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Sample records for ancestral susceptible genetic

  1. Genetic Susceptibility to Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Kovacic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a complex multifocal arterial disease involving interactions of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Advances in techniques of molecular genetics have revealed that genetic ground significantly influences susceptibility to atherosclerotic vascular diseases. Besides further investigations of monogenetic diseases, candidate genes, genetic polymorphisms, and susceptibility loci associated with atherosclerotic diseases have been identified in recent years, and their number is rapidly increasing. This paper discusses main genetic investigations fields associated with human atherosclerotic vascular diseases. The paper concludes with a discussion of the directions and implications of future genetic research in arteriosclerosis with an emphasis on prospective prediction from an early age of individuals who are predisposed to develop premature atherosclerosis as well as to facilitate the discovery of novel drug targets.

  2. Genetic susceptibility of periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laine, M.L.; Crielaard, W.; Loos, B.G.

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review, we explore and summarize the peer-reviewed literature on putative genetic risk factors for susceptibility to aggressive and chronic periodontitis. A comprehensive literature search on the PubMed database was performed using the keywords ‘periodontitis’ or ‘periodontal dise

  3. Genetic diversity and disease susceptibility.

    OpenAIRE

    Bodmer, W F

    1997-01-01

    The range of genetic diversity within human populations is enormous. Genetic susceptibility to common chronic disease is a significant part of this genetic diversity, which also includes a variety of rare clear-cut inherited diseases. Modern DNA-based genomic analysis can now routinely lead to the identification of genes involved in disease susceptibility, provides the basis for genetic counselling in affected families, and more widely for a genetically targeted approach to disease prevention...

  4. Neanderthal and Denisova genetic affinities with contemporary humans: introgression versus common ancestral polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Robert K; Uribe, Gabriel; Jimenez, Eric B; Weiss, Mark A; Herrera, Kristian J; Regueiro, Maria; Herrera, Rene J

    2013-11-01

    Analyses of the genetic relationships among modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans have suggested that 1-4% of the non-Sub-Saharan African gene pool may be Neanderthal derived, while 6-8% of the Melanesian gene pool may be the product of admixture between the Denisovans and the direct ancestors of Melanesians. In the present study, we analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity among a worldwide collection of contemporary human populations with respect to the genetic constitution of these two archaic hominins and Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee). We partitioned SNPs into subsets, including those that are derived in both archaic lineages, those that are ancestral in both archaic lineages and those that are only derived in one archaic lineage. By doing this, we have conducted separate examinations of subsets of mutations with higher probabilities of divergent phylogenetic origins. While previous investigations have excluded SNPs from common ancestors in principal component analyses, we included common ancestral SNPs in our analyses to visualize the relative placement of the Neanderthal and Denisova among human populations. To assess the genetic similarities among the various hominin lineages, we performed genetic structure analyses to provide a comparison of genetic patterns found within contemporary human genomes that may have archaic or common ancestral roots. Our results indicate that 3.6% of the Neanderthal genome is shared with roughly 65.4% of the average European gene pool, which clinally diminishes with distance from Europe. Our results suggest that Neanderthal genetic associations with contemporary non-Sub-Saharan African populations, as well as the genetic affinities observed between Denisovans and Melanesians most likely result from the retention of ancient mutations in these populations.

  5. Introduction to cancer genetic susceptibility syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Rose B; Nichols, Kim E

    2016-12-02

    The last 30 years have witnessed tremendous advances in our understanding of the cancer genetic susceptibility syndromes, including those that predispose to hematopoietic malignancies. The identification and characterization of families affected by these syndromes is enhancing our knowledge of the oncologic and nononcologic manifestations associated with predisposing germ line mutations and providing insights into the underlying disease mechanisms. Here, we provide an overview of the cancer genetic susceptibility syndromes, focusing on aspects relevant to the evaluation of patients with leukemia and lymphoma. Guidance is provided to facilitate recognition of these syndromes by hematologists/oncologists, including descriptions of the family history features, tumor genotype, and physical or developmental findings that should raise concern for an underlying cancer genetic syndrome. The clinical implications and management challenges associated with cancer susceptibility syndromes are also discussed.

  6. Genetic susceptibility for Salmonella infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amsterdam JGC van; Jong WH de; Jonge R de; Hoebee B; TOX

    2005-01-01

    The Salmonella species Typhimurium and Enteritidis form the most important causes of food poisoning. Immunity to Salmonellae requires innate and specific immune responses. Reported here are the genetic polymorphisms in the genes of Nramp1, Toll-like receptors and CD14 related to the innate immune re

  7. Genetic architecture of intrinsic antibiotic susceptibility.

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    Hany S Girgis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibiotic exposure rapidly selects for more resistant bacterial strains, and both a drug's chemical structure and a bacterium's cellular network affect the types of mutations acquired. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To better characterize the genetic determinants of antibiotic susceptibility, we exposed a transposon-mutagenized library of Escherichia coli to each of 17 antibiotics that encompass a wide range of drug classes and mechanisms of action. Propagating the library for multiple generations with drug concentrations that moderately inhibited the growth of the isogenic parental strain caused the abundance of strains with even minor fitness advantages or disadvantages to change measurably and reproducibly. Using a microarray-based genetic footprinting strategy, we then determined the quantitative contribution of each gene to E. coli's intrinsic antibiotic susceptibility. We found both loci whose removal increased general antibiotic tolerance as well as pathways whose down-regulation increased tolerance to specific drugs and drug classes. The beneficial mutations identified span multiple pathways, and we identified pairs of mutations that individually provide only minor decreases in antibiotic susceptibility but that combine to provide higher tolerance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results illustrate that a wide-range of mutations can modulate the activity of many cellular resistance processes and demonstrate that E. coli has a large mutational target size for increasing antibiotic tolerance. Furthermore, the work suggests that clinical levels of antibiotic resistance might develop through the sequential accumulation of chromosomal mutations of small individual effect.

  8. Genetics of RA susceptibility, what comes next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, James; Eyre, Stephen; Worthington, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Summary Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been used to great effect to identify genetic susceptibility loci for complex disease. A series of GWAS and meta-analyses have informed the discovery of over 100 loci for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In common with findings in other autoimmune diseases the lead signals for the majority of these loci do not map to known gene sequences. In order to realise the benefit of investment in GWAS studies it is vital we determine how disease associated alleles function to influence disease processes. This is leading to rapid development in our knowledge as to the function of non-coding regions of the genome. Here we consider possible functional mechanisms for intergenic RA-associated variants which lie within lncRNA sequences. PMID:26509058

  9. Human Genetic Ancestral Composition Correlates with the Origin of Mycobacterium leprae Strains in a Leprosy Endemic Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona-Castro, Nora; Cortés, Edwin; Beltrán, Camilo; Romero, Marcela; Badel-Mogollón, Jaime E.; Bedoya, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that leprosy originated in Africa, extended to Asia and Europe, and arrived in the Americas during European colonization and the African slave trade. Due to colonization, the contemporary Colombian population is an admixture of Native-American, European and African ancestries. Because microorganisms are known to accompany humans during migrations, patterns of human migration can be traced by examining genomic changes in associated microbes. The current study analyzed 118 leprosy cases and 116 unrelated controls from two Colombian regions endemic for leprosy (Atlantic and Andean) in order to determine possible associations of leprosy with patient ancestral background (determined using 36 ancestry informative markers), Mycobacterium leprae genotype and/or patient geographical origin. We found significant differences between ancestral genetic composition. European components were predominant in Andean populations. In contrast, African components were higher in the Atlantic region. M. leprae genotypes were then analyzed for cluster associations and compared with the ancestral composition of leprosy patients. Two M. leprae principal clusters were found: haplotypes C54 and T45. Haplotype C54 associated with African origin and was more frequent in patients from the Atlantic region with a high African component. In contrast, haplotype T45 associated with European origin and was more frequent in Andean patients with a higher European component. These results suggest that the human and M. leprae genomes have co-existed since the African and European origins of the disease, with leprosy ultimately arriving in Colombia during colonization. Distinct M. leprae strains followed European and African settlement in the country and can be detected in contemporary Colombian populations. PMID:26360617

  10. Human Genetic Ancestral Composition Correlates with the Origin of Mycobacterium leprae Strains in a Leprosy Endemic Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona-Castro, Nora; Cortés, Edwin; Beltrán, Camilo; Romero, Marcela; Badel-Mogollón, Jaime E; Bedoya, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that leprosy originated in Africa, extended to Asia and Europe, and arrived in the Americas during European colonization and the African slave trade. Due to colonization, the contemporary Colombian population is an admixture of Native-American, European and African ancestries. Because microorganisms are known to accompany humans during migrations, patterns of human migration can be traced by examining genomic changes in associated microbes. The current study analyzed 118 leprosy cases and 116 unrelated controls from two Colombian regions endemic for leprosy (Atlantic and Andean) in order to determine possible associations of leprosy with patient ancestral background (determined using 36 ancestry informative markers), Mycobacterium leprae genotype and/or patient geographical origin. We found significant differences between ancestral genetic composition. European components were predominant in Andean populations. In contrast, African components were higher in the Atlantic region. M. leprae genotypes were then analyzed for cluster associations and compared with the ancestral composition of leprosy patients. Two M. leprae principal clusters were found: haplotypes C54 and T45. Haplotype C54 associated with African origin and was more frequent in patients from the Atlantic region with a high African component. In contrast, haplotype T45 associated with European origin and was more frequent in Andean patients with a higher European component. These results suggest that the human and M. leprae genomes have co-existed since the African and European origins of the disease, with leprosy ultimately arriving in Colombia during colonization. Distinct M. leprae strains followed European and African settlement in the country and can be detected in contemporary Colombian populations.

  11. Mating animals by minimising the covariance between ancestral contributions generates less inbreeding without compromising genetic gain in breeding schemes with truncation selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henryon, M; Berg, P; Sørensen, A C

    2009-01-01

    We reasoned that mating animals by minimising the covariance between ancestral contributions (MCAC mating) will generate less inbreeding and at least as much genetic gain as minimum-coancestry mating in breeding schemes where the animals are truncation-selected. We tested this hypothesis by stoch......We reasoned that mating animals by minimising the covariance between ancestral contributions (MCAC mating) will generate less inbreeding and at least as much genetic gain as minimum-coancestry mating in breeding schemes where the animals are truncation-selected. We tested this hypothesis...

  12. Genetics of innate immunity and UTI susceptibility.

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    Ragnarsdóttir, Bryndís; Lutay, Nataliya; Grönberg-Hernandez, Jenny; Köves, Bela; Svanborg, Catharina

    2011-07-12

    A functional and well-balanced immune response is required to resist most infections. Slight dysfunctions in innate immunity can turn the 'friendly' host defense into an unpleasant foe and give rise to disease. Beneficial and destructive forces of innate immunity have been discovered in the urinary tract and mechanisms by which they influence the severity of urinary tract infections (UTIs) have been elucidated. By modifying specific aspects of the innate immune response to UTI, genetic variation either exaggerates the severity of acute pyelonephritis to include urosepsis and renal scarring or protects against symptomatic disease by suppressing innate immune signaling, as in asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). Different genes are polymorphic in patients prone to acute pyelonephritis or ABU, respectively, and yet discussions of UTI susceptibility in clinical practice still focus mainly on social and behavioral factors or dysfunctional voiding. Is it not time for UTIs to enter the era of molecular medicine? Defining why certain individuals are protected from UTI while others have severe, recurrent infections has long been difficult, but progress is now being made, encouraging new approaches to risk assessment and therapy in this large and important patient group, as well as revealing promising facets of 'good' versus 'bad' inflammation.

  13. Ancestral stories of Ghanaian Bimoba reflect millennia-old genetic lineages.

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    Hernando Sanchez-Faddeev

    Full Text Available Oral history and oral genealogies are mechanisms of collective memory and a main cultural heritage of many populations without a writing system. In the effort to analytically address the correspondence between genetic data and historical genealogies, anthropologists hypothesised that genealogies evolve through time, ultimately containing three parts: literal--where the most recent ancestry is truthfully represented; intended--ancestry is inferred and reflects political relations among groups; and mythical--that does not represent current social reality. While numerous studies discuss oral genealogies, to our knowledge no genetic studies have been able to investigate to what extent genetic relatedness corresponds to the literal and intended parts of oral genealogies. We report on the correspondence between genetic data and oral genealogies among Bimoba males in a single village in North-Eastern Ghana. We compared the pairwise mismatch distribution of Y chromosome short tandem repeat (Y-STR haplotypes among all lineages present in this village to the self-reported (oral relatedness. We found that Bimoba are able to correctly identify unrelated individuals in 92% of the cases. In contrast, they are able to correctly identify related individuals only in 38% of the cases, which can be explained by three processes: (1 the compression of genealogies, leading to increasing inaccuracy with increasing genealogical distance, (2 inclusions into the lineage from intended relations such as clan co-option or adoptions, and (3 false paternities, which in this study were found to have a minor effect on the correspondence between genetic data and oral genealogies. In addition, we observed that 70% of unrelated pairs have from six to eight Y-STR differences, a diversification peak which we attribute to an ancient West African expansion dating around 9454 years ago. We conclude that, despite all caveats, oral genealogies are reflecting ancient lineages more

  14. Ancestral stories of Ghanaian Bimoba reflect millennia-old genetic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Faddeev, Hernando; Pijpe, Jeroen; van Bodegom, David; van der Hulle, Tom; van der Gaag, Kristiaan J; Eriksson, Ulrika K; Spear, Thomas; Westendorp, Rudi G J; de Knijff, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Oral history and oral genealogies are mechanisms of collective memory and a main cultural heritage of many populations without a writing system. In the effort to analytically address the correspondence between genetic data and historical genealogies, anthropologists hypothesised that genealogies evolve through time, ultimately containing three parts: literal--where the most recent ancestry is truthfully represented; intended--ancestry is inferred and reflects political relations among groups; and mythical--that does not represent current social reality. While numerous studies discuss oral genealogies, to our knowledge no genetic studies have been able to investigate to what extent genetic relatedness corresponds to the literal and intended parts of oral genealogies. We report on the correspondence between genetic data and oral genealogies among Bimoba males in a single village in North-Eastern Ghana. We compared the pairwise mismatch distribution of Y chromosome short tandem repeat (Y-STR) haplotypes among all lineages present in this village to the self-reported (oral) relatedness. We found that Bimoba are able to correctly identify unrelated individuals in 92% of the cases. In contrast, they are able to correctly identify related individuals only in 38% of the cases, which can be explained by three processes: (1) the compression of genealogies, leading to increasing inaccuracy with increasing genealogical distance, (2) inclusions into the lineage from intended relations such as clan co-option or adoptions, and (3) false paternities, which in this study were found to have a minor effect on the correspondence between genetic data and oral genealogies. In addition, we observed that 70% of unrelated pairs have from six to eight Y-STR differences, a diversification peak which we attribute to an ancient West African expansion dating around 9454 years ago. We conclude that, despite all caveats, oral genealogies are reflecting ancient lineages more accurately than

  15. Ancestral variation and the potential for genetic accommodation in larval amphibians: implications for the evolution of novel feeding strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledon-Rettig, Cris C; Pfennig, David W; Nascone-Yoder, Nanette

    2008-01-01

    Few studies provide empirical evidence for phenotypic plasticity's role in the evolution of novel traits. One way to do so is to test whether latent plasticity is present in an ancestor that can be refined, enhanced, or diminished by selection in derived taxa (through "genetic accommodation"), thereby producing novel traits. Here, we evaluated whether gut plasticity preceded and promoted the evolution of a novel feeding strategy in spadefoot toad tadpoles. We studied Scaphiopus couchii, whose tadpoles develop an elongate gut and consume only detritus, and two derived species, Spea multiplicata and Sp. bombifrons, whose tadpoles also express a novel, short-gut phenotype in response to a novel resource (anostracan shrimp). Consistent with the expectations of plasticity-mediated trait evolution, we found that shrimp induced a range of phenotypes in Scaphiopus that were not produced with detritus. This plasticity was either suppressed or exaggerated in Spea depending on whether the induced phenotypes were adaptive. Moreover, in contrast to its effects on morphology, shrimp induced little or no functional plasticity, as assessed by gut cell proliferation, in Scaphiopus. Shrimp did, however, induce substantial proliferation in Sp. bombifrons, the species that consumes the most shrimp and that produces the short-gut phenotype the most frequently. Thus, if Spea had ancestral morphological plasticity in response to a novel diet, their shrimp-induced short-gut morphology may have undergone subsequent genetic accommodation that improved its functionality. Hence, diet-induced phenotypic plasticity may have preceded and even promoted the evolution of a novel phenotype.

  16. Relaxed genetic constraint is ancestral to the evolution of phenotypic plasticity.

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    Leichty, Aaron R; Pfennig, David W; Jones, Corbin D; Pfennig, Karin S

    2012-07-01

    Phenotypic plasticity--the capacity of a single genotype to produce different phenotypes in response to varying environmental conditions--is widespread. Yet, whether, and how, plasticity impacts evolutionary diversification is unclear. According to a widely discussed hypothesis, plasticity promotes rapid evolution because genes expressed differentially across different environments (i.e., genes with "biased" expression) experience relaxed genetic constraint and thereby accumulate variation faster than do genes with unbiased expression. Indeed, empirical studies confirm that biased genes evolve faster than unbiased genes in the same genome. An alternative hypothesis holds, however, that the relaxed constraint and faster evolutionary rates of biased genes may be a precondition for, rather than a consequence of, plasticity's evolution. Here, we evaluated these alternative hypotheses by characterizing evolutionary rates of biased and unbiased genes in two species of frogs that exhibit a striking form of phenotypic plasticity. We also characterized orthologs of these genes in four species of frogs that had diverged from the two plastic species before the plasticity evolved. We found that the faster evolutionary rates of biased genes predated the evolution of the plasticity. Furthermore, biased genes showed greater expression variance than did unbiased genes, suggesting that they may be more dispensable. Phenotypic plasticity may therefore evolve when dispensable genes are co-opted for novel function in environmentally induced phenotypes. Thus, relaxed genetic constraint may be a cause--not a consequence--of the evolution of phenotypic plasticity, and thereby contribute to the evolution of novel traits.

  17. Genetic testing for TMEM154 mutations associated with lentivirus susceptibility in sheep.

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    Michael P Heaton

    Full Text Available In sheep, small ruminant lentiviruses cause an incurable, progressive, lymphoproliferative disease that affects millions of animals worldwide. Known as ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV in the U.S., and Visna/Maedi virus (VMV elsewhere, these viruses reduce an animal's health, productivity, and lifespan. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane protein 154 gene (TMEM154 has been previously associated with OPPV infection in U.S. sheep. Sheep with the ancestral TMEM154 haplotype encoding glutamate (E at position 35, and either form of an N70I variant, were highly-susceptible compared to sheep homozygous for the K35 missense mutation. Our current overall aim was to characterize TMEM154 in sheep from around the world to develop an efficient genetic test for reduced susceptibility. The average frequency of TMEM154 E35 among 74 breeds was 0.51 and indicated that highly-susceptible alleles were present in most breeds around the world. Analysis of whole genome sequences from an international panel of 75 sheep revealed more than 1,300 previously unreported polymorphisms in a 62 kb region containing TMEM154 and confirmed that the most susceptible haplotypes were distributed worldwide. Novel missense mutations were discovered in the signal peptide (A13V and the extracellular domains (E31Q, I74F, and I102T of TMEM154. A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS assay was developed to detect these and six previously reported missense and two deletion mutations in TMEM154. In blinded trials, the call rate for the eight most common coding polymorphisms was 99.4% for 499 sheep tested and 96.0% of the animals were assigned paired TMEM154 haplotypes (i.e., diplotypes. The widespread distribution of highly-susceptible TMEM154 alleles suggests that genetic testing and selection may improve the health and productivity of infected flocks.

  18. Update on Genetic Susceptibility and Pathogenesis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

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    Morten Herlin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a multifactorial disease with a pathogenesis which remains inexplicable. However, genome-wide association studies brought forward within recent years have discovered several new susceptibility genes, and accumulating evidence supports genetic variability as playing a key role in JIA development. This review summarises the present knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA and non-HLA polymorphisms conferring disease susceptibility, and discusses the areas in JIA genetics, which are still to be investigated in order to apply JIA genetics in a clinical setting.

  19. Ancestral process and diffusion model with selection

    CERN Document Server

    Mano, Shuhei

    2008-01-01

    The ancestral selection graph in population genetics introduced by Krone and Neuhauser (1997) is an analogue to the coalescent genealogy. The number of ancestral particles, backward in time, of a sample of genes is an ancestral process, which is a birth and death process with quadratic death and linear birth rate. In this paper an explicit form of the number of ancestral particle is obtained, by using the density of the allele frequency in the corresponding diffusion model obtained by Kimura (1955). It is shown that fixation is convergence of the ancestral process to the stationary measure. The time to fixation of an allele is studied in terms of the ancestral process.

  20. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Changbing; Gao, Jing; Sheng, Yujun; Dou, Jinfa; Zhou, Fusheng; Zheng, Xiaodong; Ko, Randy; Tang, Xianfa; Zhu, Caihong; Yin, Xianyong; Sun, Liangdan; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association studies and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Recently, our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wid...

  1. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci

    OpenAIRE

    Chang eShen; Jing eGao; Yu Jun Sheng; Jinfa eDou; Fusheng eZhou; Xiaodong eZheng; Randy eKo; Xianfa eTang; Caihong Hong Zhu; Xianyong Yong Yin; Liangdan Dan Sun; Yong eCui; Xue Jun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wide association stud...

  2. Immunogenetics and genetic susceptibility in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis

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    Das Anup K

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available vAutoimmune hepatitis is a progressive liver disease. Its pathogenesis is unclear, but needs a ‘trigger’ to initiate the disease in a genetically susceptible person. The susceptibility is partly related to MHCII class genes, and more so with human leukocyte antigen (HLA. Several mechanisms have been proposed which, however, cannot fully explain the immunologic findings in autoimmune hepatitis. The susceptibility to any autoimmune disease is determined by several factors where genetic and immunological alterations, along with, environmental factor are active. MHCII antigens as a marker for AIH, or a predictor of treatment response and prognosis has been investigated. Since MHCII antigens show significant ethnic heterogeneity, mutations in MHCII may merely act as only precursors of the surface markers of immune cells, which can be of significance, because the changes in HLA and MHC are missing in certain populations. One such marker is the CTLA-4 (CD152 gene mutation, reported in the phenotypes representing susceptibility to AIH. Other candidate genes of cytokines, TNF, TGF-beta1 etc, have also been investigated but with unvalidated results. Paediatric AIH show differences in genetic susceptibility. Genetic susceptibility or resistance to AIH may be associated with polypeptides in DRB1 with certain amino-acid sequences. Understanding which genes are implicated in genesis and/or disease progression will obviously help to identify key pathways in AIH and provide better insights into its pathogenesis. But studies to identify responsible genes are complex because of the complex trait of AIH.

  3. Nutrition and genetic susceptibility to common diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, A G

    1992-06-01

    Genetic factors play a role in chronic disease and conditions such as coronary heart disease, hypertension, and obesity. Individual responses to nutritional factors involved in such conditions vary depending upon a person's genetic make-up. The role of individual genes is best understood for the hyperlipidemias that predispose to coronary heart disease. Until more and better information on gene-nutritional interactions is available, general population-wide recommendations regarding a prudent diet appear reasonable. At the same time, high risk screening for certain conditions such as the hyperlipidemias is appropriate.

  4. Genetic Susceptibility and Neurotransmitters in Tourette Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paschou, Peristera; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Sharp, Frank; Heiman, Gary A.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Martino, D; Cavanna, AE

    2013-01-01

    Family studies have consistently shown that Tourette syndrome (TS) is a familial disorder and twin studies have clearly indicated a genetic contribution in the etiology of TS. Whereas early segregation studies of TS suggested a single-gene autosomal dominant disorder, later studies have pointed to m

  5. Genetic Susceptibility to Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacko, Martin [Department of Otorhinolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Braakhuis, Boudewijn J.M. [Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sturgis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Boedeker, Carsten C. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Albert-Ludwigs-University, Freiburg, Germany and Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, HELIOS Hanseklinikum Stralsund, Stralsund (Germany); Suárez, Carlos [Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain); Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio [ENT Clinic, University of Udine, Udine (Italy); Takes, Robert P., E-mail: robert.takes@radboudumc.nl [Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-05-01

    Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence is growing. Although environmental carcinogens and carcinogenic viruses are the main etiologic factors, genetic predisposition obviously plays a risk-modulating role, given that not all individuals exposed to these carcinogens experience the disease. This review highlights some aspects of genetic susceptibility to HNSCC: among others, genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation enzymes, DNA repair pathway, apoptotic pathway, human papillomavirus-related pathways, mitochondrial polymorphisms, and polymorphism related to the bilirubin-metabolized pathway. Furthermore, epigenetic variations, familial forms of HNSCC, functional assays for HNSCC risk assessment, and the implications and perspectives of research on genetic susceptibility in HNSCC are discussed.

  6. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Changbing; Gao, Jing; Sheng, Yujun; Dou, Jinfa; Zhou, Fusheng; Zheng, Xiaodong; Ko, Randy; Tang, Xianfa; Zhu, Caihong; Yin, Xianyong; Sun, Liangdan; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association studies and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Recently, our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wide association study (GWAS). More than 40 robust susceptible loci have been identified and confirmed to be associated with vitiligo by using GWAS. Most of these associated genes participate in important pathways involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. Many susceptible loci with unknown functions in the pathogenesis of vitiligo have also been identified, indicating that additional molecular mechanisms may contribute to the risk of developing vitiligo. In this review, we summarize the key loci that are of genome-wide significance, which have been shown to influence vitiligo risk. These genetic loci may help build the foundation for genetic diagnosis and personalize treatment for patients with vitiligo in the future. However, substantial additional studies, including gene-targeted and functional studies, are required to confirm the causality of the genetic variants and their biological relevance in the development of vitiligo.

  7. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang eShen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wide association studies (GWASs. More than 40 robust susceptible loci have been identified and confirmed to be associated with vitiligo by using GWASs. Most of these associated genes participate in important pathways involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo, such as immunoregulatory function, melanocyte regulation and so on. A number of susceptible loci with unknown functions in the pathogenesis of vitiligo have also been identified, indicating that additional molecular mechanisms may contribute to the risk of developing vitiligo. In this review, we summarize the key loci that are of genome-wide significance, which have been shown to influence vitiligo risk. These genetic loci may help build the foundation for genetic diagnosis and personalize treatment for patients with vitiligo in the future. However, substantial additional studies, including gene-targeted and functional studies, are required to confirm the causality of the genetic variants and their biological relevance in vitiligo development.

  8. Genetic susceptibility to non-necrotizing erysipelas/cellulitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katariina Hannula-Jouppi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial non-necrotizing erysipelas and cellulitis are often recurring, diffusely spreading infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissues caused most commonly by streptococci. Host genetic factors influence infection susceptibility but no extensive studies on the genetic determinants of human erysipelas exist. METHODS: We performed genome-wide linkage with the 10,000 variant Human Mapping Array (HMA10K array on 52 Finnish families with multiple erysipelas cases followed by microsatellite fine mapping of suggestive linkage peaks. A scan with the HMA250K array was subsequently performed with a subset of cases and controls. RESULTS: Significant linkage was found at 9q34 (nonparametric multipoint linkage score (NPL(all 3.84, p=0.026, which is syntenic to a quantitative trait locus for susceptibility to group A streptococci infections on chromosome 2 in mouse. Sequencing of candidate genes in the 9q34 region did not conclusively associate any to erysipelas/cellulitis susceptibility. Suggestive linkage (NPL(all>3.0 was found at three loci: 3q22-24, 21q22, and 22q13. A subsequent denser genome scan with the HMA250K array supported the 3q22 locus, in which several SNPs in the promoter of AGTR1 (Angiotensin II receptor type I suggestively associated with erysipelas/cellulitis susceptibility. CONCLUSIONS: Specific host genetic factors may cause erysipelas/cellulitis susceptibility in humans.

  9. Genetic susceptibility of newborn daughters to oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decordier, Ilse; De Bont, Kelly; De Bock, Kirsten

    2007-01-01

    of a newborn as compared to his mother for oxidative DNA damage. We compared the in vitro genetic susceptibility for H2O2 in PBMC of 17 mother-newborn daughter pairs taking into account genotypes for relevant DNA repair (hOGG1, XRCC1, XRCC3, XPD) and folate metabolism (MTHFR) polymorphisms. After in vitro...

  10. Human genetic susceptibility and infection with Leishmania peruviana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M.A.; Davis, C.R.; Collins, A. [and others

    1995-11-01

    Racial differences, familial clustering, and murine studies are suggestive of host genetic control of Leishmania infections. Complex segregation analysis has been carried out by use of the programs POINTER and COMDS and data from a total population survey, comprising 636 nuclear families, from an L. perurviana endemic area. The data support genetic components controlling susceptibility to clinical leishmaniasis, influencing severity of disease and resistance to disease among healthy individuals. A multifactorial model is favored over a sporadic model. Two-locus models provided the best fit to the data, the optimal model being a recessive gene (frequency .57) plus a modifier locus. Individuals infected at an early age and with recurrent lesions are genetically more susceptible than those infected with a single episode of disease at a later age. Among people with no lesions, those with a positive skin-test response are genetically less susceptible than those with a negative response. The possibility of the involvement of more than one gene together with environmental effects has implications for the design of future linkage studies. 31 refs., 7 tabs.

  11. Genetic epidemiology of tuberculosis susceptibility: impact of study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Catherine M

    2011-01-20

    Several candidate gene studies have provided evidence for a role of host genetics in susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB). However, the results of these studies have been very inconsistent, even within a study population. Here, we review the design of these studies from a genetic epidemiological perspective, illustrating important differences in phenotype definition in both cases and controls, consideration of latent M. tuberculosis infection versus active TB disease, population genetic factors such as population substructure and linkage disequilibrium, polymorphism selection, and potential global differences in M. tuberculosis strain. These considerable differences between studies should be accounted for when examining the current literature. Recommendations are made for future studies to further clarify the host genetics of TB.

  12. Host susceptibility factors in mycobacterial infection. Genetics and body morphotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guide, Shireen V; Holland, Steven M

    2002-03-01

    Through identification and evaluation of mutations and polymorphisms in components of the IFN gamma response pathways, a better understanding of the mechanisms and risk factors influencing the development of mycobacterial disease is gained. This may lead the way for development of therapeutic and preventative strategies. Although conventional science has focused on identifying discrete mutations, greater awareness of the impact of subtle changes, both at the genetic (polymorphisms) and physical levels (body morphotype), may prove critical in the investigative process. There has been extraordinary progress in the understanding of mycobacterial susceptibility factors over the last few years. The recognition of characteristic phenotypes will lead to the identification of new genetic bases for disease.

  13. Recent advances in exploring the genetic susceptibility to diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Cristina; Ciccacci, Cinzia; D'Amato, Cinzia; Novelli, Giuseppe; Borgiani, Paola; Spallone, Vincenza

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy are common and disabling complications of diabetes. Although glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk factors are major contributory elements in its development, diabetic neuropathy recognizes a multifactorial influence and a multiplicity of pathogenetic mechanisms. Thus genetic and environmental factors may contribute to its susceptibility, each with a modest contribution, by targeting various metabolic and microvascular pathways whose alterations intervene in diabetic neuropathy pathogenesis. This review is aimed at describing major data from the available literature regarding genetic susceptibility to diabetic neuropathies. It provides an overview of the genes reported as associated with the development or progression of these complications, i.e. ACE, MTHFR, GST, GLO1, APOE, TCF7L2, VEGF, IL-4, GPX1, eNOS, ADRA2B, GFRA2, MIR146A, MIR128A. The identification of genetic susceptibility can help in both expanding the comprehension of the pathogenetic mechanisms of diabetic nerve damage and identifying biomarkers of risk prediction and response to therapeutic intervention.

  14. Genetic susceptibility to feline infectious peritonitis in Birman cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovko, Lyudmila; Lyons, Leslie A; Liu, Hongwei; Sørensen, Anne; Wehnert, Suzanne; Pedersen, Niels C

    2013-07-01

    Genetic factors are presumed to influence the incidence of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), especially among pedigreed cats. However, proof for the existence of such factors has been limited and mainly anecdotal. Therefore, we sought evidence for genetic susceptibility to FIP using feline high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays in a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Birman cats were chosen for GWAS because they are highly inbred and suffer a high incidence of FIP. DNA from 38 Birman cats that died of FIP and 161 healthy cats from breeders in Denmark and USA were selected for genotyping using 63K SNPs distributed across the feline genome. Danish and American Birman cats were closely related and the populations were therefore combined and analyzed in two manners: (1) all cases (FIP) vs. all controls (healthy) regardless of age, and (2) cases 1½ years of age and younger (most susceptible) vs. controls 2 years of age and older (most resistant). GWAS of the second cohort was most productive in identifying significant genome-wide associations between case and control cats. Four peaks of association with FIP susceptibility were identified, with two being identified on both analyses. Five candidate genes ELMO1, RRAGA, TNFSF10, ERAP1 and ERAP2, all relevant to what is known about FIP virus pathogenesis, were identified but no single association was fully concordant with the disease phenotype. Difficulties in doing GWAS in cats and interrogating complex genetic traits were discussed.

  15. Modelling genetic susceptibility to multiple sclerosis with family data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Cullen; Lin, Rui; Stankovich, James; Broadley, Simon A

    2013-01-01

    A genetic contribution to susceptibility is well established in multiple sclerosis (MS) and 57 associated genetic loci have been identified. We have undertaken a meta-analysis of familial risk studies with the aims of providing definitive figures for risks to relatives, performing a segregation analysis and estimating the proportion of the overall genetic risk that currently identified genes represent. We have used standard methods of meta-analysis combined with novel approaches to age adjustment to provide directly comparable estimates of lifetime risk. The overall recurrence risk for monozygotic twins was 18.2% and for siblings 2.7%. The recurrence risk for dizygotic twins was significantly higher than for siblings. The overall estimate of sibling relative risk (λ(S)) was 16.8. Risks for older relatives (parents, siblings, aunts, uncles and cousins) show a latitudinal gradient, in line with population risk. No latitudinal gradient for λ(S) was seen. Segregation analysis supports a multiplicative model of one locus of moderate effect with many loci of small effect. The estimated contribution of the 57 known MS loci is 18-24% of λ(S). This meta-analysis supports the notion of MS being in part the result of multiple genetic susceptibility factors and environmental factors.

  16. Genetic susceptibility to obesity and metabolic syndrome in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción M. Aguilera

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is one of the major public health problems worldwide. It is a chronic, complex, and multifactorial-origin disease characterised by body fat excess mainly due to an imbalance between dietary intake and energy expenditure. One of the major complications of obesity is metabolic syndrome, which comprises anthropometrical, clinical, and metabolic dysfunctions that predispose the affected individual to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. It is hypothesised that the variability in the susceptibility to obesity-mediated metabolic complications involves both environmental and genetic factors. Whereas advances in the knowledge of the variations in the human genome have led to the identification of susceptibility genes that contribute to obesity and related disorders, relatively few studies have specifically focused on the interactions between obesity and genetic polymorphisms and the development of metabolic complications. Despite these limited efforts, an increasing amount of evidence suggests that the effects of some gene variants on metabolic traits are modified by or present only in the setting of obesity. Furthermore, some of these loci may have larger effects on metabolic phenotypes in the presence of certain dietary or lifestyle factors. In the present manuscript, we reviewed the genes and their variants that have been evidenced to play a role in obesity-associated metabolic complications through genetic association studies, including candidate gene and genome-wide association approaches in adults and children.

  17. Genetic susceptibility to obesity and metabolic syndrome in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Concepción M; Olza, Josune; Gil, Angel

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is one of the major public health problems worldwide. It is a chronic, complex, and multifactorial origin disease characterised by body fat excess mainly due to an imbalance between dietary intake and energy expenditure. One of the major complications of obesity is metabolic syndrome, which comprises anthropometrical, clinical, and metabolic dysfunctions that predispose the affected individual to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. It is hypothesised that the variability in the susceptibility to obesity-mediated metabolic complications involves both environmental and genetic factors. Whereas advances in the knowledge of the variations in the human genome have led to the identification of susceptibility genes that contribute to obesity and related disorders, relatively few studies have specifically focused on the interactions between obesity and genetic polymorphisms and the development of metabolic complications. Despite these limited efforts, an increasing amount of evidence suggests that the effects of some gene variants on metabolic traits are modified by or present only in the setting of obesity. Furthermore, some of these loci may have larger effects on metabolic phenotypes in the presence of certain dietary or lifestyle factors. In the present manuscript, we reviewed the genes and their variants that have been evidenced to play a role in obesity-associated metabolic complications through genetic association studies, including candidate gene and genome-wide association approaches in adults and children.

  18. AN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY ON BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾卫华; 王继先; 李本孝; 李征

    2000-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the genetic susceptibility for breast cancer of Chinese, a hospital-based case-control study, pedigree survey and molecular genetic study were conducted. Methods. Logistic regression model and stratification methods were used in the risk factors analysis. Li-Mantel art and Falconer methods were used to analyze the segregation ratio and heritability. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to detect AI, G-banding technique was used to detect the chromosome aberration of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Results. Family history of breast cancer is related to enhanced breast cancer risk significartly, OR is 3.905 ( 95 % CI = 1.079 ~ 14.13), and it widely interacts with other risk factors. Accumulative incidence of breast cancer in first degree relatives is 9.99%, which is larger than that in second, third degree and non-blood relatives. Segregation ratio is 0.021, heritability among first degree relatives is 35.6 ± 5.8%. Frequencies of LOH at BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci in sporadic breast cancer are 6.12% and 5.77% respectively. In the sibs, both of them show LOH at D13S173 locus, and high frequencies of chromosome aberrations were observed. Conclusions. Genetic susceptibility contributes to breast cancer occurrence of Chinese, and its racial variation may be one of the important reasons for the large difference of incidence between western and eastern countries.

  19. AN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY ON BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾卫华; 王继先; 李本孝; 李征

    2000-01-01

    Obieaites. To investigate the genetic susceptibility for breast cancer of Chinese, a hospital-besed case-control study, pedigree survey and molecular genetic study were conducted. Methods. Logistic regression model and stratification methods were used in the risk factors analysis. Li-Mantel-Gart and Falconer methods were used to analyze the segregation ratio and heritability. Polymemse chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to detect AI, G-banding technique was used to detect the chromosome aberration of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Results. Family history of breast cancer is related to enhanced breast cancer risk significantly, OR is 3.905(95% CI = 1.079—14.13), and it widely interacts with other risk factors. Accumulative incidence of breast cancer in first degree relatives is 9.99%, which is larger than that in second, third degree and non-blnod relatives. Segregation ratio is 0.021, heritability among first degree relatives is 35.6 ± 5.8%. Frequencies of LDH at BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci in sporadic breast cancer are 6.12% and 5.77% respectively. In the sibs, both of them show LOH at D13S173 locus, and high frequencies of chromosome abermtions were observed.Condusions. Genetic susceptibility contributes to breast cancer occurrence of Chinese, and its racial variation may be one of the important reasons for the large difference of incidence between western and eastern countries.

  20. Genetic basis of susceptibility to teratogen induced birth defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Palacios, Ana M; Chapa, Claudia J; Zhu, Huiping; George, Timothy M; Finnell, Richard H

    2011-08-15

    Birth defects remain the leading cause of infant death in US. The field of teratology has been focused on the causes and underlying mechanisms of birth defects for decades, yet our understanding of these critical issues remain unacceptably vague. Conclusions from years of animal and human studies made it clear that the vast majority of birth defects have multifactorial origins, with contributions from environmental and genetic factors. The environment comprises not only of the physical, biological, and chemical external environment surrounding the pregnant woman, but it also includes the internal environment of the woman's body that interact with the developing embryo in a complex fashion. The importance of maternal and embryonic genetic factors consisting of countless genetic variants/mutations that exist within every individual contribute to birth defect susceptibility is only now being more fully appreciated. This great complexity of the genome and its diversity within individuals and populations seems to be the principal reason why the same teratogenic exposure can induce severe malformation in one embryo, while fail to do so to other exposed embryos. As the interaction between genetic and environmental factors has long been recognized as the first "Principle of Teratology" by Wilson and Warkany [1965. Teratology: Principles and techniques. Chicago: University of Chicago Press], it is only recently that the appropriate investigative tools have been developed with which to fully investigate this fundamental principle. The introduction of high throughput technologies like whole genome sequencing or genome-wide association studies are promising to deliver an enormous amount of new data that will shed light on the genomic factors that contribute susceptibility to environmental teratogens. In this review, we attempt to summarize the epidemiological and experimental literature concerning birth defects whose phenotypic expression can be clearly related to the

  1. Association of susceptible genetic markers and autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vasanth Konda Mohan; Nalini Ganesan; Rajasekhar Gopalakrishnan

    2014-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology resulting in inflammation of the synovium, cartilage and bone. The disease has a heterogeneous character, consisting of clinical subsets of anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)-positive and APCA-negative disease. Although, the pathogenesis of RA is incompletely understood, genetic factors play a vital role in susceptibility to RA as the heritability of RA is between 50 and 60%, with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus accounting for at least 30% of overall genetic risk. Non-HLA genes, i.e. tumour necrosis factor- (TNF-) within the MHC (major histocompatibility complex) have also been investigated for association with RA. Although, some contradictory results have originated from several studies on TNF- gene, the data published so far indicate the possible existence of TNF- gene promoter variants that act as markers for disease severity and response to treatment in RA. The correlation of HLA and non-HLA genes within MHC region is apparently interpreted. A considerable number of confirmed associations with RA and other autoimmune disease susceptibility loci including peptidylarginine deiminase type 4 (PADI4), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT4), cluster of differentiation 244 (CD244) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4), located outside the MHC have been reported recently. In this review, we aim to give an update on recent progress in RA genetics, the importance of the combination of HLA-DRB1 alleles, non-HLA gene polymorphism, its detection and autoantibodies as susceptibility markers for early RA disease.

  2. Genetic susceptibility to teratogens: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassina, Matteo; Salviati, Leonardo; Di Gianantonio, Elena; Clementi, Maurizio

    2012-09-01

    There is evidence that the susceptibility to the teratogenic effect of drugs within human populations varies extremely from one individual to another, even after identical exposures. One of the factors that may explain these interindividual differences is the genetic makeup in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the respective drugs. In fact, both maternal and embryonic/fetal genotypes can affect placental transport, absorption, metabolism, distribution and receptor binding of an agent, influencing its teratogenicity. We have reviewed the literature and commented on the reported correlations between genetic factors and drug-induced birth defects. There is still a clear lack of knowledge regarding this issue and the available data are often conflicting. However, the identification of specific polymorphisms associated with predisposition to teratogenesis may allow in the future the development of personalized non-teratogenic therapies for pregnant women.

  3. Radiation-sensitive genetically susceptible pediatric sub-populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinerman, Ruth A. [National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Major advances in pediatric cancer treatment have resulted in substantial improvements in survival. However, concern has emerged about the late effects of cancer therapy, especially radiation-related second cancers. Studies of childhood cancer patients with inherited cancer syndromes can provide insights into the interaction between radiation and genetic susceptibility to multiple cancers. Children with retinoblastoma (Rb), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) are at substantial risk of developing radiation-related second and third cancers. A radiation dose-response for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas has been observed in hereditary Rb patients, with many of these cancers occurring in the radiation field. Studies of NF1 patients irradiated for optic pathway gliomas have reported increased risks of developing another cancer associated with radiotherapy. High relative risks for second and third cancers were observed for a cohort of 200 LFS family members, especially children, possibly related to radiotherapy. Children with NBCCS are very sensitive to radiation and develop multiple basal cell cancers in irradiated areas. Clinicians following these patients should be aware of their increased genetic susceptibility to multiple primary malignancies enhanced by sensitivity to ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  4. Genetic susceptibility to radiation: which impact on medical practice?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alapetite, C.; Cosset, J.M. [Institut Curie, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Bourguignon, M.H.; Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2001-07-01

    Recent progress especially in the field of gene identification and expression have raised more attention on genetic susceptibility to cancer possibly enhanced by radiations. Radiation therapists are mostly concerned by this question since hypersensitive patients may suffer from adverse effects in normal tissues following a standard radiation therapy and normally sensitive patients could benefit from higher doses of radiations for a better cure of their malignant tumors. Although only a small percentage of individuals are 'hypersensitive' to radiation effects, all medical specialists using ionising radiations should be aware of these new progress in medical knowledge. The present paper reviews the main pathologies (diseases, syndromes...) known or strongly suspected to be associated with a hypersensitivity to ionizing radiations. Then the main tests capable to detect in advance such pathologies are analyzed and compared. Finally guidelines are provided, especially to the radiation therapists to limit the risk of severe complications (or even deaths) for these specific subset of patients suffering from a genetic disorder with a susceptibility to radiations. (author)

  5. Genetic susceptibility loci, pesticide exposure and prostate cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Koutros

    Full Text Available Uncovering SNP (single nucleotide polymorphisms-environment interactions can generate new hypotheses about the function of poorly characterized genetic variants and environmental factors, like pesticides. We evaluated SNP-environment interactions between 30 confirmed prostate cancer susceptibility loci and 45 pesticides and prostate cancer risk in 776 cases and 1,444 controls in the Agricultural Health Study. We used unconditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Multiplicative SNP-pesticide interactions were calculated using a likelihood ratio test. After correction for multiple tests using the False Discovery Rate method, two interactions remained noteworthy. Among men carrying two T alleles at rs2710647 in EH domain binding protein 1 (EHBP1 SNP, the risk of prostate cancer in those with high malathion use was 3.43 times those with no use (95% CI: 1.44-8.15 (P-interaction= 0.003. Among men carrying two A alleles at rs7679673 in TET2, the risk of prostate cancer associated with high aldrin use was 3.67 times those with no use (95% CI: 1.43, 9.41 (P-interaction= 0.006. In contrast, associations were null for other genotypes. Although additional studies are needed and the exact mechanisms are unknown, this study suggests known genetic susceptibility loci may modify the risk between pesticide use and prostate cancer.

  6. Beryllium-Induced Hypersensitivity: Genetic Susceptibility and Neoantigen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Andrew P; Falta, Michael T; Kappler, John W; Dai, Shaodong; McKee, Amy S

    2016-01-01

    Chronic beryllium (Be) disease is a granulomatous lung disorder that results from Be exposure in a genetically susceptible host. The disease is characterized by the accumulation of Be-responsive CD4(+) T cells in the lung, and genetic susceptibility is primarily linked to HLA-DPB1 alleles possessing a glutamic acid at position 69 of the β-chain. Recent structural analysis of a Be-specific TCR interacting with a Be-loaded HLA-DP2-peptide complex revealed that Be is coordinated by amino acid residues derived from the HLA-DP2 β-chain and peptide and showed that the TCR does not directly interact with the Be(2+) cation. Rather, the TCR recognizes a modified HLA-DP2-peptide complex with charge and conformational changes. Collectively, these findings provide a structural basis for the development of this occupational lung disease through the ability of Be to induce posttranslational modifications in preexisting HLA-DP2-peptide complexes, resulting in the creation of neoantigens.

  7. Genetic susceptibility variants associated with colorectal cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulí, Anna; Lozano, Juan José; Rodríguez-Soler, María; Jover, Rodrigo; Bessa, Xavier; Muñoz, Jenifer; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Cubiella, Joaquín; Balaguer, Francesc; Bujanda, Luis; Reñé, Josep M; Clofent, Juan; Morillas, Juan Diego; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Piqué, Josep M; Andreu, Montserrat; Castells, Antoni; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2013-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in Western countries. Once a tumour develops, a differentiated prognosis could be determined by lifestyle habits or inherited and somatic genetic factors. Finding such prognostic factors will be helpful in order to identify cases with a shorter survival or at a higher risk of recurrence that may benefit from more intensive treatment and follow-up surveillance. Sixteen CRC genetic susceptibility variants were directly genotyped in a cohort of 1235 CRC patients recruited by the EPICOLON Spanish consortium. Univariate Cox and multivariate regression analyses were performed taking as primary outcomes overall survival (OS), disease-free survival and recurrence-free interval. Genetic variants rs9929218 at 16q22.1 and rs10795668 at 10p14 may have an effect on OS. The G allele of rs9929218 was linked with a better OS [GG genotype, genotypic model: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.45-0.93, P = 0.0179; GG/GA genotypes, dominant model: HR = 0.66, 95% CI 0.47-0.94, P = 0.0202]. Likewise, the G allele of rs10795668 was associated with better clinical outcome (GG genotype, genotypic model: HR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.53-1.01, P = 0.0570; GA genotype, genotypic model: HR = 0.66, 95% CI 0.47-0.92, P = 0.0137; GG/GA genotypes, dominant model: HR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.50-0.94, P = 0.0194). In conclusion, CRC susceptibility variants rs9929218 and rs10795668 may exert some influence in modulating patient's survival and they deserve to be further tested in additional CRC cohorts in order to confirm their potential as prognosis or predictive biomarkers.

  8. Genetic susceptibility factors for multiple chemical sensitivity revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Linneberg, Allan; Andersen, Charlotte Brasch;

    2010-01-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is characterised by adverse effects due to exposure to low levels of chemical substances. Various genes, especially genes of importance to the metabolism of xenobiotic compounds, have been associated with MCS, but findings are inconsistent. The purpose of this ...... examined are of less importance to MCS than previously reported or that gene-environment interactions or significant degrees of genetic heterogeneity in MCS underlie inconsistent findings in the literature....... of this study was to investigate genetic susceptibility factors for MCS and self-reported chemical sensitivity in a population sample. Ninety six MCS patients and 1,207 controls from a general population divided into four severity groups of chemical sensitivity were genotyped for variants in the genes encoding...... compared in post hoc analyses with all individuals from the population sample (p=0.02). Genetic variants in paraoxonase 1 and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase were not associated with MSC or with self-reported chemical sensitivity in the population sample. Our results suggest that variants in the genes...

  9. Genetic Variability in Susceptibility to Occupational Respiratory Sensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berran Yucesoy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory sensitization can be caused by a variety of substances at workplaces, and the health and economic burden linked to allergic respiratory diseases continues to increase. Although the main factors that affect the onset of the symptoms are the types and intensity of allergen exposure, there is a wide range of interindividual variation in susceptibility to occupational/environmental sensitizers. A number of gene variants have been reported to be associated with various occupational allergic respiratory diseases. Examples of genes include, but are not limited to, genes involved in immune/inflammatory regulation, antioxidant defenses, and fibrotic processes. Most of these variants act in combination with other genes and environmental factors to modify disease progression, severity, or resolution after exposure to allergens. Therefore, understanding the role of genetic variability and the interaction between genetic and environmental/occupational factors provides new insights into disease etiology and may lead to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies. This paper will focus on the current state of knowledge regarding genetic influences on allergic respiratory diseases, with specific emphasis on diisocyanate-induced asthma and chronic beryllium disease.

  10. Remnants of the Legume Ancestral Genome Preserved in Gene-Rich Regions: Insights from Lupinus angustifolius Physical, Genetic, and Comparative Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Książkiewicz, Michał; Zielezinski, Andrzej; Wyrwa, Katarzyna; Szczepaniak, Anna; Rychel, Sandra; Karlowski, Wojciech; Wolko, Bogdan; Naganowska, Barbara

    The narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius) was recently considered as a legume reference species. Genetic resources have been developed, including a draft genome sequence, linkage maps, nuclear DNA libraries, and cytogenetic chromosome-specific landmarks. Here, we used a complex approach, involving DNA fingerprinting, sequencing, genetic mapping, and molecular cytogenetics, to localize and analyze L. angustifolius gene-rich regions (GRRs). A L. angustifolius genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was screened with short sequence repeat (SSR)-based probes. Selected BACs were fingerprinted and assembled into contigs. BAC-end sequence (BES) annotation allowed us to choose clones for sequencing, targeting GRRs. Additionally, BESs were aligned to the scaffolds of the genome sequence. The genetic map was supplemented with 35 BES-derived markers, distributed in 14 linkage groups and tagging 37 scaffolds. The identified GRRs had an average gene density of 19.6 genes/100 kb and physical-to-genetic distance ratios of 11 to 109 kb/cM. Physical and genetic mapping was supported by multi-BAC-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and five new linkage groups were assigned to the chromosomes. Syntenic links to the genome sequences of five legume species (Medicago truncatula, Glycine max, Lotus japonicus, Phaseolus vulgaris, and Cajanus cajan) were identified. The comparative mapping of the two largest lupin GRRs provides novel evidence for ancient duplications in all of the studied species. These regions are conserved among representatives of the main clades of Papilionoideae. Furthermore, despite the complex evolution of legumes, some segments of the nuclear genome were not substantially modified and retained their quasi-ancestral structures. Cytogenetic markers anchored in these regions constitute a platform for heterologous mapping of legume genomes.

  11. Advances in Susceptibility Genetics of Intervertebral Degenerative Disc Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin'gang Zhang, Zhengming Sun, Jiangtao Liu, Xiong Guo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional view that the etiology of lumbar disc herniation is primarily due to age, gender, occupation, smoking and exposure to vehicular vibration dominated much of the last century. Recent research indicates that heredity may be largely responsible for the degeneration as well as herniation of intervertebral discs. Since 1998, genetic influences have been confirmed by the identification of several genes forms associated with disc degeneration. These researches are paving the way for a better understanding of the biologic mechanisms. Now, many researchers unanimously agree that lumbar disc herniation appears to be similar to other complex diseases, whose etiology has both environmental and hereditary influence, each with a part of contribution and relative risk. Then addressing the etiological of lumbar disc herniation, it is important to integrate heredity with the environment factors. For the purpose of this review, we have limited our discussion to several susceptibility genes associated with disc degeneration.

  12. Genetic polymorphisms and metabolism of endocrine disruptors in cancer susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatagima Ana

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have estimated that approximately 80% of all cancers are related to environmental factors. Individual cancer susceptibility can be the result of several host factors, including differences in metabolism, DNA repair, altered expression of tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes, and nutritional status. Xenobiotic metabolism is the principal mechanism for maintaining homeostasis during the body's exposure to xenobiotics. The balance of xenobiotic absorption and elimination rates in metabolism can be important in the prevention of DNA damage by chemical carcinogens. Thus the ability to metabolize and eliminate xenobiotics can be considered one of the body's first protective mechanisms. Variability in individual metabolism has been related to the enzymatic polymorphisms involved in activation and detoxification of chemical carcinogens. This paper is a contemporary literature review on genetic polymorphisms involved in the metabolism of endocrine disruptors potentially related to cancer development.

  13. Genetic polymorphisms and metabolism of endocrine disruptors in cancer susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Hatagima

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have estimated that approximately 80% of all cancers are related to environmental factors. Individual cancer susceptibility can be the result of several host factors, including differences in metabolism, DNA repair, altered expression of tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes, and nutritional status. Xenobiotic metabolism is the principal mechanism for maintaining homeostasis during the body's exposure to xenobiotics. The balance of xenobiotic absorption and elimination rates in metabolism can be important in the prevention of DNA damage by chemical carcinogens. Thus the ability to metabolize and eliminate xenobiotics can be considered one of the body's first protective mechanisms. Variability in individual metabolism has been related to the enzymatic polymorphisms involved in activation and detoxification of chemical carcinogens. This paper is a contemporary literature review on genetic polymorphisms involved in the metabolism of endocrine disruptors potentially related to cancer development.

  14. Genetic variants of CD209 associated with Kawasaki disease susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Chang Kuo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Kawasaki disease (KD is a systemic vasculitis with unknown etiology mainly affecting children in Asian countries. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN, CD209 in humans was showed to trigger an anti-inflammatory cascade and associated with KD susceptibility. This study was conducted to investigate the association between genetic polymorphisms of CD209 and the risk KD. METHODS: A total of 948 subjects (381 KD and 567 controls were recruited. Nine tagging SNPs (rs8112310, rs4804800, rs11465421, rs1544766, rs4804801, rs2287886, rs735239, rs735240, rs4804804 were selected for TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. Clinical phenotypes, coronary artery lesions (CAL and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG treatment outcomes were collected for analysis. RESULTS: Significant associations were found between CD209 polymorphisms (rs4804800, rs2287886, rs735240 and the risk of KD. Haplotype analysis for CD209 polymorphisms showed that A/A/G haplotype (P = 0.0002, OR = 1.61 and G/A/G haplotype (P = 0.0365, OR = 1.52 had higher risk of KD as compared with G/G/A haplotype in rs2287886/rs735239/rs735240 pairwise allele analysis. There were no significant association in KD with regards to CAL formation and IVIG treatment responses. CONCLUSION: CD209 polymorphisms were responsible for the susceptibility of KD, but not CAL formation and IVIG treatment responsiveness.

  15. Genetic architecture of differences in oviposition preference between ancestral and derived populations of the seed beetle Acanthoscelides obtectus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucić, N; Seslija, D

    2007-05-01

    We investigated the additive, dominance and epistatic genetic effects underlying differentiation in oviposition preference between two populations of the seed beetle Acanthoscelides obtectus evolved in the laboratory for 102 generations on bean and chickpea seeds. We reared and tested females on each of two host legumes. The populations differed in mean oviposition preference; the preference for chickpea was stronger in population reared on the chickpea (C) than in population maintained on common bean (P). Observations in the parental populations indicated that females tend to prefer ovipositioning their eggs on the seeds they have already experienced. The patterns of the means in each of the parental populations and 12 types of hybrids (two F(1), two F(2) and eight backcrosses) indicated that population differences in oviposition preference from both rearing hosts could be explained by nonadditive genetic effects. Statistically detectable additive and dominance genetic effects were observed in the most parsimonious model only when females were reared on the chickpea. The most parsimonious models on both rearing hosts suggested a contribution of negative additive x additive epistasis to the divergence of oviposition preference between the P and C populations. This indicates a positive effect of epistasis on the performance of the second generations of hybrids.

  16. TM4SF20 ancestral deletion and susceptibility to a pediatric disorder of early language delay and cerebral white matter hyperintensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Hunter, Jill V; Hanchard, Neil A; Willer, Jason R; Shaw, Chad; Tian, Qi; Illner, Anna; Wang, Xueqing; Cheung, Sau W; Patel, Ankita; Campbell, Ian M; Gelowani, Violet; Hixson, Patricia; Ester, Audrey R; Azamian, Mahshid S; Potocki, Lorraine; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia P; Ramocki, Melissa B; Santos-Cortez, Regie L P; Wang, Gao; York, Michele K; Justice, Monica J; Chu, Zili D; Bader, Patricia I; Omo-Griffith, Lisa; Madduri, Nirupama S; Scharer, Gunter; Crawford, Heather P; Yanatatsaneejit, Pattamawadee; Eifert, Anna; Kerr, Jeffery; Bacino, Carlos A; Franklin, Adiaha I A; Goin-Kochel, Robin P; Simpson, Gayle; Immken, Ladonna; Haque, Muhammad E; Stosic, Marija; Williams, Misti D; Morgan, Thomas M; Pruthi, Sumit; Omary, Reed; Boyadjiev, Simeon A; Win, Kay K; Thida, Aye; Hurles, Matthew; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Gallagher, Thomas E; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Beaudet, Arthur L; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Shaffer, Lisa G; Davis, Erica E; Belmont, John W; Dunstan, Sarah; Simmons, Cameron P; Bonnen, Penelope E; Leal, Suzanne M; Katsanis, Nicholas; Lupski, James R; Lalani, Seema R

    2013-08-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) of the brain are important markers of aging and small-vessel disease. WMHs are rare in healthy children and, when observed, often occur with comorbid neuroinflammatory or vasculitic processes. Here, we describe a complex 4 kb deletion in 2q36.3 that segregates with early childhood communication disorders and WMH in 15 unrelated families predominantly from Southeast Asia. The premature brain aging phenotype with punctate and multifocal WMHs was observed in ~70% of young carrier parents who underwent brain MRI. The complex deletion removes the penultimate exon 3 of TM4SF20, a gene encoding a transmembrane protein of unknown function. Minigene analysis showed that the resultant net loss of an exon introduces a premature stop codon, which, in turn, leads to the generation of a stable protein that fails to target to the plasma membrane and accumulates in the cytoplasm. Finally, we report this deletion to be enriched in individuals of Vietnamese Kinh descent, with an allele frequency of about 1%, embedded in an ancestral haplotype. Our data point to a constellation of early language delay and WMH phenotypes, driven by a likely toxic mechanism of TM4SF20 truncation, and highlight the importance of understanding and managing population-specific low-frequency pathogenic alleles.

  17. Susceptibility genetic variants associated with early-onset colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giráldez, María Dolores; López-Dóriga, Adriana; Bujanda, Luis; Abulí, Anna; Bessa, Xavier; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Muñoz, Jenifer; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Jover, Rodrigo; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Piqué, Josep M; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Cosme, Angel; Enríquez-Navascués, José María; Moreno, Victor; Andreu, Montserrat; Castells, Antoni; Balaguer, Francesc; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2012-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in Western countries. Hereditary forms only correspond to 5% of CRC burden. Recently, genome-wide association studies have identified common low-penetrant CRC genetic susceptibility loci. Early-onset CRC (CRC65 years old) (n = 1264). CRC susceptibility variants at 8q23.3 (rs16892766), 8q24.21 (rs6983267), 10p14 (rs10795668), 11q23.1 (rs3802842), 15q13.3 (rs4779584), 18q21 (rs4939827), 14q22.2 (rs4444235), 16q22.1 (rs9929218), 19q13.1 (rs10411210) and 20p12.3 (rs961253) were genotyped in all DNA samples. A genotype-phenotype correlation with clinical and pathological characteristics in both groups was performed. Risk allele carriers for rs3802842 [Odds ratio (OR) = 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.05, P = 0.0096, dominant model) and rs4779584 (OR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.02-1.9, P = 0.0396, dominant model) were more frequent in the CRC<50 group, whereas homozygotes for rs10795668 risk allele were also more frequent in the early-onset CRC (P = 0.02, codominant model). Regarding early-onset cases, 14q22 (rs4444235), 11q23 (rs3802842) and 20p12 (rs961253) variants were more associated with family history of CRC or tumors of the Lynch syndrome spectrum excluding CRC. In our entire cohort, sum of risk alleles was significantly higher in patients with a CRC family history (OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.06-1.85, P = 0.01). In conclusion, variants at 10p14 (rs10795668), 11q23.1 (rs3802842) and 15q13.3 (rs4779584) may have a predominant role in predisposition to early-onset CRC. Association of CRC susceptibility variants with some patient's familiar and personal features could be relevant for screening and surveillance strategies in this high-risk group and it should be explored in further studies.

  18. HLA and Celiac Disease Susceptibility: New Genetic Factors Bring Open Questions about the HLA Influence and Gene-Dosage Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Luz María; Dema, Bárbara; López-Larios, Arturo; Maluenda, Carlos; Bodas, Andrés; López-Palacios, Natalia; Figueredo, M. Ángeles; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Núñez, Concepción

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder triggered after gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals. The major genetic determinants are HLA-DQA1*05 and HLA-DQB1*02, which encode the DQ2 heterodimer. These alleles are commonly inherited in cis with DRB1*03∶01, which is associated with numerous immune-related disorders, in some cases contributing with a different amount of risk depending on the haplotype context. We aimed at investigating those possible differences involving DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes in CD susceptibility. A family (274 trios) and a case-control sample (369 CD cases/461 controls) were analyzed. DRB1*03∶01-carrying individuals were classified according to the haplotype present (ancestral haplotype (AH) 8.1, AH 18.2 or non-conserved haplotype) after genotyping of HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, -B8, TNF -308, TNF -376 and the TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. We observe that the AH 8.1 confers higher risk than the remaining DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes, and this effect only involves individuals possessing a single copy of DQB1*02. CD risk for these individuals is similar to the one conferred by inherit DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 in trans. It seems that an additional CD susceptibility factor is present in the AH 8.1 but not in other DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes. This factor could be shared with individuals possessing DQ2.5 trans, according to the similar risk observed in those two groups of individuals. PMID:23119005

  19. Ancestral genetic diversity associated with the rapid spread of stress-tolerant coral symbionts in response to Holocene climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Benjamin C C; Voolstra, Christian R; Arif, Chatchanit; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Burt, John A; Eyal, Gal; Loya, Yossi; Wiedenmann, Jörg

    2016-04-19

    Coral communities in the Persian/Arabian Gulf (PAG) withstand unusually high salinity levels and regular summer temperature maxima of up to ∼35 °C that kill conspecifics elsewhere. Due to the recent formation of the PAG and its subsequent shift to a hot climate, these corals have had only adapt to these extreme conditions and can therefore inform on how coral reefs may respond to global warming. One key to coral survival in the world's warmest reefs are symbioses with a newly discovered alga,Symbiodinium thermophilum Currently, it is unknown whether this symbiont originated elsewhere or emerged from unexpectedly fast evolution catalyzed by the extreme environment. Analyzing genetic diversity of symbiotic algae across >5,000 km of the PAG, the Gulf of Oman, and the Red Sea coastline, we show thatS. thermophilumis a member of a highly diverse, ancient group of symbionts cryptically distributed outside the PAG. We argue that the adjustment to temperature extremes by PAG corals was facilitated by the positive selection of preadapted symbionts. Our findings suggest that maintaining the largest possible pool of potentially stress-tolerant genotypes by protecting existing biodiversity is crucial to promote rapid adaptation to present-day climate change, not only for coral reefs, but for ecosystems in general.

  20. Ancestral genetic diversity associated with the rapid spread of stress-tolerant coral symbionts in response to Holocene climate change

    KAUST Repository

    Hume, Benjamin C. C.

    2016-04-05

    Coral communities in the Persian/Arabian Gulf (PAG) withstand unusually high salinity levels and regular summer temperature maxima of up to ∼35 °C that kill conspecifics elsewhere. Due to the recent formation of the PAG and its subsequent shift to a hot climate, these corals have had only <6, 000 y to adapt to these extreme conditions and can therefore inform on how coral reefs may respond to global warming. One key to coral survival in the world\\'s warmest reefs are symbioses with a newly discovered alga, Symbiodinium thermophilum. Currently, it is unknown whether this symbiont originated elsewhere or emerged from unexpectedly fast evolution catalyzed by the extreme environment. Analyzing genetic diversity of symbiotic algae across >5, 000 km of the PAG, the Gulf of Oman, and the Red Sea coastline, we show that S. thermophilum is a member of a highly diverse, ancient group of symbionts cryptically distributed outside the PAG. We argue that the adjustment to temperature extremes by PAG corals was facilitated by the positive selection of preadapted symbionts. Our findings suggest that maintaining the largest possible pool of potentially stress-tolerant genotypes by protecting existing biodiversity is crucial to promote rapid adaptation to present-day climate change, not only for coral reefs, but for ecosystems in general.

  1. Genetic susceptibility to progressive massive fibrosis in coal miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yucesoy, B.; Johnson, V.J.; Kissling, G.E.; Fluharty, K.; Kashon, M.L.; Slaven, J.; Germolec, D.; Vallyathan, V.; Luster, M.I. [NIOSH, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2008-06-15

    Progressive massive fibrosis (PMF) is a chronic interstitial lung disease with a complex aetiology that can occur after cumulative dust exposure. A case-control study was conducted to test the hypothesis that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within genes involved in inflammatory and fibrotic processes modulate the risk of PMF development. The study population consisted of 648 underground coal miners participating in the National Coal Workers Autopsy Study, of which 304 were diagnosed with PMF SNPs that influence the regulation of interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta 1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 genes were determined using a 5'-nuclease real-time PCR assay. There were no significant differences in the distribution of any individual SNP or haplotype between the PMF and control groups. However, the polygenotype of VEGF +405/ICAM-1 +241/IL-6 -174 (C-A-G) conferred an increased risk for PMF (odds ratio 3.4, 95% confidence interval 1.3-8.8). The present study suggests that the examined genetic variations that help regulate inflammatory and fibrotic processes are unlikely to strongly influence susceptibility to this interstitial lung disease, although the role of vascular endothelial growth factor, intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 and interleukin-6 polymorphisms in the development of progressive massive fibrosis may require further investigation.

  2. Genetic susceptibility for specific cancers. Medical liability of the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, M J

    1999-12-01

    The use of genetic profiling techniques to detect individuals with an increased susceptibility to heritable cancers has provoked recent legal interest in the duties of the attending physician and in the rights of patients and their families. In the current study specific prima facie and recently litigated cases are presented and explored to delineate the issues facing physicians and to illustrate the prerogatives of patients who are caught up in a heritable cancer enigma. Various courts have attempted to answer questions involving lawsuits in which incidents of breast/ovarian carcinoma and colon carcinoma have provoked claims of negligence against health care providers. Health care workers involved in the care of these patients have specific duties to these individuals. It would appear that physicians are being forced to assume the additional duty of delving into a patient's family history of cancer through multiple generations. This duty is followed by a responsibility to provide detailed counseling to those patients in whom such activity impacts the diagnosis and management of familial cancer.

