeny of the Central Andean tin belt [rapid communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynarczyk, Michael S. J.; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.

    2005-12-01

    The Inner Arc of the Central Andes, broadly corresponding to the Eastern Cordillera, is the location of a rich Tertiary and Triassic Sn-W-(Ag-base metal) metallogenic province, commonly referred to as the Bolivian tin belt. We propose that the Tertiary metallogeny, which generated most of the tin ores, was a direct consequence of discrete "collisions" between the South American plate and the Nazca slab and sub-slab mantle, during the ongoing Andean orogeny. Evidence supporting this proposal include: (1) the coincidence of the tin province and the Inner Arc in a marked "hump" in the Andean orogen, which may represent tectonic indentation; (2) the symmetry of the tin province with respect to the Bolivian orocline, the axis of which corresponds to the direction of highest compression; (3) the relative symmetry of the magmatism and tin mineralization with respect to this axis; (4) the concurrent timing of mineralization and compressional pulses; (5) the similar host rock geochemistry and ore lead isotope data, testifying to a common crustal reservoir; and (6) the striking similarity of the igneous suites, associated with the ore deposits to those from "typical" collisional orogens. A number of studies have called upon a persistent tin anomaly to explain the metallogeny of the region. We propose, instead, that the latter is better explained by periodic compressional interaction between the Farallon/Nazca oceanic plate and the South American continent. This led to the generation of peraluminous magmas, which during fractional crystallization exsolved the fluids responsible for the voluminous Sn-W mineralization.

  20. Evolución de la serie Microphyllae (Adesmia, Fabaceae en la Cordillera de los Andes: una perspectiva biogeográfica Evolution of the series Microphyllae (Adesmia, Fabaceae in the Andean Cordillera: a biogeographic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARITZA A. K. MIHOC

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Microphyllae (subgénero Acanthadesmia es la serie que posee el mayor número de especies descritas en el género Adesmia, y su distribución incluye la mayor parte del área de distribución del género. El escenario biogeográfico evolutivo, tanto del género como de la serie, es poco claro. Algunas hipótesis sugieren que el desarrollo de los Andes estaría relacionado con la evolución de Adesmia, sin embargo, no se ha establecido el proceso (e.g., dispersión o vicarianza subyacente a dicha evolución. En este estudio se empleó la aproximación panbiogeográfica mediante un análisis de trazos y un análisis de parsimonia de endemismos (PAE, basados en la distribución de 22 de las especies de esta serie. El área de distribución de la serie fue dividida en cuadrículas de 1° x 1° (Latitud x Longitud, y franjas latitudinales y longitudinales de 1º. Todas las especies presentaron una distribución asociada con los Andes y restringida tanto latitudinal como longitudinalmente. Encontramos cinco trazos generalizados y dos nodos. Todos los trazos generalizados se asociaron longitudinalmente con la cordillera y los nodos se asociaron con la Zona de Transición Sudamericana. El PAE realizado con las franjas latitudinales establece que el área de distribución de la serie se divide en una zona norte y una sur, cuyo límite se encontraría en Chile central (ca. 33° S. Esta división se encuentra caracterizada por la presencia de A. miraflorensis en la zona norte y A. volckmannii en la zona sur. Nuestros resultados sugieren una diferenciación reciente, ocasionada por el aislamiento de poblaciones a lo largo de la cordillera; es decir, eventos vicariantes que fragmentaron la distribución y posteriormente indujeron la diferenciación de grupos. La separación se habría dado en sentido latitudinal, como lo sugiere la secuencia latitudinal de trazos generalizadosMicrophyllae (subgenus Acanthadesmia is the series of the genus Adesmia with the

  1. Three new species of Eleutherodactylus (Amphibia: Leptodactylidae from high elevations of the cordillera Central of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch John D.

    1996-11-01

    Full Text Available A new species of the Eleutherodactylus orcesi group, the smallest member of the group, is described from the Páramo de los Valles (Tolima. It is very similar to E. slmoterus. From the same locality, a new species of dwarf Eleutherodactylus, lacking a tympanum, is described. It appears to be a member of the E. myersi group. Lastly, a new large black Eleutherodactylusis described from páramo and subpáramo habitats of the Cordillera Central. This species is distributed from Antioquia to Cauca. With these three species, fifteen species of Eleutherodactylus are known for páramo and subpáramo habitats of the Cordillera Central north of the Macizo de Pasto. These 15 species be long to tour species groups.Se describe una especie nueva del grupo de Eleutherodactylus orcesi del Páramo de los Valles (Tolima. Esta especie es muy parecida a E. simoterus pero se distingue por su tamaño (la especie nueva es la más pequeña del grupo. Se describe también una especie enanita del Páramo de los Valles que posiblemente es una especie del grupo de Eleutherodactylus myersl. La especie es muy distinta porque carece de tímpano. Finalmente, se describe una especie grande y negra que se encuentra desde Antioquia hacia Cauca en la Cordillera Central. Con estas especies, tenemos 15 especies de Eleutherodactylus conocidas de los páramos y subpáramos de la Cordillera Central al norte del Macizo de Pasto, que pertenecen a cuatro grupos de especies.

  2. U-Pb La-ICP-ms geochronology and regional correlation of middle Jurassic intrusive rocks from the Garzon Massif, Upper Magdalena Valley and central cordillera, southern Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustamante, Camilo; Cardona, Agustin; Bayona, German; Mora, Andres; Valencia, Victor; Gehrels, George; Vervoort, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    New U-Pb zircon geochronology from four granitic units sampled along a southeast-northwest transect between the Garzon massif and the Serrania de las Minas (central cordillera), records a middle Jurassic magmatic activity with two different spatio-temporal domains at ca. 189 ma and 180-173 ma. Reconnaissance data suggest that the four granitoids are characterized by mineralogical and geochemical characteristics akin to a continental magmatic arc setting. The new results suggest that the southern Colombian continental margin includes remnants of tectonomagmatic elements formed by the subduction of the Farallon plate under the South American continental margin. This middle Jurassic arc magmatism is part of the broader Andean scale arc province, and is significant for understanding the tectonic and paleogeographic scenario that characterized the Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the northern Andes.

  3. Evidence of proterozoic crust under the coastal Cordillera of Central Chile: Grenville age xenocrystic zircons in cretaceous volcanic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zentilli, M; Pop, N; Heaman; L; Boric, R

    2001-01-01

    In the central Andes, Proterozoic basement rocks outcrop in isolated areas from beneath a Mesozoic and Cenozoic cover in southern Peru, northernmost Chile, Bolivia, and in northwestern Argentina. Their role in Andean magmatism and metallogenesis is well documented. In the southern Central Andes, Proterozoic rocks are so far known to outcrop in Argentina, east of the continental divide. In the course of U-Pb dating of the bimodal volcanic and sub-volcanic host rocks for Mesozoic manto-type copper deposits, we have encountered xenocrystic zircon with Proterozoic and Paleozoic ages. In the Punta del Cobre Cu-Fe (Au) District (27 o 30' S / 70 o 15' W) 22 km south of Copiapo xenocrystic zircon in the Lower Cretaceous host dacite yields ca. 1 Ga ages. In the El Soldado Cu District, (32 o 38' S /71 o 04' W), 120 km northwest of Santiago, scarce and strongly resorbed zircon crystals in the Lower Cretaceous host rhyodacite yield ages of 0.5 to 1.3 Ga. The early Cretaceous bimodal volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, which consists of primitive calc-alkaline basalts and rhyodacites, display geochemical evidence of crustal contamination. Our results suggest that, during their formation and ascent, the felsic magmas picked up zircons in the Proterozoic and Paleozoic crystalline basement of the Coastal Cordillera. The presence of Proterozoic (Grenville age) basement underlying localities as close as 30 km from the Pacific coast has implications for the extent and age of the Chilenia Terrane and gives further credence to correlation models that juxtapose eastern North America (Laurentia) and southwestern South America (Gondwana) during the Late Proterozoic (au)

  4. Geochronology, geochemistry and tectonic evolution of the Western and Central cordilleras of Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagómez, Diego; Spikings, Richard; Magna, Tomas; Kammer, Andreas; Winkler, Wilfried; Beltrán, Alejandro

    2011-08-01

    Autochthonous rocks of the pre-Cretaceous continental margin of NW South America (the Tahami Terrane) are juxtaposed against a series of para-autochthonous rock units that assembled during the Early Cretaceous. Allochthonous, oceanic crust of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province collided with and accreted onto the margin during the Late Cretaceous. We present the first regional-scale dataset of zircon U-Pb LA-ICP-MS ages for intrusive and metamorphic rocks of the autochthonous Tahami Terrane, Early Cretaceous igneous para-autochthonous rocks and accreted oceanic crust. The U-Pb zircon data are complemented by multiphase 40Ar/ 39Ar crystallization and cooling ages. The geochronological data are combined with whole rock major oxide, trace element and REE data acquired from the same units to constrain the tectonic origin of the rock units and terranes exposed in the Western Cordillera, Cauca-Patía Valley and the Central Cordillera of Colombia. The Tahami Terrane includes lower Paleozoic orthogneisses (~ 440 Ma) that may have erupted during the active margin stage of the Rheic Ocean. Basement gneisses were intruded by Permian, continental arc granites during the final assembly of Pangea. Triassic sedimentary rocks were subsequently deposited in rift basins and partially melted during high-T metamorphism associated with rifting of western Pangea during 240-220 Ma. Continental arc magmatism during 180-145 Ma is preserved along the whole length of the Central Cordillera and was followed by an Early Cretaceous out-board step of the arc axis and the inception of the Quebradagrande Arc that fringed the continental margin. Back-stepping of the arc axis may have been caused by the collision of buoyant seamounts, which were coeval with plateau rocks exposed in the Nicoya Peninsular of Costa Rica. Rapid westward drift of South America closed the Quebradagrande basin in the late Aptian and caused medium-high P-T metamorphic rocks of the Arquía Complex to exhume and obduct onto

  5. Climate in the Western Cordillera of the Central Andes over the last 4300 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Zbyněk; Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Chuman, Tomáš; Šefrna, Luděk; Mihaljevič, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The Distichia peat core obtained in the Carhuasanta valley near Nevado Mismi, Cordillera Chila, provides information on climatic and environmental conditions over the last ˜4300 years. The relative changes in the stable carbon isotope composition of plant remains preserved in the core reflect major temperature fluctuations in the Western Cordillera of the southern Peruvian Andes. These temperature variations can be additionally linked with the changes in precipitation patterns by analysing C% and C/N ratio in the core. Relatively warm and moist conditions prevailed from 4280 to 3040 cal. yrs BP (BC 2330-1090) with a short colder dry episode around 3850 cal. yrs BP (BC 1900). The most prominent climate changes recorded in the peat occurred between 3040 and 2750 cal. yrs BP (BC 1090-800) when the initial warming turned to a rapid cooling to temperatures at least 2 °C lower than the mean for the Late Holocene. Initially drier conditions within this event turned to a short wet phase after 2780 cal. yrs BP (BC 830) when the temperature increased again. This event coincides with significant changes in peat and ice core records in the Central Andes matching the timing of the global climate event around 2.8 cal. ka BP. Climatic conditions in the study area became relatively dry and stable after the event for about 800 years. Highly variable temperatures and humidity prevailed during the last 2000 years when an extended warm and relatively humid period occurred between 640 and 155 cal. yrs BP (AD 1310-1795) followed by predominantly colder and drier conditions. The established δ13C peat record represents the first continuous proxy for the temperature in the southern Peruvian Andes dated by the AMS 14C. Distichia peat is wide spread in the Andes and the proposed approach can be applied elsewhere in high altitudes, where no other traditional climate proxies are available.

  6. The Under-side of the Andes: Using Receiver Functions to Map the North Central Andean Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project is an interdisciplinary project to investigate connections between lithospheric removal, crustal shortening and surface uplift in the northern Bolivia and southern Peru region of the South American Andean orogen. The central Andes are defined by six major tectonomorphic provinces; the forearc, the volcanically active Western Cordillera (WC, ~6 km elevation), the internally drained Altiplano (~4 km elevation), an inactive fold and thrust belt in the Eastern Cordillera (EC, ~6 km elevation), a lower elevation active fold and thrust belt in the Subandean (SA) zone and the Beni, a foreland basin. Forty seismic stations installed for the CAUGHT project were deployed between 13° and 18° S latitude, covering the transition zone where the Altiplano region pinches out in southern Peru, in an effort to better constrain the changing character of the crust and mantle lithosphere. Geologic studies across the northern Bolivian portion of the eastern Andean margin (15-17° S) have documented a total of 275 km of upper crustal shortening (McQuarrie et al, Tectonics, v27, 2008), which may be associated with crustal thickening and/or the removal of lithospheric material as a thickened lithosphere root becomes unstable. For this receiver function (converted wave) study, we have little coverage in the forearc and foreland, ~75 km spacing in most of the array, and a relatively dense ~20 km spaced profile along the Charaña-La Paz-Yucumo transect, the eastern portion of which is nearly coincident with the balanced cross-section of McQuarrie et al. (2008). Using the first year of available data, more than 1200 receiver functions have been calculated using an iterative deconvolution method, and stacked using the common conversion point (CCP) method, along profiles parallel to and nearly coincident to those used for the geologic shortening estimates. We identified arrivals for the Moho and generated a 3D map of

  7. Three new species of Pristimantis (Lissamphibia, Anura from montane forests of the Cordillera Yanachaga in Central Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Duellman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe three additional new species of Pristimantis from the Cordillera Yanachaga, a part of the Andes in central Peru. Analyses of DNA sequences of the mitochondrial rRNA genes show that onespecies is a close relative of P. bipunctatus (P. conspicillatus Group, another is a close relative of P. stictogaster (P. peruvianus Group, and the third is related to several species in the P. unistrigatus Group. The first two species are morphologically similar to their closest relatives but occur at lower elevations. Twenty-nine species of Pristimantis and Phrynopus are known from the vicinity of the Cordillera Yanachaga. The number of species, especially of Pristimantis, is high in the humid montane forestin comparison with other sites in humid montane forests in Peru, but the number is lower than on the western slopes of the Andes in Ecuador.

  8. High-Up: A Remote Reservoir of Microbial Extremophiles in Central Andean Wetlands

    OpenAIRE

    Albarrac?n, Virginia H.; Kurth, Daniel; Ordo?ez, Omar F.; Belfiore, Carolina; Luccini, Eduardo; Salum, Graciela M.; Piacentini, Ruben D.; Far?as, Mar?a E.

    2015-01-01

    The Central Andes region displays unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes and salt flats at mean altitudes of 3700 m. Being isolated and hostile, these so-called “High-Altitude Andean Lakes” (HAAL) are pristine and have been exposed to little human influence. HAAL proved to be a rich source of microbes showing interesting adaptations to life in extreme settings (poly-extremophiles) such as alkalinity, high concentrations of arsenic and dissolved salts, intense dryness, large daily ambient ther...

  9. Estructura y composición florística de tres robledales en la región norte de la cordillera central de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D León

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available La alta diversidad florística que albergan los ecosistemas andinos está siendo amenazada por fuertes presiones de origen antrópico. Uno de estos ecosistemas son los robledales, bosques dominados por la especie Quercus humboldtii, que se encuentra seriamente amenazada en Colombia porque su madera es valiosa comercial y dendroenergéticamente. En este estudio, se caracterizó la composición florística y la estructura de tres robledales de los Andes colombianos, con el fin de determinar su similaridad. En cada sitio, se estableció una parcela permanente (5 000 m² donde se muestrearon todos los árboles con D ≥ 10 cm. En los tres sitios, la especie dominante fue Q. humboldtii, pero la similitud florística entre ellos no fue alta. La estructura por clases de tamaño para los tres sitios fue en forma de J invertida, aunque varió la abundancia de individuos por clase diamétrica. Los resultados indican que los robledales estudiados difieren en su composición florística y estructura a pesar de presentar características biofísicas similares. Las diferencias encontradas se deben posiblemente, a los diferentes factores que interactúan en cada sitio como la historia de uso, intensidad y duración de las perturbaciones antrópicas pasadas, topografía, fauna y clima local, que se ven reflejados en los parámetros estructurales de la vegetación.Structure and floristic composition of three oak forests in the northern region of the Central Cordillera in Colombia. Andean ecosystems harbor a high floristic diversity, which is being threatened by human disturbances such us deforestation and by the expansion of the agricultural frontier. One of these ecosystems are the Andean oak forests dominated by Quercus humboldtii, a threatened species in Colombia. We assessed the floristic composition and structure of three Andean oak forests located in three localities (San Andrés de Cuerquia, Belmira and Guarne of Antioquia. The main goal was to determine

  10. Structure of the Cordillera de la Costa Belt, North-Central Venezuela: Implications for plate tectronic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ave Lallemant, H.G.; Sisson, V.B.; Wright, J.E. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Preliminary results of an on-going study of the Cordillera de la Costa belt between Puerto Cabello and Choroni, north-central Venezuela, indicate that the deformational history is far more complicated than expected from simple plate-tectonic models. The Cordillera de la Costa belt consists of oceanic rocks (e.g., serpentinites, amphibilites, with lenses of eclogite and blueschist) intimately intermixed with metamorphosed continental margin deposits (e.g., mica and graphite schist, quartzite, marble). Locally, large granitic (basement ) complexes of Lower Paleozoic age are included as well. In late Cretaceous time, the entire belt was involved in four synmetamorphic deformations phases (D[sub 1a] to D[sub 1d]); the first (D[sub 1a]) occurred at depths of at 35-40 km and the later ones at successively shallower depths. This deformation occurred in a subduction zone, related to right-oblique convergence of the Farallon and Atlantic plates. The most penetrative structures resulted from (all in present coordinates) north-south contraction and east-west dextral simple shear (D[sub 1b]). During an Early Tertiary ( ) event (D[sub 2]), the belt was emplaced southward onto the South American continental margin. Subsequent deformational structures (D[sub 3]) resulted in cross folds and faults (with small pull-apart basins) which are consistent with the eastward passage of the Caribbean past the South American plate.

  11. Bridging the gap between North and Central Chile : insight from new GPS data on coupling complexities and the Andean sliver motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, E.; Métois, M.; Meneses, G.; Vigny, C.; Delorme, A.

    2018-03-01

    GPS surveys have been extensively used over the past 20 years to quantify crustal deformation associated with the Andean subduction zone in Chile. Such measurements revealed the coupling variations associated with the seismic segmentation of the subduction. However, because of data gaps mostly due to access difficulties, the Atacama-Antofagasta regions of North Chile remain poorly known. We present here an upgraded interseismic velocity field aggregating new data acquired between 2012 and 2016 in the region of Taltal (24° S - 26° S), over a small scale network of 20 benchmarks. This denser data set reveals a new complexity regarding the modelling methodology commonly used. We first show that a large scale rigid Andean sliver, running from central to North Chile, does not allow to explain the velocities measured near the cordillera in the region of Taltal. This region exhibits an additional coherent block motion of almost 8 mm/yr with respect to the inland motion generated by the rotation of the sliver proposed by (e.g. Brooks et al. 2003; Métois et al. 2013, 2014) which works well everywhere else. Second, once this local block motion is taken into account, the coupling in the Taltal area is refined, which brings new insights about the subduction segmentation there. The Taltal area shows as a relative low in coupling (although coupling values are still high), potentially cutting a long section of the subduction into two independent highly coupled segments: the Paranal segment - North of Taltal, between 23° S and 25° S - and the Chañaral segment - south of Taltal, between 26° S and 28° S. These segments may rupture individually with magnitude ˜8 earthquakes or simultaneously which would produce a larger earthquake, especially if a third segment (Atacama - more to the south - between 28° S and 29° S) is also involved.

  12. Tipos de vegetación del llano de Paletará. Cordillera Central Colombia Tipos de vegetación del llano de Paletará. Cordillera Central Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restrepo Carla

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the vegetation found in the Llano de Paletará, municipality of Coconuco, department of Cauca, Colombia. Based on the physiognomy and floristic composition of the vegetation we identified 8 paramo vegetation types. These units represent the most extensive azonal paramo vegetation types described up to now for the Cordillera Central. Four of the 8 vegetation types are herbaceous ("frailejonal-pajonal" with Espeletia, "chuscal abierto" with Chusquea,"swamp" with Carex, and "grassland" with Calamagrostis , three are bush tickets (thicket with Hypericum, thicket with Ageratina, and thicket with Diplostephium, and one is a forest of low stature (forest with Escallonia. We analyze some aspects of the ecology and distribution of the vegetation types and evaluate their degree of peril and value of conservation. Se estudiaron los tipos de vegetación del Llano de Paletará, municipio de Coconuco, departamento del Cauca, Colombia. Basados en la fisonomía y composición florística de la vegetación identificamos 8 tipos de vegetación, los cuales representan los tipos de vegetación paramunos de carácter azonal más extensos de la Cordillera Central registrados hasta el momento. De los 8 tipos de vegetación, cuatro son de porte herbáceo (''frailejonalpajonal'' con Espeletia. "chuscal abierto" con Chusquea. "pantano" con Carex y un "pajonal" con Calamagrostis, tres son de porte arbustivo (matorral con Hypericum, matorral con Ageratina y matorral con Diplostephium y uno es de porte arbóreo (bosque con Escallonia. Se analizan algunos aspectos de la ecología y distribución de los tipos de vegetación y se evalúa su grado de amenaza y valor de conservación.

  13. Present and future water resources supply and demand in the Central Andes of Peru: a comprehensive review with focus on the Cordillera Vilcanota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenkhan, Fabian; Huggel, Christian; Salzmann, Nadine; Giráldez, Claudia; Suarez, Wilson; Rohrer, Mario; Molina, Edwin; Montoya, Nilton; Miñan, Fiorella

    2014-05-01

    Glaciers have been an important element of Andean societies and livelihoods as direct freshwater supply for agriculture irrigation, hydropower generation and mining activities. Peru's mainly remotely living population in the Central Andes has to cope with a strong seasonal variation of precipitations and river runoff interannually superimposed by El Niño impacts. Direct glacier and lake water discharge thus constitute a vital continuous water supply and represent a regulating buffer as far as hydrological variability is concerned. This crucial buffer effect is gradually altered by accelerated glacier retreat which leads most likely to an increase of annual river runoff variability. Furthermore, a near-future crossing of the 'peak water' is expected, from where on prior enhanced streamflow decreases and levels out towards a new still unknown minimum discharge. Consequently, a sustainable future water supply especially during low-level runoff dry season might not be guaranteed whereas Peru's water demand increases significantly. Here we present a comprehensive review, the current conditions and perspectives for water resources in the Cusco area with focus on the Vilcanota River, Cordillera Vilcanota, Southern Peru. With 279 km2 the Cordillera Vilcanota represents the second largest glacierized mountain range of the tropics worldwide. Especially as of the second half of the 1980s, it has been strongly affected by massive ice loss with around 30% glacier area decline until present. Furthermore, glacier vanishing triggers the formation of new lakes and increase of lake levels and therefore constitutes determining hazardous drivers for mass movements related to deglaciation effects. The Vilcanota River still lacks more profound hydrological studies. It is likely that its peak water has already been or might be crossed in near-future. This has strong implications for the still at 0.9% (2.2%) annually growing population of the Cusco department (Cusco city). People mostly

  14. Effect of human disturbance on seed and seedling distribution of the Andean Oak (Quercus humboldtii Bonpl., Fagaceae) in the Colombian Eastern Cordillera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero Rodriguez, Sandra Bibiana; Paz Camacho, Erika Andrea; Parrado Rosselli, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Animals affect the spatial occupation patterns of tropical forest plants throughout the seed dispersal they perform. Therefore, changes in vertebrate populations by human disturbance might affect re generation dynamics of plant species. We studied differences in the spatial distribution of seeds and seedlings of the Andean oak (Quercus humboldtii) between two nearby forests with contrasting levels of anthropogenic influence in the Colombian Andes. Density and spatial distribution of seedlings were evaluated in 490 and 484 1 m2 plots located in a 28 ha area, in the high and low disturbed site, respectively. In each plot, all seedlings found were sampled and classified into three age categories. Density and spatial distribution of seeds were evaluated in 0.25 m 2s ubplots placed in the same plots described above. Results showed a higher number and density of seedlings in the high disturbed site, as well as a marked decrease in seedling density as age increases. Distances to the nearest neighbour were shorter in the high disturbed site for all seedlings and each age category, in contrast to the low disturbed site. Indexes of spatial distribution indicate an aggregated pattern in the most disturbed site, while a uniform pattern in the low disturbed one. Seeds also exhibited an aggregated pattern in the high disturbed site and a higher seed predation by invertebrates. Results seemed to be a consequence of forest fragmentation and a decrease of vertebrate seed dispersers, seed predators and herbivores associated to the regeneration processes of the species. These results provide important information for the forest management and restoration activities, since in order to maintain plant populations in the long term, presence and viable populations of seed dispersers should be also maintained.

  15. ANÁLISIS MORFOLÓGICO DE LAS ESPORAS DE SERPOCAULON (POLYPODIACEAE DE LA CORDILLERA CENTRAL DE COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez-valencia Valentina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Serpocaulon A. R. Sm. es un género monofilético de Polypodiaceae, compuesto por42 especies neotropicales, cuya mayor riqueza de especies se encuentra en Colombia,principalmente en la Cordillera Central (21 taxones. Su delimitación infragenéricaaún no es precisa, debido a: a problemas nomenclaturales, b el desconocimiento desu distribución geográfica, c su diversidad y d los múltiples eventos de hibridaciónpresentes en el género. Con el fin de incrementar el conocimiento taxonómico deSerpocaulon, se describió la morfología de las esporas de 21 taxones registrados enla Cordillera Central de Colombia, a partir de microscopía de luz transmitida-MLT yelectrónica de barrido-MEB. Los especímenes analizados fueron obtenidos de herbariosregionales. Se evaluaron 15 caracteres morfológicos y se promediaron 25 esporas envista lateral y 25 en vista proximal por taxón. Se realizó un análisis de componentesprincipales (ACP con el fin de identificar la variabilidad de los taxones. Se registraronesporas mónadas, heteropolares, con simetría bilateral, y formas elipsoidales, subelipsoidalesa globulares en vista proximal y plano-convexas a cóncavo-convexas envista lateral. Todos los taxones estudiados presentan ornamentación verrugada, quevaría en tamaño, forma y distribución. Se observaron dos tipos de perisporio (plegadoy liso. Los resultados sugieren que las verrugas son un importante carácter en ladeterminación de las especies, así como en su definición infragenérica, y que el ACPes útil para identificar algunos patrones morfológicos. Finalmente, se sugieren cuatrogrupos morfológicos conformados por especies que coinciden con clados propuestospreviamente en estudios moleculares.

  16. Seismic imaging of the upper mantle beneath the northern Central Andean Plateau: Implications for surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, K. M.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Wagner, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    Extending over 1,800 km along the active South American Cordilleran margin, the Central Andean Plateau (CAP) as defined by the 3 km elevation contour is second only to the Tibetan Plateau in geographic extent. The uplift history of the 4 km high Plateau remains uncertain with paleoelevation studies along the CAP suggesting a complex, non-uniform uplift history. As part of the Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project, we use surface waves measured from ambient noise and two-plane wave tomography to image the S-wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle to investigate the upper mantle component of plateau uplift. We observe three main features in our S-wave velocity model including (1), a high velocity slab (2), a low velocity anomaly above the slab where the slab changes dip from near horizontal to a normal dip, and (3), a high-velocity feature in the mantle above the slab that extends along the length of the Altiplano from the base of the Moho to a depth of ~120 km with the highest velocities observed under Lake Titicaca. A strong spatial correlation exists between the lateral extent of this high-velocity feature beneath the Altiplano and the lower elevations of the Altiplano basin suggesting a potential relationship. Non-uniqueness in our seismic models preclude uniquely constraining this feature as an uppermost mantle feature bellow the Moho or as a connected eastward dipping feature extending up to 300 km in the mantle as seen in deeper mantle tomography studies. Determining if the high velocity feature represents a small lithospheric root or a delaminating lithospheric root extending ~300 km into the mantle requires more integration of observations, but either interpretation shows a strong geodynamic connection with the uppermost mantle and the current topography of the northern CAP.

  17. (Plio-)Pleistocene alluvial-lacustrine basin infill evolution in a strike-slip active zone (Northern Andes, Western-Central Cordilleras, Colombia)

    OpenAIRE

    SUTER, F.; NEUWERTH, R.; GORIN, G.; GUZMÁN, C.

    2009-01-01

    The (Plio)-Pleistocene Zarzal Formation was deposited in the Cauca Depression and Quindío-Risaralda Basin between the Western and Central Cordilleras (Northern Andes). This area is structurally located on the transcurrent Romeral Fault System (RFS). Because of the interaction between the Nazca plate and the Chocó-Panamá block (an active indenter), the RFS strike-slip component changes direction around the study zone (dextral in the south, senestral in the north). Zarzal sediments are the olde...

  18. Un modelo de la historia de la vegetación de la Cordillera de La Costa de Chile central-sur: la hipótesis glacial de Darwin A model for the history of vegetation of the Coastal Range of central-southern Chile: Darwin's glacial hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAROLINA VILLAGRÁN

    2001-12-01

    Andean and at high latitudes exist in south-central Chile, between 37 and 43° S. According to Darwin (1859, such "islands" are remnants of glacial populations, which were distributed at lower altitudes and latitudes during glacier advances. Also, in Chile there were expansions of the Andean and southernmost flora into the Longitudinal Valley of Los Lagos region during the last glaciation, which reversed during the Late-glacial (14, 600-10,000 14C years BP and Holocene (after 10,000 14C years BP. Considering this hypothesis, in this study we analyzed two palynological sequences from summits of the Coastal Range of Los Lagos region (Cordillera de Nahuelbuta and Cordillera de Sarao and both were correlated with published high and low altitude records from the Los Lagos and Los Canales regions. The records from the Coastal Range show the following chronological sequence: (1 at the lower and middle Holocene, after 9,040 14C years BP, the Cordillera de Sarao site documents the colonization of Magellanic moorlands and north-Patagonian forest elements, followed by north-Patagonian-Valdivian forest elements during the upper Holocene; (2 the Cordillera de Nahuelbuta site shows the development of conifer forest and Magellanic moorlands during the middle Holocene, ca. 5,430 14C years BP. Other palynological records from the Coastal Range (Cordillera Pelada and Cordillera de Piuchué show the development of both communities during the Late-glacial and lower Holocene. In contrast, the low altitude pollen records from the Los Lagos region indicate that conifers and magellanic moorland elements occupied the Longitudinal Valley during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ca. 22,000 14C years BP. Various pollen profiles from Los Lagos and Los Canales regions evidenced for the late-glacial (14,600-10,000 14C years BP the rapid southern expansion of conifers and other north-Patagonian elements, following the deglaciation of these areas. During the Holocene, Valdivian forest elements invaded the

  19. Migración boyacense en la cordillera central, 1876-1945: Del altiplano cundiboyacense a los espacion de homogeneización antioqueña

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-01-01

    órico de la migración interregional, desde el punto de vista de su aporte demográfico, cultural y económico, y la confluencia de diferentes elementos étnicos y regionales desde mediados del siglo diecinueve. El estudio resalta la importancia de los factores locales -carencia de tierra, disposición laboral y violencias-, los factores externos -ofertas de tierras y jornales- y las motivaciones personales -contactos personales y modos de vida- como elementos que interactuaron durante las distintas fases de migración y circunstancias históricas relacionadas con la distribución de tierras baldías y la expansión de la caficultura en la cordillera central colombiana. This article offers a historical and sociological point perspective cundiboyacense migrational process in Colombian Central mountains and explains the historical evolution, the phases of migration, and its socio-cultural processes. It identifies the determinants of the phenomenon, and explains the profile of its contact and the consequent adaptation and integration with people of Antioquia ancestry in the zone of settlement. The selected Andean area -the municipalities of Libano and Murillo in the state of Tolima, the high mountain of Letras and Manizales in the state of Caldas- allows a study of the historical role of the interregional migration from the point of view of its demographic, cultural and economic contribution to the confluence of different regional and ethnics elements since the middle nineteenth century. The study points the importance of local factors -lack of land, labour disposition and violence the external factors -land and wage offers and personal motivations -personal contacts and life's style. And it points too the importance of elements that interacted during the different phases of migration and historic circumtances related with free uncultivated land distribution and the expansion of the coffee culture in the Colombian Central mountain.

  20. Pre-Andean peraluminous and metaluminous leucogranitoid suites in the High Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parada, Miguel A.

    Two distinct pre-Andean leucogranitoid suites are recognized in the High Andes of Central Chile (30°31'S): the Hacienda Vieja and Monte Grande Suites (HVS and MGS). Both represent the transition from upper Paleozoic orogenic magmatism to Andean orogenic igneous activity (post-Triassic). The HVS comprises medium-grained peraluminous leucogranites and leucogranodiorites, whereas the MGS includes medium- to fine-grained and porphyritic leucogranites of metaluminous character. The mineralogy of the HVS leucogranitoids consists mainly of plagioclase, quartz, interstitial microcline, biotite ± muscovite ± cordierite, and small andalusite-bearing inclusions. The MGS leucogranites are characterized by large amounts of quartz, plagioclase, and perthitic K-feldspar, and minor Fe-hornblende, Fe-hedenbergite, and biotite. The two suites have a small range of composition caused mainly by intrasuite plagioclase-dominated fractionation. Calculations based on compositions of feldspar, muscovite, biotite, and FeTi oxides indicate that the HVS plutons crystallized at higher total pressure (˜3.0 Kb), lower temperature (˜670°) and higher oxygen fugacities than those of the MGS (P,˜1 Kb; T,˜750°C). Although fractionation of a mantle-derived magma is not ruled out in the origin of the MGS, the two suites may be the products of partial fusion at different crustal depths, and hence H 2O contents of semipelitic protolith in the case of the HVS, and Ca-poor quartzo-feldspathic ( s.l.) rocks in the case of the MGS. Crustal melting was probably induced by a long-lived thermal perturbation caused by voluminous upper Paleozoic mantle-derived magma injection and decompression of the crust linked to an extensional tectonic regime.

  1. Calculo Preliminar de la Tasa de Meteorización del Batolito Antioqueño, Cordillera Central, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Garcia

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo es una estimación preliminar del tiempo necesario para generar la espesa capa de saprolito que caracteriza el perfil de meteorización actual de un batolito cuarzodiorítico cretácico que aflora en altiplanos de la Cordillera Central de Colombia, entre 5º50' y 7º00' de latitud Norte y 74º50' y 75º35' de longitud Oeste y a alturas entre 750 y 2700 m.Se utilizan datos obtenidos previamente mediante el análisis de la composición química de las aguas superficiales de cuatro cuencas con áreas diferentes, ubicadas sobre el Batolito Antioqueño, al este de Medellín. Los cáculos se hicieron con el método basado en la pérdida de componentes en solución utilizando diferentes valores de solutos. Al utilizar la pérdida de sílice se obtiene un tiempo de meteorización de unos 6 x 10 6 años, comparable con el obtenido mediante la datación de las cenizas volcánicas mas antiguas que recubren la topografía actual y que indican la fecha mínima de configuración de la superficie de erosión.A pesar de resultar de una serie de suposiciones simplificadoras, este resultado es interesante y justifica la realización de determinaciones mas detalladas. Confirma la larga preservación de superficies de erosión antiguas conformadas sobre un saprolito que desde hace varios millones de años no ha sido sometido a una erosión profunda, fenómeno poco común en una zona tectónicamente activa como la estudiada.

  2. Recognizing Andean Uplift and the Growth of Continuous Topographic Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, B. K.

    2014-12-01

    Although long debated, the timing of Andean uplift and establishment of a continuous topographic barrier along western South America remains critical to biogeographic assessments of the influence of mountain uplift and erosion on Neotropical biodiversity. Recent methodological advances allow independent geologic estimates of barrier uplift and river drainage shifts that can be compared with molecular-clock calculations of genetic divergence times for various Andean and Amazonian populations. Emerging results from U-Pb geochronology and stable-isotope paleoaltimetry suggest a nearly continuous western barrier since the late Eocene-Oligocene and a complex yet decipherable Miocene-Quaternary history of eastward advancing Andean deformation, upper-crustal erosion, and foreland-directed fluvial transport. In the central Andes, U-Pb ages for detrital zircon minerals from multiple sedimentary basins suggest continuous contributions of Cenozoic-age volcanic detritus from the Western Cordillera since late Eocene-Oligocene time. Hydrogen stable isotopic signatures from volcanic glasses further suggest that the long-lived Western Cordillera magmatic arc attained modern elevations by 19-16 Ma in southern Peru. In the northern Andes, major shifts in detrital age signatures, sandstone compositions, and sediment dispersal for hinterland basins of southern Colombia and Ecuador record punctuated 12-6 Ma uplift of the Eastern Cordillera fold-thrust belt. This eastward advance of deformation helped establish the modern Amazon, Magdalena, and Orinoco river drainage systems, terminating any significant west-directed sediment transport and likely explaining late Miocene vicariance events among taxa of the northern Andes, western forearc slope, and Amazonian foreland basin.

  3. Petrology of the Miocene igneous rocks in the Altar region, main Cordillera of San Juan, Argentina. A geodynamic model within the context of the Andean flat-slab segment and metallogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydagán, Laura; Franchini, Marta; Chiaradia, Massimo; Pons, Josefina; Impiccini, Agnes; Toohey, Jeff; Rey, Roger

    2011-07-01

    The Altar porphyry Cu-(Au-Mo) deposit (31° 29' S, 70° 28' W) is located in the Andean Main Cordillera of San Juan Province (Argentina), in the southern portion of the flat-slab segment (28-33°S), 25 km north of the world-class porphyry Cu-Mo deposits of Los Pelambres and El Pachón. Igneous rocks in the area have been grouped into the Early Miocene Lower Volcanic Complex -composed of intercalations of lava flows and thin volcaniclastic units that grade upwards to a thick massive tuff- and the Middle-Late Miocene Upper Subvolcanic Suite that consists of a series of porphyritic stocks and dikes and magmatic and hydrothermal breccias. The Lower Volcanic Complex represents an Early Miocene arc (20.8 Ma ± 0.3 Ma; U-Pb age) erupted over a steep subduction zone. Their magmas equilibrated with an assemblage consisting of plagioclase- and pyroxene-dominated mineral residues, and experienced fractional crystallization and crustal contamination procesess. Their radiogenic signatures are interpreted to indicate conditions of relatively thickened continental crust in Altar during the Early Miocene, compared to the south and west. The Upper Subvolcanic Suite represents the development of a Middle-Late Miocene arc (11.75 ± 0.24 Ma, 10.35 ± 0.32 Ma; U-Pb ages) emplaced over a shallow subduction zone. A magmatic gap in Altar area betwen the Lower Volcanic Complex and Upper Subvolcanic Suite correlates with documented higher rates of compression in this period, that may have favored the storage of the USS magmas in cameras within the crust. Magmas of the Upper Subvolcanic Suite require a hornblende-bearing residual mineral assemblage that is interpreted to reflect their higher water contents. The relatively uniform radiogenic isotope compositions of the Upper Subvolcanic Suite magmas suggest a homogeneously mixed crust-mantle contribution in the source region. They have similar REE signatures as other fertile intrusives of the flat-slab. The differences observed in their

  4. Caracterización de superficies de erosión mediante geomorfología cuantitativa, Altiplano Antioqueño, Cordillera Central de Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Xavier Bustos; Mauricio A. Bermúdez; Gloria M. Toro; Matthias Bernet; Otilio Rojas; María I. Marín

    2013-01-01

    En el presente trabajo se caracterizan treinta y cinco superficies de erosión (SE) en la Cordillera Central de Colombia mediante geomorfología cuantitativa y análisis digital de terreno. Utilizando modelos digitales de elevación (MDE) se derivaron las curvas hipsométricas para dichas superficies, y se comparan los resultados desde dos ópticas. Primero, mediante técnicas geoestadísticas utilizando subrutinas elaboradas bajo R, en combinación con el Lenguaje de Consulta Estruct...

  5. Steady-state exhumation pattern in the central Andes SE Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz, G.M.H.; Carlotto, V.; van Heiningen, P.S.; Andriessen, P.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Western Cordillera of SE Peru is part of the Central Andes and is situated to the west of the Eastern Andes from which it is separated by the northern termination of the Altiplano - the Inter-Andean Valley. It is a volcanic-volcano-detrital chain that developed in the Palaeogene, and is

  6. Unraveling an antique subduction process from metamorphic basement around Medellín city, Central Cordillera of Colombian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Andres; Juliani, Caetano

    2011-10-01

    varies between 400 and 555 °C at pressures of 5-6 kbar in the retrograde metamorphic path. The El Retiro rocks evidence strong decompression with narrow variation in temperature, showing pressure values between 8.7 and 2.7 kbar at temperatures of 740-633 °C. These metamorphic fragments of the basement in the Central Cordillera of the Colombian Andes could represent a close relationship with an antique subduction zone.

  7. High-Up: A Remote Reservoir of Microbial Extremophiles in Central Andean Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracín, Virginia H; Kurth, Daniel; Ordoñez, Omar F; Belfiore, Carolina; Luccini, Eduardo; Salum, Graciela M; Piacentini, Ruben D; Farías, María E

    2015-01-01

    The Central Andes region displays unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes and salt flats at mean altitudes of 3700 m. Being isolated and hostile, these so-called "High-Altitude Andean Lakes" (HAAL) are pristine and have been exposed to little human influence. HAAL proved to be a rich source of microbes showing interesting adaptations to life in extreme settings (poly-extremophiles) such as alkalinity, high concentrations of arsenic and dissolved salts, intense dryness, large daily ambient thermal amplitude, and extreme solar radiation levels. This work reviews HAAL microbiodiversity, taking into account different microbial niches, such as plankton, benthos, microbial mats and microbialites. The modern stromatolites and other microbialites discovered recently at HAAL are highlighted, as they provide unique modern-though quite imperfect-analogs of environments proxy for an earlier time in Earth's history (volcanic setting and profuse hydrothermal activity, low atmospheric O2 pressure, thin ozone layer and high UV exposure). Likewise, we stress the importance of HAAL microbes as model poly-extremophiles in the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying their resistance ability against UV and toxic or deleterious chemicals using genome mining and functional genomics. In future research directions, it will be necessary to exploit the full potential of HAAL poly-extremophiles in terms of their biotechnological applications. Current projects heading this way have yielded detailed molecular information and functional proof on novel extremoenzymes: i.e., DNA repair enzymes and arsenic efflux pumps for which medical and bioremediation applications, respectively, are envisaged. But still, much effort is required to unravel novel functions for this and other molecules that dwell in a unique biological treasure despite its being hidden high up, in the remote Andes.

  8. High-up: a remote reservoir of microbial extremophiles at Central Andean Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Helena Albarracín

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Central Andes region displays unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes and salt flats at mean altitudes of 3,700 m. Being isolated and hostile, these so-called High-Altitude Andean Lakes (HAAL are pristine and have been exposed to little human influence. HAAL proved to be a rich source of microbes showing interesting adaptations to life in extreme settings (poly-extremophiles such as alkalinity, high concentrations of arsenic and dissolved salts, intense dryness, large daily ambient thermal amplitude, and extreme solar radiation levels. This work reviews HAAL microbiodiversity, taking into account different microbial niches, such as plankton, benthos, microbial mats and microbialites. The modern stromatolites and other microbialites discovered recently at HAAL are highlighted, as they provide unique modern -though quite imperfect- analogues of environments proxy for an earlier time in Earth’s history (volcanic setting and profuse hydrothermal activity, low atmospheric O2 pressure, thin ozone layer and high UV exposure. Likewise, we stress the importance of HAAL microbes as model poly-extremophiles in the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying their resistance ability against UV and toxic or deleterious chemicals using genome mining and functional genomics. In future research directions, it will be necessary to exploit the full potential of HAAL poly-extremophiles in terms of their biotechnological applications. Current projects heading this way have yielded detailed molecular information and functional proof on novel extremoenzymes: i.e. DNA repair enzymes and arsenic efflux pumps for which medical and bioremediation applications, respectively, are envisaged. But still, much effort is required to unravel novel functions for this and other molecules that dwell in a unique biological treasure despite its being hidden high up, in the remote Andes.

  9. Imaging the Seismic Cycle in the Central Andean Subduction Zone from Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Culaciati, F.; Becerra-Carreño, V. C.; Socquet, A.; Jara, J.; Carrizo, D.; Norabuena, E. O.; Simons, M.; Vigny, C.; Bataille, K. D.; Moreno, M.; Baez, J. C.; Comte, D.; Contreras-Reyes, E.; Delorme, A.; Genrich, J. F.; Klein, E.; Ortega, I.; Valderas, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    We aim to quantify spatial and temporal evolution of fault slip behavior during all stages of the seismic cycle in subduction megathrusts, with the eventual goal of improving our understanding of the mechanical behavior of the subduction system and its implications for earthquake and tsunami hazards. In this work, we analyze the portion of the Nazca-SouthAmerican plates subduction zone affected by the 1868 southern Peru and 1877 northern Chile mega-earthquakes. The 1868 and 1878 events defined a seismic gap that did not experience a large earthquake for over 124 years. Only recently, the 1995 Mw 8.1 Antofagasta, 2001 Mw 8.4 Arequipa, 2007 Mw 7.7 Tocopilla, and 2014 Mw 8.2 Pisagua earthquakes released only a small fraction of the potential slip budget, thereby raising concerns about continued seismic and tsunami hazard. We use over a decade of observations from continuous and campaign GPS networks to analyze inter-seismic strain accumulation, as well as co-seimic deformation associated to the more recent earthquakes in the in the Central Andean region. We obtain inferences of slip (and back-slip) behavior using a consistent and robust inversion framework that accounts for the spatial variability of the constraint provided by the observations on slip across the subduction megathrust. We present an updated inter-seismic coupling model and estimates of pre-, co- and post- seismic slip behavior associated with the most recent 2014 Mw 8.2 Pisagua earthquake. We analyze our results, along with published information on the recent and historical large earthquakes, to characterize the regions of the megathrust that tend to behave aseismically, and those that are capable to accumulate a slip budget (ultimately leading to the generation of large earthquakes), to what extent such regions may overlap, and discuss the potential for large earthquakes in the region.

  10. Efecto de la zona de vida y la altitud en la mortalidad y adaptabilidad al primer ano de especies forest ales en la cordillera volcanica central, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yorleny Badilla

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta los resultados de la mortalidad y adaptabilidad a los 6 y 12 meses de edad, de las especies forestales cipres (Cupressus lusitanica, eucalipto de altura (Eucalyptus globulus, pino patula (Pinus patula, pino radiata (Pinus radia- fa, roble encino (Quercus coopeyensis,jaul (Al- nus acuminata, cedro dulce (Cedrela tonduzii y tirra (Ulmus mexicana. De cada especie fueron plantadas 4 repeticiones dentro de cada una de las 3 zonas de vida de mayor representatividade la Cordillera Volcanica Central de Costa Rica, predesde los 1000 a los 2000 m de altitud. Se regis- tro una tendencia de mayor mortalidad conforme aumento la pluviosidad. Las 3 especies confferas mostraron desde los 6 meses la menor mortalidad «15% y mayor estabilidad en todas las zonas de pluvida; presentaron un alto potencial de reforesta- cion en toda la Cordillera Volcanica Central. Las especies cella dulce, tirra y jaul conformaron un grupo de especies con una mortalidad elevada, que se estabiliz6 hasta el ano de plantadas. Las especies eucalipto de altura y fable conformaron el grupo de mayor mortalidad (>50% y de adap- tabilidad mas lenta. Sin embargo, el eucalipto de altura mostro un buen crecimiento en sitios plu- viales. Un mayor cuidado de la calidad del mate- adaptrial de reforestaci6n y el empleo de tecnicas de plantaci6n como los camellones, la aporca y el drenaje, son esenciales para poder reforestar en nurszonas de altura con una elevada pluviosidad.

  11. Tectonic Constraints on the Evolution of Geothermal Systems in the Central Andean Volcanic Zone (CAVZ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, E. E.; Tardani, D.; Aron, F.; Elizalde, J. D.; Sanchez-Alfaro, P.; Godoy, B.

    2017-12-01

    South of 19°S, geothermal fields and Pliocene-to-Holocene volcanic centers of the Central Andean Volcanic Zone are spatially associated with distinct, large-scale fault systems disrupting the volcanic arc, which control the architecture and dynamics of the fluids reservoirs at shallow crustal levels. Based on an extensive compilation of structural, lithological and isotopic data, and satellite imagery band-ratio analyses, we produced detailed maps of 13 areas comprising 19 identified and/or potential geothermal fields, to examine if particular local-scale tectonic configurations are associated to fluids migrating from different crustal levels. We defined three main tectonic environments according to the specific, kilometer-scale structural arrangement and its spatial relation to the geothermal surface manifestations. T1, dominated by left-lateral, pure strike-slip motion on a NW-trending duplex-like geometry with geothermal fields located along the faults - in turn distributed into five major subparallel zones cutting across the orogenic belt between ca. 20° and 27°S. T2, dominated by shortening on a series of N-trending thrust faults and fault-propagated folds, cut and displaced by the above mentioned NW-trending faults, with geothermal fields hosted at fault intersections and at fold hinges. And T3, characterized by transtension accommodated by NW-to-WNW-trending left-lateral/normal faults, with hot-springs lying along the fault traces. Interestingly, each of the independently defined tectonic environments has distinctive helium (in fluids) and strontium (in lavas) isotopic signatures and estimated geothermal reservoir temperatures. T1 shows a large 4He contribution, low 87Sr/86Sr ratio and temperatures varying between ca. 220°-310°C; T3 low 4He and high 87Sr/86Sr ratio and temperature (260°-320°C); T2 isotopic values fall between T1 and T3, yet showing the lowest (130°-250°C) temperatures. We suggest that these particular isotopic signatures are due to

  12. Efecto del secado de las muestras sobre la extracción selectiva de Fe y A1 activos en Andisoles del norte de la cordillera central Colombiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaramillo J. Daniel F.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Muestras secadas al aire y sin secar de cinco perfiles de Andisoles del norte de la cordillera central colombiana fueron sometidas a extracción con oxalato ácido de amonio y con pirofosfato de sodio. En los extractos de oxalato se determinaron A1, Fe y Si y en los de pirofosfato A1 y Fe. El secado de las muestras redujo significativamente al 95% la cantidad de A1 y de Fe extraída con oxalato ácido, dificultando la clasificación de los suelos en el orden Andisol utilizando los parámetros de la taxonomía del USDA.

  13. Precipitation history of the central Atacama Desert since the Miocene as reconstructed from clay pan records of the Costal Cordillera/ N Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennrich, V.; Melles, M.; Diederich, J. L.; Fernández Galego, E.; Ritter, B.; Brill, D.; Niemann, K.; Rolf, C.; Dunai, T. J.

    2017-12-01

    Hyperaridity is a major limitation of Earth-surface processes and biological activity in the Atacama Desert of N Chile, one of the oldest and the driest deserts on Earth. But even the hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert of N Chile has experienced sever precipitation events, e.g., during the flash floods in 2015. On geological timescales, the overall aridity that is postulated to have lasted at least since the early Miocene was punctuated by distinct pluvial events. Such wetter conditions, e.g. during the Miocene, caused widespread lake-formation in the Central Depression and Coastal Cordillera, but also caused amplified surface processes, changes in vegetation dynamics, and enabled the dispersal of species. Unfortunately, due to the limited number and heterogeneous appearance of climate archives from the central Atacama, it's longer-scale precipitation history is still a matter of controversy. This study aims to study continuous longterm (Pleistocene-Miocene) paleoclimatic and environmental records from the hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert covering the last >10 Ma. Therefor we investigate clay pans records from endorheic basins in the Coastal Cordillera mostly formed by blocking of drainage by tectonic movement. The clay pans under study are located along a latitudinal transect across the hyperarid core of the Atacama, and thus, are assumed to have recorded local and regional precipitation variations on different timescales. The investigated sequences exhibit significant changes in the sedimentological, geochemical, and mineralogical properties due to changes in precipitation, but also in the weathering and erosion in the catchments. Diatom and phytolith remains preserved in these records clearly point to significant water bodies during the wettest periods and a significant vegetation cover. The results shed a new light on the timing, frequency, and the driving mechanisms of the intervening pluvial phases.

  14. Depositación atmosférica de nitrógeno en un transecto valle longitudinal-cordillera de Los Andes, centro-sur de Chile Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen in a transect from the Central Valley to Cordillera de Los Andes, south-central Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS E. OYARZÚN

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available El aumento de las actividades agrícolas y ganaderas en el centro-sur de Chile puede producir elevadas emisiones de nitrógeno hacia la atmósfera (mayormente NH3. El amoniaco es transportado por corrientes de aire y depositado en el suelo y vegetación. El presente estudio evalúa la depositación atmosférica de compuestos nitrogenados (NO3- y NH4+ en la química de las precipitaciones en un transecto altitudinal de 66 km, desde los alrededores de la ciudad de Osorno (40º 35' S, 72º 57' O, 55 m de altitud hasta la cordillera de Los Andes, Parque Nacional Puyehue (40º 46' S, 72º 11' O, 1.120 m de altitud. En siete sitios, durante el período anual junio-1999 hasta mayo-2000, se registró la precipitación y mensualmente se colectaron muestras de agua para determinar: pH, conductividad y las concentraciones de NO3- y NH4+. La precipitación anual se incrementó desde 1.103 mm en la zona de Osorno hasta 6.799 mm en el sector Antillanca, Parque Nacional Puyehue. Los valores promedio anual del pH registraron escasa variación desde 6,3 en el valle central hasta 5,8 en la cordillera de Los Andes. La conductividad presentó los máximos valores en la proximidad de Osorno (22,9 myS cm-1 para descender a través del transecto en zonas intermedias y alcanzar en la Cordillera de los Andes un valor de 11,3 myS cm-1. Las concentraciones promedio de NO3-Nen la lluvia fluctuaron entre 52,3 myg L-1 en la zona agrícola-ganadera y 6,9 myg L-1 en los bosques del Parque Nacional Puyehue. Las concentraciones de NH4-N variaron entre 699,4 myg L-1 en el sector de Osorno y 37,8 myL-1 en la cordillera de Los Andes. Los valores de N-inorgánico poseen una marcada tendencia estacional en el sector agrícola, con valores máximos en primavera-verano y los mínimos en invierno. Las tasas anuales de depositación atmosférica de NO3-N fluctuaron entre 0,53 y 0,57 kg ha-1 año-1 y las de NH4-N fueron entre 6,4 y 2,8 kg ha-1 año-1 para los sitios agrícola-ganaderos de

  15. Using multi-temporal Sentinal-2 imagery for mapping Andean meadows and surface soil moisture in central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Rocio; Fassnacht, Fabian E.; Lopatin, Javier; Hernández, H. Jaime

    2017-04-01

    In the Rio Maipo watershed, situated in central Chile, mining activities are the main factor impacting Andean meadows, through the consumption and exploitation of water and land. As wetlands are vulnerable and particularly susceptible to changes of water supply, alterations and modifications in the hydrological regime have direct effects on vegetation cover. In order to better understand this ecosystem, as well as for conservation planning and resource management, there is a strong need for spatially explicit and update wetland ecosystem assessment. However, there is a lack of baseline dataset and state of knowledge on these habitats. During the last decades remote sensing as evolve as an efficient tool for mapping and monitoring wetland ecosystems at different temporal and spatial scales. Accurate and up-to-date mapping and assessment of wetlands allows monitoring the changes in wetlands' vegetation due to natural and/or anthropogenic disturbances. New freely available spaceborne imagery, like Sentinel-2, supports long term monitoring on a high spatial resolution (10 m). The main aim of this work was to evaluate the potential of multi-temporal Sentinel-2 images in the detection and monitoring of water status of Andean meadows with anthropic disturbances. For these tasks we used bias support vector machines (BSVM), a one-class classifier to map and monitor meadow areas, and the support vector machines regression (SVMR) to estimate surface soil moisture (i.e. top 30 cm). BSVM produces probability maps of the class of interest, were only data of this class is needed as input of the model. One-class classifiers are well suited for situations where the numbers of the training samples from the class of interest is small and/or cover a small fraction of the area to be classified. We found that BSVM was capable to classify the meadow areas with an overall accuracy between 65% and 96%. Meanwhile, surface soil moisture prediction using SVMR reached r2 values between 0.2 and

  16. The subduction erosion and mantle source region contamination model of Andean arc magmatism: Isotopic evidence from igneous rocks of central Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, Charles R

    2001-01-01

    Continental crust may be incorporated in mantle-derived Andean magmas as these magmas rise through the crust (Hildreth and Moorbath, 1988), or alternatively, crust may be tectonically transported into the mantle by subduction of trench sediments and subduction erosion of the continental margin, and then added into the mantle source region of Andean magmas (Stern, 1991). Since the mantle has relatively low Sr, Nd, and Pb concentrations compared to continental crust, differences in the isotopic compositions of magmas erupted in different region of the Andes may be produced by relatively small differences in the amount of subducted crust added to the mantle source region of these magmas. By comparison, significantly larger amounts of crust must be assimilated by mantle-derived magmas to produce isotopic differences of similar magnitude. Therefore, constraining the process by which continental crust is incorporated in Andean magmas has important implications for understanding the chemical cycling that takes place in the Andean subduction-related magma factory. Isotopic data suggest the incorporation of a greater proportion of crust in Andean magmas erupted at the northern portion of the Southern Volcanic Zone of central Chile compared to those erupted in the southern portion of the Southern Volcanic Zone of south central Chile (SSVZ) (Stern et al., 1984; Futa and Stern, 1988; Hildreth and Moorbath, 1988). The NSVZ occurs just south of the current locus of the subduction of the Juan Fernandez Ridge. The southward migration of the locus of subduction of this ridge has resulted in decreasing subduction angle below the NSVZ, the eastward migration of the volcanic front of the Andean arc, and an increase in the crustal thickness below the arc. These factors together have caused changes, since the middle Miocene, in the isotopic composition of Andean igneous rocks of central Chile. The data indicate a close chronologic relation between the southward migrations of the locus

  17. Slab flattening, dynamic topography and normal faulting in the Cordillera Blanca region (northern Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margirier, A.; Robert, X.; Laurence, A.; Gautheron, C.; Bernet, M.; Simon-Labric, T.; Hall, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Processes driving surface uplift in the Andes are still debated and the role of subduction processes as slab flattening on surface uplift and relief building in the Andes is not well understood. Some of the highest Andean summits, the Cordillera Blanca (6768 m) and the Cordillera Negra (5187 m), are located above a present flat subduction zone (3-15°S), in northern Peru. In this area, both the geometry and timing of the flattening of the slab are well constrained (Gutscher et al., 1999; Rosenbaum et al., 2005). This region is thus a perfect target to explore the effect of slab flattening on the Andean topography and uplift. We obtained new apatite (U-Th)/He and fission-track ages from three vertical profiles located in the Cordillera Blanca and the Cordillera Negra. Time-temperature paths obtained from inverse modeling of the thermochronological data indicates a Middle Miocene cooling for both Cordillera Negra profiles. We interpret it as regional exhumation in the Cordillera Occidental starting in Middle Miocene, synchronous with the onset of the subduction of the Nazca ridge (Rosenbaum et al., 2005). We propose that the Nazca ridge subduction at 15 Ma and onset of slab flattening in northern Peru drove regional positive dynamic topography and thus enhanced exhumation in the Cordillera Occidental. This study provides new evidence of the impact subduction processes and associated dynamic topography on paleogeography and surface uplift in the Andes.

  18. Validation of digital elevation models (DEMs) and comparison of geomorphic metrics on the southern Central Andean Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purinton, Benjamin; Bookhagen, Bodo

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we validate and compare elevation accuracy and geomorphic metrics of satellite-derived digital elevation models (DEMs) on the southern Central Andean Plateau. The plateau has an average elevation of 3.7 km and is characterized by diverse topography and relief, lack of vegetation, and clear skies that create ideal conditions for remote sensing. At 30 m resolution, SRTM-C, ASTER GDEM2, stacked ASTER L1A stereopair DEM, ALOS World 3D, and TanDEM-X have been analyzed. The higher-resolution datasets include 12 m TanDEM-X, 10 m single-CoSSC TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X DEMs, and 5 m ALOS World 3D. These DEMs are state of the art for optical (ASTER and ALOS) and radar (SRTM-C and TanDEM-X) spaceborne sensors. We assessed vertical accuracy by comparing standard deviations of the DEM elevation versus 307 509 differential GPS measurements across 4000 m of elevation. For the 30 m DEMs, the ASTER datasets had the highest vertical standard deviation at > 6.5 m, whereas the SRTM-C, ALOS World 3D, and TanDEM-X were all radar DEMs (e.g., TanDEM-X) for geomorphometry are promising, but airborne or terrestrial data are still necessary for meter-scale analysis.

  19. Las bioconstrucciones de corales y sus facies asociadas durante el Malm en la Cordillera Ibérica Central (provincia de Zaragoza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meléndez, A.

    1987-08-01

    Full Text Available The differents types of bioconstructions and associated facies in the Central Iberian Chain (Higueruelas Formation, Upper Kimmeridgian have been studied. Biohermes of different thickness (decimetric to metric and less lateral continuity are developped, highly colonized by corals, that are associated to oncolitic, bioclastic and oolitic of high energy facies, in marginal areas, near the litoral developpment. At the same time takes place an important set up of mud mounds, with a small coral colonisation, in protected arcas in a inner shelf, or in outer areas, where the action of the waves is not so effective. The environment protection is been generated in some places due to the appearance of oolitic barrier islands.Se estudian los diferentes tipos de bioconstrucciones de corales, y sus facies asociadas, presentes en el sector central de la rama aragonesa de la Cordillera Ibérica, en la Formación Higueruelas (Kimmeridgiense superior. Se desarrollan biohermos de potencias métricas a decimétricas y escasa continuidad lateral, intensamente colonizados por corales coloniales, que se encuentran asociados a facies oncolíticas, bioclásticas y oolíticas de alta energía en zonas marginales, próximas al desarrollo litoral. Al mismo tiempo tiene lugar una importante instalación de mud mounds, con escasa colonización de corales, en zonas protegidas dentro de la plataforma interna o en zonas más externas, donde la acción del oleaje no es efectiva. La protección del medio viene condicionada en algunos puntos por la aparición de islas barrera oolíticas.

  20. Landsat TM and ETM+ derived snowline altitudes in the Cordillera Huayhuash and Cordillera Raura, Peru, 1986–2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ramage

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The Cordilleras Huayhuash and Raura are remote glacierized ranges in the Andes Mountains of Peru. A robust assessment of modern glacier change is important for understanding how regional change affects Andean communities, and for placing paleo-glaciers in a context relative to modern glaciation and climate. Snowline altitudes (SLAs derived from satellite imagery are used as a proxy for modern (1986–2005 local climate change in a key transition zone in the Andes. Clear sky, dry season Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM and Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+ satellite images from 1986–2005 were used to identify snowline positions, and their altitude ranges were extracted from an Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER digital elevation model (DEM. Based on satellite records from 31 glaciers, average snowline altitudes (SLAs, an approximation for the equilibrium line altitude (ELA, for the Cordillera Huayhuash (13 glaciers and Cordillera Raura (18 glaciers from 1986–2005 were 5051 m a.s.l. from 1986–2005 and 5006 m a.s.l. from 1986–2002, respectively. During the same time period, the Cordillera Huayhuash SLA experienced no significant change while the Cordillera Raura SLA rose significantly from 4947 m a.s.l. to 5044 m a.s.l.

  1. Rocas volcanoclasticas submarinas de edad Burdigaliense inferior en el sector del Mencal (Zona Subbetica, Cordillera Bética central. Contexto sedimentario y tectónico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soria, J. M.

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discuss the petrologic features of volcaniclastic rocks and its geodynamic implications. This rocks are included in the pelagic marine sediments of lower Burdigalian from the Río Fardes region (Subbetic Zone, Betic Cordillera. There are two different kinds of volcaniclastic rocks: vitric and feldspathic sandstones, and vitric siltstones, both of them from fragmental volcanic emissions of a calc-alkaline rhyodacitic magma. In these rocks there are planktonic Foraminifera that indicate volcanism occurring in a submarine environment. The emission focus is placed close to the present-day location of these rocks, due to low dispersion of the pyroclastic fragments into the pelagic marine deposits. During lower Burdigalian several N70ºE strike-slip faults was working simultanously with the pelagic marine sedimentation. In this paper it is assumed that these faults are connected with the volcanic activity. During the lower Miocene the orogenic deformation of the Sudiberian PaJeomargin (External Betic Zones are related to fracturarion and volcanism, in coincidence with a major tectonic event, best known as Burdigalian Paroxysm (Hermes, 1985.El presente trabajo se centra en la caracterización petrológica y significado geodinámico de las rocas volcanoclásticas que aparecen en los materiales marinos pelágicos del Burdigaliense inferior que afloran en el sector del Mencal (Zona Subbética del tercio central de la Cordillera Bética. Se diferencian dos tipos de rocas volcanoclásticas: areniscas vítricas y feldespáticas y limolitas vítricas, ambas procedentes de emisiones volcánicas fragmentales de un magma calcoalcalino-riodacítico. En los dos tipos se encuentran foraminíferos planctónicos, hecho que indica que el volcanismo se produjo en condiciones submarinas. La escasa dispersión de los piroclastos dentro de los depósitos marinos pelágicos permite deducir que el foco de emisión volcánica se localizó muy próximo al lugar

  2. Large along-strike variations in the onset of Subandean exhumation: Implications for Central Andean orogenic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lease, Richard O.; Ehlers, T.A.; Enkelmann, E.

    2016-01-01

    Plate tectonics drives mountain building in general, but the space-time pattern and style of deformation is influenced by how climate, geodynamics, and basement structure modify the orogenic wedge. Growth of the Subandean thrust belt, which lies at the boundary between the arid, high-elevation Central Andean Plateau and its humid, low-elevation eastern foreland, figures prominently into debates of orogenic wedge evolution. We integrate new apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometer data with previously published apatite fission-track data from samples collected along four Subandean structural cross-sections in Bolivia between 15° and 20°S. We interpret cooling ages vs. structural depth to indicate the onset of Subandean exhumation and signify the forward propagation of deformation. We find that Subandean growth is diachronous south (11 ± 3 Ma) vs. north (6 ± 2 Ma) of the Bolivian orocline and that Subandean exhumation magnitudes vary by more than a factor of two. Similar north-south contrasts are present in foreland deposition, hinterland erosion, and paleoclimate; these observations both corroborate diachronous orogenic growth and illuminate potential propagation mechanisms. Of particular interest is an abrupt shift to cooler, more arid conditions in the Altiplano hinterland that is diachronous in southern Bolivia (16-13 Ma) vs. northern Bolivia (10-7 Ma) and precedes the timing of Subandean propagation in each region. Others have interpreted the paleoclimate shift to reflect either rapid surface uplift due to lithosphere removal or an abrupt change in climate dynamics once orographic threshold elevations were exceeded. These mechanisms are not mutually exclusive and both would drive forward propagation of the orogenic wedge by augmenting the hinterland backstop, either through surface uplift or spatially variable erosion. In summary, we suggest that diachronous Subandean exhumation was driven by piecemeal hinterland uplift, orography, and the outward

  3. Stable water isotope variation in a Central Andean watershed dominated by glacier and snowmelt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ohlanders

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Central Chile is an economically important region for which water supply is dependent on snow- and ice melt. Nevertheless, the relative contribution of water supplied by each of those two sources remains largely unknown. This study represents the first attempt to estimate the region's water balance using stable isotopes of water in streamflow and its sources. Isotopic ratios of both H and O were monitored during one year in a high-altitude basin with a moderate glacier cover (11.5%. We found that the steep altitude gradient of the studied catchment caused a corresponding gradient in snowpack isotopic composition and that this spatial variation had a profound effect on the temporal evolution of streamflow isotopic composition during snowmelt. Glacier melt and snowmelt contributions to streamflow in the studied basin were determined using a quantitative analysis of the isotopic composition of streamflow and its sources, resulting in a glacier melt contribution of 50–90% for the unusually dry melt year of 2011/2012. This suggests that in (La Niña years with little precipitation, glacier melt is an important water source for central Chile. Predicted decreases in glacier melt due to global warming may therefore have a negative long-term impact on water availability in the Central Andes. The pronounced seasonal pattern in streamflow isotope composition and its close relation to the variability in snow cover and discharge presents a potentially powerful tool to relate discharge variability in mountainous, melt-dominated catchments with related factors such as contributions of sources to streamflow and snowmelt transit times.

  4. Andean waterways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mattias Borg

    Andean Waterways explores the politics of natural resource use in the Peruvian Andes in the context of climate change and neoliberal expansion. It does so through careful ethnographic analysis of the constitution of waterways, illustrating how water becomes entangled in a variety of political...

  5. Andean waterways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mattias Borg

    Andean Waterways explores the politics of natural resource use in the Peruvian Andes in the context of climate change and neoliberal expansion. It does so through careful ethnographic analysis of the constitution of waterways, illustrating how water becomes entangled in a variety of political, so...

