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Sample records for ancient immunity gene

  1. Pathogens and host immunity in the ancient human oral cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warinner, Christina; Rodrigues, João F Matias; Vyas, Rounak;

    2014-01-01

    cavity has long served as a reservoir for bacteria implicated in both local and systemic disease. We characterize (i) the ancient oral microbiome in a diseased state, (ii) 40 opportunistic pathogens, (iii) ancient human-associated putative antibiotic resistance genes, (iv) a genome reconstruction......Calcified dental plaque (dental calculus) preserves for millennia and entraps biomolecules from all domains of life and viruses. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution taxonomic and protein functional characterization of the ancient oral microbiome and demonstrate that the oral...... of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, (v) 239 bacterial and 43 human proteins, allowing confirmation of a long-term association between host immune factors, 'red complex' pathogens and periodontal disease, and (vi) DNA sequences matching dietary sources. Directly datable and nearly ubiquitous, dental...

  2. Immunity-related genes and gene families in Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophides, George K; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Birney, Ewan; Blandin, Stephanie; Blass, Claudia; Brey, Paul T; Collins, Frank H; Danielli, Alberto; Dimopoulos, George; Hetru, Charles; Hoa, Ngo T; Hoffmann, Jules A; Kanzok, Stefan M; Letunic, Ivica; Levashina, Elena A; Loukeris, Thanasis G; Lycett, Gareth; Meister, Stephan; Michel, Kristin; Moita, Luis F; Müller, Hans-Michael; Osta, Mike A; Paskewitz, Susan M; Reichhart, Jean-Marc; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Troxler, Laurent; Vernick, Kenneth D; Vlachou, Dina; Volz, Jennifer; von Mering, Christian; Xu, Jiannong; Zheng, Liangbiao; Bork, Peer; Kafatos, Fotis C

    2002-10-01

    We have identified 242 Anopheles gambiae genes from 18 gene families implicated in innate immunity and have detected marked diversification relative to Drosophila melanogaster. Immune-related gene families involved in recognition, signal modulation, and effector systems show a marked deficit of orthologs and excessive gene expansions, possibly reflecting selection pressures from different pathogens encountered in these insects' very different life-styles. In contrast, the multifunctional Toll signal transduction pathway is substantially conserved, presumably because of counterselection for developmental stability. Representative expression profiles confirm that sequence diversification is accompanied by specific responses to different immune challenges. Alternative RNA splicing may also contribute to expansion of the immune repertoire. PMID:12364793

  3. Addiction, adolescence, and innate immune gene induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulton T Crews

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Repeated drug use/abuse amplifies psychopathology, progressively reducing frontal lobe behavioral control and cognitive flexibility while simultaneously increasing limbic temporal lobe negative emotionality. The period of adolescence is a neurodevelopmental stage characterized by poor behavioral control as well as strong limbic reward and thrill seeking. Repeated drug abuse and/or stress during this stage increase the risk of addiction and elevate activator innate immune signaling in the brain. Nuclear factor-kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB is a key glial transcription factor that regulates proinflammatory chemokines, cytokines, oxidases, proteases, and other innate immune genes. Induction of innate brain immune gene expression (e.g., NF-κB facilitates negative affect, depression-like behaviors, and inhibits hippocampal neurogenesis. In addition, innate immune gene induction alters cortical neurotransmission consistent with loss of behavioral control. Studies with anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-depressant drugs as well as opiate antagonists link persistent innate immune gene expression to key behavioral components of addiction, e.g. negative affect-anxiety and loss of frontal cortical behavioral control. This review suggests that persistent and progressive changes in innate immune gene expression contribute to the development of addiction. Innate immune genes may represent a novel new target for addiction therapy.

  4. Characterization of an ancient lepidopteran lateral gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Wheeler

    Full Text Available Bacteria to eukaryote lateral gene transfers (LGT are an important potential source of material for the evolution of novel genetic traits. The explosion in the number of newly sequenced genomes provides opportunities to identify and characterize examples of these lateral gene transfer events, and to assess their role in the evolution of new genes. In this paper, we describe an ancient lepidopteran LGT of a glycosyl hydrolase family 31 gene (GH31 from an Enterococcus bacteria. PCR amplification between the LGT and a flanking insect gene confirmed that the GH31 was integrated into the Bombyx mori genome and was not a result of an assembly error. Database searches in combination with degenerate PCR on a panel of 7 lepidopteran families confirmed that the GH31 LGT event occurred deep within the Order approximately 65-145 million years ago. The most basal species in which the LGT was found is Plutella xylostella (superfamily: Yponomeutoidea. Array data from Bombyx mori shows that GH31 is expressed, and low dN/dS ratios indicates the LGT coding sequence is under strong stabilizing selection. These findings provide further support for the proposition that bacterial LGTs are relatively common in insects and likely to be an underappreciated source of adaptive genetic material.

  5. Immune genes undergo more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes in Daphnia pulex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McTaggart Seanna J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding which parts of the genome have been most influenced by adaptive evolution remains an unsolved puzzle. Some evidence suggests that selection has the greatest impact on regions of the genome that interact with other evolving genomes, including loci that are involved in host-parasite co-evolutionary processes. In this study, we used a population genetic approach to test this hypothesis by comparing DNA sequences of 30 putative immune system genes in the crustacean Daphnia pulex with 24 non-immune system genes. Results In support of the hypothesis, results from a multilocus extension of the McDonald-Kreitman (MK test indicate that immune system genes as a class have experienced more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes. However, not all immune system genes show evidence of adaptive evolution. Additionally, we apply single locus MK tests and calculate population genetic parameters at all loci in order to characterize the mode of selection (directional versus balancing in the genes that show the greatest deviation from neutral evolution. Conclusions Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that immune system genes undergo more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes, possibly as a result of host-parasite arms races. The results of these analyses highlight several candidate loci undergoing adaptive evolution that could be targeted in future studies.

  6. Differentiation of the maize subgenomes by genome dominance and both ancient and ongoing gene loss

    OpenAIRE

    James C Schnable; Springer, Nathan M.; Freeling, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Ancient tetraploidies are found throughout the eukaryotes. After duplication, one copy of each duplicate gene pair tends to be lost (fractionate). For all studied tetraploidies, the loss of duplicated genes, known as homeologs, homoeologs, ohnologs, or syntenic paralogs, is uneven between duplicate regions. In maize, a species that experienced a tetraploidy 5–12 million years ago, we show that in addition to uneven ancient gene loss, the two complete genomes contained within maize are differe...

  7. A new trick for an ancient drug: quinine dissociates antiphospholipid immune complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezati, E; Wu, X-X; Quinn, A S; Taatjes, D J; Rand, J H

    2015-01-01

    Quinine, a quinoline derivative, is an ancient antipyretic drug with antimalarial properties that has been phased out by more effective synthetic candidates. In previous studies we discovered that hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), a synthetic antimalarial with structural similarities to quinine, reduced the binding of antiphospholipid (aPL) immune complexes to phospholipid bilayers. We performed ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies to measure the effect of quinine on dissociation of anti-β2-glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI) immune complexes. We found that quinine desorbed pre-formed β2GPI-aPL immunoglobulin (Ig)G complexes from phospholipid bilayers at significantly lower molar concentrations than HCQ. Quinine also inhibited the formation of immune complexes with a higher efficacy than HCQ at equivalent drug concentrations of 0.2 mg/ml (0.192 ± 0.025 µg/cm(2) for quinine vs. 0.352 ± 0.014 µg/cm(2) for HCQ, p quinine disintegrated immune complexes bound to planar phospholipid layers. The desorptive and inhibitory effects of the old drug, quinine, toward β2GPI-aPL IgG complexes and β2GPI were significantly more pronounced compared to the synthetic antimalarial, HCQ. The results suggest that the quinoline core of the molecule is a critical domain for this activity and that side chains may further modulate this effect. The results also indicate that there may yet be room for considering new activities of very old drugs in devising clinical trials on potential non-anticoagulant treatments for antiphospholipid syndrome (APS).

  8. Inherited variation in immune genes and pathways and glioblastoma risk

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartzbaum, Judith A.; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yanhong; Tsavachidis, Spyros; Berger, Mitchel S.; Bondy, Melissa L,; Chang, Jeffrey S.; Chang, Susan M.; Decker, Paul A.; Ding, Bo; Hepworth, Sarah J; Richard S. Houlston; Hosking, Fay J; Jenkins, Robert B.; Kosel, Matthew L.

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether inherited variations in immune function single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genes or pathways affect glioblastoma risk, we analyzed data from recent genome-wide association studies in conjunction with predefined immune function genes and pathways. Gene and pathway analyses were conducted on two independent data sets using 6629 SNPs in 911 genes on 17 immune pathways from 525 glioblastoma cases and 602 controls from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) an...

  9. Ancient homeobox gene loss and the evolution of chordate brain and pharynx development : deductions from amphioxus gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Butts, Thomas; Holland, Peter W. H.; Ferrier, David Ellard Keith

    2010-01-01

    Homeobox genes encode a large superclass of transcription factors with widespread roles in animal development. Within chordates there are over 100 homeobox genes in the invertebrate cephalochordate amphioxus and over 200 in humans. Set against this general trend of increasing gene number in vertebrate evolution, some ancient homeobox genes that were present in the last common ancestor of chordates have been lost from vertebrates. Here, we describe the embryonic expression of four amphioxus de...

  10. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A; Mann, Allison E; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T; Brandt, Bernd W; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A; MacDonald, Sandy J; Thomas, Gavin H; Collins, Matthew J; Lewis, Cecil M; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-11-13

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341-534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions.

  11. Recruitment and Remodeling of an ancient gene regulatory network during land plant evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Nuno D.; Yi, Keke; Breuninger, Holger; Catarino, Bruno; Menand, Benoît; Dolan, Liam

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of multicellular organisms was made possible by the evolution of underlying gene regulatory networks. In animals, the core of gene regulatory networks consists of kernels, stable subnetworks of transcription factors that are highly conserved in distantly related species. However, in plants it is not clear when and how kernels evolved. We show here that RSL (ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE) transcription factors form an ancient land plant kernel controlling caulonema differentiation...

  12. Ancient eudicot hexaploidy meets ancestral eurosid gene order

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Chunfang; Chen, Eric; Albert, Victor A.; Lyons, Eric; Sankoff, David

    2013-01-01

    Background A hexaploidization event over 125 Mya underlies the evolutionary lineage of the majority of flowering plants, including very many species of agricultural importance. Half of these belong to the rosid subgrouping, containing severals whose genome sequences have been published. Although most duplicate and triplicate genes have been lost in all descendants, clear traces of the original chromosome triples can be discerned, their internal contiguity highly conserved in some genomes and ...

  13. The endocrine system controlling sexual reproduction in animals: Part of the evolutionary ancient but well conserved immune system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Loof, Arnold; Schoofs, Liliane; Huybrechts, Roger

    2016-01-15

    Drastic changes in hormone titers, in particular of steroid hormones, are intuitively interpreted as necessary and beneficial for optimal functioning of animals. Peaks in progesterone- and estradiol titers that accompany the estrus cycle in female vertebrates as well as in ecdysteroids at each molt and during metamorphosis of holometabolous insects are prominent examples. A recent analysis of insect metamorphosis yielded the view that, in general, a sharp rise in sex steroid hormone titer signals that somewhere in the body some tissue(s) is undergoing programmed cell death/apoptosis. Increased steroid production is part of this process. Typical examples are ovarian follicle cells in female vertebrates and invertebrates and the prothoracic gland cells, the main production site of ecdysteroids in larval insects. A duality emerges: programmed cell death-apoptosis is deleterious at the cellular level, but it may yield beneficial effects at the organismal level. Reconciling both opposites requires reevaluating the probable evolutionary origin and role of peptidic brain hormones that direct steroid hormone synthesis. Do e.g. Luteinizing Hormone in vertebrates and Prothoracicotropic Hormone (PTTH: acting through the Torso receptor) in insects still retain an ancient role as toxins in the early immune system? Does the functional link of some neuropeptides with Ca(2+)-induced apoptosis make sense in endocrine archeology? The endocrine system as a remnant of the ancient immune system is undoubtedly counterintuitive. Yet, we will argue that such paradigm enables the logical framing of many aspects, the endocrine one inclusive of both male and female reproductive physiology.

  14. Researchers Find 8 Immune Genes in Aggressive Brain Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 159031.html Researchers Find 8 Immune Genes in Aggressive Brain Cancer Discovery might eventually lead to better ... tissue samples from 170 people with a less aggressive type of brain tumor. This led to the ...

  15. Establishing the validity of domestication genes using DNA from ancient chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girdland Flink, Linus; Allen, Richard; Barnett, Ross; Malmström, Helena; Peters, Joris; Eriksson, Jonas; Andersson, Leif; Dobney, Keith; Larson, Greger

    2014-04-29

    Modern domestic plants and animals are subject to human-driven selection for desired phenotypic traits and behavior. Large-scale genetic studies of modern domestic populations and their wild relatives have revealed not only the genetic mechanisms underlying specific phenotypic traits, but also allowed for the identification of candidate domestication genes. Our understanding of the importance of these genes during the initial stages of the domestication process traditionally rests on the assumption that robust inferences about the past can be made on the basis of modern genetic datasets. A growing body of evidence from ancient DNA studies, however, has revealed that ancient and even historic populations often bear little resemblance to their modern counterparts. Here, we test the temporal context of selection on specific genetic loci known to differentiate modern domestic chickens from their extant wild ancestors. We extracted DNA from 80 ancient chickens excavated from 12 European archaeological sites, dated from ∼ 280 B.C. to the 18th century A.D. We targeted three unlinked genetic loci: the mitochondrial control region, a gene associated with yellow skin color (β-carotene dioxygenase 2), and a putative domestication gene thought to be linked to photoperiod and reproduction (thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor, TSHR). Our results reveal significant variability in both nuclear genes, suggesting that the commonality of yellow skin in Western breeds and the near fixation of TSHR in all modern chickens took place only in the past 500 y. In addition, mitochondrial variation has increased as a result of recent admixture with exotic breeds. We conclude by emphasizing the perils of inferring the past from modern genetic data alone.

  16. The Innate Immune-Related Genes in Catfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Catfish is one of the most important aquaculture species in America (as well as in Asia and Africa. In recent years, the production of catfish has suffered massive financial losses due to pathogen spread and breakouts. Innate immunity plays a crucial role in increasing resistance to pathogenic organisms and has generated increasing interest in the past few years. This review summarizes the current understanding of innate immune-related genes in catfish, including pattern recognition receptors, antimicrobial peptides, complements, lectins, cytokines, transferrin and gene expression profiling using microarrays and next generation sequencing technologies. This review will benefit the understanding of innate immune system in catfish and further efforts in studying the innate immune-related genes in fish.

  17. Dynamic expression of ancient and novel molluscan shell genes during ecological transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wörheide Gert

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mollusca constitute one of the most morphologically and ecologically diverse metazoan phyla, occupying a wide range of marine, terrestrial and freshwater habitats. The evolutionary success of the molluscs can in part be attributed to the evolvability of the external shell. Typically, the shell first forms during embryonic and larval development, changing dramatically in shape, colour and mineralogical composition as development and maturation proceeds. Major developmental transitions in shell morphology often correlate with ecological transitions (e.g. from a planktonic to benthic existence at metamorphosis. While the genes involved in molluscan biomineralisation are beginning to be identified, there is little understanding of how these are developmentally regulated, or if the same genes are operational at different stages of the mollusc's life. Results Here we relate the developmental expression of nine genes in the tissue responsible for shell production – the mantle – to ecological transitions that occur during the lifetime of the tropical abalone Haliotis asinina (Vetigastropoda. Four of these genes encode evolutionarily ancient proteins, while four others encode secreted proteins with little or no identity to known proteins. Another gene has been previously described from the mantle of another haliotid vetigastropod. All nine genes display dynamic spatial and temporal expression profiles within the larval shell field and juvenile mantle. Conclusion These expression data reflect the regulatory complexity that underlies molluscan shell construction from larval stages to adulthood, and serves to highlight the different ecological demands placed on each stage. The use of both ancient and novel genes in all stages of shell construction also suggest that a core set of shell-making genes was provided by a shared metazoan ancestor, which has been elaborated upon to produce the range of molluscan shell types we see today.

  18. Mapping of Immune-Mediated Disease Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2013-01-01

    Genetic studies in immune-mediated diseases have yielded a large number of disease-associated loci. Here we review the progress being made in 12 such diseases, for which 199 independently associated non-HLA loci have been identified by genome-wide association studies since 2007. It is striking that

  19. The effects of subsampling gene trees on coalescent methods applied to ancient divergences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Mark P; Sloan, Daniel B; Gatesy, John

    2016-04-01

    Gene-tree-estimation error is a major concern for coalescent methods of phylogenetic inference. We sampled eight empirical studies of ancient lineages with diverse numbers of taxa and genes for which the original authors applied one or more coalescent methods. We found that the average pairwise congruence among gene trees varied greatly both between studies and also often within a study. We recommend that presenting plots of pairwise congruence among gene trees in a dataset be treated as a standard practice for empirical coalescent studies so that readers can readily assess the extent and distribution of incongruence among gene trees. ASTRAL-based coalescent analyses generally outperformed MP-EST and STAR with respect to both internal consistency (congruence between analyses of subsamples of genes with the complete dataset of all genes) and congruence with the concatenation-based topology. We evaluated the approach of subsampling gene trees that are, on average, more congruent with other gene trees as a method to reduce artifacts caused by gene-tree-estimation errors on coalescent analyses. We suggest that this method is well suited to testing whether gene-tree-estimation error is a primary cause of incongruence between concatenation- and coalescent-based results, to reconciling conflicting phylogenetic results based on different coalescent methods, and to identifying genes affected by artifacts that may then be targeted for reciprocal illumination. We provide scripts that automate the process of calculating pairwise gene-tree incongruence and subsampling trees while accounting for differential taxon sampling among genes. Finally, we assert that multiple tree-search replicates should be implemented as a standard practice for empirical coalescent studies that apply MP-EST. PMID:26768112

  20. Inherited variation in immune genes and pathways and glioblastoma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzbaum, Judith A; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yanhong; Tsavachidis, Spyros; Berger, Mitchel S; Bondy, Melissa L; Chang, Jeffrey S; Chang, Susan M; Decker, Paul A; Ding, Bo; Hepworth, Sarah J; Houlston, Richard S; Hosking, Fay J; Jenkins, Robert B; Kosel, Matthew L; McCoy, Lucie S; McKinney, Patricia A; Muir, Kenneth; Patoka, Joe S; Prados, Michael; Rice, Terri; Robertson, Lindsay B; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Shete, Sanjay; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Wiemels, Joe L; Wiencke, John K; Yang, Ping; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2010-10-01

    To determine whether inherited variations in immune function single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genes or pathways affect glioblastoma risk, we analyzed data from recent genome-wide association studies in conjunction with predefined immune function genes and pathways. Gene and pathway analyses were conducted on two independent data sets using 6629 SNPs in 911 genes on 17 immune pathways from 525 glioblastoma cases and 602 controls from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and a subset of 6029 SNPs in 893 genes from 531 cases and 1782 controls from MD Anderson (MDA). To further assess consistency of SNP-level associations, we also compared data from the UK (266 cases and 2482 controls) and the Mayo Clinic (114 cases and 111 controls). Although three correlated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) SNPs were consistently associated with glioblastoma in all four data sets (Mantel-Haenzel P values = 1 × 10⁻⁵ to 4 × 10⁻³), independent replication is required as genome-wide significance was not attained. In gene-level analyses, eight immune function genes were significantly (minP < 0.05) associated with glioblastoma; the IL-2RA (CD25) cytokine gene had the smallest minP values in both UCSF (minP = 0.01) and MDA (minP = 0.001) data sets. The IL-2RA receptor is found on the surface of regulatory T cells potentially contributing to immunosuppression characteristic of the glioblastoma microenvironment. In pathway correlation analyses, cytokine signaling and adhesion-extravasation-migration pathways showed similar associations with glioblastoma risk in both MDA and UCSF data sets. Our findings represent the first systematic description of immune genes and pathways that characterize glioblastoma risk. PMID:20668009

  1. The Innate Immune-Related Genes in Catfish

    OpenAIRE

    Weidong Liu; Xianggang Gao; Yunfeng Li; Hao Su; Xueguang Liu; Chongbo He; Lei Gao

    2012-01-01

    Catfish is one of the most important aquaculture species in America (as well as in Asia and Africa). In recent years, the production of catfish has suffered massive financial losses due to pathogen spread and breakouts. Innate immunity plays a crucial role in increasing resistance to pathogenic organisms and has generated increasing interest in the past few years. This review summarizes the current understanding of innate immune-related genes in catfish, including pattern recognition receptor...

  2. Immune responses and immune-related gene expression profile in orange-spotted grouper after immunization with Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Xue-Ming; Zhang, Tuan-Wei; Li, Yan-Wei; Li, An-Xing

    2013-03-01

    In order to elucidate the immune-protective mechanisms of inactivated Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine, different doses of C. irritans theronts were used to immunize orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). We measured serum immobilization titer, blood leukocyte respiratory burst activity, serum alternative complement activity, and serum lysozyme activity weekly. In addition, the expression levels of immune-related genes such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), major histocompatibility complexes I and II (MHC I and II), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were determined in spleen and gills. The results showed that the immobilization titer, respiratory burst activity, and alternative complement activity of immunized fish were significantly increased, and the levels of the last two immune parameters in the high-dose vaccine group were significantly higher than in the low-dose vaccine group. Serum lysozyme activity in the high-dose vaccine group was significantly higher than in the PBS control group. Vaccination also regulated host immune-related gene expression. For example, at 2- and 3- weeks post immunization, IL-1β expression in the high-dose vaccine group spleen was significantly increased. At 4-weeks post immunization, the fish were challenged with a lethal dose of parasite, and the survival rates of high-dose vaccine group, low-dose vaccine group, PBS control group, and adjuvant control group were 80%, 40%, 0%, and 10% respectively. These results demonstrate that inactivated C. irritans vaccination improves specific and nonspecific immune responses in fish, enhancing their anti-parasite ability. These effects are vaccine antigen dose-dependent.

  3. SL1 RNA gene recovery from Enterobius vermicularis ancient DNA in pre-Columbian human coprolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez, Alena Mayo; Reinhard, Karl; Carvalho Gonçalves, Marcelo Luiz; Ferreira, Luiz Fernando; Araújo, Adauto; Paulo Vicente, Ana Carolina

    2006-11-01

    Enterobius vermicularis, pinworm, is one of the most common helminths worldwide, infecting nearly a billion people at all socio-economic levels. In prehistoric populations the paleoparasitological findings show a pinworm homogeneous distribution among hunter-gatherers in North America, intensified with the advent of agriculture. This same increase also occurred in the transition from nomad hunter-gatherers to sedentary farmers in South America, although E. vermicularis infection encompasses only the ancient Andean peoples, with no record among the pre-Colombian populations in the South American lowlands. However, the outline of pinworm paleoepidemiology has been supported by microscopic finding of eggs recovered from coprolites. Since molecular techniques are precise and sensitive in detecting pathogen ancient DNA (aDNA), and also could provide insights into the parasite evolutionary history, in this work we have performed a molecular paleoparasitological study of E. vermicularis. aDNA was recovered and pinworm 5S rRNA spacer sequences were determined from pre-Columbian coprolites (4110 BC-AD 900) from four different North and South American archaeological sites. The sequence analysis confirmed E. vermicularis identity and revealed a similarity among ancient and modern sequences. Moreover, polymorphisms were identified at the relative positions 160, 173 and 180, in independent coprolite samples from Tulán, San Pedro de Atacama, Chile (1080-950 BC). We also verified the presence of peculiarities (Splicing leader (SL1) RNA sequence, spliced donor site, the Sm antigen biding site, and RNA secondary structure) which characterise the SL1 RNA gene. The analysis shows that the SL1 RNA gene of contemporary pinworms was present in pre-Columbian E. vermicularis by 6110 years ago. We were successful in detecting E. vermicularis aDNA even in coprolites without direct microscopic evidence of the eggs, improving the diagnosis of helminth infections in the past and further

  4. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y; Boulianne, Gabrielle L; Hoffmann, Jules A; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-02-19

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23378635

  5. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.; Hoffmann, Jules A.; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23378635

  6. Transcriptome analysis of immune response genes induced by pathogen agonists in the Antarctic bullhead notothen Notothenia coriiceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Do-Hwan; Kang, Seunghyun; Park, Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Fish are a representative population of lower vertebrates that serve as an essential link to early vertebrate evolution, and this has fueled academic interest in studying ancient vertebrate immune defense mechanisms in teleosts. Notothenia coriiceps, a typical Antarctic notothenioid teleost, has evolved to adapt to the cold and thermally stable Antarctic sea. In this study, we examined adaptive signaling pathways and immune responses to bacterial and viral pathogenic exposure in N. coriiceps. Using RNA sequencing, we investigated transcriptional differences in the liver tissues of N. coriiceps challenged with two pathogen-mimicking agonists, a bacterial ligand (heat-killed Escherichia coli, HKEB) and a viral ligand (polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, Poly I:C). We found that 567 unique genes were up-regulated two-fold in the HKEB-exposed group, whereas 392 unique genes, including 124 immune-relevant genes, were up-regulated two-fold in the Poly I:C-exposed group. A KEGG pathway analysis of the 124 immune-relevant genes revealed that they exhibited major features of antigen processing and presentation bacterial ligand exposure, but they were down-regulated after viral ligand exposure. A quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis revealed that TNFα and TNF2, major inducers of apoptosis, were highly up-regulated after exposure to the viral ligand but not the bacterial ligand. The results suggest that the bacterial and viral ligands up-regulate inducers of different immune mechanisms in N. coriiceps liver tissue. N. coriiceps has an immune response defense strategy that uses antigen presentation against bacterial infection, but it may use a different defense, such as TNF-mediated apoptosis, against viral infection. The specific immune responses of N. coriiceps may be adaptations to the Antarctic environment and pathogens. These results will help define the characteristics of Antarctic fish and increase our understanding of their immune response mechanisms.

  7. Ancient horizontal gene transfer from bacteria enhances biosynthetic capabilities of fungi.

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    Imke Schmitt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polyketides are natural products with a wide range of biological functions and pharmaceutical applications. Discovery and utilization of polyketides can be facilitated by understanding the evolutionary processes that gave rise to the biosynthetic machinery and the natural product potential of extant organisms. Gene duplication and subfunctionalization, as well as horizontal gene transfer are proposed mechanisms in the evolution of biosynthetic gene clusters. To explain the amount of homology in some polyketide synthases in unrelated organisms such as bacteria and fungi, interkingdom horizontal gene transfer has been evoked as the most likely evolutionary scenario. However, the origin of the genes and the direction of the transfer remained elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used comparative phylogenetics to infer the ancestor of a group of polyketide synthase genes involved in antibiotic and mycotoxin production. We aligned keto synthase domain sequences of all available fungal 6-methylsalicylic acid (6-MSA-type PKSs and their closest bacterial relatives. To assess the role of symbiotic fungi in the evolution of this gene we generated 24 6-MSA synthase sequence tags from lichen-forming fungi. Our results support an ancient horizontal gene transfer event from an actinobacterial source into ascomycete fungi, followed by gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Given that actinobacteria are unrivaled producers of biologically active compounds, such as antibiotics, it appears particularly promising to study biosynthetic genes of actinobacterial origin in fungi. The large number of 6-MSA-type PKS sequences found in lichen-forming fungi leads us hypothesize that the evolution of typical lichen compounds, such as orsellinic acid derivatives, was facilitated by the gain of this bacterial polyketide synthase.

  8. Tandem inhibin gene immunization to induce sheep twinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhibin (INH) is a type of glycoprotein hormone secreted by testicular sertoli cell and ovarian granulose cell. The protein is structurally a heterodimer composed of two sub-units α and β. The development of animal follicle and the fertility could be improved by inhibin immunization. However, the utilization of active and passive immunization of inhibin immunization in animal production was restricted due to its difficulty in preparation and the higher cost. The innovation and development of gene vaccine made it practical and effective to improve the reproductive performance of sheep through inhibin immunization. To improve the follicular development, ovarian ovulation and number animals farrowed, different types of inhibin gene vaccines were constructed and used to immunize mice, rats, sheep and cattle, but the immunization was not so effective as expected. In this sense, it is necessary to explore the novel methods in inhibin production and the new strategies in immune reproductive technology. To examine the feasibility of developing the inhibin gene as vaccine for sheep, we constructed the recombinant plasmid of tandem inhibin gene and investigated its effect in sheep twinning after the gene immunization. The synthetic DNA sequence of α-subunit (1 to 32) of inhibin in swine was used as the template to amplify the forward inhibin (FINH) gene sequence with the first double of primer. Then, the FINH was used as the template to amplify the reverse inhibin (RINH) gene sequence with the second double of primer. After the two sequences were combined, they connected with T carrier. They were transfected into the E.coli. by cultivating and multiplying, then the plasmid was extracted. After enzyme digestion, tandem inhibin gene and eukaryotic vector pcDNA3.1 were connected, the recombinant plasmid (pcDNA-DINH, pcDNA-double inhibin) expressed in the eukaryon would be obtained. The adjuvant, sheep complement 3d (sC3d), was cloned from the tissue in the liver of sheep by

  9. Gene Therapy of Cancer: Induction of Anti-Tumor Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChengQian; JesusPrieto

    2004-01-01

    Many malignancies lack satisfactory treatment and new therapeutic options are urgently needed. Gene therapy is a new modality to treat both inherited and acquired diseases based on the transfer of genetic material to the tissues. Different gene therapy strategies against cancers have been developed. A considerable number of preclinical studies indicate that a great variety of cancers are amenable to gene therapy. Among these strategies, induction of anti-tumor immunity is the most promising approach. Gene therapy with cytokines has reached unprecedented success in preclinical models of cancer. Synergistic rather than additive effects have been demonstrated by combination of gene transfer of cytokines/chemokines, costimulatory molecules or adoptive cell therapy. Recent progress in vector technology and in imaging techniques allowing in vivo assessment of gene expression will facilitate the development of clinical applications of gene therapy, a procedure which may have a notorious impact in the management of cancers lacking effective treatment. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):105-111.

  10. The evolution of TEP1, an exceptionally polymorphic immunity gene in Anopheles gambiae

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    Yan Guiyun

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Host-parasite coevolution can result in balancing selection, which maintains genetic variation in the susceptibility of hosts to parasites. It has been suggested that variation in a thioester-containing protein called TEP1 (AGAP010815 may alter the ability of Anopheles mosquitoes to transmit Plasmodium parasites, and high divergence between alleles of this gene suggests the possible action of long-term balancing selection. We studied whether TEP1 is a case of an ancient balanced polymorphism in an animal immune system. Results We found evidence that the high divergence between TEP1 alleles is the product of genetic exchange between TEP1 and other TEP loci, i.e. gene conversion. Additionally, some TEP1 alleles showed unexpectedly low variability. Conclusion The TEP1 gene appears to be a chimera produced from at least two other TEP loci, and the divergence between TEP1 alleles is probably not caused by long-term balancing selection, but is instead due to two independent gene conversion events from one of these other genes. Nevertheless, TEP1 still shows evidence of natural selection, in particular there appears to have been recent changes in the frequency of alleles that has diminished polymorphism within each allelic class. Although the selective force driving this dynamic was not identified, given that susceptibility to Plasmodium parasites is known to be associated with allelic variation in TEP1, these changes in allele frequencies could alter the vectoring capacity of populations.

  11. Co-expression and Immunity of Legionella pneumophila mip Gene and Immunoadjuvant ctxB Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao WANG; Jian-Ping CHEN; Hong LI; Ke-Qian ZHI; Lei ZHANG; Chun-Lei YANG; Da-Chang TAO

    2005-01-01

    The nip gene of Legionella pneumophila and the ctxB gene of Vibrio cholerae were amplified by PCR respectively. The amplified cDNA was ligated to the pcDNA3.1 (+) vector. The recombinant plasmids pcDNA3.1-mip and pcDNA3.1-ctxB were identified by restriction analysis and PCR, and further confirmed by sequencing analysis. NIH3T3 cells were transfected with pcDNA3.1-mip and pcDNA3.1-ctxB according to the Lipofection method. Transient and stable products of the co-expression of the nip gene and ctxB gene were detected by immunofluorescence and Western blotting. The results showed that NIH3T3 cells were successfully transfected, and that the transiently and stably co-expressed products can be detected in the transfected cells. To detect the humoral and cellular immune response in immunized mice induced by the coimmunization of the mip and ctxB genes, female BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with pcDNA3.1-mip and pcDNA3.1-ctxB. The results showed that the specific antibody titer and the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response for pcDNA3.1-mip immunization and co-immunization were increased compared with that of pcDNA3.1 (+) immunization. Furthermore, the specific antibody titer and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response for co-immunization were increased compared with that of pcDNA3.1-mip immunization. Statistical analysis using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that there was a significant difference between the groups (P<0.01). The results indicated that the ctxB gene enhanced the humoral and cellular immune response to the mip gene immunization. These findings provide experimental evidence to support the development of the L. pneumophila DNA vaccine.

  12. Cancer tumors as Metazoa 1.0: tapping genes of ancient ancestors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genes of cellular cooperation that evolved with multicellularity about a billion years ago are the same genes that malfunction to cause cancer. We hypothesize that cancer is an atavistic condition that occurs when genetic or epigenetic malfunction unlocks an ancient 'toolkit' of pre-existing adaptations, re-establishing the dominance of an earlier layer of genes that controlled loose-knit colonies of only partially differentiated cells, similar to tumors. The existence of such a toolkit implies that the progress of the neoplasm in the host organism differs distinctively from normal Darwinian evolution. Comparative genomics and the phylogeny of basal metazoans, opisthokonta and basal multicellular eukaryotes should help identify the relevant genes and yield the order in which they evolved. This order will be a rough guide to the reverse order in which cancer develops, as mutations disrupt the genes of cellular cooperation. Our proposal is consistent with current understanding of cancer and explains the paradoxical rapidity with which cancer acquires a suite of mutually-supportive complex abilities. Finally we make several predictions and suggest ways to test this model

  13. The evolution of secondary organization in immune system gene libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hightower, R.; Forrest, S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Perelson, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-02-01

    A binary model of the immune system is used to study the effects of evolution on the genetic encoding for antibody molecules. We report experiments which show that the evolution of immune system genes, simulated by the genetic algorithm, can induce a high degree of genetic organization even though that organization is not explicitly required by the fitness function. This secondary organization is related to the true fitness of an individual, in contrast to the sampled fitness which is the explicit fitness measure used to drive the process of evolution.

  14. The Drosophila melanogaster methuselah gene: a novel gene with ancient functions.

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    Ana Rita Araújo

    Full Text Available The Drosophila melanogaster G protein-coupled receptor gene, methuselah (mth, has been described as a novel gene that is less than 10 million years old. Nevertheless, it shows a highly specific expression pattern in embryos, larvae, and adults, and has been implicated in larval development, stress resistance, and in the setting of adult lifespan, among others. Although mth belongs to a gene subfamily with 16 members in D. melanogaster, there is no evidence for functional redundancy in this subfamily. Therefore, it is surprising that a novel gene influences so many traits. Here, we explore the alternative hypothesis that mth is an old gene. Under this hypothesis, in species distantly related to D. melanogaster, there should be a gene with features similar to those of mth. By performing detailed phylogenetic, synteny, protein structure, and gene expression analyses we show that the D. virilis GJ12490 gene is the orthologous of mth in species distantly related to D. melanogaster. We also show that, in D. americana (a species of the virilis group of Drosophila, a common amino acid polymorphism at the GJ12490 orthologous gene is significantly associated with developmental time, size, and lifespan differences. Our results imply that GJ12490 orthologous genes are candidates for developmental time and lifespan differences in Drosophila in general.

  15. Identifying genes that mediate anthracyline toxicity in immune cells

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    Amber eFrick

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of the immune system in response to chemotherapeutic agents remains elusive. The interpatient variability observed in immune and chemotherapeutic cytotoxic responses is likely, at least in part, due to complex genetic differences. Through the use of a panel of genetically diverse mouse inbred strains, we developed a drug screening platform aimed at identifying genes underlying these chemotherapeutic cytotoxic effects on immune cells. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS, we identified four genome-wide significant quantitative trait loci (QTL that contributed to the sensitivity of doxorubicin and idarubicin in immune cells. Of particular interest, a locus on chromosome 16 was significantly associated with cell viability following idarubicin administration (p = 5.01x10-8. Within this QTL lies App, which encodes amyloid beta precursor protein. Comparison of dose-response curves verified that T-cells in App knockout mice were more sensitive to idarubicin than those of C57BL/6J control mice (p < 0.05.In conclusion, the cellular screening approach coupled with GWAS led to the identification and subsequent validation of a gene involved in T-cell viability after idarubicin treatment. Previous studies have suggested a role for App in in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity to anticancer agents; the overexpression of App enhances resistance, while the knockdown of this gene is deleterious to cell viability. Thus, further investigations should include performing mechanistic studies, validating additional genes from the GWAS, including Ppfia1 and Ppfibp1, and ultimately translating the findings to in vivo and human studies.

  16. An ancient repeat sequence in the ATP synthase beta-subunit gene of forcipulate sea stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltz, David W

    2007-11-01

    A novel repeat sequence with a conserved secondary structure is described from two nonadjacent introns of the ATP synthase beta-subunit gene in sea stars of the order Forcipulatida (Echinodermata: Asteroidea). The repeat is present in both introns of all forcipulate sea stars examined, which suggests that it is an ancient feature of this gene (with an approximate age of 200 Mya). Both stem and loop regions show high levels of sequence constraint when compared to flanking nonrepetitive intronic regions. The repeat was also detected in (1) the family Pterasteridae, order Velatida and (2) the family Korethrasteridae, order Velatida. The repeat was not detected in (1) the family Echinasteridae, order Spinulosida, (2) the family Astropectinidae, order Paxillosida, (3) the family Solasteridae, order Velatida, or (4) the family Goniasteridae, order Valvatida. The repeat lacks similarity to published sequences in unrestricted GenBank searches, and there are no significant open reading frames in the repeat or in the flanking intron sequences. Comparison via parametric bootstrapping to a published phylogeny based on 4.2 kb of nuclear and mitochondrial sequence for a subset of these species allowed the null hypothesis of a congruent phylogeny to be rejected for each repeat, when compared separately to the published phylogeny. In contrast, the flanking nonrepetitive sequences in each intron yielded separate phylogenies that were each congruent with the published phylogeny. In four species, the repeat in one or both introns has apparently experienced gene conversion. The two introns also show a correlated pattern of nucleotide substitutions, even after excluding the putative cases of gene conversion.

  17. Gene Expression by PBMC in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: Evidence for Dysregulation of Immune Mediated Genes

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    Christopher A. Aoki

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is a chronic disease of the bile ducts characterized by an inflammatory infiltrate and obliterative fibrosis. The precise role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of PSC remains unknown. We used RNA microarray analysis to identify immune-related genes and pathways that are differentially expressed in PSC. Messenger RNA (mRNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC was isolated from both patients with PSC and age and sex matched healthy controls. Samples from 5 PSC patients and 5 controls were analyzed by microarray and based upon rigorous statistical analysis of the data, relevant genes were chosen for confirmation by RT-PCR in 10 PSC patients and 10 controls. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, gene expression in PSC was statistically different from our control population. Interestingly, genes within the IL-2 receptor beta, IL-6 and MAP Kinase pathways were found to be differently expressed in patients with PSC compared to controls. Further, individual genes, TNF-α induced protein 6 (TNFaip6 and membrane-spanning 4-domains, subfamily A (ms4a were found to be upregulated in PSC while similar to Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 5 (SMAD 5 was downregulated. In conclusion, several immune-related pathways and genes were differentially expressed in PSC compared to control patients, giving further evidence that this disease is systemic and immune-mediated.

  18. Among-lake reciprocal transplants induce convergent expression of immune genes in threespine stickleback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, William E; Schmerer, Matthew; Coates, Jessica L; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2015-09-01

    Geographic variation in parasite communities can drive evolutionary divergence in host immune genes. However, biotic and abiotic environmental variation can also induce plastic differences in immune function among populations. At present, there is little information concerning the relative magnitudes of heritable vs. induced immune divergence in natural populations. We examined immune gene expression profiles of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from six lakes on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Parasite community composition differs between lake types (large or small, containing limnetic- or benthic-like stickleback) and between watersheds. We observed corresponding differences in immune gene expression profiles among wild-caught stickleback, using a set of seven immune genes representing distinct branches of the immune system. To evaluate the role of environmental effects on this differentiation, we experimentally transplanted wild-caught fish into cages in their native lake, or into a nearby foreign lake. Transplanted individuals' immune gene expression converged on patterns typical of their destination lake, deviating from their native expression profile. Transplant individuals' source population had a much smaller effect, suggesting relatively weak genetic underpinning of population differences in immunity, as viewed through gene expression. This strong environmental regulation of immune gene expression provides a counterpoint to the large emerging literature documenting microevolution and genetic diversification of immune function. Our findings illustrate the value of studying immunity in natural environmental settings where the immune system has evolved and actively functions. PMID:26118468

  19. Gene Expression Control by Glucocorticoid Receptors during Innate Immune Responses

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    André M. Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs are potent anti-inflammatory compounds that have been extensively used in clinical practice for several decades. GCs effects on inflammation are generally mediated through GC receptors (GRs. Signal transduction through these nuclear receptors leads to dramatic changes in gene expression programs in different cell types, typically due to GR binding to DNA or to transcription modulators. During the last decade the view of GCs as exclusive anti-inflammatory molecules has been challenged. GR negative interference in pro-inflammatory gene expression was a landmark in terms of molecular mechanisms that suppress immune activity. In fact, GR can induce varied inhibitory molecules, including a negative regulator of Toll-like receptors (TLRs pathway, or subject key transcription factors, such as NF-B and AP-1, to a repressor mechanism. In contrast, the expression of some acute-phase proteins (APPs and other players of innate immunity generally requires GR signaling. Consequently, GRs must operate context-dependent inhibitory, permissive or stimulatory effects on host defense signaling triggered by pathogens or tissue damage. This review aims to disclose how contradictory or comparable effects on inflammatory gene expression can depend on pharmacological approach (including selective glucocorticoid receptor modulators; SEGRMs, cell culture, animal treatment or transgenic strategies used as models. Although the current view of GR-signaling integrated many advances in the field, some answers to important questions remain elusive.

  20. Genes, Genomes, and Assemblages of Modern Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Cyanobacteria as Proxies for Ancient Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, S. L.; Dick, G.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic (OP) cyanobacteria were responsible for the production of O2 during the Proterozoic. However, the extent and degree of oxygenation of the atmosphere and oceans varied for over 2 Ga after OP cyanobacteria first appeared in the geologic record. Cyanobacteria capable of anoxygenic photosynthesis (AP) may have altered the trajectory of oxygenation, yet the scope of their role in the Proterozoic is not well known. Modern cyanobacterial populations from Middle Island Sinkhole (MIS), Michigan and a handful of cultured cyanobacterial strains, are capable of OP and AP. With their metabolic versatility, these microbes may approximate ancient cyanobacterial assemblages that mediated Earth's oxygenation. To better characterize the taxonomic and genetic signatures of these modern AP/OP cyanobacteria, we sequenced 16S rRNA genes and conducted 'omics analyses on cultured strains, lab mesocosms, and MIS cyanobacterial mat samples collected over multiple years from May to September. Diversity in the MIS cyanobacterial mat is low, with one member of Oscillatoriales dominating at all times. However, Planktothrix members are more abundant in the cyanobacterial community in late summer and fall. The shift in cyanobacterial community composition may be linked to seasonally changing light intensity. In lab mesocosms of MIS microbial mat, we observed a shift in dominant cyanobacterial groups as well as the emergence of Chlorobium, bacteria that specialize in AP. These shifts in microbial community composition and metabolism are likely in response to changing environmental parameters such as the availability of light and sulfide. Further research is needed to understand the impacts of the changing photosynthetic community on oxygen production and the entire microbial consortium. Our study connects genes and genomes of AP cyanobacteria to their environment, and improves understanding of cyanobacterial metabolic strategies that may have shaped Earth's redox evolution.

  1. Y-linked variation for autosomal immune gene regulation has the potential to shape sexually dimorphic immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutch, Ian C; Fedorka, Kenneth M

    2015-12-01

    Sexually dimorphic phenotypes arise from the differential expression of male and female shared genes throughout the genome. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which dimorphic regulation manifests and evolves are unclear. Recent work suggests that Y-chromosomes may play an important role, given that Drosophila melanogaster Ys were shown to influence the regulation of hundreds of X and autosomal genes. For Y-linked regulatory variation (YRV) to facilitate sexually dimorphic evolution, however, it must exist within populations (where selection operates) and influence male fitness. These criteria have seldom been investigated, leaving the potential for dimorphic evolution via YRV unclear. Interestingly, male and female D. melanogaster differ in immune gene regulation. Furthermore, immune gene regulation appears to be influenced by the Y-chromosome, suggesting it may contribute to dimorphic immune evolution. We address this possibility by introgressing Y-chromosomes from a single wild population into an isogenic background (to create Y-lines) and assessing immune gene regulation and bacterial defence. We found that Y-line males differed in their immune gene regulation and their ability to defend against Serratia marcescens. Moreover, gene expression and bacterial defence were positively genetically correlated. These data indicate that the Y-chromosome has the potential to shape the evolution of sexually dimorphic immunity in this system.

  2. Royal Decree: Gene Expression in Trans-Generationally Immune Primed Bumblebee Workers Mimics a Primary Immune Response.

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    Seth M Barribeau

    Full Text Available Invertebrates lack the cellular and physiological machinery of the adaptive immune system, but show specificity in their immune response and immune priming. Functionally, immune priming is comparable to immune memory in vertebrates. Individuals that have survived exposure to a given parasite are better protected against subsequent exposures. Protection may be cross-reactive, but demonstrations of persistent and specific protection in invertebrates are increasing. This immune priming can cross generations ("trans-generational" immune priming, preparing offspring for the prevailing parasite environment. While these phenomena gain increasing support, the mechanistic foundations underlying such immune priming, both within and across generations, remain largely unknown. Using a transcriptomic approach, we show that exposing bumblebee queens with an injection of heat-killed bacteria, known to induce trans-generational immune priming, alters daughter (worker gene expression. Daughters, even when unexposed themselves, constitutively express a core set of the genes induced upon direct bacterial exposure, including high expression of antimicrobial peptides, a beta-glucan receptor protein implicated in bacterial recognition and the induction of the toll signaling pathway, and slit-3 which is important in honeybee immunity. Maternal exposure results in a distinct upregulation of their daughters' immune system, with a signature overlapping with the induced individual response to a direct exposure. This will mediate mother-offspring protection, but also associated costs related to reconfiguration of constitutive immune expression. Moreover, identification of conserved immune pathways in memory-like responses has important implications for our understanding of the innate immune system, including the innate components in vertebrates, which share many of these pathways.

  3. Passive Immunization against HIV/AIDS by Antibody Gene Transfer

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    Lili Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite tremendous efforts over the course of many years, the quest for an effective HIV vaccine by the classical method of active immunization remains largely elusive. However, two recent studies in mice and macaques have now demonstrated a new strategy designated as Vectored ImmunoProphylaxis (VIP, which involves passive immunization by viral vector-mediated delivery of genes encoding broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs for in vivo expression. Robust protection against virus infection was observed in preclinical settings when animals were given VIP to express monoclonal neutralizing antibodies. This unorthodox approach raises new promise for combating the ongoing global HIV pandemic. In this article, we survey the status of antibody gene transfer, review the revolutionary progress on isolation of extremely bnAbs, detail VIP experiments against HIV and its related virus conduced in humanized mice and macaque monkeys, and discuss the pros and cons of VIP and its opportunities and challenges towards clinical applications to control HIV/AIDS endemics.

  4. Characteristic and functional analysis of toll-like receptors (TLRs in the lophotrocozoan, Crassostrea gigas, reveals ancient origin of TLR-mediated innate immunity.

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    Yang Zhang

    Full Text Available The evolution of TLR-mediated innate immunity is a fundamental question in immunology. Here, we report the characterization and functional analysis of four TLR members in the lophotrochozoans Crassostreagigas (CgTLRs. All CgTLRs bear a conserved domain organization and have a close relationship with TLRs in ancient non-vertebrate chordates. In HEK293 cells, every CgTLR could constitutively activate NF-κB responsive reporter, but none of the PAMPs tested could stimulate CgTLR-activated NF-κB induction. Subcellular localization showed that CgTLR members have similar and dual distribution on late endosomes and plasma membranes. Moreover, CgTLRs and CgMyD88 mRNA show a consistent response to multiple PAMP challenges in oyster hemocytes. As CgTLR-mediated NF-κB activation is dependent on CgMyD88, we designed a blocking peptide for CgTLR signaling that would inhibit CgTLR-CgMyD88 dependent NF-κB activation. This was used to demonstrate that a Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection-induced enhancement of degranulation and increase of cytokines TNF mRNA in hemocytes, could be inhibited by blocking CgTLR signaling. In summary, our study characterized the primitive TLRs in the lophotrocozoan C. gigas and demonstrated a fundamental role of TLR signaling in infection-induced hemocyte activation. This provides further evidence for an ancient origin of TLR-mediated innate immunity.

  5. Ancient expansion of the hox cluster in lepidoptera generated four homeobox genes implicated in extra-embryonic tissue formation.

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    Laura Ferguson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplications within the conserved Hox cluster are rare in animal evolution, but in Lepidoptera an array of divergent Hox-related genes (Shx genes has been reported between pb and zen. Here, we use genome sequencing of five lepidopteran species (Polygonia c-album, Pararge aegeria, Callimorpha dominula, Cameraria ohridella, Hepialus sylvina plus a caddisfly outgroup (Glyphotaelius pellucidus to trace the evolution of the lepidopteran Shx genes. We demonstrate that Shx genes originated by tandem duplication of zen early in the evolution of large clade Ditrysia; Shx are not found in a caddisfly and a member of the basally diverging Hepialidae (swift moths. Four distinct Shx genes were generated early in ditrysian evolution, and were stably retained in all descendent Lepidoptera except the silkmoth which has additional duplications. Despite extensive sequence divergence, molecular modelling indicates that all four Shx genes have the potential to encode stable homeodomains. The four Shx genes have distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns in early development of the Speckled Wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria, with ShxC demarcating the future sites of extraembryonic tissue formation via strikingly localised maternal RNA in the oocyte. All four genes are also expressed in presumptive serosal cells, prior to the onset of zen expression. Lepidopteran Shx genes represent an unusual example of Hox cluster expansion and integration of novel genes into ancient developmental regulatory networks.

  6. Genes related to immunity, as expressed in the alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata, during pathogen challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J; James, R

    2009-11-01

    Virtually nothing is known about disease resistance in solitary bees, so expressed sequence tag (EST) databases were developed to search for immune response genes in the alfalfa leafcutting bee. We identified 104 putative immunity-related genes from both healthy and pathogen-challenged bee larvae, and 12 more genes using PCR amplification. The genes identified coded for proteins with a wide variety of innate immune response functions, including pathogen recognition, phagocytosis, the prophenoloxidase cascade, melanization, coagulation and several signalling pathways. Some immune response genes were highly conserved with honey bee genes, and more distantly related to other insects. The data presented provides the first analysis of immune function in a solitary bee and provides a foundation for the further analysis of gene expression patterns in bees. PMID:19863668

  7. Parental vitamin deficiency affects the embryonic gene expression of immune-, lipid transport- and apolipoprotein genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjærven, Kaja H.; Jakt, Lars Martin; Dahl, John Arne; Espe, Marit; Aanes, Håvard; Hamre, Kristin; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2016-10-01

    World Health Organization is concerned for parental vitamin deficiency and its effect on offspring health. This study examines the effect of a marginally dietary-induced parental one carbon (1-C) micronutrient deficiency on embryonic gene expression using zebrafish. Metabolic profiling revealed a reduced 1-C cycle efficiency in F0 generation. Parental deficiency reduced the fecundity and a total of 364 genes were differentially expressed in the F1 embryos. The upregulated genes (53%) in the deficient group were enriched in biological processes such as immune response and blood coagulation. Several genes encoding enzymes essential for the 1-C cycle and for lipid transport (especially apolipoproteins) were aberrantly expressed. We show that a parental diet deficient in micronutrients disturbs the expression in descendant embryos of genes associated with overall health, and result in inherited aberrations in the 1-C cycle and lipid metabolism. This emphasises the importance of parental micronutrient status for the health of the offspring.

  8. Assessing the fidelity of ancient DNA sequences amplified from nuclear genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binladen, Jonas; Wiuf, Carsten Henrik; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.;

    2006-01-01

    in phenotypic traits of extinct taxa. It is well documented that postmortem damage in ancient mtDNA can lead to the generation of artifactual sequences. However, as yet no one has thoroughly investigated the damage spectrum in ancient nuDNA. By comparing clone sequences from 23 fossil specimens, recovered from......DNA and nuDNA despite great differences in cellular copy numbers. For both mtDNA and nuDNA, we find significant positive correlations between total sequence heterogeneity and the rates of type 1 transitions (adenine guanine and thymine --> cytosine) and type 2 transitions (cytosine --> thymine and guanine...

  9. An RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene in bat genomes derived from an ancient negative-strand RNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Yuki; Honda, Tomoyuki; Fujino, Kan; Akasaka, Takumi; Kohl, Claudia; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Mühldorfer, Kristin; Kurth, Andreas; Müller, Marcel A; Corman, Victor M; Gillich, Nadine; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Schwemmle, Martin; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous bornavirus-like L (EBLL) elements are inheritable sequences derived from ancient bornavirus L genes that encode a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) in many eukaryotic genomes. Here, we demonstrate that bats of the genus Eptesicus have preserved for more than 11.8 million years an EBLL element named eEBLL-1, which has an intact open reading frame of 1,718 codons. The eEBLL-1 coding sequence revealed that functional motifs essential for mononegaviral RdRp activity are well conserved in the EBLL-1 genes. Genetic analyses showed that natural selection operated on eEBLL-1 during the evolution of Eptesicus. Notably, we detected efficient transcription of eEBLL-1 in tissues from Eptesicus bats. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report showing that the eukaryotic genome has gained a riboviral polymerase gene from an ancient virus that has the potential to encode a functional RdRp. PMID:27174689

  10. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  11. The Neural/Immune Gene Ontology: clipping the Gene Ontology for neurological and immunological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubin Eitan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gene Ontology (GO is used to describe genes and gene products from many organisms. When used for functional annotation of microarray data, GO is often slimmed by editing so that only higher level terms remain. This practice is designed to improve the summarizing of experimental results by grouping high level terms and the statistical power of GO term enrichment analysis. Here, we propose a new approach to editing the gene ontology, clipping, which is the editing of GO according to biological relevance. Creation of a GO subset by clipping is achieved by removing terms (from all hierarchal levels if they are not functionally relevant to a given domain of interest. Terms that are located in levels higher to relevant terms are kept, thus, biologically irrelevant terms are only removed if they are not parental to terms that are relevant. Results Using this approach, we have created the Neural-Immune Gene Ontology (NIGO subset of GO directed for neurological and immunological systems. We tested the performance of NIGO in extracting knowledge from microarray experiments by conducting functional analysis and comparing the results to those obtained using the full GO and a generic GO slim. NIGO not only improved the statistical scores given to relevant terms, but was also able to retrieve functionally relevant terms that did not pass statistical cutoffs when using the full GO or the slim subset. Conclusions Our results validate the pipeline used to generate NIGO, suggesting it is indeed enriched with terms that are specific to the neural/immune domains. The results suggest that NIGO can enhance the analysis of microarray experiments involving neural and/or immune related systems. They also directly demonstrate the potential such a domain-specific GO has in generating meaningful hypotheses.

  12. Identification of novel immune and barrier genes in atopic dermatitis by laser capture micro-dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esaki, H.; Ewald, David Adrian; Ungar, B.;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The molecular signature of atopic dermatitis (AD) lesions is associated with TH2 and TH22 activation and epidermal alterations. However, the epidermal and dermal AD transcriptomes and their respective contributions to abnormalities in respective immune and barrier phenotypes are unknown...... normal skin from healthy volunteers, followed by gene expression (microarrays and real-time PCR) and immunostaining studies. RESULTS: Our study identified novel immune and barrier genes, including the IL-34 cytokine and claudins 4 and 8, and showed increased detection of key AD genes usually undetectable...... immune molecules and enabling detection of gene products usually not detected on arrays....

  13. Identification of novel immune and barrier genes in atopic dermatitis by means of laser capture microdissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esaki, Hitokazu; Ewald, David Adrian; Ungar, Benjamin;

    2015-01-01

    Background : The molecular signature of atopic dermatitis (AD) lesions is associated with T(H)2 and T(H)22 activation and epidermal alterations. However, the epidermal and dermal AD transcriptomes and their respective contributions to abnormalities in respective immune and barrier phenotypes are...... with AD and normal skin from healthy volunteers, followed by gene expression (microarrays and real-time PCR) and immunostaining studies. Results : Our study identified novel immune and barrier genes, including the IL-34 cytokine and claudins 4 and 8, and showed increased detection of key AD genes...... key barrier or immune molecules and enabling detection of gene products usually not detected on arrays....

  14. Variation at innate immunity Toll-like receptor genes in a bottlenecked population of a New Zealand robin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Grueber

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are an ancient family of genes encoding transmembrane proteins that bind pathogen-specific molecules and initiate both innate and adaptive aspects of the immune response. Our goal was to determine whether these genes show sufficient genetic diversity in a bottlenecked population to be a useful addition or alternative to the more commonly employed major histocompatibility complex (MHC genotyping in a conservation genetics context. We amplified all known avian TLR genes in a severely bottlenecked population of New Zealand's Stewart Island robin (Petroica australis rakiura, for which reduced microsatellite diversity was previously observed. We genotyped 17-24 birds from a reintroduced island population (including the 12 founders for nine genes, seven of which were polymorphic. We observed a total of 24 single-nucleotide polymorphisms overall, 15 of which were non-synonymous, representing up to five amino-acid variants at a locus. One locus (TLR1LB showed evidence of past directional selection. Results also confirmed a passerine duplication of TLR7. The levels of TLR diversity that we observe are sufficient to justify their further use in addressing conservation genetic questions, even in bottlenecked populations.

  15. Biological consequences of ancient gene acquisition and duplication in the large genome soil bacterium, ""solibacter usitatus"" strain Ellin6076

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challacombe, Jean F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eichorst, Stephanie A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kuske, Cheryl R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hauser, Loren [ORNL; Land, Miriam [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial genome sizes range from ca. 0.5 to 10Mb and are influenced by gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, gene loss and other evolutionary processes. Sequenced genomes of strains in the phylum Acidobacteria revealed that 'Solibacter usistatus' strain Ellin6076 harbors a 9.9 Mb genome. This large genome appears to have arisen by horizontal gene transfer via ancient bacteriophage and plasmid-mediated transduction, as well as widespread small-scale gene duplications. This has resulted in an increased number of paralogs that are potentially ecologically important (ecoparalogs). Low amino acid sequence identities among functional group members and lack of conserved gene order and orientation in the regions containing similar groups of paralogs suggest that most of the paralogs were not the result of recent duplication events. The genome sizes of cultured subdivision 1 and 3 strains in the phylum Acidobacteria were estimated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine the prevalence of the large genome trait within the phylum. Members of subdivision 1 were estimated to have smaller genome sizes ranging from ca. 2.0 to 4.8 Mb, whereas members of subdivision 3 had slightly larger genomes, from ca. 5.8 to 9.9 Mb. It is hypothesized that the large genome of strain Ellin6076 encodes traits that provide a selective metabolic, defensive and regulatory advantage in the variable soil environment.

  16. Biological Consequences of Ancient Gene Acquisition and Duplication in the Large Genome of Candidatus Solibacter usitatus Ellin6076

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challacombe, Jean F [ORNL; Eichorst, Stephanie A [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kuske, Cheryl R [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01

    Members of the bacterial phylum Acidobacteria are widespread in soils and sediments worldwide, and are abundant in many soils. Acidobacteria are challenging to culture in vitro, and many basic features of their biology and functional roles in the soil have not been determined. Candidatus Solibacter usitatus strain Ellin6076 has a 9.9 Mb genome that is approximately 2 5 times as large as the other sequenced Acidobacteria genomes. Bacterial genome sizes typically range from 0.5 to 10 Mb and are influenced by gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, gene loss and other evolutionary processes. Our comparative genome analyses indicate that the Ellin6076 large genome has arisen by horizontal gene transfer via ancient bacteriophage and/or plasmid-mediated transduction, and widespread small-scale gene duplications, resulting in an increased number of paralogs. Low amino acid sequence identities among functional group members, and lack of conserved gene order and orientation in regions containing similar groups of paralogs, suggest that most of the paralogs are not the result of recent duplication events. The genome sizes of additional cultured Acidobacteria strains were estimated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine the prevalence of the large genome trait within the phylum. Members of subdivision 3 had larger genomes than those of subdivision 1, but none were as large as the Ellin6076 genome. The large genome of Ellin6076 may not be typical of the phylum, and encodes traits that could provide a selective metabolic, defensive and regulatory advantage in the soil environment.

  17. Genome-Wide RNAi Screens in C. elegans to Identify Genes Influencing Lifespan and Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Amit; Rae, Robbie

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference is a rapid, inexpensive, and highly effective tool used to inhibit gene function. In C. elegans, whole genome screens have been used to identify genes involved with numerous traits including aging and innate immunity. RNAi in C. elegans can be carried out via feeding, soaking, or injection. Here we outline protocols used to maintain, grow, and carry out RNAi via feeding in C. elegans and determine whether the inhibited genes are essential for lifespan or innate immunity. PMID:27581293

  18. Microarray expression analysis of genes involved in innate immune memory in peritoneal macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Yoshida

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunological memory has been believed to be a feature of the adaptive immune system for long period, but recent reports suggest that the innate immune system also exhibits memory-like reaction. Although evidence of innate immune memory is accumulating, no in vivo experimental data has clearly implicated a molecular mechanism, or even a cell-type, for this phenomenon. In this study of data deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO under GSE71111, we analyzed the expression profile of peritoneal macrophages isolated from mice pre-administrated with toll-like receptor (TLR ligands, mimicking pathogen infection. In these macrophages, increased expression of a group of innate immunity-related genes was sustained over a long period of time, and these genes overlapped with ATF7-regulated genes. We conclude that ATF7 plays an important role in innate immune memory in macrophages.

  19. Ancient DNA reveals prehistoric gene-flow from siberia in the complex human population history of North East Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Balanovsky, Oleg; Brandt, Guido; Khartanovich, Valery; Buzhilova, Alexandra; Koshel, Sergey; Zaporozhchenko, Valery; Gronenborn, Detlef; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Kolpakov, Eugen; Shumkin, Vladimir; Alt, Kurt W; Balanovska, Elena; Cooper, Alan; Haak, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    North East Europe harbors a high diversity of cultures and languages, suggesting a complex genetic history. Archaeological, anthropological, and genetic research has revealed a series of influences from Western and Eastern Eurasia in the past. While genetic data from modern-day populations is commonly used to make inferences about their origins and past migrations, ancient DNA provides a powerful test of such hypotheses by giving a snapshot of the past genetic diversity. In order to better understand the dynamics that have shaped the gene pool of North East Europeans, we generated and analyzed 34 mitochondrial genotypes from the skeletal remains of three archaeological sites in northwest Russia. These sites were dated to the Mesolithic and the Early Metal Age (7,500 and 3,500 uncalibrated years Before Present). We applied a suite of population genetic analyses (principal component analysis, genetic distance mapping, haplotype sharing analyses) and compared past demographic models through coalescent simulations using Bayesian Serial SimCoal and Approximate Bayesian Computation. Comparisons of genetic data from ancient and modern-day populations revealed significant changes in the mitochondrial makeup of North East Europeans through time. Mesolithic foragers showed high frequencies and diversity of haplogroups U (U2e, U4, U5a), a pattern observed previously in European hunter-gatherers from Iberia to Scandinavia. In contrast, the presence of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups C, D, and Z in Early Metal Age individuals suggested discontinuity with Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and genetic influx from central/eastern Siberia. We identified remarkable genetic dissimilarities between prehistoric and modern-day North East Europeans/Saami, which suggests an important role of post-Mesolithic migrations from Western Europe and subsequent population replacement/extinctions. This work demonstrates how ancient DNA can improve our understanding of human population movements across

  20. Ancient DNA reveals prehistoric gene-flow from siberia in the complex human population history of North East Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clio Der Sarkissian

    Full Text Available North East Europe harbors a high diversity of cultures and languages, suggesting a complex genetic history. Archaeological, anthropological, and genetic research has revealed a series of influences from Western and Eastern Eurasia in the past. While genetic data from modern-day populations is commonly used to make inferences about their origins and past migrations, ancient DNA provides a powerful test of such hypotheses by giving a snapshot of the past genetic diversity. In order to better understand the dynamics that have shaped the gene pool of North East Europeans, we generated and analyzed 34 mitochondrial genotypes from the skeletal remains of three archaeological sites in northwest Russia. These sites were dated to the Mesolithic and the Early Metal Age (7,500 and 3,500 uncalibrated years Before Present. We applied a suite of population genetic analyses (principal component analysis, genetic distance mapping, haplotype sharing analyses and compared past demographic models through coalescent simulations using Bayesian Serial SimCoal and Approximate Bayesian Computation. Comparisons of genetic data from ancient and modern-day populations revealed significant changes in the mitochondrial makeup of North East Europeans through time. Mesolithic foragers showed high frequencies and diversity of haplogroups U (U2e, U4, U5a, a pattern observed previously in European hunter-gatherers from Iberia to Scandinavia. In contrast, the presence of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups C, D, and Z in Early Metal Age individuals suggested discontinuity with Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and genetic influx from central/eastern Siberia. We identified remarkable genetic dissimilarities between prehistoric and modern-day North East Europeans/Saami, which suggests an important role of post-Mesolithic migrations from Western Europe and subsequent population replacement/extinctions. This work demonstrates how ancient DNA can improve our understanding of human population

  1. Immune genes are associated with human glioblastoma pathology and patient survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vauléon Elodie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor in adults. Several recent transcriptomic studies in GBM have identified different signatures involving immune genes associated with GBM pathology, overall survival (OS or response to treatment. Methods In order to clarify the immune signatures found in GBM, we performed a co-expression network analysis that grouped 791 immune-associated genes (IA genes in large clusters using a combined dataset of 161 GBM specimens from published databases. We next studied IA genes associated with patient survival using 3 different statistical methods. We then developed a 6-IA gene risk predictor which stratified patients into two groups with statistically significantly different survivals. We validated this risk predictor on two other Affymetrix data series, on a local Agilent data series, and using RT-Q-PCR on a local series of GBM patients treated by standard chemo-radiation therapy. Results The co-expression network analysis of the immune genes disclosed 6 powerful modules identifying innate immune system and natural killer cells, myeloid cells and cytokine signatures. Two of these modules were significantly enriched in genes associated with OS. We also found 108 IA genes linked to the immune system significantly associated with OS in GBM patients. The 6-IA gene risk predictor successfully distinguished two groups of GBM patients with significantly different survival (OS low risk: 22.3 months versus high risk: 7.3 months; p  Conclusions This study demonstrates the immune signatures found in previous GBM genomic analyses and suggests the involvement of immune cells in GBM biology. The robust 6-IA gene risk predictor should be helpful in establishing prognosis in GBM patients, in particular in those with a proneural GBM subtype, and even in the well-known good prognosis group of patients with methylated MGMT promoter-bearing tumors.

  2. Repeated observation of immune gene sets enrichment in women with non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Jhajaira M.; Prado, Alexandra; Cardenas, Nadezhda K.; Zaharia, Mayer; Dyer, Richard; Doimi, Franco; Bravo, Leny; Pinillos, Luis; Morante, Zaida; Aguilar, Alfredo; Mas, Luis A.; Gomez, Henry L.; Vallejos, Carlos S.; Rolfo, Christian; Pinto, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    There are different biological and clinical patterns of lung cancer between genders indicating intrinsic differences leading to increased sensitivity to cigarette smoke-induced DNA damage, mutational patterns of KRAS and better clinical outcomes in women while differences between genders at gene-expression levels was not previously reported. Here we show an enrichment of immune genes in NSCLC in women compared to men. We found in a GSEA analysis (by biological processes annotated from Gene Ontology) of six public datasets a repeated observation of immune gene sets enrichment in women. “Immune system process”, “immune response”, “defense response”, “cellular defense response” and “regulation of immune system process” were the gene sets most over-represented while APOBEC3G, APOBEC3F, LAT, CD1D and CCL5 represented the top-five core genes. Characterization of immune cell composition with the platform CIBERSORT showed no differences between genders; however, there were differences when tumor tissues were compared to normal tissues. Our results suggest different immune responses in NSCLC between genders that could be related with the different clinical outcome. PMID:26958810

  3. Major histocompatibility lineages and immune gene function in teleost fishes: the road not taken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stet, R.J.M.; Kruiswijk, C.P.; Dixon, B.

    2003-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear over the course of the past decade that the immune system genes of teleosts and tetrapods are plainly derived from common ancestral genes. The last 5 years, however, have also made it abundantly clear that in the teleost genome some of these genes are organized in a

  4. Toward a new history and geography of human genes informed by ancient DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickrell, Joseph K; Reich, David

    2014-09-01

    Genetic information contains a record of the history of our species, and technological advances have transformed our ability to access this record. Many studies have used genome-wide data from populations today to learn about the peopling of the globe and subsequent adaptation to local conditions. Implicit in this research is the assumption that the geographic locations of people today are informative about the geographic locations of their ancestors in the distant past. However, it is now clear that long-range migration, admixture, and population replacement subsequent to the initial out-of-Africa expansion have altered the genetic structure of most of the world's human populations. In light of this we argue that it is time to critically reevaluate current models of the peopling of the globe, as well as the importance of natural selection in determining the geographic distribution of phenotypes. We specifically highlight the transformative potential of ancient DNA. By accessing the genetic make-up of populations living at archaeologically known times and places, ancient DNA makes it possible to directly track migrations and responses to natural selection.