  3. Genetic susceptibility: radiation effects relevant to space travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuanlin; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Warner, Christy; Bedford, Joel S

    2012-11-01

    Genetic variation in the capacity to repair radiation damage is an important factor influencing both cellular and tissue radiosensitivity variation among individuals as well as dose rate effects associated with such damage. This paper consists of two parts. The first part reviews some of the available data relating to genetic components governing such variability among individuals in susceptibility to radiation damage relevant for radiation protection and discusses the possibility and extent to which these may also apply for space radiations. The second part focuses on the importance of dose rate effects and genetic-based variations that influence them. Very few dose rate effect studies have been carried out for the kinds of radiations encountered in space. The authors present here new data on the production of chromosomal aberrations in noncycling low passage human ATM+/+ or ATM+/- cells following irradiations with protons (50 MeV or 1 GeV), 1 GeV(-1) n iron ions and gamma rays, where doses were delivered at a high dose rate of 700 mGy(-1) min, or a lower dose rate of 5 mGy min(-1). Dose responses were essentially linear over the dose ranges tested and not significantly different for the two cell strains. Values of the dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF) were expressed as the ratio of the slopes of the dose-response curves for the high versus the lower (5 mGy min(-1)) dose rate exposures. The authors refer to this as the DREF5. For the gamma ray standard, DREF5 values of approximately two were observed. Similar dose rate effects were seen for both energies of protons (DREF5 ≈ 2.2 in both cases). For 1 GeV(-1) n iron ions [linear energy transfer (LET) ≈ 150 keV μ(-1)], the DREF5 was not 1 as might have been expected on the basis of LET alone but was approximately 1.3. From these results and conditions, the authors estimate that the relative biological effectiveness for 1 GeV(-1) n iron ions for high and low dose rates, respectively, were about 10 and 15

  4. Admixture mapping of end stage kidney disease genetic susceptibility using estimated mutual information ancestry informative markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geiger Dan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The question of a genetic contribution to the higher prevalence and incidence of end stage kidney disease (ESKD among African Americans (AA remained unresolved, until recent findings using admixture mapping pointed to the association of a genomic locus on chromosome 22 with this disease phenotype. In the current study we utilize this example to demonstrate the utility of applying a multi-step admixture mapping approach. Methods A multi-step case only admixture mapping study, consisted of the following steps was designed: 1 Assembly of the sample dataset (ESKD AA; 2 Design of the estimated mutual information ancestry informative markers (n = 2016 screening panel 3; Genotyping the sample set whose size was determined by a power analysis (n = 576 appropriate for the initial screening panel; 4 Inference of local ancestry for each individual and identification of regions with increased AA ancestry using two different ancestry inference statistical approaches; 5 Enrichment of the initial screening panel; 6 Power analysis of the enriched panel 7 Genotyping of additional samples. 8 Re-analysis of the genotyping results to identify a genetic risk locus. Results The initial screening phase yielded a significant peak using the ADMIXMAP ancestry inference program applying case only statistics. Subgroup analysis of 299 ESKD patients with no history of diabetes yielded peaks using both the ANCESTRYMAP and ADMIXMAP ancestry inference programs. The significant peak was found on chromosome 22. Genotyping of additional ancestry informative markers on chromosome 22 that took into account linkage disequilibrium in the ancestral populations, and the addition of samples increased the statistical significance of the finding. Conclusions A multi-step admixture mapping analysis of AA ESKD patients replicated the finding of a candidate risk locus on chromosome 22, contributing to the heightened susceptibility of African Americans to develop non

  5. Genetic differential susceptibility on trial: meta-analytic support from randomized controlled experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J

    2015-02-01

    The most stringent test of differential susceptibility theory is provided by randomized control trials examining the moderating role of genetic markers of differential susceptibility in experimental manipulations of the environment (Gene × Experimental Environment interactions), being at least 10 times more powerful than correlational Gene × Environment interaction studies. We identified 22 experiments involving 3,257 participants with various developmental outcomes (e.g., externalizing problems, internalizing behaviors, and cognitive development). Effect sizes contrasting experimental versus control group were computed both for subjects with the polymorphism considered indicative of heightened susceptibility (e.g., the dopamine receptor D4 gene seven-repeat allele and the serotonin transporter polymorphic region short allele) and others expected to be low in susceptibility (e.g., the dopamine receptor D4 gene four-repeat allele and the serotonin transporter polymorphic region short allele). Clear-cut experimental support for genetic differential susceptibility emerged: the combined effect size of the interventions for the susceptible genotypes amounted to r = .33 (95% confidence interval = 0.23, 0.42; p differential susceptibility than microtrials, and differential susceptibility was more clearly observed in trials with externalizing and cognitive outcomes than with internalizing problems. This meta-analysis shows proof of principle for genetic differential susceptibility and indicates that it is time to explore its mechanisms and limits. The concept of differential susceptibility alters the idea of constitutional "risk" factors (reactive temperament and risk genotypes), and points to intervention efficacy hidden in Gene × Environment interactions.

  6. Family system characteristics and psychological adjustment to cancer susceptibility genetic testing : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, I.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Duivenvoorden, H. J.; Brocker-Vriends, A. H. J. T.; van Asperen, C. J.; Sijmons, R. H.; Seynaeve, C.; Van Gool, A. R.; Klijn, J. G. M.; Tibben, A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined prospectively the contribution of family functioning, differentiation to parents, family communication and support from relatives to psychological distress in individuals undergoing genetic susceptibility testing for a known familial pathogenic BRCA1/2 or Hereditary nonpolyposis

  7. Ancestral Relationships Using Metafounders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarra, Andres; Christensen, Ole Fredslund; Vitezica, Zulma G

    2015-01-01

    due to finite size of the ancestral population and connections between populations. This complicates the conciliation of both approaches and, in particular, combining pedigree with genomic relationships. We present a coherent theoretical framework to consider base population in pedigree relationships....... We suggest a conceptual framework that considers each ancestral population as a finite-sized pool of gametes. This generates across-individual relationships and contrasts with the classical view where each population is considered as an infinite, unrelated pool. Several ancestral populations may......Recent use of genomic (marker-based) relationships shows that relationships exist within and across base population (breeds or lines). However, current treatment of pedigree relationships is unable to consider relationships within or across base populations, although such relationships must exist...

  8. Genetic Counseling for Breast Cancer Susceptibility in African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    eg, internal medicine, obstetric / gynecology practices), or community oncology re- sources based on the setting from which they were referred...numerous arenas of genetic counseling, ranging from male infertility [13] to pregnant women’s satisfaction with prenatal genetic counseling [14]. Recent...Brannigan RE. Male infertility : perceptions, utility, and satisfaction with genetic counseling services. Fertil Steril 2003;80:52. [14] Tercyak KP, Johnson

  9. Differential effect of caffeine intake in subjects with genetic susceptibility to Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prakash M; Paing, Swe Swe Thet; Li, HuiHua; Pavanni, R; Yuen, Y; Zhao, Y; Tan, Eng King

    2015-11-02

    We examined if caffeine intake has a differential effect in subjects with high and low genetic susceptibility to Parkinson's disease (PD), a common neurodegenerative disorder. A case control study involving 812 subjects consisting of PD and healthy controls were conducted. Caffeine intake assessed by a validated questionnaire and genotyping of PD gene risk variant (LRRK2 R1628P) was carried out. Compared to caffeine takers with the wild-type genotype (low genetic susceptibility), non-caffeine takers with R1628P variant (high genetic susceptibility) had a 15 times increased risk of developing PD (OR = 15.4, 95% CI = (1.94, 122), P = 0.01), whereas caffeine takers with R1628P (intermediate susceptibility) had a 3 times risk (OR = 3.07, 95% CI = (2.02, 4.66), P Caffeine intake would significantly reduce the risk of PD much more in those with high genetic susceptibility compared to those with low genetic susceptibility.

  10. Genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grarup, Niels; Sandholt, Camilla H; Hansen, Torben;

    2014-01-01

    During the past 7 years, genome-wide association studies have shed light on the contribution of common genomic variants to the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes, obesity and related intermediate phenotypes. The discoveries have firmly established more than 175 genomic loci associated...... with these phenotypes. Despite the tight correlation between type 2 diabetes and obesity, these conditions do not appear to share a common genetic background, since they have few genetic risk loci in common. The recent genetic discoveries do however highlight specific details of the interplay between the pathogenesis...... of type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and obesity. The focus is currently shifting towards investigations of data from targeted array-based genotyping and exome and genome sequencing to study the individual and combined effect of low-frequency and rare variants in metabolic disease. Here we review recent...

  11. Genetic susceptibility of intervertebral disc degeneration among young Finnish adults

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Disc degeneration (DD) is a common condition that progresses with aging. Although the events leading to DD are not well understood, a significant genetic influence has been found. This study was undertaken to assess the association between relevant candidate gene polymorphisms and moderate DD in a well-defined and characterized cohort of young adults. Focusing on young age can be valuable in determining genetic predisposition to DD. Methods We investigated the associations...

  12. What's New in Genetic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plichta, Jennifer K; Griffin, Molly; Thakuria, Joseph; Hughes, Kevin S

    2016-09-15

    The advent of next-generation sequencing, and its transition further into the clinic with the US Food and Drug Administration approval of a cystic fibrosis assay in 2013, have increased the speed and reduced the cost of DNA sequencing. Coupled with a historic ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States that human genes are not patentable, these events have caused a seismic shift in genetic testing in clinical medicine. More labs are offering genetic testing services; more multigene panels are available for gene testing; more genes and gene mutations are being identified; and more variants of uncertain significance, which may or may not be clinically actionable, have been found. All these factors, taken together, are increasing the complexity of clinical management. While these developments have led to a greater interest in genetic testing, risk assessment, and large-scale population screening, they also present unique challenges. The dilemma for clinicians is how best to understand and manage this rapidly growing body of information to improve patient care. With millions of genetic variants of potential clinical significance and thousands of genes associated with rare but well-established genetic conditions, the complexities of genetic data management clearly will require improved computerized clinical decision support tools, as opposed to continued reliance on traditional rote, memory-based medicine.

  13. Genetic susceptibility testing from a stress and coping perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Holly C; Organista, Kurt; Burack, Jeffrey; Biesecker, Barbara Bowles

    2006-04-01

    Four theories of health behavior and of stress and coping are reviewed for their ability to illuminate interest in uptake and outcomes of genetic testing for adult-onset diseases. These theories are the Health Belief Model, the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), the Common Sense Model of Self-regulation (CSM), and the Transactional Model of Stress and Coping (TMSC). Basic concepts of each theory are discussed, followed by evidence from the literature supporting the relevance of these concepts to the understanding of genetic testing for four adult-onset diseases: Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, hereditary breast/ovarian cancer, and hereditary colorectal cancer. Emphasis is placed on the finding that a decision to undergo genetic testing may be considered as a way to cope with both the cognitive and affective concerns that arise from living at increased risk of developing a disease in the future. The potential value of genetic testing for reducing uncertainty about and gaining a sense of control over one's risk of developing a chronic disease is highlighted. We argue that theories which focus on stress and coping provide a useful framework for future studies of genetic testing decisions for adult-onset disease risk.

  14. Final Technical Report for the grant entitled "Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William, F., Ph.D., D.Sc.

    2006-11-22

    The goal of this proposal was to test the hypothesis that mice heterozygous for the Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS1) gene are genetically susceptible to low doses of ionizing radiation. The rationale for this is that patients with NBS are radiation sensitive, because of defects in cellular responses to radiation induced genetic damage and haploinsufficiency at this genetic locus provides the potential for genetic susceptibility to low doses of ionizing radiation. Wild type and heterozygous NBS1 mice were irradiated and followed over their lifetime for radiation induced genomic instability, carcinogenesis and non-specific life shortening. No differences in cytogenetic damage, cancer induction or life span were observed between the hypomorphic mice indicating that genetic imbalance at the NBS1 loci does not modulate low dose radiation sensitivity.

  15. ORAI1 genetic polymorphisms associated with the susceptibility of atopic dermatitis in Japanese and Taiwanese populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chiao Chang

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Multiple genetic and environmental factors are thought to be responsible for susceptibility to AD. In this study, we collected 2,478 DNA samples including 209 AD patients and 729 control subjects from Taiwanese population and 513 AD patients and 1027 control subject from Japanese population for sequencing and genotyping ORAI1. A total of 14 genetic variants including 3 novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the ORAI1 gene were identified. Our results indicated that a non-synonymous SNP (rs3741596, Ser218Gly associated with the susceptibility of AD in the Japanese population but not in the Taiwanese population. However, there is another SNP of ORAI1 (rs3741595 associated with the risk of AD in the Taiwanese population but not in the Japanese population. Taken together, our results indicated that genetic polymorphisms of ORAI1 are very likely to be involved in the susceptibility of AD.

  16. ORAI1 genetic polymorphisms associated with the susceptibility of atopic dermatitis in Japanese and Taiwanese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Chiao; Lee, Chih-Hung; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Wang, Li-Fang; Doi, Satoru; Miyatake, Akihiko; Enomoto, Tadao; Tomita, Kaori; Sakashita, Masafumi; Yamada, Takechiyo; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Ebe, Koji; Saeki, Hidehisa; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Furue, Masutaka; Chen, Wei-Chiao; Chiu, Yi-Ching; Chang, Wei Pin; Hong, Chien-Hui; Hsi, Edward; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Yu, Hsin-Su; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tamari, Mayumi

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Multiple genetic and environmental factors are thought to be responsible for susceptibility to AD. In this study, we collected 2,478 DNA samples including 209 AD patients and 729 control subjects from Taiwanese population and 513 AD patients and 1027 control subject from Japanese population for sequencing and genotyping ORAI1. A total of 14 genetic variants including 3 novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ORAI1 gene were identified. Our results indicated that a non-synonymous SNP (rs3741596, Ser218Gly) associated with the susceptibility of AD in the Japanese population but not in the Taiwanese population. However, there is another SNP of ORAI1 (rs3741595) associated with the risk of AD in the Taiwanese population but not in the Japanese population. Taken together, our results indicated that genetic polymorphisms of ORAI1 are very likely to be involved in the susceptibility of AD.

  17. Genetic polyrnorphisms in susceptibility to Type 1 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.

    2008-01-01

    Type 1 Diabetes is a serious complex disease caused by several environmental and genetic factors. It is one of most common childhood diseases, requires life-long treatment, and is associated with increased mortality, mainly due to complications that occur later in life. More than three decades of ge

  18. Genetic susceptibility to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacko, M.; Braakhuis, B.J.M.; Sturgis, E.M.; Boedeker, C.C.; Suarez, C.; Rinaldo, A.; Ferlito, A.; Takes, R.P.

    2014-01-01

    Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence is growing. Although environmental carcinogens and carcinogenic viruses are the main etiologic factors, genetic predisposition obviously plays a risk-modulating role, given that not all individ

  19. Genetic and sexual separation between insect resistant and susceptible Barbarea vulgaris plants in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toneatto, Fiorello; Nielsen, Jens Kvist; Ørgaard, Marian

    2010-01-01

    of these interactions, we tested how genetically divergent resistant and susceptible plants are, using microsatellite markers. To test whether they are reproductively fully compatible, resistant and susceptible plants were grown intermixed in an outdoor experiment, and the paternity of open-pollinated offspring...... that have been (partly) isolated at some time, during which genetic and reproductive divergence evolved. A parsimonious scenario could be that the two plant types were isolated in different refugia during the previous ice age, from which they migrated into and met in Denmark and possibly neighbouring...

  20. Genetic factors for nerve susceptibility to injuries-lessons from PMP22 deifciency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Li

    2014-01-01

    Genetic factors may be learnt from families with gene mutations that render nerve-injury sus-ceptibility even to ordinary physical activities. A typical example is hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). HNPP is caused by a heterozygous deletion of PMP22 gene. PMP22 deficiency disrupts myelin junctions (such as tight junction and adherens junctions), leading to abnormally increased myelin permeability that explains the nerve susceptibility to injury. This ifnding should motivate investigators to identify additional genetic factors contribut-ing to nerve vulnerability of injury.

  1. Evaluation of Genetic Susceptibility to Childhood Allergy and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Asthma and allergy represent complex phenotypes, which disproportionately burden ethnic minorities in the United States. Strong evidence for genomic factors predisposing subjects to asthma/allergy is available. However, methods to utilize this information to identify high risk groups are variable and replication of genetic associations in African Americans is warranted. Methods: We evaluated 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and a deletion corresponding to 11 genes demonstrating association with asthma in the literature, for association with asthma, atopy, testing positive for food allergens, eosinophilia, and total serum IgE among 141 African American children living in Detroit, Michigan. Independent SNP and haplotype associations were investigated for association with each trait, and subsequently assessed in concert using a genetic risk score (GRS). Results: Statistically significant associations with asthma were observed for SNPs in GSTM1, MS4A2, and GSTP1 genes, after correction for multiple testing. Chromosome 11 haplotype CTACGAGGCC (corresponding to MS4A2 rs574700, rs1441586, rs556917, rs502581, rs502419 and GSTP1 rs6591256, rs17593068, rs1695, rs1871042, rs947895) was associated with a nearly five-fold increase in the odds of asthma (Odds Ratio (OR) = 4.8, p = 0.007). The GRS was significantly associated with a higher odds of asthma (OR = 1.61, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.21, 2.13; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Variation in genes a

  2. Immunochip SNP array identifies novel genetic variants conferring susceptibility to candidaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Vinod; Cheng, Shih-Chin; Johnson, Melissa D.; Smeekens, Sanne P.; Wojtowicz, Agnieszka; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos; Karjalainen, Juha; Franke, Lude; Withoff, Sebo; Plantinga, Theo S.; de Veerdonk, Frank L. van; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Sokol, Harry; Bauer, Hermann; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Marchetti, Oscar; Perfect, John R.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Netea, Mihai G.

    2014-01-01

    Candidaemia is the fourth most common cause of bloodstream infection, with a high mortality rate of up to 40%. Identification of host genetic factors that confer susceptibility to candidaemia may aid in designing adjunctive immunotherapeutic strategies. Here we hypothesize that variation in immune g

  3. Genetics of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: From susceptibility and nutrient interactions to management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi Kanth, Vishnubhotla Venkata; Sasikala, Mitnala; Sharma, Mithun; Rao, Padaki Nagaraja; Reddy, Duvvuru Nageshwar

    2016-01-01

    Genetics plays an important role in determining the susceptibility of an individual to develop a disease. Complex, multi factorial diseases of modern day (diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and obesity) are a result of disparity between the type of food consumed and genes, suggesting that food which does not match the host genes is probably one of the major reasons for developing life style diseases. Non-alcoholic fatty liver is becoming a global epidemic leading to substantial morbidity. While various genotyping approaches such as whole exome sequencing using next generation sequencers and genome wide association studies have identified susceptibility loci for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) including variants in patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 genes apart from others; nutrient based studies emphasized on a combination of vitamin D, E and omega-3 fatty acids to manage fatty liver disease. However majority of the studies were conducted independent of each other and very few studies explored the interactions between the genetic susceptibility and nutrient interactions. Identifying such interactions will aid in optimizing the nutrition tailor made to an individual’s genetic makeup, thereby aiding in delaying the onset of the disease and its progression. The present topic focuses on studies that identified the genetic susceptibility for NAFLD, nutritional recommendations, and their interactions for better management of NAFLD. PMID:27458502

  4. Genetics of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: From susceptibility and nutrient interactions to management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vishnubhotla; Venkata; Ravi; Kanth; Mitnala; Sasikala; Mithun; Sharma; Padaki; Nagaraja; Rao; Duvvuru; Nageshwar; Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Genetics plays an important role in determining the susceptibility of an individual to develop a disease. Complex, multi factorial diseases of modern day(diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and obesity) are a result of disparity between the type of food consumed and genes, suggesting that food which does not match the host genes is probably one of the major reasons for developing life style diseases. Non-alcoholic fatty liver is becoming a global epidemic leading to substantial morbidity. While various genotyping approaches such as whole exome sequencing using next generation sequencers and genome wide association studies have identified susceptibility loci for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD) including variants in patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 genes apart from others; nutrient based studies emphasized on a combination of vitamin D, E and omega-3 fatty acids to manage fatty liver disease. However majority of the studies were conducted independent of each other and very few studies explored the interactions between the genetic susceptibility and nutrient interactions. Identifying such interactions will aid in optimizing the nutrition tailor made to an individual’s genetic makeup, thereby aiding in delaying the onset of the disease and its progression. The present topic focuses on studies that identified the genetic susceptibility for NAFLD, nutritional recommendations, and their interactions for better management of NAFLD.

  5. Glucocorticoid-related genetic susceptibility for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Poirier, Raphael; Wollmer, M Axel; Grimaldi, Luigi M E; Tsolaki, Magdalini; Streffer, Johannes R; Hock, Christoph; Nitsch, Roger M; Mohajeri, M Hasan; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Because glucocorticoid excess increases neuronal vulnerability, genetic variations in the glucocorticoid system may be related to the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We analyzed single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 10 glucocorticoid-related genes in a population of 814 AD patients and unrelated control subjects. Set-association analysis revealed that a rare haplotype in the 5' regulatory region of the gene encoding 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (HSD11B1) was associated with a 6-fold increased risk for sporadic AD. Results of a reporter-gene assay indicated that the rare risk-associated haplotype altered HSD11B1 transcription. HSD11B1 controls tissue levels of biologically active glucocorticoids and thereby influences neuronal vulnerability. Our results indicate that a functional variation in the glucocorticoid system increases the risk for AD, which may have important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of this disease.

  6. Genetic susceptibility of intervertebral disc degeneration among young Finnish adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelempisioti Anthi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disc degeneration (DD is a common condition that progresses with aging. Although the events leading to DD are not well understood, a significant genetic influence has been found. This study was undertaken to assess the association between relevant candidate gene polymorphisms and moderate DD in a well-defined and characterized cohort of young adults. Focusing on young age can be valuable in determining genetic predisposition to DD. Methods We investigated the associations of existing candidate genes for DD among 538 young adults with a mean age of 19 belonging to the 1986 Northern Finland Birth Cohort. Nineteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in 16 genes were genotyped. We evaluated lumbar DD using the modified Pfirrmann classification and a 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner for imaging. Results Of the 538 individuals studied, 46% had no degeneration, while 54% had DD and 51% of these had moderate DD. The risk of DD was significantly higher in subjects with an allele G of IL6 SNPs rs1800795 (OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.07-1.96 and rs1800797 (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.02-1.85 in the additive inheritance model. The role of IL6 was further supported by the haplotype analysis, which resulted in an association between the GGG haplotype (SNPs rs1800797, rs1800796 and rs1800795 and DD with an OR of 1.51 (95% CI 1.11-2.04. In addition, we observed an association between DD and two other polymorphisms, SKT rs16924573 (OR 0.27 95% CI 0.07-0.96 and CILP rs2073711 in women (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.07-3.89. Conclusion Our results indicate that IL6, SKT and CILP are involved in the etiology of DD among young adults.

  7. Genetic Based Plant Resistance and Susceptibility Traits to Herbivory Influence Needle and Root Litter Nutrient Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classen, Aimee T [ORNL; Chapman, Samantha K. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Whitham, Thomas G [Northern Arizona University; Hart, Stephen C [Northern Arizona University; Koch, George W [Northern Arizona University

    2007-01-01

    It is generally assumed that leaf and root litter decomposition have similar drivers and that nutrient release from these substrates is synchronized. Few studies have examined these assumptions, and none has examined how plant genetics (i.e., plant susceptibility to herbivory) could affect these relationships. Here we examine the effects of herbivore susceptibility and resistance on needle and fine root litter decomposition of pi on pine, Pinus edulis. The study population consists of individual trees that are either susceptible or resistant to herbivory by the pi on needle scale, Matsucoccus acalyptus, or the stem-boring moth, Dioryctria albovittella. Genetic analyses and experimental removals and additions of these insects have identified trees that are naturally resistant and susceptible to these insects. These herbivores increase the chemical quality of litter inputs and alter soil microclimate, both of which are important decomposition drivers. Our research leads to four major conclusions: Herbivore susceptibility and resistance effects on 1) needle litter mass loss and phosphorus (P) retention in moth susceptible and resistant litter are governed by microclimate, 2) root litter nitrogen (N) and P retention, and needle litter N retention are governed by litter chemical quality, 3) net nutrient release from litter can reverse over time, 4) root and needle litter mass loss and nutrient release are determined by location (above- vs. belowground), suggesting that the regulators of needle and root decomposition differ at the local scale. Understanding of decomposition and nutrient retention in ecosystems requires consideration of herbivore effects on above- and belowground processes and how these effects may be governed by plant genotype. Because an underlying genetic component to herbivory is common to most ecosystems of the world and herbivory may increase in climatic change scenarios, it is important to evaluate the role of plant genetics in affecting carbon and

  8. Identification of susceptibility genes and genetic modifiers of human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Kenneth; Kammerer, Stefan; Hoyal, Carolyn; Reneland, Rikard; Marnellos, George; Nelson, Matthew R.; Braun, Andreas

    2005-03-01

    The completion of the human genome sequence enables the discovery of genes involved in common human disorders. The successful identification of these genes is dependent on the availability of informative sample sets, validated marker panels, a high-throughput scoring technology, and a strategy for combining these resources. We have developed a universal platform technology based on mass spectrometry (MassARRAY) for analyzing nucleic acids with high precision and accuracy. To fuel this technology, we generated more than 100,000 validated assays for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering virtually all known and predicted human genes. We also established a large DNA sample bank comprised of more than 50,000 consented healthy and diseased individuals. This combination of reagents and technology allows the execution of large-scale genome-wide association studies. Taking advantage of MassARRAY"s capability for quantitative analysis of nucleic acids, allele frequencies are estimated in sample pools containing large numbers of individual DNAs. To compare pools as a first-pass "filtering" step is a tremendous advantage in throughput and cost over individual genotyping. We employed this approach in numerous genome-wide, hypothesis-free searches to identify genes associated with common complex diseases, such as breast cancer, osteoporosis, and osteoarthritis, and genes involved in quantitative traits like high density lipoproteins cholesterol (HDL-c) levels and central fat. Access to additional well-characterized patient samples through collaborations allows us to conduct replication studies that validate true disease genes. These discoveries will expand our understanding of genetic disease predisposition, and our ability for early diagnosis and determination of specific disease subtype or progression stage.

  9. Application of a hybrid model of neural networks and genetic algorithms to evaluate landslide susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. B.; Li, J. W.; Zhou, B.; Yuan, Z. Q.; Chen, Y. P.

    2013-03-01

    In the last few decades, the development of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) technology has provided a method for the evaluation of landslide susceptibility and hazard. Slope units were found to be appropriate for the fundamental morphological elements in landslide susceptibility evaluation. Following the DEM construction in a loess area susceptible to landslides, the direct-reverse DEM technology was employed to generate 216 slope units in the studied area. After a detailed investigation, the landslide inventory was mapped in which 39 landslides, including paleo-landslides, old landslides and recent landslides, were present. Of the 216 slope units, 123 involved landslides. To analyze the mechanism of these landslides, six environmental factors were selected to evaluate landslide occurrence: slope angle, aspect, the height and shape of the slope, distance to river and human activities. These factors were extracted in terms of the slope unit within the ArcGIS software. The spatial analysis demonstrates that most of the landslides are located on convex slopes at an elevation of 100-150 m with slope angles from 135°-225° and 40°-60°. Landslide occurrence was then checked according to these environmental factors using an artificial neural network with back propagation, optimized by genetic algorithms. A dataset of 120 slope units was chosen for training the neural network model, i.e., 80 units with landslide presence and 40 units without landslide presence. The parameters of genetic algorithms and neural networks were then set: population size of 100, crossover probability of 0.65, mutation probability of 0.01, momentum factor of 0.60, learning rate of 0.7, max learning number of 10 000, and target error of 0.000001. After training on the datasets, the susceptibility of landslides was mapped for the land-use plan and hazard mitigation. Comparing the susceptibility map with landslide inventory, it was noted that the prediction accuracy of landslide occurrence

  10. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services.

  11. Patients' understanding of genetic susceptibility testing in mainstream medicine: qualitative study on thrombophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Maggie H

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background UK and US policy initiatives have suggested that, in the future, patients and clinicians in mainstream medicine could use genetic information to prevent common illnesses. There are no studies on patients' experience and understanding of the process of testing for common genetic susceptibilities in mainstream medicine. Methods Qualitative interviews with 42 individuals who had undergone testing for a genetic susceptibility for deep vein thrombosis in primary and secondary care in the UK. Results Some participants, often from higher social classes, had a good understanding of the test and its implications. They had often sought additional information on thrombophilia from relatives and from the Internet. Others, often from less privileged backgrounds, had a poorer understanding of the test – seven individuals were unaware of having had the genetic test. Features of genetic information led to misunderstandings: (i at referral, (ii when communicating results, and (iii when making sense of the implications of testing. Participants' accounts indicated that non-specialist doctors may feel obliged to refer a patient for a genetic test they know little about, because a patient requests it after a relative had tested positive. Sometimes a referral for a genetic test was lost under information overload when multiple tests and issues were considered. The inconsistent and informal ways of communicating test results – for example by phone – in mainstream medicine also led to confusion. Participants did not generally overestimate their risk, but some were uncertain about whether they were taking the right preventive actions and/or whether their children were at risk. Information about genetic susceptibilities was difficult to make sense of, as it related to ambiguous risks for participants and family members, complicated and unfamiliar terminology and multiple genes and preventive strategies. Conclusion Policy visions of clinicians

  12. Psychological impact of genetic testing for cancer susceptibility: an update of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, Bettina

    2005-12-01

    This article presents an overview of the rapidly evolving body of literature on the psychological impact of genetic testing for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility, hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Uptake of genetic testing for BRCA1/2 and HNPCC-related mutations is more consistently related to psychological factors, rather than sociodemographic variables. Most studies on the psychological impact of genetic testing amongst individuals who have never been affected by cancer demonstrate that non-carriers derive significant psychological benefits from genetic testing, while no adverse effects have been observed amongst carriers. These benefits are more clear-cut for HNPCC, compared to hereditary breast/ovarian cancer, reflecting differences in risk management options. The few studies available on individuals affected with cancer indicate that the impact of genetic testing is mediated and amplified by their former experience of cancer. Future directions and challenges of research in this area are reviewed. In particular, more empirical data are needed on the broader impact of genetic testing on those with inconclusive results or results of uncertain significance. As genetic testing is becoming available for other types of familial cancer, additional investigations will be needed as there is evidence to suggest that the impact of genetic testing may be unique to each type of familial cancer.

  13. Common genetic variations in cell cycle and DNA repair pathways associated with pediatric brain tumor susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adel Fahmideh, Maral; Lavebratt, Catharina; Schüz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge on the role of genetic polymorphisms in the etiology of pediatric brain tumors (PBTs) is limited. Therefore, we investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identified by candidate gene-association studies on adult brain tumors, and PBT risk.The study...... cycle and DNA repair pathways variations associated with susceptibility to adult brain tumors also seem to be associated with PBT risk, suggesting pediatric and adult brain tumors might share similar etiological pathways....

  14. Genetic susceptibility and environmental factors of esophageal cancer in Xi'an

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An-Hui Wang; Chang-Sheng Sun; Liang-Shou Li; Jiu-Yi Huang; Qing-Shu Chen; De-Zhong Xu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To analyse the role of genetic susceptibility and environmental factors in the process of esophageal cancer (EC) formation in Xi'an, China.METHODS: A hospital based case-control study, combined with molecular epidemiological method, was carried out. A total of 127 EC cases and 101 controls were interviewed with questionnaires containing demographic items, habit of tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, and family history of EC.Polymorphism of CYP1A1 and GSTM1 of 127 EC cases and 101 controls were detected by PCR method. The interactions between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors were also discussed.RESULTS: Tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking and a family history of EC were risk factors for EC with an OR of 2.04(95% CI 1.15-3.60), 3.45(95% CI 1.74-6.91), 3.14 (95%CI 1.28-7.94), respectively. Individuals carrying CYP1A1 Val/Valgenotype compared to those with CYP1A1 Ile/Ile genotype had an increased risk for EC (OR 3.35, 95% CI 1.49-7.61). GSTM1 deletion genotype was a risk factor for EC (OR1.81, 95% CI 1.03-3.18). Gene-environment interaction analysis showed that CYP1A1 Val/Valgenotype, GSTM1 deletion genotype had synergetic interactions with tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking and family history of EC.CONCLUSION: Tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking and a family history of EC are risk factors for EC. CYP1A1 Val/'Va/and GSTM1 deletion genotypes are genetic susceptibility biomarkers for EC. There are synergic interactions between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors.

  15. The Impact of Genetic Susceptibility to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus on Placental Malaria in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Severe malaria, including cerebral malaria (CM) and placental malaria (PM), have been recognized to have many of the features of uncontrolled inflammation. We recently showed that in mice genetic susceptibility to the lethal inflammatory autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), conferred resistance to CM. Protection appeared to be mediated by immune mechanisms that allowed SLE-prone mice, prior to the onset of overt SLE symptoms, to better control their inflammatory response to...

  16. Is the comorbidity of epilepsy and migraine due to a shared genetic susceptibility?

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the comorbidity of migraine and epilepsy results from a shared genetic susceptibility to the two disorders. We used semistructured telephone interviews to collect information on migraine and epilepsy in the families (parents, siblings, and offspring) of 1,957 adult probands with epilepsy. Epilepsy was defined as a lifetime history of two or more unprovoked seizures, and migraine as self-reported severe headaches with two or more of the following symptoms: unilate...

  17. Genetic relatedness, antimicrobial and biocide susceptibility comparative analysis of methicillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Natacha; Belas, Adriana; Couto, Isabel; Perreten, Vincent; Pomba, Constança

    2014-08-01

    Forty methicillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP and MSSP, respectively) from colonization and infection in dogs and cats were characterized for clonality, antimicrobial, and biocide susceptibility. MSSP were genetically more diverse than MRSP by multi-locus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Three different spa types (t06, t02, t05) and two SCCmec types (II-III and V) were detected in the MRSP isolates. All MRSP and two MSSP strains were multidrug-resistant. Several antibiotic resistance genes (mecA, blaZ, tet(M), tet(K), aac(6')-Ie-aph(2')-Ia, aph(3')-III, ant(6)-Ia, sat4, erm(B), lnu(A), dfr(G), and catp(C221)) were identified by microarray and double mutations in the gyrA and grlA genes and a single mutation in the rpoB gene were detected by sequence analysis. No differences were detected between MSSP and MRSP in the chlorhexidine acetate (CHA) minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). However, two MSSP had elevated MIC to triclosan (TCL) and one to benzalkonium chloride and ethidium bromide. One MSSP isolate harboured a qacA gene, while in another a qacB gene was detected. None of the isolates harboured the sh-fabI gene. Three of the biocide products studied had high bactericidal activity (Otodine(®), Clorexyderm Spot Gel(®), Dermocanis Piocure-M(®)), while Skingel(®) failed to achieve a five log reduction in the bacterial counting. S. pseudintermedius have become a serious therapeutic challenge in particular if methicillin- resistance and/or multidrug-resistance are involved. Biocides, like CHA and TCL, seem to be clinically effective and safe topical therapeutic options.

  18. Genetic susceptibility to family environment: BDNF Val66met and 5-HTTLPR influence depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Elizabeth D; Hammen, Constance L; Najman, Jake M; Brennan, Patricia A

    2014-12-01

    Functional genetic polymorphisms associated with Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and serotonin (5-HTTLPR) have demonstrated associations with depression in interaction with environmental stressors. In light of evidence for biological connections between BDNF and serotonin, it is prudent to consider genetic epistasis between variants in these genes in the development of depressive symptoms. The current study examined the effects of val66met, 5-HTTLPR, and family environment quality on youth depressive symptoms in adolescence and young adulthood in a longitudinal sample oversampled for maternal depression history. A differential susceptibility model was tested, comparing the effects of family environment on depression scores across different levels of a cumulative plasticity genotype, defined as presence of both, either, or neither plasticity alleles (defined here as val66met Met and 5-HTTLPR 'S'). Cumulative plasticity genotype interacted with family environment quality to predict depression among males and females at age 15. After age 15, however, the interaction of cumulative plasticity genotype and early family environment quality was only predictive of depression among females. Results supported a differential susceptibility model at age 15, such that plasticity allele presence was associated with more or less depressive symptoms depending on valence of the family environment, and a diathesis-stress model of gene-environment interaction after age 15. These findings, although preliminary because of the small sample size, support prior results indicating interactive effects of 5-HTTLPR, val66met, and environmental stress, and suggest that family environment may have a stronger influence on genetically susceptible women than men.

  19. Faecal carriage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in healthy humans: antimicrobial susceptibility and global genetic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estepa, Vanesa; Rojo-Bezares, Beatriz; Torres, Carmen; Sáenz, Yolanda

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the Pseudomonas aeruginosa faecal carriage rate in 98 healthy humans and to perform the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of recovered isolates. The genetic relatedness among the isolates was analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing that was compared with worldwide epidemic clones. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from eight healthy individuals (8.2%), and two of them remained colonized after 5 months (in one case by the same clone). All 10 isolates (one/sample) were susceptible to 14 tested antipseudomonal agents and lacked integron structures. Six pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns and six sequence types (ST245, ST253, ST254, ST274, ST663 and the new one, ST1059) were identified among them. Four groups of OprD alterations were detected based on mutations and deletions related to PAO1 reference strain in our carbapenem-susceptible strains. This is the first study focused on P. aeruginosa from faecal samples of healthy humans that provides additional insights into the antimicrobial resistance and genetic diversity of P. aeruginosa. Although the isolates were antimicrobial susceptible, most of the sequence types detected were genetically related to Spanish epidemic clones or globally spread sequence types, such as ST274 and ST253.

  20. Evaluation of Psoriasis Genetic Risk Based on Five Susceptibility Markers in a Population from Northern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawczyk-Macieja, Marta; Rębała, Krzysztof; Szczerkowska-Dobosz, Aneta; Wysocka, Joanna; Cybulska, Lidia; Kapińska, Ewa; Haraś, Agnieszka; Miniszewska, Paulina; Nowicki, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis genetic background depends on polygenic and multifactorial mode of inheritance. As in other complex disorders, the estimation of the disease risk based on individual genetic variants is impossible. For this reason, recent investigations have been focused on combinations of known psoriasis susceptibility markers in order to improve the disease risk evaluation. Our aim was to compare psoriasis genetic risk score (GRS) for five susceptibility loci involved in the immunological response (HLA-C, ERAP1, ZAP70) and in the skin barrier function (LCE3, CSTA) between patients with chronic plaque psoriasis (n = 148) and the control group (n = 146). A significantly higher number of predisposing alleles was observed in patients with psoriasis in comparison to healthy individuals (6.1 vs. 5.2, respectively; P = 8.8×10−7). The statistical significance was even more profound when GRS weighted by logarithm odds ratios was evaluated (P = 9.9×10−14). Our results demonstrate the developed panel of five susceptibility loci to be more efficient in predicting psoriasis risk in the Polish population and to possess higher sensitivity and specificity for the disease than any of the markers analyzed separately, including the most informative HLA-C*06 allele. PMID:27658291

  1. Are palaeoscolecids ancestral ecdysozoans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Thomas H P; Dong, Xiping; Donoghue, Philip C J

    2010-01-01

    The reconstruction of ancestors is a central aim of comparative anatomy and evolutionary developmental biology, not least in attempts to understand the relationship between developmental and organismal evolution. Inferences based on living taxa can and should be tested against the fossil record, which provides an independent and direct view onto historical character combinations. Here, we consider the nature of the last common ancestor of living ecdysozoans through a detailed analysis of palaeoscolecids, an early and extinct group of introvert-bearing worms that have been proposed to be ancestral ecdysozoans. In a review of palaeoscolecid anatomy, including newly resolved details of the internal and external cuticle structure, we identify specific characters shared with various living nematoid and scalidophoran worms, but not with panarthropods. Considered within a formal cladistic context, these characters provide most overall support for a stem-priapulid affinity, meaning that palaeoscolecids are far-removed from the ecdysozoan ancestor. We conclude that previous interpretations in which palaeoscolecids occupy a deeper position in the ecdysozoan tree lack particular morphological support and rely instead on a paucity of preserved characters. This bears out a more general point that fossil taxa may appear plesiomorphic merely because they preserve only plesiomorphies, rather than the mélange of primitive and derived characters anticipated of organisms properly allocated to a position deep within animal phylogeny.

  2. The impact of genetic susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus on placental malaria in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Waisberg

    Full Text Available Severe malaria, including cerebral malaria (CM and placental malaria (PM, have been recognized to have many of the features of uncontrolled inflammation. We recently showed that in mice genetic susceptibility to the lethal inflammatory autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, conferred resistance to CM. Protection appeared to be mediated by immune mechanisms that allowed SLE-prone mice, prior to the onset of overt SLE symptoms, to better control their inflammatory response to Plasmodium infection. Here we extend these findings to ask does SLE susceptibility have 1 a cost to reproductive fitness and/or 2 an effect on PM in mice? The rates of conception for WT and SLE susceptible (SLE(s mice were similar as were the number and viability of fetuses in pregnant WT and SLE(s mice indicating that SLE susceptibility does not have a reproductive cost. We found that Plasmodium chabaudi AS (Pc infection disrupted early stages of pregnancy before the placenta was completely formed resulting in massive decidual necrosis 8 days after conception. Pc-infected pregnant SLE(s mice had significantly more fetuses (∼1.8 fold but SLE did not significantly affect fetal viability in infected animals. This was despite the fact that Pc-infected pregnant SLE(s mice had more severe symptoms of malaria as compared to Pc-infected pregnant WT mice. Thus, although SLE susceptibility was not protective in PM in mice it also did not have a negative impact on reproductive fitness.

  3. The Impact of Genetic Susceptibility to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus on Placental Malaria in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisberg, Michael; Lin, Christina K.; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Pena, Mirna; Orandle, Marlene; Bolland, Silvia; Pierce, Susan K.

    2013-01-01

    Severe malaria, including cerebral malaria (CM) and placental malaria (PM), have been recognized to have many of the features of uncontrolled inflammation. We recently showed that in mice genetic susceptibility to the lethal inflammatory autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), conferred resistance to CM. Protection appeared to be mediated by immune mechanisms that allowed SLE-prone mice, prior to the onset of overt SLE symptoms, to better control their inflammatory response to Plasmodium infection. Here we extend these findings to ask does SLE susceptibility have 1) a cost to reproductive fitness and/or 2) an effect on PM in mice? The rates of conception for WT and SLE susceptible (SLEs) mice were similar as were the number and viability of fetuses in pregnant WT and SLEs mice indicating that SLE susceptibility does not have a reproductive cost. We found that Plasmodium chabaudi AS (Pc) infection disrupted early stages of pregnancy before the placenta was completely formed resulting in massive decidual necrosis 8 days after conception. Pc-infected pregnant SLEs mice had significantly more fetuses (∼1.8 fold) but SLE did not significantly affect fetal viability in infected animals. This was despite the fact that Pc-infected pregnant SLEs mice had more severe symptoms of malaria as compared to Pc-infected pregnant WT mice. Thus, although SLE susceptibility was not protective in PM in mice it also did not have a negative impact on reproductive fitness. PMID:23675429

  4. [Genetic factors in susceptibility to age- and noise-related hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwińiska-Kowalska, Mariola; Pawelczyk, Małgorzata; Kowalski, Tomasz Jarema

    2006-10-01

    Individual susceptibility to age-related hearing loss (AHL) and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) varies greatly, and this inter-individual variation is due to an interaction of environmental factors, individual factors, and susceptibility genes. Majority of studies on susceptibility genes for AHL and NIHL have been performed in mice model. These findings suggest the role of the same genes in the development of AHL and NIHL, the more so as the pathogenesis of both diseases is similar with a crucial role of oxidative stress. The alleles responsible for AHL have been localized to the chromosome 10 (Ahl gene). Ahl-/- mice develop hearing impairment at early age and are also oversensitive to noise. Ahl gene is a recessive gene and it is probably responsible for the synthesis of cell junction proteins. In mice ahl codes for cadherin (CDH) proteins. The cadherin of interest is named otocadherin or CDH23, and it is localized to the links between stereocilia of hair cells. A hypomorphic 753G>A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Cdh 23 is associated with AHL, and the 753A variant is also correlated with susceptibility to NIHL. An increased susceptibility to AHL and NIHL may rely on the SNPs of several other genes, including the groups of oxidative stress genes, K+ ions recycling genes, monogenic deafness genes (including Connexin 26 gene, which mutation is responsible for the most frequent hereditary deafness in Caucasians), as well as mitochondrial genes. Several oxidative stress enzyme (sod1-/-, gpx -/-) knock-out mice have been shown to be more susceptible to NIHL than wild strains. Current large-scale cohort studies on AHL and NIHL performed under the European projects in between-lab collaboration along with a dynamic progress in the field of genetics of deafness open up new opportunities to find human AHL and NIHL susceptibility genes and develop methods for AHUNIHL treatment.

  5. Ancestral trees for modeling stem cell lineages genetically rather than functionally: understanding mutation accumulation and distinguishing the restrictive cancer stem cell propagation theory and the unrestricted cell propagation theory of human tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Darryl K; Kern, Scott E

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells either could be rare or common in tumors, constituting the major distinction between the two fundamentally opposed theoretical models of tumor progression: A newer and restrictive stem cell propagation model, in which the stem cells are a small and special minority of the tumor cells, and a standard older model, an unrestricted cell proliferation theory, in which many or most tumor cells are capable of indefinite generations of cell division. Stem cells of tumors are difficult to quantitate using functional assays, and the validity of the most common assays is seriously questioned. Nonetheless, stem cells are an essential component of any tumorigenesis model. Alternative approaches to studying tumor stem cells should be explored. Cell populations can be conceived of as having a genealogy, a relationship of cells to their ancestral lineage, from the zygote to the adult cells or neoplasms. Models using ancestral trees thus offer an anatomic and genetic means to "observe" stem cells independent of artificial conditions. Ancestral trees broaden our attention backward along a lineage, to the zygote stage, and thereby add insight into how the mutations of tumors accumulate. It is possible that a large fraction of mutations in a tumor originate from normal, endogenous, replication errors (nearly all being passenger mutations) occurring prior to the emergence of the first transformed cell. Trees can be constructed from experimental measurements - molecular clocks - of real human tissues and tumors. Detailed analysis of single-cell methylation patterns, heritable yet slightly plastic, now can provide this information in the necessary depth. Trees based on observations of molecular clocks may help us to distinguish between competing theories regarding the proliferative properties among cells of actual human tumors, to observe subtle and difficult phenomena such as the extinction of stem lineages, and to address the origins and rates of mutations in various

  6. Classical against molecular-genetic methods for susceptibility testing of antituberculotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porvaznik, I; Mokry, J; Solovic, I

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis currently belongs to rare respiratory diseases in Slovakia. However, the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) are major challenges for global tuberculosis control, since the treatment of resistant forms creates both medical and financial problems. Cultivation methods of diagnosis are time-consuming, many times exceeding the time of the initial phase of tuberculosis treatment. Therefore, in the presented study we compared the standard procedures, based on the cultivation of mycobacteria and subsequent drug susceptibility testing to antituberculotics, with molecular-genetic methods using PCR diagnostic kits. The molecular-genetic testing enables to obtain direct and fast evidence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with genomic verification of resistance to the most important anti-tuberculosis drugs - isoniazid and rifampicin in MDR-TB, and ethambutol, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones in XDR-TB. In 2012-2013, we confirmed 19 cases of drug-resistant tuberculosis in Slovakia. The resistance to rifampicin was confirmed in all strains with both methods. In two cases, the molecular-genetic testing did not show resistance to isoniazid, as confirmed by conventional cultivation. Furthermore, two strains demonstrating susceptibility in conventional microbiological testing to ethambutol and five strains to fluoroquinolones were verified as actually being resistant using a PCR method. Rapid diagnosis and identification of MDR-TB or XDR-TB strains using molecular-genetic testing is an essential tool for the timely and appropriate drug treatment and prevention of spread of drug resistant strains.

  7. Risk of colorectal adenomas in relation to meat consumption, meat preparation, and genetic susceptibility in a Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemersma, E.W.; Voskuil, D.W.; Bunschoten, A.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: We studied the association between meat consumption and colorectal adenomas, and potential influence of genetic susceptibility to heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCAs) formed during meat cooking at high temperatures. Methods: We studied HCA concentration in relation to preparation habits am

  8. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet, genetic susceptibility, and progression to advanced macular degeneration: a prospective cohort study123

    OpenAIRE

    Merle, Bénédicte MJ; Silver, Rachel E; Rosner, Bernard; Johanna M Seddon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet is linked to a lower risk of mortality and chronic disease, but the association with the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and genetic susceptibility is unknown.

  9. Project 6: Cumulative Risk Assessment Methods and Applications: Task 6.3. Applying Genetic and Epigenetic Data to Inform Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susceptibility is defined by the NRC (2009) as the capacity to be affected. A person can be at greater or less risk relative to population median risk because of susceptibility factors such as life stage, sex, genetics, socioeconomic status, prior exposure to chemicals, and non-c...

  10. A weighted genetic risk score using all known susceptibility variants to estimate rheumatoid arthritis risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarwood, Annie; Han, Buhm; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Lunt, Mark; Pappas, Dimitrios A; Kremer, Joel; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Plenge, Robert; Worthington, Jane; Barton, Anne; Eyre, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Background There is currently great interest in the incorporation of genetic susceptibility loci into screening models to identify individuals at high risk of disease. Here, we present the first risk prediction model including all 46 known genetic loci associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods A weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) was created using 45 RA non-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) susceptibility loci, imputed amino acids at HLA-DRB1 (11, 71 and 74), HLA-DPB1 (position 9) HLA-B (position 9) and gender. The wGRS was tested in 11 366 RA cases and 15 489 healthy controls. The risk of developing RA was estimated using logistic regression by dividing the wGRS into quintiles. The ability of the wGRS to discriminate between cases and controls was assessed by receiver operator characteristic analysis and discrimination improvement tests. Results Individuals in the highest risk group showed significantly increased odds of developing anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide-positive RA compared to the lowest risk group (OR 27.13, 95% CI 23.70 to 31.05). The wGRS was validated in an independent cohort that showed similar results (area under the curve 0.78, OR 18.00, 95% CI 13.67 to 23.71). Comparison of the full wGRS with a wGRS in which HLA amino acids were replaced by a HLA tag single-nucleotide polymorphism showed a significant loss of sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions Our study suggests that in RA, even when using all known genetic susceptibility variants, prediction performance remains modest; while this is insufficiently accurate for general population screening, it may prove of more use in targeted studies. Our study has also highlighted the importance of including HLA variation in risk prediction models. PMID:24092415

  11. Genetic and Functional Evidence Supports LPAR1 as a Susceptibility Gene for Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Ma, Lu; Li, Yang; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Gu-Yan; Sun, Zhijun; Jiang, Feng; Chen, Yundai; Liu, Huirong; Dang, Aimin; Chen, Xi; Chun, Jerold; Tian, Xiao-Li

    2015-09-01

    Essential hypertension is a complex disease affected by genetic and environmental factors and serves as a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Serum lysophosphatidic acid correlates with an elevated blood pressure in rats, and lysophosphatidic acid interacts with 6 subtypes of receptors. In this study, we assessed the genetic association of lysophosphatidic acid receptors with essential hypertension by genotyping 28 single-nucleotide polymorphisms from genes encoding for lysophosphatidic acid receptors, LPAR1, LPAR2, LPAR3, LPAR4, LPAR5, and LPAR6 and their flanking sequences, in 3 Han Chinese cohorts consisting of 2630 patients and 3171 controls in total. We identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs531003 in the 3'-flanking genomic region of LPAR1, associated with hypertension (the Bonferroni corrected P=1.09×10(-5), odds ratio [95% confidence interval]=1.23 [1.13-1.33]). The risk allele C of rs531003 is associated with the increased expression of LPAR1 and the susceptibility of hypertension, particularly in those with a shortage of sleep (P=4.73×10(-5), odds ratio [95% confidence interval]=1.75 [1.34-2.28]). We further demonstrated that blood pressure elevation caused by sleep deprivation and phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction was both diminished in LPAR1-deficient mice. Together, we show that LPAR1 is a novel susceptibility gene for human essential hypertension and that stress, such as shortage of sleep, increases the susceptibility of patients with risk allele to essential hypertension.

  12. Genetics of canine diabetes mellitus: are the diabetes susceptibility genes identified in humans involved in breed susceptibility to diabetes mellitus in dogs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchpole, Brian; Adams, Jamie P; Holder, Angela L; Short, Andrea D; Ollier, William E R; Kennedy, Lorna J

    2013-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrinopathy in companion animals, characterised by hyperglycaemia, glycosuria and weight loss, resulting from an absolute or relative deficiency in the pancreatic hormone insulin. There are breed differences in susceptibility to diabetes mellitus in dogs, with the Samoyed breed being overrepresented, while Boxers are relatively absent in the UK population of diabetic dogs, suggesting that genetic factors play an important role in determining susceptibility to the disease. A number of genes, linked with susceptibility to diabetes mellitus in humans, are associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus in dogs, some of which appear to be relatively breed-specific. Diabetes mellitus in dogs has been associated with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes (dog leucocyte antigen; DLA), with similar haplotypes and genotypes being identified in the most susceptible breeds. A region containing a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) and several polymorphisms have been identified in the canine insulin gene, with some alleles associated with susceptibility or resistance to diabetes mellitus in a breed-specific manner. Polymorphisms in the canine CTLA4 promoter and in other immune response genes are associated with susceptibility to diabetes mellitus in a number of pedigree breeds. Genome wide association studies are currently underway that should shed further light on the genetic factors responsible for the breed profile seen in the diabetic dog population.

  13. Relative susceptibilities of male germ cells to genetic defects induced by cancer chemotherapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A J; Schmid, T E; Marchetti, F

    2004-06-15

    Some chemotherapy regimens include agents that are mutagenic or clastogenic in model systems. This raises concerns that cancer survivors, who were treated before or during their reproductive years, may be at increased risks for abnormal reproductive outcomes. However, the available data from offspring of cancer survivors are limited, representing diverse cancers, therapies, time-to-pregnancies, and reproductive outcomes. Rodent breeding data after paternal exposures to individual chemotherapeutic agents illustrate the complexity of factors that influence the risk for transmitted genetic damage including agent, dose, endpoint, and the germ-cell susceptibility profiles that vary across agents. Direct measurements of chromosomal abnormalities in sperm of mice and humans by sperm FISH have corroborated the differences in germ-cell susceptibilities. The available evidence suggests that the risk of producing chromosomally defective sperm is highest during the first few weeks after the end of chemotherapy, and decays with time. Thus, sperm samples provided immediately after the initiation of cancer therapies may contain treatment-induced genetic defects that will jeopardize the genetic health of offspring.

  14. Host genetics and susceptibility to congenital and childhood cytomegalovirus infection: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelemanović, Andrea; Dobberpuhl, Katie; Krakar, Goran; Patarčić, Inga; Kolčić, Ivana; Polašek, Ozren

    2016-01-01

    Aim To summarize available evidence on the role of host genetics in the susceptibility to congenital and childhood cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections by conducting a systematic review of published studies. Methods We searched online databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus and HuGe Navigator) for relevant studies with well-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria and assessed the risk of bias using novel Confounding-Selection-Information bias score (CSI). Results 5105 studies were initially identified, but only 5 met all the inclusion criteria and were analyzed in detail. Polymorphisms of the toll-like receptors (TLRs) and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) genes were shown to have an impact on the CMV infection in infants. Polymorphisms of the TLR2 (rs3804100, rs1898830), TLR4 (rs4986791), and TLR9 (rs352140) were shown to have a role in congenital CMV infection. Low MBL levels were associated with CMV infection in Chinese individuals, a finding that was not replicated in Caucasians. The overall credibility of evidence was weak. Conclusions Based on currently available very limited amount of evidence, it is uncertain whether congenital and childhood CMV infections are under host genetic control. Additional primary studies are needed with more specific research hypotheses that will enable gradual understanding of specific mechanisms of the CMV pathogenesis. More genetic studies in the future will facilitate better understanding of host susceptibility and likely enable novel preventative and curative measures. PMID:27586547

  15. Genetic markers of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility in anti-citrullinated peptide antibody negative patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viatte, Sebastien; Plant, Darren; Bowes, John; Lunt, Mark; Eyre, Stephen; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Introduction There are now over 30 confirmed loci predisposing to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Studies have been largely undertaken in patients with anticyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) positive RA, and some genetic associations appear stronger in this subgroup than in anti-CCP negative disease, although few studies have had adequate power to address the question. The authors therefore investigated confirmed RA susceptibility loci in a large cohort of anti-CCP negative RA subjects. Methods RA patients and controls, with serological and genetic data, were available from UK Caucasian patients (n=4068 anti-CCP positive, 2040 anti-CCP negative RA) and 13,009 healthy controls. HLA-DRB1 genotypes and 36 single nucleotide polymorphisms were tested for association between controls and anti-CCP positive or negative RA. Results The shared epitope (SE) showed a strong association with anti-CCP positive and negative RA, although the effect size was significantly lower in the latter (effect size ratio=3.18, p<1.0E-96). A non-intronic marker at TNFAIP3, GIN1/C5orf30, STAT4, ANKRD55/IL6ST, BLK and PTPN22 showed association with RA susceptibility, irrespective of the serological status, the latter three markers remaining significantly associated with anti-CCP negative RA, after correction for multiple testing. No significant association with anti-CCP negative RA was detected for other markers (eg, AFF3, CD28, intronic marker at TNFAIP3), though the study power for those markers was over 80%. Discussion In the largest sample size studied to date, the authors have shown that the strength of association, the effect size and the number of known RA susceptibility loci associated with disease is different in the two disease serotypes, confirming the hypothesis that they might be two genetically different subsets. PMID:22661644

  16. Meta-analysis of tau genetic polymorphism and sporadic progressive supranuclear palsy susceptibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Yuan; Xiuyan Yang; Hanlin Kang; Ying Cheng; Huiming Ren; Xiaotong Wang

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantitatively evaluate the association between tau genetic polymorphism (H, and H2) and susceptibility to sporadic progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP).DATA SOURCES: Relevant Medical Subject Heading terms and text words were used to identify articles from MEDLINE (1966/2010 07), EMBASE (1984/2010-07), and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (1979/2010), as well as references of the retrieved articles.STUDY SELECTION: The selected articles met the following criteria: sporadic PSP case group and healthy control group, as well as genotype frequency (H,/H, and H,/H2+H2/H2) in cases and controls.Genotype distribution in the control groups was tested using the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE).Articles irrelevant to HWE were excluded, and a forest plot was performed to combine all selected articles with Review Manager (Version 5.0).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The summary odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95%Cl)for tau polymorphism (H,/H, and H,/H2+H2/H2) between sporadic PSP case and healthy control groups were estimated using the fixed effects model to assess whether tau genetic polymorphism is associated with sporadic PSP susceptibility.RESULTS: According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, a total of 16 articles, which included 1 337 sporadic PSP cases and 2 073 controls, were used in the study.Two articles were excluded because of deviation from HWE in the control groups.The combined result, based on all studies,showed a significant difference in genotype distribution between cases and controls: H,H, vs.H,H2 +H2H2 (odds ratio (OR)=4.98, 95%Cl: 3.97-6.23, P < 0.01).Stratifying for geographic distribution of PSP, sporadic PSP cases exhibited a significantly higher frequency of H,H, genotypes than controls in the United States (OR=4.07, 95%CF.3.16-5.25, P < 0.01) and Europe (OR=8.60,95%C1.5.05-14.64, P < 0.01).CONCLUSION: Tau genetic polymorphism is associated with sporadic PSP susceptibility, and geographic distribution might

  17. Association of genetic susceptibility variants for type 2 diabetes with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wen, Wanqing; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. METHODS: We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2D suscept...

  18. The genetic and regulatory architecture of ERBB3-type 1 diabetes susceptibility locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Mirza, Aashiq H; Brorsson, Caroline Anna;

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to explore the role of ERBB3 in type 1 diabetes (T1D). We examined whether genetic variation of ERBB3 (rs2292239) affects residual β-cell function in T1D cases. Furthermore, we examined the expression of ERBB3 in human islets, the effect of ERBB3 knockdown on apoptosis in insulin......-producing INS-1E cells and the genetic and regulatory architecture of the ERBB3 locus to provide insights to how rs2292239 may confer disease susceptibility. rs2292239 strongly correlated with residual β-cell function and metabolic control in children with T1D. ERBB3 locus associated lncRNA (NONHSAG011351...... regulators in the β-cells and may constitute novel targets to prevent β-cell destruction in T1D....

  19. Future management of human obesity: understanding the meaning of genetic susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins AB

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Arthur B Jenkins,1,2 Lesley V Campbell2,3 1School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia; 2Diabetes and Obesity Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Diabetes Centre and Department of Endocrinology, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Gene–environment interactions are central to the expression of obesity. The condition is strongly heritable (ie, genetic, and most of the variation in obesity levels between countries and between individuals can be explained by the effects of obesogenic environments on individual genetic susceptibilities. The nature of the obesogenic environmental influences is not clear in detail, but they correlate closely with measures of affluence. The causes of variation in genetic susceptibility are also not clearly defined, but their general nature has become clearer. The failure of genome-wide association studies or large linkage studies to identify or replicate causative genetic variants, together with the segregation of obesity-related traits in families, implicates a heterogenetic mechanism in which rare, dominantly or additively expressed genetic variants are responsible for most of common obesity. The search for rare causative variants continues with some successes, but those identified contribute very little to the overall burden and, assuming heterogenetics, there are many more to find. The time when genomic risk factors provide more information than do currently available markers, such as family history, is a long way off. Genomic studies to date have contributed little, if anything, to the prevention and treatment of common obesity and its associated disorders. This contrasts with the obvious and immediate potential implications of the well-established overall genetic basis of obesity, which have not yet been exploited in the clinical or public health arenas. Genomic studies, which have helped to define the genetic basis of

  20. Identifying predictors of activity based anorexia susceptibility in diverse genetic rodent populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneda Pjetri

    Full Text Available Animal studies are very useful in detection of early disease indicators and in unravelling the pathophysiological processes underlying core psychiatric disorder phenotypes. Early indicators are critical for preventive and efficient treatment of progressive psychiatric disorders like anorexia nervosa. Comparable to physical hyperactivity observed in anorexia nervosa patients, in the activity-based anorexia rodent model, mice and rats express paradoxical high voluntary wheel running activity levels when food restricted. Eleven inbred mouse strains and outbred Wistar WU rats were exposed to the activity-based anorexia model in search of identifying susceptibility predictors. Body weight, food intake and wheel running activity levels of each individual mouse and rat were measured. Mouse strains and rats with high wheel running activity levels during food restriction exhibited accelerated body weight loss. Linear mixed models for repeated measures analysis showed that baseline wheel running activity levels preceding the scheduled food restriction phase strongly predicted activity-based anorexia susceptibility (mice: Beta  =  -0.0158 (±0.003 SE, P<0.0001; rats: Beta  =  -0.0242 (±0.004 SE, P<0.0001 compared to other baseline parameters. These results suggest that physical activity levels play an important role in activity-based anorexia susceptibility in different rodent species with genetically diverse background. These findings support previous retrospective studies on physical activity levels in anorexia nervosa patients and indicate that pre-morbid physical activity levels could reflect an early indicator for disease severity.

  1. Genetic polymorphisms in the carbonic anhydrase VI gene and dental caries susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z-Q; Hu, X-P; Zhou, J-Y; Xie, X-D; Zhang, J-M

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the role of 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the carbonic anhydrase (CA) VI gene (rs2274328, rs17032907, rs11576766, rs2274333, rs10864376, rs3765964, and rs6680186) and the possible association between these polymorphisms and dental caries susceptibility in a Northwestern Chinese population. We collected samples from 164 high caries experience and 191 very low caries experience and conducted a case-control study according to the number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth index and genotyped the 7 polymorphisms using a 384-well plate format with the Sequenom MassARRAY platform. Individuals carrying the rs17032907 TT genotype were more likely to have an increased risk of dental caries compared with carriers of the C/C genotype in the co-dominant model, with an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 2.144 (1.096-4.195). We also found that the haplotype (ACA) (rs2274328, rs17032907 and rs11576766) was associated with a low number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth index with an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.635 (0.440-0.918). However, we found no association between dental caries susceptibility and the rs2274328, rs11576766, rs2274333, rs10864376, rs3765964, and rs6680186 polymorphisms and other haplotypes. The rs17032907 genetic variant and the haplotype (ACA) of CA VI may be associated with dental caries susceptibility.

  2. Risk perceptions, worry, and attitudes about genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Linda D; Reeve, Jeanne

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the unique associations of risk perceptions and worry with attitudes about genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility. Women (general practitioner clinic attenders, university students, and first-degree relatives of breast cancer survivors; N = 303) read information about genetic testing and completed measures assessing perceived cancer risk, cancer worry, and genetic testing attitudes and beliefs. Worry was associated with greater interest in genetic testing, stronger beliefs that testing has detrimental emotional consequences, and positive beliefs about benefits of testing and risk-reducing surgeries. Perceived risk was unrelated to interest and associated with more skeptical beliefs about emotional consequences and benefits of testing and risk-reducing surgeries. At low worry levels, testing interest increased with more positive beliefs about testing benefits; at high worry levels, interest was high regardless of benefits beliefs. The findings support Leventhal's Common-Sense Model of self-regulation delineating interactive influences of risk-related cognitions and emotions on information processing and behavior.

  3. Seeking genetic susceptibility variants for colorectal cancer: the EPICOLON consortium experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Abulí, Anna; Muñoz, Jenifer; Bessa, Xavier; Brea-Fernández, Alejandro; Ferro, Marta; Giráldez, María Dolores; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Jover, Rodrigo; Piqué, Josep M; Andreu, Montserrat; Castells, Antoni; Carracedo, Angel

    2012-03-01

    The EPICOLON consortium was initiated in 1999 by the Gastrointestinal Oncology Group of the Spanish Gastroenterology Association. It recruited consecutive, unselected, population-based colorectal cancer (CRC) cases and control subjects matched by age and gender without personal or familial history of cancer all over Spain with the main goal of gaining knowledge in Lynch syndrome and familial CRC. This epidemiological, prospective and multicentre study collected extensive clinical data and biological samples from ∼2000 CRC cases and 2000 controls in Phases 1 and 2 involving 25 and 14 participating hospitals, respectively. Genetic susceptibility projects in EPICOLON have included candidate-gene approaches evaluating single-nucleotide polymorphisms/genes from the historical category (linked to CRC risk by previous studies), from human syntenic CRC susceptibility regions identified in mouse, from the CRC carcinogenesis-related pathways Wnt and BMP, from regions 9q22 and 3q22 with positive linkage in CRC families, and from the mucin gene family. This consortium has also participated actively in the identification 5 of the 16 common, low-penetrance CRC genetic variants identified so far by genome-wide association studies. Finishing their own pangenomic study and performing whole-exome sequencing in selected CRC samples are among EPICOLON future research prospects.

  4. Role of HLA-DR Alleles to Increase Genetic Susceptibility to Onychomycosis in Nail Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Meléndrez, Hilda; Ortega-Hernández, Esteban; Granados, Julio; Arroyo, Sara; Barquera, Rodrigo; Arenas, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with nail psoriasis have an increased risk of onychomycosis. Previous studies suggest it may be due to structural changes of the nails. However, a genetic predisposition seems to be also at play. Objective To determine a genetic susceptibility for onychomycosis in nails with changes of psoriasis. Methods This is a prospective case-control study of patients with suggestive changes of nail psoriasis with onychomycosis (cases) and without onychomycosis (controls) confirmed by mycological tests. HLA typing was performed in all of them by sequence-specific primers. Results Twenty-five patients and 20 controls with a mean age of 50 years (range 37-72 years) were studied. HLA-DRB1*08 was found in 12 cases (48%) and only 3 controls (15%) [p < 0.033, odds ratio (OR) = 3.8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.9-19]. HLA-DR1 was found in 9 cases (36%) and only 1 control (5%) (p < 0.023, OR = 8.5, 95% CI: 1-188). Conclusion HLA-DR*08 and HLA-DR*01 probably increase the susceptibility to fungal infection in psoriasis-affected nails, but larger studies are required to confirm this observation. PMID:27843918

  5. Differential genetic susceptibility to child risk at birth in predicting observed maternal behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren Fortuna

    Full Text Available This study examined parenting as a function of child medical risks at birth and parental genotype (dopamine D4 receptor; DRD4. Our hypothesis was that the relation between child risks and later maternal sensitivity would depend on the presence/absence of a genetic variant in the mothers, thus revealing a gene by environment interaction (GXE. Risk at birth was defined by combining risk indices of children's gestational age at birth, birth weight, and admission to the neonatal intensive care unit. The DRD4-III 7-repeat allele was chosen as a relevant genotype as it was recently shown to moderate the effect of environmental stress on parental sensitivity. Mothers of 104 twin pairs provided DNA samples and were observed with their children in a laboratory play session when the children were 3.5 years old. Results indicate that higher levels of risk at birth were associated with less sensitive parenting only among mothers carrying the 7-repeat allele, but not among mothers carrying shorter alleles. Moreover, mothers who are carriers of the 7-repeat allele and whose children scored low on the risk index were observed to have the highest levels of sensitivity. These findings provide evidence for the interactive effects of genes and environment (in this study, children born at higher risk on parenting, and are consistent with a genetic differential susceptibility model of parenting by demonstrating that some parents are inherently more susceptible to environmental influences, both good and bad, than are others.

  6. Genetic analysis of dilated cardiomyopathy--HLA and immunoglobulin genes may confer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, H; Kimura, A; Fukuta, S; Kusukawa, R; Kawamura, K; Nimura, Y; Nagano, M; Yasuda, H; Kawai, C; Sugimoto, T

    1992-10-01

    To identify genetic factors in the immune system which control the susceptibility to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), HLA class II DNA typing was performed in 61 Japanese patients, using PCR/SSO probe analyses. The frequencies of HLA-DQB1*0503 (15% vs 5%; RR = 3.06, chi 2 = 7.19) and DQB1*0604 (21% vs 10%; RR = 2.41, chi 2 = 6.20) were significantly increased and that of HLA-DQB1*0502 (RR = 1.74) was slightly increased in the DCM patients. The frequency of DQB1*0303 (16% vs 31%; RR = 0.44, chi 2 = 5.16) was significantly decreased in the patients. The increased HLA-DQB1 alleles have a histidine residue in common at the 30th codon for the HLA-DQ beta chain. Among the genetic markers studied by Southern blot analyses, IGLV (immunoglobulin lambda light chain, pV3.3) showed a strong association with DCM, i.e. A2/A2 genotype was found in 37.7% of patients whereas it was observed in only 18.9% of the control subjects (RR = 2.6, chi 2 = 7.77). The frequency of this genotype was higher in patients under age 45 years at the time of diagnosis (45.5%, RR = 3.6, chi 2 = 10.02). These results suggest that HLA and immunoglobulin genes are closely linked to susceptibility to DCM.

  7. Cervical Cancer Genetic Susceptibility: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses of Recent Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Nava, Gabriela A.; Fernández-Niño, Julián A.; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cervical cancer (CC) has one of the highest mortality rates among women worldwide. Several efforts have been made to identify the genetic susceptibility factors underlying CC development. However, only a few polymorphisms have shown consistency among studies. Materials and Methods We conducted a systematic review of all recent case-control studies focused on the evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and CC risk, stringently following the “PRISMA” statement recommendations. The MEDLINE data base was used for the search. A total of 100 case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. Polymorphisms that had more than two reports were meta-analyzed by fixed or random models according to the heterogeneity presented among studies. Results We found significant negative association between the dominant inheritance model of p21 rs1801270 polymorphism (C/A+A/A) and CC (pooled OR = 0.76; 95%CI: 0.63–0.91; p<0.01). We also found a negative association with the rs2048718 BRIP1 polymorphism dominant inheritance model (T/C+C/C) and CC (pooled OR = 0.83; 95%CI: 0.70–0.98; p = 0.03), as well as with the rs11079454 BRIP1 polymorphism recessive inheritance model and CC (pooled OR = 0.79; 95%CI: 0.63–0.99; p = 0.04). Interestingly, we observed a strong tendency of the meta-analyzed studies to be of Asiatic origin (67%). We also found a significant low representation of African populations (4%). Conclusions Our results provide evidence of the negative association of p21 rs1801270 polymorphism, as well as BRIP1 rs2048718 and rs11079454 polymorphisms, with CC risk. This study suggests the urgent need for more replication studies focused on GWAS identified CC susceptibility variants, in order to reveal the most informative genetic susceptibility markers for CC across different populations. PMID:27415837

  8. Identification of a shared genetic susceptibility locus for coronary heart disease and periodontitis.

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    Arne S Schaefer

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate a mutual epidemiological relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD and periodontitis. Both diseases are associated with similar risk factors and are characterized by a chronic inflammatory process. In a candidate-gene association study, we identify an association of a genetic susceptibility locus shared by both diseases. We confirm the known association of two neighboring linkage disequilibrium regions on human chromosome 9p21.3 with CHD and show the additional strong association of these loci with the risk of aggressive periodontitis. For the lead SNP of the main associated linkage disequilibrium region, rs1333048, the odds ratio of the autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance is 1.99 (95% confidence interval 1.33-2.94; P = 6.9 x 10(-4 for generalized aggressive periodontitis, and 1.72 (1.06-2.76; P = 2.6 x 10(-2 for localized aggressive periodontitis. The two associated linkage disequilibrium regions map to the sequence of the large antisense noncoding RNA ANRIL, which partly overlaps regulatory and coding sequences of CDKN2A/CDKN2B. A closely located diabetes-associated variant was independent of the CHD and periodontitis risk haplotypes. Our study demonstrates that CHD and periodontitis are genetically related by at least one susceptibility locus, which is possibly involved in ANRIL activity and independent of diabetes associated risk variants within this region. Elucidation of the interplay of ANRIL transcript variants and their involvement in increased susceptibility to the interactive diseases CHD and periodontitis promises new insight into the underlying shared pathogenic mechanisms of these complex common diseases.