  6. Remote sensing analysis for fault-zones detection in the Central Andean Plateau (Catamarca, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traforti, Anna; Massironi, Matteo; Zampieri, Dario; Carli, Cristian

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing techniques have been extensively used to detect the structural framework of investigated areas, which includes lineaments, fault zones and fracture patterns. The identification of these features is fundamental in exploration geology, as it allows the definition of suitable sites for the exploitation of different resources (e.g. ore mineral, hydrocarbon, geothermal energy and groundwater). Remote sensing techniques, typically adopted in fault identification, have been applied to assess the geological and structural framework of the Laguna Blanca area (26°35'S-66°49'W). This area represents a sector of the south-central Andes localized in the Argentina region of Catamarca, along the south-eastern margin of the Puna plateau. The study area is characterized by a Precambrian low-grade metamorphic basement intruded by Ordovician granitoids. These rocks are unconformably covered by a volcano-sedimentary sequence of Miocene age, followed by volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of Upper Miocene to Plio-Pleistocene age. All these units are cut by two systems of major faults, locally characterized by 15-20 m wide damage zones. The detection of main tectonic lineaments in the study area was firstly carried out by classical procedures: image sharpening of Landsat 7 ETM+ images, directional filters applied to ASTER images, medium resolution Digital Elevation Models analysis (SRTM and ASTER GDEM) and hill shades interpretation. In addition, a new approach in fault zone identification, based on multispectral satellite images classification, has been tested in the Laguna Blanca area and in other sectors of south-central Andes. In this perspective, several prominent fault zones affecting basement and granitoid rocks have been sampled. The collected fault gouge samples have been analyzed with a Field-Pro spectrophotometer mounted on a goniometer. We acquired bidirectional reflectance spectra, from 0.35μm to 2.5μm with 1nm spectral sampling, of the sampled fault rocks

  7. El neopaleozoico de la Sierra de Castaño (Cordillera Frontal andina, San Juan, Argentina: Reconstrucción tectónica y paleoambiental The neopaleozoic of the Sierra de Castaño (Andean Cordillera Frontal, San Juan, Argentina: Tectonic and paleoenviromental reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Busquets

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Se efectúa el análisis estratigráfico de la secuencia neopaleozoica aflorante en la Sierra de Castaño (Cordillera Frontal de la provincia de San Juan, donde han sido reconocidas tres unidades estratigráficas. La basal corresponde a la Formación Cerro Agua Negra (Carbonífero tardío-Pérmico temprano?, formada por areniscas y pelitas depositadas en ambiente marino de plataforma somera y litoral. Sobre ella se dispone la Formación San Ignacio, compuesta por sedimentitas silicoclásticas (desde conglomerados hasta pelitas, calizas estromatolíticas-microbiales, rocas volcánicas, en su mayoría de composición mesosilícica y ácida, y depósitos volcanoclásticos. Estas últimas rocas, probablemente depositadas hacia fines del Carbonífero tardío o en el Pérmico más temprano, cubren en discordancia angular a las de la Formación Cerro Agua Negra en la Sierra de Castaño. Dentro de la Formación San Ignacio fueron identificadas 3 asociaciones de facies sedimentarias. La inferior (AFa está formada por brechas, conglomerados brechosos y areniscas líticas, sedimentadas en sistemas aluviales y fluviales entrelazados que rellenaron una irregular topografía labrada sobre la Formación Cerro Agua Negra. La asociación de facies media (AFb, compuesta por conglomerados, areniscas y pelitas, desarrolla ciclos granodecrecientes de escala métrica muy probablemente originados en sistemas fluviales de alta sinuosidad. La asociación de facies superior (AFc comprende calizas estromatolíticas microbiales, pelitas, niveles de volcanitas y piroclastitas, originadas en cuerpos de aguas someros sujetos a recurrente actividad volcánica. La Formación San Ignacio permite caracterizar el pasaje entre las sucesiones no volcánicas de la Formación Cerro Agua Negra y el intenso magmatismo representado en el Grupo Choiyoi (Pérmico medio-Triásico Inferior. Además demuestra la existencia de dos eventos mayores de deformación tectónica en la regi

  8. The origin and crust/mantle mass balance of Central Andean ignimbrite magmatism constrained by oxygen and strontium isotopes and erupted volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymuth, Heye; Brandmeier, Melanie; Wörner, Gerhard

    2015-06-01

    Volcanism during the Neogene in the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ) of the Andes produced (1) stratovolcanoes, (2) rhyodacitic to rhyolitic ignimbrites which reach volumes of generally less than 300 km3 and (3) large-volume monotonous dacitic ignimbrites of up to several thousand cubic kilometres. We present models for the origin of these magma types using O and Sr isotopes to constrain crust/mantle proportions for the large-volume ignimbrites and explore the relationship to the evolution of the Andean crust. Oxygen isotope ratios were measured on phenocrysts in order to avoid the effects of secondary alteration. Our results show a complete overlap in the Sr-O isotope compositions of lavas from stratovolcanoes and low-volume rhyolitic ignimbrites as well as older (>9 Ma) large-volume dacitic ignimbrites. This suggests that the mass balance of crustal and mantle components are largely similar. By contrast, younger (de Pica ignimbrites) and 70 km3 Ma-1 km-1 (assuming plutonic/volcanic ratios of 1:5) which are additional to, but within the order of, the arc background magmatic flux. Comparing our results to average shortening rates observed in the Andes, we observe a "lag-time" with large-volume eruptions occurring after accelerated shortening. A similar delay exists between the ignimbrite pulses and the subduction of the Juan Fernandez ridge. This is consistent with the idea that large-volume ignimbrite eruptions occurred in the wake of the N-S passage of the ridge after slab steepening has allowed hot asthenospheric mantle to ascend into and cause the melting of the mantle wedge. In our model, the older large-volume dacitic ignimbrites in the northern part of the CVZ have lower (15-37 %) crustal contributions because they were produced at times when the Central Andean crust was thinner and colder, and large-scale melting in the middle crust could not be achieved. Younger ignimbrite flare-ups further south (22°S) formed with a significantly higher crustal contribution

  9. Estudio sedimentológico del Keuper inferior, a partir del análisis de facies, en el sector central de la Cordillera Bética. Algunas consideraciones paleogeográficas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Chicano, M.

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available The lower Keuper of the central sector of Betic Cordillera shows a predominance of clays with variegated colours. They have intercalations of thin layers of sandstones (fine grain, gypsum and carbonates. Through sedimentological and stratigraphic analysis we can conclude that these materials are from a systems tract fluviocoastal further more it allows us to distinguish sorne different facies types which characterize the following subenvironments. They are set in a framework of mud flat, found on a vast tidal coastal lutitic plain. Terrigenous sediments (fine sands from the mainland are deposited on the lutitic plain by ephemeral streams. In this coastal environment there are subenvironments of salt marsh, salt pans, sabkha, coastal lagoons, etc. The distribution in time and space of these facies was mainly controlled by the climate and the frequent incursions of the sea over the coastal plain, facilited by the flat geographical nature of coastline.En el Keuper inferior del sector central de la Cordillera Bética hay un predominio de materiales arcillosos, de colores abigarrados, con niveles intercalados de areniscas de grano fino, yesos y carbonatos. A partir del análisis estratigráfico y sedimentológico se han interpretado estos materiales como pertenecientes a un cortejo fluviocostero. Este análisis ha permitido, previamente, diferenciar diversas asociaciones de facies que caracterizan varios ambientes sedimentarios. Esencialmente, se enmarcan en un mud flat, dentro de una extensa llanura costera parcialmente afectada por mareas. A ésta llegan sedimentos detríticos continentales (arenas finas mediante corrientes fluviales efímeras. Dentro de este mismo medio costero aparecen ambientes de marisma, salt pans, sabkha, laguna, etc. La evolución en el tiempo y en el espacio de estas facies está controlada principalmente por el clima y por las frecuentes ingresiones del mar sobre la llanura costera, las cuales están facilitadas por la

  10. A new minute Andean Pristimantis (Anura: Strabomantidae from Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César L. Barrio-Amorós

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Pristimantis is described from the Venezuelan Andes. The new species is the smallest in its genus known in Venezuela and belongs to the Pristimantis unistrigatus Group. It differs from the rest of Venezuelan Andean congeners in body size (mean male SVL < 21.3 mm, female SVL < 26.3 mm, expanded discs on fingers and toes, absence of dorsolateral folds, and a distinctivecall consisting in 2–5 cricket-like short notes. The new species inhabits the southwestern part of the Cordillera de Mérida in Venezuela and the Venezuelan side of the Cordillera Oriental deColombia, and could be present on the Colombian portion of the cordillera as well.

  11. Deformation monitoring in Zafarraya fault and Sierra Tejeda antiform (Betic cordillera, Spain) using satellite radar interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Armenteros, A.M.; Delgado, J.M.; Sousa, J.J.; Hanssen, R.F.; Caro, M.; Gil, A.J.; Galindo-Zaldívar, J.; Galdeano, C.S. de

    2015-01-01

    The Betic-Rif cordilleras are build-up in the western Mediterranean by the deformations related to the Eurasian-African plate boundary. The recent NW-SE convergence produces the simultaneous development of large folds and faults in the central part of the Internal Zones of the Betic Cordilleras,

  12. El Cenozoico del alto río Teno, Cordillera Principal, Chile central: estratigrafía, plutonismo y su relación con estructuras profundas The Cenozoic of the upper Teno River, Cordillera Principal, Central Chile: stratigraphy, plutonism and their relation with deep structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Piquer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available La evolución geológica cenozoica del sector central de la Cordillera Principal a ~35°S, se encuentra íntimamente relacionada con la evolución de estructuras profundas, las cuales habrían controlado, en distintas etapas de su historia, tanto la depositación de secuencias volcano-sedimentarias como el ascenso y emplazamiento de cuerpos intrusivos. Estudios estratigráficos en el entorno de estas estructuras, permiten confirmar la edad cenozoica de un conjunto de rocas piroclásticas y sedimentarias que subyacen concordantemente a lavas andesíticas de la Formación Abanico (asignada al Eoceno Tardío-Mioceno Temprano a Medio. Se determinó la existencia de cuatro fases intrusivas principales (diorita, granodiorita, pórfido riodacítico y pórfido dacítico, en ese orden de intrusión, cuyos productos afloran siguiendo una franja de orientación norte-sur. La granodiorita fue datada en 7,8±0,4 Ma (K-Ar en biotita. Pórfidos riodacíticos, considerados como facies marginales de la unidad anterior, se dataron en 7,9±0,4 Ma (K-Ar en fenocristales de plagioclasa. Se reconocieron dos estructuras de importancia regional: el Corrimiento El Fierro, y, más al oeste, se definió el Sistema de Fallas Infiernillo-Los Cipreses. En la caracterización de esta última estructura, se utilizó la modelación magnética de secciones como complemento a la información geológica. Se interpreta que el ascenso de las distintas fases intrusivas mencionadas fue controlado por el Sistema de Fallas Infiernillo-Los Cipreses. Este, al igual que el Corrimiento El Fierro, habría actuado como una falla normal de borde de cuenca durante el Eoceno Tardío-Moceno Medio, controlando la depositación de productos volcánicos y sedimentarios de la Formación Abanico. Ambas fallas fueron reactivadas en modo inverso durante un importante episodio de contracción tectónica y de elevada presión de fluidos inducida por circulación de magmas, en el Mioceno Tard

  13. Out of Amazonia: the unexpected trans-Andean distribution of Cochranella resplendens (Lynch and Duellman, 1978) (Anura: Centrolenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Zuluaga, Claudia; Cano, Estefany; Restrepo, Adriana; Rada, Marco; Daza, Juan M

    2017-03-02

    The glassfrog genus Cochranella, with nine recognized species, is distributed in the lowlands and mid elevation of the Neotropical forests, from Nicaragua to Bolivia (Guayasamin et al. 2009; Twomey et al. 2014). Four species are trans-Andean-C. granulosa (Taylor 1949) occurs in the lowlands and mountains, at mid elevation, of Central America, C. litoralis (Ruiz-Carranza & Lynch 1996) and C. mache Guayasamin & Bonaccorso 2004 occur in the Pacific lowlands and the western cloud forests of Colombia and Ecuador, and C. euknemos (Savage & Starrett 1967) occurs both in Central America and South America (northwestern Colombia).-The other five species have cis-Andean distributions in the Amazonian slopes and lowlands, from Colombia to Bolivia: C. nola Harvey 1996, C. guayasamini Twomey, Delia & Castroviejo-Fisher 2014, C. resplendens (Lynch & Duellman 1973), C. erminea Torres-Gastello, Suárez-Segovia & Cisneros-Heredia 2007, and C. phryxa Aguayo-Vedia & Harvey 2006. In Colombia, C. resplendens is known from the foothills of the Amazon versant in Caquetá (Malambo et al. 2013) and Putumayo (Lynch & Duellman 1973; Ruiz-Carranza et al. 1996). The species is also known from Ecuador (Lynch & Duellman 1973) and Peru (Twomey et al. 2014). Here, we report two new records of Cochranella resplendens, extending the species distribution beyond the Amazonian lowlands into the northern Cordillera Central in Colombia.

  14. Características de la fauna de braquiópodos del Toarciense superior en el Sector Central de la Cordillera Ibérica (noroeste de España

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Joral, F.

    1984-04-01

    Full Text Available Studying brachiopod faunas from the Upper Toarcian beds of the Iberian Range (Central Sector, bring out the few number of species and the local range for the majority of them. In relation with that, populations show characteristics (polymorphism, gregarism and generalism that suggest an unstable environment, probably produced by the progressive isolation of the basin, the shallowing trend and the tectosedimentary instability quoted by differents authors, As a consequence of this situation there is a faunistic turnover for the brachiopods at this time, that could be the origin of some lineages developped in the Western European Dogger.

    En el estudio de la fauna de braquiópodos del Toarciense superior del Sector Central de la Cordillera Ibérica destacan el bajo. número de especies que la componen y el ámbito local de la mayoría de ellas. En relación con esto, las poblaciones muestran unas características (polimorfismo, gregarismo y forma generalizada que sugieren un ambiente inestable, provocado probablemente por el aislamiento progresivo de la cuenca, la tendencia somerizadora y la inestabilidad tectosedimentaria que han señalado diversos autores. La consecuencia de esta situación es una renovación faunística para el grupo en esta edad, que puede haber dado origen a algunas de las ramas filéticas que se desarrollan en el Dogger de Europa Occidental.

  15. Estructura comunitaria de diatomeas presentes en los sedimentos superficiales de ocho lagos andinos de Chile central Diatoms community structure in superficial sediments of eight Andean lakes of central Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    INGRID E ALVIAL

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se analizó la estructura comunitaria de diatomeas depositadas en los sedimentos superficiales de ocho lagos andinos chilenos ubicados entre los 32°49' y 38°48' S. Se encontró un total de 99 taxa de diatomeas, distribuidos en 48 géneros. Del total de taxa, 74 fueron identificados a nivel de especie siendo todos ellos cosmopolitas a excepción de Eunotia andinofrequens, Gomphonema punae, Pinnularia araucanensis y Pinnularia acidicola, entre otras, que están descritos solo para el Hemisferio Sur. Por otro lado, las muestras analizadas presentaron distinta composición florística de diatomeas. De esta manera, en los ensambles diatomológicos depositados en los sedimentos de las lagunas de altura Ocho, Huifa, Ensueño y Negra ubicadas sobre los 2.860 m del nivel del mar, abundaron especies bentónicas, típicas de aguas oligotróficas y acidas como Achnanthidium exiguum, Achnanthidium minutissimum, Encyonema minutum, Pinnularia acidicola y Planothidium lanceolatum. En los ensambles diatomológicos de los lagos Galletué, Icalma y Laja, ubicados bajo los 1.360 m del nivel del mar, abundaron diatomeas planctónicas, características de aguas alcalinas y mesotróficas como Asterionella formosa, Aulacoseira distans, Aulacoseira granulata, Cyclotella stelligera y Rhopalodia gibbaIn this research the taxonomic structure of diatoms in sediments of high mountain lakes was studied. These lakes are located in Chile between 32°49' and 38°48' S in the Andean Cordillera. A total of 99 diatom taxa distributed in 48 genera were identified and all this taxa are cosmopolitan excepting a Eunotia andinofrequens, Gomphonema punae, Pinnularia araucanensis and Pinnularia acidicola, which are know only for the Southern Hemisphere. The assemblages of diatoms were different in the studied lakes. So the high mountain lakes Ocho, Huifa, Ensueño and Negra, dominated benthic diatoms which are typical of oligotrophic and acid waters as Achnanthidium

  16. Exhumation of the Western Cordillera of the Peruvian Andes (5-12°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, M.; Hall, S. R.; Farber, D.; Hourigan, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    The topography of mountain belts is the first-order morphological expression of the dynamical forces that drive plate tectonics. Despite recent advances in techniques that quantify tectonic and geomorphologic processes, characterizing the near and far-field forces that form mountainous topography at a continental scale remains challenging. The South American Andes are an example of a long-lived orogen that is morphologically and tectonically segmented. For example, the Northern Peruvian Andes are a region characterized by flat-slab subduction, no active volcanism and a relatively narrow section of high topography, in contrast to the central Andes, which contain the broad Altiplano-Puna plateau, active volcanism and normal-angle subduction. Current models of Andean orogenesis based on paleoelevation estimates, thermochronology data, and structural analysis suggest that most of the high topography evolved sometime in the last 20Ma, possibly characterized by a period of punctuated uplift from 10-6Ma. However, as many of these data are from the central Andes, they may not be directly applicable to the entire Andean chain. Therefore, it is critical to investigate areas outside of the central Andean region using similar techniques to test the applicability of these models elsewhere in the Andes. For this study, we use (U-Th)/He low-temperature thermochronology to characterize the shallow crustal cooling history from three sites in the Western Cordillera of the Peruvian Andes, across seven degrees of latitude (5°S to 12°S). Near-vertical sample transects were taken in three river valleys that expose the Jurassic through Eocene granitoids of the 1,600km long Coastal Batholith of Peru. By using both apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometers we are able to quantify crustal exhumation rates as well as detect temporal and spatial accelerations and decelerations of exhumation. This new dataset, combined with existing crystallization ages of the plutonic sequence of the

  17. A new species ofPhrynopus(Amphibia, Anura, Craugastoridae) from upper montane forests and high Andean grasslands of the Pui Pui Protected Forest in central Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Edgar; von May, Rudolf; Moravec, Jiří; Cusi, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    We describe a new species of Phrynopus from the upper montane forests and high Andean grasslands (puna) of the Pui Pui Protected Forest and its close surroundings (Región Junín, central Peru) and compare it morphologically and genetically with other species of Phrynopus . Phrynopus inti sp. n. is known from four localities outside and two localities inside the Pui Pui Protected Forest between 3350 and 3890 m a.s.l. Studied specimens of the new species are characterized by a snout-vent length of 27.2-35.2 mm in males (n = 6), and 40.4 mm in a single female, by having the skin on dorsum and flanks smooth with scattered tubercles, venter smooth, by lacking a tympanum, and males without vocal slits and nuptial pads. In life, the dorsum is pale grayish brown with or without dark brown blotches, or dorsum blackish brown with small yellow flecks, throat, chest and venter are pale grayish brown with salmon mottling, groin is pale grayish brown with salmon colored flecks, and the iris is golden orange with fine dark brown reticulations. The new species is morphologically most similar to Phrynopus kauneorum and P. juninensis . For the latter we describe the coloration in life for a specimen obtained at the type locality. A molecular phylogenetic analysis based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences inferred that the new species is most closely related to Phrynopus kauneorum , P. miroslawae , P. tautzorum , and an undescribed species distributed at high elevation in Región Pasco, central Peru.

  18. A new species of Phrynopus (Amphibia, Anura, Craugastoridae from upper montane forests and high Andean grasslands of the Pui Pui Protected Forest in central Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Lehr

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new species of Phrynopus from the upper montane forests and high Andean grasslands (puna of the Pui Pui Protected Forest and its close surroundings (Región Junín, central Peru and compare it morphologically and genetically with other species of Phrynopus. Phrynopus inti sp. n. is known from four localities outside and two localities inside the Pui Pui Protected Forest between 3350 and 3890 m a.s.l. Studied specimens of the new species are characterized by a snout-vent length of 27.2–35.2 mm in males (n = 6, and 40.4 mm in a single female, by having the skin on dorsum and flanks smooth with scattered tubercles, venter smooth, by lacking a tympanum, and males without vocal slits and nuptial pads. In life, the dorsum is pale grayish brown with or without dark brown blotches, or dorsum blackish brown with small yellow flecks, throat, chest and venter are pale grayish brown with salmon mottling, groin is pale grayish brown with salmon colored flecks, and the iris is golden orange with fine dark brown reticulations. The new species is morphologically most similar to Phrynopus kauneorum and P. juninensis. For the latter we describe the coloration in life for a specimen obtained at the type locality. A molecular phylogenetic analysis based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences inferred that the new species is most closely related to Phrynopus kauneorum, P. miroslawae, P. tautzorum, and an undescribed species distributed at high elevation in Región Pasco, central Peru.

  19. Variables Associated with Utilization of a Centralized Medical Post in the Andean Community of Pampas Grande, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Stephen P.; Rohrer, James E.; Thacher, Thomas D.; Summers, Matthew R.; Alpern, Jonathan D.; Contino, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Integral to the location of health resources is the distance decay of utilization observed in a population. In rural Peru, a nongovernmental organization planning to increase the availability of health services needed this information. Purpose: To determine variables associated with utilization of a central medical clinic and determine…

  20. Vegetation composition and altitudinal distribution of Andean rain forests in El Angel and Guandera reserves, northern Ecuador

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moscol Olivera, M.C.; Cleef, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Patterns of vascular plant species composition and structure of the remaining rain forest of the Andean Cordillera in northern Ecuador were studied in two reserves: Guandera and El Angel. Thirty three plots located between 3300 and 3700 in were examined along two altitudinal transects crossing the

  1. Vegetation composition and altitudinal distribution of Andean rain forests in El Angel and Guandera reserves, northern Ecuador

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moscol Olivera, M.C.; Cleef, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Patterns of vascular plant species composition and structure of the remaining rain forest of the Andean Cordillera in northern Ecuador were studied in two reserves: Guandera and El Angel. Thirty three plots located between 3300 and 3700 m were examined along two altitudinal transects crossing the

  2. Two new species of Andean gymnophthalmid lizards of the genus Euspondylus (Reptilia, Squamata from central and southern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Chávez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of lizards assigned to the genus Euspondylus from the montane forests of the Peruvian Andes in the Pasco Department (central Peru and Ayacucho Department (southern Peru both at elevations of 2550 and 3450 m, respectively, are described. The new species are distinguishable from all other Peruvian and Ecuadorian species of Euspondylus by a unique combination of morphometric, scalation and color pattern characteristics. Natural history data for the new species and for E. spinalis are also provided.

  3. Two new species of Andean gymnophthalmid lizards of the genus Euspondylus (Reptilia, Squamata) from central and southern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Germán; Siu-Ting, Karen; Duran, Vilma; Venegas, Pablo J

    2011-01-01

    Two new species of lizards assigned to the genus Euspondylus from the montane forests of the Peruvian Andes in the Pasco Department (central Peru) and Ayacucho Department (southern Peru) both at elevations of 2550 and 3450 m, respectively, are described. The new species are distinguishable from all other Peruvian and Ecuadorian species of Euspondylus by a unique combination of morphometric, scalation and color pattern characteristics. Natural history data for the new species and for Euspondylus spinalis are also provided.

  4. Multiple Natural Hazards Assessment and Comparison to Planned Land Use in an Andean Touristic Site within the Riskscape Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andreas; Jaque Castillo, Edilia

    2017-04-01

    The Andes of central Chile are a natural environment characterized by multiple natural hazards (mass movements, volcanic hazards, seismic hazards, snow avalanches to name a few). The totality of these hazards, according to the notion of Müller-Mahn et al. an in relation to vulnerable entities, spans a riskscape. Spatial planning should take this riskscape into account in order to ensure a save an resilient regional development. However, as frequently observed in developing or newly developed countries, such precaution measures are only hardly realized. Spatial planing tends to be reactive to private inversion, opportunistic and frequently clientelistic. This results in spatial structures whose future development is vulnerable to natural disasters. The contribution analyses these circumstances within a riskscape in central Chile. Within the VIII. Region, close to the volcanic complex Nevados de Chillan, a touristic development around a Hotel for winter sports is established. However, the place is affected by a multitude of natural hazards. The contribution, on the basis of primary and secondary data, first provides hazard maps for several natural hazards. Secondly, the individual hazard maps are merged to an overall hazard map. This overall hazard map is related to the vulnerable entities to span a riskscape. The vulnerable entities are settlements, but also tourist infrastructures. Then, the contribution compares how a precautions spatial planning could have avoided putting vulnerable entities at risk, which spatial structure - especially regarding tourism - is actually found and which challenges for spatial development do exist. It reveals that the most important tourist infrastructures are found particularly at places, characterized by a high overall hazard. Furthermore, it will show that alternatives at economically equally attractive sites, but with a much smaller overall hazard, would have existed. It concludes by discussing possible reasons for this by

  5. Forest health in Canada, Montane cordillera ecozone 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, E.; Garbutt, R.; Hirvonen, H.; Pinnell, H.

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes the key forest health issues affecting the 6 main forest types in Canada's Montane Cordillera ecozone in the central interior of British Columbia and the Alberta Foothills. In order to protect and conserve biological diversity, the Canadian Council of Forest Ministers adopted national criteria to measure sustainable forest management. This report describes the Montane Cordillera landscape conditions, pre-industrial ecological influences, current ecological influences, and the impact of invasive alien insects and diseases on the diversity of tree species. Pine forests in the Montane Cordillera ecozone are threatened by the mountain pine beetle. Fire suppression has also resulted in ecological changes to forests in the Montane Cordillera, including an increase in Douglas-firs, gradual replacement of Lodgepole pine forests, and reduced health of Ponderosa pine ecosystems. Alien insects are being monitored by provincial forestry agencies through annual surveys. They are also being controlled through localized treatment programs. The impact of land use practices such as forest harvesting on forest structure and composition was also addressed. It was noted that the unrestricted movement of wood and forestry products also increases the threat of invasive alien diseases and insects. The trees in this ecozone have not been damaged by air pollution. refs., tabs., figs.

  6. Caracterización Física, Química y Mineralógica de Suelos con Vocación Forestal Protectora Región Andina Central Colombiana / Physical Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of Soils with a Protective Forest Vocation, Central Andean Region of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyder Echeverri Tafur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen. En la Reserva Forestal Protectora Bosques de la CHEC, ubicada sobre la vertiente occidental de la cordillera central colombiana, municipios de Manizales y Villamaría, departamento de Caldas, se hizo la caracterización física, química y mineralógica de dos perfiles de suelos, descritos sobre dos laderas, con un manejo actual correspondiente a una plantación de aliso (Alnus acuminata y un bosque secundario. Los resultados permitieron establecer,desde el punto de vista físico, el dominio de clase textural areno francosa en la plantación de aliso y franco arenoso en el bosque secundario. Químicamente el suelo del perfil plantado con aliso, presentó valores de pH más bajos, mayor saturación de acidez intercambiable y menor saturación de bases en comparación con el perfil del bosque secundario. En ambos perfiles, el análisis óptico con microscopio petrográfico, permitió observar que los feldespatos, del grupo de las plagioclasas y el vidrio volcánico, se destacan como minerales abundantes en la fracción arena; mientras que en la fracción arcilla, el material no cristalino, seconsidera mineral predominante, seguido de la cristobalita y los feldespatos, según la metodología de difracción de rayos X. Se concluye que la vocación de uso forestal protector, bajo el cual se encuentran sometidos ambos suelos, es el más adecuado, teniendo en cuenta que las limitaciones químicas, dificultan el establecimiento de sistemas de producción agropecuaria. / Abstract. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization of two soil profiles on two slopes, with a management currently corresponding to an Andean alder plantation (Alnus acuminata and a secondary forest, was carried out at the Protective Forest Reserve of the CHEC. This reserve is located on the western slope of the Central Mountain Range of the Colombian Andes, in the municipalities of Manizales and Villamaria, Caldas Department. The results

  7. Pioneer study of population genetics of Rhodnius ecuadoriensis (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) from the central coastand southern Andean regions of Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villacís, Anita G; Marcet, Paula L; Yumiseva, César A; Dotson, Ellen M; Tibayrenc, Michel; Brenière, Simone Frédérique; Grijalva, Mario J

    2017-09-01

    Effective control of Chagas disease vector populations requires a good understanding of the epidemiological components, including a reliable analysis of the genetic structure of vector populations. Rhodnius ecuadoriensis is the most widespread vector of Chagas disease in Ecuador, occupying domestic, peridomestic and sylvatic habitats. It is widely distributed in the central coast and southern highlands regions of Ecuador, two very different regions in terms of bio-geographical characteristics. To evaluate the genetic relationship among R. ecuadoriensis populations in these two regions, we analyzed genetic variability at two microsatellite loci for 326 specimens (n=122 in Manabí and n=204 in Loja) and the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (Cyt b) sequences for 174 individuals collected in the two provinces (n=73 and=101 in Manabí and Loja respectively). The individual samples were grouped in populations according to their community of origin. A few populations presented positive F IS, possible due to Wahlund effect. Significant pairwise differentiation was detected between populations within each province for both genetic markers, and the isolation by distance model was significant for these populations. Microsatellite markers showed significant genetic differentiation between the populations of the two provinces. The partial sequences of the Cyt b gene (578bp) identified a total of 34 haplotypes among 174 specimens sequenced, which translated into high haplotype diversity (Hd=0.929). The haplotype distribution differed among provinces (significant Fisher's exact test). Overall, the genetic differentiation of R. ecuadoriensis between provinces detected in this study is consistent with the biological and phenotypic differences previously observed between Manabí and Loja populations. The current phylogenetic analysis evidenced the monophyly of the populations of R. ecuadoriensis within the R. pallescens species complex; R. pallescens and R. colombiensis were more

  8. Seismological observations at the Northern Andean region of Colombia: Evidence for a shallowly subducting Caribbean Slab and an extensional regime in the upper plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalve, G.; Cardona, A.; Yarce, J.; Alvira, D.; Poveda, E.

    2013-05-01

    A number of seismological observations, among which we can mention teleseismic travel time residuals, P to S receiver functions and Pn velocity quantification, suggest a clear distinction between the seismic structure of the crust and uppermost mantle between the plains on the Caribbean coast of Colombia and the mountains at the Northern Andean region. Absolute and relative travel time residuals indicate the presence of a seismically fast material in the upper mantle beneath northern Colombia; preliminary results of Pn studies show a region of relatively slow Pn velocities (between 7.8 and 7.9 km/s) underneath the Caribbean coast, contrasting with values greater than 8 km/s beneath the Central and Western cordilleras of Colombia, and the Pacific coast; receiver functions suggest a significantly thinner crust beneath the Caribbean coast, with a crustal thickness between 25 and 30 km, than beneath the Northern Andean zone at the cordilleras of Colombia, where it exceeds 40 km and reaches about 57 km at the location of Bogota. Besides the obviuos discrepancies that appear in response to different topography, we think that the seismological observations are a consequence of the presence of two very distinct slab segments beneath Colombia and contrasting behaviors of the upper plate, which correspond to Caribbean and Nazca subductions. Our seismic observations can be explained by a shallowly subducting Caribbean Plate, in the absence of an asthenospheric wedge, that steepens at about the location of the Bucaramanga nest, and a thinned continental crust that reflects an extensional component linked to oblique convergence of the Caribbean, which contrasts with the crustal thickening in the Andean Cordillera linked to crustal shortening and Nazca plate subuction. These new data are consistent with the idea of of a relatively warm Nazca slab of Neogene age which seems to have a relatively frontal convergence, and a colder, more buoyant Caribbean slab which represents an

  9. Groundwater origin and recharge in the hyperarid Cordillera de la Costa, Atacama Desert, northern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Christian; Gamboa, Carolina; Custodio, Emilio; Jordan, Teresa; Godfrey, Linda; Jódar, Jorge; Luque, José A; Vargas, Jimmy; Sáez, Alberto

    2018-05-15

    The Cordillera de la Costa is located along the coastline of northern Chile, in the hyperarid Atacama Desert area. Chemical and isotopic analyses of several small coastal springs and groundwater reservoirs between 22.5 °S and 25.5 °S allow understanding groundwater origin, renewal time and the probable timing of recharge. The aquifers are mostly in old volcanic rocks and alluvial deposits. All spring waters are brackish, of the sodium chloride type due to intensive concentration of precipitation due aridity and for deep groundwater to additional water-rock interaction in slowly renewed groundwater and mixing with deep seated brines. The heavy δ 18 O and δ 2 H values in spring water are explained by recharge by the arrival of moist air masses from the Pacific Ocean and the originally lighter values in the deep wells can be associated to past recharge by air masses coming from the Atlantic Ocean. Current recharge is assumed almost nil but it was significant in past wetter-than-present periods, increasing groundwater reserves, which are not yet exhausted. To explain the observed chloride content and radiocarbon ( 14 C) activity, a well-mixed (exponential) flow model has been considered for aquifer recharge. The average residence time of groundwater feeding the springs has been estimated between 1 and 2kyr, up to 5kyr and between 7 and 13kyr for deep well water, assuming that current recharge is much less than during the previous wetter period. The recharge period feeding the coastal springs could have been produced 1 to 5kyr BP, when the area was already inhabited, and recharge in the Michilla mine was produced during the 10 to 14.5kyr BP CAPE (Central Andean Pluvial Event) pluvial events of the central Andes. The approximate coincidence of turnover time with the past wet periods, as revealed by paleoclimate data, points to significant recharge during them. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Del santuario al caserío: acerca de la neolitización en la Cordillera de los Andes Centrales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Les faits archéologiques mis en évidence sur le site de Piruru ouvrent des perspectives nouvelles sur la sédentarisation et l'apparition du village dans les Andes centrales. Piruru présente, au Précéramique Final (3000/2500 - 1800/1500 av.JC, une longue période de construction à des fins religieuses avant que n'existent, au Formatif Initial et Moyen (1800/1500 - 800/600 av.JC, des structures à usage domestique. Cette antériorité de l'architecture publique et cérémonielle, observable à l'échelle régionale, permet de proposer l'hypothèse qu'au Précéramique Final, les sanctuaires montagnards jouent un rôle catalyseur, non seulement dans la naissance et le développement de l'architecture, mais aussi dans l'organisation spatiale des communautés en cours de sédentarisation. Durant la longue occupation du Précéramique Final, plus de 1000 ans, les premières phases de la séquence de Piruru montrent l'existence de petits temples, qui sont les plus anciens connus actuellement dans les Andes centrales. Ensuite, la phase plus récente du temple P1 permet de relier Piruru aux autres sanctuaires connus, et de définir la tradition Mito, courant religieux qui se manifeste dans les Andes d'Ancash et de Huánuco, durant la deuxième partie du Précéramique Final. Au Formatif Initial, dans le même temps où la céramique est introduite sur le site, Piruru devient un petit habitat groupé, premier exemple connu à ce jour en montagne. Au cours d'un processus long de plus de 700 ans, les transformations dans l'organisation globale de l'habitat indiquent un degré croissant de sédentarité, et montrent le passage d'un hameau utilisé de façon saisonnière à un village habité de façon permanente, la sédentarité paraissant acquise au début du Formatif Moyen. Los hechos arqueológicos puestos en evidencia en el sitio de Piruru ofrecen nuevas perspectivas sobre la sedentarización y la aparición de la aldea en los Andes centrales

  11. Hydrochemical and isotopic patterns in a calc-alkaline Cu- and Au-rich arid Andean basin: The Elqui River watershed, North Central Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyarzún, Jorge; Carvajal, María José; Maturana, Hugo; Núñez, Jorge; Kretschmer, Nicole; Amezaga, Jaime M.; Rötting, Tobias S.; Strauch, Gerhard; Thyne, Geoffrey; Oyarzún, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Major ions are provided by rock weathering and NaCl recycling. ► Aridity and cal-alkaline lithology effects abate acid drainage. ► Factors affecting hydrochemistry in mineral rich zone are addressed. ► Stable isotopes confirm the meteoric origin of groundwaters. ► High sulfate contents are explained by widespread sulfide minerals. - Abstract: The geochemistry of surface water and groundwater from the Elqui River basin, North-Central Chile, was studied in spring 2007 and fall 2008 to obtain a general understanding of the factors and mechanisms controlling the water chemistry of steep rivers located in mineral-rich, arid to semi arid zones. Besides its uniform intermediate igneous lithology, this basin is known for acid drainage and high As contents in the El Indio Au–Cu–As district, in its Andean head. Abundant tailings deposits are present in the middle part of the basin, where agricultural activities are important. According to the results, the chemical and isotopic composition of the Elqui basin surface water and groundwater is related to uniform calc-alkaline lithology and the major polluting system of the chemically reactive, but closed El Indio mining district. The resulting compositional imprints in surface and ground-water are, (a) high SO 4 levels, reaching about 1000 mg/L in the Toro River water, directly draining the mining area; (b) a major depletion of Fe and pollutant metals in surface water after the confluence of the Toro and La Laguna rivers; (c) similar chemical composition of surface and ground-waters that differ in H and O isotopic composition, reflecting the effect of differential evaporation processes downstream of the Puclaro dam; and (d) seasonal variations of Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn in surface water. In contrast, the groundwater chemistry exhibits moderate seasonal changes, mainly in HCO 3 - content. In spite of the acid drainage pollution, water quality is adequate for human consumption and irrigation. This is a

  12. Thermochronologic Evidence for Late Eocene Andean Mountain Building at 30°S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossada, Ana C.; Giambiagi, Laura; Hoke, Gregory D.; Fitzgerald, Paul G.; Creixell, Christian; Murillo, Ismael; Mardonez, Diego; Velásquez, Ricardo; Suriano, Julieta

    2017-11-01

    The Andes between 28° and 30°S represent a transition between the Puna-Altiplano Plateau and the Frontal/Principal Cordillera fold-and-thrust belts to the south. While significant early Cenozoic deformation documented in the Andean Plateau, deciphering the early episodes of deformation during Andean mountain building in the transition area is largely unstudied. Apatite fission track (AFT) and (U-Th-Sm)/He (AHe) thermochronology from a vertical and a horizontal transect reveal the exhumation history of the High Andes at 30°S, an area at the heart of this major transition. Interpretation of the age-elevation profile, combined with inverse thermal modeling, indicates that the onset of rapid cooling was underway by 35 Ma, followed by a significant decrease in cooling rate at 30-25 Ma. AFT thermal models also reveal a second episode of rapid cooling in the early Miocene ( 18 Ma) related to rock exhumation to its present position. Low exhumation between the rapid cooling events allowed for the development of a partial annealing zone. We interpret the observed Eocene rapid exhumation as the product of a previously unrecognized compressive event in this part of the Andes that reflects a southern extension of Eocene orogenesis recognized in the Puna/Altiplano. Renewed early-Miocene exhumation indicates that the late Cenozoic compressional stresses responsible for the main phase of uplift of the South Central Andes also impacted the core of the range in this transitional sector. The major episode of Eocene exhumation suggests the creation of significant topographic relief in the High Andes earlier than previously thought.

  13. A Holocene pollen record of vegetation change and human impact from Pantano de Vargas, an intra-Andean basin of Duitama, Colombia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez, A.; Berrio, J.C.; Hooghiemstra, H.; Becerra, M.; Marchant, R.

    2007-01-01

    Holocene environments in the intra-Andean basin of Duitama (Eastern Cordillera of Colombia, 2510 m altitude) are presented based on the 620 cm long Vargas pollen and sediment record. Seven AMS radiocarbon dates show these lake and swamp sediments represent the period from 8800 to 2610 14C yr BP. We

  14. VARIABILIDAD ESPACIAL DE PROPIEDADES QUÍMICAS Y FÍSICAS EN UN TYPIC UDIVITRANDS, ARENOSO DE LA REGIÓN ANDINA CENTRAL COLOMBIANA SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A SANDY TYPIC UDIVITRANDS IN THE COLOMBIAN CENTRAL ANDEAN ZONE

    OpenAIRE

    Franco Humberto Obando Moncayo; Andrés Mauricio Villegas Hincapié; Jorge H. Betancur P.; Leyder Echeverri Tafur

    2006-01-01

    Se estudió la variabilidad espacial de propiedades químicas y físicas en un Typic Udivitrands arenoso de la granja experimental Tesorito de la Universidad de Caldas, ubicado en la Cordillera Central Colombiana a 5º 01’47” N, 75º 26’ 03” W y 2280 msnm. El área experimental se localiza en un Piedemonte Coluvial, con un manejo antecedente y actual en pastos, frutales de clima frío moderado y hortalizas. Se realizó un muestreo sistemático en red con una distancia aproximada entre sitios de muestr...

  15. Análisis espectral de materiales geológicos en la Cordillera Volcánica Central de Costa Rica y su relación con la detección remota de anomalías

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejas, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is the comparative study of methods for calculating spectral anomalies from imaging spectrometry in several test areas of the Central Volcanic Range (CVR of Costa Rica. In the detection of anomalous responses it is assumed no prior knowledge of the targets, so that the pixels are automatically separated according to their spectral information significantly differentiated with respect to a background to be estimated, either globally for the full scene, either locally by image segmentation techniques. We used spectral ranges of visible-near infrared (VNIR, shortwave infrared (SWIR and thermal (TIR data cubes hiperepectrales from HyMAP airborne sensors and MASTER. We have designed experiments on natural scenes of the CVC, and semi-urban of different complexity, analyzing the behavior of the standard RX (Reed & Xiaoli, 1990 anomaly detector and different approaches based on imaging and dimensionality reduction. In this paper we propose a new technique for anomaly detection in hyperspectral data called DAFT (Detector de Anomalías de Fondo Térmico, as a Projection Pursuit (Malpica et al., 2008 variant, based on dimensionality reduction by projecting anomalies or targets with unknown spectral signature to the background, in a range thermal spectrum wavelengths. We discuss the results considering their implications on geological processes, as well as their use as terrestrial analogs for planetary exploration.El objetivo del presente trabajo es el estudio de bandas de absorción y reflexión de espectros de materiales geológicos presentes en distintas áreas de test de la Cordillera Volcánica Central (CVC de Costa Rica, y su correlación con el cálculo automático de anomalías a partir de espectrometría de imagen de alta resolución, también llamada teledetección hiperespectral. En la detección de respuestas anómalas se asume un no conocimiento previo de los objetivos. Los píxeles se separan automáticamente en funci

  16. Predicting Polylepis distribution: vulnerable and increasingly important Andean woodlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Zutta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Polylepis woodlands are a vital resource for preserving biodiversity and hydrological functions, which will be altered by climate change and challenge the sustainability of local human communities. However, these highaltitude Andean ecosystems are becoming increasingly vulnerable due to anthropogenic pressure including fragmentation, deforestation and the increase in livestock. Predicting the distribution of native woodlands has become increasingly important to counteract the negative effects of climate change through reforestation and conservation. The objective of this study was to develop and analyze the distribution models of two species that form extensive woodlands along the Andes, namely Polylepis sericea and P. weberbaueri. This study utilized the program Maxent, climate and remotely sensed environmental layers at 1 km resolution. The predicted distribution model for P. sericea indicated that the species could be located in a variety of habitats along the Andean Cordillera, while P. weberbaueri was restricted to the high elevations of southern Peru and Bolivia. For both species, elevation and temperature metrics were the most significant factors for predicted distribution. Further model refinement of Polylepis and other Andean species using increasingly available satellite data demonstrate the potential to help define areas of diversity and improve conservation strategies for the Andes.

  17. Volcanism and associated hazards: The Andean perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, R.I.

    2009-01-01

    Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA), which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years) than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions") recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene. The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru). The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars) were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru has spurred significant improvements in reducing volcano risk in the Andean region. But much remains to be done.

  18. Nueva especie de rana (Atelopus de Los Farallones de Cali, Cordillera Occidental de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kattan Gustavo

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available Durante la realización de colecciones herpetológicas en el Departamento del Valle del Cauca, fue encontrada una especie no descrita de Atelopus (Anura: Bufonidae en los farallones de Cali, a 2600 m de altura. Esta es la primera especie en este género que se encuentra a elevaciones superiores a 2000 m en la Cordillera Occidental. Se conocen varias especies de Atelopus en las Cordilleras Central y Oriental de Colombia y en los Andes ecuatorianos (COCHRAN y GOIN 1970; PETERS 1973; RIVERO 1963 y probablemente futuras colecciones herpetológicas continuaran revelando nuevas especies en las partes altas de la Cordillera Occidental.

  19. SPECIES RICHNESS AND INDICES OF ABUNDANCE OF MEDIUM-SIZED MAMMALS IN ANDEAN FOREST AND REFORESTATIONS WITH ANDEAN ALDER: A PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SÁNCHEZ FRANCISCO

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the species richness and two indices of abundance of medium-sizedmammals in areas with Andean forest and Andean alder (Alnus acuminatareforestations in a reserve at the Central Andes of Colombia. Since reforested areashave a less complex habitat structure and lower plant diversity than native forests, wepredicted that they have lower richness of mammals than areas with Andean forest.We obtained the indices of abundance from direct contacts in transects and from theuse of track stations. Our results suggest that, indeed, areas with Andean forest hada higher richness of mammals than reforestations, but this pattern may be modifiedby anthropogenic factors. We found no differences between the indices of abundanceof the squirrel, Sciurus granatensis, in the two forest types. In contrast, the coatiswere recorded more frequently in the reforestations than in areas with Andean forestat the reserve.

  20. Andean region study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-10-01

    New opportunities for climate change mitigation arising from a higher energy integration among Andean Pact nations were analysed within the framework of the UNEP/GEF Project. Apart from the search for regional mitigation actions, the study was mainly aimed at detecting methodological problems which arise when passing from a strictly national view to the co-ordination of regional actions to deal with climate change. In accordance with the available resources and data, and in view of the mainly methodological nature of the project, it was decided to analyse the opportunities to delve into the energy integration of the Region as regards electricity and natural gas industries and their eventual impact on the emission of greenhouse gases. Although possibilities of setting up electricity and natural gas markets are real, their impacts on GHG emission from the energy system would not prove substantially higher than those which the nations could achieve through the use of their own energy resources, in view that the Andean systems are competitive rather than complementary. More in-depth studies and detail information will be required - unavailable for the present study - to be able to properly evaluate all benefits associated with higher energy integration. Nevertheless, the supply of natural gas to Ecuador seems to be the alternative with the highest impact on GHG emission. If we were to analyse the supply and final consumption of energy jointly, we would most certainly detect additional mitigation options resulting from higher co-operation and co-ordination in the energy field. (EHS)

  1. Phylogeny and biogeography of exindusiate Andean Polystichum (Dryopteridaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Monique A; Barrington, David S

    2014-02-01

    Uplift of the tropical Andes had a significant impact on the diversification of South American flora and fauna. Recent biogeographic inquiries have established patterns of Andean divergence, but investigations on ferns are scant. The fern genus Polystichum Roth (Dryopteridaceae) combines widespread geographic and elevational distribution with a large number of species to form an ideal system for investigation of the origin and diversification patterns of a fern lineage in the tropical Andes. The relationships among 42 Polystichum species, including taxa from all major biogeographic regions, were analyzed with 2591 aligned nucleotides from four plastid markers using maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference. The resulting phylogeny was then used to estimate divergence times and reconstruct both ancestral areas and ancestral elevations. Tropical Andean South American polystichums that lack an indusium (sori exindusiate) were confirmed to form a monophyletic group. This exindusiate Andean Polystichum clade diverged from a middle-elevation forest lineage now rich in species endemic to Mexico during the middle Miocene (13.12 million years ago). The majority of diversification that followed took place in the montane regions of the central Andes with radiations to the northern Andes, southeastern Brazil, and alpine regions. The monophyletic exindusiate Andean Polystichum lineage diverged from a Mexican lineage in the middle Miocene and diversified in the central Andes before dispersing northward. This south-to-north dispersal pattern, documented for many other Andean lineages, corresponds with episodes of uplift in the tropical Andes.

  2. The Andean Geotrail (1): A scientific adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassier, C.; Galland, O.; Raufaste, C.; Mair, K.

    2009-12-01

    The role of Geosciences in our society is of primary importance. Its implications for humanity relate to major challenges such as climate change, managing energy resources, natural hazard mitigation, and water scarcity. Despite these issues being familiar to specialists, this is in general not the case for the public. In a world, where the impact of human activity is beginning to be seen on the environment, knowledge of the Earth and its history is paramount to make informed decisions that will influence our future. The necessity to educate the global population and raise awareness of Geosciences has led UNESCO to designate 2009 the International Year of the Planet Earth. In this context and with the label of the UNESCO, we organized and performed a popular science adventure that was followed in real time by both school children and many adults around the world. The Andean Geotrail consisted of a cycling expedition through a spectacular geological environment, the Andean Cordillera. During the nine month expedition, we cycled 8000 km and walked 400 km from Ushuaia in the Southern tip of Argentina to Nazca in Peru to encounter a rich variety of geological environments: active volcanoes, earthquakes, mineral and hydrocarbon deposits, and fantastic geological scenery. All this makes the Andes a great pedagogical natural laboratory. During the expedition, we visited spectacular geological localities that illustrate key Earth Science phenomena (such as mines and hydrocarbon deposits, erupting volcanoes and seismogenically active areas, and national parks) and discovered their implications for the local people. Along the way, we interviewed local geologists and scientists who helped us understand the geology of their areas. We gathered our own observations with those of the local specialists and published essays, articles and photographs on our website and blog (www.georouteandine.fr/English, http://georouteandine.blogspot.com). Seventeen schools in France and Norway

  3. Preliminary Results From the CAUGHT Experiment: Investigation of the North Central Andes Subsurface Using Receiver Functions and Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Ward, K. M.; Porter, R. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2011-12-01

    Jamie Ryan, Kevin M. Ward, Ryan Porter, Susan Beck, George Zandt, Lara Wagner, Estela Minaya, and Hernando Tavera The University of Arizona The University of North Carolina San Calixto Observatorio, La Paz, Bolivia IGP, Lima, Peru In order to investigate the interplay between crustal shortening, lithospheric removal, and surface uplift we have deployed 50 broadband seismometers in northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru as part of the interdisciplinary Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project. The morphotectonic units of the central Andes from west to east, consist of the Western Cordillera, the active volcanic arc, the Altiplano, an internally drained basin (~4 km elevation), the Eastern Cordillera, the high peaks (~6 km elevation) of an older fold and thrust belt, the Subandean zone, the lower elevation active fold and thrust belt, and the foreland Beni basin. Between northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru, the Altiplano pinches out north of Lake Titicaca as the Andes narrow northward. The CAUGHT seismic instruments were deployed between 13° to 18° S latitudes to investigate the crust and mantle lithosphere of the central Andes in this transitional zone. In northwest Bolivia, perpendicular to the strike of the Andes, there is a total of 275 km of documented upper crustal shortening (15° to 17°S) (McQuarrie et al, 2008). Associated with the shortening is crustal thickening and possibly lithospheric removal as the thickening lithospheric root becomes unstable. An important first order study is to compare upper crustal shortening estimates with present day crustal thickness. To estimate crustal thickness, we have calculated receiver functions using an iterative deconvolution method and used common conversion point stacking along the same profile as the geologically based shortening estimates. In our preliminary results, we observed a strong P to S conversion corresponding to the Moho at approximately 60-65 km depth underneath the

  4. Dispersal, isolation and diversification with continued gene flow in an Andean tropical dry forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toby Pennington, R; Lavin, Matt

    2017-07-01

    The Andes are the world's longest mountain chain, and the tropical Andes are the world's richest biodiversity hot spot. The origin of the tropical Andean cordillera is relatively recent because the elevation of the mountains was relatively low (400-2500 m palaeoelevations) only 10 MYA with final uplift being rapid. These final phases of the Andean orogeny are thought to have had a fundamental role in shaping processes of biotic diversification and biogeography, with these effects reaching far from the mountains themselves by changing the course of rivers and deposition of mineral-rich Andean sediments across the massive Amazon basin. In a recent issue of Molecular Ecology, Oswald, Overcast, Mauck, Andersen, and Smith (2017) investigate the biogeography and diversification of bird species in the Andes of Peru and Ecuador. Their study is novel in its focus on tropical dry forests (Figure 1) rather than more mesic biomes such as rain forests, cloud forests and paramos, which tend to be the focus of science and conservation in the Andean hot spot. It is also able to draw powerful conclusions via the first deployment of genomic approaches to a biogeographic question in the threatened dry forests of the New World. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Volcanism and associated hazards: the Andean perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Tilling

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA, which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions" recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene.

    The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru. The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (<0.05 km3 in 1985 of Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia killed about 25 000 people – the worst volcanic disaster in the Andean region as well as the second worst in the world in the 20th century. The Ruiz tragedy has been attributed largely to ineffective communications of hazards information and indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent

  6. Sustainable extraction tripeperro (Philodendron longirrhizum M. Mora and Croat, Araceae) in the central Andes of Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Nestor; Galeano Gloria

    2009-01-01

    The tripeperro (Philodendron longirrhizum) is a widely distributed hemiepiphyte along the Andean region of Colombia. The aerial roots of this species have been employed as a source of fiber for the production of baskets and other handicrafts in the Eje Cafetero region (Cordillera Central). This activity is concentrated in the town of Filandia, in the Quindio state, where a decrease in the availability of appropriate roots for craftsmanship has been detected over the last years. In order to propose sustainable harvest alternatives, we evaluated the natural stock and product demand of tripeperro. Root production and life cycle, distribution of the harvested areas, harvest time and costs, and product demand were studied. It was found that tripeperro natural stock can only supply the demand for improve the economic benefits for artisans.

  7. The Link between Fluid Flow, Structure and Hydrothermal Inputs in Central Chile: An Interdisciplinary Approach for Low-Enthalpy Andean Hydrogeothermal Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arancibia, G.; Daniele, L.; Navarro, L.; Astudillo, F.; Vázquez, M.; Morata, D.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between fault zones and hydrogeological domains are an open challenge and require the understanding of the complex relationship between structure, fluid flow and hydrothermal transport and processes. Faults stimulate hydraulic conductivity when acting as conduit, but it can also be a barrier by mineral precipitation and comminution. Structural heterogeneity of fractured lithology induces a flow partition within the aquifer system creating preferential flows paths and some fracture connectivity. We propose an interdisciplinary approach from hydrogeological and structural point of view, in a low-enthalpy aquifer system in the central valley of Central Chile, where several low-temperature thermal springs are spatially related to regional long-lived fault zone (Pocuro Fault Zone). Pocuro Fault zone is a kilometric NS-striking steeply dipping fault zone, with at least 50 km long. Metric wide fault core includes gouge and cataclastic rocks, whereas decametric damage zone consists of intensely fractured and hydrothermal altered Meso-Cenozoic volcanic and volcaniclastic host rocks, crossed by centimetric to milimetric subvertical NE-striking veins. Preliminary results of vein infill clays minerals and zeolites from damage zone, suggest P-T conditions interpreted as an exhumed fossil high-temperature (120º-230ºC) geothermal system. Currently, only low-temperature thermal springs are discharging with different geochemical patterns (bicarbonate to chlorine and sulphate dominant ions) and a homogeneous temperature range (20º-25ºC). This is an interesting study case, to better understand the permeability evolution of geothermal system and the link between internal fault architecture, hydrogeology and hydrothermal inputs.

  8. New Paleomagnetic Results and Ar-Ar Geochronology From the Vallenar Region (29oS), N. Chile: Implications for the Timing of Rotations in the Andean Forearc Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, M. J.; Taylor, G. K.; Grocott, J.

    2001-12-01

    The Andean forearc in northern Chile comprises from west to east three tectonomorphic zones - the Coastal Cordillera, the Central Valley and the Precordillera/Chilean Altiplano which lie outboard of the High Andes which represent the present-day active magmatic/volcanic arc. In the Vallenar region the Coastal Cordillera passes directly eastward into the Precordillera with no Central Valley present. The Coastal Cordillera is composed of deformed Palaeozoic sediments intruded by Permo-Triassic plutons, which together comprise the basement of the region. This basement is intruded by Jurassic to Upper Cretaceous plutons of the Coastal Batholith, which is in part overlain by and intruded into Lower Cretaceous arc to back-arc sequences of volcanics and marine limestones. This region is separated from the Upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary volcanics and intrusives of the Precordillera to the east by a narrow deformational zone which extends for at least 200km along strike and which we believe to have formed as a result of sinistral transpression. New palaeomagnetic results from the westernmost part of the Lower Cretaceous batholith (n = 7/9 sites, dec = 35.5, inc = -45.0, {α }95 = 4.9), dated to between 130-128 Ma using Ar-Ar geochronology, reveal a well constrained clockwise rotation of 47 {+/-} 7o, consistent with previous results from further north in the Coastal Cordillera. Results from the easternmost pluton of the batholith, dated at 91 Ma, yields a characteristic direction (n = 9 sites, dec = 22.6, inc = -51.1, {α }95 = 4.5) and a rotation of 37 {+/-} 7o. The Coastal Cordillera - Precordillera boundary in this region is marked by an interbedded sequence of red sandstones and andesitic flows (the Punte del Cobre Fm.) overlain by limestones (Chanarcillo Gp.) which are here deformed in a relatively narrow (5-10km wide) fold and thrust belt. The characteristic magnetization of these units (n = 9 sites, dec = 31.5, inc = -50.7, α 95 = 4.3) clearly fails the fold

  9. Andean contributions to the biogeochemistry of the amazon river system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1995-01-01

    Atlántico. Un nuevo programa colaborativo de investigación se inició en 1994 con el propósito de caracterizar de una manera más completa la biogeoquímica de los ríos andinos. Contributions from Andean rivers may play a significant role in determining the basin-wide biogeochemistry integrated into the mainstem Amazon River of Brazil. Concentration data for organic C, NO3-, and PO43- in Andean rivers are highly variable and reveal no clear spatial or altitudinal patterns. Concentrations measured in Andean rivers are similar to those reported in the mainstem Amazon river and its major tributaries. Explanations of processes which alter Andean-derived particulates and solutes as they exit the Cordillera are only speculative at this time, but their net effect is to diminish Andean signals through decomposition and dilution by lowland inputs. The 13C of particulate and dissolved organic matter in the mainstem Amazon provides evidence that some fraction of Andean derived material persists within the river system, ultimately to be discharged to the Atlantic Ocean. In 1994 a new collaborative research program was launched to further characterize the biogeochemistry of Andean rivers.

  10. Hemoglobin affinity in Andean rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HRVOJ OSTOJIC

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood hemoglobin oxygen affinity (P50 was measured in three Andean species and in the laboratory rat (control, all raised near sea level. Chinchilla lanigera (Molina, 1792 has an altitudinal habitat range from low Andean slopes up to 3000 m., while Chinchilla brevicaudata (Waterhouse, 1848 has an altitudinal range from 3000 to 5000 m. The laboratory type guinea pig, wild type guinea pig (Cavia porcellus, (Waterhouse, 1748, and laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus were also raised at sea level. The Andean species had high hemoglobin oxygen affinities (low P50 compared with the rat. Chinchilla brevicaudata had a higher affinity than Chinchilla lanigera. The wild type guinea pig had a higher affinity than the laboratory type. As has been shown in other species, this is another example of an inverse correlation between the altitude level and the P50 values. This is the first hemoglobin oxygen affinity study in Chinchilla brevicaudata.

  11. Geodynamic controls on the contamination of Cenozoic arc magmas in the southern Central Andes: Insights from the O and Hf isotopic composition of zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rosemary E.; Kirstein, Linda A.; Kasemann, Simone A.; Dhuime, Bruno; Elliott, Tim; Litvak, Vanesa D.; Alonso, Ricardo; Hinton, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Subduction zones, such as the Andean convergent margin of South America, are sites of active continental growth and crustal recycling. The composition of arc magmas, and therefore new continental crust, reflects variable contributions from mantle, crustal and subducted reservoirs. Temporal (Ma) and spatial (km) variations in these contributions to southern Central Andean arc magmas are investigated in relation to the changing plate geometry and geodynamic setting of the southern Central Andes (28-32° S) during the Cenozoic. The in-situ analysis of O and Hf isotopes in zircon, from both intrusive (granitoids) and extrusive (basaltic andesites to rhyolites) Late Cretaceous - Late Miocene arc magmatic rocks, combined with high resolution U-Pb dating, demonstrates distinct across-arc variations. Mantle-like δ18O(zircon) values (+5.4‰ to +5.7‰ (±0.4 (2σ))) and juvenile initial εHf(zircon) values (+8.3 (±0.8 (2σ)) to +10.0 (±0.9 (2σ))), combined with a lack of zircon inheritance suggests that the Late Cretaceous (∼73 Ma) to Eocene (∼39 Ma) granitoids emplaced in the Principal Cordillera of Chile formed from mantle-derived melts with very limited interaction with continental crustal material, therefore representing a sustained period of upper crustal growth. Late Eocene (∼36 Ma) to Early Miocene (∼17 Ma) volcanic arc rocks present in the Frontal Cordillera have 'mantle-like' δ18O(zircon) values (+4.8‰ (±0.2 (2σ) to +5.8‰ (±0.5 (2σ))), but less radiogenic initial εHf(zircon) values (+1.0 (±1.1 (2σ)) to +4.0 (±0.6 (2σ))) providing evidence for mixing of mantle-derived melts with the Late Paleozoic - Early Mesozoic basement (up to ∼20%). The assimilation of both Late Paleozoic - Early Mesozoic Andean crust and a Grenville-aged basement is required to produce the higher than 'mantle-like' δ18O(zircon) values (+5.5‰ (±0.6 (2σ) to +7.2‰ (±0.4 (2σ))) and unradiogenic, initial εHf(zircon) values (-3.9 (±1.0 (2σ)) to +1.6 (±4.4 (2

  12. Barren Miocene granitoids in the Central Andean metallogenic belt, Chile: Geochemistry and Nd-Hf and U-Pb isotope systematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deckart, Katja; Godoy, Estanislao; Bertens, Alfredo; Jerez, Daniela; Saeed, Ayesha

    2010-01-01

    Four Middle-to-Late Miocene barren plutonic complexes that occur between the giant porphyry copper deposits of the central Chilean Andes were selected for U-Pb LA-ICPMS geochronology and Hf-isotope systematics on single zircon grains. Major and trace elements and Sr-Nd-Hf isotope whole rock geochemical studies were undertaken to compare with slightly younger or coeval barren and fertile intrusive rocks between 32 o and 34 o S. The studied granitoids yield resolvable crystallization ages of 11.3±0.1 Ma (Cerro Meson Alto massif), 10.3±0.2 Ma (La Gloria pluton), 14.9±0.2 Ma/14.9±0.1 Ma (Yerba Loca stock) and 11.2±0.1 Ma/14.7±0.1 Ma (San Francisco Batholith). Major and trace elements discard an adakitic signature as suggested for coeval porphyric intrusions at 32 o S, slightly younger mineralized porphyries at Rio Blanco-Los Bronces deposit and other Cenozoic adakites. Volcanic host rocks are less fractionated than the intrusive rock units. The same observation can be made for the unmineralized northern plutons compared to the southern ones. Initial Sr-Nd isotope data show insignificant variation (0.703761-0.704118 and 0.512758- 0.512882), plotting in the mantle array. Trace element enrichment can be explained by addition of subducted-slab fluids and/or terrigenous sediments to the mantle wedge prior to and/or slight crustal input during magma ascent. Zircon grains separated from these barren intrusives share a similar initial εHf-data variation for the younger age group (10-12 Ma; 7.04-9.54) and show a more scattered range for the older one (14-15 Ma; 8.50-15.34); both sets plot between the DM and CHUR evolution lines. There is evidence that magma evolution was slightly distinct through time from older to younger barren magmatism, compared to a few fertile porphyritic rocks from Rio Blanco-Los Bronces porphyry copper deposit. It is suggested that chronological inconsistencies within these complexes might be related to differential shortening across the NE

  13. The basement of the Eastern Cordillera, Colombia: An allochthonous terrane in northwestern South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero Suarez, A.

    The fault system of the Borde Llanero of Colombia represents the limit between two early Paleozoic geologic provinces: the Guiana Shield (Gondwana) to the east, and an allochthonous terrane — formerly a piece of the North American continent — to the west. The Baudó Range, the Western Cordillera, and the western flank of the Central Cordillera are the result of post-Jurassic accretion. In contrast the pre-Emsian metamorphic rocks of the eastern flank of the Central Cordillera, of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia, and of the Mérida Andes correspond to an allochthonous terrane that was accreted to the north-western continental border of South America during the collision between North America and Gondwana in Silurian-Early Devonian times. Geochronologic and petrographic data indicate the presence of the Grenvillian granulite belt, represented by the Garzón-Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta belt. This belt is separated from the Guiana Shield by a magmatic tract which is parallel to the Borde Llanero of Venezuela and Colombia. The late Paleozoic regional metamorphism in the Northern Andes of Colombia occurred during Late Silurian-Early Devonian times. Since the late Emsian, a sedimentary cycle was initiated on this allochthonous basement. The faunal records of northwestern South America and the North American continent are indistinguishable for that time. This similarity clearly shows that both northwestern South America and the North American regions of the Appalachians and New Mexico belong to the same paleobiogeographic province. The faunal communication in this case supports the idea of the immediate neighborhood of the two continents.

  14. Preliminary phylogenetic analysis of the Andean clade and the placement of new Colombian blueberries (Ericaceae, Vaccinieae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Pedraza-Penalosa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The blueberry tribe Vaccinieae (Ericaceae is particularly diverse in South America and underwent extensive radiation in Colombia where many endemics occur. Recent fieldwork in Colombia has resulted in valuable additions to the phylogeny and as well in the discovery of morphologically noteworthy new species that need to be phylogenetically placed before being named. This is particularly important, as the monophyly of many of the studied genera have not been confirmed. In order to advance our understanding of the relationships within neotropical Vaccinieae and advice the taxonomy of the new blueberry relatives, here we present the most comprehensive phylogenetic analysis for the Andean clade. Anthopterus, Demosthenesia, and Pellegrinia are among the putative Andean genera recovered as monophyletic, while other eight Andean genera were not. The analyses also showed that genera that have been traditionally widely defined are non-monophyletic and could be further split into more discrete groups. Four newly discovered Colombian Vaccinieae are placed in the monophyletic Satyria s.s. and the Psammisia I clade. Although these new species are endemic to the Colombian Western Cordillera and Chocó biogeographic region and three are not known outside of Las Orquídeas National Park, they do not form sister pairs.

  15. [Diversity and dynamics of a high sub-Andean forest from Northern Andes, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Jesús Oswaldo Velásquez; Maniguaje, Nancy Lorena; Duque, Alvaro Javier

    2012-06-01

    The sub-Andean forests are characterized by a high biodiversity, but little is known about their natural dynamics. In order to generate new information, this study assessed two permanent plots of one hectare each, in the Northern Andean area of the Western Cordillera, Colombia. Methodology included the evaluation of diversity patterns, above ground biomass (AGB) dynamics, and mortality and recruitment rates. Besides, we used the Fisher's Alpha index to calculate species diversity. Forest dynamics and AGB were evaluated in both plots by means of three censuses carried out within a nine years period. In total, we found 1 664 individuals with diameter at breast height (DBH)> or =10cm belonging to 222 species, 113 genera and 60 families. Mean species richness was of 156 species/ha and a mean Fisher's Alpha index of 56.2/ha. The mortality rate was 0.88% and recruitment was 1.16%, which did not allow to lay any external effect of global warming or climate change on individual forest dynamics. However, the mean AGB was 243.44+/-9.82t/ha, with an annual average increase of 2.9t/ha, a higher value than the one reported in other studies of high sub-Andean forests, which suggests that equilibrium in terms of the AGB have not yet been reached. Besides, according to field observations, a recovery process, from a disturbance that occurred in the past, might be on his way.

  16. CARACTERIZACIÓN FÍSIOGRÁFICA DE LA PUNA DE SAJAMA, CORDILLERA OCCIDENTAL DE LOS ANDES (BOLIVIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Javier Santa Cecilia Mateos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo aproxima a la realidad física de la cordillera Occidental de los Andes. Un espacio geográfico donde los caracteres geológicos relacionados con el vulcanismo adquieren una relevancia especial en la configuración del paisaje andino. Los nevados y llanuras intermedias o altiplanos, son los dos elementos que constituyen la imagen de la puna andina, un territorio situado por encima de los 4.000 metros, ámbito intermedio entre los valles húmedos o yungas y las más altas cumbres de los Andes. A la singularidad volcánica habría que añadir la relacionada con el modelado glaciar, los aspectos hidrográficos y la biogeografia en esta área. El artículo toma como ejemplo de estudio la puna de Sajama en eldepartamento de Oruro, en la frontera boliviano-chilena.Abstract. This article approaches the physical reality of the Western Cordillera of the Andes. A geographical space where characters related geological volcanism are of particular importance in shaping the landscape Andean. The intermediate plains or mountains and plateaus, are the two elements that make up the image of the Andean puna, an area located above 4,000 meters, the middle ground between Yungas wet valley and the highest peaks of the Andes. A volcanic uniqueness should add that related to glacier modeling, hydrographic aspects and biogeography in this area. The article uses the example of the highlands of Sajama study in thedepartment of Oruro in Bolivian-Chilean border.

  17. Modelling beta diversity of aquatic macroinvertebrates in High Andean wetlands

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Nieto; Daniel A. Dos Santos; Andrea E. Izquierdo; José S. Rodríguez; Héctor R. Grau

    2017-01-01

    Central Andean Highlands represent a singular environment characterized by various extreme conditions. Among them, peatbogs are exceptional marshy habitats scattered throughout this arid and harsh area. In an effort to understand the patterns of beta diversity, we sampled the benthic macroinvertebrates of thirteen peatbogs and related the biological distance with ecological distance using the GDM (Generalized Dissimilarity Modelling) approach. Variables analyzed were altitude, geographical di...

  18. THE PAIPA VOLCANO, EASTERN CORDILLERA OF COLOMBIA, SOUTH AMERICA (PART II: PETROGRAPHY AND MAJOR ELEMENTS PETROLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cepeda Héctor

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Paipa volcano products are mainly pyroclastic pumice and ash flow tuffs, lava domes and pyroclastic block and ash flow tuffs. They are classified as alkaline rhyolites and trachytes and high-K calcalkaline rhyolites. Chemical data show SiO2 values between 68 and 72%, and alkalis (Na2O+K2O content of 7%-10%. Essential minerals are phenocrysts and glomerocrysts of anorthoclase, sanidine up to 1,5 cm and anorthoclase-mantled plagioclase; accessory minerals are red biotite, and hastingsite while trace minerals are augite, zircon, sphene and magnetite. Crystals have disequilibrium textures, such as dissolution embayments, corrosion and reabsortion borders, normal, inverse, oscillating and patchy zonation, together with fibrous borders intercalated with euhedral borders. In correlation with published data of Iza volcanic rocks, Paipa rocks chemical composition confirms that acid and alkaline magmas that have erupted in the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia during the Neogene are strongly different from the calc-alkaline magmas that erupt in the westward active arc (Central Cordillera. Detailed structural, geochemical and geophysical research has to be done in future research to establish the geodynamic framework that governs the volcanism of the Eastern Cordillera.

  19. Proglacial hydrology in the tropical Andes: lessons from the Cordillera Blanca, Peru (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, J. M.; Mark, B. G.; Baraer, M.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the complexities of tropical Andean hydrology is critical for managing modern water resources and interpreting paleohydrologic records. Glaciers are the most visible component of these systems, responding to global climate change and acting as critical hydrologic reservoirs. Tropical Andean glaciers are undergoing rapid retreat with complex impacts on the downstream hydrology. Groundwater is also an important component of the Andean regional hydrologic system, but its contribution is difficult to assess due to remote site access, minimal baseline data, and lack of continuous historical discharge and precipitation measurements. We have synthesized hydrochemical data from synoptically sampled glacial melt water, groundwater, precipitation, and stream discharge collected intermittently between 1998 and July 2008 throughout the Callejon de Huaylas, a 5000 km2 watershed that drains the western side of the Cordillera Blanca in northern Perú. Our data from 2004 to 2006 show systematic annual shifts in the isotopic ratios (δ18O and δ2H) of river water, indicating an increase in glacial melt water input, and we are able to use these changes across the Cordillera Blanca to estimate an average increase of 1.6 (± 1.1) % in the specific discharge of the glacierized basins. Enhanced total stream discharge in more glacierized catchments (>20% glacier area) is demonstrated by a significant positive trend in a 43-year discharge anomaly record. Our hydrochemical basin characterization method (HBCM) uses chemical mass balance mixing to quantify the contribution of glacial melt water, groundwater, and surface runoff to streams for different valleys and nested watersheds in the Callejon de Huaylas. The Yanamarey basin (7% glaciated) has been observed since 1998 and the HBCM results show good agreement with measured stream discharge (maximum R2 of 0.99) for monthly cumulative values. These results suggest that for most of the studied years groundwater is the main

  20. Snakes of an urban-rural landscape in the central Andes of Colombia: species composition, distribution, and natural history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Andrés Rojas-Morales

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available From 2005 to 2011, I studied the composition, distribution and natural history of an Andean urban-rural snake assemblage at the Cordillera Central of Colombia, based on three data sources: (1 examination of specimens in the MHN-UC [Museo de Historia Natural, Universidad de Caldas], (2 incidental encounters by author, and (3 collection of data by other researchers. Additionally, I provide natural history notes for the species involved. A total of 14 species, including two subspecies of snakes, belonging to 12 genera and four families, have been found in the studied area (municipality of Manizales, Caldas. Taking into account this total, 10 had atleast one record in the urban area, 13 in the rural area and 14 in forested areas. Only Liophis epinephelus bimaculatus was found exclusively in forest environment. Three species (21.4% are apparently endemic to the region, six species (42.8% correspond to afauna representative of the Tropical–Andean range of South America, four species (28.5% are distributed from Central America to the tropical Andes, and only one species is widely distributed in the whole continent. The snake assemblage in Manizales is mostly terrestrial, and in general, the species tend to be more active in the rainy periods of the year (mainly from October–December, and most of them may occasionally be found in urban areas, mainly close to areas of vegetation such as crops and pastures.