  5. Electronic Sorting of Immune Cell Subpopulations Based on Highly Plastic Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pingzhang; Han, Wenling; Ma, Dalong

    2016-07-15

    Immune cells are highly heterogeneous and plastic with regard to gene expression and cell phenotype. In this study, we categorized genes into those with low and high gene plasticity, and those categories revealed different functions and applications. We proposed that highly plastic genes could be suited for the labeling of immune cell subpopulations; thus, novel immune cell subpopulations could be identified by gene plasticity analysis. For this purpose, we systematically analyzed highly plastic genes in human and mouse immune cells. In total, 1,379 human and 883 mouse genes were identified as being extremely plastic. We also expanded our previous immunoinformatic method, electronic sorting, which surveys big data to perform virtual analysis. This approach used correlation analysis and took dosage changes into account, which allowed us to identify the differentially expressed genes. A test with human CD4(+) T cells supported the method's feasibility, effectiveness, and predictability. For example, with the use of human nonregulatory T cells, we found that FOXP3(hi)CD4(+) T cells were highly expressive of certain known molecules, such as CD25 and CTLA4, and that this process of investigation did not require isolating or inducing these immune cells in vitro. Therefore, the sorting process helped us to discover the potential signature genes or marker molecules and to conduct functional evaluations for immune cell subpopulations. Finally, in human CD4(+) T cells, 747 potential immune cell subpopulations and their candidate signature genes were identified, which provides a useful resource for big data-driven knowledge discoveries. PMID:27288532

  6. Identification of Immunity Related Genes to Study the Physalis peruviana – Fusarium oxysporum Pathosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enciso-Rodríguez, Felix E.; González, Carolina; Rodríguez, Edwin A.; López, Camilo E.; Landsman, David; Barrero, Luz Stella; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    The Cape gooseberry (Physalisperuviana L) is an Andean exotic fruit with high nutritional value and appealing medicinal properties. However, its cultivation faces important phytosanitary problems mainly due to pathogens like Fusarium oxysporum, Cercosporaphysalidis and Alternaria spp. Here we used the Cape gooseberry foliar transcriptome to search for proteins that encode conserved domains related to plant immunity including: NBS (Nucleotide Binding Site), CC (Coiled-Coil), TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor). We identified 74 immunity related gene candidates in P. peruviana which have the typical resistance gene (R-gene) architecture, 17 Receptor like kinase (RLKs) candidates related to PAMP-Triggered Immunity (PTI), eight (TIR-NBS-LRR, or TNL) and nine (CC–NBS-LRR, or CNL) candidates related to Effector-Triggered Immunity (ETI) genes among others. These candidate genes were categorized by molecular function (98%), biological process (85%) and cellular component (79%) using gene ontology. Some of the most interesting predicted roles were those associated with binding and transferase activity. We designed 94 primers pairs from the 74 immunity-related genes (IRGs) to amplify the corresponding genomic regions on six genotypes that included resistant and susceptible materials. From these, we selected 17 single band amplicons and sequenced them in 14 F. oxysporum resistant and susceptible genotypes. Sequence polymorphisms were analyzed through preliminary candidate gene association, which allowed the detection of one SNP at the PpIRG-63 marker revealing a nonsynonymous mutation in the predicted LRR domain suggesting functional roles for resistance. PMID:23844210

  7. Identification of immunity related genes to study the Physalis peruviana--Fusarium oxysporum pathosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enciso-Rodríguez, Felix E; González, Carolina; Rodríguez, Edwin A; López, Camilo E; Landsman, David; Barrero, Luz Stella; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    The Cape gooseberry (Physalisperuviana L) is an Andean exotic fruit with high nutritional value and appealing medicinal properties. However, its cultivation faces important phytosanitary problems mainly due to pathogens like Fusarium oxysporum, Cercosporaphysalidis and Alternaria spp. Here we used the Cape gooseberry foliar transcriptome to search for proteins that encode conserved domains related to plant immunity including: NBS (Nucleotide Binding Site), CC (Coiled-Coil), TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor). We identified 74 immunity related gene candidates in P. peruviana which have the typical resistance gene (R-gene) architecture, 17 Receptor like kinase (RLKs) candidates related to PAMP-Triggered Immunity (PTI), eight (TIR-NBS-LRR, or TNL) and nine (CC-NBS-LRR, or CNL) candidates related to Effector-Triggered Immunity (ETI) genes among others. These candidate genes were categorized by molecular function (98%), biological process (85%) and cellular component (79%) using gene ontology. Some of the most interesting predicted roles were those associated with binding and transferase activity. We designed 94 primers pairs from the 74 immunity-related genes (IRGs) to amplify the corresponding genomic regions on six genotypes that included resistant and susceptible materials. From these, we selected 17 single band amplicons and sequenced them in 14 F. oxysporum resistant and susceptible genotypes. Sequence polymorphisms were analyzed through preliminary candidate gene association, which allowed the detection of one SNP at the PpIRG-63 marker revealing a nonsynonymous mutation in the predicted LRR domain suggesting functional roles for resistance. PMID:23844210

  8. Identification of immunity related genes to study the Physalis peruviana--Fusarium oxysporum pathosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix E Enciso-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available The Cape gooseberry (Physalisperuviana L is an Andean exotic fruit with high nutritional value and appealing medicinal properties. However, its cultivation faces important phytosanitary problems mainly due to pathogens like Fusarium oxysporum, Cercosporaphysalidis and Alternaria spp. Here we used the Cape gooseberry foliar transcriptome to search for proteins that encode conserved domains related to plant immunity including: NBS (Nucleotide Binding Site, CC (Coiled-Coil, TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor. We identified 74 immunity related gene candidates in P. peruviana which have the typical resistance gene (R-gene architecture, 17 Receptor like kinase (RLKs candidates related to PAMP-Triggered Immunity (PTI, eight (TIR-NBS-LRR, or TNL and nine (CC-NBS-LRR, or CNL candidates related to Effector-Triggered Immunity (ETI genes among others. These candidate genes were categorized by molecular function (98%, biological process (85% and cellular component (79% using gene ontology. Some of the most interesting predicted roles were those associated with binding and transferase activity. We designed 94 primers pairs from the 74 immunity-related genes (IRGs to amplify the corresponding genomic regions on six genotypes that included resistant and susceptible materials. From these, we selected 17 single band amplicons and sequenced them in 14 F. oxysporum resistant and susceptible genotypes. Sequence polymorphisms were analyzed through preliminary candidate gene association, which allowed the detection of one SNP at the PpIRG-63 marker revealing a nonsynonymous mutation in the predicted LRR domain suggesting functional roles for resistance.

  9. Evolution of red algal plastid genomes: ancient architectures, introns, horizontal gene transfer, and taxonomic utility of plastid markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Janouškovec

    Full Text Available Red algae have the most gene-rich plastid genomes known, but despite their evolutionary importance these genomes remain poorly sampled. Here we characterize three complete and one partial plastid genome from a diverse range of florideophytes. By unifying annotations across all available red algal plastid genomes we show they all share a highly compact and slowly-evolving architecture and uniquely rich gene complements. Both chromosome structure and gene content have changed very little during red algal diversification, and suggest that plastid-to nucleus gene transfers have been rare. Despite their ancient character, however, the red algal plastids also contain several unprecedented features, including a group II intron in a tRNA-Met gene that encodes the first example of red algal plastid intron maturase - a feature uniquely shared among florideophytes. We also identify a rare case of a horizontally-acquired proteobacterial operon, and propose this operon may have been recruited for plastid function and potentially replaced a nucleus-encoded plastid-targeted paralogue. Plastid genome phylogenies yield a fully resolved tree and suggest that plastid DNA is a useful tool for resolving red algal relationships. Lastly, we estimate the evolutionary rates among more than 200 plastid genes, and assess their usefulness for species and subspecies taxonomy by comparison to well-established barcoding markers such as cox1 and rbcL. Overall, these data demonstrates that red algal plastid genomes are easily obtainable using high-throughput sequencing of total genomic DNA, interesting from evolutionary perspectives, and promising in resolving red algal relationships at evolutionarily-deep and species/subspecies levels.

  10. Evolutionary dynamics of immune-related genes and pathways in disease-vector mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Robert M; Kriventseva, Evgenia V; Meister, Stephan; Xi, Zhiyong; Alvarez, Kanwal S; Bartholomay, Lyric C; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Bian, Guowu; Blandin, Stephanie; Christensen, Bruce M; Dong, Yuemei; Jiang, Haobo; Kanost, Michael R; Koutsos, Anastasios C; Levashina, Elena A; Li, Jianyong; Ligoxygakis, Petros; Maccallum, Robert M; Mayhew, George F; Mendes, Antonio; Michel, Kristin; Osta, Mike A; Paskewitz, Susan; Shin, Sang Woon; Vlachou, Dina; Wang, Lihui; Wei, Weiqi; Zheng, Liangbiao; Zou, Zhen; Severson, David W; Raikhel, Alexander S; Kafatos, Fotis C; Dimopoulos, George; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Christophides, George K

    2007-06-22

    Mosquitoes are vectors of parasitic and viral diseases of immense importance for public health. The acquisition of the genome sequence of the yellow fever and Dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (Aa), has enabled a comparative phylogenomic analysis of the insect immune repertoire: in Aa, the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae (Ag), and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (Dm). Analysis of immune signaling pathways and response modules reveals both conservative and rapidly evolving features associated with different functional gene categories and particular aspects of immune reactions. These dynamics reflect in part continuous readjustment between accommodation and rejection of pathogens and suggest how innate immunity may have evolved. PMID:17588928

  11. Evolutionary Dynamics of Immune-Related Genes and Pathways in Disease-Vector Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Robert M.; Kriventseva, Evgenia V.; Meister, Stephan; Xi, Zhiyong; Alvarez, Kanwal S.; Bartholomay, Lyric C.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Bian, Guowu; Blandin, Stephanie; Christensen, Bruce M.; Dong, Yuemei; Jiang, Haobo; Kanost, Michael R.; Koutsos, Anastasios C.; Levashina, Elena A.; Li, Jianyong; Ligoxygakis, Petros; MacCallum, Robert M.; Mayhew, George F.; Mendes, Antonio; Michel, Kristin; Osta, Mike A.; Paskewitz, Susan; Shin, Sang Woon; Vlachou, Dina; Wang, Lihui; Wei, Weiqi; Zheng, Liangbiao; Zou, Zhen; Severson, David W.; Raikhel, Alexander S.; Kafatos, Fotis C.; Dimopoulos, George; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Christophides, George K.

    2007-01-01

    Mosquitoes are vectors of parasitic and viral diseases of immense importance for public health. The acquisition of the genome sequence of the yellow fever and Dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (Aa), has enabled a comparative phylogenomic analysis of the insect immune repertoire: in Aa, the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae (Ag), and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (Dm). Analysis of immune signaling pathways and response modules reveals both conservative and rapidly evolving features associated with different functional gene categories and particular aspects of immune reactions. These dynamics reflect in part continuous readjustment between accommodation and rejection of pathogens and suggest how innate immunity may have evolved. PMID:17588928

  12. Genes of the adaptive immune system are expressed early in zebrafish larval development following lipopolysaccharide stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fengling; ZHANG Shicui; WANG Zhiping; LI Hongyan

    2011-01-01

    Information regarding immunocompetence of the adaptive immune system (AIS) in zebrafish Danio rerio remains limited. Here, we stimulated an immune response in fish embryos,larvae and adults using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and measured the upregulation of a number of AIS-related genes (Rag2, AID, TCRAC, IgLC-1, mIg, sIg, IgZ and DAB) 3 and 18 h later. We found that all of the genes evaluated were strongly induced following LPS stimulation, with most of them responding at 8 d post fertilization. This confirms that a functional adaptive immune response is present in D. rerio larvae, and provides a window for further functional analyses.

  13. Ancient signals: comparative genomics of plant MAPK and MAPKK gene families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamel, Louis-Philippe; Nicole, Marie-Claude; Sritubtim, Somrudee;

    2006-01-01

    MAPK signal transduction modules play crucial roles in regulating many biological processes in plants, and their components are encoded by highly conserved genes. The recent availability of genome sequences for rice and poplar now makes it possible to examine how well the previously described...... Arabidopsis MAPK and MAPKK gene family structures represent the broader evolutionary situation in plants, and analysis of gene expression data for MPK and MKK genes in all three species allows further refinement of those families, based on functionality. The Arabidopsis MAPK nomenclature appears sufficiently...... robust to allow it to be usefully extended to other well-characterized plant systems....

  14. New immune systems: pathogen-specific host defence, life history strategies and hypervariable immune-response genes of invertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    L Bowden; NM Dheilly; DA Raftos; SV Nair

    2007-01-01

    Our understanding of invertebrate immune systems is undergoing a paradigm shift. Until recently, the host defence responses of invertebrates were thought to rely on limited molecular diversity that could not tailor reactions toward specific microbes. This view is now being challenged. Highly discriminatory defence responses, and hypervariable gene systems with the potential to drive them, have been identified in a number of invertebrate groups. These systems seem to be quite distinct, suggest...

  15. A new era of targeting the ancient gatekeepers of the immune system: toll-like agonists in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, Zahra; Holgate, Stephen T; Radzioch, Danuta; Rezaei, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) belong to a large family of pattern recognition receptors known as the ancient 'gatekeepers' of the immune system. TLRs are located at the first line of defense against invading pathogens as well as aeroallergens, making them interesting targets to modulate the natural history of respiratory allergy. Agonists of TLRs have been widely employed in therapeutic or prophylactic preparations useful for asthma/allergic rhinitis (AR) patients. MPL® (a TLR4 agonist) and the CpG oligodeoxynucleotide of 1018 ISS, a TLR9 agonist, show strong immunogenicity effects that make them appropriate adjuvants for allergy vaccines. Targeting the TLRs can enhance the efficacy of specific allergen immunotherapy, currently the only available 'curative' treatment for respiratory allergies. In addition, intranasal administration of AZD8848 (a TLR7 agonist) and VTX-1463 (a TLR8 agonist) as stand-alone therapeutics have revealed efficacy in the relief of the symptoms of AR patients. No anaphylaxis has been so far reported with such compounds targeting TLRs, with the most common adverse effects being transient and local irritation (e.g. redness, swelling and pruritus). Many other compounds that target TLRs have been found to suppress airway inflammation, eosinophilia and airway hyper-responsiveness in various animal models of allergic inflammation. Indeed, in the future a wide variability of TLR agonists and even antagonists that exhibit anti-asthma/AR effects are likely to emerge.

  16. Cloning and expression of swine myostatin gene and its application in animal immunization trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xianyong; CAO Yongchang; SHU Dingming; BI Yingzuo

    2005-01-01

    We have amplified swine myostatin (MSTN) gene by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and cloned it into pGEM-T Easy vector. The cloned swine MSTN gene consists of 1128 nucleotides, which has been submitted to GenBank (acquired registered code- AY448008). The cloned swine MSTN gene was successfully expressed in E. coli without the first 25 amino acids. Crude extraction of the expressed recombinant MSTN protein was used to immunize mice to investigate the effects on their bodyweights. We show here that the body weights of the immunized mice were higher than that of the controls, even though the difference was not significant. Surprisingly, the progenies of the immunized mice also were heavier than the controls. Especially at day 3, the average body weight of the immunized mice was 10.5% higher than that of the controls , which is significant (p < 0.05).

  17. Analysis of stop-gain and frameshift variants in human innate immunity genes.

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    Antonio Rausell

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function variants in innate immunity genes are associated with Mendelian disorders in the form of primary immunodeficiencies. Recent resequencing projects report that stop-gains and frameshifts are collectively prevalent in humans and could be responsible for some of the inter-individual variability in innate immune response. Current computational approaches evaluating loss-of-function in genes carrying these variants rely on gene-level characteristics such as evolutionary conservation and functional redundancy across the genome. However, innate immunity genes represent a particular case because they are more likely to be under positive selection and duplicated. To create a ranking of severity that would be applicable to innate immunity genes we evaluated 17,764 stop-gain and 13,915 frameshift variants from the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project and 1,000 Genomes Project. Sequence-based features such as loss of functional domains, isoform-specific truncation and nonsense-mediated decay were found to correlate with variant allele frequency and validated with gene expression data. We integrated these features in a Bayesian classification scheme and benchmarked its use in predicting pathogenic variants against Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM disease stop-gains and frameshifts. The classification scheme was applied in the assessment of 335 stop-gains and 236 frameshifts affecting 227 interferon-stimulated genes. The sequence-based score ranks variants in innate immunity genes according to their potential to cause disease, and complements existing gene-based pathogenicity scores. Specifically, the sequence-based score improves measurement of functional gene impairment, discriminates across different variants in a given gene and appears particularly useful for analysis of less conserved genes.

  18. A molecular phylogeny of bivalve mollusks: ancient radiations and divergences as revealed by mitochondrial genes.

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    Federico Plazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bivalves are very ancient and successful conchiferan mollusks (both in terms of species number and geographical distribution. Despite their importance in marine biota, their deep phylogenetic relationships were scarcely investigated from a molecular perspective, whereas much valuable work has been done on taxonomy, as well as phylogeny, of lower taxa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present a class-level bivalve phylogeny with a broad sample of 122 ingroup taxa, using four mitochondrial markers (MT-RNR1, MT-RNR2, MT-CO1, MT-CYB. Rigorous techniques have been exploited to set up the dataset, analyze phylogenetic signal, and infer a single final tree. In this study, we show the basal position of Opponobranchia to all Autobranchia, as well as of Palaeoheterodonta to the remaining Autobranchia, which we here propose to call Amarsipobranchia. Anomalodesmata were retrieved as monophyletic and basal to (Heterodonta + Pteriomorphia. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Bivalve morphological characters were traced onto the phylogenetic trees obtained from the molecular analysis; our analysis suggests that eulamellibranch gills and heterodont hinge are ancestral characters for all Autobranchia. This conclusion would entail a re-evaluation of bivalve symplesiomorphies.

  19. Ancient horizontal transfer of transaldolase-like protein gene and its role in plant vascular development

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zefeng; Zhou, Yong; Huang, Jinling; Hu, Yunyun; Zhang, Enying; Xie, Zhengwen; Ma, Sijia; Gao, Yun; Song, Song; Xu, Chenwu; Liang, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    A major event in land plant evolution is the origin of vascular tissues, which ensure the long-distance transport of water, nutrients and organic compounds. However, the molecular basis for the origin and evolution of plant vascular tissues remains largely unknown. Here, we investigate the evolution of the land plant TAL-type transaldolase (TAL) gene and its potential function in rice (Oryza sativa) based on phylogenetic analyses and transgenic experiments, respectively. TAL genes are only pr...

  20. Gene Therapy of Cancer: Induction of Anti-Tumor Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Qian; Jesus Prieto

    2004-01-01

    Many malignancies lack satisfactory treatment and new therapeutic options are urgently needed. Gene therapy is a new modality to treat both inherited and acquired diseases based on the transfer of genetic material to the tissues. Different gene therapy strategies against cancers have been developed. A considerable number of preclinical studies indicate that a great variety of cancers are amenable to gene therapy. Among these strategies,induction of anti-tumorimmunity is the most promising approach. Gene therapy with cytokines has reached unprecedented success in preclinical models of cancer. Synergistic rather than additive effects have beendemonstrated by combination of gene transfer of cytokines/chemokines, costimulatory molecules or adoptive cell therapy. Recent progress in vector technology and in imaging techniques allowing in vivo assessment of gene expression will facilitate the development of clinical applications of gene therapy, a procedure which may have a notorious impact in the management of cancers lacking effective treatment.

  1. Tissue-Specific Immune Gene Expression in the Migratory Locust, Locusta Migratoria

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    Tamara Pulpitel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of hosts to respond to infection involves several complex immune recognition pathways. Broadly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs allow individuals to target a range of invading microbes. Recently, studies on insect innate immunity have found evidence that a single pathogen can activate different immune pathways across species. In this study, expression changes in immune genes encoding peptidoglycan-recognition protein SA (PGRP-SA, gram-negative binding protein 1 (GNBP1 and prophenoloxidase (ProPO were investigated in Locusta migratoria, following an immune challenge using injected lipopolysaccharide (LPS solution from Escherichia coli. Since immune activation might also be tissue-specific, gene expression levels were followed across a range of tissue types. For PGRP-SA, expression increased in response to LPS within all seven of the tissue-types assayed and differed significantly between tissues. Expression of GNBP1 similarly varied across tissue types, yet showed no clear expression difference between LPS-injected and uninfected locusts. Increases in ProPO expression in response to LPS, however, could only be detected in the gut sections. This study has revealed tissue-specific immune response to add a new level of complexity to insect immune studies. In addition to variation in recognition pathways identified in previous works, tissue-specificity should be carefully considered in similar works.

  2. Expression of immune-related genes in embryos and larvae of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Aifu; Zhou, Zunchun; Dong, Ying; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Zhong; Guan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Bai; Sun, Dapeng

    2010-11-01

    The echinoderm immunity system has been extensively investigated in adults in several classes such as echinoid and holothuroidea. However, the defense mechanism in embryos and larvae remains largely unexplored. To profile the immune-related genes expression in embryos and larvae and to monitor the stimulation of the innate immune response by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) challenge, we investigated the expression patterns of nine immune-related genes in embryos and larvae of sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) at eleven developmental stages using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The expression of six encoding proteins including heat shock protein70 (Hsp70), Hsp90, Hsp gp96, thymosin-beta, ferritin and DD104 protein was detected at all eleven development stages according to mRNA expression data. However, the expression of mannan-binding C-type lectin (MBCL) was detected at early auricularia to juvenile stages, while lysozyme and serine proteinase inhibitor (SPI) were detected only at juvenile stage. Out of these nine genes, three (MBCL, lysozyme and SPI) were found to be up-regulated in mRNA expression upon LPS challenge, whereas the other six showed no significant change. Our study presents a first preliminary view into the expression patterns of immune-related genes at different developmental stages of sea cucumber, which increases the available information on echinoderm immunity. PMID:20673800

  3. A molecular phylogeny of bivalve mollusks: ancient radiations and divergences as revealed by mitochondrial genes

    OpenAIRE

    Plazzi, Federico

    2011-01-01

    The main scope of my PhD is the reconstruction of the large-scale bivalve phylogeny on the basis of four mitochondrial genes, with samples taken from all major groups of the class. To my knowledge, it is the first attempt of such a breadth in Bivalvia. I decided to focus on both ribosomal and protein coding DNA sequences (two ribosomal encoding genes -12s and 16s -, and two protein coding ones - cytochrome c oxidase I and cytochrome b), since either bibliography and my preliminary results con...

  4. Characterization of the rainbow trout spleen transcriptome and identification of immune-related genes

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    Ali eAli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Resistance against diseases affects profitability of rainbow trout. Limited information is available about functions and mechanisms of teleost immune pathways. Immunogenomics provides powerful tools to determine disease resistance genes/gene pathways and develop genetic markers for genomic selection.RNA-Seq sequencing of the rainbow trout spleen yielded 93,532,200 reads (100bp. High quality reads were assembled into 43,047 contigs. 26,333 (61.17% of the contigs had hits to the NR protein database and 7,024 (16.32% had hits to the KEGG database. Gene ontology showed significant percentages of transcripts assigned to binding (51%, signaling (7%, response to stimuli (9% and receptor activity (4% suggesting existence of many immune-related genes. KEGG annotation revealed 2,825 sequences belonging to organismal systems with the highest number of sequences, 842 (29.81%, assigned to immune system. A number of sequences were identified for the first time in rainbow trout belonging to Toll-like receptor signaling (25, B cell receptor signaling pathway (28, T cell receptor signaling pathway (33, chemokine signaling pathway (44, Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis (23, leukocyte transendothelial migration (34 and NK cell mediated cytotoxicity (21. In addition, 51 transcripts were identified as spleen-specific genes. The list includes 277 full-length cDNAs.The presence of a large number of immune-related genes and pathways similar to other vertebrates suggests that innate and adaptive immunity in fish are conserved. This study provides deep-sequence data of rainbow trout spleen transcriptome and identifies many new immune-related genes and full-length cDNAs. This data will help identify allelic variations suitable for genomic selection and genetic manipulation in aquaculture.

  5. Ancient and recent adaptive evolution of primate non-homologous end joining genes.

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    Ann Demogines

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In human cells, DNA double-strand breaks are repaired primarily by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ pathway. Given their critical nature, we expected NHEJ proteins to be evolutionarily conserved, with relatively little sequence change over time. Here, we report that while critical domains of these proteins are conserved as expected, the sequence of NHEJ proteins has also been shaped by recurrent positive selection, leading to rapid sequence evolution in other protein domains. In order to characterize the molecular evolution of the human NHEJ pathway, we generated large simian primate sequence datasets for NHEJ genes. Codon-based models of gene evolution yielded statistical support for the recurrent positive selection of five NHEJ genes during primate evolution: XRCC4, NBS1, Artemis, POLλ, and CtIP. Analysis of human polymorphism data using the composite of multiple signals (CMS test revealed that XRCC4 has also been subjected to positive selection in modern humans. Crystal structures are available for XRCC4, Nbs1, and Polλ; and residues under positive selection fall exclusively on the surfaces of these proteins. Despite the positive selection of such residues, biochemical experiments with variants of one positively selected site in Nbs1 confirm that functions necessary for DNA repair and checkpoint signaling have been conserved. However, many viruses interact with the proteins of the NHEJ pathway as part of their infectious lifecycle. We propose that an ongoing evolutionary arms race between viruses and NHEJ genes may be driving the surprisingly rapid evolution of these critical genes.

  6. γ-Crystallins of the chicken lens: remnants of an ancient vertebrate gene family in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingwei; Sagar, Vatsala; Len, Hoay-Shuen; Peterson, Katherine; Fan, Jianguo; Mishra, Sanghamitra; McMurtry, John; Wilmarth, Phillip A; David, Larry L; Wistow, Graeme

    2016-04-01

    γ-Crystallins, abundant proteins of vertebrate lenses, were thought to be absent from birds. However, bird genomes contain well-conserved genes for γS- and γN-crystallins. Although expressed sequence tag analysis of chicken eye found no transcripts for these genes, RT-PCR detected spliced transcripts for both genes in chicken lens, with lower levels in cornea and retina/retinal pigment epithelium. The level of mRNA for γS in chicken lens was relatively very low even though the chicken crygs gene promoter had lens-preferred activity similar to that of mouse. Chicken γS was detected by a peptide antibody in lens, but not in other ocular tissues. Low levels of γS and γN proteins were detected in chicken lens by shotgun mass spectroscopy. Water-soluble and water-insoluble lens fractions were analyzed and 1934 proteins (chicken lens proteome 30-fold. Although chicken γS is well conserved in protein sequence, it has one notable difference in leucine 16, replacing a surface glutamine conserved in other γ-crystallins, possibly affecting solubility. However, L16 and engineered Q16 versions were both highly soluble and had indistinguishable circular dichroism, tryptophan fluorescence and heat stability (melting temperature Tm ~ 65 °C) profiles. L16 has been present in birds for over 100 million years and may have been adopted for a specific protein interaction in the bird lens. However, evolution has clearly reduced or eliminated expression of ancestral γ-crystallins in bird lenses. The conservation of genes for γS- and γN-crystallins suggests they may have been preserved for reasons unrelated to the bulk properties of the lens.

  7. Influence of Immune Responses in Gene/Stem Cell Therapies for Muscular Dystrophies

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    Andrea Farini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies (MDs are a heterogeneous group of diseases, caused by mutations in different components of sarcolemma, extracellular matrix, or enzymes. Inflammation and innate or adaptive immune response activation are prominent features of MDs. Various therapies under development are directed toward rescuing the dystrophic muscle damage using gene transfer or cell therapy. Here we discussed current knowledge about involvement of immune system responses to experimental therapies in MDs.

  8. Innate Immune Activity Conditions the Effect of Regulatory Variants upon Monocyte Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Fairfax, B. P.; Humburg, P.; Makino, S.; Naranbhai, V; Wong, D.; Lau, E; Jostins, L; Plant, K.; Andrews, R; McGee, C.; Knight, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    To systematically investigate the impact of immune stimulation upon regulatory variant activity, we exposed primary monocytes from 432 healthy Europeans to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or differing durations of lipopolysaccharide and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). More than half of cis-eQTLs identified, involving hundreds of genes and associated pathways, are detected specifically in stimulated monocytes. Induced innate immune activity reveals multiple master regulatory trans-eQTL...

  9. Expression of putative immune response genes during early ontogeny in the coral Acropora millepora.

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    Eneour Puill-Stephan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Corals, like many other marine invertebrates, lack a mature allorecognition system in early life history stages. Indeed, in early ontogeny, when corals acquire and establish associations with various surface microbiota and dinoflagellate endosymbionts, they do not efficiently distinguish between closely and distantly related individuals from the same population. However, very little is known about the molecular components that underpin allorecognition and immunity responses or how they change through early ontogeny in corals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Patterns in the expression of four putative immune response genes (apextrin, complement C3, and two CELIII type lectin genes were examined in juvenile colonies of Acropora millepora throughout a six-month post-settlement period using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR. Expression of a CELIII type lectin gene peaked in the fourth month for most of the coral juveniles sampled and was significantly higher at this time than at any other sampling time during the six months following settlement. The timing of this increase in expression levels of putative immune response genes may be linked to allorecognition maturation which occurs around this time in A. millepora. Alternatively, the increase may represent a response to immune challenges, such as would be involved in the recognition of symbionts (such as Symbiodinium spp. or bacteria during winnowing processes as symbioses are fine-tuned. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data, although preliminary, are consistent with the hypothesis that lectins may play an important role in the maturation of allorecognition responses in corals. The co-expression of lectins with apextrin during development of coral juveniles also raises the possibility that these proteins, which are components of innate immunity in other invertebrates, may influence the innate immune systems of corals through a common pathway or system. However, further studies

  10. De novo annotation of the immune-enriched transcriptome provides insights into immune system genes of Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rong; Du, He-Jun; Li, Shun-Yi; Li, Ya-Dong; Ni, Hong; Yu, Xue-Jing; Yang, Yan-Yan; Fan, Yu-Ding; Jiang, Nan; Zeng, Ling-Bing; Wang, Xing-Guo

    2016-08-01

    Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis), one of the oldest extant actinopterygian fishes with very high evolutionary, economical and conservation interest, is considered to be one of the critically endangered aquatic animals in China. Up to date, the immune system of this species remains largely undetermined with little sequence information publicly available. Herein, the first comprehensive transcriptome of immune tissues for Chinese sturgeon was characterized using Illumina deep sequencing. Over 67 million high-quality reads were generated and de novo assembled into the final set of 91,739 unique sequences. The annotation pipeline revealed that 25,871 unigenes were successfully annotated in the public databases, of which only 2002 had significant match to the existing sequences for the genus Acipenser. Overall 22,827 unigenes were categorized into 52 GO terms, 12,742 were classified into 26 KOG categories, and 4968 were assigned to 339 KEGG pathways. A more detailed annotation search showed the presence of a notable representation of immune-related genes, which suggests that this non-teleost actinopterygian fish harbors the same intermediates as in the well known immune pathways from mammals and teleosts, such as pattern recognition receptor (PRR) signaling pathway, JAK-STAT signaling pathway, complement and coagulation pathway, T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathways. Additional genetic marker discovery led to the retrieval of 20,056 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 327,140 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This immune-enriched transcriptome of Chinese sturgeon represents a rich resource that adds to the currently nascent field of chondrostean fish immunogenetics and furthers the conservation and management of this valuable fish. PMID:27368537

  11. In vitro infection with classical swine fever virus inhibits the transcription of immune response genes

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    Feng Li

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical swine fever virus (CSFV can evade the immune response and establish chronic infection under natural and experimental conditions. Some genes related to antigen processing and presentation and to cytokine regulation are known to be involved in this response, but the precise mechanism through which each gene responds to CSFV infection remains unclear. Results In this study, the amplification standard curve and corresponding linear regression equations for the genes SLA-2, TAP1, SLA-DR, Ii, CD40, CD80, CD86, IFN-α, and IFN-β were established successfully. Real-time RT-PCR was used to quantify the immune response gene transcription in PK-15 cells post CSFV infection. Results showed that: (1 immune response genes were generally down-regulated as a result of CSFV infection, and (2 the expression of SLA-2, SLA-DR, Ii and CD80 was significantly decreased (p Conclusion We conclude that in vitro infection with CSFV inhibits the transcription of host immune response genes. These findings may facilitate the development of effective strategies for controlling CSF.

  12. An ancient dental gene set governs development and continuous regeneration of teeth in sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, Liam J; Martin, Kyle J; Cooper, Rory L; Metscher, Brian D; Underwood, Charlie J; Fraser, Gareth J

    2016-07-15

    The evolution of oral teeth is considered a major contributor to the overall success of jawed vertebrates. This is especially apparent in cartilaginous fishes including sharks and rays, which develop elaborate arrays of highly specialized teeth, organized in rows and retain the capacity for life-long regeneration. Perpetual regeneration of oral teeth has been either lost or highly reduced in many other lineages including important developmental model species, so cartilaginous fishes are uniquely suited for deep comparative analyses of tooth development and regeneration. Additionally, sharks and rays can offer crucial insights into the characters of the dentition in the ancestor of all jawed vertebrates. Despite this, tooth development and regeneration in chondrichthyans is poorly understood and remains virtually uncharacterized from a developmental genetic standpoint. Using the emerging chondrichthyan model, the catshark (Scyliorhinus spp.), we characterized the expression of genes homologous to those known to be expressed during stages of early dental competence, tooth initiation, morphogenesis, and regeneration in bony vertebrates. We have found that expression patterns of several genes from Hh, Wnt/β-catenin, Bmp and Fgf signalling pathways indicate deep conservation over ~450 million years of tooth development and regeneration. We describe how these genes participate in the initial emergence of the shark dentition and how they are redeployed during regeneration of successive tooth generations. We suggest that at the dawn of the vertebrate lineage, teeth (i) were most likely continuously regenerative structures, and (ii) utilised a core set of genes from members of key developmental signalling pathways that were instrumental in creating a dental legacy redeployed throughout vertebrate evolution. These data lay the foundation for further experimental investigations utilizing the unique regenerative capacity of chondrichthyan models to answer evolutionary

  13. An ancient dental gene set governs development and continuous regeneration of teeth in sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, Liam J; Martin, Kyle J; Cooper, Rory L; Metscher, Brian D; Underwood, Charlie J; Fraser, Gareth J

    2016-07-15

    The evolution of oral teeth is considered a major contributor to the overall success of jawed vertebrates. This is especially apparent in cartilaginous fishes including sharks and rays, which develop elaborate arrays of highly specialized teeth, organized in rows and retain the capacity for life-long regeneration. Perpetual regeneration of oral teeth has been either lost or highly reduced in many other lineages including important developmental model species, so cartilaginous fishes are uniquely suited for deep comparative analyses of tooth development and regeneration. Additionally, sharks and rays can offer crucial insights into the characters of the dentition in the ancestor of all jawed vertebrates. Despite this, tooth development and regeneration in chondrichthyans is poorly understood and remains virtually uncharacterized from a developmental genetic standpoint. Using the emerging chondrichthyan model, the catshark (Scyliorhinus spp.), we characterized the expression of genes homologous to those known to be expressed during stages of early dental competence, tooth initiation, morphogenesis, and regeneration in bony vertebrates. We have found that expression patterns of several genes from Hh, Wnt/β-catenin, Bmp and Fgf signalling pathways indicate deep conservation over ~450 million years of tooth development and regeneration. We describe how these genes participate in the initial emergence of the shark dentition and how they are redeployed during regeneration of successive tooth generations. We suggest that at the dawn of the vertebrate lineage, teeth (i) were most likely continuously regenerative structures, and (ii) utilised a core set of genes from members of key developmental signalling pathways that were instrumental in creating a dental legacy redeployed throughout vertebrate evolution. These data lay the foundation for further experimental investigations utilizing the unique regenerative capacity of chondrichthyan models to answer evolutionary

  14. The Dispanins : A Novel Gene Family of Ancient Origin That Contains 14 Human Members

    OpenAIRE

    Markus Sällman Almén; Nathalie Bringeland; Robert Fredriksson; Helgi B Schiöth

    2012-01-01

    The Interferon induced transmembrane proteins (IFITM) are a family of transmembrane proteins that is known to inhibit cell invasion of viruses such as HIV-1 and influenza. We show that the IFITM genes are a subfamily in a larger family of transmembrane (TM) proteins that we call Dispanins, which refers to a common 2TM structure. We mined the Dispanins in 36 eukaryotic species, covering all major eukaryotic groups, and investigated their evolutionary history using Bayesian and maximum likeliho...

  15. Immunity and AAV-mediated gene therapy for muscular dystrophies in large animal models and human trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zejing eWang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Adeno-associated viral (AAV vector mediated gene replacement for the treatment of muscular dystrophy represents a promising therapeutic strategy in modern medicine. One major obstacle in using AAV vectors for in vivo gene delivery is the development of host immune responses to the viral capsid protein and transgene products as evidenced in animal models and human trials for a range of genetic diseases. Here, we review immunity against AAV vector and transgene in the context of gene delivery to muscles for treating muscular dystrophies, and immune modulatory strategies to prevent unwanted immune responses and induce tolerance for a successful gene therapy.

  16. Methylation and Expression of Immune and Inflammatory Genes in the Offspring of Bariatric Bypass Surgery Patients

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    Frédéric Guénard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Maternal obesity, excess weight gain and overnutrition during pregnancy increase risks of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease in the offspring. Maternal biliopancreatic diversion is an effective treatment for severe obesity and is beneficial for offspring born after maternal surgery (AMS. These offspring exhibit lower severe obesity prevalence and improved cardiometabolic risk factors including inflammatory marker compared to siblings born before maternal surgery (BMS. Objective. To assess relationships between maternal bariatric surgery and the methylation/expression of genes involved in the immune and inflammatory pathways. Methods. A differential gene methylation analysis was conducted in a sibling cohort of 25 BMS and 25 AMS offspring from 20 mothers. Following differential gene expression analysis (23 BMS and 23 AMS, pathway analysis was conducted. Correlations between gene methylation/expression and circulating inflammatory markers were computed. Results. Five immune and inflammatory pathways with significant overrepresentation of both differential gene methylation and expression were identified. In the IL-8 pathway, gene methylation correlated with both gene expression and plasma C-reactive protein levels. Conclusion. These results suggest that improvements in cardiometabolic risk markers in AMS compared to BMS offspring may be mediated through differential methylation of genes involved in immune and inflammatory pathways.

  17. Complement C3 gene: Expression characterization and innate immune response in razor clam Sinonovacula constricta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Maoxiao; Niu, Donghong; Wang, Fei; Chen, Zhiyi; Li, Jiale

    2016-08-01

    Complement component 3 (C3) is central to the complement system, playing an important role in immune defense, immune regulation and immune pathology. Several C3 genes have been characterized in invertebrates but very few in shellfish. The C3 gene was identified from the razor clam Sinonovacula constricta, referred to here as Sc-C3. It was found to be highly homologous with the C3 gene of Ruditapes decussatus. All eight model motifs of the C3 gene were found to be included in the thiolester bond and the C345C region. Sc-C3 was widely expressed in all healthy tissues with expression being highest in hemolymph. A significant difference in expression was revealed at the umbo larvae development stage. The expression of Sc-C3 was highly regulated in the hemolymph and liver, with a distinct response pattern being noted after a challenge with Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Vibrio parahemolyticus. It is therefore suggested that a complicated and unique response pathway may be present in S. constricta. Further, serum of S. constricta containing Sc-C3 was extracted. This was activated by LPS or bacterium for verification for function. The more obvious immune function of Sc-C3 was described as an effective membrane rupture in hemocyte cells of rabbit, V. parahemolyticus and Vibrio anguillarum. Thus, Sc-C3 plays an essential role in the immune defense of S. constricta. PMID:27231190

  18. An ancient spliceosomal intron in the ribosomal protein L7a gene (Rpl7a of Giardia lamblia

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    Gray Michael W

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only one spliceosomal-type intron has previously been identified in the unicellular eukaryotic parasite, Giardia lamblia (a diplomonad. This intron is only 35 nucleotides in length and is unusual in possessing a non-canonical 5' intron boundary sequence, CT, instead of GT. Results We have identified a second spliceosomal-type intron in G. lamblia, in the ribosomal protein L7a gene (Rpl7a, that possesses a canonical GT 5' intron boundary sequence. A comparison of the two known Giardia intron sequences revealed extensive nucleotide identity at both the 5' and 3' intron boundaries, similar to the conserved sequence motifs recently identified at the boundaries of spliceosomal-type introns in Trichomonas vaginalis (a parabasalid. Based on these observations, we searched the partial G. lamblia genome sequence for these conserved features and identified a third spliceosomal intron, in an unassigned open reading frame. Our comprehensive analysis of the Rpl7a intron in other eukaryotic taxa demonstrates that it is evolutionarily conserved and is an ancient eukaryotic intron. Conclusion An analysis of the phylogenetic distribution and properties of the Rpl7a intron suggests its utility as a phylogenetic marker to evaluate particular eukaryotic groupings. Additionally, analysis of the G. lamblia introns has provided further insight into some of the conserved and unique features possessed by the recently identified spliceosomal introns in related organisms such as T. vaginalis and Carpediemonas membranifera.

  19. Sequencing of Sylvilagus VDJ genes reveals a new VHa allelic lineage and shows that ancient VH lineages were retained differently in leporids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Ana; Melo-Ferreira, José; Abrantes, Joana; Martinelli, Nicola; Lavazza, Antonio; Alves, Paulo C; Gortázar, Christian; Esteves, Pedro J

    2014-12-01

    Antigen recognition by immunoglobulins depends upon initial rearrangements of heavy chain V, D, and J genes. In leporids, a unique system exists for the VH genes usage that exhibit highly divergent lineages: the VHa allotypes, the Lepus sL lineage and the VHn genes. For the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), four VHa lineages have been described, the a1, a2, a3 and a4. For hares (Lepus sp.), one VHa lineage was described, the a2L, as well as a more ancient sL lineage. Both genera use the VHn genes in a low frequency of their VDJ rearrangements. To address the hypothesis that the VH specificities could be associated with different environments, we sequenced VDJ genes from a third leporid genus, Sylvilagus. We found a fifth and equally divergent VHa lineage, the a5, and an ancient lineage, the sS, related to the hares' sL, but failed to obtain VHn genes. These results show that the studied leporids employ different VH lineages in the generation of the antibody repertoire, suggesting that the leporid VH genes are subject to strong selective pressure likely imposed by specific pathogens.

  20. Ancient exaptation of a CORE-SINE retroposon into a highly conserved mammalian neuronal enhancer of the proopiomelanocortin gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M Santangelo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The proopiomelanocortin gene (POMC is expressed in the pituitary gland and the ventral hypothalamus of all jawed vertebrates, producing several bioactive peptides that function as peripheral hormones or central neuropeptides, respectively. We have recently determined that mouse and human POMC expression in the hypothalamus is conferred by the action of two 5' distal and unrelated enhancers, nPE1 and nPE2. To investigate the evolutionary origin of the neuronal enhancer nPE2, we searched available vertebrate genome databases and determined that nPE2 is a highly conserved element in placentals, marsupials, and monotremes, whereas it is absent in nonmammalian vertebrates. Following an in silico paleogenomic strategy based on genome-wide searches for paralog sequences, we discovered that opossum and wallaby nPE2 sequences are highly similar to members of the superfamily of CORE-short interspersed nucleotide element (SINE retroposons, in particular to MAR1 retroposons that are widely present in marsupial genomes. Thus, the neuronal enhancer nPE2 originated from the exaptation of a CORE-SINE retroposon in the lineage leading to mammals and remained under purifying selection in all mammalian orders for the last 170 million years. Expression studies performed in transgenic mice showed that two nonadjacent nPE2 subregions are essential to drive reporter gene expression into POMC hypothalamic neurons, providing the first functional example of an exapted enhancer derived from an ancient CORE-SINE retroposon. In addition, we found that this CORE-SINE family of retroposons is likely to still be active in American and Australian marsupial genomes and that several highly conserved exonic, intronic and intergenic sequences in the human genome originated from the exaptation of CORE-SINE retroposons. Together, our results provide clear evidence of the functional novelties that transposed elements contributed to their host genomes throughout evolution.

  1. Evolutionary responses to a constructed niche: ancient Mesoamericans as a model of gene-culture coevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tábita Hünemeier

    Full Text Available Culture and genetics rely on two distinct but not isolated transmission systems. Cultural processes may change the human selective environment and thereby affect which individuals survive and reproduce. Here, we evaluated whether the modes of subsistence in Native American populations and the frequencies of the ABCA1*Arg230Cys polymorphism were correlated. Further, we examined whether the evolutionary consequences of the agriculturally constructed niche in Mesoamerica could be considered as a gene-culture coevolution model. For this purpose, we genotyped 229 individuals affiliated with 19 Native American populations and added data for 41 other Native American groups (n = 1905 to the analysis. In combination with the SNP cluster of a neutral region, this dataset was then used to unravel the scenario involved in 230Cys evolutionary history. The estimated age of 230Cys is compatible with its origin occurring in the American continent. The correlation of its frequencies with the archeological data on Zea pollen in Mesoamerica/Central America, the neutral coalescent simulations, and the F(ST-based natural selection analysis suggest that maize domestication was the driving force in the increase in the frequencies of 230Cys in this region. These results may represent the first example of a gene-culture coevolution involving an autochthonous American allele.

  2. The kinetics of IL—4 and IFN—γ gene expression in Mice after Trichosansin immunization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGCUIHONG; YONGYONGJI; 等

    1998-01-01

    Trichosanthin (TCS) is a potent allergen to mice.According to our previous experiments,it could bring out the IgE response to ovabumin (OVA) if TCS was given one day before OVA immunization,while OVA alone could not induce IgE to it.In this work,the kinetics of interleukin 4(IL-4) and interferon γ(IFN-γ) gene expression in the mesenteric lymph node (MLN) of TCS-immunized mice was investigated using a semi-quantitative RT-PCR method.It indicated that TCS induced significant IL-4 gene expression and the peaks of IL4 gene expression were on day one after TCS immunization in both primary and secondary response.In contrast,the IFN-γ gene expression was suppressed.Furthermor,the IL-4 gene expression in the secondary response was lower than that in the primary response.Thus the presence of IgE memory B cells were studied.Results showed that the amount of mature IgE mRNA arose significantly and rapidly one day after TCS restimulation,while in the MLN of the mice primed 30 days before and without boost,it was almost as the same amount of the unimmunized control.These findings suggest the existence of the IgE memory B cells in the mice after the primary TCS immunization.

  3. Ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Virginia

    This four-week fourth grade social studies unit dealing with religious dimensions in ancient Egyptian culture was developed by the Public Education Religion Studies Center at Wright State University. It seeks to help students understand ancient Egypt by looking at the people, the culture, and the people's world view. The unit begins with outlines…

  4. Temperature stress affects the expression of immune response genes in the alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J; James, Rosalind R

    2012-04-01

    Environmental stresses are thought to be associated with increases in disease suceptibility, attributable to evolutionary trade-offs between the energy demands required to deal with stress vs pathogens. We compared the effects of temperature stress and pathogen exposure on the immune response of a solitary bee, Megachile rotundata. Using an oligonucleotide microarray with 125 genes (375 probes), we determined that both high and low temperatures increased the expression of immune response genes in M. rotundata and reduced levels of a disease called chalkbrood. In the absence of the pathogen, trypsin-like serine and pathogen recognition proteases were most highly expressed at the lowest rearing temperature (20°C), while immune response signalling pathways and melanization were highly expressed at the warmest temperature tested (35°C). In pathogen-exposed bees, immune response genes tended to be most highly expressed at moderate temperatures, where we also saw the greatest infection levels. Temperature stress appears to have activated immunity before the pathogen elicited a response from the host, and this early activity prevented infection under stressful conditions. In this insect, the trade-off in energetic costs associated with stress and infection may be partially avoided by the use of conserved responses that reduce the effects of both. PMID:22356318

  5. DNA immunization with fusion genes containing HCV core region and HBV core region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨莉; 刘晶; 孔玉英; 汪垣; 李光地

    1999-01-01

    The eucaryotic expression plasmids were constructed to express the complete (HCc191) or the truncated (HCc69 and HCc40) HCV core genes, solely or fused with the HBV core gene (HBc144). These constructions were transiently expressed in COS cells under the control of the CMV promoter. The antigenicity of HBc and HCc could be detected in the expression products by ELISA and Western blot. The mice immunized with these expression plasmids efficiently produced the anti-HCc antibodies, and also anti-HBc antibodies when the plasmids contained the fusion genes. In addition, the antibodies induced by the fusion genes were more persistent than those induced by the non-fusion HCV core genes. These indicate that the fusion of HCc genes to HBc gene is in favor of the immunogenicity of HCc, while the immunogenicity of HBc is not affected.

  6. Introduction of optical reporter gene into cancer and immune cells using lentiviral vector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Joon; Le, Uyenchi N.; Moon, Sung Min; Heo, Young Jun; Song, Ho Chun; Bom, Hee Seung [School of Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon Soo [Schoole of Medicine, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    For some applications such as gene therapy or reporter gene imaging, a gene has to be introduced into the organism of interest. Adenoviral vectors are capable of transducing both replicating and non-dividing cells. The adenoviral vectors do not integrate their DNA into host DNA, but do lead to an immune response. Lentiviruses belong to the retrovirus family and are capable of infecting both dividing and non-dividing cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an example of a lentavirus. A disabled HIV virus has been developed and could be used for in vivo gene delivery. A portion of the viral genome which encodes for accessory proteins canbe deleted without affecting production of the vector and efficiency of infection. Lentiviral delivery into various rodent tissues shows sustained expression of the transgene of up to six months. Furthermore, there seems to be little or no immune response with these vectors. These lentiviral vectors hold significant promise for in vivo gene delivery. We constructed lentiviral vector encoding firefly luciferase (Fluc) and eGFP. Fluc-eGFP fusion gene was inserted into multiple cloning sites of pLentiM1.3 vector. Reporter gene (Fluc-eGFP) was designed to be driven by murine CMV promoter with enhanced efficacy of transgene expression as compared to human CMV promoter. We transfected pLenti1.3-Fluc into human cervix cancer cell line (HeLa) and murine T lymphocytes. We also constructed adenovirus encoding Fluc and transfected to HeLa and T cells. This LentiM1.3-Fluc was transfected into HeLa cells and murine T lymphocytes in vitro, showing consistent expression of eGFP under the fluorescence microscopy from the 2nd day of transfection. Firefly luciferase reporter gene was not expressed in immune cells when it is mediated by adenovirus. Lentivirus was validated as a useful vector for both immune and cancer cells.

  7. Candidate gene approach for parasite resistance in sheep--variation in immune pathway genes and association with fecal egg count.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathiravan Periasamy

    Full Text Available Sheep chromosome 3 (Oar3 has the largest number of QTLs reported to be significantly associated with resistance to gastro-intestinal nematodes. This study aimed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within candidate genes located in sheep chromosome 3 as well as genes involved in major immune pathways. A total of 41 SNPs were identified across 38 candidate genes in a panel of unrelated sheep and genotyped in 713 animals belonging to 22 breeds across Asia, Europe and South America. The variations and evolution of immune pathway genes were assessed in sheep populations across these macro-environmental regions that significantly differ in the diversity and load of pathogens. The mean minor allele frequency (MAF did not vary between Asian and European sheep reflecting the absence of ascertainment bias. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clusters with most of South Asian, South East Asian and South West Asian breeds clustering together while European and South American sheep breeds clustered together distinctly. Analysis of molecular variance revealed strong phylogeographic structure at loci located in immune pathway genes, unlike microsatellite and genome wide SNP markers. To understand the influence of natural selection processes, SNP loci located in chromosome 3 were utilized to reconstruct haplotypes, the diversity of which showed significant deviations from selective neutrality. Reduced Median network of reconstructed haplotypes showed balancing selection in force at these loci. Preliminary association of SNP genotypes with phenotypes recorded 42 days post challenge revealed significant differences (P<0.05 in fecal egg count, body weight change and packed cell volume at two, four and six SNP loci respectively. In conclusion, the present study reports strong phylogeographic structure and balancing selection operating at SNP loci located within immune pathway genes. Further, SNP loci identified in the study were found to have

  8. Candidate Gene Approach for Parasite Resistance in Sheep – Variation in Immune Pathway Genes and Association with Fecal Egg Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Kathiravan; Pichler, Rudolf; Poli, Mario; Cristel, Silvina; Cetrá, Bibiana; Medus, Daniel; Basar, Muladno; A. K., Thiruvenkadan; Ramasamy, Saravanan; Ellahi, Masroor Babbar; Mohammed, Faruque; Teneva, Atanaska; Shamsuddin, Mohammed; Podesta, Mario Garcia; Diallo, Adama

    2014-01-01

    Sheep chromosome 3 (Oar3) has the largest number of QTLs reported to be significantly associated with resistance to gastro-intestinal nematodes. This study aimed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within candidate genes located in sheep chromosome 3 as well as genes involved in major immune pathways. A total of 41 SNPs were identified across 38 candidate genes in a panel of unrelated sheep and genotyped in 713 animals belonging to 22 breeds across Asia, Europe and South America. The variations and evolution of immune pathway genes were assessed in sheep populations across these macro-environmental regions that significantly differ in the diversity and load of pathogens. The mean minor allele frequency (MAF) did not vary between Asian and European sheep reflecting the absence of ascertainment bias. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clusters with most of South Asian, South East Asian and South West Asian breeds clustering together while European and South American sheep breeds clustered together distinctly. Analysis of molecular variance revealed strong phylogeographic structure at loci located in immune pathway genes, unlike microsatellite and genome wide SNP markers. To understand the influence of natural selection processes, SNP loci located in chromosome 3 were utilized to reconstruct haplotypes, the diversity of which showed significant deviations from selective neutrality. Reduced Median network of reconstructed haplotypes showed balancing selection in force at these loci. Preliminary association of SNP genotypes with phenotypes recorded 42 days post challenge revealed significant differences (P<0.05) in fecal egg count, body weight change and packed cell volume at two, four and six SNP loci respectively. In conclusion, the present study reports strong phylogeographic structure and balancing selection operating at SNP loci located within immune pathway genes. Further, SNP loci identified in the study were found to have potential for

  9. Innate immune activity conditions the effect of regulatory variants upon monocyte gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfax, Benjamin P; Humburg, Peter; Makino, Seiko; Naranbhai, Vivek; Wong, Daniel; Lau, Evelyn; Jostins, Luke; Plant, Katharine; Andrews, Robert; McGee, Chris; Knight, Julian C

    2014-03-01

    To systematically investigate the impact of immune stimulation upon regulatory variant activity, we exposed primary monocytes from 432 healthy Europeans to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or differing durations of lipopolysaccharide and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). More than half of cis-eQTLs identified, involving hundreds of genes and associated pathways, are detected specifically in stimulated monocytes. Induced innate immune activity reveals multiple master regulatory trans-eQTLs including the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), coding variants altering enzyme and receptor function, an IFN-β cytokine network showing temporal specificity, and an interferon regulatory factor 2 (IRF2) transcription factor-modulated network. Induced eQTL are significantly enriched for genome-wide association study loci, identifying context-specific associations to putative causal genes including CARD9, ATM, and IRF8. Thus, applying pathophysiologically relevant immune stimuli assists resolution of functional genetic variants. PMID:24604202

  10. Gene-gene interaction and functional impact of polymorphisms on innate immune genes in controlling Plasmodium falciparum blood infection level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhumita Basu

    Full Text Available Genetic variations in toll-like receptors and cytokine genes of the innate immune pathways have been implicated in controlling parasite growth and the pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum mediated malaria. We previously published genetic association of TLR4 non-synonymous and TNF-α promoter polymorphisms with P.falciparum blood infection level and here we extend the study considerably by (i investigating genetic dependence of parasite-load on interleukin-12B polymorphisms, (ii reconstructing gene-gene interactions among candidate TLRs and cytokine loci, (iii exploring genetic and functional impact of epistatic models and (iv providing mechanistic insights into functionality of disease-associated regulatory polymorphisms. Our data revealed that carriage of AA (P = 0.0001 and AC (P = 0.01 genotypes of IL12B 3'UTR polymorphism was associated with a significant increase of mean log-parasitemia relative to rare homozygous genotype CC. Presence of IL12B+1188 polymorphism in five of six multifactor models reinforced its strong genetic impact on malaria phenotype. Elevation of genetic risk in two-component models compared to the corresponding single locus and reduction of IL12B (2.2 fold and lymphotoxin-α (1.7 fold expressions in patients'peripheral-blood-mononuclear-cells under TLR4Thr399Ile risk genotype background substantiated the role of Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction derived models. Marked reduction of promoter activity of TNF-α risk haplotype (C-C-G-G compared to wild-type haplotype (T-C-G-G with (84% and without (78% LPS stimulation and the loss of binding of transcription factors detected in-silico supported a causal role of TNF-1031. Significantly lower expression of IL12B+1188 AA (5 fold and AC (9 fold genotypes compared to CC and under-representation (P = 0.0048 of allele A in transcripts of patients' PBMCs suggested an Allele-Expression-Imbalance. Allele (A+1188C dependent differential stability (2 fold of IL12B-transcripts upon

  11. Generation of antigen-specific T cell immunity through T cell receptor gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coccoris, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Cancer cells often escape the attack of immune cells because they originate from self-tissue. Through T cell receptor gene transfer it is possible to equip peripheral T cells with a desired specificity, and this strategy may be useful to generate tumor-specific T cells for the treatment of cancer in

  12. Genes meet geology: fish phylogeographic pattern reflects ancient, rather than modern, drainage connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, J M; Craw, D; Youngson, J H; Wallis, G P

    2001-09-01

    We used DNA analysis of the freshwater Galaxias vulgaris complex (Pisces: Galaxiidae) to test a geological hypothesis of drainage evolution in South Island, New Zealand. Geological evidence suggests that the presently north-flowing Nevis River branch of the Clutha/Kawarau River system (Otago) once flowed south into the Nokomai branch of the Mataura system (Southland). The flow reversal is thought to have resulted from fault and fold activity associated with post-Miocene uplift. Mitochondrial DNA sequence data (control region and cytochrome b genes; 76 individuals; maximum divergence 7.1%) corroborate this geomorphological hypothesis: The Nevis River retains a freshwater fish species (Galaxias gollumoides; five sites; 10 haplotypes) that is otherwise restricted to Southland (nine sites; 15 haplotypes). There is no indication that the Nevis River lineage of G. gollumoides lives elsewhere in the Clutha/ Kawarau system (> 30 sites). Likewise, two widespread Clutha lineages (G. 'sp D'; G. anomalus-G. pullus) are apparently absent from the Nevis (> 30 sites). In particular, G. 'sp D' lives throughout much of the Clutha (12 sites, 23 haplotypes), including a tributary of the Kawarau, but is absent from the Nevis itself. Conventional molecular clock calibrations (based on a minimum Nevis-Mataura haplotype divergence of 3.0%) indicate that the Nevis flow reversal may have occurred in the early-mid Pleistocene, which is roughly consistent with geological data. The broad phylogeographic structure evident in the Clutha system is consistent with the sedentary nature of nonmigratory galaxiids. Our study reinforces the value of combining biological and geological data for the formulation and testing of historical hypotheses. PMID:11681739

  13. High amino acid diversity and positive selection at a putative coral immunity gene (tachylectin-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellberg Michael E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes involved in immune functions, including pathogen recognition and the activation of innate defense pathways, are among the most genetically variable known, and the proteins that they encode are often characterized by high rates of amino acid substitutions, a hallmark of positive selection. The high levels of variation characteristic of immunity genes make them useful tools for conservation genetics. To date, highly variable immunity genes have yet to be found in corals, keystone organisms of the world's most diverse marine ecosystem, the coral reef. Here, we examine variation in and selection on a putative innate immunity gene from Oculina, a coral genus previously used as a model for studies of coral disease and bleaching. Results In a survey of 244 Oculina alleles, we find high nonsynonymous variation and a signature of positive selection, consistent with a putative role in immunity. Using computational protein structure prediction, we generate a structural model of the Oculina protein that closely matches the known structure of tachylectin-2 from the Japanese horseshoe crab (Tachypleus tridentatus, a protein with demonstrated function in microbial recognition and agglutination. We also demonstrate that at least three other genera of anthozoan cnidarians (Acropora, Montastrea and Nematostella possess proteins structurally similar to tachylectin-2. Conclusions Taken together, the evidence of high amino acid diversity, positive selection and structural correspondence to the horseshoe crab tachylectin-2 suggests that this protein is 1 part of Oculina's innate immunity repertoire, and 2 evolving adaptively, possibly under selective pressure from coral-associated microorganisms. Tachylectin-2 may serve as a candidate locus to screen coral populations for their capacity to respond adaptively to future environmental change.

  14. Baltic salmon activates immune relevant genes in fin tissue when responding to Gyrodactylus salaris infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kania, Per Walther; Larsen, Thomas Bjerre; Ingerslev, Hans C.;

    2007-01-01

    A series of immune relevant genes are expressed when the Baltic salmon responds on infections with the ectoparasite Gyrodactylus salaris which leads to a decrease of the parasite infection......A series of immune relevant genes are expressed when the Baltic salmon responds on infections with the ectoparasite Gyrodactylus salaris which leads to a decrease of the parasite infection...

  15. Innate immune-stimulating and immune genes up-regulating activities of three types of alginate from Sargassum siliquosum in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudiati, Ervia; Isnansetyo, Alim; Murwantoko; Ayuningtyas; Triyanto; Handayani, Christina Retna

    2016-07-01

    The Total Haemocyte Count (THC), phenoloxidase (PO), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) activity, Phagocytic Activity/Index and Total Protein Plasma (TPP) were examined after feeding the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei with diets supplemented with three different types of alginates (acid, calcium and sodium alginates). Immune-related genes expression was evaluated by quantitative Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results indicated that the immune parameters directly increased according to the doses of alginates and time. The 2.0 g kg(-1) of acid and sodium alginate treatments were gave better results. Four immune-related genes expression i.e. LGBP, Toll, Lectin, proPO were up regulated. It is therefore concluded that the supplementation of alginate of Sargassum siliquosum on the diet of L. vannamei enhanced the innate immunity as well as the expression of immune-related genes. It is the first report on the simultaneous evaluation of three alginate types to enhance innate immune parameters and immune-related genes expression in L. vannamei. PMID:26993614

  16. Investigation of gene therapy of adenovirus in immune suppression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi XIA; Beibei WANG; Li CAO; Gang CHEN; Peng WU; Yunping LU; Jianfeng ZHOU; Ding MA

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the safety of reconstructed adenovirus in immunosuppressive ther-apeutics and to explore the role of ciclosporin A in ant-agonizing the elimination of the vector. Several rats were given retroperitoneal injection of purified ADV-TK in order to obtain models. After 14 days' treatment of ciclos-porin A, samples of different periods were obtained, then stained with hematoxylin-eosin (HE) to detect inflam-mation reactions. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of adenovirus in organs. The results are as follows: (1) In HE stained sections of the organs, some transitory and reversible inflammation was detected. (2) In immunohistochemistry assay, recon-structed adenovirus decreased gradually as time went by in the control group, while it did not happen in the experi-mental group in which the adenovirus showed a relative increase compared with their counterparts (P<0.05). (3) The distributions of adenovirus in the liver, spleen and lung were higher than those in the other organs detected. Reconstructed adenovirus as a vector is definitely safe in immunosuppressive therapeutics, and ciclosporin A, to some extent, is able to consequently inhibit the immune response of the rats and prolong the existing period of adenovirus.

  17. A comprehensive transcriptome and immune-gene repertoire of the lepidopteran model host Galleria mellonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glöckner Gernot

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The larvae of the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella are increasingly used (i as mini-hosts to study pathogenesis and virulence factors of prominent bacterial and fungal human pathogens, (ii as a whole-animal high throughput infection system for testing pathogen mutant libraries, and (iii as a reliable host model to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotics against human pathogens. In order to compensate for the lack of genomic information in Galleria, we subjected the transcriptome of different developmental stages and immune-challenged larvae to next generation sequencing. Results We performed a Galleria transcriptome characterization on the Roche 454-FLX platform combined with traditional Sanger sequencing to obtain a comprehensive transcriptome. To maximize sequence diversity, we pooled RNA extracted from different developmental stages, larval tissues including hemocytes, and from immune-challenged larvae and normalized the cDNA pool. We generated a total of 789,105 pyrosequencing and 12,032 high-quality Sanger EST sequences which clustered into 18,690 contigs with an average length of 1,132 bases. Approximately 40% of the ESTs were significantly similar (E ≤ e-03 to proteins of other insects, of which 45% have a reported function. We identified a large number of genes encoding proteins with established functions in immunity related sensing of microbial signatures and signaling, as well as effector molecules such as antimicrobial peptides and inhibitors of microbial proteinases. In addition, we found genes known as mediators of melanization or contributing to stress responses. Using the transcriptomic data, we identified hemolymph peptides and proteins induced upon immune challenge by 2D-gelelectrophoresis combined with mass spectrometric analysis. Conclusion Here, we have developed extensive transcriptomic resources for Galleria. The data obtained is rich in gene transcripts related to immunity, expanding remarkably our

  18. Expression analysis of 13 ovine immune response candidate genes in Visna/Maedi disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larruskain, Amaia; Bernales, Irantzu; Luján, Lluis; de Andrés, Damián; Amorena, Beatriz; Jugo, Begoña M

    2013-07-01

    Visna/Maedi virus (VMV) is a lentivirus that infects cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage in sheep. Infection with VMV may lead to Visna/Maedi (VM) disease, which causes a multisystemic inflammatory disorder causing pneumonia, encephalitis, mastitis and arthritis. The role of ovine immune response genes in the development of VM disease is not fully understood. In this work, sheep of the Rasa Aragonesa breed were divided into two groups depending on the presence/absence of VM-characteristic clinical lesions in the aforementioned organs and the relative levels of candidate gene expression, including cytokines and innate immunity loci were measured by qPCR in the lung and udder. Sheep with lung lesions showed differential expression in five target genes: CCR5, TLR7, and TLR8 were up regulated and IL2 and TNFα down regulated. TNFα up regulation was detected in the udder. PMID:23582860

  19. Immunogenic Subtypes of Breast Cancer Delineated by Gene Classifiers of Immune Responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lance D; Chou, Jeff A; Black, Michael A; Print, Cristin; Chifman, Julia; Alistar, Angela; Putti, Thomas; Zhou, Xiaobo; Bedognetti, Davide; Hendrickx, Wouter; Pullikuth, Ashok; Rennhack, Jonathan; Andrechek, Eran R; Demaria, Sandra; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M

    2016-07-01

    The abundance and functional orientation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer is associated with distant metastasis-free survival, yet how this association is influenced by tumor phenotypic heterogeneity is poorly understood. Here, a bioinformatics approach defined tumor biologic attributes that influence this association and delineated tumor subtypes that may differ in their ability to sustain durable antitumor immune responses. A large database of breast tumor expression profiles and associated clinical data was compiled, from which the ability of phenotypic markers to significantly influence the prognostic performance of a classification model that incorporates immune cell-specific gene signatures was ascertained. Markers of cell proliferation and intrinsic molecular subtype reproducibly distinguished two breast cancer subtypes that we refer to as immune benefit-enabled (IBE) and immune benefit-disabled (IBD). The IBE tumors, comprised mostly of highly proliferative tumors of the basal-like, HER2-enriched, and luminal B subtypes, could be stratified by the immune classifier into significantly different prognostic groups, while IBD tumors could not, indicating the potential for productive engagement of metastasis-protective immunity in IBE tumors, but not in IBD tumors. The prognostic stratification in IBE was independent of conventional variables. Gene network analysis predicted the activation of TNFα/IFNγ signaling pathways in IBE tumors and the activation of the transforming growth factor-β pathway in IBD tumors. This prediction supports a model in which breast tumors can be distinguished on the basis of their potential for metastasis-protective immune responsiveness. Whether IBE and IBD represent clinically relevant contexts for evaluating sensitivity to immunotherapeutic agents warrants further investigation. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(7); 600-10. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197066

  20. Molecular evolution of immune genes in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tovi Lehmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As pathogens that circumvent the host immune response are favoured by selection, so are host alleles that reduce parasite load. Such evolutionary processes leave their signature on the genes involved. Deciphering modes of selection operating on immune genes might reveal the nature of host-pathogen interactions and factors that govern susceptibility in host populations. Such understanding would have important public health implications. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We analyzed polymorphisms in four mosquito immune genes (SP14D1, GNBP, defensin, and gambicin to decipher selection effects, presumably mediated by pathogens. Using samples of Anopheles arabiensis, An. quadriannulatus and four An. gambiae populations, as well as published sequences from other Culicidae, we contrasted patterns of polymorphisms between different functional units of the same gene within and between populations. Our results revealed selection signatures operating on different time scales. At the most recent time scale, within-population diversity revealed purifying selection. Between populations and between species variation revealed reduced differentiation (GNBP and gambicin at coding vs. noncoding- regions, consistent with balancing selection. McDonald-Kreitman tests between An. quadriannulatus and both sibling species revealed higher fixation rate of synonymous than nonsynonymous substitutions (GNBP in accordance with frequency dependent balancing selection. At the longest time scale (>100 my, PAML analysis using distant Culicid taxa revealed positive selection at one codon in gambicin. Patterns of genetic variation were independent of exposure to human pathogens. SIGNIFICANCE AND CONCLUSIONS: Purifying selection is the most common form of selection operating on immune genes as it was detected on a contemporary time scale on all genes. Selection for "hypervariability" was not detected, but negative balancing selection, detected at a recent evolutionary time scale

  1. Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008254 Prokaryotic expression and immunogenicity of Fba,a novel fibronectin-binding protein of group A streptococcus.MA Cuiqing(马翠柳),et al.Dept Immunol,Basic Med Coll,Hebei Med Univ,Shijiazhuang 050017.Chin J Infect Dis 2008;26(3):146-150.Objective To express the novel fibronectin-binding protein Fba ofgroupAstreptococcus(GAS)and analyze its immunogenicity,so to evaluate the immune responses to GAS infection.Methods fbagene was amplified by

  2. Effector CD4+ T cell expression signatures and immune-mediated disease associated genes.

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    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS in immune-mediated diseases have identified over 150 associated genomic loci. Many of these loci play a role in T cell responses, and regulation of T cell differentiation plays a critical role in immune-mediated diseases; however, the relationship between implicated disease loci and T cell differentiation is incompletely understood. To further address this relationship, we examined differential gene expression in naïve human CD4+ T cells, as well as in in vitro differentiated Th1, memory Th17-negative and Th17-enriched CD4+ T cells subsets using microarray and RNASeq. We observed a marked enrichment for increased expression in memory CD4+ compared to naïve CD4+ T cells of genes contained among immune-mediated disease loci. Within memory T cells, expression of disease-associated genes was typically increased in Th17-enriched compared to Th17-negative cells. Utilizing RNASeq and promoter methylation studies, we identified a differential regulation pattern for genes solely expressed in Th17 cells (IL17A and CCL20 compared to genes expressed in both Th17 and Th1 cells (IL23R and IL12RB2, where high levels of promoter methylation are correlated to near zero RNASeq levels for IL17A and CCL20. These findings have implications for human Th17 celI plasticity and for the regulation of Th17-Th1 expression signatures. Importantly, utilizing RNASeq we found an abundant isoform of IL23R terminating before the transmembrane domain that was enriched in Th17 cells. In addition to molecular resolution, we find that RNASeq provides significantly improved power to define differential gene expression and identify alternative gene variants relative to microarray analysis. The comprehensive integration of differential gene expression between cell subsets with disease-association signals, and functional pathways provides insight into disease pathogenesis.

  3. Screening a novel Na+/H+ antiporter gene from a metagenomic library of halophiles colonizing in the Dagong Ancient Brine Well in China.

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    Xiang, Wenliang; Zhang, Jie; Li, Lin; Liang, Huazhong; Luo, Hai; Zhao, Jian; Yang, Zhirong; Sun, Qun

    2010-05-01

    Metagenomic DNA libraries constructed from the Dagong Ancient Brine Well were screened for genes with Na(+)/H(+) antiporter activity on the antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli KNabc strain. One clone with a stable Na(+)-resistant phenotype was obtained and its Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene was sequenced and designated as m-nha. The deduced amino acid sequence of M-Nha protein consists of 523 residues with a calculated molecular weight of 58 147 Da and a pI of 5.50, which is homologous with NhaH from Halobacillus dabanensis D-8(T) (92%) and Halobacillus aidingensis AD-6(T) (86%), and with Nhe2 from Bacillus sp. NRRL B-14911 (64%). It had a hydropathy profile with 10 putative transmembrane domains and a long carboxyl terminal hydrophilic tail of 140 amino acid residues, similar to Nhap from Synechocystis sp. and Aphanothece halophytica, as well as NhaG from Bacillus subtilis. The m-nha gene in the antiporter-negative mutant E. coli KNabc conferred resistance to Na(+) and the ability to grow under alkaline conditions. The difference in amino acid sequence and the putative secondary structure suggested that the m-nha isolated from the Dagong Ancient Brine Well in this study was a novel Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene.