  9. Combination of hearing screening and genetic screening for deafness-susceptibility genes in newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Gen-Dong; Li, Shou-Xia; Chen, Ding-Li; Feng, Hai-Qin; Zhao, Su-Bin; Liu, Yong-Jie; Guo, Li-Li; Yang, Zhi-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Sun, Cai-Xia; Wang, Ze-Hui; Zhang, Wei-Yong

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical significance of the results of screening of newborn hearing and the incidence of deafness-susceptibility genes. One thousand newborn babies in the Handan Center Hospital (Handan, China) underwent screening of hearing and deafness-susceptibility genes. The first screening test was carried out using otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Babies with hearing loss who failed to pass the initial screening were scheduled for rescreening at 42 days after birth. Cord blood was used for the screening of deafness-susceptibility genes, namely the GJB2, SLC26A4 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA (MTRNR1) genes. Among the 1,000 neonates that underwent the first hearing screening, 25 exhibited left-sided hearing loss, 21 exhibited right-sided hearing loss and 15 cases had binaural hearing loss. After rescreening 42 days later, only one of the initial 61 cases exhibited hearing loss under OAE testing. The neonatal deafness gene tests showed two cases with 1555A>G mutation and two cases with 1494C>T mutation of the MTRNR1 gene. In the SLC26A4 gene screening, four cases exhibited the heterozygous IVS7-2A>G mutation and one case exhibited heterozygous 1226G>A mutation. In the GJB2 gene screening, two cases exhibited the homozygous 427C>T mutation and 10 exhibited the heterozygous 235delC mutation. The genetic screening revealed 21 newborns with mutations in the three deafness-susceptibility genes. The overall carrier rate was 2.1% (21/1,000). The association of hearing and gene screening may be the promising screening strategy for the diagnosis of hearing loss.

  10. Dissecting the Genetic Susceptibility to Graves' Disease in a Cohort of Patients of Italian Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Angela; Menconi, Francesca; Greenberg, David; Concepcion, Erlinda; Leo, Marenza; Rocchi, Roberto; Marinó, Michele; Keddache, Mehdi; Tomer, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune oligogenic disorder with a strong hereditary component. Several GD susceptibility genes have been identified and confirmed during the last two decades. However, there are very few studies that evaluated susceptibility genes for GD in specific geographic subsets. Previously, we mapped a new locus on chromosome 3q that was unique to GD families of Italian origin. In the present study, we used association analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) at the 3q locus in a cohort of GD patients of Italian origin in order to prioritize the best candidates among the known genes in this locus to choose the one(s) best supported by the association. DNA samples were genotyped using the Illumina GoldenGate genotyping assay analyzing 690 SNP in the linked 3q locus covering all 124 linkage disequilibrium blocks in this locus. Candidate non-HLA (human-leukocyte-antigen) genes previously reported to be associated with GD and/or other autoimmune disorders were analyzed separately. Three SNPs in the 3q locus showed a nominal association (p < 0.05): rs13097181, rs763313, and rs6792646. Albeit these could not be further validated by multiple comparison correction, we were prioritizing candidate genes at a locus already known to harbor a GD-related gene, not hypothesis testing. Moreover, we found significant associations with the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) gene, the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) gene, and the thyroglobulin (TG) gene. In conclusion, we identified three SNPs on chromosome 3q that may map a new GD susceptibility gene in this region which is unique to the Italian population. Furthermore, we confirmed that the TSHR, the CTLA-4, and the TG genes are associated with GD in Italians. Our findings highlight the influence of ethnicity and geographic variations on the genetic susceptibility to GD.

  11. An unbiased systems genetics approach to mapping genetic loci modulating susceptibility to severe streptococcal sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourtan F Abdeltawab

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Striking individual differences in severity of group A streptococcal (GAS sepsis have been noted, even among patients infected with the same bacterial strain. We had provided evidence that HLA class II allelic variation contributes significantly to differences in systemic disease severity by modulating host responses to streptococcal superantigens. Inasmuch as the bacteria produce additional virulence factors that participate in the pathogenesis of this complex disease, we sought to identify additional gene networks modulating GAS sepsis. Accordingly, we applied a systems genetics approach using a panel of advanced recombinant inbred mice. By analyzing disease phenotypes in the context of mice genotypes we identified a highly significant quantitative trait locus (QTL on Chromosome 2 between 22 and 34 Mb that strongly predicts disease severity, accounting for 25%-30% of variance. This QTL harbors several polymorphic genes known to regulate immune responses to bacterial infections. We evaluated candidate genes within this QTL using multiple parameters that included linkage, gene ontology, variation in gene expression, cocitation networks, and biological relevance, and identified interleukin1 alpha and prostaglandin E synthases pathways as key networks involved in modulating GAS sepsis severity. The association of GAS sepsis with multiple pathways underscores the complexity of traits modulating GAS sepsis and provides a powerful approach for analyzing interactive traits affecting outcomes of other infectious diseases.

  12. Genetic Variation between Biomphalaria alexandrina Snails Susceptible and Resistant to Schistosoma mansoni Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne M. F. El-Nassery

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Much effort has been made to control schistosomiasis infection in Egypt. However, enduring effects from such strategies have not yet been achieved. In this study, we sought to determine the genetic variability related to the interaction between Biomphalaria alexandrina snails and Schistosoma mansoni. Using RAPD-PCR with eight (10 mers random primers, we were able to determine the polymorphic markers that differed between snails susceptible and resistant to Schistosoma mansoni infection using five primers out of the eight. Our results suggest that the RAPD-PCR technique is an efficient means by which to compare genomes and to detect genetic variations between schistosomiasis intermediate hosts. The RAPD technique with the above-noted primers can identify genomic markers that are specifically related to the Biomphalaria alexandrina/Schistosoma mansoni relationship in the absence of specific nucleotide sequence information. This approach could be used in epidemiologic surveys to investigate genetic diversity among Biomphalaria alexandrina snails. The ability to determine resistant markers in Biomphalaria alexandrina snails could potentially lead to further studies that use refractory snails as agents to control the spread of schistosomiasis.

  13. Genetic variation between Biomphalaria alexandrina snails susceptible and resistant to Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nassery, Suzanne M F; Abou-El-Naga, Iman F; Allam, Sonia R; Shaat, Eman A; Mady, Rasha F M

    2013-01-01

    Much effort has been made to control schistosomiasis infection in Egypt. However, enduring effects from such strategies have not yet been achieved. In this study, we sought to determine the genetic variability related to the interaction between Biomphalaria alexandrina snails and Schistosoma mansoni. Using RAPD-PCR with eight (10 mers) random primers, we were able to determine the polymorphic markers that differed between snails susceptible and resistant to Schistosoma mansoni infection using five primers out of the eight. Our results suggest that the RAPD-PCR technique is an efficient means by which to compare genomes and to detect genetic variations between schistosomiasis intermediate hosts. The RAPD technique with the above-noted primers can identify genomic markers that are specifically related to the Biomphalaria alexandrina/Schistosoma mansoni relationship in the absence of specific nucleotide sequence information. This approach could be used in epidemiologic surveys to investigate genetic diversity among Biomphalaria alexandrina snails. The ability to determine resistant markers in Biomphalaria alexandrina snails could potentially lead to further studies that use refractory snails as agents to control the spread of schistosomiasis.

  14. Genetic antimicrobial susceptibility testing in Gram-negative sepsis - impact on time to results in a routine laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommedal, Øyvind; Aasen, Johanne Lind; Lindemann, Paul Christoffer

    2016-07-01

    Diagnostic testing of positive blood cultures is among the most critical tasks performed by clinical microbiology laboratories, and the total analysis time from sampling to results should be kept as short as possible. By providing identification of pelleted bacteria directly from positive blood-cultures, MALDI-TOF MS opens for relatively low-complex species-adjusted genetic susceptibility testing from the same bacterial pellet. In our lab routine, we prospectively evaluated a rapid in-house real-time PCR targeting the most common aminoglycoside and cephalosporin resistance genes in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and measured time to preliminary susceptibility reporting for 138 samples. The results were compared to direct phenotypic susceptibility testing with interpretation after 6 h and overnight incubation respectively. Results from the genetic susceptibility testing were available for 69.5% (96/138) of the positive blood cultures within 24 h after sample collection. No phenotypic susceptibility results were available at this time. Compared to overnight direct susceptibility testing, the average time from sample collection to preliminary susceptibility reporting was reduced with 43%, from 45 h and 5 min to 25 h and 44 min, providing an earlier adjustment of antimicrobial therapy for 12 patients. Minor logistic adjustments have the potential to save yet another 4 h.

  15. Genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes and breast cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Jieping; Rudolph, Anja; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression plays a pivotal role in assisting tumors to evade immune destruction and promoting tumor development. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes may be implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. We included 42,510 female breast cancer cases.......5 × 10(-4) and 0.63, respectively). Our data provide evidence that the immunosuppression pathway genes STAT3, IL5, and GM-CSF may be novel susceptibility loci for breast cancer in women of European ancestry....... and 40,577 controls of European ancestry from 37 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (2015) with available genotype data for 3595 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 133 candidate genes. Associations between genotyped SNPs and overall breast cancer risk, and secondarily according...

  16. Genetic variation in pattern recognition receptors: functional consequences and susceptibility to infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Martin; Stappers, Mark H T; Joosten, Leo A B; Gyssens, Inge C; Netea, Mihai G

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the innate immune system are equipped with surface and cytoplasmic receptors for microorganisms called pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). PRRs recognize specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns and as such are crucial for the activation of the immune system. Currently, five different classes of PRRs have been described: Toll-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and absent in melanoma 2-like receptors. Following their discovery, many sequence variants in PRR genes have been uncovered and shown to be implicated in human infectious diseases. In this review, we will discuss the effect of genetic variation in PRRs and their signaling pathways on susceptibility to infectious diseases in humans.

  17. Effect of multiple genetic polymorphisms on antigen presentation and susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Stewart T; Linderman, Jennifer J; Kirschner, Denise E

    2008-07-01

    Several molecules related to antigen presentation, including gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), are encoded by polymorphic genes. Some polymorphisms were found to affect susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) when they were considered singly in epidemiological studies, but how multiple polymorphisms interact to determine susceptibility to TB in an individual remains an open question. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in some genes may counteract or intensify the effects of polymorphisms in other genes. For example, an increase in IFN-gamma expression may counteract the weak binding that a particular MHC variant displays for a peptide from Mycobacterium tuberculosis to establish the same T-cell response as another, more strongly binding MHC variant. To test this hypothesis, we developed a mathematical model of antigen presentation based on experimental data for the known effects of genetic polymorphisms and simulated time courses when multiple polymorphisms were present. We found that polymorphisms in different genes could affect antigen presentation to the same extent and therefore compensate for each other. Furthermore, we defined the conditions under which such relationships could exist. For example, increased IFN-gamma expression compensated for decreased peptide-MHC affinity in the model only above a certain threshold of expression. Below this threshold, changes in IFN-gamma expression were ineffectual compared to changes in peptide-MHC affinity. The finding that polymorphisms exhibit such relationships could explain discrepancies in the epidemiological literature, where some polymorphisms have been inconsistently associated with susceptibility to TB. Furthermore, the model allows polymorphisms to be ranked by effect, providing a new tool for designing association studies.

  18. Association between the APC gene D1822V variant and the genetic susceptibility of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Maohui; Fang, Xiping; Yang, Qian; Ouyang, Gang; Chen, Daping; Ma, Xiang; Li, Huachi; Xie, Wei

    2014-07-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene polymorphisms are believed to contribute to tumor susceptibility. However, the association between genetic variants (A/T) in the APC gene D1822V polymorphism and colorectal cancer (CRC) susceptibility remains unknown. To determine this association, a case-control study was performed. The genotype of the APC gene D1822V variants was analyzed by DNA sequencing in blood samples collected from 196 patients with CRC and 279 healthy subjects. There were no significant associations between the case and control groups in the distribution of AT [odds ratio (OR), 0.604; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.355-1.029) and TT genotypes (OR, 0.438; 95% CI, 0.045-4.247) relative to the AA genotype. The ratio of the T allele was significantly lower (P=0.047) in the case group compared with the control group (OR, 0.611; 95% CI, 0.374-0.997), indicating that the T allele conferred a protective effect in CRC. The frequency of the AT genotype among the subjects diagnosed at >45 years of age was lower than those diagnosed at a younger age (P<0.05). The present study demonstrates that the T allele of the D1822V polymorphism may exert a protective effect against CRC, however, these findings require further validation in a larger sample size.

  19. Differential Susceptibility: The Genetic Moderation of Peer Pressure on Alcohol Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Amanda M; Cleveland, H Harrington; Schlomer, Gabriel L; Vandenbergh, David J; Feinberg, Mark E

    2015-10-01

    Although peer pressure can influence adolescents' alcohol use, individual susceptibility to these pressures varies across individuals. The dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4) is a potential candidate gene that may influence adolescents' susceptibility to their peer environment due to the role dopamine plays in reward sensation during social interaction. We hypothesized that DRD4 genotype status would moderate the impact of 7th-grade antisocial peer pressure on 12th-grade lifetime alcohol use (n = 414; 58.7% female; 92.8% White). The results revealed significant main effects for antisocial peer pressure, but no main effects for DRD4 genotype on lifetime alcohol use. Adolescent DRD4 genotype moderated the association between peer pressure and lifetime alcohol use. For individuals who carried at least one copy of the DRD4 7-repeat allele (7+), antisocial peer pressure was associated with increased lifetime alcohol use. These findings indicate that genetic sensitivity to peer pressure confers increased alcohol use in late adolescence.

  20. Association of genetic polymorphism of HLA-DRB1 antigens with the susceptibility to lepromatous leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ESCAMILLA-TILCH, MONICA; TORRES-CARRILLO, NORA MAGDALENA; PAYAN, ROSALIO RAMOS; AGUILAR-MEDINA, MARIBEL; SALAZAR, MA ISABEL; FAFUTIS-MORRIS, MARY; ARENAS-GUZMAN, ROBERTO; ESTRADA-PARRA, SERGIO; ESTRADA-GARCIA, IRIS; GRANADOS, JULIO

    2013-01-01

    Despite the introduction of multidrug therapy and the overall reduction of leprosy prevalence in Mexico, the disease remains endemic in certain regions of the country. A genetic basis for the immune susceptibility to Mycobacterium leprae has already been established in different populations worldwide. In this study, we investigated the possible association of the HLA-DRB1 alleles with leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo population. The results demonstrated that the HLA-DRB1*01 allele is associated with lepromatous and dimorphic leprosy [P<0.001, odds ratio (OR)=4.6, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.8–11.4; and P=0.03, OR=6.2, 95% CI: 1.1–31.6, respectively] and the frequency of the HLA-DRB1*08 allele was found to be significantly lower among leprosy patients compared to controls (P=0.046, OR=2.4, 95% CI: 1–5.8). In conclusion, although the association of the HLA-DR locus with leprosy has been established in different populations and several studies have demonstrated significant differences in the DR alleles, this study demonstrated an association of the HLA-DRB1*01 allele with susceptibility to lepromatous and dimorphic leprosy, as well as an association of the HLA-DRB1*08 allele with protection against leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo population. PMID:24649058

  1. The Impact of PPARγ Genetic Variants on IBD Susceptibility and IBD Disease Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Mwinyi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available PPARγ is a nuclear receptor that regulates numerous pathways including cytokine expression and immune responses and plays an important role in controlling colon inflammation. We aimed at determining the occurring PPARγ SNPs, at predicting the haplotypes, and at determining the frequency outcome in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients in comparison with healthy controls. We determined genetic variants in the coding exons and flanking intronic sequences of the NR1C3 gene in 284 IBD patients and 194 controls and predicted NR1C3 haplotypes via bioinformatic analysis. We investigated whether certain NR1C3 variants are associated with susceptibility to IBD or its disease course. None of the detected 22 NR1C3 variants were associated with IBD. Two variants with allelic frequencies over 1% were included in haplotype/diplotype analyses. None of the NR3C1 haplotypes showed association with IBD development or disease course. We conclude that NR1C3 haplotypes are not related to IBD susceptibility or IBD disease activity.

  2. Genetic susceptibility to dental caries differs between the sexes: a family-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, John R; Wang, Xiaojing; McNeil, Daniel W; Weyant, Robert J; Crout, Richard; Marazita, Mary L

    2015-01-01

    Many of the factors affecting susceptibility to dental caries are likely influenced by genetics. In fact, genetics accounts for up to 65% of inter-individual variation in dental caries experience. Sex differences in dental caries experience have been widely reported, with females usually exhibiting a higher prevalence and severity of disease across all ages. The cause for this sex bias is currently uncertain, although it may be partly due to the differential effects of genetic factors between the sexes: gene-by-sex interactions. In this family based study (N = 2,663; 740 families; ages 1-93 years), we assessed dental caries via intra-oral examination and generated six indices of caries experience (DMFS, dfs, and indices of both pit-and-fissure surface caries and smooth surface caries in both primary and permanent dentitions). We used likelihood-based methods to model the variance in caries experience conditional on the expected genetic sharing among relatives in our sample. This modeling framework allowed us to test two lines of evidence for gene-by-sex interactions: (1) whether the magnitude of the cumulative effect of genes differs between the sexes, and (2) whether different genes are involved. We observed significant evidence of gene-by-sex interactions for caries experience in both the primary and permanent dentitions. In the primary dentition, the magnitude of the effect of genes was greater in males than females. In the permanent dentition, different genes may play important roles in each of the sexes. Overall, this study provides the first direct evidence that sex differences in dental caries experiences may be explained, in part, by gene-by-sex interactions.

  3. Evaluation of breast cancer susceptibility using improved genetic algorithms to generate genotype SNP barcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Lin, Yu-Da; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic association is a challenging task for the identification and characterization of genes that increase the susceptibility to common complex multifactorial diseases. To fully execute genetic studies of complex diseases, modern geneticists face the challenge of detecting interactions between loci. A genetic algorithm (GA) is developed to detect the association of genotype frequencies of cancer cases and noncancer cases based on statistical analysis. An improved genetic algorithm (IGA) is proposed to improve the reliability of the GA method for high-dimensional SNP-SNP interactions. The strategy offers the top five results to the random population process, in which they guide the GA toward a significant search course. The IGA increases the likelihood of quickly detecting the maximum ratio difference between cancer cases and noncancer cases. The study systematically evaluates the joint effect of 23 SNP combinations of six steroid hormone metabolisms, and signaling-related genes involved in breast carcinogenesis pathways were systematically evaluated, with IGA successfully detecting significant ratio differences between breast cancer cases and noncancer cases. The possible breast cancer risks were subsequently analyzed by odds-ratio (OR) and risk-ratio analysis. The estimated OR of the best SNP barcode is significantly higher than 1 (between 1.15 and 7.01) for specific combinations of two to 13 SNPs. Analysis results support that the IGA provides higher ratio difference values than the GA between breast cancer cases and noncancer cases over 3-SNP to 13-SNP interactions. A more specific SNP-SNP interaction profile for the risk of breast cancer is also provided.

  4. Investigating arsenic susceptibility from a genetic perspective in Drosophila reveals a key role for glutathione synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Jorge G Muñiz; Opoka, Robert; Kane, Daniel; Cartwright, Iain L

    2009-02-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic-contaminated drinking water can lead to a variety of serious pathological outcomes. However, differential responsiveness within human populations suggests that interindividual genetic variation plays an important role. We are using Drosophila to study toxic metal response pathways because of unrivalled access to varied genetic approaches and significant demonstrable overlap with many aspects of mammalian physiology and disease phenotypes. Genetic analysis (via chromosomal segregation and microsatellite marker-based recombination) of various wild-type strains exhibiting relative susceptibility or tolerance to the lethal toxic effects of arsenite identified a limited X-chromosomal region (16D-F) able to confer a differential response phenotype. Using an FRT-based recombination approach, we created lines harboring small, overlapping deficiencies within this region and found that relative arsenite sensitivity arose when the dose of the glutathione synthetase (GS) gene (located at 16F1) was reduced by half. Knockdown of GS expression by RNA interference (RNAi) in cultured S2 cells led to enhanced arsenite sensitivity, while GS RNAi applied to intact organisms dramatically reduced the concentration of food-borne arsenite compatible with successful growth and development. Our analyses, initially guided by observations on naturally occurring variants, provide genetic proof that an optimally functioning two-step glutathione (GSH) biosynthetic pathway is required in vivo for a robust defense against arsenite; the enzymatic implications of this are discussed in the context of GSH supply and demand under arsenite-induced stress. Given an identical pathway for human GSH biosynthesis, we suggest that polymorphisms in GSH biosynthetic genes may be an important contributor to differential arsenic sensitivity and exposure risk in human populations.

  5. The genetic profile of susceptibility to infectious diseases in Roman-Period populations from Central Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Magda; Jędrychowska-Dańska, Krystyna; Zamerska, Alicja; Płoszaj, Tomasz; Witas, Henryk W

    2017-01-01

    For thousands of years human beings have resisted life-threatening pathogens. This ongoing battle is considered to be the major force shaping our gene pool as every micro-evolutionary process provokes specific shifts in the genome, both that of the host and the pathogen. Past populations were more susceptible to changes in allele frequencies not only due to selection pressure, but also as a result of genetic drift, migration and inbreeding. In the present study we have investigated the frequency of five polymorphisms within innate immune-response genes (SLC11A1 D543N, MBL2 G161A, P2RX7 A1513C, IL10 A-1082G, TLR2 -196 to -174 ins/del) related to susceptibility to infections in humans. The DNA of individuals from two early Roman-Period populations of Linowo and Rogowo was analysed. The distribution of three mutations varied significantly when compared to the modern Polish population. The TAFT analysis suggests that the decreased frequency of SLC11A1 D543N in modern Poles as compared to 2nd century Linowo samples is the result of non-stochastic mechanisms, such as purifying or balancing selection. The disparity in frequency of other mutations is most likely the result of genetic drift, an evolutionary force which is remarkably amplified in low-size groups. Together with the FST analysis, mtDNA haplotypes' distribution and deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, we suggest that the two populations were not interbreeding (despite the close proximity between them), but rather inbreeding, the results of which are particularly pronounced among Rogowo habitants.

  6. Clinical Course and Genetic Susceptibility of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis: Analysis of a Prospective Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasio, Piero Luigi; Licata, Anna; Maida, Marcello; Macaluso, Fabio Salvatore; Costantino, Andrea; Alessi, Nicola; Grimaudo, Stefania; Accardi, Giulia; Caruso, Calogero; Craxi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Natural history of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is partially characterized in patients from the Mediterranean area whose genetic background differs from that of Northern Europeans. Objectives We aimed to describe genetic susceptibility and clinical course of PBC in patients from Southern Italy. Methods Socio-demographic, clinical, biochemical and histological data at diagnosis as well as disease progression of 81 PBC consecutive patients were collected. All subjects were treated with Ursodeoxycholic acid at a dose of 15 mg/kg. HLA class II DRB1 alleles were compared with those of 237 healthy control subjects. IL28B genotyping for IL28B rs12979860 C/T and rs80899917 G/T was performed in a sub-group of patients. Results HLA-DRB1*07 (RR 5.3, P = 0.0008) and HLA-DRB1*08 (RR n.c. P = 0.0005) were significantly associated with the risk of PBC development. Patients younger than 45 years had significantly higher alanine aminotransferase (P = 0.038) and alkaline phosphatase levels (P = 0.047) than older cases. In comparison to non-CC rs12979860, patients with CC rs12979860 genotype showed an early histological stage at onset (93.8% vs. 62.5%, P = 0.03). After a mean follow-up of 61 months, three patients died, one underwent liver transplantation and sixteen (21.9%) had progression of the disease. At multivariate analysis, extrahepatic autoimmune disease (P = 0.04), pruritus (P = 0.008) and advanced histological stage (P < 0.0001) were independent risk factors for disease progression. Conclusions HLA-DRB1*07 and HLA-DRB1*08 alleles increase susceptibility to disease development. At onset, higher biochemical activity was observed in younger patients, whereas rs12979860 CC genotype was associated with milder histological stage. Pruritus and coexistence of extrahepatic autoimmune diseases were significantly associated with poorer prognosis. PMID:28070198

  7. Genetic and genomic analysis modeling of germline c-MYC overexpression and cancer susceptibility

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    Nunes Virginia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline genetic variation is associated with the differential expression of many human genes. The phenotypic effects of this type of variation may be important when considering susceptibility to common genetic diseases. Three regions at 8q24 have recently been identified to independently confer risk of prostate cancer. Variation at 8q24 has also recently been associated with risk of breast and colorectal cancer. However, none of the risk variants map at or relatively close to known genes, with c-MYC mapping a few hundred kilobases distally. Results This study identifies cis-regulators of germline c-MYC expression in immortalized lymphocytes of HapMap individuals. Quantitative analysis of c-MYC expression in normal prostate tissues suggests an association between overexpression and variants in Region 1 of prostate cancer risk. Somatic c-MYC overexpression correlates with prostate cancer progression and more aggressive tumor forms, which was also a pathological variable associated with Region 1. Expression profiling analysis and modeling of transcriptional regulatory networks predicts a functional association between MYC and the prostate tumor suppressor KLF6. Analysis of MYC/Myc-driven cell transformation and tumorigenesis substantiates a model in which MYC overexpression promotes transformation by down-regulating KLF6. In this model, a feedback loop through E-cadherin down-regulation causes further transactivation of c-MYC. Conclusion This study proposes that variation at putative 8q24 cis-regulator(s of transcription can significantly alter germline c-MYC expression levels and, thus, contribute to prostate cancer susceptibility by down-regulating the prostate tumor suppressor KLF6 gene.

  8. Genetic susceptibility of the arterial wall is an important determinant of atherosclerosis in C57BL/6 and FVB/N mouse strains

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    Shim, Jeong; Handberg, Aase; Östergren, Eva-Britt Caroline

    2011-01-01

    How genetic variations among inbred mouse strains translate into differences in atherosclerosis susceptibility is of significant interest for the development of new therapeutic strategies. The objective of the present study was to examine whether genetically controlled arterial wall properties...

  9. Depression from childhood into late adolescence: Influence of gender, development, genetic susceptibility, and peer stress.

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    Hankin, Benjamin L; Young, Jami F; Abela, John R Z; Smolen, Andrew; Jenness, Jessica L; Gulley, Lauren D; Technow, Jessica R; Gottlieb, Andrea Barrocas; Cohen, Joseph R; Oppenheimer, Caroline W

    2015-11-01

    Depression is a debilitating mental illness with clear developmental patterns from childhood through late adolescence. Here, we present data from the Gene Environment Mood (GEM) study, which used an accelerated longitudinal cohort design with youth (N = 665) starting in 3rd, 6th, and 9th grades, and a caretaker, who were recruited from the general community, and were then assessed repeatedly through semistructured diagnostic interviews every 6 months over 3 years (7 waves of data) to establish and then predict trajectories of depression from age 8 to 18. First, we demonstrated that overall prevalence rates of depression over time, by age, gender, and pubertal status, in the GEM study closely match those trajectories previously obtained in past developmental epidemiological research. Second, we tested whether a genetic vulnerability-stress model involving 5-HTTLPR and chronic peer stress was moderated by developmental factors. Results showed that older aged adolescents with SS/SL genotype, who experienced higher peer chronic stress over 3 years, were the most likely to be diagnosed with a depressive episode over time. Girls experiencing greater peer chronic stress were the most likely to develop depression. This study used repeated assessments of diagnostic interviewing in a moderately large sample of youth over 3 years to show that depression rates increase in middle to late adolescence, or postpubertally, and that the gender difference in depression emerges earlier in adolescence (age 12.5), or postpubertally. Additionally, genetically susceptible older adolescents who experience chronic peer stress were the most likely to become depressed over time.

  10. Genetic variation in telomere maintenance genes, telomere length, and lung cancer susceptibility.

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    Hosgood, H Dean; Cawthon, Richard; He, Xingzhou; Chanock, Stephen; Lan, Qing

    2009-11-01

    Telomeres are responsible for the protection of the chromosome ends and shortened telomere length has been associated with risk of multiple cancers. Genetic variation in telomere-related genes may alter cancer risk associated with telomere length. Using lung cancer cases (n=120) and population-based controls (n=110) from Xuanwei, China, we analyzed telomere length separately and in conjunction with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the telomere maintenance genes POT1, TERT, and TERF2, which we have previously reported were associated with risk of lung cancer in this study. POT1 rs10244817, TERT rs2075786, and TERF2 rs251796 were significantly associated with lung cancer (p(trend)telomere length was not significantly associated with risk of lung cancer (OR=1.58; 95% CI=0.79-3.18) when compared to the longest tertile of telomere length. When stratified by genotype, there was a suggestion of a dose-response relationship between tertiles of telomere length and risk of lung cancer among the POT1 rs10244817 common variant carriers (OR (95% CI)=1.33 (0.47-3.75), 3.30 (1.14-9.56), respectively) but not among variant genotype carriers (p(interaction)=0.05). Our findings provide evidence that telomere length and genetic variation in telomere maintenance genes may be associated with risk of lung cancer susceptibility and warrant replication in larger studies.

  11. Susceptibility to chronic pain following nerve injury is genetically affected by CACNG2.

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    Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Devor, Marshall; Seltzer, Ze'ev; Gebauer, Mathias; Michaelis, Martin; Tal, Michael; Dorfman, Ruslan; Abitbul-Yarkoni, Merav; Lu, Yan; Elahipanah, Tina; delCanho, Sonia; Minert, Anne; Fried, Kaj; Persson, Anna-Karin; Shpigler, Hagai; Shabo, Erez; Yakir, Benjamin; Pisanté, Anne; Darvasi, Ariel

    2010-09-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain is affected by specifics of the precipitating neural pathology, psychosocial factors, and by genetic predisposition. Little is known about the identity of predisposing genes. Using an integrative approach, we discovered that CACNG2 significantly affects susceptibility to chronic pain following nerve injury. CACNG2 encodes for stargazin, a protein intimately involved in the trafficking of glutamatergic AMPA receptors. The protein might also be a Ca(2+) channel subunit. CACNG2 has previously been implicated in epilepsy. Initially, using two fine-mapping strategies in a mouse model (recombinant progeny testing [RPT] and recombinant inbred segregation test [RIST]), we mapped a pain-related quantitative trait locus (QTL) (Pain1) into a 4.2-Mb interval on chromosome 15. This interval includes 155 genes. Subsequently, bioinformatics and whole-genome microarray expression analysis were used to narrow the list of candidates and ultimately to pinpoint Cacng2 as a likely candidate. Analysis of stargazer mice, a Cacng2 hypomorphic mutant, provided electrophysiological and behavioral evidence for the gene's functional role in pain processing. Finally, we showed that human CACNG2 polymorphisms are associated with chronic pain in a cohort of cancer patients who underwent breast surgery. Our findings provide novel information on the genetic basis of neuropathic pain and new insights into pain physiology that may ultimately enable better treatments.

  12. Relationships of OPG Genetic Polymorphisms with Susceptibility to Cardiovascular Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

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    Song, De-Hua; Zhou, Peng-Zhen; Xiu, Xiao-Lin; Zhou, Guang-Hui; Sun, Yu-Xia; Song, Chun

    2016-04-12

    BACKGROUND The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine whether genetic polymorphisms in the osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene contribute to increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). MATERIAL AND METHODS Electronic databases were searched carefully without any language restriction. Analyses of data were conducted using STATA software. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were also calculated. RESULTS Seven clinical case-control studies that enrolled 1170 CVD patients and 1194 healthy subjects were included. The results indicated that OPG gene polymorphism might be closely associated with susceptibility to CVD, especially for rs2073617 T>C and rs2073618 G>C polymorphisms. Ethnicity-stratified analysis indicated that genetic polymorphism in the OPG were closely related with the pathogenesis of CVD among Asians (all P0.05). CONCLUSIONS Our meta-analysis provided quantitative evidence that OPG gene polymorphism may be closely related to an increased risk of CVD, especially for rs2073617 T>C and rs2073618 G>C polymorphisms.

  13. Vascular Genetic Variants and Ischemic Stroke Susceptibility in Albanians from the Republic of Macedonia

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    Bajram Kamberi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute first-ever ischemic stroke (FIS is a heterogeneous, polygenic disorder. The contribution of vascular genetic variants as inherited causes of ischemic stroke has remained controversial. AIM: To examine the association of genetic variants in vascular factors with the occurrence of FIS. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The current research was performed in a group of 39 patients with FIS (study group and 102 healthy volunteers (control group. We analyzed the prevalence of vascular genetic variants in following genes: factor V, prothrombin, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR, factor XIII, plasminogen activator 1, endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein E, β-fibrinogen, human platelet antigen 1, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and lymphotoxin alpha. RESULTS: It was found that heterozygous LTA 804C>A and FXIII V34L Leu/Leu were significantly more frequent in patients with FIS than in control group (p = 0.036 and p = 0.017, respectively. The frequency of FXIII V34L Val/Val was significantly lower in patients with FIS than in control group (p = 0.020. Other frequencies of vascular gene variants in patients with FIS and in control group were not significantly different. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first comprehensive study to present data indicating that polymorphism of vascular genes in the prevalence of acute FIS exists in the Albanian population from the Republic of Macedonia. Variations in these genes have been detected in patients with acute FIS, suggesting that their combination might act in a susceptible or protective manner in this Albanian population.

  14. Nutritional status, genetic susceptibility, and insulin resistance--important precedents to atherosclerosis.

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    McGillicuddy, Fiona C; Roche, Helen M

    2012-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease that starts early in life and is manifested clinically as coronary artery disease (CAD), cerebrovascular disease, or peripheral artery disease. CAD remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western society despite the great advances made in understanding its underlying pathophysiology. The key risk factors associated with CAD include hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, poor diet, obesity, age, male gender, smoking, and physical inactivity. Genetics also play an important role that may interact with environmental factors, including diet, nutritional status, and physiological parameters. Furthermore, certain chronic inflammatory conditions also predispose to the development of CAD. The spiraling increase in obesity rates worldwide has made it more pertinent than ever before to understand the metabolic perturbations that link over nutrition to enhanced cardiovascular risk. Great breakthroughs have been made at the pharmacological level to manage CAD; statins and aspirin have revolutionized treatment of CAD and prolonged lifespan. Nonetheless, lifestyle intervention prior to clinical presentation of CAD symptoms would negate/delay the need for chronic pharmacotherapy in at-risk individuals which in turn would relieve healthcare systems of a costly burden. Throughout this review, we debate the relative impact of nutrition versus genetics in driving CAD. We will investigate how overnutrition affects adipose tissue biology and drives IR and will discuss the subsequent implications for the cardiovascular system. Furthermore, we will discuss how lifestyle interventions including diet modification and weight loss can improve both IR and metabolic dyslipidemia that is associated with obesity. We will conclude by delving into the concept that nutritional status interacts with genetic susceptibility, such that perhaps a more personalized nutrition approach may be more effective in determining diet-related risk as well as

  15. Melanoma susceptibility as a complex trait: genetic variation controls all stages of tumor progression.

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    Ferguson, B; Ram, R; Handoko, H Y; Mukhopadhyay, P; Muller, H K; Soyer, H P; Morahan, G; Walker, G J

    2015-05-28

    Susceptibility to most common cancers is likely to involve interaction between multiple low risk genetic variants. Although there has been great progress in identifying such variants, their effect on phenotype and the mechanisms by which they contribute to disease remain largely unknown. We have developed a mouse melanoma model harboring two mutant oncogenes implicated in human melanoma, CDK4(R24C) and NRAS(Q61K). In these mice, tumors arise from benign precursor lesions that are a recognized strong risk factor for this neoplasm in humans. To define molecular events involved in the pathway to melanoma, we have for the first time applied the Collaborative Cross (CC) to cancer research. The CC is a powerful resource designed to expedite discovery of genes for complex traits. We characterized melanoma genesis in more than 50 CC strains and observed tremendous variation in all traits, including nevus and melanoma age of onset and multiplicity, anatomical site predilection, time for conversion of nevi to melanoma and metastases. Intriguingly, neonatal ultraviolet radiation exposure exacerbated nevus and melanoma formation in most, but not all CC strain backgrounds, suggesting that genetic variation within the CC will help explain individual sensitivity to sun exposure, the major environmental skin carcinogen. As genetic variation brings about dramatic phenotypic diversity in a single mouse model, melanoma-related endophenotype comparisons provide us with information about mechanisms of carcinogenesis, such as whether melanoma incidence is dependent upon the density of pre-existing nevus cells. Mouse models have been used to examine the functional role of gene mutations in tumorigenesis. This work represents their next phase of development to study how biological variation greatly influences lesion onset and aggressiveness even in the setting of known somatic driver mutations.

  16. Genome-wide trans-ancestry meta-analysis provides insight into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahajan, Anubha; Go, Min Jin; Zhang, Weihua

    2014-01-01

    To further understanding of the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) susceptibility, we aggregated published meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including 26,488 cases and 83,964 controls of European, east Asian, south Asian and Mexican and Mexican American ancestry. We obs...

  17. Genetic context determines susceptibility to intraocular pressure elevation in a mouse pigmentary glaucoma

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    Cosma Ioan M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DBA/2J (D2 mice develop an age-related form of glaucoma. Their eyes progressively develop iris pigment dispersion and iris atrophy followed by increased intraocular pressure (IOP and glaucomatous optic nerve damage. Mutant alleles of the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 genes are necessary for the iris disease, but it is unknown whether alleles of other D2 gene(s are necessary for the distinct later stages of disease. We initiated a study of congenic strains to further define the genetic requirements and disease mechanisms of the D2 glaucoma. Results To further understand D2 glaucoma, we created congenic strains of mice on the C57BL/6J (B6 genetic background. B6 double-congenic mice carrying D2-derived Gpnmb and Tyrp1 mutations develop a D2-like iris disease. B6 single-congenics with only the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 mutations develop milder forms of iris disease. Genetic epistasis experiments introducing a B6 tyrosinase mutation into the congenic strains demonstrated that both the single and double-congenic iris diseases are rescued by interruption of melanin synthesis. Importantly, our experiments analyzing mice at ages up to 27 months indicate that the B6 double-congenic mice are much less prone to IOP elevation and glaucoma than are D2 mice. Conclusion As demonstrated here, the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 iris phenotypes are both individually dependent on tyrosinase function. These results support involvement of abnormal melanosomal events in the diseases caused by each gene. In the context of the inbred D2 mouse strain, the glaucoma phenotype is clearly influenced by more genes than just Gpnmb and Tyrp1. Despite the outward similarity of pigment-dispersing iris disease between D2 and the B6 double-congenic mice, the congenic mice are much less susceptible to developing high IOP and glaucoma. These new congenic strains provide a valuable new resource for further studying the genetic and mechanistic complexity of this form of glaucoma.

  18. Common variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes do not confer genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia in Han Chinese.

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    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Chen; Yi, Zhenghui; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Gong, Wei; Tang, Jinsong; Wang, Dong; Lu, Weihong; Chen, Xiaogang; Fang, Yiru; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2015-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a prevalent psychiatric disorder with a complex etiology. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been frequently reported in schizophrenia. Phosphatase and tension homologue-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and presenilin-associated rhomboid-like protease (PARL) are mitochondrial proteins, and genetic variants of these two genes may confer genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia by influencing mitochondrial function. In this study, we conducted a two-stage genetic association study to test this hypothesis. We genotyped 4 PINK1 and 5 PARL genetic variants and evaluated the potential association of the 9 SNPs with schizophrenia in two independent case-control cohorts of 2510 Han Chinese individuals. No positive association of common genetic variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes with schizophrenia was identified in our samples after Bonferroni correction. Re-analysis of the newly updated Psychiatric Genetics Consortium (PGC) data sets confirmed our negative result. Intriguingly, one PINK1 SNP (rs10916832), which showed a marginally significant association in only Hunan samples (P = 0.032), is associated with the expression of a schizophrenia susceptible gene KIF17 according to the expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis. Our study indicated that common genetic variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes are unlikely to be involved in schizophrenia. Further studies are essential to characterize the role of the PINK1 and PARL genes in schizophrenia.

  19. Alcohol induces sensitization to gluten in genetically susceptible individuals: a case control study.

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    Stuart Currie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanisms of cerebellar degeneration attributed to prolonged and excessive alcohol intake remain unclear. Additional or even alternative causes of cerebellar degeneration are often overlooked in suspected cases of alcohol-related ataxia. The objectives of this study were two fold: (1 to investigate the prevalence of gluten-related serological markers in patients with alcohol-related ataxia and; (2 to compare the pattern of brain involvement on magnetic resonance imaging between patients with alcohol and gluten ataxias. MATERIALS & METHODS: Patients diagnosed with alcohol and gluten ataxias were identified from a retrospective review of patients attending a tertiary clinic. HLA genotype and serological markers of gluten-related disorders were recorded. Cerebellar volumetry, MR spectroscopy and voxel-based morphometric analyses were performed on patients and compared with matched control data. RESULTS: Of 904 registered patients, 104 had alcohol ataxia and 159 had gluten ataxia. 61% of the alcohol ataxia group and 70% of the gluten ataxia group had HLA DQ2/DQ8 genotype compared to 30% in healthy local blood donors. 44% of patients with alcohol ataxia had antigliadin antibodies compared to 12% in the healthy local population and 10% in patients with genetically confirmed ataxias. None of the patients with alcohol ataxia and antigliadin antibodies had celiac disease compared to 40% in patients with gluten ataxia. The pattern of structural brain abnormality in patients with alcohol ataxia who had antigliadin antibodies differed from gluten ataxia and was identical to that of alcohol ataxia. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol related cerebellar degeneration may, in genetically susceptible individuals, induce sensitization to gluten. Such sensitization may result from a primary cerebellar insult, but a more systemic effect is also possible. The duration and amount of exposure to alcohol may not be the only factors responsible for the cerebellar

  20. Genetic Variation in Osteopontin Gene Is Associated with Susceptibility to Sarcoidosis in Slovenian Population

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    A. Maver

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a systemic inflammatory disease characterised by appearance of granulomas. Precise etiology has not been elucidated. Osteopontin (Opn is a Th1 cytokine whose levels have been found increased in granulomas and serum samples from patients with sarcoidosis. We investigated whether genetic variation in Osteopontin gene (OPN gene contributes to susceptibility to sarcoidosis. Haplotype-block structure in the OPN gene region was investigated using data from HapMap project. Three representative SNPs have been selected from each block of SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (rs11730582-C/T, rs11728697-C/T and rs4754-C/T. Genotyping was performed using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays on a sample of 165 patients and 284 controls. Statistical analyses of association were performed using Chi-Square test and algorithms implemented in the haplo.stats and PHASE packages. Genotyping analysis revealed a significant difference in genotype frequencies at rs4754 polymorphism in groups of patients and controls under recessive genetic model (p=0.036, OR=1.99, 95%CI=1.04-3.82, CC homozygotes being significantly over-represented in the patients group. However these results failed to reach significance after correction for multiple testing (p=0.25. The frequencies of predicted haplotypes differed between patient and control groups, frequency of TTT haplotype was found to be significantly decreased in the group of patients with sarcoidosis (p=0.014, OR=0.40, 95%CI=0.20-0.79. Our results suggest that variation in the OPN gene might be significantly associated with sarcoidosis and that the TTT haplotype in OPN may act as a protective factor in sarcoidosis.

  1. PHACTR1 Is a Genetic Susceptibility Locus for Fibromuscular Dysplasia Supporting Its Complex Genetic Pattern of Inheritance.

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    Soto Romuald Kiando

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD is a nonatherosclerotic vascular disease leading to stenosis, dissection and aneurysm affecting mainly the renal and cerebrovascular arteries. FMD is often an underdiagnosed cause of hypertension and stroke, has higher prevalence in females (~80% but its pathophysiology is unclear. We analyzed ~26K common variants (MAF>0.05 generated by exome-chip arrays in 249 FMD patients and 689 controls. We replicated 13 loci (P<10-4 in 402 cases and 2,537 controls and confirmed an association between FMD and a variant in the phosphatase and actin regulator 1 gene (PHACTR1. Three additional case control cohorts including 512 cases and 669 replicated this result and overall reached the genomic level of significance (OR = 1.39, P = 7.4×10-10, 1,154 cases and 3,895 controls. The top variant, rs9349379, is intronic to PHACTR1, a risk locus for coronary artery disease, migraine, and cervical artery dissection. The analyses of geometrical parameters of carotids from ~2,500 healthy volunteers indicate higher intima media thickness (P = 1.97×10-4 and wall to lumen ratio (P = 0.002 in rs9349379-A carriers, suggesting indices of carotid hypertrophy previously described in carotids of FMD patients. Immunohistochemistry detected PHACTR1 in endothelium and smooth muscle cells of FMD and normal human carotids. The expression of PHACTR1 by genotypes in primary human fibroblasts showed higher expression in rs9349379-A carriers (N = 86, P = 0.003. Phactr1 knockdown in zebrafish resulted in dilated vessels indicating subtle impaired vascular development. We report the first susceptibility locus for FMD and provide evidence for a complex genetic pattern of inheritance and indices of shared pathophysiology between FMD and other cardiovascular and neurovascular diseases.

  2. Advancement in genetic variants conferring obesity susceptibility from genome-wide association studies.

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    Wang, Tao; Jia, Weiping; Hu, Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Obesity prevalence has increased in recent years. Lifestyle change fuels obesity, but genetic factors cause more than 50% of average variations in obesity. The advent of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has hastened the progress of polygenic obesity research. As of this writing, more than 73 obesity susceptibility loci have been identified in ethnic groups through GWAS. The identified loci explain only 2% to 4% of obesity heritability, thereby indicating that a large proportion of loci remain undiscovered. Thus, the next step is to identify and confirm novel loci, which may exhibit smaller effects and lower allele frequencies than established loci. However, achieving these tasks has been difficult for researchers. GWAS help researchers discover the causal loci. Moreover, numerous biological studies have been performed on the polygenic effects on obesity, such as studies on fat mass- and obesity-associated gene (FTO), but the role of these polygenic effects in the mechanism of obesity remains unclear. Thus, obesity-causing variations should be identified, and insights into the biology of polygenic effects on obesity are needed.

  3. Genetic relatedness and antifungal susceptibility profile of Candida albicans isolates from fungaemia patients.

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    Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Sousa, Inês; Correia, Alexandra; Sampaio, Paula; Pais, Célia; Rodrigues, Acácio Gonçalves; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2011-04-01

    A prospective study to assess fungaemia was conducted for 12 months at a Portuguese University Hospital. A total of 35 Candida albicans isolates obtained from 12 patients with fungaemia were compared by a multiplex PCR system using four microsatellite loci. Blood isolates were evaluated against concomitant isolates from urine, lower respiratory secretions and central venous catheters, as well as with successive isolates recovered from recurrent episodes of fungaemia. The data analyzed included the department of admission, underlying diseases and antifungal therapy. The susceptibility phenotypes of all isolates to amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin were determined according to the CLSI M27-A3 protocol. We observed a high degree of similarity between successive blood isolates and between blood and concomitant isolates from other sites of the same patient. This is suggestive of the recurrence of fungaemia and was due to the same strain, possibly as a result of the failure of antifungal therapy. The genetic similarity observed between some strains isolated from different patients suggested the likelihood that they were hospital acquired. Distinct patients were infected by the same strain at different time periods, and an increase in antifungal resistance was observed over time for some of these strains. Hospital-acquired exogenous nosocomial infections can be associated with higher risks of antifungal resistance and need to be closely monitored. Particular attention should also be given to endogenous non-blood Candida isolates which can be critical in high risk patients, as they often can become invasive in immunodeficient individuals.

  4. An assessment of molecular pathways of obesity susceptible to nutrient, toxicant and genetically induced epigenetic perturbation.

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    Xue, Jing; Ideraabdullah, Folami Y

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, the etiology of human disease has greatly improved with the inclusion of epigenetic mechanisms, in particular as a common link between environment and disease. However, for most diseases we lack a detailed interpretation of the epigenetic regulatory pathways perturbed by environment and causal mechanisms. Here, we focus on recent findings elucidating nutrient-related epigenetic changes linked to obesity. We highlight studies demonstrating that obesity is a complex disease linked to disruption of epigenetically regulated metabolic pathways in the brain, adipose tissue and liver. These pathways regulate (1) homeostatic and hedonic eating behaviors, (2) adipocyte differentiation and fat accumulation, and (3) energy expenditure. By compiling these data, we illustrate that obesity-related phenotypes are repeatedly linked to disruption of critical epigenetic mechanisms that regulate key metabolic genes. These data are supported by genetic mutation of key epigenetic regulators, and many of the diet-induced epigenetic mechanisms of obesity are also perturbed by exposure to environmental toxicants. Identifying similarly perturbed epigenetic mechanisms in multiple experimental models of obesity strengthens the translational applications of these findings. We also discuss many of the ongoing challenges to understanding the role of environmentally induced epigenetic pathways in obesity and suggest future studies to elucidate these roles. This assessment illustrates our current understanding of molecular pathways of obesity that are susceptible to environmental perturbation via epigenetic mechanisms. Thus, it lays the groundwork for dissecting the complex interactions between diet, genes and toxicants that contribute to obesity and obesity-related phenotypes.

  5. HIV type 1 genetic diversity and genotypic drug susceptibility in the Republic of Moldova.

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    Pandrea, I; Descamps, D; Collin, G; Robertson, D L; Damond, F; Dimitrienco, V; Gheorghita, S; Pecec, M; Simon, F; Brun-Vézinet, F; Apetrei, C

    2001-09-01

    HIV-1 genetic diversity and, for the first time, genotypic drug susceptibility was investigated for strains circulating in the Republic of Moldova (of the former Soviet Union). Eighty-three samples from adults recently infected by intravenous drug use (IDU) (n = 60), heterosexual contact (n = 8), and from blood donors (n = 15) that tested positive from 1997 to 1998, and originating from different regions of Moldova were serotyped. By group-specific and subtype-specific peptide ELISA, patients were infected by serotype A (n = 65), serotype B (n = 1), or were nontypable (n = 17). Heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) confirmed 11 subtype A and the one subtype B infection. Analyses of pol and env sequences for six of the IDUs confirmed that they were infected with subtype A strain. These strains clustered tightly with subtype A strains isolated from the former Soviet Union in phylogenetic analysis. No mutations associated with drug resistance were detected. The Republic of Moldova is culturally more closely related to Romania (where subtype F dominates the epidemic), but depends economically on Russia (where subtype A is established among IDUs). Thus, our results suggest that the spread of HIV in this region is driven by drug networks rather than being due to cultural similarities.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of genetic susceptibility to language impairment in an isolated Chilean population

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    Villanueva, Pia; Newbury, Dianne F; Jara, Lilian; De Barbieri, Zulema; Mirza, Ghazala; Palomino, Hernán M; Fernández, María Angélica; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Monaco, Anthony P; Palomino, Hernán

    2011-01-01

    Specific language impairment (SLI) is an unexpected deficit in the acquisition of language skills and affects between 5 and 8% of pre-school children. Despite its prevalence and high heritability, our understanding of the aetiology of this disorder is only emerging. In this paper, we apply genome-wide techniques to investigate an isolated Chilean population who exhibit an increased frequency of SLI. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) mapping and parametric and non-parametric linkage analyses indicate that complex genetic factors are likely to underlie susceptibility to SLI in this population. Across all analyses performed, the most consistently implicated locus was on chromosome 7q. This locus achieved highly significant linkage under all three non-parametric models (max NPL=6.73, P=4.0 × 10−11). In addition, it yielded a HLOD of 1.24 in the recessive parametric linkage analyses and contained a segment that was homozygous in two affected individuals. Further, investigation of this region identified a two-SNP haplotype that occurs at an increased frequency in language-impaired individuals (P=0.008). We hypothesise that the linkage regions identified here, in particular that on chromosome 7, may contain variants that underlie the high prevalence of SLI observed in this isolated population and may be of relevance to other populations affected by language impairments. PMID:21248734

  7. A multidirectional non-cell autonomous control and a genetic interaction restricting tobacco etch virus susceptibility in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Gopalan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Viruses constitute a major class of pathogens that infect a variety of hosts. Understanding the intricacies of signaling during host-virus interactions should aid in designing disease prevention strategies and in understanding mechanistic aspects of host and pathogen signaling machinery. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An Arabidopsis mutant, B149, impaired in susceptibility to Tobacco etch virus (TEV, a positive strand RNA virus of picoRNA family, was identified using a high-throughput genetic screen and a counterselection scheme. The defects include initiation of infection foci, rate of cell-to-cell movement and long distance movement. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The defect in infectivity is conferred by a recessive locus. Molecular genetic analysis and complementation analysis with three alleles of a previously published mutant lsp1 (loss of susceptibility to potyviruses indicate a genetic interaction conferring haploinsufficiency between the B149 locus and certain alleles of lsp1 resulting in impaired host susceptibility. The pattern of restriction of TEV foci on leaves at or near the boundaries of certain cell types and leaf boundaries suggest dysregulation of a multidirectional non-cell autonomous regulatory mechanism. Understanding the nature of this multidirectional signal and the molecular genetic mechanism conferring it should potentially reveal a novel arsenal in the cellular machinery.

  8. A Systems Genetic Approach to Identify Low Dose Radiation-Induced Lymphoma Susceptibility/DOE2013FinalReport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmain, Allan [University of California, San Francisco; Song, Ihn Young [University of California, San Francisco

    2013-05-15

    The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the combinations of genetic variants that confer an individual's susceptibility to the effects of low dose (0.1 Gy) gamma-radiation, in particular with regard to tumor development. In contrast to the known effects of high dose radiation in cancer induction, the responses to low dose radiation (defined as 0.1 Gy or less) are much less well understood, and have been proposed to involve a protective anti-tumor effect in some in vivo scientific models. These conflicting results confound attempts to develop predictive models of the risk of exposure to low dose radiation, particularly when combined with the strong effects of inherited genetic variants on both radiation effects and cancer susceptibility. We have used a Systems Genetics approach in mice that combines genetic background analysis with responses to low and high dose radiation, in order to develop insights that will allow us to reconcile these disparate observations. Using this comprehensive approach we have analyzed normal tissue gene expression (in this case the skin and thymus), together with the changes that take place in this gene expression architecture a) in response to low or high- dose radiation and b) during tumor development. Additionally, we have demonstrated that using our expression analysis approach in our genetically heterogeneous/defined radiation-induced tumor mouse models can uniquely identify genes and pathways relevant to human T-ALL, and uncover interactions between common genetic variants of genes which may lead to tumor susceptibility.

  9. Case-control study for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility in EPICOLON: previously identified variants and mucins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno Victor

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Familial aggregation in CRC is also important outside syndromic forms and, in this case, a polygenic model with several common low-penetrance alleles contributing to CRC genetic predisposition could be hypothesized. Mucins and GALNTs (N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase are interesting candidates for CRC genetic susceptibility and have not been previously evaluated. We present results for ten genetic variants linked to CRC risk in previous studies (previously identified category and 18 selected variants from the mucin gene family in a case-control association study from the Spanish EPICOLON consortium. Methods CRC cases and matched controls were from EPICOLON, a prospective, multicenter, nationwide Spanish initiative, comprised of two independent stages. Stage 1 corresponded to 515 CRC cases and 515 controls, whereas stage 2 consisted of 901 CRC cases and 909 controls. Also, an independent cohort of 549 CRC cases and 599 controls outside EPICOLON was available for additional replication. Genotyping was performed for ten previously identified SNPs in ADH1C, APC, CCDN1, IL6, IL8, IRS1, MTHFR, PPARG, VDR and ARL11, and 18 selected variants in the mucin gene family. Results None of the 28 SNPs analyzed in our study was found to be associated with CRC risk. Although four SNPs were significant with a P-value ADH1C (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.06-2.50, P-value = 0.02, recessive, rs1800795 in IL6 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.10-2.37, P-value = 0.01, recessive, rs3803185 in ARL11 (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.17-2.15, P-value = 0.007, codominant, and rs2102302 in GALNTL2 (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.00-1.44, P-value = 0.04, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles], only rs3803185 achieved statistical significance in EPICOLON stage 2 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.06-1.69, P-value = 0.01, recessive. In the joint analysis for both stages, results were only significant for rs3803185 (OR = 1

  10. Characterizing genetic risk at known prostate cancer susceptibility loci in African Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Haiman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available GWAS of prostate cancer have been remarkably successful in revealing common genetic variants and novel biological pathways that are linked with its etiology. A more complete understanding of inherited susceptibility to prostate cancer in the general population will come from continuing such discovery efforts and from testing known risk alleles in diverse racial and ethnic groups. In this large study of prostate cancer in African American men (3,425 prostate cancer cases and 3,290 controls, we tested 49 risk variants located in 28 genomic regions identified through GWAS in men of European and Asian descent, and we replicated associations (at p≤0.05 with roughly half of these markers. Through fine-mapping, we identified nearby markers in many regions that better define associations in African Americans. At 8q24, we found 9 variants (p≤6×10(-4 that best capture risk of prostate cancer in African Americans, many of which are more common in men of African than European descent. The markers found to be associated with risk at each locus improved risk modeling in African Americans (per allele OR = 1.17 over the alleles reported in the original GWAS (OR = 1.08. In summary, in this detailed analysis of the prostate cancer risk loci reported from GWAS, we have validated and improved upon markers of risk in some regions that better define the association with prostate cancer in African Americans. Our findings with variants at 8q24 also reinforce the importance of this region as a major risk locus for prostate cancer in men of African ancestry.

  11. Association of Environmental Arsenic Exposure, Genetic Polymorphisms of Susceptible Genes, and Skin Cancers in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-I Hsu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency in the capability of xenobiotic detoxification and arsenic methylation may be correlated with individual susceptibility to arsenic-related skin cancers. We hypothesized that glutathione S-transferase (GST M1, T1, and P1, reactive oxygen species (ROS related metabolic genes (NQO1, EPHX1, and HO-1, and DNA repair genes (XRCC1, XPD, hOGG1, and ATM together may play a role in arsenic-induced skin carcinogenesis. We conducted a case-control study consisting of 70 pathologically confirmed skin cancer patients and 210 age and gender matched participants with genotyping of 12 selected polymorphisms. The skin cancer risks were estimated by odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI using logistic regression. EPHX1 Tyr113His, XPD C156A, and GSTT1 null genotypes were associated with skin cancer risk (OR = 2.99, 95% CI = 1.01–8.83; OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 0.99–4.27; OR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.00–3.02, resp.. However, none of these polymorphisms showed significant association after considering arsenic exposure status. Individuals carrying three risk polymorphisms of EPHX1 Tyr113His, XPD C156A, and GSTs presented a 400% increased skin cancer risk when compared to those with less than or equal to one polymorphism. In conclusion, GSTs, EPHX1, and XPD are potential genetic factors for arsenic-induced skin cancers. The roles of these genes for arsenic-induced skin carcinogenesis need to be further evaluated.

  12. Genetic modifiers of Lepr{sup fa} associated with variability in insulin production and susceptibility to NIDDM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, W.K.; Zheng, M.; Chua, M. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    In an attempt to identify the genetic basis for susceptibility to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus within the context of obesity, we generated 401 genetically obese Lepr{sup fa}/Lepr{sup fa} F2 WKY13M intercross rats that demonstrated wide variation in multiple phenotypic measures related to diabetes, including plasma glucose concentration, percentage of glycosylated hemoglobin, plasma insulin concentration, and pancreatic islet morphology. Using selective genotyping genome scanning approaches, we have identified three quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on Chr. 1 (LOD 7.1 for pancreatic morpholology), Chr. 12 (LOD 5.1 for body mass index and LOD 3.4 for plasma glucose concentration), and Chr. 16 (P < 0.001 for genotype effect on plasma glucose concentration). The obese F2 progeny demonstrated sexual dimorphism for these traits, with increased diabetes susceptibility in the males appearing at approximately 6 weeks of age, as sexual maturation occurred. For each of the QTLs, the linked phenotypes demonstrated sexual dimorphism (more severe affection in males). The QTL on Chr. 1 maps to a region vicinal to that previously linked to adiposity in studies of diabetes susceptibility in the nonobese Goto-Kakizaki rat, which is genetically closely related to the Wistar counterstrain we employed. Several candidate genes, including tubby (tub), multigenic obesity 1 (Mob1), adult obesity and diabetes (Ad), and insulin-like growth factor-2 (Igf2), map to murine regions homologous to the QTL region identified on rat Chr. 1. 60 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Interleukin-16 Gene Polymorphisms Are Considerable Host Genetic Factors for Patients’ Susceptibility to Chronic Hepatitis B Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Romani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Host genetic background is known as an important factor in patients’ susceptibility to infectious diseases such as viral hepatitis. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of genetic polymorphisms of interleukin-16 (IL-16 cytokine on susceptibility of hepatitis B virus (HBV infected patients to develop chronic HBV infection. Genotyping was conducted using PCR followed by enzymatic digestion and RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. We genotyped three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the Il-16 gene (rs11556218 T>G, rs4778889 T>C, and rs4072111 C>T to test for relationship between variation at these loci and patients’ susceptibility to chronic HBV infection. Allele frequency of Il-16 gene rs4072111 and rs11556218 was significantly different between chronic HBV patients and healthy blood donors. Genotype frequency of rs4778889 polymorphism of Il-16 gene was significantly different when chronic HBV patients and HBV clearance subjects were compared. Our results showed that Il-16 gene polymorphisms are considerable host genetic factors when we chase biomarkers for prognosis of HBV infected patients.

  14. Investigating the viability of genetic screening/testing for RA susceptibility using combinations of five confirmed risk loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Annie; Lunt, Mark; Eyre, Steve; Ke, Xiayi; Thomson, Wendy; Hinks, Anne; Bowes, John; Gibbons, Laura; Plant, Darren; Wilson, Anthony G.; Marinou, Ioanna; Morgan, Ann W.; Emery, Paul; Steer, Sophia; Hocking, Lynne J.; Reid, David M.; Wordsworth, Paul; Harrison, Pille; Worthington, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Five loci—the shared epitope (SE) of HLA-DRB1, the PTPN22 gene, a locus on 6q23, the STAT4 gene and a locus mapping to the TRAF1/C5 genetic region—have now been unequivocally confirmed as conferring susceptibility to RA. The largest single effect is conferred by SE. We hypothesized that combinations of susceptibility alleles may increase risk over and above that of any individual locus alone. Methods. We analysed data from 4238 RA cases and 1811 controls, for which genotypes were available at all five loci. Results. Statistical analysis identified eight high-risk combinations conferring an odds ratio >6 compared with carriage of no susceptibility variants and, interestingly, 10% population controls carried a combination conferring high risk. All high-risk combinations included SE, and all but one contained PTPN22. Statistical modelling showed that a model containing only these two loci could achieve comparable sensitivity and specificity to a model including all five. Furthermore, replacing SE (which requires full subtyping at the HLA-DRB1 gene) with DRB1*1/4/10 carriage resulted in little further loss of information (correlation coefficient between models = 0.93). Conclusions. This represents the first exploration of the viability of population screening for RA and identifies several high-risk genetic combinations. However, given the population incidence of RA, genetic screening based on these loci alone is neither sufficiently sensitive nor specific at the current time. PMID:19741008

  15. Genetic variations in the KIR gene family may contribute to susceptibility to ankylosing spondylitis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Hai-Ning; Wang, Zhi-Long; Cui, Dao-Ran; Xin, Da-Jiang

    2014-08-01

    The present meta-analysis of relevant case-control studies was conducted to investigate the possible relationships between genetic variations in the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene clusters of the human KIR gene family and susceptibility to ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The following electronic databases were searched for relevant articles without language restrictions: the Web of Science, the Cochrane Library Database, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM) and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases, covering all papers published until 2013. STATA statistical software was adopted in this meta-analysis as well. We also calculated the crude odds ratios (OR) and its 95% confidence intervals (95 % CI). Seven case-control studies with 1,004 patients diagnosed with AS and 2,138 healthy cases were implicated in our meta-analysis, and 15 genes in the KIR gene family were also evaluated. The results of our meta-analysis show statistical significance between the genetic variations in the KIR2DL1, KIR2DS4, KIR2DS5 and KIR3DS1 genes and an increased susceptibility to AS (KIR2DL1: OR 7.82, 95% CI 3.87-15.81, P0.05). The current meta-analysis provides reliable evidence that genetic variations in the KIR gene family may contribute to susceptibility to AS, especially for the KIR2DL1, KIR2DS4, KIR2DS5 and KIR3DS1 genes.

  16. Genetic polymorphisms and drug susceptibility in four isolates of Leishmania tropica obtained from Canadian soldiers returning from Afghanistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Plourde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is a vector-borne parasitic disease characterized by the presence of one or more lesions on the skin that usually heal spontaneously after a few months. Most cases of CL worldwide occur in Southwest Asia, Africa and South America, and a number of cases have been reported among troops deployed to Afghanistan. No vaccines are available against this disease, and its treatment relies on chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to characterize parasites isolated from Canadian soldiers at the molecular level and to determine their susceptibility profile against a panel of antileishmanials to identify appropriate therapies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Parasites were isolated from skin lesions and characterized as Leishmania tropica based on their pulsed field gel electrophoresis profiles and pteridine reductase 1 (PTR1 sequences. Unusually high allelic polymorphisms were observed at several genetic loci for the L. tropica isolates that were characterized. The drug susceptibility profile of intracellular amastigote parasites was determined using an established macrophage assay. All isolates were sensitive to miltefosine, amphotericin B, sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam and paromomycin, but were not susceptible to fluconazole. Variable levels of susceptibility were observed for the antimalarial agent atovaquone/proguanil (Malarone. Three Canadian soldiers from this study were successfully treated with miltefosine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study shows high heterogeneity between the two L. tropica allelic versions of a gene but despite this, L. tropica isolated from Afghanistan are susceptible to several of the antileishmanial drugs available.

  17. Genetic polymorphisms affecting susceptibility to mercury neurotoxicity in children: summary findings from the Casa Pia Children's Amalgam clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, James S; Heyer, Nicholas J; Russo, Joan E; Martin, Michael D; Farin, Federico M

    2014-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) is neurotoxic, and children may be particularly susceptible to this effect. A current major challenge is identification of children who may be uniquely susceptible to Hg toxicity because of genetic predisposition. We examined the possibility that common genetic variants that are known to affect neurologic functions or Hg handling in adults would modify the adverse neurobehavioral effects of Hg exposure in children. Three hundred thirty subjects who participated as children in the recently completed Casa Pia Clinical Trial of Dental Amalgams in Children were genotyped for 27 variants of 13 genes that are reported to affect neurologic functions and/or Hg disposition in adults. Urinary Hg concentrations, reflecting Hg exposure from any source, served as the Hg exposure index. Regression modeling strategies were employed to evaluate potential associations between allelic status for individual genes or combinations of genes, Hg exposure, and neurobehavioral test outcomes assessed at baseline and for 7 subsequent years during the clinical trial. Among boys, significant modification of Hg effects on neurobehavioral outcomes over a broad range of neurologic domains was observed with variant genotypes for 4 of 13 genes evaluated. Modification of Hg effects on a more limited number of neurobehavioral outcomes was also observed for variants of another 8 genes. Cluster analyses suggested some genes interacting in common processes to affect Hg neurotoxicity. In contrast, significant modification of Hg effects on neurobehavioral functions among girls with the same genotypes was substantially more limited. These observations suggest increased susceptibility to the adverse neurobehavioral effects of Hg among children, particularly boys, with genetic variants that are relatively common to the general human population. These findings advance public health goals to identify factors underlying susceptibility to Hg toxicity and may contribute to strategies for preventing

  18. Novel genetic susceptibility loci for diabetic end-stage renal disease identified through robust naive Bayes classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sambo, Francesco; Malovini, Alberto; Sandholm, Niina;

    2014-01-01

    .05), and rs12137135 upstream of WNT4 was associated with ESRD in Steno. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: This study supports the previously identified findings on the RGMA/MCTP2 region and suggests novel susceptibility loci for ESRD. This highlights the importance of applying complementary statistical methods...... in diabetic patients. Our aim was to detect novel genetic variants associated with diabetic nephropathy and ESRD. METHODS: We exploited a novel algorithm, 'Bag of Naive Bayes', whose marker selection strategy is complementary to that of conventional genome-wide association models based on univariate...... of Kidneys in Diabetes UK collection (UK-Republic of Ireland) and the Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes US Study (GoKinD US). RESULTS: Five genetic loci (WNT4/ZBTB40-rs12137135, RGMA/MCTP2-rs17709344, MAPRE1P2-rs1670754, SEMA6D/SLC24A5-rs12917114 and SIK1-rs2838302) were associated with ESRD in the Finn...

  19. A Genome-Wide Test of the Differential Susceptibility Hypothesis Reveals a Genetic Predictor of Differential Response to Psychological Treatments for Child Anxiety Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keers, Robert; Coleman, Jonathan R. I.; Lester, Kathryn J.; Roberts, Susanna; Breen, Gerome; Thastum, Mikael; Bogels, Susan; Schneider, Silvia; Heiervang, Einar; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Nauta, Maaike; Creswell, Cathy; Thirlwall, Kerstin; Rapee, Ronald M.; Hudson, Jennifer L.; Lewis, Cathryn; Plomin, Robert; Eley, Thalia C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The differential susceptibly hypothesis suggests that certain genetic variants moderate the effects of both negative and positive environments on mental health and may therefore be important predictors of response to psychological treatments. Nevertheless, the identification of such vari

  20. Project 6: Cumulative Risk Assessment Methods and ApplicationsTask 6.3: Applying Genetic and Epigenetic Data to Inform Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susceptibility is defined as the capacity to be affected; an individual can be at greater or less risk relative to population median risk because of susceptibility factors such as life stage, sex, genetics, socioeconomic status, prior exposure to chemicals, and non-chemical stres...