  1. Disentangling Topographic and Climatic Change during the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic in the Western US Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, K. E.; Eiler, J. M.; Wernicke, B. P.; Peppe, D. J.; Fox, D. L.; Fetrow, A. C.; Passey, B. H.

    2014-12-01

    A diverse suite of tectonic and climatic drivers influenced the topographic evolution of the western USA Cordillera. Despite years of study, considerable uncertainty remains about fundamentals of this evolution, such as the timing and magnitude of maximum average elevations for the different physiographic provinces; the drivers and topographic effects of different episodes of extension during the Cenozoic; and the relative relief of peaks and intermontane basins within the Cordillera at different times and in different places. Numerous tectonic models have been developed to explain the evolution of the Cordillera, and understanding these details is key for distinguishing between these different models. In addition, the topographic changes in the Cordillera have important implications for regional and local climate of the western US at different times in the past, and may drive important differences in local climatic responses to global climate changes through the Cenozoic. The majority of the tools that currently exist for quantitatively reconstructing changes in topography through time and space rely on paleoclimate proxy data. Thus it is also important to be able to disentangle climatic change from elevation change in terrestrial paleoclimate records. To address some of these outstanding questions, we have generated and compiled paleotemperature estimates from the Late Cretaceous through the Miocene of the western US. In this presentation, we will focus on the latest installment of the project, which utilizes Oligocene paleotemperature records from central Utah and South Dakota and Miocene-Holocene paleotemperature records from Kansas. The data are dominantly composed of mean annual temperature estimates from leaf margin analysis and summer temperature estimates from carbonate clumped isotope thermometry. We will discuss how these data compare to temperature data from the Paleogene from the western US, what general trends exist within all the data and how these

  2. Cordillera Blanca: glaciares en la historia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available CORDILLERE BLANCHE - DES GLACIERS DANS L’HISTOIRE. La plus vaste couverture glaciaire de l’entre-tropiques n’apparaît comme un objet d’études que très tard, à la fin du XIXème siècle et, surtout grâce aux expéditions austro-allemandes, à partir des années 1930-1940. Le développement de l’alpinisme et un grand nombre de catastrophes meurtrières associées à la dynamique de ces glaciers (rupture de lacs de barrage morainique, avalanches ont attiré l’attention sur eux et suscité des recherches glaciologiques. En 1980, ils comptent parmi les mieux surveillés des glaciers tropicaux, d’abord grâce à un programme d’étude développé par les Péruviens eux-mêmes. à un moment où le réchauffement global fait craindre un recul très important de la glaciation dans la zone tropicale, les glaciers de la Cordillère Blanche deviennent d’excellents indicateurs de l’évolution climatique en cours et la ressource en eau qui leur est associée constitue à la fois un sujet d’étude et un enjeu économique de haute importance. La más vasta cobertura glaciar situada entre los trópicos aparece como objeto de estudio relativamente tarde, a fines del siglo XIX, sobre todo gracias a las expediciones austro alemanas a partir de los años 1930-1940. El desarrollo del alpinismo y un gran número de catástrofes mortales asociadas a la dinámica de estos glaciares (rotura de lagunas de represa morrénica, avalanchas atrajeron la atención y suscitaron investigaciones glaciológicas. En 1980, se encuentran entre los mejor monitoreados de los glaciares tropicales, primero, gracias a un programa de estudio desarrollado por los peruanos. En un momento en que el recalentamiento global hace temer un retroceso muy importante de la glaciación en la zona tropical, los glaciares de la Cordillera Blanca se convierten en excelentes indicadores de la evolución climática en curso y el recurso hídrico que se les asocia constituye a la vez un tema

  3. K-Ar dates from the Altiplano and Cordillera Oriental of Bolivia: implications for Cenozoic stratigraphy and tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennan, L.; Lamb, S.; Rundle, C.

    1995-04-01

    New K-Ar dates from tuffs, lavas and granites, collected in the Bolivian Altiplano and Cordillera Oriental, constrain the evolution of the Bolivian Andes. A phlogopite megacryst from a post-cleavage kimberlite dike near Independencia gave an age of ca. 98 Ma. In the central Altiplano, a widespread suite of basaltic to andesitic lavas, sills and rhyolitic tuffs has yielded dates of 25-22 Ma, coeval with the first major influx of conglomerates in the central Altiplano basin. Rapid early Miocene erosion of the Cordillera Oriental is suggested by biotites from the Quimsa Cruz Granite in the Cordillera Oriental, which vary in age between 32-22 Ma, and also by zircon fission track data. Gentle folding in the Cordillera Oriental near Potosi pre-dates the early Miocene Mondragon Formation which contains a ca. 19 Ma ignimbrite near its base. Further folding here occurred prior to the eruption of the flat-lying ca. 7 Ma ignimbrites of the Condor Nasa Meseta and ca. 12 Ma ignimbrites from the central Los Frailes Meseta. Intense folding in the central Altiplano also occurred between 9 Ma and 5 Ma, and younger tuffs are only slightly tilted. In the Cochabamba region, sedimentary infill of the Parotani Basin contains a ca. 20 Ma tuff horizon, and folded tuffs from the nearby Sacaba Basin have been dated at ca. 2.2 Ma. These ages suggest a protracted history for associated basin-margin ESE sinistral strike-slip and normal faults. However, regional folding pre-dates the San Juan del Oro Surface, which formed an extensive flatlying peneplain, preserved at ca. 3000 m in the central and eastern Cordillera Oriental. The age of valley-fill tuffs suggest that dissection of this surface had commenced in the Cochabamba region by 6.5 Ma. However, near Sucre, flat-lying tuffs, dated between 3.5 and 1.4 Ma, mantle the surface and predate the deep Pleistocene dissection of the central Cordillera Oriental. Deformation has been concentrated in the Subandean foreland thrust belt since the

  4. VARIABILIDAD ESPACIAL DE PROPIEDADES QUÍMICAS Y FÍSICAS EN UN TYPIC UDIVITRANDS, ARENOSO DE LA REGIÓN ANDINA CENTRAL COLOMBIANA SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A SANDY TYPIC UDIVITRANDS IN THE COLOMBIAN CENTRAL ANDEAN ZONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Humberto Obando Moncayo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la variabilidad espacial de propiedades químicas y físicas en un Typic Udivitrands arenoso de la granja experimental Tesorito de la Universidad de Caldas, ubicado en la Cordillera Central Colombiana a 5º 01’47” N, 75º 26’ 03” W y 2280 msnm. El área experimental se localiza en un Piedemonte Coluvial, con un manejo antecedente y actual en pastos, frutales de clima frío moderado y hortalizas. Se realizó un muestreo sistemático en red con una distancia aproximada entre sitios de muestreo de 30 m en un área efectiva de 3,96 ha; para un total de 60 sitios. El análisis geoestadístico se llevó a cabo en tres etapas: 1 análisis exploratorio de los datos utilizando los software Statgraphics Plus v 2.0 y SPSS 9.0, 2 análisis estructural o semivariografía. 3 interpolación por el método Kriging puntual utilizando el paquete geoestadístico GS+ versión 5.3b. Los modelos esférico y exponencial fueron los de mejor ajuste a los modelos experimentales excepto para el DPM, que se ajustó a un modelo lineal (Nugget puro. El alcance para las variables analizadas se encuentra dentro de la distancia máxima ( 350 m del área de muestreo considerada para el cálculo de los semivariogramas, excepto para el fósforo que presento un alcance de 479,4 metros. El alcance fluctuó entre 33,9 m para el Na y 308,5 m para el DPM. La variabilidad espacial de atributos del suelo en el predio experimental es alta, siendo mayor en propiedades químicas, igualmente, permitió visualizar la variabilidad espacial del deterioro estructural del suelo coincidiendo con la zona de mayor variabilidad química.A study of the spatial variability of the chemical and physical properties of a Sandy Typic Udivitrands was conducted in the Tesorito Experimental Farm of Universidad de Caldas, located in the Colombian Central Cordillera at 5º 01’47” N, 75º 26’ 03” W and 2280 m elevation. The experimental plot was located in a Coluvial Piedmont with

  5. Regional polyphase deformation of the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas (Argentina Andean foreland): strengths and weaknesses of paleostress inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traforti, Anna; Zampieri, Dario; Massironi, Matteo; Viola, Giulio; Alvarado, Patricia; Di Toro, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    The Eastern Sierras Pampeanas of central Argentina are composed of a series of basement-cored ranges, located in the Andean foreland c. 600 km east of the Andean Cordillera. Although uplift of the ranges is partly attributed to the regional Neogene evolution (Ramos et al. 2002), many questions remain as to the timing and style of deformation. In fact, the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas show compelling evidence of a long lasting brittle history (spanning the Early Carboniferous to Present time), characterised by several deformation events reflecting different tectonic regimes. Each deformation phase resulted in further strain increments accommodated by reactivation of inherited structures and rheological anisotropies (Martino 2003). In the framework of such a polyphase brittle tectonic evolution affecting highly anisotropic basement rocks, the application of paleostress inversion methods, though powerful, suffers from some shortcomings, such as the likely heterogeneous character of fault slip datasets and the possible reactivation of even highly misoriented structures, and thus requires careful analysis. The challenge is to gather sufficient fault-slip data, to develop a proper understanding of the regional evolution. This is done by the identification of internally consistent fault and fracture subsets (associated to distinct stress states on the basis of their geometric and kinematic compatibility) in order to generate a chronologically-constrained evolutionary conceptual model. Based on large fault-slip datasets collected in the Sierras de Cordoba (Eastern Sierras Pampeanas), reduced stress tensors have been generated and interpreted as part of an evolutionary model by considering the obtained results against: (i) existing K-Ar illite ages of fault gouges in the study area (Bense et al. 2013), (ii) the nature and orientation of pre-existing anisotropies and (iii) the present-day stress field due to the convergence of the Nazca and South America plates (main shortening

  6. Exploring the potential of an Andean fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivares Tenorio, Mary Luz

    2017-01-01

    Cape gooseberry is a fruit cultivated in Andean countries. Currently it is available some international markets, besides the domestic Andean market. Colombia is the major producer and export country at the moment. The value chain of cape gooseberry faces several barriers of technological and

  7. 77 FR 31039 - Andean Trade Preference Act: Impact on the U.S. Economy and on Andean Drug Crop Eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 332-352] Andean Trade Preference Act: Impact on the U.S. Economy and on Andean Drug Crop Eradication AGENCY: United States International Trade.... 332-352, Andean Trade Preference Act: Impact on the U.S. Economy and on Andean Drug Crop Eradication...

  8. Administrative Law in the Andean Community of Nations

    OpenAIRE

    Santos Rodríguez, Jorge Enrique

    2013-01-01

    One of the contemporary tendencies of Administrative Law is the recognition of its existence beyond the borders of a State. Under such premise, this paper aims to demonstrate that in the Andean Community of Nations sufficient elements to consider the existence of an Andean administrative Law. In the Andean statutes and rules, it is possible to identify an administrative function, as well as an administrative organization inside the Andean Integration System; and a system of Andean administrat...

  9. Identification of aquifer limits inside an Andean Piedmont (between 19,5°S and 20°S - Northern Chile) with TDEM and gauging methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viguier, Benoit; Jourde, Hervé; Leonardi, Véronique; Moya, Claudio; Líra, Elias; Yáñez, Gonzalo; Maringue, José; García-Pérez, Tiaren; Lictevout, Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    In times of brutal climate changes and water scarcity in arid areas, the management of water resource has become a major issue. In this aim, several studies attempted to quantify the aquifer recharge and hydrodynamic processes. However, the quality of many studies depends on the characterization of aquifer boundaries. In arid areas, the amount of observation points (e.g. wells) and their spatial distribution constrain the understanding of aquifer boundaries spatial variations. In this study, we propose a methodology to characterize both water table level and boundaries of aquifer in such areas where the observation points do not exist. The Andean Piedmont (between 19,5°S and 20°S - Northern Chile) is located in the Pampa del Tamarugal Central Depression and is bounded respectively at the westside and the eastside by the Coastal Cordillera (1100 m a.s.l) and the Precordillera mountain range (4500 m a.s.l). The piedmont and the basin floor are composed of the late-Cenozoic alluvial deposits (hundred meters thick) which contain the Pampa del Tamarugal aquifer. Due to the hyperarid context, this regional aquifer is one of the main strategic groundwater resources in Northern Chile. This aquifer is mainly unconfined and the electrical conductivity of groundwater varies around 3000 μS/cm in the study area. The analysis of resistivity variation with depth, acquired by Time Domain Electromagnetic (TDEM) method in various points inside the piedmont, allow identifying a continuous resistivity contrast (from ≥ 100-40 Ω.m to ≤ 10 Ω.m) that varies over the study area. This continuous resistivity contrast is assumed to be related to the water table of the unconfined aquifer rather than to a lithology contrast. After validation of the observations, a piezometric map was constructed using both the available hydrogeological information and the TDEM results. In the piedmont, river sink were identified; these zones where surface water sinks are correlated with the resistivity

  10. Delineating priority habitat areas for the conservation of Andean bears in northern Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralvo, M.F.; Cuesta, F.; Van Manen, F.

    2005-01-01

    We sought to identify priority areas for the conservation of Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus) habitat in the northern portion of the eastern Andean cordillera in Ecuador. The study area included pa??ramo and montane forest habitats within the Antisana and Cayambe-Coca ecological reserves, and unprotected areas north of these reserves with elevations ranging from 1,800 to 4,300 m. We collected data on bear occurrence along 53 transects during 2000-01 in the Oyacachi River basin, an area of indigenous communities within the Cayambe-Coca Ecological Reserve. We used those data and a set of 7 environmental variables to predict suitability of Andean bear habitat using Mahalanobis distance, a multivariate measure of dissimilarity. The Mahalanobis distance values were classified into 5 classes of habitat suitability and generalized to a resolution of 1,650-m ?? 1,650-m grid cells. Clusters of grid cells with high suitability values were delineated from the generalized model and denned as important habitat areas (IHAs) for conservation. The IHAs were ranked using a weighted index that included factors of elevation range, influence from disturbed areas, and current conservation status. We identified 12 IHAs, which were mainly associated with pa??ramo and cloud forest habitats; 2 of these areas have high conservation priorities because they are outside existing reserves and close to areas of human pressure. The distribution of the IHAs highlighted the role of human land use as the main source of fragmentation of Andean bear habitat in this region, emphasizing the importance of preserving habitat connectivity to allow the seasonal movements among habitat types that we documented for this species. Furthermore, the existence of areas with high habitat suitability close to areas of intense human use indicates the importance of bear-human conflict management as a critical Andean bear conservation strategy. We suggest that a promising conservation opportunity for this species is

  11. Late Cenozoic basin evolution and fold-thrust deformation in the southern Central Andes: Initial constraints from synorogenic deposits of the Precordillera, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levina, M.; Horton, B. K.; Fuentes, F.; Stockli, D. F.

    2012-12-01

    In the Precordillera region of the Argentine Andes, Cenozoic shortening associated with flattening of the Pampean segment of the subducting Nazca plate has resulted in a series of thin skinned fold-thrust systems that partitioned and uplifted Cenozoic foreland basin deposits. The kinematic and temporal evolution of the Andean Precordillera can be approached through detailed analyses of the sedimentary fill now preserved in intermontane regions and the bedrock low-temperature thermochronology of the fold-thrust belt. In this project, we focus on Neogene foreland basin fill exposed in the central and eastern Precordillera along the San Juan River (Quebrada Albarracín and Pachaco regions), on the western flank of the Sierra Talacasto, and in the Loma de las Tapias area near the Ullum dam. The sedimentary successions exposed in these regions record the hinterland development of the Frontal Cordillera (detrital zircon provenance and composition of sandstone and conglomeratic units), regional volcanism (pyroclastic flows and tuffaceous sandstone units), and initial construction of the Precordillera (fault cutoff relationships, growth strata, and paleocurrent changes). We investigate the development and subsequent partitioning and deformation of these synorogenic sections using sediment provenance (detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology, conglomerate clast counts, sandstone petrography, and paleocurrent measurements), facies analysis of measured stratigraphic successions, and initial apatite (U-Th)/He cooling histories to constrain the age of uplift-induced exhumation of successive thrust sheets in the Andean Precordillera.

  12. What controls millennial-scale denudation rates across the Central Andes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Gerold; Korup, Oliver; Schlunegger, Fritz; Kober, Florian

    2015-04-01

    depends largely on the location within the orogen, causing a strong segmentation reflected by metrics of slope (plane versus cordillera) and precipitation (desert versus tropical rain forest). This regional pattern, contained in larger catchments, is superimposed by a local pattern, revealed in mid- to small-sized catchments. Yet a substantial fraction of the overall variance in denudation rates remains unexplained. We discuss possible reasons for this, and reflect on the prospect of predicting denudation rates in ungauged Central Andean catchments.

  13. Prices and Politics in Andean Water Reforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, R.A.; Zwarteveen, M.Z.

    2005-01-01

    Water rights are best understood as politically contested and culturally embedded relationships among different social actors. In the Andean region, existing rights of irrigators¿ collectives often embody historical struggles over resources, rules, authorities and identities. This article argues,

  14. Exploring the potential of an Andean fruit

    OpenAIRE

    Olivares Tenorio, Mary Luz

    2017-01-01

    Cape gooseberry is a fruit cultivated in Andean countries. Currently it is available some international markets, besides the domestic Andean market. Colombia is the major producer and export country at the moment. The value chain of cape gooseberry faces several barriers of technological and governance nature.  This research is an interdisciplinary study on the Colombian cape gooseberry value chain. It aimed to evaluate quality attributes of the fruit during the supply chain, including t...

  15. Calcite Twin Analysis in the Central Andes of Northern Argentina and Southern Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, E.; Hindle, D.

    2005-12-01

    The use of calcite twinning to infer compression directions and strain axes patterns has been applied widely in both fold and thrust belts, and continental interiors. Calcite twinning is noted to be one of the most precise methods for determining the internal strain of deformed rocks. Until now, such data from the deformed plate boundary of the Central Andes were lacking. This study has examined twinning orientations along the deformed Andean foreland (southern Bolivia and northern Argentina) from -25 to -20 latitude. In the Central Andes, we find an abundance of calcite twins in intervals of the Cretaceous age Yacorite limestone. Twin samples were collected, measured for orientation and type (I and II can be best used for strain analysis), and processed using the Groshong method, to give resultant strain tensors. The orientations of the twin short axes trend mostly NE-SW, which is close to the plate convergence direction. However, in a limited number of samples from the north, adjacent to the southern culmination of the active Subandean fold thrust belt, they trend NW-SE. This difference may be related to the more active, or more recent, shortening of the southern portion of the Eastern Cordillera, south of the culmination of the Subandean belt. This implies that twin short axes vary consistently with respect to geographic location and local tectonic regime. NW-SE trends in the northern region match well with fault kinematic studies in rocks pre-dating the San Juan del Oro unconformity (9-10 Ma). NE-SW trends in the south could correspond to much younger (~1-3 Ma) fault kinematic trends. In the Eastern Cordillera, where there is present day tectonic activity, the plunges of the twin short axes are found to be almost horizontal. This suggests that the twins were formed after folding occurred.

  16. Lost crops of the Incas: Origins of domestication of the Andean pulse crop tarwi, Lupinus mutabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Guy W; Nevado, Bruno; Eastwood, Ruth J; Contreras-Ortiz, Natalia; Reynel, Carlos; Madriñán, Santiago; Filatov, Dmitry A; Hughes, Colin E

    2016-09-01

    The Andean highlands are a hotspot of domestication, yet our understanding of the origins of early Andean agriculture remains fragmentary. Key questions of where, when, how many times, and from what progenitors many Andean crops were domesticated remain unanswered. The Andean lupine crop tarwi (Lupinus mutabilis) is a regionally important pulse crop with exceptionally high seed protein and oil content and is the focus of modern breeding efforts, but its origins remain obscure. A large genome-wide DNA polymorphism data set was generated using nextRADseq to infer relationships among more than 200 accessions of Andean Lupinus species, including 24 accessions of L. mutabilis and close relatives. Phylogenetic and demographic analyses were used to identify the likely progenitor of tarwi and elucidate the area and timing of domestication in combination with archaeological evidence. We infer that tarwi was domesticated once in northern Peru, most likely in the Cajamarca region within, or adjacent to the extant distribution of L. piurensis, which is the most likely wild progenitor. Demographic analyses suggest that tarwi split from L. piurensis around 2600 BP and suffered a classical domestication bottleneck. The earliest unequivocal archaeological evidence of domesticated tarwi seeds is from the Mantaro Valley, central Peru ca. 1800 BP. A single origin of tarwi from L. piurensis in northern Peru provides a robust working hypothesis for the domestication of this regionally important crop and is one of the first clear-cut examples of a crop originating in the highlands of northern Peru. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  17. A new species of broad-headed eleutherodactylus from the cordillera occidental of Colombia (Amphibia, Leptodactylidae A new species of Broad-Headed Eleutherodactylus from the Cordillera Occidental of Colombia (Amphibia, Leptodactylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch John D.

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available The broad-headed eleutherodactyline frogs have been studied by Lynch(1975, 1981. Although frogs of this assembly are easily identified (Lynch,1975, 1976, 1981, the assembly is not a natural group (Lynch, 1986.Recently, Rivero (1984 described a new species, E. sernai, from westernAntioquia, Colombia. Although Rivero associated E. sernai with thebiporcatus group, the species appears to be a member of the sulcatus group(because it possesses the plesiornorphic condition of the mandibular musclesadductors and the trigeminal nerve mandibular ramus. However, this characteristicis not sufficient to place E. sernai within the sulcatus group; theassignment will be defended in a future paper on the osteology of the variousspecies of the group. For the moment, the sulcatus group contains thefollowing species: E. cerasies Lynch, E. cornutus (Jimenez de la Espada,E. helonotus (Lynch, E. ingeri (Cochran and Gain, E. ruizi Lynch, E.sernai Rivero, and E. sulcatus Se describe Eleutherodactylus cadenai sp. nov. de las selvas de la vertiente occidental de la Cordillera Occidental de Colombia (corregimiento .de Murrí, Municipio de Frontino, Antioquia.  La especie parece tener un ancestro común con Eleutherodactylus ingeri de los bosques nublados de la Cordillera Oriental de Colombia y las dos tienen parentescos con Eleutherodactylus ruizi de las cordilleras Central y Occidental de Colombia.

  18. Paleontologic and stratigraphic relations of phosphate beds in Upper Cretaceous rocks of the Cordillera Oriental, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Edwin K.; Zambrano O., Francisco; Mojica G., Pedro; Abozaglo M., Jacob; Pachon P., Fernando; Duran R., Raul

    1979-01-01

    Phosphorite crops out in the Cordillera Oriental of the Colombian Andes in rocks of Late Cretaceous age as strata composed mostly of pelletal carbonate fluorapatite. One stratum of Santonian age near the base of the Galembo Member of the La Luna Formation crops out at many places in the Departments of Santander and Norte de Santander and may be of commercial grade. This stratum is more than one meter thick at several places near Lebrija and near Sardinata, farther south it is locally one meter thick or more near the base of the Guadalupe Formation in the Department of Boyaca. Other phosphorite beds are found at higher stratigraphic levels in the Galembo Member and the Guadalupe Formation, and at some places these may be commercial also. A stratigraphically lower phosphorite occurs below the Galembo Member in the Capacho Formation (Cenomanian age) in at least one area near the town of San Andres, Santander. A phosphorite or pebbly phosphate conglomerate derived from erosion of the Galembo Member forms the base of the Umir Shale and the equivalent Colon Shale at many places. Deposition of the apatite took place upon the continental shelf in marine water of presumed moderate depth between the Andean geosyncline and near-shore detrital deposits adjacent to the Guayana shield. Preliminary calculations indicate phosphorite reserves of approximately 315 million metric tons in 9 areas, determined from measurements of thickness, length of the outcrop, and by projecting the reserves to a maximum of 1,000 meters down the dip of the strata into the subsurface. Two mines were producing phosphate rock in 1969; one near Turmeque, Boyaca, and the other near Tesalia, Huila.

  19. Extreme High Prevalence of a Defective Mannose-Binding Lectin (MBL2) Genotype in Native South American West Andean Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandoval, José Raul; Madsen, Hans O; De Stefano, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    communities of the Lake Titicaca), but lower frequencies of 0.22 in Junin (Central Andean highland) and Ucayali (Central Amazonian forest), as well as 0.27 and 0.24 in the Congoma and Cayapa/Chachis populations in the Amazonian forest in Ecuador were also observed. Our results suggest that the high prevalence...

  20. Carbon storage and long-term rate of accumulation in high-altitude Andean peatlands of Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Hribljan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available (1 The high-altitude (4,500+ m Andean mountain range of north-western Bolivia contains many peatlands. Despite heavy grazing pressure and potential damage from climate change, little is known about these peatlands. Our objective was to quantify carbon pools, basal ages and long-term peat accumulation rates in peatlands in two areas of the arid puna ecoregion of Bolivia: near the village of Manasaya in the Sajama National Park (Cordillera Occidentale, and in the Tuni Condoriri National Park (Cordillera Real. (2 We cored to 5 m depth in the Manasaya peatland, whose age at 5 m was ca. 3,675 yr. BP with a LARCA of 47 g m-2 yr-1. However, probing indicated that the maximum depth was 7–10 m with a total estimated (by extrapolation carbon stock of 1,040 Mg ha-1. The Tuni peat body was 5.5 m thick and initiated ca. 2,560 cal. yr. BP. The peatland carbon stock was 572 Mg ha-1 with a long-term rate of carbon accumulation (LARCA of 37 g m-2 yr-1. (3 Despite the dry environment of the Bolivian puna, the region contains numerous peatlands with high carbon stocks and rapid carbon accumulation rates. These peatlands are heavily used for llama and alpaca grazing.

  1. Geochemistry of the Puna Austral and Cordillera Oriental basement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becchio, Raul; Lucassen, Friedrich; Franz, Gerhard; Kasemann, Simone

    1998-01-01

    Major and trace elements, rare earths, and 143 Nd/ 147 Nd and, 147 Sm/ 144 Nd isotope ratios have been determined in the Puna Austral and Cordillera Oriental basement. The basement is formed by high temperature amphibolite facies rocks ranulites (750-550 degrees C) and green schists. They are represented by schists, paragneiss, orthogneiss, migmatites, few metabasites, marbles and chalcosilicatic banks. Hypotheses on the formation and evolution of the basement are presented

  2. Administrative Law in the Andean Community of Nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Santos Rodríguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the contemporary tendencies of Administrative Law is the recognition of its existence beyond the borders of a State. Under such premise, this paper aims to demonstrate that in the Andean Community of Nations sufficient elements to consider the existence of an Andean administrative Law. In the Andean statutes and rules, it is possible to identify an administrative function, as well as an administrative organization inside the Andean Integration System; and a system of Andean administrative rules and an administrative justice system.

  3. Modelling beta diversity of aquatic macroinvertebrates in High Andean wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Nieto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Central Andean Highlands represent a singular environment characterized by various extreme conditions. Among them, peatbogs are exceptional marshy habitats scattered throughout this arid and harsh area. In an effort to understand the patterns of beta diversity, we sampled the benthic macroinvertebrates of thirteen peatbogs and related the biological distance with ecological distance using the GDM (Generalized Dissimilarity Modelling approach. Variables analyzed were altitude, geographical distance, physical and chemical parameters of the water. A coefficient based on the ordering properties of count data, from the perspective of both sites and taxa, was used to measure the compositional similarity between samples. The most frequent taxa were: Hyallela, Simuliidae, Andesiops, Austrelmis, Podonominae, Protallagma, Trichocorixa, Orthocladiinae and Glossiphonidae. The highest altitudinal record ever for leeches is reported here. Altitude and conductivity contributed greatly to the single ecological predictor of beta diversity. Sampling points can be classified first by altitude (cutoff sets at 4,200 m, which can be considered a surrogate of a regional factor (distinction between Puna and High Andean ecoregions and then by conductivity (cutoff sets at 135 µS cm-1, which can be considered a proxy of a local factor (distinction between hyperfresh and more mineralized habitats. These results suggest a system of ecological filters acting on them. 

  4. Taxonomic revision of the moss salamander Nototriton barbouri (Schmidt (Caudata: Plethodontidae), with description of two new species from the Cordillera Nombre de Dios, Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Josiah H

    2016-11-24

    Moss salamanders (genus Nototriton) are represented in northern Central America by nine putative species: N. barbouri, N. brodiei, N. lignicola, N. limnospectator, N. mime, N. picucha, N. saslaya, N. stuarti, and N. tomamorum. I estimate the phylogenetic relationships for these species based on data from three mitochondrial gene fragments (16S, cytochrome b, and COI), and compare morphological variation among putative taxa. As evidenced here and in previous studies, the taxon N. barbouri is paraphyletic with respect to populations from the Cordillera Nombre de Dios in northern Honduras. I restrict this taxon to populations from the Sierra de Sulaco in central Yoro, Honduras, and describe two new species from the Cordillera Nombre de Dios.

  5. Reproductive traits associated with species turnover of amphibians in Amazonia and its Andean slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Robles, Octavio; Guayasamin, Juan M; Ron, Santiago R; De la Riva, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    Assembly of ecological communities is important for the conservation of ecosystems, predicting perturbation impacts, and understanding the origin and loss of biodiversity. We tested how amphibian communities are assembled by neutral and niche-based mechanisms, such as habitat filtering. Species richness, β-diversities, and reproductive traits of amphibians were evaluated at local scale in seven habitats at different elevation and disturbance levels in Wisui Biological Station, Morona-Santiago, Ecuador, on the foothills of the Cordillera del Kutukú; and at regional scale using 109 localities across evergreen forests of Amazonia and its Andean slopes (0-3,900 m a.s.l.). At local scale, species composition showed strong differences among habitats, explained mainly by turnover. Reproductive modes occurred differently across habitats (e.g., prevalence of direct developers at high elevation, where breeding in ground level water disappears). At regional scale, elevation was the most important factor explaining the changes in species richness, reproductive trait occurrences, and biotic dissimilarities. Species number in all groups decreased with elevation except for those with lotic tadpoles and terrestrial reproduction stages. Seasonality, annual precipitation, and relative humidity partially explained the occurrence of some reproductive traits. Biotic dissimilarities were also mostly caused by turnover rather than nestedness and were particularly high in montane and foothill sites. Within lowlands, geographic distance explained more variability than elevation. Habitat filtering was supported by the different occurrence of reproductive traits according to elevation, water availability, and breeding microhabitats at both scales, as well as other assembly mechanisms based in biotic interactions at local scale. Human-generated land use changes in Amazonia and its Andean slopes reduce local amphibian biodiversity by alteration of primary forests and loss of their

  6. Accumulation rate in a tropical Andean glacier as a proxy for northern Amazon precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha Ribeiro, Rafael; Simões, Jefferson Cardia; Ramirez, Edson; Taupin, Jean-Denis; Assayag, Elias; Dani, Norberto

    2018-04-01

    Andean tropical glaciers have shown a clear shrinkage throughout the last few decades. However, it is unclear how this general retreat is associated with variations in rainfall patterns in the Amazon basin. To investigate this question, we compared the annual net accumulation variations in the Bolivian Cordillera Real (Andes), which is derived from an ice core from the Nevado Illimani (16° 37' S, 67° 46' W), covering the period 1960-1999 using the Amazonian Rainfall Index, Northern Atlantic Index (TNA), Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI), and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The accumulation rate at the Nevado Illimani ice core decreased by almost 25% after 1980, from 1.02 w.eq. a-1 (water equivalent per year) in the 1961-1981 period to 0.76 w.eq. a-1 in the 1981-1999 period. The Northern Amazonian Rainfall (NAR) index best reflects changes in accumulation rates in the Bolivian ice core. Our proposal is based on two observations: (1) This area shows reduced rainfall associated with a more frequent and intense El Niño (during the positive phase of the MEI). The opposite (more rain) is true during La Niña phases. (2) Comparisons of the ice core record and NAR, PDO, and MEI indexes showed similar trends for the early 1980s, represented by a decrease in the accumulation rates and its standard deviations, probably indicating the same causality. The general changes observed by early 1980s coincided with the beginning of a PDO warm phase. This was followed by an increase in the Amazonian and tropical Andean precipitation from 1999, coinciding with a new PDO phase. However, this increase did not result in an expansion of the Zongo Glacier area.

  7. Andean Mountain Building Did not Preclude Dispersal of Lowland Epiphytic Orchids in the Neotropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Escobar, Oscar Alejandro; Gottschling, Marc; Chomicki, Guillaume; Condamine, Fabien L; Klitgård, Bente B; Pansarin, Emerson; Gerlach, Günter

    2017-07-07

    The Andean uplift is one of the major orographic events in the New World and has impacted considerably the diversification of numerous Neotropical lineages. Despite its importance for biogeography, the specific role of mountain ranges as a dispersal barrier between South and Central American lowland plant lineages is still poorly understood. The swan orchids (Cycnoches) comprise ca 34 epiphytic species distributed in lowland and pre-montane forests of Central and South America. Here, we study the historical biogeography of Cycnoches to better understand the impact of the Andean uplift on the diversification of Neotropical lowland plant lineages. Using novel molecular sequences (five nuclear and plastid regions) and twelve biogeographic models, we infer that the most recent common ancestor of Cycnoches originated in Amazonia ca 5 Mya. The first colonization of Central America occurred from a direct migration event from Amazonia, and multiple bidirectional trans-Andean migrations between Amazonia and Central America took place subsequently. Notably, these rare biological exchanges occurred well after major mountain building periods. The Andes have limited plant migration, yet it has seldom allowed episodic gene exchange of lowland epiphyte lineages such as orchids with great potential for effortless dispersal because of the very light, anemochorous seeds.

  8. Un modelo de la historia de la vegetación de la Cordillera de La Costa de Chile central-sur: la hipótesis glacial de Darwin A model for the history of vegetation of the Coastal Range of central-southern Chile: Darwin's glacial hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    CAROLINA VILLAGRÁN

    2001-01-01

    En Chile central-sur, entre los paralelos 37 y 43º S, existen comunidades aisladas de coníferas y tundras magallánicas, cuya distribución principal es altoandina y/o de latitudes altas. De acuerdo a Darwin (1859), en general, estas "islas" corresponderían a los remanentes de poblaciones glaciales, que ocuparon sitios de menor altitud y latitudes más bajas, durante el avance de los hielos. Se desprende de esta hipótesis que, a lo largo de Chile, se habrían producido desplazamientos de la flora...

  9. Andean region: measles on the way out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    In August 1996, health officials, program managers, epidemiologists, laboratory representatives, UNICEF, Rotary International, and Pan American Health Organization staff attended the VII Andean EPI Meeting in Quito, Ecuador, to review the progress of the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI). All Andean countries have conducted catch-up measles vaccination campaigns targeting children 9 months to 15 years old. These campaigns achieved 90% vaccine coverage and a strong reduction in measles incidence (only 7 confirmed cases in 1996). Follow-up campaigns were conducted during 1995-1996 in Colombia, Peru, and Chile. They were expected in Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela during 1997-1999. The Andean countries implemented a national surveillance system for measles in 1995. Meeting representatives made eight recommendations regarding measles. For example, health officials should reach and maintain routine vaccination coverage greater than 95% for children 12-23 months old in each municipality. Laboratory representatives proposed recommendations on uniform criteria for measles diagnosis. The last indigenous wild poliovirus in the Americas was isolated in 1991. Imported wild poliovirus remains a concern. The Andean countries are expanding surveillance of neonatal tetanus activities. Since 1989 the frequency of neonatal tetanus has been falling in the Andean region, especially in Bolivia and Peru. The impact of migration on the control of neonatal tetanus should be a higher priority. Participants repeated the need for systematic use and continuous monitoring of EPI indicators (e.g., vaccination coverage). Three countries plan on analyzing surveys on missed opportunities for vaccination in 1996. Three countries presented progress reports on hepatitis B vaccination and surveillance. Participants issued recommendations on quality control of vaccines. The responsibility for quality control lies with the manufacturers and the government. Vaccines for invasive diseases (e

  10. Rapid climate change from north Andean Lake Fúquene pollen records driven by obliquity: implications for a basin-wide biostratigraphic zonation for the last 284 ka

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogotá-A, R.G.; Groot, M.H.M.; Hooghiemstra, H.; Lourens, L.J.; Linden, M. van der; Berrio, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares a new super-high resolution pollen record from a central location in Lake Fúquene (4 N) with 3 pollen records from marginal sites from the same lake basin, located at 2540 m elevation in the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia. We harmonized the pollen sum of all records, and

  11. Rapid climate change from north Andean Lake Fúquene pollen records driven by obliquity: implications for a basin-wide biostratigraphic zonation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogotá-A, R.G.; Groot, M.H.M.; Hooghiemstra, H.; Lourens, L.J.; van der Linden, M.; Berrio, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares a new super-high resolution pollen record from a central location in Lake Fúquene (4°N) with 3 pollen records from marginal sites from the same lake basin, located at 2540 m elevation in the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia. We harmonized the pollen sum of all records, and provided

  12. Cenozoic sedimentation and exhumation of the foreland basin system preserved in the Precordillera thrust belt (31-32°S), southern central Andes, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levina, Mariya; Horton, Brian K.; Fuentes, Facundo; Stockli, Daniel F.

    2014-09-01

    Andean retroarc compression associated with subduction and shallowing of the oceanic Nazca plate resulted in thin-skinned thrusting that partitioned and uplifted Cenozoic foreland basin fill in the Precordillera of west-central Argentina. Evolution of the central segment of the Precordillera fold-thrust belt is informed by new analyses of clastic nonmarine deposits now preserved in three intermontane regions between major east directed thrust faults. We focus on uppermost Oligocene-Miocene basin fill in the axial to frontal Precordillera at 31-32°S along the Río San Juan (Albarracín and Pachaco sections) and the flank of one of the leading thrust structures (Talacasto section). The three successions record hinterland construction of the Frontal Cordillera, regional arc volcanism, and initial exhumation of Precordillera thrust sheets. Provenance changes recorded by detrital zircon U-Pb age populations suggest that initial shortening in the Frontal Cordillera coincided with an early Miocene shift from eolian to fluvial accumulation in the adjacent foreland basin. Upward coarsening of fluvial deposits and increased proportions of Paleozoic clasts reflect cratonward (eastward) advance of deformation into the Precordillera and resultant structural fragmentation of the foreland basin into isolated intermontane segments. Apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry of basin fill constrains to 12-9 Ma the most probable age of uplift-induced exhumation and cooling of Precordillera thrust sheets. This apparent pulse of exhumation is evident in each succession, suggestive of rapid, large-scale exhumation by synchronous thrusting above a single décollement linking major structures of the Precordillera.

  13. The magmatic history of the Vetas-California mining district, Santander Massif, Eastern Cordillera, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla Figueroa, Luis C.; Bissig, Thomas; Valencia, Víctor; Hart, Craig J. R.

    2013-08-01

    The Vetas-California Mining District (VCMD), located in the central part of the Santander Massif (Colombian Eastern Cordillera), based on U-Pb dating of zircons, records the following principal tectono-magmatic events: (1) the Grenville Orogenic event and high grade metamorphism and migmatitization between ˜1240 and 957 Ma; (2) early Ordovician calc-alkalic magmatism, which was synchronous with the Caparonensis-Famatinian Orogeny (˜477 Ma); (3) middle to late Ordovician post-collisional calc-alkalic magmatism (˜466-436 Ma); (4) late Triassic to early Jurassic magmatism between ˜204 and 196 Ma, characterized by both S- and I-type calc-alkalic intrusions and; (5) a late Miocene shallowly emplaced intermediate calc-alkaline intrusions (10.9 ± 0.2 and 8.4 ± 0.2 Ma). The presence of even younger igneous rocks is possible, given the widespread magmatic-hydrothermal alteration affecting all rock units in the area. The igneous rocks from the late Triassic-early Jurassic magmatic episodes are the volumetrically most important igneous rocks in the study area and in the Colombian Eastern Cordillera. They can be divided into three groups based on their field relationships, whole rock geochemistry and geochronology. These are early leucogranites herein termed Alaskites-I (204-199 Ma), Intermediate rocks (199-198 Ma), and late leucogranites, herein referred to as Alaskites-II (198-196 Ma). This Mesozoic magmatism is reflecting subtle changes in the crustal stress in a setting above an oblique subduction of the Panthalassa plate beneath Pangea. The lower Cretaceous siliciclastic Tambor Formation has detrital zircons of the same age populations as the metamorphic and igneous rocks present in the study area, suggesting that the provenance is related to the erosion of these local rocks during the late Jurassic or early Cretaceous, implying a local supply of sediments to the local depositional basins.

  14. The fabrication of andean particularism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1989-01-01

    original culture through resistance, it focuses on the fabrication of tradition within the disciplinary strategies of the colonial order and on the local re-employment of those productions in political mobilizations. The discussion of this major issue within the field of Andean history is undertaken against the horizon of a case of resistance focusing on the Inca from the Audiencia of Quito in the seventeenth century. Such an incident affords a privileged field for the investigation of the connections between colonial authority and origins, since it stages the recall, simulation and reinstatement of the past.

  15. Large-Scale Patterns of Turnover and Basal Area Change in Andean Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Báez Jácome, Vera Selene

    2015-01-01

    General patterns of forest dynamics and productivity in the Andes Mountains are poorly characterized. Here we present the first large-scale study of Andean forest dynamics using a set of 63 permanent forest plots assembled over the past two decades. In the North-Central Andes tree turnover (mortality and recruitment) and tree growth declined with increasing elevation and decreasing temperature. In addition, basal area increased in Lower Montane Moist Forests but did not change in Higher Monta...

  16. The Andean Swallow (Orochelidon andecola) in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Mazar Barnett, Juan; Pugnali, Germán D.; Pearman Morrison, Mark; Bodrati, Alejandro; Moschione, Flavio; Clark, Ricardo; Roesler, Carlos Ignacio; Monteleone, Diego; Casañas, Hernán; Burgos Gallardo, Freddy; Segovia, José; Pagano, Luis; Povedano, Hernán; Areta, Juan Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    During ornithological studies in the provinces of Jujuy, Salta, and San Juan, we recorded the Andean Swallow Orochelidon andecola at 40 localities. These are the first records in Argentina, and also represent the southernmost for the species. Some of these localities are up to 1500 m lower than the previously known elevational limit (now 800 masl), and up to 1100 km southwards. This is a relatively poorly known swallow, and we present novel natural history data. We found evidence of breeding ...

  17. La Icnofacies Zoophycos-Chondrites del Cretácico de la Cordillera Occidental de Colombia y su posible significación paleoambiental La Icnofacies Zoophycos-Chondrites del Cretácico de la Cordillera Occidental de Colombia y su posible significación paleoambiental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etayo Serna Fernando

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available The Zoophycos-Chondrites ichnofacies is common in fine-grained Cretaceous sedimentary rocks, in both biosiliceous and terrigenous claystone and siltstone of the Western Cordillera of Colombia, but it is absent from isopic coeval rocks of the Central and Eastern Cordilleras: The absence of this ichnofacies is attributed to the influence of a belt of oceanic anoxic waters developped during middle and late Cretaceous, that caused stagnant episodes in the sea floor of the epicontinental seas that stretched across the places of the actual Central and Eastern Cordilleras, but that did not affect the deep-sea floor where the sediments of the present Western Cordillera were accumulating.  In sections perpendicular to the bedding the trace fossil Zoophycos generally appears as belt-like burrows composed of a series of closely juxtaposed meniscate markings. Identification in the axial vertical burrows of the concave-side of the menisci, that originally face up-section, may help as a way-up criterion when dealing with rocks affected by low-grade penetrative metamorphism. La icnofacies Zoophycos-Chondrites presente en sedimentitas finogranulares cretácicas de la cordillera Occidental de Colombia, no existe -hasta donde se conoce- en las rocas isópicas coetáneas de las cordilleras Central y Oriental. Esta falta de la icnofacies se explica si se tiene en cuenta que a mediados y finales del Cretácico hubo lapsos durante los cuales se generaron cinturones de aguas anóxicas, que tocaron los fondos finogranulares de los dominios del mar epicontinental que cubrió el centro y el oriente colombianos, mas no alcanzaron los fondos óptimos para el desarrollo de Zoophycos en el océano en el que se originó el actual occidente de Colombia.  La identificación de la posición de la concavidad de los meniscos semilunares de las galerías verticales axiales de Zoophycos, que miraron hacia la superficie de depósito, permite su utilización en el discernimiento de

  18. Climate Change Impacts in a Colombian Andean Tropical Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, O. L.; Vélez, J. J.; Londoño, A.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change and climate variability have a large impact on water resources. Developing regions have less capacity to prepare for, respond to, and recover from climate-related hazards and effects, and then, populations may be disproportionately affected. In Colombia, the geographical location and the marked irregularity in the terrain, give as a result, a complex climate. These factors have contributed to the water supply of the territory. Unfortunately, the visualization of abundant and inexhaustible water resources created a great disregard for them. Besides, the water supply is not distributed uniformly across the country, and then there is water-deficit in some areas as Andean Region, where the largest population and the main development centers are located. In recent decades, water conflicts have emerged locally and regionally, which have generated a crisis in the allocation mechanisms and have improved the understanding of the water situation in Colombia. The Second National Communication to CCMNU alerts on possible future consequences of climate change and the need for regional studies for understanding climate change impacts on the fragile ecosystems of high mountains as paramos and fog forest, which are water production regulators. Colombian water resources are greatly affected by changes in rainfall patterns influenced by El Niño and La Niña. The recent disasters in the 2010-2011 rainy seasons have caught the attention of not only the authorities but from the scientific community to explore strategies to improve water management by tracking, anticipating and responding to climate variability and climate change. Whereas sound water management is built upon long-term, the country is undertaking a pilot exercise for the integrated management of water resources, five Basins are selected, among them, is the Chinchiná River Basin; this Andean tropical Basin is located on the western slopes at the central range in the Andes between 4°48 and 5°12 N

  19. Agronomic performance and stability of andean common bean lines with white grains in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helton Santos Pereira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the effect of genotype by environment interaction in Andean common bean lines with white grains, in Central Southern Brazil, to identify lines with high agronomic performance, stability and adaptability, aiming to meet domestic demand and to increase the Brazilian participation in the foreign market of common bean. Nineteen trials with twelve Andean lines were conducted in 2007, 2008 and 2009, in Central Southern Brazil. Grain yield and other agronomic traits were evaluated. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and of adaptability/stability using Annicchiarico and modified AMMI methods. Significant differences were found between lines for all traits evaluated. Genotype by environment interaction was important for lines with Andean origin and white seed. The utilization of weighted mean of absolute scores and yield with the AMMI results enabled the identification of the most stable and adapted lines. Lines Poroto Alubia, CNFB 16211, Ouro Branco and WAF 160 were stable and adapted, using both methods. CNFB 16211 line presented high agronomic performance, stability and adaptability and therefore this line may be a new cultivar. USWA 70 and WAF 75 lines presented grain size similar to that required by the foreign market and superior to the Brazilian cultivars, besides favorable agronomic traits, and thus these lines may be indicated as new cultivars.

  20. A new climate and glacier baseline for the Cordillera Vilcanota, Peru, reduces critical information gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, Nadine; Huggel, Christian; Rohrer, Mario; Silverio, Walter; Mark, Bryan G.; Cochachin, Alejo; Suarez, Wilson; Giráldez, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    The Cordillera Vilcanota in the Southern Peruvian Andes is the second largest ice-covered Cordillera in Peru (after the Cordillera Blanca) and serves for the Cusco Region as a temporary water storage for fresh-water and hydropower generation and irrigation. Despite the Cordillera Vilcanota's size and socio-economic relevance, there has so far no comprehensive baseline data been available for climate and glacier evolution. In the framework of two jointly launched -Peruvian-Swiss climate change impact and adaptation programs (Climate Change Adaptation Programm - PACC; Glacier Change Adaptation and Desaster Risk Reduction Programm - Glacier 513) significant efforts have been undertaken and are on the way to create a climate, glacier and hazard baseline for the Cordillera Vilcanota. Because of the remoteness of the area and the scarcity of available data, multiple sources such as climate stations, climate reanalysis and satellite data have been collected, processed and analyzed. Based on our data, we found only marginal glacier changes between 1962 and 1985, but a massive ice loss since 1985 (about 30% of area and about 45% of volume). These high numbers corroborate studies from other glacierized cordilleras in Peru. The climate data show overall a moderate increase in air temperature, and mostly weak and not significant trends for precipitation sums, which probably cannot fully explain the observed substantial ice loss. The likely increase of specific humidity in the upper troposphere, where the glaciers are located, probably played a major role in the observed massive of the Cordillera Vilcanota over the past decades. The mass balance measurements initiated in 2010 on two glaciers of the Cordillera Vilcanota, and the climate station installed in 2011 on one of the glaciers, preliminarily indicate that ice loss (in water equivalent) is clearly lower that in the Cordillera Blanca. In the near future the data will provide new and important insights on climate and

  1. Unraveling Tropical Mountain Hydroclimatology by Coupling Autonomous Sensor Observations and Climate Modeling: Llanganuco Valley, Cordillera Blanca, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellstrom, R. A.; Fernandez, A.; Mark, B. G.; Covert, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Northern Peru will face critical water resource issues in the near future as permanent ice retreats. Much of current global and regional climate research neglects the meteorological forcing of lapse rates and valley wind dynamics on critical components of the Peruvian Andes' water-cycle. In 2004 and 2005 we installed an autonomous sensor network (ASN) within the glacierized Llanganuco Valley, Cordillera Blanca (9°S), consisting of discrete, cost-effective, automatic temperature loggers located along the valley axis and anchored by two automatic weather stations. Comparisons of these embedded atmospheric measurements from the ASN and climate modeling (CM) by dynamical downscaling using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model elucidate distinct diurnal and seasonal characteristics of the mountain valley winds and lapse rates. Wind, temperature, humidity, and cloud simulations by WRF suggest that thermally driven valley winds converging with easterly flow aloft enhance late afternoon and evening cloud development which helps explain detected nocturnal precipitation maxima measured by the ASN. We attribute sustained evapotranspiration (ET), as estimated by the FAO-56 Penman-Monteith model, to an abundance of glacial melt-water during the dry season and strong pre-noon solar heating during the wet season. Furthermore, the extreme diurnal variability of along-valley-axis lapse rates and valley wind detected from ground observations and confirmed by dynamical downscaling demonstrate the importance of realistic scale parameterizations of the boundary layer to improve regional CM projections in mountainous regions. Our findings portray ET as an integral yet poorly represented process in Andean hydroclimatology. We show that coupling ASN and CM can improve understanding of multi-scale atmospheric and associated hydrological processes in mountain valleys.

  2. A review of the Cis-Andean species of Hemibrycon Günther (Teleostei: Characiformes: Characidae: Stevardiinae, with description of two new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius A. Bertaco

    Full Text Available The species of Hemibrycon occurring in the east of the Andean Cordilleras are reviewed based on their type series and additional specimens. Nine species are redescribed: H. beni from río Beni basin, Bolivia; H. helleri from the upper rio Ucayali, Peru; H. huambonicus from the ríos Huallaga and Marañon basins, Peru; H. jeslkii from the upper portions of ríos Marañon, Ucayali and Madeira basins, Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru; H. metae from río Orinoco basin, Colombia and Venezuela, and Caribbean coastal basins of Venezuela; H. polyodon (type species from río Pastaza basin, Ecuador; H. surinamensis from coastal basins of French Guiana and Suriname, and from lower rios Tapajós, Tocantins and Xingu basins, Brazil; H. taeniurus from river basins from Trinidad Island, Trinidad and Tobago, and H. tridens from upper río Ucayali basin, Peru. Two new species are described: H. inambari from the upper río Madre de Dios basin, Peru and H. mikrostiktos from río Ucayali basin, Peru. These species are distinguished among themselves mainly by the color pattern, and meristic characters. The distribution area of the genus is enlarged reaching the lower Tapajós, Tocantins and Xingu river basins, Brazil, with the first record of the occurrence of H. surinamensis in this country. A new description and diagnosis is provided for the type species of the genus, regardless its recent redescription. The type series of H. helleri that was previously considered dubious is found and described. Hemibrycon coxeyi and H. pautensis are considered junior synonyms of H. polyodon. Tetragonopterus (Hemibrycon trinitatis, previously considered species inquirenda in Characidae, and Hemibrycon guppyi are junior synonyms of H. taeniurus. Hemibrycon orcesi is transferred to Boehlkea. A taxonomic key for the species of the genus to the east of the Andean Cordilleras is presented.

  3. Marking behavior of Andean bears in an Ecuadorian cloud forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipczyková, Eva; Heitkonig, Ignas; Castellanos, Armando; Hantson, Wouter; Steyaert, Sam M.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Very little is known about marking behavior of the endangered Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus). Here, we present a first detailed description of Andean bear marking behavior obtained using camera traps. From November 2012 to April 2013, we inspected 16 bear trails in the Napo province of eastern

  4. Recent glacier retreat and climate trends in Cordillera Huaytapallana, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Moreno, J. I.; Fontaneda, S.; Bazo, J.; Revuelto, J.; Azorin-Molina, C.; Valero-Garcés, B.; Morán-Tejeda, E.; Vicente-Serrano, S. M.; Zubieta, R.; Alejo-Cochachín, J.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed 19 annual Landsat Thematic Mapper images from 1984 to 2011 to determine changes of the glaciated surface and snow line elevation in six mountain areas of the Cordillera Huaytapallana range in Peru. In contrast to other Peruvian mountains, glacier retreat in these mountains has been poorly documented, even though this is a heavily glaciated area. These glaciers are the main source of water for the surrounding lowlands, and melting of these glaciers has triggered several outburst floods. During the 28-year study period, there was a 55% decrease in the surface covered by glaciers and the snowline moved upward in different regions by 93 to 157 m. Moreover, several new lakes formed in the recently deglaciated areas. There was an increase in precipitation during the wet season (October-April) over the 28-year study period. The significant increase in maximum temperatures may be related to the significant glacier retreat in the study area. There were significant differences in the wet season temperatures during El Niño (warmer) and La Niña (colder) years. Although La Niña years were generally more humid than El Niño years, these differences were not statistically significant. Thus, glaciers tended to retreat at a high rate during El Niño years, but tended to be stable or increase during La Niña years, although there were some notable deviations from this general pattern. Climate simulations for 2021 to 2050, based on the most optimistic assumptions of greenhouse gas concentrations, forecast a continuation of climate warming at the same rate as documented here. Such changes in temperature might lead to a critical situation for the glaciers of the Cordillera Huaytapallana, and may significantly impact the water resources, ecology, and natural hazards of the surrounding areas.

  5. Climatic controls on drainage basin topography - a synopsis of the western Andean flanks between 15.5 S and 41.5 S lat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehak, K.; Strecker, M. R.; Echtler, H. P.; Bookhagen, B.

    2007-12-01

    Topography in tectonically active mountain ranges is determined by the interplay between tectonics and climate. Due to the complexity of natural systems it is difficult to evaluate tectonic versus climatic contributions to the long- term landscape evolution. Previous studies suggest that rainfall and its variability strongly influence the morphology of river profiles and mountain ranges. However, it is still controversially discussed how drainage basins reflect tectonic and climatic processes. The Andean Cordillera provides a unique natural setting for studying the relationship between climate, tectonics, and topography. The Andes host various climatic zones with pronounced differences in rainfall regimes. In the central to southern western Andes, climate ranges from hyperarid in the Atacama Desert, 22 to 23°S lat, with a mean annual rainfall of ~ 5 mm/yr to year-round humid conditions south of Valdivia, ~ 40°S lat, with more than 2500 mm/yr. This zonation is controlled by hemisphere-scale atmospheric circulation patterns. With the exception of a northward shift of the Southern Hemisphere Westerlies during glacials the overall precipitation pattern has remained stable on the west coast of South America. The shelf width is reasonably constant along the margin. Uplift rate and lithology vary non-systematically and do not correlate with climatic parameters. Here, we present an analysis of 120 drainage basins along the watershed of the western Andean flank between 15.5 S and 41.5 S lat, using SRTMV3-90m data and a high-resolution rainfall dataset (TRMM 5x5 km). The basins comprise drainage areas of 1 to ~ 30 x 103 km2 and were split into subsets according to position and size. For each basin, we extracted 21 geometry, relief, and climate parameters in order to unravel the determinants of drainage-basin morphology. Our data shows that river-profile concavity and slope, hypsometric integral, basin maximum and mean elevation decrease with increasing rainfall and

  6. Differential Late Paleozoic active margin evolution in South-Central Chile (37°S-40°S) - the Lanalhue Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glodny, Johannes; Echtler, Helmut; Collao, Santiago; Ardiles, Mary; Burón, Pablo; Figueroa, Oscar

    2008-12-01

    The N-S oriented Coastal Cordillera of South Central Chile shows marked lithological contrasts along strike at ˜38°S. Here, the sinistral NW-SE-striking Lanalhue Fault Zone ( nomen novum) juxtaposes Permo-Carboniferous magmatic arc granitoids and associated, frontally accreted metasediments (Eastern Series) in the northeast with a Late Carboniferous to Triassic basal-accretionary forearc wedge complex (Western Series) in the southwest. The fault is interpreted as an initially ductile deformation zone with divergent character, located in the eastern flank of the basally growing, upwarping, and exhuming Western Series. It was later transformed and reactivated as a semiductile to brittle sinistral transform fault. Rb-Sr data and fluid inclusion studies of late-stage fault-related mineralizations revealed Early Permian ages between 280 and 270 Ma for fault activity, with subsequent minor erosion. Regionally, crystallization of arc intrusives and related metamorphism occurred between ˜306 and ˜286 Ma, preceded by early increments of convergence-related deformation. Basal Western Series accretion started at >290 Ma and lasted to ˜250 Ma. North of the Lanalhue fault, Late Paleozoic magmatic arc granitoids are nearly 100 km closer to the present day Andean trench than further south. We hypothesize that this marked difference in paleo-forearc width is due to an Early Permian period of subduction erosion north of 38°S, contrasting with ongoing accretion further south, which kinematically triggered the evolution of the Lanalhue Fault Zone. Permo-Triassic margin segmentation was due to differential forearc accretion and denudation characteristics, and is now expressed in contrasting lithologies and metamorphic signatures in todays Andean forearc region north and south of the Lanalhue Fault Zone.

  7. The TF1 Radio Astronomy Working Group in the Andean ROAD: goals and challenges for 2025

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro Molano, G.

    2017-07-01

    Since the creation of the Andean Regional Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) of the International Astronomical Union, one of the main goals has been to foster a scientific culture of radio astronomy in countries of the central and northern Andes (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Perú, and Venezuela). For this reason, Andean ROAD Task Force 1 (Research and Education in Universities) created the Radio Astronomy Working Group to set a path along which collaborative endeavors can grow and yield scientific results. The first official meeting of the Working Group took place in Bogotá, Colombia during the 2nd Astronomá en los Andes Workshop (2015) where scientists actively developing projects in radio astronomy set goals for the near future, such as improving mobility for researchers and students, developing collaborations in related areas such as engineering and data science, and building transnational collaborations aiming at developing VLBI across the countries of the Andean ROAD and beyond. In this poster, I present current projects and associated research groups (ROAS - Perú, SiAMo - Colombia, Alfa-Orion UTP - Colombia, RAIG - Chile) and discuss goalposts and current challenges in the development of transnational radioastronomical projects. As a case study, I present the development and early astronomical results of the privately funded UECCI 4m Radio Telescope for 21 cm line observations in Bogotá, Colombia.

  8. ‘Diffuse faulting’ in the Machu Picchu granitoid pluton, Eastern Cordillera, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli, Stefano; Vitale, Stefano; Delmonaco, Giuseppe; Guerriero, Vincenzo; Margottini, Claudio; Spizzichino, Daniele

    2009-11-01

    A series of batholiths, forming part of the 'roots' of a Permo-Liassic rift system, are exposed in the high Eastern Cordillera of central Peru as a result of tectonic inversion. Shortening of the Machu Picchu granitoid pluton was accommodated by widespread shear reactivation of primary joints, by a process termed here 'diffuse faulting'. Fault-like reactivation of precursor joint surfaces, marked by chlorite, epidote and quartz shear fibres, is locally evidenced by few centimetres offsets within apparently undeformed granite. Analysis of fault slip data indicates that shear reactivation of different joint sets was kinematically consistent with ENE oriented shortening. Less frequent mylonitic shear zones appear to have evolved from the common brittle precursors. Apart from rare phyllonitic shear zones, fluid-rock interaction along the brittle precursors was generally limited, and pluton deformation appears to be mainly controlled by the geometry and distribution of primary joints. Three main sets of reactivated joints can be recognized, characterized by oblique-slip kinematics with variable reverse and strike-slip components of motion. Theoretical modelling based on quantitative fracture analysis (scan-line data) and different displacement-length relationships applied to the main reactivated joint sets yield first-order estimates of pluton finite strain. The results suggest that bulk finite strain is oblate and essentially coaxial, and is characterized by horizontal shortening not exceeding 10%. Relatively small finite strains, integrated over the size of the pluton, still result in a few kilometres of crustal shortening.

  9. Birds of Two Oceans? Trans-Andean and Divergent Migration of Black Skimmers (Rynchops niger cinerascens) from the Peruvian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Lisa C; Goodenough, Katharine S; Haugaasen, Torbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal flooding compels some birds that breed in aquatic habitats in Amazonia to undertake annual migrations, yet we know little about how the complex landscape of the Amazon region is used seasonally by these species. The possibility of trans-Andes migration for Amazonian breeding birds has largely been discounted given the high geographic barrier posed by the Andean Cordillera and the desert habitat along much of the Pacific Coast. Here we demonstrate a trans-Andes route for Black Skimmers (Rynchops niger cinerascens) breeding on the Manu River (in the lowlands of Manu National Park, Perú), as well as divergent movement patterns both regionally and across the continent. Of eight skimmers tracked with satellite telemetry, three provided data on their outbound migrations, with two crossing the high Peruvian Andes to the Pacific. A third traveled over 1800 km to the southeast before transmissions ended in eastern Paraguay. One of the two trans-Andean migrants demonstrated a full round-trip migration back to its tagging location after traveling down the Pacific Coast from latitude 9° South to latitude 37° S, spending the austral summer in the Gulf of Arauco, Chile. This is the first documentation of a trans-Andes migration observed for any bird breeding in lowland Amazonia. To our knowledge, this research also documents the first example of a tropical-breeding waterbird migrating out of the tropics to spend the non-breeding season in the temperate summer, this being the reverse pattern with respect to seasonality for austral migrants in general.

  10. Birds of Two Oceans? Trans-Andean and Divergent Migration of Black Skimmers (Rynchops niger cinerascens from the Peruvian Amazon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa C Davenport

    Full Text Available Seasonal flooding compels some birds that breed in aquatic habitats in Amazonia to undertake annual migrations, yet we know little about how the complex landscape of the Amazon region is used seasonally by these species. The possibility of trans-Andes migration for Amazonian breeding birds has largely been discounted given the high geographic barrier posed by the Andean Cordillera and the desert habitat along much of the Pacific Coast. Here we demonstrate a trans-Andes route for Black Skimmers (Rynchops niger cinerascens breeding on the Manu River (in the lowlands of Manu National Park, Perú, as well as divergent movement patterns both regionally and across the continent. Of eight skimmers tracked with satellite telemetry, three provided data on their outbound migrations, with two crossing the high Peruvian Andes to the Pacific. A third traveled over 1800 km to the southeast before transmissions ended in eastern Paraguay. One of the two trans-Andean migrants demonstrated a full round-trip migration back to its tagging location after traveling down the Pacific Coast from latitude 9° South to latitude 37° S, spending the austral summer in the Gulf of Arauco, Chile. This is the first documentation of a trans-Andes migration observed for any bird breeding in lowland Amazonia. To our knowledge, this research also documents the first example of a tropical-breeding waterbird migrating out of the tropics to spend the non-breeding season in the temperate summer, this being the reverse pattern with respect to seasonality for austral migrants in general.

  11. A 5000 Year Record of Andean South American Summer Monsoon Variability from Laguna de Ubaque, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudloff, O. M.; Bird, B. W.; Escobar, J.

    2014-12-01

    Our understanding of Northern Hemisphere South American summer monsoon (SASM) dynamics during the Holocene has been limited by the small number of terrestrial paleoclimate records from this region. In order to increase our knowledge of SASM variability and to better inform our predictions of its response to ongoing rapid climate change, we require high-resolution paleoclimate records from the Northern Hemisphere Andes. To this end, we present sub-decadally resolved sedimentological and geochemical data from Laguna de Ubaque that spans the last 5000 years. Located in the Eastern Cordillera of the Colombian Andes, Laguna de Ubaque (2070 m asl) is a small, east facing moraine-dammed lake in the upper part of the Rio Meta watershed near Bogotá containing finely laminated clastic sediments. Dry bulk density, %organic matter, %carbonate and magnetic susceptibility (MS) results from Ubaque suggest a period of intense precipitation between 3500 and 2000 years BP interrupted by a 300 yr dry interval centered at 2700 years BP. Following this event, generally drier conditions characterize the last 2000 years. Although considerably lower amplitude than the middle Holocene pluvial events, variability in the sedimentological data support climatic responses during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA; 900 to 1200 CE) and Little Ice Age (LIA; 1450 to 1900 CE) that are consistent with other records of local Andean conditions. In particular, reduced MS during the MCA suggests a reduction in terrestrial material being washed into the lake as a result of generally drier conditions. The LIA on the other hand shows a two phase structure with increased MS between 1450 and 1600 CE, suggesting wetter conditions during the onset of the LIA, and reduced MS between 1600 and 1900 CE, suggesting a return to drier conditions during the latter part of the LIA. These LIA trends are similar to the Quelccaya accumulation record, possibly supporting an in-phase relationship between the South American

  12. Review of the andean armored catfishes of the genus Dolichancistrus Isbrücker (Siluriformes: Loricariidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A. Ballen

    Full Text Available The loricariid catfish genus Dolichancistrus is reviewed and four species recognized. Species of Dolichancistrus are distinguished from each other by the degree of development of the pectoral-fin spine, the form of the distal margin of the pelvic fin, the relative size and form of the cheek plates, the pattern of odontodes along the margin of the snout, the presence versus absence of a buccal papilla at the premaxillary symphysis, and the relative lengths of the anal- versus pelvic-spines. Dolichancistrus atratoensis is known from the río Atrato system and the río Cubarradó on the Pacific versant of Colombia; D. carnegiei occurs in the eastern río Magdalena basin in the departments of Boyacá and Santander, Colombia; D. cobrensis inhabits southern tributaries of the Lago Maracaibo basin in Colombia and Venezuela along with some highland rivers of the Cordillera de Mérida in Venezuela draining into the río Orinoco system; and D. fuesslii is known from the Andean piedmont portions of the río Meta basin in the western río Orinoco system. Pseudancistrus pediculatus is considered a junior synonym of Ancistrus fuesslii. Chaetostomus setosus previously assigned to Dolichancistrus, was found to lack features characteristic of its putative congeners and is rather more closely related to other members of Chaetostoma group. Consequently, the species is herein considered as incertae sedis within that group. Dolichancistrus is diagnosed, a key is provided to the members of the genus, and diagnoses and redescriptions are provided for all of the recognized species.

  13. Slab flattening and exhumation of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siravo, G.; Faccenna, C.; Fellin, M. G.; Herman, F.; Becker, T. W.; Molin, P.

    2017-12-01

    Mountain belt topography is shaped by processes acting at different time scales and depths, from the surface down to the crust and mantle. In particular, subduction dynamics is expected to strongly affect upper plate topography. Here, we present the case of the Eastern Cordillera (EC) in Colombia as a case history for dynamic mantle forcing from a subduction zone on the upper plate topography. The EC is an active double-vergent fold and thrust belt formed during the Cenozoic by the inversion of a Mesozoic rift, and topography there has grown up to 5000 m (Cocuy Sierra). The EC is located far ( 500 km) from the trench where the Nazca slab subducts below the South American plate. Tomography and seismicity show the presence of a flat slab subduction north of 5° N (Chiarabba et al., 2016). Slab flattening may have occurred transitionally from 10 to 5 Ma shutting down the arc volcanism (Wagner et al., 2017). We reconstruct the exhumation of the EC based on previously published and new thermochronologic data collected in the area of the Cocuy Sierra. Results of this analysis show notably fast exhumation rates since Late Miocene. We also analyze the likely contributions to topography and show that neither the present-day crustal thickness nor the cumulative shortening in the Cenozoic as extracted form balanced cross section can isostatically explain the present day topography. We conclude that fast EC exhumation and uplift are driven by mantle dynamics and likely occurred during the recent episode of slab flattening.

  14. The new Andean Regional Office of Astronomy for Development (ROAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Char, Farid; Forero-Romero, Jaime

    2015-08-01

    The Andean Regional Office of Astronomy for Development (ROAD) is a new effort in South America to serve several goals in astronomical development. Six countries (Bolivia, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, Perú and Venezuela) will work together, representing a common language block in the Andean region and focusing on develop strategies to strengthen the professional research, education and popularization of astronomy. Our current Working Structure comprises a ROAD Coordinator and Coordinators per Task Force, as well as Organizing Committees, Collaborators and Volunteers.The participating institutions of this new ROAD have been involved in many projects involving each of the current OAD’s Task Forces: research, schools and children and public, exploring educational activities/material to be shared among the Andean countries, standardizing the knowledge and creating inspirational experiences. We expect to generate many efforts in order to bring a more homogeneous activity in each Andean country, taking into account the special role of Chile in global astronomy, due to its great conditions for astronomy and the involvement of many professional observatories, universities and astronomy institutions.Our current (and upcoming) most relevant activities includes: Andean Schools on Astronomy, Andean Graduate Program and Massive Open Online Courses (TF1); Virtual Training Sessions and Teaching material for the visually impaired students; Annual TF2 meeting to gather all the collaborators (TF2); Development for planetariums and Communicating Astronomy with the Public (TF3). The Andean region, in the other hand, will also be involved in at least two important events: the CAP Meeting in May 2016 and the XV LARIM in October 2016 (both in Colombia); and Chile will bid to host the XXXI IAU GA in 2021, with the aim of show the great advances in astronomical development from the Andean region and South America.

  15. Proposing a Digital Information System for the Management and Conservation of the Qhapaq ÑAN - Andean Road System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duperré, G. N.