  4. Immunity and AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy for Muscular Dystrophies in Large Animal Models and Human Trials

    OpenAIRE

    ZejingWang; StephenJTapscott; JeffreySChamberlain; RainerStorb

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated gene replacement for the treatment of muscular dystrophy represents a promising therapeutic strategy in modern medicine. One major obstacle in using AAV vectors for in vivo gene delivery is the development of host immune responses to the viral capsid protein and transgene products as evidenced in animal models and human trials for a range of genetic diseases. Here, we review immunity against AAV vector and transgene in the context of gene delivery ...

  5. Stable Expression of Hantavirus H8205 Strain G1/IL-2 Gene and Immune Protection of the Fusion Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Ying; YUAN Yuan; JIA Min; YU Bing; HUANG Hanju

    2007-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of stable expression of Hantavirus H8205 strain G1 segment and human IL-2 fusion gene in Vero cells, and to examine the immune protection effects on mice vaccinated with this recombinant eukaryotic expression vector containing Hantavirus G1 gene and IL-2 gene. With the help of lipofectamine, the Vero cells were transfected with pcDNA3.1/HisB-IL-2-G1 and the positive cells were selected by G418. IFAT and SDS-PAGE electrophoresis were used to determine the stable transfection and expression of recombinant protein.Each mouse was inoculated with plasmids intramuscularly (i.m.) three times, 2 boosts were given at 2-week intervals, serum anti-hantavirus antibodies were detected by ELISA and neutralizing antibodies (NAb) were detected by Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test. The fusion protein expressed in Vero cells was 78 kD, corresponding to the estimated molecular size. The neutralizing antibody titers of mice with pcDNA3.1/HisB-IL-2-G1 were 1:20-1:80. IL-2/G1 fusion gene could be transferred in Vero cells and stably express the fusion protein. Specific humeral immune responses in mice can be induced with the recombinant eukaryotic expression vector containing the fusion gene, which lays the foundation for further development of therapeutic HTNV vaccine.

  6. Polymorphisms in Anopheles gambiae immune genes associated with natural resistance to Plasmodium falciparum.

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    Caroline Harris

    Full Text Available Many genes involved in the immune response of Anopheles gambiae, the main malaria vector in Africa, have been identified, but whether naturally occurring polymorphisms in these genes underlie variation in resistance to the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, is currently unknown. Here we carried out a candidate gene association study to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with natural resistance to P. falciparum. A. gambiae M form mosquitoes from Cameroon were experimentally challenged with three local wild P. falciparum isolates. Statistical associations were assessed between 157 SNPs selected from a set of 67 A. gambiae immune-related genes and the level of infection. Isolate-specific associations were accounted for by including the effect of the isolate in the analysis. Five SNPs were significantly associated to the infection phenotype, located within or upstream of AgMDL1, CEC1, Sp PPO activate, Sp SNAKElike, and TOLL6. Low overall and local linkage disequilibrium indicated high specificity in the loci found. Association between infection phenotype and two SNPs was isolate-specific, providing the first evidence of vector genotype by parasite isolate interactions at the molecular level. Four SNPs were associated to either oocyst presence or load, indicating that the genetic basis of infection prevalence and intensity may differ. The validity of the approach was verified by confirming the functional role of Sp SNAKElike in gene silencing assays. These results strongly support the role of genetic variation within or near these five A. gambiae immune genes, in concert with other genes, in natural resistance to P. falciparum. They emphasize the need to distinguish between infection prevalence and intensity and to account for the genetic specificity of vector-parasite interactions in dissecting the genetic basis of Anopheles resistance to human malaria.

  7. The Human Malaria Parasite Pfs47 Gene Mediates Evasion of the Mosquito Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Garver, Lindsey S.; Alabaster, Amy; Bangiolo, Lois; Haile, Ashley; Winikor, Jared; Ortega, Corrie; van Schaijk, Ben C. L.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Taylor-Salmon, Emma; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Summary The surface protein Pfs47 mediates Plasmodium falciparum evasion of the Anopheles gambiae complement-like immune system. Plasmodium falciparum transmission by Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes is remarkably efficient, resulting in a very high prevalence of human malaria infection in sub-Saharan Africa. A combination of genetic mapping, linkage group selection, and functional genomics was used to identify Pfs47 as a P. falciparum gene that allows the parasite to infect A. gambiae without activating the mosquito immune system. Disruption of Pfs47 greatly reduced parasite survival in the mosquito and this phenotype could be reverted by genetic complementation of the parasite or by disruption of the mosquito complement-like system. Pfs47 suppresses midgut nitration responses that are critical to activate the complement-like system. We provide direct experimental evidence that immune evasion mediated by Pfs47 is critical for efficient human malaria transmission by A. gambiae. PMID:23661646

  8. AAV2-mediated in vivo immune gene therapy of solid tumours

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Sara A

    2010-12-20

    Abstract Background Many strategies have been adopted to unleash the potential of gene therapy for cancer, involving a wide range of therapeutic genes delivered by various methods. Immune therapy has become one of the major strategies adopted for cancer gene therapy and seeks to stimulate the immune system to target tumour antigens. In this study, the feasibility of AAV2 mediated immunotherapy of growing tumours was examined, in isolation and combined with anti-angiogenic therapy. Methods Immune-competent Balb\\/C or C57 mice bearing subcutaneous JBS fibrosarcoma or Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumour xenografts respectively were treated by intra-tumoural administration of AAV2 vector encoding the immune up-regulating cytokine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the co-stimulatory molecule B7-1 to subcutaneous tumours, either alone or in combination with intra-muscular (IM) delivery of AAV2 vector encoding Nk4 14 days prior to tumour induction. Tumour growth and survival was monitored for all animals. Cured animals were re-challenged with tumourigenic doses of the original tumour type. In vivo cytotoxicity assays were used to investigate establishment of cell-mediated responses in treated animals. Results AAV2-mediated GM-CSF, B7-1 treatment resulted in a significant reduction in tumour growth and an increase in survival in both tumour models. Cured animals were resistant to re-challenge, and induction of T cell mediated anti-tumour responses were demonstrated. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes to naïve animals prevented tumour establishment. Systemic production of Nk4 induced by intra-muscular (IM) delivery of Nk4 significantly reduced subcutaneous tumour growth. However, combination of Nk4 treatment with GM-CSF, B7-1 therapy reduced the efficacy of the immune therapy. Conclusions Overall, this study demonstrates the potential for in vivo AAV2 mediated immune gene therapy, and provides data on the inter-relationship between tumour

  9. Changes in immune gene expression and resistance to bacterial infection in lobster (Homarus gammarus) post-larval stage VI following acute or chronic exposure to immune stimulating compounds.

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    Hauton, C; Brockton, V; Smith, V J

    2007-01-01

    Real-time PCR was used to measure changes in transcript abundance of genes encoding important immune proteins, namely prophenoloxidase (proPO gene), beta-1,3-glucan binding protein (betaGBP gene) and a 12.2 kDa antimicrobial peptide (amp gene) in post-larval stage VI (PLVI) juveniles of the European lobster, Homarus gammarus. Gene expression was studied in both healthy PLVI and following single or repeat exposure to a range of compounds claimed to induce immune reactivity. A single acute (3-h) exposure to any of the tested stimulants did not produce a significant increase in expression of either the proPO or betaGBP genes, measured 6h after stimulation. However, there were a small sub-group of positive responders, identified mainly from betaGBP expression, within the experimental groups stimulated with either a beta-1,3-glucan or an alginate. There was also no significant increase in the expression of any of the three genes tested 24 h after repeated weekly (3-h) exposures to a either the beta-1,3-glucan or the alginate over the longer (36-day) period. The results do show that amp is expressed at an extremely high level compared to proPO or betaGBP in healthy animals and a significant correlation was found between the expression of proPO and both betaGBP and amp, irrespective of whether or not the larvae were stimulated. None of the immune stimulated compounds improved survival of PLVI challenged with the opportunistic pathogen, Listonella anguillarum, or the lobster pathogen, Aerococcus viridans var. homari. Thus, we found no evidence to support recent claims that immunity and disease resistance can be primed or promoted within a given population of crustaceans or that these animals exhibit functional immune memory to some soluble immune elicitors. PMID:16569431

  10. Immune Responses to Trichloroethylene and Skin Gene Expression Profiles in Sprague Dawley Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO-YAN CHEN; ZHI-XIONG ZHUANG; XIAO-HUI WANG; JIN-ZHOU ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To characterize the immune reaction in SD rats exposed to trichloroethylene (TCE) and to identify the gene expression profiles involved in skin after TCE exposure. Methods Fifteen percent of TCE was injected intradermally into the rat back (100 μL/120 g) at intervals of 7 days. Whole blood was collected 24 h after the fifth or seventh intradermic administration of TCE. The percentages of CD4+ and CD8+ of T lymphocytes were measured by a flow cytometer. The concentrations of IFN-gamma and IL-4 in the serum were semi-quantified by ELISA. Total RNAs of skin samples at 3 h or 24 h after the seventh dose of TCE in SD rats were extracted, and gene expression profiles of these tissues were analyszed by rat toxicology U34 array of Affymetrix. Results Obvious decline of CD4+ in T lymphocytes was observed in theTCE-administer group. No significant concentration differences in IFN-gamma and IL-4 were found between TCE-treated and control rats. Gadd45a and Mel were significantly up regulated in skin tissue 24 h after TCE exposure. The expression regulation of immune response factors was as active as proteins associated with lipid metabolism and synthesis process in these skin samples of SD rats exposed to TCE. Conclusion T-helper type 1 cells mediate immune response can not be elicited in TCE-treated SD rats, but certain immune disorder can be induced.

  11. Characterization of immune-related genes in the yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco in response to LPS challenge.

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    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Xin, Zhao-Zhe; Chai, Xin-Yue; Jiang, Sen-Hao; Li, Chao-Feng; Zhang, Hua-Bin; Ge, Bao-Ming; Zhang, Dai-Zhen; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Tang, Bo-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Fish are considered an excellent model for studies in comparative immunology as they are a representative population of lower vertebrates linked to invertebrate evolution. To gain a better understanding of the immune response in fish, we constructed a subtractive cDNA library from the head kidney of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). A total of 300 putative EST clones were identified which contained 95 genes, including 27 immune-related genes, 7 cytoskeleton-related genes, 3 genes involved in the cell cycle and apoptosis, 9 respiration and energy metabolism-related genes, 7 genes related to transport, 24 metabolism-related genes, 10 genes involved in stress responses, seven genes involved in regulation of transcription and translation and 59 unknown genes. Using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR, a subset of randomly selected genes involved in the immune response to lipopolysaccharide challenge were investigated to verify the reliability of the SSH data which identified 16 up-regulated genes. The genes identified in this study provide novel insight into the immune response in fish. PMID:27235365

  12. Antibody study in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein gene-immunized mice.

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    Yuan, B; Li, X Y; Zhu, T; Yuan, L; Hu, J P; Chen, J; Gao, W; Ren, W Z

    2015-01-01

    The gene for the nucleocapsid (N) protein of canine distemper virus was cloned into the pMD-18T vector, and positive recombinant plasmids were obtained by enzyme digestion and sequencing. After digestion by both EcoRI and KpnI, the plasmid was directionally cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA; the positive clone pcDNA-N was screened by electrophoresis and then transfected into COS-7 cells. Immunofluorescence analysis results showed that the canine distemper virus N protein was expressed in the cytoplasm of transfected COS-7 cells. After emulsification in Freund's adjuvant, the recombinant plasmid pcDNA-N was injected into the abdominal cavity of 8-week-old BABL/c mice, with the pcDNA original vector used as a negative control. Mice were immunized 3 times every 2 weeks. The blood of immunized mice was drawn 2 weeks after completing the immunizations to measure titer levels. The antibody titer in the pcDNA-N test was 10(1.62 ± 0.164), while in the control group this value was 10(0.52 ± 0.56), indicating that specific humoral immunity was induced in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein-immunized mice. PMID:25966074

  13. Genome-Wide Association Studies Suggest Limited Immune Gene Enrichment in Schizophrenia Compared to 5 Autoimmune Diseases.

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    Pouget, Jennie G; Gonçalves, Vanessa F; Spain, Sarah L; Finucane, Hilary K; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kennedy, James L; Knight, Jo

    2016-09-01

    There has been intense debate over the immunological basis of schizophrenia, and the potential utility of adjunct immunotherapies. The major histocompatibility complex is consistently the most powerful region of association in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of schizophrenia and has been interpreted as strong genetic evidence supporting the immune hypothesis. However, global pathway analyses provide inconsistent evidence of immune involvement in schizophrenia, and it remains unclear whether genetic data support an immune etiology per se. Here we empirically test the hypothesis that variation in immune genes contributes to schizophrenia. We show that there is no enrichment of immune loci outside of the MHC region in the largest genetic study of schizophrenia conducted to date, in contrast to 5 diseases of known immune origin. Among 108 regions of the genome previously associated with schizophrenia, we identify 6 immune candidates (DPP4, HSPD1, EGR1, CLU, ESAM, NFATC3) encoding proteins with alternative, nonimmune roles in the brain. While our findings do not refute evidence that has accumulated in support of the immune hypothesis, they suggest that genetically mediated alterations in immune function may not play a major role in schizophrenia susceptibility. Instead, there may be a role for pleiotropic effects of a small number of immune genes that also regulate brain development and plasticity. Whether immune alterations drive schizophrenia progression is an important question to be addressed by future research, especially in light of the growing interest in applying immunotherapies in schizophrenia. PMID:27242348

  14. Adult Drosophila melanogaster evolved for antibacterial defense invest in infection-induced expression of both humoral and cellular immunity genes

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    McGraw Elizabeth A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the transcription of innate immunity genes in response to bacterial infection has been well-characterised in the Drosophila model, we recently demonstrated the capacity for such transcription to evolve in flies selected for improved antibacterial defense. Here we use this experimental system to examine how insects invest in constitutive versus infection-induced transcription of immunity genes. These two strategies carry with them different consequences with respect to energetic and pleiotropic costs and may be more or less effective in improving defense depending on whether the genes contribute to humoral or cellular aspects of immunity. Findings Contrary to expectation we show that selection preferentially increased the infection-induced expression of both cellular and humoral immunity genes. Given their functional roles, infection induced increases in expression were expected for the humoral genes, while increases in constitutive expression were expected for the cellular genes. We also report a restricted ability to improve transcription of immunity genes that is on the order of 2-3 fold regardless of total transcription level of the gene. Conclusions The evolved increases in infection-induced expression of the cellular genes may result from specific cross talk with humoral pathways or from generalised strategies for enhancing immunity gene transcription. A failure to see improvements in constitutive expression of the cellular genes suggests either that increases might come at too great a cost or that patterns of expression in adults are decoupled from the larval phase where increases would be most effective. The similarity in fold change increase across all immunity genes may suggest a shared mechanism for the evolution of increased transcription in small, discrete units such as duplication of cis-regulatory elements.

  15. Expression of immune-related genes in goldfish gills induced by Dactylogyrus intermedius infections.

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    Lu, Cheng; Ling, Fei; Ji, Jie; Kang, Yu-Jun; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2013-01-01

    Dactylogyrus intermedius, an oviparous monogenean parasite, is regarded as a devastating pathogen in freshwater aquaculture and ornamental fish trade, and accounts for significant economic losses worldwide. The study was undertaken to determine the differential expression of immune-related genes TNFα1, TNFα2, IL-1β2, TGFβ, iNOSa and iNOSb in goldfish gills during D. intermedius infection by real-time quantitative PCR. The results show that the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β2, TNFα1 and TNFα2) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine (TGFβ) were up-regulated at day 7 p.i. (post infection). The mRNA levels of these cytokines returned to normal levels or were down-regulated at day 21 p.i. In the cases of iNOSa and iNOSb, a significant up-regulation in iNOSa transcription levels were seen at day 14 p.i. while the expression of iNOSb gene showed a distinct up-regulation at day 7 p.i. Additionally, this study was conducted to investigate the expression of immune-related genes in different degrees of goldfish experimentally infected with the monogenean D. intermedius. The results indicated that D. intermedius infection might regulate the fish immunity by showing differential expression levels of immune-related gene. The study confirms goldfish gill acts as an important source of inflammatory molecules, as well as an active modulator of local inflammation after initially infected with D. intermedius. Moreover, the results obtained in this study could be useful towards understanding the susceptibility of goldfish to D. intermedius and mechanisms involved in protection of goldfish to ectoparasitic infections.

  16. Robust TLR4-induced gene expression patterns are not an accurate indicator of human immunity

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    Davidson Donald J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs is widely accepted as an essential event for defence against infection. Many TLRs utilize a common signalling pathway that relies on activation of the kinase IRAK4 and the transcription factor NFκB for the rapid expression of immunity genes. Methods 21 K DNA microarray technology was used to evaluate LPS-induced (TLR4 gene responses in blood monocytes from a child with an IRAK4-deficiency. In vitro responsiveness to LPS was confirmed by real-time PCR and ELISA and compared to the clinical predisposition of the child and IRAK4-deficient mice to Gram negative infection. Results We demonstrated that the vast majority of LPS-responsive genes in IRAK4-deficient monocytes were greatly suppressed, an observation that is consistent with the described role for IRAK4 as an essential component of TLR4 signalling. The severely impaired response to LPS, however, is inconsistent with a remarkably low incidence of Gram negative infections observed in this child and other children with IRAK4-deficiency. This unpredicted clinical phenotype was validated by demonstrating that IRAK4-deficient mice had a similar resistance to infection with Gram negative S. typhimurium as wildtype mice. A number of immunity genes, such as chemokines, were expressed at normal levels in human IRAK4-deficient monocytes, indicating that particular IRAK4-independent elements within the repertoire of TLR4-induced responses are expressed. Conclusions Sufficient defence to Gram negative immunity does not require IRAK4 or a robust, 'classic' inflammatory and immune response.

  17. Insect parents improve the anti-parasitic and anti-bacterial defence of their offspring by priming the expression of immune-relevant genes.

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    Trauer-Kizilelma, Ute; Hilker, Monika

    2015-09-01

    Insect parents that experienced an immune challenge are known to prepare (prime) the immune activity of their offspring for improved defence. This phenomenon has intensively been studied by analysing especially immunity-related proteins. However, it is unknown how transgenerational immune priming affects transcript levels of immune-relevant genes of the offspring upon an actual threat. Here, we investigated how an immune challenge of Manduca sexta parents affects the expression of immune-related genes in their eggs that are attacked by parasitoids. Furthermore, we addressed the question whether the transgenerational immune priming of expression of genes in the eggs is still traceable in adult offspring. Our study revealed that a parental immune challenge did not affect the expression of immune-related genes in unparasitised eggs. However, immune-related genes in parasitised eggs of immune-challenged parents were upregulated to a higher level than those in parasitised eggs of unchallenged parents. Hence, this transgenerational immune priming of the eggs was detected only "on demand", i.e. upon parasitoid attack. The priming effects were also traceable in adult female progeny of immune-challenged parents which showed higher transcript levels of several immune-related genes in their ovaries than non-primed progeny. Some of the primed genes showed enhanced expression even when the progeny was left unchallenged, whereas other genes were upregulated to a greater extent in primed female progeny than non-primed ones only when the progeny itself was immune-challenged. Thus, the detection of transgenerational immune priming strongly depends on the analysed genes and the presence or absence of an actual threat for the offspring. We suggest that M. sexta eggs laid by immune-challenged parents "afford" to upregulate the transcription of immunity-related genes only upon attack, because they have the chance to be endowed by parentally directly transferred protective proteins

  18. Extensive innate immune gene activation accompanies brain aging, increasing vulnerability to cognitive decline and neurodegeneration: a microarray study

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    Cribbs David H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study undertakes a systematic and comprehensive analysis of brain gene expression profiles of immune/inflammation-related genes in aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Methods In a well-powered microarray study of young (20 to 59 years, aged (60 to 99 years, and AD (74 to 95 years cases, gene responses were assessed in the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, superior frontal gyrus, and post-central gyrus. Results Several novel concepts emerge. First, immune/inflammation-related genes showed major changes in gene expression over the course of cognitively normal aging, with the extent of gene response far greater in aging than in AD. Of the 759 immune-related probesets interrogated on the microarray, approximately 40% were significantly altered in the SFG, PCG and HC with increasing age, with the majority upregulated (64 to 86%. In contrast, far fewer immune/inflammation genes were significantly changed in the transition to AD (approximately 6% of immune-related probesets, with gene responses primarily restricted to the SFG and HC. Second, relatively few significant changes in immune/inflammation genes were detected in the EC either in aging or AD, although many genes in the EC showed similar trends in responses as in the other brain regions. Third, immune/inflammation genes undergo gender-specific patterns of response in aging and AD, with the most pronounced differences emerging in aging. Finally, there was widespread upregulation of genes reflecting activation of microglia and perivascular macrophages in the aging brain, coupled with a downregulation of select factors (TOLLIP, fractalkine that when present curtail microglial/macrophage activation. Notably, essentially all pathways of the innate immune system were upregulated in aging, including numerous complement components, genes involved in toll-like receptor signaling and inflammasome signaling, as well as genes coding for immunoglobulin (Fc receptors and human

  19. MIrExpress: A Database for Gene Coexpression Correlation in Immune Cells Based on Mutual Information and Pearson Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Luman Wang; Qiaochu Mo; Jianxin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Most current gene coexpression databases support the analysis for linear correlation of gene pairs, but not nonlinear correlation of them, which hinders precisely evaluating the gene-gene coexpression strengths. Here, we report a new database, MIrExpress, which takes advantage of the information theory, as well as the Pearson linear correlation method, to measure the linear correlation, nonlinear correlation, and their hybrid of cell-specific gene coexpressions in immune cells. For a given ge...

  20. Long-term programming of antigen-specific immunity from gene expression signatures in the PBMC of rhesus macaques immunized with an SIV DNA vaccine.

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    Sarah E Belisle

    Full Text Available While HIV-1-specific cellular immunity is thought to be critical for the suppression of viral replication, the correlates of protection have not yet been determined. Rhesus macaques (RM are an important animal model for the study and development of vaccines against HIV/AIDS. Our laboratory has helped to develop and study DNA-based vaccines in which recent technological advances, including genetic optimization and in vivo electroporation (EP, have helped to dramatically boost their immunogenicity. In this study, RMs were immunized with a DNA vaccine including individual plasmids encoding SIV gag, env, and pol alone, or in combination with a molecular adjuvant, plasmid DNA expressing the chemokine ligand 5 (RANTES, followed by EP. Along with standard immunological assays, flow-based activation analysis without ex vivo restimulation and high-throughput gene expression analysis was performed. Strong cellular immunity was induced by vaccination which was supported by all assays including PBMC microarray analysis that identified the up-regulation of 563 gene sequences including those involved in interferon signaling. Furthermore, 699 gene sequences were differentially regulated in these groups at peak viremia following SIVmac251 challenge. We observed that the RANTES-adjuvanted animals were significantly better at suppressing viral replication during chronic infection and exhibited a distinct pattern of gene expression which included immune cell-trafficking and cell cycle genes. Furthermore, a greater percentage of vaccine-induced central memory CD8+ T-cells capable of an activated phenotype were detected in these animals as measured by activation analysis. Thus, co-immunization with the RANTES molecular adjuvant followed by EP led to the generation of cellular immunity that was transcriptionally distinct and had a greater protective efficacy than its DNA alone counterpart. Furthermore, activation analysis and high-throughput gene expression data may

  1. Tamil merchant in ancient Mesopotamia.

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    Malliya Gounder Palanichamy

    Full Text Available Recent analyses of ancient Mesopotamian mitochondrial genomes have suggested a genetic link between the Indian subcontinent and Mesopotamian civilization. There is no consensus on the origin of the ancient Mesopotamians. They may be descendants of migrants, who founded regional Mesopotamian groups like that of Terqa or they may be merchants who were involved in trans Mesopotamia trade. To identify the Indian source population showing linkage to the ancient Mesopotamians, we screened a total of 15,751 mitochondrial DNAs (11,432 from the literature and 4,319 from this study representing all major populations of India. Our results although suggest that south India (Tamil Nadu and northeast India served as the source of the ancient Mesopotamian mtDNA gene pool, mtDNA of these ancient Mesopotamians probably contributed by Tamil merchants who were involved in the Indo-Roman trade.

  2. Tamil merchant in ancient Mesopotamia.

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    Palanichamy, Malliya Gounder; Mitra, Bikash; Debnath, Monojit; Agrawal, Suraksha; Chaudhuri, Tapas Kumar; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Recent analyses of ancient Mesopotamian mitochondrial genomes have suggested a genetic link between the Indian subcontinent and Mesopotamian civilization. There is no consensus on the origin of the ancient Mesopotamians. They may be descendants of migrants, who founded regional Mesopotamian groups like that of Terqa or they may be merchants who were involved in trans Mesopotamia trade. To identify the Indian source population showing linkage to the ancient Mesopotamians, we screened a total of 15,751 mitochondrial DNAs (11,432 from the literature and 4,319 from this study) representing all major populations of India. Our results although suggest that south India (Tamil Nadu) and northeast India served as the source of the ancient Mesopotamian mtDNA gene pool, mtDNA of these ancient Mesopotamians probably contributed by Tamil merchants who were involved in the Indo-Roman trade. PMID:25299580

  3. The immune response induced by DNA vaccine expressing nfa1 gene against Naegleria fowleri.

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    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hee; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Park, Sun; Kim, Kyongmin; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2012-12-01

    The pathogenic free-living amoeba, Naegleria fowleri, causes fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in experimental animals and in humans. The nfa1 gene that was cloned from N. fowleri is located on pseudopodia, especially amoebic food cups and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of N. fowleri. In this study, we constructed and characterized retroviral vector and lentiviral vector systems for nfa1 DNA vaccination in mice. We constructed the retroviral vector (pQCXIN) and the lentiviral vector (pCDH) cloned with the egfp-nfa1 gene. The expression of nfa1 gene in Chinese hamster ovary cell and human primary nasal epithelial cell transfected with the pQCXIN/egfp-nfa1 vector or pCDH/egfp-nfa1 vector was observed by fluorescent microscopy and Western blotting analysis. Our viral vector systems effectively delivered the nfa1 gene to the target cells and expressed the Nfa1 protein within the target cells. To evaluate immune responses of nfa1-vaccinated mice, BALB/c mice were intranasally vaccinated with viral particles of each retro- or lentiviral vector expressing nfa1 gene. DNA vaccination using viral vectors expressing nfa1 significantly stimulated the production of Nfa1-specific IgG subclass, as well as IgG levels. In particular, both levels of IgG2a (Th1) and IgG1 (Th2) were significantly increased in mice vaccinated with viral vectors. These results show the nfa1-vaccination induce efficiently Th1 type, as well as Th2 type immune responses. This is the first report to construct viral vector systems and to evaluate immune responses as DNA vaccination in N. fowleri infection. Furthermore, these results suggest that nfal vaccination may be an effective method for treatment of N. fowleri infection.

  4. Novel Constructs of Tuberculosis Gene Vaccine and Its Immune Effect on Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Dou; Junsong Chen; Jing Wang; Guobin Chen; Fengshu Zhao; Quan Tang; Xuesong Fang; Lili Chu; Meng Pan

    2005-01-01

    A novel tuberculosis (TB) gene vaccine containing mouse granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) and a TB antigen (Ag85A) was developed in this study. The genes encoding Ag85A and mGM-CSF were amplified by PCR respectively from the Ag85A-containing pBSby5 and pC-mGM-CSF. The genes were then cloned into two different polylinker sites of plasmid pIRES, forming a novel TB gene vaccine construct pI85AGM.Following transfection of pI85AGM plasmid into 7721 cell line by LipofectamineTM, the expression of Ag85A and GM-CSF proteins was identified by Western blotting or RT-PCR. Then Balb/c mice were inoculated with the recombinant pI85AGM, pI85A, pIGM or plasmid alone, respectively. The activities of CTL, NK cells and the Ag85A-stimulated proliferation of spleen cells were measured by MTT method. The serum antibody against Ag85A was detected by ELISA. The results showed that the Ag85A and GM-CSF proteins could be expressed in 7721 cell line and the activity of CTLs and the proliferation of spleen cells were significantly increased in the pI85AGM-immunized mice, indicating that the pI85AGM-immunized mice could generate specific immune responses to Ag85A. This study might provide possibility for developing novel anti-TB gene vaccine.

  5. Ancient Duplications Have Led to Functional Divergence of Vitellogenin-Like Genes Potentially Involved in Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Honey Bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela, Heli; Stark, Taina; Stucki, Dimitri; Fuchs, Siiri; Freitak, Dalial; Dey, Alivia; Kent, Clement F; Zayed, Amro; Dhaygude, Kishor; Hokkanen, Heikki; Sundström, Liselotte

    2016-03-01

    Protection against inflammation and oxidative stress is key in slowing down aging processes. The honey bee (Apis mellifera) shows flexible aging patterns linked to the social role of individual bees. One molecular factor associated with honey bee aging regulation is vitellogenin, a lipoglycophosphoprotein with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Recently, we identified three genes in Hymenopteran genomes arisen from ancient insect vitellogenin duplications, named vg-like-A, -B, and -C. The function of these vitellogenin homologs is unclear. We hypothesize that some of them might share gene- and protein-level similarities and a longevity-supporting role with vitellogenin. Here, we show how the structure and modifications of the vg-like genes and proteins have diverged from vitellogenin. Furthermore, all three vg-like genes show signs of positive selection, but the spatial location of the selected protein sites differ from those found in vitellogenin. We show that all these genes are expressed in both long-lived winter worker bees and in summer nurse bees with intermediate life expectancy, yet only vg-like-A shows elevated expression in winter bees as found in vitellogenin. Finally, we show that vg-like-A responds more strongly than vitellogenin to inflammatory and oxidative conditions in summer nurse bees, and that also vg-like-B responds to oxidative stress. We associate vg-like-A and, to lesser extent, vg-like-B to the antiaging roles of vitellogenin, but that vg-like-C probably is involved in some other function. Our analysis indicates that an ancient duplication event facilitated the adaptive and functional divergence of vitellogenin and its paralogs in the honey bee. PMID:26961250

  6. Autoselection of cytoplasmic yeast virus like elements encoding toxin/antitoxin systems involves a nuclear barrier for immunity gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alene Kast

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic virus like elements (VLEs from Kluyveromyces lactis (Kl, Pichia acaciae (Pa and Debaryomyces robertsiae (Dr are extremely A/T-rich (>75% and encode toxic anticodon nucleases (ACNases along with specific immunity proteins. Here we show that nuclear, not cytoplasmic expression of either immunity gene (PaORF4, KlORF3 or DrORF5 results in transcript fragmentation and is insufficient to establish immunity to the cognate ACNase. Since rapid amplification of 3' ends (RACE as well as linker ligation of immunity transcripts expressed in the nucleus revealed polyadenylation to occur along with fragmentation, ORF-internal poly(A site cleavage due to the high A/T content is likely to prevent functional expression of the immunity genes. Consistently, lowering the A/T content of PaORF4 to 55% and KlORF3 to 46% by gene synthesis entirely prevented transcript cleavage and permitted functional nuclear expression leading to full immunity against the respective ACNase toxin. Consistent with a specific adaptation of the immunity proteins to the cognate ACNases, cross-immunity to non-cognate ACNases is neither conferred by PaOrf4 nor KlOrf3. Thus, the high A/T content of cytoplasmic VLEs minimizes the potential of functional nuclear recruitment of VLE encoded genes, in particular those involved in autoselection of the VLEs via a toxin/antitoxin principle.

  7. Autoselection of cytoplasmic yeast virus like elements encoding toxin/antitoxin systems involves a nuclear barrier for immunity gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Alene; Voges, Raphael; Schroth, Michael; Schaffrath, Raffael; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2015-05-01

    Cytoplasmic virus like elements (VLEs) from Kluyveromyces lactis (Kl), Pichia acaciae (Pa) and Debaryomyces robertsiae (Dr) are extremely A/T-rich (>75%) and encode toxic anticodon nucleases (ACNases) along with specific immunity proteins. Here we show that nuclear, not cytoplasmic expression of either immunity gene (PaORF4, KlORF3 or DrORF5) results in transcript fragmentation and is insufficient to establish immunity to the cognate ACNase. Since rapid amplification of 3' ends (RACE) as well as linker ligation of immunity transcripts expressed in the nucleus revealed polyadenylation to occur along with fragmentation, ORF-internal poly(A) site cleavage due to the high A/T content is likely to prevent functional expression of the immunity genes. Consistently, lowering the A/T content of PaORF4 to 55% and KlORF3 to 46% by gene synthesis entirely prevented transcript cleavage and permitted functional nuclear expression leading to full immunity against the respective ACNase toxin. Consistent with a specific adaptation of the immunity proteins to the cognate ACNases, cross-immunity to non-cognate ACNases is neither conferred by PaOrf4 nor KlOrf3. Thus, the high A/T content of cytoplasmic VLEs minimizes the potential of functional nuclear recruitment of VLE encoded genes, in particular those involved in autoselection of the VLEs via a toxin/antitoxin principle. PMID:25973601

  8. Early Involvement of Immune/Inflammatory Response Genes in Retinal Degeneration in DBA/2J Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Fan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The DBA/2J (D2 mouse carries mutations in two of its genes, Tyrp1 and Gpnmb. These alterations result in the development of an immune response in the iris, leading to iris atrophy and pigment dispersion. The development of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP in this model of glaucoma is considered to be a significant factor leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. Changes in gene expression in the retina have already been correlated with the appearance of elevated IOP in the D2 mouse. The purpose of the present study was to determine if any changes in gene expression occur prior to the development of IOP. Methods: The IOP was measured monthly using a rebound tonometer in D2 and age-matched C57/BL6 (B6 mice (normal controls. D2 animals with normal IOP at 2 and 4 M were used. In addition, mice at the age of 6–7 M were included to look for any trends in gene expression that might develop during the progression of the disease. Separate RNA samples were prepared from each of three individual retinas for each age, and gene expression profiles were determined with the aid of mouse oligonucleotide arrays (Agilent. A subset of genes was examined with the aid of real-time PCR. Immunocytochemistry was used to visualize changes in the retina for some of the gene-products. Results: Four hundred and thirteen oligonucleotide probes were differentially expressed in the retinas of 4 M versus 2 M old D2 mice. The most significantly up-regulated genes (181 were associated with immune responses including interferon signaling, the complement system and the antigen presentation pathway, whereas the down-regulated genes (232 were linked to pathways related to cell death and known neurological diseases/disorders. These particular changes were not revealed in the age-matched B6 mice. By 6 M, when IOP started to increase in many of the D2 mice, more robust changes of these same genes were observed. Changes in the levels of selected genes

  9. Ancient genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten Erik; Avila Arcos, Maria del Carmen;

    2015-01-01

    , archaic hominins, ancient pathogens and megafaunal species. Those have revealed important functional and phenotypic information, as well as unexpected adaptation, migration and admixture patterns. As such, the field of aDNA has entered the new era of genomics and has provided valuable information when...

  10. Ancient mitogenomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, Simon Y W; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    the technical challenges that face researchers in the field. We catalogue the diverse sequencing methods and source materials used to obtain ancient mitogenomic sequences, summarise the associated genetic and phylogenetic studies that have been conducted, and evaluate the future prospects of the field....

  11. Effects of date palm fruit extracts on skin mucosal immunity, immune related genes expression and growth performance of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) fry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein; Khalili, Mohsen; Rufchaei, Rudabeh; Raeisi, Mojtaba; Attar, Marzieh; Cordero, Héctor; Esteban, M Ángeles

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of date palm fruit extracts (DPFE) on skin mucosal immunity, immune related genes expression and growth performance of fry common carp (Cyprinus carpio). One hundred and twenty specimens (4.06 ± 0.13 g) were supplied and allocated into six aquaria; specimens in three aquaria were fed non-supplemented diet (control) while the fish in the other 3 aquaria were fed with DPFE at 200 ml kg(-1). At the end of feeding trial (8 weeks) skin mucus immune parameters (total immunoglobulins, lysozyme, protease and alkaline phosphatase activity) and immune related gene expression (tumor necrosis factor α [tnfa], lysozyme [ly] and interleukin-1-beta, [il1b]) in the head-kidney were studied. The results revealed that feeding carp fry with 200 ml kg(-1) DPFE remarkably elevated the three skin mucus immune parameters tested (P diet, while the expression of ly remained similar (P > 0.05) compared to control fish (fed control diet). Furthermore, growth performance parameters were significantly improved in fry fed DPFE (P < 0.05). More studies are needed to understand different aspects of DPFE administration in fry mucosal immunity. PMID:26439417

  12. Polymorphisms in innate immunity genes and lung cancer risk in Xuanwei, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, M.; Vermeulen, R.; Rajaraman, P.; Menashe, I.; He, X.Z.; Chapman, R.S.; Yeager, M.; Thomas, G.; Burdett, L.; Hutchinson, A.; Yuenger, J.; Chanock, S.; Lan, Q. [NCI, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2009-05-15

    The high incidence of lung cancer in Xuanwei County, China has been attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The inflammatory response induced by coal smoke components may promote lung tumor development. We studied the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in innate immunity and lung cancer risk in a population-based case-control study (122 cases and 122 controls) in Xuanwei. A total of 1,360 tag SNPs in 149 gene regions were included in the analysis. FCER2 rs7249320 was the most significant SNP (OR: 0.30; 95% Cl: 0.16-0.55; P: 0.0001; false discovery rate value, 0.13) for variant carriers. The gene regions ALOX12B/ALOX15B and KLK2 were associated with increased lung cancer risk globally (false discovery rate value < 0.15). In addition, there were positive interactions between KLK15 rs3745523 and smoky coal use (OR: 9.40; P-interaction = 0.07) and between FCER2 rs7249320 and KLK2 rs2739476 (OR: 10.77; P-interaction = 0.003). Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms in innate immunity genes may play a role in the genesis of lung cancer caused by PAH-containing coal smoke. Integrin/receptor and complement pathways as well as IgE regulation are particularly noteworthy.

  13. Anti-tumor Immune Response Mediated by Newcastle Disease Virus HN Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Li-ping; JIN Ning-yi; LI Xiao; SUN Li-li; WEN Zhong-mei; LIU Yan; GAO Peng; HUANG Hai-yan; PIAO Bing-guo; JIN Jing

    2011-01-01

    Hemagglutinin-neuramidinase(HN) is one of the most important surface structure proteins of the Newcastle disease virus(NDV). HN not only mediates receptor recognition but also possesses neuraminidase(NA) activity,which gives it the ability to cleave a component of those receptors, NAcneu. Previous studies have demonstrated that HN has interesting anti-neoplastic and immune-stimulating properties in mammalian species, including humans. To explore the application of the HN gene in cancer gene therapy, we constructed a Lewis lung carcinoma(LLC) solid tumor model using C57BL/6 mice. Mice were injected intratumorally with the recombinant adenovirus expressing HN gene(Ad-HN), and the effect of HN was explored by natural killer cell activity assay, cytotoxic lymphocyte activity assay, T cell subtype evaluation, and Thl/Th2 cytokines analysis. The results demonstrate that HN not only can elicit clonal expansion of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations and cytotoxic T lymphocyte(CTL) and killer cell response, but also skews the immune response toward Thl. Thus, vaccination with Ad-HN may be a potential strategy for cancer gene therapy.

  14. Expression of Immune-Related Genes of Ducks Infected with Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC

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    Rong eLi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC can cause severe disease in ducks, characterized by perihepatitis, pericarditis and airsacculitis. Although the studies of bacteria isolation and methods of detection have been reported, host immune responses to APEC infection remain unclear. In response, we systemically examined the expression of immune-related genes and bacteria distribution in APEC-infected ducks. Results demonstrated that APEC can quickly replicate in the liver, spleen and brain, with the highest bacteria content at 2 day post infection. The expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs, avian β-defensins (AvBDs and major histocompatibility complex (MHC were tested in the liver, spleen and brain of infected ducks. TLR2, TLR4, TLR5 and TLR15 showed different expression patterns, which indicated that they all responded to APEC infection. The expression of AvBD2 was upregulated in all tested tissues during the 3 days of testing, whereas the expression of AvBD4, AvBD5, AvBD7 and AvBD9 were downregulated, and though MHC-I was upregulated on all test days, MHC-II was dramatically downregulated. Overall, our results suggest that APEC can replicate in various tissues in a short time, and the activation of host immune responses begins at onset of infection. These findings thus clarify duck immune responses to APEC infection and offer insights into its pathogenesis.

  15. Expression of Immune-Related Genes of Ducks Infected with Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Li, Ning; Zhang, Jinzhou; Wang, Yao; Liu, Jiyuan; Cai, Yumei; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2016-01-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) can cause severe disease in ducks, characterized by perihepatitis, pericarditis, and airsacculitis. Although the studies of bacteria isolation and methods of detection have been reported, host immune responses to APEC infection remain unclear. In response, we systemically examined the expression of immune-related genes and bacteria distribution in APEC-infected ducks. Results demonstrated that APEC can quickly replicate in the liver, spleen, and brain, with the highest bacteria content at 2 days post infection. The expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs), avian β-defensins (AvBDs) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) were tested in the liver, spleen, and brain of infected ducks. TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR15 showed different expression patterns, which indicated that they all responded to APEC infection. The expression of AvBD2 was upregulated in all tested tissues during the 3 days of testing, whereas the expression of AvBD4, AvBD5, AvBD7, and AvBD9 were downregulated, and though MHC-I was upregulated on all test days, MHC-II was dramatically downregulated. Overall, our results suggest that APEC can replicate in various tissues in a short time, and the activation of host immune responses begins at onset of infection. These findings thus clarify duck immune responses to APEC infection and offer insights into its pathogenesis. PMID:27199963

  16. Evolution of a Novel Antiviral Immune-Signaling Interaction by Partial-Gene Duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Korithoski

    Full Text Available The RIG-like receptors (RLRs are related proteins that identify viral RNA in the cytoplasm and activate cellular immune responses, primarily through direct protein-protein interactions with the signal transducer, IPS1. Although it has been well established that the RLRs, RIG-I and MDA5, activate IPS1 through binding between the twin caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs on the RLR and a homologous CARD on IPS1, it is less clear which specific RLR CARD(s are required for this interaction, and almost nothing is known about how the RLR-IPS1 interaction evolved. In contrast to what has been observed in the presence of immune-modulating K63-linked polyubiquitin, here we show that-in the absence of ubiquitin-it is the first CARD domain of human RIG-I and MDA5 (CARD1 that binds directly to IPS1 CARD, and not the second (CARD2. Although the RLRs originated in the earliest animals, both the IPS1 gene and the twin-CARD domain architecture of RIG-I and MDA5 arose much later in the deuterostome lineage, probably through a series of tandem partial-gene duplication events facilitated by tight clustering of RLRs and IPS1 in the ancestral deuterostome genome. Functional differentiation of RIG-I CARD1 and CARD2 appears to have occurred early during this proliferation of RLR and related CARDs, potentially driven by adaptive coevolution between RIG-I CARD domains and IPS1 CARD. However, functional differentiation of MDA5 CARD1 and CARD2 occurred later. These results fit a general model in which duplications of protein-protein interaction domains into novel gene contexts could facilitate the expansion of signaling networks and suggest a potentially important role for functionally-linked gene clusters in generating novel immune-signaling pathways.

  17. The human malaria parasite Pfs47 gene mediates evasion of the mosquito immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Garver, Lindsey S; Alabaster, Amy; Bangiolo, Lois; Haile, Ashley; Winikor, Jared; Ortega, Corrie; van Schaijk, Ben C L; Sauerwein, Robert W; Taylor-Salmon, Emma; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2013-05-24

    Plasmodium falciparum transmission by Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes is remarkably efficient, resulting in a very high prevalence of human malaria infection in sub-Saharan Africa. A combination of genetic mapping, linkage group selection, and functional genomics was used to identify Pfs47 as a P. falciparum gene that allows the parasite to infect A. gambiae without activating the mosquito immune system. Disruption of Pfs47 greatly reduced parasite survival in the mosquito, and this phenotype could be reverted by genetic complementation of the parasite or by disruption of the mosquito complement-like system. Pfs47 suppresses midgut nitration responses that are critical to activate the complement-like system. We provide direct experimental evidence that immune evasion mediated by Pfs47 is critical for efficient human malaria transmission by A. gambiae. PMID:23661646

  18. Effects of excretory/secretory products from Anisakis simplex (Nematoda) on immune gene expression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlool, Qusay Z M; Skovgaard, Alf; Kania, Per W; Buchmann, Kurt

    2013-09-01

    Excretory/secretory (ES) products are molecules produced by parasitic nematodes, including larval Anisakis simplex, a parasite occurring in numerous marine fish hosts. The effects of these substances on host physiology have not been fully described. The present work elucidates the influence of ES substances on the fish immune system by measuring immune gene expression in spleen and liver of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) injected intraperitoneally with ES products isolated from A. simplex third stage larvae. The overall gene expression profile of exposed fish showed a generalized down-regulation of the immune genes tested, suggesting a role of ES proteins in immunomodulation. We also tested the enzymatic activity of the ES proteins and found that lipase, esterase/lipase, valine and cysteine arylamidases, naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase and α-galactosidase activities were present in the ES solution. This type of hydrolytic enzyme activity may play a role in nematode penetration of host tissue. In addition, based on the notion that A. simplex ES products may have an immune-depressive effect (by minimizing immune gene expression) it could also be suggested that worm enzymes directly target host immune molecules which would add to a decreased host immune response and increased worm survival.

  19. The associations between immunity-related genes and breast cancer prognosis in Korean women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaesung Choi

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of common genetic variation in immune-related genes on breast cancer disease-free survival (DFS in Korean women. 107 breast cancer patients of the Seoul Breast Cancer Study (SEBCS were selected for this study. A total of 2,432 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 283 immune-related genes were genotyped with the GoldenGate Oligonucleotide pool assay (OPA. A multivariate Cox-proportional hazard model and polygenic risk score model were used to estimate the effects of SNPs on breast cancer prognosis. Harrell's C index was calculated to estimate the predictive accuracy of polygenic risk score model. Subsequently, an extended gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA-SNP was conducted to approximate the biological pathway. In addition, to confirm our results with current evidence, previous studies were systematically reviewed. Sixty-two SNPs were statistically significant at p-value less than 0.05. The most significant SNPs were rs1952438 in SOCS4 gene (hazard ratio (HR = 11.99, 95% CI = 3.62-39.72, P = 4.84E-05, rs2289278 in TSLP gene (HR = 4.25, 95% CI = 2.10-8.62, P = 5.99E-05 and rs2074724 in HGF gene (HR = 4.63, 95% CI = 2.18-9.87, P = 7.04E-05. In the polygenic risk score model, the HR of women in the 3rd tertile was 6.78 (95% CI = 1.48-31.06 compared to patients in the 1st tertile of polygenic risk score. Harrell's C index was 0.813 with total patients and 0.924 in 4-fold cross validation. In the pathway analysis, 18 pathways were significantly associated with breast cancer prognosis (P<0.1. The IL-6R, IL-8, IL-10RB, IL-12A, and IL-12B was associated with the prognosis of cancer in data of both our study and a previous study. Therefore, our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms in immune-related genes have relevance to breast cancer prognosis among Korean women.

  20. Flagellin Encoded in Gene-Based Vector Vaccines Is a Route-Dependent Immune Adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, Hamada F; Dai, Guixiang; Huang, Weitao; Shellito, Judd E; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2016-01-01

    Flagellin has been tested as a protein-based vaccine adjuvant, with the majority of studies focused on antibody responses. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant activity of flagellin for both cellular and humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice in the setting of gene-based immunization, and have made several novel observations. DNA vaccines and adenovirus (Ad) vectors were engineered to encode mycobacterial protein Ag85B, with or without flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium (FliC). DNA-encoded flagellin given IM enhanced splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to co-expressed vaccine antigen, including memory responses. Boosting either IM or intranasally with Ad vectors expressing Ag85B without flagellin led to durable enhancement of Ag85B-specific antibody and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both spleen and pulmonary tissues, correlating with significantly improved protection against challenge with pathogenic aerosolized M. tuberculosis. However, inclusion of flagellin in both DNA prime and Ad booster vaccines induced localized pulmonary inflammation and transient weight loss, with route-dependent effects on vaccine-induced T cell immunity. The latter included marked reductions in levels of mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses following IM DNA/IN Ad mucosal prime-boosting, although antibody responses were not diminished. These findings indicate that flagellin has differential and route-dependent adjuvant activity when included as a component of systemic or mucosally-delivered gene-based prime-boost immunization. Clear adjuvant activity for both T and B cell responses was observed when flagellin was included in the DNA priming vaccine, but side effects occurred when given in an Ad boosting vector, particularly via the pulmonary route. PMID:26844553

  1. Flagellin Encoded in Gene-Based Vector Vaccines Is a Route-Dependent Immune Adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada F Rady

    Full Text Available Flagellin has been tested as a protein-based vaccine adjuvant, with the majority of studies focused on antibody responses. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant activity of flagellin for both cellular and humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice in the setting of gene-based immunization, and have made several novel observations. DNA vaccines and adenovirus (Ad vectors were engineered to encode mycobacterial protein Ag85B, with or without flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium (FliC. DNA-encoded flagellin given IM enhanced splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to co-expressed vaccine antigen, including memory responses. Boosting either IM or intranasally with Ad vectors expressing Ag85B without flagellin led to durable enhancement of Ag85B-specific antibody and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both spleen and pulmonary tissues, correlating with significantly improved protection against challenge with pathogenic aerosolized M. tuberculosis. However, inclusion of flagellin in both DNA prime and Ad booster vaccines induced localized pulmonary inflammation and transient weight loss, with route-dependent effects on vaccine-induced T cell immunity. The latter included marked reductions in levels of mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses following IM DNA/IN Ad mucosal prime-boosting, although antibody responses were not diminished. These findings indicate that flagellin has differential and route-dependent adjuvant activity when included as a component of systemic or mucosally-delivered gene-based prime-boost immunization. Clear adjuvant activity for both T and B cell responses was observed when flagellin was included in the DNA priming vaccine, but side effects occurred when given in an Ad boosting vector, particularly via the pulmonary route.

  2. Flagellin Encoded in Gene-Based Vector Vaccines Is a Route-Dependent Immune Adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, Hamada F; Dai, Guixiang; Huang, Weitao; Shellito, Judd E; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2016-01-01

    Flagellin has been tested as a protein-based vaccine adjuvant, with the majority of studies focused on antibody responses. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant activity of flagellin for both cellular and humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice in the setting of gene-based immunization, and have made several novel observations. DNA vaccines and adenovirus (Ad) vectors were engineered to encode mycobacterial protein Ag85B, with or without flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium (FliC). DNA-encoded flagellin given IM enhanced splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to co-expressed vaccine antigen, including memory responses. Boosting either IM or intranasally with Ad vectors expressing Ag85B without flagellin led to durable enhancement of Ag85B-specific antibody and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both spleen and pulmonary tissues, correlating with significantly improved protection against challenge with pathogenic aerosolized M. tuberculosis. However, inclusion of flagellin in both DNA prime and Ad booster vaccines induced localized pulmonary inflammation and transient weight loss, with route-dependent effects on vaccine-induced T cell immunity. The latter included marked reductions in levels of mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses following IM DNA/IN Ad mucosal prime-boosting, although antibody responses were not diminished. These findings indicate that flagellin has differential and route-dependent adjuvant activity when included as a component of systemic or mucosally-delivered gene-based prime-boost immunization. Clear adjuvant activity for both T and B cell responses was observed when flagellin was included in the DNA priming vaccine, but side effects occurred when given in an Ad boosting vector, particularly via the pulmonary route.

  3. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lacking hfq gene confers protective immunity against murine typhoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Shankar Allam

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is an important enteric pathogen and its various serovars are involved in causing both systemic and intestinal diseases in humans and domestic animals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella leading to increased morbidity and mortality has further complicated its management. Live attenuated vaccines have been proven superior over killed or subunit vaccines due to their ability to induce protective immunity. Of the various strategies used for the generation of live attenuated vaccine strains, focus has gradually shifted towards manipulation of virulence regulator genes. Hfq is a RNA chaperon which mediates the binding of small RNAs to the mRNA and assists in post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the Salmonella Typhimurium Δhfq strain as a candidate for live oral vaccine in murine model of typhoid fever. Salmonella hfq deletion mutant is highly attenuated in cell culture and animal model implying a significant role of Hfq in bacterial virulence. Oral immunization with the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant efficiently protects mice against subsequent oral challenge with virulent strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, protection was induced upon both multiple as well as single dose of immunizations. The vaccine strain appears to be safe for use in pregnant mice and the protection is mediated by the increase in the number of CD4(+ T lymphocytes upon vaccination. The levels of serum IgG and secretory-IgA in intestinal washes specific to lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein were significantly increased upon vaccination. Furthermore, hfq deletion mutant showed enhanced antigen presentation by dendritic cells compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, the studies in murine immunization model suggest that the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant can be a novel live oral vaccine candidate.

  4. Association study of functional genetic variants of innate immunity related genes in celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggest that the innate immune system is implicated in the early events of celiac disease (CD pathogenesis. In this work for the first time we have assessed the relevance of different proinflammatory mediators typically related to innate immunity in CD predisposition. Methods We performed a familial study in which 105 celiac families characterized by the presence of an affected child with CD were genotyped for functional polymorphisms located at regulatory regions of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RN, IL-18, RANTES and MCP-1 genes. Familial data was analysed with a transmission disequilibrium test (TDT that revealed no statistically significant differences in the transmission pattern of the different genetic markers considered. Results The TDT analysis for IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RN, IL-18, and MCP-1 genes genetic variants did not reveal biased transmission to the affected offspring. Only a borderline association of RANTES promoter genetic variants with CD predisposition was observed. Conclusion Our results suggest that the analysed polymorphisms of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RN, IL-18, RANTES and MCP-1 genes do not seem to play a major role in CD genetic predisposition in our population.

  5. Expression patterns and action analysis of genes associated with physiological responses during rat liver regeneration: Innate immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Wen Chen; Ming-Zhen Zhang; Li-Feng Zhao; Cun-Shuan Xu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between innate immune response and liver regeneration (LR) at transcriptional level.METHODS: Genes associated with innate immunity response were obtained by collecting the data from databases and retrieving articles. Gene expression changes in rat regenerating liver were detected by rat genome 230 2.0 array.RESULTS: A total of 85 genes were found to be associated with LR. The initially and totally expressed number of genes at the phases of initiation [0.5-4 h after partial hepatectomy (PH)], transition from Go to G1 (4-6 h after PH), cell proliferation (6-66 h after PH),cell differentiation and structure-function reconstruction (66-168 h after PH) was 36, 9, 47, 4 and 36, 26, 78,50, respectively, illustrating that the associated genes were mainly triggered at the initial phase of LR and worked at different phases. According to their expression similarity, these genes were classified into 5 types: 41 up-regulated, 4 predominantly up-regulated, 26 downregulated, 6 predominantly down-regulated, and 8 approximately up/down-regulated genes, respectively.The expression of these genes was up-regulated 350 times and down-regulated 129 times respectively,demonstrating that the expression of most genes was enhanced while the expression of a small number of genes was decreased during LR. Their time relevance was classified into 14 groups, showing that the cellular physiological and biochemical activities during LR were staggered. According to the gene expression patterns,they were classified into 28 types, indicating that the cellular physiological and biochemical activities were diverse and complicated during LR.CONCLUSION: Congenital cellular immunity is enhanced mainly in the forepart, prophase and anaphase of LR while congenital molecular immunity is increased dominantly in the forepart and anaphase of LR. A total of 85 genes associated with LR play an important role in innate immunity.

  6. Novel immune genes associated with excessive inflammatory and antiviral responses to rhinovirus in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baines Katherine J

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhinovirus (RV is a major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD exacerbations, and primarily infects bronchial epithelial cells. Immune responses from BECs to RV infection are critical in limiting viral replication, and remain unclear in COPD. The objective of this study is to investigate innate immune responses to RV infection in COPD primary BECs (pBECs in comparison to healthy controls. Methods Primary bronchial epithelial cells (pBECs from subjects with COPD and healthy controls were infected with RV-1B. Cells and cell supernatant were collected and analysed using gene expression microarray, qPCR, ELISA, flow cytometry and titration assay for viral replication. Results COPD pBECs responded to RV-1B infection with an increased expression of antiviral and pro-inflammatory genes compared to healthy pBECs, including cytokines, chemokines, RNA helicases, and interferons (IFNs. Similar levels of viral replication were observed in both disease groups; however COPD pBECs were highly susceptible to apoptosis. COPD pBECs differed at baseline in the expression of 9 genes, including calgranulins S100A8/A9, and 22 genes after RV-1B infection including the signalling proteins pellino-1 and interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase 2. In COPD, IFN-β/λ1 pre-treatment did not change MDA-5/RIG-I and IFN-β expression, but resulted in higher levels IFN-λ1, CXCL-10 and CCL-5. This led to reduced viral replication, but did not increase pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conclusions COPD pBECs elicit an exaggerated pro-inflammatory and antiviral response to RV-1B infection, without changing viral replication. IFN pre-treatment reduced viral replication. This study identified novel genes and pathways involved in potentiating the inflammatory response to RV in COPD.

  7. Immune response in mice and cattle after immunization with a Boophilus microplus DNA vaccine containing bm86 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Lina María; Orduz, Sergio; López, Elkin D; Guzmán, Fanny; Patarroyo, Manuel E; Armengol, Gemma

    2007-03-15

    Plasmid pBMC2 encoding antigen Bm86 from a Colombian strain of cattle tick Boophilus microplus, was used for DNA-mediated immunization of BALB/c mice, employing doses of 10 and 50microg, delivered by intradermic and intramuscular routes. Anti-Bm86 antibody levels were significantly higher compared to control mice treated with PBS. In the evaluation of immunoglobulin isotypes, significant levels of IgG2a and IgG2b were observed in mice immunized with 50microg of pBMC2. Measurement of interleukine (IL) levels (IL-4, IL-5, IL-12(p40)) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in the sera of mice immunized with pBMC2 indicated high levels of IL-4 and IL-5, although there were also significant levels of IFN-gamma. Mice immunized with pBMC2 showed antigen-specific stimulation of splenocytes according to the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine and IFN-gamma secretion. In all trials, mice injected intramuscularly with 50microg of pBMC2 presented the highest immune response. Moreover, cattle immunized with this DNA vaccine showed antibody production significantly different to the negative control. In conclusion, these results suggest the potential of DNA immunization with pBMC2 to induce humoral and cellular immune responses against B. microplus. PMID:17055651

  8. De novo transcriptomic analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes from the Chinese goose: gene discovery and immune system pathway description.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Tariq

    Full Text Available The Chinese goose is one of the most economically important poultry birds and is a natural reservoir for many avian viruses. However, the nature and regulation of the innate and adaptive immune systems of this waterfowl species are not completely understood due to limited information on the goose genome. Recently, transcriptome sequencing technology was applied in the genomic studies focused on novel gene discovery. Thus, this study described the transcriptome of the goose peripheral blood lymphocytes to identify immunity relevant genes.De novo transcriptome assembly of the goose peripheral blood lymphocytes was sequenced by Illumina-Solexa technology. In total, 211,198 unigenes were assembled from the 69.36 million cleaned reads. The average length, N50 size and the maximum length of the assembled unigenes were 687 bp, 1,298 bp and 18,992 bp, respectively. A total of 36,854 unigenes showed similarity by BLAST search against the NCBI non-redundant (Nr protein database. For functional classification, 163,161 unigenes were comprised of three Gene Ontology (Go categories and 67 subcategories. A total of 15,334 unigenes were annotated into 25 eukaryotic orthologous groups (KOGs categories. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG database annotated 39,585 unigenes into six biological functional groups and 308 pathways. Among the 2,757 unigenes that participated in the 15 immune system KEGG pathways, 125 of the most important immune relevant genes were summarized and analyzed by STRING analysis to identify gene interactions and relationships. Moreover, 10 genes were confirmed by PCR and analyzed. Of these 125 unigenes, 109 unigenes, approximately 87%, were not previously identified in the goose.This de novo transcriptome analysis could provide important Chinese goose sequence information and highlights the value of new gene discovery, pathways investigation and immune system gene identification, and comparison with other avian species as useful

  9. RNA sequencing analysis of human podocytes reveals glucocorticoid regulated gene networks targeting non-immune pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lulu; Hindmarch, Charles C. T.; Rogers, Mark; Campbell, Colin; Waterfall, Christy; Coghill, Jane; Mathieson, Peter W.; Welsh, Gavin I.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are steroids that reduce inflammation and are used as immunosuppressive drugs for many diseases. They are also the mainstay for the treatment of minimal change nephropathy (MCN), which is characterised by an absence of inflammation. Their mechanisms of action remain elusive. Evidence suggests that immunomodulatory drugs can directly act on glomerular epithelial cells or ‘podocytes’, the cell type which is the main target of injury in MCN. To understand the nature of glucocorticoid effects on non-immune cell functions, we generated RNA sequencing data from human podocyte cell lines and identified the genes that are significantly regulated in dexamethasone-treated podocytes compared to vehicle-treated cells. The upregulated genes are of functional relevance to cytoskeleton-related processes, whereas the downregulated genes mostly encode pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. We observed a tendency for dexamethasone-upregulated genes to be downregulated in MCN patients. Integrative analysis revealed gene networks composed of critical signaling pathways that are likely targeted by dexamethasone in podocytes. PMID:27774996

  10. Immune signatures and disorder-specific patterns in a cross-disorder gene expression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Simone; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Patel, Hamel; Lee, Sanghyuck; Dempster, David; Curtis, Charles; Paya-Cano, Jose; Murphy, Declan; Wilson, C. Ellie; Horder, Jamie; Mendez, M. Andreina; Asherson, Philip; Rivera, Margarita; Costello, Helen; Maltezos, Stefanos; Whitwell, Susannah; Pitts, Mark; Tye, Charlotte; Ashwood, Karen L.; Bolton, Patrick; Curran, Sarah; McGuffin, Peter; Dobson, Richard; Breen, Gerome

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies point to overlap between neuropsychiatric disorders in symptomatology and genetic aetiology. Aims To systematically investigate genomics overlap between childhood and adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). Method Analysis of whole-genome blood gene expression and genetic risk scores of 318 individuals. Participants included individuals affected with adult ADHD (n = 93), childhood ADHD (n = 17), MDD (n = 63), ASD (n = 51), childhood dual diagnosis of ADHD–ASD (n = 16) and healthy controls (n = 78). Results Weighted gene co-expression analysis results reveal disorder-specific signatures for childhood ADHD and MDD, and also highlight two immune-related gene co-expression modules correlating inversely with MDD and adult ADHD disease status. We find no significant relationship between polygenic risk scores and gene expression signatures. Conclusions Our results reveal disorder overlap and specificity at the genetic and gene expression level. They suggest new pathways contributing to distinct pathophysiology in psychiatric disorders and shed light on potential shared genomic risk factors. PMID:27151072

  11. Transcriptome profiling analysis of naked carp (Gymnocypris przewalskii) provides insights into the immune-related genes in highland fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Chao; Zhang, Cunfang; Zhang, Renyi; Zhao, Kai

    2015-10-01

    The naked carp, Gymnocypris przewalskii, is one of the dominant aquaculture fish species in Qinghai Province, China. Its wild stocks have severely suffered from overfishing, and the farming species are vulnerable to various pathogens infections. Here we report the first immune-related tissues transcriptome of a wild naked carp using a deep sequencing approach. A total of 158,087 unigenes are generated, 2687 gill-specific gene and 3215 kidney-specific genes are identified, respectively. Gene ontology analysis shows that 51,671 unigenes are involved in three major functional categories: biological process, cellular component, and molecular function. Further analysis shows that numerous consensus sequences are homologous to known immune-related genes. Pathways mapping annotate 56,270 unigenes and identify a large number of immune-related pathways. In addition, we focus on the immune-related genes and gene family in Toll-like receptor signaling pathway involved in innate immunity, including toll-like receptors (TLRs), interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), interleukins (ILs) and tumor necrosis factors (TNFs). Eventually, we identify 5 TLRs, 4 IRFs, 3 ILs and 2 TNFs with a completed coding sequence though mining the transcriptome data. Phylogeny analysis shows these genes of naked carp are mostly close to zebrafish. Protein domain and selection pressure analyses together show that all these genes are highly conserved in gene sequence and protein domain structure with other species, and purifying selection underwent in these genes, implied functionally important features are conserved in the genes above. Intriguingly, we detect positive selection signals in naked carp TLR4, and significant divergence occurred among tested species TLR4, suggested that naked carp TLR4 function may be affected. Finally, we identify 23,867 simple sequence repeat (SSR) marks in this transcriptome. Taken together, this study not only contributes a large number of candidate genes in naked carp

  12. Preterm Birth Reduces Nutrient Absorption With Limited Effect on Immune Gene Expression and Gut Colonization in Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mette V; Cilieborg, Malene S.; Skovgaard, Kerstin;

    2015-01-01

    The primary risk factors for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) are preterm birth, enteral feeding, and gut colonization. It is unclear whether feeding and colonization induce excessive expression of immune genes that lead to NEC. Using a pig model, we hypothesized that reduced gestational age would...... upregulate immune-related genes and cause bacterial imbalance after birth. Preterm (85%-92% gestation, n = 53) and near-term (95%-99% gestation, n = 69) pigs were delivered by cesarean section and euthanized at birth or after 2 days of infant formula or bovine colostrum feeding. At birth, preterm delivery...... reduced 5 of 30 intestinal genes related to nutrient absorption and innate immunity, relative to near-term pigs, whereas 2 genes were upregulated. Preterm birth also reduced ex vivo intestinal glucose and leucine uptake (40%-50%), but failed to increase cytokine secretions from intestinal explants...

  13. Transcriptome analysis of the white body of the squid Euprymna tasmanica with emphasis on immune and hematopoietic gene discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla A Salazar

    Full Text Available In the mutualistic relationship between the squid Euprymna tasmanica and the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri, several host factors, including immune-related proteins, are known to interact and respond specifically and exclusively to the presence of the symbiont. In squid and octopus, the white body is considered to be an immune organ mainly due to the fact that blood cells, or hemocytes, are known to be present in high numbers and in different developmental stages. Hence, the white body has been described as the site of hematopoiesis in cephalopods. However, to our knowledge, there are no studies showing any molecular evidence of such functions. In this study, we performed a transcriptomic analysis of white body tissue of the Southern dumpling squid, E. tasmanica. Our primary goal was to gain insights into the functions of this tissue and to test for the presence of gene transcripts associated with hematopoietic and immune processes. Several hematopoiesis genes including CPSF1, GATA 2, TFIID, and FGFR2 were found to be expressed in the white body. In addition, transcripts associated with immune-related signal transduction pathways, such as the toll-like receptor/NF-κβ, and MAPK pathways were also found, as well as other immune genes previously identified in E. tasmanica's sister species, E. scolopes. This study is the first to analyze an immune organ within cephalopods, and to provide gene expression data supporting the white body as a hematopoietic tissue.

  14. Gene expression profiling of coelomic cells and discovery of immune-related genes in the earthworm, Eisenia andrei, using expressed sequence tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Eun Sik; Cho, Sung-Jin; Park, Soon Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The coelomic cells of the earthworm consist of leukocytes, chlorogocytes, and coelomocytes, which play an important role in innate immunity reactions. To gain insight into the expression profiles of coelomic cells of the earthworm, Eisenia andrei, we analyzed 1151 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from the cDNA library of the coelomic cells. Among the 1151 ESTs analyzed, 493 ESTs (42.8%) showed a significant similarity to known genes and represented 164 unique genes, of which 93 ESTs were singletons and 71 ESTs manifested as two or more ESTs. From the 164 unique genes sequenced, we found 24 immune-related and cell defense genes. Furthermore, real-time PCR analysis showed that levels of lysenin-related proteins mRNA in coelomic cells of E. andrei were upregulated after the injection of Bacillus subtilis bacteria. This EST data-set would provide a valuable resource for future researches of earthworm immune system. PMID:25496401

  15. Transportin-SR Is Required for Proper Splicing of Resistance Genes and Plant Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shaohua; Zhang, Zhibin; Jing, Beibei; Gannon, Patrick; Ding, Jinmei; Xu, Fang; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2011-01-01

    Transportin-SR (TRN-SR) is a member of the importin-β super-family that functions as the nuclear import receptor for serine-arginine rich (SR) proteins, which play diverse roles in RNA metabolism. Here we report the identification and cloning of mos14 (modifier of snc1-1, 14), a mutation that suppresses the immune responses conditioned by the auto-activated Resistance (R) protein snc1 (suppressor of npr1-1, constitutive 1). MOS14 encodes a nuclear protein with high similarity to previously characterized TRN-SR proteins in animals. Yeast two-hybrid assays showed that MOS14 interacts with AtRAN1 via its N-terminus and SR proteins via its C-terminus. In mos14-1, localization of several SR proteins to the nucleus was impaired, confirming that MOS14 functions as a TRN-SR. The mos14-1 mutation results in altered splicing patterns of SNC1 and another R gene RPS4 and compromised resistance mediated by snc1 and RPS4, suggesting that nuclear import of SR proteins by MOS14 is required for proper splicing of these two R genes and is important for their functions in plant immunity. PMID:21738492

  16. Transportin-SR is required for proper splicing of resistance genes and plant immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohua Xu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Transportin-SR (TRN-SR is a member of the importin-β super-family that functions as the nuclear import receptor for serine-arginine rich (SR proteins, which play diverse roles in RNA metabolism. Here we report the identification and cloning of mos14 (modifier of snc1-1, 14, a mutation that suppresses the immune responses conditioned by the auto-activated Resistance (R protein snc1 (suppressor of npr1-1, constitutive 1. MOS14 encodes a nuclear protein with high similarity to previously characterized TRN-SR proteins in animals. Yeast two-hybrid assays showed that MOS14 interacts with AtRAN1 via its N-terminus and SR proteins via its C-terminus. In mos14-1, localization of several SR proteins to the nucleus was impaired, confirming that MOS14 functions as a TRN-SR. The mos14-1 mutation results in altered splicing patterns of SNC1 and another R gene RPS4 and compromised resistance mediated by snc1 and RPS4, suggesting that nuclear import of SR proteins by MOS14 is required for proper splicing of these two R genes and is important for their functions in plant immunity.