  1. Genome-wide trans-ancestry meta-analysis provides insight into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Anubha; Go, Min Jin; Zhang, Weihua; Below, Jennifer E; Gaulton, Kyle J; Ferreira, Teresa; Horikoshi, Momoko; Johnson, Andrew D; Ng, Maggie C Y; Prokopenko, Inga; Saleheen, Danish; Wang, Xu; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Adair, Linda S; Almgren, Peter; Atalay, Mustafa; Aung, Tin; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Bao, Yuqian; Barnett, Anthony H; Barroso, Ines; Basit, Abdul; Been, Latonya F; Beilby, John; Bell, Graeme I; Benediktsson, Rafn; Bergman, Richard N; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Burtt, Noël; Cai, Qiuyin; Campbell, Harry; Carey, Jason; Cauchi, Stephane; Caulfield, Mark; Chan, Juliana C N; Chang, Li-Ching; Chang, Tien-Jyun; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Chen, Han; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Chia, Kee-Seng; Chidambaram, Manickam; Chines, Peter S; Cho, Nam H; Cho, Young Min; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Collins, Francis S; Cornelis, Marylin C; Couper, David J; Crenshaw, Andrew T; van Dam, Rob M; Danesh, John; Das, Debashish; de Faire, Ulf; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; Dimas, Antigone S; Dina, Christian; Doney, Alex S; Donnelly, Peter J; Dorkhan, Mozhgan; van Duijn, Cornelia; Dupuis, Josée; Edkins, Sarah; Elliott, Paul; Emilsson, Valur; Erbel, Raimund; Eriksson, Johan G; Escobedo, Jorge; Esko, Tonu; Eury, Elodie; Florez, Jose C; Fontanillas, Pierre; Forouhi, Nita G; Forsen, Tom; Fox, Caroline; Fraser, Ross M; Frayling, Timothy M; Froguel, Philippe; Frossard, Philippe; Gao, Yutang; Gertow, Karl; Gieger, Christian; Gigante, Bruna; Grallert, Harald; Grant, George B; Grrop, Leif C; Groves, Chrisropher J; Grundberg, Elin; Guiducci, Candace; Hamsten, Anders; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hara, Kazuo; Hassanali, Neelam; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hayward, Caroline; Hedman, Asa K; Herder, Christian; Hofman, Albert; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Hovingh, Kees; Hreidarsson, Astradur B; Hu, Cheng; Hu, Frank B; Hui, Jennie; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Sarah E; Hunter, David J; Hveem, Kristian; Hydrie, Zafar I; Ikegami, Hiroshi; Illig, Thomas; Ingelsson, Erik; Islam, Muhammed; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Jafar, Tazeen; James, Alan; Jia, Weiping; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Jonsson, Anna; Jowett, Jeremy B M; Kadowaki, Takashi; Kang, Hyun Min; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kao, Wen Hong L; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kato, Norihiro; Katulanda, Prasad; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Kirkka M; Kelly, Ann M; Khan, Hassan; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Young Jin; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Kowlessur, Sudhir; Kraft, Peter; Kravic, Jasmina; Kristensen, Malene M; Krithika, S; Kumar, Ashish; Kumate, Jesus; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kwak, Soo Heon; Laakso, Markku; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Langford, Cordelia; Lawrence, Robert; Leander, Karin; Lee, Jen-Mai; Lee, Nanette R; Li, Man; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Yun; Liang, Junbin; Liju, Samuel; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lindholm, Eero; Liu, Ching-Ti; Liu, Jian Jun; Lobbens, Stéphane; Long, Jirong; Loos, Ruth J F; Lu, Wei; Luan, Jian'an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Ma, Ronald C W; Maeda, Shiro; Mägi, Reedik; Männisto, Satu; Matthews, David R; Meigs, James B; Melander, Olle; Metspalu, Andres; Meyer, Julia; Mirza, Ghazala; Mihailov, Evelin; Moebus, Susanne; Mohan, Viswanathan; Mohlke, Karen L; Morris, Andrew D; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Bill; Nakamura, Jiro; Nakashima, Eitaro; Navarro, Pau; Ng, Peng-Keat; Nica, Alexandra C; Nilsson, Peter M; Njølstad, Inger; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohnaka, Keizo; Ong, Twee Hee; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin N A; Pankow, James S; Park, Kyong Soo; Parkin, Melissa; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peltonen, Leena; Perry, John R B; Peters, Annette; Pinidiyapathirage, Janini M; Platou, Carl G; Potter, Simon; Price, Jackie F; Qi, Lu; Radha, Venkatesan; Rallidis, Loukianos; Rasheed, Asif; Rathman, Wolfgang; Rauramaa, Rainer; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rayner, N William; Rees, Simon D; Rehnberg, Emil; Ripatti, Samuli; Robertson, Neil; Roden, Michael; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rudan, Igor; Rybin, Denis; Saaristo, Timo E; Salomaa, Veikko; Saltevo, Juha; Samuel, Maria; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Scott, James; Scott, Laura J; Scott, Robert A; Segrè, Ayellet V; Sehmi, Joban; Sennblad, Bengt; Shah, Nabi; Shah, Sonia; Shera, A Samad; Shu, Xiao Ou; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sigurđsson, Gunnar; Sijbrands, Eric; Silveira, Angela; Sim, Xueling; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Small, Kerrin S; So, Wing Yee; Stančáková, Alena; Stefansson, Kari; Steinbach, Gerald; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stirrups, Kathleen; Strawbridge, Rona J; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Suo, Chen

    2014-03-01

    To further understanding of the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) susceptibility, we aggregated published meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including 26,488 cases and 83,964 controls of European, east Asian, south Asian and Mexican and Mexican American ancestry. We observed a significant excess in the directional consistency of T2D risk alleles across ancestry groups, even at SNPs demonstrating only weak evidence of association. By following up the strongest signals of association from the trans-ethnic meta-analysis in an additional 21,491 cases and 55,647 controls of European ancestry, we identified seven new T2D susceptibility loci. Furthermore, we observed considerable improvements in the fine-mapping resolution of common variant association signals at several T2D susceptibility loci. These observations highlight the benefits of trans-ethnic GWAS for the discovery and characterization of complex trait loci and emphasize an exciting opportunity to extend insight into the genetic architecture and pathogenesis of human diseases across populations of diverse ancestry.

  2. Genetic susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage in the rat. Evidence based on kidney-specific genome transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, P C; Churchill, M C; Bidani, A K; Griffin, K A; Picken, M; Pravenec, M; Kren, V; St Lezin, E; Wang, J M; Wang, N; Kurtz, T W

    1997-09-15

    To test the hypothesis that genetic factors can determine susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage, we derived an experimental animal model in which two genetically different yet histocompatible kidneys are chronically and simultaneously exposed to the same blood pressure profile and metabolic environment within the same host. Kidneys from normotensive Brown Norway rats were transplanted into unilaterally nephrectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-RT1.N strain) that harbor the major histocompatibility complex of the Brown Norway strain. 25 d after the induction of severe hypertension with deoxycorticosterone acetate and salt, proteinuria, impaired glomerular filtration rate, and extensive vascular and glomerular injury were observed in the Brown Norway donor kidneys, but not in the SHR-RT1.N kidneys. Control experiments demonstrated that the strain differences in kidney damage could not be attributed to effects of transplantation-induced renal injury, immunologic rejection phenomena, or preexisting strain differences in blood pressure. These studies (a) demonstrate that the kidney of the normotensive Brown Norway rat is inherently much more susceptible to hypertension-induced damage than is the kidney of the spontaneously hypertensive rat, and (b) establish the feasibility of using organ-specific genome transplants to map genes expressed in the kidney that determine susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal injury in the rat.

  3. Allele variations in the OCA2 gene (pink-eyed-dilution locus) are associated with genetic susceptibility to melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannot, Anne-Sophie; Meziani, Roubila; Bertrand, Guylene; Gérard, Benedicte; Descamps, Vincent; Archimbaud, Alain; Picard, Catherine; Ollivaud, Laurence; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Kerob, Delphine; Lanternier, Guy; Lebbe, Celeste; Saiag, P; Crickx, Beatrice; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Grandchamp, Bernard; Soufir, Nadem; Melan-Cohort

    2005-08-01

    The occuloalbinism 2 (OCA2) gene, localized at 15q11, encodes a melanosomal transmembrane protein that is involved in the most common form of human occulo-cutaneous albinism, a human genetic disorder characterized by fair pigmentation and susceptibility to skin cancer. We wondered whether allele variations at this locus could influence susceptibility to malignant melanoma (MM). In all, 10 intragenic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 113 patients with melanomas and in 105 Caucasian control subjects with no personal or family history of skin cancer. By comparing allelic distribution between cases and controls, we show that MM and OCA2 are associated (p value=0.030 after correction for multiple testing). Then, a recently developed strategy, the 'combination test' enabled us to show that a combination formed by two SNPs was most strongly associated to MM, suggesting a possible interaction between intragenic SNPs. In addition, the role of OCA2 on MM risk was also detected using a logistic model taking into account the presence of variants of the melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R, a key pigmentation gene) and all pigmentation characteristics as melanoma risk factors. Our data demonstrate that a second pigmentation gene, in addition to MC1R, is involved in genetic susceptibility to melanoma.

  4. Differential Susceptibility: The Genetic Moderation of Peer Pressure on Alcohol Use

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, Amanda M.; Cleveland, H. Harrington; Schlomer, Gabriel L.; Vandenbergh, David J; Feinberg, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Although peer pressure can influence adolescents’ alcohol use, individual susceptibility to these pressures varies across individuals. The dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4) is a potential candidate gene that may influence adolescents’ susceptibility to their peer environment due to the role dopamine plays in reward sensation during social interaction. We hypothesized that DRD4 genotype status would moderate the impact of 7th-grade antisocial peer pressure on 12th-grade lifetime alcohol use (n ...

  5. Genetic variation in the NBS1, MRE11, RAD50 and BLM genes and susceptibility to non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gascoyne Randy D

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Translocations are hallmarks of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL genomes. Because lymphoid cell development processes require the creation and repair of double stranded breaks, it is not surprising that disruption of this type of DNA repair can cause cancer. The members of the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN complex and BLM have central roles in maintenance of DNA integrity. Severe mutations in any of these genes cause genetic disorders, some of which are characterized by increased risk of lymphoma. Methods We surveyed the genetic variation in these genes in constitutional DNA of NHL patients by means of gene re-sequencing, then conducted genetic association tests for susceptibility to NHL in a population-based collection of 797 NHL cases and 793 controls. Results 114 SNPs were discovered in our sequenced samples, 61% of which were novel and not previously reported in dbSNP. Although four variants, two in RAD50 and two in NBS1, showed association results suggestive of an effect on NHL, they were not significant after correction for multiple tests. Conclusion These results suggest an influence of RAD50 and NBS1 on susceptibility to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and marginal zone lymphoma. Larger association and functional studies could confirm such a role.

  6. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Genetic Polymorphisms and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Any Role in Disease Susceptibility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Dongiovanni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD defines a wide spectrum of liver diseases that extend from simple steatosis, that is, increased hepatic lipid content, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, a condition that may progress to cirrhosis with its associated complications. Nuclear hormone receptors act as intracellular lipid sensors that coordinate genetic networks regulating lipid metabolism and energy utilization. This family of transcription factors, in particular peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, represents attractive drug targets for the management of NAFLD and NASH, as well as related conditions such as type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. The impact on the regulation of lipid metabolism observed for PPARs has led to the hypothesis that genetic variants within the human PPARs genes may be associated with human disease such as NAFLD, the metabolic syndrome, and/or coronary heart disease. Here we review the available evidence on the association between PPARs genetic polymorphism and the susceptibility to NAFLD and NASH, and we provide a meta-analysis of the available evidence. The impact of PPAR variants on the susceptibility to NASH in specific subgroup of patients, and in particular on the response to therapies, especially those targeting PPARs, represents promising new areas of investigation.

  7. Genetic susceptibility of lead poisoning%儿童铅中毒易感基因研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李珊珊; 王琳琳; 赵娟

    2013-01-01

    遗传因素影响机体对铅毒性的易感性.δ-氨基乙酰丙酸脱水酶(ALAD)基因、维生素D受体(VDR)基因、血色素基因(HFE)基因、基质γ-羧基谷氨酸蛋白(MGP)T-138C、X射线交错互不修复基因1(XRCC1)和X射线交错互不修复基因3(XRCC3)的不同基因多态性对铅中毒的易感性有一定影响.铅毒性基因的易感性研究将会为儿童铅中毒的易感人群筛选和铅中毒治疗提供遗传学的依据,以便及早识别易感者,尽早保护易感人群,防止或减少铅中毒的发生并采取针对性的健康教育宣传.%Genetic factors affect the susceptibility of lead toxicity. It has certain influence to the susceptibility of lead poisoning that is the different gene polymorphism of delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase ( ALAD) gene, vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene, hemoglobin gene (HFE), matrix-carboxyl glutamic acid protein (MGP) T-138C, X ray staggered no repair gene 1 (XRCC1) and X ray staggered no repair gene 3 (XRRC3). The research of lead toxicity genetic susceptibility will provide the basis for the children lead poisoning at-risk group screening and lead poisoning treatments, in order to recognise and protect the susceptible person, prevent or reduce the occurrence of lead poisoning and take pertinent the health education propaganda.

  8. The effects of selective breeding against scrapie susceptibility on the genetic variability of the Latxa Black-Faced sheep breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legarra Andrés

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Breeding sheep populations for scrapie resistance could result in a loss of genetic variability. In this study, the effect on genetic variability of selection for increasing the ARR allele frequency was estimated in the Latxa breed. Two sources of information were used, pedigree and genetic polymorphisms (fifteen microsatellites. The results based on the genealogical information were conditioned by a low pedigree completeness level that revealed the interest of also using the information provided by the molecular markers. The overall results suggest that no great negative effect on genetic variability can be expected in the short time in the population analysed by selection of only ARR/ARR males. The estimated average relationship of ARR/ARR males with reproductive females was similar to that of all available males whatever its genotype: 0.010 vs. 0.012 for a genealogical relationship and 0.257 vs. 0.296 for molecular coancestry, respectively. However, selection of only ARR/ARR males implied important losses in founder animals (87 percent and low frequency alleles (30 percent in the ram population. The evaluation of mild selection strategies against scrapie susceptibility based on the use of some ARR heterozygous males was difficult because the genetic relationships estimated among animals differed when pedigree or molecular information was used, and the use of more molecular markers should be evaluated.

  9. Genetic testing of newborns for type 1 diabetes susceptibility: a prospective cohort study on effects on maternal mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Per

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concerns about the general psychological impact of genetic testing have been raised. In the Environmental Triggers of Type 1 Diabetes (MIDIA study, genetic testing was performed for HLA-conferred type 1 diabetes susceptibility among Norwegian newborns. The present study assessed whether mothers of children who test positively suffer from poorer mental health and well-being after receiving genetic risk information about their children. Methods The study was based on questionnaire data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort (MoBa study conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Many of the mothers in the MoBa study also took part in the MIDIA study, in which their newborn children were tested for HLA-conferred genetic susceptibility for type 1 diabetes. We used MoBa questionnaire data from the 30th week of pregnancy (baseline and 6 months post-partum (3-3.5 months after disclosure of test results. We measured maternal symptoms of anxiety and depression (SCL-8, maternal self-esteem (RSES, and satisfaction with life (SWLS. The mothers also reported whether they were seriously worried about their child 6 months post-partum. We compared questionnaire data from mothers who had received information about having a newborn with high genetic risk for type 1 diabetes (N = 166 with data from mothers who were informed that their baby did not have a high-risk genotype (N = 7224. The association between genetic risk information and maternal mental health was analysed using multiple linear regression analysis, controlling for baseline mental health scores. Results Information on genetic risk in newborns was found to have no significant impact on maternal symptoms of anxiety and depression (p = 0.9, self-esteem (p = 0.2, satisfaction with life (p = 0.2, or serious worry about their child (OR = 0.98, 95% CI 0.64-1.48. Mental health before birth was strongly associated with mental health after birth. In addition, an increased

  10. Atopic Dermatitis: Clinical Connotations, Especially a Focus on Concomitant Atopic Undertones in Immunocompromised/Susceptible Genetic and Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Khurana, Ananta; Mendiratta, Vibhu; Saxena, Deepti; Srivastava, Govind; Aggarwal, Ashok K; Chatterjee, Kingshuk

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an intriguing clinical entity. Its clinical connotations are varied, the updates of which are required to be done periodically. An attempt to bring its various facets have been made highlighting its clinical features keeping in view the major and the minor criteria to facilitate the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, complications, and associated dermatoses. The benefit of the current dissertation may percolate to the trainees in dermatology, in addition to revelations that atopic undertones in genetic susceptibility and metabolic disorder may provide substantive insight for the future in the understanding of thus far enigmatic etiopathogenesis of AD. PMID:27293243

  11. Evaluation of shared genetic susceptibility loci between autoimmune diseases and schizophrenia based on genome-wide association studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeffding, Louise K; Rosengren, Anders; Thygesen, Johan H;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have documented higher than expected comorbidity (or, in some cases, inverse comorbidity) between schizophrenia and several autoimmune disorders. It remains unknown whether this comorbidity reflects shared genetic susceptibility loci. AIMS: The present study...... aimed to investigate whether verified genome wide significant variants of autoimmune disorders confer risk of schizophrenia, which could suggest a common genetic basis. METHODS: Seven hundred and fourteen genome wide significant risk variants of 25 autoimmune disorders were extracted from the NHGRI GWAS...... catalogue and examined for association to schizophrenia in the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium schizophrenia GWAS samples (36,989 cases and 113,075 controls). RESULTS: Two independent loci at 4q24 and 6p21.32-33 originally identified from GWAS of autoimmune diseases were found genome wide associated...

  12. Identification of new genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer through consideration of gene-environment interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeps, Anja; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Genes that alter disease risk only in combination with certain environmental exposures may not be detected in genetic association analysis. By using methods accounting for gene-environment (G × E) interaction, we aimed to identify novel genetic loci associated with breast cancer risk. Up to 34,47...

  13. Media violence and children’s ADHD-related behaviors: a genetic susceptibility perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikkelen, S.W.C.; Vossen, H.G.M.; Valkenburg, P.M.; Velders, F.P.; Windhorst, D.A.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Hofman, A.; Verhulst, F.C.; Tiemeier, H.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between media violence exposure and Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-related behaviors. Using survey (parent-reported) and genetic data of 1,612 Dutch children (aged 5 to 9 years), we examined genetic disposition as a possible cause of individual d

  14. Susceptibility of Arabidopsis to the downy mildew pathogen Hyaloperonospora parasitica : A reverse genetics approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    The research described in this thesis was performed to gain insight into disease susceptibility in the model system Arabidopsis thaliana – Hyaloperonospora parasitica. The aim was to identify host genes that support the infection process. For this, global expression profiling using DNA microarrays w

  15. Analysis of a p53 Mutation Associated with Cancer Susceptibility for Biochemistry and Genetic Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Cruz, Isabel; Legorreta-Herrera, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of a p53 polymorphism associated with cancer susceptibility. First, students collected a drop of peripheral blood cells using a sterile sting and then used FTA cards to extract the genomic DNA. The p53 region is then PCR…

  16. Differential susceptibility to hypertension is due to selection during the out-of-Africa expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Hunter Young

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a leading cause of stroke, heart disease, and kidney failure. The genetic basis of blood pressure variation is largely unknown but is likely to involve genes that influence renal salt handling and arterial vessel tone. Here we argue that susceptibility to hypertension is ancestral and that differential susceptibility to hypertension is due to differential exposure to selection pressures during the out-of-Africa expansion. The most important selection pressure was climate, which produced a latitudinal cline in heat adaptation and, therefore, hypertension susceptibility. Consistent with this hypothesis, we show that ecological variables, such as latitude, temperature, and rainfall, explain worldwide variation in heat adaptation as defined by seven functional alleles in five genes involved in blood pressure regulation. The latitudinal cline in heat adaptation is consistent worldwide and is largely unmatched by latitudinal clines in short tandem repeat markers, control single nucleotide polymorphisms, or non-functional single nucleotide polymorphisms within the five genes. In addition, we show that latitude and one of these alleles, GNB3 (G protein beta3 subunit 825T, account for a major portion of worldwide variation in blood pressure. These results suggest that the current epidemic of hypertension is due to exposures of the modern period interacting with ancestral susceptibility. Modern populations differ in susceptibility to these new exposures, however, such that those from hot environments are more susceptible to hypertension than populations from cold environments. This differential susceptibility is likely due to our history of adaptation to climate.

  17. Host factors and genetic susceptibility to infections due to intracellular bacteria and fastidious organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, S A; Morré, S A; Bochud, P-Y; Greub, G

    2014-12-01

    While genetic polymorphisms play a paramount role in tuberculosis (TB), less is known about their contribution to the severity of diseases caused by other intracellular bacteria and fastidious microorganisms. We searched electronic databases for observational studies reporting on host factors and genetic predisposition to infections caused by intracellular fastidious bacteria published up to 30 May 2014. The contribution of genetic polymorphisms was documented for TB. This includes genetic defects in the mononuclear phagocyte/T helper cell type 1 (Th1) pathway contributing to disseminated TB disease in children and genome-wide linkage analysis (GWAS) in reactivated pulmonary TB in adults. Similarly, experimental studies supported the role of host genetic factors in the clinical presentation of illnesses resulting from other fastidious intracellular bacteria. These include IL-6 -174G/C or low mannose-binding (MBL) polymorphisms, which are incriminated in chronic pulmonary conditions triggered by C. pneumoniae, type 2-like cytokine secretion polymorphisms, which are correlated with various clinical patterns of M. pneumoniae infections, and genetic variation in the NOD2 gene, which is an indicator of tubal pathology resulting from Chamydia trachomatis infections. Monocyte/macrophage migration and T lymphocyte recruitment defects are corroborated to ineffective granuloma formation observed among patients with chronic Q fever. Similar genetic polymorphisms have also been suggested for infections caused by T. whipplei although not confirmed yet. In conclusion, this review supports the paramount role of genetic factors in clinical presentations and severity of infections caused by intracellular fastidious bacteria. Genetic predisposition should be further explored through such as exome sequencing.

  18. Markers of genetic susceptibility in human environmental hygiene and toxicology: the role of selected CYP, NAT and GST genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thier, Ricarda; Brüning, Thomas; Roos, Peter H; Rihs, Hans-Peter; Golka, Klaus; Ko, Yon; Bolt, Hermann M

    2003-06-01

    Inherited genetic traits co-determine the susceptibility of an individual to a toxic chemical. Special emphasis has been put on individual responses to environmental and industrial carcinogens, but other chronic diseases are of increasing interest. Polymorphisms of relevant xenobiotic metabolising enzymes may be used as toxicological susceptibility markers. A growing number of genes encoding enzymes involved in biotransformation of toxicants and in cellular defence against toxicant-induced damage to the cells has been identified and cloned, leading to increased knowledge of allelic variants of genes and genetic defects that may result in a differential susceptibility toward environmental toxicants. "Low penetrating" polymorphisms in metabolism genes tend to be much more common in the population than allelic variants of "high penetrating" cancer genes, and are therefore of considerable importance from a public health point of view. Positive associations between cancer and CYP1A1 alleles, in particular the *2C I462V allele, were found for tissues following the aerodigestive tract. Again, in most cases, the effect of the variant CYP1A1 allele becomes apparent or clearer in connection with the GSTM1 null allele. The CYP1B1 codon 432 polymorphism (CYP1B1*3) has been identified as a susceptibility factor in smoking-related head-and-neck squameous cell cancer. The impact of this polymorphic variant of CYP1B1 on cancer risk was also reflected by an association with the frequency of somatic mutations of the p53 gene. Combined genotype analysis of CYP1B1 and the glutathione transferases GSTM1 or GSTT1 has also pointed to interactive effects. Of particular interest for the industrial and environmental field is the isozyme CYP2E1. Several genotypes of this isozyme have been characterised which seem to be associated with different levels of expression of enzyme activity. The acetylator status for NAT2 can be determined by genotyping or by phenotyping. In the pathogenesis of

  19. Health communication, genetic determinism, and perceived control: the roles of beliefs about susceptibility and severity versus disease essentialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Roxanne; Kahl, Mary L; Ndiaye, Khadidiatou; Traeder, Tara

    2012-08-01

    This research examined the lay public's beliefs about genes and health that might be labeled deterministic. The goals of this research were to sort through the divergent and contested meanings of genetic determinism in an effort to suggest directions for public health genomic communication. A survey conducted in community-based settings of 717 participants included 267 who self-reported race as African American and 450 who self-reported race as Caucasian American. The survey results revealed that the structure of genetic determinism included 2 belief sets. One set aligned with perceived threat, encompassing susceptibility and severity beliefs linked to genes and health. The other set represents beliefs about biological essentialism linked to the role of genes for health. These concepts were found to be modestly positively related. Threat beliefs predicted perceived control over genes. Public health efforts to communicate about genes and health should consider effects of these messages for (a) perceived threat relating to susceptibility and severity and (b) perceptions of disease essentialism. Perceived threat may enhance motivation to act in health protective ways, whereas disease essentialist beliefs may contribute to a loss of motivation associated with control over health.

  20. Relationship between genetic polymorphisms of DNA ligase 1 and non-small cell lung cancer susceptibility and radiosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, H; He, X; Yin, L; Guo, W J; Xia, Y Y; Jiang, Z X

    2015-06-26

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between genetic polymorphisms in DNA ligase 1 (LIG1) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) susceptibility and radiosensitivity in a Chinese population. This was a case-control study that included 352 NSCLC patients and 448 healthy controls. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was conducted to detect HaeIII polymorphisms in exon 6 of the LIG1 gene in this popula-tion. This information was used to observe the effects of radiation in pa-tients with different genotypes in order to determine the genotypes as-sociated with radiosensitivity. The CC genotype and C allele frequency were significantly higher in the NSCLC group than in the control group (P = 0.012 and P = 0.023, respectively). The relative risk of experienc-ing NSCLC was 2.55 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-3.98] for CC homozygous patients and 0.87 (95%CI, 0.46-1.88) for AA homozygous patients. Analysis of LIG1 genetic polymorphisms and radiosensitiv-ity of NSCLC patients showed that AA homozygous patients were sig-nificantly more radiosensitive than the control group (AA vs AC, P = 0.014; AA vs CC, P < 0.001; AC vs CC, P = 0.023). Therefore, the LIG1 CC genotype was associated with susceptibility to NSCLC, and the AA genotype demonstrated increased radiosensitivity compared to the AC and CC genotypes.

  1. Genetic Biomarkers of Barrett's Esophagus Susceptibility and Progression to Dysplasia and Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, John M; Middleton, Mark R; Tomlinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a common and important precursor lesion of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). A third of patients with BE are asymptomatic, and our ability to predict the risk of progression of metaplasia to dysplasia and EAC (and therefore guide management) is limited. There is an urgent need for clinically useful biomarkers of susceptibility to both BE and risk of subsequent progression. This study aims to systematically identify, review, and meta-analyze genetic biomarkers reported to predict both. A systematic review of the PubMed and EMBASE databases was performed in May 2014. Study and evidence quality were appraised using the revised American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines, and modified Recommendations for Tumor Marker Scores. Meta-analysis was performed for all markers assessed by more than one study. A total of 251 full-text articles were reviewed; 52 were included. A total of 33 germline markers of susceptibility were identified (level of evidence II-III); 17 were included. Five somatic markers of progression were identified; meta-analysis demonstrated significant associations for chromosomal instability (level of evidence II). One somatic marker of progression/relapse following photodynamic therapy was identified. However, a number of failings of methodology and reporting were identified. This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate genetic biomarkers of BE susceptibility and risk of progression. While a number of limitations of study quality temper the utility of those markers identified, some-in particular, those identified by genome-wide association studies, and chromosomal instability for progression-appear plausible, although robust validation is required.

  2. Systems genetics reveals a transcriptional network associated with susceptibility in the maize-grey leaf spot pathosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Nanette; Myburg, Alexander A; Joubert, Fourie; Murray, Shane L; Carstens, Maryke; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Meyer, Jacqueline; Crampton, Bridget G; Christensen, Shawn A; Ntuli, Jean F; Wighard, Sara S; Van de Peer, Yves; Berger, Dave K

    2017-02-01

    We used a systems genetics approach to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the responses of maize to grey leaf spot (GLS) disease caused by Cercospora zeina, a threat to maize production globally. Expression analysis of earleaf samples in a subtropical maize recombinant inbred line population (CML444 × SC Malawi) subjected in the field to C. zeina infection allowed detection of 20 206 expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). Four trans-eQTL hotspots coincided with GLS disease QTLs mapped in the same field experiment. Co-expression network analysis identified three expression modules correlated with GLS disease scores. The module (GY-s) most highly correlated with susceptibility (r = 0.71; 179 genes) was enriched for the glyoxylate pathway, lipid metabolism, diterpenoid biosynthesis and responses to pathogen molecules such as chitin. The GY-s module was enriched for genes with trans-eQTLs in hotspots on chromosomes 9 and 10, which also coincided with phenotypic QTLs for susceptibility to GLS. This transcriptional network has significant overlap with the GLS susceptibility response of maize line B73, and may reflect pathogen manipulation for nutrient acquisition and/or unsuccessful defence responses, such as kauralexin production by the diterpenoid biosynthesis pathway. The co-expression module that correlated best with resistance (TQ-r; 1498 genes) was enriched for genes with trans-eQTLs in hotspots coinciding with GLS resistance QTLs on chromosome 9. Jasmonate responses were implicated in resistance to GLS through co-expression of COI1 and enrichment of genes with the Gene Ontology term 'cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase complex' in the TQ-r module. Consistent with this, JAZ repressor expression was highly correlated with the severity of GLS disease in the GY-s susceptibility network.

  3. Genetic isolation of a chromosome 1 region affecting susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Lezin, E; Griffin, K A; Picken, M; Churchill, M C; Churchill, P C; Kurtz, T W; Liu, W; Wang, N; Kren, V; Zidek, V; Pravenec, M; Bidani, A K

    1999-08-01

    Linkage studies in the fawn-hooded hypertensive rat have suggested that genes influencing susceptibility to hypertension-associated renal failure may exist on rat chromosome 1q. To investigate this possibility in a widely used model of hypertension, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), we compared susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage between an SHR progenitor strain and an SHR congenic strain that is genetically identical except for a defined region of chromosome 1q. Backcross breeding with selection for the markers D1Mit3 and Igf2 on chromosome 1 was used to create the congenic strain (designated SHR.BN-D1Mit3/Igf2) that carries a 22 cM segment of chromosome 1 transferred from the normotensive Brown Norway rat onto the SHR background. Systolic blood pressure (by radiotelemetry) and urine protein excretion were measured in the SHR progenitor and congenic strains before and after the induction of accelerated hypertension by administration of DOCA-salt. At the same level of DOCA-salt hypertension, the SHR.BN-D1Mit3/Igf2 congenic strain showed significantly greater proteinuria and histologically assessed renal vascular and glomerular injury than the SHR progenitor strain. These findings demonstrate that a gene or genes that influence susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage have been trapped in the differential chromosome segment of the SHR.BN-D1Mit3/Igf2 congenic strain. This congenic strain represents an important new model for the fine mapping of gene(s) on chromosome 1 that affect susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal injury in the rat.

  4. Genetic susceptibility to male infertility: news from genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, K I

    2014-05-01

    A thorough understanding of the genetic basis of male infertility has eluded researchers in spite of significant efforts to identify novel genetic causes of the disease, particularly over the past decade. Approximately half of male factor infertility cases have no known cause; however, it is likely that the majority of idiopathic male factor infertility cases have some unidentified genetic basis. Well-established genetic causes of male infertility are limited to Y chromosome microdeletions and Klinefelter's syndrome, together accounting for 10-20% of cases of severe spermatogenic failure. In addition to these, several genetic polymorphisms have been demonstrated to be significantly associated with male infertility. The discovery of new genetic associations with male infertility has been hampered by two primary factors. First, most studies are underpowered because of insufficient sample size and ethnic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Second, most studies evaluate a single gene, an approach that is very inefficient in the context of male infertility, considering that many hundreds of genes are involved in the process of testicular development and spermatogenesis. Significant recent advances in microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies have enabled the application of whole-genome approaches to the study of male infertility. We recently performed a pilot genome-wide association study (GWAS) for severe spermatogenic failure, and several additional male infertility GWAS have since been published. More recently, genomic microarray tools have been applied to the association of copy number variants with male infertility. These studies are beginning to shed additional light on the genetic architecture of male infertility, and whole-genome studies have proven effective in identifying novel genetic causes of the disease. This review will discuss some of the recent findings of these whole-genome studies as well as future directions for this research that will likely

  5. Geographic differences in genetic susceptibility to IgA nephropathy: GWAS replication study and geospatial risk analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Kiryluk

    Full Text Available IgA nephropathy (IgAN, major cause of kidney failure worldwide, is common in Asians, moderately prevalent in Europeans, and rare in Africans. It is not known if these differences represent variation in genes, environment, or ascertainment. In a recent GWAS, we localized five IgAN susceptibility loci on Chr.6p21 (HLA-DQB1/DRB1, PSMB9/TAP1, and DPA1/DPB2 loci, Chr.1q32 (CFHR3/R1 locus, and Chr.22q12 (HORMAD2 locus. These IgAN loci are associated with risk of other immune-mediated disorders such as type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis, or inflammatory bowel disease. We tested association of these loci in eight new independent cohorts of Asian, European, and African-American ancestry (N = 4,789, followed by meta-analysis with risk-score modeling in 12 cohorts (N = 10,755 and geospatial analysis in 85 world populations. Four susceptibility loci robustly replicated and all five loci were genome-wide significant in the combined cohort (P = 5×10⁻³²-3×10⁻¹⁰, with heterogeneity detected only at the PSMB9/TAP1 locus (I² = 0.60. Conditional analyses identified two new independent risk alleles within the HLA-DQB1/DRB1 locus, defining multiple risk and protective haplotypes within this interval. We also detected a significant genetic interaction, whereby the odds ratio for the HORMAD2 protective allele was reversed in homozygotes for a CFHR3/R1 deletion (P = 2.5×10⁻⁴. A seven-SNP genetic risk score, which explained 4.7% of overall IgAN risk, increased sharply with Eastward and Northward distance from Africa (r = 0.30, P = 3×10⁻¹²⁸. This model paralleled the known East-West gradient in disease risk. Moreover, the prediction of a South-North axis was confirmed by registry data showing that the prevalence of IgAN-attributable kidney failure is increased in Northern Europe, similar to multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes. Variation at IgAN susceptibility loci correlates with differences in disease prevalence

  6. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Genetic Characterisation of Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolated from Malaysian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalda Khosravi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Ceftazidime (CAZ, the synthetic β-lactam, is normally used as the first-line antibiotic therapy for treatment of melioidosis. However, acquired CAZ resistance can develop in vivo during treatment with CAZ, leading to mortality if therapy is not switched to a different antibiotic(s in a timely manner. In this study, susceptibilities of 81 B. pseudomallei isolates to nine different antimicrobial agents were determined using the disk diffusion method, broth microdilution test and Etest. Highest percentage of susceptibility was demonstrated to CAZ, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, meropenem, imipenem, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Although these drugs demonstrated the highest percentage of susceptibility in B. pseudomallei, the overall results underline the importance of the emergence of resistance in this organism. PCR results showed that, of the 81 B. pseudomallei, six multidrug resistant (MDR isolates carried bpeB, amrB, and BPSS1119 and penA genes. Genotyping of the isolates using random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis showed six different PCR fingerprinting patterns generated from the six MDR isolates clusters (A and eight PCR fingerprinting patterns generated for the remaining 75 non-MDR isolates clusters (B.

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, emm type distribution and genetic diversity of Streptococcus pyogenes recovered in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauber P Arêas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes is responsible for a variety of infectious diseases and immunological complications. In this study, 91 isolates of S. pyogenes recovered from oropharynx secretions were submitted to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, emm typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE analysis. All isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone, levofloxacin, penicillin G and vancomycin. Resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin was 15.4%, which is higher than previous reports from this area, while 20.9% of the isolates were not susceptible to tetracycline. The macrolide resistance phenotypes were cMLSB (10 and iMLSB (4. The ermB gene was predominant, followed by the ermA gene. Thirty-two emm types and subtypes were found, but five (emm1, emm4, emm12, emm22, emm81 were detected in 48% of the isolates. Three new emm subtypes were identified (emm1.74, emm58.14, emm76.7. There was a strong association between emm type and PFGE clustering. A variety of PFGE profiles as well as emm types were found among tetracycline and erythromycin-resistant isolates, demonstrating that antimicrobial resistant strains do not result from the expansion of one or a few clones. This study provides epidemiological data that contribute to the development of suitable strategies for the prevention and treatment of such infections in a poorly studied area.

  8. The ancestral process of long term seed bank models

    CERN Document Server

    Blath, Jochen; Kurt, Noemi; Spanò, Dario

    2012-01-01

    We present a new model for the evolution of genetic types in the presence of so-called seed banks, i.e., where individuals may obtain their genetic type from ancestors which have lived in the near as well as the very far past. The classical Wright-Fisher model, as well as a seed bank model with bounded age distribution considered by Kaj, Krone and Lascoux (2001) are special cases of our model. We discern three parameter regimes of the seed bank age distribution, which lead to substantially different behaviour in terms of genetic variability, in particular with respect to fixation of types and time to the most recent common ancestor. We prove that for age distributions with finite mean, the rescaled ancestral process converges to a time-changed Kingman coalescent, while in the case of infinite mean, ancestral lineages might not merge at all with positive probability. Further, we present a construction of the forward in time process in equilibrium. The mathematical methods are based on renewal theory, the urn p...

  9. Twins as a tool for evaluating the influence of genetic susceptibility in thyroid autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, T H; Hegedüs, L

    2011-01-01

    irrefutable evidence of a genetic component in the aetiology of both Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, as well as for harbouring thyroid autoantibodies. Biometric modelling shows that approximately 75% of the total phenotypic variance in autoimmune thyroid disease is due to genetic effects. Despite......By means of large twin cohorts, it has been possible to provide relatively valid and unbiased data regarding the influence of genetic and to some extent epigenetic factors in the aetiology of thyroid autoimmunity. The comparison of concordance rates between monozygotic and dizygotic twins provides...... the well known gender difference in the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease, the analyzes suggest that it is the same set of genes that operate in males and females. The lack of complete phenotypic concordance in monozygotic twin pairs indicates that also environmental and/or epigenetic factors...

  10. Molecular Assay for Detection of Genetic Markers Associated with Decreased Susceptibility to Cephalosporins in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, S W; Martin, I; Demczuk, W; Bharat, A; Hoang, L; Wylie, J; Allen, V; Lefebvre, B; Tyrrell, G; Horsman, G; Haldane, D; Garceau, R; Wong, T; Mulvey, M R

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of antimicrobial-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae continues to rise in Canada; however, antimicrobial resistance data are lacking for approximately 70% of gonorrhea infections that are diagnosed directly from clinical specimens by nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). We developed a molecular assay for surveillance use to detect mutations in genes associated with decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins that can be applied to both culture isolates and clinical samples. Real-time PCR assays were developed to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ponA, mtrR, penA, porB, and one N. gonorrhoeae-specific marker (porA). We tested the real-time PCR assay with 252 gonococcal isolates, 50 nongonococcal isolates, 24 N. gonorrhoeae-negative NAAT specimens, and 34 N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens. Twenty-four of the N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens had matched culture isolates. Assay results were confirmed by comparison with whole-genome sequencing data. For 252 N. gonorrhoeae strains, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porA, ponA, and penA, 99.6% for mtrR, and 95.2% for porB. The presence of ≥2 SNPs correlated with decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone (sensitivities of >98%) and cefixime (sensitivities of >96%). Of 24 NAAT specimens with matched cultures, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porB, 95.8% for ponA and mtrR, and 91.7% for penA. We demonstrated the utility of a real-time PCR assay for sensitive detection of known markers for the decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins in N. gonorrhoeae. Preliminary results with clinical NAAT specimens were also promising, as they correlated well with bacterial culture results.

  11. The role of disease perceptions and results sharing in psychological adaptation after genetic susceptibility testing: the REVEAL Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Sato; Koehly, Laura M; Roberts, J Scott; Chen, Clara A; Hiraki, Susan; Green, Robert C

    2010-12-01

    This study evaluates the extent to which psychological adaptation (validated measures of depressive symptoms, anxiety, and test-specific distress) after genetic susceptibility testing is influenced by changes in beliefs about Alzheimer's disease (AD) and sharing of test results with others. Adult children of AD patients (N=269) from a randomized clinical trial involving genetic testing for apolipoprotein E (APOE) provided information before, as well as 6 weeks and 12 months after results disclosure. The levels of adaptation varied highly among participants at 12-month assessment. Participants who learned that they were ε4 negative (lower risk) had a reduction in perceived risk and concern about developing AD compared with those who learned that they were ε4 positive. Those who received results through an extended educational protocol (three in-person visits) had a larger decline in AD concern than those in a condensed protocol (educational brochure and two in-person visits). Increase in AD concern 6 weeks after disclosure was associated with increase in depression scores (b=0.20, Ptesting (b=0.18, P=0.02) 1 year after testing. Increase in perceived risk (b=0.16, P=0.04) was also associated with higher AD genetic testing distress. Sharing the test results with health professionals and friends (but not family) was associated with decrease in depression (b=-0.11, P=0.05) and anxiety levels (b=-0.16, Ptesting may help facilitate test recipients' long-term psychological adaptation.

  12. Genetic testing for TMEM154 mutations associated with lentivirus susceptibility in sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovine lentiviruses cause incurable, progressive, lymphoproliferative diseases that affect millions of sheep worldwide. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane protein 154 gene (TMEM154) has been recently associated with lentivirus infections in U.S. sheep. Sheep with the two most common TMEM1...

  13. WNT2 Locus Is Involved in Genetic Susceptibility of Peyronie's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolmans, Guido H.; Werker, Paul M.; de Jong, Igle J.; Nijman, Rien J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Ophoff, Roel A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Peyronie's disease (PD) is a fibromatosis of the penis, with a pathology very similar to what is seen in the hand (palmar fascia) in Dupuytren's disease (DD). Recently, we performed a genome-wide association study and identified nine genetic loci containing common variants associated w

  14. Susceptibility to pre-eclampsia is associated with multiple genetic polymorphisms in maternal biotransformation enzymes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zusterzeel, P.L.M.; Peters, W.H.M.; Burton, G.J.; Visser, W. de; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Steegers, E.A.P.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Probably no single gene is responsible for pre-eclampsia, but the disease merely is the result of polymorphisms in several genes in association with environmental factors. We therefore studied the simultaneous occurrence of several genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation enzymes

  15. Genetic Variant rs10757278 on Chromosome 9p21 Contributes to Myocardial Infarction Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyuan Chen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS have revealed that rs10757278 polymorphism (or its proxy rs1333049 on chromosome 9p21 is associated with myocardial infarction (MI susceptibility in individuals of Caucasian ancestry. Following studies in other populations investigated this association. However, some of these studies reported weak or no significant association. Here, we reevaluated this association using large-scale samples by searching PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Our results showed significant association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI with p = 6.09 × 10−22, odds ratio (OR = 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.22–1.36 in pooled population. We further performed a subgroup analysis, and found significant association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI in Asian and Caucasian populations. We identified that the association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI did not vary substantially by excluding any one study. However, the heterogeneity among the selected studies varies substantially by excluding the study from the Pakistan population. We found even more significant association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI in pooled population, p = 3.55 × 10−53, after excluding the study from the Pakistan population. In summary, previous studies reported weak or no significant association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI. Interestingly, our analysis suggests that rs10757278 polymorphism is significantly associated with MI susceptibility by analyzing large-scale samples.

  16. Serotype distribution, antibiotic susceptibility, and genetic relatedness of Neisseria meningitidis strains recently isolated in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrantonio, Paola; Stefanelli, Paola; Fazio, Cecilia; Sofia, Tonino; Neri, Arianna; La Rosa, Giuseppina; Marianelli, Cinzia; Muscillo, Michele; Caporali, Maria Grazia; Salmaso, Stefania

    2003-02-15

    The availability of new polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C prompted European National Health authorities to carefully monitor isolate characteristics. In Italy, during 1999-2001, the average incidence was 0.4 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Serogroup B was predominant and accounted for 75% of the isolates, followed by serogroup C with 24%. Serogroup C was isolated almost twice as frequently in cases of septicemia than in cases of meningitis, and the most common phenotypes were C:2a:P1.5 and C:2b:P1.5. Among serogroup B meningococci, the trend of predominant phenotypes has changed from year to year, with a recent increase in the frequency of B:15:P1.4. Only a few meningococci had decreased susceptibility to penicillin, and, in the penA gene, all of these strains had exogenous DNA blocks deriving from the DNA of commensal Neisseria flavescens, Neisseria cinerea, and Neisseria perflava/sicca. Fluorescent amplified fragment-length polymorphism analysis revealed the nonclonal nature of the strains with decreased susceptibility to penicillin.

  17. Influence of Factor V Leiden on susceptibility to and outcome from critical illness: a genetic association study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, Thomas; Ejrnaes, Karen; Juul, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    . METHODS: A genetic association study involving four case cohorts comprising two Gram negative sepsis, one invasive pneumococcal disease and one intensive care unit cohort with a total of 1,249 patients. Controls were derived from a population-based cohort study (N = 8,147). DNA from patients and controls...... to intensive care (N = 237), susceptibility and the likelihood of long-term death was influenced by the FVL mutation. In adjusted logistic regression analysis, FVL carriers had an increased risk of ICU admission compared to non-carriers (OR 1.62; 95% CI, 1.08 to 2.42). In adjusted Cox regression analysis, FVL...... not appear to increase the risk of admission due to severe invasive infections. Nevertheless, in the subgroup of patients admitted to intensive care an increased risk and a poorer long-term outcome for individuals with critical illness were observed for FVL mutation carriers....

  18. Genetic susceptibility to environmental toxicants: the interface between human and experimental studies in the development of new toxicological concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thier, Ricarda; Golka, Klaus; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon; Bolt, Hermann M

    2002-02-28

    The growing knowledge of the genetic polymorphisms of enzymes metabolising xenobiotics in humans and their connections with individual susceptibility towards toxicants has created new and important interfaces between human epidemiology and experimental toxicology. The results of molecular epidemiological studies may provide new hypotheses and concepts, which call for experimental verification, and experimental concepts may obtain further proof by molecular epidemiological studies. If applied diligently, these possibilities may be combined to lead to new strategies of human-oriented toxicological research. This overview will present some outstanding examples for such strategies taken from the practically very important field of occupational toxicology. The main focus is placed on the effects of enzyme polymorphisms of the xenobiotic metabolism in association with the induction of bladder cancer and renal cell cancer after exposure to occupational chemicals. Also, smoking and induction of head and neck squamous cell cancer are considered.

  19. Fine-mapping and phenotypic analysis of the Ity3 Salmonella susceptibility locus identify a complex genetic structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia T Khan

    Full Text Available Experimental animal models of Salmonella infections have been widely used to identify genes important in the host immune response to infection. Using an F2 cross between the classical inbred strain C57BL/6J and the wild derived strain MOLF/Ei, we have previously identified Ity3 (Immunity to Typhimurium locus 3 as a locus contributing to the early susceptibility of MOLF/Ei mice to infection with Salmonella Typhimurium. We have also established a congenic strain (B6.MOLF-Ity/Ity3 with the MOLF/Ei Ity3 donor segment on a C57BL/6J background. The current study was designed to fine map and characterize functionally the Ity3 locus. We generated 12 recombinant sub-congenic strains that were characterized for susceptibility to infection, bacterial load in target organs, cytokine profile and anti-microbial mechanisms. These analyses showed that the impact of the Ity3 locus on survival and bacterial burden was stronger in male mice compared to female mice. Fine mapping of Ity3 indicated that two subloci contribute collectively to the susceptibility of B6.MOLF-Ity/Ity3 congenic mice to Salmonella infection. The Ity3.1 sublocus controls NADPH oxidase activity and is characterized by decreased ROS production, reduced inflammatory cytokine response and increased bacterial burden, thereby supporting a role for Ncf2 (neutrophil cytosolic factor 2 a subunit of NADPH oxidase as the gene underlying this sublocus. The Ity3.2 sub-locus is characterized by a hyperresponsive inflammatory cytokine phenotype after exposure to Salmonella. Overall, this research provides support to the combined action of hormonal influences and complex genetic factors within the Ity3 locus in the innate immune response to Salmonella infection in wild-derived MOLF/Ei mice.

  20. Integrated genetic and epigenetic analysis identifies haplotype-specific methylation in the FTO type 2 diabetes and obesity susceptibility locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G Bell

    Full Text Available Recent multi-dimensional approaches to the study of complex disease have revealed powerful insights into how genetic and epigenetic factors may underlie their aetiopathogenesis. We examined genotype-epigenotype interactions in the context of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D, focussing on known regions of genomic susceptibility. We assayed DNA methylation in 60 females, stratified according to disease susceptibility haplotype using previously identified association loci. CpG methylation was assessed using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation on a targeted array (MeDIP-chip and absolute methylation values were estimated using a Bayesian algorithm (BATMAN. Absolute methylation levels were quantified across LD blocks, and we identified increased DNA methylation on the FTO obesity susceptibility haplotype, tagged by the rs8050136 risk allele A (p = 9.40×10(-4, permutation p = 1.0×10(-3. Further analysis across the 46 kb LD block using sliding windows localised the most significant difference to be within a 7.7 kb region (p = 1.13×10(-7. Sequence level analysis, followed by pyrosequencing validation, revealed that the methylation difference was driven by the co-ordinated phase of CpG-creating SNPs across the risk haplotype. This 7.7 kb region of haplotype-specific methylation (HSM, encapsulates a Highly Conserved Non-Coding Element (HCNE that has previously been validated as a long-range enhancer, supported by the histone H3K4me1 enhancer signature. This study demonstrates that integration of Genome-Wide Association (GWA SNP and epigenomic DNA methylation data can identify potential novel genotype-epigenotype interactions within disease-associated loci, thus providing a novel route to aid unravelling common complex diseases.

  1. Prevalence, genetic diversity, and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine mastitis in Zhejiang Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-ping LI; Hai-jian ZHOU; Lin YUAN; Ting HE; Song-hua HU

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine genetic diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Staphylococcusaureus recovered from bovine mastitis in Zhejiang Province, China. Out of 3178 quarter milk samples from 846 lactating cows, among which 459 cows (54.3%) were found HMT positive, 890 quarters (28%) were found having subclinical mastitis. From 75 representative S. aureus isolates, 16 distinct types were identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Four major PFGE types (A, B, C, and D) accounted for 82.7% of all isolates, and type A (41.3%) was observed in multiple herds across the studied areas. Each region was found to have a predominant type: Hangzhou type A (64.1%), Ningbo type C (34.5%) and type B (23.1%), Jinhua type D (53.3%), and Taizhou type C (62.5%). Results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests showed that 90.7% of the isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial. Resistance to penicillin and ampicillin (77.3%), tetracycline (60.0%), or erythromycin (48.0%) was observed. The bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics such as penicillin, ampicillin, tetracycline, and erythromycin were commonly found. The information obtained from this study is useful for designing specific control programs for bovine S. aureus mastiffs in this region.

  2. Alcohol-related cancers and genetic susceptibility in Europe: the ARCAGE project: study samples and data collection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lagiou, Pagona

    2009-02-01

    Cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) include those of the oral cavity, pharynx (other than nasopharynx), larynx, and esophagus. Tobacco smoking and consumption of alcoholic beverages are established causes of UADT cancers, whereas reduced intake of vegetables and fruits are likely causes. The role of genetic predisposition and possible interactions of genetic with exogenous factors, however, have not been adequately studied. Moreover, the role of pattern of smoking and drinking, as well as the exact nature of the implicated dietary variables, has not been clarified. To address these issues, the International Agency for Research on Cancer initiated in 2002 the alcohol-related cancers and genetic susceptibility (ARCAGE) in Europe project, with the participation of 15 centers in 11 European countries. Information and biological data from a total of 2304 cases and 2227 controls have been collected and will be used in a series of analyses. A total of 166 single nucleotide polymorphisms of 76 genes are being studied for genetic associations with UADT cancers. We report here the methodology of the ARCAGE project, main demographic and lifestyle characteristics of the cases and controls, as well as the distribution of cases by histology and subsite. About 80% of cases were males and fewer than 20% of all cases occurred before the age of 50 years. Overall, the most common subsite was larynx, followed by oral cavity, oropharynx, esophagus and hypopharynx. Close to 90% of UADT cancers were squamous cell carcinomas. A clear preponderance of smokers and alcohol drinkers among UADT cases compared with controls was observed.

  3. Education reduces the effects of genetic susceptibilities to poor physical health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Wendy; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Mortensen, Erik L;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Greater education is associated with better physical health. This has been of great concern to public health officials. Most demonstrations show that education influences mean levels of health. Little is known about the influence of education on variance in health status, or about how...... Health Survey. We used quantitative genetic models to examine how genetic and environmental variance in physical health differed with level of education, adjusting for birth-year effects. RESULTS: and Conclusions As expected, greater education was associated with better physical health. Greater education...... was also associated with smaller variance in health status. In both sexes, 2 standard deviations (SDs) above mean educational level, variance in physical health was only about half that among those 2 SDs below. This was because fewer highly educated people reported poor health. There was less total...

  4. Genetic susceptibility and genotype-phenotype association in 588 Danish children with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, C; Cleynen, I; Andersen, Susanne Pia;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between known inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-associated genetic variants and development of paediatric IBD, and specific clinical sub-phenotypes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this case-control study we included IBD patients ... retrieved and clinical information was extracted. DNA was obtained from Guthrie cards from the Danish National Neonatal Screening Biobank (PKU-biobanken) at Statens Serum Institut and from blood samples. RESULTS: A total of 588 IBD patients (244 Crohn's disease (CD), 318 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 26 IBD...... associated with disease localisation, medical treatment or surgery after correcting for multiple analyses. CONCLUSION: We found an association between CD and three previously published genetic variants and replicated the association with the paediatric specific ZMIZ1 gene. No Bonferroni corrected significant...

  5. Genetic polymorphism of interleukin 1β -511C/T and susceptibility to sporadic Alzheimer's disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hai; Xia, Qing; Ge, Pingping; Wu, Shaowei

    2013-02-01

    A large number of epidemiological studies have been performed to investigate the association between Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk and interleukin-1β -511C/T genetic polymorphism, however, inconsistent results have been reported. The effect of the IL-1β -511C/T polymorphism on AD susceptibility was evaluated by a meta-analysis. Series of databases were researched. 14 studies involving 2640 AD case and 3493 control subjects were identified. The pooled results showed there were no statistical associations of interleukin-1β -511C/T genetic polymorphism with susceptibility to AD for five analysis models in all subjects. However, obvious heterogeneity among studies was detected. When stratifying for age at onset, ethnicity and geographic distribution of population to explore the original source of heterogeneity, the meta-analysis results based on geographic distribution of population showed the significant difference (CC vs CT, OR 1.26, 95 % CI: 1.03, 1.54, z = 2.25, P = 0.025; CC vs CT+TT, OR 1.24, 95 % CI: 1.03, 1.50, z = 2.24, P = 0.025) only in non-Europe. These findings indicate that the IL-1β -511C/T polymorphism might be associated with AD risk, and individuals with IL-1β -511C/C genotype might be at higher risk of AD in non-Europe. Further larger sample research would be warranted to confirm these conclusions.

  6. 肺癌遗传易感性研究进展%Research progress on genetic susceptibility to lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆丽杰

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is currently one of the most common malignant tumors in the world, with an increasing trend of morbidity and mortality.The major causes of lung cancer are inhaled carcinogens, such as tobacco and environmental pollution, but a growing number of researches suggest that the incidence of lung cancer is closely related to genetic factors.In the past few years, great progress has been made in research on single nucleotide polymorphism of susceptibility gene in lung cancer, and the most studies that have aimed to ultimately provide scientific basis for preventing and controlling the lung cancer have focused on screening of lung cancer etiology and developing gene therapy.In this review, the new findings of genetic susceptibility in lung cancer have been summarized.%肺癌是目前全球范围内最常见的恶性肿瘤之一,发病率和病死率均呈上升趋势.烟草、环境污染物质等吸入性致癌物是引发肺癌的主要因素,但越来越多的研究表明肺癌发病与遗传因素关系密切.近年来,对肺癌易感基因单核苷酸多态性的研究取得了较大进展,全球学者致力于筛选肺癌病因、寻找基因治疗方法,最终为预防和控制肺癌提供科学依据.文章针对目前肺癌遗传易感性研究进展作一综述.

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characteristics of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from India, Pakistan and Bhutan in 2007–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethi Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge on antimicrobial drug resistance and genetic characteristics of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates circulating in India, Pakistan, and Bhutan is sorely lacking. In this paper, we describe the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristics of N. gonorrhoeae isolates from India, Pakistan, and Bhutan in 2007–2011. Methods Antimicrobial susceptibility and β-lactamase production were tested for 65 N. gonorrhoeae isolates from India (n=40, Pakistan (n=18 and Bhutan (n=7 using Etest methodology (eight antimicrobials and nitrocefin solution, respectively. Resistance determinants, i.e. penA, mtrR, porB1b, gyrA, and parC, were sequenced. N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST was performed for molecular epidemiology. Results The highest resistance level was observed for ciprofloxacin (94%, followed by penicillin G (68%, erythromycin (62%, tetracycline (55%, and azithromycin (7.7%. All the isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone, cefixime, and spectinomycin. Thirty-four (52% of the isolates were producing β-lactamase. No penA mosaic alleles or A501-altered alleles of penicillin-binding protein 2 were identified. Forty-nine NG-MAST STs were identified, of which 42 STs have not been previously described worldwide. Conclusions Based on this study, ceftriaxone, cefixime, and spectinomycin can be used as an empirical first-line therapy for gonorrhoea in India, Pakistan, and Bhutan, whereas ciprofloxacin, penicillin G, tetracycline, erythromycin, and azithromycin should not be. It is imperative to strengthen the laboratory infrastructure in this region, as well as to expand the phenotypic and genetic surveillance of antimicrobial resistance, emergence of new resistance, particularly, to extended-spectrum cephalosporins, and molecular epidemiology.

  8. Gentamicin susceptibility in Escherichia coli related to the genetic background: problems with breakpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, L.; Sandvang, D.; Jensen, Vibeke Frøkjær

    2007-01-01

    In total, 120 Escherichia coli isolates positive for one of the gentamicin resistance (GEN(R)) genes aac(3)-II, aac(3)-IV or ant(2 '')-I were tested for gentamicin susceptibility by the agar dilution method. Isolates positive for aac(3)-IV or ant(2 '')-I had an MIC distribution of 8-64 mg....../L, whereas isolates positive for aac(3)-II had MICs of 32 to > 512 mg/L, suggesting a relationship between the distribution of MICs and the specific GEN(R) mechanism. The MIC distribution, regardless of the GEN(R) mechanism, was 8 - > 512 mg/L, which supports the clinical breakpoint of MIC > 4 mg/L suggested...

  9. Study on relationship of apolipoprotein E gene polymorphism and genetic susceptibility of stress urinary incontinence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Jia-li; Lang Jing-he; Zhu lan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene polymorphism and susceptibility of stress urinary incontinence (SUI).Methods: ApoE genotypes were examined by polymerase chain reaction-restricted fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique in 99 patients with SUI and 101 asymptomatic controls. Results: The frequency of allele e3 of ApoE was slightly lower in patients with anatomic SUI than that in controls (79.44% vs. 81.68%), while the frequency of allele e4 of ApoE was slightly higher in patients with anatomic SUI than that in controls (10.00% vs. 9.90%). No significant difference was found in frequency of allele e3 or e4 between SUI patients and controls (χ2=0.523, P=0.770).Conclusion: The gene polymorphism of ApoE is not independently involved in the development of SUI.

  10. An Integrated Genome-Wide Systems Genetics Screen for Breast Cancer Metastasis Susceptibility Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Bai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis remains the primary cause of patient morbidity and mortality in solid tumors and is due to the action of a large number of tumor-autonomous and non-autonomous factors. Here we report the results of a genome-wide integrated strategy to identify novel metastasis susceptibility candidate genes and molecular pathways in breast cancer metastasis. This analysis implicates a number of transcriptional regulators and suggests cell-mediated immunity is an important determinant. Moreover, the analysis identified novel or FDA-approved drugs as potentially useful for anti-metastatic therapy. Further explorations implementing this strategy may therefore provide a variety of information for clinical applications in the control and treatment of advanced neoplastic disease.

  11. Differences in the Genetic Susceptibility to Age-Related Macular Degeneration Clinical Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ling; Hoffmann, Thomas J.; Melles, Ronald B.; Sakoda, Lori C.; Kvale, Mark N.; Banda, Yambazi; Schaefer, Catherine; Risch, Neil; Jorgenson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared across age-related macular degeneration (AMD) subtypes the effect of AMD risk variants, their predictive power, and heritability. Methods The prevalence of AMD was estimated among active non-Hispanic white Kaiser Permanente Northern California members who were at least 65 years of age as of June 2013. The genetic analysis included 5,170 overall AMD cases ascertained from electronic health records (EHR), including 1,239 choroidal neovascularization (CNV) cases and 1,060 nonexudative AMD cases without CNV, and 23,130 controls of non-Hispanic white ancestry from the Kaiser Permanente Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort. Imputation was based on the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel. Results The narrow-sense heritability due to common autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was 0.37 for overall AMD, 0.19 for AMD unspecified, 0.20 for nonexudative AMD, and 0.60 for CNV. For the 19 previously reported AMD risk loci, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.675 for overall AMD, 0.640 for AMD unspecified, 0.678 for nonexudative AMD, and 0.766 for CNV. The individual effects on the risk of AMD for 18 of the 19 SNPs were in a consistent direction with those previously reported, including a protective effect of the APOE ε4 allele. Conversely, the risk of AMD was significantly increased in carriers of the ε2 allele. Conclusions These findings provide an independent confirmation of many of the previously identified AMD risk loci, and support a potentially greater role of genetic factors in the development of CNV. The replication of established associations validates the use of EHR in genetic studies of ophthalmologic traits. PMID:26176866

  12. Genetic polymorphism of MMP family and coronary disease susceptibility: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Shi, Jingpu; Fu, Lingyu; Wang, Hailong; Zhou, Bo; Wu, Xiaomei

    2012-03-01

    The issue that genetic polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family is in association with coronary disease is controversial. So we did a meta-analysis to clarify it clearly. We made a literature search of PubMed, the Web of Science, and Cochrane Collaboration's database to identify eligible reports. The methodological quality of each included studies was assessed. We calculated the pooled ORs with their 95%CI for each genetic polymorphism in STATA 11 software. Separate analysis was performed to address the consistency of results across the subgroup with different continents. A total of 39 studies were included, with a sample of 42269 individuals. This meta-analysis provided evidence that genetic polymorphism of MMP1-1607 1G/2G, MMP3-Gly45lys, MMP3-376 G/C, MMP3-1171 5A/6A, MMP9-1562 C/T and MMP9-R279Q have a small to medium effect on incidence of coronary disease. There was no evidence that MMP1-519 A/G, MMP1-340 T/C and MMP2-1306 C/T polymorphism could increase risk of coronary disease. Results from subgroup analysis supported a relation between MMP3-1711 5A allele, MMP9-1562 C allele and coronary disease especially in Asian population. The results provide moderate association between the six common genetic polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase family and coronary disease. However, the challenge for researcher is identifying separate effect on different races.

  13. Pathway analysis of GWAS provides new insights into genetic susceptibility to 3 inflammatory diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariklia Eleftherohorinou

    Full Text Available Although the introduction of genome-wide association studies (GWAS have greatly increased the number of genes associated with common diseases, only a small proportion of the predicted genetic contribution has so far been elucidated. Studying the cumulative variation of polymorphisms in multiple genes acting in functional pathways may provide a complementary approach to the more common single SNP association approach in understanding genetic determinants of common disease. We developed a novel pathway-based method to assess the combined contribution of multiple genetic variants acting within canonical biological pathways and applied it to data from 14,000 UK individuals with 7 common diseases. We tested inflammatory pathways for association with Crohn's disease (CD, rheumatoid arthritis (RA and type 1 diabetes (T1D with 4 non-inflammatory diseases as controls. Using a variable selection algorithm, we identified variants responsible for the pathway association and evaluated their use for disease prediction using a 10 fold cross-validation framework in order to calculate out-of-sample area under the Receiver Operating Curve (AUC. The generalisability of these predictive models was tested on an independent birth cohort from Northern Finland. Multiple canonical inflammatory pathways showed highly significant associations (p 10(-3-10(-20 with CD, T1D and RA. Variable selection identified on average a set of 205 SNPs (149 genes for T1D, 350 SNPs (189 genes for RA and 493 SNPs (277 genes for CD. The pattern of polymorphisms at these SNPS were found to be highly predictive of T1D (91% AUC and RA (85% AUC, and weakly predictive of CD (60% AUC. The predictive ability of the T1D model (without any parameter refitting had good predictive ability (79% AUC in the Finnish cohort. Our analysis suggests that genetic contribution to common inflammatory diseases operates through multiple genes interacting in functional pathways.

  14. Virulence Genes, Genetic Diversity, Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Phylogenetic Background of Escherichia coli Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The epidemiology of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC in urban and rural communities in Iran was never investigated prior to this study. Objectives The aims of this study were to detect the frequency of virulence genes and determine the antimicrobial susceptibility and phylogenetic background of Escherichia coli isolates collected from urban and rural communities. Materials and Methods A total of 100 E. coli isolates were collected from urine samples of patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs residing in two different locations, and confirmed by current biochemical tests. The phylogenetic groups were determined by the triplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR method, and multiplex PCRs were used to detect eight Vf genes (fimH, iucD, irp2, hlyA, ompT, iha, iroN, and cnf1. The susceptibility profile of E. coli isolates was determined by the disk diffusion method. Results Ninety-five percent of UPEC showed at least one of the virulence genes, the most prevalent being fimH (95%, followed by irp2 (89%, iucD (69%, ompT (67%, iroN (29%, and iha (29%. The various combinations of detected genes were designated as virulence patterns. Phylogenetic groups, B2 (55% and D (22%, comprised the majority of isolated strains. Phenotypic tests showed that 92%, 74% and 71% of the isolates were resistant to ampicillin, ceftizoxime and cefixime, respectively. Conclusions These findings indicate that the UPEC isolates had eight virulence factors with high frequencies. Moreover, these results suggest a direct connection between virulence factors, gene diversity, phylogenetic background, and antimicrobial resistance in UPEC isolates.

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characterization of Escherichia coli recovered from frozen game meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateus-Vargas, Rafael H; Atanassova, Viktoria; Reich, Felix; Klein, Günter

    2017-05-01

    The increasing number of antimicrobial resistant Enterobacteriaceae both in veterinary and human medicine, the dissemination of these bacteria in several environments and their possible repercussions on human health is causing concern. Game meat is usually seen as free of antimicrobial resistant bacteria. The objective of this study was to evaluate the current antimicrobial susceptibility status in generic Escherichia coli isolated from packed frozen game meat from a game handling establishment in Germany. A total of 229 E. coli isolates were obtained from cuts of red deer, roe deer and wild boar. The susceptibility to 12 antimicrobial agents was evaluated by a broth microdilution method according to ISO 20776-1:2006. Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values were compared to breakpoints and cut-off values published by the EUCAST. Isolates showing MICs above the reference values were further studied for associated resistance determinants and phylogrouping by PCR. Overall, 16 E. coli isolates (7.0%) showed resistance (microbiological or clinical) to at least one antimicrobial agent tested. Clinical resistance was recorded to ampicillin (5/229) and chloramphenicol (4/229), whereas the MIC of 9 isolates exceeded the epidemiological cut-off value for doxycycline. One of the ampicillin-resistant isolates showed resistance to the β-lactam antibiotic derivatives tested, cephalosporines and aztreonam. Three of 9 non-wild-type isolates for doxycycline were positive for tet (B) genes. The ß-lactam-resistant isolate was found to harbour blaCTX-M-1 gene. These data show a low prevalence of resistant E. coli in packed game meat compared to studies on conventional meat. Although isolates obtained in this study may also be originating from the processing environment and not necessarily from animals, based on our results, it is important to monitor the development of antimicrobial resistance in game animals and products in order to identify future threats for the

  16. Evaluation of polymorphisms in pbp4 gene and genetic diversity in penicillin-resistant, ampicillin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis from hospitals in different states in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Victor Hugo Pacagnelli; Conceição, Natália; de Oliveira, Adriana Gonçalves; Darini, Ana Lúcia da Costa

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify whether penicillin-resistant, ampicillin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis (PRASEF) occurred in Brazil prior to the beginning of the 21st century, and to verify whether ampicillin susceptibility can predict susceptibility to other β-lactams in E. faecalis with this inconsistent phenotype. The presence of polymorphisms in the pbp4 gene and genetic diversity among the isolates were investigated. Of 21 PRASEF analyzed, 5 (23.8%) and 4 (19.0%) were imipenem and piperacillin resistant simultaneously by disk diffusion and broth dilution respectively, contradicting the current internationally accepted standards of susceptibility testing. Sequencing of pbp4 gene revealed an amino acid substitution (Asp-573→Glu) in all PRASEF isolates but not in the penicillin-susceptible, ampicillin-susceptible E. faecalis. Most PRASEF (90.5%) had related pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles, but were different from other PRASEF described to date. Results demonstrate that penicillin-resistant, ampicillin-susceptible phenotype was already a reality in the 1990s in E. faecalis isolates in different Brazilian states, and some of these isolates were also imipenem- and piperacillin-resistant; therefore, internationally accepted susceptibility criteria cannot be applied to these isolates. According to pbp4 gene sequencing, this study suggests that a specific amino acid substitution in pbp4 gene found in all PRASEF analyzed is associated with penicillin resistance.