    2017-08-01

    The ancient network of roads in the Andean region is one of the most important works of infrastructure in South America. The extensive territory where the main exchanges between their communities were locally performed is previous to the expansion of the Inca Empire. In the year 2014, the region was included on the World Heritage List by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. This communication network is the Qhapaq Ñan, Andean Road System. The Incas planned their route in the diverse landscape of the Andes to promote social and economic ties among the Andean communities. The routes originated in the central square of Cusco, creating cross-connections in a wide geographical area. The Tawantinsuyu depended on this sole route to link very distant production and worship centers. The Qhapaq Ñan was the result of a political project. Even nowadays, it continues to articulate the development of cultural traditions in the Andean region. The present contribution analyzes its transcendental importance as a Cultural Heritage and the singularity of its nomination by the UNESCO, as for the first time six countries are sharing common objectives towards guaranteeing its protection. Furthermore, this research explores the sense of timing in Latin American countries and the implicit challenges in the implementation of the new information technologies for the dissemination of information on Main Andean Road and for its conservation. Although many of the countries have already incorporated the necessary digital tools in this matter, we conclude that there is a need to implement an Integrated Digital Model for the coordinated management in the countries that form the region.

  16. Late Pleistocene glacial fluctuations in Cordillera Oriental, subtropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Mateo A.; Kaplan, Michael R.; Strelin, Jorge A.; Astini, Ricardo A.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Caffee, Marc W.; Schwartz, Roseanne

    2017-09-01

    The behavior of subtropical glaciers during Middle to Late Pleistocene global glacial maxima and abrupt climate change events, specifically in Earth's most arid low-latitude regions, remains an outstanding problem in paleoclimatology. The present-day climate of Cordillera Oriental, in arid northwestern Argentina, is influenced by shifts in subtropical climate systems, including the South American Summer Monsoon. To understand better past glacier-subtropical climates during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 26.5-19 ka) and other time periods, we combined geomorphic features with forty-two precise 10Be ages on moraine boulders and reconstructed paleo-equilibrium line altitudes (ELA) at Nevado de Chañi (24°S) in the arid subtropical Andes. We found a major glacial expansion at ∼23 ± 1.6 ka, that is, during the global LGM. Additional glacial expansions are observed before the global LGM (at ∼52-39 ka), and after, at 15 ± 0.5 and 12 ± 0.6 ka. The ∼15 ka glacial event was found on both sides of Chañi and the ∼12 ka event is only recorded on the east side. Reconstructed ELAs of the former glaciers exhibit a rise from east to west that resembles the present subtropical climate trajectory from the Atlantic side of the continent; hence, we infer that this climate pattern must have been present in the past. Based on comparison with other low-latitude paleoclimate records, such as those from lakes and caves, we infer that both temperature and precipitation influenced past glacial occurrence in this sector of the arid Andes. Our findings also imply that abrupt deglacial climate events associated with the North Atlantic, specifically curtailed meridional overturning circulation and regional cooling, may have had attendant impacts on low subtropical Southern Hemisphere latitudes, including the climate systems that affect glacial activity around Nevado de Chañi.

  17. Investigation of a measles outbreak in Cordillera, northern Philippines, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Katrina Ching

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Measles is a highly infectious viral illness that remains one of the leading causes of death among children worldwide. In the Philippines, decreasing routine vaccination coverage from 2007 to 2011 led to local measles outbreaks. A team investigated a measles outbreak reported in Cordillera of the Philippines in May 2013. Methods: Measles case data with symptom onset from 2 February to 27 May 2013 were obtained from official sources and verified on site. Data included age, sex, residential address, signs and symptoms and vaccination status. Active case-findings were also conducted for contacts of these cases. The living environments of the cases were investigated. A survey was conducted with the cases and caregivers to understand their knowledge and attitudes about measles. Results: There were 50 measles cases identified with an age range from six months to 32 years (median: 16 years. Thirty-two were male (64%. Twenty (40% were hospitalized with one death. Thirty-two (64% cases were laboratory confirmed, and 36 (72% received a single dose of measles vaccine. Overcrowded living environments were observed among many cases. The majority of respondents (46/48, 96% knew about measles, but there were misconceptions about the cause of measles and how it can be prevented and managed. Conclusion: This measles outbreak occurred in an area with low immunization coverage. Achieving 95% measles immunization coverage and strengthening routine immunization strategies to address high-risk populations are recommended. Also, we recommend health education campaigns to include components that address misconceptions about measles.

  18. Role of erosion and isostasy in the Cordillera Blanca uplift: Insights from landscape evolution modeling (northern Peru, Andes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margirier, Audrey; Braun, Jean; Robert, Xavier; Audin, Laurence

    2018-03-01

    The processes driving uplift and exhumation of the highest Peruvian peaks (the Cordillera Blanca) are not well understood. Uplift and exhumation seem closely linked to the formation and movement on the Cordillera Blanca normal fault (CBNF) that delimits and shapes the western flank of the Cordillera Blanca. Several models have been proposed to explain the presence of this major normal fault in a compressional setting, but the CBNF and the Cordillera Blanca recent rapid uplift remain enigmatic. Whereas the Cordillera Blanca morphology demonstrates important erosion and thus a significant mass of rocks removal, the impact of erosion and isostasy on the evolution of the Cordillera Blanca uplift rates has never been explored. We address the role of erosion and associated flexural rebound in the uplift and exhumation of the Cordillera Blanca with numerical modeling of landscape evolution. We perform inversions of the broad features of the present-day topography, total exhumation and thermochronological data using a landscape evolution model (FastScape) to provide constraints on the erosion efficiency factor, the uplift rate and the temperature gradient. Our results evidence the not negligible contribution of erosion and associated flexural rebound to the uplift of the Cordillera Blanca and allow us to question the models previously proposed for the formation of the CBNF.

  19. Glacier surface mass balance and freshwater runoff modeling for the entire Andes Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernild, Sebastian H.; Liston, Glen E.; Yde, Jacob C.

    2017-04-01

    Glacier surface mass balance (SMB) observations for the Andes Cordillera are limited and, therefore, estimates of the SMB contribution from South America to sea-level rise are highly uncertain. Here, we simulate meteorological, snow, glacier surface, and hydrological runoff conditions and trends for the Andes Cordillera (1979/80-2013/14), covering the tropical latitudes in the north down to the sub-polar latitudes in the far south, including the Northern Patagonia Ice Field (NPI) and Southern Patagonia Ice Field (SPI). SnowModel - a fully integrated energy balance, blowing-snow distribution, multi-layer snowpack, and runoff routing model - was used to simulate glacier SMBs for the Andes Cordillera. The Randolph Glacier Inventory and NASA Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications products, downscaled in SnowModel, allowed us to conduct relatively high-resolution simulations. The simulated glacier SMBs were verified against independent directly-observed and satellite gravimetry and altimetry-derived SMB, indicating a good statistical agreement. For glaciers in the Andes Cordillera, the 35-year mean annual SMB was found to be -1.13 m water equivalent. For both NPI and SPI, the mean SMB was positive (where calving is the likely reason for explaining why geodetic estimates are negative). Further, the spatio-temporal freshwater river runoff patterns from individual basins, including their runoff magnitude and change, were simulated. For the Andes Cordillera rivers draining to the Pacific Ocean, 86% of the simulated runoff originated from rain, 12% from snowmelt, and 2% from ice melt, whereas, for example, for Chile, the water-source distribution was 69, 24, and 7%, respectively. Along the Andes Cordillera, the 35-year mean basin outlet-specific runoff (L s-1 km-2) showed a characteristic regional hourglass shape pattern with highest runoff in both Colombia and Ecuador and in Patagonia, and lowest runoff in the Atacama Desert area.

  20. Geometry of the inverted Cretaceous Chañarcillo Basin based on 2-D gravity and field data - an approach to the structure of the western Central Andes of northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, F.; Maksymowicz, A.; Ochoa, H.; Díaz, D.

    2015-12-01

    This paper discusses an integrated approach that provides new ideas about the structural geometry of the NNE-striking, Cretaceous Chañarcillo Basin located along the eastern Coastal Cordillera in the western Central Andes of northern Chile (27-28° S). The results obtained from the integration of two transverse (E-W) gravity profiles with previous geological information show that the architecture of this basin is defined by a large NNE-SSE-trending and east-vergent anticline ("Tierra Amarilla Anticlinorium"), which is related to the positive reactivation of a former Cretaceous normal fault (Elisa de Bordos Master Fault). Moreover, intercalations of high and low gravity anomalies and steep gravity gradients reveal a set of buried, west-tilted half-grabens associated with a synthetic normal fault pattern. These results, together with the uplift and folding style of the Cretaceous synextensional deposits recognized within the basin, suggest that its structure could be explained by an inverted fault system linked to the shortening of pre-existing Cretaceous normal fault systems. Ages of the synorogenic deposits exposed unconformably over the frontal limb of the Tierra Amarilla Anticlinorium confirm a Late Cretaceous age for the Andean deformation and tectonic inversion of the basin.

  1. Andean tectonics: Implications for Satellite Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenby, R. J.

    1984-09-01

    Current knowledge and theories of large scale Andean tectonics as they relate to site planning for the NASA Crustal Dynamics Program's proposed high precision geodetic measurements of relative motions between the Nazca and South American plates are summarized. The Nazca Plate and its eastern margin, the Peru-Chile Trench, is considered a prototype plate marked by rapid motion, strong seismicity and well defined boundaries. Tectonic activity across the Andes results from the Nazca Plate subducting under the South American plate in a series of discrete platelets with different widths and dip angles. This in turn, is reflected in the tectonic complexity of the Andes which are a multitutde of orogenic belts superimposed on each other since the Precambrian. Sites for Crustal Dynamics Program measurements are being located to investigate both interplate and extraplate motions. Observing operations have already been initiated at Arequipa, Peru and Easter Island, Santiago and Cerro Tololo, Chile. Sites under consideration include Iquique, Chile; Oruro and Santa Cruz, Bolivia; Cuzco, Lima, Huancayo and Bayovar, Peru; and Quito and the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador. Based on scientific considerations, Santa Cruz, Huancayo (or Lima), Quito and the Galapagos Islands should be replaced by Isla San Felix, Chile; Brazilia or Petrolina, Brazil; and Guayaquil, Ecuador. If resources permit, additional important sites would be Buenaventura and Villavicencio or Puerto La Concordia, Colombia; and Mendoza and Cordoba, Argentina.

  2. Environment, vulnerability, and gender in Andean ethnomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larme, A C

    1998-10-01

    In Cuyo Cuyo, in the southern Peruvian highlands, ethnomedicine is rife with images of human vulnerability to a hostile and unpredictable environment. This is represented in the ethnomedical system by a focus on wayras, air- or wind-borne illnesses that enter through vulnerable body openings such as the head, orifices, lower back, and feet. Women are viewed to be more vulnerable, or débil, than men to illness because they have an extra orifice, the vagina, they lose copious amounts of blood, which is thought to be irreplaceable, during childbirth. and because they suffer more negative emotions, which are thought to attract wayras and other illnesses to the body. The relationship of ethnomedical beliefs to the Andean physical and political economic environment is explored within the context of social and economic change. Negative beliefs about women's bodies have negative effects on women's roles and position vis-à-vis men in present day Cuyo Cuyo. Ethnomedical beliefs reflect and reinforce gender inequalities in present day Peru and are part of a cultural ideology that in general devalues women. This case study demonstrates that power is a key dimension in the cultural construction of medical knowledge. whether in non-Western or Western societies.

  3. The functional extinction of Andean megafauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozas-Davila, Angela; Valencia, Bryan G; Bush, Mark B

    2016-10-01

    Controversy exists over the cause and timing of the extinction of the Pleistocene megafauna. In the tropical Andes, deglaciation and associated rapid climate change began ~8,000 years before human arrival, providing an opportunity to separate the effects of climate change from human hunting on megafaunal extinction. We present a paleoecological record spanning the last 25,000 years from Lake Pacucha, Peru (3,100 m elevation). Fossil pollen, charcoal, diatoms, and the dung fungus Sporormiella, chronicle a two-stage megaherbivore population collapse. Sporormiella abundance, the proxy for megafaunal presence, fell sharply at ~21,000 years ago, but rebounded prior to a permanent decline between ~16,800 and 15,800 years ago. This two-stage decline in megaherbivores resulted in a functional extinction by ~15,800 years ago, 3,000 years earlier than known human occupation of the high Andes. Declining megaherbivore populations coincided with warm, wet intervals. Climatic instability and megafaunal population collapse triggered an ecological cascade that resulted in novel floral assemblages, and increases in woody species, fire frequency, and plant species that were sensitive to trampling. Our data revealed that Andean megafaunal populations collapsed due to positive feedbacks between habitat quality and climate change rather than human activity. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  4. Two new Cystoderma species from high Andean Ecuador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saar, I.; Læssøe, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Two new agaric species, Cystoderma andinum and C. papallactae are described from high Andean Ecuador.......ABSTRACT: Two new agaric species, Cystoderma andinum and C. papallactae are described from high Andean Ecuador....

  5. Pedological and mineralogical investigations on a soil-paleosoil sequence within Andosols in the Western Cordillera of the Peruvian Andes (region Laramate, 14.5S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leceta Gobitz, Fernando; Mächtle, Bertil; Schukraft, Gerd; Meyer, Hans-Peter; Eitel, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    An integrated research project of environmental sciences focuses on a group of four Andosol profiles in Western flank of the Peruvian southern Andes. Aim of this study is to contribute to the reconstruction of the paleo environmental conditions in the Western Cordillera of the Peruvian Andes. Standard pedological and sedimentological analysis has been conducted in order to identify morphological and geochemical features generated by climatic variations during the middle and late Holocene. Though a provenance analysis of sediments, all potential lithological sources around the town of Laramate are being examined under the scanning electron microscope, in order to find significant mineralogical associations downward the soil-profile. Preliminary results reveal two edaphic cycles within a soil-paleo soil-sequence: a relative poor developed "Ah" topsoil, mostly composed by fine grain sediments, is underlain by a well preserved "2Ah" paleo soil; a "2Bwt" subsoil exhibits signs of alteration and clay translocation; parent material in slight weathered statement at "2C" culminates the sequence. Mineralogical analytical data supports the premise, that materials in the uppermost horizons are relatable to distal geological units of the Western and Eastern Cordillera, therefore also related to other described aeolian archives from the region: "Desert Margin Loess" at the Andean foot-zone and "Mixed Loess" in the Puna grassland. The amphibole varieties Actinolite, Mg-Hornblende and Edenite could be only distinguished within the soil sediments. The fluvial transport to its current position is excluded, insofar mentioned varieties stem from the granodiorites of Coastal Batholite (downstream the study area), and the vulcanites of the Anta und Andahuaylas Formation (eastward the continental divide). References: Eitel, B., et al. (2005). "Geoarchaeological evidence from desert loess in the Nazca-Palpa region, southern Peru : Palaeoenvironmental changes and their impact on Pre

  6. Andean and Tibetan patterns of adaptation to high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Abigail W; Wilson, Megan J; Julian, Colleen G; Kiyamu, Melisa; Vargas, Enrique; Leon-Velarde, Fabiola; Rivera-Chira, Maria; Rodriquez, Carmelo; Browne, Vaughn A; Parra, Esteban; Brutsaert, Tom D; Moore, Lorna G; Shriver, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    High-altitude hypoxia, or decreased oxygen levels caused by low barometric pressure, challenges the ability of humans to live and reproduce. Despite these challenges, human populations have lived on the Andean Altiplano and the Tibetan Plateau for millennia and exhibit unique circulatory, respiratory, and hematological adaptations to life at high altitude. We and others have identified natural selection candidate genes and gene regions for these adaptations using dense genome scan data. One gene previously known to be important in cellular oxygen sensing, egl nine homolog 1 (EGLN1), shows evidence of positive selection in both Tibetans and Andeans. Interestingly, the pattern of variation for this gene differs between the two populations. Continued research among Tibetan populations has identified statistical associations between hemoglobin concentration and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype at EGLN1 and a second gene, endothelial PAS domain protein 1 (EPAS1). To measure for the effects of EGLN1 and EPAS1 altitude genotypes on hemoglobin concentration among Andean highlanders, we performed a multiple linear regression analysis of 10 candidate SNPs in or near these two genes. Our analysis did not identify significant associations between EPAS1 or EGLN1 SNP genotypes and hemoglobin concentration in Andeans. These results contribute to our understanding of the unique set of adaptations developed in different highland groups to the hypoxia of high altitude. Overall, the results provide key insights into the patterns of genetic adaptation to high altitude in Andean and Tibetan populations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. IAI Global Change Agenda and Support of Higher Education in the Andean Amazon Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarraga, R.; McClain, M.; Fierro, V.

    2007-05-01

    The Andean Amazon River Analysis and Management project, an IAI Collaborative Research Network operating during 1999-2004, examined the impacts of climate and land-use changes on the hydrobiogeochemistry of rivers draining the Amazon Andes of Ecuador, Peru, Colombia and Bolivia. The project also provided a means to strengthen scientific collaboration among these Andean countries and the USA. Research in these countries was carried out under the guidance of investigators with backgrounds in the relevant environmental fields, but the bulk of the research activities were carried out by undergraduate and graduate students who studied within these countries and overseas. Twenty graduate students and 15 undergraduates completed studies within the project, in topics related to monitoring hydrometeorological variables both in time and space. Student research and capacity building were focused in areas central to global environmental change, including modeling of precipitation and precipitation-runoff processes, basin-scale water quality characterization and biogeochemical cycling, and socioeconomic controls on the use and management of riverine resources. The analysis of human dimension aspects of climate change research was also featured, especially those aspects that linked the consequences of water quality degradation on human health. Most of undergraduate and graduate students that collaborated in the AARAM project have joined national environmental institutions and some have continued for higher scientific degrees in fields closely related to the IAI scientific agenda. Through this IAI initiative, the number of trained global change scientists in the Andean countries has grown and there is enhanced awareness of key global change science issues among the scientific community.

  8. On the Nature of Cross-Linguistic Transfer: A Case Study of Andean Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntendam, Antje G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on cross-linguistic transfer in Andean Spanish word order. In Andean Spanish the object appears in preverbal position more frequently than in non-Andean Spanish, which has been attributed to an influence from Quechua (a Subject-Object-Verb language). The high frequency of preverbal objects could be…

  9. Biodiversity of Andean potatoes: Morphological, nutritional and functional characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calliope, Sonia Rosario; Lobo, Manuel Oscar; Sammán, Norma Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Andean potatoes (Solanum tuberosum andigenum) are a staple food for Andean population; there is great biodiversity but only few varieties are cultivated nowadays. In order to contribute to biodiversity conservation of Andean potatoes, information about their morphological, nutritional and functional characteristics was generated. In gene bank (INTA-Balcarce), varieties collected from regional producers were preserved. Forty-four genotypes were multiplied and characterized. Morphological characteristics; proximate composition and functional compounds were analyzed. Cluster analysis separated them into 3 groups according to distinguishing characteristics, which define industrial or nutritional applications. Group 2 was characterized by higher content of macronutrients and Group 3 with the highest antioxidant activity, both would be advisable for direct consumption. Genotype CS 1418 had big size and oval form so it could be destined to potato chips industry. Knowledge on nutritional and functional properties of genotypes contributes to promoting the cultivation depending on properties and also to preserve biodiversity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ethno–botanical survey of edible wild fruits in Benguet, Cordillera administrative region, the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Racquel Tan Chua-Barcelo

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: Benguet province in the Cordillera region provides a diversity of edible wild fruits. The data gathered from the study signifies that collection, processing and utilization of edible wild fruits are still part of the daily activities of the people in Benguet.

  11. Glacial lake outburst floods in the area of Huarás, Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vilímek, V.; Zapata, M. L.; Klimeš, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 39, - (2005), s. 115-124 ISSN 0081-6434 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LA 157 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : GLOFs * Cordillera Blanca * Peru Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  12. Stress field evolution above the Peruvian flat-slab (Cordillera Blanca, northern Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margirier, A.; Audin, L.; Robert, X.; Pêcher, A.; Schwartz, S.

    2017-08-01

    In subduction settings, the tectonic regime of the overriding plate is closely related to the geometry of the subducting plate. Flat-slab segments are supposed to increase coupling at the plate interface in the Andes, resulting in an increase and eastward migration of the shortening in the overriding plate. Above the Peruvian flat-slab, a 200 km-long normal fault trend parallel to the range and delimits the western flank of the Cordillera Blanca. In a context of flat subduction, expected to produce shortening, the presence of the Cordillera Blanca normal fault (CBNF) is surprising. We performed a systematic inversion of striated fault planes in the Cordillera Blanca region to better characterize the stress field above the Peruvian flat-slab. It evidences the succession of different tectonic regimes. NE-SW extension is predominant in most of the sites indicating a regional extension. We suggest that the Peruvian flat-slab trigger extension in the Western Cordillera while the shortening migrated eastward. Finally, we propose that flat-slab segments do not increase the coupling at the trench neither the shortening in the overriding plate but only favor shortening migration backward. However, the stress field of the overriding plate arises from the evolution of plate interface properties through time due to bathymetric anomaly migration.

  13. The effects of governance modes on the energy matrix of Andean countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the consequences of different modes of energy governance on the energy matrix. Energy governance is understood as a regulation system of the energy related interplays between the State, the society and the economy. The energy matrix is a useful instrument for comparative policy analysis, since it informs us about production and consumption trends, by sources and sectors. Our central argument is that energy governance follows two different patterns, one hierarchical and the other cooperative, that are not necessarily determined by the initial factors allocation, and produce different effects on the energy matrix. Hierarchical governance is based on centralized decision-making and State-centered development, while co-governance is based on decentralized decision-making and market-oriented development. To develop this argument, we compare the energy matrix from the five Andean countries (Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia).

  14. The effects of governance modes on the energy matrix of Andean countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, Guillaume, E-mail: gfontaine@flacso.org.e [Latin American Faculty for Social Sciences (FLACSO), Research Laboratory on Governance, Quito (Ecuador)

    2011-05-15

    This article addresses the consequences of different modes of energy governance on the energy matrix. Energy governance is understood as a regulation system of the energy related interplays between the State, the society and the economy. The energy matrix is a useful instrument for comparative policy analysis, since it informs us about production and consumption trends, by sources and sectors. Our central argument is that energy governance follows two different patterns, one hierarchical and the other cooperative, that are not necessarily determined by the initial factors allocation, and produce different effects on the energy matrix. Hierarchical governance is based on centralized decision-making and State-centered development, while co-governance is based on decentralized decision-making and market-oriented development. To develop this argument, we compare the energy matrix from the five Andean countries (Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia).

  15. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Bruce D.; Steck, Gary J.; Norrbom, Allen L.; Rodriguez, Erick J.; Srivastava, Pratibha; Alvarado, Norma Nolazco; Colque, Fredy; Landa, Erick Yábar; Sánchez, Juan José Lagrava; Quisberth, Elizabeth; Peñaranda, Emilio Arévalo; Clavijo, P. A. Rodriguez; Alvarez-Baca, Jeniffer K.; Zapata, Tito Guevara; Ponce, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The ITS1 regions of additional specimens (17 collections) from Central America (México, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Panamá), Brazil, Caribbean Colombia, and coastal Venezuela were sequenced and together with published sequences (Paraguay) provided context for interpretation. A total of six ITS1 sequence variants were recognized in the Andean region comprising four groups. Type I predominates in the southernmost range of Anastrepha fraterculus. Type II predominates in its northernmost range. In the central and northern Andes, the geographic distributions overlap and interdigitate with a strong elevational effect. A discussion of relationships between observed ITS1 types and morphometric types is included. PMID:26798259

  16. Histopathology of Andean Potato (Solanum tuberosum Andigenum group) varieties parasitized by the false root-knot nematode, Nacobbus aberrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordable, M Del C; Andrade, A J; Doucet, M E; Lax, P

    2018-02-01

    Landraces of the Solanum tuberosum Andigenum group are abundant and diverse. They are a valuable genetic resource possessing resistance to pests, diseases, and environmental stresses. In the Andean region, populations of the false root-knot nematode Nacobbus aberrans became specialized to infect native potatoes, being one of the major limiting factors affecting this crop. A better understanding of the host plant-parasite interactions is important in order to select tolerant or resistant plants to be included in management programs. Despite the close of association of N. aberrans with potato, and the great diversity of the S. tuberosum Andigenum group, few histopathological studies have been conducted. The aim of this work was to analyze histological alterations induced by different Argentine populations of the nematode in naturally infested roots of four Andean potato varieties (Collareja, Negra Imilla, Ojo de Señorita and Colorada). All the varieties showed hyperplastic tissue in the central zone of galls, where syncytia developed in close association with the nematode female. Syncytia were composed of modified hyperplastic tissue and parenchyma xylem cells. The results showed differences among varieties in their response to nematode populations, with Ojo de Señorita and Negra Imilla being the most susceptible ones. This study is the first describing histopathological alterations induced by N. aberrans in susceptible Andean potato landraces.

  17. Histopathology of Andean Potato (Solanum tuberosum Andigenum group varieties parasitized by the false root-knot nematode, Nacobbus aberrans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. del C. Tordable

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Landraces of the Solanum tuberosum Andigenum group are abundant and diverse. They are a valuable genetic resource possessing resistance to pests, diseases, and environmental stresses. In the Andean region, populations of the false root-knot nematode Nacobbus aberrans became specialized to infect native potatoes, being one of the major limiting factors affecting this crop. A better understanding of the host plant-parasite interactions is important in order to select tolerant or resistant plants to be included in management programs. Despite the close of association of N. aberrans with potato, and the great diversity of the S. tuberosum Andigenum group, few histopathological studies have been conducted. The aim of this work was to analyze histological alterations induced by different Argentine populations of the nematode in naturally infested roots of four Andean potato varieties (Collareja, Negra Imilla, Ojo de Señorita and Colorada. All the varieties showed hyperplastic tissue in the central zone of galls, where syncytia developed in close association with the nematode female. Syncytia were composed of modified hyperplastic tissue and parenchyma xylem cells. The results showed differences among varieties in their response to nematode populations, with Ojo de Señorita and Negra Imilla being the most susceptible ones. This study is the first describing histopathological alterations induced by N. aberrans in susceptible Andean potato landraces.

  18. Lake records of Northern Hemisphere South American summer monsoon variability from the Cordillera Oriental, Colombia: Initial results from Lago de Tota and Laguna de Ubaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, J.; Rudloff, O.; Bird, B. W.

    2013-12-01

    The lack of terrestrial paleoclimate records from the Northern Hemisphere Andes with decadal resolution has meant that our understanding of abrupt South American summer monsoon (SASM) variability during the Holocene is almost exclusively based on data from Southern Hemisphere sites. In order to develop a more integrated and complete picture of the SASM as a system and its response during rapid climate changes, high-resolution paleoclimate records are needed from the Northern Hemisphere Andes. We present initial results from analysis of lake sediment cores that were collected from Lago de Tota (N 5.554, W 72.916) and Laguna de Ubaque (N 4.500, W 73.935) in the Eastern Cordillera of the Colombian Andes. These sediment cores were collected in July 2013 as part on an ongoing paleoclimate research initiative in Colombia. Located in the Boyacá Provence, Lago de Tota is the largest high-altitude lake (3010 masl) in the Northern Hemisphere Andes and the second largest Andean lake in South America. As such, hydrologic changes recorded in the lake's sediment record reflect regional climate responses. Lago de Ubaque (2070 masl) is a small east facing moraine-dammed lake near the capital of Bogotá that contains finely laminated clastic sediments. The initial sedimentological and chronological results demonstrate that Lago de Tota and Laguna de Ubaque have excellent potential for resolving Northern Hemisphere SASM variability at decadal time scales or better. Such records will provide important counterparts to high-resolution paleoclimate records from the Southern Hemisphere Andes.

  19. Bayesian inferences suggest that Amazon Yunga Natives diverged from Andeans less than 5000 ybp: implications for South American prehistory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scliar, Marilia O; Gouveia, Mateus H; Benazzo, Andrea; Ghirotto, Silvia; Fagundes, Nelson J R; Leal, Thiago P; Magalhães, Wagner C S; Pereira, Latife; Rodrigues, Maira R; Soares-Souza, Giordano B; Cabrera, Lilia; Berg, Douglas E; Gilman, Robert H; Bertorelle, Giorgio; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo

    2014-09-30

    Archaeology reports millenary cultural contacts between Peruvian Coast-Andes and the Amazon Yunga, a rainforest transitional region between Andes and Lower Amazonia. To clarify the relationships between cultural and biological evolution of these populations, in particular between Amazon Yungas and Andeans, we used DNA-sequence data, a model-based Bayesian approach and several statistical validations to infer a set of demographic parameters. We found that the genetic diversity of the Shimaa (an Amazon Yunga population) is a subset of that of Quechuas from Central-Andes. Using the Isolation-with-Migration population genetics model, we inferred that the Shimaa ancestors were a small subgroup that split less than 5300 years ago (after the development of complex societies) from an ancestral Andean population. After the split, the most plausible scenario compatible with our results is that the ancestors of Shimaas moved toward the Peruvian Amazon Yunga and incorporated the culture and language of some of their neighbors, but not a substantial amount of their genes. We validated our results using Approximate Bayesian Computations, posterior predictive tests and the analysis of pseudo-observed datasets. We presented a case study in which model-based Bayesian approaches, combined with necessary statistical validations, shed light into the prehistoric demographic relationship between Andeans and a population from the Amazon Yunga. Our results offer a testable model for the peopling of this large transitional environmental region between the Andes and the Lower Amazonia. However, studies on larger samples and involving more populations of these regions are necessary to confirm if the predominant Andean biological origin of the Shimaas is the rule, and not the exception.

  20. Regional Analysis of the Hazard Level of Glacial Lakes in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisolm, Rachel E.; Jhon Sanchez Leon, Walter; McKinney, Daene C.; Cochachin Rapre, Alejo

    2016-04-01

    The Cordillera Blanca mountain range is the highest in Peru and contains many of the world's tropical glaciers. This region is severely impacted by climate change causing accelerated glacier retreat. Secondary impacts of climate change on glacier retreat include stress on water resources and the risk of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) from the many lakes that are forming and growing at the base of glaciers. A number of GLOFs originating from lakes in the Cordillera Blanca have occurred over the last century, several of which have had catastrophic impacts on cities and communities downstream. Glaciologists and engineers in Peru have been studying the lakes of the Cordillera Blanca for many years and have identified several lakes that are considered dangerous. However, a systematic analysis of all the lakes in the Cordillera Blanca has never before been attempted. Some methodologies for this type of systematic analysis have been proposed (eg. Emmer and Vilimek 2014; Wang, et al. 2011), but as yet they have only been applied to a few select lakes in the Cordillera Blanca. This study uses remotely sensed data to study all of the lakes of the Glacial Lake Inventory published by the Glaciology and Water Resources Unit of Peru's National Water Authority (UGRH 2011). The objective of this study is to assign a level of potential hazard to each glacial lake in the Cordillera Blanca and to ascertain if any of the lakes beyond those that have already been studied might pose a danger to nearby populations. A number of parameters of analysis, both quantitative and qualitative, have been selected to assess the hazard level of each glacial lake in the Cordillera Blanca using digital elevation models, satellite imagery, and glacier outlines. These parameters are then combined to come up with a preliminary assessment of the hazard level of each lake; the equation weighting each parameter draws on previously published methodologies but is tailored to the regional characteristics

  1. Conceptual frameworks for monitoring of high-altitude Andean ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    David E. Busch; Xavier Silva

    2006-01-01

    The Ecuadorian government and its partner organizations in the international conservation community share an interest in developing monitoring programs for Andean protected areas to help support management for recreation, education, and ecological sustainability. To accomplish this goal, the U.S. Agency for International Development and the Department of the Interior...

  2. Isolation of lipolytic bacteria from Colombian Andean soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaramillo, Paola Andrea Palacios; Borda-Molina, Daniel; Montaña, José Salvador

    2017-01-01

    Microbial enrichments with a substrate of interest could enhance the possibility of finding certain desired metabolic activities. As lipases are one of the most important enzymes in industrial applications, the Colombian Andean soils were explored as a source of lipolytic microorganisms. Two Ande...

  3. Cultural Politics, Communal Resistance and Identity in Andean Irrigation Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, R.A.; Gelles, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    This article uses two case studies to illustrate how Andean irrigation development and management emerges from a hybrid mix of local community rules and the changing political forms and ideological forces of hegemonic states. Some indigenous water-control institutions are with us today because they

  4. Andean grasslands are as productive as tropical cloud forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveras Menor, I.; Girardin, C.; Doughty, C.E.; Cahuana, N.; Arenas, C.E.; Oliver, V.; Huaraca Huasco, W.; Malhi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We aim to assess net primary productivity (NPP) and carbon cycling in Andean tropical alpine grasslands (puna) and compare it with NPP of tropical montane cloud forests. We ask the following questions: (1) how do NPP and soil respiration of grasslands vary over the seasonal cycle? (2) how do burning

  5. Democratic Governability in the Andean Region : Political and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Over the past 15 years, the Andean countries - Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela - have undertake a number of unsustainable political and institutional reforms that have caused dissatisfaction, exacerbated social and political unrest, and in some cases led to violent confrontation. New political and institutional reforms ...

  6. Andean shrublands of Moquegua, South Peru: Prepuna plant communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montesinos, D.B.; Cleef, A.M.; Sykora, K.V.

    2012-01-01

    A syntaxonomic overview of shrubland vegetation in the southern Andean regions of Peru is presented. For each plant community, information is given on physiognomy, floristic diversity, ecology and geographical distribution. The shrub vegetation on the slopes of the upper Tambo river valley includes

  7. The Andean Common Market: An Experiment in Regional Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Reynold E.

    The Grupo Andino (GRAN) was formed in 1969 as an effort at economic integration by six Latin American countries (Bolivia, Chile, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela). It was an outgrowth of its predecessor, the Latin American Free Trade Association (LAFTA), which had been formed in 1960 with eleven member countries. The Andean Group (GRAN) from…

  8. Inflammatory aspects of type 2 diabetes in the Andean region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.Y. Baldeón Rojas (Lucy)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract This thesis deals with the immune inflammatory aspects of obesity, the metabolic syndrome (MetS), insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the Andean region, more precisely in Quito, Ecuador. To understand the research questions a short introduction in the

  9. Short-and-long-term Slip Rates Along the Carboneras Fault in the Betic Cordillera, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaradze, G.; López, R.; Pallàs, R.; Ortuño, M.; Bordonau, J.; Masana, E.

    2017-12-01

    We present the new results from our long-standing studies to understand the geodynamic behavior of the Carboneras fault, located in the SE Betic Cordilleras of Spain. Specifically, we quantify the geodetic and geologic slip rates for the onland section of the fault. As a result of our previous GPS observations, we have been able to confirm the continuing tectonic activity of the Carboneras fault: we were able to quantify that the geodetic slip rate of the fault equals 1.3±0.2 mm/yr, expressed mainly as a left-lateral strike slip motion (Echeverria et al., 2015). In autumn 2017, with the purpose of revealing a detailed nature of the crustal deformation and its partitioning between different structures, 3 new continuous GPS stations will be established along the fault-perpendicular profile. In addition, since summer 2016, we have conducted surveys of the nearby CuaTeNeo and IGN Regente campaign points. We have also established and measured several new geodetic points in the vicinity of the fault, with the aim of increasing the spatial coverage around it. The GPS measured, short-term slip rates are in surprising agreement with the estimates of the long-term, geologic slip rates based on paleoseismic studies, which indicate a minimum strike-slip rate of 1.31 mm/yr and dip-slip rate of 0.05 mm/yr since 110.3 ka (Moreno et al. 2015). In order to increase the paleoseismic event database, several new sites have been identified along the fault, where further paleoseismic trenching surveys will be performed within the coming year or two. At the site of Tostana, located at the central part of the fault, in winter 2017 seven trenches have been opened and clear evidence of past earthquakes has been encountered. These new data, combined with the findings of the recent geomorphological study of river offsets (Ferrater, 2016) and new GPS observations, should improve the reliability of the existent deformation data and therefore, will help to better understand the seismic hazard

  10. NEW GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL CONTRIBUTIONS IN THE SECTION IBAGUÉ – ARMENIA, CENTRAL CORDILLERA - COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas Carlos A.

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Ha sido interpretada la sección geológica entre las ciudades de Ibagué y Armenia basada en observaciones geofísicas y estructurales en busca de establecer el estilo estructural dominante y la configuración del basamento en profundidad. Inicialmente se realizaron mediciones gravimétricas y magnetométricas levantadas cada 500 m entre estas ciudades, las cuales permitieron soportar el desarrollo del experimento sísmico "Armenia-Quake". El alcance del experimento sísmico permitió detectar reflectores hasta aproximadamente 17 km de profundidad en un área de influencia de aproximadamente 25 km. La interpretación integral de la información geológica y geofísica permite concluir que el Complejo Cajamarca define una estructura sinclinal amplia cerca al Municipio de Cajamarca. Partiendo de dicha información se pudo reconocer la presencia de un basamento compuesto por cuñas de rocas basálticas y sedimentarias asociadas a las formaciones Quebradagrande y Arquía. Igualmente se reconoce la existencia de una gran flexión de la paleo-placa oceánica relacionada a la formación Barroso, la cual se encuentra limitada al occidente por la falla Cauca-Almaguer. La estructura en flexión y la evolución compresiva del estado de esfuerzos en esta región de América del Sur podrían ser las responsables del depósito y posterior plegamiento de la formación Cinta de Piedra que constituye en gran medida la Serranía de Santa Bárbara.

  11. DEM supported tectonic geomorphology : the Coastal Cordillera of the South-Central Chilean active margin ; [Poster

    OpenAIRE

    Rehak, Katrin; Strecker, Manfred; Echtler, Helmut

    2006-01-01

    Fluvial systems are one of the major features shaping a landscape. They adjust to the prevailing tectonic and climatic setting and therefore are very sensitive markers of changes in these systems. If their response to tectonic and climatic forcing is quantified and if the climatic signal is excluded, it is possible to derive a local deformation history. Here, we investigate fluvial terraces and erosional surfaces in the southern Chilean forearc to assess a long-term geomorphic and hence tecto...

  12. Una nueva especie de Atelopus A.M.C. Dumeril & Bibron 1841 (Amphibia: Bulonidae de la cordillera Occidental, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz Carranza Pedro M.

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available A new species of the genus Atelopus of the longirostris Group (A.negreti is nomined and described from the Eastern slope of the Cordillera Occidental, S. P.N.N. Munchique, Cauca, at 1470-1580m.Se nomina y describe una nueva especie de atelopus del grupo longirostris: A.negreti del flanco occidental de la Cordillera Occidental, límite S. del Parque Nacional Natural Munchique, Cauca, 1470-1580m.

  13. Study of Maca (Lepidium meyenii Walp., Andean crop with therapeutic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Sifuentes-Penagos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The maca is a native product of the Central Andes of Peru, it is resistant to hail, to frost and to prolonged droughts. It is cultivated from the Inca period in altitudes between 3800 - 4500 meters above sea level. This herbaceous plant, has not only a high nutritional value, but it is also valued for its medicinal role. Among the chemical components of this andean crop that have been related with therapeutic actions the increasing fertility and the energy levels, the antioxidant actions, the improving sexual desire and the growth rate. There are glucosinolates, sterols, fatty acids (macaene and their corresponding amides (macamides, alkaloids (lepidilines A and B, macaridine and polyphenols. This article presents a compilation of the researches that has been performed on the therapeutic properties of maca and its compounds responsible of them.

  14. The time-space distribution of Eocene to Miocene magmatism in the central Peruvian polymetallic province and its metallogenetic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissig, Thomas; Ullrich, Thomas D.; Tosdal, Richard M.; Friedman, Richard; Ebert, Shane

    2008-07-01

    Eocene to late Miocene magmatism in the central Peruvian high-plain (approx. between Cerro de Pasco and Huancayo; Lats. ˜10.2-12°S) and east of the Cordillera Occidental is represented by scattered shallow-level intrusions as well as subaerial domes and volcanic deposits. These igneous rocks are calc-alkalic and range from basalt to rhyolite in composition, and many of them are spatially, temporally and, by inference, genetically associated with varied styles of major polymetallic mineralization. Forty-four new 40Ar- 39Ar and three U/Pb zircon dates are presented, many for previously undated intrusions. Our new time constraints together with data from the literature now cover most of the Cenozoic igneous rocks of this Andean segment and provide foundation for geodynamic and metallogenetic research. The oldest Cenozoic bodies are of Eocene age and include dacitic domes to the west of Cerro de Pasco with ages ranging from 38.5 to 33.5 Ma. South of the Domo de Yauli structural dome, Eocene igneous rocks occur some 15 km east of the Cordillera Occidental and include a 39.34 ± 0.28 Ma granodioritic intrusion and a 40.14 ± 0.61 Ma rhyolite sill, whereas several diorite stocks were emplaced between 36 and 33 Ma. Eocene mineralization is restricted to the Quicay high-sulfidation epithermal deposit some 10 km to the west of Cerro de Pasco. Igneous activity in the earliest Oligocene was concentrated up to 70 km east of the Cordillera Occidental and is represented by a number of granodioritic intrusions in the Milpo-Atacocha area. Relatively voluminous early Oligocene dacitic to andesitic volcanism gave rise to the Astabamba Formation to the southeast of Domo de Yauli. Some stocks at Milpo and Atacocha generated important Zn-Pb (-Ag) skarn mineralization. After about 29.3 Ma, magmatism ceased throughout the study region. Late Oligocene igneous activity was restricted to andesitic and dacitic volcanic deposits and intrusions around Uchucchacua (approx. 25 Ma) and felsic

  15. Uranium deposits in connection with the tertiary vulcanities of the Latin American Cordilleras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, H.; Schneider, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    During the last ten years, uranium deposits of a rather unknown and unnoticed type till now have been discovered in the Latin American Cordilleras. The uranium is concentrated in tertiary, acid vulcanites (mostly ignimbrites) and the adjacent clastic sedimentary series. Occurences of this type have become known from Mexico via Bolivia to Argentinia and owing to the enormous spreading of the vulcanities certainly represent reserves of economical interest. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 MKO [de

  16. The role of changing geodynamics in the progressive contamination of Late Cretaceous to Late Miocene arc magmas in the southern Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rosemary E.; Kirstein, Linda A.; Kasemann, Simone A.; Litvak, Vanesa D.; Poma, Stella; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Hinton, Richard; EIMF

    2016-10-01

    The tectonic and geodynamic setting of the southern Central Andean convergent margin changed significantly between the Late Cretaceous and the Late Miocene, influencing magmatic activity and its geochemical composition. Here we investigate how these changes, which include changing slab-dip angle and convergence angles and rates, have influenced the contamination of the arc magmas with crustal material. Whole rock geochemical data for a suite of Late Cretaceous to Late Miocene arc rocks from the Pampean flat-slab segment (29-31 °S) of the southern Central Andes is presented alongside petrographic observations and high resolution age dating. In-situ U-Pb dating of magmatic zircon, combined with Ar-Ar dating of plagioclase, has led to an improved regional stratigraphy and provides an accurate temporal constraint for the geochemical data. A generally higher content of incompatible trace elements (e.g. Nb/Zr ratios from 0.019 to 0.083 and Nb/Yb from 1.5 to 16.4) is observed between the Late Cretaceous ( 72 Ma), when the southern Central Andean margin is suggested to have been in extension, and the Miocene when the thickness of the continental crust increased and the angle of the subducting Nazca plate shallowed. Trace and rare earth element compositions obtained for the Late Cretaceous to Late Eocene arc magmatic rocks from the Principal Cordillera of Chile, combined with a lack of zircon inheritance, suggest limited assimilation of the overlying continental crust by arc magmas derived from the mantle wedge. A general increase in incompatible, fluid-mobile/immobile (e.g., Ba/Nb) and fluid-immobile/immobile (e.g., Nb/Zr) trace element ratios is attributed to the influence of the subducting slab on the melt source region and/or the influx of asthenospheric mantle. The Late Oligocene ( 26 Ma) to Early Miocene ( 17 Ma), and Late Miocene ( 6 Ma) arc magmatic rocks present in the Frontal Cordillera show evidence for the bulk assimilation of the Permian-Triassic (P

  17. Foreland sedimentary record of Andean mountain building during advancing and retreating subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Brian K.

    2016-04-01

    As in many ocean-continent (Andean-type) convergent margins, the South American foreland has long-lived (>50-100 Myr) sedimentary records spanning not only protracted crustal shortening, but also periods of neutral to extensional stress conditions. A regional synthesis of Andean basin histories is complemented by new results from the Mesozoic Neuquén basin system and succeeding Cenozoic foreland system of west-central Argentina (34-36°S) showing (1) a Late Cretaceous shift from backarc extension to retroarc contraction and (2) an anomalous mid-Cenozoic (~40-20 Ma) phase of sustained nondeposition. New detrital zircon U-Pb geochronological results from Jurassic through Neogene clastic deposits constrain exhumation of the evolving Andean magmatic arc, retroarc thrust belt, foreland basement uplifts, and distal eastern craton. Abrupt changes in sediment provenance and distal-to-proximal depositional conditions can be reconciled with a complex Mesozoic-Cenozoic history of extension, post-extensional thermal subsidence, punctuated tectonic inversion involving thick- and thin-skinned shortening, alternating phases of erosion and rapid accumulation, and overlapping igneous activity. U-Pb age distributions define the depositional ages of several Cenozoic stratigraphic units and reveal a major late middle Eocene-earliest Miocene (~40-20 Ma) hiatus in the Malargüe foreland basin. This boundary marks an abrupt shift in depositional conditions and sediment sources, from Paleocene-middle Eocene distal fluviolacustrine deposition of sediments from far western volcanic sources (Andean magmatic arc) and subordinate eastern cratonic basement (Permian-Triassic Choiyoi igneous complex) to Miocene-Quaternary proximal fluvial and alluvial-fan deposition of sediments recycled from emerging western sources (Malargüe fold-thrust belt) of Mesozoic basin fill originally derived from basement and magmatic arc sources. Neogene eastward advance of the fold-thrust belt involved thick

  18. A new catfish species of the genus Trichomycterus (Siluriformes: Trichomycteridae from the río Orinoco versant of Páramo de Cruz Verde, Eastern Cordillera of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos DoNascimiento

    Full Text Available A new Trichomycterus is described from a highland tributary of the río Meta (Orinoco basin, along the east flank of Páramo de Cruz Verde, Eastern Cordillera of Colombia. The new species is distinguished from most of its congeners by having a reduced posterior cranial fontanel, restricted to the parieto-supraoccipital, cleithrum pierced by several foramina, and an unique combination of four irregular rows of conic teeth in premaxilla and dentary, 13-14 opercular odontodes, 41-43 interopercular odontodes, 6-7 branchiostegal rays, 40 or 41 free vertebrae, 14-18 ribs, first ray of pectoral fin slightly projected as a short filament, 7-8 branched pectoral-fin rays, dorsal-fin origin at same level of pelvic-fin insertion, anal-fin origin posterior to dorsal-fin base, caudal-fin margin slightly rounded, a single upper hypural plate (3+4+5, and coloration pattern consisting in ground color dark brown with a thin mid-lateral dark stripe. Phylogenetic relationships of the new species based on the shared presence of derived features related to posterior cranial fontanel and cleithrum are discussed. The new species is also compared to the only two described species from Andean tributaries of río Orinoco basin.

  19. mtDNA and Y-chromosome diversity in Aymaras and Quechuas from Bolivia: different stories and special genetic traits of the Andean Altiplano populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayà-Vidal, Magdalena; Moral, Pedro; Saenz-Ruales, Nancy; Gerbault, Pascale; Tonasso, Laure; Villena, Mercedes; Vasquez, René; Bravi, Claudio M; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel

    2011-06-01

    Two Bolivian samples belonging to the two main Andean linguistic groups (Aymaras and Quechuas) were studied for mtDNA and Y-chromosome uniparental markers to evaluate sex-specific differences and give new insights into the demographic processes of the Andean region. mtDNA-coding polymorphisms, HVI-HVII control regions, 17 Y-STRs, and three SNPs were typed in two well-defined populations with adequate size samples. The two Bolivian samples showed more genetic differences for the mtDNA than for the Y-chromosome. For the mtDNA, 81% of Aymaras and 61% of Quechuas presented haplogroup B2. Native American Y-chromosomes were found in 97% of Aymaras (89% hg Q1a3a and 11% hg Q1a3*) and 78% of Quechuas (100% hg Q1a3a). Our data revealed high diversity values in the two populations, in agreement with other Andean studies. The comparisons with the available literature for both sets of markers indicated that the central Andean area is relatively homogeneous. For mtDNA, the Aymaras seemed to have been more isolated throughout time, maintaining their genetic characteristics, while the Quechuas have been more permeable to the incorporation of female foreigners and Peruvian influences. On the other hand, male mobility would have been widespread across the Andean region according to the homogeneity found in the area. Particular genetic characteristics presented by both samples support a past common origin of the Altiplano populations in the ancient Aymara territory, with independent, although related histories, with Peruvian (Quechuas) populations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Contemporary recent extension and compression in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibaldi, A.; Bonali, F. L.

    2018-02-01

    Although extension in the high Andes vs. compression in the lowlands has already been widely discussed in the literature, for the first time we recognized both extensional and contractional structures that developed contemporaneously during late Pliocene-Quaternary times in a wide area of the central Andean chain (about 90,000 km2), where crustal earthquake data are missing. This area comprises north-eastern Chile, south-western Bolivia and north-western Argentina, and extends from the Puna Plateau to the Altiplano-volcanic belt. Late Pliocene-Quaternary folds, with hinge lines trending NNE-SSW to N-S, are mostly located along the westernmost part of the volcanic belt and the eastern part of the Western Cordillera. Locally, there are coeval reverse faults, parallel to the folds, which reach up to the surface; particularly, the Miscanti Ridge, Tolocha Fault and La Casualidad Ridge may be the morphostructural expression of tens-km-long fault-propagation folds, which locally show topographic scarps hundreds of meters high. North and east of the contractional structures, we found evidence of late Pliocene-Quaternary normal faults striking N-S in the southern part of the study area, and NW-SE in the northern part. Well-developed grabens are present in the higher areas of the volcanic belt and in the transition zone with the Puna Plateau. The surface rupture zones of normal fault swarms range 8-24 km in length, with single fault strands up to 18 km long, which are typical of tectonic structures. The distribution in space and time of the studied contractional and extensional structures indicates that they originated in the same time period; we thus address the challenging question regarding the possible origin of the stress sources, by analysing possible causes such as volcanotectonics, high topography, orogeny collapse, and gravitational spreading of the orogen, in relation also with the role played by inherited structures. We finally analyse the relations between the

  1. Paleoseismology and tectonic geomorphology of the Pallatanga fault (Central Ecuador), a major structure of the South-American crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baize, Stéphane; Audin, Laurence; Winter, Thierry; Alvarado, Alexandra; Pilatasig Moreno, Luis; Taipe, Mercedes; Reyes, Pedro; Kauffmann, Paul; Yepes, Hugo

    2015-05-01

    The Pallatanga fault (PF) is a prominent NNE-SSW strike-slip fault crossing Central Ecuador. This structure is suspected to have hosted large earthquakes, including the 1797 Riobamba event which caused severe destructions to buildings and a heavy death toll (more than 12,000 people), as well as widespread secondary effects like landsliding, liquefaction and surface cracking. The scope of this study is to evaluate the seismic history of the fault through a paleoseismological approach. This work also aims at improving the seismotectonic map of this part of the Andes through a new mapping campaign and, finally, aims at improving the seismic hazard assessment. We show that the PF continues to the north of the previously mapped fault portion in the Western Cordillera (Rumipamba-Pallatanga portion) into the Inter-Andean Valley (Riobamba basin). Field evidences of faulting are numerous, ranging from a clear geomorphological signature to fault plane outcrops. Along the western side of the Riobamba basin, the strike-slip component seems predominant along several fault portions, with a typical landscape assemblage (dextral offsets of valleys, fluvial terrace risers and generation of linear pressure ridges). In the core of the inter-Andean valley, the main fault portion exhibits a vertical component along the c. 100 m-high cumulative scarp. The presence of such an active fault bounding the western suburbs of Riobamba drastically increases the seismic risk for this densely inhabited and vulnerable city. To the east (Peltetec Massif, Cordillera Real), the continuation of the Pallatanga fault is suspected, but not definitely proved yet. Based on the analysis of three trenches, we state that the Rumipamba-Pallatanga section of the PF experienced 4 (maybe 5) Holocene to Historical strong events (Mw > 7). The coseismic behavior of the fault is deduced from the occurrence of several colluvial wedges and layers associated with the fault activity and interbedded within the organic

  2. DEFORMACION CORTICAL Y PELIGRO SISMICO ASOCIADO A LA FALLA SAN RAMON EN EL FRENTE CORDILLERANO DE SANTIAGO, CHILE CENTRAL (33°S)

    OpenAIRE

    RAULD PLOTT, RODRIGO ANDRES; RAULD PLOTT, RODRIGO ANDRES

    2011-01-01

    1) El orógeno Andino es fundamentalmente bi-vergente, incluyendo un gran sistema de fallas inversas cabalgantes en el frente occidental chileno, que son sintéticas con respecto al acoplamiento tectónico causante de la orogenia Andina (subducción de la placa Nazca, oceánica, bajo la placa Sudamericana, continental); 2) El funcionamiento del Cabalgamiento Andino Occidental (West Andean Thrust, WAT), documentado por la estructura con vergencia oeste de la Cordillera Principal en Chile, tiene ...

  3. Structure and Evolution of the Central Andes of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, L.; Pfiffner, O. A.

    2009-04-01

    Three major units make up the Andes in Peru: (1) The Western Cordillera consists of the Cretaceous Coastal Batholith intruding Jurassic to Cretaceous volcaniclastics (Casma group) in the west, and a fold-and-thrust belt of Mesozoic sediments in the east. Eocene and Miocene volcanics (Calipuy group and equivalents) overly all of these rock types. (2) The Central Highland contains a folded Paleozoic-Mesozoic sedimentary sequence overlain by thick Quaternary deposits. A major fault puts Neoproterozoic basement rocks of the Eastern Cordillera next to these units. (3) In the Eastern Cordillera, Late Paleozoic clastic successions unconformably overly folded Early Paleozoic sediments and a Neoproterozoic basement in the east. Permian (locally Triassic) granitoids intruded these units and were affected by folding and thrusting. In the core of the Eastern Cordillera, Early Cretaceous overly Early or Late Paleozoic strata. To the west, a thrust belt of Paleozoic to Cenozoic strata forms the transition to the foreland of the Brasilian shield. The most external part of this thrust belt involves Pliocene sediments and is referred to as Subandine zone. The Coastal Batholith is internally undeformed. The adjacent fold-and-thrust belt to the east is characterized by tight, nearly isoclinal upright folds with amplitudes of up to 1000 m. At the surface only Cretaceous rocks are observed. Using balancing techniques, a detachment horizon at the base of the Lowermost Cretaceous (Goyallarisquizga group - Oyon Formation) can be proposed. Further east, folds are more open, asymmetric and east verging, Jurassic sediments appear in the cores of the anticlines. The abrupt change in style from upright tight folding in the west to more open folding in the east is explained by a primary difference in the depositional sequence, most probably associated with synsedimentary faulting. The overlying volcanics of the Calipuy group and equivalents are, in turn, only slightly folded. In the Northern

  4. Genetic diversity and germplasm conservation of three minor Andean tuber crop species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malice M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In traditional Andean agrosystems, three minor tuber crop species are of regional or local importance: oca (Oxalis tuberosa Molina, ulluco (Ullucus tuberosus Caldas and mashua (Tropaeolum tuberosum Ruiz and Pav.. Genetic diversity within these species is very large and could result from the high ecological and cultural variability that characterizes the Andean area. Nowadays, many anthropic or ecological factors cause the loss of diversity and contribute to genetic erosion. The development of conservation strategies for genetic resources of Andean tubers, in situ as well as ex situ, includes a better knowledge of diversity in addition to the study of Andean farming strategies linked to this genetic diversity.

  5. Erosion of particulate organic material from an Andean river and its delivery to the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kathryn; Hilton, Robert; West, A. Joshua; Robles Caceres, Arturo; Grocke, Darren; Marthews, Toby; Asner, Greg; New, Mark; Mahli, Yadvinder

    2016-04-01

    Organic carbon and nutrients discharged by mountainous rivers can play an important role in biogeochemical cycles from regional to global scales. The eastern Andes host productive forests on steep, rapidly eroding slopes, a combination that is primed to deliver sediment, carbon and nutrients to the lowland Amazon River. We quantify clastic sediment and particulate organic carbon (POC) discharge for the Kosñipata River, Peru, an Andean tributary of the Madre de Dios River, using suspended sediment samples and discharge measurements over one year at two gauging stations. Calculations of sediment yield on the basis of this data suggest that the Madre de Dios basin may have erosion rates ˜10 times greater than the Amazon Basin average. The total POC yield over the sampling period was up to five times higher than the yield in the lowland Amazon Basin, with most POC (70-80%) exported between December and March in the wet season. We use radiocarbon, stable C isotopes and C/N ratios to distinguish between the erosion and discharge of POC from sedimentary rocks (petrogenic POC) and POC eroded from the modern terrestrial biosphere, from vegetation and soil (biospheric POC). We find that biospheric POC discharge was significantly enhanced during flood events, over that of clastic sediment and petrogenic POC. The ultimate fate of the eroded POC may play a central role in the net carbon budget of Andean forest. In these forests, net productivity minus heterotrophic respiration is close to zero at the scale of forest plots, and the erosion of biospheric POC by this Andean river is sufficiently rapid that its fate downstream (sedimentary burial/preservation versus oxidation/degradation) may determine whether the mountain forest is a carbon sink or source to the atmosphere. In addition, the measured discharge of petrogenic POC suggests that fluxes from the Andes may be considerably higher than measured downstream in the Madeira River. If this petrogenic POC is oxidised rather

  6. Andean cutaneous leishmaniasis (Andean-CL, uta) in Peru and Ecuador: the causative Leishmania parasites and clinico-epidemiological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa; Gomez, Eduardo A L; Cáceres, Abraham G; Velez, Lenin N; Villegas, Nancy V; Hashiguchi, Kazue; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Uezato, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirotomo

    2018-01-01

    This study provides comprehensive information on the past and current status of the Andean cutaneous leishmaniasis (Andean-CL, uta) in Peru and Ecuador, mainly focusing on the causative Leishmania parasites and clinico-epidemiological features. Available information and data including our unpublished works were analyzed thoroughly. Endemic regions of the Andean-CL (uta) in Peru run from the north Piura/Cajamarca to the south Ayacucho at a wide range of the Pacific watersheds of the Andes through several departments, while in Ecuador those exist at limited and spotted areas in the country's mid-southwestern two provinces, Azuay and Chimborazo. The principal species of the genus Leishmania are completely different at subgenus level, L. (Viannia) peruviana in Peru, and L. (Leishmania) mexicana and L. (L.) major-like (infrequent occurrence) in Ecuador. The Peruvian uta is now prevalent in different age and sex groups, being not clearly defined as found in the past. The precise reasons are not known and should be elucidated further, though probable factors, such as emergence of other Leishmania parasites, non-immune peoples' migration into the areas, etc., were discussed briefly in the text. The Andean-CL cases in Ecuador are more rural than before, probably because of a rapid development of the Leishmania-positive communities and towns, and the change of life-styles of the inhabitants, including newly constructed houses and roads in the endemic areas. Such information is helpful for future management of the disease, not only for Leishmania-endemic areas in the Andes but also for other endemic areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of erosion and isostasy in the Cordillera Blanca uplift: insights from Low-T thermochronology and landscape evolution modeling (northern Peru, Andes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margirier, A.; Robert, X.; Braun, J.; Laurence, A.

    2017-12-01

    The uplift and exhumation of the highest Peruvian peaks seems closely linked to the Cordillera Blanca normal fault that delimits and shape the western flank of the Cordillera Blanca. Two models have been previously proposed to explain the occurrence of extension and the presence of this active normal fault in a compression setting but the Cordillera Blanca normal fault and the uplift and exhumation of the Cordillera Blanca remain enigmatic. Recent studies suggested an increase of exhumation rates during the Quaternary in the Cordillera Blanca and related this increase to a change in climate and erosion process (glacial erosion vs. fluvial erosion). The Cordillera Blanca granite has been significantly eroded since its emplacement (12-5 Ma) indicating a significant mass of rocks removal. Whereas it has been demonstrated recently that the effect of eroding denser rocks can contribute to an increase of uplift rate, the impact of erosion and isostasy on the increase of the Cordillera Blanca uplift rates has never been explored. Based on numerical modeling of landscape evolution we address the role of erosion and isostasy in the uplift and exhumation of the Cordillera Blanca. We performed inversions of the present-day topography, total exhumation and thermochronological data using a landscape evolution model (FastScape). Our results evidence the contribution of erosion and associated flexural rebound to the uplift of the Cordillera Blanca. Our models suggest that the erosion of the Cordillera Blanca dense intrusion since 3 Ma could also explain the Quaternary exhumation rate increase in this area. Finally, our results allow to question the previous models proposed for the formation of the Cordillera Blanca normal fault.

  8. Uptake of Hg2+ by picocyanobacteria in natural water from four Andean lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diéguez M.C.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In lake food webs, planktonic bacteria and algae represent the greatest bioconcentration step for Hg2+ and monomethyl-Hg (MeHg. As they are the most abundant organisms in planktonic trophic webs and also the main food resource for herbivorous plankton, they can mobilize large amounts of Hg to higher trophic levels. In Andean Patagonian lakes (Argentina, dissolved organic matter (DOM concentration and character, coupled with photo-reactions, play a central role in the complexation of Hg2+ in the water column and can even regulate the uptake of Hg2+ by planktonic algae. In this investigation we evaluated the DOM character of natural waters (NW from four Andean lakes and studied its influence on the uptake of 197Hg2+ in a strain of the picocyanobacteria Synechococcus by using Hg2+ labeled with 197Hg2+. The uptake of radiolabeled Hg2+ by Synechococcus showed different magnitude in NW of lakes Moreno, El Trébol, Morenito and Escondido. Increasing lake DOM concentration reduced the bioavailability of Hg2+ as indicated by the lower uptakes rates found in NW with higher complexity and concentration of the DOM pool. Uptakes of Hg2+ by this picocyanobacteria contrasted among NW from pelagic (surface and bottom and littoral compartments of Lake Escondido which suggest that the entry of this metal may be highly variable even in the same environment. The study of the uptake of radiolabeled Hg2+ in a set of dilutions of NW from Lake Escondido demonstrated that the bioavailability of Hg2+ decrease with increasing DOM concentration.

  9. Education can improve the negative perception of a threatened long-lived scavenging bird, the Andean condor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailly Arnulphi, Verónica B.; Lambertucci, Sergio A.

    2017-01-01

    Human-wildlife conflicts currently represent one of the main conservation problems for wildlife species around the world. Vultures have serious conservation concerns, many of which are related to people's adverse perception about them due to the belief that they prey on livestock. Our aim was to assess local perception and the factors influencing people's perception of the largest scavenging bird in South America, the Andean condor. For this, we interviewed 112 people from Valle Fértil, San Juan province, a rural area of central west Argentina. Overall, people in the area mostly have an elementary education, and their most important activity is livestock rearing. The results showed that, in general, most people perceive the Andean condor as an injurious species and, in fact, some people recognize that they still kill condors. We identified two major factors that affect this perception, the education level of villagers and their relationship with livestock ranching. Our study suggests that conservation of condors and other similar scavengers depends on education programs designed to change the negative perception people have about them. Such programs should be particularly focused on ranchers since they are the ones who have the worst perception of these scavengers. We suggest that highlighting the central ecological role of scavengers and recovering their cultural value would be fundamental to reverse their persecution and their negative perception by people. PMID:28950019

  10. Soil Organic Carbon Variability in High-Andean Ecosystems: Bringing Together Machine Learning and Proximal Soil Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilan, C.; Grunwald, S.; Quiroz, R.

    2017-12-01

    The Andes represent the largest and highest mountain range in the tropics and is considered an important reserve of biodiversity, water provision and soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks. Nevertheless, limited attention has been given to estimate these stocks due to the lack of recent soil data, the poor accessibility and the wide range of coexistent ecosystems. In addition, conventional methods to determine SOC are usually time consuming and expensive to use in large-scale studies, hindering the possibility to have an accurate SOC assessment in the region. Proximal soil sensing techniques, such as visible near infrared (VNIR) and mid infrared (MIR) spectroscopy, have proven to be useful as an alternative to conventional methods for characterizing SOC but have not been tested in Andean soils. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of using VNIR and MIR spectroscopy to predict SOC content in the Central Andean region, using multivariate methods. Three study areas were selected across the Peruvian Central Andes. A total of 400 topsoil samples (0-30 cm) were collected and analyzed for SOC. The VNIR and MIR reflectance of the soil samples was measured in the laboratory. Three modeling approaches: Partial least squares regression (PLSR), random forest (RF) and support vector machine (SVM) were used to predict SOC from VNIR and MIR spectra in the study areas. The data was preprocessed in order to minimize the noise and optimize the accuracy of predictions. The models, for each study area, were assessed using 10-fold cross validation. Independent validation was implemented in the whole dataset (400 observations) by splitting it into calibration (70 %) and validation (30%) sets. Overall, the results indicate potential for both VNIR and MIR spectra to predict SOC content in the Andean soils. SOC content predictions from MIR spectra outperformed those from VNIR spectra. The evaluation of model performance shows that RF and SVM provide more accurate SOC predictions

  11. The role of western Mediterranea tectonic evolution in the geometry of a karstic domain in the Betic Cordilleras (Sierra Gorda, Spain): Importance of a tardy extensional regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistre, Séverin; Lopez-Chicano, Manuel; Pulido-Bosch, Antonio; Drogue, Claude

    1999-01-01

    Located in the central part of the Betic Cordilleras, the large carbonate Sierra Gorda Massif provides an example of a west-Mediterranean karstic aquifer. In spite of a complex polyphased tectonic history, the fracturing presents, from aerial views and at outcrop scale a quite organised geometry. Four fracture directions are found over the massif: N000-010, N050-070, N090-100 and N140-170. The statistical and geostatistical approach allows the characteristics (lengths, orientations) and the spatial structure for each fracture set to be determined. The NOOO-010 and N140-170 sets are grouped in packets whereas the two other sets are grouped in bands. The microtectonic study describes the evolution of the massif in the geodynamic context of this part of Mediterranea, distinguishing three recent stages of brittle tectonic activity in the massif: a WNW-ESE Middle Miocene compression, then a NNW-SSE to NW-SE compression with a poorly wrenching regime, and finally a probably pre-Quaternary N-S radial distension. This last stage is essential for the karstification of the massif and groundwater circulation. From the combined analysis of fracture network geometry and palaeostresses a multiple porosity model in agreement with hydrological observations made inside the massif can be proposed: in particular, the hectometric N090-100 (and N050-070) fractures which are essential for the network connectivity, and have a major drainage role at aquifer scale, while the N000-010 and N140-170 ones have a more local drainage role. This extensive tardy regime, which is for the first time described separately from the internal zones of the Cordilleras, must be considered as a significant phenomenon on a regional scale, and henceforth integrated in future geodynamic schemes of this part of Mediterranea.

  12. Lithospheric Structure across the Alaskan Cordillera from Surface Waves and Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, K. M.; Lin, F. C.

    2017-12-01

    The long awaited Transportable Array (TA) deployment in Alaska and western Canada is nearing its final deployment stage. With only one more deployment season, most of the TA station locations have been occupied and begun providing data. These TA stations combined with upgraded existing locations have provided enough high-quality data to begin investigating the crustal and upper mantle structure across the entire Alaskan Cordillera. From a tectonic standpoint, many interesting questions remain unanswered. For example, how does the transition from oceanic-oceanic subduction to continental-oceanic normal subduction to continental-oceanic "flat-slab" subduction to strike-slip conservative plate motion affect the deformation/uplift of the overriding plate and mantle geodynamic characteristics? How does the long and completed terrene accretion process partition stress/strain in the crust? On more local scales, are there any significant mid-crustal magmatic systems as observed in other sections of the American Cordillera, and if so, what is there role in uplift and crustal deformation? Our approach to investigating these questions is though surface wave imaging from ambient noise and earthquake generated sources along with Rayleigh wave ellipticity paired with Ps receiver functions. Our preliminary tomography results agree with previous studies but expand the spatial coverage showing additional detail. Our ellipticity results show a heterogeneous but spatially consistent anisotropic shallow crust. Although the complete TA data set has not yet been collected, we have jointly inverted surface waves with receiver functions for a 3-D shear-wave velocity model across the entire Alaskan Cordillera. Key features of our velocity model include a high-velocity feature in the upper mantle associated with the subducting Pacific plate that extends north of the seismicity used to contour the geometry of the slab and mid-crustal low-velocity zones associated with the active volcanics in

  13. El magmatismo de la cordillera oriental, importante metalotecto para la presencia de uranio

    OpenAIRE

    Valencia, Jacinto; Mamani, Enoc

    2013-01-01

    Un análisis del aspecto estructural del dispositivo geotectónico andino para postular la condición por la cual se constituyen las unidades intrusivas de la Cordillera Oriental del Perú, como favorables para la presencia de uranio, comparadas con unidades intrusivas del Batolito de la Costa. Trabajos de campo iniciados durante la ejecución del Proyecto OIEA PER 02/016, indican que el Batolito de la Costa, de edad del mioceno y formado principalmente por material mantélico, por colisión de plac...

  14. El enjambre sísmico de Macas (cordillera de Cutucú)

    OpenAIRE

    Legrand, Denis; Baby, Patrice; Bondoux, Francis; Dorbath, Catherine; Bès de Berc, Séverine; Rivadeneira, Marco

    2015-01-01

    La sismicidad de la región de Macas es comparada a la sismicidad global del Ecuador. Un experimento con diez estaciones sismológicas de corto período fue realizado entre 1999 y 2000, cerca de la ciudad de Macas, en la parte sur del piedemonte subandino del Ecuador (Cordillera de Cutucú). Las ubicaciones de los terremotos registrados fueron comparadas y correlacionadas con las estructuras geológicas. Algunos eventos están alineados en una dirección NNE-SSW que corresponde a la orientación de l...

  15. Photos provide information on age, but not kinship, of Andean bear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, Russell C; Zug, Becky; Appleton, Robyn D; Velez-Liendo, Ximena; Paisley, Susanna; LaCombe, Corrin

    2015-01-01

    Using photos of captive Andean bears of known age and pedigree, and photos of wild Andean bear cubs camera trap photos are one of the most readily available sources of information on large cryptic mammals, we suggest that similar methods be tested for use in other poorly understood species.