  17. Immune response genes and pathogen presence predict migration survival in wild salmon smolts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Ken M; Hinch, Scott G; Gale, Marika Kirstin; Clark, Timothy D; Lotto, Andrew G; Casselman, Matthew T; Li, Shaorong; Rechisky, Erin L; Porter, Aswea D; Welch, David W; Miller, Kristina M

    2014-12-01

    We present the first data to link physiological responses and pathogen presence with subsequent fate during migration of wild salmonid smolts. We tagged and non-lethally sampled gill tissue from sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) smolts as they left their nursery lake (Chilko Lake, BC, Canada) to compare gene expression profiles and freshwater pathogen loads with migration success over the first ~1150 km of their migration to the North Pacific Ocean using acoustic telemetry. Fifteen per cent of smolts were never detected again after release, and these fish had gene expression profiles consistent with an immune response to one or more viral pathogens compared with fish that survived their freshwater migration. Among the significantly upregulated genes of the fish that were never detected postrelease were MX (interferon-induced GTP-binding protein Mx) and STAT1 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 1-alpha/beta), which are characteristic of a type I interferon response to viral pathogens. The most commonly detected pathogen in the smolts leaving the nursery lake was infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Collectively, these data show that some of the fish assumed to have died after leaving the nursery lake appeared to be responding to one or more viral pathogens and had elevated stress levels that could have contributed to some of the mortality shortly after release. We present the first evidence that changes in gene expression may be predictive of some of the freshwater migration mortality in wild salmonid smolts. PMID:25354752

  18. Echinoderm immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L Courtney; Ghosh, Julie; Buckley, Katherine M; Clow, Lori A; Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Haug, Tor; Henson, John H; Li, Chun; Lun, Cheng Man; Majeske, Audrey J; Matranga, Valeria; Nair, Sham V; Rast, Jonathan P; Raftos, David A; Roth, Mattias; Sacchi, Sandro; Schrankel, Catherine S; Stensvåg, Klara

    2010-01-01

    A survey for immune genes in the genome for the purple sea urchin has shown that the immune system is complex and sophisticated. By inference, immune responses of all echinoderms maybe similar. The immune system is mediated by several types of coelomocytes that are also useful as sensors of environmental stresses. There are a number of large gene families in the purple sea urchin genome that function in immunity and of which at least one appears to employ novel approaches for sequence diversification. Echinoderms have a simpler complement system, a large set of lectin genes and a number of antimicrobial peptides. Profiling the immune genes expressed by coelomocytes and the proteins in the coelomic fluid provide detailed information about immune functions in the sea urchin. The importance of echinoderms in maintaining marine ecosystem stability and the disastrous effects of their removal due to disease will require future collaborations between ecologists and immunologists working towards understanding and preserving marine habitats. PMID:21528703

  19. Evaluation of ToxA and Vibrio parahaemolyticus lysate on humoral immune response and immune-related genes in Pacific red snapper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Becerril, Martha; Maldonado-García, Minerva; Guluarte, Crystal; León-Gallo, Amalia; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Ascencio, Felipe; Hirono, Ikuo; Angulo, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Immunogenicity of ToxA and Vibrio parahaemolyticus lysate was evaluated in a double immunostimulation scheme in Pacific red snapper after V. parahaemolyticus infection. Three groups of Pacific red snapper were intraperitonealy (i.p.) injected with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS group), ToxA of V. parahaemolyticus (ToxA-Vp group) or V. parahaemolyticus lysate (lysate-Vp group) (first injection, day 1; second injection, day 7). Fish were subsequently infected with live V. parahaemolyticus. Humoral immune parameters in skin mucus and serum were evaluated on days 1, 7, 8 and 14 days post-immunostimulation and 7 days post-infection. Moreover expression of immune-related genes was quantified by real time PCR in head-kidney leukocytes, spleen, liver, and intestine. The ToxA-Vp-treated group showed a higher anti-protease and catalase activity in skin mucus when compared with the PBS group. Measurements of SOD and CAT activities showed an increment in both activities a day after the second boost with ToxA-Vp or lysate-Vp. Interestingly, IgM levels in mucus and transcripts were enhanced followed the ToxA-Vp treatment even after challenge. Furthermore, IL-1β was strongly expressed in all analyzed cell or tissues followed ToxA-Vp or Vp-lysate treatments. Finally, SOD and CAT gene expression was up-regulated in fish immunostimulated with either treatment ToxA-Vp or lysate-Vp, mainly after infection in head-kidney leukocytes and intestine. This is the first study where the effects of ToxA from V. parahaemolyticus in the immune system of Pacific red snapper was evaluated. These results suggest that ToxA-Vp would positively affect humoral immune response and up-regulate expression of genes involved in the immune system function; and could help in the control of V. parahaemolyticus infection in Pacific red snapper Lutjanus peru, an economic important fish in Mexico.

  20. Ancient Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, Ashwin Balegar

    This thesis involves development of an interactive GIS (Geographic Information System) based application, which gives information about the ancient history of Egypt. The astonishing architecture, the strange burial rituals and their civilization were some of the intriguing questions that motivated me towards developing this application. The application is a historical timeline starting from 3100 BC, leading up to 664 BC, focusing on the evolution of the Egyptian dynasties. The tool holds information regarding some of the famous monuments which were constructed during that era and also about the civilizations that co-existed. It also provides details about the religions followed by their kings. It also includes the languages spoken during those periods. The tool is developed using JAVA, a programing language and MOJO (Map Objects Java Objects) a product of ESRI (Environmental Science Research Institute) to create map objects, to provide geographic information. JAVA Swing is used for designing the user interface. HTML (Hyper Text Markup Language) pages are created to provide the user with more information related to the historic period. CSS (Cascade Style Sheets) and JAVA Scripts are used with HTML5 to achieve creative display of content. The tool is kept simple and easy for the user to interact with. The tool also includes pictures and videos for the user to get a feel of the historic period. The application is built to motivate people to know more about one of the prominent and ancient civilization of the Mediterranean world.

  1. Regulation of the human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide gene by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in primary immune cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lowry, Malcolm B; Guo, Chunxiao; Borregaard, Niels;

    2014-01-01

    Production of the human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide gene (hCAP18/LL-37), is regulated by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) and is critical in the killing of pathogens by innate immune cells. In addition, secreted LL-37 binds extracellular receptors and modulates the recruitment and activity...... of both innate and adaptive immune cells. Evidence suggests that during infections activated immune cells locally produce increased levels of 1,25D3 thus increasing production of hCAP18/LL-37. The relative expression levels of hCAP18/LL-37 among different immune cell types are not well characterized...... type and lineage. Furthermore, potent induction of hCAP18 by 1,25D3 in macrophages and dendritic cells may modulate functions of both innate and adaptive immune cells at sites of infection....

  2. In Vitro Immune Toxicity of Depleted Uranium: Effects on Murine Macrophages, CD4+ T Cells, and Gene Expression Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Bin; Fleming, James T.; Schultz, Terry W.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2005-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a by-product of the uranium enrichment process and shares chemical properties with natural and enriched uranium. To investigate the toxic effects of environmental DU exposure on the immune system, we examined the influences of DU (in the form of uranyl nitrate) on viability and immune function as well as cytokine gene expression in murine peritoneal macrophages and splenic CD4+ T cells. Macrophages and CD4+ T cells were exposed to various concentrations of DU, and cel...

  3. De Novo assembly of the Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus spleen transcriptome to identify putative genes involved in immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Huang

    Full Text Available Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus is an economically important marine fish in Asia and has suffered from disease outbreaks caused by various pathogens, which requires more information for immune relevant genes on genome background. However, genomic and transcriptomic data for Japanese flounder remain scarce, which limits studies on the immune system of this species. In this study, we characterized the Japanese flounder spleen transcriptome using an Illumina paired-end sequencing platform to identify putative genes involved in immunity.A cDNA library from the spleen of P. olivaceus was constructed and randomly sequenced using an Illumina technique. The removal of low quality reads generated 12,196,968 trimmed reads, which assembled into 96,627 unigenes. A total of 21,391 unigenes (22.14% were annotated in the NCBI Nr database, and only 1.1% of the BLASTx top-hits matched P. olivaceus protein sequences. Approximately 12,503 (58.45% unigenes were categorized into three Gene Ontology groups, 19,547 (91.38% were classified into 26 Cluster of Orthologous Groups, and 10,649 (49.78% were assigned to six Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. Furthermore, 40,928 putative simple sequence repeats and 47, 362 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. Importantly, we identified 1,563 putative immune-associated unigenes that mapped to 15 immune signaling pathways.The P. olivaceus transciptome data provides a rich source to discover and identify new genes, and the immune-relevant sequences identified here will facilitate our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the immune response. Furthermore, the plentiful potential SSRs and SNPs found in this study are important resources with respect to future development of a linkage map or marker assisted breeding programs for the flounder.

  4. Analysis of polymorphisms in 16 genes in type 1 diabetes that have been associated with other immune-mediated diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Neil M

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of the HLA class II, insulin (INS, CTLA-4 and PTPN22 genes as determinants of type 1 diabetes (T1D susceptibility indicates that fine tuning of the immune system is centrally involved in disease development. Some genes have been shown to affect several immune-mediated diseases. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that alleles of susceptibility genes previously associated with other immune-mediated diseases might perturb immune homeostasis, and hence also associate with predisposition to T1D. Methods We resequenced and genotyped tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from two genes, CRP and FCER1B, and genotyped 27 disease-associated polymorphisms from thirteen gene regions, namely FCRL3, CFH, SLC9A3R1, PADI4, RUNX1, SPINK5, IL1RN, IL1RA, CARD15, IBD5-locus (including SLC22A4, LAG3, ADAM33 and NFKB1. These genes have been associated previously with susceptibility to a range of immune-mediated diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, Graves' disease (GD, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis (PA, atopy, asthma, Crohn disease and multiple sclerosis (MS. Our T1D collections are divided into three sample subsets, consisting of set 1 families (up to 754 families, set 2 families (up to 743 families, and a case-control collection (ranging from 1,500 to 4,400 cases and 1,500 to 4,600 controls. Each SNP was genotyped in one or more of these subsets. Our study typically had approximately 80% statistical power for a minor allele frequency (MAF >5% and odds ratios (OR of 1.5 with the type 1 error rate, α = 0.05. Results We found no evidence of association with T1D at most of the loci studied 0.02 P ADAM33, rs2787094, was any evidence of association obtained, P = 0.0004 in set 1 families (relative risk (RR = 0.78, but further support was not observed in the 4,326 cases and 4,610 controls, P = 0.57 (OR = 1.02. Conclusion Polymorphisms in a variety of genes previously associated with

  5. Derived immune and ancestral pigmentation alleles in a 7,000-year-old Mesolithic European

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olalde, I.; Allentoft, M.E.; Sanchez-Quinto, F.; Santpere, G.; Chiang, C.W.; DeGiorgio, M.; Prado-Martinez, J.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Rasmussen, S.; Quilez, J.; Ramirez, O.; Marigorta, U.M.; Fernandez-Callejo, M.; Prada, M.E.; Encinas, J.M.; Nielsen, R.; Netea, M.G.; Novembre, J.; Sturm, R.A.; Sabeti, P.; Marques-Bonet, T.; Navarro, A.; Willerslev, E.; Lalueza-Fox, C.

    2014-01-01

    Ancient genomic sequences have started to reveal the origin and the demographic impact of farmers from the Neolithic period spreading into Europe. The adoption of farming, stock breeding and sedentary societies during the Neolithic may have resulted in adaptive changes in genes associated with immun

  6. Identification of the VERNALIZATION 4 gene reveals the origin of spring growth habit in ancient wheats from South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat varieties with a winter growth habit require long exposures to low temperatures (vernalization) to accelerate flowering. Natural variation in the vernalization genes regulating this requirement has favored wheat adaptation to different environments. The main wheat vernalization genes VRN1, V...

  7. Systems biology analysis of gene expression during in vivo Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis enteric colonization reveals role for immune tolerance.

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    Sangeeta Khare

    Full Text Available Survival and persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP in the intestinal mucosa is associated with host immune tolerance. However, the initial events during MAP interaction with its host that lead to pathogen survival, granulomatous inflammation, and clinical disease progression are poorly defined. We hypothesize that immune tolerance is initiated upon initial contact of MAP with the intestinal Peyer's patch. To test our hypothesis, ligated ileal loops in neonatal calves were infected with MAP. Intestinal tissue RNAs were collected (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 hrs post-infection, processed, and hybridized to bovine gene expression microarrays. By comparing the gene transcription responses of calves infected with the MAP, informative complex patterns of expression were clearly visible. To interpret these complex data, changes in the gene expression were further analyzed by dynamic Bayesian analysis, and genes were grouped into the specific pathways and gene ontology categories to create a holistic model. This model revealed three different phases of responses: i early (30 min and 1 hr post-infection, ii intermediate (2, 4 and 8 hrs post-infection, and iii late (12 hrs post-infection. We describe here the data that include expression profiles for perturbed pathways, as well as, mechanistic genes (genes predicted to have regulatory influence that are associated with immune tolerance. In the Early Phase of MAP infection, multiple pathways were initiated in response to MAP invasion via receptor mediated endocytosis and changes in intestinal permeability. During the Intermediate Phase, perturbed pathways involved the inflammatory responses, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, and cell-cell signaling. During the Late Phase of infection, gene responses associated with immune tolerance were initiated at the level of T-cell signaling. Our study provides evidence that MAP infection resulted in differentially regulated genes, perturbed

  8. Immune gene expression in the spleen of chickens experimentally infected with Ascaridia galli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgaard, Tina S; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Norup, Liselotte R; Pleidrup, Janne; Permin, Anders; Schou, Torben W; Vadekær, Dorte F; Jungersen, Gregers; Juul-Madsen, Helle R

    2015-03-15

    Ascaridia galli is a gastrointestinal nematode infecting chickens. Chickens kept in alternative rearing systems or at free-range experience increased risk for infection with resulting high prevalences. A. galli infection causes reduced weight gain, decreased egg production and in severe cases increased mortality. More importantly, the parasitised chickens are more susceptible to secondary infections and their ability to develop vaccine-induced protective immunity against other diseases may be compromised. Detailed information about the immune response to the natural infection may be exploited to enable future vaccine development. In the present study, expression of immune genes in the chicken spleen during an experimental infection with A. galli was investigated using the Fluidigm(®) BioMark™ microfluidic qPCR platform which combines automatic high-throughput with attractive low sample and reagent consumption. Spleenic transcription of immunological genes was compared between infected chickens and non-infected controls at week 2, 6, and 9 p.i. corresponding to different stages of parasite development/maturation. At week 2 p.i. increased expression of IL-13 was observed in infected chickens. Increased expression of MBL, CRP, IFN-α, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-12β and IL-18 followed at week 6 p.i. and at both week 6 and 9 p.i. expression of DEFβ1 was highly increased in infected chickens. In summary, apart from also earlier reported increased expression of the Th2 signature cytokine IL-13 we observed only few differentially expressed genes at week 2 p.i. which corresponds to the larvae histotrophic phase. In contrast, we observed increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and acute phase proteins in infected chickens, by week 6 p.i. where the larvae re-enter the intestinal lumen. Increased expression of DEFβ1 was observed in infected chickens at week 6 p.i. but also at week 9 p.i. which corresponds to a matured stage where adult worms are present in the

  9. Tumor-derived exosomes regulate expression of immune function-related genes in human T cell subsets

    OpenAIRE

    Laurent Muller; Masato Mitsuhashi; Patricia Simms; GOODING, WILLIAM E.; Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cell-derived exosomes (TEX) suppress functions of immune cells. Here, changes in the gene profiles of primary human T lymphocytes exposed in vitro to exosomes were evaluated. CD4+ Tconv, CD8+ T or CD4+ CD39+ Treg were isolated from normal donors’ peripheral blood and co-incubated with TEX or exosomes isolated from supernatants of cultured dendritic cells (DEX). Expression levels of 24–27 immune response-related genes in these T cells were quantified by qRT-PCR. In activated T cells, TEX...

  10. Expression of immune response genes in peripheral blood of cattle infested with Rhipicephalus microplus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, R; Wohlres-Viana, S; Reis, D R L; Teixeira, H C; Ferreira, A P; Guimarães, S E F; Prata, M C A; Furlong, J; Verneque, R S; Machado, M A

    2014-01-01

    The bovine tick Rhipicephalus microplus is responsible for severe economic losses in tropical cattle production. Bos indicus breeds are more resistant to tick infestations than are Bos taurus breeds, and the understanding of the physiological mechanisms involved in this difference is important for the development of new methods of parasite control. We evaluated differences in the transcript expression of genes related to the immune response in the peripheral blood of cattle previously characterized as resistant or susceptible to tick infestation. Crossbreed F2 Gir x Holstein animals (resistant, N = 6; susceptible, N = 6) were artificially submitted to tick infestation. Blood samples were collected at 0, 24, and 48 h after tick infestation and evaluated for transcript expression of the CD25, CXCL8, CXCL10, FoxP3, interleukin (IL)-10, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) genes. Gene expression of CD25 (6.00, P resistant group at 48 h compared with samples collected before infestation. In the susceptible group, CXCL8 (-2.02, P resistance to R. microplus in cattle. PMID:24938612

  11. Expression of immune-related genes in larval stages of the giant tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul; Puanglarp, Narongsak; Petkon, Sasithon; Donnuea, Seri; Söderhäll, Irene; Söderhäll, Kenneth

    2007-10-01

    Shrimp undergo several morphologically different stages during development and therefore the expression of some immune-related genes such as prophenoloxidase (proPO), peroxinectin (Prx), crustin (Crus), penaeidin (Pen), transglutaminase (TGase), haemocyanin (Hc) and astakine (Ak) were determined during larval development of the shrimp (Penaeus monodon), i.e. nauplius 4 (N4), protozoea 1 and 3 (Z1 and 3), mysis 3 (My 3), post-larvae 3 (PL3) and also in haemocytes of juveniles. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that all transcripts were already present in the early larval stage of N4 but at different levels. The transcript of proPO was found to be extremely low or even absent at N4, whereas Prx, Crus, Pen, TGase, Hc and Ak were significantly expressed at all larval stages. Up to now expression of proPO and Prx has only been reported from haemocytes in crustaceans and in this study Prx also appeared to be expressed in stages which appear to lack haemocytes. Thus, this may suggest that Prx is expressed in other cells than haemocytes. It is well known among invertebrates that the proPO system plays a crucial role as an immune effector molecule against microbes. However, in this study, the transcript of proPO was low during the larval stages and hardly present at all at N4. This might indicate that the development of immune-competent haemocytes during the larval stages is not completed and as a consequence they are likely to be more susceptible to infectious diseases during these stages.

  12. The effects of Ficus carica polysaccharide on immune response and expression of some immune-related genes in grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xia; Guo, Jian Lin; Ye, Jin Yun; Zhang, Yi Xiang; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of Ficus carica polysaccharide (FCP), isolated from the fruit of F. carica L., at 0%, 0.1%, 0.5% and 1.0% doses supplementation with feed on genes Interleukin 1-β (IL-1β), Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNF-α) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) gene expression in blood, humoral innate immune parameters and resistant to Flavobacterium columnare of grass carp at weeks 1, 2 and 3. The results revealed that administration of FCP significantly (P<0.05) up regulated IL-1β and TNF-α gene expression. HSP70 gene expression was significantly (P<0.05) lower in FCP-fed fish at the end of trial. The serum total protein, albumin and globulin did not significantly increased in any diet on the first week whereas it was significantly enhanced in 0.5% and 1.0% supplementation diets on weeks 2 and 3 when compared to control. The serum complement C3 was significantly (P<0.05) increased on weeks 1 and 2 when compared to control, however, no significant difference was found in this activity after 3 weeks of treatment. All diets significantly enhanced the serum lysozyme activity, bactericidal activity from weeks 1-2 as compared to control. Grass carp fed with FCP showed remarkably higher resistance against F. columnare (60% survival) compared to the control group (30% survival). These results confirm that FCP can up regulate immune related genes expression, stimulates immune response that per se enhances disease resistance in grass carp.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and archaeal arsC gene sequences suggests an ancient, common origin for arsenate reductase

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    Dugas Sandra L

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ars gene system provides arsenic resistance for a variety of microorganisms and can be chromosomal or plasmid-borne. The arsC gene, which codes for an arsenate reductase is essential for arsenate resistance and transforms arsenate into arsenite, which is extruded from the cell. A survey of GenBank shows that arsC appears to be phylogenetically widespread both in organisms with known arsenic resistance and those organisms that have been sequenced as part of whole genome projects. Results Phylogenetic analysis of aligned arsC sequences shows broad similarities to the established 16S rRNA phylogeny, with separation of bacterial, archaeal, and subsequently eukaryotic arsC genes. However, inconsistencies between arsC and 16S rRNA are apparent for some taxa. Cyanobacteria and some of the γ-Proteobacteria appear to possess arsC genes that are similar to those of Low GC Gram-positive Bacteria, and other isolated taxa possess arsC genes that would not be expected based on known evolutionary relationships. There is no clear separation of plasmid-borne and chromosomal arsC genes, although a number of the Enterobacteriales (γ-Proteobacteria possess similar plasmid-encoded arsC sequences. Conclusion The overall phylogeny of the arsenate reductases suggests a single, early origin of the arsC gene and subsequent sequence divergence to give the distinct arsC classes that exist today. Discrepancies between 16S rRNA and arsC phylogenies support the role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT in the evolution of arsenate reductases, with a number of instances of HGT early in bacterial arsC evolution. Plasmid-borne arsC genes are not monophyletic suggesting multiple cases of chromosomal-plasmid exchange and subsequent HGT. Overall, arsC phylogeny is complex and is likely the result of a number of evolutionary mechanisms.

  14. Immunization with the cysteine proteinase Ldccys1 gene from Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi and the recombinant Ldccys1 protein elicits protective immune responses in a murine model of visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Josie Haydée L; Gentil, Luciana Girotto; Dias, Suzana Souza; Fedeli, Carlos Eduardo C; Katz, Simone; Barbiéri, Clara Lúcia

    2008-01-30

    The gene Ldccys1 encoding a cysteine proteinase of 30 kDa from Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi, as well as the recombinant cysteine proteinase rLdccys1, obtained by cloning and expression of the Ldccys1 gene in the pHIS vector, were used to evaluate their ability to induce immune protective responses in BALB/c mice against L. (L.) chagasi infection. Mice were immunized subcutaneously with rLdccys1 plus Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) or Propionibacterium acnes as adjuvants or intramuscularly with a plasmid carrying the Ldccys1 gene (Ldccys1/pcDNA3) and CpG ODN as the adjuvant, followed by a booster with rLdccys1 plus CpG ODN. Two weeks after immunization the animals were challenged with 1 x 10(7) amastigotes of L. (L.) chagasi. Both immunization protocols induced significant protection against L. (L.) chagasi infection as shown by a very low parasite load in the spleen of immunized mice compared to the non-immunized controls. However, DNA immunization was 10-fold more protective than immunization with the recombinant protein. Whereas rLdccys1 induced a significant secretion of IFN-gamma and nitric oxide (NO), animals immunized with the Ldccys1 gene increased the production of IgG2a antibodies, IFN-gamma and NO. These results indicated that protection triggered by the two immunization protocols was correlated to a predominant Th1 response.

  15. High-throughput sequence analysis of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus transcriptome using 454-pyrosequencing for the discovery of antiviral immune genes.

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    Patricia Pereiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L. is an important aquacultural resource both in Europe and Asia. However, there is little information on gene sequences available in public databases. Currently, one of the main problems affecting the culture of this flatfish is mortality due to several pathogens, especially viral diseases which are not treatable. In order to identify new genes involved in immune defense, we conducted 454-pyrosequencing of the turbot transcriptome after different immune stimulations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Turbot were injected with viral stimuli to increase the expression level of immune-related genes. High-throughput deep sequencing using 454-pyrosequencing technology yielded 915,256 high-quality reads. These sequences were assembled into 55,404 contigs that were subjected to annotation steps. Intriguingly, 55.16% of the deduced protein was not significantly similar to any sequences in the databases used for the annotation and only 0.85% of the BLASTx top-hits matched S. maximus protein sequences. This relatively low level of annotation is possibly due to the limited information for this specie and other flatfish in the database. These results suggest the identification of a large number of new genes in turbot and in fish in general. A more detailed analysis showed the presence of putative members of several innate and specific immune pathways. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge, this study is the first transcriptome analysis using 454-pyrosequencing for turbot. Previously, there were only 12,471 EST and less of 1,500 nucleotide sequences for S. maximus in NCBI database. Our results provide a rich source of data (55,404 contigs and 181,845 singletons for discovering and identifying new genes, which will serve as a basis for microarray construction, gene expression characterization and for identification of genetic markers to be used in several applications. Immune stimulation in turbot was very

  16. Digital quantification of gene expression in sequential breast cancer biopsies reveals activation of an immune response.

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    Rinath M Jeselsohn

    Full Text Available Advancements in molecular biology have unveiled multiple breast cancer promoting pathways and potential therapeutic targets. Large randomized clinical trials remain the ultimate means of validating therapeutic efficacy, but they require large cohorts of patients and are lengthy and costly. A useful approach is to conduct a window of opportunity study in which patients are exposed to a drug pre-surgically during the interval between the core needle biopsy and the definitive surgery. These are non-therapeutic studies and the end point is not clinical or pathological response but rather evaluation of molecular changes in the tumor specimens that can predict response. However, since the end points of the non-therapeutic studies are biologic, it is critical to first define the biologic changes that occur in the absence of treatment. In this study, we compared the molecular profiles of breast cancer tumors at the time of the diagnostic biopsy versus the definitive surgery in the absence of any intervention using the Nanostring nCounter platform. We found that while the majority of the transcripts did not vary between the two biopsies, there was evidence of activation of immune related genes in response to the first biopsy and further investigations of the immune changes after a biopsy in early breast cancer seem warranted.

  17. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 1 antagonizes innate immune response by interacting with retinoic acid inducible gene I

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    Qin Lan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nonstructural protein 1 (NSP1 of rotavirus has been reported to block interferon (IFN signaling by mediating proteasome-dependent degradation of IFN-regulatory factors (IRFs and (or the β-transducin repeat containing protein (β-TrCP. However, in addition to these targets, NSP1 may subvert innate immune responses via other mechanisms. Results The NSP1 of rotavirus OSU strain as well as the IRF3 binding domain truncated NSP1 of rotavirus SA11 strain are unable to degrade IRFs, but can still inhibit host IFN response, indicating that NSP1 may target alternative host factor(s other than IRFs. Overexpression of NSP1 can block IFN-β promoter activation induced by the retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I, but does not inhibit IFN-β activation induced by the mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS, indicating that NSP1 may target RIG-I. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that NSP1 interacts with RIG-I independent of IRF3 binding domain. In addition, NSP1 induces down-regulation of RIG-I in a proteasome-independent way. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that inhibition of RIG-I mediated type I IFN responses by NSP1 may contribute to the immune evasion of rotavirus.

  18. The potential immune modulatory effect of chronic bisphenol A exposure on gene regulation in male medaka (Oryzias latipes) liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wenhui; Shen, Yang; Pan, Chenyuan; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Minghong; Yang, Ming; Wang, Ke-Jian

    2016-08-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a well-known estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) ubiquitously present in various environmental media. The present study aims to identify the responsive genes in male fish chronically exposed to low concentrations of BPA at the transcription level. We screened genes from a suppression subtractive hybridization library constructed from male medaka (Oryzias latipes) livers after 60-d exposure to 10μg/L BPA under the condition at which changes of hepatic antioxidant parameters have been previously reported. The identified genes were predicted to be involved in multiple biological processes including antioxidant physiology, endocrine system, detoxification, notably associated with the immune response processes. With real time PCR analysis, the immune-associated genes including hepcidin-like precursor, complement component and factors, MHC class I, alpha-2-macroglobulin and novel immune-type receptor 6 isoform were significantly up-regulated in a nonmonotonic dose response pattern in livers upon exposure to different concentrations of BPA (0.1, 1, 10, 100, 1000μg/L). Our results demonstrated a negative impact on gene regulation in fish chronically exposed to relatively low and environmentally relevant concentrations of BPA, and suggested the potential immune modulatory effect of chronic EDC exposure on fish. The immunotoxicity of BPA and other EDCs should be much concerned for the health of human beings and other vertebrates exposed to it. PMID:27104808

  19. Evidence of inflammatory immune signaling in chronic fatigue syndrome: A pilot study of gene expression in peripheral blood

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    Vernon Suzanne D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic profiling of peripheral blood reveals altered immunity in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS however interpretation remains challenging without immune demographic context. The object of this work is to identify modulation of specific immune functional components and restructuring of co-expression networks characteristic of CFS using the quantitative genomics of peripheral blood. Methods Gene sets were constructed a priori for CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD19+ B cells, CD14+ monocytes and CD16+ neutrophils from published data. A group of 111 women were classified using empiric case definition (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and unsupervised latent cluster analysis (LCA. Microarray profiles of peripheral blood were analyzed for expression of leukocyte-specific gene sets and characteristic changes in co-expression identified from topological evaluation of linear correlation networks. Results Median expression for a set of 6 genes preferentially up-regulated in CD19+ B cells was significantly lower in CFS (p = 0.01 due mainly to PTPRK and TSPAN3 expression. Although no other gene set was differentially expressed at p Conclusion Dissection of blood microarray profiles points to B cell dysfunction with coordinated immune activation supporting persistent inflammation and antibody-mediated NK cell modulation of T cell activity. This has clinical implications as the CD19+ genes identified could provide robust and biologically meaningful basis for the early detection and unambiguous phenotyping of CFS.

  20. Finding immune gene expression differences induced by marine bacterial pathogens in the Deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, E.; Queiroz, A.; Serrão Santos, R.; Bettencourt, R.

    2013-11-01

    The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus lives in a natural environment characterised by extreme conditions of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, pH, high concentrations of heavy metals, methane and hydrogen sulphide. The deep-sea vent biological systems represent thus the opportunity to study and provide new insights into the basic physiological principles that govern the defense mechanisms in vent animals and to understand how they cope with microbial infections. Hence, the importance of understanding this animal's innate defense mechanisms, by examining its differential immune gene expressions toward different pathogenic agents. In the present study, B. azoricus mussels were infected with single suspensions of marine bacterial pathogens, consisting of Vibrio splendidus, Vibrio alginolyticus, or Vibrio anguillarum, and a pool of these Vibrio bacteria. Flavobacterium suspensions were also used as a non-pathogenic bacterium. Gene expression analyses were carried out using gill samples from infected animals by means of quantitative-Polymerase Chain Reaction aimed at targeting several immune genes. We also performed SDS-PAGE protein analyses from the same gill tissues. We concluded that there are different levels of immune gene expression between the 12 h to 24 h exposure times to various bacterial suspensions. Our results from qPCR demonstrated a general pattern of gene expression, decreasing from 12 h over 24 h post-infection. Among the bacteria tested, Flavobacterium is the bacterium inducing the highest gene expression level in 12 h post-infections animals. The 24 h infected animals revealed, however, greater gene expression levels, using V. splendidus as the infectious agent. The SDS-PAGE analysis also pointed at protein profile differences between 12 h and 24 h, particularly evident for proteins of 18-20 KDa molecular mass, where most dissimilarity was found. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that immune genes, as well as experimental

  1. Expression Analysis of Immune Related Genes Identified from the Coelomocytes of Sea Cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus in Response to LPS Challenge

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    Ying Dong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus occupies a basal position during the evolution of deuterostomes and is also an important aquaculture species. In order to identify more immune effectors, transcriptome sequencing of A. japonicus coelomocytes in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS challenge was performed using the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform. One hundred and seven differentially expressed genes were selected and divided into four functional categories including pathogen recognition (25 genes, reorganization of cytoskeleton (27 genes, inflammation (41 genes and apoptosis (14 genes. They were analyzed to elucidate the mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions and downstream signaling transduction. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qRT-PCRs of 10 representative genes validated the accuracy and reliability of RNA sequencing results with the correlation coefficients from 0.88 to 0.98 and p-value <0.05. Expression analysis of immune-related genes after LPS challenge will be useful in understanding the immune response mechanisms of A. japonicus against pathogen invasion and developing strategies for resistant markers selection.

  2. Multi-species protein similarity clustering reveals novel expanded immune gene families in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Ian C; Modak, Tejashree H; Lane, Chris E; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta

    2016-06-01

    Comparative genomics research in non-model species has highlighted how invertebrate hosts possess complex diversified repertoires of immune molecules. The levels of diversification in particular immune gene families appear to differ between invertebrate lineages and even between species within lineages, reflecting differences not only in evolutionary histories, but also in life histories, environmental niches, and pathogen exposures. The goal of this research was to identify immune-related gene families experiencing high levels of diversification in eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica. Families containing 1) transcripts differentially expressed in eastern oysters in response to bacterial challenge and 2) a larger number of transcripts compared to other species included those coding for the C1q and C-type lectin domain containing proteins (C1qDC and CTLDC), GTPase of the immune-associated proteins (GIMAP), scavenger receptors (SR), fibrinogen-C domain containing proteins (also known as FREPs), dopamine beta-hydrolase (DBH), interferon-inducible 44 (IFI44), serine protease inhibitors, apextrin, and dermatopontin. Phylogenetic analysis of two of the families significantly expanded in bivalves, IFI44 and GIMAP, showed a patchy distribution within both protostomes and deuterostomes, suggesting multiple independent losses and lineage-specific expansions. Increased availability of genomic information for a broader range of non-model species broadly distributed through vertebrate and invertebrate phyla will likely lead to improved knowledge on mechanisms of immune-gene diversification. PMID:27033806

  3. An ancient history of gene duplications, fusions and losses in the evolution of APOBEC3 mutators in mammals

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    Münk Carsten

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The APOBEC3 (A3 genes play a key role in innate antiviral defense in mammals by introducing directed mutations in the DNA. The human genome encodes for seven A3 genes, with multiple splice alternatives. Different A3 proteins display different substrate specificity, but the very basic question on how discerning self from non-self still remains unresolved. Further, the expression of A3 activity/ies shapes the way both viral and host genomes evolve. Results We present here a detailed temporal analysis of the origin and expansion of the A3 repertoire in mammals. Our data support an evolutionary scenario where the genome of the mammalian ancestor encoded for at least one ancestral A3 gene, and where the genome of the ancestor of placental mammals (and possibly of the ancestor of all mammals already encoded for an A3Z1-A3Z2-A3Z3 arrangement. Duplication events of the A3 genes have occurred independently in different lineages: humans, cats and horses. In all of them, gene duplication has resulted in changes in enzyme activity and/or substrate specificity, in a paradigmatic example of convergent adaptive evolution at the genomic level. Finally, our results show that evolutionary rates for the three A3Z1, A3Z2 and A3Z3 motifs have significantly decreased in the last 100 Mya. The analysis constitutes a textbook example of the evolution of a gene locus by duplication and sub/neofunctionalization in the context of virus-host arms race. Conclusions Our results provide a time framework for identifying ancestral and derived genomic arrangements in the APOBEC loci, and to date the expansion of this gene family for different lineages through time, as a response to changes in viral/retroviral/retrotransposon pressure.

  4. Expression patterns and action analysis of genes associated with physiological responses during rat liver regeneration: Cellular immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Xing Zhang; Li-Feng Zhao; An-Shi Zhang; Xiao-Guang Chen; Cun-Shuan Xu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the cellular immune response during rat liver regeneration (LR) at a transcriptional level.METHODS: Genes associated with the cellular immune response were obtained by collecting the data from databases and retrieving articles. Gene expression changes during LR were detected by rat genome 230 2.0 array.RESULTS: A total of 127 genes were found to be associated with LR. The number of initially and totally expressing genes in the initial phase of LR [0.5-4 h after partial hepatectomy (PH)], transition from G0-G1(4-6 h after PH), cell proliferation (6-66 h after PH),cell differentiation and structure-function reconstruction (66-168 h after PH) was 54, 11, 34, 3 and 54, 49, 70, 49 respectively, illustrating that the associated genes were mainly triggered at the initiation of LR, and worked at different phases. According to their expression similarity,these genes were classified into 41 up-regulated, 21 predominantly up-regulated, 41 down-regulated, 14 predominantly down-regulated, 10 similarly up-regulated and down-regulated genes, respectively. The total upand down-regulated expression times were 419 and 274,respectively, demonstrating that the expression of most genes was increased while the expression of a small number of genes was decreased. Their time relevance was classified into 14 groups, showing that the cellular physiological and biochemical activities were staggered during LR. According to the gene expression patterns,they were classified into 21 types, showing the activities were diverse and complicated during LR.CONCLUSION: Antigen processing and presentation are enhanced mainly in the forepart, prophase and anaphase of LR. T-cell activation and antigen elimination are enhanced mainly in the forepart and prophase of LR. A total of 127 genes associated with LR play an important role in cellular immunity.

  5. Expression of immune-response genes in lepidopteran host is suppressed by venom from an endoparasitoid, Pteromalus puparum

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    Fang Qi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationships between parasitoids and their insect hosts have attracted attention at two levels. First, the basic biology of host-parasitoid interactions is of fundamental interest. Second, parasitoids are widely used as biological control agents in sustainable agricultural programs. Females of the gregarious endoparasitoid Pteromalus puparum (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae inject venom along with eggs into their hosts. P. puparum does not inject polydnaviruses during oviposition. For this reason, P. puparum and its pupal host, the small white butterfly Pieris rapae (Lepidoptera: Pieridae, comprise an excellent model system for studying the influence of an endoparasitoid venom on the biology of the pupal host. P. puparum venom suppresses the immunity of its host, although the suppressive mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we tested our hypothesis that P. puparum venom influences host gene expression in the two main immunity-conferring tissues, hemocytes and fat body. Results At 1 h post-venom injection, we recorded significant decreases in transcript levels of 217 EST clones (revealing 113 genes identified in silico, including 62 unknown contigs derived from forward subtractive libraries of host hemocytes and in transcript levels of 288 EST clones (221 genes identified in silico, including 123 unknown contigs from libraries of host fat body. These genes are related to insect immune response, cytoskeleton, cell cycle and apoptosis, metabolism, transport, stress response and transcriptional and translational regulation. We verified the reliability of the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH data with semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a set of randomly selected genes. This analysis showed that most of the selected genes were down-regulated after venom injection. Conclusions Our findings support our hypothesis that P. puparum venom influences gene expression in host hemocytes and fat body. Specifically

  6. Impact of date palm fruits extracts and probiotic enriched diet on antioxidant status, innate immune response and immune-related gene expression of European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardiola, F A; Porcino, C; Cerezuela, R; Cuesta, A; Faggio, C; Esteban, M A

    2016-05-01

    The application of additives in the diet as plants or extracts of plants as natural and innocuous compounds has potential in aquaculture as an alternative to antibiotics and immunoprophylactics. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the potential effects of dietary supplementation of date palm fruit extracts alone or in combination with Pdp11 probiotic on serum antioxidant status, on the humoral and cellular innate immune status, as well as, on the expression levels of some immune-related genes in head-kidney and gut of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) after 2 and 4 weeks of administration. This study showed for the first time in European sea bass an immunostimulation in several of the parameters evaluated in fish fed with date palm fruits extracts enriched diet or fed with this substance in combination with Pdp 11 probiotic, mainly after 4 weeks of treatment. In the same way, dietary supplementation of mixture diet has positive effects on the expression levels of immune-related genes, chiefly in head-kidney of Dicentrarchus labrax. Therefore, the combination of both could be considered of great interest as potential additives for farmed fish. PMID:27033470

  7. Ancient Origin of the U2 Small Nuclear RNA Gene-Targeting Non-LTR Retrotransposons Utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kenji K; Jurka, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Most non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons encoding a restriction-like endonuclease show target-specific integration into repetitive sequences such as ribosomal RNA genes and microsatellites. However, only a few target-specific lineages of non-LTR retrotransposons are distributed widely and no lineage is found across the eukaryotic kingdoms. Here we report the most widely distributed lineage of target sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons, designated Utopia. Utopia is found in three supergroups of eukaryotes: Amoebozoa, SAR, and Opisthokonta. Utopia is inserted into a specific site of U2 small nuclear RNA genes with different strength of specificity for each family. Utopia families from oomycetes and wasps show strong target specificity while only a small number of Utopia copies from reptiles are flanked with U2 snRNA genes. Oomycete Utopia families contain an "archaeal" RNase H domain upstream of reverse transcriptase (RT), which likely originated from a plant RNase H gene. Analysis of Utopia from oomycetes indicates that multiple lineages of Utopia have been maintained inside of U2 genes with few copy numbers. Phylogenetic analysis of RT suggests the monophyly of Utopia, and it likely dates back to the early evolution of eukaryotes. PMID:26556480

  8. Fibroblasts Express Immune Relevant Genes and Are Important Sentinel Cells during Tissue Damage in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Hans-Christian; Ossum, Carlo Gunnar; Lindenstrom, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    local inflammatory response following tissue injury. The damaged muscle tissue showed a strong increase in the expression of the immune genes IL-1 beta, IL-8 and TGF-beta already 4 hours post injury at the site of injury while the expression in non-damaged muscle tissue was not influenced. A weaker, but......Fibroblasts have shown to be an immune competent cell type in mammals. However, little is known about the immunological functions of this cell-type in lower vertebrates. A rainbow trout hypodermal fibroblast cell-line (RTHDF) was shown to be responsive to PAMPs and DAMPs after stimulation with LPS...... significant response was also seen for TLR-9 and TLR-22. Rainbow trout fibroblasts were found to be highly immune competent with a significant ability to express cytokines and immune receptors. Thus fish fibroblasts are believed to contribute significantly to local inflammatory reactions in concert with the...

  9. Characterization of gene expression regulated by human OTK18 using Drosophila melanogaster as a model system for innate immunity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cole R. Spresser; Sarah E. Marshall; Kimberly A. Carlson

    2008-08-01

    OTK18 is a human transcriptional suppressor implicated in the regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type-one infection of mononuclear phagocytes. It is ubiquitously expressed in all normal tissues, but its normal homeostatic function is yet to be characterized. One hypothesis is that OTK18 aids in the regulation of the innate immune system. To test this hypothesis, cDNA microarray analysis was performed on the total RNA extracted from Drosophila melanogaster embryonic Schneider 2 (S2) cells transfected with either pEGFP-OTK18 (enhanced green fluorescent protein) or empty vector controls (pEGFP-N3) for 6, 12 and 24 h. cDNA microarray analysis revealed differential expression of genes known to be important in regulation of Drosophila innate immunity. The expression levels of two genes, Metchnikowin and CG16708 were verified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. These results suggest a role for OTK18 in innate immunity.

  10. Overwintering Is Associated with Reduced Expression of Immune Genes and Higher Susceptibility to Virus Infection in Honey Bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Nadja; Corona, Miguel; Neumann, Peter; Dainat, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The eusocial honey bee, Apis mellifera, has evolved remarkable abilities to survive extreme seasonal differences in temperature and availability of resources by dividing the worker caste into two groups that differ in physiology and lifespan: summer and winter bees. Most of the recent major losses of managed honey bee colonies occur during the winter, suggesting that winter bees may have compromised immune function and higher susceptibility to diseases. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the expression of eight immune genes and naturally occurring infection levels of deformed wing virus (DWV), one of the most widespread viruses in A. mellifera populations, between summer and winter bees. Possible interactions between immune response and physiological activity were tested by measuring the expression of vitellogenin and methyl farnesoate epoxidase, a gene coding for the last enzyme involved in juvenile hormone biosynthesis. Our data show that high DWV loads in winter bees correlate with reduced expression of genes involved in the cellular immune response and physiological activity and high expression of humoral immune genes involved in antibacterial defense compared with summer bees. This expression pattern could reflect evolutionary adaptations to resist bacterial pathogens and economize energy during the winter under a pathogen landscape with reduced risk of pathogenic viral infections. The outbreak of Varroa destructor infestation could have overcome these adaptations by promoting the transmission of viruses. Our results suggest that reduced cellular immune function during the winter may have increased honey bee’s susceptibility to DWV. These results contribute to our understanding of honey bee colony losses in temperate regions. PMID:26121358

  11. Overwintering Is Associated with Reduced Expression of Immune Genes and Higher Susceptibility to Virus Infection in Honey Bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Nadja; Corona, Miguel; Neumann, Peter; Dainat, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The eusocial honey bee, Apis mellifera, has evolved remarkable abilities to survive extreme seasonal differences in temperature and availability of resources by dividing the worker caste into two groups that differ in physiology and lifespan: summer and winter bees. Most of the recent major losses of managed honey bee colonies occur during the winter, suggesting that winter bees may have compromised immune function and higher susceptibility to diseases. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the expression of eight immune genes and naturally occurring infection levels of deformed wing virus (DWV), one of the most widespread viruses in A. mellifera populations, between summer and winter bees. Possible interactions between immune response and physiological activity were tested by measuring the expression of vitellogenin and methyl farnesoate epoxidase, a gene coding for the last enzyme involved in juvenile hormone biosynthesis. Our data show that high DWV loads in winter bees correlate with reduced expression of genes involved in the cellular immune response and physiological activity and high expression of humoral immune genes involved in antibacterial defense compared with summer bees. This expression pattern could reflect evolutionary adaptations to resist bacterial pathogens and economize energy during the winter under a pathogen landscape with reduced risk of pathogenic viral infections. The outbreak of Varroa destructor infestation could have overcome these adaptations by promoting the transmission of viruses. Our results suggest that reduced cellular immune function during the winter may have increased honey bee's susceptibility to DWV. These results contribute to our understanding of honey bee colony losses in temperate regions. PMID:26121358

  12. Overwintering Is Associated with Reduced Expression of Immune Genes and Higher Susceptibility to Virus Infection in Honey Bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Steinmann

    Full Text Available The eusocial honey bee, Apis mellifera, has evolved remarkable abilities to survive extreme seasonal differences in temperature and availability of resources by dividing the worker caste into two groups that differ in physiology and lifespan: summer and winter bees. Most of the recent major losses of managed honey bee colonies occur during the winter, suggesting that winter bees may have compromised immune function and higher susceptibility to diseases. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the expression of eight immune genes and naturally occurring infection levels of deformed wing virus (DWV, one of the most widespread viruses in A. mellifera populations, between summer and winter bees. Possible interactions between immune response and physiological activity were tested by measuring the expression of vitellogenin and methyl farnesoate epoxidase, a gene coding for the last enzyme involved in juvenile hormone biosynthesis. Our data show that high DWV loads in winter bees correlate with reduced expression of genes involved in the cellular immune response and physiological activity and high expression of humoral immune genes involved in antibacterial defense compared with summer bees. This expression pattern could reflect evolutionary adaptations to resist bacterial pathogens and economize energy during the winter under a pathogen landscape with reduced risk of pathogenic viral infections. The outbreak of Varroa destructor infestation could have overcome these adaptations by promoting the transmission of viruses. Our results suggest that reduced cellular immune function during the winter may have increased honey bee's susceptibility to DWV. These results contribute to our understanding of honey bee colony losses in temperate regions.

  13. Differential response of immune-related genes to peptidoglycan and lipoteichoic acid challenge in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulabh, Sourabh; Bhushan, Bharat; Panigrahi, Manjit; Verma, Ankita; Baba, Naseer Ahmad; Kumar, Pushpendra

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of Staphylococcus aureus cell wall antigens, peptidoglycan (PGN) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) challenge on immune cells present in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Materials and Methods: In this study, efforts have been made to investigate the effects of three combinations (10+10, 20+20 and 30+30 μg/ml) of PGN and LTA obtained from S. aureus. These antigens were used to challenge the bovine PBMCs. After 6 h of incubation quantitative, real time-polymerase chain reaction was used to study toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) and major cytokine mRNA expression in bovine PBMC challenged with three different antigen blends. Results: The results indicated that mRNA level of interferon gamma is influenced by the expression of TLR-2 gene. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 10 (IL-10), and IL-8 genes showed a maximum response at a dose of 10 μg of PGN and 10 μg of LTA challenge per ml of culture medium. The outcome also suggests that both IL-10 and IL-8 followed the expression pattern of TNF-α. Conclusion: A dose of 10 μg of PGN and 10 μg of LTA per ml of culture medium was found to be most suitable for challenging PBMC. PMID:27733800

  14. Biphasic Hoxd gene expression in shark paired fins reveals an ancient origin of the distal limb domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Freitas

    Full Text Available The evolutionary transition of fins to limbs involved development of a new suite of distal skeletal structures, the digits. During tetrapod limb development, genes at the 5' end of the HoxD cluster are expressed in two spatiotemporally distinct phases. In the first phase, Hoxd9-13 are activated sequentially and form nested domains along the anteroposterior axis of the limb. This initial phase patterns the limb from its proximal limit to the middle of the forearm. Later in development, a second wave of transcription results in 5' HoxD gene expression along the distal end of the limb bud, which regulates formation of digits. Studies of zebrafish fins showed that the second phase of Hox expression does not occur, leading to the idea that the origin of digits was driven by addition of the distal Hox expression domain in the earliest tetrapods. Here we test this hypothesis by investigating Hoxd gene expression during paired fin development in the shark Scyliorhinus canicula, a member of the most basal lineage of jawed vertebrates. We report that at early stages, 5'Hoxd genes are expressed in anteroposteriorly nested patterns, consistent with the initial wave of Hoxd transcription in teleost and tetrapod paired appendages. Unexpectedly, a second phase of expression occurs at later stages of shark fin development, in which Hoxd12 and Hoxd13 are re-expressed along the distal margin of the fin buds. This second phase is similar to that observed in tetrapod limbs. The results indicate that a second, distal phase of Hoxd gene expression is not uniquely associated with tetrapod digit development, but is more likely a plesiomorphic condition present the common ancestor of chondrichthyans and osteichthyans. We propose that a temporal extension, rather than de novo activation, of Hoxd expression in the distal part of the fin may have led to the evolution of digits.

  15. Identification of proteins from 4200-year-old skin and muscle tissue biopsies from ancient Egyptian mummies of the first intermediate period shows evidence of acute inflammation and severe immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jana; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Ravishankar, Prathiba; Xavier, Dylan; Lim, Do Seon; Shin, Dong Hoon; Bianucci, Raffaella; Haynes, Paul A

    2016-10-28

    We performed proteomics analysis on four skin and one muscle tissue samples taken from three ancient Egyptian mummies of the first intermediate period, approximately 4200 years old. The mummies were first dated by radiocarbon dating of the accompany-\\break ing textiles, and morphologically examined by scanning electron microscopy of additional skin samples. Proteins were extracted, separated on SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) gels, and in-gel digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were analysed using nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We identified a total of 230 unique proteins from the five samples, which consisted of 132 unique protein identifications. We found a large number of collagens, which was confirmed by our microscopy data, and is in agreement with previous studies showing that collagens are very long-lived. As expected, we also found a large number of keratins. We identified numerous proteins that provide evidence of activation of the innate immunity system in two of the mummies, one of which also contained proteins indicating severe tissue inflammation, possibly indicative of an infection that we can speculate may have been related to the cause of death.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'. PMID:27644972

  16. Effect of hUC-MSCs treatment on immune function, tryptophan metabolic pathways and related gene expression of children with immune thrombocytopenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zu-Bin Wang; Yi-Lin Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of hUC-MSCs treatment on immune function, tryptophan metabolic pathways and related gene expression of children with immune thrombocytopenia. Methods: A total of 58 cases of children with immune thrombocytopenia were enrolled for study and randomly divided into hUC-MSCs group and conventional group, hUC-MSCs group received glucocorticoid + gamma globulin + hUC-MSCs treatment and conventional group received glucocorticoid + gamma globulin treatment. Then platelet content, immune function, tryptophan metabolism as well as expression of T-bet and GATA-3 of two groups were compared.Results: Platelet content of hUC-MSCs group was higher than that of conventional group; serum IFN-γ and IL-2 contents of hUC-MSCs group were lower than those of conventional group, and serum IL-4 and IL-10 contents as well as peripheral blood Treg cell ratio was higher than those of conventional group; serum Trp concentration and Trp/Kyn ratio of hUC-MSCs group were lower than those of conventional group, Kyn concentration was higher than that of conventional group, IDO expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was higher than that of conventional group, and TTS expression was lower than that of conventional group; mRNA content of T-bet in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of hUC-MSCs group was lower than that of conventional group, and mRNA content of GATA-3 was higher than that of conventional group.Conclusion: hUC-MSCs therapy can increase platelet content and regulate Th1/Th2 balance and tryptophan metabolism; it's an ideal method for the treatment of immune thrombocytopenia.

  17. Transcription profiling of immune genes during parasite infection in susceptible and resistant strains of the flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Daibin; Wang, Mei-Hui; Pai, Aditi; Yan, Guiyun

    2013-05-01

    The flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is an intermediate host for the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta and has become an important genetic model to explore immune responses to parasite infection in insect hosts. The present study examined the immune responses to tapeworm infection in resistant (TIW1) and susceptible (cSM) strains of the red flour beetle, T. castaneum, using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR on 29 immunity-related genes that exhibit antimicrobial properties. Thirteen of the 29 genes showed constitutive differences in expression between the two strains. Fourteen to fifteen of the 29 genes exhibited significant differences in transcription levels when beetles were challenged with tapeworm parasite in the resistant and susceptible strains. Nine genes (GNBP3, cSPH2, lysozyme4, defensin1, PGRP-SA, defensin2, coleoptericin1, attacin2 and serpin29) in cSM and 13 genes (lysozyme2, proPO1, GNBP3, cSPH2, lysozyme4, defensin1, PGRP-SA, defensin2, coleoptericin1, attacin2, proPO2/3, PGRP-LE and PGRP-SB) in TIW1 were up-regulated by infections or showed parasite infection-induced expression. Seven genes (attacin2, coleoptericin1, defensin1, defensin2, lysozyme2, PGRP-SA and PGRP-SB) were more than 10 folds higher in the resistant TIW1 strain than in the susceptible cSM strain after exposure to tapeworm parasites. This study demonstrated the effects of genetic background, the transcription profile to parasite infection, and identified the immunity-related genes that were significantly regulated by the infection of tapeworms in Tribolium beetles.

  18. Detecting the effects of selection at the population level in six bovine immune genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Caitriona

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The capacity of a species or population to respond to and survive novel infectious disease challenge is one of the most significant selective forces shaping genetic diversity and the period following animal domestication was likely one of the most important in terms of newly emerging diseases. Inter-specific genome-wide comparison has suggested that genes, including cluster of differentiation 2 (CD2, ADP-ribosyltransferase 4 (ART4, tyrosine kinase binding protein (TYROBP and interleukins IL2, IL5, IL13, may have undergone positive selection during the evolution of the bovine lineage. Past adaptive change implies that more recent variation may have also been subject to selective forces. Results In this paper, we re-sequence each of these genes in cattle cohorts from Europe, Africa and Asia to investigate patterns of polymorphism at the population level. Patterns of diversity are higher within Bos indicus suggesting different demographic history to that of Bos taurus. Significant coding polymorphism was observed within each of the cell-surface receptors. In particular, CD2 shows two divergent haplotypes defined by a series of six derived nonsynonymous substitutions that are significantly clustered on the extracellular surface of the protein and give significant values for Fay and Wu's H, strongly suggesting a recent adaptive history. In contrast, the signaling molecules (especially IL13 display outlying allele frequency spectra which are consistent with the effects of selection, but display negligible coding polymorphism. Conclusion We present evidence suggestive of recent adaptive history in bovine immune genes; implying some correspondence between intra- and inter-specific signals of selection. Interestingly, three signaling molecules have negligible nonsynonymous variation but show outlying test statistics in contrast to three receptors, where it is protein sequence diversity that suggests selective history.

  19. INDUCTION OF IMMUNE RESPONSE BY IL-6 GENE-MODIFIED LEUKEMIA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Xuetao; Ge Lingfu; Ju Dian Wen; Yu Yizhi; Tao Qun; Zhang Weiping

    1998-01-01

    Human IL-6 gene was transduced into FBL-3murine erythroleukemia cells in vitro by calcium phosphate co-participation. After selection in the presence of G418, limiting dilution and biological activity assay, G418resistant clone that secreted the highest level of IL-6(225.6 U/ml) was selected out of 24 IL-6-secreting clones.The FBL-3 cells secreting the highest level of IL-6 (FBL-3-IL-6) showed decreased growth potential and clonogenicity in vitro. Inhibition of cell growth and clone formation was found to be closely related to the level of IL-6 secretion. FBL-3-IL-6 cells grew more slowly than wild-type FBL-3 leukemia cells and FBL-3 cells secreting lower level of IL-6 (21.3 U/ml) when inoculated s.c. into C57BL/6 mice. The mice inoculated with FBL-3-IL-6 cells showed prolonged survival period than those inoculated with control leukemia cells. Increased cytotoxic activities of splenic NK and CTL were found in mice inoculated with FBL-3-IL-6 cells. The secretions of IL-2, TNF and GM-CSF from murine splenocytes were also found to be greatly elevated after the inoculation of FBL-3-IL-6leukemia cells. These data suggested that transduction of IL-6 gene into FBL-3 cells magnificently decreased the tumorigenicity and increased the immunogenicity of the leukemia cells, could induce specific and nonspecific antitumor immune responses. IL-6 gene-modified leukemia cells might be of great interests to be used as vaccine for the treatment of leukemia.

  20. Chromium(VI) stimulates Fyn to initiate innate immune gene induction in human airway epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Antonia A.; Zubritsky, Lindsey M.; Barchowsky, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms for pathogenic metal signaling in airway injury or disease promotion are poorly understood. It is widely believed that one mechanism for pathogenic and possible carcinogenic effects of inhaled chromium (Cr(VI)) is inhibition of inducible gene transactivation. However, we recently reported that Cr(VI) inhibition of Sp1-dependent transactivation required signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-dependent expression of an inhibitory protein in airway epithelium. Thus, Cr(VI) exposures can induce genes and we hypothesized this induction resulted from Cr(VI) signaling through an innate immune-like STAT1-dependent pathway initiated by Fyn. Exposure of human airway epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells to Cr(VI) selectively transactivated STAT-responsive interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) and induced ISRE-driven transactivation of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), without affecting the gamma interferon-activated site (GAS)-driven IRF1 expression. Cr(VI)-induced IRF7 was absent or greatly reduced in cells that lacked STAT1, were treated with the Src family kinase inhibitor, PP2, or lacked Fyn. Expressing Fyn, but not Src, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts cells null for Src, Yes, and Fyn restored Cr(VI)-stimulated STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation and IRF7 expression. Finally, shRNA knockdown of Fyn in BEAS-2B cells prevented Cr(VI)-activated STAT1 transactivation of IRF7. These data support a novel mechanism through which Cr(VI) stimulates Fyn to initiate interferon-like signaling for STAT1-dependent gene transactivation. PMID:19994902

  1. Metabolic gene expression changes in astrocytes in Multiple Sclerosis cerebral cortex are indicative of immune-mediated signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Zeis, T.

    2015-04-01

    Emerging as an important correlate of neurological dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), extended focal and diffuse gray matter abnormalities have been found and linked to clinical manifestations such as seizures, fatigue and cognitive dysfunction. To investigate possible underlying mechanisms we analyzed the molecular alterations in histopathological normal appearing cortical gray matter (NAGM) in MS. By performing a differential gene expression analysis of NAGM of control and MS cases we identified reduced transcription of astrocyte specific genes involved in the astrocyte–neuron lactate shuttle (ANLS) and the glutamate–glutamine cycle (GGC). Additional quantitative immunohistochemical analysis demonstrating a CX43 loss in MS NAGM confirmed a crucial involvement of astrocytes and emphasizes their importance in MS pathogenesis. Concurrently, a Toll-like/IL-1β signaling expression signature was detected in MS NAGM, indicating that immune-related signaling might be responsible for the downregulation of ANLS and GGC gene expression in MS NAGM. Indeed, challenging astrocytes with immune stimuli such as IL-1β and LPS reduced their ANLS and GGC gene expression in vitro. The detected upregulation of IL1B in MS NAGM suggests inflammasome priming. For this reason, astrocyte cultures were treated with ATP and ATP/LPS as for inflammasome activation. This treatment led to a reduction of ANLS and GGC gene expression in a comparable manner. To investigate potential sources for ANLS and GGC downregulation in MS NAGM, we first performed an adjuvant-driven stimulation of the peripheral immune system in C57Bl/6 mice in vivo. This led to similar gene expression changes in spinal cord demonstrating that peripheral immune signals might be one source for astrocytic gene expression changes in the brain. IL1B upregulation in MS NAGM itself points to a possible endogenous signaling process leading to ANLS and GGC downregulation. This is supported by our findings that, among others

  2. Expression analysis of immune related genes identified from the coelomocytes of sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) in response to LPS challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ying; Sun, Hongjuan; Zhou, Zunchun; Yang, Aifu; Chen, Zhong; Guan, Xiaoyan; Gao, Shan; Wang, Bai; Jiang, Bei; Jiang, Jingwei

    2014-01-01

    The sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) occupies a basal position during the evolution of deuterostomes and is also an important aquaculture species. In order to identify more immune effectors, transcriptome sequencing of A. japonicus coelomocytes in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge was performed using the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform. One hundred and seven differentially expressed genes were selected and divided into four functional categories including pathogen recognition (25 genes), reorganization of cytoskeleton (27 genes), inflammation (41 genes) and apoptosis (14 genes). They were analyzed to elucidate the mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions and downstream signaling transduction. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qRT-PCRs) of 10 representative genes validated the accuracy and reliability of RNA sequencing results with the correlation coefficients from 0.88 to 0.98 and p-value japonicus against pathogen invasion and developing strategies for resistant markers selection. PMID:25421239

  3. Association of two porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) receptor genes, CD163 and SN with immune traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengli; Qiu, Haifang; Zhang, Qingde; Peng, Zhongzhen; Liu, Bang

    2012-04-01

    CD163 and sialoadhesin (SN) were reported as two essential receptors for the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus. To investigate the relationship between these two genes and porcine immunity, we assigned porcine CD163 and SN respectively to SSC5q21-q24 and SSC17q23 by IMpRH. Expression profiles revealed that CD163 and SN were ubiquitously expressed in ten tissues, and were expressed highly in lymph gland, spleen and liver, which implied the potential functions of CD163 and SN in immunity. Moreover, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.3534C>T was found in 3'-UTR of the CD163 gene and association analysis showed that this gene was significantly associated with the IgG content in blood (P G located in exon4 of the SN gene which caused the amino acid transition from histidine to arginine was detected, and it was significantly associated with the WBC count in the peripheral blood (P < 0.05). These results provided fundamental evidence for CD163 and SN as two functional candidate genes affecting immunity in pigs. PMID:21786159

  4. Seasonal changes and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) effects on innate immune genes expression in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Huan; Zhou, Yi; Yu, Fan; Xiao, Jun; Gan, Xi; Zhang, Ming

    2014-06-01

    We profiled the expression of a group of proinflammatory immune genes, comprising TNFα-1, TNFα-2, IFN-γ, IL1β-1, IL1β-2, CCL-1, and CXCL-8 in liver, head kidney, gills, and spleen of goldfish, during the reproductive cycle and in response to injection of the hormone human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG). Most genes showed higher expression during the breeding season in both sexes. However, activation of immune responses was much stronger in female goldfish. Injection with hCG, an analog of luteinizing hormone (LH), which is involved in numerous reproductive functions, markedly changed gene expression in most studied organs, in both male and female goldfish. Again, female goldfish were found to be more responsive than male goldfish. The strongest activation of these genes was seen 7 days post-injection; the effect was dose dependent with a lower dose being in general more effective. For several of the genes, the gills were the most responsive tissue and, in male goldfish, gills were often the only responsive tissue, suggesting an important immunological role for gills during breeding. The data suggest that increasing expression levels are regulated by LH arising during the breeding season, with greater sensitivity in female goldfish than in male goldfish. These data support an interaction between the innate immune system and the reproductive axis. PMID:24709628

  5. Enhanced expression of trim14 gene suppressed Sindbis virus reproduction and modulated the transcription of a large number of genes of innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenasheva, V V; Kovaleva, G V; Uryvaev, L V; Ionova, K S; Dedova, A V; Vorkunova, G K; Chernyshenko, S V; Khaidarova, N V; Tarantul, V Z

    2015-07-01

    In the present research, we have studied an influence of enhanced expression TRIM14 on alphavirus Sindbis (SINV, Togaviridae family) infection. In the HEK293 cells transfected with human trim14 gene (HEK-trim14), SINV yield after infection was decreased 1000-10,000 times (3-4 lg of TCD50/ml) at 24 h p.i. and considerably less (1-2 lg of TCD50/ml) at 48 h p.i. Analysis of the expression of 43 genes directly or indirectly involved in innate immune machine in HEK-trim14 non-infected cells comparing with the control (non-transfected) HEK293 cells revealed that stable trim14 transfection in HEK293 cells caused increased transcription of 18 genes (ifna, il6 (ifnβ2), isg15, raf-1, NF-kB (nf-kb1, rela, nf-kb2, relb), grb2, grb3-3, traf3ip2, junB, c-myb, pu.1, akt1, tyk2, erk2, mek2) and lowered transcription of 3 genes (ifnγ, gata1, il-17a). The similar patterns of genes expression observe in SINV-infected non-transfected HEK293 cells. However, SINV infection of HEK-trim14 cells caused inhibition of the most interferon cascade genes as well as subunits of transcription factor NF-κB. Thus, stable enhanced expression of trim14 gene in cells activates the transcription of many immunity genes and suppresses the SINV reproduction, but SINV infection of HEK-trim14 cells promotes inhibition of some genes involved in innate immune system. PMID:25948474

  6. Ontogeny of the carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) innate immune system: Gene expression and experimental limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jacob; Przybylska, Dominika Alicja; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the ontogeny of the immune system in common carp (Cyprinus carpio, L.). The work has been focused on innate immune responses during the wound healing processes and how the innate immune response develops with age and size of the fish. Newly hatched...

  7. Sulfated galactans from Gracilaria fisheri bind to shrimp haemocyte membrane proteins and stimulate the expression of immune genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudtanatip, Tawut; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Wongprasert, Kanokpan

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that sulfated galactans (SG) from Gracilaria fisheri (G. fisheri) exhibit immunostimulant activity in shrimp. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that SG stimulates signaling molecules of the immune response of shrimp by binding to receptors on the host cell membrane. Accordingly, we evaluated the ability of SG to bind to shrimp haemocytes and showed that SG bound to the shrimp haemocyte membrane (SHM), potentially to specific receptors. Furthermore, this binding was associated with an activation of immune response genes of shrimp. Data from confocal laser scanning micrographs revealed that FITC-labeled SG bound to haemocytes. Far western blot analysis demonstrated that SHM peptides, with molecular sizes of 13, 14, 15, 17, and 25 kDa, were associated with SG. Peptide sequence analysis of the isolated bands using LC-MS/MS and NCBI blast search revealed the identity of the 13, 14, and 17 kDa peptides as lipopolysaccharide and β-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP). SG induced the expression of immune related genes and downstream signaling mediators of LGBP including IMD, IKKs, NF-κB, antimicrobial peptides (crustin and PEN-4), the antiviral immunity (dicer), and proPO system (proPO-I and proPO-II). A LGBP neutralizing assay with anti-LGBP antibody indicated a decrease in SG-induced expression of LGBP downstream signaling mediators and the immune related genes. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the SG-stimulated immune activity in haemocytes is mediated, in part, through the LGBP, and IMD-NF-κB pathway.

  8. Possible influence of B chromosomes on genes included in immune response and parasite burden in Apodemus flavicollis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnađević, Tanja; Jovanović, Vladimir M; Blagojević, Jelena; Budinski, Ivana; Cabrilo, Borislav; Bjelić-Čabrilo, Olivera; Bijelić-Čabrilo, Olivera; Vujošević, Mladen

    2014-01-01

    Genetic background underlying wild populations immune response to different parasites is still not well understood. We studied immune response to multiple infections and to competition between different parasite species at different developmental stages in population of yellow-necked mouse, Apodemus flavicollis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to investigate associations of MHC II-DRB, IL-10 and Tgf-β genes expressions with presence of intestinal parasites at different developmental stages. Furthermore, we were interested whether the host related characteristics (sex, age, body condition, presence of B chromosomes or expression of other genes) or characteristics of present parasites (number of adult parasites of each identified species, egg count of each parasite genus, total number of nematode individuals) affect differential expression of the studied genes. A significant invert association between the expression of MHC II-DRB and Tgf-β gene was found, which together with absence of IL-10 association confirmed modified Th2 as the main type of immune response to nematode infections. Effect of recorded parasites and parasite life-cycle stage on expression levels of MHC II-DRB gene was detected only through interactions with host-related characteristics such as sex, age, and the presence of B chromosomes. The presence of B chromosomes is associated with lower expression level of Tgf-β gene. Although the influence of host genetic background on parasite infection has already been well documented, this is the first study in mammals that gave presence of B chromosomes on immune response full consideration. PMID:25372668

  9. Possible influence of B chromosomes on genes included in immune response and parasite burden in Apodemus flavicollis.

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    Tanja Adnađević

    Full Text Available Genetic background underlying wild populations immune response to different parasites is still not well understood. We studied immune response to multiple infections and to competition between different parasite species at different developmental stages in population of yellow-necked mouse, Apodemus flavicollis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to investigate associations of MHC II-DRB, IL-10 and Tgf-β genes expressions with presence of intestinal parasites at different developmental stages. Furthermore, we were interested whether the host related characteristics (sex, age, body condition, presence of B chromosomes or expression of other genes or characteristics of present parasites (number of adult parasites of each identified species, egg count of each parasite genus, total number of nematode individuals affect differential expression of the studied genes. A significant invert association between the expression of MHC II-DRB and Tgf-β gene was found, which together with absence of IL-10 association confirmed modified Th2 as the main type of immune response to nematode infections. Effect of recorded parasites and parasite life-cycle stage on expression levels of MHC II-DRB gene was detected only through interactions with host-related characteristics such as sex, age, and the presence of B chromosomes. The presence of B chromosomes is associated with lower expression level of Tgf-β gene. Although the influence of host genetic background on parasite infection has already been well documented, this is the first study in mammals that gave presence of B chromosomes on immune response full consideration.

  10. Hepatic expression patterns of inflammatory and immune response genes associated with obesity and NASH in morbidly obese patients.

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    Adeline Bertola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity modulates inflammation and activation of immune pathways which can lead to liver complications. We aimed at identifying expression patterns of inflammatory and immune response genes specifically associated with obesity and NASH in the liver of morbidly obese patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Expression of 222 genes was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR in the liver of morbidly obese patients with histologically normal liver (n = 6, or with severe steatosis without (n = 6 or with NASH (n = 6, and in lean controls (n = 5. Hepatic expression of 58 out of 222 inflammatory and immune response genes was upregulated in NASH patients. The most notable changes occurred in genes encoding chemokines and chemokine receptors involved in leukocyte recruitment, CD and cytokines involved in the T cell activation towards a Th1 phenotype, and immune semaphorins. This regulation seems to be specific for the liver since visceral adipose tissue expression and serum levels of MCP1, IP10, TNFα and IL6 were not modified. Importantly, 47 other genes were already upregulated in histologically normal liver (e.g. CRP, Toll-like receptor (TLR pathway. Interestingly, serum palmitate, known to activate the TLR pathway, was increased with steatosis. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The liver of obese patients without histological abnormalities already displayed a low-grade inflammation and could be more responsive to activators of the TLR pathway. NASH was then characterized by a specific gene signature. These findings help to identify new potential actors of the pathogenesis of NAFLD.

  11. Hepatic Expression Patterns of Inflammatory and Immune Response Genes Associated with Obesity and NASH in Morbidly Obese Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertola, Adeline; Bonnafous, Stéphanie; Anty, Rodolphe; Patouraux, Stéphanie; Saint-Paul, Marie-Christine; Iannelli, Antonio; Gugenheim, Jean; Barr, Jonathan; Mato, José M.; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Tran, Albert; Gual, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background Obesity modulates inflammation and activation of immune pathways which can lead to liver complications. We aimed at identifying expression patterns of inflammatory and immune response genes specifically associated with obesity and NASH in the liver of morbidly obese patients. Methodology/Principal Findings Expression of 222 genes was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR in the liver of morbidly obese patients with histologically normal liver (n = 6), or with severe steatosis without (n = 6) or with NASH (n = 6), and in lean controls (n = 5). Hepatic expression of 58 out of 222 inflammatory and immune response genes was upregulated in NASH patients. The most notable changes occurred in genes encoding chemokines and chemokine receptors involved in leukocyte recruitment, CD and cytokines involved in the T cell activation towards a Th1 phenotype, and immune semaphorins. This regulation seems to be specific for the liver since visceral adipose tissue expression and serum levels of MCP1, IP10, TNFα and IL6 were not modified. Importantly, 47 other genes were already upregulated in histologically normal liver (e.g. CRP, Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway). Interestingly, serum palmitate, known to activate the TLR pathway, was increased with steatosis. Conclusion/Significance The liver of obese patients without histological abnormalities already displayed a low-grade inflammation and could be more responsive to activators of the TLR pathway. NASH was then characterized by a specific gene signature. These findings help to identify new potential actors of the pathogenesis of NAFLD. PMID:21042596

  12. Immune responses and gene expression in hepatopancreas from Macrobrachium rosenbergii challenged by a novel pathogen spiroplasma MR-1008.