  17. Male Reproductive Disorders and Fertility Trends: Influences of Environment and Genetic Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skakkebaek, Niels E; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Buck Louis, Germaine M; Toppari, Jorma; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Eisenberg, Michael L; Jensen, Tina Kold; Jørgensen, Niels; Swan, Shanna H; Sapra, Katherine J; Ziebe, Søren; Priskorn, Lærke; Juul, Anders

    2016-01-01

    It is predicted that Japan and European Union will soon experience appreciable decreases in their populations due to persistently low total fertility rates (TFR) below replacement level (2.1 child per woman). In the United States, where TFR has also declined, there are ethnic differences. Caucasians have rates below replacement, while TFRs among African-Americans and Hispanics are higher. We review possible links between TFR and trends in a range of male reproductive problems, including testicular cancer, disorders of sex development, cryptorchidism, hypospadias, low testosterone levels, poor semen quality, childlessness, changed sex ratio, and increasing demand for assisted reproductive techniques. We present evidence that several adult male reproductive problems arise in utero and are signs of testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS). Although TDS might result from genetic mutations, recent evidence suggests that it most often is related to environmental exposures of the fetal testis. However, environmental factors can also affect the adult endocrine system. Based on our review of genetic and environmental factors, we conclude that environmental exposures arising from modern lifestyle, rather than genetics, are the most important factors in the observed trends. These environmental factors might act either directly or via epigenetic mechanisms. In the latter case, the effects of exposures might have an impact for several generations post-exposure. In conclusion, there is an urgent need to prioritize research in reproductive physiology and pathophysiology, particularly in highly industrialized countries facing decreasing populations. We highlight a number of topics that need attention by researchers in human physiology, pathophysiology, environmental health sciences, and demography.

  18. Host genetic factors in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Koushik Chatterjee

    2010-04-01

    HIV-1 infection has rapidly spread worldwide and has become the leading cause of mortality in infectious diseases. The duration for development of AIDS (AIDS progression) is highly variable among HIV–1 infected individuals, ranging from 2–3 years to no signs of AIDS development in the entire lifetime. Several factors regulate the rate at which HIV-1 infection progresses to AIDS. Host genetic factors play an important role in the outcome of such complex or multifactor diseases as AIDS and are also known to regulate the rate of disease progression. This review focuses on the major host genes reported to affect the progression to AIDS in HIV-1 infected individuals.

  19. ZFAT gene variant association with multiple sclerosis in the Arabian Gulf population: A genetic basis for gender-associated susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourguiba-Hachemi, Sonia; Ashkanani, Tebah K.; Kadhem, Fatema J.; Almawi, Wassim Y.; Alroughani, Raed; Fathallah, M. Dahmani

    2016-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are useful genetic markers to investigate the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS). A genome wide association study identified 7 SNPs associated with interferon-β therapy response, however, not with MS risk in a Spanish population. To investigate these findings in a different cohort, the 7 SNPs were investigated in an Arabian Gulf population. The SNPs were analyzed in 268 subjects (156 patients and 112 healthy volunteers) from the Arabian Gulf region using restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and KBioscience Competitive Allele Specific PCR genotyping methods. Associations between the SNPs and MS were investigated using logistic regression. The present study observed, for the first time, that in an Arabian Gulf population, the ZFAT rs733254 polymorphism (T>G) is a gender-specific risk marker for MS. ZFAT was associated with MS in women but not in men. The G variant was highly associated with the risk of MS [odds ratio (OR)=2.38 and 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.45–3.91); P=0.0014]. Whereas variant T was a significantly protective factor [OR=0.420 (95% CI, 0.25–0.69); P=0.0014, recessive model]. The findings of the present study provide a genetic basis for the gender-associated susceptibility to MS. In addition, this MS-associated rs733254 SNP may predict MS onset in females from the Arabian Gulf population. PMID:27572828

  20. Genetic Polymorphisms of Phase II Metabolic Enzymes and Lung Cancer Susceptibility in a Population of Central South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-chun Chen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A case-control study was conducted for analyzing the genetic polymorphisms of phase II metabolic enzymes in 97 patients with lung cancer and 197 healthy subjects from Han ethnic group of Hunan Province located in Central South China. The results showed that the frequencies of glutathione S-transferase (GST M1-null (GSTM1- or GSTT1-null (GSTT1- genotype alone, or combined form of both in lung cancer patients were significantly higher than those of the controls. Genotypes of combining GSTP1 mutant/GSTM1(- or GSTP1 mutant/GSTT1(- led to high risk of lung cancer. Individuals carrying any two or all three of GSTM1(-, GSTT1(- and GSTP1 mutant genotypes have a distinctly increased risk of lung cancer when compared to those with GSTM1 present (GSTM1+: GSTM1+/+ or GSTM1+/−, GSTT1 present (GSTT1+: GSTT1+/+ or GSTT1+/− and GSTP1 wild genotypes. Furthermore, individuals possessing combined genotypes of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 rapid acetylator, GSTP1 mutant and both GSTT1(- and GSTM1(- have a remarkably higher lung cancer risk than those carrying combined NAT2 slow acetylator genotype, GSTP1 wild genotype and both GSTT1(+ and GSTM1(+ genotypes. All these findings suggest that the genetic polymorphisms of phase II metabolic enzymes affect the susceptibility of lung cancer in the Han ethnic group of Central South China.

  1. Analysis of eight genes modulating interferon gamma and human genetic susceptibility to tuberculosis: a case-control association study

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    Hoal Eileen G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon gamma is a major macrophage-activating cytokine during infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative pathogen of tuberculosis, and its role has been well established in animal models and in humans. This cytokine is produced by activated T helper 1 cells, which can best deal with intracellular pathogens such as M. tuberculosis. Based on the hypothesis that genes which regulate interferon gamma may influence tuberculosis susceptibility, we investigated polymorphisms in eight candidate genes. Methods Fifty-four polymorphisms in eight candidate genes were genotyped in over 800 tuberculosis cases and healthy controls in a population-based case-control association study in a South African population. Genotyping methods used included the SNPlex Genotyping System™, capillary electrophoresis of fluorescently labelled PCR products, TaqMan® SNP genotyping assays or the amplification mutation refraction system. Single polymorphisms as well as haplotypes of the variants were tested for association with TB using statistical analyses. Results A haplotype in interleukin 12B was nominally associated with tuberculosis (p = 0.02, but after permutation testing, done to assess the significance for the entire analysis, this was not globally significant. In addition a novel allele was found for the interleukin 12B D5S2941 microsatellite. Conclusions This study highlights the importance of using larger sample sizes when attempting validation of previously reported genetic associations. Initial studies may be false positives or may propose a stronger genetic effect than subsequently found to be the case.

  2. A preliminary study of genetic factors that influence susceptibility to bovine tuberculosis in the British cattle herd.

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    Erin E Driscoll

    Full Text Available Associations between specific host genes and susceptibility to Mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis have been reported in several species. Bovine tuberculosis (bTB impacts greatly the UK cattle industry, yet genetic predispositions have yet to be identified. We therefore used a candidate gene approach to study 384 cattle of which 160 had reacted positively to an antigenic skin test ('reactors'. Our approach was unusual in that it used microsatellite markers, embraced high breed diversity and focused particularly on detecting genes showing heterozygote advantage, a mode of action often overlooked in SNP-based studies. A panel of neutral markers was used to control for population substructure and using a general linear model-based approach we were also able to control for age. We found that substructure was surprisingly weak and identified two genomic regions that were strongly associated with reactor status, identified by markers INRA111 and BMS2753. In general the strength of association detected tended to vary depending on whether age was included in the model. At INRA111 a single genotype appears strongly protective with an overall odds ratio of 2.2, the effect being consistent across nine diverse breeds. Our results suggest that breeding strategies could be devised that would appreciably increase genetic resistance of cattle to bTB (strictly, reduce the frequency of incidence of reactors with implications for the current debate concerning badger-culling.

  3. The 12p13.33/RAD52 locus and genetic susceptibility to squamous cell cancers of upper aerodigestive tract.

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    Manon Delahaye-Sourdeix

    Full Text Available Genetic variants located within the 12p13.33/RAD52 locus have been associated with lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC. Here, within 5,947 UADT cancers and 7,789 controls from 9 different studies, we found rs10849605, a common intronic variant in RAD52, to be also associated with upper aerodigestive tract (UADT squamous cell carcinoma cases (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.04-1.15, p = 6x10(-4. We additionally identified rs10849605 as a RAD52 cis-eQTL inUADT(p = 1x10(-3 and LUSC (p = 9x10(-4 tumours, with the UADT/LUSC risk allele correlated with increased RAD52 expression levels. The 12p13.33 locus, encompassing rs10849605/RAD52, was identified as a significant somatic focal copy number amplification in UADT(n = 374, q-value = 0.075 and LUSC (n = 464, q-value = 0.007 tumors and correlated with higher RAD52 tumor expression levels (p = 6x10(-48 and p = 3x10(-29 in UADT and LUSC, respectively. In combination, these results implicate increased RAD52 expression in both genetic susceptibility and tumorigenesis of UADT and LUSC tumors.

  4. Insights into genetic susceptibility in the etiology of spontaneous preterm birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parets SE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sasha E Parets,1 Anna K Knight,2 Alicia K Smith,1,2 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Genetics and Molecular Biology Program, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Preterm birth (PTB; <37 weeks of gestation is a complex disorder, whose etiology is influenced by a variety of factors. A greater understanding of the biological mechanisms that contribute to PTB will facilitate identification of those at increased risk and may inform new treatments. To accomplish this, it is vital to elucidate the heritability patterns of this condition as well as the environment and lifestyle factors that increase risk for PTB. Identifying individual genes that contribute to the etiology of PTB presents particular challenges, and there has been little agreement among candidate gene and genome-wide studies performed to date. In this review we will evaluate recent genetic studies of spontaneous PTB, discuss common themes among their findings, and suggest approaches for future studies of PTB. Keywords: PTB, GWAS, linkage, candidate gene, African–American, epigenetic

  5. A comprehensive review on host genetic susceptibility to human papillomavirus infection and progression to cervical cancer

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    Koushik Chattopadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. This is caused by oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV infection. Although large numbers of young sexually active women get HPV-infected, only a small fraction develop cervical cancer. This points to different co-factors for regression of HPV infection or progression to cervical cancer. Host genetic factors play an important role in the outcome of such complex or multifactor diseases such as cervical cancer and are also known to regulate the rate of disease progression. The aim of this review is to compile the advances in the field of host genetics of cervical cancer. MEDLINE database was searched using the terms, ′HPV′, ′cervical′, ′CIN′, ′polymorphism(s′, ′cervical′ + FNx01the name of the geneFNx01 and ′HPV′ + FNx01the name of the geneFNx01. This review focuses on the major host genes reported to affect the progression to cervical cancer in HPV infected individuals.

  6. Common variation in ISL1 confers genetic susceptibility for human congenital heart disease.

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    Kristen N Stevens

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most common birth abnormality and the etiology is unknown in the overwhelming majority of cases. ISLET1 (ISL1 is a transcription factor that marks cardiac progenitor cells and generates diverse multipotent cardiovascular cell lineages. The fundamental role of ISL1 in cardiac morphogenesis makes this an exceptional candidate gene to consider as a cause of complex congenital heart disease. We evaluated whether genetic variation in ISL1 fits the common variant-common disease hypothesis. A 2-stage case-control study examined 27 polymorphisms mapping to the ISL1 locus in 300 patients with complex congenital heart disease and 2,201 healthy pediatric controls. Eight genic and flanking ISL1 SNPs were significantly associated with complex congenital heart disease. A replication study analyzed these candidate SNPs in 1,044 new cases and 3,934 independent controls and confirmed that genetic variation in ISL1 is associated with risk of non-syndromic congenital heart disease. Our results demonstrate that two different ISL1 haplotypes contribute to risk of CHD in white and black/African American populations.

  7. Detection of PrPres in Genetically Susceptible Fetuses from Sheep with Natural Scrapie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, María Carmen; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Bolea, Rosa; Badiola, Juan José; Castilla, Joaquín; Monleón, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy with a wide PrPres dissemination in many non-neural tissues and with high levels of transmissibility within susceptible populations. Mechanisms of transmission are incompletely understood. It is generally assumed that it is horizontally transmitted by direct contact between animals or indirectly through the environment, where scrapie can remain infectious for years. In contrast, in utero vertical transmission has never been demonstrated and has rarely been studied. Recently, the use of the protein misfolding cyclic amplification technique (PMCA) has allowed prion detection in various tissues and excretions in which PrPres levels have been undetectable by traditional assays. The main goal of this study was to detect PrPres in fetal tissues and the amniotic fluid from natural scrapie infected ewes using the PMCA technique. Six fetuses from three infected pregnant ewes in an advanced clinical stage of the disease were included in the study. From each fetus, amniotic fluid, brain, spleen, ileo-cecal valve and retropharyngeal lymph node samples were collected and analyzed using Western blotting and PMCA. Although all samples were negative using Western blotting, PrPres was detected after in vitro amplification. Our results represent the first time the biochemical detection of prions in fetal tissues, suggesting that the in utero transmission of scrapie in natural infected sheep might be possible. PMID:22194786

  8. Detection of PrPres in genetically susceptible fetuses from sheep with natural scrapie.

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    María Carmen Garza

    Full Text Available Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy with a wide PrPres dissemination in many non-neural tissues and with high levels of transmissibility within susceptible populations. Mechanisms of transmission are incompletely understood. It is generally assumed that it is horizontally transmitted by direct contact between animals or indirectly through the environment, where scrapie can remain infectious for years. In contrast, in utero vertical transmission has never been demonstrated and has rarely been studied. Recently, the use of the protein misfolding cyclic amplification technique (PMCA has allowed prion detection in various tissues and excretions in which PrPres levels have been undetectable by traditional assays. The main goal of this study was to detect PrPres in fetal tissues and the amniotic fluid from natural scrapie infected ewes using the PMCA technique. Six fetuses from three infected pregnant ewes in an advanced clinical stage of the disease were included in the study. From each fetus, amniotic fluid, brain, spleen, ileo-cecal valve and retropharyngeal lymph node samples were collected and analyzed using Western blotting and PMCA. Although all samples were negative using Western blotting, PrPres was detected after in vitro amplification. Our results represent the first time the biochemical detection of prions in fetal tissues, suggesting that the in utero transmission of scrapie in natural infected sheep might be possible.

  9. Polymorphisms of GSTM1 and CYP1A1 genes and their genetic susceptibility to prostate cancer in Chinese men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background Variation in prostate cancer incidence between different racial groups has been well documented,for which genetic polymorphisms are hypothesized to be an explanation.We evaluated the association between polymorphisms in the cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1(CYP1A1)and glutathione S-transferase M1(GSTM1)genes and genetic susceptibility to prostate cancer in Chinese men.Methods Two hundred and eight prostate cancer patients and 230 age matched controls were enrolled in this study.All DNA samples from peripheral blood lymphocytes were genotyped for common genetic polymorphisms of the CYP1A1 and GSTM1 genes using the oligonucleotide microarray(DNA chip)technique and the polymorphism results confirmed by sequencing.The different polymorphisms in prostate cancer patients were also analyzed according to age at diagnosis,prostate specific antigen level,cancer stage and grade(Gleason score).Results The prevalence of the GSTM1(0/0)genotype was significantly higher in prostate cancer patients(58.2%)than in controls(41.7%,P<0.05).Further analysis demonstrated that the prostate cancer patients with a GSTM1(0/0)genotype were younger than those with the GSTM1(+/+)genotype(P=0.024).No significant differences in the frequency distributions of CYP1A1 polymorphisms were observed between prostate cancer patients and controls.Conclusion GSTM1(0/0)gene polymorphism may be linked to prostate cancer risk and early age of onset in Chinese.

  10. Transcriptome outlier analysis implicates schizophrenia susceptibility genes and enriches putatively functional rare genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jubao; Sanders, Alan R; Moy, Winton; Drigalenko, Eugene I; Brown, Eric C; Freda, Jessica; Leites, Catherine; Göring, Harald H H; Gejman, Pablo V

    2015-08-15

    We searched a gene expression dataset comprised of 634 schizophrenia (SZ) cases and 713 controls for expression outliers (i.e., extreme tails of the distribution of transcript expression values) with SZ cases overrepresented compared with controls. These outlier genes were enriched for brain expression and for genes known to be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. SZ cases showed higher outlier burden (i.e., total outlier events per subject) than controls for genes within copy number variants (CNVs) associated with SZ or neurodevelopmental disorders. Outlier genes were enriched for CNVs and for rare putative regulatory variants, but this only explained a small proportion of the outlier subjects, highlighting the underlying presence of additional genetic and potentially, epigenetic mechanisms.

  11. Evaluation of genetic susceptibility to childhood allergy and asthma in an African American urban population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudgens Edward E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma and allergy represent complex phenotypes, which disproportionately burden ethnic minorities in the United States. Strong evidence for genomic factors predisposing subjects to asthma/allergy is available. However, methods to utilize this information to identify high risk groups are variable and replication of genetic associations in African Americans is warranted. Methods We evaluated 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP and a deletion corresponding to 11 genes demonstrating association with asthma in the literature, for association with asthma, atopy, testing positive for food allergens, eosinophilia, and total serum IgE among 141 African American children living in Detroit, Michigan. Independent SNP and haplotype associations were investigated for association with each trait, and subsequently assessed in concert using a genetic risk score (GRS. Results Statistically significant associations with asthma were observed for SNPs in GSTM1, MS4A2, and GSTP1 genes, after correction for multiple testing. Chromosome 11 haplotype CTACGAGGCC (corresponding to MS4A2 rs574700, rs1441586, rs556917, rs502581, rs502419 and GSTP1 rs6591256, rs17593068, rs1695, rs1871042, rs947895 was associated with a nearly five-fold increase in the odds of asthma (Odds Ratio (OR = 4.8, p = 0.007. The GRS was significantly associated with a higher odds of asthma (OR = 1.61, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.21, 2.13; p = 0.001. Conclusions Variation in genes associated with asthma in predominantly non-African ethnic groups contributed to increased odds of asthma in this African American study population. Evaluating all significant variants in concert helped to identify the highest risk subset of this group.

  12. Liver proteome of mice with different genetic susceptibilities to the effects of fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    KHAN, Zohaib Nisar; LEITE, Aline de Lima; CHARONE, Senda; SABINO, Isabela Tomazini; MARTINI, Tatiana; PEREIRA, Heloísa Aparecida Barbosa da Silva; OLIVEIRA, Rodrigo Cardoso; BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A/J and 129P3/J mice strains have been widely studied over the last few years because they respond quite differently to fluoride (F) exposure. 129P3/J mice are remarkably resistant to the development of dental fluorosis, despite excreting less F in urine and having higher circulating F levels. These two strains also present different characteristics regardless of F exposure. Objective In this study, we investigated the differential pattern of protein expression in the liver of these mice to provide insights on why they have different responses to F. Material and Methods Weanling male A/J and 129P3/J mice (n=10 from each strain) were pared and housed in metabolic cages with ad libitum access to low-F food and deionized water for 42 days. Liver proteome profiles were examined using nLC-MS/MS. Protein function was classified by GO biological process (Cluego v2.0.7 + Clupedia v1.0.8) and protein-protein interaction network was constructed (PSICQUIC, Cytoscape). Results Most proteins with fold change were increased in A/J mice. The functional category with the highest percentage of altered genes was oxidation-reduction process (20%). Subnetwork analysis revealed that proteins with fold change interacted with Disks large homolog 4 and Calcium-activated potassium channel subunit alpha-1. A/J mice had an increase in proteins related to energy flux and oxidative stress. Conclusion This could be a possible explanation for the high susceptibility of these mice to the effects of F, since the exposure also induces oxidative stress. PMID:27383706

  13. Liver proteome of mice with different genetic susceptibilities to the effects of fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohaib Nisar KHAN

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A/J and 129P3/J mice strains have been widely studied over the last few years because they respond quite differently to fluoride (F exposure. 129P3/J mice are remarkably resistant to the development of dental fluorosis, despite excreting less F in urine and having higher circulating F levels. These two strains also present different characteristics regardless of F exposure. Objective In this study, we investigated the differential pattern of protein expression in the liver of these mice to provide insights on why they have different responses to F. Material and Methods Weanling male A/J and 129P3/J mice (n=10 from each strain were pared and housed in metabolic cages with ad libitum access to low-F food and deionized water for 42 days. Liver proteome profiles were examined using nLC-MS/MS. Protein function was classified by GO biological process (Cluego v2.0.7 + Clupedia v1.0.8 and protein-protein interaction network was constructed (PSICQUIC, Cytoscape. Results Most proteins with fold change were increased in A/J mice. The functional category with the highest percentage of altered genes was oxidation-reduction process (20%. Subnetwork analysis revealed that proteins with fold change interacted with Disks large homolog 4 and Calcium-activated potassium channel subunit alpha-1. A/J mice had an increase in proteins related to energy flux and oxidative stress. Conclusion This could be a possible explanation for the high susceptibility of these mice to the effects of F, since the exposure also induces oxidative stress.

  14. Green tea consumption, genetic susceptibility, PAH-rich smoky coal, and the risk of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Matthew R; Rothman, Nathaniel; Mumford, Judy L; He, Xingzhou; Shen, Min; Welch, Robert; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen; Caporaso, Neil; Lan, Qing

    2005-04-04

    Experimental evidence suggests that green tea (Camellia sinesis) may reduce the risk of lung cancer through several hypothesized mechanisms including scavenging oxidative radicals, inhibition of tumor initiation, and modulation of detoxification enzymes. However, epidemiologic results have not been consistent as to the relationship between green tea consumption and lung caner prevention. We employed a population-based case-control study of 122 cases and 122 controls to investigate the effect that green tea consumption may have on the risk of lung cancer and whether polymorphisms in 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase (OGG1), glutathione-S-transferase M1 (GSTM1), and aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) modify such an association. Daily green tea consumption was associated with a non-significant reduction in lung cancer risk. However, the effect of smoky coal exposure was higher for non-drinkers (odds ratio (OR)=4.93; 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=1.27-19.13) than for drinkers (OR=1.88; 95% CI=1.01-3.48). Further, among individuals with the OGG1 Cys(326) allele, daily consumption was associated with a 72% reduction (95% CI=0.09-0.94). Among GSTM1 null homozygotes, those who consumed green tea daily had a non-significant reduction in risk compared with non-consumers. Green tea consumption had no effect among OGG1 Ser(326) homozygotes or GSTM1 carriers. In addition, AKR1C3 genotype did not modulate the effect of green tea consumption. The chemopreventive effects of green tea in this population may be restricted to individuals who are particularly susceptible to oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage.

  15. Genetic susceptibility to ulcerative colitis in the Chinese Han ethnic population: association with TNF polymorphisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Qian; ZHU Qin; WU Min-liang; HU Wei-ling; GAO Min; SI Jian-min

    2006-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) is an important proinflammatory cytokine that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recent studies have evaluated the role of TNF promoter polymorphisms in IBD, whereas the data are inconsistent. Trans-racial mapping in an ethnically distinct but homogenous population may help clarify these associations. We investigate the association between TNF promoter polymorphisms and susceptibility to ulcerative colitis (UC) in the Chinese Han ethnic population.Methods We studied 110 unrelated UC patients and 292 healthy controls from Zhejiang Province, China.Genotyping for 6 common TNF promoter polymorphisms (TNF -1031T/C, -863C/A, -857C/T, -380G/A,-308G/A, -238G/A) was carried out by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP).Results TNF-308A was associated with disease (allele frequency patients 14.6% vs controls 8.9%, P=0.02).TNF -857T was increased in patients but without statistical significance (allele frequency 17.3% vs 12.2%,P=0.06). Haplotype analysis revealed 6 haplotypes including two (H5 and H3), which contained TNF -308A. H5was associated with disease (haplotype frequency patients -12.3% vs controls 7.5%, P=0.03). Of note the rare haplotype H3 has not previously been identified in Caucasian populations. Homozygosity for the haplotype H4comprising the common alleles at each TNF promoter single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was negatively associated with disease (patients vs controls 24.5% vs 34.9%, P<0.05).Conclusions We report the association with TNF -308A polymorphisms in Chinese patients with ulcerative colitis. The functional study in Chinese Han ethnic population is now required.

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characteristics of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from Vietnam, 2011

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    Olsen Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antimicrobial resistance (AMR in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a major public health concern worldwide. In Vietnam, knowledge regarding N. gonorrhoeae prevalence and AMR is limited, and data concerning genetic characteristics of N. gonorrhoeae is totally lacking. Herein, we investigated the phenotypic AMR (previous, current and possible future treatment options, genetic resistance determinants for extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs, and genotypic distribution of N. gonorrhoeae isolated in 2011 in Hanoi, Vietnam. Methods N. gonorrhoeae isolates from Hanoi, Vietnam isolated in 2011 (n = 108 were examined using antibiograms (Etest for 10 antimicrobials, Neisseria gonorrhoeae multi-antigen sequence typing (NG-MAST, and sequencing of ESC resistance determinants (penA, mtrR and penB. Results The levels of in vitro resistance were as follows: ciprofloxacin 98%, tetracycline 82%, penicillin G 48%, azithromycin 11%, ceftriaxone 5%, cefixime 1%, and spectinomycin 0%. The MICs of gentamicin (0.023-6 mg/L, ertapenem (0.002-0.125 mg/L and solithromycin (penA mosaic alleles were found, however, 78% of the isolates contained an alteration of amino acid A501 (A501V (44% and A501T (34% in the encoded penicillin-binding protein 2. A single nucleotide (A deletion in the inverted repeat of the promoter region of the mtrR gene and amino acid alterations in MtrR was observed in 91% and 94% of the isolates, respectively. penB resistance determinants were detected in 87% of the isolates. Seventy-five different NG-MAST STs were identified, of which 59 STs have not been previously described. Conclusions In Vietnam, the highly diversified gonococcal population displayed high in vitro resistance to antimicrobials previously recommended for gonorrhoea treatment (with exception of spectinomycin, but resistance also to the currently recommended ESCs were found. Nevertheless, the MICs of three potential future treatment options were low. It is

  17. Genome-wide association study to identify the genetic determinants of otitis media susceptibility in childhood.

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    Marie S Rye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Otitis media (OM is a common childhood disease characterised by middle ear inflammation and effusion. Susceptibility to recurrent acute OM (rAOM; ≥ 3 episodes of AOM in 6 months and chronic OM with effusion (COME; MEE ≥ 3 months is 40-70% heritable. Few underlying genes have been identified to date, and no genome-wide association study (GWAS of OM has been reported. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Data for 2,524,817 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; 535,544 quality-controlled SNPs genotyped by Illumina 660W-Quad; 1,989,273 by imputation were analysed for association with OM in 416 cases and 1,075 controls from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine Study. Logistic regression analyses under an additive model undertaken in GenABEL/ProbABEL adjusting for population substructure using principal components identified SNPs at CAPN14 (rs6755194: OR = 1.90; 95%CI 1.47-2.45; P(adj-PCA = 8.3 × 10(-7 on chromosome 2p23.1 as the top hit, with independent effects (rs1862981: OR = 1.60; 95%CI 1.29-1.99; P(adj-PCA = 2.2 × 10(-5 observed at the adjacent GALNT14 gene. In a gene-based analysis in VEGAS, BPIFA3 (P(Gene = 2 × 10(-5 and BPIFA1 (P(Gene = 1.07 × 10(-4 in the BPIFA gene cluster on chromosome 20q11.21 were the top hits. In all, 32 genomic regions show evidence of association (P(adj-PCA<10(-5 in this GWAS, with pathway analysis showing a connection between top candidates and the TGFβ pathway. However, top and tag-SNP analysis for seven selected candidate genes in this pathway did not replicate in 645 families (793 affected individuals from the Western Australian Family Study of Otitis Media (WAFSOM. Lack of replication may be explained by sample size, difference in OM disease severity between primary and replication cohorts or due to type I error in the primary GWAS. CONCLUSIONS: This first discovery GWAS for an OM phenotype has identified CAPN14 and GALNT14 on chromosome 2p23.1 and the BPIFA gene cluster on chromosome 20q11.21 as

  18. Paraoxonase-1 genetic polymorphisms and susceptibility to DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides.

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    Singh, Satyender; Kumar, Vivek; Thakur, Sachin; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh; Pasha, Syed Tazeen; Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Ichhpujani, Rattan Lal; Rai, Arvind

    2011-04-15

    Human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a lipoprotein-associated enzyme involved in the detoxification of organophosphate pesticides (OPs) by hydrolyzing the bioactive oxons. Polymorphisms of the PON1 gene are responsible for variation in the expression and catalytic activity of PON1 enzyme. In the present study, we have determined (a) the prevalence of two common PON1 polymorphisms, (b) the activity of PON1 and acetylcholinesterase enzymes, and (c) the influence of PON1 genotypes and phenotypes variation on DNA damage in workers exposed to OPs. We examined 230 subjects including 115 workers exposed to OPs and an equal number of normal healthy controls. The results revealed that PON1 activity toward paraoxon (179.19±39.36 vs. 241.52±42.32nmol/min/ml in controls) and phenylacetate (112.74±17.37 vs. 134.28±25.49μmol/min/ml in controls) was significantly lower in workers than in control subjects (p0.05). The PON1 activity toward paraoxonase was found to be significantly higher in the R/R (Arg/Arg) genotypes than Q/R (Gln/Arg) and lowest in Q/Q (Gln/Gln) genotypes in both workers and control subjects (p<0.001). For PON1(55)LM (Leu/Met), PON1 activity toward paraoxonase was observed to be higher in individuals with L/L (Leu/Leu) genotypes and lowest in individuals with M/M (Met/Met) genotypes in both groups (p<0.001). No influence of PON1 genotypes and phenotypes was seen on the activity of acetylcholinesterase and arylesterase. The DNA damage was observed to be significantly higher in workers than in control subjects (p<0.05). Further, the individuals who showed least paraoxonase activity i.e., those with (Q/Q [Gln/Gln] and M/M [Met/Met]) genotypes showed significantly higher DNA damage compared to other isoforms in workers exposed to OPs (p<0.05). The results indicate that the individuals with PON1 Q/Q and M/M genotypes are more susceptible toward genotoxicity. In conclusion, the study suggests wide variation in enzyme activities and DNA damage due to polymorphisms in PON1

  19. Association of eleven common, low-penetrance colorectal cancer susceptibility genetic variants at six risk loci with clinical outcome.

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    Janelle M Hoskins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low-penetrance genetic variants have been increasingly recognized to influence the risk of tumor development. Risk variants for colorectal cancer (CRC have been mapped to chromosome positions 8q23.3, 8q24, 9p24.1, 10p14, 11q23, 14q22.2, 15q13, 16q22.1, 18q21, 19q13.1 and 20p12.3. In particular, the 8q24 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs6983267, has reproducibly been associated with the risk of developing CRC. As the CRC risk SNPs may also influence disease outcome, thus in this study, we evaluated whether they influence patient survival. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DNA samples from 583 CRC patients enrolled in the prospective, North Carolina Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium Study (NC CanCORS were genotyped for 11 CRC susceptibility SNPs at 6 CRC risk loci. Relationships between genotypes and patient survival were examined using Cox regression analysis. In multivariate analysis, patients homozygous for the CRC risk allele of rs7013278 or rs7014346 (both at 8 q24 were only nominally significant for poorer overall survival compared to patients homozygous for the protective allele (hazard ratio = 2.20 and 1.96, respectively; P<0.05. None of these associations, however, remained statistically significant after correction for multiple testing. The other nine susceptibility SNPs tested were not significantly associated with survival. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We did not find evidence of association of CRC risk variants with patient survival.

  20. Influence of Matrix metalloproteinase 1 and 3 genetic variations on susceptibility and severity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    Abd-Allah, Somia H; El-Shal, Amal S; Shalaby, Sally M; Pasha, Heba F; Abou El-Saoud, Amany M; Abdel Galil, Sahar M; Mahmoud, Tysser A

    2015-12-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic rheumatic disease affecting children aged less than 16 years, characterized by chronic synovitis, cartilage damage, and bony erosions mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), mainly MMP-1 and MMP-3. The purpose of this study was to investigate MMP-1 and MMP-3 gene polymorphisms in patients with JIA, the role of genes in susceptibility to JIA, and their associations with JIA activity and prognosis. Case-control study included 100 patients diagnosed with JIA, according to the criteria of the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR), and 100 healthy children, age and sex matched, as controls. The MMP-1 (-1607 1G/2G) and MMP-3 (-1171 5A/6A) polymorphisms were screened by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The serum levels of MMP-1 and MMP 3 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There were significant differences between patients with JIA and control groups regarding the genotype and allele frequencies distributions of both MMP-1 1G/2G and MMP-3 5A/6A polymorphisms. The haplotype 2G-6A, which carries the abnormal alleles, showed higher frequencies in patients with JIA than in controls (OD = 2.8, P = 0.002). The prevalence of MMP-1 2G and 6A allele for MMP-3 polymorphism was found to be significantly associated with persistent oligoarticular, rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive polyarthritis, and systemic JIA groups. There were significantly increased serum levels of MMP-1 and MMP-3 associated with 2G/6A haplotype in the patient group, especially with the polyarticular RF (+ve) group than in other groups and the control group. MMP-1 and MMP-3 haplotypes could be useful genetic markers for JIA susceptibility and severity in the juvenile Egyptian population. Moreover, our data further support the use of serum MMP-3 and MMP-1 as specific markers of disease activity in JIA.

  1. Ozone exposure, vitamin C intake, and genetic susceptibility of asthmatic children in Mexico City: a cohort study

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    Moreno-Macías Hortensia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported that asthmatic children with GSTM1 null genotype may be more susceptible to the acute effect of ozone on the small airways and might benefit from antioxidant supplementation. This study aims to assess the acute effect of ozone on lung function (FEF25-75 in asthmatic children according to dietary intake of vitamin C and the number of putative risk alleles in three antioxidant genes: GSTM1, GSTP1 (rs1695, and NQO1 (rs1800566. Methods 257 asthmatic children from two cohort studies conducted in Mexico City were included. Stratified linear mixed models with random intercepts and random slopes on ozone were used. Potential confounding by ethnicity was assessed. Analyses were conducted under single gene and genotype score approaches. Results The change in FEF25-75 per interquartile range (60 ppb of ozone in persistent asthmatic children with low vitamin C intake and GSTM1 null was −91.2 ml/s (p = 0.06. Persistent asthmatic children with 4 to 6 risk alleles and low vitamin C intake showed an average decrement in FEF25-75 of 97.2 ml/s per 60 ppb of ozone (p = 0.03. In contrast in children with 1 to 3 risk alleles, acute effects of ozone on FEF25-75 did not differ by vitamin C intake. Conclusions Our results provide further evidence that asthmatic children predicted to have compromised antioxidant defense by virtue of genetic susceptibility combined with deficient antioxidant intake may be at increased risk of adverse effects of ozone on pulmonary function.

  2. HSD3B and gene-gene interactions in a pathway-based analysis of genetic susceptibility to bladder cancer.

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    Angeline S Andrew

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the 4(th most common cancer among men in the U.S. We analyzed variant genotypes hypothesized to modify major biological processes involved in bladder carcinogenesis, including hormone regulation, apoptosis, DNA repair, immune surveillance, metabolism, proliferation, and telomere maintenance. Logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between genetic variation affecting these processes and susceptibility in 563 genotyped urothelial cell carcinoma cases and 863 controls enrolled in a case-control study of incident bladder cancer conducted in New Hampshire, U.S. We evaluated gene-gene interactions using Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR and Statistical Epistasis Network analysis. The 3'UTR flanking variant form of the hormone regulation gene HSD3B2 was associated with increased bladder cancer risk in the New Hampshire population (adjusted OR 1.85 95%CI 1.31-2.62. This finding was successfully replicated in the Texas Bladder Cancer Study with 957 controls, 497 cases (adjusted OR 3.66 95%CI 1.06-12.63. The effect of this prevalent SNP was stronger among males (OR 2.13 95%CI 1.40-3.25 than females (OR 1.56 95%CI 0.83-2.95, (SNP-gender interaction P = 0.048. We also identified a SNP-SNP interaction between T-cell activation related genes GATA3 and CD81 (interaction P = 0.0003. The fact that bladder cancer incidence is 3-4 times higher in males suggests the involvement of hormone levels. This biologic process-based analysis suggests candidate susceptibility markers and supports the theory that disrupted hormone regulation plays a role in bladder carcinogenesis.

  3. Genetic fine-mapping and genomic annotation defines causal mechanisms at type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci

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    Mahajan, Anubha; Locke, Adam; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil; Scott, Robert A; Prokopenko, Inga; Scott, Laura J; Green, Todd; Sparso, Thomas; Thuillier, Dorothee; Yengo, Loic; Grallert, Harald; Wahl, Simone; Frånberg, Mattias; Strawbridge, Rona J; Kestler, Hans; Chheda, Himanshu; Eisele, Lewin; Gustafsson, Stefan; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Qi, Lu; Karssen, Lennart C; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Willems, Sara M; Li, Man; Chen, Han; Fuchsberger, Christian; Kwan, Phoenix; Ma, Clement; Linderman, Michael; Lu, Yingchang; Thomsen, Soren K; Rundle, Jana K; Beer, Nicola L; van de Bunt, Martijn; Chalisey, Anil; Kang, Hyun Min; Voight, Benjamin F; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Almgren, Peter; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Blüher, Matthias; Boeing, Heiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borringer, Erwin P; Burtt, Noël P; Carey, Jason; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Couper, David J; Crenshaw, Andrew T; van Dam, Rob M; Doney, Alex SF; Dorkhan, Mozhgan; Edkins, Sarah; Eriksson, Johan G; Esko, Tonu; Eury, Elodie; Fadista, João; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fox, Caroline; Franks, Paul W; Gertow, Karl; Gieger, Christian; Gigante, Bruna; Gottesman, Omri; Grant, George B; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Hassinen, Maija; Have, Christian T; Herder, Christian; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Hreidarsson, Astradur B; Humphries, Steve E; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Anne U; Jonsson, Anna; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Kerrison, Nicola D; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kovacs, Peter; Kraft, Peter; Kravic, Jasmina; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Liang, Liming; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lindholm, Eero; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Lobbens, Stéphane; Luan, Jian’an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; McLeod, Olga; Meyer, Julia; Mihailov, Evelin; Mirza, Ghazala; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Carmen; Nöthen, Markus M; Oskolkov, Nikolay N; Owen, Katharine R; Palli, Domenico; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perry, John RB; Platou, Carl GP; Roden, Michael; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rybin, Denis; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Sennblad, Bengt; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Stančáková, Alena; Steinbach, Gerald; Storm, Petter; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Thorand, Barbara; Tikkanen, Emmi; Tonjes, Anke; Trakalo, Joseph; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Wennauer, Roman; Wood, Andrew R; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Dunham, Ian; Birney, Ewan; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Ferrer, Jorge; Loos, Ruth JF; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Pankow, James S; van Duijn, Cornelia; Sijbrands, Eric; Meigs, James B; Hu, Frank B; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Stumvoll, Michael; Pedersen, Nancy L; Lind, Lars; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Saaristo, Timo E; Saltevo, Juha; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Metspalu, Andres; Erbel, Raimund; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Moebus, Susanne; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Ingelsson, Erik; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Koistinen, Heikki; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hveem, Kristian; Njølstad, Inger; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Donnelly, Peter J; Frayling, Timothy M; Hattersley, Andrew T; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Illig, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Cauchi, Stephane; Sladek, Rob; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Collin NA; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Nilsson, Peter M; Groop, Leif C; Barroso, Inês; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; O’Callaghan, Christopher A; Gloyn, Anna L; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; Teslovich, Tanya M; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    We performed fine-mapping of 39 established type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci in 27,206 cases and 57,574 controls of European ancestry. We identified 49 distinct association signals at these loci, including five mapping in/near KCNQ1. “Credible sets” of variants most likely to drive each distinct signal mapped predominantly to non-coding sequence, implying that T2D association is mediated through gene regulation. Credible set variants were enriched for overlap with FOXA2 chromatin immunoprecipitation binding sites in human islet and liver cells, including at MTNR1B, where fine-mapping implicated rs10830963 as driving T2D association. We confirmed that this T2D-risk allele increases FOXA2-bound enhancer activity in islet- and liver-derived cells. We observed allele-specific differences in NEUROD1 binding in islet-derived cells, consistent with evidence that the T2D-risk allele increases islet MTNR1B expression. Our study demonstrates how integration of genetic and genomic information can define molecular mechanisms through which variants underlying association signals exert their effects on disease. PMID:26551672

  4. Genetic variation in the HLA region is associated with susceptibility to herpes zoster

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    Crosslin, D R; Carrell, D S; Burt, A; Kim, D S; Underwood, J G; Hanna, D S; Comstock, B A; Baldwin, E; de Andrade, M; Kullo, I J; Tromp, G; Kuivaniemi, H; Borthwick, K M; McCarty, C A; Peissig, P L; Doheny, K F; Pugh, E; Kho, A; Pacheco, J; Hayes, M G; Ritchie, M D; Verma, S S; Armstrong, G; Stallings, S; Denny, J C; Carroll, R J; Crawford, D C; Crane, P K; Mukherjee, S; Bottinger, E; Li, R; Keating, B; Mirel, D B; Carlson, C S; Harley, J B; Larson, E B; Jarvik, G P

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster, commonly referred to as shingles, is caused by the varicella zoster virus (VZV). VZV initially manifests as chicken pox, most commonly in childhood, can remain asymptomatically latent in nerve tissues for many years and often re-emerges as shingles. Although reactivation may be related to immune suppression, aging and female sex, most inter-individual variability in re-emergence risk has not been explained to date. We performed a genome-wide association analyses in 22 981 participants (2280 shingles cases) from the electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network. Using Cox survival and logistic regression, we identified a genomic region in the combined and European ancestry groups that has an age of onset effect reaching genome-wide significance (P>1.0 × 10−8). This region tags the non-coding gene HCP5 (HLA Complex P5) in the major histocompatibility complex. This gene is an endogenous retrovirus and likely influences viral activity through regulatory functions. Variants in this genetic region are known to be associated with delay in development of AIDS in people infected by HIV. Our study provides further suggestion that this region may have a critical role in viral suppression and could potentially harbor a clinically actionable variant for the shingles vaccine. PMID:25297839

  5. Cystathionine β-synthase 844ins68 Genetic Polymorphism in Spontaneous Abortion Susceptibility

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    Radu Anghel POPP

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Genetic polymorphisms in homocysteine-related genes are subject of a large body of research in pregnancy and newborn associated pathologies. The enzyme cystationine β-synthase (CBS is involved in the transsulfuration pathway of homocysteine to cysteine. Our objective was to analyze the association of a common polymorphism exhibited by the CBS gene, 844ins68, with idiopathic spontaneous abortions (SA. Material and Methods: 131 patients with a history of at least one unexplained SA and 135 healthy women with at least one successful pregnancy and no SA were included in a case-control study. Simplex PCR was used to genotype the cases and control volunteers for the CBS 844ins68 polymorphism. Fisher’s exact test was performed to obtain the odds-based parameters describing the relationship between the two variables. Results: The variant allele was encountered with a frequency of 0.08 in the SA group and 0.048 in controls. The dominant model analysis of risk revealed the OR 1.957, 95%CI [0.920, 4.162], Fisher’s p = 0.09. Conclusion: The findings suggest possible effects of this polymorphism in SA risk that did not reach the significance level in this study. Future studies might validate or clarify the association between CBS 844ins68 and idiopathic SA.

  6. Genetic and functional profiling of Crohn's disease: autophagy mechanism and susceptibility to infectious diseases.

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    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Bianco, Anna Monica; Girardelli, Martina; Tommasini, Alberto; Martelossi, Stefano; Monasta, Lorenzo; Crovella, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a complex disease in which genome, microbiome, and environment interact to produce the immunological background of the disease. Disease in childhood is more extensive and characterized by a rapid progression, leading to severe repercussions in the course of the disorder. Several genetic variations have been associated with an increased risk of developing the disease and most of these are also implicated in other autoimmune disorders. The gut has many tiers of defense against incursion by luminal microbes, including the epithelial barrier and the innate and adaptive immune responses. Moreover, recent evidence shows that bacterial and viral infections, as well as inflammasome genes and genes involved in the autophagy process, are implicated in Crohn's disease pathogenesis. The aim of this review is to establish how much the diagnostic system can improve, thus increasing the success of Crohn's disease diagnosis. The major expectation for the near future is to be able to anticipate the possible consequences of the disease already in childhood, thus preventing associated complications, and to choose the best treatment for each patient.

  7. Genetic and Functional Profiling of Crohn's Disease: Autophagy Mechanism and Susceptibility to Infectious Diseases

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    Annalisa Marcuzzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease is a complex disease in which genome, microbiome, and environment interact to produce the immunological background of the disease. Disease in childhood is more extensive and characterized by a rapid progression, leading to severe repercussions in the course of the disorder. Several genetic variations have been associated with an increased risk of developing the disease and most of these are also implicated in other autoimmune disorders. The gut has many tiers of defense against incursion by luminal microbes, including the epithelial barrier and the innate and adaptive immune responses. Moreover, recent evidence shows that bacterial and viral infections, as well as inflammasome genes and genes involved in the autophagy process, are implicated in Crohn's disease pathogenesis. The aim of this review is to establish how much the diagnostic system can improve, thus increasing the success of Crohn's disease diagnosis. The major expectation for the near future is to be able to anticipate the possible consequences of the disease already in childhood, thus preventing associated complications, and to choose the best treatment for each patient.

  8. Genetic fine mapping and genomic annotation defines causal mechanisms at type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulton, Kyle J; Ferreira, Teresa; Lee, Yeji; Raimondo, Anne; Mägi, Reedik; Reschen, Michael E; Mahajan, Anubha; Locke, Adam; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil; Scott, Robert A; Prokopenko, Inga; Scott, Laura J; Green, Todd; Sparso, Thomas; Thuillier, Dorothee; Yengo, Loic; Grallert, Harald; Wahl, Simone; Frånberg, Mattias; Strawbridge, Rona J; Kestler, Hans; Chheda, Himanshu; Eisele, Lewin; Gustafsson, Stefan; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Qi, Lu; Karssen, Lennart C; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Willems, Sara M; Li, Man; Chen, Han; Fuchsberger, Christian; Kwan, Phoenix; Ma, Clement; Linderman, Michael; Lu, Yingchang; Thomsen, Soren K; Rundle, Jana K; Beer, Nicola L; van de Bunt, Martijn; Chalisey, Anil; Kang, Hyun Min; Voight, Benjamin F; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Blüher, Matthias; Boeing, Heiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bottinger, Erwin P; Burtt, Noël P; Carey, Jason; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Couper, David J; Crenshaw, Andrew T; van Dam, Rob M; Doney, Alex S F; Dorkhan, Mozhgan; Edkins, Sarah; Eriksson, Johan G; Esko, Tonu; Eury, Elodie; Fadista, João; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fox, Caroline; Franks, Paul W; Gertow, Karl; Gieger, Christian; Gigante, Bruna; Gottesman, Omri; Grant, George B; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Hassinen, Maija; Have, Christian T; Herder, Christian; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Hreidarsson, Astradur B; Humphries, Steve E; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Anne U; Jonsson, Anna; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Kao, Wen-Hong L; Kerrison, Nicola D; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kovacs, Peter; Kraft, Peter; Kravic, Jasmina; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Liang, Liming; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lindholm, Eero; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Lobbens, Stéphane; Luan, Jian'an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; McLeod, Olga; Meyer, Julia; Mihailov, Evelin; Mirza, Ghazala; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Carmen; Nöthen, Markus M; Oskolkov, Nikolay N; Owen, Katharine R; Palli, Domenico; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Peltonen, Leena; Perry, John R B; Platou, Carl G P; Roden, Michael; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rybin, Denis; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Sennblad, Bengt; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Stančáková, Alena; Steinbach, Gerald; Storm, Petter; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Thorand, Barbara; Tikkanen, Emmi; Tonjes, Anke; Trakalo, Joseph; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Wennauer, Roman; Wiltshire, Steven; Wood, Andrew R; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Dunham, Ian; Birney, Ewan; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Ferrer, Jorge; Loos, Ruth J F; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Pankow, James S; van Duijn, Cornelia; Sijbrands, Eric; Meigs, James B; Hu, Frank B; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Stumvoll, Michael; Pedersen, Nancy L; Lind, Lars; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Saaristo, Timo E; Saltevo, Juha; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Metspalu, Andres; Erbel, Raimund; Jöcke, Karl-Heinz; Moebus, Susanne; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Ingelsson, Erik; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Koistinen, Heikki; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hveem, Kristian; Njølstad, Inger; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Donnelly, Peter J; Frayling, Timothy M; Hattersley, Andrew T; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Illig, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Cauchi, Stephane; Sladek, Rob; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Collin N A; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Nilsson, Peter M; Groop, Leif C; Barroso, Inês; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; Gloyn, Anna L; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; Teslovich, Tanya M; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2015-12-01

    We performed fine mapping of 39 established type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci in 27,206 cases and 57,574 controls of European ancestry. We identified 49 distinct association signals at these loci, including five mapping in or near KCNQ1. 'Credible sets' of the variants most likely to drive each distinct signal mapped predominantly to noncoding sequence, implying that association with T2D is mediated through gene regulation. Credible set variants were enriched for overlap with FOXA2 chromatin immunoprecipitation binding sites in human islet and liver cells, including at MTNR1B, where fine mapping implicated rs10830963 as driving T2D association. We confirmed that the T2D risk allele for this SNP increases FOXA2-bound enhancer activity in islet- and liver-derived cells. We observed allele-specific differences in NEUROD1 binding in islet-derived cells, consistent with evidence that the T2D risk allele increases islet MTNR1B expression. Our study demonstrates how integration of genetic and genomic information can define molecular mechanisms through which variants underlying association signals exert their effects on disease.

  9. Cerebral blood volume calculated by dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging: preliminary correlation study with glioblastoma genetic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inseon Ryoo

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the usefulness of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC enhanced perfusion MR imaging in predicting major genetic alterations in glioblastomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five patients (M:F = 13∶12, mean age: 52.1±15.2 years with pathologically proven glioblastoma who underwent DSC MR imaging before surgery were included. On DSC MR imaging, the normalized relative tumor blood volume (nTBV of the enhancing solid portion of each tumor was calculated by using dedicated software (Nordic TumorEX, NordicNeuroLab, Bergen, Norway that enabled semi-automatic segmentation for each tumor. Five major glioblastoma genetic alterations (epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN, Ki-67, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT and p53 were confirmed by immunohistochemistry and analyzed for correlation with the nTBV of each tumor. Statistical analysis was performed using the unpaired Student t test, ROC (receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and Pearson correlation analysis. RESULTS: The nTBVs of the MGMT methylation-negative group (mean 9.5±7.5 were significantly higher than those of the MGMT methylation-positive group (mean 5.4±1.8 (p = .046. In the analysis of EGFR expression-positive group, the nTBVs of the subgroup with loss of PTEN gene expression (mean: 10.3±8.1 were also significantly higher than those of the subgroup without loss of PTEN gene expression (mean: 5.6±2.3 (p = .046. Ki-67 labeling index indicated significant positive correlation with the nTBV of the tumor (p = .01. CONCLUSION: We found that glioblastomas with aggressive genetic alterations tended to have a high nTBV in the present study. Thus, we believe that DSC-enhanced perfusion MR imaging could be helpful in predicting genetic alterations that are crucial in predicting the prognosis of and selecting tailored treatment for glioblastoma patients.

  10. Two HLA DRB 1 alleles confer independent genetic susceptibility to Graves disease: relevance of cross-population studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marga, M; Denisova, A; Sochnev, A; Pirags, V; Farid, N R

    2001-08-01

    Recent studies of Graves disease (GD) employing genome scanning techniques excluded the major histocompatibility complex as a contributor to disease liability. These findings contradict earlier population association studies. Our own earlier studies have also emphasized that genetic variation in human populations may give novel clues to disease liability and manifestations. To this end, we studied HLA class II alleles in 47 Latvian GD patients and 111 matched healthy controls. As expected, we found that DRB1*03 and DQA1*0501 (OR = 3.6, P = 0.029 and OR 2.35, P = 0.0373, respectively) were associated with GD. Unforeseen, DRB1*04 was found to be significantly increased in the patients compared to controls (OR 3.267, corrected P = 0.0319). The two DRB1 alleles conferred two non-overlapping and independent susceptibilities to GD, in that only three patients were positive for both alleles, and the removal of each allele in turn resulted in only the other DRB1 allele showing significant association with the disease. There was no heterogeneity between the two patient groups (DRB1*03 positive and DRB1*04 positive) in clinical characteristics or disease manifestations. The phenotype DRB1*03 and/or DRB1*04 was found in 34/47 patients compared to 27/111 controls yielding an OR of 7.395 (P corrected = 0.000019). We examined the structural basis of DRB1 susceptibility to GD in light of this and previous studies, showing that DRB1*03, 04, and 08 were positively associated with the disease, whereas DRB1*07 was negatively associated. Differences in protein sequences were noted at residues 54, 57, 59, and 66; positions 54, 57, and 66 are on the same face of the alpha helix. The canonical arginine 54 is replaced by glutamine in DRB1*07. At position 66, asparagine in DRB1*03 and tyrosine in DRB1*04 are replaced by phenylalanine in DRB1*07. Residue 59, likely involved in pocket formation in the antigen binding groove, is modified by replacement of tyrosine in DRB1*03, 08, and 04 and

  11. Role of common sarcomeric gene polymorphisms in genetic susceptibility to left ventricular dysfunction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SURENDRA KUMAR; AVSHESH MISHRA; ANSHIKA SRIVASTAVA; MANSI BHATT; N. GARG; S. K. AGARWAL; SHANTANU PANDE; BALRAJ MITTAL

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in sarcomeric genes are common genetic cause of cardiomyopathies. An intronic 25-bp deletion in cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) at 3' region is associated with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies in Southeast Asia. However, the frequency of sarcomeric gene polymorphisms and associated clinical presentation have not been established with left ventricular dysfunction (LVD). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to explore the association of MYBPC3 25-bp deletion, titin (TTN) 18 bp I/D, troponin T type 2 (TNNT2) 5 bp I/D and myospryn K2906N polymorphisms with LVD. This study includes 988 consecutive patients with angiographically confirmed coronary artery disease (CAD) and 300 healthy controls. Among the 988 CAD patients, 253 with reduced left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF≤45%) were categorized as LVD. MYBPC3 25-bp deletion,TTN 18 bp I/D and TNNT25 bp I/D polymorphisms were determined by direct polymerase chain reaction method, while myospryn K2906N polymorphism by TaqMan assay. Our results showed that MYBPC3 25-bpdeletion polymorphism was significantly associated with elevated risk of LVD (LVEF <45) (healthy controls versus LVD: OR= 3.85,P<0.001; and nonLVD versus LVD: OR=1.65,P=0.035), while TTN 18 bp I/D, TNNT25bpI/Dand myospryn K2906N polymorphisms did not show any significant association with LVD. The results also showed that MYBPC3 25-bp deletion polymorphism was significantly associated with other parameters of LV remodelling, i.e. LV dimensions (LV end diastole dimension, LVEDD: P= 0.037 and LV end systolic dimension, LVESD: P= 0.032).Our data suggests that MYBPC3 25-bp deletion may play significant role in conferring LVD as well as CAD risk in north Indian population

  12. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene C677T polymorphism and breast cancer risk: Evidence for genetic susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Total 75 studies with 31,315 cases and 35, 608 controls were found suitable for the inclusion in the present meta-analysis. The results of meta-analysis suggested that there were moderate significant association between C677T polymorphism and BC risk using overall comparisons in five genetic models (T vs. C: OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.03–1.13, p = <0.001; TT + CT vs. CC: OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.02–1.09, p = <0.001; TT vs. CC: OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.06–1.28, p = 0.001; CT vs. CC OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.01–1.08, p = 0.005; TT vs. CT + CC: OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.03–1.22, p = 0.005. In conclusion, results of present meta-analysis showed modest association between MTHFR C677T polymorphism with breast cancer in total studies. However, sub-group analysis results based on ethnicity showed strong significant association between TT genotype and breast cancer (TT vs. CC; OR°=°1.26; 95% CI: 1.06–1.51; p = 0.009 in Asian population but in Caucasian population such association was not observed (TT vs. CC; OR°=°1.08; 95% CI: 0.99–1.14; p = 0.05.

  13. Susceptibility of carnivore hosts to strains of canine distemper virus from distinct genetic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolin, Veljko M; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Michler, Frank-Uwe F; Wolf, Peter; East, Marion L

    2012-04-23

    Using the complete haemagglutinin (HA) gene and partial phosphoprotein (P) gene we investigated the genotype of canine distemper virus (CDV) strains recovered from two wildlife species in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated significant differences between the strains from raccoons Procyon lotor (family Procyonidae) obtained in 2007 and strains from red foxes Vulpes vulpes (family Canidae) obtained in 2008. The raccoon strains belonged to the CDV European wildlife lineage whereas the red fox strains belonged to the CDV Europe lineage. We combined our genetic sequence data with published data from 138 CDV stains worldwide to investigate the proposed importance of amino acid substitutions in the SLAM binding region of the CDV HA protein at position 530 (G/E to R/D/N) and 549 (Y to H) to the spread of domestic dog-adapted CDV strains to other carnivores. We found no evidence that amino acid 530 was strongly affected by host species. Rather, site 530 was conserved within CDV lineages, regardless of host species. Contrary to expectation, strains from non-dog hosts did not exhibit a bias towards the predicted substitution Y549H. Wild canid hosts were more frequently infected by strains with 549Y, a pattern similar to domestic dogs. Non-canid strains showed no significant bias towards either H or Y at site 549, although there was a trend towards 549H. Significant differences between the prevalence of 549Y and 549H in wild canid strains and non-canid strains suggests a degree of virus adaptation to these categories of host.

  14. Genetic basis of interindividual susceptibility to cancer cachexia: selection of potential candidate gene polymorphisms for association studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N. Johns; B. H. Tan; M. Macmillan; T. S. Solheim; J. A. Ross; V. E. Baracos; S. Damaraju; K. C. H. Fearon

    2014-12-01

    Cancer cachexia is a complex and multifactorial disease. Evolving definitions highlight the fact that a diverse range of biological processes contribute to cancer cachexia. Part of the variation in who will and who will not develop cancer cachexia may be genetically determined. As new definitions, classifications and biological targets continue to evolve, there is a need for reappraisal of the literature for future candidate association studies. This review summarizes genes identified or implicated as well as putative candidate genes contributing to cachexia, identified through diverse technology platforms and model systems to further guide association studies. A systematic search covering 1986–2012 was performed for potential candidate genes / genetic polymorphisms relating to cancer cachexia. All candidate genes were reviewed for functional polymorphisms or clinically significant polymorphisms associated with cachexia using the OMIM and GeneRIF databases. Pathway analysis software was used to reveal possible network associations between genes. Functionality of SNPs/genes was explored based on published literature, algorithms for detecting putative deleterious SNPs and interrogating the database for expression of quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). A total of 154 genes associated with cancer cachexia were identified and explored for functional polymorphisms. Of these 154 genes, 119 had a combined total of 281 polymorphisms with functional and/or clinical significance in terms of cachexia associated with them. Of these, 80 polymorphisms (in 51 genes) were replicated in more than one study with 24 polymorphisms found to influence two or more hallmarks of cachexia (i.e., inflammation, loss of fat mass and/or lean mass and reduced survival). Selection of candidate genes and polymorphisms is a key element of multigene study design. The present study provides a contemporary basis to select genes and/or polymorphisms for further association studies in cancer cachexia, and

  15. Genetic diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter jejuni isolates associated with sheep abortion in the United States and Great Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zuowei; Sippy, Rachel; Sahin, Orhan; Plummer, Paul; Vidal, Ana; Newell, Diane; Zhang, Qijing

    2014-06-01

    Campylobacter infection is a leading cause of ovine abortion worldwide. Historically, genetically diverse Campylobacter fetus and Campylobacter jejuni strains have been implicated in such infections, but since 2003 a highly pathogenic, tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni clone (named SA) has become the predominant cause of sheep abortions in the United States. Whether clone SA was present in earlier U.S. abortion isolates (before 2000) and is associated with sheep abortions outside the United States are unknown. Here, we analyzed 54 C. jejuni isolates collected from U.S. sheep abortions at different time periods and compared them with 42 C. jejuni isolates associated with sheep abortion during 2002 to 2008 in Great Britain, using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Although clone SA (ST-8) was present in the early U.S. isolates, it was not as tetracycline resistant (19% versus 100%) or predominant (66% versus 91%) as it was in the late U.S isolates. In contrast, C. jejuni isolates from Great Britain were genetically diverse, comprising 19 STs and lacking ST-8. PFGE and CGH analyses of representative strains further confirmed the population structure of the abortion isolates. Notably, the Great Britain isolates were essentially susceptible to most tested antibiotics, including tetracycline, while the late U.S. isolates were universally resistant to this antibiotic, which could be explained by the common use of tetracyclines for control of sheep abortions in the United States but not in Great Britain. These results suggest that the dominance of clone SA in sheep abortions is unique to the United States, and the use of tetracyclines may have facilitated selection of this highly pathogenic clone.

  16. Genetic basis of interindividual susceptibility to cancer cachexia: selection of potential candidate gene polymorphisms for association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, N; Tan, B H; MacMillan, M; Solheim, T S; Ross, J A; Baracos, V E; Damaraju, S; Fearon, K C H

    2014-12-01

    Cancer cachexia is a complex and multifactorial disease. Evolving definitions highlight the fact that a diverse range of biological processes contribute to cancer cachexia. Part of the variation in who will and who will not develop cancer cachexia may be genetically determined. As new definitions, classifications and biological targets continue to evolve, there is a need for reappraisal of the literature for future candidate association studies. This review summarizes genes identified or implicated as well as putative candidate genes contributing to cachexia, identified through diverse technology platforms and model systems to further guide association studies. A systematic search covering 1986-2012 was performed for potential candidate genes / genetic polymorphisms relating to cancer cachexia. All candidate genes were reviewed for functional polymorphisms or clinically significant polymorphisms associated with cachexia using the OMIM and GeneRIF databases. Pathway analysis software was used to reveal possible network associations between genes. Functionality of SNPs/genes was explored based on published literature, algorithms for detecting putative deleterious SNPs and interrogating the database for expression of quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). A total of 154 genes associated with cancer cachexia were identified and explored for functional polymorphisms. Of these 154 genes, 119 had a combined total of 281 polymorphisms with functional and/or clinical significance in terms of cachexia associated with them. Of these, 80 polymorphisms (in 51 genes) were replicated in more than one study with 24 polymorphisms found to influence two or more hallmarks of cachexia (i.e., inflammation, loss of fat mass and/or lean mass and reduced survival). Selection of candidate genes and polymorphisms is a key element of multigene study design. The present study provides a contemporary basis to select genes and/or polymorphisms for further association studies in cancer cachexia, and

  17. Interaction between arsenic exposure from drinking water and genetic susceptibility in carotid intima-media thickness in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fen; Jasmine, Farzana; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Liu, Mengling; Cheng, Xin; Parvez, Faruque; Paul-Brutus, Rachelle; Paul, Rina Rani; Sarwar, Golam; Ahmed, Alauddin; Jiang, Jieying; Islam, Tariqul; Slavkovich, Vesna; Rundek, Tatjana; Demmer, Ryan T; Desvarieux, Moise; Ahsan, Habibul; Chen, Yu

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies that evaluated genetic susceptibility for the effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water on subclinical atherosclerosis are limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1078 participants randomly selected from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Bangladesh to evaluate whether the association between arsenic exposure and carotid artery intima-media thickness (cIMT) differs by 207 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genes related to arsenic metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Although not statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing, nine SNPs in APOE, AS3MT, PNP, and TNF genes had a nominally statistically significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. For instance, the joint presence of a higher level of well-water arsenic (≥ 40.4 μg/L) and the GG genotype of AS3MT rs3740392 was associated with a difference of 40.9 μm (95% CI = 14.4, 67.5) in cIMT, much greater than the difference of cIMT associated with the genotype alone (β = -5.1 μm, 95% CI = -31.6, 21.3) or arsenic exposure alone (β = 7.2 μm, 95% CI = -3.1, 17.5). The pattern and magnitude of the interactions were similar when urinary arsenic was used as the exposure variable. Additionally, the at-risk genotypes of the AS3MT SNPs were positively related to the proportion of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine, which is indicative of arsenic methylation capacity. The findings provide novel evidence that genetic variants related to arsenic metabolism may play an important role in arsenic-induced subclinical atherosclerosis. Future replication studies in diverse populations are needed to confirm the findings.

  18. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene C677T polymorphism and breast cancer risk: Evidence for genetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Upendra; Rai, Vandana

    2015-12-01

    There are several evidences supporting the role of 5-10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphisms in breast cancer (BC). Case control association studies on breast cancer have been repeatedly performed over the last two decades, but results are inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis to confirm the association between MTHFR C677T polymorphism and BC risk. The articles were retrieved by searching the PubMed, Google Scholar, and Springer Link databases. Crude odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was used to assess the strength of association between C677T polymorphism and BC. Publication bias was assessed by Egger's and Begg-Mazumdar tests. Meta-analysis was performed with Open Meta Analyst. Total 75 studies with 31,315 cases and 35, 608 controls were found suitable for the inclusion in the present meta-analysis. The results of meta-analysis suggested that there were moderate significant association between C677T polymorphism and BC risk using overall comparisons in five genetic models (T vs. C: OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.03-1.13, p = < 0.001; TT + CT vs. CC: OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.02-1.09, p = < 0.001; TT vs. CC: OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.06-1.28, p = 0.001; CT vs. CC OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.01-1.08, p = 0.005; TT vs. CT + CC: OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.03-1.22, p = 0.005). In conclusion, results of present meta-analysis showed modest association between MTHFR C677T polymorphism with breast cancer in total studies. However, sub-group analysis results based on ethnicity showed strong significant association between TT genotype and breast cancer (TT vs. CC; OR°=°1.26; 95% CI: 1.06-1.51; p = 0.009) in Asian population but in Caucasian population such association was not observed (TT vs. CC; OR°=°1.08; 95% CI: 0.99-1.14; p = 0.05).

  19. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low Dose & Low Dose-Rate Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedford, Joel

    2014-04-18

    Our laboratory has, among other things, developed and used the gamma H2AX focus assay and other chromosomal and cell killing assays to show that differences in this DNA double strand break (dsb) related response can be clearly and distinctly demonstrated for cells which are mildly hyper-radiosensitive such as those associated with A-T heterozygosity. We have found this level of mild hypersensitivity for cells from some 20 to 30 % of apparently normal individuals and from apparently normal parents of Retinoblastoma patients. We found significant differences in gene expression in somatic cells from unaffected parents of Rb patients as compared with normal controls, suggesting that these parents may harbor some as yet unidentified genetic abnormality. In other experiments we sought to determine the extent of differences in normal human cellular reaponses to radiation depending on their irradiation in 2D monolayer vs 3D organized acinar growth conditions. We exmined cell reproductive death, chromosomal aberration induction, and the levels of γ-H2AX foci in cells after single acute gamma-ray doses and immediately after 20 hours of irradiation at a dose rate of 0.0017 Gy/min. We found no significant differences in the dose-responses of these cells under the 2D or 3D growth conditions. While this does not mean such differences cannot occur in other situations, it does mean that they do not generally or necessarily occur. In another series of studies in collaboration with Dr Chuan Li, with supprt from this current grant. We reported a role for apoptotic cell death in promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration in mice. Apoptotic cells released growth signals that stimulated the proliferation of progenitor or stem cells. In yet another collaboration with Dr, B. Chen with funds from this grant, the relative radiosensitivity to cell killing as well as chromosomal instability of 13 DNA-PKcs site-directed mutant cell lines (defective at phosphorylation sites or kinase

  20. Optimized ancestral state reconstruction using Sankoff parsimony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiente Gabriel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parsimony methods are widely used in molecular evolution to estimate the most plausible phylogeny for a set of characters. Sankoff parsimony determines the minimum number of changes required in a given phylogeny when a cost is associated to transitions between character states. Although optimizations exist to reduce the computations in the number of taxa, the original algorithm takes time O(n2 in the number of states, making it impractical for large values of n. Results In this study we introduce an optimization of Sankoff parsimony for the reconstruction of ancestral states when ultrametric or additive cost matrices are used. We analyzed its performance for randomly generated matrices, Jukes-Cantor and Kimura's two-parameter models of DNA evolution, and in the reconstruction of elongation factor-1α and ancestral metabolic states of a group of eukaryotes, showing that in all cases the execution time is significantly less than with the original implementation. Conclusion The algorithms here presented provide a fast computation of Sankoff parsimony for a given phylogeny. Problems where the number of states is large, such as reconstruction of ancestral metabolism, are particularly adequate for this optimization. Since we are reducing the computations required to calculate the parsimony cost of a single tree, our method can be combined with optimizations in the number of taxa that aim at finding the most parsimonious tree.

  1. Combining Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Genetic Variant rs2736100 with Epidemiologic Factors in the Prediction of Lung Cancer Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Ma, Kewei; Chi, Lumei; Cui, Jiuwei; Jin, Lina; Hu, Ji-Fan; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants from a considerable number of susceptibility loci have been identified in association with cancer risk, but their interaction with epidemiologic factors in lung cancer remains to be defined. We sought to establish a forecasting model for identifying individuals with high-risk of lung cancer by combing gene single-nucleotide polymorphisms with epidemiologic factors. Genotyping and clinical data from 500 lung cancer cases and 500 controls were used for developing the logistic regression model. We found that lung cancer was associated with telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) rs2736100 single-nucleotide polymorphism. The TERT rs2736100 model was still significantly associated with lung cancer risk when combined with environmental and lifestyle factors, including lower education, lower BMI, COPD history, heavy cigarettes smoking, heavy cooking emission, and dietary factors (over-consumption of meat and deficiency in fish/shrimp, vegetables, dairy products, and soybean products). These data suggest that combining TERT SNP and epidemiologic factors may be a useful approach to discriminate high and low-risk individuals for lung cancer.

  2. A Systems Biology Overview on Human Diabetic Nephropathy: From Genetic Susceptibility to Post-Transcriptional and Post-Translational Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conserva, Francesca; Gesualdo, Loreto; Papale, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN), a microvascular complication occurring in approximately 20-40% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is characterized by the progressive impairment of glomerular filtration and the development of Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions leading to end-stage renal failure (ESRD). The causes and molecular mechanisms mediating the onset of T2DM chronic complications are yet sketchy and it is not clear why disease progression occurs only in some patients. We performed a systematic analysis of the most relevant studies investigating genetic susceptibility and specific transcriptomic, epigenetic, proteomic, and metabolomic patterns in order to summarize the most significant traits associated with the disease onset and progression. The picture that emerges is complex and fascinating as it includes the regulation/dysregulation of numerous biological processes, converging toward the activation of inflammatory processes, oxidative stress, remodeling of cellular function and morphology, and disturbance of metabolic pathways. The growing interest in the characterization of protein post-translational modifications and the importance of handling large datasets using a systems biology approach are also discussed.