  16. Pharmaceutical policy of the Andean sub-region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Senior policy makers and health officials from the Andean countries--Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela--have developed a common pharmaceutical policy. The government's role is to assure availability and equal access to effective, quality, and affordable drugs and to safeguard their proper use. The government cannot delegate this role. The availability and accessibility of drugs gauge quality of health services and are social indicators of justice and equity. The public sector must use drugs from the essential drug list. These drugs are also valuable for the private sector. Drugs must not be treated like other merchandise, because the drug market is susceptible to misuse since the consumer cannot select the drug. Commercial advertising strongly influences prescribing of drugs and their use. The 2 major policy points are that promotion of essential drugs is the best approach from a health viewpoint and promotion of generic drug use is the best commercial alternative. The policy calls for the individual countries to pass a comprehensive drug law that reflects commitment to equity and appropriate use and incorporates standardization mechanisms. Criteria for selecting which drugs are allowed on the market include safety, proven efficacy, risk/benefit ratio, and treating the most common health problems at the lowest possible price. The Andean group is working towards harmonization of national essential drugs lists. To assure quality, health authorities must develop the capacity to enforce regulations when situations arise that threaten individual and community health. Supply, marketing, and logistics activities need to be improved and coordinated between the commercial and public sectors. Drug prices are being distanced from administrative control mechanisms and are going to be determined by a dynamic and well-supplied market. Drug information centers and prescription training are needed to achieve rational use of drugs. A joint pharmaceutical market for

  17. Integration, migration and sustainable development in the Andean group of nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, R; Kratochwil, H

    1993-04-01

    This paper, which was presented at the 1993 meeting of the International Organization for Migration, summarizes past and recent progress in Andean integration and migration arrangements. Changes in the strategy of the Andean group of nations (GAN) have occurred in the adjustment to prevailing conditions at the subregional and international level. GAN includes Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. The Andean Pact originated with the signing of the Cartegena Agreement in 1969. Members approved the Andean Strategic Design in 1989, which loosened up trade integration and the movement of capital, services, and persons across shared borders. The Strategic Design also addressed issues resulting from economic and social integration. A statement of migratory patterns among GAN, Andean integration during 1969-89, and the goals and operation of the Andean Strategic Design and integration are discussed in some detail. The Galapagos Declaration and the La Paz Statement of 1990 are also described. The present situation with Andean integration is based on the following meetings of Andean nations: the First Meeting of Migration Officials of the Andean Group of Nations in March 1991, the Second Meeting of Migration Officials in September 1991, and bilateral agreements between Andean nations. Seven basic conclusions are drawn: 1) the strategy is an institutional, deliberate, programmed process; 2) integration within GAN is the culmination of a joint, coordinated directive of achievement of sustainable development in the subregion which aims to reduce the economic gaps between the North and the South, to lessen the impact of protected markets of the North and their migration barriers, and to improve the possibility of development of technologically sophisticated human capital; 3) subregional policies are more sensitive to short-term change in domestic politics; 4) integration and migration can be sustained better with deliberate planning; 5) implementation is dependent on

  18. Geomorphologically effective floods from moraine-dammed lakes in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmer, Adam

    2017-12-01

    Outburst floods originating in moraine-dammed lakes represent a significant geomorphological process as well as a specific type of threat for local communities in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru (8.5°-10° S; 77°-78° W). An exceptional concentration of catastrophic floods has been reported from the Cordillera Blanca in the first half of 20th Century (1930s-1950s), leading to thousands of fatalities. The main objective of this paper is to provide a revised and comprehensive overview of geomorphologically effective floods in the area of interest, using various documentary data sources, verified by analysis of remotely sensed images (1948-2013) and enhanced by original field data. Verified events (n = 28; 4 not mentioned before) are analysed from the perspective of spatiotemporal distribution, pre-flood conditions, causes, mechanisms and geomorphological impacts as well as socioeconomical consequences, revealing certain patterns and similar features. GLOFs are further classified according to their magnitude: 5 extreme events, 8 major events and 15 minor events are distinguished, referring to the quantified geomorphological and socioeconomical impacts. Selected moraine dams and flood deposits are dated using lichenometric dating. Special attention is given to moraine dam breaches - the most frequent type of water release with the most significant consequences. Selected major events and their consequences are studied in detail in a separate section. Finally, a general schematic model of lake formation, growth and post-flood evolution reflecting initial topographical setting and glacier retreat is introduced and the utilization of the obtained results is outlined.

  19. Resolving the tectonic transition between ancestral North America and the northern Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, A. J.; Audet, P.; Lebedev, S.

    2015-12-01

    The northern Cordillera, situated in the Canadian northwest, is one of the most actively deforming regions in Canada and host to the highest earthquake activity in the country. Furthermore, it presents a largely contiguous snapshot through almost 4 Gyr of Earth's history across a zone architecture are expected. Additionally, significant seismicity is observed further north off the Beaufort Shelf; however, its relationship to the regional stress fields and associated tectonic forcing is unclear. Despite the high seismicity levels across, detailed study of this region has been limited by insufficient coverage of seismological infrastructure, hindering resolution in past models. With the deployment of the USArray Transportable Array in Alaska over the last several years, combined with regional arrays such as the Yukon-Northwest Seismic Network (YNSN), Banks Island Seismic Network (BISN) and Mackenzie Mountains Experiment, new studies will leverage these datasets enabling more detailed imaging of the structure and seismicity across the region. Here we present a new high-resolution, vertically polarized shear speed and azimuthal model of northwestern Canada and Alaska, constrained by vertical component seismogram fits computed using the Automated Multimode Inversion of Surface, S, and multiple-S waveforms. With this new model, we aim to address key questions relating to the dynamics of the northern Cordillera, including how far west the craton edge extends at depth, in addition to the crustal thickness, velocity structure, and pattern of crustal fabrics around major faults throughout the region.

  20. Forecasting typhoid fever incidence in the Cordillera administrative region in the Philippines using seasonal ARIMA models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawiding, Olive R.; Natividad, Gina May R.; Bato, Crisostomo V.; Addawe, Rizavel C.

    2017-11-01

    The prevalence of typhoid fever in developing countries such as the Philippines calls for a need for accurate forecasting of the disease. This will be of great assistance in strategic disease prevention. This paper presents a development of useful models that predict the behavior of typhoid fever incidence based on the monthly incidence in the provinces of the Cordillera Administrative Region from 2010 to 2015 using univariate time series analysis. The data used was obtained from the Cordillera Office of the Department of Health (DOH-CAR). Seasonal autoregressive moving average (SARIMA) models were used to incorporate the seasonality of the data. A comparison of the results of the obtained models revealed that the SARIMA (1,1,7)(0,0,1)12 with a fixed coefficient at the seventh lag produces the smallest root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE), Akaike Information Criterion (AIC), and Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). The model suggested that for the year 2016, the number of cases would increase from the months of July to September and have a drop in December. This was then validated using the data collected from January 2016 to December 2016.

  1. The metamorphic basement of the Cordillera Frontal of Mendoza: New geochronologic and isotopic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basei, Miguel; Ramos, Victor A.; Vujovich, Graciela I.; Poma, Stella

    1998-01-01

    The metamorphic rocks of the Cordillera Frontal exposed in the Cordon del Portillo, Mendoza were examined by Rb/Sr geochronology and Nd/Sm isotopic analysis. The Rb/Sr data defined a Devonian age for the last metamorphic episode, similar to the previous K/Ar and Ar/Ar ages obtained in this region and western Precordillera. The isotopic analysis identified three sets of model ages: 1.- The oldest corresponds to a set of meta sedimentary rocks with a model age of 1,400 to 1,700 Ma; 2.- A monzogranodiorite with a model age of 1,000 Ma; and 3.- Metabasites with model ages between 577 and 330 Ma. These rocks are interpreted as 1.- A typical Grenvillian derived basement; 2.- Late Paleozoic granitoids derived from a different Proterozoic basement; and 3.- Some Eopaleozoic metabasites tectonically inter fingered with the Grenvillian basement. These new data are coherent with the existence of a Laurentia derived terrane, Chilenia, that was separated by oceanic rocks from the basement of Pre cordillera during Eopaleozoic times. This last basement known as the Cuyania terrane, was also derived from Laurentia. (author)

  2. Andean cutaneous leishmaniasis (Andean-CL, uta) in Peru and Ecuador: the vector Lutzomyia sand flies and reservoir mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa; Gomez L, Eduardo A; Cáceres, Abraham G; Velez, Lenin N; Villegas, Nancy V; Hashiguchi, Kazue; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Uezato, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirotomo

    2018-02-01

    The vector Lutzomyia sand flies and reservoir host mammals of the Leishmania parasites, causing the Andean cutaneous leishmaniasis (Andean-CL, uta) in Peru and Ecuador were thoroughly reviewed, performing a survey of literatures including our unpublished data. The Peruvian L. (V.) peruviana, a principal Leishmania species causing Andean-CL in Peru, possessed three Lutzomyia species, Lu. peruensis, Lu. verrucarum and Lu. ayacuchensis as vectors, while the Ecuadorian L. (L.) mexicana parasite possessed only one species Lu. ayacuchensis as the vector. Among these, the Ecuadorian showed a markedly higher rate of natural Leishmania infections. However, the monthly and diurnal biting activities were mostly similar among these vector species was in both countries, and the higher rates of infection (transmission) reported, corresponded to sand fly's higher monthly-activity season (rainy season). The Lu. tejadai sand fly participated as a vector of a hybrid parasite of L. (V.) braziliensis/L. (V.) peruviana in the Peruvian Andes. Dogs were considered to be principal reservoir hosts of the L. (V.) peruviana and L. (L.) mexicana parasites in both countries, followed by other sylvatic mammals such as Phyllotis andium, Didelphis albiventris and Akodon sp. in Peru, and Rattus rattus in Ecuador, but information on the reservoir hosts/mammals was extremely poor in both countries. Thus, the Peruvian disease form demonstrated more complicated transmission dynamics than the Ecuadorian. A brief review was also given to the control of vector and reservoirs in the Andes areas. Such information is crucial for future development of the control strategies of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Comparative Analysis of Seismological and Gravimetric Crustal Thicknesses below the Andean Region with Flat Subduction of the Nazca Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario E. Gimenez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A gravimetric study was carried out in a region of the Central Andean Range between 28∘ and 32∘ south latitudes and from 72∘ and 66∘ west longitudes. The seismological and gravimetrical Moho models were compared in a sector which coincides with the seismological stations of the CHARGE project. The comparison reveals discrepancies between the gravity Moho depths and those obtained from seismological investigations (CHARGE project, the latter giving deeper values than those resulting from the gravimetric inversion. These discrepancies are attenuated when the positive gravimetric effect of the Nazca plate is considered. Nonetheless, a small residuum of about 5 km remains beneath the Cuyania terrane region, to the east of the main Andean chain. This residuum could be gravimetrically justified if the existence of a high density or eclogitized portion of the lower crust is considered. This result differed from the interpretations from Project “CHARGE” which revealed that the entire inferior crust extending from the Precordillera to the occidental “Sierras Pampeanas” could be “eclogitized”. In this same sector, we calculated the effective elastic thickness (Te of the crust. These results indicated an anomalous value of Te = 30 km below the Cuyania terrane. This is further conclusive evidence of the fact that the Cuyania terrane is allochthonous, for which also geological evidences exist.

  4. Climate change forces new ecological states in tropical Andean lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Michelutti

    Full Text Available Air temperatures in the tropical Andes have risen at an accelerated rate relative to the global average over recent decades. However, the effects of climate change on Andean lakes, which are vital to sustaining regional biodiversity and serve as an important water resource to local populations, remain largely unknown. Here, we show that recent climate changes have forced alpine lakes of the equatorial Andes towards new ecological and physical states, in close synchrony to the rapid shrinkage of glaciers regionally. Using dated sediment cores from three lakes in the southern Sierra of Ecuador, we record abrupt increases in the planktonic thalassiosiroid diatom Discostella stelligera from trace abundances to dominance within the phytoplankton. This unprecedented shift occurs against the backdrop of rising temperatures, changing atmospheric pressure fields, and declining wind speeds. Ecological restructuring in these lakes is linked to warming and/or enhanced water column stratification. In contrast to seasonally ice-covered Arctic and temperate alpine counterparts, aquatic production has not increased universally with warming, and has even declined in some lakes, possibly because enhanced thermal stability impedes the re-circulation of hypolimnetic nutrients to surface waters. Our results demonstrate that these lakes have already passed important ecological thresholds, with potentially far-reaching consequences for Andean water resources.

  5. Landslide and glacial lake outburst flood hazard in the Chucchún river basin, Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Jan; Vilímek, V.; Benešová, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2015), s. 173-180 ISSN 0300-5402 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1000 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : landslide hazard * GLOFs * flood hazard * Cordillera Blanca * Peru Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  6. Grain size distribution of soils within the Cordillera Blanca, Peru: An indicator of basic mechanical properties for slope stability evaluation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, J.; Klimeš, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2014), s. 563-577 ISSN 1672-6316 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1000 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : moraines * grain size distribution * shear strength * hydraulic conductivity * Cordillera Blanca Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.963, year: 2014

  7. Structure and fabric of the crust and uppermost mantle in the northern Canadian Cordillera from Rayleigh-wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Morgan; Schaeffer, Andrew J.; Audet, Pascal

    2018-01-01

    The seismic structure and fabric of the lithosphere and underlying mantle beneath the northern Canadian Cordillera provides important constraints on its evolution and current tectonics; however, it is poorly characterized due to historically sparse networks of seismic instruments. We use data from past and recently deployed networks of broadband seismic stations in northwestern Canada and measure Rayleigh waves propagating between all available pairs of seismic stations using two complementary techniques: ambient noise and teleseismic two-station interferometry. The Rayleigh-wave data are processed to obtain phase velocity dispersion curves that are inverted for phase velocity maps at periods between 8 and 80 s. To first order these maps show high velocity anomalies within the Canadian Shield and low velocity anomalies within the Cordillera at all periods. At short periods (30 s; mostly sensitive to uppermost mantle depths), high velocity anomalies of the Canadian Shield extend west past the Cordilleran Deformation Front and suggest the presence of cratonic lithosphere beneath the Cordillera, whereas the lowest velocities underlie the allochtonous terranes. Anisotropy within the crust and uppermost mantle exhibits fast-axis orientations aligned with the major faults and fabric of the Cordillera, and show evidence for vertical changes in anisotropy. These results provide new constraints on geodynamic models proposed to explain neotectonic deformation in this area.

  8. Simultaneous batholith emplacement, terrane/continent collision, and oroclinal bending in the Blue Mountains Province, North American Cordillera

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žák, J.; Verner, K.; Tomek, Filip; Holub, F. V.; Johnson, K.; Schwartz, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 6 (2015), s. 1107-1128 ISSN 0278-7407 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) * North American Cordillera * orocline * pluton emplacement * terrane accretion * terrane/continent collision Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.750, year: 2015

  9. Extreme high prevalence of a defective mannose-binding lectin (MBL2 genotype in native South American West Andean populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Raul Sandoval

    Full Text Available Mannose-binding lectin (MBL is one of the five recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. Common variant alleles in the promoter and structural regions of the human MBL gene (MBL2 influence the stability and serum concentration of the protein. Epidemiological studies have shown that MBL2 variant alleles are associated with susceptibility to and the course of different types of infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, it has been suggested that these alleles are maintained in different populations due to selected advantages for carriers. We investigated the MBL2 allelic variation in indigenous individuals from 12 different West Central South America localities spanning from the desert coast, high altitude Andean plates and the Amazon tropical forest within the territories of Peru (n = 249 (Departments of Loreto, Ucayali, Lambayeque, Junin, Ayacucho, Huancayo and Puno, and Ecuador (n = 182 (Region of Esmeraldas and Santo Domingo de los Colorados. The distribution of MBL2 genotypes among the populations showed that the defective variant LYPB haplotype was very common. It showed the highest frequencies in Puno (Taquile (0.80, Amantani (0.80 and Anapia (0.58 islander communities of the Lake Titicaca, but lower frequencies of 0.22 in Junin (Central Andean highland and Ucayali (Central Amazonian forest, as well as 0.27 and 0.24 in the Congoma and Cayapa/Chachis populations in the Amazonian forest in Ecuador were also observed. Our results suggest that the high prevalence of the MBL2 LYPB variant causing low levels of functional MBL in serum may mainly reflect a random distribution due to a population bottleneck in the founder populations.

  10. Extreme high prevalence of a defective mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) genotype in native South American West Andean populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, José Raul; Madsen, Hans O; De Stefano, Gianfranco; Descailleaux-Dulanto, Jaime; Velazquez-Reinoso, Margarita; Ñique, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Garred, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is one of the five recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. Common variant alleles in the promoter and structural regions of the human MBL gene (MBL2) influence the stability and serum concentration of the protein. Epidemiological studies have shown that MBL2 variant alleles are associated with susceptibility to and the course of different types of infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, it has been suggested that these alleles are maintained in different populations due to selected advantages for carriers. We investigated the MBL2 allelic variation in indigenous individuals from 12 different West Central South America localities spanning from the desert coast, high altitude Andean plates and the Amazon tropical forest within the territories of Peru (n = 249) (Departments of Loreto, Ucayali, Lambayeque, Junin, Ayacucho, Huancayo and Puno), and Ecuador (n = 182) (Region of Esmeraldas and Santo Domingo de los Colorados). The distribution of MBL2 genotypes among the populations showed that the defective variant LYPB haplotype was very common. It showed the highest frequencies in Puno (Taquile (0.80), Amantani (0.80) and Anapia (0.58) islander communities of the Lake Titicaca), but lower frequencies of 0.22 in Junin (Central Andean highland) and Ucayali (Central Amazonian forest), as well as 0.27 and 0.24 in the Congoma and Cayapa/Chachis populations in the Amazonian forest in Ecuador were also observed. Our results suggest that the high prevalence of the MBL2 LYPB variant causing low levels of functional MBL in serum may mainly reflect a random distribution due to a population bottleneck in the founder populations.

  11. Healthy and Sustainable Horticulture Production in the Central Andes

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Healthy and Sustainable Horticulture Production in the Central Andes. Horticultural production in mid-altitude Andean valleys uses substantial amounts of highly hazardous and mutagenic pesticides. But, it is a growing source of income for farm families and fresh vegetables for metropolitan markets. Preliminary research ...

  12. Comparative repeatome analysis on Triatoma infestans Andean and Non-Andean lineages, main vector of Chagas disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzera, Francisco; Mora, Pablo; Vela, Jesús; Cuadrado, Ángeles; Sánchez, Antonio; Palomeque, Teresa; Lorite, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Triatoma infestans is the most important Chagas disease vector in South America. Two main evolutionary lineages, named Andean and non-Andean, have been recognized by geographical distribution, phenetic and genetic characteristics. One of the main differences is the genomic size, varying over 30% in their haploid DNA content. Here we realize a genome wide analysis to compare the repetitive genome fraction (repeatome) between both lineages in order to identify the main repetitive DNA changes occurred during T. infestans differentiation process. RepeatExplorer analysis using Illumina reads showed that both lineages exhibit the same amount of non-repeat sequences, and that satellite DNA is by far the major component of repetitive DNA and the main responsible for the genome size differentiation between both lineages. We characterize 42 satellite DNA families, which are virtually all present in both lineages but with different amount in each lineage. Furthermore, chromosomal location of satellite DNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that genomic variations in T. infestans are mainly due to satellite DNA families located on the heterochromatic regions. The results also show that many satDNA families are located on the euchromatic regions of the chromosomes. PMID:28723933

  13. Glacier changes and climate trends derived from multiple sources in the data scarce Cordillera Vilcanota region, southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, N.; Huggel, C.; Rohrer, M.; Silverio, W.; Mark, B. G.; Burns, P.; Portocarrero, C.

    2013-01-01

    The role of glaciers as temporal water reservoirs is particularly pronounced in the (outer) tropics because of the very distinct wet/dry seasons. Rapid glacier retreat caused by climatic changes is thus a major concern, and decision makers demand urgently for regional/local glacier evolution trends, ice mass estimates and runoff assessments. However, in remote mountain areas, spatial and temporal data coverage is typically very scarce and this is further complicated by a high spatial and temporal variability in regions with complex topography. Here, we present an approach on how to deal with these constraints. For the Cordillera Vilcanota (southern Peruvian Andes), which is the second largest glacierized cordillera in Peru (after the Cordillera Blanca) and also comprises the Quelccaya Ice Cap, we assimilate a comprehensive multi-decadal collection of available glacier and climate data from multiple sources (satellite images, meteorological station data and climate reanalysis), and analyze them for respective changes in glacier area and volume and related trends in air temperature, precipitation and in a more general manner for specific humidity. While we found only marginal glacier changes between 1962 and 1985, there has been a massive ice loss since 1985 (about 30% of area and about 45% of volume). These high numbers corroborate studies from other glacierized cordilleras in Peru. The climate data show overall a moderate increase in air temperature, mostly weak and not significant trends for precipitation sums and probably cannot in full explain the observed substantial ice loss. Therefore, the likely increase of specific humidity in the upper troposphere, where the glaciers are located, is further discussed and we conclude that it played a major role in the observed massive ice loss of the Cordillera Vilcanota over the past decades.

  14. Glacier changes and climate trends derived from multiple sources in the data scarce Cordillera Vilcanota region, southern Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Salzmann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of glaciers as temporal water reservoirs is particularly pronounced in the (outer tropics because of the very distinct wet/dry seasons. Rapid glacier retreat caused by climatic changes is thus a major concern, and decision makers demand urgently for regional/local glacier evolution trends, ice mass estimates and runoff assessments. However, in remote mountain areas, spatial and temporal data coverage is typically very scarce and this is further complicated by a high spatial and temporal variability in regions with complex topography. Here, we present an approach on how to deal with these constraints. For the Cordillera Vilcanota (southern Peruvian Andes, which is the second largest glacierized cordillera in Peru (after the Cordillera Blanca and also comprises the Quelccaya Ice Cap, we assimilate a comprehensive multi-decadal collection of available glacier and climate data from multiple sources (satellite images, meteorological station data and climate reanalysis, and analyze them for respective changes in glacier area and volume and related trends in air temperature, precipitation and in a more general manner for specific humidity. While we found only marginal glacier changes between 1962 and 1985, there has been a massive ice loss since 1985 (about 30% of area and about 45% of volume. These high numbers corroborate studies from other glacierized cordilleras in Peru. The climate data show overall a moderate increase in air temperature, mostly weak and not significant trends for precipitation sums and probably cannot in full explain the observed substantial ice loss. Therefore, the likely increase of specific humidity in the upper troposphere, where the glaciers are located, is further discussed and we conclude that it played a major role in the observed massive ice loss of the Cordillera Vilcanota over the past decades.

  15. Air temperature, radiation budget and area changes of Quisoquipina glacier in the Cordillera Vilcanota (Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Wilson; Macedo, Nicolás; Montoya, Nilton; Arias, Sandro; Schauwecker, Simone; Huggel, Christian; Rohrer, Mario; Condom, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The Peruvian Andes host about 71% of all tropical glaciers. Although several studies have focused on glaciers of the largest glaciered mountain range (Cordillera Blanca), other regions have received little attention to date. In 2011, a new program has been initiated with the aim of monitoring glaciers in the centre and south of Peru. The monitoring program is managed by the Servicio Nacional de Meteorología e Hidrología del Perú (SENAMHI) and it is a joint project together with the Universidad San Antonio Abad de Cusco (UNSAAC) and the Autoridad Nacional del Agua (ANA). In Southern Peru, the Quisoquipina glacier has been selected due to its representativeness for glaciers in the Cordillera Vilcanota considering area, length and orientation. The Cordillera Vilcanota is the second largest mountain range in Peru with a glaciated area of approximately 279 km2 in 2009. Melt water from glaciers in this region is partly used for hydropower in the dry season and for animal breeding during the entire year. Using Landsat 5 images, we could estimate that the area of Quisoquipina glacier has decreased by approximately 11% from 3.66 km2 in 1990 to 3.26 km2 in 2010. This strong decrease is comparable to observations of other tropical glaciers. In 2011, a meteorological station has been installed on the glacier at 5180 m asl., measuring air temperature, wind speed, relative humidity, net short and longwave radiation and atmospheric pressure. Here, we present a first analysis of air temperature and the radiation budget at the Quisoquipina glacier for the first three years of measurements. Additionally, we compare the results from Quisoquipina glacier to results obtained by the Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD) for Zongo glacier (Bolivia) and Antizana glacier (Ecuador). For both, Quisoquipina and Zongo glacier, net shortwave radiation may be the most important energy source, thus indicating the important role of albedo in the energy balance of the glacier

  16. Regeneración Natural del Roble Negro (Colombobalanus excelsa, Fagaceae en Dos Poblaciones de la Cordillera Oriental de los Andes, Colombia Natural Regeneration of Black Oak (Colombobalanus excelsa, Fagaceae in Two Populations from the Cordillera Oriental of the Colombian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Parra Aldana

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Colombobalanus excelsa es una especie endémica de la zona andina de Colombia, con cuatro poblaciones aisladas que forman rodales homogéneos denominados robledales negros. Se encuentra en categoría vulnerable de amenaza, debido principalmente a la conversión del bosque para usos agropecuarios; observaciones en campo indican que la regeneración natural bajo su propia cobertura es escasa. Se propone responder las siguientes preguntas: 1. ¿La estructura del bosque evidencia deficiencias en la regeneración natural de dos poblaciones de roble negro localizadas en la cordillera oriental de los Andes? 2. ¿El reclutamiento de fhmoreno@unal.edu.co está limitado por la disponibilidad y viabilidad de las semillas en las dos poblaciones estudiadas? Con este objetivo se establecieron 16 transectos permanentes de 0,1 ha para evaluar la estructura de adultos (DAP>10 cm y de la regeneración natural. Durante un año se realizó monitoreo sobre las épocas de fructificación, lluvia de semillas, germinación y banco de semillas. Los resultados muestran un suministro extremadamente bajo de renuevos y propágulos de roble negro, lo cual potencialmente puede poner en riesgo la persistencia de estos bosques. Esta situación obedece a diversos factores involucrados en el proceso de regeneración: desde baja producción de semillas de los árboles adultos, altos niveles de depredación pre-dispersión, alta proporción de semillas vacías, baja viabilidad de las semillas sanas, hasta alta mortalidad de las semillas sanas y viables que llegan al suelo. Si bien todos estos factores actúan en cascada, el último de ellos es quizás el que ejerce un efecto más dramático en el bajo éxito reproductivo de esta especie.Colombobalanus excelsa is an endemic species of the Andean region of Colombia, with four isolated populations, forming pure stands called black oak forests. It has been classified in the threat category ''Vulnerable'', mainly due to conversion of

  17. The «Andean judge» in intellectual property issues: application to the Peruvian case

    OpenAIRE

    Rejanovinschi Talledo, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    This paper emphasizes the role of Andean Tribunal of Justice, however disagrees with criteria used to recognize administrative entities such as «national judge» or «Andean judge». If we apply the Tribunal criteria, several administrators of justice in Intellectual Property will be exempt of collaborating with Andean integration. El presente documento enfatiza el rol del Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad Andina pero discrepa de los criterios establecidos para reconocer a las entidades ad...

  18. Proglacial Hydrogeology of the Cordillera Blanca (Peru): Integrating Field Observations with Hydrogeophysical Inversions to Inform Groundwater Flow Simulations and Conceptual Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glas, R. L.; Lautz, L.; McKenzie, J. M.; Moucha, R.; Mark, B. G.

    2017-12-01

    Geological and depositional conditions of the glaciated Cordillera Blanca in Peru have given way to proglacial aquifer systems that contribute substantially to regional streams and rivers, particularly during the dry season. As glacial retreat accelerates, the dry season water budget will be increasingly dominated by groundwater inputs, although predictions of future groundwater quantities require estimations of groundwater storage capacity, aquifer extents, and groundwater residence time. We present a characterization of the sediment structure in a prototypical proglacial valley in the central portion of the range, the Quilcayhuanca Valley. Northern and Central valleys of the Cordillera Blanca feature ubiquitous talus deposits that line the steep granite walls, and have become partially buried beneath lacustrine sediments deposited in proglacial lake beds. The portion of the talus still exposed near the valley walls provides recharge to deeper portions of the valley aquifers that underlie lacustrine clay, resulting in a confined aquifer system that is connected to the surface via perennial springs. Seismic refraction surveys reveal an interface separating relatively slow ( 400-800 m/s) and fast ( 2500 m/s) p-wave velocities. The depth of this refractor coincides with the depth to buried talus observed in drilling records. Electrical resistivity tomography profiles of the same transect show depths near the buried talus to be relatively conductive (10-100 Ωm). At these depths, we hypothesize that electrical conductance is elevated by saturated clay particles in the sediment matrix of the talus deposit. The resistivity models all show a more resistive ( 700 Ω m) region at depth, likely corresponding to a more hydraulically conductive material. The resistive zone is interpreted to be a deeper portion of a buried talus deposit that did not accumulate clay in the matrix. Other possibilities include a thick deposit of gravelly glacial outwash, or a relatively clay

  19. Reassessment of the development and hazard of the Rampac Grande landslide, Cordillera Negra, Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vilímek, V.; Klimeš, Jan; Torres, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 3, 18 April (2016), č. článku 5. E-ISSN 2197-8670 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : landslides * natural hazards * Cordillera Negra * Peru Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://download.springer.com/static/pdf/602/art%253A10.1186%252Fs40677-016-0039-8.pdf?originUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fgeoenvironmental-disasters.springeropen.com%2Farticle%2F10.1186%2Fs40677-016-0039-8&token2=exp=1486369402~acl=%2Fstatic%2Fpdf%2F602%2Fart%25253A10.1186%25252Fs40677-016-0039-8.pdf*~hmac=2a499db60ac7d16e5bc5da6d0cb065804ae5a9b0c750bef6f8c6e5f93ae5a9db

  20. Minimum 1D P wave velocity model for the Cordillera Volcanica de Guanacaste, Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, Maria C.; Linkimer, Lepolt; Taylor, Waldo

    2016-01-01

    A minimum velocity model is derived from 475 local earthquakes registered by the Observatorio Vulcanologico y Sismologico Arenal Miravalles (OSIVAM) for the Cordillera Volcanica de Guanacaste, between January 2006 and July 2014. The model has consisted of six layers from the surface up to 80 km the depth. The model has presented speeds varying between 3,96 and 7,79 km/s. The corrections obtained from the seismic stations have varied between -0,28 to 0,45, and they have shown a trend of positive values on the volcanic arc and negative on the forearc, in concordance with the crustal thickness. The relocation of earthquakes have presented three main groups of epicenters that could be associated with activity in inferred failures. The minimum ID velocity model has provided a simplified idea of the crustal structure and aims to contribute with the improvement of the routine location of earthquakes performed by OSIVAM. (author) [es

  1. Nutritional status of the Andean population of Puna and Quebrada of Humahuaca, Jujuy, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaguera, D; Samman, N; Farfán, N; Lobo, M; Pons, A; Tur, J A

    2008-06-01

    To assess the nutritional status of the Andean population of Puna and Quebrada of Humahuaca, Jujuy, using anthropometric measurements. A cross-sectional nutritional survey was carried out in a representative sample (n = 1236) of individuals from these regions. Children aged 2-9 years, adolescents (10-17 years) and adults (>or=18 years; pregnant and lactating women excluded) were considered. Height-for-age, weight-for-height and body mass index (BMI) were calculated in children and adolescents and compared with World Health Organization/National Center for Health Statistics/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reference standards using Z-scores or percentiles, in order to assess the prevalence of stunting, wasting/thinness and excess weight. In adults, BMI, waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip (WHR) ratio were used to identify obesity and central adiposity. Stunting (height-for-age Z-score or= 95th percentile) were found to be major nutritional problems in children and adolescents. Stunting was prevalent in 10.7% of children and 12.4% of adolescents; 8.2% of children and 3.5% of adolescents were obese. Adults were short (mean: 155.8 cm) and values of overweight (32.3%), obesity (18.3%) and central adiposity (mean WC: 86.5 cm) were high. Older adults and those with higher economic development showed higher prevalence of obesity and central adiposity. The present population may be at the early stages of nutritional transition as symptoms of undernutrition and overnutrition coexist at the population level. These results suggest that rates of growth retardation may be decreasing owing to improved nutritional conditions; however, this could be accompanied by a sharp increase in the prevalence of other diet-related chronic diseases.

  2. Measurements of light absorbing particulates on the glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J. D.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Celestian, A.

    2014-10-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been rapidly losing mass since the 1970s. In addition to the documented increase in air temperature, increases in light absorbing particulates deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we report on measurements of light absorbing particulates sampled from glaciers during three surveys in the Cordillera Blanca in Peru. During three research expeditions in the dry seasons (May-August) of 2011, 2012 and 2013, two hundred and forty snow samples were collected from fifteen mountain peaks over altitudes ranging from 4800 to nearly 6800 m. Several mountains were sampled each of the three expeditions and some mountains were sampled multiple times during the same expedition. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field then later analyzed using the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM), a new technique that measures the ability of particulates on filters to absorb visible light. LAHM results have been calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). As sample filters often contain dust in addition to BC, results are presented in terms of effective Black Carbon (eBC). During the 2013 survey, snow samples were collected and kept frozen for analysis with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Calculated eBC mass from the filter analysis and the SP2 refractory Black Carbon (rBC) results were well correlated (r2 = 0.92). These results indicate that a substantial portion of the light absorbing particulates in the more polluted areas were likely BC. The three years of data show that glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains close to human population centers have substantially higher levels of eBC (as high as 70 ng g-1) than remote glaciers (as low as 2.0 ng g-1 eBC), indicating that population centers can influence local glaciers by sourcing BC.

  3. Measurements of light-absorbing particles on the glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J. D.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Celestian, A.

    2015-02-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been rapidly losing mass since the 1970s. In addition to the documented increase in temperature, increases in light-absorbing particles deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we report on measurements of light-absorbing particles sampled from glaciers during three surveys in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains in Peru. During three research expeditions in the dry seasons (May-August) of 2011, 2012 and 2013, 240 snow samples were collected from 15 mountain peaks over altitudes ranging from 4800 to nearly 6800 m. Several mountains were sampled each of the 3 years and some mountains were sampled multiple times during the same year. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field then later analyzed using the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM), a new technique that measures the ability of particles on filters to absorb visible light. LAHM results have been calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). As sample filters often contain dust in addition to BC, results are presented in terms of effective black carbon (eBC). During the 2013 survey, snow samples were collected and kept frozen for analysis with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Calculated eBC mass from the LAHM analysis and the SP2 refractory black carbon (rBC) results were well correlated (r2 = 0.92). These results indicate that a substantial portion of the light-absorbing particles in the more polluted regions were likely BC. The 3 years of data show that glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains close to human population centers have substantially higher levels of eBC (as high as 70 ng g-1) than remote glaciers (as low as 2.0 ng g-1 eBC), indicating that population centers can influence local glaciers by sourcing BC.

  4. Neurophysiologic and neurocognitive case profiles of Andean patients with chronic environmental lead poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, S Allen; Buchanan, Leo H; Ortega, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    This report presents case profiles of three siblings in a family of lead (Pb) glazing workers living in a Pb-contaminated Andean village who presented with extreme plumbism (blood Pb levels: 47 to 128 microg/dl) from childhood to adolescence. These cases are examples of persons who have chronic Pb poisoning as a result of prolonged occupational and environmental exposure in a Pb-glazing ceramic cottage industry in the study area. Using behavioral and physiological techniques for measuring the integrity of the peripheral and central auditory systems, including otoacoustic emissions, and replicated auditory brainstem electrophysiological potentials, the authors found normal auditory neurosensory function in each patient, thus ruling out hearing impairment as a basis for adverse neurocognitive outcomes. This finding is contrary to the prevailing view regarding the detrimental effects of Pb poisoning on the cochlear and auditory brainstem of children. Performance on tests of visual spatial intelligence and auditory memory/attention was below average in these patients, which may underlie their reported learning disabilities. In two of the cases, there was an improvement in cognitive performance following a lowering of PbB levels from chelation therapy and Pb prevention education, suggesting some level of reversibility of their neurocognitive deficits. Nevertheless, these case profiles suggest that if the patients persist in Pb-glazing activities, in spite of repeated chelation therapy and family counseling, they may continue to be re-intoxicated and remain at risk for learning disabilities and other neurological impairments.

  5. Revisiting the Andean butterfly Eryphanis zolvizora group (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae: one or several species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Blandin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eryphanis zolvizora (Hewitson, 1877 is a rare Andean endemic butterfly, described from Bolivia, which has been historically classified either as a unique species, or as part of a group of three allopatric species from Bolivia, Ecuador and Colombia. In this paper, the group is revised using more than 200 specimens housed in 34 European, and North and South American public and private collections. For the first time, the presence of the group in Western Ecuador and Venezuela is confirmed, and important data on Peruvian populations are provided. In some populations, individual variations of genitalia are observed. Nevertheless, male genitalia allow the distinction of four geographical groups. Considering also habitus characters, eight taxa are distinguished and considered to be subspecies, of which five are new: Eryphanis zolvizora inca ssp. nov., Eryphanis zolvizora chachapoya ssp. nov., Eryphanis zolvizora casagrande ssp. nov.., Eryphanis zolvizora reyi ssp. nov., and Eryphanis zolvizora isabelae ssp. nov.  In the present state of knowledge, these taxa are allopatric, except for a possible geographic overlap in central Peru, where data are insufficient to prove sympatry. The “several subspecies vs. several species” dilemma is discussed, considering its impact for conservation action and policies.

  6. Large-scale patterns of turnover and Basal area change in Andean forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene Báez

    Full Text Available General patterns of forest dynamics and productivity in the Andes Mountains are poorly characterized. Here we present the first large-scale study of Andean forest dynamics using a set of 63 permanent forest plots assembled over the past two decades. In the North-Central Andes tree turnover (mortality and recruitment and tree growth declined with increasing elevation and decreasing temperature. In addition, basal area increased in Lower Montane Moist Forests but did not change in Higher Montane Humid Forests. However, at higher elevations the lack of net basal area change and excess of mortality over recruitment suggests negative environmental impacts. In North-Western Argentina, forest dynamics appear to be influenced by land use history in addition to environmental variation. Taken together, our results indicate that combinations of abiotic and biotic factors that vary across elevation gradients are important determinants of tree turnover and productivity in the Andes. More extensive and longer-term monitoring and analyses of forest dynamics in permanent plots will be necessary to understand how demographic processes and woody biomass are responding to changing environmental conditions along elevation gradients through this century.

  7. Large-scale patterns of turnover and Basal area change in Andean forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez, Selene; Malizia, Agustina; Carilla, Julieta; Blundo, Cecilia; Aguilar, Manuel; Aguirre, Nikolay; Aquirre, Zhofre; Álvarez, Esteban; Cuesta, Francisco; Duque, Álvaro; Farfán-Ríos, William; García-Cabrera, Karina; Grau, Ricardo; Homeier, Jürgen; Linares-Palomino, Reynaldo; Malizia, Lucio R; Cruz, Omar Melo; Osinaga, Oriana; Phillips, Oliver L; Reynel, Carlos; Silman, Miles R; Feeley, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    General patterns of forest dynamics and productivity in the Andes Mountains are poorly characterized. Here we present the first large-scale study of Andean forest dynamics using a set of 63 permanent forest plots assembled over the past two decades. In the North-Central Andes tree turnover (mortality and recruitment) and tree growth declined with increasing elevation and decreasing temperature. In addition, basal area increased in Lower Montane Moist Forests but did not change in Higher Montane Humid Forests. However, at higher elevations the lack of net basal area change and excess of mortality over recruitment suggests negative environmental impacts. In North-Western Argentina, forest dynamics appear to be influenced by land use history in addition to environmental variation. Taken together, our results indicate that combinations of abiotic and biotic factors that vary across elevation gradients are important determinants of tree turnover and productivity in the Andes. More extensive and longer-term monitoring and analyses of forest dynamics in permanent plots will be necessary to understand how demographic processes and woody biomass are responding to changing environmental conditions along elevation gradients through this century.

  8. Rise, Fall, and Semiperipheral Development in the Andean World-System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell LaLone

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how different power strategies have been playedover the course of the three-thousand year Andean civilization. In broad terms, the power strategies center on ideological, economic, and military power (Mann 1986; Earle 1997. The case materials show that what we call “states” are formations that succeed, albeit temporarily, in combining strat-egies of ideological, economic, and military power. Nonetheless, following Randall Collins (1981:71, I would argue that coercive power is the sine qua non for state development. If we start from the power to coerce as a foun-dation, varying strategies of manipulating economic, ideological, and military power will produce a number of different pathways to varying forms of organization. Some may be more centralized than others, some may be less steeply strati?ed than others, some may have more specialized institutions than others, some may look more like environmental management systems, and others may look more like well-organized predatory protection rackets. Those which were less successful in manipulating these strategies were more vulnerable to collapse, opening the way for new formations to emerge. As world-systems approaches would predict, this has often happened on the peripheries of former core formations.

  9. Bioactive Potential of Andean Fruits, Seeds, and Tubers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, David; Chirinos, Rosana; Gálvez Ranilla, Lena; Pedreschi, Romina

    2018-01-01

    The Andes is considered the longest continental mountain range in the world. It covers 7000km long and about 200-700km wide and an average height of about 4000m. Very unique plant species are endemic of this area including fruits (e.g., lucuma, cherimoya, sweet pepino, sauco), roots and tubers (potatoes, sweet potatoes, yacón, chicuru, mashua, olluco, etc.), and seeds (quinoa, amaranth, tarwi, etc.). These crops have been used for centuries by the native population and relatively recently have gained the world attention due to the wide range of nutrients and/or phytochemicals they possess. In this chapter, main Andean fruits, seeds, and roots and tubers have been selected and detailed nutritional and functional information is provided. In addition, traditional and current uses are provided and their bioactive potential is reported based on published scientific literature. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Biodegradability and mechanical properties of starch films from Andean crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, F G; Troncoso, O P; Torres, C; Díaz, D A; Amaya, E

    2011-05-01

    Different Andean crops were used to obtain starches not previously reported in literature as raw material for the production of biodegradable polymers. The twelve starches obtained were used to prepare biodegradable films by casting. Water and glycerol were used as plasticizers. The mechanical properties of the starch based films were assessed by means of tensile tests. Compost tests and FTIR tests were carried out to assess biodegradability of films. The results show that the mechanical properties (UTS, Young's modulus and elongation at break) of starch based films strongly depend on the starch source used for their production. We found that all the starch films prepared biodegrade following a three stage process and that the weight loss rate of all the starch based films tested was higher than the weight loss rate of the cellulose film used as control. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. An Outbreak of Bartonella bacilliformis in an Endemic Andean Community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Sanchez Clemente

    Full Text Available Bartonellosis affects small Andean communities in Peru, Colombia and Ecuador. Research in this area has been limited.Retrospective review of 191 cases of bartonellosis managed in Caraz District Hospital, Peru, during the last outbreak (2003.The majority of cases (65% were 14 years old and younger. There was a peak in acute cases after the rainy season; chronic cases presented more constantly throughout the year. The sensitivity of blood smear against blood culture in acute disease was 25%. The most commonly used treatment for chronic disease was rifampicin; chloramphenicol was used to treat most acute cases. Complications arose in 6.8% and there were no deaths.Diagnostic and treatment algorithms for acute and chronic bartonellosis have been developed without a strong evidence base. Preparation of ready-to-go operational research protocols for future outbreaks would strengthen the evidence base for diagnostic and treatment strategies and enhance opportunities for control.

  12. Genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans in the Northern Andean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Martha; Grajales, Alejandro; Sierra, Roberto; Rojas, Alejandro; González-Almario, Adriana; Vargas, Angela; Marín, Mauricio; Fermín, Gustavo; Lagos, Luz E; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Bernal, Adriana; Salazar, Camilo; Restrepo, Silvia

    2011-02-09

    Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, the causal agent of potato late blight, is responsible for tremendous crop losses worldwide. Countries in the northern part of the Andes dedicate a large proportion of the highlands to the production of potato, and more recently, solanaceous fruits such as cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana) and tree tomato (Solanum betaceum), all of which are hosts of this oomycete. In the Andean region, P. infestans populations have been well characterized in Ecuador and Peru, but are poorly understood in Colombia and Venezuela. To understand the P. infestans population structure in the Northern part of the Andes, four nuclear regions (ITS, Ras, β-tubulin and Avr3a) and one mitochondrial (Cox1) region were analyzed in isolates of P. infestans sampled from different hosts in Colombia and Venezuela. Low genetic diversity was found within this sample of P. infestans isolates from crops within several regions of Colombia and Venezuela, revealing the presence of clonal populations of the pathogen in this region. We detected low frequency heterozygotes, and their distribution patterns might be a consequence of a high migration rate among populations with poor effective gene flow. Consistent genetic differentiation exists among isolates from different regions. The results here suggest that in the Northern Andean region P. infestans is a clonal population with some within-clone variation. P. infestans populations in Venezuela reflect historic isolation that is being reinforced by a recent self-sufficiency of potato seeds. In summary, the P. infestans population is mainly shaped by migration and probably by the appearance of variants of key effectors such as Avr3a.

  13. Genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans in the Northern Andean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grünwald Niklaus J

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary, the causal agent of potato late blight, is responsible for tremendous crop losses worldwide. Countries in the northern part of the Andes dedicate a large proportion of the highlands to the production of potato, and more recently, solanaceous fruits such as cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana and tree tomato (Solanum betaceum, all of which are hosts of this oomycete. In the Andean region, P. infestans populations have been well characterized in Ecuador and Peru, but are poorly understood in Colombia and Venezuela. To understand the P. infestans population structure in the Northern part of the Andes, four nuclear regions (ITS, Ras, β-tubulin and Avr3a and one mitochondrial (Cox1 region were analyzed in isolates of P. infestans sampled from different hosts in Colombia and Venezuela. Results Low genetic diversity was found within this sample of P. infestans isolates from crops within several regions of Colombia and Venezuela, revealing the presence of clonal populations of the pathogen in this region. We detected low frequency heterozygotes, and their distribution patterns might be a consequence of a high migration rate among populations with poor effective gene flow. Consistent genetic differentiation exists among isolates from different regions. Conclusions The results here suggest that in the Northern Andean region P. infestans is a clonal population with some within-clone variation. P. infestans populations in Venezuela reflect historic isolation that is being reinforced by a recent self-sufficiency of potato seeds. In summary, the P. infestans population is mainly shaped by migration and probably by the appearance of variants of key effectors such as Avr3a.

  14. Watershed-based natural research management: Lessons from projects in the Andean region

    OpenAIRE

    Sowell, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    This Undergraduate Honors Thesis focuses on how different factors affect the success of a watershed management project and lessons learned from projects in the Andean Region. LTRA-3 (Watershed-based NRM for Small-scale Agriculture)

  15. Elevation-dependent changes in n-alkane δD and soil GDGTs across the South Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Moreno, Vanesa; Rohrmann, Alexander; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Sachse, Dirk; Tofelde, Stefanie; Niedermeyer, Eva M.; Strecker, Manfred R.; Mulch, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Surface uplift of large plateaus may significantly influence regional climate and more specifically precipitation patterns and temperature, sometimes complicating paleoaltimetry interpretations. Thus, understanding the topographic evolution of tectonically active mountain belts benefits from continued development of reliable proxies to reduce uncertainties in paleoaltimetry reconstructions. Lipid biomarker-based proxies provide a novel approach to stable isotope paleoaltimetry and complement authigenic or pedogenic mineral proxy materials, in particular outside semi-arid climate zones where soil carbonates are not abundant but (soil) organic matter has a high preservation potential. Here we present δD values of soil-derived n-alkanes and mean annual air temperature (MAT) estimates based on branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGT) distributions to assess their potential for paleoelevation reconstructions in the southern central Andes. We analyzed soil samples across two environmental and hydrological gradients that include a hillslope (26-28°S) and a valley (22-24°S) transect on the windward flanks of Central Andean Eastern Cordillera in NW Argentina. Our results show that present-day n-alkane δD values and brGDGT-based MAT estimates are both linearly related with elevation and in good agreement with present-day climate conditions. Soil n-alkanes show a δD lapse rate (Δ (δD)) of - 1.64 ‰ / 100 m (R2 = 0.91, p Colombia and Bolivia and the Equatorial and Peruvian Andes. BrGDGT-derived soil temperatures are similar to monitored winter temperatures in the region and show a lapse rate of ΔT = - 0.51 °C / 100 m (R2 = 0.91, p < 0.01), comparable with lapse rates from in situ soil temperature measurements, satellite-derived land-surface temperatures at this transect, and weather stations from the Eastern Cordillera at similar latitude. As a result of an increasing leeward sampling position along the valley transect lapse rates are biased towards

  16. Bee pollen as non-wood forest product in the eastern Andean highlands of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermín José Chamorro García

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Andean forests of the Eastern Andean high-lands of Colombia have a high conservation priority given the vulnerable condition of species such as Quercus humboldtii (Fagaceae that inhabit these ecosystems. Beekeeping is regarded as an alternative activity that could play a role in the conservation of Andean forests, but little is known about how the floras of these ecosystems contribute to honey and bee pollen production. We analyzed the contribution of Andean forests to bee pollen production, given the productive potential and commercial importance of this product. Pollen analyses were performed on 25 samples from apiaries near Andean forests located in the states of Cundinamarca, Boyacá and Santander. We found that Q. humboldtii is an important source of pollen with high potential for monofloral bee pollen production. In addition, bees collect pollen from other Andean forests species such as Weinmannia tomentosa, Viburnum spp. and Morella spp. Utilization of bee pollen could lead to incentives to carry out forest conservation practices through beekeeping management.

  17. From Dearth to El Dorado: Andean Nature, Plate Tectonics, and the Ontologies of Ecuadorian Resource Wealth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kneas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 1990s, the Ecuadorian government has pledged to convert the nation into a “mining country” of global standing. Contemporary claims of mineral wealth, however, stand in stark contrast to previous assessments. Indeed, through much of the 20th century, geologists described Ecuador as a country of mineral dearth. Exploring the process through which Ecuador seemingly transitioned from a nation of resource scarcity to one of mineral plenty, I demonstrate how assessments of Ecuador’s resource potential relate to ideas of Andean nature. Promoters of resource abundance have emphasized Andean uniformity and equivalence—the notion that Ecuador’s mineral wealth is inevitable by virtue of the resource richness of its Andean neighbors. Geologists who have questioned Ecuador’s mineral content, on the other hand, have emphasized Andean heterogeneity. In the recent promotion of Ecuador’s resource potential, notions of Andean uniformity have been bolstered by models of subsoil copper that emerged in the in 1970s in the context of plate-tectonic theory. In highlighting the linkage between ideas of Andean nature and appraisals of Ecuadorian resource potential since the late 19th century, I outline the dialectics between nature and natural resources that underpin processes of resource becoming.

  18. Initiation of the Andean orogeny by lower mantle subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccenna, C.; Oncken, O.; Holt, A.; Becker, T. W.

    2017-12-01

    The Cordillera of the Andes is a double-vergent orogenic belt built up by thickening of South American plate crust. Several models provide plausible explanations for the evolution of the Andes, but the reason why shortening started at 50 Ma is still unclear. We explore the evolution of the subduction zone through time by restoring the position of the Nazca trench in an absolute reference frame, comparing its position with seismic tomography models and balancing the evolution of the subducting slab. Reconstructions show that the slab enters into the lower mantle at 50+10 Ma, and then progressed, moving horizontally at shallow lower mantle depth while thickening and folding in the transition zone. We test this evolutionary scenario by numerical models, which illustrate that compression in the upper plate emerges once the slab is anchored in the lower mantle. We conclude that onset of significant shortening and crustal thickening in the Andes and its sustained action over tens of million years is related to the penetration of the slab into the lower mantle, producing a slowdown of lateral slab migration, and dragging the upper plate against the subduction zone by large-scale return flow.

  19. Antisana volcano : a representative andesitic volcano of the eastern cordillera of Ecuador : petrography, chemistry, tephra and glacial stratigraphy

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, M. L.; Mothes, P. A.; Samaniego, Pablo; Militzer, A.; Beate, B.; Ramon, P.; Robin, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Antisana volcano is representative of many active andesitic strato-volcanoes of Pleistocene age in Ecuador's Eastern Cordillera. This study represents the first modern geological and volcanological investigation of Antisana since the late 1890's; it also summarizes the present geochemical understanding of its genesis. The volcano's development includes the formation and destruction of two older edifices (Antisana I and II) during some 400 + ka. Antisana II suffered a sector collapse about 15,...

  20. Metamorphic chlorite and "vermiculitic" phases in mafic dikes from the Maláguide Complex (Betic Cordillera, Spain)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ruiz Cruz, M. D.; Novák, Jiří Karel

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2003), s. 1-14 ISSN 0935-1221 Grant - others:Ministerio de Educación y Cultura(ES) BTE-2000-1150; Research Group(ES) RNM-199 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3013912 Keywords : low-grade metamorphism * vermiculite * Betic Cordillera Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.185, year: 2003

  1. Landslides in moraines as triggers of glacial lake outburst floods: example from Palcacocha Lake (Cordillera Blanca, Peru)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Jan; Novotný, J.; Novotná, I.; Urries de, B.J.; Vilímek, V.; Emmer, Adam; Strozzi, T.; Kusák, Michal; Rapre, A.C.; Hartvich, Filip; Frey, H.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 6 (2016), s. 1461-1477 ISSN 1612-510X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1000 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : landslides * moraines * glacial lakes * slope stability calculation * glacial lake outburst floods * impact wave models * Cordillera Blanca Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography; DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography (UEK-B) Impact factor: 3.657, year: 2016

  2. A revision of the cis-andean species of the genus Brycon Müller & Troschel (Characiformes: Characidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Flávio C T

    2017-01-22

    , Bolivia, Venezuela, and Guyana; Brycon gouldingi Lima, endemic from the rio Tocantins basin, Brazil; Brycon melanopterus (Cope), from the western and central rio Amazonas basin, Brazil, Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia; and Brycon falcatus Müller & Troschel, widespread in the the rio Amazonas and Río Orinoco basins, and several guyanese river systems, in Brazil, Venezuela, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana. All species are redescribed and illustrated, and a key to the species is provided. Comments on the diagnosis of the genus Brycon, the biogeography of the cis-andean species, and their current conservation status, are presented.

  3. A new species of Andean semiaquatic lizard of the genus Potamites (Sauria, Gymnophtalmidae from southern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Chávez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new lizard species of the genus Potamites from the montane forests of the Cordillera de Vilcabamba (Cusco region and Apurimac River valley (Ayacucho region, between 1500 and 2000 meters of elevation, in southern Peru. The new species is distinguishable from all other species of the genus mainly byhighly keeled scattered scales on dorsum and females lacking femoral pores.

  4. A new species of Andean semiaquatic lizard of the genus Potamites (Sauria, Gymnophtalmidae) from southern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Germán; Vásquez, Diego

    2012-01-01

    We describe a new lizard species of the genus Potamites from the montane forests of the Cordillera de Vilcabamba (Cusco region) and Apurimac River valley (Ayacucho region), between 1500 and 2000 meters of elevation, in southern Peru. The new species is distinguishable from all other species of the genus mainly by having highly keeled scattered scales on dorsum and females lacking femoral pores.

  5. A new Andean lizard of the genus Potamites (Sauria, Gymnophthalmidae) from Manu National Park, southeastern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Germán; Catenazzi, Alessandro

    2014-03-04

    We describe a new lizard of the genus Potamites from elevations of 1000-2100 m in the montane forests of the Cordillera de Paucartambo and the upper Kosñipata valley, Region of Cusco, Peru. The new species differs from other species of Potamites by having scattered keeled scales on dorsum, an undivided frontonasal and absence of femoral pores in females.

  6. Guadiana fault: magnetic and gravity constraints related with the Monchique Alkaline Complex structure (Betic Cordillera foreland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castillo, Lourdes; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Ruiz-Constán, Ana; Pedrera, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Geophysical data are essential to reveal the main crustal deep structures in areas where geological surface observations do not provide enough detailed data. Magnetic anomalies studies help us to constrain the structure of intermediate and basic igneous rocks. Magnetic and gravity surveys have been combined to determine the geometry, position and properties of intermediate igneous intrusive bodies responsible of the magnetic anomalies in the western area of the Betic Cordillera foreland. Furthermore, crustal structure has been characterized revealing the presence of a blind fault: The Guadiana fault. The aeromagnetic data reveal that the southwestern Iberian Peninsula is characterized by an elongated E-W dipole extending 200 km towards the Betic Cordillera external zones. The anomaly is related to the outcropping Monchique Alkaline Complex, characterized by rocks of moderate magnetic susceptibility (0.029 SI) intruding into the metapelitic host rock of the South Portuguese Zone. In this region, new total field magnetic data has been acquired with a GSM 8 proton precession magnetometer with an accuracy of 1 nT at a mean height of 2 m above the topography. Susceptibility measurements were done with an Exploranium KT-9 kappameter. Combined analysis of aeromagnetic and field magnetic anomalies serves to constrain the depth and geometry of this laccolith. Toward the east, the magnetic dipole has a 60 km long N-S sharp step that coincides with the southern part of the Guadiana River (Spain-Portugal southernmost border). In addition, gravity measurements were performed simultaneously with the magnetic data acquisition using a Scintrex Autograv CG-5 gravity meter whose maximum accuracy is 0.001 mGal. This data support the presence of this major discontinuity in the elongated anomalous body, with an E downthrown block, interpreted as the offset produced by a deep N-S crustal fault - The Guadiana Fault. Therefore, the Guadiana River has three long linear segments near its

  7. Compositional change in fish assemblages along the Andean piedmont - Llanos floodplain gradient of the río Portuguesa, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Hoeinghaus

    Full Text Available The Llanos is an extensive area of savannas and floodplains in central and western Venezuela that encompasses a gradual elevation gradient from the río Orinoco to the foothills of the Andean piedmont. The río Portuguesa is one of the major rivers in this region that until recently had escaped major anthropogenic impacts and still maintains substantial seasonal fish migrations. However, little work has been conducted on fish ecology in this river. The present study analyzes museum collections sampled at 28 locations along the longitudinal gradient of the río Portuguesa to assess similarity of species composition from the foothills of the Andean piedmont to the lowland llanos floodplain. The standardized samples used in this analysis contained greater than 133 species representing 6 orders and 27 families, dominated by characiforms (61 species and siluriforms (52 species. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA ordination of samples revealed a continual pattern of compositional change, and species are added at a faster rate than they are lost as one moves from the foothills of the piedmont to the low llanos. Based on DCA, samples from three elevational segments were found to significantly differ in fish species composition. Assemblages in the upper reaches contained unique species of loricariid catfishes, small pimelodid and trichomycterid catfishes, and small characiforms not observed at lower elevations. The lowland reach contained species of cichlids, large catfishes and characids not collected from the other two regions. Samples from the middle region revealed transitional species composition. Longitudinal species turnover probably reflects differences in environmental characteristics such as a water velocity, substrate composition and disturbance regime. Findings from this broad-scale analysis contribute to a baseline for future studies of fish ecology in this region.

  8. From Subordinate Marker to Discourse Marker: que in Andean Spanish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna María Escobar

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an analysis of a redundant use of que ('that' found in Andean Spanish as an expression which has undergone a grammaticalization process. Evidence suggests that the function of que as subordinate marker is much more generalized in this variety than in other dialects of Spanish. que is found to be used as a marker introducing both nominal and adjectival clauses, suggesting that adjectival subordinates behave as nominal subordinates in this variety of Spanish. An intrusive que appears in restricted syntactic and semantic contexts with clauses that have nominal and adjectival functions, and even appears replacing adverbial expressions in some adverbial subordinates (temporal, spatial, and manner. Furthermore, it is found to be sensitive to the degree of the argument’s thematic/semantic function in the subordinate clause. In particular, it seems to occur more often with low-agency arguments in adjectival and nominal contexts, and, in nominal subordinates, tends to appear with a restricted set of epistemic and evidential main verbs (e.g. creer 'to believe', saber 'to know', decir 'to say'. The analysis suggests that que has developed a new function in this variety of Spanish, namely, one of indicating that the information contained in the subordinate clause does not constitute background information (as would be expected in non-contact varieties of Spanish but instead contains information relevant to the discourse.

  9. Changing Hydrology in Glacier-fed High Altitude Andean Peatbogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayback, D. A.; Yager, K.; Baraer, M.; Mohr, K. I.; Argollo, J.; Wigmore, O.; Meneses, R. I.; Mark, B. G.

    2012-12-01

    Montane peatbogs in the glacierized Andean highlands of Peru and Bolivia provide critical forage for camelids (llama and alpaca) in regionally extensive pastoral agriculture systems. During the long dry season, these wetlands often provide the only available green forage. A key question for the future of these peatbog systems, and the livelihoods they support, is the impact of climate change and glacier recession on their hydrology, and thus forage production. We have already documented substantial regional glacier recession, of, on average, approximately 30% of surface area over the past two decades. As glaciers begin to retreat under climate change, there is initially a period of increased meltwater outflow, culminating in a period of "peak water", and followed by a continual decline in outflows. Based on previous work, we know that some glaciers in the region have already passed peak water conditions, and are now declining. To better understand the impacts of these processes on peatbog hydrology and productivity, we have begun collecting a variety of surface data at several study sites in both Bolivia and Peru. These include precipitation, stream flow, water levels, water chemistry and isotope analyses, and peatbog biodiversity and biomass. These measurements will be used in conjunction with a regional model driven by satellite data to predict likely future impacts. We will present the results from these initial surface measurements, and an overview of satellite datasets to be used in the regional model.

  10. Phoretic mites identified on andean hummingbirds (Trochilidae of Caldas, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia López-Orozco

    Full Text Available Within the bird-plant-mite system, the relationship between hummingbirds, flowers, and mites remains poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated the degree of association between nasal mites and eight species of Andean hummingbirds in Colombia (Amazilia saucerrottei,A. tzacatl, Chalybura buffonii,Chlorostilbon mellisugus, Florisuga mellivora, Glaucis hirsutus, Phaethornis guy and P. striigularis. Over a five-month period (trapping effort 360 hours/month, a total of 178 birds were captured, from which 81 mite specimens were collected and identified as belonging to three genera (Proctolaelaps, Rhinoseius andTropicoseius spanning eleven species. This is the first report of its kind from Colombia on the identification of the mite speciesP. rabulatus, R. luteyni, R. rafinskii, T. berryi, T. colwelli, T. erro and T. uniformisand the first record of P. guy as phoretic host forProctolaelaps rabulatus. Morphological characteristics (length of the dorsal plate, width of the dorsal plate and setae z5 length alone failed to distinguish between mite species. The ecologic impact of this relationship on flowers with respect to nectar and pollen availability and the effect of mites on pollination by hummingbirds needs to be determined.

  11. Phoretic mites identified on Andean hummingbirds (Trochilidae) of Caldas, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Orozco, Natalia; Cañón-Franco, William Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Within the bird-plant-mite system, the relationship between hummingbirds, flowers, and mites remains poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated the degree of association between nasal mites and eight species of Andean hummingbirds in Colombia (Amazilia saucerrottei, A. tzacatl, Chalybura buffonii, Chlorostilbon mellisugus, Florisuga mellivora, Glaucis hirsutus, Phaethornis guy and P. striigularis). Over a five-month period (trapping effort 360 hours/month), a total of 178 birds were captured, from which 81 mite specimens were collected and identified as belonging to three genera (Proctolaelaps, Rhinoseius and Tropicoseius) spanning eleven species. This is the first report of its kind from Colombia on the identification of the mite species P. rabulatus, R. luteyni, R. rafinskii, T. berryi, T. colwelli, T. erro and T. uniformis and the first record of P. guy as phoretic host for Proctolaelaps rabulatus. Morphological characteristics (length of the dorsal plate, width of the dorsal plate and setae z5 length) alone failed to distinguish between mite species. The ecologic impact of this relationship on flowers with respect to nectar and pollen availability and the effect of mites on pollination by hummingbirds needs to be determined.

  12. Evolution of the drainage system in the SE Betic Cordillera since the Tortonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loget, Nicolas; Diot, Xavier; Van Den Driessche, Jean; Gorini, Christian; Do Couto, Damien

    2013-04-01

    The emersion of Betic Cordilleras (Sierra Nevada, Sierra de Gador) and associated marine neogene basins is the result of recent tectonic processes. This emersion was followed by the installation of drainage systems (rio Andarax, rio Adra) where detrital products were trapped at their outlets with morphosedimentary shapes as deltas or alluvial fans. Starting from a simple examination of the morphology of the SE Betic area, we can note that some deltaic morphologies as Campo de Dalias (south of the Sierra de Gador) do not correspond with the current upstream drainage network. We suppose, consequently, a reorganization of the drainage network between the formation of deltaic systems, and present. A sediment budget and a geomorphological analysis were performed to study this drainage evolution since this emergence in a context of high uplift (the Sierra de Gador has raised tortonian marine deposits up to 1800m). The calculated sediment budget shows that the deposits of Campo de Dalias cannot be explained only by a feeding that comes from its current source (the south side of the Sierra de Gador). Longitudinal profiles and relief maps show that rivers have responded to the uplift by incising the landscape with numerous knickpoints and by an eastward shift of the drainage network attested by windgaps in the landscape. We conclude that the morphosedimentary shape of Campo de Dalias could be an abandoned deltaic morphology resulting from a shift of the drainage network toward the east since the Pliocene linked to the uplift of the Sierra de Gador.

  13. The Seismogenic Coupling Zone in Southern Central Chile, 38° S: Structure and state of the convergent margin between surface and down-dip end

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micksch, U.; Krawczyk, C. M.; Ryberg, T.; Gro{ß}, K.; Buske, S.; Stiller, M.; Wigger, P.

    2006-12-01

    The Andean convergent margin varies significantly along its 8000 km length. The geodynamic evolution of this system, and the relationship between deep and surface structures, are poorly understood. For Southern Central Chile we present a structural image and geodynamic interpretation of the subduction zone setting obtained with seismic methods within the multi-disciplinary project TIPTEQ (from The Incoming Plate to mega- Thrust EarthQuake processes). The active seismic experiment consists of a 110 km long profile line and spans from the coast over the down- dip end of the seismogenic coupling zone. There, it crosses the hypocenter of the 1960 Valdivia mega-thrust earthquake. Two processing approaches are applied to the data, a standard seismic processing and a Kirchhoff prestack depth migration. Further, a first-break tomographic velocity model supplements the wide- angle velocity model at this latitude. The subducting Nazca plate can be traced from a depth of 25 km below the coast down to a depth of 50 km at the eastern end of the profile. A subduction channel may be interpreted directly above the plate interface with a varying thickness of up to 5 km. The continental crust exhibits highly reflective bands with an average thickness of 2-3 km, dipping at various angles. Broad arching structures argue for basal accretion and subsequent uplift of material, dated by isotope tectonochronology and simulated in analogue sandbox experiments. Between depths of 5 to 25 km several bright reflectivity spots can be seen in the upper plate, which may suggest fluid traps in the accretionary wedge. The tomographic velocity model reaches approximately 10 km depth and can, therefore, extend surface geology studies towards depth. The sediment thickness of the sedimentary basins in the Central Valley is approx. 3 km, and we see prominent fault systems like the Lanalhue fault zone also in the tomographic model. However, the reflectivity pattern intensity varies down-dip along the

  14. Estimating detection and density of the Andean cat in the high Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppucci, Juan; Gardner, Beth; Lucherini, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    The Andean cat (Leopardus jacobita) is one of the most endangered, yet least known, felids. Although the Andean cat is considered at risk of extinction, rigorous quantitative population studies are lacking. Because physical observations of the Andean cat are difficult to make in the wild, we used a camera-trapping array to photo-capture individuals. The survey was conducted in northwestern Argentina at an elevation of approximately 4,200 m during October–December 2006 and April–June 2007. In each year we deployed 22 pairs of camera traps, which were strategically placed. To estimate detection probability and density we applied models for spatial capture–recapture using a Bayesian framework. Estimated densities were 0.07 and 0.12 individual/km2 for 2006 and 2007, respectively. Mean baseline detection probability was estimated at 0.07. By comparison, densities of the Pampas cat (Leopardus colocolo), another poorly known felid that shares its habitat with the Andean cat, were estimated at 0.74–0.79 individual/km2 in the same study area for 2006 and 2007, and its detection probability was estimated at 0.02. Despite having greater detectability, the Andean cat is rarer in the study region than the Pampas cat. Properly accounting for the detection probability is important in making reliable estimates of density, a key parameter in conservation and management decisions for any species.

  15. Use of spatial capture–recapture to estimate density of Andean bears in northern Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Santiago; Fuller, Angela K.; Morin, Dana J.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus) is the only extant species of bear in South America and is considered threatened across its range and endangered in Ecuador. Habitat loss and fragmentation is considered a critical threat to the species, and there is a lack of knowledge regarding its distribution and abundance. The species is thought to occur at low densities, making field studies designed to estimate abundance or density challenging. We conducted a pilot camera-trap study to estimate Andean bear density in a recently identified population of Andean bears northwest of Quito, Ecuador, during 2012. We compared 12 candidate spatial capture–recapture models including covariates on encounter probability and density and estimated a density of 7.45 bears/100 km2 within the region. In addition, we estimated that approximately 40 bears used a recently named Andean bear corridor established by the Secretary of Environment, and we produced a density map for this area. Use of a rub-post with vanilla scent attractant allowed us to capture numerous photographs for each event, improving our ability to identify individual bears by unique facial markings. This study provides the first empirically derived density estimate for Andean bears in Ecuador and should provide direction for future landscape-scale studies interested in conservation initiatives requiring spatially explicit estimates of density.