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    Du, Jie; Zhu, Huanxi; Liu, Peng; Chen, Jing; Xiu, Yunji; Yao, Wei; Wu, Ting; Ren, Qian; Meng, Qingguo; Gu, Wei; Wang, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii inoculated with 100 μl novel pathogen spiroplasma strain MR-1008 in logarithmic phase (10(8) spiroplasmas ml(-1)) were examined for alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity, acid phosphatase (ACP) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, catalase (CAT) activity, as well as expressions of 7 immune related genes in hepatopancreas after 1-28 d. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining showed obvious pathological features in hepatopancreas connective and epithelial tissue. Enzyme activity analyze showed that hepatopancreas AKP and ACP activity increased markedly (P < 0.05) when inoculated with spiroplasma MR-1008 after 5 d and 10 d, respectively. SOD enzyme activity changed less obviously and slightly increased at 1 day post-inoculation, but CAT activity decreased significantly after 5 d inoculation. The expression levels of lipopolysaccharide and β-1,3-glucan-binding protein (LGBP), peroxinectin (PE), α2-macroglobulin (α2M), AKP, ACP, CAT, and copper/zinc SOD (Cu, Zn-SOD) genes in the hepatopancreas were examined by Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) and the results demonstrated that these immune related genes were induced by challenge with spiroplasma MR-1008. The results suggested that the prawn immune responses could be activated or inhibited by spiroplasma MR-1008, and that the hepatopancreas also plays key roles in innate immunity for defense against the pathogen.

  13. Novel DNA vaccine based on hepatitis B virus core gene induces specific immune responses in Balb/c mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ping Xing; Zu-Hu Huang; Shi-Xia Wang; Jie Cai; Jun Li; Te-Hui W Chou; Shan Lu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the immunogenicity of a novel DNA vaccine,pSW3891/HBc, based on HBV core gene in Balb/c mice.METHODS: A novel DNA vaccine, pSW3891/HBc, encoding HBV core gene was constructed using a vector plasmid pSW3891. Balb/c mice were immunized with either pSW3891/HBc or empty vector DNA via gene gun. IgG anti-HBc responses in mouse sera were demonstrated by ELISA. Specific cytotoxicity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) of mice was quantitatively measured by lactate dehydrogenase release assay.RESULTS: HBcAg was expressed effectively in 293T cell line transiently transfected with pSW3891/HBc. Strong IgG anti-HBc responses were elicited in mice immunized with pSW3891/HBc. The end-point titers of anti-HBc reached the highest 1:97 200, 4 wk after the third immunization. The specific CTL killing with the highest specific lysis reached 73.25% at effector:target ratio of 20:1 in mice that received pSW3891/HBc DNA vaccine.CONCLUSION: pSW3891/HBc vaccination elicits specific anti-HBc response and induces HBc-specific CTL response in immunized Balb/c mice.

  14. Functional similarities between pigeon 'milk' and mammalian milk: induction of immune gene expression and modification of the microbiota.

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    Meagan J Gillespie

    Full Text Available Pigeon 'milk' and mammalian milk have functional similarities in terms of nutritional benefit and delivery of immunoglobulins to the young. Mammalian milk has been clearly shown to aid in the development of the immune system and microbiota of the young, but similar effects have not yet been attributed to pigeon 'milk'. Therefore, using a chicken model, we investigated the effect of pigeon 'milk' on immune gene expression in the Gut Associated Lymphoid Tissue (GALT and on the composition of the caecal microbiota. Chickens fed pigeon 'milk' had a faster rate of growth and a better feed conversion ratio than control chickens. There was significantly enhanced expression of immune-related gene pathways and interferon-stimulated genes in the GALT of pigeon 'milk'-fed chickens. These pathways include the innate immune response, regulation of cytokine production and regulation of B cell activation and proliferation. The caecal microbiota of pigeon 'milk'-fed chickens was significantly more diverse than control chickens, and appears to be affected by prebiotics in pigeon 'milk', as well as being directly seeded by bacteria present in pigeon 'milk'. Our results demonstrate that pigeon 'milk' has further modes of action which make it functionally similar to mammalian milk. We hypothesise that pigeon 'lactation' and mammalian lactation evolved independently but resulted in similarly functional products.

  15. Immune gene expression in Bombus terrestris: signatures of infection despite strong variation among populations, colonies, and sister workers.

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    Franziska S Brunner

    Full Text Available Ecological immunology relies on variation in resistance to parasites. Colonies of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris vary in their susceptibility to the trypanosome gut parasite Crithidia bombi, which reduces colony fitness. To understand the possible origin of this variation in resistance we assayed the expression of 28 immunologically important genes in foraging workers. We deliberately included natural variation of the host "environment" by using bees from colonies collected in two locations and sampling active foraging workers that were not age controlled. Immune gene expression patterns in response to C. bombi showed remarkable variability even among genetically similar sisters. Nevertheless, expression varied with parasite exposure, among colonies and, perhaps surprisingly, strongly among populations (collection sites. While only the antimicrobial peptide abaecin is universally up regulated upon exposure, linear discriminant analysis suggests that the overall exposure effect is driven by a combination of several immune pathways and further immune functions such as ROS regulation. Also, the differences among colonies in their immune gene expression profiles provide clues to the mechanistic basis of well-known inter-colony variation in susceptibility to this parasite. Our results show that transcriptional responses to parasite exposure can be detected in ecologically heterogeneous groups despite strong background noise.

  16. Antagonistic roles for KNOX1 and KNOX2 genes in patterning the land plant body plan following an ancient gene duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumizu, Chihiro; Alvarez, John Paul; Sakakibara, Keiko; Bowman, John L

    2015-02-01

    Neofunctionalization following gene duplication is thought to be one of the key drivers in generating evolutionary novelty. A gene duplication in a common ancestor of land plants produced two classes of KNOTTED-like TALE homeobox genes, class I (KNOX1) and class II (KNOX2). KNOX1 genes are linked to tissue proliferation and maintenance of meristematic potentials of flowering plant and moss sporophytes, and modulation of KNOX1 activity is implicated in contributing to leaf shape diversity of flowering plants. While KNOX2 function has been shown to repress the gametophytic (haploid) developmental program during moss sporophyte (diploid) development, little is known about KNOX2 function in flowering plants, hindering syntheses regarding the relationship between two classes of KNOX genes in the context of land plant evolution. Arabidopsis plants harboring loss-of-function KNOX2 alleles exhibit impaired differentiation of all aerial organs and have highly complex leaves, phenocopying gain-of-function KNOX1 alleles. Conversely, gain-of-function KNOX2 alleles in conjunction with a presumptive heterodimeric BELL TALE homeobox partner suppressed SAM activity in Arabidopsis and reduced leaf complexity in the Arabidopsis relative Cardamine hirsuta, reminiscent of loss-of-function KNOX1 alleles. Little evidence was found indicative of epistasis or mutual repression between KNOX1 and KNOX2 genes. KNOX proteins heterodimerize with BELL TALE homeobox proteins to form functional complexes, and contrary to earlier reports based on in vitro and heterologous expression, we find high selectivity between KNOX and BELL partners in vivo. Thus, KNOX2 genes confer opposing activities rather than redundant roles with KNOX1 genes, and together they act to direct the development of all above-ground organs of the Arabidopsis sporophyte. We infer that following the KNOX1/KNOX2 gene duplication in an ancestor of land plants, neofunctionalization led to evolution of antagonistic biochemical

  17. Wild-type Escherichia coli producing microcins B17, D93, J25, and L; cloning of genes for microcin L production and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablé, S; Duarte, M; Bravo, D; Lanneluc, I; Pons, A M; Cottenceau, G; Moreno, F

    2003-05-01

    For the first time, an Escherichia coli strain producing four microcins (Mcc), B17, D93, J25, and L, and showing immunity to Mcc V was isolated and characterized. Each of the gene clusters encoding the production of Mcc B17, D93, and L was cloned separately. The gene cluster for Mcc L was cloned within a 13.5-kb HindIII-SalI fragment, which includes the Mcc V immunity gene, cvi.

  18. DNA Methyltransferase 3B Gene Promoter and Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Polymorphisms in Childhood Immune Thrombocytopenia

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    Margarita Pesmatzoglou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP is one of the most common blood diseases as well as the commonest acquired bleeding disorder in childhood. Although the etiology of ITP is unclear, in the pathogenesis of the disease, both environmental and genetic factors including polymorphisms of TNF-a, IL-10, and IL-4 genes have been suggested to be involved. In this study, we investigated the rs2424913 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP (C46359T in DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B gene promoter and the VNTR polymorphism of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1 Ra intron-2 in 32 children (17 boys with the diagnosis of ITP and 64 healthy individuals. No significant differences were found in the genotype distribution of DNMT3B polymorphism between the children with ITP and the control group, whereas the frequency of allele T appeared significantly increased in children with ITP (P = 0.03, OR = 2, 95% CI: 1.06–3.94. In case of IL-1 Ra polymorphism, children with ITP had a significantly higher frequency of genotype I/II, compared to control group (P = 0.043, OR = 2.60, 95% CI: 1.02–6.50. Moreover, genotype I/I as well as allele I was overrepresented in the control group, suggesting that allele I may have a decreased risk for development of ITP. Our findings suggest that rs2424913 DNMT3B SNP as well as IL-1 Ra VNTR polymorphism may contribute to the susceptibility to ITP.

  19. Abnormal immunity and gene mutation in patients with severe hepatitis-B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Yan Wang; Pei Liu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the abnormal immunity and gene mutation at precore 1896 site in patients with severe hepatitis-B.METHODS: This study included 23 patients with severe hepatitis-B, 22 patients with acute hepatitis-B and 20 controls.Mutation at precore 1896 site of HBV gene was confirmed with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis.Cytokines including TNF-α, IFN-y, IL-6, and IL-8 were measured with ELISA, and T subgroups were detected with alkaline phosphatase anti alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) technique.RESULTS: In patients with severe hepatitis-B, the infective rate of HBV mutant strain was 52.5% (12/23), and only one patient with acute hepatitis-B was infected with the mutant strain. The percentage of CD8+ T lymphocyte was obviously lower (0.16±0.02%) and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ was obviously higher (2.35±0.89) in mutant group than in wildtype group (0.28±0.05% and 1.31±0.18%, respectively,P<0.01 or P<0.05). The levels of cytokines in patients with severe hepatitis-B were higher (TNF-α 359.0±17.2 ng/L, IFNγ 234.7±16.5 ng/L, IL-6 347.5±31.3 ng/L, IL-8 181.1±19.6ng/L) than those in acute hepatitis-B (TNF-α 220.6±8.9ng/L, IFN-γ 174.9±12.0 ng/L, IL-6 285.8±16.5 ng/L, IL-8118.4±5.1 ng/L, P<0.01 or 0.05). In patients with severe hepatitis-B, the levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 were higher in mutant group (273.4±26.6 ng/L, 387.7±32.5 ng/L) than in wild-type group (207.8±12.8 ng/L, 300.9±16.3 ng/L). The mortality of patients infected with HBV mutant strain was higher (100%)than that with wild-type (0.9%).CONCLUSION: In severe hepatitis-B, the infective rate of HBV mutant strain was high. The mutant strain induces more severe immune disorders in host, resulting in the activation of lymphocyte and release of cytokines. HBV DNA mutates easily in response to the altered immunity. Ultimately liver damage is more prominent.

  20. VACCINATION OF HYBRID STRIPED BASS: GROWTH, IMMUNE REACTION AND GENE EXPRESSION

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    Mark Westerman

    2012-10-01

    -points revealed differences (P < 0.05 between 11 and 25 days post-vaccination. Examination of the hepatic microarray datasets revealed only four immune-discrete genes that were impacted 53-days following vaccination when compared against control fish. These included the up-regulated TCIRG1, or T-cell immune regulator 1 (P < 0.0467 and IL20RA, or interleukin 20 receptor alpha (P < 0.0433, and down-regulated cytokine inducible kinase, plk3 (P < 0.01 and mouse immune responsive protein, IRG1 (P < 0.01.

  1. Gene cloning of the 18S rRNA of an ancient viable moss from the permafrost of northeastern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsic, Damien; Hoover, Richard B.; Gilichinsky, David A.; Ng, Joseph D.

    1999-12-01

    A moss plant dating as much as 40,000 years old was collected from the permafrost of the Kolyma Lowlands of Northeastern Siberia. The plant tissue was revived and cultured for the extraction of its genomic DNA. Using the polymerase chain reaction technique, the 18S ribosomal RNA gene was cloned and its sequence studied. Comparative sequence analysis of the cloned ribosomal DNA to other known 18S RNA showed very high sequence identity and was revealed to be closest to the moss specie, Aulacomnium turgidum. The results of this study also show the ability of biological organisms to rest dormant in deep frozen environments where they can be revived and cultured under favorable conditions. This is significant in the notion that celestial icy bodies can be media to preserve biological function and genetic material during long term storage or transport.

  2. Aberrant host immune response induced by highly virulent PRRSV identified by digital gene expression tag profiling

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    Zhao Xiao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There was a large scale outbreak of the highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS in China and Vietnam during 2006 and 2007 that resulted in unusually high morbidity and mortality among pigs of all ages. The mechanisms underlying the molecular pathogenesis of the highly virulent PRRS virus (H-PRRSV remains unknown. Therefore, the relationship between pulmonary gene expression profiles after H-PRRSV infection and infection pathology were analyzed in this study using high-throughput deep sequencing and histopathology. Results H-PRRSV infection resulted in severe lung pathology. The results indicate that aberrant host innate immune responses to H-PRRSV and induction of an anti-apoptotic state could be responsible for the aggressive replication and dissemination of H-PRRSV. Prolific rapid replication of H-PRRSV could have triggered aberrant sustained expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines leading to a markedly robust inflammatory response compounded by significant cell death and increased oxidative damage. The end result was severe tissue damage and high pathogenicity. Conclusions The systems analysis utilized in this study provides a comprehensive basis for better understanding the pathogenesis of H-PRRSV. Furthermore, it allows the genetic components involved in H-PRRSV resistance/susceptibility in swine populations to be identified.

  3. Landscape-scale variation in an anthropogenic factor shapes immune gene variation within a wild population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Quevedo, Catalina; Davies, Richard G; Phillips, Karl P; Spurgin, Lewis G; Richardson, David S

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the spatial scale at which selection acts upon adaptive genetic variation in natural populations is fundamental to our understanding of evolutionary ecology, and has important ramifications for conservation. The environmental factors to which individuals of a population are exposed can vary at fine spatial scales, potentially generating localized patterns of adaptation. Here, we compared patterns of neutral and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) variation within an island population of Berthelot's pipit (Anthus berthelotii) to assess whether landscape-level differences in pathogen-mediated selection generate fine-scale spatial structuring in these immune genes. Specifically, we tested for spatial associations between the distribution of avian malaria, and the factors previously shown to influence that distribution, and MHC variation within resident individuals. Although we found no overall genetic structure across the population for either neutral or MHC loci, we did find localized associations between environmental factors and MHC variation. One MHC class I allele (ANBE48) was directly associated with malaria infection risk, while the presence of the ANBE48 and ANBE38 alleles within individuals correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with distance to the nearest poultry farm, an anthropogenic factor previously shown to be an important determinant of disease distribution in the study population. Our findings highlight the importance of considering small spatial scales when studying the patterns and processes involved in evolution at adaptive loci. PMID:27411090

  4. Polymorphisms of immunity genes and susceptibility to otitis media in children.

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    Johanna Nokso-Koivisto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute otitis media (OM is a common disease which often develops through complex interactions between the host, the pathogen and environmental factors. We studied single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of genes involved in innate and adaptive immunity, and other host and environmental factors for their role in OM. METHODS: Using Sequenom Massarray platform, 21 SNPs were studied in 653 children from prospective (n = 202 and retrospective (n = 451 cohorts. Data were analyzed for the relationship between SNPs and upper respiratory infection (URI frequency, risk of acute OM during URI episodes, and proneness to recurrent OM. RESULTS: Increased risk for OM proneness was associated with CX3CR1 (Thr280Met SNP and with a jointly interactive group of IL-10 (-1082 SNP, IL-1β (-511 wild type genotype and white race. Family history of OM proneness independently increased the risk for frequent URIs, OM occurrence during URI, and OM proneness. Additionally, IL-1β (-31 SNP was associated with increased risk for frequent URIs, but IL-10 (-592, IL-1β (-511, IL-5 (-746 and IL-8 (-251 SNPs were associated with decreased risk of URI. CONCLUSION: IL-1β (-31, CX3CR1 (Thr280Met, IL-10 (-1082 and IL-1β (-511 SNPs were associated with increased risk for frequent URIs or OM proneness.

  5. Sublethal effects of acaricides and Nosema ceranae infection on immune related gene expression in honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Paula Melisa; Porrini, Martín Pablo; Antúnez, Karina; Branchiccela, Belén; Martínez-Noël, Giselle María Astrid; Zunino, Pablo; Salerno, Graciela; Eguaras, Martín Javier; Ieno, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Nosema ceranae is an obligate intracellular parasite and the etiologic agent of Nosemosis that affects honeybees. Beside the stress caused by this pathogen, honeybee colonies are exposed to pesticides under beekeeper intervention, such as acaricides to control Varroa mites. These compounds can accumulate at high concentrations in apicultural matrices. In this work, the effects of parasitosis/acaricide on genes involved in honeybee immunity and survival were evaluated. Nurse bees were infected with N. ceranae and/or were chronically treated with sublethal doses of coumaphos or tau-fluvalinate, the two most abundant pesticides recorded in productive hives. Our results demonstrate the following: (1) honeybee survival was not affected by any of the treatments; (2) parasite development was not altered by acaricide treatments; (3) coumaphos exposure decreased lysozyme expression; (4) N. ceranae reduced levels of vitellogenin transcripts independently of the presence of acaricides. However, combined effects among stressors on imagoes were not recorded. Sublethal doses of acaricides and their interaction with other ubiquitous parasites in colonies, extending the experimental time, are of particular interest in further research work. PMID:27118545

  6. Heligmosomoides polygyrus infection is associated with lower MHC class II gene expression in Apodemus flavicollis: indication for immune suppression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axtner, Jan; Sommer, Simone

    2011-12-01

    Due to their key role in recognizing foreign antigens and triggering the subsequent immune response the genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) provide a potential target for parasites to attack in order to evade detection and expulsion from the host. A diminished MHC gene expression results in less activated T cells and might serve as a gateway for pathogens and parasites. Some parasites are suspected to be immune suppressors and promote co-infections of other parasites even in other parts of the body. In our study we found indications that the gut dwelling nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus might exert a systemic immunosuppressive effect in yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis). The amount of hepatic MHC class II DRB gene RNA transcripts in infected mice was negatively associated with infection intensity with H. polygyrus. The hepatic expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, such as transforming growth factor β and interleukin 10 was not associated with H. polygyrus infection. We did not find direct positive associations of H. polygyrus with other helminth species. But the prevalence and infection intensity of the nematodes Syphacia stroma and Trichuris muris were higher in multiple infected individuals. Furthermore, our data indicated antagonistic effects in the helminth community of A. flavicollis as cestode infection correlated negatively with H. polygyrus and helminth species richness. Our study shows that expression analyses of immune relevant genes can also be performed in wildlife, opening new aspects and possibilities for future ecological and evolutionary research. PMID:21983561

  7. Transcriptome Signatures Reveal Rapid Induction of Immune-Responsive Genes in Human Memory CD8(+) T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Khanniche, Asma; DiSpirito, Joanna R; Ji, Ping; Wang, Shujun; Wang, Ying; Shen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Memory T cells (TM) play a prominent role in protection and auto-immunity due to their ability to mount a more effective response than naïve T cells (TN). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying enhanced functionality of TM are not well defined, particularly in human TM. We examined the global gene expression profiles of human CD8(+) TN and TM before and after stimulation. There were 1,284, 1,373 and 1,629 differentially expressed genes between TN and TM at 0 hr, 4 hr and 24 hr after stimulation, respectively, with more genes expressed to higher levels in TM. Genes rapidly up-regulated in TN cells were largely involved in nitrogen, nucleoside and amino acid metabolisms. In contrast, those in CD8(+) TM were significantly enriched for immune-response-associated processes, including cytokine production, lymphocyte activation and chemotaxis. Multiple cytokines were rapidly up-regulated in TM cells, including effector cytokines known to be produced by CD8(+) T cells and important for their functions, as well as regulatory cytokines, both pro- and anti-inflammatory, that are not typically produced by CD8(+) T cells. These results provide new insights into molecular mechanisms that contribute to the enhanced functionality of human CD8(+) TM and their prominent role in protection and auto-immunity. PMID:27243788

  8. The effects of a partitioned var gene repertoire of Plasmodium falciparum on antigenic diversity and the acquisition of clinical immunity

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    Arinaminpathy Nimalan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum exploits antigenic diversity and within-host antigenic variation to evade the host's immune system. Of particular importance are the highly polymorphic var genes that encode the family of cell surface antigens PfEMP1 (Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1. It has recently been shown that in spite of their extreme diversity, however, these genes fall into distinct groups according to chromosomal location or sequence similarity, and that recombination may be confined within these groups. Methods This study presents a mathematical analysis of how recombination hierarchies affect diversity, and, by using simple stochastic simulations, investigates how intra- and inter-genic diversity influence the rate at which individuals acquire clinical immunity. Results The analysis demonstrates that the partitioning of the var gene repertoire has a limiting effect on the total diversity attainable through recombination and that the limiting effect is strongly influenced by the respective sizes of each of the partitions. Furthermore, by associating expression of one of the groups with severe malaria it is demonstrated how a small number of infections can be sufficient to protect against disease despite a seemingly limitless number of possible non-identical repertoires. Conclusion Recombination hierarchies within the var gene repertoire of P. falciparum have a severe effect on strain diversity and the process of acquiring immunity against clinical malaria. Future studies will show how the existence of these recombining groups can offer an evolutionary advantage in spite of their restriction on diversity.

  9. De novo characterization of Larimichthys crocea transcriptome for growth-/immune-related gene identification and massive microsatellite (SSR) marker development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaofang; Xiao, Shijun; Liu, Xiande; Liu, Yang; Li, Jiakai; Xie, Yangjie; Wang, Zhi Yong

    2016-04-01

    The large yellow croaker, Larimichthys crocea is an important marine fish in China with a high economic value. In the last decade, the stock conservation and aquaculture industry of this species have been facing severe challenges because of wild population collapse and degeneration of important economic traits. However, genes contributing to growth and immunity in L. crocea have not been thoroughly analyzed, and available molecular markers are still not sufficient for genetic resource management and molecular selection. In this work, we sequenced the transcriptome in L. crocea liver tissue with a Roche 454 sequencing platform and assembled the transcriptome into 93 801 transcripts. Of them, 38 856 transcripts were successfully annotated in nt, nr, Swiss-Prot, InterPro, COG, GO and KEGG databases. Based on the annotation information, 3 165 unigenes related to growth and immunity were identified. Additionally, a total of 6 391 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified from the transcriptome, among which 4 498 SSRs had enough flanking regions to design primers for polymerase chain reactions (PCR). To access the polymorphism of these markers, 30 primer pairs were randomly selected for PCR amplification and validation in 30 individuals, and 12 primer pairs (40.0%) exhibited obvious length polymorphisms. This work applied RNA-Seq to assemble and analyze a live transcriptome in L. crocea. With gene annotation and sequence information, genes related to growth and immunity were identified and massive SSR markers were developed, providing valuable genetic resources for future gene functional analysis and selective breeding of L. crocea.

  10. Effects of excretory/secretory products from Anisakis simplex (Nematoda) on immune gene expression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahlool, Qusay Zuhair Mohammad; Skovgaard, Alf; Kania, Per Walter;

    2013-01-01

    -regulation of the immune genes tested, suggesting a role of ES proteins in immunomodulation. We also tested the enzymatic activity of the ES proteins and found that lipase, esterase/lipase, valine and cysteine arylamidases, naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase and a-galactosidase activities were present in the ES solution....... This type of hydrolytic enzyme activity may play a role in nematode penetration of host tissue. In addition, based on the notion that A. simplex ES products may have an immune-depressive effect (by minimizing immune gene expression) it could also be suggested that worm enzymes directly target host immune...

  11. Transcriptome analysis and discovery of genes involved in immune pathways from hepatopancreas of microbial challenged mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xihong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis is an important economic crustacean and has been seriously attacked by various diseases, which requires more and more information for immune relevant genes on genome background. Recently, high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq technology provides a powerful and efficient method for transcript analysis and immune gene discovery. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cDNA library from hepatopancreas of E. sinensis challenged by a mixture of three pathogen strains (Gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus luteus, Gram-negative bacteria Vibrio alginolyticus and fungi Pichia pastoris; 10(8 cfu·mL(-1 was constructed and randomly sequenced using Illumina technique. Totally 39.76 million clean reads were assembled to 70,300 unigenes. After ruling out short-length and low-quality sequences, 52,074 non-redundant unigenes were compared to public databases for homology searching and 17,617 of them showed high similarity to sequences in NCBI non-redundant protein (Nr database. For function classification and pathway assignment, 18,734 (36.00% unigenes were categorized to three Gene Ontology (GO categories, 12,243 (23.51% were classified to 25 Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG, and 8,983 (17.25% were assigned to six Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways. Potentially, 24, 14, 47 and 132 unigenes were characterized to be involved in Toll, IMD, JAK-STAT and MAPK pathways, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first systematical transcriptome analysis of components relating to innate immune pathways in E. sinensis. Functional genes and putative pathways identified here will contribute to better understand immune system and prevent various diseases in crab.

  12. Vaccination with lentiviral vector expressing the nfa1 gene confers a protective immune response to mice infected with Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Yang, Hee-Jong; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin; Park, Sun; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2013-07-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a pathogenic free-living amoeba, causes fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and animals. The nfa1 gene (360 bp), cloned from a cDNA library of N. fowleri, produces a 13.1-kDa recombinant protein which is located on pseudopodia, particularly the food cup structure. The nfa1 gene plays an important role in the pathogenesis of N. fowleri infection. To examine the effect of nfa1 DNA vaccination against N. fowleri infection, we constructed a lentiviral vector (pCDH) expressing the nfa1 gene. For the in vivo mouse study, BALB/c mice were intranasally vaccinated with viral particles of a viral vector expressing the nfa1 gene. To evaluate the effect of vaccination and immune responses of mice, we analyzed the IgG levels (IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a), cytokine induction (interleukin-4 [IL-4] and gamma interferon [IFN-γ]), and survival rates of mice that developed PAM. The levels of both IgG and IgG subclasses (IgG1 and IgG2a) in vaccinated mice were significantly increased. The cytokine analysis showed that vaccinated mice exhibited greater IL-4 and IFN-γ production than the other control groups, suggesting a Th1/Th2 mixed-type immune response. In vaccinated mice, high levels of Nfa1-specific IgG antibodies continued until 12 weeks postvaccination. The mice vaccinated with viral vector expressing the nfa1 gene also exhibited significantly higher survival rates (90%) after challenge with N. fowleri trophozoites. Finally, the nfa1 vaccination effectively induced protective immunity by humoral and cellular immune responses in N. fowleri-infected mice. These results suggest that DNA vaccination using a viral vector may be a potential tool against N. fowleri infection.

  13. Morphology, morphogenesis and gene sequence of a freshwater ciliate, Pseudourostyla cristata (Ciliophora, Urostyloidea) from the ancient Lake Biwa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xumiao; Li, Zicong; Hu, Xiaozhong; Kusuoka, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    The urostyloid freshwater ciliate Pseudourostyla cristata was recorded for the first time from Lake Biwa, a 4-million-year-old lake located in Shiga Prefecture, Japan. Its morphology and morphogenesis were investigated using live observation and protargol impregnation, and the SSU ribosomal RNA gene was sequenced. Based on the current observations and previous descriptions, this species is readily recognized mainly by the following characters: body slender or broadly oval to elliptical, and dark grey in color; size in vivo about 170-400 x 40-150 microm; pellicle flexible and contractile, with extrusomes forming a hyaline seam underneath; ciliature comprising about 60-130 adoral membranelles, usually 1 buccal cirrus, 20-24 frontal, 2 frontoterminal, 17-26 pairs of midventral, and 5-16 transverse cirri, 4-6 left and 4-5 right marginal rows, and 8-10 dorsal kineties; 15-83 macronuclear nodules and 2-9 micronuclei; freshwater habitat. The main morphogenetic developments are: (1) the oral primordium for the proter originates de novo on the dorsal wall of the buccal cavity, and the dedifferentiated undulating membranes and some parental proximal membranelles join in the primordial development; the old adoral zone will be partly replaced by new structures; (2) the oral primordium for the opisthe occurs epiapokinetally left of the midventral complex between the adoral zone and the transverse cirri; (3) the fronto-midventral transverse cirral (FVT) anlagen develop separately in both dividers by dedifferentiation of most of the midventral cirri; (4) the single buccal cirrus is generated from the posterior end of FVT anlage II; (5) the leftmost frontal cirrus is derived from the anterior end of the undulating membranes anlage (FVT anlage I); (6) the marginal rows of each side are formed from a single anlage which arises within the rightmost row; (7) the dorsal kineties develop by intrakinetal basal body proliferation; and (8) the most posterior FVT anlage contributes the two

  14. Dactylogyrus intermedius parasitism enhances Flavobacterium columnare invasion and alters immune-related gene expression in Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Dong-liang; Chi, Cheng; Ling, Fei; Wang, Gao-xue

    2015-09-17

    The monogenean Dactylogyrus intermedius and the bacterium Flavobacterium columnare are 2 common pathogens in aquaculture. The objective of the present study was to examine the effect of prior parasitism by D. intermedius on the susceptibility of goldfish to F. columnare and to explore the potential immune mechanisms related to the parasite infection. A F. columnare challenge trial was conducted between D. intermedius-parasitized and non-parasitized goldfish. The F. columnare load in gill, kidney, spleen and liver were compared. The expression of immune-related genes (IL-1β2, TNF-α1, TGF-β, iNOS-a, C3 and Lyz) in gill and kidney of D. intermedius-only infected and uninfected control fish were evaluated. D. intermedius-parasitized goldfish exhibited higher mortality and significantly higher loads (3051 to 537,379 genome equivalents [GEs] mg(-1)) of F. columnare, which were 1.13 to 50.82-fold higher than non-parasitized fish (389 to 17,829 GEs mg(-1)). Furthermore, the immune genes IL-1β2, TNF-α1, iNOS-a and Lyz were up-regulated while the TGF-β and C3 were down-regulated in the gill and kidney of parasite-infected fish compared to the non-parasitized controls. The down-regulation TGF-β and C3 was especially noteworthy, as this might indicate the suppression of the host immune functions due to the parasitism by D. intermedius. Taken together, these data demonstrate that parasite infection can enhance bacterial invasion and presents a hypothesis, based on gene expression data, that modulation of host immune response could play a role.

  15. Finding immune gene expression differences induced by marine bacterial pathogens in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus

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    R. Bettencourt

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus lives in a natural environment characterized by extreme conditions of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, pH, high concentrations of heavy metals, methane and hydrogen sulphide. The deep-sea vent biological systems represent thus the opportunity to study and provide new insights into the basic physiological principles that govern the defense mechanisms in vent animals and to understand how they cope with microbial infections. Hence, the importance of understanding this animal's innate defense mechanisms, by examining its differential immune gene expressions toward different pathogenic agents. In the present study, B. azoricus mussels were infected with single suspensions of marine bacterial pathogens, consisting of Vibrio splendidus, Vibrio alginolyticus, or Vibrio anguillarum, and a pool of these Vibrio strains. Flavobacterium suspensions were also used as an irrelevant bacterium. Gene expression analyses were carried out using gill samples from animals dissected at 12 h and 24 h post-infection times by means of quantitative-Polymerase Chain Reaction aimed at targeting several immune genes. We also performed SDS-PAGE protein analyses from the same gill tissues. We concluded that there are different levels of immune gene expression between the 12 h and 24 h exposure times to various bacterial suspensions. Our results from qPCR demonstrated a general pattern of gene expression, decreasing from 12 h over 24 h post-infection. Among the bacteria tested, Flavobacterium is the microorganism species inducing the highest gene expression level in 12 h post-infections animals. The 24 h infected animals revealed, however, greater gene expression levels, using V. splendidus as the infectious agent. The SDS-PAGE analysis also pointed at protein profile differences between 12 h and 24 h, particularly around a protein area, of 18 KDa molecular mass, where most dissimilarities were found. Multivariate

  16. Antagonistic roles for KNOX1 and KNOX2 genes in patterning the land plant body plan following an ancient gene duplication.

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    Chihiro Furumizu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neofunctionalization following gene duplication is thought to be one of the key drivers in generating evolutionary novelty. A gene duplication in a common ancestor of land plants produced two classes of KNOTTED-like TALE homeobox genes, class I (KNOX1 and class II (KNOX2. KNOX1 genes are linked to tissue proliferation and maintenance of meristematic potentials of flowering plant and moss sporophytes, and modulation of KNOX1 activity is implicated in contributing to leaf shape diversity of flowering plants. While KNOX2 function has been shown to repress the gametophytic (haploid developmental program during moss sporophyte (diploid development, little is known about KNOX2 function in flowering plants, hindering syntheses regarding the relationship between two classes of KNOX genes in the context of land plant evolution. Arabidopsis plants harboring loss-of-function KNOX2 alleles exhibit impaired differentiation of all aerial organs and have highly complex leaves, phenocopying gain-of-function KNOX1 alleles. Conversely, gain-of-function KNOX2 alleles in conjunction with a presumptive heterodimeric BELL TALE homeobox partner suppressed SAM activity in Arabidopsis and reduced leaf complexity in the Arabidopsis relative Cardamine hirsuta, reminiscent of loss-of-function KNOX1 alleles. Little evidence was found indicative of epistasis or mutual repression between KNOX1 and KNOX2 genes. KNOX proteins heterodimerize with BELL TALE homeobox proteins to form functional complexes, and contrary to earlier reports based on in vitro and heterologous expression, we find high selectivity between KNOX and BELL partners in vivo. Thus, KNOX2 genes confer opposing activities rather than redundant roles with KNOX1 genes, and together they act to direct the development of all above-ground organs of the Arabidopsis sporophyte. We infer that following the KNOX1/KNOX2 gene duplication in an ancestor of land plants, neofunctionalization led to evolution of antagonistic

  17. Hepatic gene expression changes in pigs experimentally infected with the lung pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae as analysed with an innate immunity focused microarray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Boye, Mette;

    2010-01-01

    response of genes associated with innate immune responses was studied in pigs 14–18 h after intranasal inoculation with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, using innate immune focused microarrays and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The microarray analysis of liver tissue established that 51 genes were......, transferrin and albumin which were down-regulated. Additional genes associated with innate immune responses were investigated using qPCR; genes encoding interleukin (IL)1, IL6, IL8, lipopolysaccharide binding protein, lactotransferrin, and PigMAP were up-regulated and interferon 1a, a1-acid glycoprotein...... in initiating and orchestrating the innate immune response to A. pleuropneumoniae infection. Keywords: acute phase protein, hepatic transcriptional response, innate defence, gene expression, pig...

  18. Beta-globin gene evolution in the ruminants: evidence for an ancient origin of sheep haplotype B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y; Wang, X; Kijas, J W; Dalrymple, B P

    2015-10-01

    Domestic sheep (Ovis aries) can be divided into two groups with significantly different responses to hypoxic environments, determined by two allelic beta-globin haplotypes. Haplotype A is very similar to the goat beta-globin locus, whereas haplotype B has a deletion spanning four globin genes, including beta-C globin, which encodes a globin with high oxygen affinity. We surveyed the beta-globin locus using resequencing data from 70 domestic sheep from 42 worldwide breeds and three Ovis canadensis and two Ovis dalli individuals. Haplotype B has an allele frequency of 71.4% in O. aries and was homozygous (BB) in all five wild sheep. This shared ancestry indicates haplotype B is at least 2-3 million years old. Approximately 40 kb of the sequence flanking the ~37-kb haplotype B deletion had unexpectedly low identity between haplotypes A and B. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the divergent region of sheep haplotype B is remarkably distinct from the beta-globin loci in goat and cattle but still groups with the Ruminantia. We hypothesize that this divergent ~40-kb region in haplotype B may be from an unknown ancestral ruminant and was maintained in the lineage to O. aries, but not other Bovidae, evolving independently of haplotype A. Alternatively, the ~40-kb sequence in haplotype B was more recently acquired by an ancestor of sheep from an unknown non-Bovidae ruminant, replacing part of haplotype A. Haplotype B has a lower nucleotide diversity than does haplotype A, suggesting a recent bottleneck, whereas the higher frequency of haplotype B suggests a subsequent spread through the global population of O. aries. PMID:26096044

  19. Effects of chronic produced water exposure on the expression of some immune-related genes of juvenile Atlantic cod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study assessed the impacts of exposure to processed water produced by offshore oil operators on immune-related genes of juvenile Atlantic cod exposed to processed water for a period of 22 weeks. The study investigated the influence of processed water concentrations on growth parameters; food consumption; plasma cortisol; respiratory burst activity (RB); and mRNA expression. The study showed that the RB of circulating leukocytes was significantly elevated. Significant up-regulation of the mRNA expression of microglobulin, immunoglobulin light chain, and interleukins was observed in some fish. The down-regulation of the interferon stimulated gene was also observed. The study indicated that chronic exposure to significant amounts of processed water causes modulations of the immune system of juvenile Atlantic cod.

  20. Apps for Ancient Civilizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    This project incorporates technology and a historical emphasis on science drawn from ancient civilizations to promote a greater understanding of conceptual science. In the Apps for Ancient Civilizations project, students investigate an ancient culture to discover how people might have used science and math smartphone apps to make their lives…

  1. The effect of the CCR5-delta32 deletion on global gene expression considering immune response and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hütter Gero

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural function of the C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5 is poorly understood. A 32 base pair deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5-delta32 located on chromosome 3 results in a non-functional protein. It is supposed that this deletion causes an alteration in T-cell response to inflammation. For example, the presence of the CCR5-delta32 allele in recipients of allografts constitutes as an independent and protective factor associated with a decreased risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD and graft rejection. However, the mechanism of this beneficial effect of the deletion regarding GVHD is unknown. In this survey we searched for a CCR5-delta32 associated regulation of critical genes involved in the immune response and the development of GVHD. Methods We examined CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from bone marrow samples from 19 healthy volunteers for the CCR5-delta32 deletion with a genomic PCR using primers flanking the site of the deletion. Results 12 individuals were found to be homozygous for CCR5 WT and 7 carried the CCR5-delta32 deletion heterozygously. Global gene expression analysis led to the identification of 11 differentially regulated genes. Six of them are connected with mechanisms of immune response and control: LRG1, CXCR2, CCRL2, CD6, CD7, WD repeat domain, and CD30L. Conclusions Our data indicate that the CCR5-delta32 mutation may be associated with differential gene expression. Some of these genes are critical for immune response, in the case of CD30L probably protective in terms of GVHD.

  2. Expression Analysis of Immune Related Genes Identified from the Coelomocytes of Sea Cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) in Response to LPS Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Dong; Hongjuan Sun; Zunchun Zhou; Aifu Yang; Zhong Chen; Xiaoyan Guan; Shan Gao; Bai Wang; Bei Jiang; Jingwei Jiang

    2014-01-01

    The sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) occupies a basal position during the evolution of deuterostomes and is also an important aquaculture species. In order to identify more immune effectors, transcriptome sequencing of A. japonicus coelomocytes in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge was performed using the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform. One hundred and seven differentially expressed genes were selected and divided into four functional categories including pathogen recognition ...

  3. Transcriptome profiling analysis on whole bodies of microbial challenged Eriocheir sinensis larvae for immune gene identification and SNP development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoxia Cui

    Full Text Available To study crab immunogenetics of individuals, newly hatched Eriocheir sinensis larvae were stimulated with a mixture of three pathogen strains (Gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus luteus, Gram-negative bacteria Vibrio alginolyticus and fungi Pichia pastoris; 10(8 cfu·mL(-1. A total of 44,767,566 Illumina clean reads corresponding to 4.52 Gb nucleotides were generated and assembled into 100,252 unigenes (average length: 1,042 bp; range: 201-19,357 bp. 17,097 (26.09% of 65,535 non-redundant unigenes were annotated in NCBI non-redundant protein (Nr database. Moreover, 23,188 (35.38% unigenes were assigned to three Gene Ontology (GO categories, 15,071 (23.00% to twenty-six Clusters of orthologous Groups (COG and 8,574 (13.08% to six Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways, respectively. Numerous genes were further identified to be associated with multiple immune pathways, including Toll, immune deficiency (IMD, janus kinase (JAK-signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways. Some of them, such as tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP, JNK-interacting protein 1 (JIP1, were first identified in E. sinensis. TRAF6 was even first discovered in crabs. Additionally, 49,555 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were developed from over 13,309 unigenes. This is the first transcriptome report of whole bodies of E. sinensis larvae after immune challenge. Data generated here not only provide detail information to identify novel genes in genome reference-free E. sinensis, but also facilitate our understanding on host immunity and defense mechanism of the crab at whole transcriptome level.

  4. Liver gene therapy by lentiviral vectors reverses anti-factor IX pre-existing immunity in haemophilic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annoni, Andrea; Cantore, Alessio; Della Valle, Patrizia; Goudy, Kevin; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Russo, Fabio; Bartolaccini, Sara; D'Angelo, Armando; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Naldini, Luigi

    2013-11-01

    A major complication of factor replacement therapy for haemophilia is the development of anti-factor neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors). Here we show that liver gene therapy by lentiviral vectors (LVs) expressing factor IX (FIX) strongly reduces pre-existing anti-FIX antibodies and eradicates FIX inhibitors in haemophilia B mice. Concomitantly, plasma FIX levels and clotting activity rose to 50-100% of normal. The treatment was effective in 75% of treated mice. FIX-specific plasma cells (PCs) and memory B cells were reduced, likely because of memory B-cell depletion in response to constant exposure to high doses of FIX. Regulatory T cells displaying FIX-specific suppressive capacity were induced in gene therapy treated mice and controlled FIX-specific T helper cells. Gene therapy proved safer than a regimen mimicking immune tolerance induction (ITI) by repeated high-dose FIX protein administration, which induced severe anaphylactoid reactions in inhibitors-positive haemophilia B mice. Liver gene therapy can thus reverse pre-existing immunity, induce active tolerance to FIX and establish sustained FIX activity at therapeutic levels. These data position gene therapy as an attractive treatment option for inhibitors-positive haemophilic patients. PMID:24106222

  5. A functional genomic screen for evolutionarily conserved genes required for lifespan and immunity in germline-deficient C. elegans.

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    Amit Sinha

    Full Text Available The reproductive system regulates lifespan in insects, nematodes and vertebrates. In Caenorhabditis elegans removal of germline increases lifespan by 60% which is dependent upon insulin signaling, nuclear hormone signaling, autophagy and fat metabolism and their microRNA-regulators. Germline-deficient C. elegans are also more resistant to various bacterial pathogens but the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Firstly, we demonstrate that previously identified genes that regulate the extended lifespan of germline-deficient C. elegans (daf-2, daf-16, daf-12, tcer-1, mir-7.1 and nhr-80 are also essential for resistance to the pathogenic bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila. We then use a novel unbiased approach combining laser cell ablation, whole genome microarrays, RNAi screening and exposure to X. nematophila to generate a comprehensive genome-wide catalog of genes potentially required for increased lifespan and innate immunity in germline-deficient C. elegans. We find 3,440 genes to be upregulated in C. elegans germline-deficient animals in a gonad dependent manner, which are significantly enriched for genes involved in insulin signaling, fatty acid desaturation, translation elongation and proteasome complex function. Using RNAi against a subset of 150 candidate genes selected from the microarray results, we show that the upregulated genes such as transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO, the PTEN homolog lipid phosphatase DAF-18 and several components of the proteasome complex (rpn-6.1, rpn-7, rpn-9, rpn-10, rpt-6, pbs-3 and pbs-6 are essential for both lifespan and immunity of germline deficient animals. We also identify a novel role for genes including par-5 and T12G3.6 in both lifespan-extension and increased survival on X. nematophila. From an evolutionary perspective, most of the genes differentially expressed in germline deficient C. elegans also show a conserved expression pattern in germline deficient Pristionchus pacificus, a

  6. Contribution of C3d-P28 repeats to enhancement of immune responses against HBV-preS2/S induced by gene immunization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Xin Wang; Wei Xu; Qing-Dong Guan; Yi-Wei Chu; Ying Wang; Si-Dong Xiong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether P28 derived from C3d can enhance the immune response to HBV-preS2/S induced by directly injection of naked plasmids containing variable repeats of P28 and HBV-preS2/S in fusion form.METHODS: One to four copies of C3d-P28 coding gene,amplified by PCR and modified by restriction endonucleases digestion, were subcloned into a eukaryotic expression vector pVAON33 to construct pVAON33-P28, pVAON33-P28.2, pVAON33-P28.3 and pVAON33-P28.4 (pVAON33-P28.[1-4]). HBV-preS2/S coding sequence was then introduced into the pVAON33-P28.[1-4] and identified by both PCR and DNA sequencing. BALB/c mice were primed by intramuscular gene immunization with 100 μg different recombinant plasmids on day 0 and were boosted by subcutaneous inoculation with HBsAg protein (1 μg) 12wk post-priming. The levels and avidity of specific IgG in sera collected at the indicated times from each group were determined by ELISA and NaSCN-displacement ELISA,respectively.RESULTS: HBsAg specific antibody response was elicited in groups primed with plasmids pVAON33-S2/S-P28.[1-4]and pVAON33-S2/S. However, the response against HBsAg in the groups primed with pVAON33-S2/S-P28.[1-4] was significantly higher than that in pVAON33-S2/S group, the highest level of the specific antibody response was observed in the groups primed with pVAON33-S2/S-P28.4 (P<0.01).After secondary immunization with specific antigen, the acceleration of antibody levels was significantly higher and faster in the mice primed with DNA expressing preS2/S-P28 fusions than that with DNA expressing preS2/S only (P<0.05).Interestingly, mice primed with DNA expressing preS2/SP28.4 fusions maintained the highest levels of anti-HBs antibodies in all animals. The avidity assay showed that the avidity index (AI) collected at 18 wk from mice primed with pVAON33-S2/S-P28.3 and pVAON33-S2/S-P28.4 were significantly higher than that from preS2/S-DNA vaccinated mice (P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Different repeats of C3d-P28 can

  7. Expression profile of immune-associated genes in the kidney of cultured large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea in the East China Sea area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shujiang; Zhao, Qian; Chen, Yinghua; Lv, Baoqiang; Wu, Xiongfei; Liu, Huihui; Zhu, Aiyi; Wu, Changwen

    2016-08-01

    To explore the effect of environment conditions on immune activity of fish, eight immune-associated genes responsible for innate immunity were selected from the GenBank, i.e. Pgrn-a, Ifit2, P-hepcidin, Lect2, β2m, Irf1, Il25 and Hsp96, and the mRNA expressions of them in the kidney of cultured large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea in different sea areas in the East China Sea were examined with qPCR techniques. In the contrasts of immune-associated gene expression between areas and populations, significant differences were found, expression levels of these immune-associated genes were lower in the clear water area than in the poor water quantity area, and lower in May than in October. MY was more sensitive to environmental factors than DQ, which was coincident with the water quality in the culturing areas. Differential analyses of the expression levels of these immune-associated genes showed that significant up-regulation could be triggered by poor environmental factors. The expression patterns indicated that the expression levels of these genes were sensitive to ecological changes, thereby the immune-associated genes, especially Pgrn-a, Ifit2, β2m, Il25 and Hsp96, might serve as immediate and sensitive indicators of population immunologic vigor and ecosystem health. But the expression of immunity-associated genes at the level of gene transcription is highly influenced by multiple factors, and the exact causes or influencing factors of the up-regulation or down-regulation of these genes still need further thorough investigation.

  8. Yeast expression and DNA immunization of hepatitis B virus S gene with second-loop deletion of α determinant region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Hu; Xiao-Mou Peng; Yang-Su Huang; Lin Gu; Qi-Feng Xie; Zhi-Liang Gao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Immune escape mutations of HBV often occur in the dominant epitope, the second-loop of the a determinant of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). To let the hosts respond to the subdominant epitopes in HBsAg may be an effective way to decrease the prevalence of immune escape mutants. For this reason, a man-made clone of HBV S gene with the second-loop deletion was constructed. Its antigenicity was evaluated by yeast expression analysis and DNA immunization in mice.METHODS: HBV S gene with deleted second-loop, amino acids from 139 to 145, was generated using splicing by overlap extension. HBV deleted S gene was then cloned into the yeast expression vector pPIC9 and the mammalian expression vector pcDNA3 to generate pHB-SDY and pHB-SD,respectively. The complete S gene was cloned into the same vectors as controls. The deleted recombinant HBsAg expressed in yeasts was detected using Abbott IMx HBsAg test kits, enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA)and immune dot blotting to evaluate its antigenicity in vitro.The anti-HBs responses to DNA immunization in BALB/c mice were detected using Abbott IMx AUSAB test kits to evaluate the antigenicity of that recombinant protein in vivo.RESULTS: Both deleted and complete HBsAg were successfully expressed in yeasts. They were intracellular expressions. The deleted HBsAg could not be detected by ELISA, in which the monoclonal anti-HBs against the α determinant was used, but could be detected by Abbott IMx and immune dot blotting, in which multiple monoclonal antiHBs and polyclonal anti-HBs were used, respectively. The activity of the deleted HBsAg detected by Abbott IMx was much lower than that of complete HBsAg (the ratio of sample value/cut off value, 106±26.7 vs1 814.4±776.3, P<0.01,t = 5.02). The anti-HBs response of pHB-SD to DNA immunization was lower than that of complete HBV S gene vector pHB (the positive rate 2/10 vs6/10, 4.56±3.52 mIU/mL vs27.60±17.3 mIU/mL, P= 0.02, t= 2.7).CONCLUSIONS: HBsAg with deleted

  9. Divergence of gut permeability and mucosal immune gene expression in two gluten-associated conditions: celiac disease and gluten sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito Pasquale

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease (CD is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten. Gluten-sensitive individuals (GS cannot tolerate gluten and may develop gastrointestinal symptoms similar to those in CD, but the overall clinical picture is generally less severe and is not accompanied by the concurrence of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies or autoimmune comorbidities. By studying and comparing mucosal expression of genes associated with intestinal barrier function, as well as innate and adaptive immunity in CD compared with GS, we sought to better understand the similarities and differences between these two gluten-associated disorders. Methods CD, GS and healthy, gluten-tolerant individuals were enrolled in this study. Intestinal permeability was evaluated using a lactulose and mannitol probe, and mucosal biopsy specimens were collected to study the expression of genes involved in barrier function and immunity. Results Unlike CD, GS is not associated with increased intestinal permeability. In fact, this was significantly reduced in GS compared with controls (P = 0.0308, paralleled by significantly increased expression of claudin (CLDN 4 (P = 0.0286. Relative to controls, adaptive immunity markers interleukin (IL-6 (P = 0.0124 and IL-21 (P = 0.0572 were expressed at higher levels in CD but not in GS, while expression of the innate immunity marker Toll-like receptor (TLR 2 was increased in GS but not in CD (P = 0.0295. Finally, expression of the T-regulatory cell marker FOXP3 was significantly reduced in GS relative to controls (P = 0.0325 and CD patients (P = 0.0293. Conclusions This study shows that the two gluten-associated disorders, CD and GS, are different clinical entities, and it contributes to the characterization of GS as a condition associated with prevalent gluten-induced activation of innate, rather than adaptive, immune responses in the absence of detectable changes in mucosal barrier function.

  10. RNA-seq profiles of immune related genes in the staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis infected with white band disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libro, Silvia; Kaluziak, Stefan T; Vollmer, Steven V

    2013-01-01

    Coral diseases are among the most serious threats to coral reefs worldwide, yet most coral diseases remain poorly understood. How the coral host responds to pathogen infection is an area where very little is known. Here we used next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) to produce a transcriptome-wide profile of the immune response of the Staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis to White Band Disease (WBD) by comparing infected versus healthy (asymptomatic) coral tissues. The transcriptome of A. cervicornis was assembled de novo from A-tail selected Illumina mRNA-seq data from whole coral tissues, and parsed bioinformatically into coral and non-coral transcripts using existing Acropora genomes in order to identify putative coral transcripts. Differentially expressed transcripts were identified in the coral and non-coral datasets to identify genes that were up- and down-regulated due to disease infection. RNA-seq analyses indicate that infected corals exhibited significant changes in gene expression across 4% (1,805 out of 47,748 transcripts) of the coral transcriptome. The primary response to infection included transcripts involved in macrophage-mediated pathogen recognition and ROS production, two hallmarks of phagocytosis, as well as key mediators of apoptosis and calcium homeostasis. The strong up-regulation of the enzyme allene oxide synthase-lipoxygenase suggests a key role of the allene oxide pathway in coral immunity. Interestingly, none of the three primary innate immune pathways--Toll-like receptors (TLR), Complement, and prophenoloxydase pathways, were strongly associated with the response of A. cervicornis to infection. Five-hundred and fifty differentially expressed non-coral transcripts were classified as metazoan (n = 84), algal or plant (n = 52), fungi (n = 24) and protozoans (n = 13). None of the 52 putative Symbiodinium or algal transcript had any clear immune functions indicating that the immune response is driven by the coral host, and not its algal

  11. Humoral immune response and TLR9 gene expression in Pacific red snapper (Lutjanus peru) experimentally exposed to Aeromonas veronii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Becerril, Martha; Angulo, Carlos; Ascencio, Felipe

    2015-02-01

    Aquaculture production of Pacific red snapper Lutjanus peru is growing rapidly in Mexico, especially in Gulf of California. As it is a relatively new aquaculture species there are few reports evaluating its immune response to pathogens. The Gram-negative bacteria Aeromonas veronii is a heterogeneous organism that causes the disease known as motile aeromonad septicemia, which is responsible for serious economic loss in seabream culture due to bacterial infections. For the purpose of this study, juvenile Pacific red snapper specimens were intraperitoneally injected with low doses of A. veronii (1 × 10(6) CFU ml(-1)). Changes in humoral immune parameters (total protein, myeloperoxidase, lisozyme and antiprotease activities and IgM levels), as well as superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, and TLR9 gene expression were evaluated 24 and 48 h after injection. Overall, the results showed an enhanced in humoral immune parameters and SOD and CAT activities in fish infected with A. veronii compared with control group at 24 or 48 h. By real time PCR assays, the basal mRNA transcripts of TLR9 showed that were highly expressed in intestine and leucocytes compared to skin, head kidney, liver and gill. Then, the mRNA expression levels of TLR9 in head kidney, skin, liver and intestine were analyzed in non-infected and experimentally infected fish 24 and 48 h after injection. A. veronii up-regulated the expression of TLR9 at 24 or 48 h of exposure in all samples analyzed except in liver. Interestingly, intestine produced the greatest increase in transcript levels upon exposure (48 h) to A. veronii. Taken together, our results suggest that low doses of A. veronii infection inducing humoral immune system and TLR9 immune gene in Pacific red snapper that can be useful in the health control of this species. PMID:25462554

  12. Mucosal immunization with recombinant adenoviral vectors expressing murine gammaherpesvirus-68 genes M2 and M3 can reduce latent viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh-Petersen, Mette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P;

    2009-01-01

    of the gammaherpesvirinae speaks against using a similar approach in humans. DNA immunization with plasmids encoding the MHV-68 genes M2 or M3 caused a reduction in either acute or early latent viral load, respectively, but neither immunization had an effect at times later than 14 days post-infection. Adenovirus...

  13. A novel naturally occurring tandem promoter in modified vaccinia virus ankara drives very early gene expression and potent immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia T Wennier

    Full Text Available Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA has been shown to be suitable for the generation of experimental vaccines against cancer and infectious diseases, eliciting strong humoral and cellular immune responses. In viral vectored vaccines, strong recombinant antigen expression and timing of expression influence the quantity and quality of the immune response. Screening of synthetic and native poxvirus promoters for strong protein expression in vitro and potent immune responses in vivo led to the identification of the MVA13.5L promoter, a unique and novel naturally occurring tandem promoter in MVA composed of two 44 nucleotide long repeated motifs, each containing an early promoter element. The MVA13.5L gene is highly conserved across orthopoxviruses, yet its function is unknown. The unique structure of its promoter is not found for any other gene in the MVA genome and is also conserved in other orthopoxviruses. Comparison of the MVA13.5L promoter activity with synthetic poxviral promoters revealed that the MVA13.5L promoter produced higher levels of protein early during infection in HeLa cells and particularly in MDBK cells, a cell line in which MVA replication stops at an early stage before the expression of late genes. Finally, a recombinant antigen expressed under the control of this novel promoter induced high antibody titers and increased CD8 T cell responses in homologous prime-boost immunization compared to commonly used promoters. In particular, the recombinant antigen specific CD8 T cell responses dominated over the immunodominant B8R vector-specific responses after three vaccinations and even more during the memory phase. These results have identified the native MVA13.5L promoter as a new potent promoter for use in MVA vectored preventive and therapeutic vaccines.

  14. Phase I trial of recombinant adenovirus gene transfer in lung cancer. Longitudinal study of the immune responses to transgene and viral products.

    OpenAIRE

    Gahéry-Ségard, H; Molinier-Frenkel, V.; Le Boulaire, C; Saulnier, P.; Opolon, P; Lengagne, R.; Gautier, E; Le Cesne, A; Zitvogel, L; Venet, A.; Schatz, C; Courtney, M; Le Chevalier, T.; Tursz, T; Guillet, J G

    1997-01-01

    Animal studies indicate that the use of replication-deficient adenovirus for human gene therapy is limited by host antivector immune responses that result in transient recombinant protein expression and blocking of gene transfer when rechallenged. Therefore, we have examined immune responses to an adenoviral vector and to the beta-galactosidase protein in four patients with lung cancer given a single intratumor injection of 10(9) plaque-forming units of recombinant adenovirus. The beta-galact...

  15. Regulation of genes affecting body size and innate immunity by the DBL-1/BMP-like pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Gleason Ryan J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs are members of the conserved transforming growth factor β (TGFβ superfamily, and play many developmental and homeostatic roles. In C. elegans, a BMP-like pathway, the DBL-1 pathway, controls body size and is involved in innate immunity. How these functions are carried out, though, and what most of the downstream targets of this pathway are, remain unknown. Results We performed a microarray analysis and compared expression profiles of animals lacking the SMA-6 DBL-1 receptor, which decreases pathway signaling, with animals that overexpress DBL-1 ligand, which increases pathway signaling. Consistent with a role for DBL-1 in control of body size, we find positive regulation by DBL-1 of genes involved in physical structure, protein synthesis and degradation, and metabolism. However, cell cycle genes were mostly absent from our results. We also identified genes in a hedgehog-related pathway, which may comprise a secondary signaling pathway downstream of DBL-1 that controls body size. In addition, DBL-1 signaling up-regulates pro-innate immunity genes. We identified a reporter for DBL-1 signaling, which is normally repressed but is up-regulated when DBL-1 signaling is reduced. Conclusions Our results indicate that body size in C. elegans is controlled in part by regulation of metabolic processes as well as protein synthesis and degradation. This supports the growing body of evidence that suggests cell size is linked to metabolism. Furthermore, this study discovered a possible role for hedgehog-related pathways in transmitting the BMP-like signal from the hypodermis, where the core DBL-1 pathway components are required, to other tissues in the animal. We also identified the up-regulation of genes involved in innate immunity, clarifying the role of DBL-1 in innate immunity. One of the highly regulated genes is expressed at very low levels in wild-type animals, but is strongly up-regulated in Sma

  16. Rare gross deletion in T-cell immune regulator-1 gene in Iranian familywith infantile malignant osteopetrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infantile malignant osteopetrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder.Mutations in the T-cell immune regulator 1 (TCIG1) gene were found as thecause of arOP. We found the first Iranian patient with a rare gross deletionin this gene. The patient was a 5-year-old girl with macrocephaly, facialdysmorphism, blindness, mental retardation, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopeniaand osteosclerotic changes in the skull and the limb. Molecular analysis wasperformed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for exons10-19 of the TCIRG1 gene followed by whole gene sequencing. She showed a 275bp unexpected amplified segment. Sequencing revealed a gross deletion inexons 10-15 transcript region of TCIRG1 that affected codon 389 to 518.Various types of mutations in the TCIRG1 gene in arOP have been reported,however, gross deletions are reported rarely. This gross deletion is thefirst mutation reported among Iranian patients in this gene. This deletion isalso the largest deletion of TCIRG1 gene reported to date. (author)

  17. ANTITUMOR IMMUNITY AND VACCINE EFFECT INDUCED BY IL-12 SYNERGIZES B7-1 GENE TRANSFECTED CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志华; 李弘; 张春艳

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the synergic effects of IL-12 and B7-1 transfectant on antitumor immunity in vivo. Methods: The retrovirus vector encoding mIL-12 and mB7-1 gene was tranfected into EL-4 thymic lymphoma cells respectively. The cells were used as tumor vaccine and the therapeutic effect was observed. Results: In contrast to the mice immunized with EL-4/Wt or EL-4/Neo groups, the tumorigenicity of EL-4/IL-12 transfectant was decreased (P<0.001). The EL-4/IL-12 and EL-4/B7-1 cells irradiated with 60Co showed significant systematic protective effects against the rechallenge of EL-4/Wt. 60Co irradiated EL-4/IL-12 cells delayed the occurrence of tumor and prolonged the survival period of tumor bearing mice. Combination of the vaccines of EL-4/IL-12 and EL-4/B7-1 resulted in the enhanced therapeutic effect compared with each single transfectant group (P<0.001). Conclusion: The results showed that IL-12 transduced cells could enhance the antitumor immunity of host as cancer vaccine. Combination of the EL-4/IL-12 and EL-4/B7-1 transfectant could improve immunity of host and is a prospect cancer vaccine.

  18. Whole transcriptome profiling of successful immune response to Vibrio infections in the oyster Crassostrea gigas by digital gene expression analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien de Lorgeril

    Full Text Available The cultivated Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas has suffered for decades large scale summer mortality phenomenon resulting from the interaction between the environment parameters, the oyster physiological and/or genetic status and the presence of pathogenic microorganisms including Vibrio species. To obtain a general picture of the molecular mechanisms implicated in C. gigas immune responsiveness to circumvent Vibrio infections, we have developed the first deep sequencing study of the transcriptome of hemocytes, the immunocompetent cells. Using Digital Gene Expression (DGE, we generated a transcript catalog of up-regulated genes from oysters surviving infection with virulent Vibrio strains (Vibrio splendidus LGP32 and V. aestuarianus LPi 02/41 compared to an avirulent one, V. tasmaniensis LMG 20012(T. For that an original experimental infection protocol was developed in which only animals that were able to survive infections were considered for the DGE approach. We report the identification of cellular and immune functions that characterize the oyster capability to survive pathogenic Vibrio infections. Functional annotations highlight genes related to signal transduction of immune response, cell adhesion and communication as well as cellular processes and defence mechanisms of phagocytosis, actin cytosqueleton reorganization, cell trafficking and autophagy, but also antioxidant and anti-apoptotic reactions. In addition, quantitative PCR analysis reveals the first identification of pathogen-specific signatures in oyster gene regulation, which opens the way for in depth molecular studies of oyster-pathogen interaction and pathogenesis. This work is a prerequisite for the identification of those physiological traits controlling oyster capacity to survive a Vibrio infection and, subsequently, for a better understanding of the phenomenon of summer mortality.

  19. Effect of in ovo administration of inulin and Lactococcus lactis on immune-related gene expression in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płowiec, Arkadiusz; Sławińska, Anna; Siwek, Maria Z; Bednarczyk, Marek F

    2015-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of in ovo administration of inulin and Lactococcus lactis on immune-related gene expression in broiler chickens. ANIMALS 45 Ross broilers. PROCEDURES On day 12 of embryonic development, 360 eggs were equally allocated among 3 treatment groups and injected with 0.2 mL of a solution that contained 1.76 mg of inulin (prebiotic group) or 1.76 mg of inulin enriched with 1,000 CFUs of L lactis subsp lactis 2955 (synbiotic group), or they were injected with 0.2 mL of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (control). At 1, 14, and 35 days after hatching, 5 male birds from each group were euthanized, and the spleen and cecal tonsils were harvested for determination of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12p40, IL-18, cluster of differentiation 80, interferon-β, and interferon-γ expression by means of a reverse transcription quantitative PCR assay. Gene expressions in the cecal tonsils and spleens of chickens in the prebiotic and synbiotic groups were compared with those of control chickens at each tissue collection time. RESULTS Compared with control birds, immune-related gene expression was downregulated in birds in the prebiotic and synbiotic groups, and the magnitude of that downregulation was more pronounced in the cecal tonsils than in the spleen and increased with age. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that in ovo administration of a prebiotic or synbiotic to broilers was associated with downregulation of immune-related gene expression in the cecal tonsils and spleen. The magnitude of that downregulation increased with age and was most likely caused by stabilization of the gastrointestinal microbiota.

  20. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in the Drinking Water Alters the Expression of Immune Response Genes in Mouse Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozul, Courtney D.; Hampton, Thomas H.; Davey, Jennifer C.; Gosse, Julie A.; Nomikos, Athena P.; Eisenhauer, Phillip L.; Weiss, Daniel J.; Thorpe, Jessica E.; Ihnat, Michael A.; Hamilton, Joshua W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic exposure to drinking water arsenic is a significant worldwide environmental health concern. Exposure to As is associated with an increased risk of lung disease, which may make it a unique toxicant, because lung toxicity is usually associated with inhalation rather than ingestion. Objectives The goal of this study was to examine mRNA and protein expression changes in the lungs of mice exposed chronically to environmentally relevant concentrations of As in the food or drinking water, specifically examining the hypothesis that As may preferentially affect gene and protein expression related to immune function as part of its mechanism of toxicant action. Methods C57BL/6J mice fed a casein-based AIN-76A defined diet were exposed to 10 or 100 ppb As in drinking water or food for 5–6 weeks. Results Whole genome transcriptome profiling of animal lungs revealed significant alterations in the expression of many genes with functions in cell adhesion and migration, channels, receptors, differentiation and proliferation, and, most strikingly, aspects of the innate immune response. Confirmation of mRNA and protein expression changes in key genes of this response revealed that genes for interleukin 1β, interleukin 1 receptor, a number of toll-like receptors, and several cytokines and cytokine receptors were significantly altered in the lungs of As-exposed mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that chronic low-dose As exposure at the current U.S. drinking-water standard can elicit effects on the regulation of innate immunity, which may contribute to altered disease risk, particularly in lung. PMID:19654921

  1. Evolutionary dynamics of immune-related genes and pathways in disease-vector mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Waterhouse, R. M.; Kriventseva, E. V.; Meister, Stephan; Xi, Zhiyong; Alvarez, K. S.; Bartholomay, L.C.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Bian, Guowu; Blandin, Stephanie; Christensen, B. M.; Dong, Yuemei; Jiang, Haobo; Kanost, M. R.; Koutsos, A. C.; Levashina, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    Mosquitoes are vectors of parasitic and viral diseases of immense importance for public health. The acquisition of the genome sequence of the yellow fever and Dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (Aa), has enabled a comparative phylogenomic analysis of the insect immune repertoire: in Aa, the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae (Ag), and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (Dm). Analysis of immune signaling pathways and response modules reveals both conservative and rapidly evolving features associate...

  2. Immune Responses Induced by Gene Gun or Intramuscular Injection of DNA Vaccines That Express Immunogenic Regions of the Serine Repeat Antigen from Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    Belperron, Alexia A.; Feltquate, David; Fox, Barbara A.; Horii, Toshihiro; Bzik, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The liver- and blood-stage-expressed serine repeat antigen (SERA) of Plasmodium falciparum is a candidate protein for a human malaria vaccine. We compared the immune responses induced in mice immunized with SERA-expressing plasmid DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular (i.m.) injection or delivered intradermally by Gene Gun immunization. Mice were immunized with a pcdna3 plasmid encoding the entire 47-kDa domain of SERA (amino acids 17 to 382) or the N-terminal domain (amino acids 17 to 110)...

  3. Adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene inhibits infiltration of immune cells and cell apoptosis in rats after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Ping Jiang; Zhen-Hua Hu; Shu-Sen Zheng; Chang-Ku Jia; Ai-Bin Zhang; Wei-Lin Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene therapy in inhibiting the infiltration of macrophages and CD8+T cells and cell apoptosis after liver transplantation.METHODS: The rat orthotopic liver transplantation model was applied. The rats were divided into three groups:group Ⅰ: rejection control (SD-to-Wistar); group Ⅱ: acute rejection treated with intramuscular injection of CsA injection of 1× 109 PFU adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene liquor in dorsal vein of penis 7 d before liver transplantation(SD-to-Wistar+CTLA4Ig). Immunohistochemistry and transferase-mediated dUTPnick-end labeling (TUNEL)were used to analyze the expression of CTLA4Ig gene in liver, infiltration of macrophages and CD8+T cells, cell apoptosis in grafts at different time-points after liver transplantation. Histopathological examination was done.RESULTS: CTLA4Ig gene expression was positive in liver on d 7 after administering adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene via vein, and remained positive until day 60 after liver transplantation. Infiltration of macrophages and CD8+T cells in CTLA4Ig-treated group was less than in rejection control group and CsA-treated group. The apoptotic index of rejection group on d 3, 5, and 7 were significantly higher than that of CTLA4Ig-treated group. A good correlation was found between severity of rejection reaction and infiltration of immune activator cells or cell apoptotic index in grafts.CONCLUSION: CTLA4Ig gene is constantly expressed in liver and plays an important role in inducing immune tolerance.