  3. A Systems Biology Overview on Human Diabetic Nephropathy: From Genetic Susceptibility to Post-Transcriptional and Post-Translational Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Conserva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN, a microvascular complication occurring in approximately 20–40% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, is characterized by the progressive impairment of glomerular filtration and the development of Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions leading to end-stage renal failure (ESRD. The causes and molecular mechanisms mediating the onset of T2DM chronic complications are yet sketchy and it is not clear why disease progression occurs only in some patients. We performed a systematic analysis of the most relevant studies investigating genetic susceptibility and specific transcriptomic, epigenetic, proteomic, and metabolomic patterns in order to summarize the most significant traits associated with the disease onset and progression. The picture that emerges is complex and fascinating as it includes the regulation/dysregulation of numerous biological processes, converging toward the activation of inflammatory processes, oxidative stress, remodeling of cellular function and morphology, and disturbance of metabolic pathways. The growing interest in the characterization of protein post-translational modifications and the importance of handling large datasets using a systems biology approach are also discussed.

  4. Prenatal exposure of mice to the human liver carcinogen Aflatoxin B1 reveals a critical window of susceptibility to genetic change

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    It has become axiomatic that critical windows of susceptibility to genotoxins exist and that genetic damage in utero may be a trigger for later life cancers. Data supporting this critical window hypothesis are remarkably few. This study provides a quantitative bridge between DNA damage by the liver carcinogen aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) during prenatal development and the risk of later life genetic disease. AFB1 was given to pregnant C57BL/6J mice, carrying F1 gestation day 14 (GD14) embryos of the B...

  5. Genetic association between the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor gene p27/Kip1 polymorphism (rs34330) and cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao-Ke; Wang, Xue-Jun; Li, Xiao-Dong; Ren, Xue-Qun

    2017-01-01

    The p27 rs34330 (-79C/T) polymorphism has been widely studied for human cancer susceptibility. The current findings, however, still remained controversial. Therefore, we performed the meta-analysis to provide a more accurate result. Eligible studies were identified from PubMed database up to June 2015. The association of p27 rs34330 polymorphism and cancer susceptibility was estimated with odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals. The meta-analysis was performed with Stata 12. A total of ten studies with 11,214 cases and more than 8,776 controls were included in the meta-analysis (including breast, lung, thyroid, endometrial, and hepatocellular cancer). In pooled analysis, p27 gene rs34330 polymorphism significantly increased the cancer susceptibility. Subgroup analysis indicated that the elevated risk was observed under all the genetic models for Asians and under three genetic models for Caucasians. Results of sensitivity analysis were similar to the overall results. The results suggested that the p27 rs34330 polymorphism increased the cancer susceptibility, especially in Asians. Further well-designed and large sample size studies are warranted to verify the conclusion. PMID:28317869

  6. Interaction between arsenic exposure from drinking water and genetic susceptibility in carotid intima–media thickness in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Fen [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Jasmine, Farzana; Kibriya, Muhammad G. [Department of Health Studies, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); The University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Liu, Mengling; Cheng, Xin [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Parvez, Faruque [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York City, NY (United States); Paul-Brutus, Rachelle [Department of Health Studies, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); The University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Islam, Tariqul; Paul, Rina Rani; Sarwar, Golam; Ahmed, Alauddin [U-Chicago Research Bangladesh, Ltd., Dhaka (Bangladesh); Jiang, Jieying [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Islam, Tariqul [U-Chicago Research Bangladesh, Ltd., Dhaka (Bangladesh); Slavkovich, Vesna [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York City, NY (United States); Rundek, Tatjana [Department of Neurology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Department of Public Health Sciences, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Demmer, Ryan T.; Desvarieux, Moise [Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York City, NY (United States); and others

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies that evaluated genetic susceptibility for the effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water on subclinical atherosclerosis are limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1078 participants randomly selected from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Bangladesh to evaluate whether the association between arsenic exposure and carotid artery intima–media thickness (cIMT) differs by 207 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genes related to arsenic metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Although not statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing, nine SNPs in APOE, AS3MT, PNP, and TNF genes had a nominally statistically significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. For instance, the joint presence of a higher level of well-water arsenic (≥ 40.4 μg/L) and the GG genotype of AS3MT rs3740392 was associated with a difference of 40.9 μm (95% CI = 14.4, 67.5) in cIMT, much greater than the difference of cIMT associated with the genotype alone (β = − 5.1 μm, 95% CI = − 31.6, 21.3) or arsenic exposure alone (β = 7.2 μm, 95% CI = − 3.1, 17.5). The pattern and magnitude of the interactions were similar when urinary arsenic was used as the exposure variable. Additionally, the at-risk genotypes of the AS3MT SNPs were positively related to the proportion of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine, which is indicative of arsenic methylation capacity. The findings provide novel evidence that genetic variants related to arsenic metabolism may play an important role in arsenic-induced subclinical atherosclerosis. Future replication studies in diverse populations are needed to confirm the findings. - Highlights: • Nine SNPs had a nominally significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. • Three SNPs in AS3MT showed nominally significant interactions with urinary arsenic. • cIMT was much higher among subjects with higher arsenic exposure and AS3MT

  7. Autism genetic database (AGD: a comprehensive database including autism susceptibility gene-CNVs integrated with known noncoding RNAs and fragile sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talebizadeh Zohreh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism is a highly heritable complex neurodevelopmental disorder, therefore identifying its genetic basis has been challenging. To date, numerous susceptibility genes and chromosomal abnormalities have been reported in association with autism, but most discoveries either fail to be replicated or account for a small effect. Thus, in most cases the underlying causative genetic mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present work, the Autism Genetic Database (AGD was developed as a literature-driven, web-based, and easy to access database designed with the aim of creating a comprehensive repository for all the currently reported genes and genomic copy number variations (CNVs associated with autism in order to further facilitate the assessment of these autism susceptibility genetic factors. Description AGD is a relational database that organizes data resulting from exhaustive literature searches for reported susceptibility genes and CNVs associated with autism. Furthermore, genomic information about human fragile sites and noncoding RNAs was also downloaded and parsed from miRBase, snoRNA-LBME-db, piRNABank, and the MIT/ICBP siRNA database. A web client genome browser enables viewing of the features while a web client query tool provides access to more specific information for the features. When applicable, links to external databases including GenBank, PubMed, miRBase, snoRNA-LBME-db, piRNABank, and the MIT siRNA database are provided. Conclusion AGD comprises a comprehensive list of susceptibility genes and copy number variations reported to-date in association with autism, as well as all known human noncoding RNA genes and fragile sites. Such a unique and inclusive autism genetic database will facilitate the evaluation of autism susceptibility factors in relation to known human noncoding RNAs and fragile sites, impacting on human diseases. As a result, this new autism database offers a valuable tool for the research

  8. Individual Genetic Susceptibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric J. Hall

    2008-12-08

    Risk estimates derived from epidemiological studies of exposed populations, as well as the maximum permissible doses allowed for occupational exposure and exposure of the public to ionizing radiation are all based on the assumption that the human population is uniform in its radiosensitivity, except for a small number of individuals, such as ATM homozygotes who are easily identified by their clinical symptoms. The hypothesis upon which this proposal is based is that the human population is not homogeneous in radiosensitiviry, but that radiosensitive sub-groups exist which are not easy to identify. These individuals would suffer an increased incidence of detrimental radiation effects, and distort the shape of the dose response relationship. The radiosensitivity of these groups depend on the expression levels of specific proteins. The plan was to investigate the effect of 3 relatively rare, high penetrate genes available in mice, namely Atm, mRad9 & Brca1. The purpose of radiation protection is to prevent! deterministic effects of clinical significance and limit stochastic effects to acceptable levels. We plan, therefore to compare with wild type animals the radiosensitivity of mice heterozygous for each of the genes mentioned above, as well as double heterozygotes for pairs of genes, using two biological endpoints: a) Ocular cataracts as an important and relevant deterministic effect, and b) Oncogenic transformation in cultured embryo fibroblasts, as a surrogate for carcinogenesis, the most relevant stochastic effect.

  9. Genetic variants on 3q21 and in the Sp8 transcription factor gene (SP8 as susceptibility loci for psychotic disorders: a genetic association study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Kondo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs investigating bipolar disorder (BD have detected a number of susceptibility genes. These studies have also provided novel insight into shared genetic components between BD and schizophrenia (SCZ, two major psychotic disorders. To examine the replication of the risk variants for BD and the pleiotropic effect of the variants associated with BD, we conducted a genetic association study of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that were selected based upon previous BD GWASs, which targeted psychotic disorders (BD and SCZ in the Japanese population. METHODS: Forty-eight SNPs were selected based upon previous GWASs. A two-stage analysis was conducted using first-set screening (for all SNPs: BD = 1,012, SCZ = 1,032 and control = 993 and second-set replication samples (for significant SNPs in the screening analysis: BD = 821, SCZ = 1,808 and control = 2,149. We assessed allelic association between BD, SCZ, psychosis (BD+SCZ and the SNPs selected for the analysis. RESULTS: Eight SNPs revealed nominal association signals for all comparisons (Puncorrected<0.05. Among these SNPs, the top two SNPs (associated with psychosis: Pcorrected = 0.048 and 0.037 for rs2251219 and rs2709722, respectively were further assessed in the second-set samples, and we replicated the signals from the initial screening analysis (associated with psychosis: Pcorrected = 0.0070 and 0.033 for rs2251219 and rs2709722, respectively. The meta-analysis between the current and previous GWAS results showed that rs2251219 in Polybromo1 (PBRM1 was significant on genome-wide association level (P = 5×10(-8 only for BD (P = 9.4×10(-9 and psychosis (P = 2.0×10(-10. Although the association of rs2709722 in Sp8 transcription factor (SP8 was suggestive in the Asian population (P = 2.1×10(-7 for psychosis, this signal weakened when the samples size was increased by including data from a

  10. Genetic Variants on 3q21 and in the Sp8 Transcription Factor Gene (SP8) as Susceptibility Loci for Psychotic Disorders: A Genetic Association Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Kenji; Ikeda, Masashi; Kajio, Yusuke; Saito, Takeo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Aleksic, Branko; Yamada, Kazuo; Toyota, Tomoko; Hattori, Eiji; Ujike, Hiroshi; Inada, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Kato, Tadafumi; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Ozaki, Norio; Iwata, Nakao

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) investigating bipolar disorder (BD) have detected a number of susceptibility genes. These studies have also provided novel insight into shared genetic components between BD and schizophrenia (SCZ), two major psychotic disorders. To examine the replication of the risk variants for BD and the pleiotropic effect of the variants associated with BD, we conducted a genetic association study of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were selected based upon previous BD GWASs, which targeted psychotic disorders (BD and SCZ) in the Japanese population. Methods Forty-eight SNPs were selected based upon previous GWASs. A two-stage analysis was conducted using first-set screening (for all SNPs: BD = 1,012, SCZ = 1,032 and control = 993) and second-set replication samples (for significant SNPs in the screening analysis: BD = 821, SCZ = 1,808 and control = 2,149). We assessed allelic association between BD, SCZ, psychosis (BD+SCZ) and the SNPs selected for the analysis. Results Eight SNPs revealed nominal association signals for all comparisons (Puncorrected<0.05). Among these SNPs, the top two SNPs (associated with psychosis: Pcorrected = 0.048 and 0.037 for rs2251219 and rs2709722, respectively) were further assessed in the second-set samples, and we replicated the signals from the initial screening analysis (associated with psychosis: Pcorrected = 0.0070 and 0.033 for rs2251219 and rs2709722, respectively). The meta-analysis between the current and previous GWAS results showed that rs2251219 in Polybromo1 (PBRM1) was significant on genome-wide association level (P = 5×10−8) only for BD (P = 9.4×10−9) and psychosis (P = 2.0×10−10). Although the association of rs2709722 in Sp8 transcription factor (SP8) was suggestive in the Asian population (P = 2.1×10−7 for psychosis), this signal weakened when the samples size was increased by including data from a

  11. Genetic variation in bacterial kidney disease (BKD) susceptibility in Lake Michigan Chinook Salmon and its progenitor population from the Puget Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Hard, Jeffrey J.; Neely, Kathleen G.; Park, Linda K.; Winton, James R.; Elliott, Diane G.

    2014-01-01

    Mass mortality events in wild fish due to infectious diseases are troubling, especially given the potential for long-term, population-level consequences. Evolutionary theory predicts that populations with sufficient genetic variation will adapt in response to pathogen pressure. Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were introduced into Lake Michigan in the late 1960s from a Washington State hatchery population. In the late 1980s, collapse of the forage base and nutritional stress in Lake Michigan were thought to contribute to die-offs of Chinook Salmon due to bacterial kidney disease (BKD). Previously, we demonstrated that Lake Michigan Chinook Salmon from a Wisconsin hatchery have greater survival following BKD challenge relative to their progenitor population. Here, we evaluated whether the phenotypic divergence of these populations in BKD susceptibility was due to selection rather than genetic drift. Comparison of the overall magnitude of quantitative trait to neutral marker divergence between the populations suggested selection had occurred but a direct test of quantitative trait divergence was not significant, preventing the rejection of the null hypothesis of differentiation through genetic drift. Estimates of phenotypic variation (VP), additive genetic variation (VA) and narrow-sense heritability (h2) were consistently higher in the Wisconsin relative to the Washington population. If selection had acted on the Wisconsin population there was no evidence of a concomitant loss of genetic variation in BKD susceptibility. The Renibacterium salmoninarum exposures were conducted at both 14°C and 9°C; the warmer temperature accelerated time to death in both populations and there was no evidence of phenotypic plasticity or a genotype-by-environment (G × E) interaction. High h2 estimates for BKD susceptibility in the Wisconsin population, combined with a lack of phenotypic plasticity, predicts that future adaptive gains in BKD resistance are still possible and

  12. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be ap...

  13. Genetic Variability of Spodoptera frugiperda Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Populations from Latin America Is Associated with Variations in Susceptibility to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry Toxins▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnerat, Rose ; Martins, Erica; Queiroz, Paulo; Ordúz, Sergio; Jaramillo, Gabriela; Benintende, Graciela ; Cozzi, Jorge; Real, M. Dolores; Martinez-Ramirez, Amparo; Rausell, Carolina ; Cerón, Jairo; Ibarra, Jorge E.; Del Rincon-Castro, M. Cristina; Espinoza, Ana M. ; Meza-Basso, Luis; Cabrera, Lizbeth; Sánchez, Jorge; Soberon, Mario ; Bravo, Alejandra

    2006-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis strains isolated from Latin American soil samples that showed toxicity against three Spodoptera frugiperda populations from different geographical areas (Mexico, Colombia, and Brazil) were characterized on the basis of their insecticidal activity, crystal morphology, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of parasporal crystals, plasmid profiles, and cry gene content. We found that the different S. frugiperda populations display different susceptibilities to the selected B. thuringiensis strains and also to pure preparations of Cry1B, Cry1C, and Cry1D toxins. Binding assays performed with pure toxin demonstrated that the differences in the toxin binding capacities of these insect populations correlated with the observed differences in susceptibility to the three Cry toxins analyzed. Finally, the genetic variability of the three insect populations was analyzed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA-PCR, which showed significant genetic diversity among the three S. frugiperda populations analyzed. The data presented here show that the genetic variability of S. frugiperda populations should be carefully considered in the development of insect pest control strategies, including the deployment of genetically modified maize in different geographical regions. PMID:16936049

  14. Genetic variability of Spodoptera frugiperda Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) populations from Latin America is associated with variations in susceptibility to Bacillus thuringiensis cry toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnerat, Rose; Martins, Erica; Queiroz, Paulo; Ordúz, Sergio; Jaramillo, Gabriela; Benintende, Graciela; Cozzi, Jorge; Real, M Dolores; Martinez-Ramirez, Amparo; Rausell, Carolina; Cerón, Jairo; Ibarra, Jorge E; Del Rincon-Castro, M Cristina; Espinoza, Ana M; Meza-Basso, Luis; Cabrera, Lizbeth; Sánchez, Jorge; Soberon, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2006-11-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis strains isolated from Latin American soil samples that showed toxicity against three Spodoptera frugiperda populations from different geographical areas (Mexico, Colombia, and Brazil) were characterized on the basis of their insecticidal activity, crystal morphology, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of parasporal crystals, plasmid profiles, and cry gene content. We found that the different S. frugiperda populations display different susceptibilities to the selected B. thuringiensis strains and also to pure preparations of Cry1B, Cry1C, and Cry1D toxins. Binding assays performed with pure toxin demonstrated that the differences in the toxin binding capacities of these insect populations correlated with the observed differences in susceptibility to the three Cry toxins analyzed. Finally, the genetic variability of the three insect populations was analyzed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA-PCR, which showed significant genetic diversity among the three S. frugiperda populations analyzed. The data presented here show that the genetic variability of S. frugiperda populations should be carefully considered in the development of insect pest control strategies, including the deployment of genetically modified maize in different geographical regions.

  15. Two-stage comprehensive evaluation of genetic susceptibility of common variants in FBXO38, AP3B2 and WHAMM to severe chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Dong; Dong, Li; Zeng, Lingfang; Yang, Rui; Xu, Jing; Wu, Yue; Xu, Ran; Tao, Hong; Zhang, Nan

    2015-12-08

    Chronic periodontitis is an oral disorder characterized with gingival inflammation and bone destruction. As the sixth-most prevalent condition affecting more than 743 million people around the world, it is classified as one of the seven destructive oral disorders. Early genetic epidemiological evidence indicated a major role for genetics in periodontal disease development. In this study, we conducted a two-stage comprehensive evaluation of the genetic susceptibility of FBXO38, AP3B2 and WHAMM with the diagnosis of severe chronic periodontitis. A total of 5,065 study subjects from the Han Chinese population consisting of 1,264 cases and 3,801 healthy controls were recruited, and 65 single nucleotide markers related to the three candidate genes were genotyped to investigate the susceptibility of patients with these polymorphisms to severe chronic periodontitis. To increase the coverage of genetic markers, we implemented imputation techniques to extend the number of tested makers to 416. Single marker and haplotype-based analyses were performed, and significant results were obtained for FBXO38 (rs10043775, P = 0.0009) and AP3B2 (rs11631963-rs11637433, CA, P = 9.98 × 10(-5); rs1864699-rs2099259-rs2278355, ATC, P = 3.84 × 10(-8)). Our findings provide direct evidence for the association of FBXO38 and AP3B2 with severe chronic periodontitis in the Han Chinese population.

  16. The association between carbohydrate-rich foods and risk of cardiovascular disease is not modified by genetic susceptibility to dyslipidemia as determined by 80 validated variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Sonestedt

    Full Text Available It is still unclear whether carbohydrate consumption is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD risk. Genetic susceptibility might modify the associations between dietary intakes and disease risk.The aim was to examine the association between the consumption of carbohydrate-rich foods (vegetables, fruits and berries, juice, potatoes, whole grains, refined grains, cookies and cakes, sugar and sweets, and sugar-sweetened beverages and the risk of incident ischemic CVD (iCVD; coronary events and ischemic stroke, and whether these associations differ depending on genetic susceptibility to dyslipidemia.Among 26,445 individuals (44-74 years; 62% females from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study cohort, 2,921 experienced an iCVD event during a mean follow-up time of 14 years. At baseline, dietary data were collected using a modified diet history method, and clinical risk factors were measured in 4,535 subjects. We combined 80 validated genetic variants associated with triglycerides and HDL-C or LDL-C, into genetic risk scores and examined the interactions between dietary intakes and genetic risk scores on the incidence of iCVD.Subjects in the highest intake quintile for whole grains had a 13% (95% CI: 3-23%; p-trend: 0.002 lower risk for iCVD compared to the lowest quintile. A higher consumption of foods rich in added sugar (sugar and sweets, and sugar-sweetened beverages had a significant cross-sectional association with higher triglyceride concentrations and lower HDL-C concentrations. A stronger positive association between a high consumption of sugar and sweets on iCVD risk was observed among those with low genetic risk score for triglycerides (p-interaction=0.05.In this prospective cohort study that examined food sources of carbohydrates, individuals with a high consumption of whole grains had a decreased risk of iCVD. No convincing evidence of an interaction between genetic susceptibility for dyslipidemia, measured as genetic risk scores of

  17. Association of genetic polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase (GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1) with bladder cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarinejad, Mohammad Reza; Safarinejad, Saba; Shafiei, Nayyer; Safarinejad, Shiva

    2013-10-01

    The glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) comprise a class of enzymes that detoxify carcinogenic compounds by conjugating glutathione to facilitate their removal. Polymorphisms in GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 genes have been related to risk for bladder cancer. Studies focusing on GSTs gene variants relationship with the risk of bladder cancer have produced conflicting and inconsistent results. We examine the association between genetic polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase P1, GSTM1, GSTT1 genes and development of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). The study population consisted of 166 histologically confirmed male bladder TCC cases and 332 healthy male controls. Genotyping was done using the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method and also investigated combined gene interactions. The GSTP1 Val/Val genotype was significantly associated with bladder cancer (OR = 4.32, 95% CI: 2.64-6.34), whereas the association observed for GSTM1 null (OR = 1.32, 95% CI: 0.82-2.62; P = 0.67) and GSTT1 null genotype (OR = 1.18, 95% CI: 0.79-1.67; P = 0.74) did not reach statistical significance. There was a significant multiple interaction between GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 genotypes in risk of bladder cancer (P for interaction = 0.02). The risk associated with the concurrent presence of GSTM1 positive and GSTP1 Ile/Val or Val/Val (OR = 3.71, 95% CI: 2.34-5.54) and GSTT1 positive and GSTP1 Ile/Val or Val/Val (OR = 2.66, 95% CI: 1.54-4.72) was statistically significant. Patients carrying GSTP1 Val/Val genotype were at increased risk for developing high-grade (OR = 7.68, 95% CI: 4.73-19.25) and muscle invasive (OR = 10.67, 95% CI: 6.34-21.75) bladder cancer. High risk for bladder TCC also was observed with respect to combined GSTT1 null/GSTP1 Ile/Val or Val/Val (OR = 4.76, 95% CI: 2.68-18.72) and GSTM1 null/GSTT1 null/GSTP1 Ile/Val or Val/Val (OR = 6.42, 95% CI: 4.76-14.72) genotype variant. This study suggests that the GSTP1 polymorphism

  18. Genome-wide Association Studies from the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) Initiative | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGEMS identifies common inherited genetic variations associated with a number of cancers, including breast and prostate. Data from these genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are available through the Division of Cancer Epidemiology & Genetics website.

  19. Reconstructing ancestral ranges in historical biogeography: properties and prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kristin S. LAMM; Benjamin D. REDELINGS

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a proliferation of quantitative methods for biogeographic inference. In particular, novel parametric approaches represent exciting new opportunities for the study of range evolution. Here, we review a selection of current methods for biogeographic analysis and discuss their respective properties. These methods include generalized parsimony approaches, weighted ancestral area analysis, dispersal-vicariance analysis, the dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis model and other maximum likelihood approaches, and Bayesian stochastic mapping of ancestral ranges, including a novel approach to inferring range evolution in the context of island biogeography. Some of these methods were developed specifically for problems of ancestral range reconstruction, whereas others were designed for more general problems of character state reconstruction and subsequently applied to the study of ancestral ranges. Methods for reconstructing ancestral history on a phylogenetic tree differ not only in the types of ancestral range states that are allowed, but also in the various historical events that may change the ancestral ranges. We explore how the form of allowed ancestral ranges and allowed transitions can both affect the outcome of ancestral range estimation. Finally, we mention some promising avenues for future work in the development of model-based approaches to biogeographic analysis.

  20. Characteristics of mRNA levels of hepatic key enzymes in cholesterol metabolism of genetically gallstone-susceptible mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许国强; 赵力

    2004-01-01

    @@ Our previous study1 indicated that biliary cholesterol hypersecretion was the key pathophysiological defect of gallstone formation. Lith genes determine biliary cholesterol hypersecretion and susceptibility to cholesterol gallstone formation in C57L mice.

  1. Temporal and seasonal changes of genetic polymorphisms associated with altered drug susceptibility to chloroquine, lumefantrine and quinine in Guinea-Bissau between 2003 and 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jovel, Irina Tatiana; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Rombo, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guinea-Bissau, West-Africa introduced artemether-lumefantrine in 2008 but quinine has also been commonly prescribed for treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. An efficacious high-dose chloroquine treatment regimen was used previously. Temporal and seasonal changes...... of genetic polymorphisms associated with altered drug susceptibility to chloroquine, lumefantrine and quinine are described. METHODS: Pfcrt K76T, pfmdr1 gene copy numbers, N86Y, Y184F and 1034-1246 sequences were determined using PCR-based methods. Blood samples came from virtually all (n=1806) children aged.......001). CONCLUSIONS: Following the discontinuation of an effective chloroquine regimen highly artemether-lumefantrine susceptible P. falciparum (with pfcrt 76T) accumulated possibly due to suboptimal use of quinine and despite a fitness cost linked to 76T....

  2. Genetic variants in toll-like receptors are not associated with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility or anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke J H Coenen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies point to a role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We investigated if genetic variants in TLR genes are associated with RA and response to tumour necrosis factor blocking (anti-TNF medication. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in seven TLR genes were genotyped in a Dutch cohort consisting of 378 RA patients and 294 controls. Significantly associated variants were investigated in replication cohorts from The Netherlands, United Kingdom and Sweden (2877 RA patients and 2025 controls. 182 of the Dutch patients were treated with anti-TNF medication. Using these patients and a replication cohort (269 Swedish patients we analysed if genetic variants in TLR genes were associated with anti-TNF outcome. In the discovery phase of the study we found a significant association of SNPs rs2072493 in TLR5 and rs3853839 in TLR7 with RA disease susceptibility. Meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts did not confirm these findings. SNP rs2072493 in TLR5 was associated with anti-TNF outcome in the Dutch but not in the Swedish population. CONCLUSION: We conclude that genetic variants in TLRs do not play a major role in susceptibility for developing RA nor in anti-TNF treatment outcome in a Caucasian population.

  3. Selection of ovine housekeeping genes for normalisation by real-time RT-PCR; analysis of PrP gene expression and genetic susceptibility to scrapie

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    Hurtado Ana

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular prion protein expression is essential for the development of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, and in sheep, genetic susceptibility to scrapie has been associated to PrP gene polymorphisms. To test the hypothetical linkage between PrP gene expression and genetic susceptibility, PrP mRNA levels were measured by real-time RT-PCR in six ovine tissues of animals with different genotypes. Results Previous to the PrP gene expression analysis the stability of several housekeeping (HK genes was assessed in order to select the best ones for relative quantification. The normalisation of gene expression was carried out using a minimum of three HK genes in order to detect small expression differences more accurately than using a single control gene. The expression stability analysis of six HK genes showed a large tissue-associated variation reflecting the existence of tissue-specific factors. Thereby, a specific set of HK genes was required for an accurate normalisation of the PrP gene expression within each tissue. Statistical differences in the normalised PrP mRNA levels were found among the tissues, obtaining the highest expression level in obex, followed by ileum, lymph node, spleen, cerebellum and cerebrum. A tendency towards increased PrP mRNA levels and genetic susceptibility was observed in central nervous system. However, the results did not support the hypothesis that PrP mRNA levels vary between genotypes. Conclusion The results on PrP gene expression presented here provide valuable baseline data for future studies on scrapie pathogenesis. On the other hand, the results on stability data of several HK genes reported in this study could prove very useful in other gene expression studies carried out in these relevant ovine tissues.

  4. An X chromosome association scan of the Norfolk Island genetic isolate provides evidence for a novel migraine susceptibility locus at Xq12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget H Maher

    Full Text Available Migraine is a common and debilitating neurovascular disorder with a complex envirogenomic aetiology. Numerous studies have demonstrated a preponderance of women affected with migraine and previous pedigree linkage studies in our laboratory have identified susceptibility loci on chromosome Xq24-Xq28. In this study we have used the genetic isolate of Norfolk Island to further analyse the X chromosome for migraine susceptibility loci.An association approach was employed to analyse 14,124 SNPs spanning the entire X chromosome. Genotype data from 288 individuals comprising a large core-pedigree, of which 76 were affected with migraine, were analysed. Although no SNP reached chromosome-wide significance (empirical α = 1 × 10(-5 ranking by P-value revealed two primary clusters of SNPs in the top 25. A 10 SNP cluster represents a novel migraine susceptibility locus at Xq12 whilst a 11 SNP cluster represents a previously identified migraine susceptibility locus at Xq27. The strongest association at Xq12 was seen for rs599958 (OR = 1.75, P = 8.92 × 10(-4, whilst at Xq27 the strongest association was for rs6525667 (OR = 1.53, P = 1.65 × 10(-4. Further analysis of SNPs at these loci was performed in 5,122 migraineurs from the Women's Genome Health Study and provided additional evidence for association at the novel Xq12 locus (P<0.05.Overall, this study provides evidence for a novel migraine susceptibility locus on Xq12. The strongest effect SNP (rs102834, joint P = 1.63 × 10(-5 is located within the 5'UTR of the HEPH gene, which is involved in iron homeostasis in the brain and may represent a novel pathway for involvement in migraine pathogenesis.

  5. MHC Expression on Spleen Lymphocyte Subsets in Genetically Resistant and Susceptible Chickens Infected with Marek's Disease Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tina; Bøving, Mette K.; Handberg, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Resistance and susceptibility to Marek's disease (MD) are strongly influenced by the chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC). In this study, splenic lymphocytes from MD-resistant and MD-susceptible chickens of three MHC genotypes (B21/B21, B19/B21, and B19/B19) were analyzed by flow...... cytometry for MHC surface expression. In the spleen, constitutive MHC class I surface expression was found to be highest in homozygous B19, lowest in homozygous B21, and intermediate in heterozygous B19/B21 animals. This was observed on CD4(+), CD8(+), and Bu-1(+) splenic lymphocytes. Chickens of all three...

  6. Genetic variation between susceptible and non-susceptible snails to Schistosoma infection using random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPDs Variação genética entre moluscos susceptíveis e não susceptíveis à infecção pelo Schistosoma através da análise do DNA polimórfico amplificado aleatóriamente (RAPDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Hamid Zaki ABDEL-HAMID

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of snails to infection by certain trematodes and their suitability as hosts for continued development has been a bewildering problem in host-parasite relationships. The present work emphasizes our interest in snail genetics to determine what genes or gene products are specifically responsible for susceptibility of snails to infection. High molecular weight DNA was extracted from both susceptible and non-susceptible snails within the same species Biomphalaria tenagophila. RAPD was undertaken to distinguish between the two types of snails. Random primers (10 mers were used to amplify the extracted DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE and silver staining. The results suggest that RAPD represents an efficient means of genome comparison, since many molecular markers were detected as genetic variations between susceptible and non-susceptible snails.A susceptibilidade de moluscos à infecção por certos trematódeos e a sua capacidade como hospedeiro para o contínuo desenvolvimento é o problema mais deslumbrante nas relações parasita hospedeiro. O presente trabalho, focaliza nosso interesse na genética dos moluscos para determinar quais genes ou produtos gênicos são especificamente responsáveis pela susceptibilidade do molusco à infecção. DNA de alto peso molecular, foi extraído de ambos moluscos susceptíveis e não susceptíveis da espécie Biomphalaria tenagophila. Iniciadores aleatórios com 10 pares de bases foram usados na amplificação aleatória (RAPD de ambos os DNAs e análise por eletroforese em gel de poliacrilamida e coloração com prata. Os resultados mostram que a amplificação aleatória do DNA representa um eficiente caminho para a comparação dos genomas desde que marcadores moleculares foram detectados como variantes genéticos entre os moluscos susceptíveis e não susceptíveis.

  7. Ancestral Area Analysis of the Genus Caragara (Leguminosae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGMing-Li

    2004-01-01

    Caragana has a temperate Asian distribution. Based on the phylogeny and 13 distributionalareas of this genus, its ancestral area was studied via the ancestral area analysis suggested by Bremer(1992), Ronquist (1994) and Hausdorf (1997). The results indicate that three areas, Far East-NortheastChina, Altai-Sayan and North China-Qinling Mountains (Mts) are likely the ancestral areas. Linking to theviewpoints of the Holarctic origin for north temperate flora, Far East-Northeast China seems more likely tobe the ancestral area. According to the three ancestral areas isolated geographically and the analysis inthe present study, as well as former biogeographical analysis of this genus, it is suggested that Caraganaspeciation is mainly in the mode of vicariance rather than dispersal, and dispersed is often in shortdistance.

  8. Association of genetic susceptibility variants for type 2 diabetes with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Zhao (Zhiguo); W. Wen (Wanqing); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); B. Zhang (Bin); J. Long (Jirong); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.L. Milne (Roger); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); H. Ahsan (Habibul); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); V. Arndt (Volker); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A. Beeghly-Fadiel (Alicia); J. Benítez (Javier); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); H. Brenner (Hermann); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); Q. Cai (Qiuyin); G. Casey (Graham); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); K. Czene (Kamila); T. Dörk (Thilo); M. Dumont (Martine); P.A. Fasching (Peter); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); O. Fletcher (Olivia); H. Flyger (Henrik); F. Fostira (Florentia); M. Gammon (Marilie); G.G. Giles (Graham); P. Guénel (Pascal); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); U. Hamann (Ute); P. harrington (Patricia); J.M. Hartman (Joost); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); J.L. Hopper (John); A. Jakubowska (Anna); F. Jasmine (Farzana); E.M. John (Esther); N. Johnson (Nichola); M. Kabisch (Maria); S. Khan (Sofia); M.G. Kibriya (Muhammad); J.A. Knight (Julia A.); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); M. Kriege (Mieke); V. Kristensen (Vessela); L. Le Marchand (Loic); E. Lee (Eunjung); J. Li (Jingmei); A. Lindblom (Annika); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); R.N. Luben (Robert); J. Lubinski (Jan); K.E. Malone (Kathleen E.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); S. Margolin (Sara); F. Marme (Federick); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A. Meindl (Alfons); X. Miao; K.R. Muir (K.); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P. Neven (Patrick); J.E. Olson (Janet); B. Perkins (Barbara); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Rudolph (Anja); R. Santella (Regina); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); M. Shah (Mitul); M. Shrubsole (Martha); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A.E. Toland (Amanda); I. Tomlinson (Ian); D. Torres (Diana); T. Truong (Thérèse); G. Ursin (Giske); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); S. Verhoef; S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); A.S. Whittemore (Alice S.); R. Winqvist (Robert); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); H. Zhao (Hui); A.M. Dunning (Alison); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Hall (Per); P. Kraft (Peter); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); D. Hunter (David); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); W. Zheng (Wei)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. Methods: We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2

  9. Association of genetic susceptibility variants for type 2 diabetes with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wen, Wanqing; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Ben; Long, Jirong; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Milne, Roger L; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lindstrom, Sara; Bojesen, Stig E; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Qiuyin; Casey, Graham; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gammon, Marilie; Giles, Graham G; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Harrington, Patricia; Hartman, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jasmine, Farzana; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Khan, Sofia; Kibriya, Muhammad; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriege, Mieke; Kristensen, Vessela; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Luben, Robert; Lubinski, Jan; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miao, Hui; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olson, Janet E; Perkins, Barbara; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Santella, Regina; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schoemaker, Minouk; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Toland, Amanda E; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Ursin, Giske; Van Der Luijt, Rob B; Verhoef, Senno; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Whittemore, Alice S; Winqvist, Robert; Pilar Zamora, M; Zhao, Hui; Dunning, Alison M; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul; Hunter, David; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. METHODS: We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2D susceptibi

  10. Genetic polymorphism of interleukin-6 influences susceptibility to HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma in a male Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shengli; Yuan, Yufeng; He, Yueming; Pan, Dingyu; Zhang, Yongxi; Liu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Quanyan; Zhang, Zhonglin; Liu, Zhisu

    2014-04-01

    As a multifunctional cytokine, interleukin-6 (IL-6) plays a key role in chronic inflammation as well as tumor growth and progression of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Recent studies have implicated that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) -572C>G (rs1800796) located within the promoter region of IL-6 gene was associated with susceptibility to several diseases. Here, a case-control study was undertaken to investigate the association between this polymorphism and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) susceptibility in a Chinese Han population. A total of 900 patients with chronic HBV infection, including 505 HBV-related HCC patients and 395 HBV infected patients without HCC were enrolled, and rs1800796 polymorphism was genotyped by the TaqMan method and DNA sequencing technology. The results indicated no significant association between rs1800796 polymorphism and the risk of HBV-related HCC in all subjects; however, a significant difference was identified in male subjects. Under the dominant model, male subjects with the G allele (CG/GG) have higher susceptibility to HBV-related HCC than those with CC genotype after adjusting confounding factors (P=0.012, odds ratio [OR] 1.68, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.15-2.42). Our results suggested that rs1800796 polymorphism of IL-6 gene was associated with susceptibility to HBV-related HCC in a male Chinese Han population.

  11. Detection of an ABCA1 Variant Associated with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Susceptibility for Biochemistry and Genetic Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legorreta-Herrera, M.; Mosqueda-Romo, N. A.; Hernández-Clemente, F.; Soto-Cruz, I.

    2013-01-01

    We selected diabetes mellitus for this laboratory exercise to provide students with an explicit model for scientific research concerning the association between the R230C polymorphism and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is highly prevalent in the Mexican population. We used a collaborative project-based learning to engage…

  12. Drug Susceptibility and Genetic Evaluation of Plasmodium falciparum Isolates Obtained in Four Distinct Geographical Regions of Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Mbaisi, Abigael; Liyala, Pamela; Eyase, Fredrick; Achilla, Rachel; Akala, Hosea; Wangui, Julia; Mwangi, Josphat; Osuna, Finnley; Alam, Uzma; Smoak, Bonnie L.; Davis, Jon M.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Coldren, Rodney L; Mason, Carl; Waters, Norman C.

    2004-01-01

    The drug resistance profiles of Plasmodium falciparum isolated from four regions in Kenya were analyzed for drug resistance profiles. We observed variability in resistance to a broad range of antimalarial drugs across Kenya as determined from in vitro drug susceptibility screening and genotyping analysis.

  13. Ancestral informative marker selection and population structure visualization using sparse Laplacian eigenfunctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available Identification of a small panel of population structure informative markers can reduce genotyping cost and is useful in various applications, such as ancestry inference in association mapping, forensics and evolutionary theory in population genetics. Traditional methods to ascertain ancestral informative markers usually require the prior knowledge of individual ancestry and have difficulty for admixed populations. Recently Principal Components Analysis (PCA has been employed with success to select SNPs which are highly correlated with top significant principal components (PCs without use of individual ancestral information. The approach is also applicable to admixed populations. Here we propose a novel approach based on our recent result on summarizing population structure by graph laplacian eigenfunctions, which differs from PCA in that it is geometric and robust to outliers. Our approach also takes advantage of the priori sparseness of informative markers in the genome. Through simulation of a ring population and the real global population sample HGDP of 650K SNPs genotyped in 940 unrelated individuals, we validate the proposed algorithm at selecting most informative markers, a small fraction of which can recover the similar underlying population structure efficiently. Employing a standard Support Vector Machine (SVM to predict individuals' continental memberships on HGDP dataset of seven continents, we demonstrate that the selected SNPs by our method are more informative but less redundant than those selected by PCA. Our algorithm is a promising tool in genome-wide association studies and population genetics, facilitating the selection of structure informative markers, efficient detection of population substructure and ancestral inference.

  14. Inference of Ancestral Recombination Graphs through Topological Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cámara, Pablo G; Levine, Arnold J; Rabadán, Raúl

    2016-08-01

    The recent explosion of genomic data has underscored the need for interpretable and comprehensive analyses that can capture complex phylogenetic relationships within and across species. Recombination, reassortment and horizontal gene transfer constitute examples of pervasive biological phenomena that cannot be captured by tree-like representations. Starting from hundreds of genomes, we are interested in the reconstruction of potential evolutionary histories leading to the observed data. Ancestral recombination graphs represent potential histories that explicitly accommodate recombination and mutation events across orthologous genomes. However, they are computationally costly to reconstruct, usually being infeasible for more than few tens of genomes. Recently, Topological Data Analysis (TDA) methods have been proposed as robust and scalable methods that can capture the genetic scale and frequency of recombination. We build upon previous TDA developments for detecting and quantifying recombination, and present a novel framework that can be applied to hundreds of genomes and can be interpreted in terms of minimal histories of mutation and recombination events, quantifying the scales and identifying the genomic locations of recombinations. We implement this framework in a software package, called TARGet, and apply it to several examples, including small migration between different populations, human recombination, and horizontal evolution in finches inhabiting the Galápagos Islands.

  15. Genetic Polymorphisms of TGFB1, TGFBR1, SNAI1 and TWIST1 Are Associated with Endometrial Cancer Susceptibility in Chinese Han Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Wang, Ya-Jun; Zheng, Li-Yuan; Jia, Yu-Mian; Chen, Yi-Lin; Chen, Lan; Liu, Dong-Ge; Li, Xiang-Hong; Guo, Hong-Yan; Sun, Ying-Li; Tian, Xin-Xia; Fang, Wei-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is a complex disease involving multiple gene-gene and gene–environment interactions. TGF-β signaling plays pivotal roles in EC development. This study aimed to investigate whether the genetic polymorphisms of TGF-β signaling related genes TGFB1, TGFBR1, SNAI1 and TWIST1 contribute to EC susceptibility. Using the TaqMan Genotyping Assay, 19 tagging-SNPs of these four genes were genotyped in 516 EC cases and 707 controls among Chinese Han women. Logistic regression (LR) showed that the genetic variants of TGFB1 rs1800469, TGFBR1 rs6478974 and rs10733710, TWIST1 rs4721745 were associated with decreased EC risk, and these four loci showed a dose-dependent effect (Ptrend menarche-first full term pregnancy intervals (˃11 years) and BMI˂24 (aOR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.17–0.90, P = 0.0275). These results suggest that polymorphisms in TGFB1, TGFBR1, SNAI1 and TWIST1 may modulate EC susceptibility, both separately and corporately. PMID:27171242

  16. Probability theory-based SNP association study method for identifying susceptibility loci and genetic disease models in human case-control data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiguo; Zhang, Junying; Wang, Yue

    2010-12-01

    One of the most challenging points in studying human common complex diseases is to search for both strong and weak susceptibility single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and identify forms of genetic disease models. Currently, a number of methods have been proposed for this purpose. Many of them have not been validated through applications into various genome datasets, so their abilities are not clear in real practice. In this paper, we present a novel SNP association study method based on probability theory, called ProbSNP. The method firstly detects SNPs by evaluating their joint probabilities in combining with disease status and selects those with the lowest joint probabilities as susceptibility ones, and then identifies some forms of genetic disease models through testing multiple-locus interactions among the selected SNPs. The joint probabilities of combined SNPs are estimated by establishing Gaussian distribution probability density functions, in which the related parameters (i.e., mean value and standard deviation) are evaluated based on allele and haplotype frequencies. Finally, we test and validate the method using various genome datasets. We find that ProbSNP has shown remarkable success in the applications to both simulated genome data and real genome-wide data.

  17. No Direct Association of Serotonin Transporter (STin2 VNTR and Receptor (HT 102T>C Gene Variants in Genetic Susceptibility to Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Joshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to find out if the serotonin receptor (HT102T>C and serotonin transporter (STin 2 polymorphisms play any role in genetic susceptibility of migraine. For the study, 217 migraine patients and 217 healthy controls (HC were recruited and genotyping was carried out using the Polymerase Chain Reaction and Restriction Fragment Length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method. All results were Bonferroni corrected. We could not find any significant differences in the genotype or allele frequencies in case of HT 102 T>C polymorphism between migraine patients and healthy controls (P value=0.224. No significant association was seen at allele and carrier levels. Sub-grouping the patients on the basis of gender or on basis of migraine type i.e. with or without aura also did not show any association. Similarly, no difference in genotype (P value=0.236, allele (P value=0.550 or carrier frequency (P value=0.771 in STin 2 VNTR polymorphism was observed between migraine patients. However, HT 102 TC genotype was observed to interact significantly with the STin 2.10/10 genotype in enhancing risk of migraine, both with and without aura. In conclusion, the HT102 T>C receptor and the STin 2 VNTR transporter polymorphisms, did not individually confer any significant risk of migraine or its clinical subtypes but the two polymorphisms appear to synergistically influence susceptibility to migraine. Serotonin transporter (STin2 VNTR and receptor (HT 102T>C polymorphisms; Migraine with aura (MA; Migraine without aura (MO; Genetic susceptibility

  18. Host genetic variations in glutathione-S-transferases, superoxide dismutases and catalase genes influence susceptibility to malaria infection in an Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Rayzel C; Hasan, Marriyah; Gupta, Himanshu; Geetha, K; Rai, Padmalatha S; Hande, Manjunath H; D'Souza, Sydney C; Adhikari, Prabha; Brand, Angela; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2015-06-01

    Antioxidant enzymes can contribute to disease susceptibility or determine response to therapy in individuals with malaria. Genetic variations due to polymorphisms in host genes encoding antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione S-transferases-theta, mu, pi (GSTT, GSTM, GSTP), superoxide dismutases (SOD) and catalase (CAT), may therefore, influence inter-individual response to malaria pathology and propensity of infection caused by Plasmodium vivax (Pv) and Plasmodium falciparum (Pf). Therefore, using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and DNA sequencing, we investigated the association of deletions of GSTT1 and GSTM1, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of GSTP1 (rs1695), SOD1 (rs2234694), SOD2 (rs4880, rs1141718), SOD3 (rs2536512) and CAT (rs1001179) in individuals infected with Pf (n = 100) and Pv (n = 100) against healthy controls (n = 150). Our data suggest a significant role for GSTM1 deletions in complicated Pv (p = 0.0007) malaria with ODDs ratio 3.8 [with 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.9-7.4]. The results also indicated that polymorphisms present in GSTP1, SOD1 and CAT genes may be associated with malaria susceptibility (p < 0.05), whereas SOD3 polymorphism may play a role in malarial resistance (p < 0.05). In addition, we observed significant SNP-SNP interactions with synergistic genetic effects in SOD2, SOD3 and CAT genes for Pv and in SOD2 and SOD3 genes for Pf. In conclusion, our results provide convincing evidence for a relationship between polymorphisms in host antioxidant enzymes and susceptibility to malaria infection.

  19. Genetic susceptibility to chronic wasting disease in free-ranging white-tailed deer: complement component C1q and Prnp polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchong, Julie A; Heisey, Dennis M; Scribner, Kim T; Libants, Scot V; Johnson, Chad; Aiken, Judd M; Langenberg, Julia A; Samuel, Michael D

    2009-12-01

    The genetic basis of susceptibility to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in free-ranging cervids is of great interest. Association studies of disease susceptibility in free-ranging populations, however, face considerable challenges including: the need for large sample sizes when disease is rare, animals of unknown pedigree create a risk of spurious results due to population admixture, and the inability to control disease exposure or dose. We used an innovative matched case-control design and conditional logistic regression to evaluate associations between polymorphisms of complement C1q and prion protein (Prnp) genes and CWD infection in white-tailed deer from the CWD endemic area in south-central Wisconsin. To reduce problems due to admixture or disease-risk confounding, we used neutral genetic (microsatellite) data to identify closely related CWD-positive (n=68) and CWD-negative (n=91) female deer to serve as matched cases and controls. Cases and controls were also matched on factors (sex, location, age) previously demonstrated to affect CWD infection risk. For Prnp, deer with at least one Serine (S) at amino acid 96 were significantly less likely to be CWD-positive relative to deer homozygous for Glycine (G). This is the first characterization of genes associated with the complement system in white-tailed deer. No tests for association between any C1q polymorphism and CWD infection were significant at p<0.05. After controlling for Prnp, we found weak support for an elevated risk of CWD infection in deer with at least one Glycine (G) at amino acid 56 of the C1qC gene. While we documented numerous amino acid polymorphisms in C1q genes none appear to be strongly associated with CWD susceptibility.

  20. Lung necrosis and neutrophils reflect common pathways of susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in genetically diverse, immune-competent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Muhammad K K; Dhulekar, Nimit; Schmidt, Diane; Major, Samuel; Cooper, Rachel; Abeijon, Claudia; Gatti, Daniel M; Kramnik, Igor; Yener, Bulent; Gurcan, Metin; Beamer, Gillian

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in susceptible humans. Here, we infected Diversity Outbred (DO) mice with ∼100 bacilli by aerosol to model responses in a highly heterogeneous population. Following infection, 'supersusceptible', 'susceptible' and 'resistant' phenotypes emerged. TB disease (reduced survival, weight loss, high bacterial load) correlated strongly with neutrophils, neutrophil chemokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and cell death. By contrast, immune cytokines were weak correlates of disease. We next applied statistical and machine learning approaches to our dataset of cytokines and chemokines from lungs and blood. Six molecules from the lung: TNF, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL5, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 12 (IL-12); and two molecules from blood - IL-2 and TNF - were identified as being important by applying both statistical and machine learning methods. Using molecular features to generate tree classifiers, CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL5 distinguished four classes (supersusceptible, susceptible, resistant and non-infected) from each other with approximately 77% accuracy using completely independent experimental data. By contrast, models based on other molecules were less accurate. Low to no IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-2 and IL-10 successfully discriminated non-infected mice from infected mice but failed to discriminate disease status amongst supersusceptible, susceptible and resistant M.-tuberculosis-infected DO mice. Additional analyses identified CXCL1 as a promising peripheral biomarker of disease and of CXCL1 production in the lungs. From these results, we conclude that: (1) DO mice respond variably to M. tuberculosis infection and will be useful to identify pathways involving necrosis and neutrophils; (2) data from DO mice is suited for machine learning methods to build, validate and test models with independent data based solely on molecular biomarkers; (3) low levels of immunological cytokines best indicate a lack of exposure

  1. MBL2 Genetic Variants in HCV Infection Susceptibility, Spontaneous Viral Clearance and Pegylated Interferon Plus Ribavirin Treatment Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupin, L; Polesello, V; Alberi, G; Moratelli, G; Crocè, S L; Masutti, F; Pozzato, G; Crovella, S; Segat, L

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C is disease that damages the liver, and it is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The pathology became chronic in about 80% of the cases due to virus persistence in the host organism. The standard of care consists of pegylated interferon plus ribavirin; however, the treatment response is very variable and different host/viral factors may concur in the disease outcome. The mannose-binding protein C (MBL) is a component of the innate immune system, able to recognize HCV and consecutively activating the immune response. MBL is encoded by MBL2 gene, and polymorphisms, two in the promoter region (H/L and X/Y) and three in exon 1 (at codon 52, 54 and 57), have been described as functionally influencing protein expression. In this work, 203 Italian HCV patients and 61 healthy controls were enrolled and genotyped for the five MBL2 polymorphisms mentioned above to investigate their role in HCV infection susceptibility, spontaneous viral clearance and treatment response. MBL2 polymorphisms were not associated with HCV infection susceptibility and with spontaneous viral clearance, while MBL2 O allele, O/O genotype, HYO haplotype and DP combined genotype (all correlated with low or deficient MBL expression) were associated with sustained virological response. Moreover, a meta-analysis to assess the role of MBL2 polymorphisms in HCV infection susceptibility was also performed: YA haplotype could be associated with protection towards HCV infection.

  2. Identification of shared genetic susceptibility locus for coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity: a meta-analysis of genome-wide studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Chaoneng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Type 2 diabetes (2DM, obesity, and coronary artery disease (CAD are frequently coexisted being as key components of metabolic syndrome. Whether there is shared genetic background underlying these diseases remained unclear. We performed a meta-analysis of 35 genome screens for 2DM, 36 for obesity or body mass index (BMI-defined obesity, and 21 for CAD using genome search meta-analysis (GSMA, which combines linkage results to identify regions with only weak evidence and provide genetic interactions among different diseases. For each study, 120 genomic bins of approximately 30 cM were defined and ranked according to the best linkage evidence within each bin. For each disease, bin 6.2 achieved genomic significanct evidence, and bin 9.3, 10.5, 16.3 reached suggestive level for 2DM. Bin 11.2 and 16.3, and bin 10.5 and 9.3, reached suggestive evidence for obesity and CAD respectively. In pooled all three diseases, bin 9.3 and 6.5 reached genomic significant and suggestive evidence respectively, being relatively much weaker for 2DM/CAD or 2DM/obesity or CAD/obesity. Further, genomewide significant evidence was observed of bin 16.3 and 4.5 for 2DM/obesity, which is decreased when CAD was added. These findings indicated that bin 9.3 and 6.5 are most likely to be shared by 2DM, obesity and CAD. And bin 16.3 and 4.5 are potentially common regions to 2DM and obesity only. The observed shared susceptibility regions imply a partly overlapping genetic aspects of disease development. Fine scanning of these regions will definitely identify more susceptibility genes and causal variants.

  3. Polymorphisms and Plasma Levels of Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-3: Impact on Genetic Susceptibility and Clinical Outcome of Oral Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chun-Wen; Huang, Yi-Wen; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Su, Shih-Chi; Yang, Shun-Fa; Lin, Chiao-Wen

    2015-11-01

    Oral cancer, the fourth most common cancer among men in Taiwan, is associated with environmental carcinogens. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP3), a member of the TIMP family, is the only protein that binds to the extracellular matrix for suppressing cancer cell growth, angiogenesis, migration, and invasion. The association of TIMP3 polymorphism with oral cancer susceptibility, however, has not yet been reported. In this study, 1947 participants-1200 healthy male controls and 747 male patients with oral cancer-were recruited. Allelic discrimination of TIMP3 -1296 T > C (rs9619311), TIMP3 C > T (rs9862), and TIMP3 C > T (rs11547635) polymorphisms were assessed through real-time polymerase chain reaction. The authors discovered that individuals carrying the polymorphic rs9862 allele are more susceptible to oral cancer [odds ratio (OR), 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.2-1.9; adjusted OR (AOR), 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2-2.1] after adjustment for betel quid chewing, alcohol, and tobacco consumption. Among 601 betel quid chewers, the TIMP3 polymorphism rs9862 T/T carriers had a 32.2-fold (95% CI, 20.2-51.3) increased oral cancer risk compared with those carrying C/C and not chewing betel quid. In addition, the authors observed a significant association between rs9862 variants and large tumors (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.0-2.3) development. Moreover, TIMP3 plasma levels significantly increased in oral cancer patients who have large tumor or carry T allele rs9862 polymorphism. In conclusion, these results suggest that gene-environment interactions between the TIMP3 rs9862 polymorphisms and betel quid may alter oral cancer susceptibility and tumor growth in Taiwanese men.

  4. Lung necrosis and neutrophils reflect common pathways of susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in genetically diverse, immune-competent mice

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    Muhammad K. K. Niazi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in susceptible humans. Here, we infected Diversity Outbred (DO mice with ∼100 bacilli by aerosol to model responses in a highly heterogeneous population. Following infection, ‘supersusceptible’, ‘susceptible’ and ‘resistant’ phenotypes emerged. TB disease (reduced survival, weight loss, high bacterial load correlated strongly with neutrophils, neutrophil chemokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF and cell death. By contrast, immune cytokines were weak correlates of disease. We next applied statistical and machine learning approaches to our dataset of cytokines and chemokines from lungs and blood. Six molecules from the lung: TNF, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL5, interferon-γ (IFN-γ, interleukin 12 (IL-12; and two molecules from blood – IL-2 and TNF – were identified as being important by applying both statistical and machine learning methods. Using molecular features to generate tree classifiers, CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL5 distinguished four classes (supersusceptible, susceptible, resistant and non-infected from each other with approximately 77% accuracy using completely independent experimental data. By contrast, models based on other molecules were less accurate. Low to no IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-2 and IL-10 successfully discriminated non-infected mice from infected mice but failed to discriminate disease status amongst supersusceptible, susceptible and resistant M.-tuberculosis-infected DO mice. Additional analyses identified CXCL1 as a promising peripheral biomarker of disease and of CXCL1 production in the lungs. From these results, we conclude that: (1 DO mice respond variably to M. tuberculosis infection and will be useful to identify pathways involving necrosis and neutrophils; (2 data from DO mice is suited for machine learning methods to build, validate and test models with independent data based solely on molecular biomarkers; (3 low levels of immunological cytokines best

  5. Why Meillassoux’s Speculative Materialism Struggles with Ancestrality

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    Ciprian Jeler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows that Quentin Meillassoux’s speculative materialism doesn’t offer us the means to account for the ancestral statements that the modern sciences produce, i.e. for the scientific statements about events preceding all forms of life. An analysis of the reasons why Meillassoux thinks that the problem of ancestrality problematizes the contemporary self-evidence of correlationism is first offered. The results of this analysis are then applied to speculative materialism itself and the consequences are not very promising: very much like correlationism, speculative materialism explicitly denies what I call the “generalized version of the realistic assumption of science” and, in so doing, renders scientific ancestral statements de jure unverifiable. Therefore, if correlationism is rendered suspicious by the issue of ancestrality, the same can be said of speculative materialism.

  6. Bayesian phylogeography of influenza A/H3N2 for the 2014-15 season in the United States using three frameworks of ancestral state reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchard, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Ancestral state reconstructions in Bayesian phylogeography of virus pandemics have been improved by utilizing a Bayesian stochastic search variable selection (BSSVS) framework. Recently, this framework has been extended to model the transition rate matrix between discrete states as a generalized linear model (GLM) of genetic, geographic, demographic, and environmental predictors of interest to the virus and incorporating BSSVS to estimate the posterior inclusion probabilities of each predictor. Although the latter appears to enhance the biological validity of ancestral state reconstruction, there has yet to be a comparison of phylogenies created by the two methods. In this paper, we compare these two methods, while also using a primitive method without BSSVS, and highlight the differences in phylogenies created by each. We test six coalescent priors and six random sequence samples of H3N2 influenza during the 2014–15 flu season in the U.S. We show that the GLMs yield significantly greater root state posterior probabilities than the two alternative methods under five of the six priors, and significantly greater Kullback-Leibler divergence values than the two alternative methods under all priors. Furthermore, the GLMs strongly implicate temperature and precipitation as driving forces of this flu season and nearly unanimously identified a single root state, which exhibits the most tropical climate during a typical flu season in the U.S. The GLM, however, appears to be highly susceptible to sampling bias compared with the other methods, which casts doubt on whether its reconstructions should be favored over those created by alternate methods. We report that a BSSVS approach with a Poisson prior demonstrates less bias toward sample size under certain conditions than the GLMs or primitive models, and believe that the connection between reconstruction method and sampling bias warrants further investigation. PMID:28170397

  7. T allele at site 6007 of bone morphogenetic protein-4 gene increases genetic susceptibility to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in male Chinese Han population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xiang-long; WANG Hao; YANG Hui; HAI Yong; TIAN Bao-peng; LIN Xin

    2010-01-01

    Background Several candidate genes of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) susceptibility have been identified, but their polymorphisms account for only a small percent of the total variance. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) is a potent ectopic ossification inducing factor. BMP4 protein and mRNA are present in cells from OPLL patients, but not non-OPLL controls. A single nucleotide polymorphism of 6007C>T(rs17563) of BMP4 has been reported to affect bone density in postmenopausal women. Thus, BMP4 may function in OPLL development. Appropriately, the relationship between BMP4 polymorphisms and OPLL was investigated.Methods A case-control association study investigated the genetic etiology in 179 OPLL patients and 298 non-OPLL controls. Extent of OPLL was analyzed by radiologic examinations. Whether single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of -5826G>A(rs1957860) 5′ of the transcription start site and 6007C>T(rs17563) in exon 4 of the BMP4 gene were statistically associated with genetic susceptibility to OPLL in Chinese Han subjects was assessed.Results A significant statistical difference in genotype of 6007C>T polymorphism between male OPLL patients and male controls was evident, and the frequency of "TT" genotype in male OPLL patients was significantly higher than in male controls (P=0.039). The frequency of the "T" allele was also significantly higher in male OPLL subjects than in male controls (P=0.014, 0R=1.57). A significant difference was also observed between the 6007C>T polymorphism and the number of ossified cervical vertebrae in OPLL patients, while no statistical difference was apparent between the -5826G>A polymorphism and OPLL occurrence.Conclusions The T allele in the 6007C>T polymorphism may be a risk factor for male Han Chinese with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine. Chinese Han male patients with CT and TT 6007C>T genotypes have a genetic susceptibility to OPLL and more extensive OPLL in

  8. The genetic association between pri-miR-34b/c polymorphism (rs4938723 T > C) and susceptibility to cancers: evidence from published studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Wang, Liguang; Yu, Jianyu; Xu, Jun; Du, Jiajun

    2014-12-01

    Recently, several molecular epidemiological studies have focused on the association between pri-miR-34b/c rs4938723 SNP and the susceptibility to different cancers. Due to the controversial rather than conclusive results, we performed this meta-analysis to assess more precise and comprehensive conclusion about the association. Data published until July 2014 were collected from PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Data, Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, and VIP database of Chinese Journal. Ultimately, 13 articles with a total of 7,753 cases and 8,014 controls were considered eligible for inclusion. The odds ratio (OR) and its 95 % confidence interval (95%CI) were used to assess the strength of association. In the overall analysis, a significant association between pri-miR-34b/c rs4938723 polymorphism and increased cancer susceptibility was found in heterozygous model (TC vs. TT: OR = 1.148, 95%CI 1.034-1.275, P = 0.010) and dominant model (CC + TC vs. TT: OR =1.166, 95%CI 1.028-1.322, P = 0.017). In subgroup analysis of ethnicity, pri-miR-34b/c rs4938723 polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased cancer susceptibility for Asian population in heterozygous model (TC vs. TT: OR = 1.169, 95%CI 1.031-1.326, P = 0.015) and dominant model (CC + TC vs. TT: OR = 1.185, 95%CI 1.017-1.382, P = 0.030), whereas no significant association for Caucasian population was observed in any genetic models. Intriguingly, stratified analysis revealed opposite results that pri-miR-34b/c polymorphism contributed to susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma while reduced susceptibility to colorectal cancer and esophageal squamous cell cancer in Asians. Considering some limitation of our meta-analysis, future well-designed case-control studies with larger sample sizes are required to confirm our findings.

  9. Effect of genetic background and diet on plasma fibrinogen in mice. Possible relation with susceptibility to atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezaee, F.; Maas, A.; Maat, M.P.M.de; Verheijen, J.H.; Koopman, J.

    2002-01-01

    Many epidemiological studies suggest that elevated plasma fibrinogen concentrations form one of the most important independent risk factors in blood for cardiovascular disease and particularly atherosclerosis in humans. To clarify the effect of genetic factors, diets and their interactions on plasma

  10. An integrated epigenetic and genetic analysis of DNA methyltransferase genes (DNMTs) in tumor resistant and susceptible chicken lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both epigenetic alterations and genetic variations play essential roles in tumorigenesis. The epigenetic modification of DNA methylation is catalyzed and maintained by the DNA methyltransferases (DNMT3a, DNMT3b and DNMT1). DNA mutations and DNA methylation profiles of DNMTs themselves and their rela...

  11. Systems genetics reveals a transcriptional network associated with susceptibility in the maize-grey leaf spot pathosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have applied a systems genetics approach to elucidate molecular mechanisms of maize responses to gray leaf spot (GLS) disease, caused by Cercospora zeina, a major threat to maize production globally. We conducted expression QTL (eQTL) analysis of gene expression variation measured in earleaf samp...

  12. Temporal and seasonal changes of genetic polymorphisms associated with altered drug susceptibility to chloroquine, lumefantrine, and quinine in Guinea-Bissau between 2003 and 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovel, Irina Tatiana; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Rombo, Lars; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Ursing, Johan

    2015-02-01

    In 2008, artemether-lumefantrine was introduced in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa, but quinine has also been commonly prescribed for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. An efficacious high-dose chloroquine treatment regimen was used previously. Temporal and seasonal changes of genetic polymorphisms associated with altered drug susceptibility to chloroquine, lumefantrine, and quinine have been described. P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) K76T, pfmdr1 gene copy numbers, pfmdr1 polymorphisms N86Y and Y184F, and pfmdr1 sequences 1034 to 1246 were determined using PCR-based methods. Blood samples came from virtually all (n=1,806) childrenquinine and despite a fitness cost linked to pfcrt 76T. (The studies reported here were registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00137514 [PSB-2001-chl-amo], NCT00137566 [PSB-2004-paracetamol], NCT00426439 [PSB-2006-coartem], NCT01157689 [AL-eff 2010], and NCT01704508 [Eurartesim 2012].).

  13. Population Genetics of GYPB and Association Study between GYPB*S/s Polymorphism and Susceptibility to P. falciparum Infection in the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Daphne R. T.; Costa, Daiane C.; Furlani, Natália G.; Zuccherato, Luciana W.; Machado, Moara; Reid, Marion E.; Zalis, Mariano G.; Rossit, Andréa R.; Santos, Sidney E. B.; Machado, Ricardo L.; Lustigman, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Background Merozoites of Plasmodium falciparum invade through several pathways using different RBC receptors. Field isolates appear to use a greater variability of these receptors than laboratory isolates. Brazilian field isolates were shown to mostly utilize glycophorin A-independent invasion pathways via glycophorin B (GPB) and/or other receptors. The Brazilian population exhibits extensive polymorphism in blood group antigens, however, no studies have been done to relate the prevalence of the antigens that function as receptors for P. falciparum and the ability of the parasite to invade. Our study aimed to establish whether variation in the GYPB*S/s alleles influences susceptibility to infection with P. falciparum in the admixed population of Brazil. Methods Two groups of Brazilian Amazonians from Porto Velho were studied: P. falciparum infected individuals (cases); and uninfected individuals who were born and/or have lived in the same endemic region for over ten years, were exposed to infection but have not had malaria over the study period (controls). The GPB Ss phenotype and GYPB*S/s alleles were determined by standard methods. Sixty two Ancestry Informative Markers were genotyped on each individual to estimate admixture and control its potential effect on the association between frequency of GYPB*S and malaria infection. Results GYPB*S is associated with host susceptibility to infection with P. falciparum; GYPB*S/GYPB*S and GYPB*S/GYPB*s were significantly more prevalent in the in the P. falciparum infected individuals than in the controls (69.87% vs. 49.75%; P<0.02). Moreover, population genetics tests applied on the GYPB exon sequencing data suggest that natural selection shaped the observed pattern of nucleotide diversity. Conclusion Epidemiological and evolutionary approaches suggest an important role for the GPB receptor in RBC invasion by P. falciparum in Brazilian Amazons. Moreover, an increased susceptibility to infection by this parasite is

  14. Population genetics of GYPB and association study between GYPB*S/s polymorphism and susceptibility to P. falciparum infection in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Tarazona-Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Merozoites of Plasmodium falciparum invade through several pathways using different RBC receptors. Field isolates appear to use a greater variability of these receptors than laboratory isolates. Brazilian field isolates were shown to mostly utilize glycophorin A-independent invasion pathways via glycophorin B (GPB and/or other receptors. The Brazilian population exhibits extensive polymorphism in blood group antigens, however, no studies have been done to relate the prevalence of the antigens that function as receptors for P. falciparum and the ability of the parasite to invade. Our study aimed to establish whether variation in the GYPB*S/s alleles influences susceptibility to infection with P. falciparum in the admixed population of Brazil. METHODS: Two groups of Brazilian Amazonians from Porto Velho were studied: P. falciparum infected individuals (cases; and uninfected individuals who were born and/or have lived in the same endemic region for over ten years, were exposed to infection but have not had malaria over the study period (controls. The GPB Ss phenotype and GYPB*S/s alleles were determined by standard methods. Sixty two Ancestry Informative Markers were genotyped on each individual to estimate admixture and control its potential effect on the association between frequency of GYPB*S and malaria infection. RESULTS: GYPB*S is associated with host susceptibility to infection with P. falciparum; GYPB*S/GYPB*S and GYPB*S/GYPB*s were significantly more prevalent in the in the P. falciparum infected individuals than in the controls (69.87% vs. 49.75%; P<0.02. Moreover, population genetics tests applied on the GYPB exon sequencing data suggest that natural selection shaped the observed pattern of nucleotide diversity. CONCLUSION: Epidemiological and evolutionary approaches suggest an important role for the GPB receptor in RBC invasion by P. falciparum in Brazilian Amazons. Moreover, an increased susceptibility to infection by this

  15. Association of GST genetic polymorphisms with the susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in Chinese population evaluated by an updated systematic meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Due to the possible involvement of Glutathione S-transferase Mu-1 (GSTM1 and Glutathione S-transferase theta-1 (GSTT1 in the detoxification of environmental carcinogens, environmental toxins, and oxidative stress products, genetic polymorphisms of these two genes may play important roles in the susceptibility of human being to hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the existing research results are not conclusive. METHODS: A systematic literature search using databases (PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Data, etc. for the eligible studies meeting the inclusion criteria including case-control studies or cohort studies is evaluated using an updated systematic meta-analysis. RESULTS: Significant increase in the risk of HCC in the Chinese population is found in GSTM1 null genotype (OR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.21 to 1.79, P<0.001 and GSTT1 null genotype (OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.14 to 1.65, P<0.001. Analysis using the random-effects model found an increased risk of HCC in GSTM1-GSTT1 dual null population (OR = 1.79, 95% CI: 1.26 to 2.53, P<0.001. In addition, subgroup analyses showed a significant increase in the association of GST genetic polymorphisms (GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTM1-GSTT1 with HCC in southeast and central China mainland. However, available data collected by this study fail to show an association between GST genetic polymorphisms and HCC in people from the Taiwan region (for GSTM1: OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.60 to 1.01, P = 0.06; for GSTT1: OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.78 to 1.14, P = 0.546; for GSTM1-GSTT1: OR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.81 to 1.32, P = 0.77. Sensitivity analysis and publication bias diagnostics confirmed the reliability and stability of this meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that both GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotypes are associated with an increased HCC risk in Chinese population. Peoples with dual null genotypes of GSTM1-GSTT1

  16. Negative selection on BRCA1 susceptibility alleles sheds light on the population genetics of late-onset diseases and aging theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Pavard

    Full Text Available The magnitude of negative selection on alleles involved in age-specific mortality decreases with age. This is the foundation of the evolutionary theory of senescence. Because of this decrease in negative selection with age, and because of the absence of reproduction after menopause, alleles involved in women's late-onset diseases are generally considered evolutionarily neutral. Recently, genetic and epidemiological data on alleles involved in late onset-diseases have become available. It is therefore timely to estimate selection on these alleles. Here, we estimate selection on BRCA1 alleles leading to susceptibility to late-onset breast and ovarian cancer. For this, we integrate estimates of the risk of developing a cancer for BRCA1-carriers into population genetics frameworks, and calculate selection coefficients on BRCA1 alleles for different demographic scenarios varying across the extent of human demography. We then explore the magnitude of negative selection on alleles leading to a diverse range of risk patterns, to capture a variety of late-onset diseases. We show that BRCA1 alleles may have been under significant negative selection during human history. Although the mean age of onset of the disease is long after menopause, variance in age of onset means that there are always enough cases occurring before the end of reproductive life to compromise the selective value of women carrying a susceptibility allele in BRCA1. This seems to be the case for an extended range of risk of onset functions varying both in mean and variance. This finding may explain the distribution of BRCA1 alleles' frequency, and also why alleles for many late-onset diseases, like certain familial forms of cancer, coronary artery diseases and Alzheimer dementia, are typically recent and rare. Finally, we discuss why the two most popular evolutionary theories of aging, mutation accumulation and antagonistic pleiotropy, may underestimate the effect of selection on

  17. Negative selection on BRCA1 susceptibility alleles sheds light on the population genetics of late-onset diseases and aging theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavard, Samuel; Metcalf, C Jessica E

    2007-11-21

    The magnitude of negative selection on alleles involved in age-specific mortality decreases with age. This is the foundation of the evolutionary theory of senescence. Because of this decrease in negative selection with age, and because of the absence of reproduction after menopause, alleles involved in women's late-onset diseases are generally considered evolutionarily neutral. Recently, genetic and epidemiological data on alleles involved in late onset-diseases have become available. It is therefore timely to estimate selection on these alleles. Here, we estimate selection on BRCA1 alleles leading to susceptibility to late-onset breast and ovarian cancer. For this, we integrate estimates of the risk of developing a cancer for BRCA1-carriers into population genetics frameworks, and calculate selection coefficients on BRCA1 alleles for different demographic scenarios varying across the extent of human demography. We then explore the magnitude of negative selection on alleles leading to a diverse range of risk patterns, to capture a variety of late-onset diseases. We show that BRCA1 alleles may have been under significant negative selection during human history. Although the mean age of onset of the disease is long after menopause, variance in age of onset means that there are always enough cases occurring before the end of reproductive life to compromise the selective value of women carrying a susceptibility allele in BRCA1. This seems to be the case for an extended range of risk of onset functions varying both in mean and variance. This finding may explain the distribution of BRCA1 alleles' frequency, and also why alleles for many late-onset diseases, like certain familial forms of cancer, coronary artery diseases and Alzheimer dementia, are typically recent and rare. Finally, we discuss why the two most popular evolutionary theories of aging, mutation accumulation and antagonistic pleiotropy, may underestimate the effect of selection on survival at old ages.