  16. Bioactive maca (Lepidium meyenii) alkamides are a result of traditional Andean postharvest drying practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza, Eliana; Hadzich, Antonella; Kofer, Waltraud; Mithöfer, Axel; Cosio, Eric G

    2015-08-01

    Maca, Lepidium meyenii Walpers (Brassicaceae), is an annual herbaceous plant native to the high plateaus of the Peruvian central Andes. Its underground storage hypocotyls have been a traditional medicinal agent and dietary staple since pre-Columbian times. Reported properties include energizing and fertility-enhancing effects. Published reports have focused on the benzylalkamides (macamides) present in dry hypocotyls as one of the main bioactive components. Macamides are secondary amides formed by benzylamine and a fatty acid moiety, with varying hydrocarbon chain lengths and degree of unsaturation. Although it has been assumed that they are usually present in fresh undamaged tissues, analyses show them to be essentially absent from them. However, hypocotyls dried by traditional Andean postharvest practices or industrial oven drying contain up to 800μgg(-1) dry wt (2.3μmolg(-1) dry wt) of macamides. In this study, the generation of macamides and their putative precursors were studied during nine-week traditional drying trials at 4200m altitude and in ovens under laboratory conditions. Freeze-thaw cycles in the open field during drying result in tissue maceration and release of free fatty acids from storage and membrane lipids up to levels of 1200μgg(-1) dry wt (4.3μmolg(-1) dry wt). Endogenous metabolism of the isothiocyanates generated from glucosinolate hydrolysis during drying results in maximal benzylamine values of 4300μgg(-1) dry wt (40.2μmolg(-1) dry wt). Pearson correlation coefficients of the accumulation profiles of benzylamine and free fatty acid to that of macamides showed good values of 0.898 and 0.934, respectively, suggesting that both provide sufficient substrate for amide synthesis during the drying process. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Low-grade metamorphism of Cambro-Ordovician successions in the Famatina belt, Southern-Central Andes: Burial-inversion history linked to the evolution of the proto-Andean Gondwana margin Metamorfismo de bajo grado de sucesiones cambro-ordovícicas en el cinturón del Famatina, Andes Centrales de Argentina: Historia de enterramiento-exhumación ligada a la evolución del margen proto-andino de Gondwana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilda Collo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The metamorphic P-T conditions of low-grade units from the Famatina belt, Central Andes of Argentina, were estimated through petrography, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy. For the Middle-Upper Cambrian Negro Peinado Formation a tectono-metamorphic event associated with intense intrafoliar folding, with estimated temperatures between 290 and 400°C (KIcis: 0.16-0.27A°29, biotite blastesis and compositional homogeneity in dioctahedral micas and intermediate pressure conditions (white mica b parameter: 9.010Á-9.035Á, was recognized. The Achavil Formation (Middle-Upper Cambrian presents a main metamorphic event associated with temperatures between 200 and 290°C (KIcis: 0.26-0.41A°29 and intermediate- to low-pressure conditions (white mica b parameter values: 8.972Á-9.017Á. Some illitic substitution in dioctahedral micas also indicates lower metamorphic grade than the Negro Peinado Formation. For Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician sequences a burial metamorphic pattern, with a progressive decrease in metamorphic grade from Volcancito Formation to Cerro Morado Group (ca. 490-465 Ma; KIcis: 0.31-0.69A°29 and absence of tendency changes linked to strati-graphic discontinuities was proposed. Mica and chlorite are the main phyllosilicates in the oldest units, while Ilt/ Sme (R3 mixed-layer is almost the only one in the youngest. White mica b parameter indicates intermediate- to low-pressure conditions for all these sequences. This burial metamorphic pattern presents a marked break as the youngest Ordovician unit (La Aguadita Formation, after ca. 452 Ma records higher metamorphic conditions (IKcis: 0.28-0.19A°29 than units from the Ordovician arc, with estimated temperatures between 270 and 330°C and intermediate-pressure conditions. Our results indicate that basin contraction and inversion processes related to the Ordovician Ocloyic Orogeny involved at least two well-discriminated and not superposed metamorphic episodes in this region

  18. Diverging responses of tropical Andean biomes under future climate conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Carolina; Arnillas, Carlos Alberto; Cuesta, Francisco; Buytaert, Wouter

    2013-01-01

    Observations and projections for mountain regions show a strong tendency towards upslope displacement of their biomes under future climate conditions. Because of their climatic and topographic heterogeneity, a more complex response is expected for biodiversity hotspots such as tropical mountain regions. This study analyzes potential changes in the distribution of biomes in the Tropical Andes and identifies target areas for conservation. Biome distribution models were developed using logistic regressions. These models were then coupled to an ensemble of 8 global climate models to project future distribution of the Andean biomes and their uncertainties. We analysed projected changes in extent and elevational range and identified regions most prone to change. Our results show a heterogeneous response to climate change. Although the wetter biomes exhibit an upslope displacement of both the upper and the lower boundaries as expected, most dry biomes tend to show downslope expansion. Despite important losses being projected for several biomes, projections suggest that between 74.8% and 83.1% of the current total Tropical Andes will remain stable, depending on the emission scenario and time horizon. Between 3.3% and 7.6% of the study area is projected to change, mostly towards an increase in vertical structure. For the remaining area (13.1%-17.4%), there is no agreement between model projections. These results challenge the common believe that climate change will lead to an upslope displacement of biome boundaries in mountain regions. Instead, our models project diverging responses, including downslope expansion and large areas projected to remain stable. Lastly, a significant part of the area expected to change is already affected by land use changes, which has important implications for management. This, and the inclusion of a comprehensive uncertainty analysis, will help to inform conservation strategies in the Tropical Andes, and to guide similar assessments for other

  19. Social inequality and child malnutrition in four Andean countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Larrea

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze the effects of socioeconomic, regional, and ethnic conditions on chronic malnutrition in four Andean countries of South America: Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Methods. The study was based on Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS for Colombia (1995, Peru (1996, and Bolivia (1997, and on a Living Standard Measurement Survey for Ecuador (1998. We developed an index of household socioeconomic status using categorical principal components analysis. We broke down the prevalence of stunting by socioeconomic status (SES, ethnicity, place of residence (large cities, small cities, towns, and countryside, and region (highland region versus other areas of the country. We applied smoothed regression curves and linear functions to analyze SES effects on stunting, with specific models for Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru. Results. Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru have similar characteristics, with high stunting prevalences overall; higher stunting prevalences in their highland areas, particularly among indigenous populations; and strong socioeconomic disparities. Colombia, in contrast, has a lower stunting prevalence and smaller regional disparities. The socioeconomic gradient of stunting is strong in all four countries, with prevalence rates in the poorest deciles at least three times as high as those in the top decile. Discussion. The sharp contrast between the conditions found in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru and those in Colombia may be the result of specific ethnic factors affecting indigenous groups; a particular diet profile in the highland areas, with low protein and micronutrient intake; and differences in the long-term economic and social development paths that the countries have taken. Along with the strong socioeconomic gradient in all the countries, the weight of ethnic and regional factors suggests the need to reduce inequality as well as to comprehensively improve education and housing, better target health and nutrition programs

  20. Sedimentary cyclicity in early Pleistocene, evaporitic, playa-lake lacustrine deposits in the Guadix-Baza basin (Betic Cordillera, Spain); Ciclicidad sedimentaria en depositos lacustres evaporiticos tipo playa-lake del Pleistoceno inferior en la cuenca de Guadix-Baza (Cordillera Betica, Espana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Aguilar, J. M.; Guera-Menchan, A.; Serrano, F.; Palmqvist, P.

    2013-06-01

    The Guadix-Baza basin (Betic Cordillera, southern Spain) contains in its eastern sector an early Pleistocene (Gelasian and lowermost Calabrian) sedimentary unit that was deposited in a shallow lacustrine environment. Given that the chronological limits of this unit lie between 2.5 and 1.6 Ma BP, the thickness of its preserved sediments (400 m) and high sedimentation rate (44.4 cm/ka) are remarkable. Numerous sedimentary cycles marked by an alternation of marls and sands are commonly found in the marginal sectors and marls and gypsum in the central sector, which would owe their origins to permanent flooding and evaporation/ re-flooding phases due to global climatic changes. Spectral analyses carried out using Fourier transform have revealed the existence of temporary frequencies associated with sedimentary cycles of between 0.2 and 5.2 ka. The origin of these cycles may be associated with variations in solar radiation and oscillations in the Moons orbital position, which would induce global climatic changes resulting in the rise and fall of the water table of the lake. Autocorrelation analyses conducted separately on the marly and evaporitic levels support this conclusion, as they indicate the existence of significant direct correlations between about 4 to 12 sedimentary cycles, which would correspond to repetitions of the stratigraphic series over a time span of 1.3 to 4 ka. (Author)

  1. Physiological and molecular characterization of Phytophthora infestans isolates from the Central Colombian Andean Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, María C; Cárdenas, Martha E; Vargas, Angela M; Rojas, Alejandro; Morales, Juan G; Jiménez, Pedro; Bernal, Adriana J; Restrepo, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans, is one of the most devastating diseases found in potato and tomato crops worldwide. In Colombia it also attacks other important crops: cape gooseberry and tree tomato. The knowledge of the pathogen population is determinant to effectively design control strategies. To determine the physiological and molecular characteristics of a set of Colombian P. infestans isolates. Strains isolated from Cundinamarca and Boyacá were examined for the level of resistance to mefenoxam and cymoxanil. Virulence was tested for all strains and crosses between A1 mating type, from different hosts, and the Colombian A2 mating type were tested for the production and viability of oospores in different substrates. Additionally, the molecular diversity of the avirulence gene Avr3a, the β-tubulin gene, and two single copy genes showing RxLR motif, was assessed. We found all levels of mefenoxam sensitivity, with 48% of the strains resistant. A high diversity of races was detected and the population was genetically clonal. Colombian strains had the possibility of sexual reproduction. These results will help in optimizing the use of fungicides and deployment of resistance as control strategies and will contribute to broader studies on diversity of this pathogen. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. ¿fallamiento activo en la cordillera oriental al suroeste de bogotá, colombia? is there active faulting in the eastern cordillera southwest of bogotá, colombia?

    OpenAIRE

    Olaya, Angela; Dimaté, Cristina; Robertson, Kim

    2011-01-01

    En la zona axial de la Cordillera Oriental, al suroeste de Bogotá, se encuentran varios lineamientos, asociados con actividad neotectónica según algunos autores. Entre estos se destaca el conocido como Falla La Cajita, localizada sobre el flanco occidental del Macizo de Sumapaz, que ha sido señalada como falla activa, con sismo histórico asociado y, por lo tanto, de gran importancia para la amenaza sísmica de Bogotá. En contraste, los registros de sismicidad de la Red Sismológica Nacional mue...

  3. Four New Species of Nepenthes L. (Nepenthaceae) from the Central Mountains of Mindanao, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronemeyer, Thomas; Coritico, Fulgent; Wistuba, Andreas; Marwinski, David; Gieray, Tobias; Micheler, Marius; Mey, François Sockhom; Amoroso, Victor

    2014-06-06

    Together with the islands of Sumatra (Indonesia) and Borneo (Indonesia, Malaysia), the Philippines are the main center of diversity for carnivorous pitcher plants of the genus, Nepenthes L. Nepenthes are the largest of all carnivorous plants, and the species with the biggest pitchers are capable of trapping and digesting small amphibians and even mammals. The central cordillera of Mindanao Island in the south of the Philippines is mostly covered with old, primary forest and is the largest remaining cohesive, untouched area of wilderness in the Philippines. In a recent field exploration of two areas of the central cordillera, namely Mount Sumagaya and a section of the Pantaron range, four new taxa of Nepenthes were discovered. These four remarkable new species, N. pantaronensis, N. cornuta, N. talaandig and N. amabilis, are described, illustrated and assessed.

  4. Four New Species of Nepenthes L. (Nepenthaceae from the Central Mountains of Mindanao, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gronemeyer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Together with the islands of Sumatra (Indonesia and Borneo (Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines are the main center of diversity for carnivorous pitcher plants of the genus, Nepenthes L. Nepenthes are the largest of all carnivorous plants, and the species with the biggest pitchers are capable of trapping and digesting small amphibians and even mammals. The central cordillera of Mindanao Island in the south of the Philippines is mostly covered with old, primary forest and is the largest remaining cohesive, untouched area of wilderness in the Philippines. In a recent field exploration of two areas of the central cordillera, namely Mount Sumagaya and a section of the Pantaron range, four new taxa of Nepenthes were discovered. These four remarkable new species, N. pantaronensis, N. cornuta, N. talaandig and N. amabilis, are described, illustrated and assessed.

  5. Late Cenozoic Deformation of the Coastal Cordillera, Northern Chilean Forearc, 18- 25°S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmendinger, R. W.; González, G.; Loveless, J. P.; Carrizo, D.

    2007-12-01

    Overlying the only part of the South American continental crust that is in direct contact with the subducting Nazca Plate, the Coastal Cordillera of northern Chile and southern Peru should provide the most complete geological record of the coupling between the two plates. This record of coupling is exquisitely preserved in the hyperarid Atacama Desert. This preservation is both one of the major advantages and major challenges of working in this region: On the positive side, exposure of geomorphic surfaces is complete and unencumbered by erosion or vegetation, and brittle saline soils preserve subtle deformation features that would quickly be obliterated in more humid environments. On the negative side, ancient geomorphic features are just as fresh as Recent one and the lack of organic material precludes radiocarbon dating, a traditional tool of paleoseismology. During the last several years, we have concentrated on documenting three fundamental characteristics of late Cenozoic forearc deformation: (1) NS shortening on reverse faults striking at a high angle to, and dextral-reverse faults striking oblique to, the continental margin; (2) N-striking normal faults of the forearc and their reactivation, locally, as reverse faults; and (3) extensive suites of tension cracks. Reverse faults striking at a high angle to the margin are present between 19 and 21.5°S, straddling the topographic symmetry plane that marks the axis of the Bolivian orocline. Limited dating of tuffs and surfaces shows that these structures have been active for at least the last 6 Ma. At least 5 of these structures -- Atajaña, Pisagua, Iquique north and south, and Barranco Alto -- cut the Pleistocene marine terraces of the coastal platform, producing 20 to 50 m of vertical offset. A forearc crustal earthquake just south of Pisagua in March 2007 demonstrates that margin parallel shortening continues to the present and that permanent deformation occurs during the interseismic part of the plate

  6. A closer look to the San Ramón fault seismicity in the west Andean thrust front of Santiago, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Easton, G.; Ammirati, J. B.; Potin, B.; Abrahami, R.; Rebolledo, S.; Barrientos, S. E.

    2017-12-01

    In Central Chile, most of the recorded seismicity is linked with the subduction of the Nazca plate and associated intra-slab deformation, under the South American plate. More to the east, a much smaller portion of the regional seismicity ( 5%) is related to thrusting deformation of the western cordilleran front of the south Central Andes. Although large earthquakes are far less frequent on this shallow region than on the plate boundary, paleoseismic studies evidenced the occurrence of at least 2 major episodes (Mw 7-7.5) over the past 17 kyr, associated with the San Ramón fault; the most obvious manifestation of the west Andean thrust system. The Santiago basin, located in the central valley at the western flank of the Andes, hosts close to 50% of the total Chilean population and thus receives particular attention. In order to better understand the seismicity of the San Ramón fault, the Chilean National Seismological Center (CSN) improved its permanent network with seven new broadband seismic stations, located around and over this geological structure. Because the number of events recorded is very large, we use a multiband array detection and seismic source location method to differentiate events associated with the San Ramón's system and those coming from other seismogenic zones. Our results show that the San Ramón fault and the west Andean thrust system in general, present seismic activity characterized by low magnitude events (Ml < 2.5). Preliminary seismic locations show focal depths around 8-12 km, in good agreement with the estimated depth of the west-vergent main décollement level associated to the western cordilleran front. In the future, event locations, magnitude and focal mechanism estimations will be improved in order to present a more complete catalog for a better assessment of seismic hazard in this region, together with the general tectonic evolution of the western cordilleran front of the south Central Andes.

  7. East-west thrusting and anomalous magnetic declinations in the Sierra Gorda, Betic Cordillera, southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzman, E. S.

    1994-01-01

    Structural and palaeomagnetic studies in the Sierra Gorda (Sierra de Loja), located in the External zone of the Betic Cordillera, indicate that westward-directed thrusting is not associated with significant rotations about a vertical axis. Detailed mapping and slip vector analysis show that the Sierra Gorda is a thrust complex composed of three thrust sheets. The uppermost thrust places Early Jurassic pelagic carbonates on top of Jurassic to Oligocene sediments that form a large doubly-plunging footwall syncline. The eastern limb of this syncline has been overturned and is tectonically thinned as a result of the overthrusting. Palaeomagnetic results from Mesozoic and Tertiary sediments both within and around the perimeter of the Sierra Gorda indicate that: (1) the average remanence vector of the seven Late Jurassic localities sampled within the Sierra Gorda has a direction (D = 328° and I = 38°) that is not significantly different from the expected declination for the Upper Jurassic of stable Iberia; and (2) there is no significant difference between the remanences in the two upper thrust sheets indicating that differential rotation did not occur during the initiation and displacement on the thrusts. In contrast, the one Late Jurassic site that was sampled to the west of the Sierra Gorda is rotated, like the rest of the Subbetics, 60° clockwise of the reference direction. The unrotated directions obtained in the Sierra suggest, either that it has rotated in a clockwise sense concordant with the rest of the Subbetic zone and has then been backrotated, or that it has never rotated relative to stable Iberia. In the latter, simpler hypothesis the unrotated declinations may be explained in terms of orthogonal convergence along an irregular continental margin.

  8. Karyotypic polymorphism and evolution within and between the Liolaemus monticola (Iguanidae "northern 2n = 38-40" chromosome race populations in central Chile Polimorfismo cromosómico y evolución intra e inter poblacional de la raza cromosómica "Norte 2n = 28-40" de Liolaemus monticola (Iguanidae en Chile Central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MADELEINE LAMBOROT

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal genotypes were scored from 359 Liolaemus monticola lizards of the "northern, 2n = 38-40" chromosomal race from 21 locality samples between the Maipo (and one of its tributaries and the Aconcagua (and one of its tributaries ribers, plus a sample from the interracial hybridization zone, and some representative locality samples of the "southern 2n = 34" and the "multiple fission 2n = 42-44" chromosomal races for comparisons. The first seven variable chromosomal pairs were coded as Mendelian genotypes and statistically summarized by several clustering and population genetic algorithms. Spatial and temporal differentiation was assessed by chromosome frequencies, chromosomal diversity and heterozygosity. While no differentiation was found for diversity in the "northern 2n = 38-40" race, chromosomal frequencies and heterozygosity showed significant spatial differentiation that permit distinguishing between the coastal, Andean and transversal mountain range populations. The sample of Cuesta Chacabuco may represent a hybrid zone between the other two range samples. The origin of the chromosomal rearrangements, the population cytogenetics, and the recombination patterns resulting from chromosomal heterozygosity are compared in these chromosomal races, thus expanding the geographical area. These patterns are discussed with respect to the evolution of this complex in Chile and the importance of the riverine barriers in central ChileSe cuantificaron los "genotipos" cromosómicos para 359 lagartijas de 21 muestras poblacionales de la raza "Norte, 2n = 38-40" comprendida entre los ríos: río Maipo y uno de sus afluentes el río Yeso y río Aconcagua (y uno de sus afluentes el río Juncal. Con fines comparativos agregamos una muestra de la zona de hibridación interracial, algunas muestras representativas de la raza "Sur 2n = 34" y una de la raza "múltiples fisiones 2n = 42-44". Los siete primeros pares cromosómicos variables fueron codificados

  9. Soil charcoal analysis as a climato-stratigraphical tool: The key case of Cordillera Real, northern Andes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Pasquale, G.; Impagliazzo, S.; Lubritto, C.; Marziano, M.; Passariello, I.; Ermolli, E. Russo

    2010-01-01

    The present study represents the first attempt of reconstructing fire history through soil charcoal dating. The investigated area is located in the Guandera Biological Reserve (western Cordillera Real, northern Ecuador). Six AMS radiocarbon dating, performed at the base of five soil profiles allowed a fire phase to be identified during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. A strong correspondence was highlighted between the age of the Guandera fires and the El Abra stadial, which is considered the Younger Dryas equivalent in South America. This local evidence of fires contributes to define the geographic area in which the El Abra stadial was recorded and suggests a wider use of the soil charcoal analysis.

  10. Mapping Glacier Dynamics and Proglacial Wetlands with a Multispectral UAV at 5000m in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigmore, O.; Mark, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    The glaciers of the Cordillera Blanca, Peru are rapidly retreating as a result of rising temperatures, transforming the hydrology and impacting the socio-economic and environmental systems of the Rio Santa basin. Documenting the heterogeneous spatial patterns of these changes to understand processes of water storage and flow is hindered by technologic and logistic challenges. Highly complex topography, cloud cover and coarse spatial resolution limit the application of satellite data while airborne data collection remains costly and potentially dangerous. However, recent developments have made Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technology a viable and potentially transformative method for studying glacier dynamics and proglacial hydrology. The extreme altitudes (4000-6700m) of the Cordillera Blanca limit the use of 'off the shelf' UAVs. Therefore we developed a low cost multispectral (visible, near-infrared and thermal infrared) multirotor UAV capable of conducting fully autonomous aerial surveys at elevations over 5000m within the glacial valleys of the Cordillera Blanca. Using this platform we have completed repeat aerial surveys (in 2014 and 2015) of the debris covered Llaca Glacier, generating highly accurate 10-20cm DEM's and 5cm orthomosaics using a structure from motion workflow. Analysis of these data reveals a highly dynamic system with some areas of the glacier losing as much as 16m of vertical elevation, while other areas have gained up to 5m of elevation over one year. The magnitude and direction of these changes appears to be associated with the presence of debris free ice faces and meltwater ponds. Additionally, we have mapped proglacial meadow and wetland systems. Thermal mosaics at 10-20cm resolution are providing novel insights into the hydrologic pathways of glacier meltwater including mapping the distribution of artesian springs that feed these wetland systems. The high spatial resolution of these UAV datasets facilitates a better understanding of the

  11. Soil charcoal analysis as a climato-stratigraphical tool: The key case of Cordillera Real, northern Andes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Pasquale, G. [Dipartimento di Arboricoltura Botanica e Patologia Vegetale, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Impagliazzo, S., E-mail: stefania.impagliazzo@unina.i [Dipartimento di Arboricoltura Botanica e Patologia Vegetale, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Lubritto, C. [CIRCE, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, II Universita di Napoli, and INNOVA, via Vivaldi, 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); Marziano, M. [Dipartimento di Arboricoltura Botanica e Patologia Vegetale, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Passariello, I. [CIRCE, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, II Universita di Napoli, and INNOVA, via Vivaldi, 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); Ermolli, E. Russo [Dipartimento di Arboricoltura Botanica e Patologia Vegetale, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055 Portici (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    The present study represents the first attempt of reconstructing fire history through soil charcoal dating. The investigated area is located in the Guandera Biological Reserve (western Cordillera Real, northern Ecuador). Six AMS radiocarbon dating, performed at the base of five soil profiles allowed a fire phase to be identified during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. A strong correspondence was highlighted between the age of the Guandera fires and the El Abra stadial, which is considered the Younger Dryas equivalent in South America. This local evidence of fires contributes to define the geographic area in which the El Abra stadial was recorded and suggests a wider use of the soil charcoal analysis.

  12. Discovery and description of a new trichostrongyloid species (Nematoda: Ostertagiinae), abomasal parasites in mountain goat, Oreamnos americanus, from the Western Cordillera of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberg, Eric P; Abrams, Arthur; Pilitt, Patricia A; Jenkins, Emily J

    2012-08-01

    Marshallagia lichtenfelsi sp. n. is a dimorphic ostertagiine nematode occurring in the abomasum of mountain goats, Oreamnos americanus, from the Western Cordillera of North America. Major and minor morphotype males and females are characterized and distinguished relative to the morphologically similar Marshallagia marshalli / Marshallagia occidentalis from North America and Marshallagia dentispicularis, along with other congeners, from the Palearctic region. The configuration of the convoluted and irregular synlophe in the cervical region of males and females of M. lichtenfelsi is apparently unique, contrasting with a continuous and parallel system of ridges among those species of Marshallagia, including M. marshalli/M. occidentalis, which have been evaluated. Specimens of M. lichtenfelsi are further defined by the rectangular form of the accessory bursal membrane (width > length) in the major morphotype and by the trapezoidal Sjöberg's organ in the minor morphotype, in addition to specific attributes of the spicules and spicule tips. We regard 12 species, including the proposed new taxon, to be valid. Primary diagnostic characters are reviewed for Marshallagia and a framework is presented for standardization of future descriptions incorporating the synlophe in males and females and the structure of the spicules and genital cone in major and minor morphotype males. The center of diversity for species of Marshallagia is the mountain-steppe region of central Eurasia where 11 species (including the Holarctic M. marshalli) are recognized in association with Caprini, Rupicaprini, and Antelopinae; only 2 species occur in the Nearctic. In this assemblage, M. lichtenfelsi is endemic to North America and limited in host distribution to mountain goats. An intricate history for refugial isolation and population fragmentation demonstrated for mountain goats and wild sheep indicates the potential for considerable cryptic diversity for Marshallagia and other nematodes. Shifting

  13. Deciphering shallow paleomagnetic inclinations: 1. Implications from correlation of Albian volcanic rocks along the Insular/Intermontane Superterrane boundary in the southern Canadian Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskin, M. L.; Enkin, R. J.; Mahoney, J. B.; Mustard, P. S.; Baker, J.

    2003-04-01

    Geologic and paleomagnetic data lead to two contradictory hypotheses regarding the paleoposition of the Insular and Intermontane Superterranes that presently constitute the western Canadian Cordillera. Paleomagnetic data from the Insular and Intermontane superterranes suggest a southerly origin coinciding with the latitude of Mexico and the northwest United States, respectively, during the mid-Cretaceous. Geologic evidence points to a northerly origin for these same tectonic entities during this period; both models cannot be correct. Geologic and paleomagnetic data from the Empire Valley-Churn Creek area in south central British Columbia (51.5°N, 122.5°W) are critical to resolving these contradictory hypotheses. Late Cretaceous rocks correlated to the Insular Superterrane with large paleomagnetic displacements unconformably overlie mid-Cretaceous rocks correlative to the Spences Bridge Group of the Intermontane Superterrane. We provide paleomagnetic evidence of this correlation based on similar magnetic properties, opaque mineral assemblages, demagnetization behavior, fold test results, mean inclinations, clockwise vertical axes rotations, and statistically indistinguishable paleomagnetic poles and displacement estimates. This correlation and the observed geologic relationships in the Empire Valley-Churn Creek area indicate that the Insular and Intermontane Superterranes were linked by the mid-Cretaceous. Sites from the two previous Spences Bridge Group studies are combined with their correlatives in the Empire Valley-Churn Creek area to give 81 sites that yield a paleomagnetic pole of 60.5°N, 304.5°E, dp = 3.7°, dm = 5.5° which corresponds to 1050 ± 450 km of displacement from the south. This new displacement estimate suggests that the Spences Bridge arc formed at the latitude of southern Oregon during the mid-Cretaceous.

  14. Characterization of Two Microbial Isolates from Andean Lakes in Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demergasso, C.; Blamey, J.; Escudero, L.; Chong, G.; Casamayor, E. O.; Cabrol, N. A.; Grin, E. A.; Hock, A.; Kiss, A.; Borics, G.

    2004-01-01

    We are currently investigating the biological population present in the highest and least explored perennial lakes on earth in the Bolivian and Chilean Andes, including several volcanic crater lakes of more than 6000 m elevation, in combination of microbiological and molecular biological methods. Our samples were collected in saline lakes of the Laguna Blanca Laguna Verde area in the Bolivian Altiplano and in the Licancabur volcano crater (27 deg. 47 min S/67 deg. 47 min. W) in the ongoing project studying high altitude lakes. The main goal of the project is to look for analogies with Martian paleolakes. These Bolivian lakes can be described as Andean lakes following the classification of Chong. We have attempted to isolate pure cultures and phylogenetically characterize prokaryotes that grew under laboratory conditions. Sediment samples taken from the Licancabur crater lake (LC), Laguna Verde (LV), and Laguna Blanca (LB) were analyzed and cultured using enriched liquid media under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. All cultures were incubated at room temperature (15 to 20 C) and under light exposure. For the reported isolates, 36 hours incubation were necessary for reaching optimal optical densities to consider them viable cultures. Ten serial dilutions starting from 1% inoculum were required to obtain a suitable enriched cell culture to transfer into solid media. Cultures on solid medium were necessary to verify the formation of colonies in order to isolate pure cultures. Different solid media were prepared using several combinations of both trace minerals and carbohydrates sources in order to fit their nutrient requirements. The microorganisms formed individual colonies on solid media enriched with tryptone, yeast extract and sodium chloride. Cells morphology was studied by optical and electronic microscopy. Rodshape morphologies were observed in most cases. Total bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from 50 ml late-exponential phase culture by using the CTAB

  15. Assessment of satellite rainfall products over the Andean plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satgé, Frédéric; Bonnet, Marie-Paule; Gosset, Marielle; Molina, Jorge; Hernan Yuque Lima, Wilson; Pillco Zolá, Ramiro; Timouk, Franck; Garnier, Jérémie

    2016-01-01

    Nine satellite rainfall estimations (SREs) were evaluated for the first time over the South American Andean plateau watershed by comparison with rain gauge data acquired between 2005 and 2007. The comparisons were carried out at the annual, monthly and daily time steps. All SREs reproduce the salient pattern of the annual rain field, with a marked north-south gradient and a lighter east-west gradient. However, the intensity of the gradient differs among SREs: it is well marked in the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis 3B42 (TMPA-3B42), Precipitation Estimation from remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN) and Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP) products, and it is smoothed out in the Climate prediction center MORPHing (CMORPH) products. Another interesting difference among products is the contrast in rainfall amounts between the water surfaces (Lake Titicaca) and the surrounding land. Some products (TMPA-3B42, PERSIANN and GSMaP) show a contradictory rainfall deficit over Lake Titicaca, which may be due to the emissivity contrast between the lake and the surrounding lands and warm rain cloud processes. An analysis differentiating coastal Lake Titicaca from inland pixels confirmed this trend. The raw or Real Time (RT) products have strong biases over the study region. These biases are strongly positive for PERSIANN (above 90%), moderately positive for TMPA-3B42 (28%), strongly negative for CMORPH (- 42%) and moderately negative for GSMaP (- 18%). The biases are associated with a deformation of the rain rate frequency distribution: GSMaP underestimates the proportion of rainfall events for all rain rates; CMORPH overestimates the proportion of rain rates below 2 mm day- 1; and the other products tend to overestimate the proportion of moderate to high rain rates. These biases are greatly reduced by the gauge adjustment in the TMPA-3B42, PERSIANN and CMORPH products, whereas a

  16. Phylogeny and historical biogeography of trans-Andean cichlid fishes (Teleostei: Cichlidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musilová, Zuzana; Říčan, O.; Říčanová, Š.; Janšta, P.; Gahura, O.; Novák, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 3 (2015), s. 333-350 ISSN 1864-5755 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : Andean uplift * Andinoacara * Mesoheros Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.722, year: 2015

  17. Andean mountain building and magmatic arc migration driven by subduction-induced whole mantle flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.

    2017-01-01

    Subduction along the western margin of South America has been active since the Jurassic, but Andean orogeny started in the middle Cretaceous and was preceded by backarc extension in the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous. The timing and sequence of these events has remained unexplained. Here I present a

  18. Persistence of chironomids in metal polluted Andean high altitude streams: does melanin play a role?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loayza Muro, R.A.; Marticorena-Ruíz, J.K.; Palomino, E.J.; Merritt, C.; de Baat, M.L.; van Gemert, M.; Verweij, R.A.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Admiraal, W.

    2013-01-01

    In high altitude Andean streams an intense solar radiation and coinciding metal pollution allow the persistence of only a few specialized taxa, including chironomids. The aim of the present study was therefore to determine the mechanisms underlying the persistence of chironomids under these multiple

  19. Photos provide information on age, but not kinship, of Andean bear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell C. Van Horn

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Using photos of captive Andean bears of known age and pedigree, and photos of wild Andean bear cubs <6 months old, we evaluated the degree to which visual information may be used to estimate bears’ ages and assess their kinship. We demonstrate that the ages of Andean bear cubs ≤6 months old may be estimated from their size relative to their mothers with an average error of <0.01 ± 13.2 days (SD; n = 14, and that ages of adults ≥10 years old may be estimated from the proportion of their nose that is pink with an average error of <0.01 ± 3.5 years (n = 41. We also show that similarity among the bears’ natural markings, as perceived by humans, is not associated with pedigree kinship among the bears (R2 < 0.001, N = 1,043, p = 0.499. Thus, researchers may use photos of wild Andean bears to estimate the ages of young cubs and older adults, but not to infer their kinship. Given that camera trap photos are one of the most readily available sources of information on large cryptic mammals, we suggest that similar methods be tested for use in other poorly understood species.

  20. Regional water resources management in the Andean region with numerical models and satellite remote sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menenti, M.; Mulders, C.W.B.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the development and adaptation of distributed numerical simulation models of hydrological processes in complex watersheds typical of the Andean region. These distributed models take advantage of the synoptic capabilities of sensors on-board satellites and GIS procedures have

  1. Trade in Andean Condor Vulture gryphus feathers and body parts in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    body parts in the city of Cusco and the Sacred Valley,. Cusco region, Peru. Robert S. R. ... The sale of Andean Condor feathers and body parts is undertaken openly in the tourist markets of Cusco and the Sacred .... and shops. Prices in local currency – Nuevo Sol and US Dollar equivalent given in parentheses). Feather.

  2. An enigmatic frog of the genus Atelopus (Family Bufonidae from Parque Nacional Chirripó, Cordillera de Talamanca, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay M Savage

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A distinctive new species of Atelopus is described from Parque Nacional Chirripó Grande, Cordillera de Talamanca (3 400-3 500 m. It closely resembles populations of the Atelopus ignescens complex from the Andes of northern Ecuador and southern Colombia. it differs most significantly from these frogs in the pattern of spiculae and coni development on the throat, chest, hands and feet. The Costa Rican species appears to be an outlier of the complex inexplicably separated geographically from its nearest allies by an over land distance of about 1 600 km. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (1-2: 381-386. Epub 2009 June 30.Se describe una nueva especie de Atelopus del Parque Nacional Chirripó Grande, Cordillera de Talamanca (3 400-3 500 m sobre el nivel del mar. Se parece a poblaciones del complejo de Atelopus ignescens de los Andes del norte de Ecuador y del sur de Colombia. Principalmente difiere de estas ranas en el patrón de desarrollo de espículas y conos en la garganta, pecho, manos y pies. La especie de Costa Rica es atípica dentro del complejo por estar inexplicablemente separada geográficamente de sus más cercanos representantes por una distancia aproximada de 1 600 km por tierra.

  3. A new species of semiarboreal toad of the Rhinella festae group (Anura, Bufonidae from the Cordillera Azul National Park, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Cusi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A new semiarboreal species of the Rhinella festae group is described from montane forests of the Cordillera Azul National Park between 1245 and 1280 m a.s.l. in the Cordillera Oriental, San Martín region, northern Peru. The new species is morphologically and genetically compared with members of the Rhinella acrolopha group (former genus Rhamphophryne and members of the R. festae group. The new species is characterized by its large size (female SVL 47.1–58.3 mm, n = 4, eight presacral vertebrae, fusion of the sacrum and coccyx, long protuberant snout, snout directed slightly anteroventral in lateral view, cranial crests moderately developed, absence of occipital crest, presence of tympanic membrane, dorsolateral rows of small conical tubercles extending from parotoid gland to groin, hands and feet with long digits, fingers basally webbed and toes moderately webbed. Phylogenetically it is a member of the R. festae group which is most closely related to R. chavin and R. yanachaga from Peru. Morphologically the new species shares similarities with R. tenrec and R. truebae, members of the R. acrolopha group from Colombia.

  4. Recent trends in annual snowline variations in the northern wet outer tropics: case studies from southern Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veettil, Bijeesh Kozhikkodan; Wang, Shanshan; Bremer, Ulisses Franz; de Souza, Sergio Florêncio; Simões, Jefferson Cardia

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes the changes in the annual maximum snowlines of a selected set of mountain glaciers at the southern end of the Cordillera Blanca between 1984 and 2015 using satellite images. Furthermore, we analysed the existing glacier records in the Cordillera Blanca since the last glacial maximum to understand the evolution of glaciers in this region over a few centuries. There was a rise in the snowline altitude of glaciers in this region since the late 1990s with a few small glacier advances. Historical to the present El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) records were also analysed to understand whether there was a teleconnection between the glacier fluctuations in the region and the phase changes of ENSO and PDO. We also assessed the variations in three important climatic parameters that influence the glacier retreat—temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity—over a few decades. We calculated the anomalies as well as the seasonal changes in these variables since the mid-twentieth century. There was an increase in temperature during this period, and the decrease in precipitation was not so prominent compared with the temperature rise. There was an exceptionally higher increase in relative humidity since the early 2000s, which is relatively higher than that expected due to the observed rate of warming, and this increase in humidity is believed to be the reason behind the unprecedented rise in the snowline altitudes since the beginning of the twenty-first century.

  5. A new species of semiarboreal toad of the Rhinella festae group (Anura, Bufonidae) from the Cordillera Azul National Park, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusi, Juan C.; Moravec, Jiří; Lehr, Edgar; Gvoždík, Václav

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A new semiarboreal species of the Rhinella festae group is described from montane forests of the Cordillera Azul National Park between 1245 and 1280 m a.s.l. in the Cordillera Oriental, San Martín region, northern Peru. The new species is morphologically and genetically compared with members of the Rhinella acrolopha group (former genus Rhamphophryne) and members of the R. festae group. The new species is characterized by its large size (female SVL 47.1–58.3 mm, n = 4), eight presacral vertebrae, fusion of the sacrum and coccyx, long protuberant snout, snout directed slightly anteroventral in lateral view, cranial crests moderately developed, absence of occipital crest, presence of tympanic membrane, dorsolateral rows of small conical tubercles extending from parotoid gland to groin, hands and feet with long digits, fingers basally webbed and toes moderately webbed. Phylogenetically it is a member of the R. festae group which is most closely related to R. chavin and R. yanachaga from Peru. Morphologically the new species shares similarities with R. tenrec and R. truebae, members of the R. acrolopha group from Colombia. PMID:28769671

  6. Identifying signatures of natural selection in Tibetan and Andean populations using dense genome scan data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Abigail; Bauchet, Marc; Pinto, Dalila; Mao, Xianyun; Akey, Joshua M; Mei, Rui; Scherer, Stephen W; Julian, Colleen G; Wilson, Megan J; López Herráez, David; Brutsaert, Tom; Parra, Esteban J; Moore, Lorna G; Shriver, Mark D

    2010-09-09

    High-altitude hypoxia (reduced inspired oxygen tension due to decreased barometric pressure) exerts severe physiological stress on the human body. Two high-altitude regions where humans have lived for millennia are the Andean Altiplano and the Tibetan Plateau. Populations living in these regions exhibit unique circulatory, respiratory, and hematological adaptations to life at high altitude. Although these responses have been well characterized physiologically, their underlying genetic basis remains unknown. We performed a genome scan to identify genes showing evidence of adaptation to hypoxia. We looked across each chromosome to identify genomic regions with previously unknown function with respect to altitude phenotypes. In addition, groups of genes functioning in oxygen metabolism and sensing were examined to test the hypothesis that particular pathways have been involved in genetic adaptation to altitude. Applying four population genetic statistics commonly used for detecting signatures of natural selection, we identified selection-nominated candidate genes and gene regions in these two populations (Andeans and Tibetans) separately. The Tibetan and Andean patterns of genetic adaptation are largely distinct from one another, with both populations showing evidence of positive natural selection in different genes or gene regions. Interestingly, one gene previously known to be important in cellular oxygen sensing, EGLN1 (also known as PHD2), shows evidence of positive selection in both Tibetans and Andeans. However, the pattern of variation for this gene differs between the two populations. Our results indicate that several key HIF-regulatory and targeted genes are responsible for adaptation to high altitude in Andeans and Tibetans, and several different chromosomal regions are implicated in the putative response to selection. These data suggest a genetic role in high-altitude adaption and provide a basis for future genotype/phenotype association studies necessary

  7. Identifying signatures of natural selection in Tibetan and Andean populations using dense genome scan data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Bigham

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available High-altitude hypoxia (reduced inspired oxygen tension due to decreased barometric pressure exerts severe physiological stress on the human body. Two high-altitude regions where humans have lived for millennia are the Andean Altiplano and the Tibetan Plateau. Populations living in these regions exhibit unique circulatory, respiratory, and hematological adaptations to life at high altitude. Although these responses have been well characterized physiologically, their underlying genetic basis remains unknown. We performed a genome scan to identify genes showing evidence of adaptation to hypoxia. We looked across each chromosome to identify genomic regions with previously unknown function with respect to altitude phenotypes. In addition, groups of genes functioning in oxygen metabolism and sensing were examined to test the hypothesis that particular pathways have been involved in genetic adaptation to altitude. Applying four population genetic statistics commonly used for detecting signatures of natural selection, we identified selection-nominated candidate genes and gene regions in these two populations (Andeans and Tibetans separately. The Tibetan and Andean patterns of genetic adaptation are largely distinct from one another, with both populations showing evidence of positive natural selection in different genes or gene regions. Interestingly, one gene previously known to be important in cellular oxygen sensing, EGLN1 (also known as PHD2, shows evidence of positive selection in both Tibetans and Andeans. However, the pattern of variation for this gene differs between the two populations. Our results indicate that several key HIF-regulatory and targeted genes are responsible for adaptation to high altitude in Andeans and Tibetans, and several different chromosomal regions are implicated in the putative response to selection. These data suggest a genetic role in high-altitude adaption and provide a basis for future genotype/phenotype association

  8. Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus) in Ecuador: Geographic Distribution, Population Size and Extinction Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveda-Rodríguez, Adrián; Vargas, Félix Hernán; Kohn, Sebastián; Zapata-Ríos, Galo

    2016-01-01

    The Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus) in Ecuador is classified as Critically Endangered. Before 2015, standardized and systematic estimates of geographic distribution, population size and structure were not available for this species, hampering the assessment of its current status and hindering the design and implementation of effective conservation actions. In this study, we performed the first quantitative assessment of geographic distribution, population size and population viability of Andean Condor in Ecuador. We used a methodological approach that included an ecological niche model to study geographic distribution, a simultaneous survey of 70 roosting sites to estimate population size and a population viability analysis (PVA) for the next 100 years. Geographic distribution in the form of extent of occurrence was 49 725 km2. During a two-day census, 93 Andean Condors were recorded and a population of 94 to 102 individuals was estimated. In this population, adult-to-immature ratio was 1:0.5. In the modeled PVA scenarios, the probability of extinction, mean time to extinction and minimum population size varied from zero to 100%, 63 years and 193 individuals, respectively. Habitat loss is the greatest threat to the conservation of Andean Condor populations in Ecuador. Population size reduction in scenarios that included habitat loss began within the first 15 years of this threat. Population reinforcement had no effects on the recovery of Andean Condor populations given the current status of the species in Ecuador. The population size estimate presented in this study is the lower than those reported previously in other countries where the species occur. The inferences derived from the population viability analysis have implications for Condor management in Ecuador. This study highlights the need to redirect efforts from captive breeding and population reinforcement to habitat conservation.

  9. Shifts in leaf litter breakdown along a forest-pasture-urban gradient in Andean streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez-Armijos, Carlos; Rausche, Sirkka; Cueva, Augusta; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Espinosa, Carlos; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-07-01

    Tropical montane ecosystems of the Andes are critically threatened by a rapid land-use change which can potentially affect stream variables, aquatic communities, and ecosystem processes such as leaf litter breakdown. However, these effects have not been sufficiently investigated in the Andean region and at high altitude locations in general. Here, we studied the influence of land use (forest-pasture-urban) on stream physico-chemical variables (e.g., water temperature, nutrient concentration, and pH), aquatic communities (macroinvertebrates and aquatic fungi) and leaf litter breakdown rates in Andean streams (southern Ecuador), and how variation in those stream physico-chemical variables affect macroinvertebrates and fungi related to leaf litter breakdown. We found that pH, water temperature, and nutrient concentration increased along the land-use gradient. Macroinvertebrate communities were significantly different between land uses. Shredder richness and abundance were lower in pasture than forest sites and totally absent in urban sites, and fungal richness and biomass were higher in forest sites than in pasture and urban sites. Leaf litter breakdown rates became slower as riparian land use changed from natural to anthropogenically disturbed conditions and were largely determined by pH, water temperature, phosphate concentration, fungal activity, and single species of leaf-shredding invertebrates. Our findings provide evidence that leaf litter breakdown in Andean streams is sensitive to riparian land-use change, with urban streams being the most affected. In addition, this study highlights the role of fungal biomass and shredder species (Phylloicus; Trichoptera and Anchytarsus; Coleoptera) on leaf litter breakdown in Andean streams and the contribution of aquatic fungi in supporting this ecosystem process when shredders are absent or present low abundance in streams affected by urbanization. Finally, we summarize important implications in terms of managing of

  10. Description of new andean species of the genus Phymaturus (Iguania: Liolaemidae) from Northwestern Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Fernando; Laspiur, Alejandro; Acosta, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    As a result of several field trips and studies of collections of Phymaturus samples from Andean areas of central western Argentina (San Juan province), we discovered two populations that exhibit a particular character combination not seen in other species formally recognized in the literature. Based on a detailed analysis of an extended list of morphological characters (93), including scalation, color pattern, gular and nuchal folds, precloacal pores, and morphometric data, we conclude that these populations represent independent lineages that deserve to be considered as new species. According to the most recent revision of the genus and considering the descriptions made in another recent contribution, the taxonomic composition of the genus was increased to 38 species. In this study we provide the formal description of two additional new taxa, including their diagnosis and detailed comparisons with other members of their species group. The two new species belong to the palluma group, and can be assigned to the Puna subclade because they present the typical dorsal "spray" pattern. Other characters described in this study suggest their close phylogenetic relationship with other species of this subclade inhabiting the southern Puna region of Argentina, such as Phymaturus punae. Within the Puna subclade, Phymaturus aguanegra sp. nov. differs from all other members (P. antofagastensis, P. denotatus, P. laurenti, P punae, P extrilidus, P mallimaccii and P paihuanense) exhibiting the following combination of diagnostic characters: a complete melanism over the dorsum of neck, the presence of enlarged scales at the base of tail in males, having strongly keeled tarsal scales, lacking enlarged scales on the anterior margin of the antehumeral fold and centre of chest, females without flank coloration, a vertebral dark gray stripe usually present on the dorsum, females exhibiting a tricolor dorsal pattern, with two types of brown and scattered ferriferous oxide spots, and the

  11. Transport of RFID tracers in a glacierized Andean stream (Estero Morales, Chile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainato, Riccardo; Toro, Matteo; Mao, Luca; Fraccarollo, Luigi; Brardinoni, Francesco; Aristide Lenzi, Mario

    2015-04-01

    A proper quantification of bedload transport is crucial in order to improve the knowledge on the morphology and dynamics of river systems. Unfortunately, bedload surveys in mountain streams are notoriously difficult. Also, equations for predicting the transport capacity often overestimate the actual bedload rates, and field measurement are still rare. An alternative to direct bedload sampling during floods is the use of tracers, which allow to obtain precious data on sediment dynamic and transport due to different conditions of hydraulic forcing, especially in mountain streams. In this work, the results obtained by the employment of passive RFID tracers in a steep Andean channel are presented. The study site is the Estero Morales, a high-gradient stream located in the Metropolitan Region (central Chile). The channel bed exhibits boulder-cascade, step-pool and plane bed morphologies while the average slope is of about 9.5%. The basin (27 km2) hosts the San Francisco glacier (1.8 km2) that strongly affects the hydrological regime. In particular during the melt period (December-March) the glacier ensures daily discharge fluctuations with highly variable associated bedload transport rates. Overall, 429 RFID tracers were installed in the Estero Morales and the displacements over a reach of approximately 700 m were monitored through 15 surveys, performed between January and March 2014. The recovery rate ranges between 19% and 97%. Tracers travel distance were paired to the peaks of stream power per unit area (ω, in W/m2) that occurred during the study period. Due to the wide range of flow magnitude observed, the values of stream power were grouped in three classes: low (650-750 W/m2), moderate (750-800 W/m2), and high (800-900 W/m2). Despite the different conditions of hydraulic forcing, moderate and low classes show mean displacement very similar, equal to 33 m and 24 m, respectively. In either cases a size selective transport was observed. On the other hand, the high

  12. Taxonomic study of Hoplias microlepis (Günther, 1864, a trans-Andean species of trahiras (Ostariophysi: Characiformes: Erythrinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George M. T. Mattox

    Full Text Available The Hoplias malabaricus species group represents one of the most complexes taxonomical problems in the systematics of Neotropical fishes, including specimens widely distributed in most drainages of South America and part of Central America with great variation or overlap of putative diagnostic characters. The large number of nominal species, many of which without known type material, renders the problem more complicated. Currently, at least three nominal species can be included in the Hopliasmalabaricusspecies group based on the form of the medial margins of dentaries and presence of tooth plates on the tongue: Hoplias malabaricus, H. teres, and H. microlepis, the latter representing the only exclusively trans-Andean known species of the genus. We present herein a taxonomic study of Hoplias microlepis based on examination of syntypes and recently collected specimens, including a redescription of the species. Hoplias microlepisoccurs in the Pacific drainages of Panama and Southwestern Costa Rica, in addition to the río Guayas basin in Ecuador and the region near its mouth (río Tumbes, Northwestern Peru. Records of the species on the Atlantic coast of Panama are restricted to the Canal Zone, suggesting dispersal through the Panama Canal. We also designate lectotype and paralectotypes.

  13. Evidence of contrasting low-grade metamorphic conditons from clay mineral assablages in Triassic Alpujárride-Maláguide transtional units in the Betic Cordilleras, Spain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ruiz Cruz, M. D.; Franco, F.; Sanz de Galdeano, C.; Novák, Jiří Karel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 41, 2 (2006), s. 621-638 ISSN 0009-8558 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : low- grade metamorphism * clay minerals * Betic Cordilleras Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.974, year: 2006

  14. Sea-Surface Temperatures in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific and Surface Temperatures in the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia during El Niño: Implications for Pliocene Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Angel, L. C.; Molnar, P. H.

    2017-12-01

    Regressions of surface temperatures in the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia with sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) in the equatorial Pacific, and specifically with Niño1+2 and Niño3 temperature anomalies, show that the Eastern Cordillera warms or cools by half of the amplitude of the variation in the eastern Tropical Pacific. Because Pliocene SSTs in the eastern Tropical Pacific resemble those during major El Niño events, when SSTs warm by 4°C, these regressions suggest that the Pliocene Eastern Cordillera was possibly warmer by 2ºC at high elevations. Such post-Pliocene cooling is smaller than the 9-12ºC inferred from fossil pollen assemblages, but comparable to recent estimates of Anderson et al. of 3 ± 1ºC (1σ) since 8 Ma. This change in surface temperature could be explained by a change in regional climate associated with a different tropical Pacific SST distribution, and therefore would require neither an elevation change of the Eastern Cordillera since that time, nor a change between Pliocene and present-day temperatures in the tropics that is as large as estimates of the global change of 2.5-4°C.

  15. Sea Surface Temperatures in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific and Surface Temperatures in the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia During El Niño: Implications for Pliocene Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Angel, Lina C.; Molnar, Peter

    2017-11-01

    Regressions of surface temperatures in the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia with sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the equatorial Pacific, and specifically with Niño1+2 and Niño3 temperature anomalies, show that the Eastern Cordillera warms or cools by approximately half of the amplitude of the variation of SSTs in the eastern tropical Pacific. Because Pliocene SSTs in the eastern tropical Pacific resemble those during major El Niño events, when SSTs warm by 4°C, these regressions suggest that the Pliocene Eastern Cordillera was warmer by 2°C at both high and low elevations. Such post-Pliocene cooling is smaller than the 9-12°C inferred from fossil pollen assemblages, but comparable to recent estimates of Anderson et al. of 3 ± 1°C (1σ) since 8 Ma. This change in surface temperature could be explained by a change in regional climate associated with a different tropical Pacific SST distribution and therefore would require neither an elevation change of the Eastern Cordillera since that time nor a change between Pliocene and present-day temperatures in the tropics that is as large as estimates of the global change of 2.5-4°C.

  16. Pollen-based 17-kyr forest dynamics and climate change from the Western Cordillera of Colombia: no-analogue associations and temporarely lost biomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velásquez-R., C.A.; Hooghiemstra, H.

    2013-01-01

    A 17 kyr long pollen record from the unexplored Western Cordillera of Colombia (Páramo de Frontino; 3460 m elevation) shows vegetation change and inferred climate dynamics at ~ 125 yr resolution. The cold and wet Lateglacial showed well-defined stadials and interstadials. At the transition to the

  17. Passalidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) of the Biogeographical Province of Chocó and the West Andean Region of Colombia, with the Description of Two New Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ferbans, L; Reyes-Castillo, P; Schuster, J C

    2018-03-12

    We present a synopsis of the Passalidae of the Chocó biogeographical province and the western slopes of the Western Andean range of Colombia as a result of field collections, examination of entomological collections, and review of the literature. We record a total of 41 species, provide an identification key, and, for the 39 species for which we were able to examine specimens, include a diagnosis and collecting data. Two new species of Passalus (Pertinax) are described and illustrated. The species of this region compose 42% of the passalid species known for Colombia. The richness of species and the high degree of endemism (34%) indicate the faunistic importance of this area, which is closely related to the fauna of lowland Central America.

  18. Towards a GLOF hazard map for the city of Huaraz, Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Holger; Huggel, Christian; E Chisolm, Rachel; Gonzales, César; Cochachin, Alejo; Portocarrero, César

    2017-04-01

    Huaraz, with 120,000 inhabitants, is the largest city at the foot of the Cordillera Blanca Mountain Range, Peru, and is located at the confluence of the Quillcay River with the main Santa River. Three moraine dammed glacier lakes are located in the headwaters of the Quillcay catchment, which pose a potential threat of glacier lake outburst floods (GLOFs) to Huaraz: Laguna Cuchillacocha (2.5 x 106 m3), Laguna Tullparaju (12 x 106 m3), and Laguna Palcacocha (17 x 106 m3). The latter burst out in 1941, causing one of the deadliest GLOFs known in history, with about 2000 casualties and destroying a third of the city of Huaraz. Currently, the presence of these lakes within potential runout distances of possibly very large ice or rock/ice-avalanches, combined with the large damage potential in the city of Huaraz, some 20 km downstream of the lakes and further potentially endangered infrastructures such as the city of Trujillo, large-scale irrigation projects and hydropower plants along the Santa River poses a high-risk situation, despite lake safety systems at all three lakes were constructed in the last century. At Laguna Palcacocha, temporary measures, such as syphoning and a permanent supervision by a team of observers are undertaken at Laguna Palcacocha. For the future, more permanent measures are planned, including non-structural measures, such as a sensor-based early warning system for the entire catchment. In this framework, a preliminary GLOF hazard map for the entire Quillcay catchment has been developed, based on physically-based numerical modeling. For each of the three lakes, three scenarios of different magnitudes and related probabilities were modeled. For each case, a series of models was used to simulate each part of the chain of interacting processes. The eventual GLOFs were simulated with FLO2D for Palcacocha and RAMMS for Tullparaju and Cuchillacocha. Small, medium and large scenarios were merged for all three lakes, in order to come up with a single

  19. PIPER ANDAKIENSIS (PIPERACEAE UNA ESPECIE NUEVA DE LA VERTIENTE AMAZÓNICA DE LA CORDILLERA ORIENTAL DE COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WILLIAM TRUJILLO-C.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Se describe e ilustra Piper andakiensis W. Trujillo & Callejas, sp. nov. (Piperaceae procedente del piedemonte oriental de la cordillera Oriental en la jurisdicción de los departamentos de Caquetá y Putumayo (SE de Colombia. La especie nueva se distingue por sus hojas basalmente lobadas y oblicuas sobre un lado, con lobos divergentes y más cortos que el pecíolo, la lámina foliar gruesa y cartácea, con tallos, haz de la hoja, pecíolos y pedúnculos glabros y con crecimientos epidérmicos en pecíolos y márgenes peciolares; se discuten sus relaciones taxonómicas, se presentan comentarios sobre su distribución y ecología y se ilustran sus caracteres diagnósticos.

  20. Diversity and ecological ranges of plant species from dry inter-Andean valleys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Catalina

    Dry valleys in the American Andes and other mountains have provided excellent agricultural lands since millennia. Besides agriculture, wood extraction and the establishment of urban areas have diminished the native vegetation of these valleys. Consequently the original vegetation is now mostly...... found on steep slopes and in ravines. These areas of original dry valley vegetation preserve many wild relatives of cultivated plants on the one hand and old lineages of other wild plant groups. Dry inter-Andean valleys (DIAVs) in Ecuador therefore makeup a biodiversity hot spot for both plants...... of Ecuadorian dry inter-Andean valleys vegetation, including information related to the physical settings as well as to the vegetation and flora of the valleys. 2) This chapter unveils the influence of disturbance, water availability and low temperature in shaping species composition and occurrence. We found...

  1. Molecular identification of cryptic diversity in species of cis-Andean Mylossoma (Characiformes: Serrasalmidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateussi, Nadayca T B; Pavanelli, Carla Simone; Oliveira, Claudio

    2017-09-01

    Mylossoma is a Serrasalmidae genus with only two current valid species in the cis-Andean region but with several available names, today considered as junior synonymous. Morphological information combined with single-locus DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase I gene analysed by Barcode Index Number and General Mixed Yule Coalescent model were used in the present study to help the recognition of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) in cis-Andean Mylossoma and discuss species boundaries within the genus. Five OTUs were recognized based on both morphological and molecular approaches. The analysis using the Barcode Index Number resulted in five OTUs, with M. duriventre being split in one unity in the Amazon, one in the Orinoco, one in Paraná-Paraguay and one in Tocantins-Araguaia which is coherent with our morphological results.

  2. Small-scale convection at a continental back-arc to craton transition: Application to the southern Canadian Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardebol, N. J.; Pysklywec, R. N.; Stephenson, R.

    2012-01-01

    A step in the depth of the lithosphere base, associated with lateral variations in the upper mantle temperature structure, can trigger mantle flow that is referred to as edge-driven convection. This paper aims at outlining the implications of such edge-driven flow at a lateral temperature transition from a hot and thin to a cold and thick lithosphere of a continental back-arc. This configuration finds application in the southern Canadian Cordillera, where a hot and thin back-arc is adjacent to the cold and thick North American Craton. A series of geodynamical models tested the thermodynamical behavior of the lithosphere and upper mantle induced by a step in lithosphere thickness. The mantle flow patterns, thickness and heat flow evolution of the lithosphere, and surface topography are examined. We find that the lateral temperature transition shifts cratonward due to the vigorous edge-driven mantle flow that erodes the craton edge, unless the craton has a distinct high viscosity mantle lithosphere. The mantle lithosphere viscosity structure determines the impact of edge-driven flow on crustal deformation and surface heat flow; a dry olivine rheology for the craton prevents the edge from migrating and supports a persistent surface heat flow contrast. These phenomena are well illustrated at the transition from the hot Canadian Cordillera to craton that is supported by a rheological change and that coincides with a lateral change in surface heat flow. Fast seismic wave velocities observed in the upper mantle cratonward of the step can be explained as downwellings induced by the edge-driven flow.

  3. Direct and indirect effects of glaciers on aquatic biodiversity in high Andean peatlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quenta, Estefania; Molina-Rodriguez, Jorge; Gonzales, Karina

    2016-01-01

    -elevation peatlands (>4500 m above sea level). We sampled 200 pools from 20 peatlands along a glacier gradient in the Cordillera Real of Bolivia. We performed structural equation modeling (SEM) to analyze the potential mechanisms underlying the observed diversity patterns. Intermediate levels of glacial influence (15...... to which there is high α-diversity at intermediate levels of glacial influence due to the high degree of environmental heterogeneity caused by glacier water. This α-diversity pattern generates high levels of between-site aquatic community variation (high β diversity) and increases regional diversity (γ...

  4. Maternal Knowledge and Use of Galactagogues in Andean Communities of Cusco, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalena Monteban

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A commonly reported reason for early breastfeeding cessation is inadequate milk production. In response, women across the globe turn to galactagogues – substances used to increase the milk supply. Andean women have traditional knowledge about the medicinal and nutritional properties of plants and animals that are considered good to eat during breastfeeding. This research explores the maintenance and use of galactagogues, and specifically the use of the Andean flicker bird, within the wider framework of breastfeeding and nutrition policies in Peru. To elicit maternal knowledge and use of galactagogues, semi-structured and free-listing interviews were conducted with 33 mothers. Data analysis calculated the frequency and percentage of women reporting each type of galactagogue. In addition, thematic codes and relevant text passages were used in an iterative analytic process to document emerging themes. Identified galactagogues included five plants and six animals. Several galactagogues included protein-rich foods such as lamb meat and the Andean flicker bird. The use of protein-rich galactagogues as solid food is reinforced by public health messages. However, galactagogues in the research communities are usually consumed as soups or drinks, which are less rich in proteins than solid meals. The potential role of liquid galactagogues in the maintenance of appropriate hydration levels during breastfeeding in an environment where safe drinking water is scarce is a new contribution to the existing literature. The results are relevant to the design of maternal and child health policies that comply with intercultural health premises that value and respect the knowledge and practices of Andean Peoples.

  5. Coca: The History and Medical Significance of an Ancient Andean Tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Sue Biondich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coca leaf products are an integral part of the lives of the Andean peoples from both a cultural and traditional medicine perspective. Coca is also the whole plant from which cocaine is derived. Coca products are thought to be a panacea for health troubles in regions of South America. This review will examine the toxicology of whole coca and will also look at medicinal applications of this plant, past, present, and future.

  6. New records in the Tubeufiaceae from Andean Patagonian forests of Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Romina Magali; Bianchinotti, Maria Virginia

    2017-01-01

    Tubeufiaceae (Pleosporales, Ascomycota) occurring on native trees from the Andean Patagonian forests in Argentina are described and illustrated. Acanthostigma minutum and Tubeufia cerea with its anamorphic state are reported from South America for the first time on Nothofagus dombeyi and N. antarctica, respectively. Both species were up to now only known from the Northern Hemisphere. Fil: Sanchez, Romina Magali. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico ...

  7. Biofabrication of copper oxide nanoparticles using Andean blackberry (Rubus glaucus Benth.) fruit and leaf

    OpenAIRE

    Brajesh Kumar; Kumari Smita; Luis Cumbal; Alexis Debut; Yolanda Angulo

    2017-01-01

    Biofabrication of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs) of a desired size remains a significant challenge. In this report, CuO-NPs were fabricated by treating 10 mM copper nitrate with Andean blackberry fruit (ABF) and leaf (ABL); and evaluated its antioxidant activity. As-prepared NPs characterization were determined by UV–visible spectrophotometry, Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and X-ray diffraction (XRD)...

  8. Ultrasound agitated phytofabrication of palladium nanoparticles using Andean blackberry leaf and its photocatalytic activity

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Brajesh; Smita, Kumari; Cumbal, Luis; Debut, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    In this report, ultrasonication and Andean blackberry leaf extract are employed for the fabrication of palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs); and further evaluated its photocatalytic activity against methylene blue (MB). The as-synthesized PdNPs were characterized using UV–visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). TEM analysis demonstrated the formation of decahedron shape PdNPs with a diameter of 55–60 nm and XRD confi...

  9. Proliferation of hydroelectric dams in the Andean Amazon and implications for Andes-Amazon connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N

    2012-01-01

    Due to rising energy demands and abundant untapped potential, hydropower projects are rapidly increasing in the Neotropics. This is especially true in the wet and rugged Andean Amazon, where regional governments are prioritizing new hydroelectric dams as the centerpiece of long-term energy plans. However, the current planning for hydropower lacks adequate regional and basin-scale assessment of potential ecological impacts. This lack of strategic planning is particularly problematic given the intimate link between the Andes and Amazonian flood plain, together one of the most species rich zones on Earth. We examined the potential ecological impacts, in terms of river connectivity and forest loss, of the planned proliferation of hydroelectric dams across all Andean tributaries of the Amazon River. Considering data on the full portfolios of existing and planned dams, along with data on roads and transmission line systems, we developed a new conceptual framework to estimate the relative impacts of all planned dams. There are plans for 151 new dams greater than 2 MW over the next 20 years, more than a 300% increase. These dams would include five of the six major Andean tributaries of the Amazon. Our ecological impact analysis classified 47% of the potential new dams as high impact and just 19% as low impact. Sixty percent of the dams would cause the first major break in connectivity between protected Andean headwaters and the lowland Amazon. More than 80% would drive deforestation due to new roads, transmission lines, or inundation. We conclude with a discussion of three major policy implications of these findings. 1) There is a critical need for further strategic regional and basin scale evaluation of dams. 2) There is an urgent need for a strategic plan to maintain Andes-Amazon connectivity. 3) Reconsideration of hydropower as a low-impact energy source in the Neotropics.

  10. Oxyoppia mustaciata n. sp. from andean forests of northwestern patagonia and key to oxyoppiinae from Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Kun, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; During a three-year survey of oribatid mites in soil and leaf litter of Andean North patagonian forests, specimens belonging to the genus Oxyoppia were collected. Even though the specimens could be recognized by the use of previous descriptions and existing keys as being close to Oxyoppia (Oxyoppiella) suramericana, morphological analyses suggest enough differences to propose a new species Oxyoppia mustaciata n. sp. A new identification key to species of Oxyoppiinae fr...

  11. MORPHOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS AND NECTAR ROBBING IN THREE ANDEAN BUMBLE BEE SPECIES (HYMENOPTERA, APIDAE, BOMBINI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RIVEROS ANDRE J.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We report differences in foraging behavior of three Andean bumblebee species onflowers of Digitalis purpurea (Scrophulariaceae. Bombus atratus was a potentialpollinator while B. hortulanus and B. rubicundus collected nectar by robbing throughholes. We attribute behavioral differences to physical constraints. B. atratus has alonger glossa and a larger body size and is able to reach the nectaries, whereas B.hortulanus and B. rubicundus have shorter glossae and smaller bodies and probablymust rob nectar through holes at the base of flowers.

  12. Proliferation of hydroelectric dams in the Andean Amazon and implications for Andes-Amazon connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Finer

    Full Text Available Due to rising energy demands and abundant untapped potential, hydropower projects are rapidly increasing in the Neotropics. This is especially true in the wet and rugged Andean Amazon, where regional governments are prioritizing new hydroelectric dams as the centerpiece of long-term energy plans. However, the current planning for hydropower lacks adequate regional and basin-scale assessment of potential ecological impacts. This lack of strategic planning is particularly problematic given the intimate link between the Andes and Amazonian flood plain, together one of the most species rich zones on Earth. We examined the potential ecological impacts, in terms of river connectivity and forest loss, of the planned proliferation of hydroelectric dams across all Andean tributaries of the Amazon River. Considering data on the full portfolios of existing and planned dams, along with data on roads and transmission line systems, we developed a new conceptual framework to estimate the relative impacts of all planned dams. There are plans for 151 new dams greater than 2 MW over the next 20 years, more than a 300% increase. These dams would include five of the six major Andean tributaries of the Amazon. Our ecological impact analysis classified 47% of the potential new dams as high impact and just 19% as low impact. Sixty percent of the dams would cause the first major break in connectivity between protected Andean headwaters and the lowland Amazon. More than 80% would drive deforestation due to new roads, transmission lines, or inundation. We conclude with a discussion of three major policy implications of these findings. 1 There is a critical need for further strategic regional and basin scale evaluation of dams. 2 There is an urgent need for a strategic plan to maintain Andes-Amazon connectivity. 3 Reconsideration of hydropower as a low-impact energy source in the Neotropics.

  13. Sensory evaluation and acceptability of gluten-free Andean corn spaghetti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Maria A; Gámbaro, Adriana; Miraballes, Marcelo; Roascio, Antonella; Amarillo, Miguel; Sammán, Norma; Lobo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Although pasta is one of the most widely demanded products among gluten-intolerant people, few studies have focused on the sensory analysis and acceptability of these products. Spaghetti was made from Andean corn (Zea mays var. amylacea), capia and cully varieties from northern Argentina, and the flash profile technique was applied by semi-trained assessors to compare the sensory profile of this type of spaghetti with those made with rice and wheat flours. Acceptability of capia corn spaghetti was studied in celiac and non-celiac consumer groups using a 9-point hedonic scale and check-all-that-apply (CATA) questions. Two Andean corn spaghetti samples were described by assessors as rough, odd-smelling and odd-tasting. These terms were also used by non-celiac consumers to describe the capia corn spaghetti sample, which explained its low acceptability scores. However, celiac consumers assigned high acceptability scores to the same sample and described it as tasty, smooth, tender, novel, having a pleasant flavor and good quality, and as a product that can be consumed every day and by the whole family. The results of this study suggest that Andean corn flours are a suitable and acceptable product for celiac consumers and can be used in the production of spaghetti for celiac consumers but should be reformulated for non-celiac consumers. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Natural Selection on Genes Related to Cardiovascular Health in High-Altitude Adapted Andeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jacob E; Amaru, Ricardo; Song, Jihyun; Julian, Colleen G; Racimo, Fernando; Cheng, Jade Yu; Guo, Xiuqing; Yao, Jie; Ambale-Venkatesh, Bharath; Lima, João A; Rotter, Jerome I; Stehlik, Josef; Moore, Lorna G; Prchal, Josef T; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2017-11-02

    The increase in red blood cell mass (polycythemia) due to the reduced oxygen availability (hypoxia) of residence at high altitude or other conditions is generally thought to be beneficial in terms of increasing tissue oxygen supply. However, the extreme polycythemia and accompanying increased mortality due to heart failure in chronic mountain sickness most likely reduces fitness. Tibetan highlanders have adapted to high altitude, possibly in part via the selection of genetic variants associated with reduced polycythemic response to hypoxia. In contrast, high-altitude-adapted Quechua- and Aymara-speaking inhabitants of the Andean Altiplano are not protected from high-altitude polycythemia in the same way, yet they exhibit other adaptive features for which the genetic underpinnings remain obscure. Here, we used whole-genome sequencing to scan high-altitude Andeans for signals of selection. The genes showing the strongest evidence of selection-including BRINP3, NOS2, and TBX5-are associated with cardiovascular development and function but are not in the response-to-hypoxia pathway. Using association mapping, we demonstrated that the haplotypes under selection are associated with phenotypic variations related to cardiovascular health. We hypothesize that selection in response to hypoxia in Andeans could have vascular effects and could serve to mitigate the deleterious effects of polycythemia rather than reduce polycythemia itself. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Production and use of the pastures of the Colombia high Andean areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotero Cadavid, J.

    1993-01-01

    A relationship of the most common pastures is made in the Andean high area between the 2000 and 3000 m.s.n.m. and of their native vegetable associations, as well as of the invaders plants and overgrowths. The gramineae germoplasm and leguminous is indicated that has been proven lower those conditions. Data of yield average of dry matter are presented for native and introduced grasses of cold climate in Colombia. Equally it is indicated the daily earnings by animal, the load capacity and the animal production with different fertilization systems and some parameters of productivity are shown of gramineous and leguminous introduced in the high areas of Colombia. The nutritious value of gramineous and leguminous of cold climate and its chemical composition are made. A description is made of the ecological areas of the Andean high area and the pastures types that prevail in them. The factors are described that they impact in the degree of deterioration of the pastures like the environment, the same grass, the handling, the livestock, the type of exploitation, the holding of the earth and the administration. The agricultural production systems are mentioned that are associate the Andean pastures, as well as the main obstacles to increase the production of the systems and pastures and their possible solutions

  16. La Cordillera de los Andes: presentación de los problemas geomorfológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1974-01-01

    érites sont souvent déblayées sur les pentes fortes par le ruissellement et les divers glissements et éboulements. El alzamiento en bóveda del Ponto-plioceno ha dado a los .Andes su volumen montañoso actual y ha llevado a más de 4000 m superficies de erosión elaboradas durante e! Terciario. Estas superficies o 'puna' son muy probablemente poligénicas y policíclicas. Están dominadas por grandes cordilleras que son generalmente horsts que delimitan los sectores de surrección máxima, horsts que son posteriores a la elaboración de la superficie de las mesetas. Esta superficie está deformada tanto sobre los bordes de las cuencas interiores como sobre los flancos de la montaña donde ella ha sido disectada y reducida a bandas. Algunas veces esta superficie ha podido desaparecer debido a su recorte en lo alto de los flancos de los grandes valles, sobretodo en los dos extremos de la cadena. A un nivel inferior, se desarrollaron aplanamientos menores durante el Plioceno y posiblemente durante el Cuaternario antiguo, en sectores que habían permanecido relativamente estables: son los 'glacis' de erosión en lazos del altiplano perú-boliviano o las superficies de abrasión retocadas en 'glacis' sobre los abombamientos costeros perú-chilenos. Algunos grandes valles están adaptados a las grandes direcciones estructurales consecutivas a los movimientos del fin de Terciario (la adaptación del conjunto va acompañada a menudo de numerosas inadaptaciones locales. Otros valles siguen antiguas direcciones estructurales, anteriores al alzamiento andino. El Cuaternario está marcado por una serie de períodos fríos acompañados de glaciaciones en la montaña. Se ha podido determinar lar existencia de cuatro glaciaciones distintas de las cuales una al menos remonta al Cuaternario antiguo. Las glaciaciones recientes son contemporáneas de las glaciaciones del Cuaternario reciente de Europa y de América del Norte. Sus causas hay que buscarlas, para las latitudes medias, en un

  17. Leaf-mining Nepticulidae (Lepidoptera) from record high altitudes: documenting an entire new fauna in the Andean páramo and puna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonis, Jonas R; Diškus, Arūnas; Remeikis, Andrius; Gerulaitis, Virginijus; Karsholt, Ole

    2016-11-01

    The monograph treats 29 species of leaf-mining pygmy moths (Insecta, Lepidoptera, Nepticulidae) discovered in the northern Andean bush and grass páramo and the central Andean puna at altitudes above 3700 m. They represent the world's highest-altitudinal Nepticulidae fauna known. The height record belongs to Stigmella nivea sp. nov. from Peru collected at an elevation of 4700 m. Except for one species, all belong to Stigmella Schrank. Twenty-two of the species recorded are new and are named and described in the current paper: Stigmella paramica Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. lachemillae Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. gynoxyphaga Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. calceolariae Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. rigida Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. altiplanica Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. robusta Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. pseudorobusta Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. auriargentata Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. altimontana Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. pandora Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. ampla Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. evanida Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. mustelina Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. angusta Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. alticosma Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. nivea Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. kristenseni Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. lobata Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. ageratinae Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. clinopodiella Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov.; and S. calceolarifoliae Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov. Some of these species are leaf-miners on Asteraceae (Pentacalia, Baccharis, Gynoxys, and Ageratina plants), Calceolariaceae (Calceolaria), Lamiaceae (Clinopodium), and Rosaceae (Lachemilla). Twenty species are known only from adults with no data on their biology and host-plants. In addition, we present data and discuss recently discovered nepticulid taxa associated with Polylepis forests that is the natural vegetation in much of the High Andes. All High-Andean Stigmella species treated are illustrated with photographs of the

  18. Andean stratigraphic record of the transition from backarc extension to orogenic shortening: A case study from the northern Neuquén Basin, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Brian K.; Fuentes, Facundo; Boll, Andrés; Starck, Daniel; Ramirez, Sebastian G.; Stockli, Daniel F.