  4. Effects of mannose-binding lectin on pulmonary gene expression and innate immune inflammatory response to ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciencewicki, Jonathan M; Verhein, Kirsten C; Gerrish, Kevin; McCaw, Zachary R; Li, Jianying; Bushel, Pierre R; Kleeberger, Steven R

    2016-08-01

    Ozone is a common, potent oxidant pollutant in industrialized nations. Ozone exposure causes airway hyperreactivity, lung hyperpermeability, inflammation, and cell damage in humans and laboratory animals, and exposure to ozone has been associated with exacerbation of asthma, altered lung function, and mortality. The mechanisms of ozone-induced lung injury and differential susceptibility are not fully understood. Ozone-induced lung inflammation is mediated, in part, by the innate immune system. We hypothesized that mannose-binding lectin (MBL), an innate immunity serum protein, contributes to the proinflammatory events caused by ozone-mediated activation of the innate immune system. Wild-type (Mbl(+/+)) and MBL-deficient (Mbl(-/-)) mice were exposed to ozone (0.3 ppm) for up to 72 h, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was examined for inflammatory markers. Mean numbers of eosinophils and neutrophils and levels of the neutrophil attractants C-X-C motif chemokines 2 [Cxcl2 (major intrinsic protein 2)] and 5 [Cxcl5 (limb expression, LIX)] in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were significantly lower in Mbl(-/-) than Mbl(+/+) mice exposed to ozone. Using genome-wide mRNA microarray analyses, we identified significant differences in transcript response profiles and networks at baseline [e.g., nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2)-mediated oxidative stress response] and after exposure (e.g., humoral immune response) between Mbl(+/+) and Mbl(-/-) mice. The microarray data were further analyzed to discover several informative differential response patterns and subsequent gene sets, including the antimicrobial response and the inflammatory response. We also used the lists of gene transcripts to search the LINCS L1000CDS(2) data sets to identify agents that are predicted to perturb ozone-induced changes in gene transcripts and inflammation. These novel findings demonstrate that targeted deletion of Mbl caused differential levels of inflammation-related gene sets at

  5. Extended LTA, TNF, LST1 and HLA gene haplotypes and their association with rubella vaccine-induced immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna G Ovsyannikova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have suggested the importance of HLA genes in determining immune responses following rubella vaccine. The telomeric class III region of the HLA complex harbors several genes, including lymphotoxin alpha (LTA, tumor necrosis factor (TNF and leukocyte specific transcript -1 (LST1 genes, located between the class I B and class II DRB1 loci. Apart from HLA, little is known about the effect of this extended genetic region on HLA haplotypic backgrounds as applied to immune responses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the association between immune responses and extended class I-class II-class III haplotypes among 714 healthy children after two doses of rubella vaccination. These extended haplotypes were then compared to the HLA-only haplotypes. The most significant association was observed between haplotypes extending across the HLA class I region, ten-SNP haplotypes, and the HLA class II region (i.e. A-C-B-LTA-TNF-LST1-DRB1-DQA1-DQB1-DPA1-DPB1 and rubella-specific antibodies (global p-value of 0.03. Associations were found between both extended A*02-C*03-B*15-AAAACGGGGC-DRB1*04-DQA1*03-DQB1*03-DPA1*01-DPB1*04 (p = 0.002 and HLA-only A*02-C*03-B*15-DRB1*04-DQA1*03-DQB1*03-DPA1*01-DPB1*04 haplotypes (p = 0.009 and higher levels of rubella antibodies. The class II HLA-only haplotype DRB1*13-DQA1*01-DQB1*06-DPA1*01-DPB1*04 (p = 0.04 lacking LTA-TNF-LST1 SNPs was associated with lower rubella antibody responses. Similarly, the class I-class II HLA-only A*01-C*07-B*08-DRB1*03-DQA1*05-DQB1*02-DPA1*01-DPB1*04 haplotype was associated with increased TNF-alpha secretion levels (p = 0.009. In contrast, the extended AAAACGGGGC-DRB1*01-DQA1*01-DQB1*05-DPA1*01-DPB1*04 (p = 0.01 haplotype was found to trend with decreased rubella-specific IL-6 secretion levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest the importance of examining both HLA genes and genes in the class III region as part of the extended haplotypes useful in

  6. Transcriptome analysis to identify genes for peptides and proteins involved in immunity and reproduction from male accessory glands and ejaculatory duct of Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dong; Tian, Chuan-Bei; Liu, Shi-Huo; Wang, Tao; Smagghe, Guy; Jia, Fu-Xian; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2016-06-01

    In the male reproductive system of insects, the male accessory glands and ejaculatory duct (MAG/ED) are important organs and their primary function is to enhance the fertility of spermatozoa. Proteins secreted by the MAG/ED are also known to induce post-mating changes and immunity responses in the female insect. To understand the gene expression profile in the MAG/ED of the oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), that is an important pest in fruits, we performed an Illumina-based deep sequencing of mRNA. This yielded 54,577,630 clean reads corresponding to 4.91Gb total nucleotides that were assembled and clustered to 30,669 unigenes (average 645bp). Among them, 20,419 unigenes were functionally annotated to known proteins/peptides in Gene Orthology, Clusters of Orthologous Groups, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway databases. Typically, many genes were involved in immunity and these included microbial recognition proteins and antimicrobial peptides. Subsequently, the inducible expression of these immunity-related genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis when insects were challenged with immunity-inducible factors, suggesting their function in guaranteeing fertilization success. Besides, we identified some important reproductive genes such as juvenile hormone- and ecdysteroid-related genes in this de novo assembly. In conclusion, this transcriptomic sequencing of B. dorsalis MAG/ED provides insights to facilitate further functional research of reproduction, immunity and molecular evolution of reproductive proteins in this important agricultural pest.

  7. Massively parallel RNA sequencing identifies a complex immune gene repertoire in the lophotrochozoan Mytilus edulis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva E R Philipp

    Full Text Available The marine mussel Mytilus edulis and its closely related sister species are distributed world-wide and play an important role in coastal ecology and economy. The diversification in different species and their hybrids, broad ecological distribution, as well as the filter feeding mode of life has made this genus an attractive model to investigate physiological and molecular adaptations and responses to various biotic and abiotic environmental factors. In the present study we investigated the immune system of Mytilus, which may contribute to the ecological plasticity of this species. We generated a large Mytilus transcriptome database from different tissues of immune challenged and stress treated individuals from the Baltic Sea using 454 pyrosequencing. Phylogenetic comparison of orthologous groups of 23 species demonstrated the basal position of lophotrochozoans within protostomes. The investigation of immune related transcripts revealed a complex repertoire of innate recognition receptors and downstream pathway members including transcripts for 27 toll-like receptors and 524 C1q domain containing transcripts. NOD-like receptors on the other hand were absent. We also found evidence for sophisticated TNF, autophagy and apoptosis systems as well as for cytokines. Gill tissue and hemocytes showed highest expression of putative immune related contigs and are promising tissues for further functional studies. Our results partly contrast with findings of a less complex immune repertoire in ecdysozoan and other lophotrochozoan protostomes. We show that bivalves are interesting candidates to investigate the evolution of the immune system from basal metazoans to deuterostomes and protostomes and provide a basis for future molecular work directed to immune system functioning in Mytilus.

  8. Bioinformatics analysis of the factors controlling type I IFN gene expression in autoimmune disease and virus-induced immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di eFeng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS display increased levels of type I IFN-induced genes. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs are natural interferon producing cells and considered to be a primary source of IFN-α in these two diseases. Differential expression patterns of type I IFN inducible transcripts can be found in different immune cell subsets and in patients with both active and inactive autoimmune disease. A type I IFN gene signature generally consists of three groups of IFN-induced genes - those regulated in response to virus-induced type I IFN, those regulated by the IFN-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK pathway, and those by the IFN-induced phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3K pathway. These three groups of type I IFN-regulated genes control important cellular processes such as apoptosis, survival, adhesion, and chemotaxis, that when dysregulated, contribute to autoimmunity. With the recent generation of large datasets in the public domain from next-generation sequencing and DNA microarray experiments, one can perform detailed analyses of cell type-specific gene signatures as well as identify distinct transcription factors that differentially regulate these gene signatures. We have performed bioinformatics analysis of data in the public domain and experimental data from our lab to gain insight into the regulation of type I IFN gene expression. We have found that the genetic landscape of the IFNA and IFNB genes are occupied by transcription factors, such as insulators CTCF and cohesin, that negatively regulate transcription, as well as IRF5 and IRF7, that positively and distinctly regulate IFNA subtypes. A detailed understanding of the factors controlling type I IFN gene transcription will significantly aid in the identification and development of new therapeutic strategies targeting the IFN pathway in autoimmune disease.

  9. Unraveling the effects of selection and demography on immune gene variation in free-ranging plains zebra (Equus quagga populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline L Kamath

    Full Text Available Demography, migration and natural selection are predominant processes affecting the distribution of genetic variation among natural populations. Many studies use neutral genetic markers to make inferences about population history. However, the investigation of functional coding loci, which directly reflect fitness, is critical to our understanding of species' ecology and evolution. Immune genes, such as those of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC, play an important role in pathogen recognition and provide a potent model system for studying selection. We contrasted diversity patterns of neutral data with MHC loci, ELA-DRA and -DQA, in two southern African plains zebra (Equus quagga populations: Etosha National Park, Namibia, and Kruger National Park, South Africa. Results from neutrality tests, along with observations of elevated diversity and low differentiation across populations, supported previous genus-level evidence for balancing selection at these loci. Despite being low, MHC divergence across populations was significant and may be attributed to drift effects typical of geographically separated populations experiencing little to no gene flow, or alternatively to shifting allele frequency distributions driven by spatially variable and fluctuating pathogen communities. At the DRA, zebra exhibited geographic differentiation concordant with microsatellites and reduced levels of diversity in Etosha due to highly skewed allele frequencies that could not be explained by demography, suggestive of spatially heterogeneous selection and local adaptation. This study highlights the complexity in which selection affects immune gene diversity and warrants the need for further research on the ecological mechanisms shaping patterns of adaptive variation among natural populations.

  10. Polymorphisms in bovine immune genes and their associations with somatic cell count and milk production in dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magee David A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mastitis, an inflammation of the mammary gland, is a major source of economic loss on dairy farms. The aim of this study was to quantify the associations between two previously identified polymorphisms in the bovine toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 and chemokine receptor 1 (CXCR1 genes and mammary health indictor traits in (a 246 lactating dairy cow contemporaries representing five breeds from one research farm and (b 848 Holstein-Friesian bulls that represent a large proportion of the Irish dairy germplasm. To expand the study, a further 14 polymorphisms in immune genes were included for association studies in the bull population. Results TLR4-2021 associated (P SERPINA1 haplotype with superior genetic merit for milk protein yield and milk fat percentage (P Conclusion Of the sixteen polymorphisms in seven immune genes genotyped, just CXCR1-777 tended to associate with SCS, albeit only in the on-farm study. The lack of an association between the polymorphisms with SCS in the Holstein-Friesian data set would question the potential importance of these variants in selection for improved mastitis resistance in the Holstein-Friesian cow.

  11. Cotesia vestalis teratocytes express a diversity of genes and exhibit novel immune functions in parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Gu, Qi-Juan; Pan, Jing; Wang, Ze-Hua; Yin, Chuan-Lin; Li, Fei; Song, Qi-Sheng; Strand, Michael R; Chen, Xue-Xin; Shi, Min

    2016-01-01

    Some endoparasitoid wasps lay eggs that produce cells called teratocytes. In this study, we sequenced and analyzed the transcriptome of teratocytes from the solitary endoparasitoid Cotesia vestalis (Braconidae), which parasitizes larval stage Plutella xylostella (Plutellidae). Results identified many teratocyte transcripts with potential functions in affecting host immune defenses, growth or metabolism. Characterization of teratocyte-secreted venom-like protein 8 (TSVP-8) indicated it inhibits melanization of host hemolymph in vitro, while two predicted anti-microbial peptides (CvT-def 1 and 3) inhibited the growth of bacteria. Results also showed the parasitized hosts lacking teratocytes experienced higher mortality after immune challenge by pathogens than hosts with teratocytes. Taken together, these findings indicate that C. vestalis teratocytes secrete products that alter host immune functions while also producing anti-microbial peptides with functions that help protect the host from infection by other organisms. PMID:27254821

  12. The potential of effector-target genes in breeding for plant innate immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Gawehns, F.; Cornelissen, B.J.C.; Takken, F.L.W.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of infectious crop diseases that are caused by fungi and oomycetes urge the need to develop alternative strategies for resistance breeding. As an alternative for the use of resistance (R) genes, the application of mutant susceptibility (S) genes has been proposed as a potentially more durable type of resistance. Identification of S genes is hampered by their recessive nature. Here we explore the use of pathogen-derived effectors as molecular probes to identify S genes. Effe...

  13. The genes involved in production of and immunity to sakacin A, a bacteriocin from Lactobacillus sake Lb706.

    OpenAIRE

    Axelsson, L.; Holck, A

    1995-01-01

    Sakacin A is a small, heat-stable, antilisterial bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus sake Lb706. The nucleotide sequence of a 8,668-bp fragment, shown to contain all information necessary for sakacin A production and immunity, was determined. The sequence revealed the presence of two divergently transcribed operons. The first encompassed the structural gene sapA (previously designated sakA) and saiA, which encoded a putative peptide of 90 amino acid residues. The second encompassed sapK (pr...

  14. Characterization of a honey bee Toll related receptor gene Am18w and its potential involvement in antimicrobial immune defense

    OpenAIRE

    Aronstein, Katherine; Saldivar, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    International audience Toll receptors are involved in intracellular signal transduction and initiation of insect antimicrobial immune responses. Here we report the isolation and characterization of a novel gene (Am18w) from honey bee Apis mellifera, which encodes for the Toll-like receptor and shares a striking 51.4% similarity with Bombyx mori 18-wheeler, 46.6% with Drosophila Toll-7 receptor and 42.5% with Drosophila 18-wheeler. The sequence analysis of the deduced 18W protein revealed a...

  15. Expression of immune system-related genes during ontogeny in experimentally wounded common carp (Cyprinus carpio) larvae and juveniles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jacob; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of full-thickness incisional wounding on expression of genes related to the immune system in larvae and juveniles of common carp (Cyprinus carpio). The wounds were inflicted by needle puncture immediately below the anterior part of the dorsal fin on days 7, 14, 28 and 49...... they were microscopically indistinguishable from normal tissue by day 3 post-wounding in all but the juvenile carp wounded on day 49 post-fertilization. In these juveniles the wounded area was still visible even 7days post-wounding. On the transcriptional level a very limited response was observed...

  16. Gene expression profiling of immune-competent human cells exposed to engineered zinc oxide or titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soile Tuomela

    Full Text Available A comprehensive in vitro assessment of two commercial metal oxide nanoparticles, TiO2 and ZnO, was performed using human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC, and Jurkat T cell leukemia-derived cell line. TiO2 nanoparticles were found to be non-toxic whereas ZnO nanoparticles caused dose-dependent cell death. Subsequently, global gene expression profiling was performed to identify transcriptional response underlying the cytotoxicity caused by ZnO nanoparticles. Analysis was done with doses 1 µg/ml and 10 µg/ml after 6 and 24 h of exposure. Interestingly, 2703 genes were significantly differentially expressed in HMDM upon exposure to 10 µg/ml ZnO nanoparticles, while in MDDCs only 12 genes were affected. In Jurkat cells, 980 genes were differentially expressed. It is noteworthy that only the gene expression of metallothioneins was upregulated in all the three cell types and a notable proportion of the genes were regulated in a cell type-specific manner. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the top biological processes disturbed in HMDM and Jurkat cells were regulating cell death and growth. In addition, genes controlling immune system development were affected. Using a panel of modified ZnO nanoparticles, we obtained an additional support that the cellular response to ZnO nanoparticles is largely dependent on particle dissolution and show that the ligand used to modify ZnO nanoparticles modulates Zn(2+ leaching. Overall, the study provides an extensive resource of transcriptional markers for mediating ZnO nanoparticle-induced toxicity for further mechanistic studies, and demonstrates the value of assessing nanoparticle responses through a combined transcriptomics and bioinformatics approach.

  17. TNL-mediated immunity in Arabidopsis requires complex regulation of the redundant ADR1 gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Oliver Xiaoou; Tong, Meixuezi; Bonardi, Vera; El Kasmi, Farid; Woloshen, Virginia; Wünsch, Lisa K; Dangl, Jeffery L; Li, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs) serve as intracellular immune receptors in animals and plants. Sensor NLRs perceive pathogen-derived effector molecules and trigger robust host defense. Recent studies revealed the role of three coiled-coil-type NLRs (CNLs) of the ADR1 family - ADR1, ADR1-L1 and ADR1-L2 - as redundant helper NLRs, whose function is required for defense mediated by multiple sensor NLRs. From a mutant snc1-enhancing (MUSE) forward genetic screen in Arabidopsis targeted to identify negative regulators of snc1 that encodes a TIR-type NLR (TNL), we isolated two alleles of muse15, both carrying mutations in ADR1-L1. Interestingly, loss of ADR1-L1 also enhances immunity-related phenotypes in other autoimmune mutants including cpr1, bal and lsd1. This immunity-enhancing effect is not mediated by increased SNC1 protein stability, nor is it fully dependent on the accumulation of the defense hormone salicylic acid (SA). Transcriptional analysis revealed an upregulation of ADR1 and ADR1-L2 in the adr1-L1 background, which may overcompensate the loss of ADR1-L1, resulting in enhanced immunity. Interestingly, autoimmunity of snc1 and chs2, which encode typical TNLs, is fully suppressed by the adr1 triple mutant, suggesting that the ADRs are required for TNL downstream signaling. This study extends our knowledge on the interplay among ADRs and reveals their complexity in defense regulation. PMID:27074399

  18. Protection against Vibrio alginolyticus in crimson snapper Lutjanus erythropterus immunized with a DNA vaccine containing the ompW gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shuang-Hu; Lu, Yi-Shan; Jian, Ji-Chang; Wang, Bei; Huang, Yu-Cong; Tang, Ju-Fen; Ding, Yu; Wu, Zao-He

    2013-09-24

    The outer membrane proteins of Vibrio alginolyticus play an important role in the virulence of the bacterium and are potential candidates for vaccine development. In the present study, the ompW gene was cloned, expressed and purified. A DNA vaccine was constructed by inserting the ompW gene into a pcDNA plasmid. Crimson snapper Lutjanus erythropterus (Bloch) were injected intramuscularly with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA-ompW. The expression of the DNA vaccine was detected in gill, head kidney, heart, liver, spleen and injection site muscle of crimson snapper by RT-PCR 7 and 28 d post-vaccination. The ELISA results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine produced an observable antibody response in all sera of the vaccinated fish. In addition, crimson snapper immunized with the DNA vaccine showed a relative percentage survival (RPS) of 92.53%, indicating effective protection against V. alginolyticus infection.

  19. Chronic activation of the epithelial immune system of the fruit fly's salivary glands has a negative effect on organismal growth and induces a peculiar set of target genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelsadik Ahmed

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial and especially mucosal immunity represents the first line of defence against the plethora of potential pathogens trying to invade via the gastrointestinal tract. The salivary glands of the fruit fly are an indispensable part of the gastrointestinal tract, but their contribution to the mucosal immunity has almost completely been neglected. Our major goal was to elucidate if the fly's salivary glands are able to mount an immune response and what the major characteristics of this immune response are. Results Ectopic activation of the IMD-pathway within the salivary gland cells is able to induce an immune response, indicating that the salivary glands are indeed immune competent. This reaction is characterized by the concurrent expression of numerous antimicrobial peptide genes. In addition, ectopic activation of the salivary gland's immune response induces morphological changes such as dwarfism throughout all developmental stages and a significantly decreased length of the salivary glands themselves. DNA-microarray analyses of the reaction revealed a complex pattern of up- and downregulated genes. Gene ontology analyses of regulated genes revealed a significant increase in genes associated with ribosomal and proteasomal function. On the other hand, genes coding for peptide receptors and some potassium channels are downregulated. In addition, the comparison of the transcriptional events induced following IMD-activation in the trachea and the salivary glands shows also only a small overlap, indicating that the general IMD-activated core transcriptome is rather small and that the tissue specific component of this response is dominating. Among the regulated genes, those that code for signaling associated protease activity are significantly modulated. Conclusions The salivary glands are immune-competent and they contribute to the overall intestinal immune system. Although they produce antimicrobial peptides, their overall

  20. Studying Ancient History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Robin

    1982-01-01

    Defends the value and relevance of the study of ancient history and classics in history curricula. The unique homogeneity of the classical period contributes to its instructional manageability. A year-long, secondary-level course on fifth-century Greece and Rome is described to illustrate effective approaches to teaching ancient history. (AM)

  1. E-cigarette use results in suppression of immune and inflammatory-response genes in nasal epithelial cells similar to cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth M; Clapp, Phillip W; Rebuli, Meghan E; Pawlak, Erica A; Glista-Baker, Ellen; Benowitz, Neal L; Fry, Rebecca C; Jaspers, Ilona

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke is known to result in impaired host defense responses and immune suppressive effects. However, the effects of new and emerging tobacco products, such as e-cigarettes, on the immune status of the respiratory epithelium are largely unknown. We conducted a clinical study collecting superficial nasal scrape biopsies, nasal lavage, urine, and serum from nonsmokers, cigarette smokers, and e-cigarette users and assessed them for changes in immune gene expression profiles. Smoking status was determined based on a smoking history and a 3- to 4-wk smoking diary and confirmed using serum cotinine and urine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) levels. Total RNA from nasal scrape biopsies was analyzed using the nCounter Human Immunology v2 Expression panel. Smoking cigarettes or vaping e-cigarettes resulted in decreased expression of immune-related genes. All genes with decreased expression in cigarette smokers (n = 53) were also decreased in e-cigarette smokers. Additionally, vaping e-cigarettes was associated with suppression of a large number of unique genes (n = 305). Furthermore, the e-cigarette users showed a greater suppression of genes common with those changed in cigarette smokers. This was particularly apparent for suppressed expression of transcription factors, such as EGR1, which was functionally associated with decreased expression of 5 target genes in cigarette smokers and 18 target genes in e-cigarette users. Taken together, these data indicate that vaping e-cigarettes is associated with decreased expression of a large number of immune-related genes, which are consistent with immune suppression at the level of the nasal mucosa. PMID:27288488

  2. E-cigarette use results in suppression of immune and inflammatory-response genes in nasal epithelial cells similar to cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth M; Clapp, Phillip W; Rebuli, Meghan E; Pawlak, Erica A; Glista-Baker, Ellen; Benowitz, Neal L; Fry, Rebecca C; Jaspers, Ilona

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke is known to result in impaired host defense responses and immune suppressive effects. However, the effects of new and emerging tobacco products, such as e-cigarettes, on the immune status of the respiratory epithelium are largely unknown. We conducted a clinical study collecting superficial nasal scrape biopsies, nasal lavage, urine, and serum from nonsmokers, cigarette smokers, and e-cigarette users and assessed them for changes in immune gene expression profiles. Smoking status was determined based on a smoking history and a 3- to 4-wk smoking diary and confirmed using serum cotinine and urine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) levels. Total RNA from nasal scrape biopsies was analyzed using the nCounter Human Immunology v2 Expression panel. Smoking cigarettes or vaping e-cigarettes resulted in decreased expression of immune-related genes. All genes with decreased expression in cigarette smokers (n = 53) were also decreased in e-cigarette smokers. Additionally, vaping e-cigarettes was associated with suppression of a large number of unique genes (n = 305). Furthermore, the e-cigarette users showed a greater suppression of genes common with those changed in cigarette smokers. This was particularly apparent for suppressed expression of transcription factors, such as EGR1, which was functionally associated with decreased expression of 5 target genes in cigarette smokers and 18 target genes in e-cigarette users. Taken together, these data indicate that vaping e-cigarettes is associated with decreased expression of a large number of immune-related genes, which are consistent with immune suppression at the level of the nasal mucosa.

  3. The Association of the Immune Response Genes to Human Papillomavirus-Related Cervical Disease in a Brazilian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Vansan Marangon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic variability of the host contributes to the risk of human papillomavirus (HPV-related cervical disease. Immune response genes to HPV must be investigated to define patients with the highest risk of developing malignant disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of polymorphic immune response genes, namely KIR, HLA class I and II, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of cytokines with HPV-related cervical disease. We selected 79 non-related, admixed Brazilian women from the state of Paraná, southern region of Brazil, who were infected with high carcinogenic risk HPV and present cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3, and 150 HPV-negative women from the same region matched for ethnicity. KIR genes were genotyped using an in-house PCR-SSP. HLA alleles were typed using a reverse sequence-specific oligonucleotide technique. SNPs of TNF −308G>A, IL6 −174G>C, IFNG +874T>A, TGFB1 +869T>C +915G>C, and IL10 −592C>A −819C>T −1082G>A were evaluated using PCR-SSP. The KIR genes were not associated with HPV, although some pairs of i(inhibitoryKIR-ligands occurred more frequently in patients, supporting a role for NK in detrimental chronic inflammatory and carcinogenesis. Some HLA haplotypes were associated with HPV. The associations of INFG and IL10 SNPs potentially reflect impaired or invalid responses in advanced lesions.

  4. Association of Variants in Genes Related to the Immune Response and Obesity with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in CLUE II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, David S.; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Hoffman-Bolton, Judy; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Isaacs, William B.; Smith, Michael W.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic inflammation and obesity may contribute to the genesis or progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and BPH-associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The influence of variants in genes related to these states on BPH has not been studied extensively. Thus, we evaluated the association of 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in immune response genes (IL1B, IL6, IL8, IL10, TNF, CRP, TLR4, RNASEL) and genes involved in obesity, including insulin regulation (LEP, ADIPOQ, PPARG, TCF7L2), with BPH. METHODS BPH cases (N=568) and age-frequency matched controls (N=568) were selected from among adult male CLUE II cohort participants who responded in 2000 to a mailed questionnaire. BPH was defined as BPH surgery, use of BPH medications, or symptomatic BPH (American Urological Association Symptom Index Score ≥15). Controls were men who had not had BPH surgery, did not use BPH medications, and whose symptom score was ≤7. Age-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression. RESULTS None of the candidate SNPs was statistically significantly associated with BPH. However, we could not rule out possible weak associations for CRP rs1205 (1082C>T), ADIPOQ rs1501299 (276C>A), PPARG rs1801282 (-49C>G), and TCF7L2 rs7903146 (47833T>C). After summing risk alleles, men with ≥4 had an increased BPH risk compared with those with ≤1 (OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.10-2.89; Ptrend=0.006). CONCLUSION SNPs in genes related to immune response and obesity, especially in combination, may be associated with BPH. PMID:25224558

  5. Differential viral levels and immune gene expression in three stocks of Apis mellifera induced by different numbers of Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khongphinitbunjong, Kitiphong; de Guzman, Lilia I; Tarver, Matthew R; Rinderer, Thomas E; Chen, Yanping; Chantawannakul, Panuwan

    2015-01-01

    The viral levels and immune responses of Italian honey bees (IHB), Russian honey bees (RHB) and an outcross of Varroa Sensitive Hygienic bees (POL) deliberately infested with one or two foundress Varroa were compared. We found that the Deformed wing virus (DWV) level in IHB inoculated with one or two foundress Varroa increased to about 10(3) or 10(5) fold the levels of their uninfested brood. In contrast, POL (10(2) or 10(4) fold) and RHB (10(2) or l0(4) fold) supported a lower increase in DWV levels. The feeding of different stages of Varroa nymphs did not increase DWV levels of their pupal hosts. Analyses of their corresponding Varroa mites showed the same trends: two foundress Varroa yielded higher DWV levels than one foundress, and the addition of nymphs did not increase viral levels. Using the same pupae examined for the presence of viruses, 16 out of 24 genes evaluated showed significant differential mRNA expression levels among the three honey bee stocks. However, only four genes (Defensin, Dscam, PPOact and spaetzle), which were expressed at similar levels in uninfested pupae, were altered by the number of feeding foundress Varroa and levels of DWV regardless of stocks. This research provides the first evidence that immune response profiles of different honey bee stocks are induced by Varroa parasitism. PMID:25456452

  6. Zearalenone Mycotoxin Affects Immune Mediators, MAPK Signalling Molecules, Nuclear Receptors and Genome-Wide Gene Expression in Pig Spleen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistol, Gina Cecilia; Braicu, Cornelia; Motiu, Monica; Gras, Mihail Alexandru; Marin, Daniela Eliza; Stancu, Mariana; Calin, Loredana; Israel-Roming, Florentina; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Taranu, Ionelia

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of zearalenone (ZEA) was evaluated in swine spleen, a key organ for the innate and adaptative immune response. Weaned pigs were fed for 18 days with a control or a ZEA contaminated diet. The effect of ZEA was assessed on wide genome expression, pro- (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10, IL-4) cytokines, other molecules involved in inflammatory processes (MMPs/TIMPs), as well as signaling molecules, (p38/JNK1/JNK2-MAPKs) and nuclear receptors (PPARγ/NFkB/AP-1/STAT3/c-JUN). Microarray analysis showed that 46% of total number of differentially expressed genes was involved in cellular signaling pathway, 13% in cytokine network and 10% in the inflammatory response. ZEA increased expression and synthesis of pro- inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β) and had no effect on IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 cytokines in spleen. The inflammatory stimulation might be a consequence of JNK pathway activation rather than of p-38MAPK and NF-kB involvement whose gene and protein expression were suppressed by ZEA action. In summary, our findings indicated the role of ZEA as an immune disruptor at spleen level. PMID:26011631

  7. Zearalenone mycotoxin affects immune mediators, MAPK signalling molecules, nuclear receptors and genome-wide gene expression in pig spleen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Cecilia Pistol

    Full Text Available The toxicity of zearalenone (ZEA was evaluated in swine spleen, a key organ for the innate and adaptative immune response. Weaned pigs were fed for 18 days with a control or a ZEA contaminated diet. The effect of ZEA was assessed on wide genome expression, pro- (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, IFN-γ and anti-inflammatory (IL-10, IL-4 cytokines, other molecules involved in inflammatory processes (MMPs/TIMPs, as well as signaling molecules, (p38/JNK1/JNK2-MAPKs and nuclear receptors (PPARγ/NFkB/AP-1/STAT3/c-JUN. Microarray analysis showed that 46% of total number of differentially expressed genes was involved in cellular signaling pathway, 13% in cytokine network and 10% in the inflammatory response. ZEA increased expression and synthesis of pro- inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β and had no effect on IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 cytokines in spleen. The inflammatory stimulation might be a consequence of JNK pathway activation rather than of p-38MAPK and NF-kB involvement whose gene and protein expression were suppressed by ZEA action. In summary, our findings indicated the role of ZEA as an immune disruptor at spleen level.

  8. Differential viral levels and immune gene expression in three stocks of Apis mellifera induced by different numbers of Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khongphinitbunjong, Kitiphong; de Guzman, Lilia I; Tarver, Matthew R; Rinderer, Thomas E; Chen, Yanping; Chantawannakul, Panuwan

    2015-01-01

    The viral levels and immune responses of Italian honey bees (IHB), Russian honey bees (RHB) and an outcross of Varroa Sensitive Hygienic bees (POL) deliberately infested with one or two foundress Varroa were compared. We found that the Deformed wing virus (DWV) level in IHB inoculated with one or two foundress Varroa increased to about 10(3) or 10(5) fold the levels of their uninfested brood. In contrast, POL (10(2) or 10(4) fold) and RHB (10(2) or l0(4) fold) supported a lower increase in DWV levels. The feeding of different stages of Varroa nymphs did not increase DWV levels of their pupal hosts. Analyses of their corresponding Varroa mites showed the same trends: two foundress Varroa yielded higher DWV levels than one foundress, and the addition of nymphs did not increase viral levels. Using the same pupae examined for the presence of viruses, 16 out of 24 genes evaluated showed significant differential mRNA expression levels among the three honey bee stocks. However, only four genes (Defensin, Dscam, PPOact and spaetzle), which were expressed at similar levels in uninfested pupae, were altered by the number of feeding foundress Varroa and levels of DWV regardless of stocks. This research provides the first evidence that immune response profiles of different honey bee stocks are induced by Varroa parasitism.

  9. Zearalenone mycotoxin affects immune mediators, MAPK signalling molecules, nuclear receptors and genome-wide gene expression in pig spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistol, Gina Cecilia; Braicu, Cornelia; Motiu, Monica; Gras, Mihail Alexandru; Marin, Daniela Eliza; Stancu, Mariana; Calin, Loredana; Israel-Roming, Florentina; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Taranu, Ionelia

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of zearalenone (ZEA) was evaluated in swine spleen, a key organ for the innate and adaptative immune response. Weaned pigs were fed for 18 days with a control or a ZEA contaminated diet. The effect of ZEA was assessed on wide genome expression, pro- (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10, IL-4) cytokines, other molecules involved in inflammatory processes (MMPs/TIMPs), as well as signaling molecules, (p38/JNK1/JNK2-MAPKs) and nuclear receptors (PPARγ/NFkB/AP-1/STAT3/c-JUN). Microarray analysis showed that 46% of total number of differentially expressed genes was involved in cellular signaling pathway, 13% in cytokine network and 10% in the inflammatory response. ZEA increased expression and synthesis of pro- inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β) and had no effect on IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 cytokines in spleen. The inflammatory stimulation might be a consequence of JNK pathway activation rather than of p-38MAPK and NF-kB involvement whose gene and protein expression were suppressed by ZEA action. In summary, our findings indicated the role of ZEA as an immune disruptor at spleen level. PMID:26011631

  10. Long-term effects of di-octyl phthalate on the expression of immune-related genes in Tegillarca granosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji; Li, Ye; Dai, Juan; Su, Xiurong; Li, Chenghua; Shen, Lingling

    2016-05-01

    Di-octyl phthalate (DOP) is widely used as a plasticizer in the plastics industry. As a result, DOP is often found in marine water ecosystems where many species are exposed to it. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of long-term (14 d) DOP exposure (2.6, 7.8, or 31.2 mg/L) on the expression of immunerelated genes in Tegillarca granosa. The expression of small heat shock protein (sHSPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) were highest in clams exposed to 31.2 mg/L DOP on days 7 and 14. The relative expression of Tg-ferritin, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and metallothionein (MT) increased initially then decreased as the concentration of DOP increased. The hemoglobin of T. granosa (Tg-HbI) exhibited two distinct expression patterns at two time points. Our results suggest that the immune response of T. granosa against DOP pollution varies depending on the dose. Additionally, we identified some immune-related genes that are promising candidates for biomarkers of DOP.

  11. Derived Immune and Ancestral Pigmentation Alleles in a 7,000-Year-old Mesolithic European

    OpenAIRE

    Olalde, Iñigo; Allentoft, Morten E.; Sánchez-Quinto, Federico; Santpere, Gabriel; Chiang, Charleston W.K.; DeGiorgio, Michael; Prado-Martinez, Javier; Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Rasmussen, Simon; Quilez, Javier; Ramírez, Oscar; Marigorta, Urko M.; Fernández-Callejo, Marcos; Prada, María Encina; Encinas, Julio Manuel Vidal

    2014-01-01

    Ancient genomic sequences have started revealing the origin and the demographic impact of Neolithic farmers spreading into Europe1–3. The adoption of farming, stock breeding and sedentary societies during the Neolithic may have resulted in adaptive changes in genes associated with immunity and diet4. However, the limited data available from earlier hunter-gatherers precludes an understanding of the selective processes associated with this crucial transition to agriculture in recent human evol...

  12. Identification of upregulated immune-related genes in Vibrio harveyi challenged Penaeus monodon postlarvae

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, S.; Singh, S.K.; Ramaiah, N.; Sreepada, R.A.

    be grouped into 12 categories based on their physiological and functional roles (Fig 1). Among these, three genes are likely to be immunorelevant and, eight others, related to antioxidant and ATP metabolism. The largest group comprised of the muscle... controlled tumor protein (TCTP). Various genes encoding antioxidant molecules, such as cytochrome C-oxidase subunit III, cytochrome C-oxidase subunit I and NADH dehydrogenase subunit-I were also identified. This category of genes contributed to 6...

  13. Elucidating the Kinetics of Expression and Immune Cell Infiltration Resulting from Plasmid Gene Delivery Enhanced by Surface Dermal Electroporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate E. Broderick

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The skin is an attractive tissue for vaccination in a clinical setting due to the accessibility of the target, the ease of monitoring and most importantly the immune competent nature of the dermal tissue. While skin electroporation offers an exciting and novel future methodology for the delivery of DNA vaccines in the clinic, little is known about the actual mechanism of the approach and the elucidation of the resulting immune responses. To further understand the mechanism of this platform, the expression kinetics and localization of a reporter plasmid delivered via a surface dermal electroporation (SEP device as well as the effect that this treatment would have on the resident immune cells in that tissue was investigated. Initially a time course (day 0 to day 21 of enhanced gene delivery with electroporation (EP was performed to observe the localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP expression and the kinetics of its appearance as well as clearance. Using gross imaging, GFP expression was not detected on the surface of the skin until 8 h post treatment. However, histological analysis by fluorescent microscopy revealed GFP positive cells as early as 1 h after plasmid delivery and electroporation. Peak GFP expression was observed at 24 h and the expression was maintained in skin for up to seven days. Using an antibody specific for a keratinocyte cell surface marker, reporter gene positive keratinocytes in the epidermis were identified. H&E staining of treated skin sections demonstrated an influx of monocytes and granulocytes at the EP site starting at 4 h and persisting up to day 14 post treatment. Immunological staining revealed a significant migration of lymphocytic cells to the EP site, congregating around cells expressing the delivered antigen. In conclusion, this study provides insights into the expression kinetics following EP enhanced DNA delivery targeting the dermal space. These findings may have implications in the future to design

  14. Down-regulation of IKKβ expression in glioma-infiltrating microglia/macrophages is associated with defective inflammatory/immune gene responses in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieczkowski, Jakub; Kocyk, Marta; Nauman, Pawel; Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Sielska, Małgorzata; Przanowski, Piotr; Maleszewska, Marta; Rajan, Wenson D; Pszczolkowska, Dominika; Tykocki, Tomasz; Grajkowska, Wieslawa; Kotulska, Katarzyna; Roszkowski, Marcin; Kostkiewicz, Boguslaw; Kaminska, Bozena

    2015-10-20

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive malignancy associated with profound host immunosuppression. Microglia and macrophages infiltrating GBM acquire the pro-tumorigenic, M2 phenotype and support tumor invasion, proliferation, survival, angiogenesis and block immune responses both locally and systematically. Mechanisms responsible for immunological deficits in GBM patients are poorly understood. We analyzed immune/inflammatory gene expression in five datasets of low and high grade gliomas, and performed Gene Ontology and signaling pathway analyses to identify defective transcriptional responses. The expression of many immune/inflammatory response and TLR signaling pathway genes was reduced in high grade gliomas compared to low grade gliomas. In particular, we found the reduced expression of the IKBKB, a gene coding for IKKβ, which phosphorylates IκB proteins and represents a convergence point for most signal transduction pathways leading to NFκB activation. The reduced IKBKB expression and IKKβ levels in GBM tissues were demonstrated by qPCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The IKKβ expression was down-regulated in microglia/macrophages infiltrating glioblastoma. NFκB activation, prominent in microglia/macrophages infiltrating low grade gliomas, was reduced in microglia/macrophages in glioblastoma tissues. Down-regulation of IKBKB expression and NFκB signaling in microglia/macrophages infiltrating glioblastoma correlates with defective expression of immune/inflammatory genes and M2 polarization that may result in the global impairment of anti-tumor immune responses in glioblastoma.

  15. PAMP INDUCED EXPRESSION OF IMMUNE RELEVANT GENES IN HEAD KIDNEY LEUKOCYTES OF RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Holten-Andersen, Lars; Kania, Per Walter;

    Host immune responses elicited by invading pathogens depend on recognition of the pathogen by specific receptors present on phagocytic cells. However, the response to viral, bacterial, parasitic and fungal pathogens vary according to the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) on the surface...... mykiss) to different PAMPs mimicking bacterial (flagellin and LPS), viral (poly I:C) and fungal infections (zymosan and ß-glucan). Transcript of cytokines related to inflammation (IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-a) were highly up-regulated following LPS exposure whereas flagellin or poly I:C induced merely...... of LPS and zymosan became evident after 4 h exposure. This study suggests that rainbow trout leukocytes respond differently to viral, bacterial and fungal PAMPs, which may reflect activation of specific signaling cascades eventually leading to activation of different immune effector molecules....

  16. A food-grade cloning vector for lactic acid bacteria based on the nisin immunity gene nisI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takala, T M; Saris, P E J

    2002-08-01

    A new food-grade cloning vector for lactic acid bacteria was constructed using the nisin immunity gene nisI as a selection marker. The food-grade plasmid, pLEB 590, was constructed entirely of lactococcal DNA: the pSH 71 replicon, the nisI gene, and the constitutive promoter P45 for nisI expression. Electroporation into Lactococcus lactis MG 1614 with 60 international units (IU) nisin/ml selection yielded approximately 10(5) transformants/ micro g DNA. MG 1614 carrying pLEB 590 was shown to be able to grow in medium containing a maximum of 250 IU nisin/ml. Plasmid pLEB 590 was successfully transformed into an industrial L. lactis cheese starter carrying multiple cryptic plasmids. Suitability for molecular cloning was confirmed by cloning and expressing the proline iminopeptidase gene pepI from Lactobacillus helveticus in L. lactis and Lb. plantarum. These results show that the food-grade expression system reported in this paper has potential for expression of foreign genes in lactic acid bacteria in order to construct improved starter bacteria for food applications.

  17. Induction of Innate Immune Genes in Brain Create the Neurobiology of Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, FT; Zou, Jian; Qin, Liya

    2011-01-01

    Addiction occurs through repeated abuse of drugs that progressively reduce behavioral control and cognitive flexibility while increasing limbic negative emotion. Recent discoveries indicate neuroimmune signaling underlies addiction and co-morbid depression. Low threshold microglia undergo progressive stages of innate immune activation involving astrocytes and neurons with repeated drug abuse, stress, and/or cell damage signals. Increased brain NF-κB transcription of proinflammatory chemokines...

  18. Role of Gene Methylation in Antitumor Immune Response: Implication for Tumor Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Maximino Redondo; Isabel Castro-Vega; Alfonso Serrano

    2011-01-01

    Cancer immunosurveillance theory has emphasized the role of escape mechanisms in tumor growth. In this respect, a very important factor is the molecular characterization of the mechanisms by which tumor cells evade immune recognition and destruction. Among the many escape mechanisms identified, alterations in classical and non-classical HLA (Human Leucocyte Antigens) class I and class II expression by tumor cells are of particular interest. In addition to the importance of HLA molecules, tumo...

  19. Identification of Immunity Related Genes to Study the Physalis peruviana – Fusarium oxysporum Pathosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Enciso-Rodríguez, Felix E.; Carolina González; Rodríguez, Edwin A.; Camilo E López; David Landsman; Luz Stella Barrero; Leonardo Mariño-Ramírez

    2013-01-01

    The Cape gooseberry ( Physalis peruviana L) is an Andean exotic fruit with high nutritional value and appealing medicinal properties. However, its cultivation faces important phytosanitary problems mainly due to pathogens like Fusarium oxysporum, Cercospora physalidis and Alternaria spp. Here we used the Cape gooseberry foliar transcriptome to search for proteins that encode conserved domains related to plant immunity including: NBS (Nucleotide Binding Site), CC (Coiled-Coil), TIR (Toll/Inter...

  20. Induction of Innate Immune Response Genes by Sin Nombre Hantavirus Does Not Require Viral Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Prescott, Joseph; Ye, Chunyan; Sen, Ganes; Hjelle, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Maladaptive immune responses are considered to be important factors in the pathogenesis of the two diseases caused by hantaviruses, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS). While the intensity of adaptive antiviral T-cell responses seems to correlate with the severity of HCPS, there is increasing evidence that innate antiviral responses by endothelial cells, the native targets for hantavirus infection in vivo, are induced within hours of exposure t...

  1. AN MHC class I immune evasion gene of Marek's disease virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a widespread a-herpesvirus of chickens that causes T cell tumors. Acute, but not latent, MDV infection has previously been shown to lead to downregulation of cell-surface MHC class I (Virology 282:198–205 (2001)), but the gene(s) involved have not been identified. Here...

  2. Pathogenicty and immune prophylaxis of cag pathogenicity island gene knockout homogenic mutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan-Jian Lin; Jing Xue; Yang Bai; Ji-De Wang; Ya-Li Zhang; Dian-Yuan Zhou

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the role of cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI)of Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) in the pathogenicity and immune prophylaxis of H pyloriinfection.METHODS: Three pairs of H pylori including 3 strains of cagPAI positive wildtype bacteria and their cagPAI knockout homogenic mutants were utilized. H pylori binding to the gastric epithelial cells was analyzed by flow cytometry assays.Apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells induced by H pylori was determined by ELISA assay. Prophylaxis effect of the wildtype and mutant strains was compared by immunization with the sonicate of the bacteria into mice model.RESULTS: No difference was found in the apoptasis between cagPAI positive and knockout H pylori strains in respective of the ability in the binding to gastric epithelial cells as well as the induction of apoptosis. Both types of the bacteria were able to protect the mice from the infection of H pylori after immunization, with no difference between them regarding to the protection rate as well as the stimulation of the proliferation of splenocytes of the mice.CONCLUSION: The role of cagPAI in the pathogenicity and prophylaxis of H pylori infection remains to be cleared.

  3. Role of Gene Methylation in Antitumor Immune Response: Implication for Tumor Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Alfonso; Castro-Vega, Isabel [Department of Immunology, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Campus Universitario Teatinos S/N, 29010 Malaga (Spain); Redondo, Maximino, E-mail: mredondo@hcs.es [Department of Biochemistry, CIBER ESP, Hospital Costa del Sol, Marbella, Málaga, Carretera de Cadiz km 187, 29603 (Spain)

    2011-03-29

    Cancer immunosurveillance theory has emphasized the role of escape mechanisms in tumor growth. In this respect, a very important factor is the molecular characterization of the mechanisms by which tumor cells evade immune recognition and destruction. Among the many escape mechanisms identified, alterations in classical and non-classical HLA (Human Leucocyte Antigens) class I and class II expression by tumor cells are of particular interest. In addition to the importance of HLA molecules, tumor-associated antigens and accessory/co-stimulatory molecules are also involved in immune recognition. The loss of HLA class I antigen expression and of co-stimulatory molecules can occur at genetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Epigenetic defects are involved in at least some mechanisms that preclude mounting a successful host-antitumor response involving the HLA system, tumor-associated antigens, and accessory/co-stimulatory molecules. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of methylation in the regulation of molecules involved in the tumor immune response.

  4. Transcription in space--environmental vs. genetic effects on differential immune gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Tobias L

    2015-09-01

    Understanding how organisms adapt to their local environment is one of the key goals in molecular ecology. Adaptation can be achieved through qualitative changes in the coding sequence and/or quantitative changes in gene expression, where the optimal dosage of a gene's product in a given environment is being selected for. Differences in gene expression among populations inhabiting distinct environments can be suggestive of locally adapted gene regulation and have thus been studied in different species (Whitehead & Crawford ; Hodgins-Davis & Townsend ). However, in contrast to a gene's coding sequence, its expression level at a given point in time may depend on various factors, including the current environment. Although critical for understanding the extent of local adaptation, it is usually difficult to disentangle the heritable differences in gene regulation from environmental effects. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Stutz et al. () describe an experiment in which they reciprocally transplanted three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) between independent pairs of small and large lakes. Their experimental design allows them to attribute differences in gene expression among sticklebacks either to lake of origin or destination lake. Interestingly, they find that translocated sticklebacks show a pattern of gene expression more similar to individuals from the destination lake than to individuals from the lake of origin, suggesting that expression of the targeted genes is more strongly regulated by environmental effects than by genetics. The environmental effect by itself is not entirely surprising; however, the relative extent of it is. Especially when put in the context of local adaptation and population differentiation, as done here, these findings cast a new light onto the heritability of differential gene expression and specifically its relative importance during population divergence and ultimately ecological speciation. PMID:26374665

  5. Gene expression in brain and liver produced by three different regimens of alcohol consumption in mice: comparison with immune activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Osterndorff-Kahanek

    Full Text Available Chronically available alcohol escalates drinking in mice and a single injection of the immune activator lipopolysaccharide can mimic this effect and result in a persistent increase in alcohol consumption. We hypothesized that chronic alcohol drinking and lipopolysaccharide injections will produce some similar molecular changes that play a role in regulation of alcohol intake. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of chronic alcohol consumption or lipopolysaccharide insult by gene expression profiling in prefrontal cortex and liver of C57BL/6J mice. We identified similar patterns of transcriptional changes among four groups of animals, three consuming alcohol (vs water in different consumption tests and one injected with lipopolysaccharide (vs. vehicle. The three tests of alcohol consumption are the continuous chronic two bottle choice (Chronic, two bottle choice available every other day (Chronic Intermittent and limited access to one bottle of ethanol (Drinking in the Dark. Gene expression changes were more numerous and marked in liver than in prefrontal cortex for the alcohol treatments and similar in the two tissues for lipopolysaccharide. Many of the changes were unique to each treatment, but there was significant overlap in prefrontal cortex for Chronic-Chronic Intermittent and for Chronic Intermittent-lipopolysaccharide and in liver all pairs showed overlap. In silico cell-type analysis indicated that lipopolysaccharide had strongest effects on brain microglia and liver Kupffer cells. Pathway analysis detected a prefrontal cortex-based dopamine-related (PPP1R1B, DRD1, DRD2, FOSB, PDNY network that was highly over-represented in the Chronic Intermittent group, with several genes from the network being also regulated in the Chronic and lipopolysaccharide (but not Drinking in the Dark groups. Liver showed a CYP and GST centered metabolic network shared in part by all four treatments. We demonstrate common consequences of chronic alcohol

  6. A replication study for genome-wide gene expression levels in two layer lines elucidates differentially expressed genes of pathways involved in bone remodeling and immune responsiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin Habig

    Full Text Available The current replication study confirmed significant differences in gene expression profiles of the cerebrum among the two commercial layer lines Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL and Lohmann Brown (LB. Microarray analyses were performed for 30 LSL and another 30 LB laying hens kept in the small group housing system Eurovent German. A total of 14,103 microarray probe sets using customized Affymetrix ChiGene-1_0-st Arrays with 20,399 probe sets were differentially expressed among the two layer lines LSL and LB (FDR adjusted P-value <0.05. An at least 2-fold change in expression levels could be observed for 388 of these probe sets. In LSL, 214 of the 388 probe sets were down- and 174 were up-regulated and vice versa for the LB layer line. Among the 174 up-regulated probe sets in LSL, we identified 51 significantly enriched Gene ontology (GO terms of the biological process category. A total of 63 enriched GO-terms could be identified for the 214 down-regulated probe sets of the layer line LSL. We identified nine genes significantly differentially expressed between the two layer lines in both microarray experiments. These genes play a crucial role in protection of neuronal cells from oxidative stress, bone mineral density and immune response among the two layer lines LSL and LB. Thus, the different regulation of these genes may significantly contribute to phenotypic trait differences among these layer lines. In conclusion, these novel findings provide a basis for further research to improve animal welfare in laying hens and these layer lines may be of general interest as an animal model.

  7. Peripheral blood RNA gene expression profiling in illicit methcathinone users reveals effect on immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eSikk

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Methcathinone (ephedrone is relatively easily accessible for abuse. Its users develop an extrapyramidal syndrome and it is not known if this is caused by methcathinone itself, by side-ingredients (manganese, or both. In the present study we aimed to clarify molecular mechanisms underlying this condition. We analyzed whole genome gene expression patterns of peripheral blood from 20 methcathinone users and 20 matched controls. Gene expression profile data was analyzed by Bayesian modelling and functional annotation. In order to verify the genechip results we performed quantitative real-time (RT PCR in selected genes. 326 out of analyzed 28,869 genes showed statistically significant differential expression with FDR adjusted p-values below 0.05. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed differential expression for the most of selected genes. Functional annotation and network analysis indicated that most of the genes were related to activation immunological disease, cellular movement and cardiovascular disease gene network (enrichment score 42. As HIV and HCV infections were confounding factors, we performed additional stratification of patients. A similar functional activation of the immunological disease pathway was evident when we compared patients according to the injection status (past versus current users, balanced for HIV and HCV infection. However, this difference was not large therefore the major effect was related to the HIV status of the patients. Mn-methcathinone abusers have blood transcriptional patterns mostly caused by their HIV and HCV infections.

  8. The Differential Expression of Immune Genes between Water Buffalo and Yellow Cattle Determines Species-Specific Susceptibility to Schistosoma japonicum Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmei Yang

    Full Text Available Water buffalo are less susceptible to Schistosoma japonicum infection than yellow cattle. The factors that affect such differences in susceptibility remain unknown. A Bos taurus genome-wide gene chip was used to analyze gene expression profiles in the peripheral blood of water buffalo and yellow cattle pre- and post-infection with S. japonicum. This study showed that most of the identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs between water buffalo and yellow cattle pre- and post-infection were involved in immune-related processes, and the expression level of immune genes was lower in water buffalo. The unique DEGs (390 in yellow cattle were mainly associated with inflammation pathways, while the unique DEGs (2,114 in water buffalo were mainly associated with immune-related factors. The 83 common DEGs may be the essential response genes during S. japonicum infection, the highest two gene ontology (GO functions were associated with the regulation of fibrinolysis. The pathway enrichment analysis showed that the DEGs constituted similar immune-related pathways pre- and post-infection between the two hosts. This first analysis of the transcriptional profiles of natural hosts has enabled us to gain new insights into the mechanisms that govern their susceptibility or resistance to S. japonicum infections.

  9. Epigenetic mechanisms contribute to the expression of immune related genes in the livers of dairy cows fed a high concentrate diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjun Chang

    Full Text Available Epigenetic modifications critically regulate the expression of immune-related genes in response to inflammatory stimuli. It has been extensively reported that a high concentrate (HC diet can trigger systemic inflammation in dairy cows, yet it is unclear whether epigenetic regulation is involved in the expression of immune genes in the livers of dairy cows. This study aimed to investigate the impact of epigenetic modifications on the expression of immune-related genes.In eight mid-lactating cows, we installed a rumen cannula and catheters of the portal and hepatic veins. Cows were randomly assigned to either the treatment group fed a high concentrate (HC diet (60% concentrate + 40% forage, n = 4 or a control group fed a low concentrate (LC diet (40% concentrate + 60% forage, n = 4.After 10 weeks of feeding, the rumen pH was reduced, and levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS in the rumen, and portal and hepatic veins were notably increased in the HC group compared with the LC group. The expression levels of detected immune response-related genes, including Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, cytokines, chemokines, and acute phase proteins, were significantly up-regulated in the livers of cows fed a HC diet. Chromatin loosening at the promoter region of four candidate immune-related genes (TLR4, LPS-binding protein, haptoglobin, and serum amyloid A3 was elicited, and was strongly correlated with enhanced expression of these genes in the HC group. Demethylation at the promoter region of all four candidate immune-related genes was accompanied by chromatin decompaction.After HC diet feeding, LPS derived from the digestive tract translocated to the liver via the portal vein, enhancing hepatic immune gene expression. The up-regulation of these immune genes was mediated by epigenetic mechanisms, which involve chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation. Our findings suggest that modulating epigenetic mechanisms could provide novel ways to treat systemic inflammatory

  10. De novo assembly and analysis of tissue-specific transcriptomes revealed the tissue-specific genes and profile of immunity from Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yadong; Chang, Yaqing; Wang, Xiuli; Qiu, Xuemei; Liu, Yang

    2015-10-01

    Strongylocentrotus intermedius is an important marine species in north China and Japan. Recent years, diseases are threating the sea urchin aquaculture industry seriously. To provide a genetic resource for S. intermedius as well as overview the immune-related genes of S. intermedius, we performed transcriptome sequencing of three cDNA libraries representing three tissues, coelomocytes, gut and peristomial membrane respectively. In total 138,421 contigs were assembled from all sequencing data. 96,764 contigs were annotated according to bioinformatics databases, including NT, nr, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG. 49,336 Contigs were annotated as CDS. In this study, we obtained 24,778 gene families from S. intermedius transcriptome. The gene expression analysis revealed that more genes were expressed in gut, more high expression level genes in coelomocytes when compared with other tissues. Specific expressed contigs in coelomocytes, gut, and peristomial membrane were 546, 1136, and 1012 respectively. Pathway analysis suggested 25, 17 and 36 potential specifically pathways may specific progressed in peristomial membrane, gut and coelomocytes respectively. Similarities and differences between S. intermedius and other echinoderms were analyzed. S. intermedius was more homology to Strongylocentrotus purpuratus than others sea urchin. Of 24,778 genes, 1074 genes are immune-related, immune genes were expressed with a higher level in coelomocytes than other tissues. Complement system may be the most important immune system in sea urchin. We also identified 2438 SSRs and 16,236 SNPs for S. intermedius. These results provide a transcriptome resource and foundation to study molecular mechanisms of sea urchin immune system.

  11. De novo assembly and analysis of tissue-specific transcriptomes revealed the tissue-specific genes and profile of immunity from Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yadong; Chang, Yaqing; Wang, Xiuli; Qiu, Xuemei; Liu, Yang

    2015-10-01

    Strongylocentrotus intermedius is an important marine species in north China and Japan. Recent years, diseases are threating the sea urchin aquaculture industry seriously. To provide a genetic resource for S. intermedius as well as overview the immune-related genes of S. intermedius, we performed transcriptome sequencing of three cDNA libraries representing three tissues, coelomocytes, gut and peristomial membrane respectively. In total 138,421 contigs were assembled from all sequencing data. 96,764 contigs were annotated according to bioinformatics databases, including NT, nr, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG. 49,336 Contigs were annotated as CDS. In this study, we obtained 24,778 gene families from S. intermedius transcriptome. The gene expression analysis revealed that more genes were expressed in gut, more high expression level genes in coelomocytes when compared with other tissues. Specific expressed contigs in coelomocytes, gut, and peristomial membrane were 546, 1136, and 1012 respectively. Pathway analysis suggested 25, 17 and 36 potential specifically pathways may specific progressed in peristomial membrane, gut and coelomocytes respectively. Similarities and differences between S. intermedius and other echinoderms were analyzed. S. intermedius was more homology to Strongylocentrotus purpuratus than others sea urchin. Of 24,778 genes, 1074 genes are immune-related, immune genes were expressed with a higher level in coelomocytes than other tissues. Complement system may be the most important immune system in sea urchin. We also identified 2438 SSRs and 16,236 SNPs for S. intermedius. These results provide a transcriptome resource and foundation to study molecular mechanisms of sea urchin immune system. PMID:26253994

  12. Activation of innate immune genes in caprine blood leukocytes after systemic endotoxin challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvesen, Øyvind; Reiten, Malin R; Heegaard, Peter M. H.;

    2016-01-01

    goats valuable in inflammatory models. We performed a longitudinal study in eight Norwegian dairy goats that received LPS (0.1 μg/kg, Escherichia coli O26:B6) intravenously. A control group of five goats received corresponding volumes of sterile saline. Clinical examinations were performed continuously...... with the acute phase response, type I interferon signaling, LPS cascade and apoptosis, in addition to cytokines and chemokines were targeted. Pro-inflammatory genes, such as IL1B, CCL3 and IL8, were significantly up-regulated. Interestingly, increased mRNA levels of seven interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) were......, and blood samples were collected throughout the trial. Characteristic signs of acute sepsis, such as sickness behavior, fever, and leukopenia were observed within 1 h of LPS administration. A high-throughput longitudinal gene expression analysis of circulating leukocytes was performed, and genes associated...

  13. Vaccination of Plasmid DNA Encoding Somatostatin Gene Fused with GP5 Gene of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Induces Anti-GP5 Antibodies and Promotes Growth Performance in Immunized Pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Somatostatin (SS) is a hormone that inhibits the secretion of growth hormone. Immunization against SS can promote the growth of animals. This paper described the effects of DNA immunization on the growth and antibody response in mice and pigs immunized with a plasmid DNA encoding SS fused with GP5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). A fragment of 180 bp encoding partial SS gene was amplified by PCR from the genomic DNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of pigs, and cloned as a fusion gene with PRRSV GP5 in plasmid pISGRTK3. Three times of immunization with the resulting plasmid pISG-SS/GP5 induced anti-GP5 antibodies in BALB/c mice and pigs, as demonstrated by GP5-specific ELISA and immunoblotting. Compared with pigs immunized with empty vector pISGRTK3, the growth performance of pigs immunized with pISG-SS/GP5 was increased by 11.1% on the 13th week after the last vaccination. The results indicated the plasmid DNA encoding SS and PRRSV GP5 fusion gene elicited anti-GP5 antibodies and improved the growth performance of immunized pigs.

  14. Immune Activation, Viral Gene Product Expression and Neurotoxicity in the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Royal, Walter; Zhang, Li; Guo, Ming; Jones, Odell; Davis, Harry; Bryant, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    The HIV-1 transgenic (TG) rat has been shown to be a useful model of nervous system disease that occurs in human HIV-1 infection. Studies were, therefore, performed to examine characteristics of the immune response in the periphery and brain of the animals and expression of factors in the nervous system that might be associated with neurotoxicity. Activated splenocytes from wild-type (WT) and TG rats were stimulated with either CD3/CD28 or with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and examined for prolif...

  15. A murine model for human immune thrombocytopenic purpura and comparative analysis of multiple gene expression in bone marrow and spleen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Wei; Xinchun Ding; Jiangong Ren; Ka Liu; Pingping Tan; Daquan Li; Runlin Z.Ma

    2008-01-01

    Homeostasis of platelet number in human and other mammals is well maintained for prevention of minor bleeding and for other im-munological functions, but the exact molecular mechanism responsible for immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) has not been fullyunderstood. In an effort to identify genetic factors involved in initiation of platelet production in response to bleeding injury or plateletdestruction, we have successfully generated an animal model of human ITP via intraperitoneal injection of anti-platelet antibody into theBalb/c mouse. Platelet counts were dropped dramatically in animals that received antibody injection within 4 h, maintained at the mini-mum level for a period of 44 h, started to rebound after 48 h, and reached to the maximum at 144 h (6 days). Final homeostasis reached atapproximately 408 h (17 days), following a minor cycle of platelet number fluctuation. Using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we assessed andcompared mRNA level of CD41, c-myb, c-mpl, caspase-3, caspase-9, GATA-1, and Bcl-xl in bone marrow and spleen. Alteration ofmRNA expression was correlated with the change of platelet level, and an inverse relationship was found for expression of the genes be-tween bone marrow and spleen. No transcription was detectable for any of the seven genes in bone marrow at the time when plateletnumber reached the maximum (144 h). In contrast, mRNA transcripts of the seven genes were found to be at the highest level in spleentissue. This is the first study of simultaneous detection of multiple platelet related genes in a highly reproducible ITP animal model. Ourresults provided the supportive evidence that expression of the above seven genes are more related to negative regulation of plateletnumber in spleen tissue, at least in the model animals.

  16. Immune gene expression profile of Penaeus monodon in response to marine yeast glucan application and white spot syndrome virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Wilsy; Lowman, Douglas; Antony, Swapna P; Puthumana, Jayesh; Bright Singh, I S; Philip, Rosamma

    2015-04-01

    Immunostimulant potential of eight marine yeast glucans (YG) from Candida parapsilosis R20, Hortaea werneckii R23, Candida spencermartinsiae R28, Candida haemulonii R63, Candida oceani R89, Debaryomyces fabryi R100, Debaryomyces nepalensis R305 and Meyerozyma guilliermondii R340 were tested against WSSV challenge in Penaeus monodon post larvae (PL). Structural characterization of these marine yeast glucans by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) indicated structures containing (1-6)-branched (1-3)-β-D-glucan. PL were fed 0.2% glucan incorporated diet once in seven days for a period of 45 days and the animals were challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The immunostimulatory activity of yeast glucans were assessed pre- and post-challenge WSSV by analysing the expression profile of six antimicrobial peptide (AMP) genes viz., anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF), crustin-1, crustin-2, crustin-3, penaeidin-3 and penaeidin-5 and 13 immune genes viz., alpha-2-macroglobulin (α-2-M), astakine, caspase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-s-transferase, haemocyanin, peroxinectin, pmCathepsinC, prophenol oxidase (proPO), Rab-7, superoxide dismutase and transglutaminase. Expression of seven WSSV genes viz., DNA polymerase, endonuclease, protein kinase, immediate early gene, latency related gene, thymidine kinase and VP28 were also analysed to detect the presence and intensity of viral infection in the experimental animals post-challenge. The study revealed that yeast glucans (YG) do possess immunostimulatory activity against WSSV and also supported higher survival (40-70 %) post-challenge WSSV. Among the various glucans tested, YG23 showed maximum survival (70.27%), followed by YG20 (66.66%), YG28 (60.97%), YG89 (58.53%), YG100 (54.05%), YG63 (48.64%), YG305 (45.7%) and YG340 (43.24%). PMID:25555812

  17. Comparison of innate immune agonists for induction of tracheal antimicrobial peptide gene expression in tracheal epithelial cells of cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghuis, Lesley; Abdelaziz, Khaled Taha; Bierworth, Jodi; Wyer, Leanna; Jacob, Gabriella; Karrow, Niel A; Sharif, Shayan; Clark, Mary Ellen; Caswell, Jeff L

    2014-10-12

    Bovine respiratory disease is a complex of bacterial and viral infections of economic and welfare importance to the beef industry. Although tracheal antimicrobial peptide (TAP) has microbicidal activity against bacterial pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease, risk factors for bovine respiratory disease including BVDV and stress (glucocorticoids) have been shown to inhibit the induced expression of this gene. Lipopolysaccharide is known to stimulate TAP gene expression, but the maximum effect is only observed after 16 h of stimulation. The present study investigated other agonists of TAP gene expression in primary cultures of bovine tracheal epithelial cells. PCR analysis of unstimulated tracheal epithelial cells, tracheal tissue and lung tissue each showed mRNA expression for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 1-10. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that Pam3CSK4 (an agonist of TLR1/2) and interleukin (IL)-17A significantly induced TAP gene expression in tracheal epithelial cells after only 4-8 h of stimulation. Flagellin (a TLR5 agonist), lipopolysaccharide and interferon-α also had stimulatory effects, but little or no response was found with class B CpG ODN 2007 (TLR9 agonist) or lipoteichoic acid (TLR2 agonist). The use of combined agonists had little or no enhancing effect above that of single agonists. Thus, Pam3CSK4, IL-17A and lipopolysaccharide rapidly and significantly induce TAP gene expression, suggesting that these stimulatory pathways may be of value for enhancing innate immunity in feedlot cattle at times of susceptibility to disease.

  18. Negative energy balance alters global gene expression and immune responses in the uterus of postpartum dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathes, D Claire; Cheng, Zhangrui; Chowdhury, Waliul; Fenwick, Mark A; Fitzpatrick, Richard; Morris, Dermot G; Patton, Joe; Murphy, John J

    2009-09-01

    Most dairy cows suffer uterine microbial contamination postpartum. Persistent endometritis often develops, associated with reduced fertility. We used a model of differential feeding and milking regimes to produce cows in differing negative energy balance status in early lactation (mild or severe, MNEB or SNEB). Blood hematology was assessed preslaughter at 2 wk postpartum. RNA expression in endometrial samples was compared using bovine Affymetrix arrays. Data were mapped using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Circulating concentrations of IGF-I remained lower in the SNEB group, whereas blood nonesterified fatty acid and beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were raised. White blood cell count and lymphocyte number were reduced in SNEB cows. Array analysis of endometrial samples identified 274 differentially expressed probes representing 197 recognized genes between the energy balance groups. The main canonical pathways affected related to immunological and inflammatory disease and connective tissue disorders. Inflammatory response genes with major upregulation in SNEB cows included matrix metalloproteinases, chemokines, cytokines, and calgranulins. Expression of several interferon-inducible genes including ISG20, IFIH1, MX1, and MX2 were also significantly increased in the SNEB cows. These results provide evidence that cows in SNEB were still undergoing an active uterine inflammatory response 2 wk postpartum, whereas MNEB cows had more fully recovered from their energy deficit, with their endometrium reaching a more advanced stage of repair. SNEB may therefore prevent cows from mounting an effective immune response to the microbial challenge experienced after calving, prolonging the time required for uterine recovery and compromising subsequent fertility.

  19. Immune responses induced by gene gun or intramuscular injection of DNA vaccines that express immunogenic regions of the serine repeat antigen from Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belperron, A A; Feltquate, D; Fox, B A; Horii, T; Bzik, D J

    1999-10-01

    The liver- and blood-stage-expressed serine repeat antigen (SERA) of Plasmodium falciparum is a candidate protein for a human malaria vaccine. We compared the immune responses induced in mice immunized with SERA-expressing plasmid DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular (i.m.) injection or delivered intradermally by Gene Gun immunization. Mice were immunized with a pcdna3 plasmid encoding the entire 47-kDa domain of SERA (amino acids 17 to 382) or the N-terminal domain (amino acids 17 to 110) of SERA. Minimal antibody responses were detected following DNA vaccination with the N-terminal domain of SERA, suggesting that the N-terminal domain alone is not highly immunogenic by this route of vaccine delivery. Immunization of mice by Gene Gun delivery of the 47-kDa domain of SERA elicited a significantly higher serum antibody titer to the antigen than immunization of mice by i.m. injection with the same plasmid did. The predominant isotype subclass of the antibodies elicited to the SERA protein following i.m. and Gene Gun immunizations with SERA plasmid DNA was immunoglobulin G1. Coimmunization of mice with SERA plasmid DNA and a plasmid expressing the hepatitis B surface antigen (pCMV-s) by the i.m. route resulted in higher anti-SERA titers than those generated in mice immunized with the SERA DNA plasmid alone. Vaccination with DNA may provide a viable alternative or may be used in conjunction with protein-based subunit vaccines to maximize the efficacy of a human malaria vaccine that includes immunogenic regions of the SERA protein. PMID:10496891

  20. Cutaneous antigen priming via gene gun leads to skin-selective Th2 immune-inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, David; Harder, Greg; Fattouh, Ramzi; Sun, Jiangfeng; Goncharova, Susanna; Stämpfli, Martin R; Coyle, Anthony J; Bramson, Jonathan L; Jordana, Manel

    2005-02-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that the compartmentalization of immune responses is governed, in part, by tissue-selective homing instructions imprinted during T cell differentiation. In the context of allergic diseases, the fact that "disease" primarily manifests in particular tissue sites, despite pervasive allergen exposure, supports this notion. However, whether the original site of Ag exposure distinctly privileges memory Th2 immune-inflammatory responses to the same site, while sparing remote tissue compartments, remains to be fully investigated. We examined whether skin-targeted delivery of plasmid DNA encoding OVA via gene-gun technology in mice could generate allergic sensitization and give rise to Th2 effector responses in the skin as well as in the lung upon subsequent Ag encounter. Our data show that cutaneous Ag priming induced OVA-specific serum IgE and IgG1, robust Th2-cytokine production, and late-phase cutaneous responses and systemic anaphylactic shock upon skin and systemic Ag recall, respectively. However, repeated respiratory exposure to aerosolized OVA failed to instigate airway inflammatory responses in cutaneous Ag-primed mice, but not in mice initially sensitized to OVA via the respiratory mucosa. Importantly, these contrasting airway memory responses correlated with the occurrence of Th2 differentiation events at anatomically separate sites: indeed cutaneous Ag priming resulted in Ag-specific proliferative responses and Th2 differentiation in skin-, but not thoracic-, draining lymph nodes. These data indicate that Ag exposure to the skin leads to Th2 differentiation within skin-draining lymph nodes and subsequent Th2 immunity that is selectively manifested in the skin. PMID:15661930

  1. Intestinal microbiota and immune related genes in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) response to dietary β-glucan supplementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Gang [The Key Laboratory of Mariculture, Ministry of Education, Fisheries College, Ocean University of China (China); Xu, Zhenjiang [Biofrontiers Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Tian, Xiangli, E-mail: xianglitian@ouc.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Mariculture, Ministry of Education, Fisheries College, Ocean University of China (China); Dong, Shuanglin [The Key Laboratory of Mariculture, Ministry of Education, Fisheries College, Ocean University of China (China); Peng, Mo [School of Animal Science and Technology, Jiangxi Agricultural University (China)

    2015-02-27

    β-glucan is a prebiotic well known for its beneficial outcomes on sea cucumber health through modifying the host intestinal microbiota. High-throughput sequencing techniques provide an opportunity for the identification and characterization of microbes. In this study, we investigated the intestinal microbial community composition, interaction among species, and intestinal immune genes in sea cucumber fed with diet supplemented with or without β-glucan supplementation. The results show that the intestinal dominant classes in the control group are Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, and Verrucomicrobiae are enriched in the β-glucan group. Dietary β-glucan supplementation promoted the proliferation of the family Rhodobacteraceae of the Alphaproteobacteria class and the family Verrucomicrobiaceae of the Verrucomicrobiae class and reduced the relative abundance of the family Flavobacteriaceae of Flavobacteria class. The ecological network analysis suggests that dietary β-glucan supplementation can alter the network interactions among different microbial functional groups by changing the microbial community composition and topological roles of the OTUs in the ecological network. Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on immune responses of the intestine of sea cucumber by activating NF-κB signaling pathway, probably through modulating the balance of intestinal microbiota. - Highlights: • Dietary β-glucan supplementation increases the abundance of Rhodobacteraceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae in the intestine. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation changes the topological roles of OTUs in the ecological network. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on the immune response of intestine of sea cucumber.