  18. Genetic variants in microsomal epoxide hydrolase and N-acetyltransferase 2 in susceptibility of IBD in the Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Anja; Andersen, Vibeke; Østergaard, Mette;

    induce or sustain an immune response. Changes in detoxification of substances that causes epithelial damage may confer susceptibility to IBD. Hence, polymorphic enzymes involved in the detoxification processes may be risk factors of IBD. Methods. The two biotransformation enzymes microsomal epoxide...... hydrolase and N-acetyltransferase 2 were genotyped using TaqMan based Real-Time PCR in 388 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), 565 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 796 healthy Danish controls. Results. No association was found between low microsomal epoxide hydrolase activity or slow N......-acetyltransferase 2 acetylator status and IBD. An association between high activity of microsomal epoxide hydrolase and disease diagnosis before age 40 in CD with an OR of 2.2(1.1- 4.2) P=0.02) was found. No other phenotypic associations were found for the two enzymes and IBD, regarding age at onset, disease location...

  19. Genetic Variation in Toll-Interacting Protein Is Associated With Leprosy Susceptibility and Cutaneous Expression of Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Javeed A; Berrington, William R; Vary, James C; Wells, Richard D; Peterson, Glenna J; Kunwar, Chhatra B; Khadge, Saraswoti; Hagge, Deanna A; Hawn, Thomas R

    2016-04-01

    Leprosy is a chronic disease characterized by skin and peripheral nerve pathology and immune responses that fail to control Mycobacterium leprae. Toll-interacting protein (TOLLIP) regulates Toll-like receptor (TLR) and interleukin 1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling against mycobacteria. We analyzed messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of candidate immune genes in skin biopsy specimens from 85 individuals with leprosy. TOLLIP mRNA was highly and specifically correlated with IL-1R antagonist (IL-1Ra). In a case-control gene-association study with 477 cases and 1021 controls in Nepal, TOLLIP single-nucleotide polymorphism rs3793964 TT genotype was associated with increased susceptibility to leprosy (recessive, P = 1.4 × 10(-3)) and with increased skin expression of TOLLIP and IL-1Ra. Stimulation of TOLLIP-deficient monocytes with M. leprae produced significantly less IL-1Ra (P leprosy and offer a novel therapeutic target for IL-1-dependent diseases.

  20. Evaluation of common genetic variants associated with type 2 diabetes susceptibility in a black South African population / Tinashe Chikowore

    OpenAIRE

    Chikowore, Tinashe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The continual increase of type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevalence is a global public health concern. The aetiology of T2D has not been fully elucidated and this is hampering the development of effective preventative and curative interventions to curb the T2D burden. Although much has been done to elucidate the environmental risk factors associated with T2D, little is known about the precise genetic risk factors that predispose people to it. There is limited knowledge abo...

  1. Population Genetics and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Canine Campylobacter Isolates Collected before and after a Raw Feeding Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkkola, Satu; Kovanen, Sara; Roine, Johanna; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa; Hielm-Björkman, Anna; Kivistö, Rauni

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing numbers of consumers have become interested in feeding raw food for their pet dogs as opposed to commercial dry food, in the belief of health advantages. However, raw meat and internal organs, possibly contaminated by pathogens such as Campylobacter spp., may pose a risk of transmission of zoonoses to the pet owners. Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans but C. upsaliensis has also been associated with human disease. In this study we investigated the effect of different feeding strategies on the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in Finnish dogs. We further characterized the isolates using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), whole-genome (wg) MLST and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Dogs were sampled before and after a feeding period consisting of commercial raw feed or dry pellet feed. Altogether 56% (20/36) of the dogs yielded at least one Campylobacter-positive fecal sample. C. upsaliensis was the major species detected from 39% of the dogs before and 30% after the feeding period. Two C. jejuni isolates were recovered, both from raw-fed dogs after the dietary regimen. The isolates represented the same genotype (ST-1326), suggesting a common infection source. However, no statistically significant correlation was found between the feeding strategies and Campylobacter spp. carriage. The global genealogy of MLST types of dog and human C. upsaliensis isolates revealed weakly clonal population structure as most STs were widely dispersed. Major antimicrobial resistance among C. upsaliensis isolates was against streptomycin (STR MIC > 4 mg/l). Apart from that, all isolates were highly susceptible against the antimicrobials tested. Mutations were found in the genes rpsL or rpsL and rsmG in streptomycin resistant isolates. In conclusion, increasing trend to feed dogs with raw meat warrants more studies to evaluate the risk associated with raw feeding of pets in transmission of zoonoses to humans.

  2. Investigation of genetic variants in ubiquitin enzyme genes involved in the modulation of neurodevelopmental processes: a role in schizophrenia susceptibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jessica L; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca

    2014-11-24

    Despite extensive research during the last few decades, the etiology of schizophrenia remains unclear. Evidence of both genetic and environmental influences in the developmental profile of schizophrenia has grown, and due to the complexity of this disorder, a polygenic aspect has been associated with this neuropsychiatric pathology. Unfortunately, no diagnostic strategies based on biological measurement or genetic testing is currently available for schizophrenia. Gene-expression profiling and recent protein studies have shown a decrease in the expression of ubiquitin pathway proteins in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenia patients. We have examined single nucleotide polymorphisms (or SNPs) within three genes from the ubiquitin protein system: the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2D1 (UBE2D1) gene, the E3 SUMO-protein ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT 2 (PIAS2) gene, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 21 (FBXL21) gene, in a Caucasian case-control population for schizophrenia. After Bonferroni correction for multiple testing was applied, no significant associations were reported for any of the tested SNPs. Additional genetic analyses will be necessary to fully explore the role of these three genes in schizophrenia. Regarding the rising interest in ubiquitin-related proteins as a therapeutic target in other pathologies such as cancer, further research into the role of ubiquitin pathways in schizophrenia seems topical and timely.

  3. Association between two polymorphisms of the bone morpho-genetic protein-2 gene with genetic susceptibility to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the cervical spine and its severity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hao; YANG Zhao-hui; LIU Dong-mei; WANG Ling; MENG Xiang-long; TIAN Bao-peng

    2008-01-01

    Background Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) has a strong genetic background. Previous studies have shown that bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) and BMP2 mRNA are expressed in ossifying matrix and chondrocytes adjacent to cartilaginous areas of OPLL tissues and mesenchymal cells with fibroblastic features in the immediate vicinity of the cartilaginous areas. It is suggested that BMP2 plays different roles in the different stages of development of OPLL. However, it remains unknown which factors induce ligament cells to produce BMP2.Methods OPLL patients (n=192) and non-OPLL controls (n=304) were studied. Radiographs of the cervical spine were analyzed for extent of OPLL. We investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms of exons 3(-726) TIC and 3(-583) A/G in the BMP2 gene are statistically associated with genetic susceptibility to OPLL in Chinese Han subjects.Results There was no statistical difference between the occurrence of exons 3(-726) TIC and 3(-583) A/G and the occurrence of OPLL in the cervical spine. However, there was a significant association between occurrence of exon 3(-726) TIC polymorphism and occurrence of OPLL in males of cases and controls in the cervical spine. In addition, no significant association was found between the exons 3(-726) TIC and 3(-583) A/G with number of ossified cervical vertebrae in OPLL patients.Conclusions Exon 3(-583) A/G polymorphism in BMP2 gene is not associated with the occurrence and the extent of OPLL in the cervical spine. Chinese Han male patients with TC and CC genotypes in exon 3(-726) T/C have genetic susceptibility to OPLL but not to more extensive OPLL in the cervical spine.

  4. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  5. Identification of genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair xenoderma pigmentosum group D gene and its association with head and neck cancer susceptibility in rural Indian population: a hospital based case-control study from south-western Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailas D. Datkhile

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: This study indicates that polymorphisms in cd199 of XPD gene could play a role in modifying genetic susceptibility of individual to head and neck cancer in Maharashtra patients. Thus, the case-control study suggest that selected DNA repair genes represent genetic determinants in oral carcinogenesis along with other risk factors in the rural Indian population. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 1997-2005

  6. Genetic and geographic structure of an insect resistant and a susceptible type of Barbarea vulgaris in western Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, Thure Pavlo; Toneatto, Fiorello; Nielsen, Jens Kvist

    2012-01-01

    strongly divergent, and reproduction between them is reduced. To determine whether the two plant types and their resistance polymorphisms are also present outside Denmark, and to understand how they have evolved, we analysed 33 European populations of B. vulgaris for resistance, hairiness, glucosinolates...... is thus part of a larger divergence in Europe. Judging from the trait correlations, genetic divergence, and partial reproductive incompatibility, the plant types must have been isolated from each other for quite some time. The two P populations outside Denmark came from the north and east, suggesting...

  7. Genetic polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase-1 and coronary artery disease susceptibility: a case-control study in a Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qintao, Cui; Yan, Li; Changhong, Duan; Xiaoliang, Guo; Xiaochen, Liu

    2014-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) receives intensive research due to its high incidence and severe impact on the quality of life. One member of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-1, has been reported to be associated with CAD. To identify the markers contributing to the genetic susceptibility to CAD, nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rs1799750, rs498186, rs475007, rs514921, rs494379, rs996999, rs2071232, rs1938901, and rs2239008) throughout the MMP-1 gene were genotyped using MALDI-TOF within the MassARRAY system, and the allele and genotype distributions were compared between 438 healthy controls and 411 patients with CAD from a Chinese Han population. The analysis revealed a weak association between the rs1799750 (in the promoter region) genotype distribution and CAD (p=0.022). An increased risk of CAD was significantly associated with the 2G allele of rs1799750 (p=0.005, odds ratio=1.329, 95% confidence interval=1.090-1.620, after Bonferroni corrections). Strong linkage disequilibrium was observed in three blocks (D'>0.9). Significantly more C-2G (rs498186-rs1799750) haplotypes (p=0.001 after Bonferroni corrections) were found in CAD subjects. These findings point to a role for the polymorphism in the MMP-1 promoter in CAD among a Han Chinese population and may be informative for future genetic or biological studies on CAD.

  8. Genetic diversity of Aspergillus species isolated from onychomycosis and Aspergillus hongkongensis sp. nov., with implications to antifungal susceptibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Chi-Ching; Hui, Teresa W S; Lee, Kim-Chung; Chen, Jonathan H K; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Tam, Emily W T; Chan, Jasper F W; Wu, Andrea L; Cheung, Mei; Tse, Brian P H; Wu, Alan K L; Lai, Christopher K C; Tsang, Dominic N C; Que, Tak-Lun; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-02-01

    Thirteen Aspergillus isolates recovered from nails of 13 patients (fingernails, n=2; toenails, n=11) with onychomycosis were characterized. Twelve strains were identified by multilocus sequencing as Aspergillus spp. (Aspergillus sydowii [n=4], Aspergillus welwitschiae [n=3], Aspergillus terreus [n=2], Aspergillus flavus [n=1], Aspergillus tubingensis [n=1], and Aspergillus unguis [n=1]). Isolates of A. terreus, A. flavus, and A. unguis were also identifiable by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The 13th isolate (HKU49(T)) possessed unique morphological characteristics different from other Aspergillus spp. Molecular characterization also unambiguously showed that HKU49(T) was distinct from other Aspergillus spp. We propose the novel species Aspergillus hongkongensis to describe this previously unknown fungus. Antifungal susceptibility testing showed most Aspergillus isolates had low MICs against itraconazole and voriconazole, but all Aspergillus isolates had high MICs against fluconazole. A diverse spectrum of Aspergillus species is associated with onychomycosis. Itraconazole and voriconazole are probably better drug options for Aspergillus onychomycosis.

  9. Candida albicans bloodstream isolates in a German university hospital are genetically heterogenous and susceptible to commonly used antifungals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyke, Johanna; Martin, Ronny; Walther, Grit; Weber, Michael; Kaerger, Kerstin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Elias, Johannes; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    From an eight-year-span, 99 Candida bloodstream isolates were collected at the University Hospital Wuerzburg, Germany. In this study, all strains were analyzed using molecular and phenotypic typing methods. Confirmatory species identification revealed three isolates that were initially diagnosed as C. albicans to be actually C. dubliniensis. Two isolates contained a mixed culture of C. albicans and C. glabrata, in one of the specimens both species could be separated while it was not possible to recover C. albicans in the other sample. The remaining 95 C. albicans isolates were profiled by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Phylogenetic analyses showed a highly heterogenous collection of strains, associated with many different clades and constituting a set of new diploid sequence types (DST). For all strains with identical DST, patient data were reviewed for potential nosocomial transmission. In addition, all isolates were tested for their susceptibility to amphotericin B, caspofungin, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole. No clinically relevant resistance could be detected. Furthermore, these data underline that correlation between minimal inhibitory concentrations for caspofungin and anidulafungin is low.

  10. Association of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 and p53 Gene Polymorphisms with Genetic Susceptibility to No-small-cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ying-hao; MA Tong-hui; ZHENG Yong-chen; ZHANG Kun; YANG Jing-bo; YANG Long-fei; YANG Zhi-guang; SHAO Guo-guang

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9(MMP-9) and p53 genes play an essential role in the multi-step process of tumorigenesis in lung cancer. Single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) of MMP-9 and p53 genes are associated with the risk and progression of many cancers. In this study, we evaluated the association of the R279Q polymo rphism of MMP-9 or the A1/A2 polymorphism of p53 gene with the risk of no-small-cell lung cancer(NSCLC) in Hah population of Northeast China. We examined the frequency of SNPs in the two kinds of genes of 50 patients with NSCLC and 50 cancer-free controls frequency-matched by age and sex. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism(PCR-RFLP) technique was used to determine the genotypes. The results indicate that the 279RR genotype in MMP-9 gene and the A1/A2 genotype in p53 gene show a significantly increased risk of NSCLC. Therefore,the MMP-9 279RR and p53 A1/A2 genotypes may be used as markers for susceptibility to NSCLC in Han population of Northeast China.

  11. 冠状动脉粥样硬化性心脏病的遗传易感性%Genetic susceptibility to coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高磊; 何国平

    2007-01-01

    目的:概述冠状动脉粥样硬化性心脏病(简称冠心病)遗传易感性的研究进展,探讨冠心病的分子遗传学基础.资料来源:检索Pubmed及English Medical Current Contents(EMCC)数据库1990-01/2006-06关于冠心病分子遗传学研究的文献,检索词为"coronary artery disease,myocardial infarction,gene".同时检索Chinese Medical Current Contents(CMCC)数据库2000-01/2006-06相关中文文献.资料选择:对检索结果进行初审,选取冠心病分子遗传学研究方面的信息进行整理,筛除明显不相关的或针对性不强的文章.资料提炼:进一步分析所选文献,收集整理关于冠心病和心肌梗死遗传易感性方面针对强且又可靠的文章49篇.资料综合:参考的49篇文章表明,冠心病是一种多病因、多因素的复杂疾病,其发病受复杂的环境因素及遗传因素的影响.遗传学基础在冠心病的发生发展中起着至关重要的作用.近年来,作为人类遗传学的核心技术,全基因组关联分析及大规模病例对照相关研究鉴定了一些与冠心病易感性相关的重要基因,这些基因涉及到血脂异常、内皮完整性、炎性因子的表达及免疫反应等方面.结论:易感基因或致病基因的检测为冠心病的发病机制研究提供了新的线索,这将有利于冠心病及心肌梗死的早期诊断、早期预防及特定基因个性化治疗.%OBJECTIVE: To summarize the advances in the genetic susceptibility to coronary artery disease (CAD) and explore the heritable basis of the disease.DATA SOURCES:Related articles in English from January 1990 to June 2006 were searched in Pubmed and EMCC databases with the terms "gene, coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction". Meanwhile, the CMCC database was searched for the relevant articles published between January 2000 and June 2006 in Chinese.STUDY SELECTrON: After the preliminary selection,relevant literatures on genetics of CAD and myocardial infarction

  12. Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the breast cancer association consortium: a combined case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia M; Spurdle, Amanda B;

    2010-01-01

    Several common breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants have recently been identified. We aimed to determine how these variants combine with a subset of other known risk factors to influence breast cancer risk in white women of European ancestry using case-control studies participating in th...

  13. Comparison of individuals opting for BRCA1/2 or HNPCC genetic susceptibility testing with regard to coping, illness perceptions, illness experiences, family system characteristics and hereditary cancer distress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, Iris; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; Brocker-Vriends, Annette H. J. T.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Gool, Arthur R.; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Tibben, Aad

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study differences between individuals opting for genetic cancer susceptibility testing of a known familial BRCA1/2 and HNPCC related germline mutation. Methods: Coping, illness perceptions, experiences with cancer in relatives and family system characteristics were assessed in 271 appl

  14. Genetic polymorphisms of GSTM1, GSTP1 and GSTT1 genes and lung cancer susceptibility in the Bangladeshi population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mir Muhammad Nasir Uddin; Maizbha Uddin Ahmed; Mohammad Safiqul Islam; Mohammad Siddiqul Islam; Muhammad Shahdaat Bin Sayeed; Yearul Kabir; Abul Hasnat

    2014-01-01

    To verify possible associations between polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase Mu (GSTM1), glutathione S-transferase θ (GSTT1) and glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP1) genes and susceptibility to lung cancer. Methods: A total of 106 lung cancer patients and 116 controls were enrolled in a case-control study. The GSTM1 and GSTT1 were analyzed using PCR while GSTP1 was analyzed using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Risk of lung cancer was estimated as odds ratio at 95% confidence interval using unconditional logistic regression models adjusting for age, sex, and tobacco use. Results: GSTM1 null and GSTT1 null genotypes did not show a significant risk for developing lung cancer. A significantly elevated lung cancer risk was associated with GSTP1 heterozygous, mutant and combined heterozygous+mutant variants of rs1695. When classified by tobacco consumption status, no association with risk of lung cancer was found in case of tobacco smokers and nonsmokers carrying null and present genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1. There is a three-fold (approximately) increase in the risk of lung cancer in case of both heterozygous (AG) and heterozygous+mutant homozygous (AG+GG) genotypes whereas there is an eight-fold increase in risk of lung cancer in cases of GG with respect to AA genotype in smokers. Conclusions: Carrying the GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotype is not a risk factor for lung cancer and GSTP1Ile105Val is associated with elevated risk of lung cancer.

  15. Genetic polymorphisms of GSTM1,GSTP1 and GSTT1 genes and lung cancer susceptibility in the Bangladeshi population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mir; Muhammad; Nasir; Uddin; Maizbha; Uddin; Ahmed; Mohammad; Safiqul; Islam; Mohammad; Siddiqul; Islam; Muhammad; Shahdaat; Bin; Sayeed; Yearul; Kabir; Abul; Hasnat

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To verify possible associations between polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase Mu(GSTM1),glutathione S-transferase θ(GSTT1) and glutathione S-transferase Pi(GSTP1)genes and susceptibility to lung cancer.Methods:A total of 106 lung cancer patients and 116 controls were enrolled in a case-control study.The GSTM1 and GSTT1 were analyzed using PCR while GSTP1 was analyzed using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism.Risk of lung cancer was estimated as odds ratio at 95%confidence interval using unconditional logistic regression models adjusting for age,sex,and tobacco use.Results:GSTM1 null and GSTT1 null genotypes did not show a significant risk for developing lung cancer.A significandy elevated lung cancer risk was associated with GSTP1 heterozygous,mutant and combined heterozygous+mutant variants of rs1695.When classified by tobacco consumption status,no association with risk of lung cancer was found in case of tobacco smokers and nonsmokers carrying null and present genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTTL There is a three-fold(approximately) increase in the risk of lung cancer in case of both heterozygous(AG) and heterozygous+mutant homozygous(AG+GG) genotypes whereas there is an eightfold increase in risk of lung cancer in cases of GG with respect to AA genotype in smokers.Conclusions:Carrying the GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotype is not a risk factor for lung cancer and GSTP1Ile105 Val is associated with elevated risk of lung cancer.

  16. Genetic susceptibility to toxicants at the workplace in the environment; Genetische Suszeptibilitaet im Hinblick auf toxische Arbeitsplatz- und Umweltbelastungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thier, R.; Golka, K.; Bruening, T.; Bolt, H.M. [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Arbeitsphysiologie

    1999-11-01

    The variability of genes coding for xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes is an important reason for individual variations in susceptibilities towards chemical toxicants. In environmental and occupational medicine, polymorphisms of different isoforms of cytochrome P450, of N-acetyl-transferase (NAT2) and of glutathione transferase (GSTT1, GSTM1) are now of importance. In particular, the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP2E1 is a key enzyme of the oxidative metabolism of highly relevant industrial chemicals as it metabolizes alkenes as well as aromatic and halogenated hydrocarbons. The influence of N-acetyltransferase 2(NAT2) on the carcinogenic effect of aromatic amines upon the urothelium has been well established; the N-oxidation of aromatic amines leading to toxic and carcinogenic intermediates is higher in 'slow' compared to 'rapid' acetylators. In general, it is now evident that polymorphisms of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes may have a decisive role in modulating the effects of toxicants on humans. Further progress in this field is to be expected, and calls for intensive discussion of both the preventive and sociopolitical aspects. (orig.) [German] Eine wichtige Ursache individuell unterschiedlicher Ansprechbarkeiten gegenueber Fremdstoffen liegt in der Variabilitaet der Gene, die fuer fremdstoffmetabolisierende Enzyme kodieren. Fuer die Arbeits- und Umweltmedizin sind vor allem Polymorphismen verschiedener Isoformen des Cytochrom P450, der N-Acetyl-Transferase (NAT2) und der Glutathiontransferase (GSTT1, GSTM1) wichtig geworden. Aus arbeitsmedizinischer Sicht erscheint das Cytochrom P450 Isoenzym GYP2E1 als Schluesselenzym des oxydativen Stoffwechsels vieler bedeutsamer Grundchemikalien der chemischen Industrie; es oxydiert eine Reihe von Alkenen, Aromaten und halogenierten Kohlenwasserstoffen. Die Isoenzyme der Glutathiontransferase GSTT1 und GSTM1 sind wichtig im Metabolismus von organischen Loesemitteln, Kunststoffmonomeren und Intermediaten

  17. A Regulatory MDM4 Genetic Variant Locating in the Binding Sequence of Multiple MicroRNAs Contributes to Susceptibility of Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Gao

    Full Text Available A functional rs4245739 A>C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP locating in the MDM43'-untranslated (3'-UTR region creates a miR-191-5p or miR-887-3p targeting sites. This change results in decreased expression of oncogene MDM4. Therefore, we examined the association between this SNP and small cell lung cancer (SCLC risk as well as its regulatory function in SCLC cells. Genotypes were determined in two independent case-control sets consisted of 520SCLC cases and 1040 controls from two regions of China. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were estimated by logistic regression. The impact of the rs4245739 SNP on miR-191-5p/miR-887-3p mediated MDM4 expression regulation was investigated using luciferase reporter gene assays. We found that the MDM4 rs4245739AC and CC genotypes were significantly associated with decreased SCLC susceptibility compared with the AA genotype in both case-control sets (Shandong set: OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.32-0.89, P = 0.014; Jiangsu set: OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.26-0.879, P = 0.017. Stratified analyses indicated that there was a significantly multiplicative interaction between rs4245739 and smoking (Pinteractioin = 0.048. After co-tranfection of miRNAs and different allelic-MDM4 reporter constructs into SCLC cells, we found that the both miR-191-5p and miR-887-3p can lead to significantly decreased MDM4 expression activities in the construct with C-allelic 3'-UTR but not A-allelic 3'-UTR, suggesting a consistent genotype-phenotype correlation. Our data illuminate that the MDM4rs4245739SNP contributes to SCLC risk and support the notion that gene 3'-UTR genetic variants, impacting miRNA-binding, might modify SCLC susceptibility.

  18. A Genome-Wide Test of the Differential Susceptibility Hypothesis Reveals a Genetic Predictor of Differential Response to Psychological Treatments for Child Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keers, Robert; Coleman, Jonathan R.I.; Lester, Kathryn J.; Roberts, Susanna; Breen, Gerome; Thastum, Mikael; Bögels, Susan; Schneider, Silvia; Heiervang, Einar; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Nauta, Maaike; Creswell, Cathy; Thirlwall, Kerstin; Rapee, Ronald M.; Hudson, Jennifer L.; Lewis, Cathryn; Plomin, Robert; Eley, Thalia C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The differential susceptibly hypothesis suggests that certain genetic variants moderate the effects of both negative and positive environments on mental health and may therefore be important predictors of response to psychological treatments. Nevertheless, the identification of such variants has so far been limited to preselected candidate genes. In this study we extended the differential susceptibility hypothesis from a candidate gene to a genome-wide approach to test whether a polygenic score of environmental sensitivity predicted response to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in children with anxiety disorders. Methods We identified variants associated with environmental sensitivity using a novel method in which within-pair variability in emotional problems in 1,026 monozygotic twin pairs was examined as a function of the pairs' genotype. We created a polygenic score of environmental sensitivity based on the whole-genome findings and tested the score as a moderator of parenting on emotional problems in 1,406 children and response to individual, group and brief parent-led CBT in 973 children with anxiety disorders. Results The polygenic score significantly moderated the effects of parenting on emotional problems and the effects of treatment. Individuals with a high score responded significantly better to individual CBT than group CBT or brief parent-led CBT (remission rates: 70.9, 55.5 and 41.6%, respectively). Conclusions Pending successful replication, our results should be considered exploratory. Nevertheless, if replicated, they suggest that individuals with the greatest environmental sensitivity may be more likely to develop emotional problems in adverse environments but also benefit more from the most intensive types of treatment. PMID:27043157

  19. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M W; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-12-06

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas.

  20. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Investigators, kConFab/AOCS; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas. PMID:27792995

  1. Drug resistance and genetic characteristics of clinical isolates of staphylococci in Myanmar: high prevalence of PVL among methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus belonging to various sequence types

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    M.S. Aung

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence, drug resistance and genetic characteristics were analysed for a total of 128 clinical isolates of staphylococci obtained from a tertiary hospital in Myanmar. The dominant species were S. aureus (39% and S. haemolyticus (35%, followed by S. epidermidis (6% and S. saprophyticus (5%. The majority of S. haemolyticus isolates (71.1% harboured mecA, showing high resistance rates to ampicillin, cephalosporins, erythromycin and levofloxacin, while methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA was only 8% (four isolates among S. aureus with type IV SCCmec. Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL genes were detected in 20 isolates of S. aureus (40%, among which only one isolate was MRSA belonging to sequence type (ST 88/agr-III/coa-IIIa, and the other 19 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA isolates were classified into six STs (ST88, ST121, ST1153, ST1155, ST1930, ST3206. An ST1153 MSSA isolate with PVL was revealed to belong to a novel coa type, XIIIa. ST121 S. aureus was the most common in the PVL-positive MSSA (47%, 9/19, harbouring genes of bone sialoprotein and variant of elastin binding protein as a distinctive feature. Although PVL-positive MSSA was susceptible to most of the antimicrobial agents examined, ST1930 isolates were resistant to erythromycin and levofloxacin. ST59 PVL-negative MRSA and MSSA had more resistance genes than other MRSA and PVL-positive MSSA, showing resistance to more antimicrobial agents. This study indicated higher prevalence of mecA associated with multiple drug resistance in S. haemolyticus than in S. aureus, and dissemination of PVL genes to multiple clones of MSSA, with ST121 being dominant, among hospital isolates in Myanmar.

  2. Genetic variation in the TNF receptor-associated factor 6 gene is associated with susceptibility to sepsis-induced acute lung injury

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    Song Zhenju

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies showed that overwhelming inflammatory response mediated by the toll-like receptor (TLR-related pathway was important in the development of acute lung injury (ALI. The aim of this study was to determine whether common genetic variation in four genes of the TLR signaling pathway were associated with sepsis-induced ALI susceptibility and risk of death in Chinese Han population. Methods Fourteen tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNPs in MyD88, IRAK1, IRAK4 and TRAF6 were genotyped in samples of sepsis-induced ALI (n = 272 and sepsis alone patients (n = 276, and tested for association in this case-control collection. Then, we investigated correlation between the associated SNP and the mRNA expression level of the corresponding gene. And we also investigated correlation between the associated SNP and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α as well as interleukin-6 (IL-6 concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs exposed to lipopolysaccharides (LPS ex vivo. The mRNA expression level was determined using real-time quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR assays, and concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results The association analysis revealed that rs4755453, an intronic SNP of TRAF6, was significantly associated with susceptibility to sepsis-induced ALI. The C allele frequency of rs4755453 in the sepsis alone group was significantly higher than that in the sepsis-induced ALI group (P = 0.00026, odds ratio (OR = 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.37–0.74. These associations remained significant after adjustment for covariates in multiple logistic regression analysis and for multiple comparisons. TRAF6 mRNA expression levels in PBMCs from homozygotes of the rs4755453G allele were significantly higher than that in heterozygotes and homozygotes of the rs4755453C allele at baseline (P = 0.012 and P = 0.003, respectively as

  3. Evaluation of glutathione S-transferase genetic variants affecting type 2 diabetes susceptibility: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Song-Tao; Wang, Chang-Jiang; Tang, Hai-Qin; Zhang, Qiu; Wang, Yuan

    2013-11-10

    Genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) risk have been widely studied, however, the results were somewhat conflicting. To evaluate the association of GSTs (GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1) gene polymorphisms with T2DM, a meta-analysis was performed before October, 2012. ORs were pooled according to random-effects model. There were a total of 1354/1666 (n=9) cases/controls (studies) for GSTM1, 1271/1470 (n=8) for GSTT1, and 1205/1250 (n=7) for GSTM1. There were significant associations between GSTM1 polymorphism, GSTT1 polymorphism and T2DM in the contrast of present genotype vs. null genotype, with pooled OR=1.99 (95%CI=1.46-2.71) and OR=1.61 (95%CI=1.19-2.17), respectively. Yet no significant association of GSTP1 polymorphism and T2DM was showed. When stratified by ethnicity, the significant associations were also existed in Asians for GSTM1 and GSTT1, but not GSTP1. No publication bias but some extent of heterogeneity was observed. Finally, the accumulated evidence proved the obvious associations of GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms with an increased risk of T2DM.

  4. Genetic variant of miR-146a rs2910164 C>G and gastric cancer susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Yu, Ling-Jun; Guo, Wei-Jian; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Li, Jin; Wang, Ya-Nong; Yang, Ya-Jun; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Jin, Li; Qiu, Li-Xin; Wei, Yongyue

    2016-01-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2910164 G>C within miR-146a has been reported that is associated with the increased risk of gastric cancer (GCa). However, the results are inconclusive, espicially among Asian populations, which probably due to small sample size in each single study. To validate this association and get a more precise estimation, we conducted a large GCa study including 1,125 cases and 1,196 controls in an eastern Chinese population. Our results showed that this SNP was not associated with GCa risk in either of the three genetic models [co-dominant model: CG vs. CC, odds ratio (OR) = 0.99, 95% confidence interval (95%CI): 0.83-1.19; GG vs. CC, OR = 1.03, 95%CI: 0.81-1.32; dominant model: (CG+GG) vs. CC, OR = 1.00, 95%CI = 0.84-1.19; recessive model: GG vs. (CG+CC), OR = 1.04, 95%CI = 0.83-1.29]. Stratified analysis by age, gender, smoking status, drinking status, or tumor location confirmed this non-significant association. In summary, these results suggest that the miR-146a SNP rs2910164 may not be a risk factor for GCa in this Chinese population. Larger and well-designed, preferably prospective studies are needed to further confirm our findings. PMID:27105532

  5. Longitudinal pathways from marital hostility to child anger during toddlerhood: genetic susceptibility and indirect effects via harsh parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Kimberly A; Leve, Leslie D; Harold, Gordon T; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Shaw, Daniel S; Reiss, David

    2011-04-01

    We examined direct and indirect pathways from marital hostility to toddler anger/frustration via harsh parenting and parental depressive symptoms, with an additional focus on the moderating role of genetic influences as inferred from birth parent anger/frustration. Participants were 361 linked triads of birth mothers, adoptive parents, and adopted children who were 9 (T1) and 18 (T2) months old across the study period. Results indicated an indirect effect from T1 marital hostility to T2 toddler anger/frustration via T2 parental harsh discipline. Results also indicated that the association between marital hostility and toddler anger was moderated by birth mother anger/frustration. For children whose birth mothers reported high levels of anger/frustration, adoptive parents' marital hostility at T1 predicted toddler anger/frustration at T2. This relation did not hold for children whose birth mothers reported low levels of anger/frustration. The results suggest that children whose birth mothers report elevated frustration might inherit an emotional lability that makes them more sensitive to the effects of marital hostility.

  6. CCL5-28, CCL5-403, and CCR5 genetic polymorphisms and their synergic effect with alcohol and tobacco consumptions increase susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiu-Ting; Yang, Shun-Fa; Chen, Dar-Ren; Chan, Szu-Erh

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the relationship between gene polymorphisms of CCL5-28, CCL5-403, and CCR5 to the susceptibility of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 449 subjects, including 347 healthy controls and 102 patients with HCC, were recruited in this study and subjected to polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) to investigate the impact of these two polymorphic variants on HCC. A significant association between HCC susceptibility and genetic polymorphism, CG heterozygotes of CCL5-28 (AOR=2.35; 95% CI=1.27-4.33, p=0.006), AA homozygotes of CCL5-403 (AOR=5.18; 95% CI=2.25-11.91, p=0.0001), and AA homozygotes of CCR5 (AOR=2.47; 95% CI=1.24-4.90, p=0.009), was found compared with wild genotype after adjusting for other confounders. It was detected that synergistic effect between gene-to-gene polymorphisms increased the risk to have HCC among individuals with CG or GG of CCL5-28, and GA or AA of CCL-403, and GA or AA of CCR5 (AOR=3.42; 95% CI=1.39-8.38, p=0.007) compared to individuals with wild genotypes of CCL5-28, CCL-403, and CCR5. Also, alcohol or tobacco consumption increased the risk to have HCC among subjects with CG heterozygotes of CCL5-28 (alcohol: p=0.001; tobacco: p=0.006), AA homozygotes (alcohol: p=0.0004; tobacco: p≤0.0001) or GA heterozygotes (tobacco: p=0.03) of CCL5-403, and AA homozygotes of CCR5 (alcohol: p=0.02; tobacco: p=0.02), respectively. Gene polymorphisms of CCL5-28, CCL5-403, and CCR5 play an important factor for the susceptibility of HCC, respectively. The synergic effects of these two gene polymorphisms to tobacco or alcohol consumption significantly increase the risk to develop HCC.

  7. Role of genetic variant A-204C of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) in susceptibility to gallbladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anvesha; Pandey, Sachchida Nand; Choudhuri, Gourdas; Mittal, Balraj

    2008-05-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) usually arises in the background of gallstone disease. Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is a rate-limiting enzyme for cholesterol catabolism and bile acid synthesis. A-204C genetic polymorphism in CYP7A1 may influence gene expression and thus affect the risk of gallstone disease and GBC. We aimed to study the association of A-204C variation of CYP7A1 gene promoter polymorphism in GBC patients, gallstone patients and healthy subjects. The study included 141 histopathologically proven GBC patients, ultrasonographically proven 185 symptomatic gallstone patients and 200 gallstone-free healthy subjects. Genotyping was done by PCR-RFLP method. CYP7A1 A-204C genotypes in control population were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The CC genotype conferred marginally significant risk for gallstone disease (p=0.051; OR=1.54; 95% CI=0.9-3.4). In GBC patients, the CYP7A1 A-204C polymorphism conferred high risk for GBC at genotype (p=0.005; OR=2.78; 95% CI: 1.3-5.6) as well as allele levels (p=0.008; OR=1.58 and 95% CI: 1.1-2.2). After stratification of GBC patients on the basis of presence or absence of gallstones, CC genotype imparted higher risk for GBC without stones (p=0.002; OR=4.44: 95% CI=1.7-11.3). The association of the polymorphism with GBC was more pronounced in female GBC patients, and also in cancer patients who developed GBC at advanced age. The CC genotype of CYP7A1 is an independent genetic risk factor for GBC but plays a modest role in susceptibility to gallstone disease. The GBC pathogenesis by CYP7A1 polymorphism appears to be independent of gallstone pathway and probably involves genotoxicity due to lipid peroxidation mechanisms.

  8. The role of rheumatoid arthritis genetic susceptibility markers in the prediction of erosive disease in patients with early inflammatory polyarthritis: results from the Norfolk Arthritis Register

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Darren; Thomson, Wendy; Lunt, Mark; Flynn, Edward; Martin, Paul; Eyre, Steven; Farragher, Tracey; Bunn, Diane; Worthington, Jane; Symmons, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. Recent whole-genome and candidate gene association studies in RA have identified a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that predispose to disease with moderate risk. It remains poorly understood how recently identified genetic factors may contribute to RA severity. We therefore sought to investigate the role of recently identified RA susceptibility SNP markers in predicting erosive outcome in patients with recent-onset inflammatory polyarthritis (IP). Methods. DNA and X-ray data were available for 1049 patients who were registered between 1990 and 2003 with the Norfolk Arthritis Register (NOAR); a primary care-based inception cohort of patients with recent-onset IP. Demographic and clinical data were recorded at inclusion, and at yearly assessments thereafter. Patients were genotyped for 18 SNP markers. The presence of serum anti citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPAs) was assessed in samples collected at inclusion to the NOAR. The association of serological and genetic markers with poor radiological (Larsen) score at Years 1 and 5, and erosions at Years 1 and 5 was investigated. Results. Baseline ACPA positivity was associated with erosive disease and higher radiological damage. SNP markers within the TRAF1/C5 locus were associated with erosive disease at Year 1 [rs2900180: odds ratio (OR) 1.53 (95% CI 1.14, 2.05)] and Year 5 [rs2900180: OR 1.47 (95% CI 1.07, 2.02)]. None of the SNP markers tested was associated with Larsen score. Conclusion. Our results are in keeping with a previous report and suggest that the TRAF1/C5 region is associated with risk of development of radiological erosions in IP/RA patients. The finding requires replication in other large data sets. PMID:20219786

  9. Association of Fc gamma-receptors IIa, IIIa, and IIIb genetic polymorphism with susceptibility to chronic periodontitis in South Indian population

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    Veenu Madaan Hans

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs are the members of the immunoglobulin superfamily and may play a role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Genetic variation in these receptors and its link with various forms of periodontitis is being studied in different populations. The aim of the present study is to determine whether specific FcγRIIa, FcγRIIIa, and FcγRIIIb alleles and/or genotypes are associated with risk for susceptibility to generalized chronic periodontitis (GCP in South Indian population. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 120 South Indian subjects; 60 with GCP and 60 periodontally healthy. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA was extracted from samples collected by scrapping buccal epithelium. FcγRIIa and FcγRIIIa genotyping were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of DNA with allele-specific primers followed by allele-specific restriction digestion of the products. However, FcγRIIIb genotyping was done by allele-specific PCR. Results: No significant difference in the distribution of FcγRIIa H/R and FcγRIIIa NA1/NA2 genotypes or their respective alleles was observed in GCP patients and healthy subjects. For FcγRIIIa F/V genetic polymorphism, the homozygous V/V genotype and V allele were significantly overrepresented in GCP patients while F/F genotype and F allele in controls. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that FcγRIIIa V/V genotype, as well as V allele, could be a possible risk factor for chronic periodontitis in South Indian population.

  10. Effect of added dietary threonine on growth performance, health, immunity and gastrointestinal function of weaning pigs with differing genetic susceptibility to Escherichia coli infection and challenged with E. coli K88ac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisi, P; Corrent, E; Mazzoni, M; Messori, S; Priori, D; Gherpelli, Y; Simongiovanni, A; Bosi, P

    2015-06-01

    Threonine (Thr) is important for mucin and immunoglobulin production. We studied the effect of added dietary Thr on growth performance, health, immunity and gastrointestinal function of weaning pigs with differing genetic susceptibility to E. coli K88ac (ETEC) infection and challenged with ETEC. Forty-eight 24-day-old weaned pigs were divided into two groups by their ETEC susceptibility using mucin 4 (MUC4) gene as a marker (2 MUC4(-/-) , not-susceptible, and 2 MUC4(+/+) , susceptible, pigs per litter). Within genotype, pigs were fed two different diets: 8.5 (LThr) or 9.0 (HThr) g Thr/kg. Pigs were orally challenged on day 7 after weaning and slaughtered on day 12 or 13 after weaning. Before ETEC challenge, HThr pigs ate more (p pigs excreted less E. coli (p pigs responded to the challenge with more diarrhoea, ETEC excretion and anti-K88 IgA in blood and jejunal secretion (p pigs had a higher increase of anti-K88 IgA values in jejunal secretion (p = 0.089) and in blood (p = 0.089, in MUC4(+/+) pigs only). Thr did not affect total IgA and IgM values, morphometry of jejunum, goblet cells count in colon, total mucin from jejunum and colon, but varied jejunal goblet cells counts (p pig genetic susceptibility to ETEC infection.

  11. Musculature in sipunculan worms: ontogeny and ancestral states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Anja; Rice, Mary E

    2009-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetics suggests that the Sipuncula fall into the Annelida, although they are morphologically very distinct and lack segmentation. To understand the evolutionary transformations from the annelid to the sipunculan body plan, it is important to reconstruct the ancestral states within the respective clades at all life history stages. Here we reconstruct the ancestral states for the head/introvert retractor muscles and the body wall musculature in the Sipuncula using Bayesian statistics. In addition, we describe the ontogenetic transformations of the two muscle systems in four sipunculan species with different developmental modes, using F-actin staining with fluorescent-labeled phalloidin in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy. All four species, which have smooth body wall musculature and less than the full set of four introvert retractor muscles as adults, go through developmental stages with four retractor muscles that are eventually reduced to a lower number in the adult. The circular and sometimes the longitudinal body wall musculature are split into bands that later transform into a smooth sheath. Our ancestral state reconstructions suggest with nearly 100% probability that the ancestral sipunculan had four introvert retractor muscles, longitudinal body wall musculature in bands and circular body wall musculature arranged as a smooth sheath. Species with crawling larvae have more strongly developed body wall musculature than those with swimming larvae. To interpret our findings in the context of annelid evolution, a more solid phylogenetic framework is needed for the entire group and more data on ontogenetic transformations of annelid musculature are desirable.

  12. Ancestral gene synteny reconstruction improves extant species scaffolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmetti, Yoann; Berry, Vincent; Chauve, Cedric; Chateau, Annie; Tannier, Eric; Bérard, Sèverine

    2015-01-01

    We exploit the methodological similarity between ancestral genome reconstruction and extant genome scaffolding. We present a method, called ARt-DeCo that constructs neighborhood relationships between genes or contigs, in both ancestral and extant genomes, in a phylogenetic context. It is able to handle dozens of complete genomes, including genes with complex histories, by using gene phylogenies reconciled with a species tree, that is, annotated with speciation, duplication and loss events. Reconstructed ancestral or extant synteny comes with a support computed from an exhaustive exploration of the solution space. We compare our method with a previously published one that follows the same goal on a small number of genomes with universal unicopy genes. Then we test it on the whole Ensembl database, by proposing partial ancestral genome structures, as well as a more complete scaffolding for many partially assembled genomes on 69 eukaryote species. We carefully analyze a couple of extant adjacencies proposed by our method, and show that they are indeed real links in the extant genomes, that were missing in the current assembly. On a reduced data set of 39 eutherian mammals, we estimate the precision and sensitivity of ARt-DeCo by simulating a fragmentation in some well assembled genomes, and measure how many adjacencies are recovered. We find a very high precision, while the sensitivity depends on the quality of the data and on the proximity of closely related genomes.

  13. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes, radiosensitivity to cancer and susceptibility to acute tissue reactions in radiotherapy-treated cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A. (Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh (US)); Voronova, Natalia V. (Dept. of Molecular Diagnostics, National Research Center GosNIIgenetika, Moscow (RU)); Chistiakov, Pavel A. (Dept. of Radiology, Cancer Research Center, Moscow (RU))

    2008-06-15

    Ionizing radiation is a well established carcinogen for human cells. At low doses, radiation exposure mainly results in generation of double strand breaks (DSBs). Radiation-related DSBs could be directly linked to the formation of chromosomal rearrangements as has been proven for radiation-induced thyroid tumors. Repair of DSBs presumably involves two main pathways, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). A number of known inherited syndromes, such as ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia-telangiectasia like-disorder, radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, and LIG4 deficiency are associated with increased radiosensitivity and/or cancer risk. Many of them are caused by mutations in DNA repair genes. Recent studies also suggest that variations in the DNA repair capacity in the general population may influence cancer susceptibility. In this paper, we summarize the current status of DNA repair proteins as potential targets for radiation-induced cancer risk. We will focus on genetic alterations in genes involved in HR- and NHEJ-mediated repair of DSBs, which could influence predisposition to radiation-related cancer and thereby explain interindividual differences in radiosensitivity or radioresistance in a general population

  14. Methodological approach for substantiating disease freedom in a heterogeneous small population. Application to ovine scrapie, a disease with a strong genetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Marie-José; Durand, Benoit; Calavas, Didier; Ducrot, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Demonstrating disease freedom is becoming important in different fields including animal disease control. Most methods consider sampling only from a homogeneous population in which each animal has the same probability of becoming infected. In this paper, we propose a new methodology to calculate the probability of detecting the disease if it is present in a heterogeneous population of small size with potentially different risk groups, differences in risk being defined using relative risks. To calculate this probability, for each possible arrangement of the infected animals in the different groups, the probability that all the animals tested are test-negative given this arrangement is multiplied by the probability that this arrangement occurs. The probability formula is developed using the assumption of a perfect test and hypergeometric sampling for finite small size populations. The methodology is applied to scrapie, a disease affecting small ruminants and characterized in sheep by a strong genetic susceptibility defining different risk groups. It illustrates that the genotypes of the tested animals influence heavily the confidence level of detecting scrapie. The results present the statistical power for substantiating disease freedom in a small heterogeneous population as a function of the design prevalence, the structure of the sample tested, the structure of the herd and the associated relative risks.

  15. The Emerging Role of Complement Lectin Pathway in Trypanosomatids: Molecular Bases in Activation, Genetic Deficiencies, Susceptibility to Infection, and Complement System-Based Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Evans-Osses

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system is evolutionary and ancient and is the pivotal line of the host defense system to protect against invading pathogens and abnormal self-derived components. Cellular and molecular components are involved in recognition and effector mechanisms for a successful innate immune response. The complement lectin pathway (CLP was discovered in 1990. These new components at the complement world are very efficient. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL and ficolin not only recognize many molecular patterns of pathogens rapidly to activate complement but also display several strategies to evade innate immunity. Many studies have shown a relation between the deficit of complement factors and susceptibility to infection. The recently discovered CLP was shown to be important in host defense against protozoan microbes. Although the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by MBL and Ficolins reveal efficient complement activations, an increase in deficiency of complement factors and diversity of parasite strategies of immune evasion demonstrate the unsuccessful effort to control the infection. In the present paper, we will discuss basic aspects of complement activation, the structure of the lectin pathway components, genetic deficiency of complement factors, and new therapeutic opportunities to target the complement system to control infection.

  16. Genetic variants in three genes and smoking show strong associations with susceptibility to exudative age-related macular degeneration in a Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    cigarette smoking were also related to exudative AMD. After controlling for environmental risk factors, CFH and HTRA1 SNPs were independently associated with exudative AMD, with OR of 3.50 (1.45-8.45) for CT genotype in Y402H, 3.34 (1.33-8.36) for GG genotype in rs1410996 and 3.85 (1.58-9.42) for AA genotype in rs11200638 respectively. The interaction analysis between gene and environmental factors showed that smoking synergistically increased susceptibility of AMD for heterozygotes of rs1410996, with ORinteraction of 7.33 (Pinteraction=0.029). Conclusions In a Han Chinese population, CFH and HTRA1 polymorphisms appear to be independently and possibly additivelv hereditary contributors to exudative AMD. Y402H polymorphism conferred a significant but relatively lower contribution in Chinese than in Caucasians with a low frequency of risk allele. The gene-environment interaction may be a best way to encourage those with a high genetic risk to prevent AMD by avoiding modifiable factors until there is effective treatment for AMD.

  17. Genetic variant rs401681 at 5p15.33 modifies susceptibility to lung cancer but not esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Man Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human 5p15.33 locus contains two well-known genes, the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT and cleft lip and palate transmembrane 1-like (CLPTM1L genes, which have been implicated in carcinogenesis. A common sequence variant, rs401681, located in an intronic region of CLPTM1L, has been reported to be associated with lung cancer risk based on genome-wide association study. However, subsequent replication studies in diverse populations have yielded inconsistent results. In addition, genetic variants at 5p15.33, including rs401681, have been shown to be involved in the susceptibility to multiple malignancies. Nevertheless, the role of these TERT-CLPTM1L variants in the etiology of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC remains unknown. METHODS: We genotyped the rs401681 polymorphism using TaqMan methodology and analyzed its association with the risk of lung cancer and ESCC in a case-control study of 1,479 cancer patients (726 with lung cancer and 753 with ESCC and 860 healthy individuals. RESULTS: Logistic regression analyses revealed that rs401681 T genotypes were associated with a significantly decreased risk of lung cancer (CT vs. CC: adjusted OR=0.782, 95% CI=0.625-0.978, P=0.031; CT/TT vs. CC: adjusted OR=0.786; 95% CI=0.635-0.972, P=0.026. Stratification analysis by histology type indicated that rs401681 T genotypes were associated with a significantly reduced risk of both adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Furthermore, no significant association was observed between rs401681 and the risk of ESCC (CT vs. CC: adjusted OR=0.910, 95% CI=0.734-1.129, P=0.392; TT vs. CC: adjusted OR=0.897, 95%CI=0.624-1.290, P=0.558; CT/TT vs. CC: adjusted OR=0.908, 95% CI=0.740-1.114, P=0.355. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide further evidence supporting rs401681 as a genetic variant associated with the risk of lung cancer. In addition, we investigated the correlation between the rs401681 variant and the risk of ESCC in a Han Chinese

  18. Emergence, Retention and Selection: A Trilogy of Origination for Functional De Novo Proteins from Ancestral LncRNAs in Primates.

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    Jia-Yu Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While some human-specific protein-coding genes have been proposed to originate from ancestral lncRNAs, the transition process remains poorly understood. Here we identified 64 hominoid-specific de novo genes and report a mechanism for the origination of functional de novo proteins from ancestral lncRNAs with precise splicing structures and specific tissue expression profiles. Whole-genome sequencing of dozens of rhesus macaque animals revealed that these lncRNAs are generally not more selectively constrained than other lncRNA loci. The existence of these newly-originated de novo proteins is also not beyond anticipation under neutral expectation, as they generally have longer theoretical lifespan than their current age, due to their GC-rich sequence property enabling stable ORFs with lower chance of non-sense mutations. Interestingly, although the emergence and retention of these de novo genes are likely driven by neutral forces, population genetics study in 67 human individuals and 82 macaque animals revealed signatures of purifying selection on these genes specifically in human population, indicating a proportion of these newly-originated proteins are already functional in human. We thus propose a mechanism for creation of functional de novo proteins from ancestral lncRNAs during the primate evolution, which may contribute to human-specific genetic novelties by taking advantage of existed genomic contexts.

  19. Susceptibility of Inbred Mice to Leishmania major Infection: Genetic Analysis of Macrophage Activation and Innate Resistance to Disease in Individual Progeny of P/J (Susceptible) and C3H/HeN (Resistant) Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    mediated immu- ease and defective macrophage activation in Bx mice that nity in mice highly susceptible to Leishmania tropica . J. Exp. could not be...inbred mice to Leishmania tropica infec- tion: correlation of susceptibility with in vitro defective macro- LITERATURE CITED phage microbicidal...probability and phage activation to kill Leishmania tropica : characterization of statistics. Chemical Rubber Co., Cleveland. P/J mouse macrophage defects for

  20. Multiple Genetic Analysis System-Based Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing in Helicobacter pylori and High Eradication Rate With Phenotypic Resistance-Guided Quadruple Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fangyuan; Ji, Danian; Huang, Renxiang; Zhang, Fan; Huang, Yiqin; Xiang, Ping; Kong, Mimi; Nan, Li; Zeng, Xianping; Wu, Yong; Bao, Zhijun

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotics resistance in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major factor for eradication failure. Molecular tests including fluorescence in situ hybridization, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, and dual priming oligonucleotide-PCR (DPO-PCR) play critical roles in the detection of antibiotic susceptibility; however, limited knowledge is known about application of multiple genetic analysis system (MGAS) in the area of H. pylori identification and antibiotics resistance detection.The aim of this study is to determine the antibiotics resistance using different molecular tests and evaluate the treatment outcomes of E-test-based genotypic resistance.A total of 297 patients with dyspepsia complaint were recruited for gastroscopies. Ninety patients with H. pylori culture positive were randomly divided into 2 groups (test group and control group). E-test, general PCR, and MGAS assay were performed in test group. Patients in control group were treated with empirical therapy (rabeprazole + bismuth potassium citrate + amoxicillin [AMX] + clarithromycin [CLR]), whereas patients in test group received quadruple therapy based on E-test results twice daily for 14 consecutive days. The eradication effect of H. pylori was confirmed by C-urea breath test after at least 4 weeks when treatment was finished.Rapid urease test showed 46.5% (128/297) patients with H. pylori infection, whereas 30.3% (90/297) patients were H. pylori culture positive. E-test showed that H. pylori primary resistance rate to CLR, AMX, metronidazole, tetracycline, and levofloxacin (LVX) was 40.0% (18/45), 4.4% (2/45), 53.3% (24/45), 0% (0/45), and 55.6% (25/45), respectively. In addition, there are many multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotypes, and the MDR strains have higher minimum inhibitory concentration than their single-drug resistant counterparts. Considering E-test as the reference test, the sensitivities of general PCR and MGAS in detecting CLR resistance were 83.3% (15/18) and 94.4% (17

  1. A Large-Scale Genetic Analysis Reveals a Strong Contribution of the HLA Class II Region to Giant Cell Arteritis Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, F. David; Mackie, Sarah L.; Martín, Jose-Ezequiel; Taylor, John C.; Vaglio, Augusto; Eyre, Stephen; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Castañeda, Santos; Cid, Maria C.; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Prieto-González, Sergio; Solans, Roser; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; González-Escribano, M. Francisca; Ortiz-Fernández, Lourdes; Morado, Inmaculada C.; Narváez, Javier; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Martínez-Berriochoa, Agustín; Unzurrunzaga, Ainhoa; Hidalgo-Conde, Ana; Madroñero-Vuelta, Ana B.; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Ordóñez-Cañizares, M. Carmen; Escalante, Begoña; Marí-Alfonso, Begoña; Sopeña, Bernardo; Magro, César; Raya, Enrique; Grau, Elena; Román, José A.; de Miguel, Eugenio; López-Longo, F. Javier; Martínez, Lina; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Díaz-López, J. Bernardino; Caminal-Montero, Luis; Martínez-Zapico, Aleida; Monfort, Jordi; Tío, Laura; Sánchez-Martín, Julio; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J.; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Pérez-Conesa, Mercedes; Corbera-Bellalta, Marc; García-Villanueva, M. Jesús; Fernández-Contreras, M. Encarnación; Sanchez-Pernaute, Olga; Blanco, Ricardo; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ríos-Fernández, Raquel; Callejas, José L.; Fanlo-Mateo, Patricia; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor M.; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Ramirez, Giuseppe A.; Soriano, Alessandra; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witte, Torsten; Schirmer, Jan H.; Moosig, Frank; Schönau, Verena; Franke, Andre; Palm, Øyvind; Molberg, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; McAlear, Carol A.; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A.; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Pease, Colin T.; Gough, Andrew; Green, Michael; Hordon, Lesley; Jarrett, Stephen; Watts, Richard; Levy, Sarah; Patel, Yusuf; Kamath, Sanjeet; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Worthington, Jane; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A.; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Morgan, Ann W.; Martín, Javier

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale genetic analysis on giant cell arteritis (GCA), a polygenic immune-mediated vasculitis. A case-control cohort, comprising 1,651 case subjects with GCA and 15,306 unrelated control subjects from six different countries of European ancestry, was genotyped by the Immunochip array. We also imputed HLA data with a previously validated imputation method to perform a more comprehensive analysis of this genomic region. The strongest association signals were observed in the HLA region, with rs477515 representing the highest peak (p = 4.05 × 10−40, OR = 1.73). A multivariate model including class II amino acids of HLA-DRβ1 and HLA-DQα1 and one class I amino acid of HLA-B explained most of the HLA association with GCA, consistent with previously reported associations of classical HLA alleles like HLA-DRB1∗04. An omnibus test on polymorphic amino acid positions highlighted DRβ1 13 (p = 4.08 × 10−43) and HLA-DQα1 47 (p = 4.02 × 10−46), 56, and 76 (both p = 1.84 × 10−45) as relevant positions for disease susceptibility. Outside the HLA region, the most significant loci included PTPN22 (rs2476601, p = 1.73 × 10−6, OR = 1.38), LRRC32 (rs10160518, p = 4.39 × 10−6, OR = 1.20), and REL (rs115674477, p = 1.10 × 10−5, OR = 1.63). Our study provides evidence of a strong contribution of HLA class I and II molecules to susceptibility to GCA. In the non-HLA region, we confirmed a key role for the functional PTPN22 rs2476601 variant and proposed other putative risk loci for GCA involved in Th1, Th17, and Treg cell function. PMID:25817017

  2. Genetic susceptibility to Mycobacterium infections%分枝杆菌感染易感基因的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志明; 姜海琴; 王洪生

    2016-01-01

    人致病性分枝杆菌主要有结核分枝杆菌、麻风分枝杆菌和非结核分枝杆菌,是严重危害人类健康的病原微生物之一,其感染与宿主遗传背景关系密切.研究表明,宿主基因在分枝杆菌感染中起重要作用.近年来通过全基因组关联分析、人群候选基因研究、基于家庭连锁分析和罕见易感个体基因分析,发现和分枝杆菌感染易感相关的基因有IL12B、IL12RB1、IFNGR1、IFNGR2、TLRs、NOD2、MRC1、IRGM、NRAMP1、VDR及LTA4H等,研究这些基因为揭示分枝杆菌感染免疫机制提供可能,同时也为麻风和结核高危人群的筛查,预防提供理论依据.%Human pathogenic mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae and non-tuberculosis mycobacteria, greatly threaten human health.Mycobacterium infections are closely related to the host genetic background.Studies have indicated that host genes play important roles in Mycobacterium infections.Recently, a variety of genes have been identified to be associated with the susceptibility to Mycobacterium infections by genome-wide association studies, large-scale population-based case/control studies on candidate genes, family-based linkage studies and investigations of rare individuals with exceptional mycobacterial susceptibility, including interleukin (IL)-12B, IL-12RB1, IFNGR1, IFNGR2, TLRs, NOD2, MRC1, IRGM, NRAMP1, VDR, LTA4H, etc.Researches on these predisposing genes may contribute to the elucidation of immunologic mechanisms of Mycobacterium infections, and provide a theoretical basis for screening for populations at high risks of leprosy and tuberculosis and for prevention from Mycobacterium infections.

  3. Ancestral origin of the ATTCT repeat expansion in spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10.

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    Teresa Almeida

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by cerebellar ataxia and seizures. The disease is caused by a large ATTCT repeat expansion in the ATXN10 gene. The first families reported with SCA10 were of Mexican origin, but the disease was soon after described in Brazilian families of mixed Portuguese and Amerindian ancestry. The origin of the SCA10 expansion and a possible founder effect that would account for its geographical distribution have been the source of speculation over the last years. To unravel the mutational origin and spread of the SCA10 expansion, we performed an extensive haplotype study, using closely linked STR markers and intragenic SNPs, in families from Brazil and Mexico. Our results showed (1 a shared disease haplotype for all Brazilian and one of the Mexican families, and (2 closely-related haplotypes for the additional SCA10 Mexican families; (3 little or null genetic distance in small normal alleles of different repeat sizes, from the same SNP lineage, indicating that they are being originated by a single step mechanism; and (4 a shared haplotype for pure and interrupted expanded alleles, pointing to a gene conversion model for its generation. In conclusion, we show evidence for an ancestral common origin for SCA10 in Latin America, which might have arisen in an ancestral Amerindian population and later have been spread into the mixed populations of Mexico and Brazil.

  4. The mosaic of ancestral karyotype blocks in the Sinapis alba L. genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew N; Parkin, Isobel A P; Lydiate, Derek J

    2011-01-01

    The organisation of the Sinapis alba genome, comprising 12 linkage groups (n = 12), was compared with the Brassicaceae ancestral karyotype (AK) genomic blocks previously described in other crucifer species. Most of the S. alba genome falls into conserved triplicated genomic blocks that closely match the AK-defined genomic blocks found in other crucifer species including the A, B, and C genomes of closely related Brassica species. In one instance, an S. alba linkage group (S05) was completely collinear with one AK chromosome (AK1), the first time this has been observed in a member of the Brassiceae tribe. However, as observed for other members of the Brassiceae tribe, ancestral genomic blocks were fragmented in the S. alba genome, supporting previously reported comparative chromosome painting describing rearrangements of the AK karyotype prior to the divergence of the Brassiceae from other crucifers. The presented data also refute previous phylogenetic reports that suggest S. alba was more closely related to Brassica nigra (B genome) than to B. rapa (A genome) and B. oleracea (C genome). A comparison of the S. alba and Arabidopsis thaliana genomes revealed many regions of conserved gene order, which will facilitate access to the rich genomic resources available in the model species A. thaliana for genetic research in the less well-resourced crop species S. alba.

  5. On the Potential Origins of the High Stability of Reconstructed Ancestral Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Devin L; Kaltenbach, Miriam; Tawfik, Dan S

    2016-10-01

    Ancestral reconstruction provides instrumental insights regarding the biochemical and biophysical characteristics of past proteins. A striking observation relates to the remarkably high thermostability of reconstructed ancestors. The latter has been linked to high environmental temperatures in the Precambrian era, the era relating to most reconstructed proteins. We found that inferred ancestors of the serum paraoxonase (PON) enzyme family, including the mammalian ancestor, exhibit dramatically increased thermostabilities compared with the extant, human enzyme (up to 30 °C higher melting temperature). However, the environmental temperature at the time of emergence of mammals is presumed to be similar to the present one. Additionally, the mammalian PON ancestor has superior folding properties (kinetic stability)-unlike the extant mammalian PONs, it expresses in E. coli in a soluble and functional form, and at a high yield. We discuss two potential origins of this unexpectedly high stability. First, ancestral stability may be overestimated by a "consensus effect," whereby replacing amino acids that are rare in contemporary sequences with the amino acid most common in the family increases protein stability. Comparison to other reconstructed ancestors indicates that the consensus effect may bias some but not all reconstructions. Second, we note that high stability may relate to factors other than high environmental temperature such as oxidative stress or high radiation levels. Foremost, intrinsic factors such as high rates of genetic mutations and/or of transcriptional and translational errors, and less efficient protein quality control systems, may underlie the high kinetic and thermodynamic stability of past proteins.

  6. Perianth evolution in Ranunculaceae: are petals ancestral in the family?

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    Sophie Nadot

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Progress has been made recently towards the elucidation of phylogenetic relationships among subfamilies and tribes of the Ranunculaceae – the most recent hypothesis was published in 2016 by our team. Although relationships among the 10 tribes of the subfamily Ranunculoideae remain incompletely supported, this hypothesis provides an interesting framework to address the key issue of the ancestral vs. derived nature of a differentiated perianth within the family, and at the level of Ranunculales as a whole. Here, we present ancestral state reconstructions for several perianth characters, such as differentiation into sepals and petals, shape of petals, presence/absence of nectaries, and petaloid or sepaloid aspect of sepals. Characters were scored using the PROTEUS database and optimized on the most recent phylogeny of Ranunculaceae using parsimony and maximum likelihood methods. The results are discussed with regard to recent evo-devo studies focused on identifying genes involved in floral organs identity (the so-called ABC model in Ranunculales.

  7. Genetic Analysis with the Immunochip Platform in Behçet Disease. Identification of Residues Associated in the HLA Class I Region and New Susceptibility Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Cano, Marco-Antonio; García-Lozano, José-Raúl; Conde-Jaldón, Marta; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Castillo, María Jesús; Sánchez-Bursón, Juan; Juliá, María Rosa; Solans, Roser; Blanco, Ricardo; Barnosi-Marín, Ana-Celia; Gómez de la Torre, Ricardo; Fanlo, Patricia; Rodríguez-Carballeira, Mónica; Camps, Teresa; Castañeda, Santos; Alegre-Sancho, Juan-Jose; Martín, Javier; González-Escribano, María Francisca

    2016-01-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is an immuno-mediated vasculitis in which knowledge of its etiology and genetic basis is limited. To improve the current knowledge, a genetic analysis performed with the Immunochip platform was carried out in a population from Spain. A discovery cohort comprising 278 BD cases and 1,517 unaffected controls were genotyped using the Immunochip platform. The validation step was performed on an independent replication cohort composed of 130 BD cases and 600 additional controls. The strongest association signals were observed in the HLA class I region, being HLA-B*51 the highest peak (overall P = 6.82E-32, OR = 3.82). A step-wise conditional logistic regression with classical alleles identified HLA-B*57 and HLA-A*03 as additional independent markers. The amino acid model that best explained the association, includes the position 97 of the HLA-B molecule and the position 66 of the HLA-A. Among the non-HLA loci, the most significant in the discovery analysis were: IL23R (rs10889664: P = 3.81E-12, OR = 2.00), the JRKL/CNTN5 region (rs2848479: P = 5.00E-08, OR = 1.68) and IL12A (rs1874886: P = 6.67E-08, OR = 1.72), which were confirmed in the validation phase (JRKL/CNTN5 rs2848479: P = 3.29E-10, OR = 1.66; IL12A rs1874886: P = 1.62E-08, OR = 1.61). Our results confirm HLA-B*51 as a primary-association marker in predisposition to BD and suggest additional independent signals within the class I region, specifically in the genes HLA-A and HLA-B. Regarding the non-HLA genes, in addition to IL-23R, previously reported in our population; IL12A, described in other populations, was found to be a BD susceptibility factor also in Spaniards; finally, a new associated locus was found in the JRKL/CNTN5 region. PMID:27548383

  8. GWAS of follicular lymphoma reveals allelic heterogeneity at 6p21.32 and suggests shared genetic susceptibility with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

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    Karin E Smedby

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL represents a diverse group of hematological malignancies, of which follicular lymphoma (FL is a prevalent subtype. A previous genome-wide association study has established a marker, rs10484561 in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA class II region on 6p21.32 associated with increased FL risk. Here, in a three-stage genome-wide association study, starting with a genome-wide scan of 379 FL cases and 791 controls followed by validation in 1,049 cases and 5,790 controls, we identified a second independent FL-associated locus on 6p21.32, rs2647012 (OR(combined  = 0.64, P(combined  = 2 × 10(-21 located 962 bp away from rs10484561 (r(2<0.1 in controls. After mutual adjustment, the associations at the two SNPs remained genome-wide significant (rs2647012:OR(adjusted  = 0.70, P(adjusted  =  4 × 10(-12; rs10484561:OR(adjusted  = 1.64, P(adjusted  = 5 × 10(-15. Haplotype and coalescence analyses indicated that rs2647012 arose on an evolutionarily distinct haplotype from that of rs10484561 and tags a novel allele with an opposite (protective effect on FL risk. Moreover, in a follow-up analysis of the top 6 FL-associated SNPs in 4,449 cases of other NHL subtypes, rs10484561 was associated with risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (OR(combined  = 1.36, P(combined  =  1.4 × 10(-7. Our results reveal the presence of allelic heterogeneity within the HLA class II region influencing FL susceptibility and indicate a possible shared genetic etiology with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. These findings suggest that the HLA class II region plays a complex yet important role in NHL.

  9. Genetic variants involved in oxidative stress, base excision repair, DNA methylation, and folate metabolism pathways influence myeloid neoplasias susceptibility and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Alves, Raquel; Baldeiras, Inês; Cortesão, Emília; Carda, José Pedro; Branco, Claudia C; Oliveiros, Bárbara; Loureiro, Luísa; Pereira, Amélia; Nascimento Costa, José Manuel; Sarmento-Ribeiro, Ana Bela; Mota-Vieira, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) share common features: elevated oxidative stress, DNA repair deficiency, and aberrant DNA methylation. We performed a hospital-based case-control study to evaluate the association in variants of genes involved in oxidative stress, folate metabolism, DNA repair, and DNA methylation with susceptibility and prognosis of these malignancies. To that end, 16 SNPs (one per gene: CAT, CYBA, DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, GPX1, KEAP1, MPO, MTRR, NEIL1, NFE2F2, OGG1, SLC19A1, SOD1, SOD2, and XRCC1) were genotyped in 191 patients (101 MDS and 90 AML) and 261 controls. We also measured oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species/total antioxidant status ratio), DNA damage (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), and DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine) in 50 subjects (40 MDS and 10 controls). Results showed that five genes (GPX1, NEIL1, NFE2L2, OGG1, and SOD2) were associated with MDS, two (DNMT3B and SLC19A1) with AML, and two (CYBA and DNMT1) with both diseases. We observed a correlation of CYBA TT, GPX1 TT, and SOD2 CC genotypes with increased oxidative stress levels, as well as NEIL1 TT and OGG1 GG genotypes with higher DNA damage. The 5-methylcytosine levels were negatively associated with DNMT1 CC, DNMT3A CC, and MTRR AA genotypes, and positively with DNMT3B CC genotype. Furthermore, DNMT3A, MTRR, NEIL1, and OGG1 variants modulated AML transformation in MDS patients. Additionally, DNMT3A, OGG1, GPX1, and KEAP1 variants influenced survival of MDS and AML patients. Altogether, data suggest that genetic variability influence predisposition and prognosis of MDS and AML patients, as well AML transformation rate in MDS patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Integrative approach detected association between genetic variants of microRNA binding sites of TLRs pathway genes and OSCC susceptibility in Chinese Han population.