    2016-11-01

    The temporal transition from backarc extension to retroarc shortening is a fundamental process in the evolution of many Andean-type convergent margins. This switch in tectonic regime is preserved in the 5-7 km thick Mesozoic-Cenozoic stratigraphic record of west-central Argentina at 34-36°S, where the northern Neuquén Basin and succeeding Cenozoic foreland succession chronicle a long history of fluctuating depositional systems and diverse sediment source regions during Andean orogenesis. New findings from sediment provenance and facies analyses are integrated with detrital zircon U-Pb geochronological results from 16 samples of Jurassic through Miocene clastic deposits to delineate the progressive exhumation of the evolving Andean magmatic arc, retroarc fold-thrust belt, and foreland province. Abrupt changes in provenance and depositional conditions can be reconciled with a complex Mesozoic-Cenozoic history of extension, postextensional thermal subsidence, punctuated tectonic inversion, thick- and thin-skinned shortening, overlapping igneous activity, and alternating phases of basin accumulation, sediment bypass, and erosion. U-Pb age distributions constrain the depositional ages of Cenozoic units and reveal a prolonged late middle Eocene to earliest Miocene (roughly 40-20 Ma) hiatus in the retroarc foreland basin. This stratigraphic gap is expressed as a regional disconformity that marks a pronounced shift in depositional conditions and sediment sources, from (i) slow Paleocene-middle Eocene accumulation of distal fluviolacustrine sediments (Pircala and Coihueco Formations) contributed from far western magmatic arc sources (Cretaceous-Paleogene volcanic rocks) and subordinate eastern basement rocks (Permian-Triassic Choiyoi igneous complex) to (ii) rapid Miocene-Quaternary accumulation of proximal fluvial to megafan sediments (Agua de la Piedra, Loma Fiera, and Tristeza Formations) recycled from emerging western thrust-belt sources of Mesozoic basin fill

  19. Captivity Shapes the Gut Microbiota of Andean Bears: Insights into Health Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Borbón-García

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Andean bear is an endemic species of the tropical Andes who has an almost exclusively plant-based diet. Since herbivorous mammals do not carry enzymes for fiber degradation, the establishment of symbiosis with cellulolytic microorganisms in their gastrointestinal (GI tract is necessary to help them fulfill their nutritional needs. Furthermore, as described for other mammals, a stable, diverse, and balanced gut microbial composition is an indicator of a healthy status of the host; under disturbances this balance can be lost, leading to potential diseases of the host. The goal of this study was to describe the gut microbiota of wild and captive Andean bears and determine how habitat status influences the composition and diversity of the gut symbiotic community. Fecal samples from wild (n = 28 and captive (n = 8 Andean bears were collected in “Reserva Pantano de Martos” and “Fundación Bioandina”, Colombia. Composition and diversity analyses were performed using amplicons from the V4 region of the 16S rDNA gene sequenced using the Ion PGM platform. PICRUSt algorithm was applied to predict the gene content of the gut microbiome of wild and captive Andean bears. A total of 5,411 and 838 OTUs were identified for wild and captive bears, respectively. Captive bears contained a lower number of bacterial phyla (n = 7 compared to wild individuals (n = 9. Proteobacteria (59.03% and Firmicutes (14.03% were the phyla that contributed the most to differences between wild and captive bears (overall dissimilarity = 87.72%. At family level, Enterobacteriaceae drove the main differences between the two groups (13.7%. PICRUSt metagenomics predictions suggested a similar pattern of relative abundance of gene families associated with the metabolism of carbohydrates across samples in wild individuals, despite the taxonomic differences of their gut microbiota. Captivity alters the availability and diversity of food resources, which likely reduces microbiota

  20. U-Pb geochronology of modern river sands from the flat-slab segment of the southern central Andes, Argentina, 29-31°S: Implications for Neogene foreland and hinterland basin evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaldi, T.; Horton, B. K.; McKenzie, R.; Stockli, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates how Andean river sediments in the flat-slab segment of western Argentina record active mixing of lithologically and geochemically distinct source regions comprising the Principal Cordillera, Frontal Cordillera, Precordillera fold-thrust belt, Sierras Pampeanas basement uplifts, and recycled Neogene basin fill. Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronological results for modern river sands discriminate variations from hinterland source regions, through river tributaries and main trunks of the Bermejo, Jachal, San Juan, and Mendoza rivers, and their respective fluvial megafans within the active foreland basin. Proportions of proximal zircon populations in the hinterland trunk rivers (with extensive Permian-Triassic and Cenozoic igneous exposures) diminish downstream with progressive contributions from the frontal Precordillera fold-thrust belt (dominantly Paleozoic sedimentary rocks) and Pampean basement uplifts. However, this systematic downstream dilution is perturbed in several catchments by significant recycling of older foreland basin fill. The degree of recycling depends on the position and extent of Oligocene-Pliocene exposures within the catchments. To discern the effects of the variable detrital zircon sources, multiple statistical methods are utilized. Quantitative comparisons suggest that variations in detrital zircon age distributions among the modern sands, and with older foreland basin fill and exposed bedrock, are dependent on spatial and temporal variations in exhumation and drainage network evolution within their respective Andean catchments. The present surface area of competing source regions and the configuration of hinterland tributary rivers largely dictate the degree of downstream dilution and/or recycling. This study provides a modern analogue and baseline for reconstructing Neogene shifts in foreland basin provenance, depositional systems, and drainage configurations during a critical transition to flat-slab subduction.

  1. El clima de la vertiente del Pacífico de los Andes Centrales y sus implicaciones geomorfológicas El clima de la vertiente del Pacífico de los Andes Centrales y sus implicaciones geomorfológicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Úbeda Palenque

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate studies are of main importance to explain the external geodynamics of the Pacific Basin of the Central Andes between 15°S and 19°S. This is because the processes by which the relief modeling or morphogenesis develop are controlled by pluviometric variables and phyto stabilization. Moreover, the internal geodynamic of the region is related to the climatic conditions that determine the amounts of sediments aported to the Ocean basin (Kulm et al. 1977, affecting the erosion rate by subduction in the plane of contact between the tectonic plates and the composition of the magazas formed below the Andean erogene.In this paper we analyze the climatic effects in the external geodynamics, within a theoric framework that considers a morphoclimatic system as a set formed by the morphogenetic agents and processes that work the relief modeling in a territory, in function of its bioclimatic characteristics; and a morphoclimatic dominion is the spatial environment where a specific morphoclimatic system develops.First, we present the clima of the Central Andes, the factors that control its mean configuration and its main characteristics with diagrams made from the pluviometric data collected in a series of stations regularly distributed in the region. Second, we differentiate two climatic dominions, one in the Altiplano, related to Amazonia precipitations and the other at the Pacific side, associated to the anticyclonic permanency in the western cordillera. Third, we propose a subdivision of the western façade of the cordillera in altitudinal intervals or bioclimatics sections using bioindicators such as the vegetation absence or presence with altitudinal change. Fourth, we give a new division in altitudinal intervals or morphoclimatic zones, using the existence of some geoindicators, such as the endemic geomorphic units of each morphoclimatic zone.El estudio del clima es imprescindible para explicar la geodinámica externa en la vertiente del Pac

  2. Social network characteristics and cervical cancer screening among Quechua women in Andean Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Luque

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peru has high cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates compared to other Andean countries. Therefore, partnerships between governmental and international organizations have targeted rural areas of Peru to receive cervical cancer screening via outreach campaigns. Previous studies have found a relationship between a person’s social networks and cancer screening behaviors. Screening outreach campaigns conducted by the nonprofit organization CerviCusco created an opportunity for a social network study to examine cervical cancer screening history and social network characteristics in a rural indigenous community that participated in these campaigns in 2012 and 2013. The aim of this study was to explore social network characteristics in this community related to receipt of cervical cancer screening following the campaigns. Methods An egocentric social network questionnaire was used to collect cross-sectional network data on community participants. Each survey participant (ego was asked to name six other women they knew (alters and identify the nature of their relationship or tie (family, friend, neighbor, other, residential closeness (within 5 km, length of time known, frequency of communication, topics of conversation, and whether they lent money to the person, provided childcare or helped with transportation. In addition, each participant was asked to report the nature of the relationship between all alters identified (e.g., friend, family, or neighbor. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to explore the relationship between Pap test receipt at the CerviCusco outreach screening campaigns and social network characteristics. Results Bivariate results found significant differences in percentage of alter composition for neighbors and family, and for mean number of years known, mean density, and mean degree centrality between women who had received a Pap test (n = 19 compared to those who had not (n = 50 (p

  3. Watershed-Induced Limnological and Microbial Status in Two Oligotrophic Andean Lakes Exposed to the Same Climatic Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Echeverría-Vega

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Laguna Negra and Lo Encañado are two oligotrophic Andean lakes forming part of the system fed by meltwater from distinct glacial tongues of the Echaurren glacier in central Chile, which is in a recession period. The recent increase in temperature and decline in precipitation have led to an increase of glacial meltwater and sediments entering these lakes. Although the lacustrine systems are also hydrogeologically connected, the limnology of the lakes is strongly controlled by the surface processes related to the respective sub-watersheds and hydrology. Watershed characteristics (area and length, slope, lithology, resistance to erosion, among others affect the chemical and physical characteristics of both lakes (e.g., nutrient concentration and turbidity. We studied physical and chemical variables and performed 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to determine the specific microbial signature of the lakes. The transparency, temperature, turbidity and concentrations of chlorophyll-a, dissolved organic matter, nutrients and the total number of cells, revealed the different status of both lakes at the time of sampling. The predominant bacterial groups in both lakes were Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Bacteroidetes. Interestingly, the contribution of phototrophs was significantly higher in LN compared to LE (13 and 4% respectively and the major fraction corresponded to Anoxygenic Phototrophs (AP represented by Chloroflexi, Alpha, and Betaproteobacteria. Multivariate analyses showed that the nutrient levels and the light availability of both lakes, which finally depend on the hydrological characteristics of the respective watersheds, explain the differential community composition/function. The abundance of a diverse photoheterotrophic bacterioplankton community suggests that the ability to utilize solar energy along with organic and inorganic substrates is a key function in these oligotrophic mountain lakes.

  4. Watershed-Induced Limnological and Microbial Status in Two Oligotrophic Andean Lakes Exposed to the Same Climatic Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría-Vega, Alex; Chong, Guillermo; Serrano, Antonio E.; Guajardo, Mariela; Encalada, Olga; Parro, Victor; Blanco, Yolanda; Rivas, Luis; Rose, Kevin C.; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; Luque, José A.; Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Demergasso, Cecilia S.

    2018-01-01

    Laguna Negra and Lo Encañado are two oligotrophic Andean lakes forming part of the system fed by meltwater from distinct glacial tongues of the Echaurren glacier in central Chile, which is in a recession period. The recent increase in temperature and decline in precipitation have led to an increase of glacial meltwater and sediments entering these lakes. Although the lacustrine systems are also hydrogeologically connected, the limnology of the lakes is strongly controlled by the surface processes related to the respective sub-watersheds and hydrology. Watershed characteristics (area and length, slope, lithology, resistance to erosion, among others) affect the chemical and physical characteristics of both lakes (e.g., nutrient concentration and turbidity). We studied physical and chemical variables and performed 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to determine the specific microbial signature of the lakes. The transparency, temperature, turbidity and concentrations of chlorophyll-a, dissolved organic matter, nutrients and the total number of cells, revealed the different status of both lakes at the time of sampling. The predominant bacterial groups in both lakes were Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Bacteroidetes. Interestingly, the contribution of phototrophs was significantly higher in LN compared to LE (13 and 4% respectively) and the major fraction corresponded to Anoxygenic Phototrophs (AP) represented by Chloroflexi, Alpha, and Betaproteobacteria. Multivariate analyses showed that the nutrient levels and the light availability of both lakes, which finally depend on the hydrological characteristics of the respective watersheds, explain the differential community composition/function. The abundance of a diverse photoheterotrophic bacterioplankton community suggests that the ability to utilize solar energy along with organic and inorganic substrates is a key function in these oligotrophic mountain lakes. PMID:29556224

  5. Constraints on the origin and evolution of magmas in the Payún Matrú Volcanic Field, Quaternary Andean back-arc of western Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernadno, I R; Aragón, E; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Payún Matrú Volcanic Field (Pleistocene–Holocene) is located in the Andean back-arc of the Southern Volcanic Zone, western Argentina, and is contemporaneous with the Andean volcanic arc at the same latitude. It includes two polygenetic, mostly trachytic volcanoes: Payún Matrú (with a summit c...

  6. Imaging the lithospheric structure of the Central Andes from the joint inversion of multiple seismic data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kevin Michael

    A lingering question in Cordilleran tectonics is how high plateaus form in the absence of continental collision. The type example of an active Cordilleran high plateau is found in the Central Andes of Peru, Bolivia, Argentina, and Chile. Along this section of the South American Cordillera, tectonics are primarily driven by subduction of the oceanic Nazca Plate beneath the continental South American Plate. Extending over 1,800 km along the active continental margin, the Central Andean Plateau (CAP) reaches a maximum width of around 400 km with several peaks in excess of 6 km. Numerous morphotectonic subdivisions of the CAP highlight the complex along-strike variability of the Plateau providing a natural laboratory for investigating the relative contribution of tectonic processes involved in building and maintaining Cordilleran high plateaus. The scale of this problem extends far beyond the scope of any one geoscientific discipline requiring a multidisciplinary approach. Our contribution to this scientific problem and the focus of the work presented in this dissertation is to better understand the current lithospheric and uppermost mantle structure along the CAP. This is achieved by integrating recent advances in seismic imaging techniques with a growing availability of high-quality seismic data into three distinct studies across the South American continent. In the first study, we present a shear-wave velocity model for the crust below the Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC). The target of this study is to constrain the crustal volume of a large magma reservoir inferred to exist below the APVC. When combined with geological and petrological constraints, the large-volume magma reservoir imaged in this study suggests a significant magmatic contribution to the growth of the Plateau in excess of one kilometer over the last ten million years. In addition to the tectonic contributions of this work, we introduce a new method of jointly inverting surface-wave dispersion

  7. The potential impact of new Andean dams on Amazon fluvial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melack, John M.; Dunne, Thomas; Barthem, Ronaldo B.; Goulding, Michael; Paiva, Rodrigo C. D.; Sorribas, Mino V.; Silva, Urbano L.; Weisser, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Increased energy demand has led to plans for building many new dams in the western Amazon, mostly in the Andean region. Historical data and mechanistic scenarios are used to examine potential impacts above and below six of the largest dams planned for the region, including reductions in downstream sediment and nutrient supplies, changes in downstream flood pulse, changes in upstream and downstream fish yields, reservoir siltation, greenhouse gas emissions and mercury contamination. Together, these six dams are predicted to reduce the supply of sediments, phosphorus and nitrogen from the Andean region by 69, 67 and 57% and to the entire Amazon basin by 64, 51 and 23%, respectively. These large reductions in sediment and nutrient supplies will have major impacts on channel geomorphology, floodplain fertility and aquatic productivity. These effects will be greatest near the dams and extend to the lowland floodplains. Attenuation of the downstream flood pulse is expected to alter the survival, phenology and growth of floodplain vegetation and reduce fish yields below the dams. Reservoir filling times due to siltation are predicted to vary from 106–6240 years, affecting the storage performance of some dams. Total CO2 equivalent carbon emission from 4 Andean dams was expected to average 10 Tg y-1 during the first 30 years of operation, resulting in a MegaWatt weighted Carbon Emission Factor of 0.139 tons C MWhr-1. Mercury contamination in fish and local human populations is expected to increase both above and below the dams creating significant health risks. Reservoir fish yields will compensate some downstream losses, but increased mercury contamination could offset these benefits. PMID:28832638

  8. Deforestation and benthic indicators: how much vegetation cover is needed to sustain healthy Andean streams?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Iñiguez-Armijos

    Full Text Available Deforestation in the tropical Andes is affecting ecological conditions of streams, and determination of how much forest should be retained is a pressing task for conservation, restoration and management strategies. We calculated and analyzed eight benthic metrics (structural, compositional and water quality indices and a physical-chemical composite index with gradients of vegetation cover to assess the effects of deforestation on macroinvertebrate communities and water quality of 23 streams in southern Ecuadorian Andes. Using a geographical information system (GIS, we quantified vegetation cover at three spatial scales: the entire catchment, the riparian buffer of 30 m width extending the entire stream length, and the local scale defined for a stream reach of 100 m in length and similar buffer width. Macroinvertebrate and water quality metrics had the strongest relationships with vegetation cover at catchment and riparian scales, while vegetation cover did not show any association with the macroinvertebrate metrics at local scale. At catchment scale, the water quality metrics indicate that ecological condition of Andean streams is good when vegetation cover is over 70%. Further, macroinvertebrate community assemblages were more diverse and related in catchments largely covered by native vegetation (>70%. Our results suggest that retaining an important quantity of native vegetation cover within the catchments and a linkage between headwater and riparian forests help to maintain and improve stream biodiversity and water quality in Andean streams affected by deforestation. This research proposes that a strong regulation focused to the management of riparian buffers can be successful when decision making is addressed to conservation/restoration of Andean catchments.

  9. Identifying positive selection candidate loci for high-altitude adaptation in Andean populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Abigail W; Mao, Xianyun; Mei, Rui; Brutsaert, Tom; Wilson, Megan J; Julian, Colleen Glyde; Parra, Esteban J; Akey, Joshua M; Moore, Lorna G; Shriver, Mark D

    2009-12-01

    High-altitude environments (>2,500 m) provide scientists with a natural laboratory to study the physiological and genetic effects of low ambient oxygen tension on human populations. One approach to understanding how life at high altitude has affected human metabolism is to survey genome-wide datasets for signatures of natural selection. In this work, we report on a study to identify selection-nominated candidate genes involved in adaptation to hypoxia in one highland group, Andeans from the South American Altiplano. We analysed dense microarray genotype data using four test statistics that detect departures from neutrality. Using a candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphism-based approach, we identified genes exhibiting preliminary evidence of recent genetic adaptation in this population. These included genes that are part of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ( HIF ) pathway, a biochemical pathway involved in oxygen homeostasis, as well as three other genomic regions previously not known to be associated with high-altitude phenotypes. In addition to identifying selection-nominated candidate genes, we also tested whether the HIF pathway shows evidence of natural selection. Our results indicate that the genes of this biochemical pathway as a group show no evidence of having evolved in response to hypoxia in Andeans. Results from particular HIF -targeted genes, however, suggest that genes in this pathway could play a role in Andean adaptation to high altitude, even if the pathway as a whole does not show higher relative rates of evolution. These data suggest a genetic role in high-altitude adaptation and provide a basis for genotype/phenotype association studies that are necessary to confirm the role of putative natural selection candidate genes and gene regions in adaptation to altitude.

  10. Explaining Andean potato weevils in relation to local and landscape features: a facilitated ecoinformatics approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush Parsa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pest impact on an agricultural field is jointly influenced by local and landscape features. Rarely, however, are these features studied together. The present study applies a "facilitated ecoinformatics" approach to jointly screen many local and landscape features of suspected importance to Andean potato weevils (Premnotrypes spp., the most serious pests of potatoes in the high Andes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated a comprehensive list of predictors of weevil damage, including both local and landscape features deemed important by farmers and researchers. To test their importance, we assembled an observational dataset measuring these features across 138 randomly-selected potato fields in Huancavelica, Peru. Data for local features were generated primarily by participating farmers who were trained to maintain records of their management operations. An information theoretic approach to modeling the data resulted in 131,071 models, the best of which explained 40.2-46.4% of the observed variance in infestations. The best model considering both local and landscape features strongly outperformed the best models considering them in isolation. Multi-model inferences confirmed many, but not all of the expected patterns, and suggested gaps in local knowledge for Andean potato weevils. The most important predictors were the field's perimeter-to-area ratio, the number of nearby potato storage units, the amount of potatoes planted in close proximity to the field, and the number of insecticide treatments made early in the season. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results underscored the need to refine the timing of insecticide applications and to explore adjustments in potato hilling as potential control tactics for Andean weevils. We believe our study illustrates the potential of ecoinformatics research to help streamline IPM learning in agricultural learning collaboratives.

  11. Genetic control of the seed coat colour of Middle American and Andean bean seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possobom, Micheli Thaise Della Flora; Ribeiro, Nerinéia Dalfollo; Zemolin, Allan Emanoel Mezzomo; Arns, Fernanda Daltrozo

    2015-02-01

    Seed coat colour of bean seeds is decisive for acceptance of a cultivar. The objectives of this research were to determine whether there is maternal effect for "L", a* and b* colour parameters in Middle American and Andean bean seeds; to obtain estimates of heritability and gain with selection for "L", a* and b* values; and select recombinants with the seed coat colour required by the market demand. Thus, controlled crossings were carried out between the Middle American lines CNFP 10104 and CHC 01-175, and between the Andean lines Cal 96 and Hooter, for obtaining F1, F1 reciprocal, F2 and F2 reciprocal generations for each hybrid combination. Parents and generations were evaluated in two field experiments (2012 normal rainy and 2013 dry seasons) in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Seed coat colour was quantified with a portable colorimeter. Genetic variability for "L" (luminosity), chromaticity a* (green to red shade), and chromaticity b* (blue to yellow shade) values was observed in seeds with F2 seed coat of Middle American and Andean beans. "L", a* and b* values in bean seeds presented maternal effects. High broad-sense heritability are observed for luminosity (h(2)b: 76.66-95.07%), chromaticity a* (h(2)b: 73.08-89.31%), and chromaticity b* (h(2)b: 88.63-92.50%) values in bean seeds. From the crossings, it was possible to select bean seeds in early generation for the black group, and for carioca and cranberry types (dark or clear background) which present the colour required by the market demand.

  12. Deforestation and Benthic Indicators: How Much Vegetation Cover Is Needed to Sustain Healthy Andean Streams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez–Armijos, Carlos; Leiva, Adrián; Frede, Hans–Georg; Hampel, Henrietta; Breuer, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Deforestation in the tropical Andes is affecting ecological conditions of streams, and determination of how much forest should be retained is a pressing task for conservation, restoration and management strategies. We calculated and analyzed eight benthic metrics (structural, compositional and water quality indices) and a physical-chemical composite index with gradients of vegetation cover to assess the effects of deforestation on macroinvertebrate communities and water quality of 23 streams in southern Ecuadorian Andes. Using a geographical information system (GIS), we quantified vegetation cover at three spatial scales: the entire catchment, the riparian buffer of 30 m width extending the entire stream length, and the local scale defined for a stream reach of 100 m in length and similar buffer width. Macroinvertebrate and water quality metrics had the strongest relationships with vegetation cover at catchment and riparian scales, while vegetation cover did not show any association with the macroinvertebrate metrics at local scale. At catchment scale, the water quality metrics indicate that ecological condition of Andean streams is good when vegetation cover is over 70%. Further, macroinvertebrate community assemblages were more diverse and related in catchments largely covered by native vegetation (>70%). Our results suggest that retaining an important quantity of native vegetation cover within the catchments and a linkage between headwater and riparian forests help to maintain and improve stream biodiversity and water quality in Andean streams affected by deforestation. This research proposes that a strong regulation focused to the management of riparian buffers can be successful when decision making is addressed to conservation/restoration of Andean catchments. PMID:25147941

  13. Deforestation and benthic indicators: how much vegetation cover is needed to sustain healthy Andean streams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez-Armijos, Carlos; Leiva, Adrián; Frede, Hans-Georg; Hampel, Henrietta; Breuer, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Deforestation in the tropical Andes is affecting ecological conditions of streams, and determination of how much forest should be retained is a pressing task for conservation, restoration and management strategies. We calculated and analyzed eight benthic metrics (structural, compositional and water quality indices) and a physical-chemical composite index with gradients of vegetation cover to assess the effects of deforestation on macroinvertebrate communities and water quality of 23 streams in southern Ecuadorian Andes. Using a geographical information system (GIS), we quantified vegetation cover at three spatial scales: the entire catchment, the riparian buffer of 30 m width extending the entire stream length, and the local scale defined for a stream reach of 100 m in length and similar buffer width. Macroinvertebrate and water quality metrics had the strongest relationships with vegetation cover at catchment and riparian scales, while vegetation cover did not show any association with the macroinvertebrate metrics at local scale. At catchment scale, the water quality metrics indicate that ecological condition of Andean streams is good when vegetation cover is over 70%. Further, macroinvertebrate community assemblages were more diverse and related in catchments largely covered by native vegetation (>70%). Our results suggest that retaining an important quantity of native vegetation cover within the catchments and a linkage between headwater and riparian forests help to maintain and improve stream biodiversity and water quality in Andean streams affected by deforestation. This research proposes that a strong regulation focused to the management of riparian buffers can be successful when decision making is addressed to conservation/restoration of Andean catchments.

  14. Macrophyte Communities of Andean Rivers: Composition and Relation with Environmental Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Alida Marcela Gómez Rodríguez; Luz Teresa Valderrama Valderrama; Carlos A. Rivera-Rondón

    2017-01-01

    Small streams of tropical Andes have been poorly studied. Therefore, there is little information about the structure, dynamics and function of their macrophyte communities. In this research, aquatic plant communities of 18 Andean streams of La Vieja (Quindío) and Otún (Risaralda) river basins were studied; those are some of the basins most affected by anthropic activities in the country. Streams were selected according to their association with the main land’s uses of the region in both basin...

  15. The genus Phyllophaga Harris (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) in the Colombian Andean Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Luis Fernando; Wolff, Martha

    2013-01-01

    The number of species in the genus Phyllophaga Harris (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) in Colombia is updated to 33. This group represents one of the most common components of the "white grubs" complex, known to damage important agricultural crops, especially in the Colombian Andean Mountains. A commented taxonomic history of the genus is provided, including five new records for the country (P. schizorhina, P. onoreana, P. densata, P. guanacasteca, and P. gigantea) and Phyllophaga tesorito is described as a new species. A key to the identification of male specimens of 30 species is included with a catalogue illustrating their key structures. Finally, aspects related to their ecological importance, geographic distribution, and phenology are discussed.

  16. [Decriminalizing traditional Andean medicine: an interview with Walter Álvarez Quispe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispe, Walter Álvarez; Loza, Carmen Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Walter Álvarez Quispe, a Kallawaya healer and biomedical practitioner specializing in general surgery and gynecology, presents the struggle of traditional and alternative healers to get their Andean medical systems depenalized between 1960 and 1990. Bolivia was the first country in Latin America and the Caribbean to decriminalize traditional medicine before the proposals of the International Conference on Primary Health Care (Alma-Ata, 1978). The data provided by the interviewee show that the successes achieved, mainly by the Kallawayas, stem from their own independent initiative. These victories are not the result of official policies of interculturality in healthcare, although the successes achieved tend to be ascribed to them.

  17. The electronic contract formation in the framework of the Andean Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William David Hernández

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the Information and Communication Technology (ICT in all the aspects of the society is an unquestionable fact that implies, for the Law, the inescapable responsibility of fostering the fulfillment of the declarations or objectives of the Society of Information. Today´s world, framed in a process of globalization and regional integration, heads to the normative harmonization. In line with the above, the present document studies the elements supporting the normative unification concerning the formation of the contract by electronic means in the Andean Community.

  18. Evaluation of an andean common bean reference collection under drought stress

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Vega, Juan Carlos; Blair, Matthew W.; Monserrate, Fredy; Ligarreto Moreno, Gustavo Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    More than 60% of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production worldwide is impacted by the risk of drought. In this study, the goal was to evaluate 64 bush bean genotypes from the CIAT reference collection to identify possible sources of drought resistance in the Andean gene pool. Phenotypic traits such as yield, 100-seed weight (P100) and days to physiological maturity (Dpm) were evaluated on selected accessions of this collection which was grown in an 8x8 lattice with two repetitions unde...

  19. Physics in the Andean Countries: A Perspective from Condensed Matter, Novel Materials and Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, P.

    2009-05-01

    We will discuss the current state of R&D in the fields of condensed matter, novel materials, and nanotechnology in the Andean nations. We will initially consider Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) to then visualize individual developments, as well as those for the region as a whole in these fields of knowledge in each of the nations constituting the Andean Region (Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile, Venezuela, Peru, and Colombia). Based on Science & Technology watch exercises in the countries involved, along with the Iberian American and Inter-American Science & Technology Network of Indicators (Red de indicadores de Ciencia y Tecnolog'ia (RICYT) iberoamericana e interamericana)1, we will reveal statistical data that will shed light on the development in the fields mentioned. As will be noted, total R&D investment in Latin American and Caribbean countries remained constant since 1997. In spite of having reached a general increase in publications without international collaboration in LAC nations, the countries with greatest research productivity in Latin America (Argentina, Mexico, Brazil, and Chile) have strengthened their international collaboration with the United States, France, Germany, and Italy through close links associated with the formation processes of their researchers. Academic and research integration is evaluated through joint authorship of scientific articles, evidencing close collaboration in fields of research. This principle has been used in the creation of cooperation networks among participating nations. As far as networks of research on condensed matter, novel materials, and nanotechnology, the Andean nations have not consolidated a regional network allowing permanent and effective cooperation in research and technological development; as would be expected, given their idiomatic and cultural similarities, their historical background, and geographical proximity, which have been integrating factors in other research areas or socio-economic aspects. This

  20. A NEW ARBORESCENT SPECIES OF ZAMIA (CYCADALES, ZAMIACEAE FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF HUILA, EASTERN CORDILLERA OF COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calonje Michael

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Zamia huilensis Calonje, Esquivel, & D.W. Stev., a new arborescent species from theEastern Cordillera of Colombia (Department of Huila, is described and illustrated. Itis compared to Z. muricata Willd., which has similar leaflet shape, and to Z. tolimensisCalonje, Esquivel & D.W. Stev., with which it shares some reproductive characters.It differs from Z. muricata in having an arborescent trunk, beige-yellow to beigeovulate strobili supported by short peduncles, and microsporangia aggregated intoa single group on abaxial side of microsporophyll; it differs from Z. muricata in thesubterranean trunk, dark brown to black ovulate strobili supported by long peduncles,and microsporangia separated into two groups on abaxial side of microsporophylls.It differs from Z. tolimensis in having an overall smaller size, leaflets that are notstrongly falcate and with margins toothed below the distal half, compared to Z. tolimensiswhich is a much larger plant, and has strongly falcate leaflets that are nottoothed below the distal half.

  1. Experiencias de cordillera, ecos de frío: relatos cruzados entre Chile y Quito en el siglo XVI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Vega

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La narración de la secuencia de la conquista del Perú nos enfrenta con la fijación de dos episodios diferentes aunque articulados: la jornada a Quito de Pedro de Alvarado en 1534 y la expedición a Chile de Diego de Almagro, entre 1535 y 1536, que incluyen, ambas, una travesía cordillerana. El presente artículo discute los ecos que pueden rastrearse de los relatos acerca de estas expediciones en un conjunto de obras redactadas en torno a 1550 (Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo, Francisco López de Gómara, Pedro Cieza de León y Agustín de Zárate. A partir de convergencias y diferencias inesperadas en estos textos, se discute la importancia de la circulación oral de historias entre los conquistadores del Perú. Se plantea que la práctica social de la conversación oral permitió fijar, además de estas historias, una temprana conceptualización cristiana de los límites del Tawantinsuyu. En ella se concibió a Quito y Chile como las marcas fronterizas del espacio recién conquistado, permitiendo que ambos territorios se superpusieran al caracterizarse a partir a un mismo conjunto de imágenes sobre la experiencia de la cordillera.

  2. Late extensional shear zones and associated recumbent folds in the Alpujarride subduction complex, Betic Cordillera, southern Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orozco, M.; Alonso-Chaves, F.; Platt, J.

    2017-01-01

    The existence in the Alpujarride Complex (Betic Cordillera, southern Spain) of a relatively continuous extensional event (following crustal thickening) is based on detailed structural studies and is consistent with the P-T paths and geochronological data established for the Alpujarride rocks. According to our research, the Alpujarride Complex contains two large-scale shear zones accommodating early Miocene extension. The shear zones contain km-scale recumbent folds, some with sheath fold geometry, and megaboudinage structures, and are closely associated with detachment faults. Large-scale folds and boudins cause dome-like undulations in the detachments, which are inferred to overlap in time with the deformation in the shear zones. One shear zone in the eastern part of the orogen is top-N; the other, in the western part, is top-E. The change in the shear direction may represent a temporal evolution in the direction of shear, possibly related to a change in the subduction direction in space and time.

  3. Late extensional shear zones and associated recumbent folds in the Alpujarride subduction complex, Betic Cordillera, southern Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orozco, M.; Alonso-Chaves, F.; Platt, J.

    2017-11-01

    The existence in the Alpujarride Complex (Betic Cordillera, southern Spain) of a relatively continuous extensional event (following crustal thickening) is based on detailed structural studies and is consistent with the P-T paths and geochronological data established for the Alpujarride rocks. According to our research, the Alpujarride Complex contains two large-scale shear zones accommodating early Miocene extension. The shear zones contain km-scale recumbent folds, some with sheath fold geometry, and megaboudinage structures, and are closely associated with detachment faults. Large-scale folds and boudins cause dome-like undulations in the detachments, which are inferred to overlap in time with the deformation in the shear zones. One shear zone in the eastern part of the orogen is top-N; the other, in the western part, is top-E. The change in the shear direction may represent a temporal evolution in the direction of shear, possibly related to a change in the subduction direction in space and time.

  4. Landscape genetics, historical isolation and cross-Andean gene flow in the wax palm, Ceroxylon echinulatum (Arecaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trénel, P.; Hansen, Michael Møller; Nordmand, S.

    2008-01-01

    and landscape genetics of the Andean wax palm Ceroxylon echinulatum (Arecaceae) that occurs in two narrow bands of montane forests on each side of the Andes in Ecuador and northeastern Peru. First, we tested the hypothesis of C. echinulatum being a geographic cline species crossing the Andes in the Amotape......-Huancabamba zone (AHZ) of southern Ecuador/northern Peru, as indicated by observations on fruit morphology. Second, we assessed the timeframe of cross-Andean divergence, and third, we investigated the impact of contemporary and historical landscape features on observed spatio-genetic patterns. Individual...

  5. Climbing in the high volcanoes of central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    A chain of volcanoes extends across central Mexico along the 19th parallel, a line just south of Mexico City. The westernmost of these peaks is Nevado de Colima at 4,636 feet above sea level. A subsidiary summit of Nevado de Colima is Volcan de Colima, locally called Fuego (fire) it still emits sulphurous fumes and an occasional plume of smoke since its disastrous eruption in 1941. Parictuin, now dormant, was born in the fall of 1943 when a cornfield suddenly erupted. Within 18 months, the cone grew more than 1,700 feet. Nevado de Toluca is a 15,433-foot volcanic peak south of the city of Toluca. Just southeast of Mexico City are two high volcanoes that are permanently covered by snow: Iztaccihuatl (17,342 fet) and Popocatepetl (17,887 feet) Further east is the third highest mountain in North America: 18,700-foot Citlateptl, or El Pico de Orizaba. North of these high peaks are two volcanoes, 14, 436-foot La Malinche and Cofre de Perote at 14,048 feet. This range of mountains is known variously as the Cordillera de Anahuac, the Sierra Volcanica Transversal, or the Cordillera Neovolcanica. 

  6. Two Extreme Climate Events of the Last 1000 Years Recorded in Himalayan and Andean Ice Cores: Impacts on Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, L. G.; Mosley-Thompson, E. S.; Davis, M. E.; Kenny, D. V.; Lin, P.

    2013-12-01

    In the last few decades numerous studies have linked pandemic influenza, cholera, malaria, and viral pneumonia, as well as droughts, famines and global crises, to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Two annually resolved ice core records, one from Dasuopu Glacier in the Himalaya and one from the Quelccaya Ice Cap in the tropical Peruvian Andes provide an opportunity to investigate these relationships on opposite sides of the Pacific Basin for the last 1000 years. The Dasuopu record provides an annual history from 1440 to 1997 CE and a decadally resolved record from 1000 to 1440 CE while the Quelccaya ice core provides annual resolution over the last 1000 years. Major ENSO events are often recorded in the oxygen isotope, insoluble dust, and chemical records from these cores. Here we investigate outbreaks of diseases, famines and global crises during two of the largest events recorded in the chemistry of these cores, particularly large peaks in the concentrations of chloride (Cl-) and fluoride (Fl-). One event is centered on 1789 to 1800 CE and the second begins abruptly in 1345 and tapers off after 1360 CE. These Cl- and F- peaks represent major droughts and reflect the abundance of continental atmospheric dust, derived in part from dried lake beds in drought stricken regions upwind of the core sites. For Dasuopu the likely sources are in India while for Quelccaya the sources would be the Andean Altiplano. Both regions are subject to drought conditions during the El Niño phase of the ENSO cycle. These two events persist longer (10 to 15 years) than today's typical ENSO events in the Pacific Ocean Basin. The 1789 to 1800 CE event was associated with a very strong El Niño event and was coincidental with the Boji Bara famine resulting from extended droughts that led to over 600,000 deaths in central India by 1792. Similarly extensive droughts are documented in Central and South America. Likewise, the 1345 to 1360 CE event, although poorly documented

  7. POPULATION STRUCTURE AND DEMOGRAPHY OF THE PALM Wettinia kalbreyeri FROM AN ANDEAN MONTANE FOREST OF COLOMBIA ESTRUCTURA POBLACIONAL Y DEMOGRAFÍA DE LA PALMA MACANA Wettinia kalbreyeri EN UN BOSQUE ALTOANDINO DE COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Esteban Lara Vásquez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Wettinia kalbreyeri is a monoecious palm distributed on the Andean highland forests from Colombia and Ecuador with high ecological and economical value. For several decades, its populations have been intensively harvested, which caused a significant decrease of its natural stocks. However, no research has been done yet on the regeneration and dynamics of this important species. In order to get critical information for its management, we characterized the life cycle and surveyed for one year an undisturbed natural forest dominated by this palm in the Western Cordillera of Colombia. We established 10 permanent plots (0.1- ha each and evaluated the structure and population dynamics with a matrix model structured by sizes. We found a high density of individuals up to 50 cm- height (129.520 ± 72.701 ha-1; the density of adult palms was also high (768 ± 263 ha-1, with an average basal area of 21.34 ± 8.84 m² ha-1. Population growth was positive during the period evaluated (l = 1.079; results of the elasticity analysis suggest that changes of adult density could severely impact the population dynamics. Because of the high temporal variability of natural populations, a longer monitoring time is important to improve the reliability of estimates.Resumen. Wettinia kalbreyeri es una palma monoica de los bosques altoandinos de Colombia y Ecuador, con un alto valor ecológico y económico. Durante varias décadas sus poblaciones han sido aprovechadas intensivamente, lo cual generó una notable disminución de sus existencias naturales. Sin embargo, hasta ahora no se ha realizado ningún trabajo sobre la regeneración y dinámica de esta importante especie. Con el fin de acopiar información fundamental para su manejo, se caracterizó su ciclo de vida y se monitoreó durante un año un bosque natural no intervenido dominado por esta palma en la cordillera occidental de Colombia. Para ello se establecieron 10 parcelas permanentes de crecimiento de

  8. Rediscovery of the Endangered frog Phrynopus montium (Shreve, 1938) Amphibia, Anura, Craugastoridae) in the cloud forest of central Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Rudolf VON

    2017-10-24

    Phrynopus montium (Shreve, 1938) was described from Cascas, Junín Department, Peru, at an undetermined elevation between 3000 and 4000 m a.s.l. in the Cordillera Central. With the exception of the type specimens used in the original description, no additional sightings of P. montium had been reported for 76 years. Additionally, its coloration in life, microhabitat use, and precise elevational distribution remained unknown. During a field expedition conducted in 2014, two individuals of P. montium were found at an upper cloud forest site in central Peru, 8.7 km south from Hacienda Cascas. Here, I describe the coloration in life, microhabitat use, and elevation of these individuals.

  9. Projected distribution shifts and protected area coverage of range-restricted Andean birds under climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica del Rosario Avalos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study we projected the effect of anthropogenic climate change in endemic and restricted-range Andean bird species that spread out from the center of Bolivia to southeastern Peru. We also analyzed the representation of these species in protected areas. The ensemble forecasts from niche-based models indicated that 91–100% of species may reduce their range size under full and no dispersal scenarios, including five species that are currently threatened. The large range reduction (average 63% suggests these mountain species may be threatened by climate change. The strong effects due to range species losses are predicted in the humid mountain forests of Bolivia. The representation of bird species also decreased in protected areas. Partial gap species (94–86% are expected to increase over the present (62%. This suggests climate change and other non-climate stressors should be incorporated in conservations plans for the long-term persistence of these species. This study anticipates the magnitude of shifts in the distribution of endemic birds, and represents in the study area the first exploration of the representation of range-restricted Andean birds in protected areas under climate change.

  10. Two new trans-Andean species of Imparfinis Eigenmann & Norris, 1900 (Siluriformes: Heptapteridae from Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Ortega-Lara

    Full Text Available Two new species of Imparfinis are described from the trans-Andean region of Colombia. Imparfinis timana is diagnosed by having longer anal fin base (12.4-15.5% in SL, in combination with long adipose fin (24.6-31.3% in SL, 5-6 gill rakers on the first ceratobranchial, 42-43 vertebrae and additional measurements. Imparfinis usmai is distinguished by the combination of first ray of dorsal fin longest, but not projected as a long filament, long adipose fin (21.1-27.0% in SL, maxillary barbel exceeding pelvic-fin base, 39-40 vertebrae, upper caudal-fin lobe pointed and longer than lower lobe, lower lobe rounded, 7-8 gill rakers on the first ceratobranchial, as well as additional measurements. Imparfinis timana is only known from río Guarapas, a small tributary of the upper course of the río Magdalena. Imparfinis usmai is broadly distributed in the upper basin of ríos Cauca and Magdalena, and in the lower Patía river basin. The restricted distribution of I. nemacheir to trans-Andean drainages (Atrato, Magdalena, and Lago de Maracaibo is also discussed.

  11. The Andean Paepalanthus pilosus complex (Eriocaulaceae): a revision with three new taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensold, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    A herbarium-based revision is provided for Paepalanthus pilosus and allies, five commonly confused species of cushion plants native to Andean paramo. These are placed in the recircumscribed Paepalanthus subsect. Cryptanthella Suess. The group includes Paepalanthus pilosus, Paepalanthus dendroides, and Paepalanthus lodiculoides. An additional two species and one variety are newly described: Paepalanthus caryonauta, Paepalanthus huancabambensis, and Paepalanthus pilosus var. leoniae. The latter two are Peruvian endemics, while Paepalanthus caryonauta is known from four countries, and has long been confused with other species. An additional, possibly undescribed taxon is noted from the Serrania de Perijá, Colombia. Five new synonyms and three lectotypes are proposed, and the common misapplication of some names is noted. Within the Paepalanthus pilosus complex, species differences were found in timing of peduncle elongation, sex ratio, and leaf, perianth, diaspore and nectary morphology. Ecological differences are suggested by specimen data and a review of ecological literature. Descriptions, photographs and maps are provided for all species, as is a key to the groups of eriocaulaceous cushion plants from Andean South America.

  12. Recognizing rural territorial heritage: characterization of Andean tuber production systems in Boyacá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clavijo Ponce Neidy Lorena

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available

    In the municipalities Ventaquemada and Turmequé (Boyacá- Colombia, we identified 20 small agricultures by their production systems including the following Andean tubers: Ullucus tuberosus Caldas (ulluco, Oxalis tuberosa Molina (oca, and Tropaeolum tuberosum R. & P. (Mashua, which were important in their family meals and culture, however, their use has declined and the area has not seen research and development processes that provide alternatives for handling, conservation, use and marketing, and now are at the risk of disappearing. This research conducted participatory assessment processes for the characterization of production systems and initiated reassessment processes of territorial heritage, identifying common sub-farm agrobiodiversity and projects for these traditional Andean tuber crops in order to enhance the special and knowhow knowledge surrounding the production.

  13. Research Priorities for the Conservation and Sustainable Governance of Andean Forest Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah-Lan Mathez-Stiefel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The long-term survival of Andean forest landscapes (AFL and of their capacity to contribute to sustainable development in a context of global change requires integrated adaptation and mitigation responses informed by a thorough understanding of the dynamic and complex interactions between their ecological and social components. This article proposes a research agenda that can help guide AFL research efforts for the next 15 years. The agenda was developed between July 2015 and June 2016 through a series of workshops in Ecuador, Peru, and Switzerland and involved 48 researchers and development experts working on AFL from different disciplinary perspectives. Based on our review of current research and identification of pressing challenges for the conservation and sustainable governance of AFL, we propose a conceptual framework that draws on sustainability sciences and social–ecological systems research, and we identify a set of high-priority research goals and objectives organized into 3 broad categories: systems knowledge, target knowledge, and transformation knowledge. This paper is intended to be a reference for a broad array of actors engaged in policy, research, and implementation in the Andean region. We hope it will trigger collaborative research initiatives for the continued conservation and sustainable governance of AFL.

  14. A new species of Silvinichthys (Siluriformes, Trichomycteridae) lacking pelvic fins from mid-elevation localities of the southern Andes, with comments on the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, L; Sanabria, E A; Quiroga, L B; Vari, R P

    2014-02-01

    Silvinichthys huachi new species, is described from a stream along the lower slope of the Andean Cordillera in the Provincia de San Juan, Argentina. It shares the distinctive modifications characteristic of Silvinichthys, but is distinguished from the four previously described congeners by the combination of a lack of the pelvic fin and the pelvic girdle, details of pigmentation and various meristic and morphometric features. Silvinichthys huachi is apparently endemic to the type locality situated within an arid region of western central Argentina in the Andino Cuyana Province. Major gaps in the range of species of Silvinichthys may indicate that the origin of the genus predates the uplift events that subdivided drainages along the eastern slopes of the Andean Cordillera in west central Argentina. Silvinichthys huachi is hypothesized to be the sister species of Silvinichthys bortayro. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  15. Phenolic compound contents and antioxidant activity in plants with nutritional and/or medicinal properties form the Peruvian Andean region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chirinos, R.; Pedreschi Plasencia, R.P.; Rogez, H.

    2013-01-01

    Total phenolic compounds (TPC) and antioxidant activities using different assays (DPPH, ABTS and ORAC) in fruits, grains, leaves, seeds, roots and tubers from 27 different Peruvian Andean plants used in folk medicine or/and as food by the native population were evaluated in order to use these as

  16. Studies on Colombian cryptogams. IIA. Hepaticae – Oil body structure and ecological distribution of selected species of tropical Andean Jungermanniales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradstein, S.R.; Cleef, A.M.; Fulford, M.H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper is the second (Florschütz & Florschütz-de Waard 1974) in the series of reports on cryptogams of Colombia, especially the high Andean bryophytes and lichens, in the framework of recent phytosociological and ecological studies in the area by A. M. Cleef and T. van der Hammen (Amsterdam) and

  17. Response of the Andean diversity panel to root rot in a root rot nursery in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Andean Diversity Panel (ADP) was evaluated under low-fertility and root rot conditions in two trials conducted in 2013 and 2015 in Isabela, Puerto Rico. About 246 ADP lines were evaluated in the root rot nursery with root rot and stem diseases caused predominantly by Fusarium solani, which cause...

  18. Solar UVR-induced DNA damage and inhibition of photosynthesis in phytoplankton from Andean lakes of Argentina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villafane, VE; Buma, AGJ; Boelen, P; Helbling, EW

    2004-01-01

    During January 1999, studies were carried out in temperate lakes of the Andean region of Argentina (41degreesS, 71degreesW) to determine the short-term effects of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280-400 nm) upon natural phytoplankton assemblages. Organisms from one 'clear' (Lake Moreno) and two

  19. Contextual Analysis of the Decision To Adopt a Regional Satellite System: The Case of the Andean CONDOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Leonardo; Mody, Bella

    Acknowledging the importance of communications in economic development, this paper discusses the rationale behind the decision of the Andean Pact nations of Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela to develop a regional satellite communication system to be known as CONDOR. The application of contextual theorizing to the decision-making…

  20. Carbon storage and long-term rate of accumulation in high-altitude Andean peatlands of Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.A. Hribljan; D.J. Cooper; J. Sueltenfuss; E.C. Wolf; K.A. Heckman; Erik Lilleskov; R.A. Chimner

    2015-01-01

    The high-altitude (4,500+ m) Andean mountain range of north-western Bolivia contains many peatlands. Despite heavy grazing pressure and potential damage from climate change, little is known about these peatlands. Our objective was to quantify carbon pools, basal ages and long-term peat accumulation rates in peatlands in two areas of the arid puna ecoregion of Bolivia:...

  1. Extensional Detachment faulting in melange rocks. Plurikilometres migration by W the External Zone (Cordillera Bética, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, Francisco Javier; Azañon, Jose Miguel; Rodríguez, Jose; Mateos, Rosa Maria

    2014-05-01

    The synthesis and correlation of units carried out in the continuous geological map (Roldán et al., 2012), has revealed a fragmentation of the carbonate outcrops belong to the Subbetic Domain (García-Hernández et al., 1980). Subbetic NW verging thrust and fold axial traces have not lateral continuity and Jurassic carbonate outscrops appear as klippes on the olistotromic unit. These ductile structures that can be observed in the internal structure of these jurassic blocks are unrelated to the brittle-ductile deformation bands observed at the basal pelitic levels. Basal detachments are rooted in: a) the Olistostromic unit, a Upper Langhian-Lower Serravallian breccia constituted by gypsum-bearing clay and marls; b) Cretaceous-Tertiary marly sedimentary rocks (Rodríguez-Fernández, et al., 2013) . In both kind of rocks, cataclastic structures allows to infer a top-to-the WSW displacement. Paleostress measurements, made on these detachments levels, are compatible with a extensional regime (Roldán et al., 2012). At the same time, the analysis and interpretation of subsurface data (seismic surveys and borehole testing) shows that the Subbetic Domain (External Subbetic, Molina 1987) are affected by westward low-angle normal faults. A balanced cross-section, based on morphological and cartographic data in the area between Sierra de Cabra and Sierra de Alta Coloma (Valdepeñas de Jaén), shows plurikilometric displacements which has been produced during Late Serravallian-Early Tortonian times. References: García-Hernández, M., López-Garrido, A.C., Rivas, P., Sanz de Galdeano, C., Vera, J.A. (1980): Mesozoic paleogeographic evolution of the zones of the Betic Cordillera. Geol. Mijnb. 59 (2). 155-168. Molina, J.M. (1987). Análisis de facies del Mesozoico en el Subbético. Tesis Doctoral, Univ. Granada. 518 p. Rodríguez-Fernández, J., Roldán, F. J., Azañón, J.M. y García-Cortés, A. (2013). El colapso gravitacional del frente orogénico a lpino en el Dominio Subb

  2. Ancient DNA reveals temporal population structure within the South-Central Andes area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, M Gabriela; Mendisco, Fanny; Avena, Sergio A; Crespo, Cristian M; Arencibia, Valeria; Dejean, Cristina B; Seldes, Verónica

    2018-04-01

    The main aim of this work was to contribute to the knowledge of pre-Hispanic genetic variation and population structure among the South-central Andes Area by studying individuals from Quebrada de Humahuaca, North-western (NW) Argentina. We analyzed 15 autosomal STRs in 19 individuals from several archaeological sites in Quebrada de Humahuaca, belonging to the Regional Developments Period (900-1430 AD). Compiling autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y-chromosome data, we evaluated population structure and differentiation among eight South-central Andean groups from the current territories of NW Argentina and Peru. Autosomal data revealed a structuring of the analyzed populations into two clusters which seemed to represent different temporalities in the Andean pre-Hispanic history: pre-Inca and Inca. All pre-Inca samples fell into the same cluster despite being from the two different territories of NW Argentina and Peru. Also, they were systematically differentiated from the Peruvian Inca group. These results were mostly confirmed by mitochondrial and Y-chromosome analyses. We mainly found a clearly different haplotype composition between clusters. Population structure in South America has been mostly studied on current native groups, mainly showing a west-to-east differentiation between the Andean and lowland regions. Here we demonstrated that genetic population differentiation preceded the European contact and might have been more complex than thought, being found within the South-central Andes Area. Moreover, divergence among temporally different populations might be reflecting socio-political changes occurred in the evermore complex pre-Hispanic Andean societies. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Antisana volcano: A representative andesitic volcano of the eastern cordillera of Ecuador: Petrography, chemistry, tephra and glacial stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Minard L.; Mothes, Patricia A.; Samaniego, Pablo; Militzer, Annemarie; Beate, Bernardo; Ramón, Patricio; Robin, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Antisana volcano is representative of many active andesitic strato-volcanoes of Pleistocene age in Ecuador's Eastern Cordillera. This study represents the first modern geological and volcanological investigation of Antisana since the late 1890's; it also summarizes the present geochemical understanding of its genesis. The volcano's development includes the formation and destruction of two older edifices (Antisana I and II) during some 400 + ka. Antisana II suffered a sector collapse about 15,000 years ago which was followed by the birth and growth of Antisana III. During its short life Antisana III has generated ≥50 eruptions of small to medium intensity, often associated with andesitic to dacitic lava flows and tephra, as well as with late Pleistocene and Holocene glacial advances. Throughout its long history Antisana's lavas have been characterized by a persistent mineral assemblage, consisting of 30-40 vol% phenocrysts of plagioclase, both clino- and orthopyroxene, and Fe-Ti oxides, with rare occurrences of olivine or amphibole, frequently in a microcrystalline to glassy matrix. This uniformity occurs despite the magma's progressive chemical evolution over ≥400 ka from early basic andesites (53-58 wt% SiO2) to intermediate and Si-rich andesites (58-62% SiO2), and recently to dacites (63-67% SiO2). Chemical diagrams suggest that crystal fractionation was the most likely magmatic process of evolution. The exception to this slowly evolving history was the short-lived emission at ∼210 ka of the Cuyuja lavas from Antisana II that generated a 73 km long andesitic lava flow. Contrasting with Antisana's general magmatic trend, Cuyuja lava (∼11 km3) is a high-Mg andesite with unusually high concentrations of incompatible elements. Antisana developed within the Chacana caldera complex, a large active siliceous center that began ∼3 Ma ago, however its lavas are chemically distinct from coeval lavas of Chacana.

  4. Monitoring tropical debris-covered glacier dynamics from high-resolution unmanned aerial vehicle photogrammetry, Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigmore, Oliver; Mark, Bryan

    2017-11-01

    The glaciers of the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, are rapidly retreating and thinning as a result of climate change, altering the timing, quantity and quality of water available to downstream users. Furthermore, increases in the number and size of proglacial lakes associated with these melting glaciers is increasing potential exposure to glacier lake outburst floods (GLOFs). Understanding how these glaciers are changing and their connection to proglacial lake systems is thus of critical importance. Most satellite data are too coarse for studying small mountain glaciers and are often affected by cloud cover, while traditional airborne photogrammetry and lidar are costly. Recent developments have made unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) a viable and potentially transformative method for studying glacier change at high spatial resolution, on demand and at relatively low cost.Using a custom designed hexacopter built for high-altitude (4000-6000 m a. s. l. ) operation, we completed repeat aerial surveys (2014 and 2015) of the debris-covered Llaca Glacier tongue and proglacial lake system. High-resolution orthomosaics (5 cm) and digital elevation models (DEMs) (10 cm) were produced and their accuracy assessed. Analysis of these datasets reveals highly heterogeneous patterns of glacier change. The most rapid areas of ice loss were associated with exposed ice cliffs and meltwater ponds on the glacier surface. Considerable subsidence and low surface velocities were also measured on the sediments within the pro-glacial lake, indicating the presence of extensive regions of buried ice and continued connection to the glacier tongue. Only limited horizontal retreat of the glacier tongue was observed, indicating that measurements of changes in aerial extent alone are inadequate for monitoring changes in glacier ice quantity.

  5. Post-harvest practices linked with ochratoxin A contamination of coffee in three provinces of Cordillera Administrative Region, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelo, Jonathan M; Barcelo, Racquel C

    2018-02-01

    One of the emerging concerns in the Cordillera Administrative Region, Philippines is ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination in coffee. During 2015 to 2016, a total of 51 Arabica (Coffea arabica) coffee samples from Benguet province and 71 Robusta (Coffea canephora var. Robusta) coffee samples from the provinces of Ifugao and Kalinga were analysed for OTA contamination. The OTA-producing fungal contaminants during drying and storage of Arabica and Robusta coffee were Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus ochraceus. Ochratoxin A was more commonly detected in Robusta coffee (36.6%) than in Arabica coffee (21.6%). Among the contaminated samples, Robusta coffee cherries in the drying yard had the highest mean OTA level (120.2 μg kg -1 , n = 10) while roasted Robusta coffee beans had the lowest mean level (4.8 μg kg -1 , n = 9). The onset of contamination of Arabica coffee occurred during storage, with a mean OTA level of 46.7 μg kg -1 (n = 9). Roasted coffee had lower OTA content although five samples had levels >5.0 μg kg -1 . Pearson Chi-square analysis (χ 2 ) and Fisher's exact test revealed that several post-harvest practices involving non-removal of the husk or hull and mixing of defective coffee were significantly associated with the occurrence of OTA during drying and storage (p coffee in all stages of post-harvest and rapid reduction of moisture content particularly during drying.

  6. Monitoring tropical debris-covered glacier dynamics from high-resolution unmanned aerial vehicle photogrammetry, Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Wigmore

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The glaciers of the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, are rapidly retreating and thinning as a result of climate change, altering the timing, quantity and quality of water available to downstream users. Furthermore, increases in the number and size of proglacial lakes associated with these melting glaciers is increasing potential exposure to glacier lake outburst floods (GLOFs. Understanding how these glaciers are changing and their connection to proglacial lake systems is thus of critical importance. Most satellite data are too coarse for studying small mountain glaciers and are often affected by cloud cover, while traditional airborne photogrammetry and lidar are costly. Recent developments have made unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs a viable and potentially transformative method for studying glacier change at high spatial resolution, on demand and at relatively low cost.Using a custom designed hexacopter built for high-altitude (4000–6000 m a. s. l.  operation, we completed repeat aerial surveys (2014 and 2015 of the debris-covered Llaca Glacier tongue and proglacial lake system. High-resolution orthomosaics (5 cm and digital elevation models (DEMs (10 cm were produced and their accuracy assessed. Analysis of these datasets reveals highly heterogeneous patterns of glacier change. The most rapid areas of ice loss were associated with exposed ice cliffs and meltwater ponds on the glacier surface. Considerable subsidence and low surface velocities were also measured on the sediments within the pro-glacial lake, indicating the presence of extensive regions of buried ice and continued connection to the glacier tongue. Only limited horizontal retreat of the glacier tongue was observed, indicating that measurements of changes in aerial extent alone are inadequate for monitoring changes in glacier ice quantity.

  7. UNA ESPECIE NUEVA DE RANA DEL GÉNERO CHIASMOCLEIS (MICROHYLIDAE: GASTROPHRYNINAE DE LA CORDILLERA DEL CÓNDOR, ECUADOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA ALMENDÁRIZ C.

    Full Text Available RESUMEN Se describe una especie nueva de rana del género Chiasmocleis de los bosques montanos del suroriente del Ecuador, en las laderas occidentales de la Cordillera del Cóndor, entre 1.025-1.630 m de altitud. En base a nuevas secuencias de ADN mitocondrial y nuclear presentamos las relaciones filogenéticas de la nueva especie y sus congéneres. La filogenia muestra una relación cercana a C. antenori, C. carvalhoi, C. magnova, y C. tridactyla. La nueva especie forma parte de un clado integrado por especies que previamente habían sido asignadas al género Syncope. Este clado es hermano de otro conformado por el resto de especies de Chiasmocleis. La nueva especie difiere de sus congéneres por su dorso café ladrillo a café obscuro (sepia cubierto por puntos diminutos blanco-amarillentos. Chiasmocleis parkeri sp. nov. se parece a Chiasmocleis antenori por la ausencia del dedo I, tanto en las manos como en los pies, pero difiere en la coloración, la disposición y tamaño de las manchas claras y la ausencia de una línea clara en la región cantal. La especie nueva presenta algunos rasgos que le distinguen de especies similares. Describimos el canto, caracterizado por tener notas sin pulsos y aportamos datos ecológicos de la localidad típica y áreas adyacentes.

  8. Preliminary Depositional and Provenance Records of Mesozoic Basin Evolution and Cenozoic Shortening in the High Andes, La Ramada Fold-Thrust Belt, Southern-Central Andes (32-33°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackaman-Lofland, C.; Horton, B. K.; Fuentes, F.; Constenius, K. N.; McKenzie, R.; Alvarado, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Argentinian Andes define key examples of retroarc shortening and basin evolution above a zone of active subduction. The La Ramada fold-thrust belt (RFTB) in the High Andes provides insights into the relative influence and temporal records of diverse convergent margin processes (e.g. flat-slab subduction, convergent wedge dynamics, structural inversion). The RFTB contains Mesozoic extensional basin strata deformed by later Andean shortening. New detrital zircon U-Pb analyses of Mesozoic rift sediments reveal: (1) a dominant Permo-Triassic age signature (220-280 Ma) associated with proximal sources of effective basement (Choiyoi Group) during Triassic synrift deposition; (2) upsection younging of maximum depositional ages from Late Triassic through Early Cretaceous (230 to 100 Ma) with the increasing influence of western Andean arc sources; and (3) a significant Late Cretaceous influx of Paleozoic (~350-550 Ma) and Proterozoic (~650-1300 Ma) populations during the earliest shift from back-arc post-extensional subsidence to upper-plate shortening. The Cenozoic detrital record of the Manantiales foreland basin (between the Frontal Cordillera and Precordillera) records RFTB deformation prior to flat-slab subduction. A Permo-Triassic Choiyoi age signature dominates the Miocene succession, consistent with sources in the proximal Espinacito range. Subordinate Mesozoic (~80-250 Ma) to Proterozoic (~850-1800 Ma) U-Pb populations record exhumation of the Andean magmatic arc and recycling of different structural levels in the RFTB during thrusting/inversion of Mesozoic rift basin strata and subjacent Paleozoic units. Whereas maximum depositional ages of sampled Manantiales units cluster at 18-20 Ma, the Estancia Uspallata basin (~50 km to the south) shows consistent upsection younging of Cenozoic populations attributed to proximal volcanic centers. Ongoing work will apply low-temperature thermochronology to pinpoint basin accumulation histories and thrust timing.

  9. The niche and phylogeography of a passerine reveal the history of biological diversification between the Andean and the Atlantic forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Arias, Natalia; Dantas, Gisele P M; Arbeláez-Cortés, Enrique; Naoki, Kazuya; Gómez, Maria I; Santos, Fabricio R; Miyaki, Cristina Y; Aleixo, Alexandre; Tubaro, Pablo L; Cabanne, Gustavo S

    2017-07-01

    The Atlantic Forest is separated from the Andean tropical forest by dry and open vegetation biomes (Chaco and Cerrado). Despite this isolation, both rainforests share closely related lineages, which suggest a past connection. This connection could have been important for forest taxa evolution. In this study, we used the Saffron-billed Sparrow (Arremon flavirostris) as a model to evaluate whether the Andean and the Atlantic forests act as a refugia system, as well as to test for a history of biogeographic connection between them. In addition, we evaluated the molecular systematic of intraspecific lineages of the studied species. We modeled the current and past distribution of A. flavirostris, performed phylogeographic analyses based on mitochondrial and nuclear genes, and used Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) analyses to test for biogeographic scenarios. The major phylogeographic disjunction within A. flavirostris was found between the Andean and the Atlantic forests, with a divergence that occurred during the Mid-Pleistocene. Our paleodistribution models indicated a connection between these forest domains in different periods and through both the Chaco and Cerrado. Additionally, the phylogeographic and ABC analyses supported that the Cerrado was the main route of connection between these rainforests, but without giving decisive evidence against a Chaco connection. Our study with A. flavirostris suggest that the biodiversity of the Andean and of the Atlantic forests could have been impacted (and perhaps enriched?) by cycles of connections through the Cerrado and Chaco. This recurrent cycle of connection between the Andean and the Atlantic Forest could have been important for the evolution of Neotropical forest taxa. In addition, we discussed taxonomic implications of the results and proposed to split the studied taxon into two full species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The analysis of remote sensing data to delineate landsystem tracts in proglacial valleys in the Río Santa Basin, Cordillera Blanca, Perú

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narro Perez, R. A.; Eyles, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Río Santa Basin is an important glacially-influenced basin of social, economic and cultural importance to the country of Perú. It produces a large portion of Peru's hydroelectricity, is an important agricultural area, and hosts two major mining complexes. The Río Santa receives its water from precipitation, glacial runoff from over 450 glaciers draining the Cordillera Blanca, and groundwater discharge. Despite being the largest tropical glacier ice field in the world, the area of glacial coverage in the Cordillera Blanca has decreased from 825 km2 in 1930 to 528 km2 in 2003. It is estimated that glacial runoff contributes 10-20% of the Río Santa's annual flow but during the dry season it can contribute up to 66% of water flow with groundwater supplying the remainder. The contribution of glacial meltwater makes the Río Santa less susceptible to discharge variability caused by inter-annual variation in precipitation. Due to decreased meltwater contributions, the urban centers and rural communities in the basin are expected to face severe water scarcity in the future, especially during the dry season. This poster will show the results of a remote sensing survey, using Google Earth and LiDAR data, to delineate landsystem tracts and components in several proglacial valleys in the Cordillera Blanca. The results of this survey allow detailed documentation of the geomorphological evolution of the landscape which will in turn allow a better understanding of the glacial history and subsurface geology of the area. These findings will better inform current hydrogeological models used to determine the sustainability of water resources in the Río Santa basin. Understanding the landsystem architecture, sedimentology and subsurface stratigraphy of the basin will also allow these models to more accurately predict the impact that future climate change will have on water resources and the people of the Río Santa basin.

  11. Una especie nueva de rana arbórea del género Hyloscirtus (Amphibia: Anura: Hylidae de la Cordillera del Cóndor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Almendáriz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Las ranas ecuatorianas del género Hyloscirtus incluyen 16 especies descritas, de las cuales 11 pertenecen al grupo H. larinopygion. Su distribución se limita a los flancos de la Cordillera de los Andes, tanto al oriente como al occidente. Una evaluación de la herpetofauna en el sector meridional de la Cordillera del Cóndor (bosques montanos sobre mesetas de arenisca en la provincia de Zamora Chinchipe, Ecuador, condujo al descubrimiento de una especie nueva del grupo que describimos aquí como Hyloscirtus condor sp. nov.; se analizan los renacuajos, las llamadas de anuncio y se estima las relaciones filogenéticas de la especie nueva y de las especies relacionadas en base a nuevas secuencias de los genes mitocondriales 12S, tRNA Val y 16S, con un total de hasta 2508 bp. Los resultados muestran que el grupo H. larinopygion está conformado por dos clados, uno distribuido en los Andes norte y centro de Ecuador y el otro al sur. La nueva especie pertenece al clado sur y es hermana de H. tapichalaca y de una especie aparentemente no descrita de la Provincia Morona Santiago. La especie nueva difiere de sus congéneres por su patrón de coloración dorsal, que consiste de puntos amarillo obscuro en un fondo canela. Es la especie más grande del grupo H. larinopygion y comparte con H. tapichalaca la presencia de una espina prepólica grande y curvada y brazos hipertrofiados. La especie nueva habita un área remota y bien conservada de la Cordillera del Cóndor. El descubrimiento de ésta y otras especies nuevas del mismo lugar denota la importancia biológica del área y motivan al desarrollo de planes de conservación.

  12. Two new cis-Andean species of the South American catfish genus Megalonema allied to trans-Andean Megalonema xanthum, with description of a new subgenus (Siluriformes: Pimelodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Lundberg

    Full Text Available A revised diagnosis of the pimelodid catfish genus Megalonema is given based on synapomorphic features of the Weberian complex and gas bladder. Megalonema xanthum from the Magdalena River is redescribed. Two new cis-Andean species of Megalonema are described, M. amaxanthum n. sp. from the Amazon River basin, and M. orixanthum n. sp. from the Orinoco River basin. These three species are differentially diagnosed by shape and size of the supraoccipital posterior process, adipose-fin shape, vertebral counts, eye size, premaxillary bone shape and dentition, length of the anal-fin base, width between the posterior nostrils and presence/absence of dentations on the pectoral spine. Eretmomegalonema new subgenus is established for M. xanthum, M. amaxanthum and M. orixanthum and supported by the uniquely synapomorphic paddle-like structure of its pelvic fin and hypertrophied basipterygium. Unambiguous synapomorphies indicate a sister-group relationship between M. amaxanthum and M. orixanthum, with M. xanthum basal to this pair. This topology is congruent with the Neogene origins of separate Magdalena, Amazon and Orinoco basins suggesting vicariant control of diversification of Eretmomegalonema.