  2. Intestinal microbiota and immune related genes in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) response to dietary β-glucan supplementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    β-glucan is a prebiotic well known for its beneficial outcomes on sea cucumber health through modifying the host intestinal microbiota. High-throughput sequencing techniques provide an opportunity for the identification and characterization of microbes. In this study, we investigated the intestinal microbial community composition, interaction among species, and intestinal immune genes in sea cucumber fed with diet supplemented with or without β-glucan supplementation. The results show that the intestinal dominant classes in the control group are Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, and Verrucomicrobiae are enriched in the β-glucan group. Dietary β-glucan supplementation promoted the proliferation of the family Rhodobacteraceae of the Alphaproteobacteria class and the family Verrucomicrobiaceae of the Verrucomicrobiae class and reduced the relative abundance of the family Flavobacteriaceae of Flavobacteria class. The ecological network analysis suggests that dietary β-glucan supplementation can alter the network interactions among different microbial functional groups by changing the microbial community composition and topological roles of the OTUs in the ecological network. Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on immune responses of the intestine of sea cucumber by activating NF-κB signaling pathway, probably through modulating the balance of intestinal microbiota. - Highlights: • Dietary β-glucan supplementation increases the abundance of Rhodobacteraceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae in the intestine. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation changes the topological roles of OTUs in the ecological network. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on the immune response of intestine of sea cucumber

  3. Esotericism Ancient and Modern

    OpenAIRE

    Frazer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Leo Strauss presents at least two distinct accounts of the idea that the authors in the political-philosophical canon have often masked their true teachings. A weaker account of esotericism, dependent on the contingent fact of persecution, is attributed to the moderns, while a stronger account, stemming from a necessary conflict between philosophy and society, is attributed to the ancients. Although most interpreters agree that Strauss here sides with the ancients, this view fails to consider...

  4. Knockdown of PU.1 mRNA and AS lncRNA regulates expression of immune-related genes in zebrafish Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ning; Pang, Weijun; Wang, Yu; Xiong, Yan; Xu, Ruxiang; Wu, Wenjing; Zhao, Cunzhen; Yang, Gongshe

    2014-06-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 plays a key role in the development of immune system. Recent evidence demonstrated bidirectional transcription and a sense/antisense transcriptional regulatory manner in PU.1 locus. However, the effect of PU.1 mRNA and its antisense long non-coding RNA (AS lncRNA) on adaptive immunity in vivo is still not clear. In this study, we first confirmed the expression of PU.1 AS lncRNA by strand-specific RT-PCR in zebrafish. Additionally, we found that GFP was detected in zebrafish kidney using tissue smears after zebrafish was intraperitoneally injected with pLentiHI-PU.1 shRNA or pLentiHI-PU.1 AS shRNA for 2 days. Moreover, on day 0, 2 and 4, the levels of PU.1 and immune-related genes including TCRAC, Rag2, AID, IgLC-1, mIg, and sIg mRNAs were detected using real-time qPCR. The results showed that the levels of PU.1 and above 6 immune-related gene mRNAs were significantly downregulated on day 2 (PPU.1 shRNA, whereas these genes were markedly upregulated by the treatment with the pLentiHI-PU.1 AS shRNA. Based on our results, we suggested that the effects of PU.1 transcripts including mRNA and AS lncRNA on immune-related gene expression in zebrafish were opposite. To our knowledge, this was the first report that a novel functional AS lncRNA in adaptive immunity was transcribed from the zebrafish PU.1 locus. Our findings provided novel insight into further exploration on modulating adaptive immunity by regulating PU.1 mRNA and AS lncRNA.

  5. Immunity related genes in dipterans share common enrichment of AT-rich motifs in their 5' regulatory regions that are potentially involved in nucleosome formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez Mario H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the transcriptional regulation mechanisms in response to environmental challenges is of fundamental importance in biology. Transcription factors associated to response elements and the chromatin structure had proven to play important roles in gene expression regulation. We have analyzed promoter regions of dipteran genes induced in response to immune challenge, in search for particular sequence patterns involved in their transcriptional regulation. Results 5' upstream regions of D. melanogaster and A. gambiae immunity-induced genes and their corresponding orthologous genes in 11 non-melanogaster drosophilid species and Ae. aegypti share enrichment in AT-rich short motifs. AT-rich motifs are associated with nucleosome formation as predicted by two different algorithms. In A. gambiae and D. melanogaster, many immunity genes 5' upstream sequences also showed NFκB response elements, located within 500 bp from the transcription start site. In A. gambiae, the frequency of ATAA motif near the NFκB response elements was increased, suggesting a functional link between nucleosome formation/remodelling and NFκB regulation of transcription. Conclusion AT-rich motif enrichment in 5' upstream sequences in A. gambiae, Ae. aegypti and the Drosophila genus immunity genes suggests a particular pattern of nucleosome formation/chromatin organization. The co-occurrence of such motifs with the NFκB response elements suggests that these sequence signatures may be functionally involved in transcriptional activation during dipteran immune response. AT-rich motif enrichment in regulatory regions in this group of co-regulated genes could represent an evolutionary constrained signature in dipterans and perhaps other distantly species.

  6. Intestinal microbiota and immune related genes in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) response to dietary β-glucan supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Xu, Zhenjiang; Tian, Xiangli; Dong, Shuanglin; Peng, Mo

    2015-02-27

    β-glucan is a prebiotic well known for its beneficial outcomes on sea cucumber health through modifying the host intestinal microbiota. High-throughput sequencing techniques provide an opportunity for the identification and characterization of microbes. In this study, we investigated the intestinal microbial community composition, interaction among species, and intestinal immune genes in sea cucumber fed with diet supplemented with or without β-glucan supplementation. The results show that the intestinal dominant classes in the control group are Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, and Verrucomicrobiae are enriched in the β-glucan group. Dietary β-glucan supplementation promoted the proliferation of the family Rhodobacteraceae of the Alphaproteobacteria class and the family Verrucomicrobiaceae of the Verrucomicrobiae class and reduced the relative abundance of the family Flavobacteriaceae of Flavobacteria class. The ecological network analysis suggests that dietary β-glucan supplementation can alter the network interactions among different microbial functional groups by changing the microbial community composition and topological roles of the OTUs in the ecological network. Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on immune responses of the intestine of sea cucumber by activating NF-κB signaling pathway, probably through modulating the balance of intestinal microbiota. PMID:25640843

  7. Arabidopsis SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE101 stabilizes and signals within an ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 complex in plant innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feys, Bart J; Wiermer, Marcel; Bhat, Riyaz A; Moisan, Lisa J; Medina-Escobar, Nieves; Neu, Christina; Cabral, Adriana; Parker, Jane E

    2005-09-01

    Plant innate immunity against invasive biotrophic pathogens depends on the intracellular defense regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). We show here that Arabidopsis thaliana EDS1 interacts in vivo with another protein, SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE101 (SAG101), discovered through a proteomic approach to identify new EDS1 pathway components. Together with PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT4 (PAD4), a known EDS1 interactor, SAG101 contributes intrinsic and indispensable signaling activity to EDS1-dependent resistance. The combined activities of SAG101 and PAD4 are necessary for programmed cell death triggered by the Toll-Interleukin-1 Receptor type of nucleotide binding/leucine-rich repeat immune receptor in response to avirulent pathogen isolates and in restricting the growth of normally virulent pathogens. We further demonstrate by a combination of cell fractionation, coimmunoprecipitation, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments the existence of an EDS1-SAG101 complex inside the nucleus that is molecularly and spatially distinct from EDS1-PAD4 associations in the nucleus and cytoplasm. By contrast, EDS1 homomeric interactions were detected in the cytoplasm but not inside the nucleus. These data, combined with evidence for coregulation between individual EDS1 complexes, suggest that dynamic interactions of EDS1 and its signaling partners in multiple cell compartments are important for plant defense signal relay.

  8. Dynamic expression of leukocyte innate immune genes in whole blood from horses with lipopolysaccharide-induced acute systemic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Anne Mette L.; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Heegaard, Peter M. H.;

    2015-01-01

    Background: In horses, insights into the innate immune processes in acute systemic inflammation are limited even though these processes may be highly important for future diagnostic and therapeutic advances in high-mortality disease conditions as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS...... were compared with baseline levels. Results: Systemic inflammation was confirmed by the presence of clinical and hematological changes which were consistent with SIRS. The clinical response to LPS was transient and brief as all horses except one showed unaltered general demeanor after 24 h. Twenty......-two leukocyte genes were significantly regulated at at least one time point during the experimental period. By close inspection of the temporal responses the dynamic changes in mRNA abundance revealed a very rapid onset of both pro-and anti-inflammatory mediators and a substantial variation in both expression...

  9. Dominant-Negative Proteins in Herpesviruses – From Assigning Gene Function to Intracellular Immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Ruzsics

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigating and assigning gene functions of herpesviruses is a process, which profits from consistent technical innovation. Cloning of bacterial artificial chromosomes encoding herpesvirus genomes permits nearly unlimited possibilities in the construction of genetically modified viruses. Targeted or randomized screening approaches allow rapid identification of essential viral proteins. Nevertheless, mapping of essential genes reveals only limited insight into function. The usage of dominant-negative (DN proteins has been the tool of choice to dissect functions of proteins during the viral life cycle. DN proteins also facilitate the analysis of host-virus interactions. Finally, DNs serve as starting-point for design of new antiviral strategies.

  10. High contaminant loads in Lake Apopka's riparian wetland disrupt gene networks involved in reproduction and immune function in largemouth bass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyniuk, Christopher J; Doperalski, Nicholas J; Prucha, Melinda S; Zhang, Ji-Liang; Kroll, Kevin J; Conrow, Roxanne; Barber, David S; Denslow, Nancy D

    2016-09-01

    Lake Apopka (FL, USA) has elevated levels of some organochlorine pesticides in its sediments and a portion of its watershed has been designated a US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund site. This study assessed reproductive endpoints in Florida largemouth bass (LMB) (Micropterus salmoides floridanus) after placement into experimental ponds adjacent to Lake Apopka. LMB collected from a clean reference site (DeLeon Springs) were stocked at two periods of time into ponds constructed in former farm fields on the north shore of the lake. LMB were stocked during early and late oogenesis to determine if there were different effects of contamination on LMB that may be attributed to their reproductive stage. LMB inhabiting the ponds for ~4months had anywhere from 2 to 800 times higher contaminant load for a number of organochlorine pesticides (e.g. p, p'-DDE, methoxychlor) compared to control animals. Gonadosomatic index and plasma vitellogenin were not different between reproductively-stage matched LMB collected at reference sites compared to those inhabiting the ponds. However, plasma 17β-estradiol was lower in LMB inhabiting the Apopka ponds compared to ovary stage-matched LMB from the St. Johns River, a site used as a reference site. Sub-network enrichment analysis revealed that genes related to reproduction (granulosa function, oocyte development), endocrine function (steroid metabolism, hormone biosynthesis), and immune function (T cell suppression, leukocyte accumulation) were differentially expressed in the ovaries of LMB placed into the ponds. These data suggest that (1) LMB inhabiting the Apopka ponds showed disrupted reproduction and immune responses and that (2) gene expression profiles provided site-specific information by discriminating LMB from different macro-habitats. PMID:27397556

  11. Tissue Phthalate Levels Correlate With Changes in Immune Gene Expression in a Population of Juvenile Wild Salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Kelly; Hagedorn, Birgit; Ali, Shareen; Kennish, John; Applegate, Ben; Leu, Matthias; Epp, Lidia; Pallister, Chris; Zwollo, Patty

    2016-07-01

    Phthalates have detrimental effects on health and have been shown to dysregulate the immune system of mammals, birds, and fish. We recently reported that di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate exposure reduces the abundance and inhibits the proliferation of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) IgM(+) B lymphocytes and expression of secreted immunoglobulin heavy-chain mu transcripts in an in vitro culture system. We proposed that phthalates act as immunomodulators by modifying the normal B cell-activation pathways by accelerating B cell differentiation while suppressing plasmablast expansion, thus resulting in fewer IgM-secreting plasma cells. This hypothesis was tested here in an in vivo field study of juvenile Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma) from a plastic-polluted lake in the Gulf of Alaska. Fish tissues were analyzed for both phthalate levels using liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry and for changes in immune gene expression using reverse transcriptase-real time polymerase chain reaction. Results showed that fish with higher tissue levels of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, di(n-butyl) phthalate, and/or dimethyl phthalate expressed significantly fewer secreted and membrane-bound immunoglobulin heavy-chain mu and Blimp1 transcripts in their hematopoietic tissue. This suggests that in vivo uptake of phthalates in fish changes the expression of B cell-specific genes. Chronic exposure to phthalates likely dysregulates normal B-lymphoid development and antibody responses in salmonids and may increase susceptibility to infection. Given the conserved nature of B-lineage cells in vertebrate animals, other marine species may be similarly affected by chronic phthalate exposure. PMID:27177745

  12. Echinoderm immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JE García-Arrarás

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Echinoderms are exclusively marine animals that, after the chordates, represent the second largest group of deuterostomes. Their diverse species composition and singular ecological niches provide at the same time challenges and rewards when studying the broad range of responses that make up their immune mechanisms. Two types of responses comprise the immune system of echinoderms: a cellular response and a humoral one. Cell-based immunity is carried by the celomocytes, a morphologically heterogeneous population of free roaming cells that are capable of recognizing and neutralizing pathogens. Celomocytes present diverse morphologies and functions, which include phagocytosis, encapsulation, clotting, cytotoxicity, wound healing among others. Humoral immunity is mediated by a wide variety of secreted compounds that can be found in the celomic fluid and play important roles in defense against infection. Compounds such as lectins, agglutinins, perforins, complement and some cytokines make up some of the humoral responses of echinoderms. Recent advances in the field of molecular biology, genomics and transcriptomics have allowed for the discovery of new immune genes and their products. These discoveries have expanded our knowledge of echinoderm immunity and are setting up the stage for future experiments to better understand the evolution of the immune mechanisms of deuterostomes

  13. Expression of Innate Immunity Genes in Epithelial Cells of Hypertrophic Adenoids with and without Pediatric Chronic Rhinosinusitis: A Preliminary Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Peng Qu; Zhen-Xiao Huang; Yan Sun; Ting Ye; Shun-Jiu Cui; Qian Huang; Li-Jing Ma

    2015-01-01

    Background:Adenoid hypertrophy (AH) is associated with pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis (pCRS),but its role in the inflammatory process of pCRS is unclear.It is thought that innate immunity gene expression is disrupted in the epithelium of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS),including antimicrobial peptides and pattern recognition receptors (PRRs).The aim of this preliminary study was to detect the expression of innate immunity genes in epithelial cells of hypertrophic adenoids with and without pCRS to better understand their role in pCRS.Methods:Nine pCRS patients and nine simple AH patients undergoing adenoidectomy were recruited for the study.Adenoidal epithelium was isolated,and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was employed to measure relative expression levels of the following messenger RNAs in hypertrophic adenoid epithelial cells of pediatric patients with and without CRS:Human β-defensin (HBD) 2 and 3,surfactant protein (SP)-A and D,toll-like receptors 1-10,nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors NOD 1,NOD 2,and NACHT,LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3,retinoic acid-induced gene 1,melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5,and nuclear factor-KB (NF-κB).RT-qPCR data from two groups were analyzed by independent sample t-tests and Mann-Whitney U-tests.Results:The relative expression of SP-D in adenoidal epithelium of pCRS group was significantly lower than that in AH group (pCRS 0.73 ± 0.10 vs.AH 1.21 ± 0.15;P =0.0173,t =2.654).The relative expression levels of all tested PRRs and NF-κB,as well as HBD-2,HBD-3,and SP-A,showed no statistically significant differences in isolated adenoidal epithelium between pCRS group and AH group.Conclusions:Down-regulated SP-D levels in adenoidal epithelium may contribute to the development of pCRS.PRRs,however,are unlikely to play a significant role in the inflammatory process of pCRS.

  14. Immunoglobulin genes influence the magnitude of humoral immunity to cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Janardan P; Kistner-Griffin, Emily; Radwan, Faisal F; Kaur, Navtej; Namboodiri, Aryan M; Black, Laurel; Butler, Mary Ann; Carreón, Tania; Ruder, Avima M

    2014-12-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a risk factor for many human diseases, but among exposed individuals, not everyone is equally likely to develop HCMV-spurred diseases, implying the presence of host genetic factors that might modulate immunity to this virus. Here, we show that antibody responsiveness to HCMV glycoprotein B (gB) is significantly associated with particular immunoglobulin GM (γ marker) genotypes. Anti-HCMV gB antibody levels were highest in GM 17/17 homozygotes, intermediate in GM 3/17 heterozygotes, and lowest in GM 3/3 homozygotes (28.2, 19.0, and 8.1 µg/mL, respectively; P=.014). These findings provide mechanistic insights in the etiopathogenesis of HCMV-spurred diseases.

  15. Community Immunity (Herd Immunity)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ​Community Immunity ("Herd" ... population is immunized, protecting most community members. The principle of community immunity applies to control of a ...

  16. Expression of immune-related genes during wound healing in fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jacob; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2013-01-01

    damage starts with a series of non-transcriptional responses that leads to vasoconstriction and hemostasis. This is usually followed by an inflammatory response also initiated in the absence of transcription, but later greatly enhanced by expression of genes coding for proinflammatory cytokines...

  17. Modulation of chicken intestinal immune gene expression by small cationic peptides as feed additives during the first week posthatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Michael H; Genovese, Kenneth J; He, Haiqi; Swaggerty, Christina L; Jiang, Yiwei

    2013-09-01

    We have been investigating modulation strategies tailored around the selective stimulation of the host's immune system as an alternative to direct targeting of microbial pathogens by antibiotics. One such approach is the use of a group of small cationic peptides (BT) produced by a Gram-positive soil bacterium, Brevibacillus texasporus. These peptides have immune modulatory properties that enhance both leukocyte functional efficiency and leukocyte proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNA transcription activities in vitro. In addition, when provided as a feed additive for just 4 days posthatch, BT peptides significantly induce a concentration-dependent protection against cecal and extraintestinal colonization by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. In the present studies, we assessed the effects of feeding BT peptides on transcriptional changes on proinflammatory cytokines, inflammatory chemokines, and Toll-like receptors (TLR) in the ceca of broiler chickens with and without S. Enteritidis infection. After feeding a BT peptide-supplemented diet for the first 4 days posthatch, chickens were then challenged with S. Enteritidis, and intestinal gene expression was measured at 1 or 7 days postinfection (p.i.) (5 or 11 days of age). Intestinal expression of innate immune mRNA transcripts was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Analysis of relative mRNA expression showed that a BT peptide-supplemented diet did not directly induce the transcription of proinflammatory cytokine, inflammatory chemokine, type I/II interferon (IFN), or TLR mRNA in chicken cecum. However, feeding the BT peptide-supplemented diet primed cecal tissue for increased (P ≤ 0.05) transcription of TLR4, TLR15, and TLR21 upon infection with S. Enteritidis on days 1 and 7 p.i. Likewise, feeding the BT peptides primed the cecal tissue for increased transcription of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin 1β [IL-1β], IL-6, IL-18, type I and II IFNs) and inflammatory chemokine (CxCLi2

  18. Spatially and temporally fluctuating selection at non-MHC immune genes: evidence from TAP polymorphism in populations of brown trout ( Salmo trutta , L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L.F.; Hansen, Michael Møller; Mensberg, Karen-Lise Dons;

    2008-01-01

    molecules that are central to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I restricted antigen presentation and thus integral components in the adaptive immune system. As such, they could be influenced by selection, driven by pathogens and parasites in a manner similar to MHC genes. Analysis of allele......Temporal samples of Danish brown trout (Salmo trutta) from populations representing varying geographical scales were analysed using eight putatively neutral microsatellite loci and two microsatellite loci embedded in TAP genes (Transporter associated with Antigen Processing). These genes encode....... Moreover, signals of divergent selection among temporal samples within localities suggest that selection also might fluctuate at a temporal scale. These results suggest that immune genes other than the classical MHC class I and II might be subject to selection and warrant further studies of functional...

  19. Transcriptional dynamics of immune, growth and stress related genes in skeletal muscle of the fine flounder (Paralichthys adpersus) during different nutritional statuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Cristián A; Escobar, Daniela; Perez, Lorena; Zuloaga, Rodrigo; Estrada, Juan Manuel; Mercado, Luis; Valdés, Juan Antonio; Molina, Alfredo

    2015-11-01

    The effects of stress on immune activity and growth in early vertebrates have not been studied in detail. The present study used fine flounder (Paralichthys adspersus) skeletal muscle as a model to evaluate molecules involved in the stress response, including the glucocorticoid receptors, foxo1/3, and the target genes of these. Additionally, immune markers (il-1β and tnfα) and effector molecules of atrophy (bnip3, caspase-3, and lc3) were assessed. These molecules were analyzed during periods of long-term fasting and refeeding. During fasting, gene expression related to the stress response and atrophy increased; whereas immune markers were down-regulated. During refeeding, atrophy- and stress-related gene expression significantly decreased. In contrast, immune markers were up-regulated. These results provide novel insight on the control of growth in the skeletal muscle of a non-mammalian species under a stressful condition, suggesting that growth, stress, and immune activity in muscle are closely related and coordinated by orchestrated transcriptional dynamics.

  20. Isolation of immune-relating 185/333-1 gene from Sea Urchin ( Strongylocentrotus intermedius) and Its expression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinan; Ding, Jun; Liu, Yang; Liu, Xuewei; Chang, Yaqing

    2016-02-01

    The 185/333 gene family involved in the immune response of sea urchin. One 185/333 cDNA was isolated from Strongylocentrotus intermedius, and named as Si185/333-1. Its full-length cDNA was 1246 bp in length with a 906 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 301 aa. The molecular weight of the deduced protein was approximately 33.1 kD with an estimated PI of pH 6.26. Si185/333-1 had high identities (70%-86%) to most of Sp185/333. An extraordinary identity of 92% was found between Si185/333-1 and Sp185/333 C5 alpha (ABR22474). Moderate identities (63%-64%) were displayed between Si185/333-1 and He185/333. Si185/333-1 had similar structure to Sp185/333. A signal-peptide, a gly-rich region and a his-rich region were found in its secondary structure. RGD motif was found in gly-rich region at position 116-118aa. There was no transmembrane region in Si185/333-1. The element pattern of Si185/333-1 is different from any available pattern that identified in Sp185/333. Si185/333-1 clustered together with pattern C Sp185/333 in phylogenetic tree. The Si185/333-1 mRNA could be detected in tißsues including peristomial membrane, coelomocytes, muscle of Aristotles lantern, gut and tube feet, with the highest expression level detected in peristomial membrane and a relatively low expression in ovary and testis. The temporal expression of Si185/333-1 in peristomial membrane and coelomocytes were up-regulated after bacterial, ß-D-glucan and dsRNA challenges, reaching the maximum at 12 h post-stimulation. The up-regulation was more obvious in coelomocytes, and bacterial challenge triggered the highest response. These results proved that 185/333-1 gene was involved in the immune defense of S. intermedius, while more studies were necessary for its function in S. intermedius immunity.

  1. Differential Roles of Two Homologous Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Genes in Regulating Cell Cycle and Innate Immunity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdoun, Safae; Zhang, Chong; Gill, Manroop; Kumar, Narender; Churchman, Michelle; Larkin, John C; Kwon, Ashley; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Precise cell-cycle control is critical for plant development and responses to pathogen invasion. Two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes, SIAMESE (SIM) and SIM-RELATED 1 (SMR1), were recently shown to regulate Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) defense based on phenotypes conferred by a sim smr1 double mutant. However, whether these two genes play differential roles in cell-cycle and defense control is unknown. In this report, we show that while acting synergistically to promote endoreplication, SIM and SMR1 play different roles in affecting the ploidy of trichome and leaf cells, respectively. In addition, we found that the smr1-1 mutant, but not sim-1, was more susceptible to a virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain, and this susceptibility could be rescued by activating salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defense. Consistent with these results, smr1-1 partially suppressed the dwarfism, high SA levels, and cell death phenotypes in acd6-1, a mutant used to gauge the change of defense levels. Thus, SMR1 functions partly through SA in defense control. The differential roles of SIM and SMR1 are due to differences in temporal and spatial expression of these two genes in Arabidopsis tissues and in response to P. syringae infection. In addition, flow-cytometry analysis of plants with altered SA signaling revealed that SA is necessary, but not sufficient, to change cell-cycle progression. We further found that a mutant with three CYCD3 genes disrupted also compromised disease resistance to P. syringae. Together, this study reveals differential roles of two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in regulating cell-cycle progression and innate immunity in Arabidopsis and provides insights into the importance of cell-cycle control during host-pathogen interactions. PMID:26561564

  2. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis Provides Insights into Immune Related Genes and the RIG-I-Like Receptor Signaling Pathway in the Freshwater Planarian (Dugesia japonica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuxiang Pang

    Full Text Available The freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica (D. japonica possesses extraordinary ability to regenerate lost organs or body parts. Interestingly, in the process of regeneration, there is little wound infection, suggesting that D. japonica has a formidable innate immune system. The importance of immune system prompted us to search for immune-related genes and RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathways.Transcriptome sequencing of D. japonica was performed on an IlluminaHiSeq2000 platform. A total of 27,180 transcripts were obtained by Trinity assembler. CEGMA analysis and mapping of all trimmed reads back to the assembly result showed that our transcriptome assembly covered most of the whole transcriptome. 23,888 out of 27,180 transcripts contained ORF (open reading fragment, and were highly similar to those in Schistosoma mansoni using BLASTX analysis. 8,079 transcripts (29.7% and 8,668 (31.9% were annotated by Blast2GO and KEGG respectively. A DYNLRB-like gene was cloned to verify its roles in the immune response. Finally, the expression patterns of 4 genes (RIG-I, TRAF3, TRAF6, P38 in the RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway were detected, and the results showed they are very likely to be involved in planarian immune response.RNA-Seq analysis based on the next-generation sequencing technology was an efficient approach to discover critical genes and to understand their corresponding biological functions. Through GO and KEGG analysis, several critical and conserved signaling pathways and genes related to RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway were identified. Four candidate genes were selected to identify their expression dynamics in the process of pathogen stimulation. These annotated transcripts of D. japonica provide a useful resource for subsequent investigation of other important pathways.

  3. Transcriptome Analysis and Discovery of Genes Involved in Immune Pathways from Coelomocytes of Sea Cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) after Vibrio splendidus Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Qiong Gao; Meijie Liao; Yingeng Wang; Bin Li,; Zheng Zhang; Xiaojun Rong; Guiping Chen; Lan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio splendidus is identified as one of the major pathogenic factors for the skin ulceration syndrome in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus), which has vastly limited the development of the sea cucumber culture industry. In order to screen the immune genes involving Vibrio splendidus challenge in sea cucumber and explore the molecular mechanism of this process, the related transcriptome and gene expression profiling of resistant and susceptible biotypes of sea cucumber with Vibrio splendi...

  4. De novo characterization of the spleen transcriptome of the large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea) and analysis of the immune relevant genes and pathways involved in the antiviral response

    KAUST Repository

    Mu, Yinnan

    2014-05-12

    The large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea) is an economically important marine fish in China. To understand the molecular basis for antiviral defense in this species, we used Illumia paired-end sequencing to characterize the spleen transcriptome of polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidylic acid [poly(I:C)]-induced large yellow croakers. The library produced 56,355,728 reads and assembled into 108,237 contigs. As a result, 15,192 unigenes were found from this transcriptome. Gene ontology analysis showed that 4,759 genes were involved in three major functional categories: biological process, cellular component, and molecular function. We further ascertained that numerous consensus sequences were homologous to known immune-relevant genes. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes orthology mapping annotated 5,389 unigenes and identified numerous immune-relevant pathways. These immune-relevant genes and pathways revealed major antiviral immunity effectors, including but not limited to: pattern recognition receptors, adaptors and signal transducers, the interferons and interferon-stimulated genes, inflammatory cytokines and receptors, complement components, and B-cell and T-cell antigen activation molecules. Moreover, the partial genes of Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, RIG-I-like receptors signaling pathway, Janus kinase-Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway, and T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling pathway were found to be changed after poly(I:C) induction by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, suggesting that these signaling pathways may be regulated by poly(I:C), a viral mimic. Overall, the antivirus-related genes and signaling pathways that were identified in response to poly(I:C) challenge provide valuable leads for further investigation of the antiviral defense mechanism in the large yellow croaker. © 2014 Mu et al.

  5. Maternal immune activation by LPS selectively alters specific gene expression profiles of interneuron migration and oxidative stress in the fetus without triggering a fetal immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Oskvig, Devon B.; Elkahloun, Abdel G.; Johnson, Kory R.; Phillips, Terry M.; Herkenham, Miles

    2012-01-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) is a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia and autism. Infections during pregnancy activate the mother’s immune system and alter the fetal environment, with consequential effects on CNS function and behavior in the offspring, but the cellular and molecular links between infection-induced altered fetal development and risk for neuropsychiatric disorders are unknown. We investigated the immunological, molecular, and behavioral effects of MIA in the of...

  6. Long-term activation of the innate immune system in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Anette; Bekkering, Siroon; Latz, Eicke; Riksen, Niels P

    2016-08-01

    Efforts to reverse the pathologic consequences of vulnerable plaques are often stymied by the complex treatment resistant pro-inflammatory environment within the plaque. This suggests that pro-atherogenic stimuli, such as LDL cholesterol and high fat diets may impart longer lived signals on (innate) immune cells that persist even after reversing the pro-atherogenic stimuli. Recently, a series of studies challenged the traditional immunological paradigm that innate immune cells cannot display memory characteristics. Epigenetic reprogramming in these myeloid cell subsets, after exposure to certain stimuli, has been shown to alter the expression of genes upon re-exposure. This phenomenon has been termed trained innate immunity or innate immune memory. The changed responses of 'trained' innate immune cells can confer nonspecific protection against secondary infections, suggesting that innate immune memory has likely evolved as an ancient mechanism to protect against pathogens. However, dysregulated processes of immunological imprinting mediated by trained innate immunity may also be detrimental under certain conditions as the resulting exaggerated immune responses could contribute to autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Pro-atherogenic stimuli most likely cause epigenetic modifications that persist for prolonged time periods even after the initial stimulus has been removed. In this review we discuss the concept of trained innate immunity in the context of a hyperlipidemic environment and atherosclerosis. According to this idea the epigenome of myeloid (progenitor) cells is presumably modified for prolonged periods of time, which, in turn, could evoke a condition of continuous immune cell over-activation.

  7. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection causes modulation of inflammatory and immune response genes in mouse brain

    OpenAIRE

    Puri Raj K; Bhattacharya Bhaskar; Sharma Anuj; Maheshwari Radha K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Neurovirulent Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) causes lethal encephalitis in equines and is transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. VEEV is highly infectious when transmitted by aerosol and has been developed as a bio-warfare agent, making it an important pathogen to study from a military and civilian standpoint. Molecular mechanisms of VEE pathogenesis are poorly understood. To study these, the gene expression profile of VEEV infected mouse brains was investigated...

  8. Response of immune response genes to adjuvants poly [di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)phosphazene] (PCEP), CpG oligodeoxynucleotide and emulsigen at intradermal injection site in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiri, R B; Lai, K; Chaffey, A M; Wilson, H L; Berry, W E; Szafron, M L; Mutwiri, G K

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which adjuvants mediate their effects provide critical information on how innate immunity influences the development of adaptive immunity. Despite being a critical vaccine component, the mechanisms by which adjuvants mediate their effects are not fully understood and this is especially true when they are used in large animals. This lack of understanding limits our ability to design effective vaccines. In the present study, we administered polyphosphazene (PCEP), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG), emulsigen or saline via an intradermal injection into pigs and assessed the impact on the expression of reported 'adjuvant response genes' over time. CpG induced a strong upregulation of the chemokine CXL10 several 'Interferon Response Genes', as well as TNFα, and IL-10, and a down-regulation of IL-17 genes. Emulsigen upregulated expression of chemokines CCL2 and CCL5, proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNFα, as well as TLR9, and several IFN response genes. PCEP induced the expression of chemokine CCL2 and proinflammatory cytokine IL-6. These results suggest that emulsigen and CpG may promote recruitment of innate immune cells and Th1 type cytokine production but that PCEP may promote a Th-2 type immune response through the induction of IL-6, an inducer of B cell activity and differentiation. PMID:27269793

  9. Fusion of a viral antigen to invariant chain leads to augmented T-cell immunity and improved protection in gene-gun DNA-vaccinated mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grujic, Mirjana; Holst, Peter J; Christensen, Jan P;

    2009-01-01

    against lethal peripheral challenge. The current study questioned whether the same strategy, i.e. linkage of GP to an Ii chain, could be applied to a naked DNA vaccine. Following gene-gun immunization with the linked construct (DNA-IiGP), GP-specific CD4(+) T cells could not be detected by flow cytometry...

  10. Expression of genes associated with immunity in the endometrium of cattle with disparate postpartum uterine disease and fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herath Shan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contamination of the uterine lumen with bacteria is ubiquitous in cattle after parturition. Some animals develop endometritis and have reduced fertility but others have no uterine disease and readily conceive. The present study tested the hypothesis that postpartum cattle that develop persistent endometritis and infertility are unable to limit the inflammatory response to uterine bacterial infection. Methods Endometrial biopsies were collected several times during the postpartum period from animals that were subsequently infertile with persistent endometritis (n = 4 or had no clinical disease and conceived to first insemination (n = 4. Quantitative PCR was used to determine the expression of candidate genes in the endometrial biopsies, including the Toll-like receptor (TLR 1 to 10 family of innate immune receptors, inflammatory mediators and their cognate receptors. Selected proteins were examined by immunohistochemistry. Results The expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukins (IL1A, IL1B and IL6, and nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2 were higher during the first week post partum than subsequently. During the first week post partum, there was higher gene expression in infertile than fertile animals of TLR4, the receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL1A and IL1B, and their receptor IL1R2. The expression of genes encoding other Toll-like receptors, transforming growth factor beta receptor 1 (TGFBR1 or prostaglandin E2 receptors (PTGER2 and PTGER4 did not differ significantly between the animal groups. Gene expression did not differ significantly between infertile and fertile animals after the first week postpartum. However, there were higher ratios of IL1A or IL1B mRNA to the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL10, during the first week post partum in the infertile than fertile animals, and the protein products of these genes were mainly localised to the epithelium

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in immunity-related genes and their association with mastitis in Chilean dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, A M; Huircan, P; Lepori, A

    2013-07-30

    Mastitis remains a major cattle disease with great global economic implications. Various approaches are currently employed in attempts to improve understanding of mastitis resistance and develop phenotypic markers for use in breeding programs (e.g., somatic cell score), including QTL discovery, wide-genome association studies, and identification of candidate genes related to immune function. This study evaluated three single nucleotide polymorphisms contained in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and lactoferrin (LF) genes associated with mastitis traits: TLR4 P-226, TLR4 2021, and LF P-28. Genotyping was performed by restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and high-resolution melting quantitative PCR from genomic DNA of four dairy cattle breeds (Holstein, Jersey, Montbeliarde, and Overo Colorado) previously classified as healthy, with clinical or with subclinical mastitis. The high-resolution melting quantitative PCR allowed genotyping of each locus and resulted in allele frequencies indicating that all loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The TT genotype of TLR4 2021 was significantly associated with the healthy condition, but no associations with somatic cell score were evident. Further studies are therefore necessary in order to confirm the results of this investigation.

  12. Effects of seawater acclimation on mRNA levels of corticosteroid receptor genes in osmoregulatory and immune systems in trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, T.; Hyodo, S.; Schreck, C.B.

    2008-01-01

    Influence of environmental salinity on expression of distinct corticosteroid receptor (CR) genes, glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-1 and -2, and mineralcorticoid receptor (MR), was examined in osmoregulatory and hemopoietic organs and leucocytes of steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). There was no significant difference in plasma cortisol levels between freshwater (FW)- or seawater (SW)-acclimated trout, whereas Na+, K+-ATPase was activated in gill of SW fish. Plasma lysozyme levels also showed a significant increase after acclimation to SW. In SW-acclimated fish, mRNA levels of GR-1, GR-2, and MR were significantly higher in gill and body kidney than those in FW. Head kidney and spleen showed no significant change in these CR mRNA levels after SW-acclimation. On the other hand, leucocytes isolated from head kidney and peripheral blood showed significant decreases in mRNA levels of CR in SW-acclimated fish. These results showed differential regulation of gene expression of CR between osmoregulatory and immune systems. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of dietary Bacillus cereus G19, B. cereus BC-01, and Paracoccus marcusii DB11 supplementation on the growth, immune response, and expression of immune-related genes in coelomocytes and intestine of the sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus Selenka).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Tian, Xiangli; Dong, Shuanglin; Peng, Mo; Wang, Dongdong

    2015-08-01

    Probiotics have positive effects on the nutrient digestibility and absorption, immune responses, and growth of aquatic animals, including the sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus Selenka). A 60-day feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of Bacillus cereus G19, B. cereus BC-01 and Paracoccus marcusii DB11 supplementation on the growth, immune response, and expression level of four immune-related genes (Aj-p105, Aj-p50, Aj-rel, and Aj-lys) in coelomocytes and the intestine of juvenile sea cucumbers. One group was fed the basal diet (control group), while three other groups were fed the basal diet supplemented with B. cereus G19 (G19 group), B. cereus BC-01 (BC group), or P. marcusii DB11 (PM group). The growth rate of sea cucumbers fed diets with probiotics supplementation was significantly higher than that of the control group (P alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity of coelomocytes in sea cucumbers fed diets with probiotics supplementation was significantly higher than the control group (P < 0.05). Comparatively, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of coelomocytes for sea cucumber in the PM group was significantly greater (P < 0.05). As for the immune-related genes, B. cereus G19 supplementation significantly increased the expression level of the Aj-rel gene in coelomocytes (P < 0.05), while B. cereus BC-01 supplementation significantly increased that of the Aj-p50 gene as compared to the control group (P < 0.05). In the intestine, the relative expression level of Aj-p105, Aj-p50, and Aj-lys genes in the PM group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.05). These results suggested that B. cereus G19 and B. cereus BC-01 supplementation could improve the growth performance and the immune response in coelomocytes, while P. marcusii DB11 supplementation could have a positive effect on the growth performance and immune response in coelomocytes and the intestine of sea cucumbers. PMID:26052012

  14. Expression of bovine genes associated with local and systemic immune response to infestation with the Lone Star tick, Amblyomma americanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannan, Jaime L; Riggs, Penny K; Olafson, Pia U; Ivanov, Ivan; Holman, Patricia J

    2014-10-01

    The Lone Star tick, Amblyomma americanum Linnaeus 1758 (Acari; Ixodidae), causes considerable production losses to the southern U.S. cattle industry due to reduced weight, infertility, secondary infections at bite wound sites, damaged hides, and potentially death, as these ticks tend to infest livestock in large numbers. Increasing environmental concerns, along with the potential for chemical residue in food products, have led to more emphasis on alternative tick control strategies, such as selective breeding practices and anti-tick vaccines. To enable progress toward these goals, a better understanding of bovine host immune mechanisms elicited by ticks is needed. In this study, 7 calves were phenotyped as susceptible, moderately resistant, or highly resistant to adult A. americanum ticks. Tick bite-site biopsies and blood leukocytes were collected at multiple time points throughout 3 successive tick infestations. Gene expression at tick bite-site biopsies was assessed by microarray analysis over 3 time points for each phenotype group. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR expression analysis evaluated 11 candidate genes in tick bite-site biopsies, and 6 in blood leukocytes. Regression curve estimates calculated from the expression values generated by qRT-PCR in tick bite-sites identified correlations between several candidate genes. Increased expression of IGHG1, IL6, IL1α, and IL1RN in bovine tick bite-site biopsies suggests that Th2 differentiation may be important for the local bovine response to A. americanum ticks. Strong correlations in expression for IL1α and IL1β, for IL1α and IL1RN, and for IL1α and TLR4 were found in biopsies from the tick-resistant phenotypes. The up-regulation of IL12 and IL23 in blood leukocytes from Lone Star tick-infested calves of all phenotypes suggests a possible systemic recruitment of memory T cells. This study provides novel insight concerning the bovine immune response to Lone Star ticks and a basis for future

  15. Adoptive immunotherapy for cancer: the next generation of gene-engineered immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, L J; Moeller, M; Darcy, P K

    2009-10-01

    Adoptive cellular immunotherapy involving transfer of tumor-reactive T cells has shown some notable antitumor responses in a minority of cancer patients. In particular, transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes has resulted in long-term objective responses in patients with advanced melanoma. However, the inability to isolate sufficient numbers of tumor-specific T cells from most malignancies has restricted the broad utility of this approach. An emerging approach to circumvent this limitation involves the genetic modification of effector cells with T cell receptor (TCR) transgenes or chimeric single-chain variable fragment (scFv) receptors that can specifically redirect T cells to tumor. There has been much progress in the design of TCR and scFv receptors to enhance the antigen-specific activation of effector cells and their trafficking and persistence in vivo. Considerable effort has been directed toward improving the safety of this approach and reducing the immunogenicity of the receptor. This review discusses the latest developments in the field of adoptive immunotherapy using genetically modified immune cells that have been transduced with either TCR or scFv receptor transgenes and used in preclinical and clinical settings as anticancer agents. PMID:19775368

  16. Exploring genetic polymorphism in innate immune genes in Indian cattle (Bos indicus) and buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) using next generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shreya M; Koringa, Prakash G; Nathani, Neelam M; Patel, Namrata V; Shah, Tejash M; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2015-02-01

    Activation of innate immunity initiates various cascades of reactions that largely contribute to defense against physical, microbial or chemical damage, prompt for damage repair and removal of causative organisms as well as restoration of tissue homeostasis. Genetic polymorphism in innate immune genes plays prominent role in disease resistance capabilities in various breeds of cattle and buffalo. Here we studied single nucleotide variations (SNP/SNV) and haplotype structure in innate immune genes viz CHGA, CHGB, CHGC, NRAMP1, NRAMP2, DEFB1, BNBD4, BNBD5, TAP and LAP in Gir cattle and Murrah buffalo. Targeted sequencing of exonic regions of these genes was performed by Ion Torrent PGM sequencing platform. The sequence reads obtained corresponding to coding regions of these genes were mapped to reference genome of cattle BosTau7 by BWA program using genome analysis tool kit (GATK). Further variant analysis by Unified Genotyper revealed 54 and 224 SNPs in Gir and Murrah respectively and also 32 SNVs was identified. Among these SNPs 43, 36, 11,32,81,21 and 22 variations were in CHGA, CHGB, CHGC, NRAMP1, NRAMP2, DEFB1 and TAP genes respectively. Among these identified 278 SNPs, 24 were found to be reported in the dbSNP database. Variant analysis was followed by structure formation of haplotypes based on multiple SNPs using SAS software revealed a large number of haplotypes. The SNP discovery in innate immune genes in cattle and buffalo breeds of India would advance our understanding of role of these genes in determining the disease resistance/susceptibility in Indian breeds. The identified SNPs and haplotype data would also provide a wealth of sequence information for conservation studies, selective breeding and designing future strategies for identifying disease associations involving samples from distinct populations.

  17. Exploring genetic polymorphism in innate immune genes in Indian cattle (Bos indicus and buffalo (Bubalus bubalis using next generation sequencing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya M. Patel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Activation of innate immunity initiates various cascades of reactions that largely contribute to defense against physical, microbial or chemical damage, prompt for damage repair and removal of causative organisms as well as restoration of tissue homeostasis. Genetic polymorphism in innate immune genes plays prominent role in disease resistance capabilities in various breeds of cattle and buffalo. Here we studied single nucleotide variations (SNP/SNV and haplotype structure in innate immune genes viz CHGA, CHGB, CHGC, NRAMP1, NRAMP2, DEFB1, BNBD4, BNBD5, TAP and LAP in Gir cattle and Murrah buffalo. Targeted sequencing of exonic regions of these genes was performed by Ion Torrent PGM sequencing platform. The sequence reads obtained corresponding to coding regions of these genes were mapped to reference genome of cattle BosTau7 by BWA program using genome analysis tool kit (GATK. Further variant analysis by Unified Genotyper revealed 54 and 224 SNPs in Gir and Murrah respectively and also 32 SNVs was identified. Among these SNPs 43, 36, 11,32,81,21 and 22 variations were in CHGA, CHGB, CHGC, NRAMP1, NRAMP2, DEFB1 and TAP genes respectively. Among these identified 278 SNPs, 24 were found to be reported in the dbSNP database. Variant analysis was followed by structure formation of haplotypes based on multiple SNPs using SAS software revealed a large number of haplotypes. The SNP discovery in innate immune genes in cattle and buffalo breeds of India would advance our understanding of role of these genes in determining the disease resistance/susceptibility in Indian breeds. The identified SNPs and haplotype data would also provide a wealth of sequence information for conservation studies, selective breeding and designing future strategies for identifying disease associations involving samples from distinct populations.

  18. Effect of endocrine disrupting chemicals on the transcription of genes related to the innate immune system in the early developmental stage of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Chen, Rujia; Liu, Weiping; Fu, Zhengwei

    2010-01-01

    Health concerns regarding the potential interference of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the immune system of wildlife and humans have increased in recent years. However, the effects of EDCs in aquatic systems on the immune system of fish species has only received limited attention. In the present study, we found that the mRNA levels of TNFalpha, IFN, IL-1beta, IL-8, CXCL-Clc, and CC-chemokine, which are closely related to the innate immune system, were affected in newly hatched zebrafish when exposed to EDCs, such as 17beta-estradiol, 17alpha-ethynyestradiol, permethrin, atrazine and nonylphenol at various concentrations (0.1, 0.5, 2.5 and 12.5 microg/l) for three days during the embryo stage. However, the different EDCs displayed different potentials to change innate immune-related gene transcription. Among the selected chemicals, permethrin (PM) and 17beta-estradiol (E2) (12.5 microg/l) significantly increased the mRNA levels of many cytokines, exhibiting their most prominent impacts on the innate immune system of zebrafish. In addition, it was found that the mixture of the above five chemicals (2.5 microg/l each) had a greater effect on innate immune system-related gene transcription in zebrafish than equal amounts of the single compound. Moreover, the genes (such as Bcl2, Ucp2 and iNOS) relating to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen reactive free radical production were also influenced by some EDCs and their mixture. We suggest that heavy oxidative stress and the balance of nitric oxide (NO) production lead to death of immune cells. These results may provide an explanation of the possible mode how EDCs influence the innate immune system in zebrafish. Taken together, the results obtained in the present study clearly demonstrate that EDCs and their mixtures in aquatic systems will greatly influence the immune system in fish, suggesting that the effects of EDCs on fish should be associated with immune toxicity. PMID:20153439

  19. HGF Gene Modification in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury by Modulating Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wang

    Full Text Available Effective therapeutic strategies to address intestinal complications after radiation exposure are currently lacking. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which display the ability to repair the injured intestine, have been considered as delivery vehicles for repair genes. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF-gene-modified MSCs on radiation-induced intestinal injury (RIII.Female 6- to 8-week-old mice were radiated locally at the abdomen with a single 13-Gy dose of radiation and then treated with saline control, Ad-HGF or Ad-Null-modified MSCs therapy. The transient engraftment of human MSCs was detected via real-time PCR and immunostaining. The therapeutic effects of non- and HGF-modified MSCs were evaluated via FACS to determine the lymphocyte immunophenotypes; via ELISA to measure cytokine expression; via immunostaining to determine tight junction protein expression; via PCNA staining to examine intestinal epithelial cell proliferation; and via TUNEL staining to detect intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis.The histopathological recovery of the radiation-injured intestine was significantly enhanced following non- or HGF-modified MSCs treatment. Importantly, the radiation-induced immunophenotypic disorders of the mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches were attenuated in both MSCs-treated groups. Treatment with HGF-modified MSCs reduced the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the tight junction protein ZO-1, and promoted the proliferation and reduced the apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.Treatment of RIII with HGF-gene-modified MSCs reduces local inflammation and promotes the recovery of small intestinal histopathology in a mouse model. These findings might provide an effective therapeutic strategy for RIII.

  20. De novo cloning and annotation of genes associated with immunity, detoxification and energy metabolism from the fat body of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jia Yang

    Full Text Available The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a destructive pest in tropical and subtropical areas. In this study, we performed transcriptome-wide analysis of the fat body of B. dorsalis and obtained more than 59 million sequencing reads, which were assembled into 27,787 unigenes with an average length of 591 bp. Among them, 17,442 (62.8% unigenes matched known proteins in the NCBI database. The assembled sequences were further annotated with gene ontology, cluster of orthologous group terms, and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes. In depth analysis was performed to identify genes putatively involved in immunity, detoxification, and energy metabolism. Many new genes were identified including serpins, peptidoglycan recognition proteins and defensins, which were potentially linked to immune defense. Many detoxification genes were identified, including cytochrome P450s, glutathione S-transferases and ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. Many new transcripts possibly involved in energy metabolism, including fatty acid desaturases, lipases, alpha amylases, and trehalose-6-phosphate synthases, were identified. Moreover, we randomly selected some genes to examine their expression patterns in different tissues by quantitative real-time PCR, which indicated that some genes exhibited fat body-specific expression in B. dorsalis. The identification of a numerous transcripts in the fat body of B. dorsalis laid the foundation for future studies on the functions of these genes.

  1. Immune gene expression in the spleen of chickens experimentally infected with Ascaridia galli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tina S.; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Norup, Liselotte R.;

    2015-01-01

    Ascaridia galli is a gastrointestinal nematode infecting chickens. Chickens kept in alternative rearing systems or at free-range experience increased risk for infection with resulting high prevalences. A. gall infection causes reduced weight gain, decreased egg production and in severe cases incr...... lumen. Increased expression of DEF beta 1 was observed in infected chickens at week 6 p.i. but also at week 9 p.i. which corresponds to a matured stage where adult worms are present in the intestinal lumen. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....... and reagent consumption. Spleenic transcription of immunological genes was compared between infected chickens and non-infected controls at week 2, 6, and 9 p.i. corresponding to different stages of parasite development/maturation. At week 2 p.i. increased expression of IL-13 was observed in infected chickens...... we observed only few differentially expressed genes at week 2 p.i. which corresponds to the larvae histotrophic phase. In contrast, we observed increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and acute phase proteins in infected chickens, by week 6 p.i. where the larvae re-enter the intestinal...

  2. Immersion infection of germ-free zebrafish with Listeria monocytogenes induces transient expression of innate immune response genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eShan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Zebrafish, Denio rerio, could be an alternative to other classic animal models for human infectious diseases to examine the processes of microbial infections and host-pathogen interactions in vivo because of their small body dimension but large clutch size. We established germ-free zebrafish infection models of Listeria monocytogenes through different routes of infection: oral immersion and injection via yolk sac, brain ventricle and blood island. Immersion of zebrafish larva even with 1010CFU/mL L. monocytogenes EGDe strain in egg water was unable to cause mortality, but GFP-expressing bacteria in the gut lumen could be observed in frozen sections. Several selected maker genes of the innate immune system, including cyp1a, irg1l, il1b and mmp9, were significantly induced by oral immersion not only with strain EGDe, but also with strain M7 and L. innocua, though to a lesser degree (P < 0.01. Such induction appears to be transient with peak at 48 h post-infection, but returned to basal level at 72 h post-infection. Of the three injection routes, mortality after infection by yolk sac was 80% in early stage of infection. Few eggs could survive and hatch. Injection into zebrafish embryos via brain ventricle or blood island led to progressive lethal infection. L. mocytogenes EGDe showed steady replication in the fish embryos and was far more pathogenic than strain M7, which is consistent with findings in the murine model. We conclude that zebrafish could serve as susceptible and microscopically visible infection models for L. monocytogenes via different routes and could be applied to further studies on the interactions between bacterial virulence factors and host immune responses.

  3. Gene discovery and differential expression analysis of humoral immune response elements in female Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Female Culicoides sonorensis midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of pathogens that impact livestock and wildlife in the United States. Little is known about their molecular functioning, including components of their immune system. Because the insect immune response is involved ...

  4. Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Iain; Lazaridis, Iosif; Rohland, Nadin; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick; Roodenberg, Songül Alpaslan; Harney, Eadaoin; Stewardson, Kristin; Fernandes, Daniel; Novak, Mario; Sirak, Kendra; Gamba, Cristina; Jones, Eppie R; Llamas, Bastien; Dryomov, Stanislav; Pickrell, Joseph; Arsuaga, Juan Luís; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Carbonell, Eudald; Gerritsen, Fokke; Khokhlov, Aleksandr; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Lozano, Marina; Meller, Harald; Mochalov, Oleg; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Guerra, Manuel A Rojo; Roodenberg, Jacob; Vergès, Josep Maria; Krause, Johannes; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W; Brown, Dorcas; Anthony, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Haak, Wolfgang; Pinhasi, Ron; Reich, David

    2015-12-24

    Ancient DNA makes it possible to observe natural selection directly by analysing samples from populations before, during and after adaptation events. Here we report a genome-wide scan for selection using ancient DNA, capitalizing on the largest ancient DNA data set yet assembled: 230 West Eurasians who lived between 6500 and 300 bc, including 163 with newly reported data. The new samples include, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide ancient DNA from Anatolian Neolithic farmers, whose genetic material we obtained by extracting from petrous bones, and who we show were members of the population that was the source of Europe's first farmers. We also report a transect of the steppe region in Samara between 5600 and 300 bc, which allows us to identify admixture into the steppe from at least two external sources. We detect selection at loci associated with diet, pigmentation and immunity, and two independent episodes of selection on height. PMID:26595274

  5. [Psychiatry in ancient Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón Narváez, G

    1992-12-01

    Using studies on prehispanic and early post-conquest documents of Ancient Mexico--such as the Badianus Manuscript, also known as Libellus de Medicinalibus Indorum Herbis, and Brother Bernardino de Sahagún's famous work History of the Things of the New Spain, a description of some existing medical and psychiatric problems, and treatments Ancient Aztecs resorted to, is presented. The structure of the Aztec family, their problems with the excessive ingestion of alcoholic beverages, and the punishments native authorities had implemented in order to check alcoholism up are also described. PMID:1341125

  6. Exploitation of Exosomes as Nanocarriers for Gene-, Chemo-, and Immune-Therapy of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Akhil; Babu, Anish; Filant, Justyna; Moxley, Katherine M; Ruskin, Rachel; Dhanasekaran, Danny; Sood, Anil K; McMeekin, Scott; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2016-06-01

    The bottleneck in current vector-based cancer therapy is the targeted and controlled release of therapeutics in tumors. Exosomes are submicron-sized vesicles that are secreted by all cell types and are involved in communication and transportation of materials between cells. Analogous in size and function to synthetic nanoparticles, exosomes offer many advantages, rendering them the most promising candidates for targeted drug or gene delivery vehicles. Patient-specific customized therapeutic strategies can be engineered using exosomes derived from the patient's own healthy cells. Therefore, exosome-based cancer therapy has the potential to become an important part of personalized medicine. Interest in exosomes as carrier organelles is relatively recent. Knowledge about exosomal biology and its applications remains limited. The present review is an attempt to describe the current status of the application of exosomes to cancer therapy and the potential challenges associated with their use. PMID:27319211

  7. Exploitation of Exosomes as Nanocarriers for Gene-, Chemo-, and Immune-Therapy of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Akhil; Babu, Anish; Filant, Justyna; Moxley, Katherine M; Ruskin, Rachel; Dhanasekaran, Danny; Sood, Anil K; McMeekin, Scott; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2016-06-01

    The bottleneck in current vector-based cancer therapy is the targeted and controlled release of therapeutics in tumors. Exosomes are submicron-sized vesicles that are secreted by all cell types and are involved in communication and transportation of materials between cells. Analogous in size and function to synthetic nanoparticles, exosomes offer many advantages, rendering them the most promising candidates for targeted drug or gene delivery vehicles. Patient-specific customized therapeutic strategies can be engineered using exosomes derived from the patient's own healthy cells. Therefore, exosome-based cancer therapy has the potential to become an important part of personalized medicine. Interest in exosomes as carrier organelles is relatively recent. Knowledge about exosomal biology and its applications remains limited. The present review is an attempt to describe the current status of the application of exosomes to cancer therapy and the potential challenges associated with their use.

  8. Diversity of immune genes and associated gill microbes of European plaice Pleuronectes platessa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, K. Mathias; Shama, Lisa N. S.; Kellnreitner, Florian; Pockberger, Moritz

    2012-08-01

    Genetic variability of marine fish species is much higher than in most other vertebrates. Nevertheless, some species with large population sizes including flatfish such as European plaice Pleuronectes platessa show signs of population collapse and inbreeding. Taking plaice as a flagship example for fisheries-induced genetic changes also affecting the Wadden Sea, we determined the amount of genetic variability at antigen-presenting genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) and its potential interaction with the microbiota associated to gill tissue using a next-generation parallel tag sequencing approach. Genetic variation at MHC class IIB genes was extremely large, with 97 alleles found in 40 fish from different age cohorts. Although a strong signal of positive selection was present (dN/dS = 4.01) and we found significantly higher allelic diversity in 0+ fish than in older age classes, the amount of genetic variation maintained within the population may not have exceeded neutral expectations derived from mitochondrial markers. Associated microbes revealed significant spatiotemporal structure with 0+ fish displaying the highest microbial diversity as well as the highest diversity of potentially pathogenic genera. Overall the correlation between MHC genotypes and bacterial abundance was weak, and only few alleles significantly correlated with certain bacterial genera. These associations all conferred susceptibility (i.e. presence of an allele correlated to higher number of bacteria), either suggesting age-dependent selection on common alleles or weak selection on resistance against these bacterial genera. Taken together, our data suggest that selection coefficients of balancing selection maintaining immunogenetic diversity may be relatively small in large marine populations. However, if population sizes are further reduced by overharvesting, the response to increasing balancing selection coefficients will be largely unpredictable and may also negatively

  9. Equine herpesvirus type 1 modulates inflammatory host immune response genes in equine endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Stephanie; Barsova, Jekaterina; Campos, Isabel; Frampton, Arthur R

    2016-08-30

    Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM), a disease caused by equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1), is characterized by severe inflammation, thrombosis, and hypoxia in central nervous system (CNS) endothelial cells, which can result in a spectrum of clinical signs including urinary incontinence, ataxia, and paralysis. Strains of EHV-1 that contain a single point mutation within the viral DNA polymerase (nucleotide A2254>G2254: amino acid N752→D752) are isolated from EHM afflicted horses at higher frequencies than EHV-1 strains that do not harbor this mutation. Due to the correlation between the DNA Pol mutation and EHM disease, EHV-1 strains that contain the mutation have been designated as neurologic. In this study, we measured virus replication, cell to cell spread efficacy, and host inflammatory responses in equine endothelial cells infected with 12 different strains of EHV-1. Two strains, T953 (Ohio 2003) (neurologic) and Kentucky A (KyA) (non-neurologic), have well described disease phenotypes while the remaining strains used in this study are classified as neurologic or non-neurologic based solely on the presence or absence of the DNA pol mutation, respectively. Results show that the neurologic strains do not replicate better or spread more efficiently in endothelial cells. Also, the majority of the host inflammatory genes were modulated similarly regardless of EHV-1 genotype. Analyses of host gene expression showed that a subset of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including the CXCR3 ligands CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, as well as CCL5, IL-6 and TNF-α were consistently up-regulated in endothelial cells infected with each EHV-1 strain. The identification of specific pro-inflammatory cytokines in endothelial cells that are modulated by EHV-1 provides further insight into the factors that contribute to the immunopathology observed after infection and may also reveal new targets for disease intervention. PMID:27527764

  10. Insect neuropeptide bursicon homodimers induce innate immune and stress genes during molting by activating the NF-κB transcription factor Relish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiheng An

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bursicon is a heterodimer neuropeptide composed of two cystine knot proteins, bursicon α (burs α and bursicon β (burs β, that elicits cuticle tanning (melanization and sclerotization through the Drosophila leucine-rich repeats-containing G protein-coupled receptor 2 (DLGR2. Recent studies show that both bursicon subunits also form homodimers. However, biological functions of the homodimers have remained unknown until now. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, we show in Drosophila melanogaster that both bursicon homodimers induced expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides (AMPs in neck-ligated adults following recombinant homodimer injection and in larvae fat body after incubation with recombinant homodimers. These AMP genes were also up-regulated in 24 h old unligated flies (when the endogenous bursicon level is low after injection of recombinant homodimers. Up-regulation of AMP genes by the homodimers was accompanied by reduced bacterial populations in fly assay preparations. The induction of AMP expression is via activation of the NF-κB transcription factor Relish in the immune deficiency (Imd pathway. The influence of bursicon homodimers on immune function does not appear to act through the heterodimer receptor DLGR2, i.e. novel receptors exist for the homodimers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal a mechanism of CNS-regulated prophylactic innate immunity during molting via induced expression of genes encoding AMPs and genes of the Turandot family. Turandot genes are also up-regulated by a broader range of extreme insults. From these data we infer that CNS-generated bursicon homodimers mediate innate prophylactic immunity to both stress and infection during the vulnerable molting cycle.

  11. Construction of a full-length cDNA library of Solen grandis dunker and identification of defense- and immune-related genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guohua; Liu, Xiangquan; Ren, Lihua; Yang, Jianmin; Wei, Xiumei; Yang, Jialong

    2013-11-01

    The basic genetic characteristics, important functional genes, and entire transcriptome of Solen grandis Dunker were investigated by constructing a full-length cDNA library with the `switching mechanism at the 5'-end of the RNA transcript' (SMART) technique. Total RNA was isolated from the immune-relevant tissues, gills and hemocytes, using the Trizol reagent, and cDNA fragments were digested with Sfi I before being ligated to the pBluescript II SK* vector. The cDNA library had a titer of 1048 cfu μL-1 and a storage capacity of 1.05×106 cfu. Approximately 98% of the clones in the library were recombinants, and the fragment lengths of insert cDNA ranged from 0.8 kb to 3.0 kb. A total of 2038 expressed sequence tags were successfully sequenced and clustered into 965 unigenes. BLASTN analysis showed that 240 sequences were highly similar to the known genes (E-value 80%), accounting for 25% of the total unigenes. According to the Gene Ontology, these unigenes were related to several biological processes, including cell structure, signal transport, protein synthesis, transcription, energy metabolism, and immunity. Fifteen of the identified sequences were related to defense and immunity. The full-length cDNA sequence of HSC70 was obtained. The cDNA library of S. grandis provided a useful resource for future researches of functional genomics related to stress tolerance, immunity, and other physiological activities.

  12. Expression and Significance of gp96 and Immune-related Gene CTLA-4, CD8 in Lung Cancer Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan ZHENG

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that gp96 plays an important role in specific cytotoxic immune response which is involved in anti-tumor effect in the body. The aim of this study is to investigate the biological significance of heat shock protein gp96 and immune-related gene CTLA-4, CD8 expressions in lung cancer tissues of different progressive stages. Methods We used Envision immunohistochemistry method to detect the levels of expression of gp96, CTLA-4, CD8 in tissue microarray, which contained 89 primary lung cancer tissues, 12 lymph node metastasis lung cancer tissues, 12 precancerous lesions and 10 normal lung tissues, and analyzed the relationship between their expressions and clinicopathological parameters. Results (1 The positive rate of gp96 in primary lung cancer was remarkably higher than that in precancerous lesion and normal lung tissue (P < 0.05. The positive rate of CTLA-4 in primary lung cancer tissue and precancerous lesion was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissue (P < 0.05. The positive rate of CD8 in primary lung cancer tissue was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissue (P < 0.05. The positive rate of gp96 in CD8-positive lymphocytes in the high expression group was less than that in the low group (P < 0.05. (2 The positive rate of gp96 was closely related to sex, differentiation and clinical stage (P < 0.05, but not to age, gross type, histological type and lymph node metastasis (P > 0.05. The positive rate of CTLA-4 was closely related to age and differentiation (P < 0.05, but not to sex, gross type, histological type, clinical stage and lymph node metastasis (P > 0.05. CD8 expression was related to clinical stage (P < 0.05, but not to sex, age, gross type, histological type, differentiation and lymph node metastasis (P > 0.05. The positive rates of gp96, CTLA-4 were higher than that of CD8 in squamous cell carcinoma and SCLC, respectively. (3 There was positive correlation between gp

  13. Expression of innate immune genes, proteins and microRNAs in lung tissue and leukocytes of pigs infected with influenza virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Cirera, Susanna; Vasby, Ditte;

    This study aimed at providing a better understanding of the involvement of innate immune factors including microRNA (miRNA) in the local and systemic host response to influenza virus infection. Twenty pigs were challenged by influenza A virus subtype H1N2. Expression of miRNA, mRNA and proteins...... to the control group, and haptoglobin and C-reactive protein were at significantly increased at day three pi. MiRNA are small non coding RNA molecules, that regulate gene expression in a wide range of organisms. Cellular miRNAs might be involved in influenza infection, both by targeting immune related host...

  14. Evaluation of immune responses in sheep induced by DNA immunization with genes encoding GRA1, GRA4, GRA6 and GRA7 antigens of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiszczyńska-Sawicka, Elżbieta; Olędzka, Gabriela; Holec-Gąsior, Lucyna; Li, Hong; Xu, Janet Boyu; Sedcole, Richard; Kur, Józef; Bickerstaffe, Roy; Stankiewicz, Mirosław

    2011-05-11

    The dense granule proteins of Toxoplasma gondii are investigated as possible vaccine candidates against the parasite. The aim of this research was to evaluate the immune responses of sheep injected twice, intramuscularly, with DNA plasmids encoding T. gondii dense granule antigens GRA1, GRA4, GRA6 and GRA7 formulated into liposomes. Control sheep were injected with an empty vector or received no injections. The injection of sheep with DNA plasmids encoding for GRA1, GRA4, GRA6 or GRA7 elicited an immune response after the first and the second injections as indicated by the moderate to high antibody responses. The injection of pGRA7 induced a significant level of anti-GRA7 IgG2 antibody and IFN-γ responses indicating a Th1-like immune response whereas injection with pGRA1, pGRA4 and pGRA6 stimulated a IgG1 type antibody response with a limited, if any, IFN-γ response. The results demonstrate that the intramuscular injection of sheep with a DNA liposome formulated plasmid coding for GRA proteins is an effective system that induces a significant immune response against T. gondii.

  15. Bacterial feeding induces changes in immune-related gene expression and has trans-generational impacts in the cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogel Heiko

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poly- and oligophagous insects are able to feed on various host plants with a wide range of defense strategies. However, diverse food plants are also inhabited by microbiota differing in quality and quantity, posing a potential challenge for immune system mediated homeostasis in the herbivore. Recent studies highlight the complex interactions between environmentally encountered microorganisms and herbivorous insects, pointing to a potential adaptational alteration of the insects' physiology. We performed a differential gene expression analysis in whole larvae and eggs laid by parents grown on different diets to identify potential novel genes related to elevated microbial content in the caterpillars' food. Results We used GeneFishing, a novel differential display method, to study the effects of dietary bacteria on the general gene expression in different life stages and tissues of the cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni. We were able to visualize several hundred transcripts on agarose gels, one fifth of which were differentially expressed between treatments. The largest number of differentially expressed genes was found in defense-related processes (13 and in recognition and metabolism (16. 21 genes were picked out and further tested for differential gene expression by an independent method (qRT-PCR in various tissues of larvae grown on bacterial and bacteria-free diet, and also in adults. We detected a number of genes indicative of an altered physiological status of the insect, depending on the diet, developmental stage and tissue. Conclusion Changes in immune status are accompanied by specific changes in the transcript levels of genes connected to metabolism and homeostasis of the organism. Our findings show that larval feeding on bacteria-rich diet leads to substantial gene expression changes, potentially resulting in a reorganization of the insects' metabolism to maintain organismal homeostasis, not only in the larval but also

  16. Adoption in ancient times

    OpenAIRE

    Bisha Eugena

    2015-01-01

    Since in ancient times, in all human cultures, children transfered from biological parents to parents that want them to create family, for political alliances, for inheritance, for a future marriage, or to care for elderly parents. The practice of adoption was fairly common in different places and periods. Adoption is mention on Bible and Quran. Greeks, Romans, Egyptians and Babylonians had adoption systems.

  17. Ancient ports of Kalinga

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.

    which plied between Kalinga and south east Asian countries. Nanda Raja, is said to have attacked Kalinga with the intention of getting access to the sea for the landlocked Kingdom of Magadha (Bihar). The ancient texa Artha Sastra (3rd-4th century B...

  18. Ancient deforestation revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J Donald

    2011-01-01

    The image of the classical Mediterranean environment of the Greeks and Romans had a formative influence on the art, literature, and historical perception of modern Europe and America. How closely does is this image congruent with the ancient environment as it in reality existed? In particular, how forested was the ancient Mediterranean world, was there deforestation, and if so, what were its effects? The consensus of historians, geographers, and other scholars from the mid-nineteenth century through the first three quarters of the twentieth century was that human activities had depleted the forests to a major extent and caused severe erosion. My research confirmed this general picture. Since then, revisionist historians have questioned these conclusions, maintaining instead that little environmental damage was done to forests and soils in ancient Greco-Roman times. In a reconsideration of the question, this paper looks at recent scientific work providing proxy evidence for the condition of forests at various times in ancient history. I look at three scientific methodologies, namely anthracology, palynology, and computer modeling. Each of these avenues of research offers support for the concept of forest change, both in abundance and species composition, and episodes of deforestation and erosion, and confirms my earlier work.

  19. Printing Ancient Terracotta Warriors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadecki, Victoria L.

    2010-01-01

    Standing in awe in Xian, China, at the Terra Cotta warrior archaeological site, the author thought of sharing this experience and excitement with her sixth-grade students. She decided to let her students carve patterns of the ancient soldiers to understand their place in Chinese history. They would make block prints and print multiple soldiers on…

  20. Creative Ventures: Ancient Civilizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Rebecca

    The open-ended activities in this book are designed to extend the imagination and creativity of students and encourage students to examine their feelings and values about historic eras. Civilizations addressed include ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, Mayan, Stonehenge, and Mesopotamia. The activities focus upon the cognitive and affective pupil…

  1. Ancient Egyptian surgical heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Aly

    2010-12-01

    Egyptian medicine influenced the medicine of neighboring cultures, including the culture of ancient Greece. From Greece, its influence spread onward, thereby affecting Western civilization significantly. The oldest extant Egyptian medical texts are six papyri: The Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus and the Ebers Medical Papyrus are famous. PMID:21208098

  2. Ancient Egypt: History 380.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Laraine D.

    "Ancient Egypt," an upper-division, non-required history course covering Egypt from pre-dynastic time through the Roman domination is described. General descriptive information is presented first, including the method of grading, expectation of student success rate, long-range course objectives, procedures for revising the course, major course…

  3. Ancient Egypt: Personal Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinski, Arelene

    This teacher resource book provides information on ancient Egypt via short essays, photographs, maps, charts, and drawings. Egyptian social and religious life, including writing, art, architecture, and even the practice of mummification, is conveniently summarized for the teacher or other practitioner in a series of one to three page articles with…

  4. A Vibrant Ancient City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGTONG

    2004-01-01

    LIJIANG is a small city onthe Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau in southern Chinawith an 800-year history.Word of its ancient language and music, and unique natural scenery has spread over the decades, and Lijiang is now known throughout the world. It was added

  5. In Ovo Administration of Silver Nanoparticles and/or Amino Acids Influence Metabolism and Immune Gene Expression in Chicken Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrat K. Bhanja

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to their physicochemical and biological properties, silver nanoparticles (NanoAg have a wide range of applications. In the present study, their roles as a carrier of nutrients and an immunomodulator were tested in chicken embryos. Cysteine (Cys+NanoAg injected embryos had smaller livers but heavier breasts on the 19th day of embryogenesis. Cys injected embryos had lower oxygen consumption compared to threonine (Thr or NanoAg injected embryos. The energy expenditure in Thr+NanoAg, or NanoAg injected embryos was higher than Cys or Cys+NanoAg but was not different from uninjected control embryos. Relative expression of the hepatic insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I gene was higher in Cys or NanoAg injected embryos after lipopolysaccharide (LPS induction. The gene expression of hepatic tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6 did not differ among amino acids, NanoAg and uninjected controls in the non-LPS groups, but increased by many folds in the LPS treated NanoAg, Cys and Cys+NanoAg groups. In LPS treated spleens, TNF-α expression was also up-regulated by NanoAg, amino acids and their combinations, but interleukin-10 (IL-10 expression was down-regulated in Thr, Cys or Thr+NanoAg injected embryos. Toll like receptor-2 (TLR2 expression did not differ in NanoAg or amino acids injected embryos; however, toll like receptor-4 (TLR4 expression was higher in all treated embryos, except for Cys+NanoAg, than in uninjected control embryos. We concluded that NanoAg either alone or in combination with amino acids did not affect embryonic growth but improved immunocompetence, indicating that NanoAg and amino acid complexes can act as potential agents for the enhancement of innate and adaptive immunity in chicken.