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    Yun Wang

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is a leading malignancy worldwide; the overall 5-year survival rate is approximately 50%. A variety of proteins in Toll-like receptors (TLRs pathway have been related with the risk of OSCC. However, the influence of genetic variations in TLRs pathway genes on OSCC susceptibility is unclear. Previous studies mainly focused on the coding region of genes, while the UTR region remains unstudied. In the current study, a bioinformatics approach was performed to select candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on microRNA binding sites of TLRs pathway genes related with OSCC. After screening 90 OSCC related TLRs pathway genes, 16 SNPs were selected for genotyping. We found that rs5030486, the polymorphisms on 3' UTR of TRAF6, was significantly associated with OSCC risk. AG genotype of TRAF6 was strongly associated with a decreased risk of OSCC (OR = 0.252; 95% CI = 0.106, 0.598; p = 0.001. In addition, AG genotype was also related with a reduced risk of OSCC progression both in univariable analysis (HR = 0.303, 95% CI = 0.092, 0.995 and multivariable analysis (HR = 0.272, 95% CI = 0.082, 0.903. Furthermore, after detecting the mRNA expression level of TRAF6 in 24 OSCC patients, we found that TRAF6 expression level was significantly different between patients carrying different genotypes at locus rs5030486 (p = 0.013, indicating that rs5030486 of TRAF6 might contribute to OSCC risk by altering TRAF6 expression level. In general, these data indicated that SNP rs5030486 could be a potential bio-marker for OSCC risk and our results might provide new insights into the association of polymorphisms within the non-coding area of genes with cancers.

  11. GWAS of follicular lymphoma reveals allelic heterogeneity at 6p21.32 and suggests shared genetic susceptibility with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedby, Karin E; Foo, Jia Nee; Skibola, Christine F; Darabi, Hatef; Conde, Lucia; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Kumar, Vikrant; Chang, Ellen T; Rothman, Nathaniel; Cerhan, James R; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Rehnberg, Emil; Irwan, Ishak D; Ryder, Lars P; Brown, Peter N; Bracci, Paige M; Agana, Luz; Riby, Jacques; Cozen, Wendy; Davis, Scott; Hartge, Patricia; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Wang, Sophia S; Slager, Susan L; Fredericksen, Zachary S; Novak, Anne J; Kay, Neil E; Habermann, Thomas M; Armstrong, Bruce; Kricker, Anne; Milliken, Sam; Purdue, Mark P; Vajdic, Claire M; Boyle, Peter; Lan, Qing; Zahm, Shelia H; Zhang, Yawei; Zheng, Tongzhang; Leach, Stephen; Spinelli, John J; Smith, Martyn T; Chanock, Stephen J; Padyukov, Leonid; Alfredsson, Lars; Klareskog, Lars; Glimelius, Bengt; Melbye, Mads; Liu, Edison T; Adami, Hans-Olov; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun

    2011-04-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) represents a diverse group of hematological malignancies, of which follicular lymphoma (FL) is a prevalent subtype. A previous genome-wide association study has established a marker, rs10484561 in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II region on 6p21.32 associated with increased FL risk. Here, in a three-stage genome-wide association study, starting with a genome-wide scan of 379 FL cases and 791 controls followed by validation in 1,049 cases and 5,790 controls, we identified a second independent FL-associated locus on 6p21.32, rs2647012 (OR(combined)  = 0.64, P(combined)  = 2 × 10(-21)) located 962 bp away from rs10484561 (r(2)<0.1 in controls). After mutual adjustment, the associations at the two SNPs remained genome-wide significant (rs2647012:OR(adjusted)  = 0.70, P(adjusted)  =  4 × 10(-12); rs10484561:OR(adjusted)  = 1.64, P(adjusted)  = 5 × 10(-15)). Haplotype and coalescence analyses indicated that rs2647012 arose on an evolutionarily distinct haplotype from that of rs10484561 and tags a novel allele with an opposite (protective) effect on FL risk. Moreover, in a follow-up analysis of the top 6 FL-associated SNPs in 4,449 cases of other NHL subtypes, rs10484561 was associated with risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (OR(combined)  = 1.36, P(combined)  =  1.4 × 10(-7)). Our results reveal the presence of allelic heterogeneity within the HLA class II region influencing FL susceptibility and indicate a possible shared genetic etiology with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. These findings suggest that the HLA class II region plays a complex yet important role in NHL.

  12. Analysis of interleukin-8 gene variants reveals their relative importance as genetic susceptibility factors for chronic periodontitis in the Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Xu, Yuehong; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Tianxiao; Yang, Haojie; Zhang, Bao; Feng, Zufei; Zhong, Dexing

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8, an important chemokine that regulates the inflammatory response, plays an important role in periodontitis. Previous studies indicate that certain IL-8 gene polymorphisms are associated with periodontitis susceptibility in some populations. However, the literature is somewhat contradictory, and not all IL-8 polymorphisms have been examined, particularly in Han Chinese individuals. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of every IL-8 SNP with chronic periodontitis in Han Chinese individuals. We analyzed 23 SNPs with minor allele frequency (MAF)≥0.01, which were selected from 219 SNPs in the NCBI dbSNP and preliminary HapMap data analyses from a cohort of 400 cases and 750 controls from genetically independent Han Chinese individuals. Single SNP, haplotype and gender-specific associations were performed. We found that rs4073 and rs2227307 were significantly associated with chronic periodontitis. Further haplotype analysis indicated that a haplotype block (rs4073-rs2227307-rs2227306) that spans the promoter and exon1 of IL-8 was highly associated with chronic periodontitis. Additionally, the ATC haplotype in this block was increased 1.5-fold in these cases. However, when analyzing the samples by gender, no significant gender-specific associations in IL-8 were observed, similar to the results of haplotype association analyses in female and male subgroups. Our results provide further evidence that IL-8 is associated with chronic periodontitis in Han Chinese individuals. Furthermore, our results confirm previous reports suggesting the intriguing possibilities that IL-8 plays a role in the pathogenesis of chronic periodontitis and that this gene may be involved in the etiology of this condition.

  13. Genetic susceptibility to environmental toxicants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    of their meaning. A potential for inadvertently raising concerns over the effect of chemicals in experimental animals or man, or even the intentional misrepresentation of results to suggest chemicals are “playing” with our genes is enormous. History has shown that some individuals and groups in society are willing...

  14. Bilingualism (Ancestral Language Maintenance) among Native American, Vietnamese American, and Hispanic American College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharry, Cheryl

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 21 Hispanic, 22 Native American, and 10 Vietnamese American college students found that adoption or maintenance of ancestral language was related to attitudes toward ancestral language, beliefs about parental attitudes, and integrative motivation (toward family and ancestral ethnic group). There were significant differences by gender…

  15. The ancestral eutherian karyotype is present in Xenarthra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Svartman

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular studies have led recently to the proposal of a new super-ordinal arrangement of the 18 extant Eutherian orders. From the four proposed super-orders, Afrotheria and Xenarthra were considered the most basal. Chromosome-painting studies with human probes in these two mammalian groups are thus key in the quest to establish the ancestral Eutherian karyotype. Although a reasonable amount of chromosome-painting data with human probes have already been obtained for Afrotheria, no Xenarthra species has been thoroughly analyzed with this approach. We hybridized human chromosome probes to metaphases of species (Dasypus novemcinctus, Tamandua tetradactyla, and Choloepus hoffmanii representing three of the four Xenarthra families. Our data allowed us to review the current hypotheses for the ancestral Eutherian karyotype, which range from 2n = 44 to 2n = 48. One of the species studied, the two-toed sloth C. hoffmanii (2n = 50, showed a chromosome complement strikingly similar to the proposed 2n = 48 ancestral Eutherian karyotype, strongly reinforcing it.

  16. Ancestral facial morphology of Old World higher primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benefit, B R; McCrossin, M L

    1991-06-15

    Fossil remains of the cercopithecoid Victoria-pithecus recently recovered from middle Miocene deposits of Maboko Island (Kenya) provide evidence of the cranial anatomy of Old World monkeys prior to the evolutionary divergence of the extant subfamilies Colobinae and Cercopithecinae. Victoria-pithecus shares a suite of craniofacial features with the Oligocene catarrhine Aegyptopithecus and early Miocene hominoid Afropithecus. All three genera manifest supraorbital costae, anteriorly convergent temporal lines, the absence of a postglabellar fossa, a moderate to long snout, great facial height below the orbits, a deep cheek region, and anteriorly tapering premaxilla. The shared presence of these features in a catarrhine generally ancestral to apes and Old World monkeys, an early ape, and an early Old World monkey indicates that they are primitive characteristics that typified the last common ancestor of Hominoidea and Cercopithecoidea. These results contradict prevailing cranial morphotype reconstructions for ancestral catarrhines as Colobus- or Hylobates-like, characterized by a globular anterior braincase and orthognathy. By resolving several equivocal craniofacial morphocline polarities, these discoveries lay the foundation for a revised interpretation of the ancestral cranial morphology of Catarrhini more consistent with neontological and existing paleontological evidence.

  17. The ancestral eutherian karyotype is present in Xenarthra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svartman, Marta; Stone, Gary; Stanyon, Roscoe

    2006-07-01

    Molecular studies have led recently to the proposal of a new super-ordinal arrangement of the 18 extant Eutherian orders. From the four proposed super-orders, Afrotheria and Xenarthra were considered the most basal. Chromosome-painting studies with human probes in these two mammalian groups are thus key in the quest to establish the ancestral Eutherian karyotype. Although a reasonable amount of chromosome-painting data with human probes have already been obtained for Afrotheria, no Xenarthra species has been thoroughly analyzed with this approach. We hybridized human chromosome probes to metaphases of species (Dasypus novemcinctus, Tamandua tetradactyla, and Choloepus hoffmanii) representing three of the four Xenarthra families. Our data allowed us to review the current hypotheses for the ancestral Eutherian karyotype, which range from 2n = 44 to 2n = 48. One of the species studied, the two-toed sloth C. hoffmanii (2n = 50), showed a chromosome complement strikingly similar to the proposed 2n = 48 ancestral Eutherian karyotype, strongly reinforcing it.

  18. Unique variation in genetic selection among Black North American women and its potential influence on pregnancy outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Shirlee; Normand, Neil; Jayaram, Aswathi; Orfanelli, Theofano; Doulaveris, Georgios; Passos, Mariana; Kanninen, Tomi T; Bongiovanni, Ann Marie; Linhares, Iara M; Witkin, Steven S

    2013-11-01

    We hypothesize that variations in the frequency of genetic polymorphisms, reflecting ancestral differences in living conditions and exposure to microorganisms, increase susceptibility to adverse pregnancy outcome among present day Black North American women. Striking differences were observed in the frequency of genetic variants between Black and White or Hispanic women in 5 genes (IL1RN, MBL2, PPARA, ATG16L1, CIAS1) associated with inflammation and anti-microbial immunity. The CIAS1 and IL1RN polymorphisms were associated with altered interleukin-1β serum levels; the MBL2 polymorphism resulted in a decreased serum mannose-binding lectin concentration. Gene polymorphisms associated with an alteration in innate immunity were most frequent in Black women. This may reflect an evolutionary selection in response to an ancient environment containing a high multitude of microorganisms, and may increase susceptibility of Black women to infection-associated preterm birth in the current North American environment.

  19. Human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-DQA1*0501 allele associated with genetic susceptibility of Graves disease in a Caucasian population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuo, Yanagawa; Ampica, Mangklakruks; Youn-Bok Chang; Yasuyuki, Okamoto; Fisfalen, M.E.; Curran, P.G.; Degroot, L.J. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Graves disease (GB) is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland. Genes of, or closely associated to, the HLA complex are assumed to contribute to the genetic predisposition to GD. The authors have previously reported an increased frequency of HLA-DR3/DQ3 in Caucasian patients with GD, and recently the importance of Dw24 encoded by DRB3 gene has been suggested. To further investigate the associations of GD and these genes, 94 unrelated patients with GD and 75 control subjects were typed for HLA-DRB3, -DRB1, and -DQA1, and -DQB1, using sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes to analyze polymerase chain reaction amplified DNA (PCR-SSO). Three findings emerged from these studies. (1) The frequency of subjects positive for DQA1*0501 (GD, 73.4% vs. control 42.7%, P = 0.0001, RR = 3.71) was significantly increased among patients. The frequency of DR3 (GD, 34.0% vs. control 17.3%, P = 0.0146, RR = 2.46), which is in tight linkage disequilibrium with DQA1*0501, was also increased; however, it was not significant when the P value was corrected for the number of antigens tested. Neither DQB1 nor DRB3 alleles were significantly increased in frequency. (2) After exclusion of DR3-positive subjects, DQA1*0501 was still significantly increased (GD, 59.7% vs. control 30.6%, P = 0.0012, Pc < 0.01, RR = 3.35) among patients. (3) The distributions of Dw24 and Dw25,26 (Dw25 or Dw26) did not differ between patients and controls on either DR3 positive or negative groups. These findings suggest the DQA1*0501, or a closely associated unknown gene, confers susceptibility to GD, while Dw24 is not directly involved. The importance of DR3, however, remains to be elucidated, because of the fixed linkage with DQA1*0501. 34 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  20. Genotype-based ancestral background consistently predicts efficacy and side effects across treatments in CATIE and STAR*D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Adkins

    Full Text Available Only a subset of patients will typically respond to any given prescribed drug. The time it takes clinicians to declare a treatment ineffective leaves the patient in an impaired state and at unnecessary risk for adverse drug effects. Thus, diagnostic tests robustly predicting the most effective and safe medication for each patient prior to starting pharmacotherapy would have tremendous clinical value. In this article, we evaluated the use of genetic markers to estimate ancestry as a predictive component of such diagnostic tests. We first estimated each patient's unique mosaic of ancestral backgrounds using genome-wide SNP data collected in the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE (n = 765 and the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D (n = 1892. Next, we performed multiple regression analyses to estimate the predictive power of these ancestral dimensions. For 136/89 treatment-outcome combinations tested in CATIE/STAR*D, results indicated 1.67/1.84 times higher median test statistics than expected under the null hypothesis assuming no predictive power (p<0.01, both samples. Thus, ancestry showed robust and pervasive correlations with drug efficacy and side effects in both CATIE and STAR*D. Comparison of the marginal predictive power of MDS ancestral dimensions and self-reported race indicated significant improvements to model fit with the inclusion of MDS dimensions, but mixed evidence for self-reported race. Knowledge of each patient's unique mosaic of ancestral backgrounds provides a potent immediate starting point for developing algorithms identifying the most effective and safe medication for a wide variety of drug-treatment response combinations. As relatively few new psychiatric drugs are currently under development, such personalized medicine offers a promising approach toward optimizing pharmacotherapy for psychiatric conditions.

  1. Visual system evolution and the nature of the ancestral snake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, B F; Sampaio, F L; Jared, C; Antoniazzi, M M; Loew, E R; Bowmaker, J K; Rodriguez, A; Hart, N S; Hunt, D M; Partridge, J C; Gower, D J

    2015-07-01

    The dominant hypothesis for the evolutionary origin of snakes from 'lizards' (non-snake squamates) is that stem snakes acquired many snake features while passing through a profound burrowing (fossorial) phase. To investigate this, we examined the visual pigments and their encoding opsin genes in a range of squamate reptiles, focusing on fossorial lizards and snakes. We sequenced opsin transcripts isolated from retinal cDNA and used microspectrophotometry to measure directly the spectral absorbance of the photoreceptor visual pigments in a subset of samples. In snakes, but not lizards, dedicated fossoriality (as in Scolecophidia and the alethinophidian Anilius scytale) corresponds with loss of all visual opsins other than RH1 (λmax 490-497 nm); all other snakes (including less dedicated burrowers) also have functional sws1 and lws opsin genes. In contrast, the retinas of all lizards sampled, even highly fossorial amphisbaenians with reduced eyes, express functional lws, sws1, sws2 and rh1 genes, and most also express rh2 (i.e. they express all five of the visual opsin genes present in the ancestral vertebrate). Our evidence of visual pigment complements suggests that the visual system of stem snakes was partly reduced, with two (RH2 and SWS2) of the ancestral vertebrate visual pigments being eliminated, but that this did not extend to the extreme additional loss of SWS1 and LWS that subsequently occurred (probably independently) in highly fossorial extant scolecophidians and A. scytale. We therefore consider it unlikely that the ancestral snake was as fossorial as extant scolecophidians, whether or not the latter are para- or monophyletic.

  2. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  3. Estimating ancestral geographical distributions: a Gondwanan origin for aphid parasitoids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belshaw, R; Dowton, M; Quicke, D L; Austin, A D

    2000-01-01

    We tested the published hypothesis of a Gondwanan origin for the overwhelmingly northern hemisphere aphid parasitoids (Aphidiinae) as follows: (i) finding their sister group by a phylogenetic analysis of the entire Braconidae (Insecta: Hymenopterai using sequence data from approximately 500 bp fragments of both the nuclear 28S (D2 region) and mitochondrial 16S rDNA genes, (ii) using this sister-group relationship and the more informative 28S D2 gene to estimate the phylogeny of the Aphidiinae and (iii) estimating the ancestral distribution for the Aphidiinae using maximum-likelihood and maximum-parsimony methods. Both methods indicated a Gondwanan origin. PMID:10737407

  4. Estimating Divergence Time and Ancestral Effective Population Size of Bornean and Sumatran Orangutan Subspecies Using a Coalescent Hidden Markov Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailund, Thomas; Dutheil, Julien; Hobolth, Asger

    2011-01-01

    event has occurred to split them apart. The size of these segments of constant divergence depends on the recombination rate, but also on the speciation time, the effective population size of the ancestral population, as well as demographic effects and selection. Thus, inference of these parameters may......ue to genetic variation in the ancestor of two populations or two species, the divergence time for DNA sequences from two populations is variable along the genome. Within genomic segments all bases will share the same divergence—because they share a most recent common ancestor—when no recombination...

  5. Fast phylogeny reconstruction through learning of ancestral sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Mihaescu, Radu; Rao, Satish

    2008-01-01

    Given natural limitations on the length DNA sequences, designing phylogenetic reconstruction methods which are reliable under limited information is a crucial endeavor. There have been two approaches to this problem: reconstructing partial but reliable information about the tree (\\cite{Mo07, DMR08,DHJ06,GMS08}), and reaching "deeper" in the tree through reconstruction of ancestral sequences. In the latter category, \\cite{DMR06} settled an important conjecture of M.Steel, showing that, under the CFN model of evolution, all trees on $n$ leaves with edge lengths bounded by the Ising model phase transition can be recovered with high probability from genomes of length $O(\\log n)$ with a polynomial time algorithm. Their methods had a running time of $O(n^{10})$. Here we enhance our methods from \\cite{DHJ06} with the learning of ancestral sequences and provide an algorithm for reconstructing a sub-forest of the tree which is reliable given available data, without requiring a-priori known bounds on the edge lengths o...

  6. BAC libraries construction from the ancestral diploid genomes of the allotetraploid cultivated peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaine Christian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated peanut, Arachis hypogaea is an allotetraploid of recent origin, with an AABB genome. In common with many other polyploids, it seems that a severe genetic bottle-neck was imposed at the species origin, via hybridisation of two wild species and spontaneous chromosome duplication. Therefore, the study of the genome of peanut is hampered both by the crop's low genetic diversity and its polyploidy. In contrast to cultivated peanut, most wild Arachis species are diploid with high genetic diversity. The study of diploid Arachis genomes is therefore attractive, both to simplify the construction of genetic and physical maps, and for the isolation and characterization of wild alleles. The most probable wild ancestors of cultivated peanut are A. duranensis and A. ipaënsis with genome types AA and BB respectively. Results We constructed and characterized two large-insert libraries in Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC vector, one for each of the diploid ancestral species. The libraries (AA and BB are respectively c. 7.4 and c. 5.3 genome equivalents with low organelle contamination and average insert sizes of 110 and 100 kb. Both libraries were used for the isolation of clones containing genetically mapped legume anchor markers (single copy genes, and resistance gene analogues. Conclusion These diploid BAC libraries are important tools for the isolation of wild alleles conferring resistances to biotic stresses, comparisons of orthologous regions of the AA and BB genomes with each other and with other legume species, and will facilitate the construction of a physical map.

  7. Genes Suggest Ancestral Colour Polymorphisms Are Shared across Morphologically Cryptic Species in Arctic Bumblebees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul H Williams

    Full Text Available Our grasp of biodiversity is fine-tuned through the process of revisionary taxonomy. If species do exist in nature and can be discovered with available techniques, then we expect these revisions to converge on broadly shared interpretations of species. But for the primarily arctic bumblebees of the subgenus Alpinobombus of the genus Bombus, revisions by some of the most experienced specialists are unusual for bumblebees in that they have all reached different conclusions on the number of species present. Recent revisions based on skeletal morphology have concluded that there are from four to six species, while variation in colour pattern of the hair raised questions as to whether at least seven species might be present. Even more species are supported if we accept the recent move away from viewing species as morphotypes to viewing them instead as evolutionarily independent lineages (EILs using data from genes. EILs are recognised here in practice from the gene coalescents that provide direct evidence for their evolutionary independence. We show from fitting both general mixed Yule/coalescent (GMYC models and Poisson-tree-process (PTP models to data for the mitochondrial COI gene that there is support for nine species in the subgenus Alpinobombus. Examination of the more slowly evolving nuclear PEPCK gene shows further support for a previously unrecognised taxon as a new species in northwestern North America. The three pairs of the most morphologically similar sister species are separated allopatrically and prevented from interbreeding by oceans. We also find that most of the species show multiple shared colour patterns, giving the appearance of mimicry among parts of the different species. However, reconstructing ancestral colour-pattern states shows that speciation is likely to have cut across widespread ancestral polymorphisms, without or largely without convergence. In the particular case of Alpinobombus, morphological, colour-pattern, and

  8. Inferring genome-wide patterns of admixture in Qataris using fifty-five ancestral populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omberg Larsson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Populations of the Arabian Peninsula have a complex genetic structure that reflects waves of migrations including the earliest human migrations from Africa and eastern Asia, migrations along ancient civilization trading routes and colonization history of recent centuries. Results Here, we present a study of genome-wide admixture in this region, using 156 genotyped individuals from Qatar, a country located at the crossroads of these migration patterns. Since haplotypes of these individuals could have originated from many different populations across the world, we have developed a machine learning method "SupportMix" to infer loci-specific genomic ancestry when simultaneously analyzing many possible ancestral populations. Simulations show that SupportMix is not only more accurate than other popular admixture discovery tools but is the first admixture inference method that can efficiently scale for simultaneous analysis of 50-100 putative ancestral populations while being independent of prior demographic information. Conclusions By simultaneously using the 55 world populations from the Human Genome Diversity Panel, SupportMix was able to extract the fine-scale ancestry of the Qatar population, providing many new observations concerning the ancestry of the region. For example, as well as recapitulating the three major sub-populations in Qatar, composed of mainly Arabic, Persian, and African ancestry, SupportMix additionally identifies the specific ancestry of the Persian group to populations sampled in Greater Persia rather than from China and the ancestry of the African group to sub-Saharan origin and not Southern African Bantu origin as previously thought.

  9. Convergent evolution of caffeine in plants by co-option of exapted ancestral enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruiqi; O'Donnell, Andrew J; Barboline, Jessica J; Barkman, Todd J

    2016-09-20

    Convergent evolution is a process that has occurred throughout the tree of life, but the historical genetic and biochemical context promoting the repeated independent origins of a trait is rarely understood. The well-known stimulant caffeine, and its xanthine alkaloid precursors, has evolved multiple times in flowering plant history for various roles in plant defense and pollination. We have shown that convergent caffeine production, surprisingly, has evolved by two previously unknown biochemical pathways in chocolate, citrus, and guaraná plants using either caffeine synthase- or xanthine methyltransferase-like enzymes. However, the pathway and enzyme lineage used by any given plant species is not predictable from phylogenetic relatedness alone. Ancestral sequence resurrection reveals that this convergence was facilitated by co-option of genes maintained over 100 million y for alternative biochemical roles. The ancient enzymes of the Citrus lineage were exapted for reactions currently used for various steps of caffeine biosynthesis and required very few mutations to acquire modern-day enzymatic characteristics, allowing for the evolution of a complete pathway. Future studies aimed at manipulating caffeine content of plants will require the use of different approaches given the metabolic and genetic diversity revealed by this study.

  10. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Ban

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4 and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg. Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity.

  11. A mutation in negative regulator of basal resistance WRKY17 of Arabidopsis increases susceptibility to Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/no

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Lacroix

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium is a phytopathogenic bacterium that induces crown gall disease in many plant species by transferring and integrating a segment of its own DNA (T-DNA into its host genome. Whereas Agrobacterium usually does not trigger an extensive defense response in its host plants, it induces the expression of several defense-related genes and activates plant stress reactions. In the complex interplay between Agrobacterium and its host plant, Agrobacterium has evolved to take advantage of these plant defense pathways for its own purpose of advancement of the infection process. For example, Agrobacterium utilizes the host stress response transcriptional regulator VIP1 to facilitate nuclear import and proteasomal uncoating of its T-DNA during genetic transformation of the host cell. In Arabidopsis, the VIP1 gene expression is repressed by WRKY17, a negative regulator of basal resistance to Pseudomonas. Thus, we examined whether WRKY17 is also involved in plant susceptibility to genetic transformation by Agrobacterium. Using reverse genetics, we showed that a wrky17 mutant displays higher expression of the VIP1 gene in roots, but not in shoots. In a root infection assay, the wrky17 mutant plants were hyper-susceptible to Agrobacterium compared to wild type plants. WRKY17, therefore, may act as a positive regulator of Arabidopsis resistance to Agrobacterium. This notion is important for understanding the complex regulation of Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation; thus, although this paper reports a relatively small set of data that we do not plan to pursue further in our lab, we believe it might be useful for the broad community of plant pathologists and plant biotechnologists.

  12. The ancestral gene repertoire of animal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alié, Alexandre; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Sugimura, Itsuro; Manuel, Michaël; Sugano, Wakana; Mano, Akira; Satoh, Nori; Agata, Kiyokazu; Funayama, Noriko

    2015-12-22

    Stem cells are pivotal for development and tissue homeostasis of multicellular animals, and the quest for a gene toolkit associated with the emergence of stem cells in a common ancestor of all metazoans remains a major challenge for evolutionary biology. We reconstructed the conserved gene repertoire of animal stem cells by transcriptomic profiling of totipotent archeocytes in the demosponge Ephydatia fluviatilis and by tracing shared molecular signatures with flatworm and Hydra stem cells. Phylostratigraphy analyses indicated that most of these stem-cell genes predate animal origin, with only few metazoan innovations, notably including several partners of the Piwi machinery known to promote genome stability. The ancestral stem-cell transcriptome is strikingly poor in transcription factors. Instead, it is rich in RNA regulatory actors, including components of the "germ-line multipotency program" and many RNA-binding proteins known as critical regulators of mammalian embryonic stem cells.

  13. Global Alignment of Molecular Sequences via Ancestral State Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Andoni, Alexandr; Hassidim, Avinatan; Roch, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic techniques do not generally account for such common evolutionary events as site insertions and deletions (known as indels). Instead tree building algorithms and ancestral state inference procedures typically rely on substitution-only models of sequence evolution. In practice these methods are extended beyond this simplified setting with the use of heuristics that produce global alignments of the input sequences--an important problem which has no rigorous model-based solution. In this paper we consider a new version of the multiple sequence alignment in the context of stochastic indel models. More precisely, we introduce the following {\\em trace reconstruction problem on a tree} (TRPT): a binary sequence is broadcast through a tree channel where we allow substitutions, deletions, and insertions; we seek to reconstruct the original sequence from the sequences received at the leaves of the tree. We give a recursive procedure for this problem with strong reconstruction guarantees at low mut...

  14. 前列腺癌易感基因及遗传流行病学研究进展%Research progress of susceptible genes and genetic epidemiology of prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴琪俊; 徐剑锋; 施榕

    2011-01-01

    遗传学研究证实遗传因素在前列腺癌的发展过程中具有一定的作用.同时,一些病例对照研究与基于人群的队列研究也提示前列腺癌具有复杂的遗传流行病学的特征.文章分析了流行病学暴露因素及易感基因与前列腺癌的关系,并就国内外前列腺癌遗传流行病学方面的研究现状以及今后研究的发展方向作一综述.%Many genetic researches have suggested that genetic factor plays an important role in the development of prostate cancer.Meanwhile, some case-control studies and population-based cohort studies have also revealed the complex genetic epidemiology characters of prostate cancer.This paper not only analyses the relationship between epidemic exposure factors,susceptible genes and prostate cancer, but also points out the present status of genetic epidemiology of prostate cancer and the prospects of research in this aspect.

  15. The mechanistic basis of hemoglobin adaptation in the high-flying barheaded goose: insights from ancestral protein resurrection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Amit; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    of this text-book example of biochemical adaptation. Previous hypotheses about the molecular basis of the evolved increase in Hb-O2 affinity were tested by engineering BHGspecific mutations into recombinant human Hb. This approach can provide important insights, but one problem with such ‘horizontal......’ comparisons – swapping residues between proteins of contemporary species – is that the focal mutations are introduced into a sequence context that may not be evolutionarily relevant. If mutations have context-dependent effects, then introducing BHG-specific substitutions into human Hb may not recapitulate...... the functional effects of causative mutations on the genetic background in which they actually occurred during evolution (i.e., in the BHG ancestor). An alternative ‘vertical’ approach is to reconstruct and resurrect ancestral proteins to test the effects of historical mutations on the genetic background...

  16. Genetic Analysis with the Immunochip Platform in Behçet Disease. Identification of Residues Associated in the HLA Class I Region and New Susceptibility Loci

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz-Fernández, Lourdes; Carmona, F.D.; Montes-Cano, Marco-Antonio; García-Lozano, J R; Conde_Jaldón, Marta; Ortego-Centeno, N.; Castillo, María Jesús; Espinosa, Gerard; Graña-Gil, Genaro; Sánchez-Bursón, Juan; Juliá, María Rosa; Solans, Roser; Blanco, Ricardo; Barnosi-Marín, Ana C.; Gómez de la Torre, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is an immuno-mediated vasculitis in which knowledge of its etiology and genetic basis is limited. To improve the current knowledge, a genetic analysis performed with the Immunochip platform was carried out in a population from Spain. A discovery cohort comprising 278 BD cases and 1,517 unaffected controls were genotyped using the Immunochip platform. The validation step was performed on an independent replication cohort composed of 130 BD cases and 600 additional control...

  17. A role for fungal β-glucans and their receptor Dectin-1 in the induction of autoimmune arthritis in genetically susceptible mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Sakaguchi, Noriko; Kobayashi, Katsuya; Brown, Gordon D; Tagami, Tomoyuki; Sakihama, Toshiko; Hirota, Keiji; Tanaka, Satoshi; NOMURA, Takashi; Miki, Ichiro; Gordon, Siamon; Akira, Shizuo; Nakamura, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2005-01-01

    A combination of genetic and environmental factors can cause autoimmune disease in animals. SKG mice, which are genetically prone to develop autoimmune arthritis, fail to develop the disease under a microbially clean condition, despite active thymic production of arthritogenic autoimmune T cells and their persistence in the periphery. However, in the clean environment, a single intraperitoneal injection of zymosan, a crude fungal β-glucan, or purified β-glucans such as curdlan and laminarin c...

  18. Genetic Characterization of Spondweni and Zika Viruses and Susceptibility of Geographically Distinct Strains of Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, and Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) to Spondweni Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    passaged once in African green monkey kidney cells 117 (Vero; ATCC #CCL-81) for vector susceptibility experiments (virus stocks frozen at -118 80°C...maintenance between Nigeria and South Africa, 222 although interpretation is limited due to the lack of spatial and temporally spaced 223 sequences (i.e...to a single rhesus 240 monkey 72 days post-exposure [21]. Since that time, several studies have shown that 241 various geographically distinct

  19. Tumor Induction in Mice After Localized Single- or Fractionated-Dose Irradiation: Differences in Tumor Histotype and Genetic Susceptibility Based on Dose Scheduling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmondson, Elijah F., E-mail: elijah.edmondson@colostate.edu [Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado (United States); Hunter, Nancy R. [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Weil, Michael M. [Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado (United States); Mason, Kathryn A. [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate differences in tumor histotype, incidence, latency, and strain susceptibility in mice exposed to single-dose or clinically relevant, fractioned-dose γ-ray radiation. Methods and Materials: C3Hf/Kam and C57BL/6J mice were locally irradiated to the right hindlimb with either single large doses between 10 and 70 Gy or fractionated doses totaling 40 to 80 Gy delivered at 2-Gy/d fractions, 5 d/wk, for 4 to 8 weeks. The mice were closely evaluated for tumor development in the irradiated field for 800 days after irradiation, and all tumors were characterized histologically. Results: A total of 210 tumors were induced within the radiation field in 788 mice. An overall decrease in tumor incidence was observed after fractionated irradiation (16.4%) in comparison with single-dose irradiation (36.1%). Sarcomas were the predominant postirradiation tumor observed (n=201), with carcinomas occurring less frequently (n=9). The proportion of mice developing tumors increased significantly with total dose for both single-dose and fractionated schedules, and latencies were significantly decreased in mice exposed to larger total doses. C3Hf/Kam mice were more susceptible to tumor induction than C57BL/6J mice after single-dose irradiation; however, significant differences in tumor susceptibilities after fractionated radiation were not observed. For both strains of mice, osteosarcomas and hemangiosarcomas were significantly more common after fractionated irradiation, whereas fibrosarcomas and malignant fibrous histiocytomas were significantly more common after single-dose irradiation. Conclusions: This study investigated the tumorigenic effect of acute large doses in comparison with fractionated radiation in which both the dose and delivery schedule were similar to those used in clinical radiation therapy. Differences in tumor histotype after single-dose or fractionated radiation exposures provide novel in vivo evidence for differences in tumor

  20. Estimation of the ancestral effective population sizes of African great apes under different selection regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrago, Carlos G

    2014-08-01

    Reliable estimates of ancestral effective population sizes are necessary to unveil the population-level phenomena that shaped the phylogeny and molecular evolution of the African great apes. Although several methods have previously been applied to infer ancestral effective population sizes, an analysis of the influence of the selective regime on the estimates of ancestral demography has not been thoroughly conducted. In this study, three independent data sets under different selective regimes were used were composed to tackle this issue. The results showed that selection had a significant impact on the estimates of ancestral effective population sizes of the African great apes. The inference of the ancestral demography of African great apes was affected by the selection regime. The effects, however, were not homogeneous along the ancestral populations of great apes. The effective population size of the ancestor of humans and chimpanzees was more impacted by the selection regime when compared to the same parameter in the ancestor of humans, chimpanzees and gorillas. Because the selection regime influenced the estimates of ancestral effective population size, it is reasonable to assume that a portion of the discrepancy found in previous studies that inferred the ancestral effective population size may be attributable to the differential action of selection on the genes sampled.

  1. Estimation of hominoid ancestral population sizes under bayesian coalescent models incorporating mutation rate variation and sequencing errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ralph; Yang, Ziheng

    2008-09-01

    Estimation of population parameters for the common ancestors of humans and the great apes is important in understanding our evolutionary history. In particular, inference of population size for the human-chimpanzee common ancestor may shed light on the process by which the 2 species separated and on whether the human population experienced a severe size reduction in its early evolutionary history. In this study, the Bayesian method of ancestral inference of Rannala and Yang (2003. Bayes estimation of species divergence times and ancestral population sizes using DNA sequences from multiple loci. Genetics. 164:1645-1656) was extended to accommodate variable mutation rates among loci and random species-specific sequencing errors. The model was applied to analyze a genome-wide data set of approximately 15,000 neutral loci (7.4 Mb) aligned for human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and macaque. We obtained robust and precise estimates for effective population sizes along the hominoid lineage extending back approximately 30 Myr to the cercopithecoid divergence. The results showed that ancestral populations were 5-10 times larger than modern humans along the entire hominoid lineage. The estimates were robust to the priors used and to model assumptions about recombination. The unusually low X chromosome divergence between human and chimpanzee could not be explained by variation in the male mutation bias or by current models of hybridization and introgression. Instead, our parameter estimates were consistent with a simple instantaneous process for human-chimpanzee speciation but showed a major reduction in X chromosome effective population size peculiar to the human-chimpanzee common ancestor, possibly due to selective sweeps on the X prior to separation of the 2 species.

  2. A comparison of worldwide phonemic and genetic variation in human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creanza, Nicole; Ruhlen, Merritt; Pemberton, Trevor J; Rosenberg, Noah A; Feldman, Marcus W; Ramachandran, Sohini

    2015-02-03

    Worldwide patterns of genetic variation are driven by human demographic history. Here, we test whether this demographic history has left similar signatures on phonemes-sound units that distinguish meaning between words in languages-to those it has left on genes. We analyze, jointly and in parallel, phoneme inventories from 2,082 worldwide languages and microsatellite polymorphisms from 246 worldwide populations. On a global scale, both genetic distance and phonemic distance between populations are significantly correlated with geographic distance. Geographically close language pairs share significantly more phonemes than distant language pairs, whether or not the languages are closely related. The regional geographic axes of greatest phonemic differentiation correspond to axes of genetic differentiation, suggesting that there is a relationship between human dispersal and linguistic variation. However, the geographic distribution of phoneme inventory sizes does not follow the predictions of a serial founder effect during human expansion out of Africa. Furthermore, although geographically isolated populations lose genetic diversity via genetic drift, phonemes are not subject to drift in the same way: within a given geographic radius, languages that are relatively isolated exhibit more variance in number of phonemes than languages with many neighbors. This finding suggests that relatively isolated languages are more susceptible to phonemic change than languages with many neighbors. Within a language family, phoneme evolution along genetic, geographic, or cognate-based linguistic trees predicts similar ancestral phoneme states to those predicted from ancient sources. More genetic sampling could further elucidate the relative roles of vertical and horizontal transmission in phoneme evolution.

  3. [Genetic mechanisms of resistance and susceptibility to leukemia in Ayrshire and black pied cattle breeds determined by allelic distribution of gene Bola-DRB3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udina, I G; Karamysheva, E E; Turkova, S O; Orlova, A R; Sulimova, G E

    2003-03-01

    In the herds of Ayrshire and Black Pied cattle breeds of Russian selection, comparative analysis of allelic distribution of BoLA-DRB3 was performed in animal groups with different status of persistent lymphocytosis (PL) caused by the bovine leukemia virus (BLV). Alleles were typed by PCR-RFLP. Different spectra of BoLA-DRB3 alleles mediating susceptibility and resistance to leukemia were detected in the studied breeds. The role of amino acid motives in beta 1 domain of BoLA-DRB3 antigens was confirmed: ER (in positions 70-71), in resistance to leukemia and VDTY and VDTV (75-78), in susceptibility to leukemia. The nucleotide sequence of allele BoLA-DRB3.2*7 with deletion of codon 65, which resulted in the changed conformation of the corresponding antigen molecule, was associated with resistance to PL. Cows of Black Pied and Ayrshire breeds with genotypes coding VDTY/VDTV (RR = 11.67, P = 0.014) and VDTY/VDTY (RR = 4.71, P = 0.022), respectively, were shown to be susceptible to PL. The role of heterozygosity level was demonstrated (estimated by BoLA-DRB3 alleles and by amino acid motives in positions 75-78 of the antigen) as an unspecific factor of resistance to PL. The lowest heterozygosity level by amino acid motives (75-78) was revealed in PL animals, for which sample inbreeding coefficients were detected: F = 0.324 and F = 0.084 in Ayrshire and Black Pied breeds, respectively.

  4. Numerous Brugada syndrome-associated genetic variants have no effect on J-point elevation, syncope susceptibility, malignant cardiac arrhythmia, and all-cause mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghouse, Jonas; Have, Christian T; Skov, Morten W;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: We investigated whether Brugada syndrome (BrS)-associated variants identified in the general population have an effect on J-point elevation as well as whether carriers of BrS variants were more prone to experience syncope and malignant ventricular arrhythmia and had increased mortality....../620; noncarriers 9/5,524; P = 0.24), or overall mortality (hazard ratio 0.93, 95% CI 0.63-1.4). CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that a significant number of BrS-associated variants are not the monogenic cause of BrS.Genet Med advance online publication 06 October 2016Genetics in Medicine (2016); doi:10.1038/gim...

  5. Allatotropin: An Ancestral Myotropic Neuropeptide Involved in Feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzugaray, María Eugenia; Adami, Mariana Laura; Diambra, Luis Anibal; Hernandez-Martinez, Salvador; Damborenea, Cristina; Noriega, Fernando Gabriel; Ronderos, Jorge Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background Cell-cell interactions are a basic principle for the organization of tissues and organs allowing them to perform integrated functions and to organize themselves spatially and temporally. Peptidic molecules secreted by neurons and epithelial cells play fundamental roles in cell-cell interactions, acting as local neuromodulators, neurohormones, as well as endocrine and paracrine messengers. Allatotropin (AT) is a neuropeptide originally described as a regulator of Juvenile Hormone synthesis, which plays multiple neural, endocrine and myoactive roles in insects and other organisms. Methods A combination of immunohistochemistry using AT-antibodies and AT-Qdot nanocrystal conjugates was used to identify immunoreactive nerve cells containing the peptide and epithelial-muscular cells targeted by AT in Hydra plagiodesmica. Physiological assays using AT and AT- antibodies revealed that while AT stimulated the extrusion of the hypostome in a dose-response fashion in starved hydroids, the activity of hypostome in hydroids challenged with food was blocked by treatments with different doses of AT-antibodies. Conclusions AT antibodies immunolabeled nerve cells in the stalk, pedal disc, tentacles and hypostome. AT-Qdot conjugates recognized epithelial-muscular cell in the same tissues, suggesting the existence of anatomical and functional relationships between these two cell populations. Physiological assays indicated that the AT-like peptide is facilitating food ingestion. Significance Immunochemical, physiological and bioinformatics evidence advocates that AT is an ancestral neuropeptide involved in myoregulatory activities associated with meal ingestion and digestion. PMID:24143240

  6. Deep phylogeny, ancestral groups and the four ages of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2010-01-12

    Organismal phylogeny depends on cell division, stasis, mutational divergence, cell mergers (by sex or symbiogenesis), lateral gene transfer and death. The tree of life is a useful metaphor for organismal genealogical history provided we recognize that branches sometimes fuse. Hennigian cladistics emphasizes only lineage splitting, ignoring most other major phylogenetic processes. Though methodologically useful it has been conceptually confusing and harmed taxonomy, especially in mistakenly opposing ancestral (paraphyletic) taxa. The history of life involved about 10 really major innovations in cell structure. In membrane topology, there were five successive kinds of cell: (i) negibacteria, with two bounding membranes, (ii) unibacteria, with one bounding and no internal membranes, (iii) eukaryotes with endomembranes and mitochondria, (iv) plants with chloroplasts and (v) finally, chromists with plastids inside the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Membrane chemistry divides negibacteria into the more advanced Glycobacteria (e.g. Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria) with outer membrane lipolysaccharide and primitive Eobacteria without lipopolysaccharide (deserving intenser study). It also divides unibacteria into posibacteria, ancestors of eukaryotes, and archaebacteria-the sisters (not ancestors) of eukaryotes and the youngest bacterial phylum. Anaerobic eobacteria, oxygenic cyanobacteria, desiccation-resistant posibacteria and finally neomura (eukaryotes plus archaebacteria) successively transformed Earth. Accidents and organizational constraints are as important as adaptiveness in body plan evolution.

  7. Ancestral TSH mechanism signals summer in a photoperiodic mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanon, Elodie A; Lincoln, Gerald A; Fustin, Jean-Michel; Dardente, Hugues; Masson-Pévet, Mireille; Morgan, Peter J; Hazlerigg, David G

    2008-08-05

    In mammals, day-length-sensitive (photoperiodic) seasonal breeding cycles depend on the pineal hormone melatonin, which modulates secretion of reproductive hormones by the anterior pituitary gland [1]. It is thought that melatonin acts in the hypothalamus to control reproduction through the release of neurosecretory signals into the pituitary portal blood supply, where they act on pituitary endocrine cells [2]. Contrastingly, we show here that during the reproductive response of Soay sheep exposed to summer day lengths, the reverse applies: Melatonin acts directly on anterior-pituitary cells, and these then relay the photoperiodic message back into the hypothalamus to control neuroendocrine output. The switch to long days causes melatonin-responsive cells in the pars tuberalis (PT) of the anterior pituitary to increase production of thyrotrophin (TSH). This acts locally on TSH-receptor-expressing cells in the adjacent mediobasal hypothalamus, leading to increased expression of type II thyroid hormone deiodinase (DIO2). DIO2 initiates the summer response by increasing hypothalamic tri-iodothyronine (T3) levels. These data and recent findings in quail [3] indicate that the TSH-expressing cells of the PT play an ancestral role in seasonal reproductive control in vertebrates. In mammals this provides the missing link between the pineal melatonin signal and thyroid-dependent seasonal biology.

  8. A PCA-based method for ancestral informative markers selection in structured populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Identification of population structure can help trace population histories and identify disease genes. Structured association (SA) is a commonly used approach for population structure identification and association mapping. A major issue with SA is that its performance greatly depends on the informa-tiveness and the numbers of ancestral informative markers (AIMs). Present major AIM selection meth-ods mostly require prior individual ancestry information, which is usually not available or uncertain in practice. To address this potential weakness, we herein develop a novel approach for AIM selection based on principle component analysis (PCA), which does not require prior ancestry information of study subjects. Our simulation and real genetic data analysis results suggest that, with equivalent AIMs, PCA-based selected AIMs can significantly increase the accuracy of inferred individual ancestries compared with traditionally randomly selected AIMs. Our method can easily be applied to whole genome data to select a set of highly informative AIMs in population structure, which can then be used to identify potential population structure and correct possible statistical biases caused by population stratification.

  9. A PCA-based method for ancestral informative markers selection in structured populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Feng; ZHANG Lei; DENG Hong-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Identification of population structure can help trace population histories and identify disease genes.Structured association (SA) is a commonly used approach for population structure identification and association mapping. A major issue with SA is that its performance greatly depends on the informativeness and the numbers of ancestral informative markers (AIMs). Present major AIM selection methods mostly require prior individual ancestry information, which is usually not available or uncertain in practice. To address this potential weakness, we herein develop a novel approach for AIM selection based on principle component analysis (PCA), which does not require prior ancestry information of study subjects. Our simulation and real genetic data analysis results suggest that, with equivalent AIMs,PCA-based selected AIMs can significantly increase the accuracy of inferred individual ancestries compared with traditionally randomly selected AIMs. Our method can easily be applied to whole genome data to select a set of highly informative AIMs in population structure, which can then be used to identify potential population structure and correct possible statistical biases caused by population stratification.

  10. A genome-wide search for linkage to asthma phenotypes in the genetics of asthma international network families : evidence for a major susceptibility locus on chromosome 2p

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillai, SG; Chiano, MN; White, NJ; Speer, M; Barnes, KC; Carlsen, K; Gerritsen, Jorrit; Helms, P; Lenney, W; Silverman, M; Sly, P; Sundy, J; Tsanakas, J; von Berg, A; Whyte, M; Varsani, S; Skelding, P; Hauser, M; Vance, J; Pericak-Vance, M; Burns, DK; Middleton, LT; Brewster, [No Value; Anderson, WH; Riley, JH

    2006-01-01

    Asthma is a complex disease and the intricate interplay between genetic and environmental factors underlies the overall phenotype of the disease. Families with at least two siblings with asthma were collected from Europe, Australia and the US. A genome scan using a set of 364 families with a panel o

  11. Genome-wide association and genetic functional studies identify autism susceptibility candidate 2 gene (AUTS2) in the regulation of alcohol consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Schumann (Gunter); L. Coin (Lachlan); A. Lourdusamy (Anbarasu); P. Charoen (Pimphen); K.H. Berger (Karen); D. Stacey (David); S. Desrivières (Sylvane); F.A. Aliev (Fazil); A.A. Khan (Anokhi); N. Amin (Najaf); G. Bakalkin (Georgy); B. Balkau (Beverley); J.W.J. Beulens (Joline); A. Bilbao (Ainhoa); R.A. de Boer (Rudolf); D. Beury (Delphine); M.L. Bots (Michiel); E.J. Breetvelt (Elemi); S. Cauchi (Stephane); C. Cavalcanti-Proença (Christine); J.C. Chambers (John); T.-K. Clarke; N. Dahmen (N.); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); D. Dick (Danielle); F. Ducci (Francesca); A. Easton (Alanna); H.J. Edenberg (Howard); T. Esk (Tõnu); A. Fernández-Medarde (Alberto); T. Foroud (Tatiana); N.B. Freimer (Nelson); J.-A. Girault; D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); S. Guarrera (Simonetta); D.F. Gudbjartsson (Daniel); A.L. Hartikainen; A.C. Heath (Andrew); V. Hesselbrock (Victor); A. Hofman (Albert); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); M.K. Isohanni (Matti); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); B. Kuehnel (Brigitte); J. Laitinen (Jaana); S. Lobbens (Stéphane); J. Luan; M. Mangino (Massimo); M. Maroteaux (Matthieu); G. Matullo (Giuseppe); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); C. Mueller (Christian); G. Navis (Gerjan); M.E. Numans (Mattijs); A.M. Núñez (Alejandro); D.R. Nyholt (Dale); C.N. Onland-Moret (Charlotte); B.A. Oostra (Ben); P.F. O'Reilly (Paul); M. Palkovits (Miklos); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); S. Polidoro (Silvia); A. Pouta (Anneli); I. Prokopenko (Inga); F. Ricceri (Fulvio); E. Santos (Eugenio); J.H. Smit (Johannes); N. Soranzo (Nicole); K. Song (Kijoung); U. Sovio (Ulla); M. Stumvoll (Michael); I. Surakk (Ida); T.E. Thorgeirsson (Thorgeir); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C. Troakes (Claire); T. Tyrfingsson (Thorarinn); A. Tönjes (Anke); C.S.P.M. Uiterwaal (Cuno); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. van der Harst (Pim); Y.T. van der Schouw (Yvonne); O. Staehlin (Oliver); N. Vogelzangs (Nicole); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); N.J. Wareham (Nick); D. Waterworth (Dawn); J.B. Whitfield (John); E.H. Wichmann (Erich); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); X. Yuan (Xin); G. Zhai (Guangju); J.H. Zhao (Jing); W. Zhang (Weihua); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); A. Metspalu (Andres); A. Doering (Angela); J. Scott (James); T.D. Spector (Timothy); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); V. Mooser (Vincent); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); K. Stefansson (Kari); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); P. Vineis (Paolo); W.H. Sommer (Wolfgang); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); R. Spanagel (Rainer); U.A. Heberlein (Ulrike); M.R. Järvelin; P. Elliott (Paul); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlcohol consumption is a moderately heritable trait, but the genetic basis in humans is largely unknown, despite its clinical and societal importance. We report a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of ∼2.5 million directly genotyped or imputed SNPs with alcohol consumption (gram

  12. Genome-wide association and genetic functional studies identify autism susceptibility candidate 2 gene (AUTS2) in the regulation of alcohol consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schumann, Gunter; Coin, Lachlan J.; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Charoen, Pimphen; Berger, Karen H.; Stacey, David; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Aliev, Fazil A.; Khan, Anokhi A.; Amin, Najaf; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Bakalkin, Georgy; Bakker, Stephan J.; Balkau, Beverley; Beulens, Joline W.; Bilbao, Ainhoa; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Beury, Delphine; Bots, Michiel L.; Breetvelt, Elemi J.; Cauchi, Stephane; Cavalcanti-Proenca, Christine; Chambers, John C.; Clarke, Toni-Kim; Dahmen, Norbert; de Geus, Eco J.; Dick, Danielle; Ducci, Francesca; Easton, Alanna; Edenberg, Howard J.; Esk, Tonu; Fernandez-Medarde, Alberto; Foroud, Tatiana; Freimer, Nelson B.; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Guarrera, Simonetta; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heath, Andrew C.; Hesselbrock, Victor; Hofman, Albert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Isohanni, Matti K.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kuehnel, Brigitte; Laitinen, Jaana; Lobbens, Stephane; Luan, Jian'an; Mangino, Massimo; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Matullo, Giuseppe; McCarthy, Mark I.; Mueller, Christian; Navis, Gerjan; Numans, Mattijs E.; Nunez, Alejandro; Nyholt, Dale R.; Onland-Moret, Charlotte N.; Oostra, Ben A.; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Palkovits, Miklos; Penninx, Brenda W.; Polidoro, Silvia; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Ricceri, Fulvio; Santos, Eugenio; Smit, Johannes H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Song, Kijoung; Sovio, Ulla; Stumvoll, Michael; Surakk, Ida; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Troakes, Claire; Tyrfingsson, Thorarinn; Toenjes, Anke; Uiterwaal, Cuno S.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Staehlin, Oliver; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Whitfield, John B.; Wichmann, Erich H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Yuan, Xin; Zhai, Guangju; Zhao, Jing H.; Zhang, Weihua; Martin, Nicholas G.; Metspalu, Andres; Doering, Angela; Scott, James; Spector, Tim D.; Loos, Ruth J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Mooser, Vincent; Peltonen, Leena; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vineis, Paolo; Sommer, Wolfgang H.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Spanagel, Rainer; Heberlein, Ulrike A.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Elliott, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is a moderately heritable trait, but the genetic basis in humans is largely unknown, despite its clinical and societal importance. We report a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of similar to 2.5 million directly genotyped or imputed SNPs with alcohol consumption (gram p

  13. Genome-wide linkage meta-analysis identifies susceptibility loci at 2q34 and 13q31.3 for genetic generalized epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leu, Costin; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Zara, Federico

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs) have a lifetime prevalence of 0.3% with heritability estimates of 80%. A considerable proportion of families with siblings affected by GGEs presumably display an oligogenic inheritance. The present genome-wide linkage meta-analysis aimed to map: (1) ...

  14. Genetic variants in toll-like receptors are not associated with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility or anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coenen, Marieke J H; Enevold, Christian; Barrera, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    Several studies point to a role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated if genetic variants in TLR genes are associated with RA and response to tumour necrosis factor blocking (anti-TNF) medication....

  15. A Large-Scale Genetic Analysis Reveals a Strong Contribution of the HLA Class II Region to Giant Cell Arteritis Susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    David Carmona, F.; Mackie, Sarah L.; Martin, Jose-Ezequiel; Taylor, John C.; Vaglio, Augusto; Eyre, Stephen; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Castaneda, Santos; Cid, Maria C.; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jose; Prieto-Gonzalez, Sergio; Solans, Roser; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; Francisca Gonzalez-Escribano, M.; Ortiz-Fernandez, Lourdes; Morado, Inmaculada C.; Narvaez, Javier; Miranda-Filloy, Jose A.; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Ramirez, Giuseppe A.; Soriano, Alessandra; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witte, Torsten; Schirmer, Jan H.; Moosig, Frank; Schoenau, Verena; Franke, Andre; Palm, Oyvind; Molberg, Oyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; McAlear, Carol A.; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A.; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Pease, Colin T.; Gough, Andrew; Green, Michael; Hordon, Lesley; Jarrett, Stephen; Watts, Richard; Levy, Sarah; Patel, Yusuf; Kamath, Sanjeet; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Worthington, Jane; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Morgan, Ann W.; Martin, Javier

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale genetic analysis on giant cell arteritis (GCA), a polygenic immune-mediated vasculitis. A case-control cohort, comprising 1,651 case subjects with GCA and 15,306 unrelated control subjects from six different countries of European ancestry, was genotyped by the Immunochip a

  16. Development of an assay to determine single nucleotide polymorphisms in the prion gene for the genetic diagnosis of relative susceptibility to classical scrapie in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mary Lynn; Evoniuk, Jessica M; Stoltenow, Charles L; O'rourke, Katherine I; Redmer, Dale A

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a reliable Taqman 5' Nuclease Assay for genotyping sheep for scrapie susceptibility. The sheep prion gene contains 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that may mediate resistance to classical scrapie, one at codon 136, alanine (A) or valine (V), and another at codon 171, arginine (R) or glutamine (Q). The R allele appears to confer resistance to classical scrapie, with the AA(136) RR(171) genotype the most resistant to scrapie and QR(171) only rarely infected in the US sheep population. The Assays by Design protocol was used for development of probes and primers for codon 136 and Primer Express for codon 171. Commercially available kits were used to isolate genomic DNA from blood or muscle. For validation, 70 SNP determinations for each codon were compared to commercial testing with an error rate of less than 1%. Then, 935 samples from blood (n = 818) and muscle (n = 117) were tested for both codons with 928 successful determinations and only 7 samples (scrapie-resistant. This new Taqman 5' Nuclease SNP genotyping assay is accurate, easy to perform, and useful in the study of classical scrapie in sheep and its prevention through selective breeding programs to eliminate highly susceptible animals.

  17. Search for new breast cancer susceptibility genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenburg, Rogier Abel

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the search for new high-risk breast cancer susceptibility genes by linkage analysis. To date 20-25% of familial breast cancer is explained by mutations in the high-risk BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility genes. For the remaining families the genetic etiology is unknow

  18. Paraphyly of organelle DNAs in Cycas Sect. Asiorientales due to ancient ancestral polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Tsai-Wen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study addresses the apportionment of genetic diversity between Cycas revoluta and C. taitungensis, species that constitute the section Asiorientales and represent a unique, basal lineage of the Laurasian genus Cycas. Fossil evidence indicates divergence of the section from the rest of Cycas at least 30 million years ago. Geographically, C. taitungensis is limited to Taiwan whereas C. revoluta is found in the Ryukyu Archipelago and on mainland China. Results The phylogenies of ribosomal ITS region of mtDNA and the intergenic spacer between atpB and rbcL genes of cpDNA were reconstructed. Phylogenetic analyses revealed paraphyly of both loci in the two species and also in the section Asiorientales. The lack of reciprocal monophyly between these long isolated sections is likely due to persistent shared ancestral polymorphisms. Molecular dating estimated that mt- and cp DNA lineages coalesced to the most recent common ancestors (TMRCA about 327 (mt and 204 MYA (cp, corresponding with the divergence of cycad sections in the Mesozoic. Conclusion Fates of newly derived mutations of cycads follow Klopfstein et al.'s surfing model where the majority of new mutations do not spread geographically and remain at low frequencies or are eventually lost by genetic drift. Only successful 'surfing mutations' reach very high frequencies and occupy a large portion of a species range. These mutations exist as dominant cytotypes across populations and species. Geographical subdivision is lacking in both species, even though recurrent gene flow by both pollen and seed is severely limited. In total, the contrasting levels between historical and ongoing gene flow, large population sizes, a long lifespan, and slow mutation rates in both organelle DNAs have all likely contributed to the unusually long duration of paraphyly in cycads.

  19. Genetic mouse models for otitis media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingyin Zheng; Ken R Johnson

    2003-01-01

    @@ Genetics of Otitis Media (OM): OM is affected by multiple factors including eustachian tube (ET) structure and function, immune status, innate mucosal defense, genetic susceptibility, and pathogens.

  20. Evidence for high genetic diversity of NAD1 and COX1 mitochondrial haplotypes among triclabendazole resistant and susceptible populations and field isolates of Fasciola hepatica (liver fluke) in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, T; Muller, A; Brockwell, Y; Murphy, N; Grillo, V; Toet, H M; Anderson, G; Sangster, N; Spithill, T W

    2014-02-24

    In recent years, the global incidence of Fasciola hepatica (liver fluke) infections exhibiting resistance to triclabendazole (TCBZ) has increased, resulting in increased economic losses for livestock producers and threatening future control. The development of TCBZ resistance and the worldwide discovery of F. hepatica population diversity has emphasized the need to further understand the genetic structure of drug susceptible and resistant Fasciola populations within Australia. In this study, the genetic diversity of liver flukes was estimated by sequencing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encoding the NAD1 (530 bp) and COX1 (420 bp) genes of 208 liver flukes (F. hepatica) collected from three populations: field isolates obtained from abattoirs from New South Wales (NSW) and Victoria (Vic); three TCBZ-resistant fluke populations from NSW and Victoria; and the well-established TCBZ-susceptible Sunny Corner laboratory isolate. Overall nucleotide diversity for all flukes analysed of 0.00516 and 0.00336 was estimated for the NAD1 and COX1 genes respectively. Eighteen distinct haplotypes were established for the NAD1 gene and six haplotypes for the COX1 gene, resulting in haplotype diversity levels of 0.832 and 0.482, respectively. One field isolate showed a similar low level of haplotype diversity as seen in the Sunny Corner laboratory isolate. Analysis of TCBZ-resistant infrapopulations from 3 individual cattle grazing one property revealed considerable sequence parasite diversity between cattle. Analysis of parasite TCBZ-resistant infrapopulations from sheep and cattle revealed haplotypes unique to each host, but no significant difference between parasite populations. Fst analysis of fluke populations revealed little differentiation between the resistant and field populations. This study has revealed a high level of diversity in field and drug resistant flukes in South-Eastern Australia.

  1. Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus from human and animal origins: genetic diversity, antimicrobial susceptibility, and characterization of a vancomycin-resistant calf isolate carrying a vanA-Tn1546-like element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Hernández, Beatriz; Tedim, Ana P; Sánchez-Herrero, José Francisco; Librado, Pablo; Rozas, Julio; Muñoz, Gloria; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael; Del Campo, Rosa

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the antibiotic susceptibility and genetic diversity of 41 Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates: 18 isolates obtained from animals and 23 human clinical isolates. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the semiautomatic Wider system and genetic diversity by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with SmaI. Animal isolates grouped separately in the PFGE analysis, but no statistical differences in antimicrobial resistance were found between the two groups. The LMG 17956 sequence type 28 (ST28) strain recovered from the feces of a calf exhibited high levels of resistance to vancomycin and teicoplanin (MIC, ≥256 mg/liter). Its glycopeptide resistance mechanism was characterized by Southern blot hybridization and a primer-walking strategy, and finally its genome, determined by whole-genome sequencing, was compared with four closely related S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus genomes. Hybridization experiments demonstrated that a Tn1546-like element was integrated into the bacterial chromosome. In agreement with this finding, whole-genome sequencing confirmed a partial deletion of the vanY-vanZ region and partial duplication of the vanH gene. The comparative genomic analyses revealed that the LMG 17956 ST28 strain had acquired an unusually high number of transposable elements and had experienced extensive chromosomal rearrangements, as well as gene gain and loss events. In conclusion, S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates from animals seem to belong to lineages separate from those infecting humans. In addition, we report a glycopeptide-resistant isolate from a calf carrying a Tn1546-like element integrated into its chromosome.

  2. CTLA-4 gene polymorphism confers susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) independently from age and from other genetic or immune disease markers. The Belgian Diabetes Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Auwera, B J; Vandewalle, C L; Schuit, F C; Winnock, F; De Leeuw, I H; Van Imschoot, S; Lamberigts, G; Gorus, F K

    1997-10-01

    Apart from genes in the HLA complex (IDDM1) and the variable number of tandem repeats in the 5' region of the insulin gene (INS VNTR, IDDM2), several other loci have been proposed to contribute to IDDM susceptibility. Recently, linkage and association have been shown between the cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) gene on chromosome 2q and IDDM. In a registry-based group of 525 recent-onset IDDM patients immune disease markers (autoantibodies against islet cell cytoplasm (ICA); insulin (IAA); glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65-Ab); IA-2 protein tyrosine phosphatase (IA-2-Ab)) determined within the first week of insulin treatment. In new-onset IDDM patients. G-allele-containing CTLA-4 genotypes (relative risk (RR)= 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-2.0; P immune disease markers.

  3. Genetic polymorphisms of IL17A and pri-microRNA-938, targeting IL17A 3'-UTR, influence susceptibility to gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shiroeda, Hisakazu; Matsue, Yasuhito; Minato, Takahiro; Nomura, Tomoe; Yamada, Hideto; Hayashi, Ranji; Saito, Takashi; Matsunaga, Kazuhiro; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Otsuka, Toshimi; Fukumura, Atsushi; Nakamura, Masakatsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki

    2012-07-01

    We report an association between gastric cancer (GC) and polymorphisms in IL17A, rs2275913 (-197 G > A), rs3748067 (*1249 C > T), and pri-miR-938, rs2505901 (T > C). We employed the multiplex PCR-SSCP method to detect gene polymorphisms in 337 GC cases and 587 controls. The minor allele frequency of rs2275913 was significantly higher, and those of rs3748067 and rs2505901 significantly lower, in GC cases than controls. The rs2275913 AA homozygote was associated with an increased risk (OR, 2.38; 95%CI, 1.63-3.46; p pri-miR-938 contribute to cancer risk susceptibility and therefore can affect the development of gastric cancer.

  4. Negative Selection on BRCA1 Susceptibility Alleles Sheds Light on the Population Genetics of Late-Onset Diseases and Aging Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Pavard; C. Jessica E. Metcalf

    2007-01-01

    The magnitude of negative selection on alleles involved in age-specific mortality decreases with age. This is the foundation of the evolutionary theory of senescence. Because of this decrease in negative selection with age, and because of the absence of reproduction after menopause, alleles involved in women's late-onset diseases are generally considered evolutionarily neutral. Recently, genetic and epidemiological data on alleles involved in late onset-diseases have become available. It is t...

  5. Association of genetic variants of xenobiotic and estrogen metabolism pathway (CYP1A1 and CYP1B1) with gallbladder cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kiran Lata; Agarwal, Akash; Misra, Sanjeev; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Vijay; Mittal, Balraj

    2014-06-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma is a highly aggressive cancer with female predominance. Interindividual differences in the effectiveness of the activation/detoxification of environmental carcinogens and endogenous estrogens may play a crucial role in cancer susceptibility. The present study included 410 patients with carcinoma of the gallbladder (GBC) and 230 healthy subjects. This study examined association of CYP1A1-MspI, CYP1A1-Ile462Val, and CYP1B1-Val432Leu with GBC susceptibility. CYP1A1-MspI [CC] and CYP1A1-Ile462Val [iso/val] genotypes were found to be significantly associated with GBC (p=0.006 and p=0.03, respectively), as compared to healthy controls, while CYP1B1-Val432Leu was not associated with GBC. The CYP1A1 haplotype [C-val] showed a significant association with GBC (p=0.006). On stratification based on gender, the CYP1A1-MspI [CC] genotype showed an increased risk of GBC in females (p=0.018). In case-only analysis, tobacco users with CYP1A1-MspI [CT] genotypes were at a higher risk of GBC (p=0.008). Subdividing the GBC patients on the basis of gallstone status, the CYP1A1 haplotype [C-val] imparted a higher risk in patients without stones when compared to controls (p=0.001). The results remained significant even after applying Bonferroni correction. Multivariate analysis revealed an increased risk of CYP1A1 iso/val and val/val genotypes in GBC patients having BMI >25 (p=0.021). The CYP1A1 polymorphisms may confer increased risk of GBC, probably due to impaired xenobiotic or hormone metabolism through a gallstone-independent pathway.

  6. A role for fungal {beta}-glucans and their receptor Dectin-1 in the induction of autoimmune arthritis in genetically susceptible mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Sakaguchi, Noriko; Kobayashi, Katsuya; Brown, Gordon D; Tagami, Tomoyuki; Sakihama, Toshiko; Hirota, Keiji; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nomura, Takashi; Miki, Ichiro; Gordon, Siamon; Akira, Shizuo; Nakamura, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2005-03-21

    A combination of genetic and environmental factors can cause autoimmune disease in animals. SKG mice, which are genetically prone to develop autoimmune arthritis, fail to develop the disease under a microbially clean condition, despite active thymic production of arthritogenic autoimmune T cells and their persistence in the periphery. However, in the clean environment, a single intraperitoneal injection of zymosan, a crude fungal beta-glucan, or purified beta-glucans such as curdlan and laminarin can trigger severe chronic arthritis in SKG mice, but only transient arthritis in normal mice. Blockade of Dectin-1, a major beta-glucan receptor, can prevent SKG arthritis triggered by beta-glucans, which strongly activate dendritic cells in vitro in a Dectin-1-dependent but Toll-like receptor-independent manner. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment against fungi can prevent SKG arthritis in an arthritis-prone microbial environment. Multiple injections of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid double-stranded RNA also elicit mild arthritis in SKG mice. Thus, specific microbes, including fungi and viruses, may evoke autoimmune arthritis such as rheumatoid arthritis by stimulating innate immunity in individuals who harbor potentially arthritogenic autoimmune T cells as a result of genetic anomalies or variations.

  7. The microcephalin ancestral allele in a Neanderthal individual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Lari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The high frequency (around 0.70 worldwide and the relatively young age (between 14,000 and 62,000 years of a derived group of haplotypes, haplogroup D, at the microcephalin (MCPH1 locus led to the proposal that haplogroup D originated in a human lineage that separated from modern humans >1 million years ago, evolved under strong positive selection, and passed into the human gene pool by an episode of admixture circa 37,000 years ago. The geographic distribution of haplogroup D, with marked differences between Africa and Eurasia, suggested that the archaic human form admixing with anatomically modern humans might have been Neanderthal. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the first PCR amplification and high-throughput sequencing of nuclear DNA at the microcephalin (MCPH1 locus from Neanderthal individual from Mezzena Rockshelter (Monti Lessini, Italy. We show that a well-preserved Neanderthal fossil dated at approximately 50,000 years B.P., was homozygous for the ancestral, non-D, allele. The high yield of Neanderthal mtDNA sequences of the studied specimen, the pattern of nucleotide misincorporation among sequences consistent with post-mortem DNA damage and an accurate control of the MCPH1 alleles in all personnel that manipulated the sample, make it extremely unlikely that this result might reflect modern DNA contamination. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The MCPH1 genotype of the Monti Lessini (MLS Neanderthal does not prove that there was no interbreeding between anatomically archaic and modern humans in Europe, but certainly shows that speculations on a possible Neanderthal origin of what is now the most common MCPH1 haplogroup are not supported by empirical evidence from ancient DNA.

  8. The Korarchaeota: Archaeal orphans representing an ancestral lineage of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkins, James G.; Kunin, Victor; Anderson, Iain; Barry, Kerrie; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Hedlund, Brian; Hugenholtz,