  13. Evaluation of an Andean common bean reference collection under drought stress Evaluation of an Andean common bean reference collection under drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez Vega Juan Carlos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available

    More than 60% of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. production worldwide is impacted by the risk of drought. In this study, the goal was to evaluate 64 bush bean genotypes from the CIAT reference collection to identify possible sources of drought resistance in the Andean gene pool. Phenotypic traits such as yield, 100-seed weight (P100 and days to physiological maturity (Dpm were evaluated on selected accessions of this collection which was grown in an 8x8 lattice with two repetitions under three environments: intermittent drought (SI and irrigation (R in Palmira as well as early drought (ST in Darién, Colombia. The genotypes included 20 from the Nueva Granada 1 (NG1 sub-race, 19 from the Nueva Granada 2 (NG2 sub-race, 10 from race Peru (P, 14 Andean control genotypes and one Mesoamerican check. The variables were analyzed through a combined ANOVA across environments, while simple correlations between yield and others variables were determinate. The genotypes with better adaptation to drought showed higher yields, 100-seed weight and fewer days to physiological maturity. The coefficients of correlations among yield and 100-seed weight were significant and positive, while Dpm showed negative correlation. Fourteen genotypes were identified as drought tolerant: G4001, G5625, G6639, G16115, G17070, G18255, G21210 and G22247 from the NG1 sub-race; G5708, G14253, G18264 and LRK31 from the NG2 sub-race; and DRK47 and G22147 from race Peru.

  14. X-ray color maps of the zoned garnets from Silgará Formation metamorphic rocks,SantanderMassif, Eastern Cordillera (Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takasu Akira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The metamorphic rocks of the Lower Paleozoic Silgará Formation of the Santander Massif, Eastern Cordillera (Colombia, were affected by a Barrovian-type metamorphism under low to high temperature and medium pressure conditions. These rocks contain garnet porphyroblasts, which show several kinds of chemical zoning patterns. The garnet grains behave as closed systems with respect to the rock matrix. Most of the observed zoning patterns are due to gradual changes in physicochemical conditions during growth. However, some garnet grains show complex zoning patterns during multiple deformation and metamorphic events.

  15. Estudio preliminar de la mineralización uranífera en la cordillera oriental, San Ramón, Oxapampa

    OpenAIRE

    Valencia, Jacinto

    2014-01-01

    Rocas intrusivas del magmatismo permo-triásico de la cordillera oriental, constituidas por granitos de San Ramón y Oxapampa, presentan buena favorabilidad como rocas fértiles en uranio, un granito de facie roja denominado monzo-granito; esta condición es el resultado de la ejecución del proyecto de cooperación del OIEA PER 2/16, a cargo de IPEN, “Mejora del conocimiento del potencial uranífero del Perú”. Los trabajos de campo han consistido en la revisión geológico-radiométrica y toma de mues...

  16. La intrusión de Cerro Redondo (Pérmico Inferior, Cordillera Ibérica, Zaragoza): reconstrucción 3D y modelo de emplazamiento

    OpenAIRE

    Majarena Serrano, Urbez; Gil Imaz, Andrés; Lago San José, Marceliano; Galé, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    La intrusión subvolcánica de Cerro Redondo (Cordillera Ibérica, Zaragoza), de edad Pérmico Inferior, muestra una composición dactíca, una naturaleza calcoalcalina y se caracteriza por presentar una marcada estructuración interna determinada por un bandeado subvertical y d e espaciado variable (1-25 cm), que se encuentra afectado por numerosos pliegues d e flujo magmático de distinta escala (desde centimétrica hasta hectométrica). El estudio cartográfico y de la anisotropia de la susceptib...

  17. Ecological Resilience and Resistance in the Hyper Diverse Forests on the Eastern Andean Flank (Mera, Ecuador)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, H. F.; Gosling, W. D.; Montoya, E.; Sherlock, S.; Mothes, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Today the Neotropics contain some of the world's most biodiverse and threatened ecosystems. Sediments obtained from two radiocarbon infinite (>48,000 years) stratigraphic sections on the eastern Andean flank, provide new insight into the relationship between biodiversity and disturbance during the Pleistocene (~200,000 years). Pollen analysis of modern and fossil material indicates that hyper diverse forest vegetation has been a feature of the Andean flank landscape for 100,000 years (pollen richness: modern = 44, fossil = 48). Correlation of past vegetation with disturbance events (volcanic and fluvial) indicates the response of hyper-diverse forest to past landscape scale change. Pollen records from near Mera (01°27 S, 78°06 W; 1117 m asl) indicate two major changes in the pollen assemblage, with forest communities dominated by: i) Hedyosmum-Alnus-Ilex, and ii) Combretaceae-Melastomataceae-Myrtaceae. These two pollen assemblages most closely resemble modern vegetation cloud forest (2500-3400m asl) and lower montane rain forest (700-2499 m asl) respectively. Sedimentary evidence suggests that at least 21 volcanic events and three changes in the local fluvial regime perturbed the regional landscape during the period of deposition. However, there is no evidence for volcanic or fluvial disturbance events causing a persistent change in vegetation community. Volcanic events (tephra deposits) are associated with increased fire (charcoal particles), and changes in vegetation (pollen grains); however, within ~50cm of sediment accumulation above each tephra, pollen assemblages revert to pre-deposition compositions. Increased fluvial influence (gravel deposits) is associated with elevated input of pollen from taxa today found at higher elevations (Podocarpus-Celtis). The input of high elevation taxa concomitant with fluvial deposits is most likely indicative of an increase in long-distance transport of pollen along water courses originating in the Andes. Our data indicate

  18. Constuccion social de comuninad y migración en Usibamba : un estudio sobre el impacto de los procesos de globalización en los Andes centrales del Perú

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilvonio Perez, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The research for the thesis was conducted in the village of Usibamba, located in a high-Andean area called Alto Cunas east from the Mantaro Valley in the Peruvian Central Andes. Special attention was paid to the institutional context and the everyday life conditions in which the social construction

  19. Active transpressional tectonics in the Andean forearc of southern Peru quantified by 10Be surface exposure dating of an active fault scarp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavente, Carlos; Zerathe, Swann; Audin, Laurence; Hall, Sarah R.; Robert, Xavier; Delgado, Fabrizio; Carcaillet, Julien; Team, Aster

    2017-09-01

    Our understanding of the style and rate of Quaternary tectonic deformation in the forearc of the Central Andes is hampered by a lack of field observations and constraints on neotectonic structures. Here we present a detailed analysis of the Purgatorio fault, a recently recognized active fault located in the forearc of southern Peru. Based on field and remote sensing analysis (Pléiades DEM), we define the Purgatorio fault as a subvertical structure trending NW-SE to W-E along its 60 km length, connecting, on its eastern end, to the crustal Incapuquio Fault System. The Purgatorio fault accommodates right-lateral transpressional deformation, as shown by the numerous lateral and vertical plurimetric offsets recorded along strike. In particular, scarp with a 5 m cumulative throw is preserved and displays cobbles that are cut and covered by slickensides. Cosmogenic radionuclide exposure dating (10Be) of quartzite cobbles along the vertical fault scarp yields young exposure ages that can be bracketed between 0 to 6 ka, depending on the inheritance model that is applied. Our preferred scenario, which takes in account our geomorphic observations, implies at least two distinct rupture events, each associated with 3 and 2 m of vertical offset. These two events plausibly occurred during the last thousand years. Nevertheless, an interpretation invoking more tectonic events along the fault cannot be ruled out. This work affirms crustal deformation along active faults in the Andean forearc of southern Peru during the last thousand years.

  20. Sediment provenance in contractional orogens: The detrital zircon record from modern rivers in the Andean fold-thrust belt and foreland basin of western Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaldi, Tomas N.; Horton, Brian K.; McKenzie, N. Ryan; Stockli, Daniel F.; Odlum, Margaret L.

    2017-12-01

    This study analyzes detrital zircon U-Pb age populations from Andean rivers to assess whether active synorogenic sedimentation accurately records proportional contributions from varied bedrock source units across different drainage areas. Samples of modern river sand were collected from west-central Argentina (28-33°S), where the Andes are characterized by active uplift and deposition in diverse contractional provinces, including (1) hinterland, (2) wedge-top, (3) proximal foreland, and (4) distal broken foreland basin settings. Potential controls on sediment provenance were evaluated by comparing river U-Pb age distributions with predicted age spectra generated by a sediment mixing model weighted by relative catchment exposure (outcrop) areas for different source units. Several statistical measures (similarity, likeness, and cross-correlation) are employed to compare how well the area-weighted model predicts modern river age populations. (1) Hinterland basin provenance is influenced by local relief generated along thrust-bounded ranges and high zircon fertility of exposed crystalline basement. (2) Wedge-top (piggyback) basin provenance is controlled by variable lithologic durability among thrust-belt bedrock sources and recycled basin sediments. (3) Proximal foreland (foredeep) basin provenance of rivers and fluvial megafans accurately reflect regional bedrock distributions, with limited effects of zircon fertility and lithologic durability in large (>20,000 km2) second-order drainage systems. (4) In distal broken segments of the foreland basin, regional provenance signatures from thrust-belt and hinterland areas are diluted by local contributions from foreland basement-cored uplifts.

  1. Isotopic clues to magmatic source regions for neogene Andean volcanic rocks in the El Teniente area near 38oS latitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, Suzanne Mahlburg; Kurtz, A.C

    2001-01-01

    The origin of isotopic variations in Central Andean arc lavas is a long-standing problem that involves identifying mantle and crustal source regions. Advances have come from analyzing temporal and spatial variations in constrained tectonic settings. The purpose here is to highlight the similarities of temporal variations in an east-west transect of Neogene magmatic units near 34 O S latitude with those from a south-north transect along the modern Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ, e.g. Hildreth and Moorbath 1988, Tormey et al. 1991). The comparison shows the importance of crustal thickening processes associated with compressional shortening and of lithospheric scale adjustments associated with eastward migration of the arc front on magma sources. Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic analyses of 27 Neogene volcanic and plutonic samples from the El Teniente area are presented in Table 1 and plotted along with some analyses from Skewes and Stern (1994) and Stern and Skewes (1995) in Figure 2. The data show a clear progression from older samples with more 'depleted' isotopic signatures (lower 87 Sr/ 86 Sr and Pb isotopic ratios, higher εNd) to younger samples with more 'enriched' signatures (higher 87 Sr/ 86 Sr and Pb isotopic ratios, lower εNd). In detail, four temporal and spatial groups marked by discontinuities in isotopic trends can be defined. Within each group, εNd tends to decrease and 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios to increase with SiO2 concentration (au)

  2. Subadult scurvy in Andean South America: Evidence of vitamin C deficiency in the late pre-Hispanic and Colonial Lambayeque Valley, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Haagen D

    2014-06-01

    Scurvy is a disease caused by vitamin C deficiency and is a key paleopathological indicator of subadult health and nutritional status in the past. Yet, little is known about scurvy in human remains from South America and the Peruvian Central Andes in particular. In the Lambayeque Valley Complex on the north coast of Peru, a sample of 641 archaeologically recovered subadults (A.D. 900-1750) were scored for the skeletal manifestations of vitamin C deficiency, testing the hypotheses that scurvy was common in this region and that prevalence increased following European contact. The findings reveal only five convincing cases of scurvy; overall prevalence appears extremely low, and scurvy did not become perceptibly more common following conquest. Of diagnostic interest, complex ectocranial vascular impressions were documented in two cases. Though rarely attributed to scurvy, examination suggests they formed during scorbutic episodes. Another Colonial Period subadult may demonstrate comorbidity between scurvy and rickets. This work also provides new questions for the investigation of scurvy in Andean South America. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Voices and Agencies in the Education of Young Rural Andean Women: A Qualitative Look

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Alvarado

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study describes the voices and agencialities of female rural Andean students enrolled in high school. The study explores how educational practices and discourses in the school and family context impact these young women’s voices and agencialities. Also analyzed are the actions they are taking to change their existing situation. The post-structural approach and theories of resistance, voice and power inform the literature review and analysis of the study, which describes the many educational and sociocultural obstacles the young women face: an educational curriculum not adapted to their needs, untrained teachers with low expectations for their students’ future, and an educational environment that silences their voices. The results show that despite of all obstacles, these women have a firm determination to seek a different future, rather than live under the oppressive patriarchal cycle their mothers and female relatives have endured.

  4. ANDEAN COSMOLOGY AND RELIGION: A HISTORICAL DYNAMICS OF ENCOUNTERS, MISSED CONNECTIONS AND REUNIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avelar Araujo Santos Junior

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Religiosity of contemporary Andean indigenous peoples is constituted by a complex interaction between theology and the original items from the Christianized and ideologies historically produced phenomena such as taxation, interpenetration, removal, syncretism, resistance and reinvention. Embedded in this context was developed as a way of enhancing identity particular worldview is quite representative of their feelings and attitudes about the world, mainly in what it says respect to their territory and their community experiences and patterns of reciprocity in the socialization of traditions. Thus, our proposal in this article is to analyze some of the different elements of the symbolic representation, mythological and ritualistic of these communities, characterized by persistent conflict between a hegemonic dominance of the creative and creative autonomy.

  5. Collaborative networks and patent production in Andean Community of Nations universities (UCANS, 2005-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Enrique Agüero Aguilar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The competitiveness and technological development of a region are measured by the degree of innovation supporting them. The quantity and quality of patents generated and applied in production dynamics serve as an element for evaluation. In this sense, universities play a role as generators and transmitters of knowledge. So it is important to identify the level of their collaboration and the trends in terms of technology application in order to establish future policies for development in this sector. This article identifies the degree of collaboration, types of patents, actors (primary and secondary and dynamics of patents produced at the Andean Community of Nations universities during the period 2005-2015 and present in the European Patent Office database. In conclusion, there is a great disparity between CAN universities regarding patent production, so it is necessary to strengthen the collaborative level among universities in this community. Nevertheless, an increase is seen in the production of patents.

  6. The Sabethines of Northern Andean Coffee-Growing Regions of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suaza-Vasco, Juan; López-Rubio, Andrés; Galeano, Juan; Uribe, Sandra; Vélez, Iván; Porter, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Sampling for sabethine mosquitoes occurred intermittently from September 2007 to April 2013 in 17 municipalities, located in 5 departments (divisions) in the northern Andean coffee-growing regions of Colombia. Of the 9 genera within the Sabethini tribe known to occur in the Neotropical region, 6 were encountered including 15 species: Jonhbelkinia ulopus, Limatus durhamii, Sabethes ignotus, Sa. luxodens, Sa. undosus, Shannoniana fluviatilis, Trichoprosopon compressum, Tr. digitatum, Tr. evansae, Tr. pallidiventer s.l., Tr. pallidiventer s.s., Wyeomyia arthrostigma, Wy. oblita, Wy. ulocoma, and Wy. undulata. The species Sa. luxodens and Wy. undulata constitute new records for Colombia. These records broaden the knowledge of this important group that includes some important species related to the arbovirus transmission. Records are from the northern Colombian Andes, a region noted for coffee cultivation and ecotourism.

  7. Diversity and ecological ranges of plant species from dry inter-Andean valleys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Catalina

    and neighboring habitats like mountain forests, páramos, Pacific and Amazonian lowlands. No prior study of dry valleys anywhere in the Neotropics has explored how species are shared with other habitats. 4) This paper presents a spatial hierarchical prioritization analysis for 95 species of DIAVs vegetation......Dry valleys in the American Andes and other mountains have provided excellent agricultural lands since millennia. Besides agriculture, wood extraction and the establishment of urban areas have diminished the native vegetation of these valleys. Consequently the original vegetation is now mostly...... found on steep slopes and in ravines. These areas of original dry valley vegetation preserve many wild relatives of cultivated plants on the one hand and old lineages of other wild plant groups. Dry inter-Andean valleys (DIAVs) in Ecuador therefore makeup a biodiversity hot spot for both plants...

  8. Diversity patterns, environmental drivers and changes in vegetation composition in dry inter-Andean valleys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Catalina; Girardello, Marco; Barfod, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Aims We studied diversity, patterns of endemism and turnover of vegetation composition in dry inter-Andean valleys (DIAVs) where little is known about the influence of the abiotic drivers controlling plant species composition and occurrences, and the life forms that contribute most to α- and β......-diversity correlated with latitude? (iii) what are the major environmental drivers controlling spatial patterns in species composition and occurrence? Methods We established 63 transects of 5 × 100 m in areas with DIAV vegetation, impacted as little as possible by human activities. In each transect, all mature trees...... results further highlight the influence of disturbance, water availability and low temperature on plant species composition and occurrence. We also found significant, contrasting patterns in responses to environmental drivers, when analyzing our data separately by life form. Our results show...

  9. "It Is Not Natural Anymore": Nutrition, Urbanization, and Indigenous Identity on Bolivia's Andean Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipus, Adam C; Leon, Juan S; Calle, Susana C; Andes, Karen L

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this article was to characterize how urbanization and indigenous identity shape nutrition attitudes and practices in El Alto, a rapidly urbanizing and predominantly indigenous (Aymara) community on Bolivia's Andean plateau. We took a qualitative ethnographic approach, interviewing health care providers ( n = 11) and conducting focus groups with mothers of young children ( n = 4 focus groups with 25 mothers total [age = 18-43 years, 60% Aymara]). Participants generally described their urban environment as being problematic for nutrition, a place where unhealthy "junk foods" and "chemicals" have supplanted healthy, "natural," "indigenous" foods from the countryside. Placing nutrition in El Alto within a broader context of cultural identity and a struggle to harmonize different lifestyles and worldviews, we propose how an intercultural framework for nutrition can harmonize Western scientific perspectives with rural and indigenous food culture.

  10. [Microarthropods from the altiplanic andean steppe, with focus on oribatid species (Oribatida: Acarina)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarrubias, Rene

    2009-01-01

    In soils under seven types of high altitude, native vegetation and one plantation in the northernmost Chilean Altiplanic region, 20 microarthropod orders or suborders were found, including 21 oribatid mite species. Seven of these species are first mentioned for Chile. No oribatid mites were found in soils far from vegetation. Data are given as average densities (n masculine ind./1000 ml), accounting for plant preference, geographical distribution and updated taxonomic status for each species. Ten oribatid species form a group of Andean altiplanic steppe fauna also found in Peru and Bolivia. Other three species have been also found in different austral ecosystems in Argentina, and a group of eight species seems to be cosmopolitan.

  11. History aspects and ecology of the biodiversity nor Andean and Amazonic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Hammen, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    The mega-biodiversity of the neotropics is type result of the geological and environmental history. A considerable biodiversity, higher than at present, existed in the Miocene in the low-elevation tropics. The progressive upheaval of the Andes created new life zones that were populated by adaptive evolution and immigration from the austral-Antarctic and laurasiatic-holartic regions. The cooling of the earth during the Neogene and the glacial- interglacial cycles of the quaternary, and the consonant changes of temperature and rainfall, in combination with the topography, had a profound effect on vegetation, flora and fauna, the distribution of species and endemism, both in the low tropical area and in the Andean zones. Presently there is a positive relation of species-density with temperature (altitude) and with rainfall, and partly with relative humidity

  12. Traditional use of the Andean flicker (Colaptes rupicola as a galactagogue in the Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Froemming Steve

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper explores the use of the dried meat and feathers of the Andean Flicker (Colaptes rupicola to increase the milk supply of nursing women and domestic animals in the Andes. The treatment is of preColumbian origin, but continues to be used in some areas, including the village in the southern Peruvian highlands where I do ethnographic research. I explore the factors giving rise to and sustaining the practice, relate it to other galactagogues used in the Andes and to the use of birds in ethnomedical and ethnoveterinary treatments in general, and situate it within the general tendency in the Andes and elsewhere to replicate human relations in the treatment of valuable livestock. The bird's use as a galactagogue appears to be motivated by both metaphorical associations and its perceived efficacy, and conceptually blends human and animal healthcare domains.

  13. Ultrasound agitated phytofabrication of palladium nanoparticles using Andean blackberry leaf and its photocatalytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brajesh Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this report, ultrasonication and Andean blackberry leaf extract are employed for the fabrication of palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs; and further evaluated its photocatalytic activity against methylene blue (MB. The as-synthesized PdNPs were characterized using UV–visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Dynamic light scattering (DLS and X-ray diffraction (XRD. TEM analysis demonstrated the formation of decahedron shape PdNPs with a diameter of 55–60 nm and XRD confirmed its crystalline nature. It showed photocatalytic decomposition of MB (>72%, k = 0.002164 min−1, 10 mg/L in an aqueous solution under solar light irradiation. From the results obtained it is suggested that ultrasound agitated aqueous leaf extract demonstrates a simple, rapid, inexpensive method and should be utilized in future as green technology for the fabrication of nanoparticles.

  14. Attitudes towards Human Papilloma Virus Vaccination in the Latin American Andean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oroma Nwanodi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This commentary explores the distribution of human papilloma virus (HPV and HPV-related diseases, and factors affecting attitudes towards HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination in the Latin American Andean region. Lack of knowledge of HPV, known negative attitudes or incorrect assumptions about HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination provide a basis upon which to develop targeted HPV awareness and preventive health media campaigns. For maximal effect, media campaigns should use the internet, radio, and television to address health care providers, parents, and students. Additional programming can be developed for clinics to use in-house with their clients. Ministries of Education, Finance, and Health all have roles to play to increase national HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination awareness.

  15. International comparison of resistance thermometers between NMIs from Spain, Mexico and Andean countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Campo, D.; Ruiz, V. C.; Méndez-Lango, E.; Córdova, L.; von Borries, E.; Sánchez, C. A.; Arévalo, A.; Aguilera, B.; Guillén, E.; Cabrera, C.; Quintana, L.

    2013-09-01

    An international comparison on semi-standard Platinum Resistance Thermometers (PRTs) among the National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) of Spain, Mexico and the Andean Countries (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela) began in 2004 and was successfully completed in 2005. Two PRTs were circulated (hand carried) and compared from -40 °C up to 250 °C. The Centro Español de Metrología (Spanish NMI), CEM, was the pilot laboratory and the Centro Nacional de Metrología (Mexican NMI), CENAM, was the co-pilot laboratory. This paper shows the details of the comparison and the final results as they were presented in the approved final report of the comparison in September of 2005.

  16. Variable structural controls through time in the Southern Central Andes (~36°S Controles estructurales variables en el tiempo en los Andes Centrales Australes (~36°S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío L Orts

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Southern Central Andes at 36°S have been recognized as an orogenic belt where contraction, accommodated mainly by basement structures, is associated with the inversion of a Late Triassic-Early Jurassic extensional detachment. Based on a structural cross-section, constrained by field data, 2D seismic and bore-hole information, and the processing of Bouger anomalies, we propose a polyphasic tectonic evolution. In the westernmost sector, along the axis of the Cordillera, NW to NNW basement structures were inverted, being a first order control in the generation of frontal narrow N-trending thin-skinned belts. This slip transfer is controlled by the Late Jurassic main detachment. These structures have low gravity anomalies that cross obliquely the main Andean trend. East of this inversion domain, beneath the frontal thin-skinned belts, seismic information reveals that Late Triassic wedge-like depocenters did not experience substantial inversion. To the east double-vergent basement blocks define the Andean emergent orogenic front at these latitudes. These contractional structures truncate gravity anomalies defined by basement discontinuities, indicating that they are not related to tectonic inversion, in contraposition to the westernmost domain. Two contractional phases were distinguished. The oldest is Late Cretaceous in age, as inferred from onlap relations in Upper Cretaceous strata identified in seismic lines. These successions have a maximum age of 97 Ma as inferred by U-Pb in detrital zircons published in previous studies in the area. Contrastingly, the easternmost sector was mainly deformed in Late Miocene times as inferred from less than 18 Ma old synorogenic deposits. Moreover, contractional mechanisms varied through time for each specific sector. While Late Cretaceous contractional tectonics was generated by tectonic inversion and subordinate thin-skinned deformation, it is proposed that Late Miocene deformation was controlled mainly by

  17. Acceleration and novelty: community restoration speeds recovery and transforms species composition in Andean cloud forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah Jane; Rhemtulla, Jeanine M

    2016-01-01

    Community-based tropical forest restoration projects, often promoted as a win-win solution for local communities and the environment, have increased dramatically in number in the past decade. Many such projects are underway in Andean cloud forests, which, given their extremely high biodiversity and history of extensive clearing, are understudied. This study investigates the efficacy of community-based tree-planting projects to accelerate cloud forest recovery, as compared to unassisted natural regeneration. This study takes place in northwest Andean Ecuador, where the majority of the original, highly diverse cloud forests have been cleared, in five communities that initiated tree-planting projects to restore forests in 2003. In 2011, we identified tree species along transects in planted forests (n = 5), naturally regenerating forests (n = 5), and primary forests (n = 5). We also surveyed 120 households about their restoration methods, tree preferences, and forest uses. We found that tree diversity was higher in planted than in unplanted secondary forest, but both were less diverse than primary forests. Ordination analysis showed that all three forests had distinct species compositions, although planted forests shared more species with primary forests than did unplanted forests. Planted forests also contained more animal-dispersed species in both the planted canopy and in the unplanted, regenerating understory than unplanted forests, and contained the highest proportion of species with use value for local people. While restoring forest increased biodiversity and accelerated forest recovery, restored forests may also represent novel ecosystems that are distinct from the region's previous ecosystems and, given their usefulness to people, are likely to be more common in the future.

  18. Phlebotomine sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in a sub-Andean forest from the Norte de Santander, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos-López, Richard; Bolaños, Rafael; Contreras-Gutierrez, MarIa; Carrero-Sarmiento, Diego

    2016-03-01

    The recognition of communities of arthropods with medical importance in natural systems constitutes an important step in the prediction of possible epidemic events and/or emergence of infectious diseases in the human population. This is due to anthropogenic impact in natural areas and landscape modification, which changes the dynamics of pathogenic agents, reservoirs, and vector insects. In this study, an inventory was compiled of species of the genus Lutzomyia present in sub-Andean forest from the confluence of the Pamplonita River basin. CDC-light and Shannon traps were used for collecting adult phlebotomine sandflies during the month of October 2013 in a sub-Andean forest from river basin Pamplonita. All specimens were identified using morphological keys. The epidemiological relevance of each species was reported using a literature review about natural infection or vector incrimination with Leishmania species or other pathogens microorganism. A total of 2755 specimens belonging to eight species of the genus Lutzomyia were collected. Out of the eight species, seven belonged to the group verrucarum (Lutzomyia sp--townsendi series, L. ovallesi, L. spinicrassa, L. serrana, L. townsendi, L. nuneztovari and L. pia), while one belonged to the subgenus Helcocyrtomyia (L. hartmanni). A new registry of L. townsendi was observed for the Norte de Santander department. The appreciable diversity of the verrucarum group observed in this area suggest further investigation on the biogeography and evolution of this group, and epidemiological risk for human populations around this area, as there are reports of Leishmania natural infection and favourable conditions for domestication of phlebotomines in rural towns.

  19. Phytosynthesis and photocatalytic activity of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles using the Andean blackberry leaf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Brajesh; Smita, Kumari; Cumbal, Luis; Debut, Alexis; Galeas, Salome; Guerrero, Victor H.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a simple, low cost, and ecofriendly synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles (Fe 3 O 4 NPs) has been developed using Andean blackberry leaf extract. UV–vis spectroscopy technique were used to study the initial formation of Fe 3 O 4 NPs. Morphology, crystallinity and surface properties of nanoparticles were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Thermal gravimetric (TG) techniques. TEM and DLS characterization indicated the formation of spherical Fe 3 O 4 NPs of average size 54.5 ± 24.6 nm. XRD and FTIR studies confirmed the existence of the cubic spinel phase of Fe 3 O 4 NPs and Fe−O peak at 570 cm −1 , whereas TG analysis indicated that the nanoparticles contain 94% metal and 6% capping ligand. It has been observed that, as-synthesized Fe 3 O 4 NPs exhibited photocatalytic activity for degradation of organic dyes such as methylene blue (k = 0.0105475 min −1 ), congo red (k = 0.0043240 min −1 ), and methyl orange (k = 0.0028930 min −1 ), efficiently. The antioxidant activity of Fe 3 O 4 NPs against 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl were also evaluated. - Highlights: • We report extracellular phytosynthesis of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles using the Andean blackberry leaf. • The synthesized Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles are spherical and average size is 54.5 ± 24.6 nm. • It showed enhanced photocatalytic activity and weak antioxidant efficacy. • Environmentally benign, non-toxic and cost-effective method is suggested.

  20. Effects of Flat Slab Subduction on Andean Thrust Kinematics and Foreland Basin Evolution in Western Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, B. K.; Fuentes, F.; McKenzie, N. R.; Constenius, K. N.; Alvarado, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    Debate persists over the effects of flat-slab subduction on the kinematics of overriding plate deformation and the evolution of retroarc sedimentary basins. In western Argentina, major spatial and temporal variations in the geometry of the subducting Nazca slab since ~15 Ma provide opportunities to evaluate the late Cenozoic response of the Andean fold-thrust belt and foreland basin to subhorizontal subduction. Preliminary results from several structural and sedimentary transects spanning the frontal thrust belt and foreland basin system between 31°S and 35°S reveal Oligocene-middle Miocene hinterland exhumation during normal-slab subduction followed thereafter by progressive slab shallowing with initial rapid cratonward propagation of ramp-flat thrust structures (prior to basement-involved foreland uplifts) and accompanying wholesale exhumation and recycling of the early Andean foreland basin (rather than regional dynamic subsidence). Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronologic data prove instrumental for revealing shifts in thrust-belt exhumation, defining depositional ages within the foreland basin, and constraining the timing of activity along frontal thrust structures. In both the San Juan (31-32°S) and Malargüe (34-35°S) segments of the fold-thrust belt, geochronological results for volcaniclastic sandstones and syndeformational growth strata are consistent with a major eastward advance in shortening at 12-9 Ma. This episode of rapid thrust propagation precedes the reported timing of Sierras Pampeanas basement-involved foreland uplifts and encompasses modern regions of both normal- and flat-slab subduction, suggesting that processes other than slab dip (such as inherited crustal architecture, critical wedge dynamics, and arc magmatism) are additional regulators of thrust-belt kinematics and foreland basin evolution.

  1. Thoracic skeletal morphology and high-altitude hypoxia in Andean prehistory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Karen J

    2007-09-01

    Living humans from the highland Andes exhibit antero-posteriorly and medio-laterally enlarged chests in response to high-altitude hypoxia. This study hypothesizes that morphological responses to high-altitude hypoxia should also be evident in pre-Contact Andean groups. Thoracic skeletal morphology in four groups of human skeletons (N = 347) are compared: two groups from coastal regions (Ancón, Peru, n = 79 and Arica, Chile, n = 123) and two groups from high altitudes (San Pedro de Atacama, Chile, n = 102 and Machu Picchu and Cuzco, Peru, n = 43). Osteometric variables that represent proportions of chest width and depth include sternal and clavicular lengths and breadths and rib length, curvature, and area. Each variable was measured relative to body size, transformed into logarithmic indices, and compared across sex-specific groups using ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests. Atacama highlanders have the largest sternal and clavicular proportions and ribs with the greatest area and least amount of curvature, features that suggest an antero-posteriorly deep and mediolaterally wide thoracic skeleton. Ancón lowlanders exhibit proportions indicating narrower and shallower chests. Machu Picchu and Cuzco males cluster with the other highland group in rib curvature and area at the superior levels of the thorax, whereas chest proportions in Machu Picchu and Cuzco females resemble those of lowlanders. The variation in Machu Picchu and Cuzco males and females is interpreted as the result of population migrations. The presence of morphological traits indicative of enlarged chests in some highland individuals suggests that high-altitude hypoxia was an environmental stressor shaping the biology of highland Andean groups during the pre-Contact period. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Assessment of the Brainstem-Mediated Stapedius Muscle Reflex in Andean Children Living at High Altitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, S Allen; Buchanan, Leo H; Ortega, Fernando; Jacobs, Anthony B; Laurell, Göran

    2017-03-01

    Counter, S. Allen, Leo H. Buchanan, Fernando Ortega, Anthony B. Jacobs, and Göran Laurell. Assessment of the brainstem-mediated stapedius muscle reflex in Andean children living at high altitudes. High Alt Med Biol. 18:37-45, 2017.-This study examined the physiological thresholds, amplitude growth, and contraction duration of the acoustic stapedius reflex (ASR) in Andean children aged 2-17 years living at altitudes of 2850 m (Altitude I Group) and 3973 m (Altitude II Group) as part of a general medical assessment of the health status of the children. The brainstem-mediated ASR reveals the integrity of the neuronal components of the auditory reflex arc, including the cochlea receptors, eight cranial nerves, and brainstem neural projections to the cochlear nuclei, bilateral superior olivary nuclei, facial nerve nuclei, and facial nerve and its stapedius branch. Uncrossed (ipsilateral) and crossed (contralateral) ASR thresholds (ASRT), ASR amplitude growth (ASRG) function, and ASR muscle contraction duration (decay/fatigue) (ASRD) were measured noninvasively with 500, 1000 Hz and broadband (bandwidth = 125-4000 Hz) noise stimulus activators using a middle ear immittance system. Oxygen saturation (SaO 2 ) level and heart rate were measured in a subsample of the study group. Statistical analyses revealed that the Altitude I and Altitude II groups had ASRT, ASRG function, and ASRD rates comparable to children at sea level and that the two groups were not significantly different for any of the ASR measures. No significant association was found between SaO 2 or heart rate and ASRT, growth, and muscle fatigue rate. In conclusion, the assessment of the ASR in children in the high-altitude groups revealed normal function. Furthermore, the results indicate no adverse oto-physiological effects of altitude on the brainstem-mediated ASR at elevations between 2850 and 4000 m and suggest normal middle ear and auditory brainstem function.

  3. Inorganic mercury (Hg2+ uptake by different plankton fractions of Andean Patagonian lakes (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diéguez M.C.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The species composition and the size structure of natural planktonic food webs may provide essential information to understand the fate of mercury and, in particular, the bioaccumulation pattern of Hg2+ in the water column of lake ecosystems. Heterotrophic and autotrophic picoplankton and phytoplankton are the most important entry points for Hg in aquatic ecosystems since they concentrate Hg2+ and MeHg from ambient water, making them available to planktonic consumers at higher trophic levels of lake food webs. In this investigation we studied the uptake of 197Hg2+ in natural plankton assemblages from four Andean lakes (Nahuel Huapi National Park, Patagonia, Argentina, comprised in the size fractions 0.2-2.7 μm (picoplankton, 0.2-20 μm (pico and nanoplankton and 20-50 μm (microplankton through experiments using Hg2+ labeled with 197Hg2+. The experimental results showed that the uptake of Hg2+ was highest in the smallest plankton fractions (0.2-2.7 μm and 0.2-20 μm compared to the larger fraction comprising microplankton (20-50 um. This pattern was consistent in all lakes, reinforcing the idea that among pelagic organisms, heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria with the contribution of nanoflagellates and dinoflagellates constitute the main entry point of Hg2+ to the pelagic food web. Moreover, a significant direct relationship was found between the Hg2+ uptake and surface index of the planktonic fractions (SIf. Thus, the smaller planktonic fractions which bore the higher SI were the major contributors to the Hg2+ passing from the abiotic to the biotic pelagic compartments of these Andean lakes.

  4. TREATMENT SUCCESS IN THREE ANDEAN BEARS (TREMARCTOS ORNATUS) WITH ALOPECIA SYNDROME USING OCLACITINIB MALEATE (APOQUEL®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Gabby J; Nuttall, Tim; López, Javier; Magnone, William; Leclerc, Antoine; Potier, Romain; Lécu, Alexis; Guézénec, Maëlle; Kolter, Lydia; Nicolau, Amélie; Lemberger, Karin; Pin, Didier; Cosgrove, Sallie B

    2017-09-01

    Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus) alopecia syndrome (ABAS) commonly affects captive bears, particularly sexually mature females. ABAS is characterized by bilaterally symmetrical predominantly flank alopecia with or without profound pruritus and secondary bacterial and Malassezia infections. There is no effective treatment and severely affected bears have been euthanized. This paper describes the successful management of ABAS in three female Andean bears. Skin biopsies and cytology revealed a mixed dermal inflammatory infiltrate, alopecia, hyperkeratosis, and Malassezia dermatitis. Allergen specific serology was positive for environmental allergens in one case. Hematology, serum biochemistry, and thyroid and adrenal function were normal in all cases. There was no consistent response to novel diet trials, antifungals, antihistamines, allergen specific immunotherapy, or topical antimicrobials. There was a partial response to ciclosporin (Atopica® cat, Novartis Animal Health; 5 mg/kg po, sid) in one case and oral glucocorticoids in all cases (dexamethasone sodium phosphate, [Colvasone 0.2%, Norbrook], 0.15 mg/kg po, sid or prednisolone [Deltacortene, Bruno Farmaceutici, and Megasolone 20, Coophavet], 0.3-1.2 mg/kg po, sid), but treatment was withdrawn following adverse effects. Treatment with oclacitinib maleate (Apoquel®, Zoetis; 0.46-0.5 mg/kg po, bid) resulted in rapid and complete resolution of the pruritus with subsequent improvement in demeanor and fur regrowth. After 5 mo, the bears were almost fully furred and off all other medication. Treatment was tapered to the lowest dose that prevented relapse of the pruritus (0.23-0.4 mg/kg po, sid). No adverse effects have been noted. ABAS is usually an intractable condition, and, to our knowledge, oclacitinib is the first treatment shown to result in sustained clinical improvement. Further studies on the etiology of ABAS, and on efficacy and long-term safety of oclacitinib are needed.

  5. Genome-Wide Association Study of Anthracnose Resistance in Andean Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grady H Zuiderveen

    Full Text Available Anthracnose is a seed-borne disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and the pathogen is cosmopolitan in distribution. The objectives of this study were to identify new sources of anthracnose resistance in a diverse panel of 230 Andean beans comprised of multiple seed types and market classes from the Americas, Africa, and Europe, and explore the genetic basis of this resistance using genome-wide association mapping analysis (GWAS. Twenty-eight of the 230 lines tested were resistant to six out of the eight races screened, but only one cultivar Uyole98 was resistant to all eight races (7, 39, 55, 65, 73, 109, 2047, and 3481 included in the study. Outputs from the GWAS indicated major quantitative trait loci (QTL for resistance on chromosomes, Pv01, Pv02, and Pv04 and two minor QTL on Pv10 and Pv11. Candidate genes associated with the significant SNPs were detected on all five chromosomes. An independent QTL study was conducted to confirm the physical location of the Co-1 locus identified on Pv01 in an F4:6 recombinant inbred line (RIL population. Resistance was determined to be conditioned by the single dominant gene Co-1 that mapped between 50.16 and 50.30 Mb on Pv01, and an InDel marker (NDSU_IND_1_50.2219 tightly linked to the gene was developed. The information reported will provide breeders with new and diverse sources of resistance and genomic regions to target in the development of anthracnose resistance in Andean beans.

  6. Diversification rates, host plant shifts and an updated molecular phylogeny of Andean Eois moths (Lepidoptera: Geometridae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Strutzenberger

    Full Text Available Eois is one of the best-investigated genera of tropical moths. Its close association with Piper plants has inspired numerous studies on life histories, phylogeny and evolutionary biology. This study provides an updated view on phylogeny, host plant use and temporal patterns of speciation in Eois. Using sequence data (2776 bp from one mitochondrial (COI and one nuclear gene (Ef1-alpha for 221 Eois species, we confirm and reinforce previous findings regarding temporal patterns of diversification. Deep diversification within Andean Eois took place in the Miocene followed by a sustained high rate of diversification until the Pleistocene when a pronounced slowdown of speciation is evident. In South America, Eois diversification is very likely to be primarily driven by the Andean uplift which occurred concurrently with the entire evolutionary history of Eois. A massively expanded dataset enabled an in-depth look into the phylogenetic signal contained in host plant usage. This revealed several independent shifts from Piper to other host plant genera and families. Seven shifts to Peperomia, the sister genus of Piper were detected, indicating that the shift to Peperomia was an easy one compared to the singular shifts to the Chloranthaceae, Siparunaceae and the Piperacean genus Manekia. The potential for close co-evolution of Eois with Piper host plants is therefore bound to be limited to smaller subsets within Neotropical Eois instead of a frequently proposed genus-wide co-evolutionary scenario. In regards to Eois systematics we confirm the monophyly of Neotropical Eois in relation to their Old World counterparts. A tentative biogeographical hypothesis is presented suggesting that Eois originated in tropical Asia and subsequently colonized the Neotropics and Africa. Within Neotropical Eois we were able to identify the existence of six clades not recognized in previous studies and confirm and reinforce the monophyly of all 9 previously delimited

  7. Monitoring adherence to the international code of conduct: highly hazardous pesticides in central Andean agriculture and farmers' rights to health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Fadya A; Cole, Donald C; Forbes, Greg; Kroschel, Jürgen; Wanigaratne, Susitha; Arica, Denis

    2009-01-01

    The WHO has advocated monitoring adherence to the Food and Agriculture Organization's Code of Conduct to reduce use of highly hazardous pesticides in lower and middle income countries. We re-framed Code articles in terms of farmers' rights and drew on survey data, farmer focus group results, and direct observations of agrochemical stores in Ecuador and Peru to construct indicators reflecting respect for such rights. Use of highly (Ia and Ib) and moderately (II) hazardous pesticides was common. Worse indicators were observed in places with lower education, greater poverty, and more use of indigenous languages. Limited government enforcement capacity, social irresponsibility of the pesticide industry, and lack of farmers' knowledge of the Code were all factors impeding respect for farmers' rights. Addressing the power imbalance among social actors requires informed farmer and farmworker participation in monitoring adherence and active involvement of non-governmental organizations and municipal governments.

  8. Surname-inferred Andean ancestry is associated with child stature and limb lengths at high altitude in Peru, but not at sea level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Emma; Wells, Jonathan C K; Stanojevic, Sanja; Miranda, J Jaime; Moore, Lorna G; Cole, Tim J; Stock, Jay T

    2015-01-01

    Native Andean ancestry gives partial protection from reduced birthweight at high altitude in the Andes compared with European ancestry. Whether Andean ancestry is also associated with body proportions and greater postnatal body size at altitude is unknown. Therefore, we tested whether a greater proportion of Andean ancestry is associated with stature and body proportions among Peruvian children at high and low altitude. Height, head circumference, head-trunk height, upper and lower limb lengths, and tibia, ulna, hand and foot lengths, were measured in 133 highland and 169 lowland children aged 6 months to 8.5 years. For highland and lowland groups separately, age-sex-adjusted anthropometry z scores were regressed on the number of indigenous parental surnames as a proxy for Andean ancestry, adjusting for potential confounders (maternal age and education, parity, altitude [highlands only]). Among highland children, greater Andean ancestry was negatively associated with stature and tibia, ulna, and lower limb lengths, independent of negative associations with greater altitude for these measurements. Relationships were strongest for tibia length: each additional Andean surname or 1,000 m increase at altitude among highland children was associated with 0.18 and 0.65 z score decreases in tibia length, respectively. Anthropometry was not significantly associated with ancestry among lowland children. Greater Andean ancestry is associated with shorter stature and limb measurements at high but not low altitude. Gene-environment interactions between high altitude and Andean ancestry may exacerbate the trade-off between chest dimensions and stature that was proposed previously, though we could not test this directly. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The Andean hog-nosed skunk Conepatus chinga Molina, 1782 as a new definitive host for Spirometra erinacei Faust, Campbell & Kellog, 1929.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Puerta, Luis A; Ticona, Daniel S; López-Urbina, María T; González, Armando E

    2009-03-23

    This report describes the finding of Spirometra erinacei Faust, Campbell & Kellog, 1929 (Cestoda, Diphyllobothridae) infecting the small intestine of two Andean hog-nosed skunks (Conepatus chinga Molina, 1782), collected from the locality "Abra La Raya", at Cusco, Peru. Four cestodes were studied and identified as S. erinacei. This is the first report showing that the Andean hog-nosed skunk is one of the natural hosts for this parasite.

  10. Tropical Andean ecosystems and the need to keep warming limits below a +1.5°C threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Carrascal, D.; Herzog, S. K.; Guitierrez Lagoueyte, M. E.; Gonzalez-Duque, D.; Cuevas-Moreno, J.; del Valle, J. I.; Andreu-Hayles, L.; Herrera, D. A.; Martínez, R.

    2017-12-01

    Long-term climate change and rapid land-use change are synergistically threatening the integrity and functioning of tropical Andean ecosystems. The main goal of our research was to integrate climate change projections, biodiversity data and anthropogenically driven ecosystem disruption assessments to quantify the vulnerability of Andean ecosystems and species to global change at a local scale. We merged discernible trends in local quality-controlled weather station data with reanalysis data, as well as with historical and prospective simulation outputs of five well-known GCMs to assess a long-term context for the analysis of climate change exposure (temperature severity intervals). Individual, medium-term, multi-member GCM simulations included: altitude-corrected 2046-2065 (IPCC-AR4) climate change scenarios for the A1B emission scenario; and spatially-downscaled 2040-2069 (IPCC-AR5) projections for the RCP4.5. Previous studies reported mean annual temperature anomaly intervals that resulted in exceedingly high thresholds: the lowest severity interval ( +2.71°C). The least severe interval extended up to the threshold widely recognized as `dangerous' climate change, thereby leading to an underestimation of the true vulnerability of Andean species. Our analyses suggest that temperature anomalies for the full extent of the tropical Andes will likely range from low ( +2.61°C), exceeding the threshold of 'natural' climate variability (+1.78°C). Our results suggest that most species that were used as proxies of ecosystem vulnerabilities will likely experience overall low-to-medium-to-high temperature increases. Since many of them have potentially high sensitivity to such long-term changes, Andean species will likely experience greatly increases in vulnerability. The already-disrupted Andean ecosystems will suffer a further climatic stress, which will worsen the well-known detrimental synergies between climate and land-use changes. There is an imperative need to

  11. Mineralización de talco asociada a los cuerpos ultramáficos de la Faja del Río de Las Tunas, Cordillera Frontal de Mendoza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargiulo, María Florencia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Talc mineralization related to the ultramafic bodies of the Río de Las Tunas belt, Frontal Cordillera of Mendoza province. This contribution shows the main characteristics of the talc mineralization related to the Río de Las Tunas ultramafic bodies in the Salamanca Mining District, Frontal Cordillera of Mendoza province. According to the parageneses defined on the studied samples, three generations of talc were established: 1º crystallized in metaperidotites and related to the prograde stage of the regional metamorphism; 2º crystallized inreaction zones (mostly in the talc zone developed at the boundary between metaperidotites and their country-rocks.These reaction zones evidence a metasomatic process due to geochemical gradient between the ultramafic body and their country-rocks. This process was developed during the retrogression of the regional metamorphic cycle. 3º Talc present in shear-zones that cut across the ultramafic bodies. The extreme serpentinization of the ultramaficbodies is concentrated in shear-zones where the serpentine is subsequently replaced by talc ± carbonates related with a hydrothermal stage. Aqueous fluids relatively enriched in CO2 flowed through these shear-zones causing the cease of serpentine formation favoring the talc and/or carbonates. Mined talc deposits are those in shear zones and reaction zones. They are mostly industrial-, asbestine- or talcschist-type. The talc related to the hydrothermal stage can locally reach first and extra qualities.

  12. Mineralogía de los materiales de la Formación de La Viñuela (Cordilleras Béticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galán, E.

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available Mineralogy of several samples from the Viñuela Formation,Lower Burdigalian (Vélez Málaga, Cordilleras Béticas, has been studied. Materials are composed of abundant microfauna. and pebbles of micaschits, quartzites and other materials, from the Alpujárrides and Maláguides Nappes, cemented by a micritic matrix . Most samples contain zeolites (clinoptilolite, mordenite and analcime, and illite chlorite, interstratified clay minerals, montmorillonite and opal C-T. A diagenetic genesis for zeolites is suggested.

    Se ha estudiado la composición mineralógica de unas muestras de la serie tipo de la Formación de La Viñuela (norte de Vélez Málaga, Cordilleras Béticas, datadas como Burdigaliense inferior. Se trata de sedimentos marinos carbonatados micríticos, con abundante microfauna. que cementan cantos de micaesquistos, cuarcitas y otros materiales procedentes de los mantos alpujárrides y maláguides. En gran parto de estas muestras se han encontrado zeolitas (clinoptilolita, mordenita y analcima, así como illita, clorita, interestratificados, montmorillonita y ópalo C-T. Se atribuye a las zeolitas un origen diagenético.

  13. Descripción de las larvas de dos centrolénidos (Anura: Centrolenidae del noroccidente de la Cordillera Oriental, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Rada

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Se describen las larvas de dos especies de la familia Centrolenidae (Hyalinobatrachium ibama y Cochranella daidalea procedentes del flanco occidental de la cordillera Oriental en el departamento de Norte de Santander, Colombia. En la descripción de las larvas, además de las características morfológicas tradicionales, se incorporaron nuevos elementos de juicio como la longitud del tubo cloacal, la forma del rostro, el patrón de color y la posición del espiráculo, los cuales resultaron ser informativos y muy útiles en la diferenciación de las especies. Se proporciona una discusión acerca de la validez taxonómica de algunos de los caracteres morfológicos empleados usualmente en las descripciones y comparaciones de los renacuajos de la familia Centrolenidae.We describe herein the larvae of two species of the family Centrolenidae (Hyalinobatrachium ibama and Cochranella daidalea from the Department of Norte de Santander on the western flank of the Cordillera Oriental, Colombia. In order to provide an adequate description, we incorporate new elements such as: vent-tube length, snout shape, color pattern and spiracle position. A discussion about the taxonomic validity of some tadpole morphological characteristics traditionally used in descriptions and comparisons of the family Centrolenidae is provided.

  14. EXPERIENCIAS DE CORDILLERA, ECOS DE FRÍO: RELATOS CRUZADOS ENTRE CHILE Y QUITO EN EL SIGLO XVI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Vega

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available La narración de la secuencia de la conquista del Perú nos enfrenta con la fijación de dos episodios diferentes aunque articulados: la jornada a Quito de Pedro de Alvarado en 1534 y la expedición a Chile de Diego de Almagro, entre 1535 y 1536, que incluyen, ambas, una travesía cordillerana. El presente artículo discute los ecos que pueden rastrearse de los relatos acerca de estas expediciones en un conjunto de obras redactadas en torno a 1550 (Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo, Francisco López de Gómara, Pedro Cieza de León y Agustín de Zárate. A partir de convergencias y diferencias inesperadas en estos textos, se discute la importancia de la circulación oral de historias entre los conquistadores del Perú. Se plantea que la práctica social de la conversación oral permitió fijar, además de estas historias, una temprana conceptualización cristiana de los límites del Tawantinsuyu. En ella se concibió a Quito y Chile como las marcas fronterizas del espacio recién conquistado, permitiendo que ambos territorios se superpusieran al caracterizarse a partir a un mismo conjunto de imágenes sobre la experiencia de la cordillera.In the Hispanic narrative of the conquest of Peru, we can identify two different yet related episodes: Pedro de Alvarado's journey to Quito in 1534 and the expedition to Chile commanded by Diego de Almagro in 1535-1536. This article discusses the echoes than can be pinpointed in the accounts of both experiences in a corpus of texts written or printed around 1550 (Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo, Francisco López de Gómara, Pedro Cieza de León and Agustín de Zárate. By tracing unexpected similarities and differences, this proposal discusses the importance of oral circulation of histories amongst Peruvian conquistadors. The features of conversation, as a social practice, allowed the register ofan early Christian conceptualization of the Tawantinsuyu territory. Here Quito and Chile became frontier marks of the

  15. The volcaniclastic sequence of Aranzazu: Record of the impact of volcanism on Neogene fluvial system in the middle part of the Central Cordillera, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrero Pena, Carlos Alberto; Rosero Cespedes, Juan Sebastian; Valencia M, Julian David; Pardo Trujillo, Andres

    2008-01-01

    The volcaniclastic sequence of Aranzazu (VSA, late Pliocene - early Pleistocene?) was sourced from the northernmost sector of the Machin - Cerro Bravo volcanic complex. The volcaniclastic accumulations filled the pre-existing fault-bend depressions in the surroundings of Aranzazu town (Caldas department, Colombia). A new classification of volcaniclastic deposits is proposed, in which the lahars are defined as volcaniclastic resedimented deposits, and differentiated from the primary volcaniclastic and epiclastic deposits. The updating the sedimentology and rheology of the deposits related with the laharic events is aimed. The VSA stratigraphy is based on the lithofacies identification and the definition of the architectural elements for syn- and inter-eruptive periods. The VSA lower member corresponds to the successive aggradation of syneruptive lahars (SV and SB elements) resulted from re-sedimentation of pumice-rich pyroclastic deposits and transported as debris and hyperconcentrated stream/flood flows. The VSA middle and upper members defined by coal contents were formed during the dominion of inter-eruptive (FF element) over the syn-eruptive (SV and SB elements) periods. They were formed during the reestablishment of the fluvial condition after the syn-eruptive laharic activity. Once the fluvial deposition was strengthened, the necessary conditions for the peat formation were propitious and the coal-bearing bed sets were developed.

  16. Early Cretaceous Surtseyan volcanoes of the Baño Nuevo Volcanic Complex (Aysén Basin, Eastern Central Patagonian Cordillera, Chile)

    OpenAIRE

    DEMANT, A.; SUÁREZ, M.; DE LA CRUZ, R.; BRUGUIER, O.

    2010-01-01

    Tens of Surtseyan tuff cones are exposed in the Río Coichel valley, between Ñireguao and Estancia Baño Nuevo (Southern Chilean Andes). The Early Cretaceous products of the submarine eruptions rest on, or are interbedded with, shallow marine sandstones of the Hauterivian-early Aptian Apeleg Formation. The Early Cretaceous rocks typically contain large amphibole phenocrysts, clinopyroxene and plagioclase, and have compositions that range from relatively primitive basalts to andesites. The basal...

  17. Preliminary checklist of the vascular flora of the Sub-Andean forest at Cuchilla El Fara (Santander-Colombia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Ruth; Reina, Miriam; Herrera, Edna; Avila, Fabio Andres; Chaparro, Omar; Cortes B, Rocio

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary checklist of the vascular flora of the sub-Andean forest of the Cuchilla El Fara is present ed. El Fara is located at the Guantiva - La Rusia - Iguaque biological corridor, in the municipalities of Charala, Gambita, and Suaita (Santander-Colombia). Information on habit, local altitudinal range, and collection number is recorded for each species. A total of 409 species of vascular plants included in 226 genera, and 105 families were recorded. The families with the highest number of genera were Rubiaceae (18), Asteraceae (10), Melastomataceae (10), Orchidaceae (10), Euphorbiaceae (8), Arecaceae (7) and Fabaceae (7). At specific level, the best represented families were Rubiaceae (33), Melastomataceae (28), Lauraceae (21), Asteraceae (17), Araceae (17), Orchidaceae (17) and Gesneriaceae (15). The affinities of the flora with other Neotropical sub-Andean forests are discussed. Finally, species of all IUCN threat categories are highlighted so that the information presented here can make a contribution to restoration and conservation programs.

  18. Improvement of the Antioxidant Properties and Postharvest Life of Three Exotic Andean Fruits by UV-C Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María J. Andrade-Cuvi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Three Andean fruits naranjilla (Solanum quitoense Lam., uvilla (Physalis peruviana L., and mortiño (Vaccinium floribundum Kunth were subjected to prestorage UV-C treatments (0, 8, or 12.5 kJ m−2 and evaluated weekly to select the most suitable dose for fruit quality maintenance during storage (21 days at 6°C. The highest dose retains quality through lower deterioration index for all three fruits and was selected to further analyze the effects on physicochemical and antioxidant properties during storage. UV-C exposure delayed softening in naranjilla and increased soluble solid content in uvilla. UV-C also improved the maintenance of antioxidant capacity (AC in mortiño and uvilla. Overall, results indicate that short prestorage UV-C exposure may be an effective nonchemical approach to supplement low temperature storage, maintain quality, and extend the postharvest life of Andean naranjilla, uvilla, and mortiño fruit.

  19. The taxonomic status of two Telmatobius frog species (Anura: Telmatobiidae) from the western Andean slopes of northernmost Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibla, Pablo; Sáez, Paola A; Salinas, Hugo; Araya, Carolina; Sallaberry, Michel; Méndez, Marco A

    2017-04-06

    On the basis of molecular and morphological evidence, we evaluated the taxonomic identity of two species of Andean frogs of the genus Telmatobius: Telmatobius pefauri and T. zapahuirensis, present in the western Andean slopes at the northern extreme of Chile. We also investigated the taxonomic assignment of five populations of Telmatobius recently discovered around the type localities of these two species. The results indicate that T. pefauri inhabits, not only Murmuntani its type locality, but also the montane localities of Belén, Copaquilla, Lupica, Saxamar and Socoroma. Our study also shows that T. pefauri and T. zapahuirensis are the same taxon. Therefore, Telmatobius zapahuirensis Veloso, Sallaberry, Navarro, Iturra, Valencia, Penna & Díaz, 1982 would be a subjective junior synonym of Telmatobius pefauri Veloso & Trueb, 1976.

  20. The relative roles of vicariance versus elevational gradients in the genetic differentiation of the high Andean tree frog, Dendropsophus labialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnizo, Carlos E; Amézquita, Adolfo; Bermingham, Eldredge

    2009-01-01

    There are two main competing hypotheses (vicariance and vertical ecotones) that attempt to explain the tremendous diversity of the tropical Andes. We test these hypotheses at the intraspecific level by analyzing mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences from 24 populations of the high Andean frog, Dendropsophus labialis (Anura: Hylidae). This species displays geographic variation in a number of phenotypic traits. Most of these traits covary with elevation, while few vary along the horizontal (latitudinal) axis. We found that, both, vicariance and elevation had important effects on the genetic differentiation in this species. We detected two highly divergent clades along the south-north axis using independent information from mitochondrial and nuclear genes, suggesting that this differentiation was the result of long-term barriers to gene flow rather than stochastic processes. We hypothesize mechanisms for D. labialis strong differentiation in light of geological and paleoenvironmental models of evolution in the northern Andean highlands.

  1. Distributional patterns of living ungulates (Mammalia: Cetartiodactyla and Perissodactyla) of the Neotropical region, the South American transition zone and Andean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absolon, Bruno Araujo; Gallo, Valéria; Avilla, Leonardo S.

    2016-11-01

    To recognize the distributional patterns of living ungulates in the Neotropical region, the South American transition zone, and Andean region using the panbiogeographical method of track analysis, and to attempt to correlate these patterns with geological history. The distribution of 24 species of living ungulates (in the families Camelidae, Cervidae, Tapiridae and Tayassuidae) was studied by the panbiogeographical method of track analysis. It was performed using distributional data acquired from literature and databases of scientific institutions. Individual tracks were obtained for each species by plotting locality records on maps and connecting them by minimum-spanning trees. Generalized tracks were determined from the spatial overlap between individual tracks, indicating a common history. The intersection between generalized tracks defined a biogeographic node, implying that these locations are biogeographic composites resulting from different ancestral biotas coming into spatial contact, possibly at different geologic times. The superposition of the 24 individual tracks resulted in five generalized tracks (GTs): GT1, Mesoamerican/Choco (composed of Mazama pandora, Mazama temama, Odoicoileus virginianus and Tapirus bairdii); GT2, Northern Andes (Mazama rufina, Pudu mephistophiles and Tapirus pinchaque); GT3, Central Andes (Hippocamelus antisensis, Lama guanicoe, Mazama chunyi and Vicugna vicugna); GT4, Chilean Patagonia (Hippocamelus bisulcus and Pudu puda); and GT5, Chaco/Central west Brazil (Blastocerus dichotomus, Catagonus wagneri and Ozotocerus bezoarticus). The biogeographic node was found in the Northwestern Colombia. The geological events such as tectonism and volcanism that occurred through the Neogene and mainly in the Pleistocene caused fragmentation, diversification and endemism of biota. The biogeographic node in Colombia occurred within a zone of convergence. This node emphasized the complexity of the area and it contains biotic elements with

  2. The reconstruction of a glacial lake outburst flood using HEC-RAS and its significance for future hazard assessments: an example from Lake 513 in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Jan; Benešová, M.; Vilímek, V.; Bouška, P.; Rapre, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 3 (2014), s. 1617-1638 ISSN 0921-030X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1000 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : GLOFs * debris flow * natural hazard * HEC-RAS * Cordillera Blanca Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.719, year: 2014

  3. Comparative study of emission of pollutant gases in vehicle M1, using fuel of the Andean Community

    OpenAIRE

    Jaime Fernando Antamba Guasgua; Guillermo Gorky Reyes Campaña; Miguel Estuardo Granja Paredes

    2016-01-01

    The environmental pollution is a problematics that concerns all countries about the world as result of this pollution there take place the phenomena of climate change, greenhouse effect, acid rain, and diseases in people. To delimit the issues, there were selected the countries that integrate the Andean Community, the project goal is compare by means of static and dynamic tests the values of emission of pollutant gases, with the fuel that is distributed in each of the selected countries. The ...

  4. Hydrological differentiation and spatial distribution of high altitude wetlands in a semi-arid Andean region derived from satellite data

    OpenAIRE

    M. Otto; D. Scherer; J. Richters

    2011-01-01

    High Altitude Wetlands of the Andes (HAWA) belong to a unique type of wetland within the semi-arid high Andean region. Knowledge about HAWA has been derived mainly from studies at single sites within different parts of the Andes at only small time scales. On the one hand, HAWA depend on water provided by glacier streams, snow melt or precipitation. On the other hand, they are suspected to influence hydrology through water retention and veg...

  5. Hydrological differentiation and spatial distribution of high altitude wetlands in a semi-arid Andean region derived from satellite data

    OpenAIRE

    M. Otto; D. Scherer; J. Richters

    2011-01-01

    High Altitude Wetlands of the Andes (HAWA) are unique types of wetlands within the semi-arid high Andean region. Knowledge about HAWA has been derived mainly from studies at single sites within different parts of the Andes at only small time scales. On the one hand HAWA depend on water provided by glacier streams, snow melt or precipitation. On the other hand, they are suspected to influence hydrology through water retention and vegetation growth altering stream flow velocity. We derive...

  6. Counternarcotics Assistance: U.S. Agencies Have Allotted Billions in Andean Countries, but DOD Should Improve Its Reporting of Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Ecuador is a major transit route for cocaine produced primarily in neighboring Colombia and Peru. Since it uses the U.S. dollar as its currency , Ecuador ...recommendation. What GAO Found No single U.S. counternarcotics strategy exists for the Andean region. In each country—Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador , Peru...Years 2006-2010 30 Figure 11: Total Estimated Allotments for U.S. Counternarcotics Assistance in Ecuador , Fiscal Years 2006-2011 31 Figure 12: Kilos

  7. Taxonomic review of the species of Helina R.-D. (Diptera: Muscidae) from Andean-Patagonian forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patitucci, Luciano Damián; Mulieri, Pablo Ricardo; Mariluis, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-12

    Helina Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 is the second genus of Muscidae in terms of richness. This genus includes several species collected at high altitudes and high latitudes, and is poorly studied in the Neotropical region. Only 12 species of Helina have been recorded in the southern limit of South America in the Andean-Patagonian forests. In the present work, we studied all the species known from the Andean-Patagonian forests, with the exception of H. viola Malloch, 1934, present three new species, H. araucana sp. nov., H. dorada sp. nov., and H. ouina sp. nov., and provide the first description of the females of H. australis Carvalho & Pont, 1993 and H. rufoapicata Malloch, 1934. We also propose four new synonymies: H. nigrimana basilaris (Carvalho & Pont, 1993) and H. nigrimana grisea (Malloch, 1934) as new junior synonyms of H. nigrimana (Macquart, 1851); and H. fulvocalyptrata Malloch, 1934 and H. simplex Malloch, 1934 as new junior synonyms of H. chilensis Malloch, 1934. Finally, we provide a generic diagnosis and a new key for the Helina species of the Andean-Patagonian forests, as well as notes on the biology and distribution maps of each specimen, and discuss a preliminary contruction of groups of species.

  8. Physico-chemical and sensory properties of marmalades made from mixtures of fruits and under-exploited Andean tubers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotufo Haddad, Agustina M; Margalef, María Isabel; Armada, Margarita; Goldner, María Cristina

    2017-09-01

    This work studies the added value to the Andean tuber crops through the production of jams. The objective were: (1) to study the sensory and instrumental characteristics of dietetic marmalades made with fruits and Andean tubers; (2) to research consumer's acceptability and emotional responses; (3) to assess the relationship between sensory and instrumental variables and (4) to determine sensory, instrumental and emotional variables that influence the acceptability. Pearson's correlations showed that spreadability was the variable better predicted by sensory and instrumental ones. The analysis of variance showed that sourness increased with the increase of strawberry and the decrease of apple contents (P response and some emotions changed from one feeling to its corresponding opposite when the strawberry proportion reached 50 or 60. According to a partial least square 2 and a principal components analysis of sensory/acceptability/emotion data, 'typical', 'autochthonous', 'urban' and 'present' resulted in positive emotions which favored the consumer liking. Formulating marmalades with mixtures of fruits and Andean tubers will allow giving value-added to these crops. The elaboration of products using innovative raw materials will be an incentive for farmers to cultivate them. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. A Late Quaternary shortening rate for the frontal thrust of the Andean Precordillera north of Mendoza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S.; Kuhlmann, J.; Hetzel, R.; Mingorance, F.; Ramos, V. A.

    2009-12-01

    Although large historical earthquakes occurred in the Andean back-arc region between 28° and 34°S - for instance Mendoza was destroyed by an earthquake of magnitude MS = 7.0 in 1861 - the slip rates of active faults remain unknown. We report a slip rate for the 50-km-long Las Penas thrust, which constitutes the frontal thrust of the Precordillera. In its southern part, a well preserved fluvial terrace along La Escondida Creek (Costa et al., 2000) is displaced vertically by 10.6 ± 0.7 m as documented by several fault scarp profiles. Apart from radiocarbon dating of plant remnants, three different approaches for 10Be exposure dating have been applied to constrain the age of the terrace. Amalgamated sandstone pebbles (corrected for an inherited 10Be component using similar pebbles from the active creek) and a depth profile obtained from four sand samples yield 10Be exposure ages of 12.2 ± 1.5 and 11.3 ± 2.0 kyr, respectively. Both ages are in excellent agreement with the 14C age of 12.61 ± 0.20 cal kyr BP. In contrast, 10Be ages of five sandstone boulders vary significantly and exceed the age of the terrace by 10 to 70 kyr, which demonstrates that the widely used assumption of a negligible inherited component is not valid here. The age of the river terrace combined with the vertical fault offset yields an uplift rate of ~0.8 mm/yr for the Las Penas thrust. Combined with the fault dip of 25°, we determine a Late Quaternary horizontal shortening rate of ~1.8 mm/yr, which is about 40% of the GPS derived shortening rate of 4.5 ± 1.7 mm/yr in the back-arc region of the Andes (Brooks et al., 2003). References Brooks, B.A., Bevis, M., Smalley, R., Kendrick, E., Manceda, R., Lauria, E., Maturana, R. & Araujo, M. (2003): Crustal motion in the Southern Andes (26° - 36°S): Do the Andes behave like a microplate? Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 4 (10), pp. 14, 1085, doi 10.1029/2003GC000505. Costa, C.H., Gardini, C.E., Diederix, H., Cortés, J.M. (2000): The Andean orogenic

  10. Isotopic composition of Pb in ore deposits of the Betic Cordillera, Spain; origin and relationship to other European deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas , Antonio; Tosdal, Richard M.

    1994-01-01

    The Betic Cordillera in southern Spain is a complex Alpine fold belt that resulted from the Cretaceous through Cenozoic collision of Africa with Europe. The region is illustrative of one of the characteristics of the Alpine-Mediterranean orogen: the occurrence over a limited area of mineral deposits with a wide variety of host rocks, mineralization ages, and styles. The metamorphic basement in the Betic zone is characterized by a nappe structure of superimposed tectonostratigraphic units and consists of lower Paleozoic to Lower Triassic clastic metasedimentary rocks. This is overlain by Middle to Upper Triassic platform carbonate rocks with abundant strata-bound F-Pb-Zn-(Ba) deposits (e.g., Sierra de Gador, Sierra Alhamilla). Cretaceous to Paleogene subduction-related compression in southeastern Spain was followed by Miocene postcollisional extension and resulted in the formation of the Almeria-Cartagena volcanic belt and widespread hydrothermal activity and associated polymetallic mineralization. Typical Miocene hydrothermal deposits include volcanic-hosted Au (e.g., Rodalquilar) and Ag-rich base metal (e.g., Cabo de Gata, Mazarron) deposits as well as complex polymetallic veins, mantos, and irregular replacement bodies which are hosted by Paleozoic and Mesozoic metamorphic rocks and Neogene sedimentary and volcanic rocks (e.g., Cartagena, Sierra Almagrera, Sierra del Aguilon, Loma de Bas).Lead isotope compositions were measured on sulfide samples from nine ore districts and from representative fresh samples of volcanic and basement rock types of the region. The results have been used to evaluate ore-forming processes in southeastern Spain with emphasis on the sources of metals. During a Late Triassic mineralizing event, Pb was leached from Paleozoic clastic metasedimentary rocks and incorporated in galena in strata-bound F-Pb-Zn-(Ba) deposits ( 206 Pb/ 204 Pb = 18.332 + or - 12, 207Pb/ 204 Pb = 15.672 + or - 12, 208 Pb/ 204 Pb = 38.523 + or - 46). The second

  11. Levelling Profiles and a GPS Network to Monitor the Active Folding and Faulting Deformation in the Campo de Dalias (Betic Cordillera, Southeastern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Lechado, Carlos; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Gil, Antonio José; Borque, María Jesús; de Lacy, María Clara; Pedrera, Antonio; López-Garrido, Angel Carlos; Alfaro, Pedro; García-Tortosa, Francisco; Ramos, Maria Isabel; Rodríguez-Caderot, Gracia; Rodríguez-Fernández, José; Ruiz-Constán, Ana; de Galdeano-Equiza, Carlos Sanz

    2010-01-01

    The Campo de Dalias is an area with relevant seismicity associated to the active tectonic deformations of the southern boundary of the Betic Cordillera. A non-permanent GPS network was installed to monitor, for the first time, the fault- and fold-related activity. In addition, two high precision levelling profiles were measured twice over a one-year period across the Balanegra Fault, one of the most active faults recognized in the area. The absence of significant movement of the main fault surface suggests seismogenic behaviour. The possible recurrence interval may be between 100 and 300 y. The repetitive GPS and high precision levelling monitoring of the fault surface during a long time period may help us to determine future fault behaviour with regard to the existence (or not) of a creep component, the accumulation of elastic deformation before faulting, and implications of the fold-fault relationship. PMID:22319309

  12. Chemical classification and geotermometry of chlorites from the cretaceous Santa Rosa and Lutitas de Macanal formations, eastern emerald belt, eastern cordillera, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Arias, Alejandro; Mantilla Figueroa, Luis Carlos; Terraza Melo, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The study of the chemical composition of chlorites from the Santa Rosa and Lutitas de Macanal formations in the eastern emerald belt (eastern cordillera), are used to estimate the formation temperature of these minerals and the associated hydrothermal fluids. The chlorites were analyzed using the classification proposed by hey (1954), foster (1962), and Bailey (1980); and the formation temperature is calculated from empirical geothermometers from kranidiotis and Maclean (1987), Cathelineau (1988), Jowett (1991) and Xie et al. (1997). Chlorites in hydrothermally altered rocks associated with emerald mineralization of the Santa Rosa formation is classified as clinochlore and formed at temperatures of 354 Celsius degrade; this temperature is consistent with the fluid