  6. A homologue gene of β-catenin participates in the development of shrimps and immune response to bacteria and viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ya-Kai; Ding, Ding; Wang, Hui-Min; Kang, Cui-Jie

    2015-11-01

    β-Catenin is a multifunctional protein that is involved in many physiological processes, including development, cell proliferation, cell migration, and apoptosis. However, the function of β-Catenin in crustacean is unknown. In this study, the first shrimp homologous gene of β-catenin in Marsupenaeus japonicus (i.e., Mjβ-catenin) was identified and characterized. The full-length of the complementary DNA of Mjβ-catenin is 3130 bp, including a 2463 bp open reading frame that encodes 821 amino acid. Multiple alignment of β-Catenin proteins suggested that the Armadillo/β-Catenin-like repeat domains were conserved. Phylogenetic analysis showed that β-Catenin from shrimp was clustered into one group with invertebrate β-Catenin. The transcription of β-catenin in various development stages of shrimp was detected and persistently increased as the shrimp matured. In adult shrimp, β-catenin was widely distributed in detected tissues and has the relatively high expression level in gills, hemocytes, testes, and ovaries. The transcripts of β-catenin in tissues of adult shrimp were significantly up-regulated at various time points after infecting with Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio anguillarum, and white-spot syndrome virus. Furthermore, knockdown of β-catenin resulted in impaired bacterial clearance ability and increased virus copy in shrimp in vivo. Therefore, β-Catenin in shrimp participates in the development and immune response of shrimps. PMID:26334791

  7. Molecular cloning and expression of PoIR2, a novel gene involved in immune response in Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuo; Li, Chunmei; Wang, Xubo; Wang, Yanan; Liu, Zhipeng; Zhai, Teng; Zhang, Quanqi

    2010-03-01

    A novel immune-related gene was expressed in Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) injected with Vibrio anguillarum. The complete cDNA contained a 169 bp 5’UTR, a 336 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding 111 amino acids and a 556bp 3’UTR. Six exons and five introns were identified in the PoIR2 gene. Blastp similarity comparison showed its encoding protein had 50% similarity to Danio rerio neuromedin S (NMS), but further alignment indicated they did not have NMS C-terminal conservational signature domain. So it was not defined as an NMS homologue. Protein structure analysis indicated it had a 26aa signal peptide and was a secretory pathway protein. RT-PCR demonstrated that the expression of PoIR2 was quickly induced and drastically increased in liver, kidney, spleen, gills, intestine, heart, and skeletal muscle after infected with V. anguillarum. These results indicated that the PoIR2 might play some important role in Japanese flounder immune response system. This gene was named PoIR2 ( P.olivaceus immune-related gene 2, GenBank accession number: EU224372). The mature PoIR2 peptide was expressed in BL21(DE3) pLysS using pET-32a(+) vector and a great part of the recombinant mature peptide existed as soluble type.

  8. Genome evolution in an ancient bacteria-ant symbiosis: parallel gene loss among Blochmannia spanning the origin of the ant tribe Camponotini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Williams

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Stable associations between bacterial endosymbionts and insect hosts provide opportunities to explore genome evolution in the context of established mutualisms and assess the roles of selection and genetic drift across host lineages and habitats. Blochmannia, obligate endosymbionts of ants of the tribe Camponotini, have coevolved with their ant hosts for ∼40 MY. To investigate early events in Blochmannia genome evolution across this ant host tribe, we sequenced Blochmannia from two divergent host lineages, Colobopsis obliquus and Polyrhachis turneri, and compared them with four published genomes from Blochmannia of Camponotus sensu stricto. Reconstructed gene content of the last common ancestor (LCA of these six Blochmannia genomes is reduced (690 protein coding genes, consistent with rapid gene loss soon after establishment of the symbiosis. Differential gene loss among Blochmannia lineages has affected cellular functions and metabolic pathways, including DNA replication and repair, vitamin biosynthesis and membrane proteins. Blochmannia of P. turneri (i.e., B. turneri encodes an intact DnaA chromosomal replication initiation protein, demonstrating that loss of dnaA was not essential for establishment of the symbiosis. Based on gene content, B. obliquus and B. turneri are unable to provision hosts with riboflavin. Of the six sequenced Blochmannia, B. obliquus is the earliest diverging lineage (i.e., the sister group of other Blochmannia sampled and encodes the fewest protein-coding genes and the most pseudogenes. We identified 55 genes involved in parallel gene loss, including glutamine synthetase, which may participate in nitrogen recycling. Pathways for biosynthesis of coenzyme A, terpenoids and riboflavin were lost in multiple lineages, suggesting relaxed selection on the pathway after inactivation of one component. Analysis of Illumina read datasets did not detect evidence of plasmids encoding missing functions, nor the presence of

  9. Genome evolution in an ancient bacteria-ant symbiosis: parallel gene loss among Blochmannia spanning the origin of the ant tribe Camponotini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Laura E; Wernegreen, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Stable associations between bacterial endosymbionts and insect hosts provide opportunities to explore genome evolution in the context of established mutualisms and assess the roles of selection and genetic drift across host lineages and habitats. Blochmannia, obligate endosymbionts of ants of the tribe Camponotini, have coevolved with their ant hosts for ∼40 MY. To investigate early events in Blochmannia genome evolution across this ant host tribe, we sequenced Blochmannia from two divergent host lineages, Colobopsis obliquus and Polyrhachis turneri, and compared them with four published genomes from Blochmannia of Camponotus sensu stricto. Reconstructed gene content of the last common ancestor (LCA) of these six Blochmannia genomes is reduced (690 protein coding genes), consistent with rapid gene loss soon after establishment of the symbiosis. Differential gene loss among Blochmannia lineages has affected cellular functions and metabolic pathways, including DNA replication and repair, vitamin biosynthesis and membrane proteins. Blochmannia of P. turneri (i.e., B. turneri) encodes an intact DnaA chromosomal replication initiation protein, demonstrating that loss of dnaA was not essential for establishment of the symbiosis. Based on gene content, B. obliquus and B. turneri are unable to provision hosts with riboflavin. Of the six sequenced Blochmannia, B. obliquus is the earliest diverging lineage (i.e., the sister group of other Blochmannia sampled) and encodes the fewest protein-coding genes and the most pseudogenes. We identified 55 genes involved in parallel gene loss, including glutamine synthetase, which may participate in nitrogen recycling. Pathways for biosynthesis of coenzyme A, terpenoids and riboflavin were lost in multiple lineages, suggesting relaxed selection on the pathway after inactivation of one component. Analysis of Illumina read datasets did not detect evidence of plasmids encoding missing functions, nor the presence of coresident symbionts

  10. Expression profile of key immune-related genes in Penaeus monodon juveniles after oral administration of recombinant envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ancy; Sudheer, Naduvilamuriparampu Saidumuhammed; Kiron, Viswanath; Bright Singh, Issac S; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri

    2016-07-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most catastrophic pathogen the shrimp industry has ever encountered. VP28, the abundant envelope protein of WSSV was expressed in bacteria, the purified protein administered orally to Penaeus monodon juveniles and its immune modulatory effects examined. The results indicated significant up-regulation of caspase, penaeidin, crustin, astakine, syntenin, PmRACK, Rab7, STAT and C-type lectin in animals orally administered with this antigen. This revealed the immune modulations in shrimps followed by oral administration of rVP28P which resulted in the reduced transcription of viral gene vp28 and delay in mortality after WSSV challenge. The study suggests the potential of rVP28P to elicit a non-specific immune stimulation in shrimps.

  11. Transcriptome Analysis and Discovery of Genes Involved in Immune Pathways from Coelomocytes of Sea Cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) after Vibrio splendidus Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiong; Liao, Meijie; Wang, Yingeng; Li, Bin; Zhang, Zheng; Rong, Xiaojun; Chen, Guiping; Wang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio splendidus is identified as one of the major pathogenic factors for the skin ulceration syndrome in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus), which has vastly limited the development of the sea cucumber culture industry. In order to screen the immune genes involving Vibrio splendidus challenge in sea cucumber and explore the molecular mechanism of this process, the related transcriptome and gene expression profiling of resistant and susceptible biotypes of sea cucumber with Vibrio splendidus challenge were collected for analysis. A total of 319,455,942 trimmed reads were obtained, which were assembled into 186,658 contigs. After that, 89,891 representative contigs (without isoform) were clustered. The analysis of the gene expression profiling identified 358 differentially expression genes (DEGs) in the bacterial-resistant group, and 102 DEGs in the bacterial-susceptible group, compared with that in control group. According to the reported references and annotation information from BLAST, GO and KEGG, 30 putative bacterial-resistant genes and 19 putative bacterial-susceptible genes were identified from DEGs. The qRT-PCR results were consistent with the RNA-Seq results. Furthermore, many DGEs were involved in immune signaling related pathways, such as Endocytosis, Lysosome, MAPK, Chemokine and the ERBB signaling pathway. PMID:26193268

  12. Transcriptome Analysis and Discovery of Genes Involved in Immune Pathways from Coelomocytes of Sea Cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus after Vibrio splendidus Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Gao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio splendidus is identified as one of the major pathogenic factors for the skin ulceration syndrome in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus, which has vastly limited the development of the sea cucumber culture industry. In order to screen the immune genes involving Vibrio splendidus challenge in sea cucumber and explore the molecular mechanism of this process, the related transcriptome and gene expression profiling of resistant and susceptible biotypes of sea cucumber with Vibrio splendidus challenge were collected for analysis. A total of 319,455,942 trimmed reads were obtained, which were assembled into 186,658 contigs. After that, 89,891 representative contigs (without isoform were clustered. The analysis of the gene expression profiling identified 358 differentially expression genes (DEGs in the bacterial-resistant group, and 102 DEGs in the bacterial-susceptible group, compared with that in control group. According to the reported references and annotation information from BLAST, GO and KEGG, 30 putative bacterial-resistant genes and 19 putative bacterial-susceptible genes were identified from DEGs. The qRT-PCR results were consistent with the RNA-Seq results. Furthermore, many DGEs were involved in immune signaling related pathways, such as Endocytosis, Lysosome, MAPK, Chemokine and the ERBB signaling pathway.

  13. Modulation of immunity and inflammatory gene expression in the gut, in inflammatory diseases of the gut and in the liver by probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza-Diaz, Julio; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina; Fontana, Luis; Gil, Angel

    2014-11-14

    The potential for the positive manipulation of the gut microbiome through the introduction of beneficial microbes, as also known as probiotics, is currently an active area of investigation. The FAO/WHO define probiotics as live microorganisms that confer a health benefit to the host when administered in adequate amounts. However, dead bacteria and bacterial molecular components may also exhibit probiotic properties. The results of clinical studies have demonstrated the clinical potential of probiotics in many pathologies, such as allergic diseases, diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and viral infection. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the beneficial effects of probiotics, most of which involve gene expression regulation in specific tissues, particularly the intestine and liver. Therefore, the modulation of gene expression mediated by probiotics is an important issue that warrants further investigation. In the present paper, we performed a systematic review of the probiotic-mediated modulation of gene expression that is associated with the immune system and inflammation. Between January 1990 to February 2014, PubMed was searched for articles that were published in English using the MeSH terms "probiotics" and "gene expression" combined with "intestines", "liver", "enterocytes", "antigen-presenting cells", "dendritic cells", "immune system", and "inflammation". Two hundred and five original articles matching these criteria were initially selected, although only those articles that included specific gene expression results (77) were later considered for this review and separated into three major topics: the regulation of immunity and inflammatory gene expression in the gut, in inflammatory diseases of the gut and in the liver. Particular strains of Bifidobacteria, Lactobacilli, Escherichia coli, Propionibacterium, Bacillus and Saccharomyces influence the gene expression of mucins, Toll-like receptors, caspases, nuclear factor-κB, and interleukins

  14. Construction of prokaryotic expression system of TGF-β1 epitope gene and identification of recombinant fusion protein immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Hong Guo; Zhi-Ming Hao; Jin-Yan Luo; Jun-Hong Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To insert the constructed TGF-β1the el loop of C-terminus of truncated hepatitis B core antigen to increase TGF-β1expression system and to identify immunity of the expressed recombinant protein in order to exploit the possibility for obtaining anti- TGF-β1METHODS: The TGF-β1mature TGF-β1TGF-32) was amplified by polymerase chain reaction from the recombinant pGEM-7z/TGF-β1HBcAg gene fragments (encoding HBcAg from 1-71 and 89-144 amino acid residues) were amplified from PYTA1-HBcAg vector. The recombinant vector pGEMEX-1 was used to insert HBcAg1-71, TGF-β1into restrictive endonuclease enzyme and ligated with T4ligase. The fusion gene fragments HBcAg1-71-TGF-β1HBcAg89-144 were recloned to pET28a(+) and the DNA sequence was confirmed by the dideoxy chain termination method. The recombinant vector pET28a (+)/CTC was transformed and expressed in E.. Coli BL21 (DE3)under induction of IPTG. After purification with Ni+2-NTA agarose resins, the antigenicity of purified protein was detected by ELISA and Western blot and visualized under electron microscope.RESULTS: Enzyme digestion analysis and sequencing showed that TGF-β1loop of C-terminus of truncated hepatitis B core antigen.SDS-PAGE analysis showed that relative molecular mass(Mr) of the expressed product by pET28a (+)/CTC was Mr 24 600.The output of the target recombinant protein was approximately 34.8% of the total bacterial protein,mainly presented in the form of inclusion body. Western blotting and ELISA demonstrated that the fusion protein could combine with anti-TGF-β1not with anti-HBcAg. The purity of protein was about 90% and the protein was in the form of self-assembling particles visualized under electron microscope. This fusion protein had good anti-TGF-β1could be used as anti-TGF-β1CONCLUSION: A recombinant prokaryotic expression system with high expression efficiency of the target TGF- epitope gene was successfully established.The fusion protein is in the form of self-assembling particles

  15. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer for the potential therapy of adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Jared N; Elder, Melissa; Conlon, Thomas; Cruz, Pedro; Wright, Amy J; Srivastava, Arun; Flotte, Terence R

    2011-08-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare, potentially fatal pediatric disease, which results from mutations within the ADA gene, leading to metabolic abnormalities and ultimately profound immunologic and nonimmunologic defects. In this study, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors based on serotypes 1 and 9 were used to deliver a secretory version of the human ADA (hADA) gene to various tissues to promote immune reconstitution following enzyme expression in a mouse model of ADA deficiency. Here, we report that a single-stranded rAAV vector, pTR2-CB-Igκ-hADA, (1) facilitated successful gene delivery to multiple tissues, including heart, skeletal muscle, and kidney, (2) promoted ectopic expression of hADA, and (3) allowed enhanced serum-based enzyme activity over time. Moreover, the rAAV-hADA vector packaged in serotype 9 capsid drove partial, prolonged, and progressive immune reconstitution in ADA-deficient mice. Overview Summary Gene therapies for severe combined immune deficiency due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency (ADA-SCID) over two decades have exclusively involved retroviral vectors targeted to lymphocytes and hematopoietic progenitor cells. These groundbreaking gene therapies represented an unprecedented revolution in clinical medicine but in most cases did not fully correct the immune deficiency and came with the potential risk of insertional mutagenesis. Alternatively, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have gained attention as valuable tools for gene transfer, having demonstrated no pathogenicity in humans, minimal immunogenicity, long-term efficacy, ease of administration, and broad tissue tropism (Muzyczka, 1992 ; Flotte et al., 1993 ; Kessler et al., 1996 ; McCown et al., 1996 ; Lipkowitz et al., 1999 ; Marshall, 2001 ; Chen et al., 2003 ; Conlon and Flotte, 2004 ; Griffey et al., 2005 ; Pacak et al., 2006 ; Stone et al., 2008 ; Liu et al., 2009 ; Choi et al., 2010

  16. Exploiting resource use efficiency and resilience in ancient wheat species

    OpenAIRE

    Parmar, Anisha

    2014-01-01

    Modern bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) initially derived from wild progenitors which underwent hybridisation and domestication events. It is hypothesised that modern plant breeding has reduced the genetic variation among modern cultivars (Sparkes, 2010). Ancient wheat species form a conduit between wild ancient wheat and cultivated Triticum species, and may harbour the genetic variation required to supplement the modern bread wheat gene pool. The current work investigated a range of morpholog...

  17. The effects of galactooligosaccharide on systemic and mucosal immune response, growth performance and appetite related gene transcript in goldfish (Carassius auratus gibelio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miandare, Hamed Kolangi; Farvardin, Shoeib; Shabani, Ali; Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein; Ramezanpour, Seyyede Sanaz

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigates the effects of supplementation of goldfish (Carassius auratus gibelio) diet with galactooligosaccharide (GOS) on serum immune response, mucosal immune parameters as well as appetite-related (Ghrelin) and immune-related (TNF-1α and TNF-2α) genes expression. One hundred and eighty fish with an average weight of 4.88 ± 0.28 g were stocked in twelve 500-L fiberglass tank assigned to four treatments repeated in triplicates. Fish were fed on experimental diets contain 0.5, 1 and 2% GOS for 6 weeks. Supplementation of diet with GOS had no remarkable effect on goldfish growth performance (P > 0.05). Evaluation of serum innate immune parameters revealed that supplementation of diet with GOS significantly elevated total protein, Albumin, Globulins, Lysozyme and Alkaline phosphatase activity as well as agglutination compared to control group in a dose dependent manner (P diet showed increased skin mucus immune response (total protein and lysozyme activity) compared other groups (P < 0.0.5); except in case of ALP activity. Molecular studies on appetite (ghrelin) and inflammatory cytokine (TNF-1α and TNF-2α) genes expression revealed remarkably decrease and increase, respectively in GOS fed fish (P < 0.0.5). These results showed immunomodulatory effects of dietary GOS on serum and skin mucus response as well as expression of inflammatory cytokines in goldfish, though this supplement decreased appetite gene expression and had no effect on growth performance. PMID:27311434

  18. Identification of bovine leukemia virus tax function associated with host cell transcription, signaling, stress response and immune response pathway by microarray-based gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arainga Mariluz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis and is closely related to human T-cell leukemia virus type I. The Tax protein of BLV is a transcriptional activator of viral replication and a key contributor to oncogenic potential. We previously identified interesting mutant forms of Tax with elevated (TaxD247G or reduced (TaxS240P transactivation effects on BLV replication and propagation. However, the effects of these mutations on functions other than transcriptional activation are unknown. In this study, to identify genes that play a role in the cascade of signal events regulated by wild-type and mutant Tax proteins, we used a large-scale host cell gene-profiling approach. Results Using a microarray containing approximately 18,400 human mRNA transcripts, we found several alterations after the expression of Tax proteins in genes involved in many cellular functions such as transcription, signal transduction, cell growth, apoptosis, stress response, and immune response, indicating that Tax protein has multiple biological effects on various cellular environments. We also found that TaxD247G strongly regulated more genes involved in transcription, signal transduction, and cell growth functions, contrary to TaxS240P, which regulated fewer genes. In addition, the expression of genes related to stress response significantly increased in the presence of TaxS240P as compared to wild-type Tax and TaxD247G. By contrast, the largest group of downregulated genes was related to immune response, and the majority of these genes belonged to the interferon family. However, no significant difference in the expression level of downregulated genes was observed among the Tax proteins. Finally, the expression of important cellular factors obtained from the human microarray results were validated at the RNA and protein levels by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting

  19. Effects of transgene expression level per cell in mice livers on induction of transgene-specific immune responses after hydrodynamic gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Y; Takahashi, Y; Hamana, A; Nishikawa, M; Takakura, Y

    2016-07-01

    We previously showed that high and sustained transgene expression of antigenic proteins induced transgene-specific immune responses. In the present study, a detailed relationship between the level of transgene expression per cell and immune response after hydrodynamic gene transfer was investigated. Cypridina luciferase (cLuc), a secretory antigenic reporter protein, was selected as a model antigen, and pROSA-cLuc, a plasmid expressing cLuc, was constructed. A fixed dose (30 μg) of pROSA-cLuc was delivered to mice by a single hydrodynamic injection or three injections at 24-h intervals because the number of cells transfected with plasmids is dependent on the number of hydrodynamic injections. Serum cLuc activity, an indicator of the total amount of cLuc transgene expression, was almost equal between these two groups. In contrast, the high-dose single injection induced higher levels of cLuc-specific humoral and cellular immune responses than the three low-dose injections. Moreover, the serum cLuc activity of the high-dose single injection group began to decline ~10 days after injection, whereas the activity remained constant in the three low-dose injection group. These results indicate that it is preferable to reduce the level of transgene expression per cell to avoid induction of the transgene-specific immune response after hydrodynamic gene transfer. PMID:26966861

  20. Protective immunization of horses with a recombinant canarypox virus vectored vaccine co-expressing genes encoding the outer capsid proteins of African horse sickness virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Alan J; Quan, Melvyn; Lourens, Carina W; Audonnet, Jean-Christophe; Minke, Jules M; Yao, Jiansheng; He, Ling; Nordgren, Robert; Gardner, Ian A; Maclachlan, N James

    2009-07-16

    We describe the development and preliminary characterization of a recombinant canarypox virus vectored (ALVAC) vaccine for protective immunization of equids against African horse sickness virus (AHSV) infection. Horses (n=8) immunized with either of two concentrations of recombinant canarypox virus vector (ALVAC-AHSV) co-expressing synthetic genes encoding the outer capsid proteins (VP2 and VP5) of AHSV serotype 4 (AHSV-4) developed variable titres (horse immunized with a commercial recombinant canarypox virus vectored vaccine expressing the haemagglutinin genes of two equine influenza H3N8 viruses was seronegative to AHSV and following infection with virulent AHSV-4 developed pyrexia, thrombocytopenia and marked oedema of the supraorbital fossae typical of the "dikkop" or cardiac form of African horse sickness. AHSV was detected by virus isolation and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in the blood of the control horse from 8 days onwards after challenge infection whereas AHSV was not detected at any time in the blood of the ALVAC-AHSV vaccinated horses. The control horse seroconverted to AHSV by 2 weeks after challenge infection as determined by both virus neutralization and ELISA assays, whereas six of eight of the ALVAC-AHSV vaccinated horses did not seroconvert by either assay following challenge infection with virulent AHSV-4. These data confirm that the ALVAC-AHSV vaccine will be useful for the protective immunization of equids against African horse sickness, and avoids many of the problems inherent to live-attenuated AHSV vaccines.

  1. Whole transcriptome analysis reveals changes in expression of immune-related genes during and after bleaching in a reef-building coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón, Jorge H; Kamel, Bishoy; Burge, Colleen A; Harvell, C Drew; Medina, Mónica; Weil, Ernesto; Mydlarz, Laura D

    2015-04-01

    Climate change is negatively affecting the stability of natural ecosystems, especially coral reefs. The dissociation of the symbiosis between reef-building corals and their algal symbiont, or coral bleaching, has been linked to increased sea surface temperatures. Coral bleaching has significant impacts on corals, including an increase in disease outbreaks that can permanently change the entire reef ecosystem. Yet, little is known about the impacts of coral bleaching on the coral immune system. In this study, whole transcriptome analysis of the coral holobiont and each of the associate components (i.e. coral host, algal symbiont and other associated microorganisms) was used to determine changes in gene expression in corals affected by a natural bleaching event as well as during the recovery phase. The main findings include evidence that the coral holobiont and the coral host have different responses to bleaching, and the host immune system appears suppressed even a year after a bleaching event. These results support the hypothesis that coral bleaching changes the expression of innate immune genes of corals, and these effects can last even after recovery of symbiont populations. Research on the role of immunity on coral's resistance to stressors can help make informed predictions on the future of corals and coral reefs. PMID:26064625

  2. Innate immunity and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL related genes in a nested case-control study for gastric cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue K Park

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Genetic variants regulating the host immune system may contribute to the susceptibility for the development of gastric cancer. Little is known about the role of the innate immunity- and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL-related genes for gastric cancer risk. This nested case-control study was conducted to identify candidate genes for gastric cancer risk for future studies. METHODS: In the Discovery phase, 3,072 SNPs in 203 innate immunity- and 264 NHL-related genes using the Illumine GoldenGateTM OPA Panel were analyzed in 42 matched case-control sets selected from the Korean Multi-center Cancer Cohort (KMCC. Six significant SNPs in four innate immunity (DEFA6, DEFB1, JAK3, and ACAA1 and 11 SNPs in nine NHL-related genes (INSL3, CHMP7, BCL2L11, TNFRSF8, RAD50, CASP7, CHUK, CD79B, and CLDN9 with a permutated p-value <0.01 were re-genotyped in the Replication phase among 386 cases and 348 controls. Odds ratios (ORs for gastric cancer risk were estimated adjusting for age, smoking status, and H. pylori and CagA sero-positivity. Summarized ORs in the total study population (428 cases and 390 controls are presented using pooled- and meta-analyses. RESULTS: Four SNPS had no heterogeneity across the phases: in the meta-analysis, DEFA6 rs13275170 and DEFB1 rs2738169 had both a 1.3-fold increased odds ratio (OR for gastric cancer (95% CIs = 1.1-1.6; and 1.1-1.5, respectively. INSL3 rs10421916 and rs11088680 had both a 0.8-fold decreased OR for gastric cancer (95% CIs = 0.7-0.97; and 0.7-0.9, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that certain variants in the innate immunity and NHL-related genes affect the gastric cancer risk, perhaps by modulating infection-inflammation-immunity mechanisms that remain to be defined.

  3. Integration of disease association and eQTL data using a Bayesian colocalisation approach highlights six candidate causal genes in immune-mediated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hui; Fortune, Mary D; Burren, Oliver S; Schofield, Ellen; Todd, John A; Wallace, Chris

    2015-06-15

    The genes and cells that mediate genetic associations identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are only partially understood. Several studies that have investigated the genetic regulation of gene expression have shown that disease-associated variants are over-represented amongst expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) variants. Evidence for colocalisation of eQTL and disease causal variants can suggest causal genes and cells for these genetic associations. Here, we used colocalisation analysis to investigate whether 595 genetic associations to ten immune-mediated diseases are consistent with a causal variant that regulates, in cis, gene expression in resting B cells, and in resting and stimulated monocytes. Previously published candidate causal genes were over-represented amongst genes exhibiting colocalisation (odds ratio > 1.5), and we identified evidence for colocalisation (posterior odds > 5) between cis eQTLs in at least one cell type and at least one disease for six genes: ADAM15, RGS1, CARD9, LTBR, CTSH and SYNGR1. We identified cell-specific effects, such as for CTSH, the expression of which in monocytes, but not in B cells, may mediate type 1 diabetes and narcolepsy associations in the chromosome 15q25.1 region. Our results demonstrate the utility of integrating genetic studies of disease and gene expression for highlighting causal genes and cell types. PMID:25743184

  4. Effect of yeast-derived products and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on antibody-mediated immune response and gene expression of pattern recognition receptors and cytokines in broiler chickens immunized with T-cell dependent antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, M; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; Echeverry, H; Crow, G H; Slominski, B A

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of yeast-derived products on innate and antibody mediated immune response in broiler chickens following immunization with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). One-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308) were randomly assigned to 6 dietary treatments of 9 replicate cages of 5 birds each per treatment. Dietary treatments consisted of a Control diet without antibiotic, and diets containing 11 mg/kg of virginiamycin, 0.25% of yeast cell wall (YCW), 0.2% of a commercial product Maxi-Gen Plus containing processed yeast and nucleotides, 0.05% of nucleotides, or a diet containing 10% of DDGS. On days 21 and 28 post-hatching, 5 birds per treatment were immunized intramuscularly with both SRBC and BSA. One week after each immunization, blood samples were collected. Serum samples were analyzed by hemagglutination test for antibody response to SRBC, and by ELISA for serum IgM and IgG response to BSA. On d 35, 5 birds per treatment were euthanized and the tissue samples from the cecal tonsils were collected to assess the gene expression of toll-like receptors TLR2b, TLR4, and TLR21, monocyte mannose receptor (MMR), and cytokines IL-10, IL-13, IL-4, IL-12p35, and IFN-γ. The results for gene expression analysis demonstrated that the diet supplemented with YCW increased the expression of TLR2b and T-helper type 2 cytokines IL-10, IL-4, and IL-13 relative to the Control; and the expression of TLR4 and IL-13 was upregulated in the nucleotide-containing diet. However, the diets containing antibiotics or Maxi-Gen Plus downregulated the expression of IFN-γ compared to the control. The primary antibody response to SRBC was not affected by diets. However, the diet containing YCW increased the secondary antibody response to SRBC compared to the antibiotic treatment. Neither primary nor secondary IgG and IgM response against BSA were affected by diets. In conclusion, supplementation of the diet with YCW stimulated Th2 cell

  5. Post-capture immune gene expression studies in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus acclimatized to atmospheric pressure

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Barros, I.; Divya, B.; Martins, I.; Vandeperre, F.; Santos, R.S.; Bettencourt, R.

    , symbiosis is considered the most important driving factor to overcome limited metabolic capabilities in extreme habitats [6,7] conferring a clear nutritional advantage to most Bathymodiolid mussels, allowing them to obtain energy from either sulfide.... azoricus immune genes tran- scriptional activity and symbiont bacteria prevalence, in view of the lack of chemical-based energy sources during acclimatization to aquaria. Given the chemosynthetic nature of B. azoricus sym- bionts, changes...

  6. Enhancing B- and T-Cell Immune Response to a Hepatitis C Virus E2 DNA Vaccine by Intramuscular Electrical Gene Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Zucchelli, Silvia; Capone, Stefania; Fattori, Elena; Folgori, Antonella; Di Marco, Annalise; Casimiro, Danilo; Simon, Adam J.; Laufer, Ralph; La Monica, Nicola; Cortese, Riccardo; Nicosia, Alfredo

    2000-01-01

    We describe an improved genetic immunization strategy for eliciting a full spectrum of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope 2 (E2) glycoprotein responses in mammals through electrical gene transfer (EGT) of plasmid DNA into muscle fibers. Intramuscular injection of a plasmid encoding a cross-reactive hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) peptide mimic fused at the N terminus of the E2 ectodomain, followed by electrical stimulation treatment in the form of high-frequency, low-voltage electric pulses,...

  7. Combined Flt3L/TK Gene Therapy Induces Immunological Surveillance Which Mediates an Immune Response Against a Surrogate Brain Tumor Neoantigen

    OpenAIRE

    King, Gwendalyn D; Muhammad, AKM Ghulam; Larocque, Daniel; Kelson, Kyle R; Xiong, Weidong; Liu, Chunyan; Sanderson, Nicholas SR; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Castro, Maria G; Pedro R Lowenstein

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a primary brain tumor with a median survival of 14.6 months postdiagnosis. The infiltrative nature of GBM prevents complete resection and residual brain tumor cells give rise to recurrent GBM, a hallmark of this disease. Recurrent GBMs are known to harbor numerous mutations/gene rearrangements when compared to the primary tumor, which leads to the potential expression of novel proteins that could serve as tumor neoantigens. We have developed a combined immune-...

  8. Pathogenesis of listeria-infected Drosophila wntD mutants is associated with elevated levels of the novel immunity gene edin.

    OpenAIRE

    Michael D Gordon; Ayres, Janelle S.; Schneider, David S.; Roel Nusse

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster mount an effective innate immune response against invading microorganisms, but can eventually succumb to persistent pathogenic infections. Understanding of this pathogenesis is limited, but it appears that host factors, induced by microbes, can have a direct cost to the host organism. Mutations in wntD cause susceptibility to Listeria monocytogenes infection, apparently through the derepression of Toll-Dorsal target genes, some of which are deleterious to survival. Her...

  9. Associations of allergic sensitization and clinical phenotypes with innate immune response genes polymorphisms are modified by house dust mite allergen exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Kurowski, Marcin; Majkowska-Wojciechowska, Barbara; Wardzyńska, Aleksandra; Kowalski, Marek L

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Polymorphisms within innate immunity genes are associated with allergic phenotypes but results are variable. These associations were not analyzed with respect to allergen exposure. We investigated associations of TLR and CD14 polymorphisms with allergy phenotypes in the context of house dust mite (HDM) exposure. Material and methods Children, aged 12-16 years (n=326), were recruited from downtown and rural locations and assessed by allergist. Skin prick tests, total and HDM-speci...

  10. Comets in ancient India

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Patrick Das

    2014-01-01

    The Indo-aryans of ancient India observed stars and constellations for ascertaining auspicious times for sacrificial rites ordained by vedas. It is but natural that they would have recounted in the vedic texts about comets. In Rigveda ($\\sim $ 1700 - 1500 BC) and Atharvaveda ($\\sim $ 1150 BC), there are references to dhumaketus and ketus, which stand for comets in Sanskrit. Varahamihira in 550 AD and Ballala Sena ($\\sim $ 1100 - 1200 AD) have described a large number of comets recorded by ancient seers such as Parashara, Vriddha Garga, Narada, Garga, etc. In this article, I conjecture that an episode narrated in Mahabharata of a radiant king, Nahusha, ruling the heavens, and later turning into a serpent after he had kicked the seer Agastya (also the star Canopus), is a mythological retelling of a cometary event.

  11. Ancient human microbiomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warinner, Christina; Speller, Camilla; Collins, Matthew J.; Lewis, Cecil M.

    2015-01-01

    Very recently, we discovered a vast new microbial self: the human microbiome. Our native microbiota interface with our biology and culture to influence our health, behavior, and quality of life, and yet we know very little about their origin, evolution, or ecology. With the advent of industrialization, globalization, and modern sanitation, it is intuitive that we have changed our relationship with microbes, but we have little information about the ancestral state of our microbiome, and therefore, we lack a foundation for characterizing this change. High-throughput sequencing has opened up new opportunities in the field of paleomicrobiology, allowing us to investigate the evolution of the complex microbial ecologies that inhabit our bodies. By focusing on recent coprolite and dental calculus research, we explore how emerging research on ancient human microbiomes is changing the way we think about ancient disease and how archaeological studies can contribute to a medical understanding of health and nutrition today. PMID:25559298

  12. The obesity gene, TMEM18, is of ancient origin, found in majority of neuronal cells in all major brain regions and associated with obesity in severely obese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levine Allen S

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TMEM18 is a hypothalamic gene that has recently been linked to obesity and BMI in genome wide association studies. However, the functional properties of TMEM18 are obscure. Methods The evolutionary history of TMEM18 was inferred using phylogenetic and bioinformatic methods. The gene's expression profile was investigated with real-time PCR in a panel of rat and mouse tissues and with immunohistochemistry in the mouse brain. Also, gene expression changes were analyzed in three feeding-related mouse models: food deprivation, reward and diet-induced increase in body weight. Finally, we genotyped 502 severely obese and 527 healthy Swedish children for two SNPs near TMEM18 (rs6548238 and rs756131. Results TMEM18 was found to be remarkably conserved and present in species that diverged from the human lineage over 1500 million years ago. The TMEM18 gene was widely expressed and detected in the majority of cells in all major brain regions, but was more abundant in neurons than other cell types. We found no significant changes in the hypothalamic and brainstem expression in the feeding-related mouse models. There was a strong association for two SNPs (rs6548238 and rs756131 of the TMEM18 locus with an increased risk for obesity (p = 0.001 and p = 0.002. Conclusion We conclude that TMEM18 is involved in both adult and childhood obesity. It is one of the most conserved human obesity genes and it is found in the majority of all brain sites, including the hypothalamus and the brain stem, but it is not regulated in these regions in classical energy homeostatic models.

  13. Construction of exogenous multiple epitopes of helper T lymphocytes and DNA immunization of its chimeric plasmid with HBV pre-S2/S gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Jun Gao; Xiao-Mou Peng; Dong-Ying Xie; Qi-Feng Xie; Zhi-Liang Gao; Ji-Lu Yao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To design and construct an exogenous multiple epitope of helper T lymphocytes (HTL), and to evaluate its effect on anti-HBs response through DNA immunization.METHODS: Artificial HTL epitope, PADRE and four other HTL epitopes from different proteins were linked together using splicing by overlap extension to generate exogenous multiple epitopes of HTL, MTE5. pcMTE5 and pcHB weregenerated by cloning MTE5 and fragments of HBV pre-S2/S gene into mammalian expression plasmid pcDNA3. Four chimeric plasmids were constructed by cloning MTE5 into the region of pre-S2 gene (Bam HI), 5′ terminal of S gene (HincⅡ, Xba Ⅰ) and 3′ terminal of S gene (Acc Ⅰ) of pcHB respectively. BALB/c mice were used in DNA immunization of the recombinant plasmids. Anti-HBs was detected using Abbott IMx AUSAB test kits.RESULTS: The sequences of MTE5 and the 6 constructs of recombinant plasmids were confirmed to be correct by DNA sequencing. The anti-HBs response of the coinoculation of pcHB and pcMTE5 was much higher than that of the inoculation of pcHB only (136.7±69.1 mIU/mL vs 27.6±17.3 mIU/mL, P<0.01, t = -6.56). Among the 4 chimeric plasmids, only the plasmid in which MTE5 was inserted into the pre-S2 region had good anti-HBs response (57.54±7.68 mIU/mL), and had no significant difference compared with those of pcHB and the co-inoculation of pcHB and pcMTE5.CONCLUSION: Exogenous multiple epitopes of HTL had immune enhancement when they were co-inoculated with pre-S2/S gene or inoculated in the chimeric form at a proper site of pre-S2/S gene of HBV. It might suggest that it was possible to improve hepatitis B vaccine using exogenous multiple epitopes of HTL. The antibody responses were very low using DNA immunization in the study. Thus, the immune enhancement effect of exogenous multiple epitopes of HTL has to be confirmed and the effect on overcoming the drawback of the polymorphism of HLA Ⅱ antigens should also be evaluated after these chimeric plasmids are expressed

  14. MHC Class II and Non-MHC Class II Genes Differentially Influence Humoral Immunity to Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor and Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A. James

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax Lethal Toxin consists of Protective Antigen (PA and Lethal Factor (LF, and current vaccination strategies focus on eliciting antibodies to PA. In human vaccination, the response to PA can vary greatly, and the response is often directed toward non-neutralizing epitopes. Variable vaccine responses have been shown to be due in part to genetic differences in individuals, with both MHC class II and other genes playing roles. Here, we investigated the relative contribution of MHC class II versus non-MHC class II genes in the humoral response to PA and LF immunization using three immunized strains of inbred mice: A/J (H-2k at the MHC class II locus, B6 (H-2b, and B6.H2k (H-2k. IgG antibody titers to LF were controlled primarily by the MHC class II locus, whereas IgG titers to PA were strongly influenced by the non-MHC class II genetic background. Conversely, the humoral fine specificity of reactivity to LF appeared to be controlled primarily through non-MHC class II genes, while the specificity of reactivity to PA was more dependent on MHC class II. Common epitopes, reactive in all strains, occurred in both LF and PA responses. These results demonstrate that MHC class II differentially influences humoral immune responses to LF and PA.

  15. Rice Snl6, a cinnamoyl-CoA reductase-like gene family member, is required for NH1-mediated immunity to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S Bart

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rice NH1 (NPR1 homolog 1 is a key mediator of innate immunity. In both plants and animals, the innate immune response is often accompanied by rapid cell death at the site of pathogen infection. Over-expression of NH1 in rice results in resistance to the bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo, constitutive expression of defense related genes and enhanced benzothiadiazole (BTH- mediated cell death. Here we describe a forward genetic screen that identified a suppressor of NH1-mediated lesion formation and resistance, snl6. Comparative genome hybridization and fine mapping rapidly identified the genomic location of the Snl6 gene. Snl6 is a member of the cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR-like gene family. We show that Snl6 is required for NH1-mediated resistance to Xoo. Further, we show that Snl6 is required for pathogenesis-related gene expression. In contrast to previously described CCR family members, disruption of Snl6 does not result in an obvious morphologic phenotype. Snl6 mutants have reduced lignin content and increased sugar extractability, an important trait for the production of cellulosic biofuels. These results suggest the existence of a conserved group of CCR-like genes involved in the defense response, and with the potential to alter lignin content without affecting development.

  16. No change in mRNA expression of immune-related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells challenged with Theileria annulata in Murrah buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Manjit; Kumar, Amod; Bhushan, Bharat; Ghosh, Srikant; Saravanan, B C; Sulabh, Sourabh; Parida, Subhashree; Gaur, Gyanendra Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) act as carrier to Theileria annulata and show less clinical sign of tropical theileriosis as compared to indigenous and exotic cattle. Differential expression of immune-related genes such as major histocompatibility complex, class II, DQ alpha 1 (MHC-DQα), signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPA), prion protein (PRNP), Toll-like receptor 10 (TLR10), c-musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog (cMAF) and V-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog B (MAFB) genes influence host resistance to this disease in exotic, crossbred and indigenous cattle. In the present study we examined the differential mRNA expression of the abovesaid immune-related genes in response to T. annulata infection in buffaloes. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) harvested from blood samples of buffaloes were challenged with ground-up tick supernatant carrying T. annulata sporozoites in vitro. After 48h of in vitro challenge qPCR was employed to measure the relative mRNA expression of MHC-DQα, SIRPA, PRNP, TLR10, cMAF and MAFB genes in infected and control PBMCs. In the current study, the selected genes showed no change in mRNA expression after T.annulata infection which indicates that they have little role in providing host resistance to theileriosis in buffaloes. PMID:26997138

  17. Pathogenesis of listeria-infected Drosophila wntD mutants is associated with elevated levels of the novel immunity gene edin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Gordon

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster mount an effective innate immune response against invading microorganisms, but can eventually succumb to persistent pathogenic infections. Understanding of this pathogenesis is limited, but it appears that host factors, induced by microbes, can have a direct cost to the host organism. Mutations in wntD cause susceptibility to Listeria monocytogenes infection, apparently through the derepression of Toll-Dorsal target genes, some of which are deleterious to survival. Here, we use gene expression profiling to identify genes that may mediate the observed susceptibility of wntD mutants to lethal infection. These genes include the TNF family member eiger and the novel immunity gene edin (elevated during infection; synonym CG32185, both of which are more strongly induced by infection of wntD mutants compared to controls. edin is also expressed more highly during infection of wild-type flies with wild-type Salmonella typhimurium than with a less pathogenic mutant strain, and its expression is regulated in part by the Imd pathway. Furthermore, overexpression of edin can induce age-dependent lethality, while loss of function in edin renders flies more susceptible to Listeria infection. These results are consistent with a model in which the regulation of host factors, including edin, must be tightly controlled to avoid the detrimental consequences of having too much or too little activity.

  18. A Dicer-1 gene from white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei: expression pattern in the processes of immune response and larval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xuemei; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng; Zhang, Huan; Dong, Chaohua; Zhang, Ying; Qiu, Limei; Shi, Yaohua; Zhao, Jianmin; Bi, Yongkun

    2010-10-01

    Dicer is a member of the RNAase III family which catalyzes the cleavage of double-stranded RNA to small interfering RNAs and micro RNAs, and then directs sequence-specific gene silencing. In this paper, the full-length cDNA of Dicer-1 was cloned from white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (designated as LvDcr1). It was of 7636 bp, including a poly A tail, a 5' UTR of 136 bp, a 3' UTR of 78 bp, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 7422 bp encoding a putative protein of 2473 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequence comprised all recognized functional domains found in other Dicer-1 homologues and showed the highest (97.7%) similarity to the Dicer-1 from tiger shrimp Penaeus mondon. Quantitative real-time PCR was employed to investigate the tissue distribution of LvDcr1 mRNA, and its expression in shrimps under virus challenge and larvae at different developmental stages. The LvDcr1 mRNA could be detected in all examined tissues with the highest expression level in hemocyte, and was up-regulated in hemocytes and gills after virus injection. These results indicated that LvDcr1 was involved in antiviral defense in adult shrimp. During the developmental stages from fertilized egg to postlarva VII, LvDcr1 was constitutively expressed at all examined development stages, but the expression level varied significantly. The highest expression level was observed in fertilized eggs and followed a decrease from fertilized egg to nauplius I stage. Then, the higher levels of expression were detected at nauplius V and postlarva stages. LvDcr1 expression regularly increased at the upper phase of nauplius, zoea and mysis stages than their prophase. The different expression of LvDcr1 in the larval stages could provide clues for understanding the early innate immunity in the process of shrimp larval development.

  19. Dual Pressure from Antiretroviral Therapy and Cell-Mediated Immune Response on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Annika C.; Deeks, Steven G.; Barbour, Jason D.; Heiken, Brandon D.; Younger, Sophie R.; Hoh, Rebecca; Lane, Meghan; Sällberg, Matti; Ortiz, Gabriel M.; Demarest, James F.; Liegler, Teri; Grant, Robert M.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Nixon, Douglas F.

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte pressure can lead to the development of viral escape mutants, with consequent loss of immune control. Antiretroviral drugs also exert selection pressures on HIV, leading to the emergence of drug resistance mutations and increased levels of viral replication. We have determined a minimal epitope of HIV protease, amino acids 76 to 84, towards which a CD8+ T-lymphocyte response is directed. This epitope, which is HLA-A2 restricted, includes two amino acids that commonly mutate (V82A and I84V) in the face of protease inhibitor therapy. Among 29 HIV-infected patients who were treated with protease inhibitors and who had developed resistance to these drugs, we show that the wild-type PR82V76-84 epitope is commonly recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in HLA-A2-positive patients and that the CTL directed to this epitope are of high avidity. In contrast, the mutant PR82A76-84 epitope is generally not recognized by wild-type-specific CTL, or when recognized it is of low to moderate avidity, suggesting that the protease inhibitor-selected V82A mutation acts both as a CTL and protease inhibitor escape mutant. Paradoxically, the absence of a mutation at position 82 was associated with the presence of a high-avidity CD8+ T-cell response to the wild-type virus sequence. Our results indicate that both HIV type 1-specific CD8+ T cells and antiretroviral drugs provide complex pressures on the same amino acid sequence of the HIV protease gene and, thus, can influence viral sequence evolution. PMID:12767994

  20. Transcription of innate immunity genes and cytokine secretion by canine macrophages resistant or susceptible to intracellular survival of Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchetti, Andréia Pereira; da Costa, Luciana Fachini; Romão, Everton de Lima; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Santos, Renato Lima

    2015-01-15

    In this study we assessed the basal transcription of genes associated with innate immunity (i.e. Nramp1, NOD1, NOD2, TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR5, TLR6, TLR7, and TLR9) in canine monocyte-derived macrophages from Leishmania-free dogs. Additionally, secretion of cytokines (IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α and IFN-γ) and nitric oxide in culture supernatants of macrophages with higher or lower resistance to intracellular survival of Leishmania infantum was also measured. Constitutive transcription of TLR9 and NOD2 were negligible; NOD1, TLR1, and TLR7 had low levels of transcription, whereas Nramp1 and TLR2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 had higher levels of constitutive transcription in canine monocyte-derived macrophages. There were no significant differences in transcription between macrophages with higher or lower resistance to intracellular survival of L. infantum. Secretion of TNF-α was higher in more resistant macrophages (designated as resistant) at 24h after infection when compared to less resistant macrophages (designated as susceptible), as well as the secretion of IFN-γ at 72 h post infection. Secretion of IL-10 was lower in resistant macrophages at 24h after infection. No detectable production of nitric oxide was observed. Interestingly, there was a negative correlation between NOD2 transcript levels and intracellular survival of L. infantum in resistant macrophages. This study demonstrated that decreased intracellular survival of L. infantum in canine macrophages was associated with increased production of TNF-α and IFN-γ and decreased production of IL-10; and that constitutive transcription of Nramp1, TLR and NLR does not interfere in intracellular survival of L. infantum.

  1. Selection of reliable reference genes for RT-qPCR studies in Octopus vulgaris paralarvae during development and immune-stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, P; Castellanos-Martínez, S; Iglesias, J; Otero, J J; Gestal, C

    2016-07-01

    The common octopus, Octopus vulgaris is a new candidate species for aquaculture. However, rearing of octopus paralarvae is hampered by high mortality and poor growth rates that impede its entire culture. The study of genes involved in the octopus development and immune response capability could help to understand the key of paralarvae survival and thus, to complete the octopus life cycle. Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) is the most frequently tool used to quantify the gene expression because of specificity and sensitivity. However, reliability of RT-qPCR requires the selection of appropriate normalization genes whose expression must be stable across the different experimental conditions of the study. Hence, the aim of the present work is to evaluate the stability of six candidate genes: β-actin (ACT), elongation factor 1-α (EF), ubiquitin (UBI), β-tubulin (TUB), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GADPH) and ribosomal RNA 18 (18S) in order to select the best reference gene. The stability of gene expression was analyzed using geNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper, in octopus paralarvae of seven developmental stages (embryo, paralarvae of 0, 10, 15, 20, 30 and 34days) and paralarvae of 20days after challenge with Vibrio lentus and Vibrio splendidus. The results were validated by measuring the expression of PGRP, a stimuli-specific gene. Our results showed UBI, EF and 18S as the most suitable reference genes during development of octopus paralarvae, and UBI, ACT and 18S for bacterial infection. These results provide a basis for further studies exploring molecular mechanism of their development and innate immune defense. PMID:27267177

  2. Inflammatory and Immune Response Genes Polymorphisms are Associated with Susceptibility to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Tatars Population from Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korytina, Gulnaz Faritovna; Akhmadishina, L Z; Kochetova, O V; Aznabaeva, Y G; Zagidullin, Sh Z; Victorova, T V

    2016-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex chronic inflammatory disease of the respiratory system affecting primarily distal respiratory pathways and lung parenchyma. This work was designed as a case-control study aimed at investigating the association of COPD with polymorphisms in inflammatory and immune response genes (JAK1, JAK3, STAT1, STAT3, NFKB1, IL17A, ADIPOQ, ADIPOR1, etc.) in Tatar population from Russia. Ten SNPs (rs310216, rs3212780, rs12693591, rs2293152, rs28362491, rs4711998, rs1974226, rs1501299, rs266729, and rs12733285) were genotyped by the real-time polymerase chain reaction (TaqMan assays) in a case-control study (425 COPD patients and 457 in the control group, from Ufa, Russia). Logistic regression was used to detect the association of SNPs in different models. Linear regression analyses were performed to estimate the relationship between SNPs and lung function parameters and pack-years. In Tatar population, significant associations of JAK1 (rs310216) (P = 0.0002, OR 1.70 in additive model), JAK3 (rs3212780) (P = 0.001, OR 1.61 in dominant model), and IL17A (rs1974226) (P = 0.0037, OR 2.31 in recessive model) with COPD were revealed. The disease risk was higher in carriers of insertion allele of NFKB1 (rs28362491) (P = 0.045, OR 1.22). We found a significant gene-by-environment interaction of smoking status and IL17A (rs1974226) (P interact = 0.016), JAK3 (rs3212780) (P interact = 0.031), ADIPOQ (rs266729) (P interact = 0.013), and ADIPOR1 (rs12733285) (P interact = 0.018). The relationship between the rs4711998, rs1974226, rs310216, rs3212780, rs28362491, and smoking pack-years was found (P = 0.045, P = 0.004, P = 0.0005, P = 0.021, and P = 0.042). A significant genotype-dependent variation of forced vital capacity was observed for NFKB1 (rs28362491) (P = 0.017), ADIPOR1 (rs12733285) (P = 0.043), and STAT1 (rs12693591) (P = 0.048). The genotypes of STAT1 (rs12693591) (P = 0.013) and JAK1 (rs

  3. Dissection of immune gene networks in primary melanoma tumors critical for antitumor surveillance of patients with stage II-III resectable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivendran, Shanthi; Chang, Rui; Pham, Lisa; Phelps, Robert G; Harcharik, Sara T; Hall, Lawrence D; Bernardo, Sebastian G; Moskalenko, Marina M; Sivendran, Meera; Fu, Yichun; de Moll, Ellen H; Pan, Michael; Moon, Jee Young; Arora, Sonali; Cohain, Ariella; DiFeo, Analisa; Ferringer, Tammie C; Tismenetsky, Mikhail; Tsui, Cindy L; Friedlander, Philip A; Parides, Michael K; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Lebwohl, Mark G; Wolchok, Jedd D; Bhardwaj, Nina; Burakoff, Steven J; Oh, William K; Palucka, Karolina; Merad, Miriam; Schadt, Eric E; Saenger, Yvonne M

    2014-08-01

    Patients with resected stage II-III cutaneous melanomas remain at high risk for metastasis and death. Biomarker development has been limited by the challenge of isolating high-quality RNA for transcriptome-wide profiling from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) primary tumor specimens. Using NanoString technology, RNA from 40 stage II-III FFPE primary melanomas was analyzed and a 53-immune-gene panel predictive of non-progression (area under the curve (AUC)=0.920) was defined. The signature predicted disease-specific survival (DSS P<0.001) and recurrence-free survival (RFS P<0.001). CD2, the most differentially expressed gene in the training set, also predicted non-progression (P<0.001). Using publicly available microarray data from 46 primary human melanomas (GSE15605), a coexpression module enriched for the 53-gene panel was then identified using unbiased methods. A Bayesian network of signaling pathways based on this data identified driver genes. Finally, the proposed 53-gene panel was confirmed in an independent test population of 48 patients (AUC=0.787). The gene signature was an independent predictor of non-progression (P<0.001), RFS (P<0.001), and DSS (P=0.024) in the test population. The identified driver genes are potential therapeutic targets, and the 53-gene panel should be tested for clinical application using a larger data set annotated on the basis of prospectively gathered data.

  4. Dissection of Immune Gene Networks in Primary Melanoma Tumors Critical for Antitumor Surveillance of Patients with Stage II–III Resectable Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivendran, Shanthi; Chang, Rui; Pham, Lisa; Phelps, Robert G.; Harcharik, Sara T.; Hall, Lawrence D.; Bernardo, Sebastian G.; Moskalenko, Marina M.; Sivendran, Meera; Fu, Yichun; de Moll, Ellen H.; Pan, Michael; Moon, Jee Young; Arora, Sonali; Cohain, Ariella; DiFeo, Analisa; Ferringer, Tammie C.; Tismenetsky, Mikhail; Tsui, Cindy L.; Friedlander, Philip A.; Parides, Michael K.; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Lebwohl, Mark G.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Bhardwaj, Nina; Burakoff, Steven J.; Oh, William K.; Palucka, Karolina; Merad, Miriam; Schadt, Eric E.; Saenger, Yvonne M.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with resected stage II–III cutaneous melanomas remain at high risk for metastasis and death. Biomarker development has been limited by the challenge of isolating high-quality RNA for transcriptome-wide profiling from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) primary tumor specimens. Using NanoString technology, RNA from 40 stage II–III FFPE primary melanomas was analyzed and a 53-immune-gene panel predictive of non-progression (area under the curve (AUC)=0.920) was defined. The signature predicted disease-specific survival (DSS P<0.001) and recurrence-free survival (RFS P<0.001). CD2, the most differentially expressed gene in the training set, also predicted non-progression (P<0.001). Using publicly available microarray data from 46 primary human melanomas (GSE15605), a coexpression module enriched for the 53-gene panel was then identified using unbiased methods. A Bayesian network of signaling pathways based on this data identified driver genes. Finally, the proposed 53-gene panel was confirmed in an independent test population of 48 patients (AUC=0.787). The gene signature was an independent predictor of non-progression (P<0.001), RFS (P<0.001), and DSS (P=0.024) in the test population. The identified driver genes are potential therapeutic targets, and the 53-gene panel should be tested for clinical application using a larger data set annotated on the basis of prospectively gathered data. PMID:24522433

  5. Suicide in ancient Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laios, K; Tsoukalas, G; Kontaxaki, M-I; Karamanou, M; Androutsos, G

    2014-01-01

    The theme of suicide appears several times in ancient Greek literature. However, each such reference acquires special significance depending on the field from which it originates. Most of the information found in mythology, but the suicide in a mythological tale, although in terms of motivation and mental situation of heroes may be in imitation of similar incidents of real life, in fact is linked with the principles of the ancient Greek religion. In ancient drama and mainly in tragedies suicide conduces to the tragic hypostasis of the heroes and to the evolution of the plot and also is a tool in order to be presented the ideas of poets for the relations of the gods, the relation among gods and men and the relation among the men. In ancient Greek philosophy there were the deniers of suicide, who were more concerned about the impact of suicide on society and also these who accepted it, recognizing the right of the individual to put an end to his life, in order to avoid personal misfortunes. Real suicides will be found mostly from historical sources, but most of them concern leading figures of the ancient world. Closer to the problem of suicide in the everyday life of antiquity are ancient Greek medicines, who studied the phenomenon more general without references to specific incidents. Doctors did not approve in principal the suicide and dealt with it as insane behavior in the development of the mental diseases, of melancholia and mania. They considered that the discrepancy of humors in the organ of logic in the human body will cause malfunction, which will lead to the absurdity and consequently to suicide, either due to excessive concentration of black bile in melancholia or due to yellow bile in mania. They believed that greater risk to commit suicide had women, young people and the elderly. As therapy they used the drugs of their time with the intention to induce calm and repression in the ill person, therefore they mainly used mandragora. In general, we would say

  6. Suicide in ancient Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laios, K; Tsoukalas, G; Kontaxaki, M-I; Karamanou, M; Androutsos, G

    2014-01-01

    The theme of suicide appears several times in ancient Greek literature. However, each such reference acquires special significance depending on the field from which it originates. Most of the information found in mythology, but the suicide in a mythological tale, although in terms of motivation and mental situation of heroes may be in imitation of similar incidents of real life, in fact is linked with the principles of the ancient Greek religion. In ancient drama and mainly in tragedies suicide conduces to the tragic hypostasis of the heroes and to the evolution of the plot and also is a tool in order to be presented the ideas of poets for the relations of the gods, the relation among gods and men and the relation among the men. In ancient Greek philosophy there were the deniers of suicide, who were more concerned about the impact of suicide on society and also these who accepted it, recognizing the right of the individual to put an end to his life, in order to avoid personal misfortunes. Real suicides will be found mostly from historical sources, but most of them concern leading figures of the ancient world. Closer to the problem of suicide in the everyday life of antiquity are ancient Greek medicines, who studied the phenomenon more general without references to specific incidents. Doctors did not approve in principal the suicide and dealt with it as insane behavior in the development of the mental diseases, of melancholia and mania. They considered that the discrepancy of humors in the organ of logic in the human body will cause malfunction, which will lead to the absurdity and consequently to suicide, either due to excessive concentration of black bile in melancholia or due to yellow bile in mania. They believed that greater risk to commit suicide had women, young people and the elderly. As therapy they used the drugs of their time with the intention to induce calm and repression in the ill person, therefore they mainly used mandragora. In general, we would say

  7. Comparative Immunization in BALB/c Mice with Recombinant Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vector and DNA Plasmid Expressing a SARS-CoV Nucleocapsid Protein Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunling Ma; Kun Yao; Feng Zhou; Minsheng Zhu

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate immunogenicity in the induction of humoral and cellular immune responses, severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-N gene recombinant replication-defective adenoviral vector, rAd-N, was generated and immunized BALB/c mice in a pcDNA3.1-N prime-rAd-N boost regimen. After humoral and cellular immune response detection, different levels of SARS-CoV N protein specific antibodies and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion are shown compared to controls. The humoral immune response was induced more effectively by the DNA priming and recombinant adenovirus boosting regimen. There is a significant difference between heterogeneous and homologous vaccinations. The heterogeneous combinations were all higher than those of the homologous combinations in the induction of anti-N antibody response. Among the three heterogeneous combinations, pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/rAd-N induced the strongest antibody response. In the induction of IFN-γ production, the homologous combination of rAd-N/rAd-N/rAd-N/rAd- N was significantly stronger than that of pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3. 1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N, but was relatively weaker than the heterogeneous combination of pcDAN3.1-N/pcDAN3.1-N/pcDAN3.1-N/rAd-N. This combination was a most efficient immunization regimen in induction of SARS-CoV-N-specific (IFN-γ) secretion just as the antibody response. These results suggest that DNA immunization followed by recombinant adenovirus boosting could be used as a potential SARS-CoV vaccine.

  8. Expression of innate immunity genes and damage of primary human pancreatic islets by epidemic strains of Echovirus: implication for post-virus islet autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Sarmiento

    Full Text Available Three large-scale Echovirus (E epidemics (E4,E16,E30, each differently associated to the acute development of diabetes related autoantibodies, have been documented in Cuba. The prevalence of islet cell autoantibodies was moderate during the E4 epidemic but high in the E16 and E30 epidemic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of epidemic strains of echovirus on beta-cell lysis, beta-cell function and innate immunity gene expression in primary human pancreatic islets. Human islets from non-diabetic donors (n = 7 were infected with the virus strains E4, E16 and E30, all isolated from patients with aseptic meningitis who seroconverted to islet cell antibody positivity. Viral replication, degree of cytolysis, insulin release in response to high glucose as well as mRNA expression of innate immunity genes (IFN-b, RANTES, RIG-I, MDA5, TLR3 and OAS were measured. The strains of E16 and E30 did replicate well in all islets examined, resulting in marked cytotoxic effects. E4 did not cause any effects on cell lysis, however it was able to replicate in 2 out of 7 islet donors. Beta-cell function was hampered in all infected islets (P<0.05; however the effect of E16 and E30 on insulin secretion appeared to be higher than the strain of E4. TLR3 and IFN-beta mRNA expression increased significantly following infection with E16 and E30 (P<0.033 and P<0.039 respectively. In contrast, the expression of none of the innate immunity genes studied was altered in E4-infected islets. These findings suggest that the extent of the epidemic-associated islet autoimmunity may depend on the ability of the viral strains to damage islet cells and induce pro-inflammatory innate immune responses within the infected islets.

  9. The mRNA expression of immune-related genes in crossbred and Tharparkar cattle in response to in vitro infection with Theileria annulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, Prashant; Panigrahi, Manjit; Kumar, Amod; Saravanan, B C; Ghosh, Shrikant; Asaf, V N Muhashin; Parida, Subhashree; Gaur, G K; Sharma, Deepak; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-08-01

    Tropical theileriosis is a major protozoan disease of cattle and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Indigenous cattle (Bos indicus) are less affected by this disease than exotic and crossbred cattle. Genetic basis of resistance to tropical theileriosis in indigenous cattle is not well studied. Recent reports suggest that number of immune response genes expressed differentially in exotic and indigenous breeds play an important role in breed specific resistance to tropical theileriosis. Such studies comparing expression of these genes in crossbred cattle and indigenous cattle are lacking. The present study compares the mRNA expression of immune-related genes in response to Theileria annulata infection in indigenous and crossbred cattle. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from blood samples of indigenous (Tharparkar) and crossbred (HF/BS/Jersey × Hariana) cattle and challenged with prepared ground-up tick supernatant carrying Theileria annulata sporozoites in vitro. qPCR was employed to measure relative mRNA expression of toll-like receptor 10 (TLR10), signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPA), MHC class II DQα (BoLA-DQA), musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma (MAF) and prion protein (PRNP) genes in infected and control PBMCs from crossbred and indigenous cattle. On the basis of comparative fold change analysis, significant up-regulation in SIRPA, PRNP and MHC DQα genes and significant down-regulation in TLR10, cMAF and MAFB genes in crossbreds as compared to indigenous cattle was observed. Results of the present study suggest that breed specific differential expression of the genes under study may contribute to the breed specific resistance to Theileria annulata infection in indigenous cattle compared to crossbred cattle. PMID:25697418

  10. Dance in Ancient Greek Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Spalva, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The greatness and harmony of ancient Greece has had an impact upon the development of the Western European culture to this day. The ancient Greek culture has influenced contemporary literature genres and systems of philosophy, principles of architecture, sculpture and drama and has formed basis for such sciences as astronomy and mathematics. The art of ancient Greece with its penchant for beauty and clarity has been the example of the humanity’s search for an aesthetic ideal. Despite only bei...

  11. Sequence analysis of EBV immune evasion gene BNLF2a in EBV associated tumors and healthy individuals from nasopharyngeal carcinoma endemic and non-endemic regions of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Song; Wang, Xiaofeng; Shu, Jun; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Sun, Zhifu; Luo, Bing

    2015-11-01

    BNLF2a is an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) immune evasion gene. Its protein is located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, and can inhibit the antigen transporting function of TAP, thereby perturbing the immune response to EBV in lytic and prelatent phase. In order to explore whether the polymorphism of BNLF2a gene has a role in different types of EBV associated tumors, we conducted complete sequencing of the gene BNLF2a in 408 cases of EBV positive tumors (76 lymphomas, 45 gastric carcinomas, and 85 nasopharyngeal carcinomas in northern China and 27 lymphomas, 30 gastric carcinomas, and 57 nasopharyngeal carcinomas in southern China) and throat washings from healthy individuals (39 in northern China and 49 in southern China). Two main variant types of BNLF2a were identified. Type BNLF2a-A, which was similar to B95-8, was dominant in all sub-populations (66.7-100%) in this study. Type BNLF2a-B was characterized by the mutations at position 8 and 40. The variation patterns of BNLF2a were significantly different between samples from northern and southern China (P China (P China (33.3%), and the proportion of this type was higher in the northern than in the southern NPCs. These data demonstrate that the BNLF2a gene is highly conserved, and its polymorphism is geographically restricted. Type BNLF2a-B is more prevalent in northern China and may be less tumor transformative.

  12. Discovery of a Novel Immune Gene Signature with Profound Prognostic Value in Colorectal Cancer: A Model of Cooperativity Disorientation Created in the Process from Development to Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning An

    Full Text Available Immune response-related genes play a major role in colorectal carcinogenesis by mediating inflammation or immune-surveillance evasion. Although remarkable progress has been made to investigate the underlying mechanism, the understanding of the complicated carcinogenesis process was enormously hindered by large-scale tumor heterogeneity. Development and carcinogenesis share striking similarities in their cellular behavior and underlying molecular mechanisms. The association between embryonic development and carcinogenesis makes embryonic development a viable reference model for studying cancer thereby circumventing the potentially misleading complexity of tumor heterogeneity. Here we proposed that the immune genes, responsible for intra-immune cooperativity disorientation (defined in this study as disruption of developmental expression correlation patterns during carcinogenesis, probably contain untapped prognostic resource of colorectal cancer. In this study, we determined the mRNA expression profile of 137 human biopsy samples, including samples from different stages of human colonic development, colorectal precancerous progression and colorectal cancer samples, among which 60 were also used to generate miRNA expression profile. We originally established Spearman correlation transition model to quantify the cooperativity disorientation associated with the transition from normal to precancerous to cancer tissue, in conjunction with miRNA-mRNA regulatory network and machine learning algorithm to identify genes with prognostic value. Finally, a 12-gene signature was extracted, whose prognostic value was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis in five independent datasets. Using the log-rank test, the 12-gene signature was closely related to overall survival in four datasets (GSE17536, n = 177, p = 0.0054; GSE17537, n = 55, p = 0.0039; GSE39582, n = 562, p = 0.13; GSE39084, n = 70, p = 0.11, and significantly associated with disease

  13. Discovery of a Novel Immune Gene Signature with Profound Prognostic Value in Colorectal Cancer: A Model of Cooperativity Disorientation Created in the Process from Development to Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ning; Shi, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yueming; Lv, Ning; Feng, Lin; Di, Xuebing; Han, Naijun; Wang, Guiqi; Cheng, Shujun; Zhang, Kaitai

    2015-01-01

    Immune response-related genes play a major role in colorectal carcinogenesis by mediating inflammation or immune-surveillance evasion. Although remarkable progress has been made to investigate the underlying mechanism, the understanding of the complicated carcinogenesis process was enormously hindered by large-scale tumor heterogeneity. Development and carcinogenesis share striking similarities in their cellular behavior and underlying molecular mechanisms. The association between embryonic development and carcinogenesis makes embryonic development a viable reference model for studying cancer thereby circumventing the potentially misleading complexity of tumor heterogeneity. Here we proposed that the immune genes, responsible for intra-immune cooperativity disorientation (defined in this study as disruption of developmental expression correlation patterns during carcinogenesis), probably contain untapped prognostic resource of colorectal cancer. In this study, we determined the mRNA expression profile of 137 human biopsy samples, including samples from different stages of human colonic development, colorectal precancerous progression and colorectal cancer samples, among which 60 were also used to generate miRNA expression profile. We originally established Spearman correlation transition model to quantify the cooperativity disorientation associated with the transition from normal to precancerous to cancer tissue, in conjunction with miRNA-mRNA regulatory network and machine learning algorithm to identify genes with prognostic value. Finally, a 12-gene signature was extracted, whose prognostic value was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis in five independent datasets. Using the log-rank test, the 12-gene signature was closely related to overall survival in four datasets (GSE17536, n = 177, p = 0.0054; GSE17537, n = 55, p = 0.0039; GSE39582, n = 562, p = 0.13; GSE39084, n = 70, p = 0.11), and significantly associated with disease-free survival in four

  14. Climate and Ancient Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Climate, and human responses to it, have a strongly interconnected relationship. This when climate change occurs, the result of either natural or human causes, societies should react and adapt to these. But do they? If so, what is the nature of that change, and are the responses positive...... or negative for the long-term survival of social groups? In this volume, scholars from diverse disciplines including archaeology, geology and climate sciences explore scientific and material evidence for climate changes in the past, their causes, their effects on ancient societies and how those societies...

  15. Mathematics in ancient Greece

    CERN Document Server

    Dantzig, Tobias

    2006-01-01

    More than a history of mathematics, this lively book traces mathematical ideas and processes to their sources, stressing the methods used by the masters of the ancient world. Author Tobias Dantzig portrays the human story behind mathematics, showing how flashes of insight in the minds of certain gifted individuals helped mathematics take enormous forward strides. Dantzig demonstrates how the Greeks organized their precursors' melange of geometric maxims into an elegantly abstract deductive system. He also explains the ways in which some of the famous mathematical brainteasers of antiquity led

  16. Ancient concrete works

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly believed that the ancient Romans were the first to create and use concrete. This is not true, as we can easily learn from the Latin literature itself. For sure, Romans were able to prepare high-quality hydraulic cements, comparable with the modern Portland cements. In this paper, we will see that the use of concrete is quite older, ranging back to the Homeric times. For instance, it was used for the floors of some courts and galleries of the Mycenaean palace at Tiryns

  17. Therapeutic strategies for Parkinson's disease: the ancient meets the future--traditional Chinese herbal medicine, electroacupuncture, gene therapy and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Liang, Xi-Bin; Li, Feng-Qiao; Zhou, Hui-Fang; Liu, Xian-Yu; Wang, Jian-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2008-10-01

    In China, it has been estimated that there are more than 2.0 million people suffering from Parkinson's disease, which is currently becoming one of the most com